Science.gov

Sample records for aberrant ras signaling

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of compartmentalised Ras signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Prior, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are membrane bound signalling hubs that operate from both the cell surface and endomembrane compartments. However, the extent to which intracellular pools of Ras can contribute to cell signalling is debated. To address this, we have performed a global screen of compartmentalised Ras signalling. We find that whilst ER/Golgi- and endosomal-Ras only generate weak outputs, Ras localised to the mitochondria or Golgi significantly and distinctly influence both the abundance and phosphorylation of a wide range of proteins analysed. Our data reveal that ~80% of phosphosites exhibiting large (≥1.5-fold) changes compared to control can be modulated by organellar Ras signalling. The majority of compartmentalised Ras-specific responses are predicted to influence gene expression, RNA splicing and cell proliferation. Our analysis reinforces the concept that compartmentalisation influences Ras signalling and provides detailed insight into the widespread modulation of responses downstream of endomembranous Ras signalling. PMID:26620772

  2. Genomic profiling of malignant phyllodes tumors reveals aberrations in FGFR1 and PI-3 kinase/RAS signaling pathways and provides insights into intratumoral heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su-Yang; Joseph, Nancy M; Ravindranathan, Ajay; Stohr, Bradley A; Greenland, Nancy Y; Vohra, Poonam; Hosfield, Elizabeth; Yeh, Iwei; Talevich, Eric; Onodera, Courtney; Van Ziffle, Jessica A; Grenert, James P; Bastian, Boris C; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Krings, Gregor

    2016-09-01

    Malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast are poorly understood rare neoplasms with potential for aggressive behavior. Few efficacious treatment options exist for progressed or metastatic disease. The molecular features of malignant phyllodes tumors are poorly defined, and a deeper understanding of the genetics of these tumors may shed light on pathogenesis and progression and potentially identify novel treatment approaches. We sequenced 510 cancer-related genes in 10 malignant phyllodes tumors, including 5 tumors with liposarcomatous differentiation and 1 with myxoid chondrosarcoma-like differentiation. Intratumoral heterogeneity was assessed by sequencing two separate areas in 7 tumors, including non-heterologous and heterologous components of tumors with heterologous differentiation. Activating hotspot mutations in FGFR1 were identified in 2 tumors. Additional recurrently mutated genes included TERT promoter (6/10), TP53 (4/10), PIK3CA (3/10), MED12 (3/10), SETD2 (2/10) and KMT2D (2/10). Together, genomic aberrations in FGFR/EGFR PI-3 kinase and RAS pathways were identified in 8 (80%) tumors and included mutually exclusive and potentially actionable activating FGFR1, PIK3CA and BRAF V600E mutations, inactivating TSC2 mutation, EGFR amplification and PTEN loss. Seven (70%) malignant phyllodes tumors harbored TERT aberrations (six promoter mutations, one amplification). For comparison, TERT promoter mutations were identified by Sanger sequencing in 33% borderline (n=12) and no (0%, n=8) benign phyllodes tumors (P=0.391 and P=0.013 vs malignant tumors, respectively). Genetic features specific to liposarcoma, including CDK4/MDM2 amplification, were not identified. Copy number analysis revealed intratumoral heterogeneity and evidence for divergent tumor evolution in malignant phyllodes tumors with and without heterologous differentiation. Tumors with liposarcomatous differentiation revealed more chromosomal aberrations in non-heterologous components compared with

  3. Ras trafficking, localization and compartmentalized signalling

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Ian A.; Hancock, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Ras proteins are proto-oncogenes that are frequently mutated in human cancers. Three closely related isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are expressed in all cells and have overlapping but distinctive functions. Recent work has revealed how differences between the Ras isoforms in their trafficking, localization and protein-membrane orientation enable signalling specificity to be determined. We review the various strategies used to characterize compartmentalized Ras localization and signalling. Localization is an important contextual modifier of signalling networks and insights from the Ras system are of widespread relevance for researchers interested in signalling initiated from membranes. PMID:21924373

  4. RasGRP1 opposes proliferative EGFR–SOS1–Ras signals and restricts intestinal epithelial cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Depeille, Philippe; Henricks, Linda M.; van de Ven, Robert A. H.; Lemmens, Ed; Wang, Chih-Yang; Matli, Mary; Werb, Zena; Haigis, Kevin M.; Donner, David; Warren, Robert; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2015-01-01

    The character of EGFR signals can influence cell fate but mechanistic insights into intestinal EGFR-Ras signalling are limited. Here we show that two distinct Ras nucleotide exchange factors, RasGRP1 and SOS1, lie downstream of EGFR but act in functional opposition. RasGRP1 is expressed in intestinal crypts where it restricts epithelial growth. High RasGRP1 expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) patient samples correlates with a better clinical outcome. Biochemically, we find that RasGRP1 creates a negative feedback loop that limits proliferative EGFR–SOS1–Ras signals in CRC cells. Genetic Rasgrp1 depletion from mice with either an activating mutation in KRas or with aberrant Wnt signalling due to a mutation in Apc resulted in both cases in exacerbated Ras–ERK signalling and cell proliferation. The unexpected opposing cell biological effects of EGFR–RasGRP1 and EGFR–SOS1 signals in the same cell shed light on the intricacy of EGFR-Ras signalling in normal epithelium and carcinoma. PMID:26005835

  5. Targeting oncogenic Ras signaling in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Ashley F.; Braun, Benjamin S.

    2012-01-01

    Ras proteins are critical nodes in cellular signaling that integrate inputs from activated cell surface receptors and other stimuli to modulate cell fate through a complex network of effector pathways. Oncogenic RAS mutations are found in ∼ 25% of human cancers and are highly prevalent in hematopoietic malignancies. Because of their structural and biochemical properties, oncogenic Ras proteins are exceedingly difficult targets for rational drug discovery, and no mechanism-based therapies exist for cancers with RAS mutations. This article reviews the properties of normal and oncogenic Ras proteins, the prevalence and likely pathogenic role of NRAS, KRAS, and NF1 mutations in hematopoietic malignancies, relevant animal models of these cancers, and implications for drug discovery. Because hematologic malignancies are experimentally tractable, they are especially valuable platforms for addressing the fundamental question of how to reverse the adverse biochemical output of oncogenic Ras in cancer. PMID:22898602

  6. ASPP1 and ASPP2 bind active RAS, potentiate RAS signalling and enhance p53 activity in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Godin-Heymann, N; Dan Wang, X; Bergamaschi, D; Llanos, S; Lu, X

    2013-01-01

    RAS mutations occur frequently in human cancer and activated RAS signalling contributes to tumour development and progression. Apart from its oncogenic effects on cell growth, active RAS has tumour-suppressive functions via its ability to induce cellular senescence and apoptosis. RAS is known to induce p53-dependent cell cycle arrest, yet its effect on p53-dependent apoptosis remains unclear. We report here that apoptosis-stimulating protein of p53 (ASPP) 1 and 2, two activators of p53, preferentially bind active RAS via their N-terminal RAS-association domains (RAD). Additionally, ASPP2 colocalises with and contributes to RAS cellular membrane localisation and potentiates RAS signalling. In cancer cells, ASPP1 and ASPP2 cooperate with oncogenic RAS to enhance the transcription and apoptotic function of p53. Thus, loss of ASPP1 and ASPP2 in human cancer cells may contribute to the full transforming property of RAS oncogene. PMID:23392125

  7. Ras and Rap Signaling in Synaptic Plasticity and Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stornetta, Ruth L.; Zhu, J. Julius

    2011-01-01

    The Ras family GTPases (Ras, Rap1, and Rap2) and their downstream mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38MAPK) and PI3K signaling cascades control various physiological processes. In neuronal cells, recent studies have shown that these parallel cascades signal distinct forms of AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptor trafficking during experience-dependent synaptic plasticity and adaptive behavior. Interestingly, both hypo- and hyper-activation of Ras/Rap signaling impair the capacity of synaptic plasticity, underscoring the importance of a “happy-medium” dynamic regulation of the signaling. Moreover, accumulating reports have linked various genetic defects that either up- or down-regulate Ras/Rap signaling with a number of mental disorders associated with learning disability (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease, Angelman syndrome, autism, cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome, Coffin-Lowry syndrome, Costello syndrome, Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndromes, fragile X syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1, Noonan syndrome, schizophrenia, tuberous sclerosis, and X-linked mental retardation), highlighting the necessity of happy-medium dynamic regulation of Ras/Rap signaling in learning behavior. Thus, the recent advances in understanding of neuronal Ras/Rap signaling provide a useful guide for developing novel treatments for mental diseases. PMID:20431046

  8. Ras Conformational Ensembles, Allostery, and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoyong; Jang, Hyunbum; Muratcioglu, Serena; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Ras proteins are classical members of small GTPases that function as molecular switches by alternating between inactive GDP-bound and active GTP-bound states. Ras activation is regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors that catalyze the exchange of GDP by GTP, and inactivation is terminated by GTPase-activating proteins that accelerate the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate by orders of magnitude. In this review, we focus on data that have accumulated over the past few years pertaining to the conformational ensembles and the allosteric regulation of Ras proteins and their interpretation from our conformational landscape standpoint. The Ras ensemble embodies all states, including the ligand-bound conformations, the activated (or inactivated) allosteric modulated states, post-translationally modified states, mutational states, transition states, and nonfunctional states serving as a reservoir for emerging functions. The ensemble is shifted by distinct mutational events, cofactors, post-translational modifications, and different membrane compositions. A better understanding of Ras biology can contribute to therapeutic strategies. PMID:26815308

  9. RasGRP3, a Ras activator, contributes to signaling and the tumorigenic phenotype in human melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luowei; Kedei, Noemi; Tóth, Zsuzsanna E.; Czap, Alexandra; Velasquez, Julia F.; Mihova, Daniela; Michalowski, Aleksandra M.; Yuspa, Stuart H.; Blumberg, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    RasGRP3, an activator for H-Ras, R-Ras and Rap1/2, has emerged as an important mediator of signaling downstream from receptor coupled phosphoinositide turnover in B and T cells. Here, we report that RasGRP3 showed a high level of expression in multiple human melanoma cell lines as well as in a subset of human melanoma tissue samples. Suppression of endogenous RasGRP3 expression in these melanoma cell lines reduced Ras-GTP formation as well as c-Met expression and Akt phosphorylation downstream from HGF or EGF stimulation. RasGRP3 suppression also inhibited cell proliferation and reduced both colony formation in soft agar and xenograft tumor growth in immunodeficient mice, demonstrating the importance of RasGRP3 for the transformed phenotype of the melanoma cells. Reciprocally, overexpression of RasGRP3 in human primary melanocytes altered cellular morphology, markedly enhanced cell proliferation, and rendered the cells tumorigenic in a mouse xenograft model. Suppression of RasGRP3 expression in these cells inhibited downstream RasGRP3 responses and suppressed cell growth, confirming the functional role of RasGRP3 in the altered behavior of these cells. The identification of the role of RasGRP3 in melanoma highlights its importance, as a Ras activator, in the phosphoinositide signaling pathway in human melanoma and provides a new potential therapeutic target. PMID:21602881

  10. A non-cell-autonomous role for Ras signaling in C. elegans neuroblast delamination

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Jean M.; Sundaram, Meera V.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling through Ras influences many aspects of normal cell behavior, including epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and aberrant signaling promotes both tumorigenesis and metastasis. Although many such effects are cell-autonomous, here we show a non-cell-autonomous role for RTK-Ras signaling in the delamination of a neuroblast from an epithelial organ. The C. elegans renal-like excretory organ is initially composed of three unicellular epithelial tubes, namely the canal, duct and G1 pore cells; however, the G1 cell later delaminates from the excretory system to become a neuroblast and is replaced by the G2 cell. G1 delamination and G2 intercalation involve cytoskeletal remodeling, interconversion of autocellular and intercellular junctions and migration over a luminal extracellular matrix, followed by G1 junction loss. LET-23/EGFR and SOS-1, an exchange factor for Ras, are required for G1 junction loss but not for initial cytoskeletal or junction remodeling. Surprisingly, expression of activated LET-60/Ras in the neighboring duct cell, but not in the G1 or G2 cells, is sufficient to rescue sos-1 delamination defects, revealing that Ras acts non-cell-autonomously to permit G1 delamination. We suggest that, similarly, oncogenic mutations in cells within a tumor might help create a microenvironment that is permissive for other cells to detach and ultimately metastasize. PMID:25371363

  11. Decoding RAS isoform and codon-specific signalling

    PubMed Central

    Newlaczyl, Anna U.; Hood, Fiona E.; Coulson, Judy M.; Prior, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    RAS proteins are key signalling hubs that are oncogenically mutated in 30% of all cancer cases. Three genes encode almost identical isoforms that are ubiquitously expressed, but are not functionally redundant. The network responses associated with each isoform and individual oncogenic mutations remain to be fully characterized. In the present article, we review recent data defining the differences between the RAS isoforms and their most commonly mutated codons and discuss the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25109951

  12. Hyperactive Ras/MAPK signaling is critical for tibial nonunion fracture in neurofibromin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Wu, Xiaohua; Rhodes, Steven D; Chen, Shi; He, Yongzheng; Yuan, Jin; Li, Jiliang; Yang, Xianlin; Li, Xiaohong; Jiang, Li; Kim, Edward T; Stevenson, David A; Viskochil, David; Xu, Mingjiang; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2013-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder affecting 1 in 3500 individuals. Patients with NF1 are predisposed to debilitating skeletal manifestations, including osteopenia/osteoporosis and long bone pseudarthrosis (nonunion fracture). Hyperactivation of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in NF1 is known to underlie aberrant proliferation and differentiation in cell lineages, including osteoclast progenitors and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) also known as osteoblast progenitors (pro-OBLs). Our current study demonstrates the hyper Ras/MAPK as a critical pathway underlying the pathogenesis of NF1-associated fracture repair deficits. Nf1-deficient pro-OBLs exhibit Ras/MAPK hyperactivation. Introduction of the NF1 GTPase activating-related domain (NF1 GAP-related domain) in vitro is sufficient to rescue hyper Ras activity and enhance osteoblast (OBL) differentiation in Nf1(-/-) pro-OBLs and NF1 human (h) MSCs cultured from NF1 patients with skeletal abnormalities, including pseudarthrosis or scoliosis. Pharmacologic inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) signaling with PD98059 partially rescues aberrant Erk activation while enhancing OBL differentiation and expression of OBL markers, osterix and osteocalcin, in Nf1-deficient murine pro-OBLs. Similarly, MEK inhibition enhances OBL differentiation of hMSCs. In addition, PD98059 rescues aberrant osteoclast maturation in Nf1 haploinsufficient bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs). Importantly, MEK inhibitor significantly improves fracture healing in an NF1 murine model, Col2.3Cre;Nf1(flox/-). Collectively, these data indicate the Ras/MAPK cascade as a critical pathway in the pathogenesis of bone loss and pseudarthrosis related to NF1 mutations. These studies provide evidence for targeting the MAPK pathway to improve bone mass and treat pseudarthrosis in NF1. PMID:23863460

  13. Ras Homolog Enriched in Brain (Rheb) Enhances Apoptotic Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Karassek, Sascha; Berghaus, Carsten; Schwarten, Melanie; Goemans, Christoph G.; Ohse, Nadine; Kock, Gerd; Jockers, Katharina; Neumann, Sebastian; Gottfried, Sebastian; Herrmann, Christian; Heumann, Rolf; Stoll, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Rheb is a homolog of Ras GTPase that regulates cell growth, proliferation, and regeneration via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because of the well established potential of activated Ras to promote survival, we sought to investigate the ability of Rheb signaling to phenocopy Ras. We found that overexpression of lipid-anchored Rheb enhanced the apoptotic effects induced by UV light, TNFα, or tunicamycin in an mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)-dependent manner. Knocking down endogenous Rheb or applying rapamycin led to partial protection, identifying Rheb as a mediator of cell death. Ras and c-Raf kinase opposed the apoptotic effects induced by UV light or TNFα but did not prevent Rheb-mediated apoptosis. To gain structural insight into the signaling mechanisms, we determined the structure of Rheb-GDP by NMR. The complex adopts the typical canonical fold of RasGTPases and displays the characteristic GDP-dependent picosecond to nanosecond backbone dynamics of the switch I and switch II regions. NMR revealed Ras effector-like binding of activated Rheb to the c-Raf-Ras-binding domain (RBD), but the affinity was 1000-fold lower than the Ras/RBD interaction, suggesting a lack of functional interaction. shRNA-mediated knockdown of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK-1) strongly reduced UV or TNFα-induced apoptosis and suppressed enhancement by Rheb overexpression. In conclusion, Rheb-mTOR activation not only promotes normal cell growth but also enhances apoptosis in response to diverse toxic stimuli via an ASK-1-mediated mechanism. Pharmacological regulation of the Rheb/mTORC1 pathway using rapamycin should take the presence of cellular stress into consideration, as this may have clinical implications. PMID:20685651

  14. Aberrant Wnt Signaling in Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Staal, Frank J T; Famili, Farbod; Garcia Perez, Laura; Pike-Overzet, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is essential in the development and homeostasis of blood and immune cells, but its exact role is still controversial and is the subject of intense research. The malignant counterpart of normal hematopoietic cells, leukemic (stem) cells, have hijacked the Wnt pathway for their self-renewal and proliferation. Here we review the multiple ways dysregulated Wnt signaling can contribute to leukemogenesis, both cell autonomously as well as by changes in the microenvironment. PMID:27571104

  15. Ras-Mek-Erk Signaling Regulates Nf1 Heterozygous Neointima Formation

    PubMed Central

    Stansfield, Brian K.; Bessler, Waylan K.; Mali, Raghuveer; Mund, Julie A.; Downing, Brandon D.; Kapur, Reuben; Ingram, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) results from mutations in the NF1 tumor-suppressor gene, which encodes neurofibromin, a negative regulator of diverse Ras signaling cascades. Arterial stenosis is a nonneoplastic manifestation of NF1 that predisposes some patients to debilitating morbidity and sudden death. Recent murine studies demonstrate that Nf1 heterozygosity (Nf1+/−) in monocytes/macrophages significantly enhances intimal proliferation after arterial injury. However, the downstream Ras effector pathway responsible for this phenotype is unknown. Based on in vitro assays demonstrating enhanced extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk) signaling in Nf1+/− macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells and in vivo evidence of Erk amplification without alteration of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling in Nf1+/− neointimas, we tested the hypothesis that Ras-Erk signaling regulates intimal proliferation in a murine model of NF1 arterial stenosis. By using a well-established in vivo model of inflammatory cell migration and standard cell culture, neurofibromin-deficient macrophages demonstrate enhanced sensitivity to growth factor stimulation in vivo and in vitro, which is significantly diminished in the presence of PD0325901, a specific inhibitor of Ras-Erk signaling in phase 2 clinical trials for cancer. After carotid artery injury, Nf1+/− mice demonstrated increased intimal proliferation compared with wild-type mice. Daily administration of PD0325901 significantly reduced Nf1+/− neointima formation to levels of wild-type mice. These studies identify the Ras-Erk pathway in neurofibromin-deficient macrophages as the aberrant pathway responsible for enhanced neointima formation. PMID:24211110

  16. Ras-Mek-Erk signaling regulates Nf1 heterozygous neointima formation.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Brian K; Bessler, Waylan K; Mali, Raghuveer; Mund, Julie A; Downing, Brandon D; Kapur, Reuben; Ingram, David A

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) results from mutations in the NF1 tumor-suppressor gene, which encodes neurofibromin, a negative regulator of diverse Ras signaling cascades. Arterial stenosis is a nonneoplastic manifestation of NF1 that predisposes some patients to debilitating morbidity and sudden death. Recent murine studies demonstrate that Nf1 heterozygosity (Nf1(+/-)) in monocytes/macrophages significantly enhances intimal proliferation after arterial injury. However, the downstream Ras effector pathway responsible for this phenotype is unknown. Based on in vitro assays demonstrating enhanced extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk) signaling in Nf1(+/-) macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells and in vivo evidence of Erk amplification without alteration of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling in Nf1(+/-) neointimas, we tested the hypothesis that Ras-Erk signaling regulates intimal proliferation in a murine model of NF1 arterial stenosis. By using a well-established in vivo model of inflammatory cell migration and standard cell culture, neurofibromin-deficient macrophages demonstrate enhanced sensitivity to growth factor stimulation in vivo and in vitro, which is significantly diminished in the presence of PD0325901, a specific inhibitor of Ras-Erk signaling in phase 2 clinical trials for cancer. After carotid artery injury, Nf1(+/-) mice demonstrated increased intimal proliferation compared with wild-type mice. Daily administration of PD0325901 significantly reduced Nf1(+/-) neointima formation to levels of wild-type mice. These studies identify the Ras-Erk pathway in neurofibromin-deficient macrophages as the aberrant pathway responsible for enhanced neointima formation. PMID:24211110

  17. Overexpressed galectin-3 in pancreatic cancer induces cell proliferation and invasion by binding Ras and activating Ras signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Shumei; Ji, Baoan; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Wang, Huamin; Hafley, Margarete; Logsdon, Craig; Bresalier, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PDAC) is a lethal disease with a five-year survival of 3-5%. Mutations in K-Ras are found in nearly all cases, but K-Ras mutations alone are not sufficient for the development of PDAC. Additional factors contribute to activation of Ras signaling and lead to tumor formation. Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a multifunctional β-galactoside-binding protein, is highly expressed in PDAC. We therefore investigated the functional role of Gal-3 in pancreatic cancer progression and its relationship to Ras signaling. Expression of Gal-3 was determined by immunohistochemistry, Q-PCR and immunoblot. Functional studies were performed using pancreatic cell lines genetically engineered to express high or low levels of Gal-3. Ras activity was examined by Raf pull-down assays. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence were used to assess protein-protein interactions. In this study, we demonstrate that Gal-3 was highly up-regulated in human tumors and in a mutant K-Ras mouse model of PDAC. Down-regulation of Gal-3 by lentivirus shRNA decreased PDAC cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and reduced tumor volume and size in an orthotopic mouse model. Gal-3 bound Ras and maintained Ras activity; down-regulation of Gal-3 decreased Ras activity as well as Ras down-stream signaling including phosphorylation of ERK and AKT and Ral A activity. Transfection of Gal-3 cDNA into PDAC cells with low-level Gal-3 augmented Ras activity and its down-stream signaling. These results suggest that Gal-3 contributes to pancreatic cancer progression, in part, by binding Ras and activating Ras signaling. Gal-3 may therefore be a potential novel target for this deadly disease. PMID:22900040

  18. Basal but not luminal mammary epithelial cells require PI3K/mTOR signaling for Ras-driven overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Plichta, Kristin A; Mathers, Jessica L; Gestl, Shelley A; Glick, Adam B; Gunther, Edward J

    2012-11-15

    The mammary ducts of humans and mice are comprised of two main mammary epithelial cell (MEC) subtypes: a surrounding layer of basal MECs and an inner layer of luminal MECs. Breast cancer subtypes show divergent clinical behavior that may reflect properties inherent in their MEC compartment of origin. How the response to a cancer-initiating genetic event is shaped by MEC subtype remains largely unexplored. Using the mouse mammary gland, we designed organotypic three-dimensional culture models that permit challenge of discrete MEC compartments with the same oncogenic insult. Mammary organoids were prepared from mice engineered for compartment-restricted coexpression of oncogenic H-RAS(G12V) together with a nuclear fluorescent reporter. Monitoring of H-RAS(G12V)-expressing MECs during extended live cell imaging permitted visualization of Ras-driven phenotypes via video microscopy. Challenging either basal or luminal MECs with H-RAS(G12V) drove MEC proliferation and survival, culminating in aberrant organoid overgrowth. In each compartment, Ras activation triggered modes of collective MEC migration and invasion that contrasted with physiologic modes used during growth factor-initiated branching morphogenesis. Although basal and luminal Ras activation produced similar overgrowth phenotypes, inhibitor studies revealed divergent use of Ras effector pathways. Blocking either the phosphoinositide 3-kinase or the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway completely suppressed Ras-driven invasion and overgrowth of basal MECs, but only modestly attenuated Ras-driven phenotypes in luminal MECs. We show that MEC subtype defines signaling pathway dependencies downstream of Ras. Thus, cells-of-origin may critically determine the drug sensitivity profiles of mammary neoplasia. PMID:23010075

  19. Signal Integration by Lipid-Mediated Spatial Cross Talk between Ras Nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Liang, Hong; Rodkey, Travis; Ariotti, Nicholas; Parton, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid-anchored Ras GTPases form transient, spatially segregated nanoclusters on the plasma membrane that are essential for high-fidelity signal transmission. The lipid composition of Ras nanoclusters, however, has not previously been investigated. High-resolution spatial mapping shows that different Ras nanoclusters have distinct lipid compositions, indicating that Ras proteins engage in isoform-selective lipid sorting and accounting for different signal outputs from different Ras isoforms. Phosphatidylserine is a common constituent of all Ras nanoclusters but is only an obligate structural component of K-Ras nanoclusters. Segregation of K-Ras and H-Ras into spatially and compositionally distinct lipid assemblies is exquisitely sensitive to plasma membrane phosphatidylserine levels. Phosphatidylserine spatial organization is also modified by Ras nanocluster formation. In consequence, Ras nanoclusters engage in remote lipid-mediated communication, whereby activated H-Ras disrupts the assembly and operation of spatially segregated K-Ras nanoclusters. Computational modeling and experimentation reveal that complex effects of caveolin and cortical actin on Ras nanoclustering are similarly mediated through regulation of phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics. We conclude that phosphatidylserine maintains the lateral segregation of diverse lipid-based assemblies on the plasma membrane and that lateral connectivity between spatially remote lipid assemblies offers important previously unexplored opportunities for signal integration and signal processing. PMID:24366544

  20. Ras Family Small GTPase-mediated Neuroprotective Signaling in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Geng-Xian; Andres, Douglas A.; Cai, Weikang

    2012-01-01

    Selective neuronal cell death is one of the major causes of neuronal damage following stroke, and cerebral cells naturally mobilize diverse survival signaling pathways to protect against ischemia. Importantly, therapeutic strategies designed to improve endogenous anti-apoptotic signaling appear to hold great promise in stroke treatment. While a variety of complex mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of stroke, the overall mechanisms governing the balance between cell survival and death are not well-defined. Ras family small GTPases are activated following ischemic insults, and in turn, serve as intrinsic switches to regulate neuronal survival and regeneration. Their ability to integrate diverse intracellular signal transduction pathways makes them critical regulators and potential therapeutic targets for neuronal recovery after stroke. This article highlights the contribution of Ras family GTPases to neuroprotective signaling cascades, including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family protein kinase- and AKT/PKB-dependent signaling pathways as well as the regulation of cAMP response element binding (CREB), Forkhead box O (FoxO) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1(HIF1) transcription factors, in stroke. PMID:21521171

  1. FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes is attenuated by the Ras-GAP neurofibromin during endochondral bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Karolak, Matthew R.; Yang, Xiangli; Elefteriou, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) signaling disrupts chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate size and architecture, leading to various chondrodysplasias or bone overgrowth. These observations suggest that the duration, intensity and cellular context of FGFR signaling during growth plate chondrocyte maturation require tight, regulated control for proper bone elongation. However, the machinery fine-tuning FGFR signaling in chondrocytes is incompletely defined. We report here that neurofibromin, a Ras-GAP encoded by Nf1, has an overlapping expression pattern with FGFR1 and FGFR3 in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, and with FGFR1 in hypertrophic chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. Based on previous evidence that neurofibromin inhibits Ras-ERK signaling in chondrocytes and phenotypic analogies between mice with constitutive FGFR1 activation and Nf1 deficiency in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes, we asked whether neurofibromin is required to control FGFR1-Ras-ERK signaling in maturing chondrocytes in vivo. Genetic Nf1 ablation in Fgfr1-deficient chondrocytes reactivated Ras-ERK1/2 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes and reversed the expansion of the hypertrophic zone observed in mice lacking Fgfr1 in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes. Histomorphometric and gene expression analyses suggested that neurofibromin, by inhibiting Rankl expression, attenuates pro-osteoclastogenic FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes. We also provide evidence suggesting that neurofibromin in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, downstream of FGFRs and via an indirect mechanism, is required for normal extension and organization of proliferative columns. Collectively, this study indicates that FGFR signaling provides an important input into the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signaling axis in chondrocytes, and that this input is differentially regulated during chondrocyte maturation by a complex intracellular machinery, of which neurofibromin is a critical component. PMID:25616962

  2. FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes is attenuated by the Ras-GAP neurofibromin during endochondral bone formation.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Matthew R; Yang, Xiangli; Elefteriou, Florent

    2015-05-01

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) signaling disrupts chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate size and architecture, leading to various chondrodysplasias or bone overgrowth. These observations suggest that the duration, intensity and cellular context of FGFR signaling during growth plate chondrocyte maturation require tight, regulated control for proper bone elongation. However, the machinery fine-tuning FGFR signaling in chondrocytes is incompletely defined. We report here that neurofibromin, a Ras-GAP encoded by Nf1, has an overlapping expression pattern with FGFR1 and FGFR3 in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, and with FGFR1 in hypertrophic chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. Based on previous evidence that neurofibromin inhibits Ras-ERK signaling in chondrocytes and phenotypic analogies between mice with constitutive FGFR1 activation and Nf1 deficiency in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes, we asked whether neurofibromin is required to control FGFR1-Ras-ERK signaling in maturing chondrocytes in vivo. Genetic Nf1 ablation in Fgfr1-deficient chondrocytes reactivated Ras-ERK1/2 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes and reversed the expansion of the hypertrophic zone observed in mice lacking Fgfr1 in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes. Histomorphometric and gene expression analyses suggested that neurofibromin, by inhibiting Rankl expression, attenuates pro-osteoclastogenic FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes. We also provide evidence suggesting that neurofibromin in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, downstream of FGFRs and via an indirect mechanism, is required for normal extension and organization of proliferative columns. Collectively, this study indicates that FGFR signaling provides an important input into the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signaling axis in chondrocytes, and that this input is differentially regulated during chondrocyte maturation by a complex intracellular machinery, of which neurofibromin is a critical component. PMID:25616962

  3. Human iPS Cell-Derived Neurons Uncover the Impact of Increased Ras Signaling in Costello Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Gemma E.; Goodwin, Alice F.; Depeille, Philippe; Sharir, Amnon; Schofield, Claude M.; Yeh, Erika; Roose, Jeroen P.; Klein, Ophir D.; Rauen, Katherine A.; Weiss, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates abnormal Ras signaling as a major contributor in neurodevelopmental disorders, yet how such signaling causes cortical pathogenesis is unknown. We examined the consequences of aberrant Ras signaling in the developing mouse brain and uncovered several critical phenotypes, including increased production of cortical neurons and morphological deficits. To determine whether these phenotypes are recapitulated in humans, we generated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines from patients with Costello syndrome (CS), a developmental disorder caused by abnormal Ras signaling and characterized by neurodevelopmental abnormalities, such as cognitive impairment and autism. Directed differentiation toward a neuroectodermal fate revealed an extended progenitor phase and subsequent increased production of cortical neurons. Morphological analysis of mature neurons revealed significantly altered neurite length and soma size in CS patients. This study demonstrates the synergy between mouse and human models and validates the use of iPS cells as a platform to study the underlying cellular pathologies resulting from signaling deficits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Increasing evidence implicates Ras signaling dysfunction as a major contributor in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders, such as cognitive impairment and autism, but the underlying cortical cellular pathogenesis remains unclear. This study is the first to reveal human neuronal pathogenesis resulting from abnormal Ras signaling and provides insights into how these phenotypic abnormalities likely contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. We also demonstrate the synergy between mouse and human models, thereby validating the use of iPS cells as a platform to study underlying cellular pathologies resulting from signaling deficits. Recapitulating human cellular pathologies in vitro facilitates the future high throughput screening of potential therapeutic agents that may reverse phenotypic and

  4. CaM interaction and Ser181 phosphorylation as new K-Ras signaling modulators

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Moya, Blanca; Barceló, Carles; Tebar, Francesc; Jaumot, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    The small G-protein Ras was the first oncogene to be identified and has a very important contribution to human cancer development (20–23% prevalence). K-RasB, one of the members of the Ras family, is the one that is most mutated and plays a prominent role in pancreatic, colon and lung cancer development. Ras proteins are membrane bound GTPases that cycle between inactive, GDP-bound and active, GTP-bound, states. Most of the research into K-RasB activity regulation has focused on the analysis of how GTP-exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) are regulated by external and internal signals. In contrast, oncogenic K-RasB has a very low GTPase activity and furthermore is not deactivated by GAPs. Consequently, the consensus was that activity of oncogenic K-RasB was not modulated. In this extra view we recapitulate some recent data showing that calmodulin binding to K-RasB inhibits phosphorylation of K-RasB at Ser181, near to the membrane anchoring domain, modulating signaling of both non-oncogenic and oncogenic K-RasB. This may be relevant to normal cell physiology, but also opens new therapeutic perspectives for the inhibition of oncogenic K-RasB signaling in tumors. PMID:21776410

  5. Nore1a drives Ras to flick the P53 senescence switch

    PubMed Central

    Donninger, Howard; Clark, Geoffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RAS-induced senescence is a protective mechanism to avoid unrestricted cell growth due to aberrant mitogenic signals; however, the exact mechanism by which RAS induces senescence is not known. We recently identified a novel pathway linking RAS to p53 via NORE1A and HIPK2 that mechanistically explains how Ras induces senescence. PMID:27314075

  6. Orchestration of Morphogenesis in Filamentous Fungi: Conserved Roles for Ras Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fortwendel, Jarrod R.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungi undergo complex developmental programs including conidial germination, polarized morphogenesis, and differentiation of sexual and asexual structures. For many fungi, the coordinated completion of development is required for pathogenicity, as specialized morphological structures must be produced by the invading fungus. Ras proteins are highly conserved GTPase signal transducers and function as major regulators of growth and development in eukaryotes. Filamentous fungi typically express two Ras homologues, comprising distinct groups of Ras1-like and Ras2-like proteins based on sequence homology. Recent evidence suggests shared roles for both Ras1 and Ras2 homologues, but also supports the existence of unique functions in the areas of stress response and virulence. This review focuses on the roles played by both Ras protein groups during growth, development, and pathogenicity of a diverse array of filamentous fungi. PMID:26257821

  7. A novel Ras GTPase (Ras3) regulates conidiation, multi-stress tolerance and virulence by acting upstream of Hog1 signaling pathway in Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yi; Wang, Ding-Yi; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-09-01

    Two Ras ATPases (Ras1 and Ras2) are well known to regulate antagonistically or cooperatively various cellular events in many fungi. Here we show the significance of a novel Ras homolog (Ras3) for Beauveria bassiana. Ras3 possesses five domains and two GTP/GDP switches typical for Ras family and was proven to localize to plasma membrane despite the position change of a membrane-targeting cysteine in C-terminal CAAX motif. Deletion of ras3 altered temporal transcription pattern of ras1 instead of ras2. Compared with wild-type, Δras3 grew significantly faster in a rich medium but slower in some minimal media, and produced far fewer conidia with impaired quality, which was evident with slower germination, attenuated virulence, reduced thermotolerance and decreased UV-B resistance. Moreover, Δras3 was much more sensitive to the oxidative stress of menadione than of H2O2 and to the stress of high osmolarity than of cell wall perturbation during growth. The high sensitivity of Δras3 to menadione was concurrent with reductions in both gene transcripts and total activity of superoxide dismutases. Intriguingly, the high osmosensitivity was concurrent with not only reduced transcripts of a critical transcription factor (Msn2) and most signaling proteins in the high-osmolarity-glycerol pathway of Δras3 but nearly undetectable phosphorylation signal of Hog1 hallmarking the pathway. All the changes were restored by ras3 complementation. Taken together, Ras3 is involved in the Hog1 pathway required for osmoregulation and hence can positively regulate conidiation, germination, multi-stress tolerance and virulence linked to the biological control potential of the filamentous insect pathogen. PMID:26162967

  8. Regulation of H-Ras-driven MAPK signaling, transformation and tumorigenesis, but not PI3K signaling and tumor progression, by plasma membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Michael, J V; Wurtzel, J G T; Goldfinger, L E

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the contributions of plasma membrane (PM) microdomain targeting to the functions of H-Ras and R-Ras. These paralogs have identical effector-binding regions, but variant C-terminal targeting domains (tDs) which are responsible for lateral microdomain distribution: activated H-Ras targets to lipid ordered/disordered (Lo/Ld) domain borders, and R-Ras to Lo domains (rafts). We hypothesized that PM distribution regulates Ras-effector interactions and downstream signaling. We used tD swap mutants, and assessed effects on signal transduction, cell proliferation, transformation and tumorigenesis. R-Ras harboring the H-Ras tD (R-Ras-tH) interacted with Raf, and induced Raf and ERK phosphorylation similar to H-Ras. R-Ras-tH stimulated proliferation and transformation in vitro, and these effects were blocked by both MEK and PI3K inhibition. Conversely, the R-Ras tD suppressed H-Ras-mediated Raf activation and ERK phosphorylation, proliferation and transformation. Thus, Ras access to Raf at the PM is sufficient for MAPK activation and is a principal component of Ras mitogenesis and transformation. Fusion of the R-Ras extended N-terminal domain to H-Ras had no effect on proliferation, but inhibited transformation and tumor progression, indicating that the R-Ras N-terminus also contributes negative regulation to these Ras functions. PI3K activation was tD independent; however, H-Ras was a stronger activator of PI3K than R-Ras, with either tD. PI3K inhibition nearly ablated transformation by R-Ras-tH, H-Ras and H-Ras-tR, whereas MEK inhibition had a modest effect on Ras-tH-driven transformation but no effect on H-Ras-tR transformation. R-Ras-tH supported tumor initiation, but not tumor progression. While H-Ras-tR-induced transformation was reduced relative to H-Ras, tumor progression was robust and similar to H-Ras. H-Ras tumor growth was moderately suppressed by MEK inhibition, which had no effect on H-Ras-tR tumor growth. In contrast, PI3K inhibition

  9. Aberrant TGFβ Signaling Contributes to Altered Trophoblast Differentiation in Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Sivasubramaniyam, Tharini; Yinon, Yoav; Tagliaferro, Andrea; Ray, Jocelyn; Nevo, Ori; Post, Martin; Caniggia, Isabella

    2016-02-01

    TGFβ has been implicated in preeclampsia, but its intracellular signaling via phosphorylated mothers against decapentaplegic (SMADs) and SMAD-independent proteins in the placenta remains elusive. Here we show that TGFβ receptor-regulated SMAD2 was activated (Ser(465/467) phosphorylation) in syncytiotrophoblast and proliferating extravillous trophoblast cells of first-trimester placenta, whereas inhibitory SMAD7 located primarily to cytotrophoblast cells. SMAD2 phosphorylation decreased with advancing gestation, whereas SMAD7 expression increased and shifted to syncytiotrophoblasts toward term. Additionally, we found that the TGFβ SMAD-independent signaling via partitioning defective protein 6 (PARD6)/Smad ubiquitylation regulatory factor was activated at approximately 10-12 weeks of gestation in cytotrophoblast and extravillous trophoblast cells comprising the anchoring column. Placentae from early-onset, but not late-onset, preeclampsia exhibited elevated SMAD2 phosphorylation and SMAD7 levels. Whereas PARD6 expression increased and SMURF1 levels decreased in preeclamptic placentae, their association increased. SMAD2 phosphorylation by TGFβ in villous explants and BeWo cells resulted in a reduction of Glial cell missing-1 (GCM1) and fusogenic protein syncytin-1 while increasing cell cycle regulators cyclin E-1 (CCNE1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 4. SMAD7 abrogated the proliferative effects of TGFβ. CCNE1 levels were increased in preeclamptic placentae, whereas GCM1 was markedly reduced. In addition, TGFβ treatment increased the association of PARD6 and SMURF1 and down-regulated Ras homolog gene family, member A (RHOA) GTPase in JEG3 cells. In a wound assay, TGFβ treatment increased the association of PARD6 and SMURF1 and triggered JEG3 cell migration through increased cellular protrusions. Taken together, our data indicate that TGFβ signaling via both SMAD2/7 and PARD6/SMURF1 pathways plays a role in trophoblast growth and differentiation. Altered SMAD

  10. The Differential Effects of Wild-Type and Mutated K-Ras on MST2 Signaling Are Determined by K-Ras Activation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Romano, David; Maccario, Helene; Doherty, Carolanne; Quinn, Niall P.

    2013-01-01

    K-Ras is frequently mutated in human cancers. Mutant (mt) K-Ras can stimulate both oncogenic transformation and apoptosis through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and AKT pathways and the MST2 pathway, respectively. The biological outcome is determined by the balance and cross talk between these pathways. In colorectal cancer (CRC), a K-Ras mutation is negatively correlated with MST2 expression, as mt K-Ras can induce apoptosis by activating the MST2 pathway. However, wild-type (wt) K-Ras can prevent the activation of the MST2 pathway upon growth factor stimulation and enable transformation by mt K-Ras in CRC cells that express MST2. Here we have investigated the mechanism by which wt and mt K-Ras differentially regulate the MST2 pathway and MST2-dependent apoptosis. The ability of K-Ras to activate MST2 and MST2-dependent apoptosis is determined by the differential activation kinetics of mt K-Ras and wt K-Ras. Chronic activation of K-Ras by mutation or overexpression of Ras exchange factors results in the activation of MST2 and LATS1, increased MST2-LATS1 complex formation, and apoptosis. In contrast, transient K-Ras activation upon epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation prevents the formation of the MST2-LATS1 complex in an AKT-dependent manner. Our data suggest that the close relationship between Ras prosurvival and proapoptotic signaling is coordinated via the differential regulation of the MST2-LATS1 interaction by transient and chronic stimuli. PMID:23459937

  11. Mutant K-RAS Promotes Invasion and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer Through GTPase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Padavano, Julianna; Henkhaus, Rebecca S; Chen, Hwudaurw; Skovan, Bethany A; Cui, Haiyan; Ignatenko, Natalia A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies, characterized by the local invasion into surrounding tissues and early metastasis to distant organs. Oncogenic mutations of the K-RAS gene occur in more than 90% of human pancreatic cancers. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional significance and downstream effectors of mutant K-RAS oncogene in the pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis. We applied the homologous recombination technique to stably disrupt K-RAS oncogene in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2, which carries the mutant K-RASG12C oncogene in both alleles. Using in vitro assays, we found that clones with disrupted mutant K-RAS gene exhibited low RAS activity, reduced growth rates, increased sensitivity to the apoptosis inducing agents, and suppressed motility and invasiveness. In vivo assays showed that clones with decreased RAS activity had reduced tumor formation ability in mouse xenograft model and increased survival rates in the mouse orthotopic pancreatic cancer model. We further examined molecular pathways downstream of mutant K-RAS and identified RhoA GTP activating protein 5, caveolin-1, and RAS-like small GTPase A (RalA) as key effector molecules, which control mutant K-RAS-dependent migration and invasion in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Our study provides rational for targeting RhoA and RalA GTPase signaling pathways for inhibition of pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:26512205

  12. The Ras-Erk-ETS-Signaling Pathway Is a Drug Target for Longevity.

    PubMed

    Slack, Cathy; Alic, Nazif; Foley, Andrea; Cabecinha, Melissa; Hoddinott, Matthew P; Partridge, Linda

    2015-07-01

    Identifying the molecular mechanisms that underlie aging and their pharmacological manipulation are key aims for improving lifelong human health. Here, we identify a critical role for Ras-Erk-ETS signaling in aging in Drosophila. We show that inhibition of Ras is sufficient for lifespan extension downstream of reduced insulin/IGF-1 (IIS) signaling. Moreover, direct reduction of Ras or Erk activity leads to increased lifespan. We identify the E-twenty six (ETS) transcriptional repressor, Anterior open (Aop), as central to lifespan extension caused by reduced IIS or Ras attenuation. Importantly, we demonstrate that adult-onset administration of the drug trametinib, a highly specific inhibitor of Ras-Erk-ETS signaling, can extend lifespan. This discovery of the Ras-Erk-ETS pathway as a pharmacological target for animal aging, together with the high degree of evolutionary conservation of the pathway, suggests that inhibition of Ras-Erk-ETS signaling may provide an effective target for anti-aging interventions in mammals. PMID:26119340

  13. Disorders of dysregulated signal traffic through the RAS-MAPK pathway: phenotypic spectrum and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    RAS GTPases control a major signaling network implicated in several cellular functions, including cell fate determination, proliferation, survival, differentiation, migration, and senescence. Within this network, signal flow through the RAF-MEK-ERK pathway, the first identified mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, mediates early and late developmental processes controlling morphology determination, organogenesis, synaptic plasticity and growth. Signaling through the RAS-MAPK cascade is tightly controlled, and its enhanced activation represents a well-known event in oncogenesis. Unexpectedly, in the past few years, inherited dysregulation of this pathway has been recognized as the cause underlying a group of clinically related disorders sharing facial dysmorphism, cardiac defects, reduced postnatal growth, ectodermal anomalies, variable cognitive deficits and susceptibility to certain malignancies as major features. These disorders are caused by heterozygosity for mutations in genes encoding RAS proteins, regulators of RAS function, modulators of RAS interaction with effectors or downstream signal transducers. Here, we provide an overview of the phenotypic spectrum associated with germline mutations perturbing RAS-MAPK signaling, the unpredicted molecular mechanisms converging towards the dysregulation of this signaling cascade, and major genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:20958325

  14. Mapping the functional versatility and fragility of Ras GTPase signaling circuits through in vitro network reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Scott M; Lim, Wendell A

    2016-01-01

    The Ras-superfamily GTPases are central controllers of cell proliferation and morphology. Ras signaling is mediated by a system of interacting molecules: upstream enzymes (GEF/GAP) regulate Ras’s ability to recruit multiple competing downstream effectors. We developed a multiplexed, multi-turnover assay for measuring the dynamic signaling behavior of in vitro reconstituted H-Ras signaling systems. By including both upstream regulators and downstream effectors, we can systematically map how different network configurations shape the dynamic system response. The concentration and identity of both upstream and downstream signaling components strongly impacted the timing, duration, shape, and amplitude of effector outputs. The distorted output of oncogenic alleles of Ras was highly dependent on the balance of positive (GAP) and negative (GEF) regulators in the system. We found that different effectors interpreted the same inputs with distinct output dynamics, enabling a Ras system to encode multiple unique temporal outputs in response to a single input. We also found that different Ras-to-GEF positive feedback mechanisms could reshape output dynamics in distinct ways, such as signal amplification or overshoot minimization. Mapping of the space of output behaviors accessible to Ras provides a design manual for programming Ras circuits, and reveals how these systems are readily adapted to produce an array of dynamic signaling behaviors. Nonetheless, this versatility comes with a trade-off of fragility, as there exist numerous paths to altered signaling behaviors that could cause disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12435.001 PMID:26765565

  15. Role of Ras signaling in the induction of snail by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kana; Shirakihara, Takuya; Nakano, Ayako; Imamura, Takeshi; Miyazono, Kohei; Saitoh, Masao

    2009-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial morphological event that occurs during the progression of epithelial tumors. EMT can be induced by transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta in some tumor cells. Here, we demonstrate the molecular mechanism whereby Snail, a key regulator of EMT, is induced by TGF-beta in tumor cells. Snail induction by TGF-beta was highly dependent on cooperation with active Ras signals, and silencing of Ras abolished Snail induction by TGF-beta in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells. Transfection of constitutively active Ras into HeLa cells led to induction of Snail by TGF-beta, while representative direct targets of TGF-beta, including Smad7 and PAI-1, were not affected by Ras signaling. Using mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors or Smad3 or Smad2 mutants, we found that phosphorylation at the linker region of Smad2/3 was not required for the induction of Snail by TGF-beta. Taken together, these findings indicate that Ras and TGF-beta-Smad signaling selectively cooperate in the induction of Snail, which occurs in a Smad-dependent manner, but independently of phosphorylation at the linker region of R-Smads by Ras signaling. PMID:19010789

  16. RAS signalling through PI3-Kinase controls cell migration via modulation of Reelin expression

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Esther; Molina-Arcas, Miriam; Krygowska, Agata Adelajda; East, Philip; Warne, Patricia; Nicol, Alastair; Downward, Julian

    2016-01-01

    RAS signalling through phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-Kinase) has been shown to have an essential role in tumour initiation and maintenance. RAS also regulates cell motility and tumour invasiveness, but the role of direct RAS binding to PI3-Kinase in this remains uncertain. Here, we provide evidence that disruption of RAS interaction with PI3-Kinase p110α decreases cell motility and prevents activation of Rac GTPase. Analysis of gene expression in cells lacking RAS interaction with p110α reveals increased levels of the extracellular matrix glycoprotein Reelin and activation of its downstream pathway resulting in upregulation of E-cadherin expression. Induction of the Reelin/E-cadherin axis is also observed in Kras mutant lung tumours that are regressing due to blockade of RAS interaction with PI3-Kinase. Furthermore, loss of Reelin correlates with decreased survival of lung and breast cancer patients. Reelin thus plays a role in restraining RAS and PI3-kinase promotion of cell motility and potentially tumour metastasis. PMID:27071537

  17. Plant farnesyltransferase can restore yeast Ras signaling and mating

    SciTech Connect

    Yalovsky, S.; Callan, K.L.; Narita, J.O.

    1997-04-01

    Farnesyltransferase (FTase) is a heterodimeric enzyme that modifies a group of proteins, including Ras, in mammals and yeasts. Plant FTase {alpha} and {beta} subunits were cloned from tomato and expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to assess their functional conservation in farnesylating Ras and a-factor proteins, which are important for cell growth and mating. The tomato FTase {beta} subunit (LeFTB) alone was unable to complement the growth defect of ram1{del} mutant yeast strains in which the chromosomal FTase {beta} subunit gene was deleted, but coexpression of LeFTB with the plant {alpha} subunit gene (LeFTA) restored normal growth, Ras membrane association, and mating. LeFTB contains a novel 66-amino-acid sequence domain whose deletion reduces the efficiency of tomato FTase to restore normal growth to yeast ram1{del} strains. Coexpression of LeFTA and LeFTB in either yeast or insect cells yielded a functional enzyme that correctly farnesylated CaaX-motif-containing peptides. Despite their low degree of sequence homology, yeast and plant FTases shared similar in vivo and in vitro substrate specificities, demonstrating that this enzymatic modification of proteins with intermediates from the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway is conserved in evolutionarily divergent eukaryotes. 56 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Involvement of Ras/Raf/AP-1 in BMP-4 signaling during Xenopus embryonic development.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, R H; Dong, Z; Maeno, M; Kim, J; Suzuki, A; Ueno, N; Sredni, D; Colburn, N H; Kung, H F

    1996-01-01

    Previously, we elucidated the role of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) in the dorsal-ventral patterning of the Xenopus embryo by using a dominant negative mutant of the BMP-4 receptor (DN-BR). The present paper describes the involvement of Ras, Raf, and activator protein 1 (AP-1) in BMP-4 signaling during Xenopus embryonic development. The AP-1 activity was determined by injecting an AP-1-dependent luciferase reporter gene into two-cell-stage Xenopus embryos and measuring the luciferase activity at various developmental stages. We found that injection of BMP-4 mRNA increased AP-1 activity, whereas injection of DN-BR mRNA inhibited AP-1 activity. Similar inhibitory effects were seen with injection of mRNAs encoding dominant negative mutants of c-Ha-Ras, c-Raf, or c-Jun. These results suggest that the endogenous AP-1 activity is regulated by BMP-4/Ras/Raf/Jun signals. We next investigated the effects of Ras/Raf/AP-1 signals on the biological functions of BMP-4. DN-BR-induced dorsalization of the embryo, revealed by the formation of a secondary body axis or dorsalization of the ventral mesoderm explant analyzed by histological and molecular criteria, was significantly reversed by coinjection of [Val12]Ha-Ras, c-Raf, or c-Jun mRNA. Furthermore, the BMP-4-stimulated erythroid differentiation in the ventral mesoderm was substantially inhibited by coinjection with the dominant negative c-Ha-Ras, c-Raf, or c-Jun mutant. Our results suggest the involvement of Ras/Raf/AP-1 in the BMP-4 signaling pathway. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8570644

  19. GHF-1/Pit-1 functions as a cell-specific integrator of Ras signaling by targeting the Ras pathway to a composite Ets-1/GHF-1 response element.

    PubMed

    Bradford, A P; Conrad, K E; Tran, P H; Ostrowski, M C; Gutierrez-Hartmann, A

    1996-10-01

    Activation of the rat prolactin (rPRL) promoter by Ras is a prototypical example of tissue-specific transcriptional regulation in a highly differentiated cell type. Using a series of site-specific mutations and deletions of the proximal rPRL promoter we have mapped the major Ras/Raf response element (RRE) to a composite Ets-1/GHF-1 binding site located between positions -217 and -190. Mutation of either the Ets-1 or GHF-1 binding sites inhibits Ras and Raf activation of the rPRL promoter, and insertion of this RRE into the rat growth hormone promoter confers Ras responsiveness. We show that Ets-1 is expressed in GH4 cells and, consistent with their functional synergistic interaction, both Ets-1 and GHF-1 are able to bind specifically to this bipartite RRE. We confirm that Ets-1 or a related Ets factor is the nuclear target of the Ras pathway leading to activation of the rPRL promoter and demonstrate that Elk-1 and Net do not mediate the Ras response. Thus, the pituitary-specific POU homeodomain transcription factor, GHF-1, serves as a cell-specific signal integrator by functionally interacting with an Ets-1-like factor, at uniquely juxtaposed binding sites, thereby targeting an otherwise ubiquitous Ras signaling pathway to a select subset of cell-specific GHF-1-dependent genes. PMID:8798730

  20. Abnormal Ras signaling in Costello syndrome (CS) negatively regulates enamel formation

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Alice F.; Tidyman, William E.; Jheon, Andrew H.; Sharir, Amnon; Zheng, Xu; Charles, Cyril; Fagin, James A.; McMahon, Martin; Diekwisch, Thomas G.H.; Ganss, Bernhard; Rauen, Katherine A.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2014-01-01

    RASopathies are syndromes caused by gain-of-function mutations in the Ras signaling pathway. One of these conditions, Costello syndrome (CS), is typically caused by an activating de novo germline mutation in HRAS and is characterized by a wide range of cardiac, musculoskeletal, dermatological and developmental abnormalities. We report that a majority of individuals with CS have hypo-mineralization of enamel, the outer covering of teeth, and that similar defects are present in a CS mouse model. Comprehensive analysis of the mouse model revealed that ameloblasts, the cells that generate enamel, lacked polarity, and the ameloblast progenitor cells were hyperproliferative. Ras signals through two main effector cascades, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. To determine through which pathway Ras affects enamel formation, inhibitors targeting either PI3K or MEK 1 and 2 (MEK 1/2), kinases in the MAPK pathway, were utilized. MEK1/2 inhibition rescued the hypo-mineralized enamel, normalized the ameloblast polarity defect and restored normal progenitor cell proliferation. In contrast, PI3K inhibition only corrected the progenitor cell proliferation phenotype. We demonstrate for the first time the central role of Ras signaling in enamel formation in CS individuals and present the mouse incisor as a model system to dissect the roles of the Ras effector pathways in vivo. PMID:24057668

  1. Peroxiredoxin II promotes hepatic tumorigenesis through cooperation with Ras/Forkhead box M1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Y-H; Kim, S-U; Kwon, T-H; Kim, J-M; Song, I-S; Shin, H-J; Lee, B-K; Bang, D-H; Lee, S-J; Lee, D-S; Chang, K-T; Kim, B-Y; Yu, D-Y

    2016-07-01

    The current study was carried out to define the involvement of Peroxiredoxin (Prx) II in progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the underlying molecular mechanism(s). Expression and function of Prx II in HCC was determined using H-ras(G12V)-transformed HCC cells (H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells) and the tumor livers from H-ras(G12V)-transgenic (Tg) mice and HCC patients. Prx II was upregulated in H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells and H-ras(G12V)-Tg mouse tumor livers, the expression pattern of which highly similar to that of forkhead Box M1 (FoxM1). Moreover, either knockdown of FoxM1 or site-directed mutagenesis of FoxM1-binding site of Prx II promoter significantly reduced Prx II levels in H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells, indicating FoxM1 as a direct transcription factor of Prx II in HCC. Interestingly, the null mutation of Prx II markedly decreased the number and size of tumors in H-ras(G12V)-Tg livers. Consistent with this, knockdown of Prx II in H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells reduced the expression of cyclin D1, cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and tumor formation in athymic nude mice, whereas overexpression of Prx II increased or aggravated the tumor phenotypes. Importantly, the expression of Prx II was correlated with that of FoxM1 in HCC patients. The activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) pathway and the expression of FoxM1 and cyclin D1 were highly dependent on Prx II in H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells and H-ras(G12V)-Tg livers. Prx II is FoxM1-dependently-expressed antioxidant in HCC and function as an enhancer of Ras(G12V) oncogenic potential in hepatic tumorigenesis through activation of ERK/FoxM1/cyclin D1 cascade. PMID:26500057

  2. Alphavirus production is inhibited in neurofibromin 1-deficient cells through activated RAS signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Kolokoltsova, Olga A. Domina, Aaron M. Kolokoltsov, Andrey A. Davey, Robert A. | Weaver, Scott C. || Watowich, Stanley J. ||

    2008-07-20

    Virus-host interactions essential for alphavirus pathogenesis are poorly understood. To address this shortcoming, we coupled retrovirus insertional mutagenesis and a cell survival selection strategy to generate clonal cell lines broadly resistant to Sindbis virus (SINV) and other alphaviruses. Resistant cells had significantly impaired SINV production relative to wild-type (WT) cells, although virus binding and fusion events were similar in both sets of cells. Analysis of the retroviral integration sites identified the neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene as disrupted in alphavirus-resistant cell lines. Subsequent analysis indicated that expression of NF1 was significantly reduced in alphavirus-resistant cells. Importantly, independent down-regulation of NF1 expression in WT HEK 293 cells decreased virus production and increased cell viability during SINV infection, relative to infected WT cells. Additionally, we observed hyperactive RAS signalling in the resistant HEK 293 cells, which was anticipated because NF1 is a negative regulator of RAS. Expression of constitutively active RAS (HRAS-G12V) in a WT HEK 293 cell line resulted in a marked delay in virus production, compared with infected cells transfected with parental plasmid or dominant-negative RAS (HRAS-S17N). This work highlights novel host cell determinants required for alphavirus pathogenesis and suggests that RAS signalling may play an important role in neuronal susceptibility to SINV infection.

  3. Systemic Regulation of RAS/MAPK Signaling by the Serotonin Metabolite 5-HIAA

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Tobias; Snoek, L. Basten; Fröhli, Erika; van der Bent, M. Leontien; Kammenga, Jan; Hajnal, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer is caused by the interplay of mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and inherited variations in cancer susceptibility genes. While many of the tumor initiating mutations are well characterized, the effect of genetic background variation on disease onset and progression is less understood. We have used C. elegans genetics to identify genetic modifiers of the oncogenic RAS/MAPK signaling pathway. Quantitative trait locus analysis of two highly diverged C. elegans isolates combined with allele swapping experiments identified the polymorphic monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene amx-2 as a negative regulator of RAS/MAPK signaling. We further show that the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), which is a product of MAOA catalysis, systemically inhibits RAS/MAPK signaling in different organs of C. elegans. Thus, MAOA activity sets a global threshold for MAPK activation by controlling 5-HIAA levels. To our knowledge, 5-HIAA is the first endogenous small molecule that acts as a systemic inhibitor of RAS/MAPK signaling. PMID:25978500

  4. H-Ras Increases Urokinase Expression and Cell Invasion in Genetically Modified Human Astrocytes Through Ras/Raf/MEK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YUNGE; XIAO, AIZHEN; DIPIERRO, CHARLES G.; ABDEL-FATTAH, RANA; AMOS, SAMSON; REDPATH, GERARD T.; CARPENTER, JOAN E.; PIEPER, RUSSELL O.; HUSSAINI, ISA M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous study reported that the activation of Ras pathway cooperated with E6/E7-mediated inactivation of p53/pRb to transform immortalized normal human astrocytes (NHA/hTERT) into intracranial tumors strongly resembling human astrocytomas. The mechanism of how H-Ras contributes to astrocytoma formation is unclear. Using genetically modified NHA cells (E6/E7/hTERT and E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells) as models, we investigated the mechanism of Ras-induced tumorigenesis. The overexpression of constitutively active H-RasV12 in E6/E7/hTERT cells robustly increased the levels of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) mRNA, protein, activity and invasive capacity of the E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells. However, the expressions of MMP-9 and MMP-2 did not significantly change in the E6/E7/hTERT and E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells. Furthermore, E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells also displayed higher level of uPA activity and were more invasive than E6/E7/hTERT cells in 3D culture, and formed an intracranial tumor mass in a NOD-SCID mouse model. uPA specific inhibitor (B428) and uPA neutralizing antibody decreased uPA activity and invasion in E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells. uPA-deficient U-1242 glioblastoma cells were less invasive in vitro and exhibited reduced tumor growth and infiltration into normal brain in xenograft mouse model. Inhibitors of Ras (FTA), Raf (Bay 54−9085) and MEK (UO126), but not of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) (LY294002) and of protein kinase C (BIM) pathways, inhibited uPA activity and cell invasion. Our results suggest that H-Ras increased uPA expression and activity via the Ras/Raf/MEK signaling pathway leading to enhanced cell invasion and this may contribute to increased invasive growth properties of astrocytomas. PMID:18383343

  5. BRAF vs RAS oncogenes: are mutations of the same pathway equal? differential signalling and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Eftychia; Koustas, Evangelos; Goulielmaki, Maria; Pintzas, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    As the increased knowledge of tumour heterogeneity and genetic alterations progresses, it exemplifies the need for further personalized medicine in modern cancer management. Here, the similarities but also the differential effects of RAS and BRAF oncogenic signalling are examined and further implications in personalized cancer diagnosis and therapy are discussed. Redundant mechanisms mediated by the two oncogenes as well as differential regulation of signalling pathways and gene expression by RAS as compared to BRAF are addressed. The implications of RAS vs BRAF differential functions, in relevant tumour types including colorectal cancer, melanoma, lung cancer are discussed. Current therapeutic findings and future viewpoints concerning the exploitation of RAS-BRAF-pathway alterations for the development of novel therapeutics and efficient rational combinations, as well as companion tests for relevant markers of response will be evaluated. The concept that drug-resistant cells may also display drug dependency, such that altered dosing may prevent the emergence of lethal drug resistance posed a major therapy hindrance. PMID:25361007

  6. Ras-activated Dsor1 promotes Wnt signaling in Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Hall, Eric T; Verheyen, Esther M

    2015-12-15

    Wnt/Wingless (Wg) and Ras-MAPK signaling both play fundamental roles in growth and cell fate determination, and when dysregulated, can lead to tumorigenesis. Several conflicting modes of interaction between Ras-MAPK and Wnt signaling have been identified in specific cellular contexts, causing synergistic or antagonistic effects on target genes. We find novel evidence that the Drosophila homolog of the dual specificity kinases MEK1/2 (also known as MAP2K1/2), Downstream of Raf1 (Dsor1), is required for Wnt signaling. Knockdown of Dsor1 results in loss of Wg target gene expression, as well as reductions in stabilized Armadillo (Arm; Drosophila β-catenin). We identify a close physical interaction between Dsor1 and Arm, and find that catalytically inactive Dsor1 causes a reduction in active Arm. These results suggest that Dsor1 normally counteracts the Axin-mediated destruction of Arm. We find that Ras-Dsor1 activity is independent of upstream activation by EGFR, and instead it appears to be activated by the insulin-like growth factor receptor to promote Wg signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that there is a new crosstalk pathway between insulin and Wg signaling that is mediated by Dsor1. PMID:26542023

  7. Manumycin inhibits ras signal transduction pathway and induces apoptosis in COLO320-DM human colon tumourcells

    PubMed Central

    Paolo, A Di; Danesi, R; Nardini, D; Bocci, G; Innocenti, F; Fogli, S; Barachini, S; Marchetti, A; Bevilacqua, G; Tacca, M Del

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the cytotoxicity of manumycin, a specific inhibitor of farnesyl:protein transferase, as well as its effects on protein isoprenylation and kinase-dependent signal transduction in COLO320-DM human colon adenocarcinoma which harbours a wild-type K- ras gene. Immunoblot analysis of isolated cell membranes and total cellular lysates of COLO320-DM cells demonstrated that manumycin dose-dependently reduced p21 ras farnesylation with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.51 ± 0.11 μM and 2.68 ± 0.20 μM, respectively, while the geranylgeranylation of p21 rhoA and p21 rap1 was not affected. Manumycin dose-dependently inhibited (IC50= 2.40 ± 0.67 μM) the phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase 2 (p42MAPK/ERK2), the main cytoplasmic effector of p21 ras, as well as COLO320-DM cell growth (IC50= 3.58 ± 0.27 μM) without affecting the biosynthesis of cholesterol. Mevalonic acid (MVA, 100 μM), a substrate of the isoprenoid synthesis, was unable to protect COLO320-DM cells from manumycin cytotoxicity. Finally, manumycin 1–25 μM for 24–72 h induced oligonucleosomal fragmentation in a dose- and time-dependent manner and MVA did not protect COLO320-DM cells from undergoing DNA cleavage. The present findings indicate that the inhibition of p21 ras processing and signal transduction by manumycin is associated with marked inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in colon cancer cells and the effect on cell growth does not require the presence of a mutated ras gene for maximal expression of chemotherapeutic activity. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10732765

  8. Ras, Rac1, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in nitric oxide induced endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Eller-Borges, Roberta; Batista, Wagner L; da Costa, Paulo E; Tokikawa, Rita; Curcio, Marli F; Strumillo, Scheilla T; Sartori, Adriano; Moraes, Miriam S; de Oliveira, Graciele A; Taha, Murched O; Fonseca, Fábio V; Stern, Arnold; Monteiro, Hugo P

    2015-05-01

    The small GTP-binding proteins Ras and Rac1 are molecular switches exchanging GDP for GTP and converting external signals in response to a variety of stimuli. Ras and Rac1 play an important role in cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cell migration. Rac1 is directly involved in the reorganization and changes in the cytoskeleton during cell motility. Nitric oxide (NO) stimulates the Ras - ERK1/2 MAP kinases signaling pathway and is involved in the interaction between Ras and the phosphatidyl-inositol-3 Kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway and cell migration. This study utilizes bradykinin (BK), which promotes endogenous production of NO, in an investigation of the role of NO in the activation of Rac1 in rabbit aortic endothelial cells (RAEC). NO-derived from BK stimulation of RAEC and incubation of the cells with the s-nitrosothiol S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) activated Rac1. NO-derived from BK stimulation promoted RAEC migration over a period of 12 h. The use of RAEC permanently transfected with the dominant negative mutant of Ras (Ras(N17)) or with the non-nitrosatable mutant of Ras (Ras(C118S)); and the use of specific inhibitors of: Ras, PI3K, and Rac1 resulted in inhibition of NO-mediated Rac1 activation. BK-stimulated s-nitrosylation of Ras in RAEC mediates Rac1 activation and cell migration. Inhibition of NO-mediated Rac1 activation resulted in inhibition of endothelial cell migration. In conclusion, the NO indirect activation of Rac1 involves the direct participation of Ras and PI3K in the migration of endothelial cells stimulated with BK. PMID:25819133

  9. Aberrant insulin signaling in Alzheimer's disease: current knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Bedse, Gaurav; Di Domenico, Fabio; Serviddio, Gaetano; Cassano, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting elderly people. AD is a multifaceted pathology characterized by accumulation of extracellular neuritic plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and neuronal loss mainly in the cortex and hippocampus. AD etiology appears to be linked to a multitude of mechanisms that have not been yet completely elucidated. For long time, it was considered that insulin signaling has only peripheral actions but now it is widely accepted that insulin has neuromodulatory actions in the brain. Insulin signaling is involved in numerous brain functions including cognition and memory that are impaired in AD. Recent studies suggest that AD may be linked to brain insulin resistance and patients with diabetes have an increased risk of developing AD compared to healthy individuals. Indeed insulin resistance, increased inflammation and impaired metabolism are key pathological features of both AD and diabetes. However, the precise mechanisms involved in the development of AD in patients with diabetes are not yet fully understood. In this review we will discuss the role played by aberrant brain insulin signaling in AD. In detail, we will focus on the role of insulin signaling in the deposition of neuritic plaques and intracellular NFTs. Considering that insulin mitigates beta-amyloid deposition and phosphorylation of tau, pharmacological strategies restoring brain insulin signaling, such as intranasal delivery of insulin, could have significant therapeutic potential in AD treatment. PMID:26136647

  10. The effect of aquaporin 5 overexpression on the Ras signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Janghee; Lee, Juna; Kim, Myoung Sook; Jang, Se Jin; Sidransky, David; Moon, Chulso

    2008-03-07

    Human aquaporin 5 (AQP5) has been shown to be overexpressed in multiple cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. Furthermore, it has been reported that ectopic expression of AQP5 leads to many phenotypic changes characteristic of transformation. However, the biochemical mechanism leading to transformation in AQP5-overexpressing cells has not been clearly elucidated. In this report, the overexpression of AQP5 in NIH3T3 cells demonstrated a significant effect on Ras activity and, thus, cell proliferation. Furthermore, this influence was shown to be mediated by phosphorylation of the PKA consensus site of AQP5. This is the first evidence demonstrating an association between AQP5 and a signaling pathway, namely the Ras signal transduction pathway, which may be the basis of the oncogenic properties seen in AQP-overexpressing cells.

  11. Ras protein/cAMP-dependent protein kinase signaling is negatively regulated by a deubiquitinating enzyme, Ubp3, in yeast.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Wang, Yuqi

    2013-04-19

    Ras proteins and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A, PKA) are important components of a nutrient signaling pathway that mediates cellular responses to glucose in yeast. The molecular mechanisms that regulate Ras/PKA-mediated signaling remain to be fully understood. Here, we provide evidence that Ras/PKA signaling is negatively regulated by a deubiquitinating enzyme, Ubp3. Disrupting the activity of Ubp3 leads to hyperactivation of PKA, as evidenced by much enhanced phosphorylation of PKA substrates, decreased accumulation of glycogen, larger cell size, and increased sensitivity to heat shock. Levels of intracellular cAMP and the active forms of Ras proteins are also elevated in the ubp3Δ mutant. Consistent with a possibility that the increased cAMP is responsible for the abnormal signaling behavior of the ubp3Δ mutant, overexpressing PDE2, which encodes a phosphodiesterase that hydrolyzes cAMP, significantly relieves the cell size increase and heat shock sensitivity of the mutant. Further analysis reveals that Ubp3 interacts with a Ras GTPase-accelerating protein, Ira2, and regulates its level of ubiquitination. Together, our data indicate that Ubp3 is a new regulator of the Ras/PKA signaling pathway and suggest that Ubp3 regulates this pathway by controlling the ubiquitination of Ras GTPase-accelerating protein Ira2. PMID:23476013

  12. PP2A-mediated regulation of Ras signaling in G2 is essential for stable quiescence and normal G1 length

    PubMed Central

    Naetar, Nana; Soundarapandian, Velmurugan; Litovchick, Larisa; Goguen, Kelsey L.; Sablina, Anna A.; Bowman-Colin, Christian; Sicinski, Piotr; Hahn, William C.; DeCaprio, James A.; Livingston, David M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Quiescence (G0) allows cycling cells to reversibly cease proliferation. A decision to enter quiescence is suspected of occurring early in G1, before the restriction point, R. Surprisingly, we have identified G2 as an interval during which inhibition of the protein phosphatase, PP2A, results in failure to exhibit stable quiescence. This effect is accompanied by shortening of the ensuing G1. The PP2A subcomplex required for stable G0 contains the B56γ B subunit. Following PP2A inhibition in G2, aberrant overexpression of cyclin E occurs during mitosis and is responsible for overriding quiescence. Strikingly, suppression of Ras signaling re-establishes normal cyclin E levels during M and restores G0. These data point to PP2A-B56γ-driven Ras signaling-modulation in G2 as essential for suppressing aberrant cyclin E expression during mitosis and, thereby, achieving normal G0 control. Thus, G2 is an interval during which the length and growth factor dependence of the next G1 interval are established. PMID:24857551

  13. PP2A-mediated regulation of Ras signaling in G2 is essential for stable quiescence and normal G1 length.

    PubMed

    Naetar, Nana; Soundarapandian, Velmurugan; Litovchick, Larisa; Goguen, Kelsey L; Sablina, Anna A; Bowman-Colin, Christian; Sicinski, Piotr; Hahn, William C; DeCaprio, James A; Livingston, David M

    2014-06-19

    Quiescence (G0) allows cycling cells to reversibly cease proliferation. A decision to enter quiescence is suspected of occurring early in G1, before the restriction point (R). Surprisingly, we have identified G2 as an interval during which inhibition of the protein phosphatase PP2A results in failure to exhibit stable quiescence. This effect is accompanied by shortening of the ensuing G1. The PP2A subcomplex required for stable G0 contains the B56γ B subunit. After PP2A inhibition in G2, aberrant overexpression of cyclin E occurs during mitosis and is responsible for overriding quiescence. Strikingly, suppression of Ras signaling re-establishes normal cyclin E levels during M and restores G0. These data point to PP2A-B56γ-driven Ras signaling modulation in G2 as essential for suppressing aberrant cyclin E expression during mitosis and thereby achieving normal G0 control. Thus, G2 is an interval during which the length and growth factor dependence of the next G1 interval are established. PMID:24857551

  14. Small Molecule APY606 Displays Extensive Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer via Impairing Ras-MAPK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Na; Liu, Zuojia; Zhao, Wenjing; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been found with abnormal expression or mutation in Ras proteins. Oncogenic Ras activation exploits their extensive signaling reach to affect multiple cellular processes, in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling exerts important roles in tumorigenesis. Therapies targeted Ras are thus of major benefit for pancreatic cancer. Although small molecule APY606 has been successfully picked out by virtual drug screening based on Ras target receptor, its in-depth mechanism remains to be elucidated. We herein assessed the antitumor activity of APY606 against human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 and SW1990 cell lines and explored the effect of Ras-MAPK and apoptosis-related signaling pathway on the activity of APY606. APY606 treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cancer cell viability. Additionally, APY606 exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced not only by reduction in tumor cell invasion, migration and mitochondrial membrane potential but also by alteration in several apoptotic indexes. Furthermore, APY606 treatment directly inhibited Ras-GTP and the downstream activation of MAPK, which resulted in the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, leading to the up-regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway-related proteins (Bax, cytosolic Cytochrome c and Caspase 3) and of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and Cyclin A, E. These data suggest that impairing Ras-MAPK signaling is a novel mechanism of action for APY606 during therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27223122

  15. Small Molecule APY606 Displays Extensive Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer via Impairing Ras-MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Na; Liu, Zuojia; Zhao, Wenjing; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been found with abnormal expression or mutation in Ras proteins. Oncogenic Ras activation exploits their extensive signaling reach to affect multiple cellular processes, in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling exerts important roles in tumorigenesis. Therapies targeted Ras are thus of major benefit for pancreatic cancer. Although small molecule APY606 has been successfully picked out by virtual drug screening based on Ras target receptor, its in-depth mechanism remains to be elucidated. We herein assessed the antitumor activity of APY606 against human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 and SW1990 cell lines and explored the effect of Ras-MAPK and apoptosis-related signaling pathway on the activity of APY606. APY606 treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cancer cell viability. Additionally, APY606 exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced not only by reduction in tumor cell invasion, migration and mitochondrial membrane potential but also by alteration in several apoptotic indexes. Furthermore, APY606 treatment directly inhibited Ras-GTP and the downstream activation of MAPK, which resulted in the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, leading to the up-regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway-related proteins (Bax, cytosolic Cytochrome c and Caspase 3) and of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and Cyclin A, E. These data suggest that impairing Ras-MAPK signaling is a novel mechanism of action for APY606 during therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27223122

  16. Gene expression analysis of aberrant signaling pathways in meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    TORRES-MARTÍN, MIGUEL; MARTINEZ-GLEZ, VICTOR; PEÑA-GRANERO, CAROLINA; ISLA, ALBERTO; LASSALETTA, LUIS; DE CAMPOS, JOSE M.; PINTO, GIOVANNY R.; BURBANO, ROMMEL R.; MELÉNDEZ, BÁRBARA; CASTRESANA, JAVIER S.; REY, JUAN A.

    2013-01-01

    Examining aberrant pathway alterations is one method for understanding the abnormal signals that are involved in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In the present study, expression arrays were performed on tumor-related genes in meningiomas. The GE Array Q Series HS-006 was used to determine the expression levels of 96 genes that corresponded to six primary biological regulatory pathways in a series of 42 meningiomas, including 32 grade I, four recurrent grade I and six grade II tumors, in addition to three normal tissue controls. Results showed that 25 genes that were primarily associated with apoptosis and angiogenesis functions were downregulated and 13 genes frequently involving DNA damage repair functions were upregulated. In addition to the inactivation of the neurofibromin gene, NF2, which is considered to be an early step in tumorigenesis, variations of other biological regulatory pathways may play a significant role in the development of meningioma. PMID:23946817

  17. Gene expression analysis of aberrant signaling pathways in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martín, Miguel; Martinez-Glez, Victor; Peña-Granero, Carolina; Isla, Alberto; Lassaletta, Luis; DE Campos, Jose M; Pinto, Giovanny R; Burbano, Rommel R; Meléndez, Bárbara; Castresana, Javier S; Rey, Juan A

    2013-07-01

    Examining aberrant pathway alterations is one method for understanding the abnormal signals that are involved in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In the present study, expression arrays were performed on tumor-related genes in meningiomas. The GE Array Q Series HS-006 was used to determine the expression levels of 96 genes that corresponded to six primary biological regulatory pathways in a series of 42 meningiomas, including 32 grade I, four recurrent grade I and six grade II tumors, in addition to three normal tissue controls. Results showed that 25 genes that were primarily associated with apoptosis and angiogenesis functions were downregulated and 13 genes frequently involving DNA damage repair functions were upregulated. In addition to the inactivation of the neurofibromin gene, NF2, which is considered to be an early step in tumorigenesis, variations of other biological regulatory pathways may play a significant role in the development of meningioma. PMID:23946817

  18. EGFR/Ras/MAPK signaling mediates adult midgut epithelial homeostasis and regeneration in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Huaqi; Grenley, Marc O.; Bravo, Maria-Jose; Blumhagen, Rachel Z.; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Many tissues in higher animals undergo dynamic homeostatic growth, wherein damaged or aged cells are replaced by the progeny of resident stem cells. To maintain homeostasis, stem cells must respond to tissue needs. Here we show that in response to damage or stress in the intestinal (midgut) epithelium of adult Drosophila, multiple EGFR ligands and rhomboids (intramembrane proteases that activate some EGFR ligands) are induced, leading to the activation of EGFR signaling in intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Activation of EGFR signaling promotes ISC division and midgut epithelium regeneration, thus maintaining tissue homeostasis. ISCs defective in EGFR signaling cannot grow or divide, are poorly maintained, and cannot support midgut epithelium regeneration following enteric infection by the bacterium, Pseudomonas entomophila. Furthermore, ISC proliferation induced by Jak/Stat signaling is dependent upon EGFR signaling. Thus the EGFR/Ras/MAPK signaling pathway plays central, essential roles in ISC maintenance and the feedback system that mediates intestinal homeostasis. PMID:21167805

  19. Defined spatiotemporal features of RAS-ERK signals dictate cell fate in MCF-7 mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Ana; Casar, Berta; Colón-Bolea, Paula; Agudo-Ibáñez, Lorena; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Signals conveyed through the RAS-ERK pathway are essential for the determination of cell fate. It is well established that signal variability is achieved in the different microenvironments in which signals unfold. It is also known that signal duration is critical for decisions concerning cell commitment. However, it is unclear how RAS-ERK signals integrate time and space in order to elicit a given biological response. To investigate this, we used MCF-7 cells, in which EGF-induced transient ERK activation triggers proliferation, whereas sustained ERK activation in response to heregulin leads to adipocytic differentiation. We found that both proliferative and differentiating signals emanate exclusively from plasma membrane–disordered microdomains. Of interest, the EGF signal can be transformed into a differentiating stimulus by HRAS overexpression, which prolongs ERK activation, but only if HRAS localizes at disordered membrane. On the other hand, HRAS signals emanating from the Golgi complex induce apoptosis and can prevent heregulin-induced differentiation. Our results indicate that within the same cellular context, RAS can exert different, even antagonistic, effects, depending on its sublocalization. Thus cell destiny is defined by the ability of a stimulus to activate RAS at the appropriate sublocalization for an adequate period while avoiding switching on opposing RAS signals. PMID:27099370

  20. The Kinase Activity-deficient Isoform of the Protein Araf Antagonizes Ras/Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (Ras/MAPK) Signaling in the Zebrafish Embryo*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Cong; Liu, Xingfeng; Meng, Anming

    2015-01-01

    Raf kinases are important components of the Ras-Raf-Mek-Erk pathway and also cross-talk with other signaling pathways. Araf kinase has been demonstrated to inhibit TGF-β/Smad2 signaling by directly phosphorylating and accelerating degradation of activated Smad2. In this study, we show that the araf gene expresses in zebrafish embryos to produce a shorter transcript variant, araf-tv2, in addition to the full-length variant araf-tv1. araf-tv2 is predicted to encode a C-terminally truncated peptide without the kinase activity domain. Araf-tv2 can physically associate with Araf-tv1 but does not antagonize the inhibitory effect of Araf-tv1 on TGF-β/Smad2 signaling. Instead, Araf-tv2 interacts strongly with Kras and Nras, ultimately blocking MAPK activation by these Ras proteins. In zebrafish embryos, overexpression of araf-tv2 is sufficient to inhibit Fgf/Ras-promoted Erk activation, mesodermal induction, dorsal development, and neuroectodermal posteriorization. Therefore, different isoforms of Araf may participate in similar developmental processes but by regulating different signaling pathways. PMID:26306042

  1. SUMO wrestling with Ras

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haibo; Luo, Ji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This review discusses our current understanding of the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) pathway and how it functionally intersects with Ras signaling in cancer. The Ras family of small GTPases are frequently mutated in cancer. The role of the SUMO pathway in cancer and in Ras signaling is currently not well understood. Recent studies have shown that the SUMO pathway can both regulate Ras/MAPK pathway activity directly and support Ras-driven oncogenesis through the regulation of proteins that are not direct Ras effectors. We recently discovered that in Ras mutant cancer cells, the SUMOylation status of a subset of proteins is altered and one such protein, KAP1, is required for Ras-driven transformation. A better understanding of the functional interaction between the SUMO and Ras pathways could lead to new insights into the mechanism of Ras-driven oncogenesis. PMID:27057691

  2. Ras history

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although the roots of Ras sprouted from the rich history of retrovirus research, it was the discovery of mutationally activated RAS genes in human cancer in 1982 that stimulated an intensive research effort to understand Ras protein structure, biochemistry and biology. While the ultimate goal has been developing anti-Ras drugs for cancer treatment, discoveries from Ras have laid the foundation for three broad areas of science. First, they focused studies on the origins of cancer to the molecular level, with the subsequent discovery of genes mutated in cancer that now number in the thousands. Second, elucidation of the biochemical mechanisms by which Ras facilitates signal transduction established many of our fundamental concepts of how a normal cell orchestrates responses to extracellular cues. Third, Ras proteins are also founding members of a large superfamily of small GTPases that regulate all key cellular processes and established the versatile role of small GTP-binding proteins in biology. We highlight some of the key findings of the last 28 years. PMID:21686117

  3. The RET/PTC-RAS-BRAF linear signaling cascade mediates the motile and mitogenic phenotype of thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Rosa Marina; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Guarino, Valentina; De Falco, Valentina; Cirafici, Anna Maria; Salvatore, Giuliana; Caiazzo, Fiorina; Basolo, Fulvio; Giannini, Riccardo; Kruhoffer, Mogens; Orntoft, Torben; Fusco, Alfredo; Santoro, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    In papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs), rearrangements of the RET receptor (RET/PTC) and activating mutations in the BRAF or RAS oncogenes are mutually exclusive. Here we show that the 3 proteins function along a linear oncogenic signaling cascade in which RET/PTC induces RAS-dependent BRAF activation and RAS- and BRAF-dependent ERK activation. Adoptive activation of the RET/PTC-RAS-BRAF axis induced cell proliferation and Matrigel invasion of thyroid follicular cells. Gene expression profiling revealed that the 3 oncogenes activate a common transcriptional program in thyroid cells that includes upregulation of the CXCL1 and CXCL10 chemokines, which in turn stimulate proliferation and invasion. Thus, motile and mitogenic properties are intrinsic to transformed thyroid cells and are governed by an epistatic oncogenic signaling cascade. PMID:15761501

  4. The novel plant homeodomain protein rhinoceros antagonizes Ras signaling in the Drosophila eye.

    PubMed Central

    Voas, Matthew G; Rebay, Ilaria

    2003-01-01

    The sequential specification of cell fates in the Drosophila eye requires repeated activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/Ras/MAP kinase (MAPK) pathway. Equally important are the multiple layers of inhibitory regulation that prevent excessive or inappropriate signaling. Here we describe the molecular and genetic analysis of a previously uncharacterized gene, rhinoceros (rno), that we propose functions to restrict EGFR signaling in the eye. Loss of rno results in the overproduction of photoreceptors, cone cells, and pigment cells and a corresponding reduction in programmed cell death, all phenotypes characteristic of hyperactivated EGFR signaling. Genetic interactions between rno and multiple EGFR pathway components support this hypothesis. rno encodes a novel but evolutionarily conserved nuclear protein with a PHD zinc-finger domain, a motif commonly found in chromatin-remodeling factors. Future analyses of rno will help to elucidate the regulatory strategies that modulate EGFR signaling in the fly eye. PMID:14704181

  5. Oog1, an oocyte-specific protein, interacts with Ras and Ras-signaling proteins during early embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Satoshi; Ihara, Ryo; Aizawa, Akira; Kishida, Shosei; Kikuchi, Akira; Imai, Hiroshi; Minami, Naojiro . E-mail: naojiro@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-05-19

    We previously identified an oocyte-specific gene, Oogenesin 1 (Oog1), that encodes 326 amino acids containing a leucine zipper structure and a leucine-rich repeat. In the present study, to identify the interacting proteins of Oog1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening using a GV-oocyte cDNA library and found that Ral guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator (RalGDS) is the binding partner of Oog1. Coimmunoprecipitation assay confirmed the interaction between Oog1 and RalGDS proteins. Colocalization experiments provide the evidence that the nuclear localization of RalGDS depends on the expression of Oog1. Interestingly, RalGDS protein localized in the nucleus rather than the cytoplasm between late 1-cell and early 2-cell stages, the time when Oog1 localizes in the nucleus. We also examined the interaction between Oog1 and Ras by GST pull-down assay and revealed that Oog1 interacts with Ras in a GTP-dependent manner. These findings suggest a role of Oog1 as a Ras-binding protein.

  6. Epigenomic Regulation of Smad1 Signaling During Cellular Senescence Induced by Ras Activation.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Atsushi; Nonaka, Aya; Fujita, Takanori; Yamanaka, Ryota; Fujimoto, Mai; Miyazono, Kohei; Aburatani, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Epigenomic modification plays important roles in regulating gene expression during development, differentiation, and cellular senescence. When oncogenes are activated, cells fall into stable growth arrest to block cellular proliferation, which is called oncogene-induced senescence. We recently identified through genome-wide analyses that Bmp2-Smad1 signal and its regulation by harmonized epigenomic alteration play an important role in Ras-induced senescence of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. We describe in this chapter the methods for analyses of epigenomic alteration and Smad1 targets on genome-wide scale. PMID:26520136

  7. Uncoupling of EGFR-RAS signaling and nuclear localization of YBX1 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Roßner, F; Gieseler, C; Morkel, M; Royer, H-D; Rivera, M; Bläker, H; Dietel, M; Schäfer, R; Sers, C

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor YBX1 can act as a mediator of signals transmitted via the EGFR-RAS-MAPK axis. YBX1 expression has been associated with tumor progression and prognosis in multiple types of cancer. Immunohistochemical studies have revealed dependency between YBX1 expression and individual EGFR family members. We analyzed YBX1 and EGFR family proteins in a colorectal cancer (CRC) cohort and provide functional analyses of YBX1 in the context of EGFR-RAS-MAPK signaling. Immunohistochemistry for YBX1 and EGFR family receptors with two antibodies for YBX1 and EGFR were performed and related to clinicopathological data. We employed Caco2 cells expressing an inducible KRASV12 gene to determine effects on localization and levels of YBX1. Mouse xenografts of Caco2-KRASV12 cells were used to determine YBX1 dynamics in a tissue context. The two different antibodies against YBX1 showed discordant immunohistochemical stainings in cell culture and clinical specimens. Expression of YBX1 and EGFR family members were not correlated in CRC. Analysis of Caco2 xenografts displayed again heterogeneity of YBX1 staining with both antibodies. Our results suggest that YBX1 is controlled via complex regulatory mechanisms involving tumor stroma interaction and signal transduction processes. Our study highlights that YBX1 antibodies have different specificities, advocating their use in a combined manner. PMID:26779809

  8. Andrographolide derivatives inhibit guanine nucleotide exchange and abrogate oncogenic Ras function.

    PubMed

    Hocker, Harrison J; Cho, Kwang-Jin; Chen, Chung-Ying K; Rambahal, Nandini; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao; Shaari, Khozirah; Stanslas, Johnson; Hancock, John F; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2013-06-18

    Aberrant signaling by oncogenic mutant rat sarcoma (Ras) proteins occurs in ∼15% of all human tumors, yet direct inhibition of Ras by small molecules has remained elusive. Recently, several small-molecule ligands have been discovered that directly bind Ras and inhibit its function by interfering with exchange factor binding. However, it is unclear whether, or how, these ligands could lead to drugs that act against constitutively active oncogenic mutant Ras. Using a dynamics-based pocket identification scheme, ensemble docking, and innovative cell-based assays, here we show that andrographolide (AGP)--a bicyclic diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata--and its benzylidene derivatives bind to transient pockets on Kirsten-Ras (K-Ras) and inhibit GDP-GTP exchange. As expected for inhibitors of exchange factor binding, AGP derivatives reduced GTP loading of wild-type K-Ras in response to acute EGF stimulation with a concomitant reduction in MAPK activation. Remarkably, however, prolonged treatment with AGP derivatives also reduced GTP loading of, and signal transmission by, oncogenic mutant K-RasG12V. In sum, the combined analysis of our computational and cell biology results show that AGP derivatives directly bind Ras, block GDP-GTP exchange, and inhibit both wild-type and oncogenic K-Ras signaling. Importantly, our findings not only show that nucleotide exchange factors are required for oncogenic Ras signaling but also demonstrate that inhibiting nucleotide exchange is a valid approach to abrogating the function of oncogenic mutant Ras. PMID:23737504

  9. Andrographolide derivatives inhibit guanine nucleotide exchange and abrogate oncogenic Ras function

    PubMed Central

    Hocker, Harrison J.; Cho, Kwang-Jin; Chen, Chung-Ying K.; Rambahal, Nandini; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao; Shaari, Khozirah; Stanslas, Johnson; Hancock, John F.; Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant signaling by oncogenic mutant rat sarcoma (Ras) proteins occurs in ∼15% of all human tumors, yet direct inhibition of Ras by small molecules has remained elusive. Recently, several small-molecule ligands have been discovered that directly bind Ras and inhibit its function by interfering with exchange factor binding. However, it is unclear whether, or how, these ligands could lead to drugs that act against constitutively active oncogenic mutant Ras. Using a dynamics-based pocket identification scheme, ensemble docking, and innovative cell-based assays, here we show that andrographolide (AGP)—a bicyclic diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata—and its benzylidene derivatives bind to transient pockets on Kirsten-Ras (K-Ras) and inhibit GDP–GTP exchange. As expected for inhibitors of exchange factor binding, AGP derivatives reduced GTP loading of wild-type K-Ras in response to acute EGF stimulation with a concomitant reduction in MAPK activation. Remarkably, however, prolonged treatment with AGP derivatives also reduced GTP loading of, and signal transmission by, oncogenic mutant K-RasG12V. In sum, the combined analysis of our computational and cell biology results show that AGP derivatives directly bind Ras, block GDP–GTP exchange, and inhibit both wild-type and oncogenic K-Ras signaling. Importantly, our findings not only show that nucleotide exchange factors are required for oncogenic Ras signaling but also demonstrate that inhibiting nucleotide exchange is a valid approach to abrogating the function of oncogenic mutant Ras. PMID:23737504

  10. Modulation of Ras signaling alters the toxicity of hydroquinone, a benzene metabolite and component of cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Benzene is an established human leukemogen, with a ubiquitous environmental presence leading to significant population exposure. In a genome-wide functional screen in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inactivation of IRA2, a yeast ortholog of the human tumor suppressor gene NF1 (Neurofibromin), enhanced sensitivity to hydroquinone, an important benzene metabolite. Increased Ras signaling is implicated as a causal factor in the increased pre-disposition to leukemia of individuals with mutations in NF1. Methods Growth inhibition of yeast by hydroquinone was assessed in mutant strains exhibiting varying levels of Ras activity. Subsequently, effects of hydroquinone on both genotoxicity (measured by micronucleus formation) and proliferation of WT and Nf1 null murine hematopoietic precursors were assessed. Results Here we show that the Ras status of both yeast and mammalian cells modulates hydroquinone toxicity, indicating potential synergy between Ras signaling and benzene toxicity. Specifically, enhanced Ras signaling increases both hydroquinone-mediated growth inhibition in yeast and genotoxicity in mammalian hematopoetic precursors as measured by an in vitro erythroid micronucleus assay. Hydroquinone also increases proliferation of CFU-GM progenitor cells in mice with Nf1 null bone marrow relative to WT, the same cell type associated with benzene-associated leukemia. Conclusions Together our findings show that hydroquinone toxicity is modulated by Ras signaling. Individuals with abnormal Ras signaling could be more vulnerable to developing myeloid diseases after exposure to benzene. We note that hydroquinone is used cosmetically as a skin-bleaching agent, including by individuals with cafe-au-lait spots (which may be present in individuals with neurofibromatosis who have a mutation in NF1), which could be unadvisable given our findings. PMID:24386979

  11. Bypassing both surface attachment and surface recognition requirements for appressorium formation by overactive ras signaling in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhao, Xinhua; Xue, Chaoyang; Dai, Yafeng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2014-09-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae forms a highly specialized infection structure called an appressorium for plant penetration. In M. oryzae and many other plant-pathogenic fungi, surface attachment and surface recognition are two essential requirements for appressorium formation. Development of appressoria in the air has not been reported. In this study, we found that expression of a dominant active MoRAS2(G18V) allele in M. oryzae resulted in the formation of morphologically abnormal appressoria on nonconducive surfaces, in liquid suspensions, and on aerial hyphae without attachment to hard surfaces. Both the Pmk1 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade and cAMP signaling pathways that regulate surface recognition and appressorium morphogenesis in M. oryzae were overactivated in the MoRAS2(G18V) transformant. In mutants deleted of PMK1 or CPKA, expression of MoRAS2(G18V) had no significant effects on appressorium morphogenesis. Furthermore, expression of dominant MoRAS2 in Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides also caused the formation of appressorium-like structures in aerial hyphae. Overall, our data indicate that MoRas2 functions upstream from both the cAMP-PKA and Pmk1 pathways and overactive Ras signaling leads to improper activation of these two pathways and appressorium formation without surface attachment in appressorium-forming pathogens. PMID:24835254

  12. A p53-inducible microRNA-34a downregulates Ras signaling by targeting IMPDH

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hwa-Ryeon; Roe, Jae-Seok; Lee, Ji-Eun; Hwang, In-Young; Cho, Eun-Jung; Youn, Hong-Duk

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 downregulates IMPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53-dependent miR-34a transactivation inhibits IMPDH transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-34a-mediated inhibition of IMPDH downregulates GTP-dependent Ras signal. -- Abstract: p53 is a well-known transcription factor that controls cell cycle arrest and cell death in response to a wide range of stresses. Moreover, p53 regulates glucose metabolism and its mutation results in the metabolic switch to the Warburg effect found in cancer cells. Nucleotide biosynthesis is also critical for cell proliferation and the cell division cycle. Nonetheless, little is known about whether p53 regulates nucleotide biosynthesis. Here we demonstrated that p53-inducible microRNA-34a (miR-34a) repressed inosine 5 Prime -monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a rate-limiting enzyme of de novo GTP biosynthesis. Treatment with anti-miR-34a inhibitor relieved the expression of IMPDH upon DNA damage. Ultimately, miR-34a-mediated inhibition of IMPDH resulted in repressed activation of the GTP-dependent Ras signaling pathway. In summary, we suggest that p53 has a novel function in regulating purine biosynthesis, aided by miR-34a-dependent IMPDH repression.

  13. Doxycycline enhances the Ras-MAPK signaling and proliferation of mouse thymic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xun; Xia, Sheng; Li, Rong; Liu, Hui; Huang, Ying; Qian, Xiaoping; Xiao, Xueyuan; Xu, Xun; Lin, Xin; Tian, Yuxiang; Zong, Yangyong; He, Dacheng; Chen, Weifeng; Zhang, Yu; Shao, Qixiang

    2009-06-01

    Depletion of T-cell-dependent immunity is a major consideration for patients suffering from infections of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), those undergoing organ transplantation, and those receiving anti-cancer chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. In general, T-cell regeneration occurs in the thymus through thymopoiesis. We have found that doxycycline (Dox), a tetracycline derivative, enhances the proliferation of mouse thymic epithelial cells, which are unique in their capacity to support positive selection and are essential throughout the development of thymocytes. Cell cycle analysis indicates that the increased cell proliferation is due to a shortened G(0)/G(1) phase. To reveal the underlying mechanisms, we examined the expression of an array of molecules that regulate the cell cycle. The results show that in mouse thymic medullary-type epithelial cell line 1 (MTEC1) Dox leads to elevated levels of H-Ras, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2), cyclin E, cyclin dependent kinase 4/2 (CDK4/CDK2), E2F3, and c-myc. These data, and the observation that the proliferation-enhancing effect is largely abolished following treatment with an ERK inhibitor support an active role of the Ras-ERK/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In conclusion, the present study reveals a new activity of an old family of antibiotics. The in vivo effect of Dox on immune reconstitution warrants further exploration. PMID:19330805

  14. Galectin-1 dimers can scaffold Raf-effectors to increase H-ras nanoclustering.

    PubMed

    Blaževitš, Olga; Mideksa, Yonatan G; Šolman, Maja; Ligabue, Alessio; Ariotti, Nicholas; Nakhaeizadeh, Hossein; Fansa, Eyad K; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Ahmadian, Mohammad R; Abankwa, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1) dimers crosslink carbohydrates on cell surface receptors. Carbohydrate-derived inhibitors have been developed for cancer treatment. Intracellularly, Gal-1 was suggested to interact with the farnesylated C-terminus of Ras thus specifically stabilizing GTP-H-ras nanoscale signalling hubs in the membrane, termed nanoclusters. The latter activity may present an alternative mechanism for how overexpressed Gal-1 stimulates tumourigenesis. Here we revise the current model for the interaction of Gal-1 with H-ras. We show that it indirectly forms a complex with GTP-H-ras via a high-affinity interaction with the Ras binding domain (RBD) of Ras effectors. A computationally generated model of the Gal-1/C-Raf-RBD complex is validated by mutational analysis. Both cellular FRET as well as proximity ligation assay experiments confirm interaction of Gal-1 with Raf proteins in mammalian cells. Consistently, interference with H-rasG12V-effector interactions basically abolishes H-ras nanoclustering. In addition, an intact dimer interface of Gal-1 is required for it to positively regulate H-rasG12V nanoclustering, but negatively K-rasG12V nanoclustering. Our findings suggest stacked dimers of H-ras, Raf and Gal-1 as building blocks of GTP-H-ras-nanocluster at high Gal-1 levels. Based on our results the Gal-1/effector interface represents a potential drug target site in diseases with aberrant Ras signalling. PMID:27087647

  15. Galectin-1 dimers can scaffold Raf-effectors to increase H-ras nanoclustering

    PubMed Central

    Blaževitš, Olga; Mideksa, Yonatan G.; Šolman, Maja; Ligabue, Alessio; Ariotti, Nicholas; Nakhaeizadeh, Hossein; Fansa, Eyad K.; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C.; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.; Abankwa, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1) dimers crosslink carbohydrates on cell surface receptors. Carbohydrate-derived inhibitors have been developed for cancer treatment. Intracellularly, Gal-1 was suggested to interact with the farnesylated C-terminus of Ras thus specifically stabilizing GTP-H-ras nanoscale signalling hubs in the membrane, termed nanoclusters. The latter activity may present an alternative mechanism for how overexpressed Gal-1 stimulates tumourigenesis. Here we revise the current model for the interaction of Gal-1 with H-ras. We show that it indirectly forms a complex with GTP-H-ras via a high-affinity interaction with the Ras binding domain (RBD) of Ras effectors. A computationally generated model of the Gal-1/C-Raf-RBD complex is validated by mutational analysis. Both cellular FRET as well as proximity ligation assay experiments confirm interaction of Gal-1 with Raf proteins in mammalian cells. Consistently, interference with H-rasG12V-effector interactions basically abolishes H-ras nanoclustering. In addition, an intact dimer interface of Gal-1 is required for it to positively regulate H-rasG12V nanoclustering, but negatively K-rasG12V nanoclustering. Our findings suggest stacked dimers of H-ras, Raf and Gal-1 as building blocks of GTP-H-ras-nanocluster at high Gal-1 levels. Based on our results the Gal-1/effector interface represents a potential drug target site in diseases with aberrant Ras signalling. PMID:27087647

  16. A new genetic model of activity-induced Ras signaling dependent pre-synaptic plasticity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Amanda; Bowers, Mallory; Mortimer, Alysia Vrailas; Timmerman, Christina; Roux, Stephanie; Ramaswami, Mani; Sanyal, Subhabrata

    2010-01-01

    Techniques to induce activity-dependent neuronal plasticity in vivo allow the underlying signaling pathways to be studied in their biological context. Here, we demonstrate activity-induced plasticity at neuromuscular synapses of Drosophila double mutant for comatose (an NSF mutant) and Kum (a SERCA mutant), and present an analysis of the underlying signaling pathways. comt; Kum (CK) double mutants exhibit increased locomotor activity under normal culture conditions, concomitant with a larger neuromuscular junction synapse and stably elevated evoked transmitter release. The observed enhancements of synaptic size and transmitter release in CK mutants are completely abrogated by: a) reduced activity of motor neurons; b) attenuation of the Ras/ERK signaling cascade; or c) inhibition of the transcription factors Fos and CREB. all of which restrict synaptic properties to near wild type levels. Together, these results document neural activity-dependent plasticity of motor synapses in CK animals that requires Ras/ERK signaling and normal transcriptional activity of Fos and CREB. Further, novel in vivo reporters of neuronal Ras activation and Fos transcription also confirm increased signaling through a Ras/AP-1 pathway in motor neurons of CK animals, consistent with results from our genetic experiments. Thus, this study: a) provides a robust system in which to study activity-induced synaptic plasticity in vivo; b) establishes a causal link between neural activity, Ras signaling, transcriptional regulation and pre-synaptic plasticity in glutamatergic motor neurons of Drosophila larvae; and c) presents novel, genetically encoded reporters for Ras and AP-1 dependent signaling pathways in Drosophila. PMID:20193670

  17. EGFR/Ras Signaling Controls Drosophila Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation via Capicua-Regulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yinhua; Ha, Nati; Forés, Marta; Xiang, Jinyi; Gläßer, Christine; Maldera, Julieta; Jiménez, Gerardo; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial renewal in the Drosophila intestine is orchestrated by Intestinal Stem Cells (ISCs). Following damage or stress the intestinal epithelium produces ligands that activate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in ISCs. This promotes their growth and division and, thereby, epithelial regeneration. Here we demonstrate that the HMG-box transcriptional repressor, Capicua (Cic), mediates these functions of EGFR signaling. Depleting Cic in ISCs activated them for division, whereas overexpressed Cic inhibited ISC proliferation and midgut regeneration. Epistasis tests showed that Cic acted as an essential downstream effector of EGFR/Ras signaling, and immunofluorescence showed that Cic’s nuclear localization was regulated by EGFR signaling. ISC-specific mRNA expression profiling and DNA binding mapping using DamID indicated that Cic represses cell proliferation via direct targets including string (Cdc25), Cyclin E, and the ETS domain transcription factors Ets21C and Pointed (pnt). pnt was required for ISC over-proliferation following Cic depletion, and ectopic pnt restored ISC proliferation even in the presence of overexpressed dominant-active Cic. These studies identify Cic, Pnt, and Ets21C as critical downstream effectors of EGFR signaling in Drosophila ISCs. PMID:26683696

  18. First step of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis cross-talks with ergosterol biosynthesis and Ras signaling in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Bhawna; Bhatnagar, Shilpi; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Jain, Priyanka; Pratyusha, Vavilala A; Kumar, Pravin; Komath, Sneha Sudha

    2014-02-01

    Candida albicans is a leading cause of fungal infections worldwide. It has several glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored virulence factors. Inhibiting GPI biosynthesis attenuates its virulence. Building on our previous work, we explore the interaction of GPI biosynthesis in C. albicans with ergosterol biosynthesis and hyphal morphogenesis. This study is also the first report of transcriptional co-regulation existing between two subunits of the multisubunit enzyme complex, GPI-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GPI-GnT), involved in the first step of GPI anchor biosynthesis in eukaryotes. Using mutational analysis, we show that the accessory subunits, GPI2 and GPI19, of GPI-GnT exhibit opposite effects on ergosterol biosynthesis and Ras signaling (which determines hyphal morphogenesis). This is because the two subunits negatively regulate one another; GPI19 mutants show up-regulation of GPI2, whereas GPI2 mutants show up-regulation of GPI19. Two different models were examined as follows. First, the two GPI-GnT subunits independently interact with ergosterol biosynthesis and Ras signaling. Second, the two subunits mutually regulate one another and thereby regulate sterol levels and Ras signaling. Analysis of double mutants of these subunits indicates that GPI19 controls ergosterol biosynthesis through ERG11 levels, whereas GPI2 determines the filamentation by cross-talk with Ras1 signaling. Taken together, this suggests that the first step of GPI biosynthesis talks to and regulates two very important pathways in C. albicans. This could have implications for designing new antifungal strategies. PMID:24356967

  19. Monitoring Ras Interactions with the Nucleotide Exchange Factor Son of Sevenless (Sos) Using Site-specific NMR Reporter Signals and Intrinsic Fluorescence*

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Flavell, Liz; Bobby, Romel; Breeze, Alexander L.; Embrey, Kevin J.; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of Ras is controlled by the interconversion between GTP- and GDP-bound forms partly regulated by the binding of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (Sos). The details of Sos binding, leading to nucleotide exchange and subsequent dissociation of the complex, are not completely understood. Here, we used uniformly 15N-labeled Ras as well as [13C]methyl-Met,Ile-labeled Sos for observing site-specific details of Ras-Sos interactions in solution. Binding of various forms of Ras (loaded with GDP and mimics of GTP or nucleotide-free) at the allosteric and catalytic sites of Sos was comprehensively characterized by monitoring signal perturbations in the NMR spectra. The overall affinity of binding between these protein variants as well as their selected functional mutants was also investigated using intrinsic fluorescence. The data support a positive feedback activation of Sos by Ras·GTP with Ras·GTP binding as a substrate for the catalytic site of activated Sos more weakly than Ras·GDP, suggesting that Sos should actively promote unidirectional GDP → GTP exchange on Ras in preference of passive homonucleotide exchange. Ras·GDP weakly binds to the catalytic but not to the allosteric site of Sos. This confirms that Ras·GDP cannot properly activate Sos at the allosteric site. The novel site-specific assay described may be useful for design of drugs aimed at perturbing Ras-Sos interactions. PMID:26565026

  20. Monitoring Ras Interactions with the Nucleotide Exchange Factor Son of Sevenless (Sos) Using Site-specific NMR Reporter Signals and Intrinsic Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Flavell, Liz; Bobby, Romel; Breeze, Alexander L; Embrey, Kevin J; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2016-01-22

    The activity of Ras is controlled by the interconversion between GTP- and GDP-bound forms partly regulated by the binding of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (Sos). The details of Sos binding, leading to nucleotide exchange and subsequent dissociation of the complex, are not completely understood. Here, we used uniformly (15)N-labeled Ras as well as [(13)C]methyl-Met,Ile-labeled Sos for observing site-specific details of Ras-Sos interactions in solution. Binding of various forms of Ras (loaded with GDP and mimics of GTP or nucleotide-free) at the allosteric and catalytic sites of Sos was comprehensively characterized by monitoring signal perturbations in the NMR spectra. The overall affinity of binding between these protein variants as well as their selected functional mutants was also investigated using intrinsic fluorescence. The data support a positive feedback activation of Sos by Ras·GTP with Ras·GTP binding as a substrate for the catalytic site of activated Sos more weakly than Ras·GDP, suggesting that Sos should actively promote unidirectional GDP → GTP exchange on Ras in preference of passive homonucleotide exchange. Ras·GDP weakly binds to the catalytic but not to the allosteric site of Sos. This confirms that Ras·GDP cannot properly activate Sos at the allosteric site. The novel site-specific assay described may be useful for design of drugs aimed at perturbing Ras-Sos interactions. PMID:26565026

  1. Epidermal growth factor and Ras regulate gene expression in GH4 pituitary cells by separate, antagonistic signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, C A; Gutierrez-Hartmann, A

    1995-01-01

    regions on the proximal rPRL promoter. One region maps between -255 and -212, near the Ras response element, and a second maps between -125 and -54. The latter region appears to involve footprint 2, a previously identified repressor site on the rPRL promoter. Neither footprint 1 nor 3, known GHF-1 binding sites, appears to be crucial to RGF-mediated rPRL promoter activation. The results of these studies indicate that in GH4 neuroendocrine cells, rPRL gene regulation by EGF is mediated by a signal transduction pathway that is separate and antagonistic to the Ras pathway. Hence, the functional role of the Ras/Raf/MAP kinase pathway in mediating transcriptional responses to EGF and other receptor tyrosine kinase may differ in highly specialized cell types. PMID:8524243

  2. Sur8/Shoc2 promotes cell motility and metastasis through activation of Ras-PI3K signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kaduwal, Saluja; Jeong, Woo-Jeong; Park, Jong-Chan; Lee, Kug Hwa; Lee, Young-Mi; Jeon, Soung-Hoo; Lim, Yong-Beom; Min, Do Sik; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2015-01-01

    Sur8 (also known as Shoc2) is a Ras-Raf scaffold protein that modulates signaling through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Although Sur8 has been shown to be a scaffold protein of the Ras-ERK pathway, its interaction with other signaling pathways and its involvement in tumor malignancy has not been reported. We identified that Sur8 interacts with the p110α subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), as well as with Ras and Raf, and these interactions are increased in an epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and oncogenic Ras-dependent manner. Sur8 regulates cell migration and invasion via activation of Rac and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Interestingly, using inhibitors of MEK and PI3K we found Sur8 mediates these cellular behaviors predominantly through PI3K pathway. We further found that human metastatic melanoma tissues had higher Sur8 content followed by activations of Akt, ERK, and Rac. Lentivirus-mediated Sur8-knockdown attenuated metastatic potential of highly invasive B16-F10 melanoma cells indicating the role of Sur8 in melanoma metastasis. This is the first report to identify the role of scaffold protein Sur8 in regulating cell motility, invasion, and metastasis through activation of both ERK and PI3K pathways. PMID:26384305

  3. The Rho-GTPase Rnd1 Suppresses Mammary Tumorigenesis and EMT by Restraining Ras-MAPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Tomoyo; Sinha, Surajit; Esposito, Ilaria; Schiavon, Gaia; López-Lago, Miguel A.; Su, Wenjing; Pratilas, Christine A.; Abele, Cristina; Hernandez, Jonathan M.; Ohara, Masahiro; Okada, Morihito; Viale, Agnes; Heguy, Adriana; Socci, Nicholas D.; Sapino, Anna; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Long, Stephen; Inghirami, Giorgio; Rosen, Neal; Giancotti, Filippo G.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We identified the Rho-GTPase Rnd1 as a candidate metastasis suppressor through bioinformatics analysis and showed that its depletion disrupt epithelial adhesion and polarity, induced Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), and cooperated with deregulated expression of c-Myc or loss of p53 to cause neoplastic conversion. Mechanistic studies revealed that Rnd1 suppresses Ras signalling by activating the GAP domain of Plexin B1, which inhibits Rap1. Rap1 inhibition in turn led to derepression of p120-RasGAP, which was able to inhibit Ras. Inactivation of Rnd1 in mammary epithelial cells induced highly undifferentiated and invasive tumors in mice. Conversely, Rnd1 expression inhibited spontaneous and experimental lung colonization in mouse models of metastasis. Genomic studies indicated that gene deletion in combination with epigenetic silencing or, more rarely, point mutation inactivates RND1 in human breast cancer. These results reveal a previously unappreciated mechanism through which Rnd1 restrains activation of Ras-MAPK signaling and breast tumor initiation and progression. PMID:25531777

  4. Role of H-Ras/ERK signaling in carbon nanotube-induced neoplastic-like transformation of human mesothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Stueckle, Todd A.; Park, Jino; Tse, William; Dinu, Cerasela-Zoica; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development and deployment of engineered nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in various commercial and biomedical applications have raised concerns about their potential adverse health effects, especially their long-term effects which have not been well addressed. We demonstrated here that prolonged exposure of human mesothelial cells to single-walled CNT (SWCNT) induced neoplastic-like transformation as indicated by anchorage-independent cell growth and increased cell invasiveness. Such transformation was associated with an up-regulation of H-Ras and activation of ERK1/2. Downregulation of H-Ras by siRNA or inactivation of ERK by chemical inhibitor effectively inhibited the aggressive phenotype of SWCNT-exposed cells. Integrin alpha V and cortactin, but not epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) transcriptional regulators, were up-regulated in the SWCNT-exposed cells, suggesting their role in the aggressive phenotype. Cortactin expression was shown to be controlled by the H-Ras/ERK signaling. Thus, our results indicate a novel role of H-Ras/ERK signaling and cortactin in the aggressive transformation of human mesothelial cells by SWCNT. PMID:24971065

  5. Genetic and Proteomic Evidence for Roles of Drosophila SUMO in Cell Cycle Control, Ras Signaling, and Early Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Minghua; Xie, Yongming; Loo, Joseph A.; Courey, Albert J.

    2009-01-01

    SUMO is a protein modifier that is vital for multicellular development. Here we present the first system-wide analysis, combining multiple approaches, to correlate the sumoylated proteome (SUMO-ome) in a multicellular organism with the developmental roles of SUMO. Using mass-spectrometry-based protein identification, we found over 140 largely novel SUMO conjugates in the early Drosophila embryo. Enriched functional groups include proteins involved in Ras signaling, cell cycle, and pattern formation. In support of the functional significance of these findings, sumo germline clone embryos exhibited phenotypes indicative of defects in these same three processes. Our cell culture and immunolocalization studies further substantiate roles for SUMO in Ras signaling and cell cycle regulation. For example, we found that SUMO is required for efficient Ras-mediated MAP kinase activation upstream or at the level of Ras activation. We further found that SUMO is dynamically localized during mitosis to the condensed chromosomes, and later also to the midbody. Polo kinase, a SUMO substrate found in our screen, partially colocalizes with SUMO at both sites. These studies show that SUMO coordinates multiple regulatory processes during oogenesis and early embryogenesis. In addition, our database of sumoylated proteins provides a valuable resource for those studying the roles of SUMO in development. PMID:19529778

  6. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Trim7 mediates c-Jun/AP-1 activation by Ras signalling

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Atanu; Diefenbacher, Markus E.; Mylona, Anastasia; Kassel, Olivier; Behrens, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The c-Jun/AP-1 transcription factor controls key cellular behaviours, including proliferation and apoptosis, in response to JNK and Ras/MAPK signalling. While the JNK pathway has been well characterised, the mechanism of activation by Ras was elusive. Here we identify the uncharacterised ubiquitin ligase Trim7 as a critical component of AP-1 activation via Ras. We found that MSK1 directly phosphorylates Trim7 in response to direct activation by the Ras–Raf–MEK–ERK pathway, and this modification stimulates Trim7 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Trim7 mediates Lys63-linked ubiquitination of the AP-1 coactivator RACO-1, leading to RACO-1 protein stabilisation. Consequently, Trim7 depletion reduces RACO-1 levels and AP-1-dependent gene expression. Moreover, transgenic overexpression of Trim7 increases lung tumour burden in a Ras-driven cancer model, and knockdown of Trim7 in established xenografts reduces tumour growth. Thus, phosphorylation-ubiquitination crosstalk between MSK1, Trim7 and RACO-1 completes the long sought-after mechanism linking growth factor signalling and AP-1 activation. PMID:25851810

  7. Simvastatin induces a central hypotensive effect via Ras-mediated signalling to cause eNOS up-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wen-Han; Ho, Wen-Yu; Chang, Chien-Feng; Lu, Pei-Jung; Cheng, Pei-Wen; Yeh, Tung-Chen; Hong, Ling-Zong; Sun, Gwo-Ching; Hsiao, Michael; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Clinical studies indicate that statins have a BP-lowering effect in hypercholesterolemic individuals with hypertension. Specifically, statins modulate BP through the up-regulation of endothelial NOS (eNOS) activation in the brain. However, the signalling mechanisms through which statins enhance eNOS activation remain unclear. Therefore, we examined the possible signalling pathways involved in statin-mediated BP regulation in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH To investigate the involvement of Ras and other signalling pathways in simvastatin-induced effects on BP, BP and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) were determined in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) before and after i.c.v. administration of simvastatin in the absence and presence of a Ras-specific inhibitor (farnesyl thiosalicylic acid, FTS), a geranylgeranyltransferase inhibitor (GGTI-2133), a PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) or a MAPK-ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD98059). KEY RESULTS FTS significantly attenuated the decrease in BP and increased NO evoked by simvastatin and reversed the decrease in basal RSNA induced by simvastatin. Immunoblotting and pharmacological studies showed that inhibition of Ras activity by FTS significantly abolished simvastatin-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RSK), Akt and decreased eNOS phosphorylation. Likewise, administration of Akt and ERK1/2 signalling inhibitors, LY294002 and PD98059, attenuated the reduction in BP evoked by simvastatin. Furthermore, i.c.v. simvastatin decreased Rac1 activation and the number of ROS-positive cells in the NTS. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Simvastatin modulates central BP control in the NTS of SHRs by increasing Ras-mediated activation of the PI3K-Akt and ERK1/2-RSK signalling pathways, which then up-regulates eNOS activation. PMID:23889671

  8. YES oncogenic activity is specified by its SH4 domain and regulates RAS/MAPK signaling in colon carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Fanny; Leroy, Cédric; Simon, Valérie; Benistant, Christine; Roche, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Members of the SRC family of tyrosine kinases (SFK) display important functions in human cancer, but their specific role in tumorigenesis remains unclear. We previously demonstrated that YES regulates a unique oncogenic signaling important for colorectal cancer (CRC) progression that is not shared with SRC. Here, we addressed the underlying mechanism involved in this process. We show that YES oncogenic signaling relies on palmitoylation of its SH4 domain that controls YES localization in cholesterol-enriched membrane micro-domains. Specifically, deletion of the palmitoylation site compromised YES transforming activity, while addition of a palmitoylation site in the SH4 domain of SRC was sufficient for SRC to restore the transforming properties of cells in which YES had been silenced. Subsequently, SILAC phosphoproteomic analysis revealed that micro-domain-associated cell adhesive components and receptor tyrosine kinases are major YES substrates. YES also phosphorylates upstream regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling, including EGFR, SHC and SHP2, which were not targeted by SRC due to the absence of palmitoylation. Accordingly, EGFR-induced MAPK activity was attenuated by YES down-regulation, while increased RAS activity significantly restored cell transformation that was lost upon YES silencing. Collectively, these results uncover a critical role for the SH4 domain in the specification of SFK oncogenic activity and a selective role for YES in the induction of RAS/MAPK signaling in CRC cells. PMID:26269757

  9. Cyclin E1 and RTK/RAS signaling drive CDK inhibitor resistance via activation of E2F and ETS.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Harding, Barbie; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Agadjanian, Hasmik; Cheon, Dong-Joo; Mizuno, Takako; Greenberg, Danielle; Allen, Jenieke R; Spurka, Lindsay; Funari, Vincent; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Wang, Qiang; Orsulic, Sandra; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y; Wiedemeyer, W Ruprecht

    2015-01-20

    High-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOC) are genomically complex, heterogeneous cancers with a high mortality rate, due to acquired chemoresistance and lack of targeted therapy options. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKi) target the retinoblastoma (RB) signaling network, and have been successfully incorporated into treatment regimens for breast and other cancers. Here, we have compared mechanisms of response and resistance to three CDKi that target either CDK4/6 or CDK2 and abrogate E2F target gene expression. We identify CCNE1 gain and RB1 loss as mechanisms of resistance to CDK4/6 inhibition, whereas receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) and RAS signaling is associated with CDK2 inhibitor resistance. Mechanistically, we show that ETS factors are mediators of RTK/RAS signaling that cooperate with E2F in cell cycle progression. Consequently, CDK2 inhibition sensitizes cyclin E1-driven but not RAS-driven ovarian cancer cells to platinum-based chemotherapy. In summary, this study outlines a rational approach for incorporating CDKi into treatment regimens for HGSOC. PMID:25557169

  10. Cyclin E1 and RTK/RAS signaling drive CDK inhibitor resistance via activation of E2F and ETS

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Harding, Barbie; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Agadjanian, Hasmik; Cheon, Dong-Joo; Mizuno, Takako; Greenberg, Danielle; Allen, Jenieke R.; Spurka, Lindsay; Funari, Vincent; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Wang, Qiang; Orsulic, Sandra; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y.; Wiedemeyer, W. Ruprecht

    2015-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOC) are genomically complex, heterogeneous cancers with a high mortality rate, due to acquired chemoresistance and lack of targeted therapy options. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKi) target the retinoblastoma (RB) signaling network, and have been successfully incorporated into treatment regimens for breast and other cancers. Here, we have compared mechanisms of response and resistance to three CDKi that target either CDK4/6 or CDK2 and abrogate E2F target gene expression. We identify CCNE1 gain and RB1 loss as mechanisms of resistance to CDK4/6 inhibition, whereas receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) and RAS signaling is associated with CDK2 inhibitor resistance. Mechanistically, we show that ETS factors are mediators of RTK/RAS signaling that cooperate with E2F in cell cycle progression. Consequently, CDK2 inhibition sensitizes cyclin E1-driven but not RAS-driven ovarian cancer cells to platinum-based chemotherapy. In summary, this study outlines a rational approach for incorporating CDKi into treatment regimens for HGSOC. PMID:25557169

  11. Low proliferation and high apoptosis of osteoblastic cells on hydrophobic surface are associated with defective Ras signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Eun-Ju; Kim, Hong-Hee; Huh, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-Ae; Seung Ko, Jea; Chung, Chong-Pyoung; Kim, Hyun-Man . E-mail: hyunmkim@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-02-01

    The hydrophobic (HPB) nature of most polymeric biomaterials has been a major obstacle in using those materials in vivo due to low compatibility with cells. However, there is little knowledge of the molecular detail to explain how surface hydrophobicity affects cell responses. In this study, we compared the proliferation and apoptosis of human osteoblastic MG63 cells adhered to hydrophilic (HPL) and hydrophobic surfaces. On the hydrophobic surface, less formation of focal contacts and actin stress fibers, a delay in cell cycle progression, and an increase in apoptosis were observed. By using fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) as a model growth factor, we also investigated intracellular signaling pathways on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The activation of Ras, Akt, and ERK by FGF1 was impaired in MG63 cells on the hydrophobic surface. The overexpression of constitutively active form of Ras and Akt rescued those cells from apoptosis and recovered cell cycle progression. Furthermore, their overexpression also restored the actin cytoskeletal organization on the hydrophobic surface. Finally, the proliferative, antiapoptotic, and cytoskeletal effects of constitutively active Ras in MG63 cells on the hydrophobic surface were blocked by wortmannin and PD98059 that inhibit Akt and ERK activation, respectively. Therefore, our results suggest that the activation of Ras and its downstream molecules Akt and ERK to an appropriate level is one of crucial elements in the determination of osteoblast cell responses. The Ras pathway may represent a cell biological target that should be considered for successful surface modification of biomaterials to induce adequate cell responses in the bone tissue.

  12. Aberrant expression of signaling proteins in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Hui, Wuhan; Ye, Fei; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Congyan; Cui, Miao; Li, Wei; Xu, Juan; Zhang, David Y

    2013-09-01

    Dysregulated expression of signaling proteins may contribute to the pathophysiology of essential thrombocythemia (ET). This study aimed to characterize protein expression in ET and to correlate the dysregulated proteins with phenotypes and prognosis of ET patients. The expression of 128 proteins in peripheral blood neutrophils from 74 ET patients was assessed and compared with those from 29 healthy subjects and 35 polycythemia vera (PV) patients using protein pathway array. Fifteen proteins were differentially expressed between ET patients and normal controls. These dysregulated proteins were involved in the signaling pathways related with apoptosis and inflammation. Our results showed a significant overlap in protein expression between ET patients with JAK2V617F mutation and PV patients. In addition, nine proteins were associated with JAK2V617F mutation status in ET patients. Furthermore, estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) and Stat3 were independent risk factors for subsequent thrombosis during follow-up on multivariable analysis. Our study shows a broad dysregulation of signaling protein in ET patients, suggesting their roles in ET pathogenesis. The expression levels of ERβ and Stat3 could be promising predictors of subsequent thrombosis in ET patients. PMID:23639951

  13. RasGAP Shields Akt from Deactivating Phosphatases in Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling but Loses This Ability Once Cleaved by Caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Cailliau, Katia; Lescuyer, Arlette; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Cuesta-Marbán, Álvaro; Widmann, Christian; Browaeys-Poly, Edith

    2015-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are involved in proliferative and differentiation physiological responses. Deregulation of FGFR-mediated signaling involving the Ras/PI3K/Akt and the Ras/Raf/ERK MAPK pathways is causally involved in the development of several cancers. The caspase-3/p120 RasGAP module is a stress sensor switch. Under mild stress conditions, RasGAP is cleaved by caspase-3 at position 455. The resulting N-terminal fragment, called fragment N, stimulates anti-death signaling. When caspase-3 activity further increases, fragment N is cleaved at position 157. This generates a fragment, called N2, that no longer protects cells. Here, we investigated in Xenopus oocytes the impact of RasGAP and its fragments on FGF1-mediated signaling during G2/M cell cycle transition. RasGAP used its N-terminal Src homology 2 domain to bind FGFR once stimulated by FGF1, and this was necessary for the recruitment of Akt to the FGFR complex. Fragment N, which did not associate with the FGFR complex, favored FGF1-induced ERK stimulation, leading to accelerated G2/M transition. In contrast, fragment N2 bound the FGFR, and this inhibited mTORC2-dependent Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation and ERK2 phosphorylation but not phosphorylation of Akt on Thr-308. This also blocked cell cycle progression. Inhibition of Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation and entry into G2/M was relieved by PHLPP phosphatase inhibition. Hence, full-length RasGAP favors Akt activity by shielding it from deactivating phosphatases. This shielding was abrogated by fragment N2. These results highlight the role played by RasGAP in FGFR signaling and how graded stress intensities, by generating different RasGAP fragments, can positively or negatively impact this signaling. PMID:26109071

  14. Ras regulation of DNA-methylation and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Samir Kumar

    2008-04-01

    Genome wide hypomethylation and regional hypermethylation of cancer cells and tissues remain a paradox, though it has received a convincing confirmation that epigenetic switching systems, including DNA-methylation represent a fundamental regulatory mechanism that has an impact on genome maintenance and gene transcription. Methylated cytosine residues of vertebrate DNA are transmitted by clonal inheritance through the strong preference of DNA methyltransferase, DNMT1, for hemimethylated-DNA. Maintenance of methylation patterns is necessary for normal development of mice, and aberrant methylation patterns are associated with many human tumours. DNMT1 interacts with many proteins during cell cycle progression, including PCNA, p53, EZH2 and HP1. Ras family of GTPases promotes cell proliferation by its oncogenic nature, which transmits signals by multiple pathways in both lipid raft dependent and independent fashion. DNA-methylation-mediated repression of DNA-repair protein O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene and increased rate of K-Ras mutation at codon for amino acids 12 and 13 have been correlated with a secondary role for Ras-effector homologues (RASSFs) in tumourigenesis. Lines of evidence suggest that DNA-methylation associated repression of tumour suppressors and apoptotic genes and ceaseless proliferation of tumour cells are regulated in part by Ras-signaling. Control of Ras GTPase signaling might reduce the aberrant methylation and accordingly may reduce the risk of cancer development.

  15. Combination of a Selective HSP90α/β Inhibitor and a RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK Signaling Pathway Inhibitor Triggers Synergistic Cytotoxicity in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Naoya; Minami, Jiro; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Sagawa, Morihiko; Gorgun, Gullu; Cirstea, Diana; Cottini, Francesca; Jakubikova, Jana; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Chauhan, Dharminder; Richardson, Paul G.; Munshi, Nikhil; Ando, Kiyoshi; Utsugi, Teruhiro; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP)90 inhibitors have shown significant anti-tumor activities in preclinical settings in both solid and hematological tumors. We previously reported that the novel, orally available HSP90α/β inhibitor TAS-116 shows significant anti-MM activities. In this study, we further examined the combination effect of TAS-116 with a RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway inhibitor in RAS- or BRAF-mutated MM cell lines. TAS-116 monotherapy significantly inhibited growth of RAS-mutated MM cell lines and was associated with decreased expression of downstream target proteins of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway. Moreover, TAS-116 showed synergistic growth inhibitory effects with the farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib, the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib, and the MEK inhibitor selumetinib. Importantly, treatment with these inhibitors paradoxically enhanced p-C-Raf, p-MEK, and p-ERK activity, which was abrogated by TAS-116. TAS-116 also enhanced dabrafenib-induced MM cytotoxicity associated with mitochondrial damage-induced apoptosis, even in the BRAF-mutated U266 MM cell line. This enhanced apoptosis in RAS-mutated MM triggered by combination treatment was observed even in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells. Taken together, our results provide the rationale for novel combination treatment with HSP90α/β inhibitor and RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway inhibitors to improve outcomes in patients with in RAS- or BRAF-mutated MM. PMID:26630652

  16. Combination of a Selective HSP90α/β Inhibitor and a RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK Signaling Pathway Inhibitor Triggers Synergistic Cytotoxicity in Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Rikio; Kikuchi, Shohei; Harada, Takeshi; Mimura, Naoya; Minami, Jiro; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Sagawa, Morihiko; Gorgun, Gullu; Cirstea, Diana; Cottini, Francesca; Jakubikova, Jana; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Chauhan, Dharminder; Richardson, Paul G; Munshi, Nikhil; Ando, Kiyoshi; Utsugi, Teruhiro; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP)90 inhibitors have shown significant anti-tumor activities in preclinical settings in both solid and hematological tumors. We previously reported that the novel, orally available HSP90α/β inhibitor TAS-116 shows significant anti-MM activities. In this study, we further examined the combination effect of TAS-116 with a RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway inhibitor in RAS- or BRAF-mutated MM cell lines. TAS-116 monotherapy significantly inhibited growth of RAS-mutated MM cell lines and was associated with decreased expression of downstream target proteins of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway. Moreover, TAS-116 showed synergistic growth inhibitory effects with the farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib, the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib, and the MEK inhibitor selumetinib. Importantly, treatment with these inhibitors paradoxically enhanced p-C-Raf, p-MEK, and p-ERK activity, which was abrogated by TAS-116. TAS-116 also enhanced dabrafenib-induced MM cytotoxicity associated with mitochondrial damage-induced apoptosis, even in the BRAF-mutated U266 MM cell line. This enhanced apoptosis in RAS-mutated MM triggered by combination treatment was observed even in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells. Taken together, our results provide the rationale for novel combination treatment with HSP90α/β inhibitor and RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway inhibitors to improve outcomes in patients with in RAS- or BRAF-mutated MM. PMID:26630652

  17. Noncanonical control of C. elegans germline apoptosis by the insulin/IGF-1 and Ras/MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Perrin, A J; Gunda, M; Yu, B; Yen, K; Ito, S; Forster, S; Tissenbaum, H A; Derry, W B

    2013-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 pathway controls a number of physiological processes in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, including development, aging and stress response. We previously found that the Akt/PKB ortholog AKT-1 dampens the apoptotic response to genotoxic stress in the germline by negatively regulating the p53-like transcription factor CEP-1. Here, we report unexpected rearrangements to the insulin/IGF-1 pathway, whereby the insulin-like receptor DAF-2 and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase PDK-1 oppose AKT-1 to promote DNA damage-induced apoptosis. While DNA damage does not affect phosphorylation at the PDK-1 site Thr350/Thr308 of AKT-1, it increased phosphorylation at Ser517/Ser473. Although ablation of daf-2 or pdk-1 completely suppressed akt-1-dependent apoptosis, the transcriptional activation of CEP-1 was unaffected, suggesting that daf-2 and pdk-1 act independently or downstream of cep-1 and akt-1. Ablation of the akt-1 paralog akt-2 or the downstream target of the insulin/IGF-1 pathway daf-16 (a FOXO transcription factor) restored sensitivity to damage-induced apoptosis in daf-2 and pdk-1 mutants. In addition, daf-2 and pdk-1 mutants have reduced levels of phospho-MPK-1/ERK in their germ cells, indicating that the insulin/IGF-1 pathway promotes Ras signaling in the germline. Ablation of the Ras effector gla-3, a negative regulator of mpk-1, restored sensitivity to apoptosis in daf-2 mutants, suggesting that gla-3 acts downstream of daf-2. In addition, the hypersensitivity of let-60/Ras gain-of-function mutants to damage-induced apoptosis was suppressed to wild-type levels by ablation of daf-2. Thus, insulin/IGF-1 signaling selectively engages AKT-2/DAF-16 to promote DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis downstream of CEP-1 through the Ras pathway. PMID:22935616

  18. Aberrant Hedgehog Signaling and Clinical Outcome in Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Winnie W.; Pinnaduwage, Dushanthi; Gokgoz, Nalan; Wunder, Jay S.; Andrulis, Irene L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of Hedgehog signaling in bone development, the relationship between Hedgehog pathway expression and osteosarcoma clinical characteristics and outcome has not been investigated. In this study of 43 high-grade human osteosarcoma samples, we detected high expression levels of the Hedgehog ligand gene, IHH, and target genes, PTCH1 and GLI1, in most samples. Further analysis in tumors of patients with localized disease at diagnosis identified coexpression of IHH and PTCH1 exclusively in large tumors. Higher levels of IHH were observed more frequently in males and patients with higher levels of GLI1 were more responsive to chemotherapy. Subgroup analysis by tumor size and IHH expression indicated that the well-known association between survival and tumor size was further refined when IHH levels were taken into consideration. PMID:24799831

  19. Involvement of aberrant calcium signalling in herpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Rebekah A; Hanani, Menachem

    2016-03-01

    Alpha-herpesviruses, herpes simplex viruses (HSV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV), are pathogens of the peripheral nervous system. After primary infection, these viruses establish latency within sensory ganglia, while retaining the ability to reactivate. Reactivation of VZV results in herpes zoster, a condition characterized by skin lesions that leads to post-herpetic neuralgia. Recurrent reactivations of HSV, which cause mucocutaneous lesions, may also result in neuralgia. During reactivation of alpha-herpesviruses, satellite glial cells (SGCs), which surround neurons in sensory ganglia, become infected with the replicating virus. SGCs are known to contribute to neuropathic pain in a variety of animal pain models. Here we investigated how infection of short-term cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia with HSV-1 affects communication between SGCs and neurons, and how this altered communication may increase neuronal excitability, thus contributing to herpetic neuralgia. Mechanical stimulation of single neurons or SGCs resulted in intercellular calcium waves, which were larger in cultures infected with HSV-1. Two differences were observed between control and HSV-1 infected cultures that could account for this augmentation. Firstly, HSV-1 infection induced cell fusion among SGCs and neurons, which would facilitate the spread of calcium signals over farther distances. Secondly, using calcium imaging and intracellular electrical recordings, we found that neurons in the HSV-1 infected cultures exhibited augmented influx of calcium upon depolarization. These virally induced changes may not only cause more neurons in the sensory ganglia to fire action potentials, but may also increase neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic terminals in the spinal cord. They are therefore likely to be contributing factors to herpetic neuralgia. PMID:26684187

  20. Review: Ras GTPases and myosin: Qualitative conservation and quantitative diversification in signal and energy transduction.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Matthias P; Goody, Roger S

    2016-08-01

    Most GTPases and many ATPases belong to the P-loop class of proteins with significant structural and mechanistic similarities. Here we compare and contrast the basic properties of the Ras family GTPases and myosin, and conclude that there are fundamental similarities but also distinct differences related to their specific roles. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 422-430, 2016. PMID:27018658

  1. Interplay Between HGF/SF-Met-Ras Signaling, Tumor Metabolism and Blood Flow as a Potential Target for Breast Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Natan, Sari; Tsarfaty, Galia; Horev, Judith; Haklai, Roni; Kloog, Yoel; Tsarfaty, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    High glucose uptake and increase blood flow is a characteristic of most metastatic tumors. Activation of Ras signaling increases glycolytic flux into lactate, de novo nucleic acid synthesis and uncoupling of ATP synthase from the proton gradient. Met tyrosine kinase receptor signaling upon activation by its ligand, hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), increases glycolysis, oxidative phosporylation, oxygen consumption, and tumor blood volume. Ras is a key factor in Met signaling. Using the Ras inhibitor S-trans,trans-farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS), we investigated interplay between HGF/SF-Met-Ras signaling, metabolism, and tumor blood-flow regulation. In vitro, HGF/SF-activated Met increased Ras activity, Erk phosphorylation, cell motility and glucose uptake, but did not affect ATP. FTS inhibited basal and HGF/SF-induced signaling and cell motility, while further increasing glucose uptake and inhibiting ATP production. In vivo, HGF/SF rapidly increased tumor blood volume. FTS did not affect basal blood-flow but abolished the HGF/SF effect. Our results further demonstrate the complex interplay between growth-factor-receptor signaling and cellular and tumor metabolism, as reflected in blood flow. Inhibition of Ras signaling does not affect glucose consumption or basal tumor blood flow but dramatically decreases ATP synthesis and the HGF/SF induced increase in tumor blood volume. These findings demonstrate that the HGF/SF-Met-Ras pathway critically influences tumor-cell metabolism and tumor blood-flow regulation. This pathway could potentially be used to individualize tumor therapy based on functional molecular imaging, and for combined signaling/anti-metabolic targeted therapy. PMID:25593982

  2. Effects of mutant human Ki-ras{sup G12C} gene dosage on murine lung tumorigenesis and signaling to its downstream effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dance-Barnes, Stephanie T.; Kock, Nancy D.; Floyd, Heather S.; Moore, Joseph E.; Mosley, Libyadda J.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Miller, Mark Steven

    2008-08-15

    Studies in cell culture have suggested that the level of RAS expression can influence the transformation of cells and the signaling pathways stimulated by mutant RAS expression. However, the levels of RAS expression in vivo appear to be subject to feedback regulation, limiting the total amount of RAS protein that can be expressed. We utilized a bitransgenic mouse lung tumor model that expressed the human Ki-ras{sup G12C} allele in a tetracycline-inducible, lung-specific manner. Treatment for 12 months with 500 {mu}g/ml of doxycycline (DOX) allowed for maximal expression of the human Ki-ras{sup G12C} allele in the lung, and resulted in the development of focal hyperplasia and adenomas. We determined if different levels of mutant RAS expression would influence the phenotype of the lung lesions. Treatment with 25, 100 and 500 {mu}g/ml of DOX resulted in dose-dependent increases in transgene expression and tumor multiplicity. Microscopic analysis of the lungs of mice treated with the 25 {mu}g/ml dose of DOX revealed infrequent foci of hyperplasia, whereas mice treated with the 100 and 500 {mu}g/ml doses exhibited numerous hyperplastic foci and also adenomas. Immunohistochemical and RNA analysis of the downstream effector pathways demonstrated that different levels of mutant RAS transgene expression resulted in differences in the expression and/or phosphorylation of specific signaling molecules. Our results suggest that the molecular alterations driving tumorigenesis may differ at different levels of mutant Ki-ras{sup G12C} expression, and this should be taken into consideration when inducible transgene systems are utilized to promote tumorigenesis in mouse models.

  3. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Novel Roles of the Ras and Cyclic AMP Signaling Pathways in Environmental Stress Response and Antifungal Drug Sensitivity in Cryptococcus neoformans ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Shinae; Ko, Young-Joon; Kim, Gyu-Bum; Jung, Kwang-Woo; Floyd, Anna; Heitman, Joseph; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2010-01-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway plays a central role in the growth, differentiation, and virulence of pathogenic fungi, including Cryptococcus neoformans. Three upstream signaling regulators of adenylyl cyclase (Cac1), Ras, Aca1, and Gpa1, have been demonstrated to control the cAMP pathway in C. neoformans, but their functional relationship remains elusive. We performed a genome-wide transcriptome analysis with a DNA microarray using the ras1Δ, gpa1Δ, cac1Δ, aca1Δ, and pka1Δ pka2Δ mutants. The aca1Δ, gpa1Δ, cac1Δ, and pka1Δ pka2Δ mutants displayed similar transcriptome patterns, whereas the ras1Δ mutant exhibited transcriptome patterns distinct from those of the wild type and the cAMP mutants. Interestingly, a number of environmental stress response genes are modulated differentially in the ras1Δ and cAMP mutants. In fact, the Ras signaling pathway was found to be involved in osmotic and genotoxic stress responses and the maintenance of cell wall integrity via the Cdc24-dependent signaling pathway. Notably, the Ras and cAMP mutants exhibited hypersensitivity to a polyene drug, amphotericin B, without showing effects on ergosterol biosynthesis, which suggested a novel method of antifungal combination therapy. Among the cAMP-dependent gene products that we characterized, two small heat shock proteins, Hsp12 and Hsp122, were found to be involved in the polyene antifungal drug susceptibility of C. neoformans. PMID:20097740

  4. The Ras/PKA signaling pathway may control RNA polymerase II elongation via the Spt4p/Spt5p complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Susie C; Hester, Arelis; Herman, Paul K

    2003-01-01

    The Ras signaling pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae controls cell growth via the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA. Recent work has indicated that these effects on growth are due, in part, to the regulation of activities associated with the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. However, the precise target of these Ras effects has remained unknown. This study suggests that Ras/PKA activity regulates the elongation step of the RNA polymerase II transcription process. Several lines of evidence indicate that Spt5p in the Spt4p/Spt5p elongation factor is the likely target of this control. First, the growth of spt4 and spt5 mutants was found to be very sensitive to changes in Ras/PKA signaling activity. Second, mutants with elevated levels of Ras activity shared a number of specific phenotypes with spt5 mutants and vice versa. Finally, Spt5p was efficiently phosphorylated by PKA in vitro. Altogether, the data suggest that the Ras/PKA pathway might be directly targeting a component of the elongating polymerase complex and that this regulation is important for the normal control of yeast cell growth. These data point out the interesting possibility that signal transduction pathways might directly influence the elongation step of RNA polymerase II transcription. PMID:14668364

  5. Ras and TGF-β signaling enhance cancer progression by promoting the ΔNp63 transcriptional program.

    PubMed

    Vasilaki, Eleftheria; Morikawa, Masato; Koinuma, Daizo; Mizutani, Anna; Hirano, Yudai; Ehata, Shogo; Sundqvist, Anders; Kawasaki, Natsumi; Cedervall, Jessica; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Moustakas, Aristidis; Miyazono, Kohei; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The p53 family of transcription factors includes p63, which is a master regulator of gene expression in epithelial cells. Determining whether p63 is tumor-suppressive or tumorigenic is complicated by isoform-specific and cellular context-dependent protein associations, as well as antagonism from mutant p53. ΔNp63 is an amino-terminal-truncated isoform, that is, the predominant isoform expressed in cancer cells of epithelial origin. In HaCaT keratinocytes, which have mutant p53 and ΔNp63, we found that mutant p53 antagonized ΔNp63 transcriptional activity but that activation of Ras or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathways reduced the abundance of mutant p53 and strengthened target gene binding and activity of ΔNp63. Among the products of ΔNp63-induced genes was dual-specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6), which promoted the degradation of mutant p53, likely by dephosphorylating p53. Knocking down all forms of p63 or DUSP6 and DUSP7 (DUSP6/7) inhibited the basal or TGF-β-induced or epidermal growth factor (which activates Ras)-induced migration and invasion in cultures of p53-mutant breast cancer and squamous skin cancer cells. Alternatively, overexpressing ΔNp63 in the breast cancer cells increased their capacity to colonize various tissues upon intracardiac injection in mice, and this was inhibited by knocking down DUSP6/7 in these ΔNp63-overexpressing cells. High abundance of ΔNp63 in various tumors correlated with poor prognosis in patients, and this correlation was stronger in patients whose tumors also had a mutation in the gene encoding p53. Thus, oncogenic Ras and TGF-β signaling stimulate cancer progression through activation of the ΔNp63 transcriptional program. PMID:27555661

  6. DA-Raf–dependent inhibition of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells controls alveolar formation

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe-Takano, Haruko; Takano, Kazunori; Sakamoto, Akemi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Tokuhisa, Takeshi; Endo, Takeshi; Hatano, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar formation is coupled to the spatiotemporally regulated differentiation of alveolar myofibroblasts (AMYFs), which contribute to the morphological changes of interalveolar walls. Although the Ras-ERK signaling pathway is one of the key regulators for alveolar formation in developing lungs, the intrinsic molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying its role remain largely unknown. By analyzing the Ras-ERK signaling pathway during postnatal development of lungs, we have identified a critical role of DA-Raf1 (DA-Raf)—a dominant-negative antagonist for the Ras-ERK signaling pathway—in alveolar formation. DA-Raf–deficient mice displayed alveolar dysgenesis as a result of the blockade of AMYF differentiation. DA-Raf is predominantly expressed in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s) in developing lungs, and DA-Raf–dependent MEK1/2 inhibition in AEC2s suppresses expression of tissue inhibitor of matalloprotienase 4 (TIMP4), which prevents a subsequent proteolytic cascade matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)14–MMP2. Furthermore, MMP14–MMP2 proteolytic cascade regulates AMYF differentiation and alveolar formation. Therefore, DA-Raf–dependent inhibition of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in AEC2s is required for alveolar formation via triggering MMP2 activation followed by AMYF differentiation. These findings reveal a pivotal role of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in the dynamic regulation of alveolar development. PMID:24843139

  7. DISC1 regulates astrogenesis in the embryonic brain via modulation of RAS/MEK/ERK signaling through RASSF7.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shukun; Liang, Qingli; Qiao, Huimin; Li, Hong; Shen, Tianjin; Ji, Fen; Jiao, Jianwei

    2016-08-01

    Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is known as a high susceptibility gene for schizophrenia. Recent studies have indicated that schizophrenia might be caused by glia defects and dysfunction. However, there is no direct evidence of a link between the schizophrenia gene DISC1 and gliogenesis defects. Thus, an investigation into the involvement of DISC1 (a ubiquitously expressed brain protein) in astrogenesis during the late stage of mouse embryonic brain development is warranted. Here, we show that suppression of DISC1 expression represses astrogenesis in vitro and in vivo, and that DISC1 overexpression substantially enhances the process. Furthermore, mouse and human DISC1 overexpression rescued the astrogenesis defects caused by DISC1 knockdown. Mechanistically, DISC1 activates the RAS/MEK/ERK signaling pathway via direct association with RASSF7. Also, the pERK complex undergoes nuclear translocation and influences the expression of genes related to astrogenesis. In summary, our results demonstrate that DISC1 regulates astrogenesis by modulating RAS/MEK/ERK signaling via RASSF7 and provide a framework for understanding how DISC1 dysfunction might lead to neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:27287808

  8. Activation of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway alone is not sufficient to induce glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    van den Berghe, N; Ouwens, D M; Maassen, J A; van Mackelenbergh, M G; Sips, H C; Krans, H M

    1994-01-01

    The signal transduction pathway by which insulin stimulates glucose transport is largely unknown, but a role for tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases has been proposed. Since mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is activated by insulin through phosphorylation on both tyrosine and threonine residues, we investigated whether MAP kinase and its upstream regulator, p21ras, are involved in insulin-mediated glucose transport. We did this by examining the time- and dose-dependent stimulation of glucose uptake in relation to the activation of Ras-GTP formation and MAP kinase by thrombin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and insulin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Ras-GTP formation was stimulated transiently by all three agonists, with a peak at 5 to 10 min. Thrombin induced a second peak at approximately 30 min. The activation of p21ras was paralleled by both the phosphorylation and the activation of MAP kinase: transient for insulin and EGF and biphasic for thrombin. However, despite the strong activation of Ras-GTP formation and MAP kinase by EGF and thrombin, glucose uptake was not stimulated by these agonists, in contrast to the eightfold stimulation of 2-deoxy-D-[14C]glucose uptake by insulin. In addition, insulin-mediated glucose transport was not potentiated by thrombin or EGF. Although these results cannot exclude the possibility that p21ras and/or MAP kinase is needed in conjunction with other signaling molecules that are activated by insulin and not by thrombin or EGF, they show that the Ras/MAP kinase signaling pathway alone is not sufficient to induce insulin-mediated glucose transport. Images PMID:7511205

  9. Lysine-acetylation as a fundamental regulator of Ran function: Implications for signaling of proteins of the Ras-superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Knyphausen, Philipp; Kuhlmann, Nora; de Boor, Susanne; Lammers, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The small GTP-binding protein Ran is involved in the regulation of essential cellular processes in interphase but also in mitotic cells: Ran controls the nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins and RNA, it regulates mitotic spindle formation and nuclear envelope assembly. Deregulations in Ran dependent processes were implicated in the development of severe diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. To understand how Ran-function is regulated is therefore of highest importance. Recently, several lysine-acetylation sites in Ran were identified by quantitative mass-spectrometry, some being located in highly important regions such as the P-loop, switch I, switch II and the G5/SAK motif. We recently reported that lysine-acetylation regulates nearly all aspects of Ran-function such as RCC1 catalyzed nucleotide exchange, intrinsic nucleotide hydrolysis, its interaction with NTF2 and the formation of import- and export-complexes. As a hint for its biological importance, we identified Ran-specific lysine-deacetylases (KDACs) and -acetyltransferases (KATs). Also for other small GTPases such as Ras, Rho, Cdc42, and for many effectors and regulators thereof, lysine-acetylation sites were discovered. However, the functional impact of lysine-acetylation as a regulator of protein function has only been marginally investigated so far. We will discuss recent findings of lysine-acetylation as a novel modification to regulate Ras-protein signaling. PMID:26507377

  10. Aspafilioside B induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by up-regulating H-Ras and N-Ras via ERK and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Ning, Rui; Chen, Rui-Ni; Huang, Xue-Feng; Dai, Qin-Sheng; Hu, Jin-Hua; Wang, Yu-Wen; Wu, Li-Li; Xiong, Jing; Hu, Gang; Guo, Qing-Long; Yang, Jian; Wang, Hao

    2016-05-01

    We recently establish that aspafilioside B, a steroidal saponin extracted from Asparagus filicinus, is an active cytotoxic component. However, its antitumor activity is till unknown. In this study, the anticancer effect of aspafilioside B against HCC cells and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Our results showed that aspafilioside B inhibited the growth and proliferation of HCC cell lines. Further study revealed that aspafilioside B could significantly induce G2 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, accompanying the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but blocking ROS generation with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) could not prevent G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Additionally, treatment with aspafilioside B induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 MAP kinase. Moreover, both ERK inhibitor PD98059 and p38 inhibitor SB203580 almost abolished the G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis induced by aspafilioside B, and reversed the expression of cell cycle- and apoptosis-related proteins. We also found that aspafilioside B treatment increased both Ras and Raf activation, and transfection of cells with H-Ras and N-Ras shRNA almost attenuated aspafilioside B-induced G2 phase arrest and apoptosis as well as the ERK and p38 activation. Finally, in vivo, aspafilioside B suppressed tumor growth in mouse xenograft models, and the mechanism was the same as in vitro study. Collectively, these findings indicated that aspafilioside B may up-regulate H-Ras and N-Ras, causing c-Raf phosphorylation, and lead to ERK and p38 activation, which consequently induced the G2 phase arrest and apoptosis. This study provides the evidence that aspafilioside B is a promising therapeutic agent against HCC. PMID:25683703

  11. Involvement of the Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signalling pathway in the regulation of ERCC-1 mRNA levels by insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Kwon, W; Park, D; Bernier, M

    1998-01-01

    Expression of DNA repair enzymes, which includes ERCC-1, might be under the control of hormonal and growth factor stimulation. In the present study it was observed that insulin increased ERCC-1 mRNA levels both in Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing human insulin receptors (HIRc cells) and in fully differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the increase in ERCC-1 gene expression in HIRc cells, we used a variety of pharmacological tools known to inhibit distinct signalling pathways. None of these inhibitors affected the amount of ERCC-1 mRNA in unstimulated cells. The pretreatment of cells with two chemically unrelated phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294002, failed to block the doubling of ERCC-1 mRNA content by insulin. Similarly, inhibition of pp70 S6 kinase by rapamycin had no apparent effects on this insulin response. In contrast, altering the p21(ras)-dependent pathway with either manumycin, an inhibitor of Ras farnesylation, or PD98059, an inhibitor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) kinase, suppressed the induction of ERCC-1 mRNA by insulin (P<0.001). Furthermore inhibition of RNA and protein synthesis negatively regulated the expression of this insulin-regulated gene (P<0.005). These results suggest that insulin enhances ERCC-1 mRNA levels by the activation of the Ras-ERK-dependent pathway without the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/pp70 S6 kinase. PMID:9531502

  12. Hypotaurine evokes a malignant phenotype in glioma through aberrant hypoxic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nesvick, Cody L.; Feldman, Michael J.; Sizdahkhani, Saman; Liu, Huailei; Chu, Huiying; Yang, Fengxu; Tang, Ling; Tian, Jing; Zhao, Shiguang; Li, Guohui; Heiss, John D.; Liu, Yang; Zhuang, Zhengping; Xu, Guowang

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics has shown significant potential in identifying small molecules specific to tumor phenotypes. In this study we analyzed resected tissue metabolites using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and found that tissue hypotaurine levels strongly and positively correlated with glioma grade. In vitro studies were conducted to show that hypotaurine activates hypoxia signaling through the competitive inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-2. This leads to the activation of hypoxia signaling as well as to the enhancement of glioma cell proliferation and invasion. In contrast, taurine, the oxidation metabolite of hypotaurine, decreased intracellular hypotaurine and resulted in glioma cell growth arrest. Lastly, a glioblastoma xenograft mice model was supplemented with taurine feed and exhibited impaired tumor growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that hypotaurine is an aberrantly produced oncometabolite, mediating tumor molecular pathophysiology and progression. The hypotaurine metabolic pathway may provide a potentially new target for glioblastoma diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26934654

  13. Hypotaurine evokes a malignant phenotype in glioma through aberrant hypoxic signaling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yang, Chunzhang; Nesvick, Cody L; Feldman, Michael J; Sizdahkhani, Saman; Liu, Huailei; Chu, Huiying; Yang, Fengxu; Tang, Ling; Tian, Jing; Zhao, Shiguang; Li, Guohui; Heiss, John D; Liu, Yang; Zhuang, Zhengping; Xu, Guowang

    2016-03-22

    Metabolomics has shown significant potential in identifying small molecules specific to tumor phenotypes. In this study we analyzed resected tissue metabolites using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and found that tissue hypotaurine levels strongly and positively correlated with glioma grade. In vitro studies were conducted to show that hypotaurine activates hypoxia signaling through the competitive inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-2. This leads to the activation of hypoxia signaling as well as to the enhancement of glioma cell proliferation and invasion. In contrast, taurine, the oxidation metabolite of hypotaurine, decreased intracellular hypotaurine and resulted in glioma cell growth arrest. Lastly, a glioblastoma xenograft mice model was supplemented with taurine feed and exhibited impaired tumor growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that hypotaurine is an aberrantly produced oncometabolite, mediating tumor molecular pathophysiology and progression. The hypotaurine metabolic pathway may provide a potentially new target for glioblastoma diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26934654

  14. The tumor suppressor p53 inhibits Net, an effector of Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Nakade, Koji; Zheng, Hong; Ganguli, Gitali; Buchwalter, Gilles; Gross, Christian; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2004-02-01

    The tumor suppressor function of p53 is linked to its ability to repress gene expression, but the mechanisms of specific gene repression are poorly understood. We report that wild-type p53 inhibits an effector of the Ras oncogene/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway, the transcription factor Net. Tumor-associated mutant p53s are less efficient inhibitors. p53 inhibits by preventing phosphorylation of Net by MAP kinases. Loss of p53 in vivo leads to increased Net phosphorylation in response to wound healing and UV irradiation of skin. Our results show that p53 can repress specific gene expression by inhibiting Net, a factor implicated in cell cycle entry. PMID:14729959

  15. Signal-transducing protein phosphorylation cascades mediated by Ras/Rho proteins in the mammalian cell: the potential for multiplex signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Denhardt, D T

    1996-01-01

    The features of three distinct protein phosphorylation cascades in mammalian cells are becoming clear. These signalling pathways link receptor-mediated events at the cell surface or intracellular perturbations such as DNA damage to changes in cytoskeletal structure, vesicle transport and altered transcription factor activity. The best known pathway, the Ras-->Raf-->MEK-->ERK cascade [where ERK is extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and MEK is mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase/ERK kinase], is typically stimulated strongly by mitogens and growth factors. The other two pathways, stimulated primarily by assorted cytokines, hormones and various forms of stress, predominantly utilize p21 proteins of the Rho family (Rho, Rac and CDC42), although Ras can also participate. Diagnostic of each pathway is the MAP kinase component, which is phosphorylated by a unique dual-specificity kinase on both tyrosine and threonine in one of three motifs (Thr-Glu-Tyr, Thr-Phe-Tyr or Thr-Gly-Tyr), depending upon the pathway. In addition to activating one or more protein phosphorylation cascades, the initiating stimulus may also mobilize a variety of other signalling molecules (e.g. protein kinase C isoforms, phospholipid kinases, G-protein alpha and beta gamma subunits, phospholipases, intracellular Ca2+). These various signals impact to a greater or lesser extent on multiple downstream effectors. Important concepts are that signal transmission often entails the targeted relocation of specific proteins in the cell, and the reversible formation of protein complexes by means of regulated protein phosphorylation. The signalling circuits may be completed by the phosphorylation of upstream effectors by downstream kinases, resulting in a modulation of the signal. Signalling is terminated and the components returned to the ground state largely by dephosphorylation. There is an indeterminant amount of cross-talk among the pathways, and many of the proteins in the pathways belong to families

  16. Suppressors of hedgehog signaling: Linking aberrant development of neural progenitors and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Ferretti, Elisabetta; De Smaele, Enrico; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto

    2006-12-01

    Subversion of signals that physiologically suppress Hedgehog pathway results in aberrant neural progenitor development and medulloblastoma, a malignancy of the cerebellum. The Hedgehog antagonist RENKCTD11 maps to chromosome 17p13.2 and is involved in the withdrawal of the Hedgehog signaling at the granule cell progenitor transition from the outer to the inner external germinal layers, thus promoting growth arrest and differentiation. Deletion of chromosome 17p, the most frequent genetic lesion observed in this tumor, is responsible for the loss of function of RENKCTD11, resulting in upregulated Hedgehog signaling and medulloblastoma. Persistence of signals that limit Hedgehog activity is also associated with malignancy. Hedgehog signaling- induced downregulation of ErbB4 receptor expression is attenuated in medulloblastoma subsets in which the extent of Hedgehog pathway activity is limited, thus favoring the accumulation of ErbB4 with imbalanced alternative splice CYT-1 isoform over the CYT-2. This is responsible for both Neuregulin ligand-induced CYT-1-dependent prosurvival activity and loss of CYT-2-mediated growth arrest. PMID:17308352

  17. Lead acetate induces EGFR activation upstream of SFK and PKC{alpha} linkage to the Ras/Raf-1/ERK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-Y.; Wang, Y.-T.; Tzeng, D.-W.; Yang, J.-L.

    2009-03-01

    Lead acetate (Pb), a probable human carcinogen, can activate protein kinase C (PKC) upstream of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Yet, it remains unclear whether Pb activation of PKC {yields} ERK1/2 involves receptor/non-receptor tyrosine kinases and the Ras signaling transducer. Here we demonstrate a novel mechanism elicited by Pb for transmitting ERK1/2 signaling in CL3 human non-small-cell lung adenocarcinoma cells. Pb induction of higher steady-state levels of Ras-GTP was essential for increasing phospho-Raf-1{sup S338} and phospho-ERK1/2. Pre-treatment of the cells with a conventional PKC inhibitor Goe6976 or depleting PKC{alpha} using specific small interfering RNA blocked Pb induction of Ras-GTP. Pb also activated cellular tyrosine kinases. Specific pharmacological inhibitors, PD153035 for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and SU6656 for Src family tyrosine kinases (SFK), but not AG1296 for platelet-derived growth factor receptor, could suppress the Pb-induced tyrosine kinases, PKC{alpha}, Ras-GTP, phospho-Raf-1{sup S338} and phospho-ERK1/2. Furthermore, phosphorylation of tyrosines on the EGFR multiple autophosphorylation sites and the conserved SFK autophosphorylation site occurred during exposure of cells to Pb for 1-5 min and 5-30 min, respectively. Intriguingly, Pb activation of EGFR required the intrinsic kinase activity but not dimerization of the receptor. Inhibition of SFK or PKC{alpha} activities did not affect EGFR phosphorylation, while knockdown of EGFR blocked SFK phosphorylation and PKC{alpha} activation following Pb. Together, these results indicate that immediate activation of EGFR in response to Pb is obligatory for activation of SFK and PKC{alpha} and subsequent the Ras-Raf-1-MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling cascade.

  18. Regulation of SREBPs by Sphingomyelin in Adipocytes via a Caveolin and Ras-ERK-MAPK-CREB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Makdissy, Nehman; Haddad, Katia; Mouawad, Charbel; Popa, Iuliana; Younsi, Mohamed; Valet, Philippe; Brunaud, Laurent; Ziegler, Olivier; Quilliot, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Sterol response element binding protein (SREBP) is a key transcription factor in insulin and glucose metabolism. We previously demonstrated that elevated levels of membrane sphingomyelin (SM) were related to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), which is a known target gene of SREBP-1 in adipocytes. However, the role of SM in SREBP expression in adipocytes remains unknown. In human abdominal adipose tissue from obese women with various concentrations of fasting plasma insulin, SREBP-1 proteins decreased in parallel with increases in membrane SM levels. An inverse correlation was found between the membrane SM content and the levels of SREBP-1c/ERK/Ras/PPARγ/CREB proteins. For the first time, we demonstrate the effects of SM and its signaling pathway in 3T3-F442A adipocytes. These cells were enriched or unenriched with SM in a range of concentrations similar to those observed in obese subjects by adding exogenous natural SMs (having different acyl chain lengths) or by inhibiting neutral sphingomyelinase. SM accumulated in caveolae of the plasma membrane within 24 h and then in the intracellular space. SM enrichment decreased SREBP-1 through the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) but not JNK or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Ras/Raf-1/MEK1/2 and KSR proteins, which are upstream mediators of ERK, were down-regulated, whereas SREBP-2/caveolin and cholesterol were up-regulated. In SM-unmodulated adipocytes treated with DL-1-Phenyl-2-Palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PPMP), where the ceramide level increased, the expression levels of SREBPs and ERK were modulated in an opposite direction relative to the SM-enriched cells. SM inhibited the insulin-induced expression of SREBP-1. Rosiglitazone, which is an anti-diabetic agent and potent activator of PPARγ, reversed the effects of SM on SREBP-1, PPARγ and CREB. Taken together, these findings provide novel insights indicating that excess membrane SM might

  19. Regulation of SREBPs by Sphingomyelin in Adipocytes via a Caveolin and Ras-ERK-MAPK-CREB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Makdissy, Nehman; Popa, Iuliana; Younsi, Mohamed; Valet, Philippe; Brunaud, Laurent; Ziegler, Olivier; Quilliot, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Sterol response element binding protein (SREBP) is a key transcription factor in insulin and glucose metabolism. We previously demonstrated that elevated levels of membrane sphingomyelin (SM) were related to peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), which is a known target gene of SREBP-1 in adipocytes. However, the role of SM in SREBP expression in adipocytes remains unknown. In human abdominal adipose tissue from obese women with various concentrations of fasting plasma insulin, SREBP-1 proteins decreased in parallel with increases in membrane SM levels. An inverse correlation was found between the membrane SM content and the levels of SREBP-1c/ERK/Ras/PPARγ/CREB proteins. For the first time, we demonstrate the effects of SM and its signaling pathway in 3T3-F442A adipocytes. These cells were enriched or unenriched with SM in a range of concentrations similar to those observed in obese subjects by adding exogenous natural SMs (having different acyl chain lengths) or by inhibiting neutral sphingomyelinase. SM accumulated in caveolae of the plasma membrane within 24 h and then in the intracellular space. SM enrichment decreased SREBP-1 through the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) but not JNK or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Ras/Raf-1/MEK1/2 and KSR proteins, which are upstream mediators of ERK, were down-regulated, whereas SREBP-2/caveolin and cholesterol were up-regulated. In SM-unmodulated adipocytes treated with DL-1-Phenyl-2-Palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PPMP), where the ceramide level increased, the expression levels of SREBPs and ERK were modulated in an opposite direction relative to the SM-enriched cells. SM inhibited the insulin-induced expression of SREBP-1. Rosiglitazone, which is an anti-diabetic agent and potent activator of PPARγ, reversed the effects of SM on SREBP-1, PPARγ and CREB. Taken together, these findings provide novel insights indicating that excess membrane SM

  20. Effects of RAF inhibitors on PI3K/AKT signalling depend on mutational status of the RAS/RAF signalling axis

    PubMed Central

    Fritsche-Guenther, Raphaela; Witzel, Franziska; Kempa, Stefan; Brummer, Tilman; Sers, Christine; Blüthgen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies within the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signalling axis become increasingly popular, yet cross-talk and feedbacks in the signalling network lead to unexpected effects. Here we look systematically into how inhibiting RAF and MEK with clinically relevant inhibitors result in changes in PI3K/AKT activation. We measure the signalling response using a bead-based ELISA, and use a panel of three cell lines, and isogenic cell lines that express mutant forms of the oncogenes KRAS and BRAF to interrogate the effects of the MEK and RAF inhibitors on signalling. We find that treatment with the RAF inhibitors have opposing effects on AKT phosphorylation depending on the mutational status of two important oncogenes, KRAS and BRAF. If these two genes are in wildtype configuration, RAF inhibitors reduce AKT phosphorylation. In contrast, if BRAF or KRAS are mutant, RAF inhibitors will leave AKT phosphorylation unaffected or lead to an increase of AKT phosphorylation. Down-regulation of phospho-AKT by RAF inhibitors also extends to downstream transcription factors, and correlates with apoptosis induction. Our results show that oncogenes rewire signalling such that targeted therapies can have opposing effects on parallel pathways, which depend on the mutational status of the cell. PMID:26799289

  1. Effects of RAF inhibitors on PI3K/AKT signalling depend on mutational status of the RAS/RAF signalling axis.

    PubMed

    Fritsche-Guenther, Raphaela; Witzel, Franziska; Kempa, Stefan; Brummer, Tilman; Sers, Christine; Blüthgen, Nils

    2016-02-16

    Targeted therapies within the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signalling axis become increasingly popular, yet cross-talk and feedbacks in the signalling network lead to unexpected effects. Here we look systematically into how inhibiting RAF and MEK with clinically relevant inhibitors result in changes in PI3K/AKT activation. We measure the signalling response using a bead-based ELISA, and use a panel of three cell lines, and isogenic cell lines that express mutant forms of the oncogenes KRAS and BRAF to interrogate the effects of the MEK and RAF inhibitors on signalling. We find that treatment with the RAF inhibitors have opposing effects on AKT phosphorylation depending on the mutational status of two important oncogenes, KRAS and BRAF. If these two genes are in wildtype configuration, RAF inhibitors reduce AKT phosphorylation. In contrast, if BRAF or KRAS are mutant, RAF inhibitors will leave AKT phosphorylation unaffected or lead to an increase of AKT phosphorylation. Down-regulation of phospho-AKT by RAF inhibitors also extends to downstream transcription factors, and correlates with apoptosis induction. Our results show that oncogenes rewire signalling such that targeted therapies can have opposing effects on parallel pathways, which depend on the mutational status of the cell. PMID:26799289

  2. RalA, a GTPase targeted by miR-181a, promotes transformation and progression by activating the Ras-related signaling pathway in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaochuang; Yang, Juhua; Li, Yumin; Li, Tianfu; Wang, Ruirui; Fei, Jia

    2016-01-01

    BCR/ABL is a well-known activator of multiple signaling pathways. RalA, a Ras downstream signaling molecule and a small GTPase, plays an important role in Bcr-Abl-induced leukemogenesis but the exact mechanism remains elusive. Here, we show that RalA GTPase activity is commonly high in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell lines and patient samples. Overexpression of RalA results in malignant transformation and progression, and induces resistance to imatinib (IM) in BaF3 and K562 cell lines. RalA reduced survival and led to IM resistance in a xenografted mouse model. Ablation of RalA by either siRNA or miR-181a, a RalA targeting microRNA, attenuated the malignant phenotypes in K562 cells. RBC8, a selective Ral inhibitor, enhanced the inhibitory effects of IM in K562, KCL22 and BaF3-P210 cells. Interestingly, the phospho-specific protein microarray assay revealed that multiple phosphorylation signal proteins were decreased by RalA inhibition, including SAPK, JNK, SRC, VEGFR2, P38 MAPK, c-Kit, JunB, and Keratin18. Among them, P38 MAPK and SAPK/JNK are Ras downstream signaling kinases. Taken together, RalA GTPase might be an important oncogene activating the Ras-related signaling pathway in CML. PMID:26967392

  3. TISSUE SPECIFIC RESPONSES TO ABERRANT FGF SIGNALING IN COMPLEX HEAD PHENOTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Motch, Susan M.; Pankratz, Talia L.; Wang, Yingli; Aldridge, Kristina; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of fibroblast growth factor and receptor (FGF/FGFR) signaling in bone development is well studied, partly because mutations in FGFRs cause human diseases of achondroplasia and FGFR-related craniosynostosis syndromes including Crouzon syndrome. The FGFR2c C342Y mutation is a frequent cause of Crouzon syndrome, characterized by premature cranial vault suture closure, midfacial deficiency and neurocranial dysmorphology. Here, using newborn Fgfr2cC342Y/+ Crouzon syndrome mice, we tested whether the phenotypic effects of this mutation go beyond the skeletal tissues of the skull, altering the development of other non-skeletal head tissues including the brain, the eyes, the nasopharynx and the inner ears. Results Quantitative analysis of 3D multimodal imaging (high resolution micro computed tomography and magnetic resonance microscopic images) revealed local differences in skull morphology and coronal suture patency between Fgfr2cC342Y/+ mice and unaffected littermates, as well as changes in brain shape but not brain size, significant reductions in nasopharyngeal and eye volumes, and no difference in inner ear volume in Fgfr2cC342Y/+ mice. Conclusion These findings provide an expanded catalogue of clinical phenotypes in Crouzon syndrome caused by aberrant FGF/FGFR signaling and evidence of the broad role for FGF/FGFR signaling in development and evolution of the vertebrate head. PMID:23172727

  4. Ras transformation uncouples the kinesin-coordinated cellular nutrient response.

    PubMed

    Zaganjor, Elma; Weil, Lauren M; Gonzales, Joshua X; Minna, John D; Cobb, Melanie H

    2014-07-22

    The kinesin family members (KIFs) KIF2A and KIF2C depolymerize microtubules, unlike the majority of other kinesins, which transport cargo along microtubules. KIF2A regulates the localization of lysosomes in the cytoplasm, which assists in activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) on the lysosomal surface. We find that the closely related kinesin KIF2C also influences lysosomal organization in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). Expression of KIF2C and, to a lesser extent, KIF2A in untransformed and mutant K-Ras-transformed cells is regulated by ERK1/2. Prolonged inhibition of ERK1/2 activation with PD0325901 mimics nutrient deprivation by disrupting lysosome organization and decreasing mTORC1 activity in HBEC, suggesting a long-term mechanism for optimization of mTORC1 activity by ERK1/2. We tested the hypothesis that up-regulation of KIF2C and KIF2A by ERK1/2 caused aberrant lysosomal positioning and mTORC1 activity in a mutant K-Ras-dependent cancer and cancer model. In Ras-transformed cells, however, mTORC1 activity and lysosome organization appear independent of ERK1/2 and these kinesins although ERK1/2 activity and the kinesins are required for Ras-dependent proliferation and migration. We conclude that mutant K-Ras repurposes these signaling and regulatory proteins to support the transformed phenotype. PMID:25002494

  5. Label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics with novel pairwise abundance normalization reveals synergistic RAS and CIP2A signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kauko, Otto; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Jumppanen, Mikael; Hintsanen, Petteri; Suni, Veronika; Haapaniemi, Pekka; Corthals, Garry; Aittokallio, Tero; Westermarck, Jukka; Imanishi, Susumu Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactivated RAS drives progression of many human malignancies. However, oncogenic activity of RAS is dependent on simultaneous inactivation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity. Although PP2A is known to regulate some of the RAS effector pathways, it has not been systematically assessed how these proteins functionally interact. Here we have analyzed phosphoproteomes regulated by either RAS or PP2A, by phosphopeptide enrichment followed by mass-spectrometry-based label-free quantification. To allow data normalization in situations where depletion of RAS or PP2A inhibitor CIP2A causes a large uni-directional change in the phosphopeptide abundance, we developed a novel normalization strategy, named pairwise normalization. This normalization is based on adjusting phosphopeptide abundances measured before and after the enrichment. The superior performance of the pairwise normalization was verified by various independent methods. Additionally, we demonstrate how the selected normalization method influences the downstream analyses and interpretation of pathway activities. Consequently, bioinformatics analysis of RAS and CIP2A regulated phosphoproteomes revealed a significant overlap in their functional pathways. This is most likely biologically meaningful as we observed a synergistic survival effect between CIP2A and RAS expression as well as KRAS activating mutations in TCGA pan-cancer data set, and synergistic relationship between CIP2A and KRAS depletion in colony growth assays. PMID:26278961

  6. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies proteins modulating aberrant FLT3-ITD signaling

    PubMed Central

    Caldarelli, A; Müller, J P; Paskowski-Rogacz, M; Herrmann, K; Bauer, R; Koch, S; Heninger, A K; Krastev, D; Ding, L; Kasper, S; Fischer, T; Brodhun, M; Böhmer, F-D; Buchholz, F

    2013-01-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 is a commonly mutated gene in acute myeloid leukemia, with about one-third of patients carrying an internal-tandem duplication of the juxtamembrane domain in the receptor (FLT3-ITD). FLT3-ITD exhibits altered signaling quality, including aberrant activation of STAT5. To identify genes affecting FLT3-ITD-mediated STAT5 signaling, we performed an esiRNA-based RNAi screen utilizing a STAT5-driven reporter assay. Knockdowns that caused reduced FLT3-ITD-mediated STAT5 signaling were enriched for genes encoding proteins involved in protein secretion and intracellular protein transport, indicating that modulation of protein transport processes could potentially be used to reduce constitutive STAT5 signaling in FLT3-ITD-positive cells. The relevance of KDELR1, a component involved in the Golgi-ER retrograde transport, was further analyzed. In FLT3-ITD-expressing leukemic MV4-11 cells, downregulation of KDELR1 resulted in reduced STAT5 activation, proliferation and colony-forming capacity. Stable shRNA-mediated depletion of KDELR1 in FLT3-ITD-expressing 32D cells likewise resulted in reduced STAT5 signaling and cell proliferation. Importantly, these cells also showed a reduced capacity to generate a leukemia-like disease in syngeneic C3H/HeJ mice. Together our data suggest intracellular protein transport as a potential target for FLT3-ITD driven leukemias, with KDELR1 emerging as a positive modulator of oncogenic FLT3-ITD activity. PMID:23508117

  7. Ultra-sensitive biosensor for K-ras gene detection using enzyme capped gold nanoparticles conjugates for signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xian; Bai, Lijuan; Han, Xiaowei; Wang, Jiao; Shi, Anqi; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2014-09-01

    In this study, an ultra-sensitive hairpin DNA-based electrochemical DNA biosensor for K-ras gene detection is described. Gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-streptavidin capped Au-NPs (HAS) conjugates are used for signal amplification. Initially, hairpin DNA dually labeled with thiol at its 5' end and with biotin at its 3' end is immobilized on the surface of Au-NPs modified electrode, and the hairpin DNA is in a "closed" state; hence, the HAS conjugates are shielded from being approached by the biotin due to steric hindrance. However, in the presence of target DNA, the target DNA hybridizes with the loop structure of hairpin DNA and causes conformational change, resulting in biotin forced away from the electrode surface, thereby becoming accessible for the HAS conjugates. Thus, the HAS conjugates are linked to the electrode surface via the specific interaction between biotin and streptavidin. Electrochemical detection was performed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) containing tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and H2O2. Under optimal conditions, the peak current differences (ΔI) are linear with the target DNA in the range from 0.1 fM to 1 nM with a detection limit of 0.035 fM. Furthermore, this biosensor also demonstrates its excellent specificity for single-base mismatched DNA. PMID:24939462

  8. Uncoupling of EGFR–RAS signaling and nuclear localization of YBX1 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roßner, F; Gieseler, C; Morkel, M; Royer, H-D; Rivera, M; Bläker, H; Dietel, M; Schäfer, R; Sers, C

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor YBX1 can act as a mediator of signals transmitted via the EGFR–RAS–MAPK axis. YBX1 expression has been associated with tumor progression and prognosis in multiple types of cancer. Immunohistochemical studies have revealed dependency between YBX1 expression and individual EGFR family members. We analyzed YBX1 and EGFR family proteins in a colorectal cancer (CRC) cohort and provide functional analyses of YBX1 in the context of EGFR–RAS–MAPK signaling. Immunohistochemistry for YBX1 and EGFR family receptors with two antibodies for YBX1 and EGFR were performed and related to clinicopathological data. We employed Caco2 cells expressing an inducible KRASV12 gene to determine effects on localization and levels of YBX1. Mouse xenografts of Caco2-KRASV12 cells were used to determine YBX1 dynamics in a tissue context. The two different antibodies against YBX1 showed discordant immunohistochemical stainings in cell culture and clinical specimens. Expression of YBX1 and EGFR family members were not correlated in CRC. Analysis of Caco2 xenografts displayed again heterogeneity of YBX1 staining with both antibodies. Our results suggest that YBX1 is controlled via complex regulatory mechanisms involving tumor stroma interaction and signal transduction processes. Our study highlights that YBX1 antibodies have different specificities, advocating their use in a combined manner. PMID:26779809

  9. Aberrant hedgehog signaling is responsible for the highly invasive behavior of a subpopulation of hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y-H; Ding, J; Nguyen, S; Liu, X-J; Xu, G; Zhou, H-Y; Duan, N-N; Yang, S-M; Zern, M A; Wu, J

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoma exhibits a series of heterogeneous subpopulations in its cell surface markers, tumorigenicity, invasion and metastatic capability. We previously demonstrated that the CD133(-)/EpCAM(-) hepatoma subpopulation was more metastatic than its counterpart; however, the controlling mechanisms are unexplored. The present study aimed to delineate the significance of aberrant hedgehog (Hh) signaling in the mediation of metastases. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting-enriched CD133(-)/EpCAM(-) (double negative, DN), Huh-7 cells underwent a transwell selection for metastatic cells (transwell-selected, TS). The TS cells displayed much greater metastatic activity as evidenced by an increased invasion rate, extremely upregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1/2/9 genes compared with DN and double-positive (DP) subpopulations. In contrast to DP cells, TS cells lost E-cadherin and were all vimentin-positive as shown by immunocytochemistry. There was a transitional increase in Gli-1/2 gene expression levels from DP, DN to TS subpopulations, which was consistent with elevated Gli-1/2 or Twist-1 protein levels in the nuclear fraction. Furthermore, truncated Gli-1 (tGli-1), which transactivates molecules involved in metastasis, was detected in the highly invasive Huh-7 cell subpopulation, but not in less metastatic hepatoma cells or normal hepatocytes. The enhanced metastatic features with increased expression of MMPs as well as the presence of twist and snail genes in TS Huh-7 cells were reversed by LDE225, a potent Smoothened antagonist. In conclusion, the highly metastatic capability of a unique TS subpopulation was highly attributed to significant epithelial-mesenchymal transition, enhanced Hh activity and aberrant occurrence of a tGli-1 variant, which appears to be responsible for the highly invasive behavior. PMID:25772244

  10. RAS diseases in children

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, Charlotte M.

    2014-01-01

    RAS genes encode a family of 21 kDa proteins that are an essential hub for a number of survival, proliferation, differentiation and senescence pathways. Signaling of the RAS-GTPases through the RAF-MEK-ERK pathway, the first identified mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is essential in development. A group of genetic syndromes, named “RASopathies”, had been identified which are caused by heterozygosity for germline mutations in genes that encode protein components of the RAS/MAPK pathway. Several of these clinically overlapping disorders, including Noonan syndrome, Noonan-like CBL syndrome, Costello syndrome, cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome, neurofibromatosis type I, and Legius syndrome, predispose to cancer and abnormal myelopoiesis in infancy. This review focuses on juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), a malignancy of early childhood characterized by initiating germline and/or somatic mutations in five genes of the RAS/MAPK pathway: PTPN11, CBL, NF-1, KRAS and NRAS. Natural courses of these five subtypes differ, although hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapy option for most children with JMML. With whole-exome sequencing studies revealing few secondary lesions it will be crucial to better understand the RAS/MAPK signaling network with its crosstalks and feed-back loops to carefully design early clinical trials with novel pharmacological agents in this still puzzling leukemia. PMID:25420281

  11. Aberrant Salience Is Related to Reduced Reinforcement Learning Signals and Elevated Dopamine Synthesis Capacity in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Rebecca; Deserno, Lorenz; Gleich, Tobias; Katthagen, Teresa; Pankow, Anne; Behr, Joachim; Buchert, Ralph; Roiser, Jonathan P; Heinz, Andreas; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2015-07-15

    The striatum is known to play a key role in reinforcement learning, specifically in the encoding of teaching signals such as reward prediction errors (RPEs). It has been proposed that aberrant salience attribution is associated with impaired coding of RPE and heightened dopamine turnover in the striatum, and might be linked to the development of psychotic symptoms. However, the relationship of aberrant salience attribution, RPE coding, and dopamine synthesis capacity has not been directly investigated. Here we assessed the association between a behavioral measure of aberrant salience attribution, the salience attribution test, to neural correlates of RPEs measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging while healthy participants (n = 58) performed an instrumental learning task. A subset of participants (n = 27) also underwent positron emission tomography with the radiotracer [(18)F]fluoro-l-DOPA to quantify striatal presynaptic dopamine synthesis capacity. Individual variability in aberrant salience measures related negatively to ventral striatal and prefrontal RPE signals and in an exploratory analysis was found to be positively associated with ventral striatal presynaptic dopamine levels. These data provide the first evidence for a specific link between the constructs of aberrant salience attribution, reduced RPE processing, and potentially increased presynaptic dopamine function. PMID:26180188

  12. Involvement of deregulated epiregulin expression in tumorigenesis in vivo through activated Ki-Ras signaling pathway in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Baba, I; Shirasawa, S; Iwamoto, R; Okumura, K; Tsunoda, T; Nishioka, M; Fukuyama, K; Yamamoto, K; Mekada, E; Sasazuki, T

    2000-12-15

    To identify the genes located downstream of the activated Ki-Ras signaling pathways in human colon cancer cells, a PCR-based cDNA subtraction library was constructed between HCT116 cells and HCT116-derived activated Ki-ras-disrupted cells (HKe3). One of the genes in HCT116 that was evidently up-regulated was epiregulin, a member of the epidermal growth factor family that is expressed in many kinds of human cancer cells. HKe3-stable transfectants expressing activated Ki-Ras regained over-expression of epiregulin. To further elucidate the biochemical structure and significance of epiregulin expression in tumorigenesis, HKe3-stable transfectants expressing epiregulin (e3-pSE cells) were established. Epiregulin existed as highly glycosylated membrane-bound forms, and TPA rapidly induced ectodomain shedding of epiregulin. Furthermore, the conditioned medium of e3-pSE cells showed more DNA synthesis for 32D cells expressing epidermal growth factor receptor (DER) cells than that of HKe3. Although anchorage-independent growth in soft agar was not observed for e3-pSE cells, tumorigenicity in nude mice was observed evidently, and their growth rate was correlated with each amount of exogenous epiregulin expression. These results suggested that activated Ki-Ras will be one of the factors contributing to the overexpression of epiregulin in human colon cancer cells, and that epiregulin will play a critical role in human tumorigenesis in vivo. PMID:11156386

  13. Immunohistochemical expression of aberrant Notch-1 signaling in vitiligo: an implication for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Seleit, Iman; Bakry, Ola Ahmed; Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Dawoud, Noha Mohammed

    2014-06-01

    The etiopathogenetic mechanisms leading to pigment loss in vitiligo are not fully understood. Notch signaling is required for development and maintenance of melanocyte lineage and acts as a key component among keratinocyte-melanocyte interactions. The current study aimed to investigate the possible role of Notch signaling and its effect on the whole melanocyte lineage in vitiligo and correlating it with the different clinicopathologic parameters. Using immunohistochemical technique, Notch-1 expression was evaluated in 50 lesional and 20 perilesional biopsies of patients with vitiligo in comparison with 20 normal skin biopsies as a control group. Lesional biopsies were stained with human melanoma black-45 and tyrosinase-related protein-2 to demonstrate the melanocyte lineage. Membranous and/or nuclear expression of Notch-1 was in favor of control and perilesional skin, whereas cytoplasmic expression appeared only in vitiliginous lesions (P < .05). Membranous and/or nuclear expression of Notch-1 was significantly associated with epidermal human melanoma black-45 positivity (P = .01) and percentage of expression in both epidermis (P = .02) and hair follicles (P = .03) of lesional skin. Cytoplasmic pattern of Notch-1 expression in epidermis was significantly found in lesions with white hair (P = .04) and in cases with marked keratinocyte vacuolization (P = .03). Segmental and acrofacial vitiligo were associated with mild to moderate Notch-1 intensity, whereas generalized vitiligo was associated with strong intensity of expression (P = .02). In conclusion, Notch-1 signaling is inactivated in vitiligo with consequent loss of epidermal and/or follicular active melanocytes. Aberrant Notch signaling in vitiliginous white hair and acral and segmental vitiligo may be the cause of their treatment resistance. PMID:24560443

  14. Aberrant adenosine A2A receptor signaling contributes to neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments in a mouse model of synucleinopathy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qidi; Ren, Xiangpeng; Liu, Ya; Li, Zhihui; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Xingjun; He, Chaoxiang; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2016-09-01

    Synucleinopathy is characterized by abnormal accumulation of misfolded α-synuclein (α-Syn)-positive cytoplasmic inclusions and by neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments, but the pathogenesis mechanism of synucleinopathy remains to be defined. Using a transmission model of synucleinopathy by intracerebral injection of preformed A53T α-Syn fibrils, we investigated whether aberrant adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) signaling contributed to pathogenesis of synucleinopathy. We demonstrated that intra-hippocampal injection of preformed mutant α-Syn fibrils triggered a striking and selective induction of A2AR expression which was closely co-localized with pSer129 α-Syn-rich inclusions in neurons and glial cells of hippocampus. Importantly, by abolishing aberrant A2AR signaling triggered by mutant α-Syn, genetic deletion of A2ARs blunted a cascade of pathological events leading to synucleinopathy, including pSer129 α-Syn-rich and p62-positive aggregates, NF-κB activation and astrogliosis, apoptotic neuronal cell death and working memory deficits without affecting motor activity. These findings define α-Syn-triggered aberrant A2AR signaling as a critical pathogenesis mechanism of synucleinopathy with dual controls of cognition and neurodegeneration by modulating α-Syn aggregates. Thus, aberrant A2AR signaling represents a useful biomarker as well as a therapeutic target of synucleinopathy. PMID:27342081

  15. Regulation of MYC gene expression by aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rennoll, Sherri; Yochum, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway controls intestinal homeostasis and mutations in components of this pathway are prevalent in human colorectal cancers (CRCs). These mutations lead to inappropriate expression of genes controlled by Wnt responsive DNA elements (WREs). T-cell factor/Lymphoid enhancer factor transcription factors bind WREs and recruit the β-catenin transcriptional co-activator to activate target gene expression. Deregulated expression of the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC) by aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling drives colorectal carcinogenesis. In this review, we discuss the current literature pertaining to the identification and characterization of WREs that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRCs. A common theme has emerged whereby these WREs often map distally to the MYC genomic locus and control MYC gene expression through long-range chromatin loops with the MYC proximal promoter. We propose that by determining which of these WREs is critical for CRC pathogenesis, novel strategies can be developed to treat individuals suffering from this disease. PMID:26629312

  16. Aberrant expression of Sonic hedgehog signaling in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoping; Su, Juan; Li, Ran; Wang, Yadong; Zeng, Di; Wu, Baoping

    2016-04-01

    The SHH signaling pathway is critical for gastrointestinal development and organic patterning, and dysregulation of SHH pathway molecules has been detected in multiple gastrointestinal neoplasms. This study investigated the role of the SHH signaling pathway in PJS. Expression of SHH, PTCH, and GLI1 was examined by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry in 20 normal tissues and 75 colorectal lesions (25 PJPs, 25 adenomas, and 25 adenocarcinomas). Expression of SHH, PTCH, and GLI1 mRNA was higher in PJPs than in normal tissue (P < .05) and gradually increased along the PJP-adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence (P < .05). Immunostaining indicated that SHH expression was present in 60% of PJPs, 72% of adenomas, and 84% of carcinomas, whereas 68% of PJPs, 72% of adenomas, and 88% of carcinomas exhibited cytoplasmic expression of PTCH. Moreover, high GLI1 expression was detected in 56% of PJPs, 64% of adenomas, and 80% of carcinomas; and high nuclear expression of GLI1 was observed in 8 adenomas with atypia and 15 carcinomas. Increased SHH, PTCH, and GLI1 protein correlated positively with tumor grade (P = .012, P = .003, and P = .007, respectively), tumor depth (P = .024, P = .007, and P = .01), and lymph node metastasis (P = .05, P = .015, and P = .005). This study identified aberrant expression of SHH pathway molecules in PJS, and the findings may supply a novel mechanism for the development of PJ polyps. PMID:26997450

  17. Regulation of the Notch target gene Hes-1 by TGF{alpha} induced Ras/MAPK signaling in human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stockhausen, Marie-Therese; Sjoelund, Jonas; Axelson, Hakan . E-mail: hakan.axelson@molmed.mas.lu.se

    2005-10-15

    Ras and Notch signaling have recently been shown to cooperate in the maintenance of neoplastic transformation. Here, we show that TGF{alpha}, a known activator of Ras signaling, can drive cell proliferation and at the same time induce the expression of the Notch target Hes-1 in the neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE(2)c. The up-regulation of Hes-1 occurred both at the transcriptional and protein levels and by use of EGFR and MEK inhibitors we could show that the Hes-1 response was dependent on activation of the MAP kinase ERK. Blocking Notch activation by {gamma}-secretase inhibition did not profoundly affect the Hes-1 levels, neither in untreated nor in TGF{alpha} treated cells. The up-regulation of Hes-1 was associated with down-regulation of its pro-neuronal target gene Hash-1. Taken together, these results show that TGF{alpha} is a potent mitogen of neuroblastoma cells and suggest a connection between activation of ERK and Hes-1, thus providing a link between the Ras and Notch signaling pathways.

  18. Areca Nut Components Affect COX-2, Cyclin B1/cdc25C and Keratin Expression, PGE2 Production in Keratinocyte Is Related to Reactive Oxygen Species, CYP1A1, Src, EGFR and Ras Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiao-Hua; Chan, Chiu-Po; Yeh, Chien-Yang; Wang, Yin-Lin; Cheng, Ru-Hsiu; Hahn, Liang-Jiunn; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Aims Chewing of betel quid (BQ) increases the risk of oral cancer and oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), possibly by BQ-induced toxicity and induction of inflammatory response in oral mucosa. Methods Primary gingival keratinocytes (GK cells) were exposed to areca nut (AN) components with/without inhibitors. Cytotoxicity was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl- thiazol- 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. mRNA and protein expression was evaluated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. PGE2/PGF2α production was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results Areca nut extract (ANE) stimulated PGE2/PGF2α production, and upregulated the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1), but inhibited expression of keratin 5/14, cyclinB1 and cdc25C in GK cells. ANE also activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Src and Ras signaling pathways. ANE-induced COX-2, keratin 5, keratin 14 and cdc25C expression as well as PGE2 production were differentially regulated by α–naphthoflavone (a CYP 1A1/1A2 inhibitor), PD153035 (EGFR inhibitor), pp2 (Src inhibitor), and manumycin A (a Ras inhibitor). ANE-induced PGE2 production was suppressed by piper betle leaf (PBL) extract and hydroxychavicol (two major BQ components), dicoumarol (a NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase - NQO1 inhibitor) and curcumin. ANE-induced cytotoxicity was inhibited by catalase and enhanced by dicoumarol, suggesting that AN components may contribute to the pathogenesis of OSF and oral cancer via induction of aberrant differentiation, cytotoxicity, COX-2 expression, and PGE2/PGF2αproduction. Conclusions CYP4501A1, reactive oxygen species (ROS), EGFR, Src and Ras signaling pathways could all play a role in ANE-induced pathogenesis of oral cancer. Addition of PBL into BQ and curcumin consumption could inhibit the ANE-induced inflammatory response. PMID:25051199

  19. A Model for Direction Sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum: Ras Activity and Symmetry Breaking Driven by a Gβγ-Mediated, Gα2-Ric8 -- Dependent Signal Transduction Network

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yougan; Othmer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis is a dynamic cellular process, comprised of direction sensing, polarization and locomotion, that leads to the directed movement of eukaryotic cells along extracellular gradients. As a primary step in the response of an individual cell to a spatial stimulus, direction sensing has attracted numerous theoretical treatments aimed at explaining experimental observations in a variety of cell types. Here we propose a new model of direction sensing based on experiments using Dictyostelium discoideum (Dicty). The model is built around a reaction-diffusion-translocation system that involves three main component processes: a signal detection step based on G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) for cyclic AMP (cAMP), a transduction step based on a heterotrimetic G protein Gα2βγ, and an activation step of a monomeric G-protein Ras. The model can predict the experimentally-observed response of cells treated with latrunculin A, which removes feedback from downstream processes, under a variety of stimulus protocols. We show that Gα2βγ cycling modulated by Ric8, a nonreceptor guanine exchange factor for Gα2 in Dicty, drives multiple phases of Ras activation and leads to direction sensing and signal amplification in cAMP gradients. The model predicts that both Gα2 and Gβγ are essential for direction sensing, in that membrane-localized Gα2*, the activated GTP-bearing form of Gα2, leads to asymmetrical recruitment of RasGEF and Ric8, while globally-diffusing Gβγ mediates their activation. We show that the predicted response at the level of Ras activation encodes sufficient ‘memory’ to eliminate the ‘back-of-the wave’ problem, and the effects of diffusion and cell shape on direction sensing are also investigated. In contrast with existing LEGI models of chemotaxis, the results do not require a disparity between the diffusion coefficients of the Ras activator GEF and the Ras inhibitor GAP. Since the signal pathways we study are highly conserved between Dicty

  20. A Model for Direction Sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum: Ras Activity and Symmetry Breaking Driven by a Gβγ-Mediated, Gα2-Ric8 -- Dependent Signal Transduction Network.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yougan; Othmer, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Chemotaxis is a dynamic cellular process, comprised of direction sensing, polarization and locomotion, that leads to the directed movement of eukaryotic cells along extracellular gradients. As a primary step in the response of an individual cell to a spatial stimulus, direction sensing has attracted numerous theoretical treatments aimed at explaining experimental observations in a variety of cell types. Here we propose a new model of direction sensing based on experiments using Dictyostelium discoideum (Dicty). The model is built around a reaction-diffusion-translocation system that involves three main component processes: a signal detection step based on G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) for cyclic AMP (cAMP), a transduction step based on a heterotrimetic G protein Gα2βγ, and an activation step of a monomeric G-protein Ras. The model can predict the experimentally-observed response of cells treated with latrunculin A, which removes feedback from downstream processes, under a variety of stimulus protocols. We show that [Formula: see text] cycling modulated by Ric8, a nonreceptor guanine exchange factor for [Formula: see text] in Dicty, drives multiple phases of Ras activation and leads to direction sensing and signal amplification in cAMP gradients. The model predicts that both [Formula: see text] and Gβγ are essential for direction sensing, in that membrane-localized [Formula: see text], the activated GTP-bearing form of [Formula: see text], leads to asymmetrical recruitment of RasGEF and Ric8, while globally-diffusing Gβγ mediates their activation. We show that the predicted response at the level of Ras activation encodes sufficient 'memory' to eliminate the 'back-of-the wave' problem, and the effects of diffusion and cell shape on direction sensing are also investigated. In contrast with existing LEGI models of chemotaxis, the results do not require a disparity between the diffusion coefficients of the Ras activator GEF and the Ras inhibitor GAP. Since

  1. Differentiation of central nervous system neuronal cells by fibroblast-derived growth factor requires at least two signaling pathways: roles for Ras and Src.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, W L; Chung, K C; Rosner, M R

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the role of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and other signaling pathways in neuronal cell differentiation by basic fibroblast-derived growth factor (bFGF), we used a conditionally immortalized cell line from rat hippocampal neurons (H19-7). Previous studies have shown that activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK) is insufficient to induce neuronal differentiation of H19-7 cells. To test the requirement for MEK and MAP kinase (ERK1 and ERK2), H19-7 cells were treated with the MEK inhibitor PD098059. Although the MEK inhibitor blocked the induction of differentiation by constitutively activated Raf, the H19-7 cells still underwent differentiation by bFGF. These results suggest that an alternative pathway is utilized by bFGF for differentiation of the hippocampal neuronal cells. Expression in the H19-7 cells of a dominant-negative Ras (N17-Ras) or Raf (C4-Raf) blocked differentiation by bFGF, suggesting that Ras and probably Raf are required. Expression of dominant-negative Src (pcSrc295Arg) or microinjection of an anti-Src antibody blocked differentiation by bFGF in H19-7 cells, indicating that bFGF also signals through a Src kinase-mediated pathway. Although neither constitutively activated MEK (MEK-2E) nor v-Src was sufficient individually to differentiate the H19-7 cells, coexpression of constitutively activated MEK and v-Src induced neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that (i) activation of MAP kinase (ERK1 and ERK2) is neither necessary nor sufficient for differentiation by bFGF; (ii) activation of Src kinases is necessary but not sufficient for differentiation by bFGF; and (iii) differentiation of H19-7 neuronal cells by bFGF requires at least two signaling pathways activated by Ras and Src. PMID:9234720

  2. Ras in Cancer and Developmental Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Medarde, Alberto; Santos, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Somatic, gain-of-function mutations in ras genes were the first specific genetic alterations identified in human cancer about 3 decades ago. Studies during the last quarter century have characterized the Ras proteins as essential components of signaling networks controlling cellular proliferation, differentiation, or survival. The oncogenic mutations of the H-ras, N-ras, or K-ras genes frequently found in human tumors are known to throw off balance the normal outcome of those signaling pathways, thus leading to tumor development. Oncogenic mutations in a number of other upstream or downstream components of Ras signaling pathways (including membrane RTKs or cytosolic kinases) have been detected more recently in association with a variety of cancers. Interestingly, the oncogenic Ras mutations and the mutations in other components of Ras/MAPK signaling pathways appear to be mutually exclusive events in most tumors, indicating that deregulation of Ras-dependent signaling is the essential requirement for tumorigenesis. In contrast to sporadic tumors, separate studies have identified germline mutations in Ras and various other components of Ras signaling pathways that occur in specific association with a number of different familial, developmental syndromes frequently sharing common phenotypic cardiofaciocutaneous features. Finally, even without being a causative force, defective Ras signaling has been cited as a contributing factor to many other human illnesses, including diabetes and immunological and inflammatory disorders. We aim this review at summarizing and updating current knowledge on the contribution of Ras mutations and altered Ras signaling to development of various tumoral and nontumoral pathologies. PMID:21779504

  3. A New View of Ras Isoforms in Cancers.

    PubMed

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Chakrabarti, Mayukh; Jang, Hyunbum

    2016-01-01

    Does small GTPase K-Ras4A have a single state or two states, one resembling K-Ras4B and the other N-Ras? A recent study of K-Ras4A made the remarkable observation that even in the absence of the palmitoyl, K-Ras4A can be active at the plasma membrane. Importantly, this suggests that K-Ras4A may exist in two distinct signaling states. In state 1, K-Ras4A is only farnesylated, like K-Ras4B; in state 2, farnesylated and palmitoylated, like N-Ras. The K-Ras4A hypervariable region sequence is positively charged, in between K-Ras4B and N-Ras. Taken together, this raises the possibility that the farnesylated but nonpalmitoylated state 1, like K-Ras4B, binds calmodulin and is associated with colorectal and other adenocarcinomas like lung cancer and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. On the other hand, state 2 may be associated with melanoma and other cancers where N-Ras is a major contributor, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Importantly, H-Ras has two, singly and doubly, palmitoylated states that may also serve distinct functional roles. The multiple signaling states of palmitoylated Ras isoforms question the completeness of small GTPase Ras isoform statistics in different cancer types and call for reevaluation of concepts and protocols. They may also call for reconsideration of oncogenic Ras therapeutics. PMID:26659836

  4. Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Ras Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gysin, Stephan; Salt, Megan; Young, Amy; McCormick, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Ras genes are frequently activated in cancer. Attempts to develop drugs that target mutant Ras proteins have, so far, been unsuccessful. Tumors bearing these mutations, therefore, remain among the most difficult to treat. Most efforts to block activated Ras have focused on pathways downstream. Drugs that inhibit Raf kinase have shown clinical benefit in the treatment of malignant melanoma. However, these drugs have failed to show clinical benefit in Ras mutant tumors. It remains unclear to what extent Ras depends on Raf kinase for transforming activity, even though Raf proteins bind directly to Ras and are certainly major effectors of Ras action in normal cells and in development. Furthermore, Raf kinase inhibitors can lead to paradoxical activation of the MAPK pathway. MEK inhibitors block the Ras-MAPK pathway, but often activate the PI3’-kinase, and have shown little clinical benefit as single agents. This activation is mediated by EGF-R and other receptor tyrosine kinases through relief of a negative feedback loop from ERK. Drug combinations that target multiple points within the Ras signaling network are likely to be necessary to achieve substantial clinical benefit. Other effectors may also contribute to Ras signaling and provide a source of targets. In addition, unbiased screens for genes necessary for Ras transformation have revealed new potential targets and have added to our understanding of Ras cancer biology. PMID:21779505

  5. Potential signal to accommodation from the Stiles–Crawford effect and ocular monochromatic aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Lawrence R.; Kruger, Philip B.; Rucker, Frances J.; Swanson, William H.; Schmidt, Nathan; Hardy, Caitlin; Rutman, Hadassa; Borgovan, Theodore; Burke, Sean; Badar, Mustanser; Shah, Raj

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if cues within the blurred retinal image due to the Stiles–Crawford (SC) effect and the eye’s monochromatic aberrations can drive accommodation with a small pupil (3 mm) that is typical of bright photopic conditions. The foveal, psychophysical SC function (17 min arc) and ocular monochromatic aberrations were measured in 21 visually normal adults. The retinal image of a 10.2 min arc disc was simulated for spherical defocus levels of −1 D, 0 D and +1 D in each of four conditions consisting of combinations of the presence or absence of the individual SC function and monochromatic aberrations with a 3 mm pupil. Accommodation was recorded in eleven participants as each viewed the simulations through a 0.75-mm pinhole. The SC effect alone did not provide a significant cue to accommodation. Monochromatic aberrations provided a statistically significant but rather small cue to monocular accommodation. PMID:20835401

  6. NF1 regulation of RAS/ERK signaling is required for appropriate granule neuron progenitor expansion and migration in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Cho, Woosung; Nazarenko, Inga; Mo, Wei; Chen, Jian; Parada, Luis F

    2014-11-01

    Cerebellar development is regulated by a coordinated spatiotemporal interplay between granule neuron progenitors (GNPs), Purkinje neurons, and glia. Abnormal development can trigger motor deficits, and more recent data indicate important roles in aspects of memory, behavior, and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Germline mutation in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene underlies Neurofibromatosis type 1, a complex disease that enhances susceptibility to certain cancers and neurological disorders, including intellectual deficits and ASD. The NF1 gene encodes for neurofibromin, a RAS GTPase-activating protein, and thus negatively regulates the RAS signaling pathway. Here, using mouse models to direct conditional NF1 ablation in either embryonic cerebellar progenitors or neonatal GNPs, we show that neurofibromin is required for appropriate development of cerebellar folia layering and structure. Remarkably, neonatal administration of inhibitors of the ERK pathway reversed the morphological defects. Thus, our findings establish a critical cell-autonomous role for the NF1-RAS-ERK pathway in the appropriate regulation of cerebellar development and provide a basis for using neonatal ERK inhibitor-based therapies to treat NF1-induced cerebellar disorders. PMID:25367036

  7. RAS oncogenes: weaving a tumorigenic web

    PubMed Central

    Pylayeva-Gupta, Yuliya; Grabocka, Elda; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2013-01-01

    RAS proteins are essential components of signalling pathways that emanate from cell surface receptors. Oncogenic activation of these proteins owing to missense mutations is frequently detected in several types of cancer. A wealth of biochemical and genetic studies indicates that RAS proteins control a complex molecular circuitry that consists of a wide array of interconnecting pathways. In this Review, we describe how RAS oncogenes exploit their extensive signalling reach to affect multiple cellular processes that drive tumorigenesis. PMID:21993244

  8. Differential utilization of Ras signaling pathways by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage CSF receptors during macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Guidez, F; Li, A C; Horvai, A; Welch, J S; Glass, C K

    1998-07-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) independently stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of macrophages from bone marrow progenitor cells. Although the GM-CSF and M-CSF receptors are unrelated, both couple to Ras-dependent signal transduction pathways, suggesting that these pathways might account for common actions of GM-CSF and M-CSF on the expression of macrophage-specific genes. To test this hypothesis, we have investigated the mechanisms by which GM-CSF and M-CSF regulate the expression of the macrophage scavenger receptor A (SR-A) gene. We demonstrate that induction of the SR-A gene by M-CSF is dependent on AP-1 and cooperating Ets domain transcription factors that bind to sites in an M-CSF-dependent enhancer located 4.1 to 4.5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start site. In contrast, regulation by GM-CSF requires a separate enhancer located 4.5 to 4.8 kb upstream of the transcriptional start site that confers both immediate-early and sustained transcriptional responses. Results of a combination of DNA binding experiments and functional assays suggest that immediate transcriptional responses are mediated by DNA binding proteins that are constitutively bound to the GM-CSF enhancer and are activated by Ras. At 12 to 24 h after GM-CSF treatment, the GM-CSF enhancer becomes further occupied by additional DNA binding proteins that may contribute to sustained transcriptional responses. In concert, these studies indicate that GM-CSF and M-CSF differentially utilize Ras-dependent signal transduction pathways to regulate scavenger receptor gene expression, consistent with the distinct functional properties of M-CSF- and GM-CSF-derived macrophages. PMID:9632769

  9. The impact of higher-order aberrations on the strength of directional signals produced by accommodative microfluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Metlapally, Sangeetha; Tong, Jianliang L.; Tahir, Humza J.; Schor, Clifton M.

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that the accommodation system could perform contrast discrimination between the two dioptric extremes of accommodative microfluctuations to extract directional signals for reflex accommodation. Higher-order aberrations (HOAs) may have a significant influence on the strength of these contrast signals. Our goal was to compute the effect HOAs may have on contrast signals for stimuli within the upper defocus limit by comparing computed microcontrast fluctuations with psychophysical contrast increment thresholds (Bradley & Ohzawa, 1986). Wavefront aberrations were measured while subjects viewed a Maltese spoke stimulus monocularly. Computations were performed for accommodation or disaccommodation stimuli from a 3 Diopter (D) baseline. Microfluctuations were estimated from the standard deviation of the wavefronts over time at baseline. Through-focus Modulation Transfer, optical contrast increments (ΔC), and Weber fractions (ΔC/C) were derived from point spread functions computed from the wavefronts at baseline for 2 and 4 cycles per degree (cpd) components, with and without HOAs. The ΔCs thus computed from the wavefronts were compared with psychophysical contrast increment threshold data. Microfluctuations are potentially useful for extracting directional information for defocus values within 3 D, where contrast increments for the 2 or 4 cpd components exceed psychophysical thresholds. HOAs largely reduce contrast signals produced by microfluctuations, depending on the mean focus error, and their magnitude in individual subjects, and they may shrink the effective stimulus range for reflex accommodation. The upper defocus limit could therefore be constrained by discrimination of microcontrast fluctuations. PMID:25342542

  10. Small-molecule binding of the axin RGS domain promotes β-catenin and Ras degradation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Pu-Hyeon; Cho, Yong-Hee; Lee, Sang-Kyu; Lee, JaeHeon; Jeong, Woo-Jeong; Moon, Byoung-San; Yun, Ji-Hye; Yang, Jee Sun; Choi, Sooho; Yoon, Juyong; Kim, Hyun-Yi; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Kaduwal, Saluja; Lee, Weontae; Min, Do Sik; Kim, Hoguen; Han, Gyoonhee; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2016-08-01

    Both the Wnt/β-catenin and Ras pathways are aberrantly activated in most human colorectal cancers (CRCs) and interact cooperatively in tumor promotion. Inhibition of these signaling may therefore be an ideal strategy for treating CRC. We identified KY1220, a compound that destabilizes both β-catenin and Ras, via targeting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and synthesized its derivative KYA1797K. KYA1797K bound directly to the regulators of G-protein signaling domain of axin, initiating β-catenin and Ras degradation through enhancement of the β-catenin destruction complex activating GSK3β. KYA1797K effectively suppressed the growth of CRCs harboring APC and KRAS mutations, as shown by various in vitro studies and by in vivo studies using xenograft and transgenic mouse models of tumors induced by APC and KRAS mutations. Destabilization of both β-catenin and Ras via targeting axin is a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of CRC and other type cancers activated Wnt/β-catenin and Ras pathways. PMID:27294323

  11. RAS Laboratory Groups

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Initiative uses multiple technologies to attack RAS-driven cancers. The resources of the Frederick National Lab allocated to the RAS Hub are organized into seven laboratory groups, each contributing to the collaborative effort.

  12. The RAS Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the RAS Initiative to explore innovative approaches for attacking the proteins encoded by mutant forms of RAS genes and to ultimately create effective, new therapies for RAS-related cancers.

  13. Expression, Purification, and Characterization of Ras Protein (BmRas1) from Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Yanping; Liu, Guangqiang; Yu, Wei; Nie, Zuoming; Chen, Jian; Lv, Zhengbing; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2012-01-01

    The Ras subfamily is the member of small G proteins superfamily involved in cellular signal transduction. Activation of Ras signaling causes cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Bombyx mori Ras-like protein (BmRas1) may belong to the Ras subfamily. It contained an H-N-K-Ras-like domain. The BmRas1 mRNA consisted of 1459 bp. The open reading frame contained 579 bp, encoding 192 amino acids. The protein had such secondary structures as α-helices, extended strand, and random coil. BmRas1 was expressed successfully in E. coli BL21. The recombinant protein was purified with metal-chelating affinity chromatography. The GTPase activity of purified protein was determined by FeSO4-(NH4)2MoO4 assay. The results showed that purified recombinant protein had intrinsic activity of GTPase. High titer polyclonal antibodies were generated by New Zealand rabbit immunized with purified protein. The gene expression features of BmRas1 at different stages and in different organs of the fifth instar larvae were analyzed by Western blot. The results showed that BmRas1 was expressed highly in three development stages including egg, pupae, and adult, but low expression in larva. BmRas1 was expressed in these tissues including head, malpighian tubule, genital gland, and silk gland. The purified recombinant protein would be utilized to further function studies of BmRas1. PMID:22536118

  14. TLR9 signalling in microglia attenuates seizure-induced aberrant neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Taito; Murao, Naoya; Katano, Yuki; Juliandi, Berry; Kohyama, Jun; Akira, Shizuo; Kawai, Taro; Nakashima, Kinichi

    2015-01-01

    Pathological conditions such as epilepsy cause misregulation of adult neural stem/progenitor populations in the adult hippocampus in mice, and the resulting abnormal neurogenesis leads to impairment in learning and memory. However, how animals cope with abnormal neurogenesis remains unknown. Here we show that microglia in the mouse hippocampus attenuate convulsive seizure-mediated aberrant neurogenesis through the activation of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), an innate immune sensor known to recognize microbial DNA and trigger inflammatory responses. We found that microglia sense self-DNA from degenerating neurons following seizure, and secrete tumour necrosis factor-α, resulting in attenuation of aberrant neurogenesis. Furthermore, TLR9 deficiency exacerbated seizure-induced cognitive decline and recurrent seizure severity. Our findings thus suggest the existence of bidirectional communication between the innate immune and nervous systems for the maintenance of adult brain integrity. PMID:25751136

  15. RAS/MAPK Activation Drives Resistance to Smo Inhibition, Metastasis, and Tumor Evolution in Shh Pathway-Dependent Tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Ornell, Kimberly J; Zhou, Pengcheng; Dabral, Sukriti K; Pak, Ekaterina; Li, Wei; Atwood, Scott X; Whitson, Ramon J; Chang, Anne Lynn S; Li, Jiang; Oro, Anthony E; Chan, Jennifer A; Kelleher, Joseph F; Segal, Rosalind A

    2015-09-01

    Aberrant Shh signaling promotes tumor growth in diverse cancers. The importance of Shh signaling is particularly evident in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), where inhibitors targeting the Shh pathway component Smoothened (Smo) show great therapeutic promise. However, the emergence of drug resistance limits long-term efficacy, and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Using new medulloblastoma models, we identify two distinct paradigms of resistance to Smo inhibition. Sufu mutations lead to maintenance of the Shh pathway in the presence of Smo inhibitors. Alternatively activation of the RAS-MAPK pathway circumvents Shh pathway dependency, drives tumor growth, and enhances metastatic behavior. Strikingly, in BCC patients treated with Smo inhibitor, squamous cell cancers with RAS/MAPK activation emerged from the antecedent BCC tumors. Together, these findings reveal a critical role of the RAS-MAPK pathway in drug resistance and tumor evolution of Shh pathway-dependent tumors. PMID:26130651

  16. RAS/MAPK activation drives resistance to Smo inhibition, metastasis and tumor evolution in Shh pathway-dependent tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Ornell, Kimberly J.; Zhou, Pengcheng; Dabral, Sukriti K.; Pak, Ekaterina; Li, Wei; Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Chang, Anne Lynn S.; Li, Jiang; Oro, Anthony E.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Kelleher, Joseph F.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Shh signaling promotes tumor growth in diverse cancers. The importance of Shh signaling is particularly evident in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), where inhibitors targeting the Shh pathway component Smoothened (Smo) show great therapeutic promise. However, the emergence of drug resistance limits long-term efficacy and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Using new medulloblastoma models, we identify two distinct paradigms of resistance to Smo inhibition. Sufu mutations lead to maintenance of the Shh pathway in the presence of Smo inhibitors. Alternatively activation of the RAS/MAPK pathway circumvents Shh pathway-dependency, drives tumor growth and enhances metastatic behavior. Strikingly, in BCC patients treated with Smo inhibitor, squamous cell cancers with RAS/MAPK activation emerged from the antecedent BCC tumors. Together these findings reveal a critical role of RAS/MAPK pathway in drug resistance and tumor evolution of Shh pathway-dependent tumors. PMID:26130651

  17. Caenorhabditis elegans TRPV Channels Function in a Modality-Specific Pathway to Regulate Response to Aberrant Sensory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ezak , Meredith J.; Hong , Elizabeth; Chaparro-Garcia , Angela; Ferkey , Denise M.

    2010-01-01

    Olfaction and some forms of taste (including bitter) are mediated by G protein-coupled signal transduction pathways. Olfactory and gustatory ligands bind to chemosensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in specialized sensory cells to activate intracellular signal transduction cascades. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are negative regulators of signaling that specifically phosphorylate activated GPCRs to terminate signaling. Although loss of GRK function usually results in enhanced cellular signaling, Caenorhabditis elegans lacking GRK-2 function are not hypersensitive to chemosensory stimuli. Instead, grk-2 mutant animals do not chemotax toward attractive olfactory stimuli or avoid aversive tastes and smells. We show here that loss-of-function mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels OSM-9 and OCR-2 selectively restore grk-2 behavioral avoidance of bitter tastants, revealing modality-specific mechanisms for TRPV channel function in the regulation of C. elegans chemosensation. Additionally, a single amino acid point mutation in OCR-2 that disrupts TRPV channel-mediated gene expression, but does not decrease channel function in chemosensory primary signal transduction, also restores grk-2 bitter taste avoidance. Thus, loss of GRK-2 function may lead to changes in gene expression, via OSM-9/OCR-2, to selectively alter the levels of signaling components that transduce or regulate bitter taste responses. Our results suggest a novel mechanism and multiple modality-specific pathways that sensory cells employ in response to aberrant signal transduction. PMID:20176974

  18. Regulation of Ras Exchange Factors and Cellular Localization of Ras Activation by Lipid Messengers in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jesse E.; Rubio, Ignacio; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2013-01-01

    The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs) catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and Son of Sevenless (SOS)-family GEFs. Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood. One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of RasGEFs functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells. PMID:24027568

  19. Aberrant JAK/STAT Signaling Suppresses TFF1 and TFF2 through Epigenetic Silencing of GATA6 in Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Shyong; Wei, Kuo-Liang; Chou, Jian-Liang; Lu, Chung-Kuang; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Lin, Jora M J; Deng, Yi-Fang; Hsu, Wan-Ting; Wang, Hui-Min David; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Li, Chin; Chan, Michael W Y

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer. In this study, we examined the role of STAT3 in the expression and methylation of its targets in gastric cancer patients. Results from RNA sequencing identified an inverse correlation between the expression of STAT3 and GATA6 in 23 pairs of gastric cancer patient samples. We discovered that the expression of GATA6 is epigenetically silenced through promoter methylation in gastric cancer cell lines. Interestingly, the inhibition of STAT3 using a novel STAT3 inhibitor restored the expression of GATA6 and its targets, trefoil factors 1 and 2 (TFF1/2). Moreover, disruption of STAT3 binding to GATA6 promoter by small hairpin RNA restored GATA6 expression in AGS cells. A clinically significant correlation was also observed between the expression of GATA6 and TFF1/2 among tissue samples from 60 gastric cancer patients. Finally, bisulfite pyrosequencing revealed GATA6 methylation in 65% (39/60) of the patients, and those with higher GATA6 methylation tended to have shorter overall survival. In conclusion, we demonstrated that aberrant JAK/STAT signaling suppresses TFF1/2 partially through the epigenetic silencing of GATA6. Therapeutic intervention of STAT3 in reversing the epigenetic status of GATA6 could benefit the treatment of gastric cancer and is worthy of further investigation. PMID:27598141

  20. A novel quinoline, MT477: suppresses cell signaling through Ras molecular pathway, inhibits PKC activity, and demonstrates in vivo anti-tumor activity against human carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jasinski, Piotr; Welsh, Brandon; Galvez, Jorge; Land, David; Zwolak, Pawel; Ghandi, Lori; Terai, Kaoru; Dudek, Arkadiusz Z

    2008-06-01

    MT477 is a novel thiopyrano[2,3-c]quinoline that has been identified using molecular topology screening as a potential anticancer drug with a high activity against protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms. The objective of the present study was to determine the mechanism of action of MT477 and its activity against human cancer cell lines. MT477 interfered with PKC activity as well as phosphorylation of Ras and ERK1/2 in H226 human lung carcinoma cells. It also induced poly-caspase-dependent apoptosis. MT477 had a dose-dependent (0.006 to 0.2 mM) inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation of H226, MCF-7, U87, LNCaP, A431 and A549 cancer cell lines as determined by in vitro proliferation assays. Two murine xenograft models of human A431 and H226 lung carcinoma were used to evaluate tumor response to intraperitoneal administration of MT477 (33 microg/kg, 100 microg/kg, and 1 mg/kg). Tumor growth was inhibited by 24.5% in A431 and 43.67% in H226 xenografts following MT477 treatment, compared to vehicle controls (p < 0.05). In conclusion, our empirical findings are consistent with molecular modeling of MT477's activity against PKC. We also found, however, that its mechanism of action occurs through suppressing Ras signaling, indicating that its effects on apoptosis and tumor growth in vivo may be mediated by Ras as well as PKC. We propose, therefore, that MT477 warrants further development as an anticancer drug. PMID:17957339

  1. Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway contributes to the sequential progression of DMBA-induced HBP carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Vidya Priyadarsini, Ramamurthi; Senthil Murugan, Ramalingam; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2012-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathway mediated via interactions between β-catenin and members of the TCF/LEF-1 family of transcription factors plays a central role in the regulation of epithelial cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, adhesion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and invasion. Aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway with overexpression of Wnt and Fz, mutations of APC, β-catenin, and axin 1, and cytoplasmic accumulation of β-catenin have been frequently reported in a broad spectrum of human malignancies including oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). However, changes in the components of the Wnt signaling pathway have not been documented during 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis, a paradigm for oral oncogenesis and chemointervention. In this study, we evaluated the role of β-catenin accumulation and Wnt ligands, Wnt signaling members (Fz, Dvl, APC, GSK-3β, axin, and WIF) and the downstream targets of Wnt (cyclin D1, MMP-2, and MMP-9) during the sequential progression of DMBA-induced HBP carcinomas by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Our data reveal a correlation between β-catenin accumulation and activation of Wnt signaling, and its downstream effector molecules during the sequential development of HBP carcinomas from hyperplasia to invasive carcinoma through dysplasia. Our data also support a pivotal role for β-catenin in the malignant transition of the HBP. Aberrant Wnt signaling may be a hallmark of progression to malignancy during DMBA-induced HBP carcinogenesis and could be a potential preventive and therapeutic target for suppression of OSCC. PMID:21924667

  2. Structural analysis of autoinhibition in the Ras-specific exchange factor RasGRP1

    PubMed Central

    Iwig, Jeffrey S; Vercoulen, Yvonne; Das, Rahul; Barros, Tiago; Limnander, Andre; Che, Yan; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Wemmer, David E; Roose, Jeroen P; Kuriyan, John

    2013-01-01

    RasGRP1 and SOS are Ras-specific nucleotide exchange factors that have distinct roles in lymphocyte development. RasGRP1 is important in some cancers and autoimmune diseases but, in contrast to SOS, its regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Activating signals lead to the membrane recruitment of RasGRP1 and Ras engagement, but it is unclear how interactions between RasGRP1 and Ras are suppressed in the absence of such signals. We present a crystal structure of a fragment of RasGRP1 in which the Ras-binding site is blocked by an interdomain linker and the membrane-interaction surface of RasGRP1 is hidden within a dimerization interface that may be stabilized by the C-terminal oligomerization domain. NMR data demonstrate that calcium binding to the regulatory module generates substantial conformational changes that are incompatible with the inactive assembly. These features allow RasGRP1 to be maintained in an inactive state that is poised for activation by calcium and membrane-localization signals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00813.001 PMID:23908768

  3. RAS and Hedgehog--partners in crime.

    PubMed

    Lauth, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Both RAS and Hedgehog (HH) pathway activation can be found in approximately one third of all cancers. In many cases, this activation occurs in the same tumor types, suggesting a positive impact of a simultaneous activation of RAS and HH on tumor development. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge about the molecular and functional crosstalk of RAS and HH signaling in the development of hyperproliferative disease. PMID:21622175

  4. P120-GAP associated with syndecan-2 to function as an active switch signal for Src upon transformation with oncogenic ras

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.-W.; Chen, C.-L.; Chuang, N.-N. . E-mail: zonnc@sinica.edu.tw

    2005-04-15

    BALB/3T3 cells transfected with plasmids pcDNA3.1-[S-ras(Q{sub 61}K)] of shrimp Penaeus japonicus were applied to reveal a complex of p120-GAP/syndecan-2 being highly expressed upon transformation. Of interest, most of the p120-GAP/syndecan-2 complex was localized at caveolae, a membrane microdomain enriched with caveolin-1. To confirm the molecular interaction between syndecan-2 and p120-GAP, we further purified p120-GAP protein from mouse brains by using an affinity column of HiTrap-RACK1 and expressed mouse RACK1-encoded fusion protein and mouse syndecan-2-encoded fusion protein in bacteria. We report molecular affinities exist between p120-GAP and RACK1, syndecan-2 and RACK1 as well as p120-GAP and syndecan-2. The selective affinity between p120-GAP and syndecan-2 was found to be sufficient to detach RACK1. The p120-GAP/syndecan-2 complex was demonstrated to keep Src tyrosine kinase in an activated form. On the other hand, the syndecan-2/RACK1 complex was found to have Src in an inactivated form. These data indicate that the p120-GAP/syndecan-2 complex at caveolae could provide a docking site for Src to transmit tyrosine signaling, implying that syndecan-2/p120-GAP functions as a tumor promoter upon transformation with oncogenic ras of shrimp P. japonicus.

  5. Loss of tumor suppressor Merlin results in aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Erhong; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Bailey, Sarah K.; Metge, Brandon J.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Samant, Rajeev S.; Shevde, Lalita A.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of the tumor suppressor Merlin is compromised in nervous system malignancies due to genomic aberrations. We demonstrated for the first time, that in breast cancer, Merlin protein expression is lost due to proteasome-mediated elimination. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissues from patients with metastatic breast cancer revealed characteristically reduced Merlin expression. Importantly, we identified a functional role for Merlin in impeding breast tumor xenograft growth and reducing invasive characteristics. We sought to determine a possible mechanism by which Merlin accomplishes this reduction in malignant activity. We observed that breast and pancreatic cancer cells with loss of Merlin show an aberrant increase in the activity of β-catenin concomitant with nuclear localization of β-catenin. We discovered that Merlin physically interacts with β-catenin, alters the sub-cellular localization of β-catenin, and significantly reduces the protein levels of β-catenin by targeting it for degradation through the upregulation of Axin1. Consequently, restoration of Merlin inhibited β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity in breast and pancreatic cancer cells. We also present evidence that loss of Merlin sensitizes tumor cells to inhibition by compounds that target β-catenin-mediated activity. Thus, this study provides compelling evidence that Merlin reduces the malignant activity of pancreatic and breast cancer, in part by suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Given the potent role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in breast and pancreatic cancer and the flurry of activity to test β-catenin inhibitors in the clinic, our findings are opportune and provide evidence for Merlin in restraining aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26908451

  6. RasGRP1 and RasGRP3 Are Required for Efficient Generation of Early Thymic Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Golec, Dominic P; Henao Caviedes, Laura M; Baldwin, Troy A

    2016-09-01

    T cell development is dependent on the migration of progenitor cells from the bone marrow to the thymus. Upon reaching the thymus, progenitors undergo a complex developmental program that requires inputs from various highly conserved signaling pathways including the Notch and Wnt pathways. To date, Ras signaling has not been implicated in the very earliest stages of T cell differentiation, but members of a family of Ras activators called RasGRPs have been shown to be involved at multiple stages of T cell development. We examined early T cell development in mice lacking RasGRP1, RasGRP3, and RasGRPs 1 and 3. We report that RasGRP1- and RasGRP3-deficient thymi show significantly reduced numbers of early thymic progenitors (ETPs) relative to wild type thymi. Furthermore, RasGRP1/3 double-deficient thymi show significant reductions in ETP numbers compared with either RasGRP1 or RasGRP3 single-deficient thymi, suggesting that both RasGRP1 and RasGRP3 regulate the generation of ETPs. In addition, competitive bone marrow chimera experiments reveal that RasGRP1/3 double-deficient progenitors intrinsically generate ETPs less efficiently than wild type progenitors. Finally, RasGRP1/3-deficient progenitors show impaired migration toward the CCR9 ligand, CCL25, suggesting that RasGRP1 and RasGRP3 may regulate progenitor entry into the thymus through a CCR9-dependent mechanism. These data demonstrate that, in addition to Notch and Wnt, the highly conserved Ras pathway is critical for the earliest stages of T cell development and further highlight the importance of Ras signaling during thymocyte maturation. PMID:27465532

  7. Paradoxical activation of MEK/ERK signaling induced by B-Raf inhibition enhances DR5 expression and DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, You-Take; Deng, Jiusheng; Yue, Ping; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    B-Raf inhibitors have been used for the treatment of some B-Raf–mutated cancers. They effectively inhibit B-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling in cancers harboring mutant B-Raf, but paradoxically activates MEK/ERK in Ras-mutated cancers. Death receptor 5 (DR5), a cell surface pro-apoptotic protein, triggers apoptosis upon ligation with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or aggregation. This study focused on determining the effects of B-Raf inhibition on DR5 expression and DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells. Using chemical and genetic approaches, we have demonstrated that the B-Raf inhibitor PLX4032 induces DR5 upregulation exclusively in Ras-mutant cancer cells; this effect is dependent on Ras/c-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling activation. PLX4032 induces DR5 expression at transcriptional levels, largely due to enhancing CHOP/Elk1-mediated DR5 transcription. Pre-exposure of Ras-mutated cancer cells to PLX4032 sensitizes them to TRAIL-induced apoptosis; this is also a c-Raf/MEK/ERK-dependent event. Collectively, our findings highlight a previously undiscovered effect of B-Raf inhibition on the induction of DR5 expression and the enhancement of DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells and hence may suggest a novel therapeutic strategy against Ras-mutated cancer cells by driving their death due to DR5-dependent apoptosis through B-Raf inhibition. PMID:27222248

  8. Paradoxical activation of MEK/ERK signaling induced by B-Raf inhibition enhances DR5 expression and DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, You-Take; Deng, Jiusheng; Yue, Ping; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    B-Raf inhibitors have been used for the treatment of some B-Raf-mutated cancers. They effectively inhibit B-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling in cancers harboring mutant B-Raf, but paradoxically activates MEK/ERK in Ras-mutated cancers. Death receptor 5 (DR5), a cell surface pro-apoptotic protein, triggers apoptosis upon ligation with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or aggregation. This study focused on determining the effects of B-Raf inhibition on DR5 expression and DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells. Using chemical and genetic approaches, we have demonstrated that the B-Raf inhibitor PLX4032 induces DR5 upregulation exclusively in Ras-mutant cancer cells; this effect is dependent on Ras/c-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling activation. PLX4032 induces DR5 expression at transcriptional levels, largely due to enhancing CHOP/Elk1-mediated DR5 transcription. Pre-exposure of Ras-mutated cancer cells to PLX4032 sensitizes them to TRAIL-induced apoptosis; this is also a c-Raf/MEK/ERK-dependent event. Collectively, our findings highlight a previously undiscovered effect of B-Raf inhibition on the induction of DR5 expression and the enhancement of DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells and hence may suggest a novel therapeutic strategy against Ras-mutated cancer cells by driving their death due to DR5-dependent apoptosis through B-Raf inhibition. PMID:27222248

  9. Ras transformation uncouples the kinesin-coordinated cellular nutrient response

    PubMed Central

    Zaganjor, Elma; Weil, Lauren M.; Gonzales, Joshua X.; Minna, John D.; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2014-01-01

    The kinesin family members (KIFs) KIF2A and KIF2C depolymerize microtubules, unlike the majority of other kinesins, which transport cargo along microtubules. KIF2A regulates the localization of lysosomes in the cytoplasm, which assists in activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) on the lysosomal surface. We find that the closely related kinesin KIF2C also influences lysosomal organization in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). Expression of KIF2C and, to a lesser extent, KIF2A in untransformed and mutant K-Ras–transformed cells is regulated by ERK1/2. Prolonged inhibition of ERK1/2 activation with PD0325901 mimics nutrient deprivation by disrupting lysosome organization and decreasing mTORC1 activity in HBEC, suggesting a long-term mechanism for optimization of mTORC1 activity by ERK1/2. We tested the hypothesis that up-regulation of KIF2C and KIF2A by ERK1/2 caused aberrant lysosomal positioning and mTORC1 activity in a mutant K-Ras–dependent cancer and cancer model. In Ras-transformed cells, however, mTORC1 activity and lysosome organization appear independent of ERK1/2 and these kinesins although ERK1/2 activity and the kinesins are required for Ras-dependent proliferation and migration. We conclude that mutant K-Ras repurposes these signaling and regulatory proteins to support the transformed phenotype. PMID:25002494

  10. Visualizing and Quantitating the Spatiotemporal Regulation of Ras/ERK Signaling by Dual-Specificity Mitogen-Activated Protein Phosphatases (MKPs).

    PubMed

    Caunt, Christopher J; Kidger, Andrew M; Keyse, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway is critical in determining the physiological and pathophysiological outcome of signaling. Dual-specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatases (DUSPs or MKPs) are key regulators of pathway activity and may also localize ERK to distinct subcellular locations. Here we present methods largely based on the use of high content microscopy to both visualize and quantitate the subcellular distribution of activated (p-ERK) and total ERK in populations of mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from mice lacking DUSP5, a nuclear ERK-specific MKP. Such methods in combination with rescue experiments using adenoviral vectors encoding wild-type and mutant forms of DUSP5 have allowed us to visualize specific defects in ERK regulation in these cells thus confirming the role of this phosphatase as both a nuclear regulator of ERK activity and localization. PMID:27514808

  11. Nucleophosmin Mutants Promote Adhesion, Migration and Invasion of Human Leukemia THP-1 Cells through MMPs Up-regulation via Ras/ERK MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Jingrong; Shao, Huiyuan; Chen, Xianchun; Zhang, Shuaishuai; Quan, Jing; Zou, Qin; Jin, Hongjun; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with mutated nucleophosmin (NPM1) has been defined as a unique subgroup in the new classification of myeloid neoplasm, and the AML patients with mutated NPM1 frequently present extramedullary infiltration, but how NPM1 mutants regulate this process remains elusive. In this study, we found that overexpression of type A NPM1 gene mutation (NPM1-mA) enhanced the adhesive, migratory and invasive potential in THP-1 AML cells lacking mutated NPM1. NPM1-mA had up-regulated expression and gelatinolytic matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2)/MMP-9 activity, as assessed by real-time PCR, western blotting and gelatin zymography. Following immunoprecipitation analysis to identify the interaction of NPM1-mA with K-Ras, we focused on the effect of NPM1-mA overexpression on the Ras/Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling axis and showed that NPM1-mA increased the MEK and ERK phosphorylation levels, as evaluated by western blotting. Notably, a specific inhibitor of the ERK/MAPK pathway (PD98059), but not p38/MAPK, JNK/MAPK or PI3-K/AKT inhibitors, markedly decreased the cell invasion numbers in a transwell assay. Further experiments demonstrated that blocking the ERK/MAPK pathway by PD98059 resulted in reduced MMP-2/9 protein levels and MMP-9 activity. Additionally, NPM1-mA overexpression had down-regulated gene expression and protein production of tissue inhibitor of MMP-2 (TIMP-2) in THP-1 cells. Furthermore, evaluation of gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset revealed that MMP-2 was overexpressed in AML patient samples with NPM1 mutated and high MMP-2 expression associated with leukemic skin infiltration. Taken together, our results reveal that NPM1 mutations contribute to the invasive potential of AML cells through MMPs up-regulation via Ras/ERK MAPK signaling pathway activation and offer novel insights into the potential role of NPM1 mutations in leukemogenesis. PMID:26884713

  12. Adenosine dialdehyde suppresses MMP-9-mediated invasion of cancer cells by blocking the Ras/Raf-1/ERK/AP-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Kim, Jong Heon; Kim, Seung Cheol; Yi, Young-Su; Yang, Woo Seok; Yang, Yanyan; Kim, Han Gyung; Lee, Jae Yong; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Yoo, Byong Chul; Hong, Sungyoul; Cho, Jae Youl

    2013-11-01

    Adenosine dialdehyde (AdOx) inhibits transmethylation by the accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), a negative feedback inhibitor of methylation, through the suppression of SAH hydrolase (SAHH). In this study, we aimed to determine the regulatory effect of AdOx on cancer invasion by using three different cell lines: MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and U87. The invasive capacity of these cells in the presence (MCF-7) or absence (MDA-MB-231 and U87) of phorbal 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) was strongly decreased by AdOx treatment. Furthermore, the expression, secretion, and activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, a critical enzyme regulating cell invasion, in these cells were diminished by AdOx treatment. AdOx strongly suppressed AP-1-mediated luciferase activity and, in parallel, reduced the translocation of c-Fos and c-Jun into the nucleus. AdOx was shown to block a series of upstream AP-1 activation signaling complexes composed of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), mitogen-activated protein ERK kinase (MEK)1/2, Raf-1, and Ras, as assessed by measuring the levels of the phosphorylated and membrane-translocated forms. Furthermore, we found that suppression of SAHH by siRNA and 3-deazaadenosine, knock down of isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase (ICMT), and treatment with SAH showed inhibitory patterns similar to those of AdOx. Therefore, our data suggest that AdOx is capable of targeting the methylation reaction regulated by SAHH and ICMT and subsequently downregulating MMP-9 expression and decreasing invasion of cancer cells through inhibition of the Ras/Raf-1/ERK/AP-1 pathway. PMID:23994169

  13. Unbiased RNAi screen for hepcidin regulators links hepcidin suppression to proliferative Ras/RAF and nutrient-dependent mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Mleczko-Sanecka, Katarzyna; Roche, Franziska; da Silva, Ana Rita; Call, Debora; D'Alessio, Flavia; Ragab, Anan; Lapinski, Philip E; Ummanni, Ramesh; Korf, Ulrike; Oakes, Christopher; Damm, Georg; D'Alessandro, Lorenza A; Klingmüller, Ursula; King, Philip D; Boutros, Michael; Hentze, Matthias W; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2014-03-01

    The hepatic hormone hepcidin is a key regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Its expression is largely regulated by 2 signaling pathways: the "iron-regulated" bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and the inflammatory JAK-STAT pathways. To obtain broader insights into cellular processes that modulate hepcidin transcription and to provide a resource to identify novel genetic modifiers of systemic iron homeostasis, we designed an RNA interference (RNAi) screen that monitors hepcidin promoter activity after the knockdown of 19 599 genes in hepatocarcinoma cells. Interestingly, many of the putative hepcidin activators play roles in signal transduction, inflammation, or transcription, and affect hepcidin transcription through BMP-responsive elements. Furthermore, our work sheds light on new components of the transcriptional machinery that maintain steady-state levels of hepcidin expression and its responses to the BMP- and interleukin-6-triggered signals. Notably, we discover hepcidin suppression mediated via components of Ras/RAF MAPK and mTOR signaling, linking hepcidin transcriptional control to the pathways that respond to mitogen stimulation and nutrient status. Thus using a combination of RNAi screening, reverse phase protein arrays, and small molecules testing, we identify links between the control of systemic iron homeostasis and critical liver processes such as regeneration, response to injury, carcinogenesis, and nutrient metabolism. PMID:24385536

  14. Past, Present, and Future of Targeting Ras for Cancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi; Zhang, Shuxing

    2016-01-01

    For decades, mutant Ras (mut-Ras) proteins have been identified as drivers of multiple cancers including pancreatic, lung, and colon cancers. However, targeting this oncogene has been challenging and no Ras inhibitors are on the market to date. Lately several candidates targeting the downstream pathways of Ras signaling, including PI3K and Raf, were approved for cancer treatment. However, they do not present promising therapeutic effects on patients harboring Ras mutations. Recently, a variety of compounds have been reported to impair the activity of Ras, and these exciting discoveries reignite the hope for development of novel drugs targeting mut-Ras. In this article, we will review the progress made in this field and the current state-of-the-art technologies to develop Ras inhibitors. Also we will discuss the future direction of targeting Ras. PMID:26423695

  15. A Review: Molecular Aberrations within Hippo Signaling in Bone and Soft-Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Deel, Michael D.; Li, Jenny J.; Crose, Lisa E. S.; Linardic, Corinne M.

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is an evolutionarily conserved developmental network vital for the regulation of organ size, tissue homeostasis, repair and regeneration, and cell fate. The Hippo pathway has also been shown to have tumor suppressor properties. Hippo transduction involves a series of kinases and scaffolding proteins that are intricately connected to proteins in developmental cascades and in the tissue microenvironment. This network governs the downstream Hippo transcriptional co-activators, YAP and TAZ, which bind to and activate the output of TEADs, as well as other transcription factors responsible for cellular proliferation, self-renewal, differentiation, and survival. Surprisingly, there are few oncogenic mutations within the core components of the Hippo pathway. Instead, dysregulated Hippo signaling is a versatile accomplice to commonly mutated cancer pathways. For example, YAP and TAZ can be activated by oncogenic signaling from other pathways, or serve as co-activators for classical oncogenes. Emerging evidence suggests that Hippo signaling couples cell density and cytoskeletal structural changes to morphogenic signals and conveys a mesenchymal phenotype. While much of Hippo biology has been described in epithelial cell systems, it is clear that dysregulated Hippo signaling also contributes to malignancies of mesenchymal origin. This review will summarize the known molecular alterations within the Hippo pathway in sarcomas and highlight how several pharmacologic compounds have shown activity in modulating Hippo components, providing proof-of-principle that Hippo signaling may be harnessed for therapeutic application in sarcomas. PMID:26389076

  16. The GTPase-activating protein of Ras suppresses platelet-derived growth factor beta receptor signaling by silencing phospholipase C-gamma 1.

    PubMed Central

    Valius, M; Secrist, J P; Kazlauskas, A

    1995-01-01

    The beta receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (beta PDGFR) is activated by binding of PDGF and undergoes phosphorylation at multiple tyrosine residues. The tyrosine-phosphorylated receptor associates with numerous SH2-domain-containing proteins which include phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC gamma), the GTPase-activating protein of Ras (GAP), the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), the phosphotyrosine phosphatase Syp, and several other proteins. Our previous studies indicated that PI3K and PLC gamma were required for relay of the mitogenic signal of beta PDGFR, whereas GAP and Syp did not appear to be required for this response. In this study, we further investigated the role of GAP and Syp in mitogenic signaling by beta PDGFR. Focusing on the PLC gamma-dependent branch of beta PDGFR signaling, we constructed a series of mutant beta PDGFRs that contained the binding sites for pairs of the receptor-associated proteins: PLC gamma and PI3K, PLC gamma and GAP, or PLC gamma and Syp. Characterization of these mutants showed that while all receptors were catalytically active and bound similar amounts of PLC gamma, they differed dramatically in their ability to initiate DNA synthesis. This signaling deficiency related to an inability to efficiently tyrosine phosphorylate and activate PLC gamma. Surprisingly, the crippled receptor was the one that recruited PLC gamma and GAP. Thus, GAP functions to suppress signal relay by the beta PDGFR, and it does so by silencing PLC gamma. These findings demonstrate that the biological response to PDGF depends not only on the ability of the beta PDGFR to recruit signal relay enzymes but also on the blend of these receptor-associated proteins. PMID:7760802

  17. Activated K-Ras, But Not H-Ras or N-Ras, Regulates Brain Neural Stem Cell Proliferation in a Raf/Rb-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Bender, R. Hugh F.; Haigis, Kevin M.; Gutmann, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) give rise to all the major cell types in the brain, including neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes. However, the intracellular signaling pathways that govern brain NSC proliferation and differentiation have been incompletely characterized to date. Since some neurodevelopmental brain disorders (Costello syndrome and Noonan syndrome) are caused by germline activating mutations in the RAS genes, Ras small GTPases are likely critical regulators of brain NSC function. In the mammalian brain, Ras exists as three distinct molecules (H-Ras, K-Ras, and N-Ras), each with different subcellular localizations, downstream signaling effectors, and biological effects. Leveraging a novel series of conditional-activated Ras molecule-expressing genetically engineered mouse strains, we demonstrate that activated K-Ras, but not H-Ras or N-Ras, expression increases brain NSC growth in a Raf-dependent, but Mek-independent, manner. Moreover, we show that activated K-Ras regulation of brain NSC proliferation requires Raf binding and suppression of retinoblastoma (Rb) function. Collectively, these observations establish tissue-specific differences in activated Ras molecule regulation of brain cell growth that operate through a noncanonical mechanism. PMID:25788415

  18. ASPP2 Is a Novel Pan-Ras Nanocluster Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Posada, Itziar M. D.; Serulla, Marc; Zhou, Yong; Oetken-Lindholm, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Ras-induced senescence mediated through ASPP2 represents a barrier to tumour formation. It is initiated by ASPP2’s interaction with Ras at the plasma membrane, which stimulates the Raf/MEK/ERK signaling cascade. Ras to Raf signalling requires Ras to be organized in nanoscale signalling complexes, called nanocluster. We therefore wanted to investigate whether ASPP2 affects Ras nanoclustering. Here we show that ASPP2 increases the nanoscale clustering of all oncogenic Ras isoforms, H-ras, K-ras and N-ras. Structure-function analysis with ASPP2 truncation mutants suggests that the nanocluster scaffolding activity of ASPP2 converges on its α-helical domain. While ASPP2 increased effector recruitment and stimulated ERK and AKT phosphorylation, it did not increase colony formation of RasG12V transformed NIH/3T3 cells. By contrast, ASPP2 was able to suppress the transformation enhancing ability of the nanocluster scaffold Gal-1, by competing with the specific effect of Gal-1 on H-rasG12V- and K-rasG12V-nanoclustering, thus imposing ASPP2’s ERK and AKT signalling signature. Similarly, ASPP2 robustly induced senescence and strongly abrogated mammosphere formation irrespective of whether it was expressed alone or together with Gal-1, which by itself showed the opposite effect in Ras wt or H-ras mutant breast cancer cells. Our results suggest that Gal-1 and ASPP2 functionally compete in nanocluster for active Ras on the plasma membrane. ASPP2 dominates the biological outcome, thus switching from a Gal-1 supported growth-promoting setting to a senescence inducing and stemness suppressive program in cancer cells. Our results support Ras nanocluster as major integrators of tumour fate decision events. PMID:27437940

  19. Changes in Dopamine Signalling Do Not Underlie Aberrant Hippocampal Plasticity in a Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Dallérac, Glenn M; Cummings, Damian M; Hirst, Mark C; Milnerwood, Austen J; Murphy, Kerry P S J

    2016-03-01

    Altered dopamine receptor labelling has been demonstrated in presymptomatic and symptomatic Huntington's disease (HD) gene carriers, indicating that alterations in dopaminergic signalling are an early event in HD. We have previously described early alterations in synaptic transmission and plasticity in both the cortex and hippocampus of the R6/1 mouse model of Huntington's disease. Deficits in cortical synaptic plasticity were associated with altered dopaminergic signalling and could be reversed by D1- or D2-like dopamine receptor activation. In light of these findings we here investigated whether defects in dopamine signalling could also contribute to the marked alteration in hippocampal synaptic function. To this end we performed dopamine receptor labelling and pharmacology in the R6/1 hippocampus and report a marked, age-dependent elevation of hippocampal D1 and D2 receptor labelling in R6/1 hippocampal subfields. Yet, pharmacological inhibition or activation of D1- or D2-like receptors did not modify the aberrant synaptic plasticity observed in R6/1 mice. These findings demonstrate that global perturbations to dopamine receptor expression do occur in HD transgenic mice, similarly in HD gene carriers and patients. However, the direction of change and the lack of effect of dopaminergic pharmacological agents on synaptic function demonstrate that the perturbations are heterogeneous and region-specific, a finding that may explain the mixed results of dopamine therapy in HD. PMID:26782175

  20. K-RAS(V12) Induces Autocrine Production of EGFR Ligands and Mediates Radioresistance Through EGFR-Dependent Akt Signaling and Activation of DNA-PKcs

    SciTech Connect

    Minjgee, Minjmaa; Toulany, Mahmoud; Kehlbach, Rainer; Giehl, Klaudia; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: It is known that postirradiation survival of tumor cells presenting mutated K-RAS is mediated through autocrine activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this study the molecular mechanism of radioresistance of cells overexpressing mutated K-RAS(V12) was investigated. Methods and Materials: Head-and-neck cancer cells (FaDu) presenting wild-type K-RAS were transfected with empty vector or vector expressing mutated K-RAS(V12). The effect of K-RAS(V12) on autocrine production of EGFR ligands, activation of EGFR downstream pathways, DNA damage repair, and postirradiation survival was analyzed. Results: Conditioned medium collected from K-RAS(V12)-transfected cells enhanced activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt pathway and increased postirradiation survival of wild-type K-RAS parental cells when compared with controls. These effects were reversed by amphiregulin (AREG)-neutralizing antibody. In addition, secretion of the EGFR ligands AREG and transforming growth factor {alpha} was significantly increased upon overexpression of K-RAS(V12). Expression of mutated K-RAS(V12) resulted in an increase in radiation-induced DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation at S2056. This increase was accompanied by increased repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Abrogation of DNA-PKcs phosphorylation by serum depletion or AREG-neutralizing antibody underscored the role of autocrine production of EGFR ligands, namely, AREG, in regulating DNA-PKcs activation in K-RAS mutated cells. Conclusions: These data indicate that radioresistance of K-RAS mutated tumor cells is at least in part due to constitutive production of EGFR ligands, which mediate enhanced repair of DNA double-strand breaks through the EGFR-phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt cascade.

  1. Aberrant Activation of the RANK Signaling Receptor Induces Murine Salivary Gland Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Allison P.; Dougall, William C.; Ittmann, Michael M.; Lydon, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike cancers of related exocrine tissues such as the mammary and prostate gland, diagnosis and treatment of aggressive salivary gland malignancies have not markedly advanced in decades. Effective clinical management of malignant salivary gland cancers is undercut by our limited knowledge concerning the key molecular signals that underpin the etiopathogenesis of this rare and heterogeneous head and neck cancer. Without knowledge of the critical signals that drive salivary gland tumorigenesis, tumor vulnerabilities cannot be exploited that allow for targeted molecular therapies. This knowledge insufficiency is further exacerbated by a paucity of preclinical mouse models (as compared to other cancer fields) with which to both study salivary gland pathobiology and test novel intervention strategies. Using a mouse transgenic approach, we demonstrate that deregulation of the Receptor Activator of NFkB Ligand (RANKL)/RANK signaling axis results in rapid tumor development in all three major salivary glands. In line with its established role in other exocrine gland cancers (i.e., breast cancer), the RANKL/RANK signaling axis elicits an aggressive salivary gland tumor phenotype both at the histologic and molecular level. Despite the ability of this cytokine signaling axis to drive advanced stage disease within a short latency period, early blockade of RANKL/RANK signaling markedly attenuates the development of malignant salivary gland neoplasms. Together, our findings have uncovered a tumorigenic role for RANKL/RANK in the salivary gland and suggest that targeting this pathway may represent a novel therapeutic intervention approach in the prevention and/or treatment of this understudied head and neck cancer. PMID:26061636

  2. Targeting RTK Signaling Pathways in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Regad, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    The RAS/MAP kinase and the RAS/PI3K/AKT pathways play a key role in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation and survival. The induction of these pathways depends on Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) that are activated upon ligand binding. In cancer, constitutive and aberrant activations of components of those pathways result in increased proliferation, survival and metastasis. For instance, mutations affecting RTKs, Ras, B-Raf, PI3K and AKT are common in perpetuating the malignancy of several types of cancers and from different tissue origins. Therefore, these signaling pathways became prime targets for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide an overview about the most frequently encountered mutations, the pathogenesis that results from such mutations and the known therapeutic strategies developed to counteract their aberrant functions. PMID:26404379

  3. Molecular processes leading to aberrant androgen receptor signaling and castration resistance in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rong; Denmeade, Samuel R; Luo, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Hormone therapies targeting androgen receptor signaling are the mainstay of treatment for patients with advanced prostate cancer. The length of clinical remission induced by hormone therapies varies substantially among treated patients. Why some patients progress rapidly after treatment while others benefit with prolonged remission is a question that remains unsolved. The androgen receptor signaling pathway is the key molecular determinant of castration resistance, and a key target for prostate cancer drug design. Recent advances in characterizing molecular processes leading to the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer, including the discovery of multiple androgen receptor splicing variants, offer opportunities for rational development of new clinical tools or approaches to predict, monitor or control/prevent prostate cancer progression in the castrate setting. PMID:21318111

  4. Aberrant Notch signaling in glioblastoma stem cells contributes to tumor recurrence and invasion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Bo; Jiang, Hao; Zhan, Ren-Ya

    2016-08-01

    Upregulation of the Notch signaling pathway in cancer stem cells and side population (SP) cells has a major role in maintenance, self-renewal and chemoresistance. The present study isolated a cancer stem cell-like SP accounting for 4.1% of a glioblastoma cell population using a Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion assay. In this glioblastoma SP, the expression of of Notch1 signaling proteins Notch1 intracellular domain and Hes‑1 was markedly upregulated. Furthermore, knockdown of Notch1 by RNA interference significantly diminished the neurosphere formation ability, self‑renewal and chemoresistance of the SP cells. In addition, the expression of the stem‑cell surface genes Oct‑4, Sox2 and Nanog in SP cells was significantly reduced and the sensitivity to the SP cells to chemotherapeutics was enhanced following Notch1 knockdown. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that upregulation of Notch1 is involved in the chemotherapy resistance and tumor recurrence of glioblastoma. Hence, the development of novel anti‑cancer drugs targeting the Notch1 signaling pathway may be a promising strategy for curing glioblastoma. PMID:27315154

  5. Aberrant Activation of Notch Signaling Inhibits PROX1 Activity to Enhance the Malignant Behavior of Thyroid Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dongwon; Ramu, Swapnika; Park, Eunkyung; Jung, Eunson; Yang, Sara; Jung, Wonhyeuk; Choi, Inho; Lee, Sunju; Kim, Kyu Eui; Seong, Young Jin; Hong, Mingu; Daghlian, George; Kim, Daniel; Shin, Eugene; Seo, Jung In; Khatchadourian, Vicken; Zou, Mengchen; Li, Wei; De Filippo, Roger; Kokorowski, Paul; Chang, Andy; Kim, Steve; Bertoni, Ana; Furlanetto, Tania Weber; Shin, Sung; Li, Meng; Chen, Yibu; Wong, Alex; Koh, Chester; Geliebter, Jan; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2016-02-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is one of the most common endocrine malignancies associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although multiple studies have contributed to a better understanding of the genetic alterations underlying this frequently arising disease, the downstream molecular effectors that impact PTC pathogenesis remain to be further defined. Here, we report that the regulator of cell fate specification, PROX1, becomes inactivated in PTC through mRNA downregulation and cytoplasmic mislocalization. Expression studies in clinical specimens revealed that aberrantly activated NOTCH signaling promoted PROX1 downregulation and that cytoplasmic mislocalization significantly altered PROX1 protein stability. Importantly, restoration of PROX1 activity in thyroid carcinoma cells revealed that PROX1 not only enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling but also regulated several genes known to be associated with PTC, including thyroid cancer protein (TC)-1, SERPINA1, and FABP4. Furthermore, PROX1 reexpression suppressed the malignant phenotypes of thyroid carcinoma cells, such as proliferation, motility, adhesion, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, and polyploidy. Moreover, animal xenograft studies demonstrated that restoration of PROX1 severely impeded tumor formation and suppressed the invasiveness and the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio of PTC cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that NOTCH-induced PROX1 inactivation significantly promotes the malignant behavior of thyroid carcinoma and suggest that PROX1 reactivation may represent a potential therapeutic strategy to attenuate disease progression. PMID:26609053

  6. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Gita; Mahalingam, S.

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  7. RasGRP3 regulates the migration of glioma cells via interaction with Arp3

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae Kyung; Finniss, Susan; Cazacu, Simona; Xiang, Cunli; Poisson, Laila M.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Brodie, Chaya

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most aggressive primary brain tumors, are highly infiltrative. Although GBM express high Ras activity and Ras proteins have been implicated in gliomagenesis, Ras-activating mutations are not frequent in these tumors. RasGRP3, an important signaling protein responsive to diacylglycerol (DAG), increases Ras activation. Here, we examined the expression and functions of RasGRP3 in GBM and glioma cells. RasGRP3 expression was upregulated in GBM specimens and glioma stem cells compared with normal brains and neural stem cells, respectively. RasGRP3 activated Ras and Rap1 in glioma cells and increased cell migration and invasion partially via Ras activation. Using pull-down assay and mass spectroscopy we identified the actin-related protein, Arp3, as a novel interacting protein of RasGRP3. The interaction of RasGRP3 and Arp3 was validated by immunofluorescence staining and co-immunoprecipitation, and PMA, which activates RasGRP3 and induces its translocation to the peri-nuclear region, increased the association of Arp3 and RasGRP3. Arp3 was upregulated in GBM, regulated cell spreading and migration and its silencing partially decreased these effects of RasGRP3 in glioma cells. In summary, RasGRP3 acts as an important integrating signaling protein of the DAG and Ras signaling pathways and actin polymerization and represents an important therapeutic target in GBM. PMID:25682201

  8. Renal Hypodysplasia Associates with a Wnt4 Variant that Causes Aberrant Canonical Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vivante, Asaf; Mark-Danieli, Michal; Davidovits, Miriam; Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Omer, Dorit; Gnatek, Yehudit; Cleper, Roxana; Landau, Daniel; Kovalski, Yael; Weissman, Irit; Eisenstein, Israel; Soudack, Michalle; Wolf, Haike Reznik; Issler, Naomi; Lotan, Danny; Anikster, Yair

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal differentiation of the renal stem/progenitor pool into kidney tissue can lead to renal hypodysplasia (RHD), but the underlying causes of RHD are not well understood. In this multicenter study, we identified 20 Israeli pedigrees with isolated familial, nonsyndromic RHD and screened for mutations in candidate genes involved in kidney development, including PAX2, HNF1B, EYA1, SIX1, SIX2, SALL1, GDNF, WNT4, and WT1. In addition to previously reported RHD-causing genes, we found that two affected brothers were heterozygous for a missense variant in the WNT4 gene. Functional analysis of this variant revealed both antagonistic and agonistic canonical WNT stimuli, dependent on cell type. In HEK293 cells, WNT4 inhibited WNT3A induced canonical activation, and the WNT4 variant significantly enhanced this inhibition of the canonical WNT pathway. In contrast, in primary cultures of human fetal kidney cells, which maintain WNT activation and more closely represent WNT signaling in renal progenitors during nephrogenesis, this mutation caused significant loss of function, resulting in diminished canonical WNT/β-catenin signaling. In conclusion, heterozygous WNT4 variants are likely to play a causative role in renal hypodysplasia. PMID:23520208

  9. Biochemical similarity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe ras1 protein with RAS2 protein of Saccharomyces cervisiae.

    PubMed

    Onozawa, T; Danjoh, I; Fujiyama, A

    1995-07-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains single ras oncogene homologue, ras1, that functions in the signal transduction pathway conducting the cell's mating processes. To understand the biochemical basis of yeast ras proteins, we have purified the ras1 protein and compared the major biochemical constants with those of RAS2 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian ras proteins. The purified ras1 protein showed a remarkably high Kd value for GDP binding (178 nM) and for binding with ATP. In contrast, the Kd value for GTP binding and the rate of GTPase activity were 64 nM and 77 x 10(-6) s-1 at 37 degrees C, respectively; both were higher than normal p21ras protein, but at the same level as the RAS2 protein. We directly measured rate of GTP binding and GDP binding which were 3.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and 1.8 x 10(-3) s-1 at 30 degrees C, respectively. On the other hand, exchange rates between bound and free nucleotides remained almost constant throughout the tested combination of GTP and GDP, and were several-fold lower than the binding rate. These results suggest that the release of the guanine nucleotide is the rate-limiting step in the ras-GTP/GDP cycle. As a whole, the biochemical properties of the ras1 protein are close to those of the RAS2 protein, although these two proteins function differently in the signal transduction pathway in the cells. PMID:7483844

  10. ROLE OF RAS IN METAL-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR AND NFKB SIGNALING IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have shown previously that EGF receptor signaling is triggered by some metals associated with ambient air particles. Western blot using phospho-specific antibodies showed that As, Zn and V activated EGF receptor tyrosine kinase and the downstream kinases, MEK1/2 and ERK1/2. Us...

  11. Basal cell carcinoma and the carcinogenic role of aberrant Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Saran, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most frequent cancer in the white population and its incidence appears to be increasing worldwide. While the majority of BCCs arise sporadically, many cases are attributable to basal cell nevus syndrome, or Gorlin syndrome, an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder characterized by the occurrence of multiple BCCs and by extracutaneous tumors. Genetic studies on patients with basal cell nevus syndrome indicate deregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in epidermal keratinocytes as the primary event in the pathogenesis of BCC. This article summarizes the recent progress in understanding Hh-dependent BCC tumorigenesis, as well as evidence for deregulation of other molecular pathways, primarily the Wnt developmental pathway. Understanding the molecular genetics of BCC development has provided new opportunities for molecular therapy of this cancer by targeting Hh and other signaling pathways. PMID:20528237

  12. RasGRP1 overexpression in T-ALL increases basal nucleotide exchange on Ras rendering the Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway responsive to protumorigenic cytokines.

    PubMed

    Ksionda, O; Melton, A A; Bache, J; Tenhagen, M; Bakker, J; Harvey, R; Winter, S S; Rubio, I; Roose, J P

    2016-07-14

    Ras GTPases are activated by RasGEFs and inactivated by RasGAPs, which stimulate the hydrolysis of RasGTP to inactive RasGDP. GTPase-impairing somatic mutations in RAS genes, such as KRAS(G12D), are among the most common oncogenic events in metastatic cancer. A different type of cancer Ras signal, driven by overexpression of the RasGEF RasGRP1 (Ras guanine nucleotide-releasing protein 1), was recently implicated in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients and murine models, in which RasGRP1 T-ALLs expand in response to treatment with interleukins (ILs) 2, 7 and 9. Here, we demonstrate that IL-2/7/9 stimulation activates Erk and Akt pathways downstream of Ras in RasGRP1 T-ALL but not in normal thymocytes. In normal lymphocytes, RasGRP1 is recruited to the membrane by diacylglycerol (DAG) in a phospholipase C-γ (PLCγ)-dependent manner. Surprisingly, we find that leukemic RasGRP1-triggered Ras-Akt signals do not depend on acute activation of PLCγ to generate DAG but rely on baseline DAG levels instead. In agreement, using three distinct assays that measure different aspects of the RasGTP/GDP cycle, we established that overexpression of RasGRP1 in T-ALLs results in a constitutively high GTP-loading rate of Ras, which is constantly counterbalanced by hydrolysis of RasGTP. KRAS(G12D) T-ALLs do not show constitutive GTP loading of Ras. Thus, we reveal an entirely novel type of leukemogenic Ras signals that is based on a RasGRP1-driven increased in flux through the RasGTP/GDP cycle, which is mechanistically very different from KRAS(G12D) signals. Our studies highlight the dynamic balance between RasGEF and RasGAP in these T-ALLs and put forth a new model in which IL-2/7/9 decrease RasGAP activity. PMID:26549032

  13. Novel triterpenoids isolated from raisins exert potent antiproliferative activities by targeting mitochondrial and Ras/Raf/ERK signaling in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Wang, Yihai; Liu, Rui Hai; He, Xiangjiu

    2016-07-13

    Raisins are produced in many regions of the world and may be eaten raw or used in cooking, baking and brewing. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of raisins was used to determine the chemical identity of bioactive constituents. Seven triterpenoids, including three novel triterpenoids, were isolated and identified. The novel triterpenoids were elucidated to be 3β,13β-dihydroxy-12,13-dihydrooleanolic acid (1), 3β,12β,13β-trihydroxy-12,13-dihydrooleanolic acid (2, TOA), and 3β,13β-dihydroxy-12,13-dihydroursolic acid (7), respectively. TOA showed the highest antiproliferative activity against MCF-7/DOX cells, with an EC50 value of 3.60 ± 0.55 μM. Compounds 1, 3 and 7 also exhibited potent antiproliferative activity against MCF-7/DOX cells, with an EC50 value of 7.10 ± 0.65, 10.22 ± 0.90 and 8.91 ± 1.12 μM. Compounds 1 and 2 also exhibited potent antioxidant activities. Moreover, the detailed cytotoxic mechanisms of TOA were investigated by targeting the mitochondrial and protein tyrosine kinase signaling (Ras/Raf/ERK). The results strongly demonstrated that the novel triterpenoids isolated from raisins could be promising candidates for therapy of breast cancer. PMID:27359376

  14. MicroRNA-122 confers sorafenib resistance to hepatocellular carcinoma cells by targeting IGF-1R to regulate RAS/RAF/ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanmin; Huang, Ji; Ma, Leina; Shan, Juanjuan; Shen, Junjie; Yang, Zhi; Liu, Limei; Luo, Yongli; Yao, Chao; Qian, Cheng

    2016-02-28

    Sorafenib is the first-line treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the clinical response to sorafenib is seriously limited by drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of sorafenib resistance in HCC cells. Our miRNA microarray data indicate that liver-specific miR-122 expression was significantly reduced in sorafenib-resistant cells. Overexpression of miR-122 made drug-tolerant cells sensitive to sorafenib and induced apoptosis. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) was validated as a target of miR-122 and was repressed by this miRNA. miR-122-induced apoptosis was repressed by the IGF-1R activator IGFI or IGFII. Conversely, the IGF-1R inhibitor PPP or NVP-AEW541 in combination with sorafenib significantly induced cell apoptosis and disrupted tolerance to drugs in vitro. These results indicated that activation of IGF-1R by ectopic down-regulation of miR-122 counteracted the effects of sorafenib-induced apoptosis, thus conferring sorafenib resistance. Further study revealed that activation of IGF-1R by miR-122 down-regulation contributed to activation of RAS/RAF/ERK signaling, which was associated with drug resistance. Our data imply that an intimate correlation between miR-122 and IGF-1R abnormal expression is a critical determinant of sorafenib tolerance. PMID:26655273

  15. Resequencing Analysis of the Candidate Tyrosine Kinase and RAS Pathway Gene Families in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Hucthagowder, Vishwanathan; Meyer, Rekha; Mullins, Chelsea; Nagarajan, Rakesh; DiPersio, John F.; Vij, Ravi; Tomasson, Michael H.; Kulkarni, Shashikant

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable, B-cell malignancy, characterized by the clonal proliferation and accumulation of malignant plasma cells in bone marrow. Despite recent advances in understanding of genomic aberrations, a comprehensive catalogue of clinically actionable mutations in MM is just beginning to emerge. The tyrosine kinase (TK) and RAS oncogenes, which encode important regulators of various signaling pathways, are among the most frequently altered gene families in cancer. To clarify the role of TK and RAS genes in pathogenesis of MM, we performed a systematic, targeted screening of mutations on prioritized RAS and TK genes, in CD138 sorted bone marrow specimens from 42 untreated patients. We identified a total of 24 mutations in KRAS, PIK3CA, INSR, LTK and MERTK genes. In particular, seven novel mutations in addition to known KRAS mutations were observed. Prediction analysis tools, PolyPhen and SIFT were used to assess the functional significance of these novel mutations. Our analysis predicted that these mutations may have a deleterious effect, resulting in functional alteration of proteins involved in the pathogenesis of myeloma. While further investigation is needed to determine the functional consequences of these proteins, mutational testing of the RAS and TK genes in larger myeloma cohorts might be also useful to establish the recurrent nature of these mutations. PMID:22939401

  16. Superoxide Inhibits Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) Action on Ras, but not on Rho, through Desensitization of Ras to GEF

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ras and Rho GTPases are molecular switches for various vital cellular signaling pathways. Overactivation of these GTPases often causes development of cancer. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and oxidants function to upregulate these GTPases through facilitation of guanine nucleotide exchange (GNE) of these GTPases. However, the effect of oxidants on GEF functions, or vice versa, has not been known. We show that, via targeting Ras Cys51, an oxidant inhibits the catalytic action of Cdc25—the catalytic domain of RasGEFs—on Ras. However, the enhancement of Ras GNE by an oxidant continues regardless of the presence of Cdc25. Limiting RasGEF action by an oxidant may function to prevent the pathophysiological overactivation of Ras in the presence of both RasGEFs and oxidants. The continuous exposure of Ras to nitric oxide and its derivatives can form S-nitrosated Ras (Ras-SNO). This study also shows that an oxidant not only inhibits the catalytic action of Cdc25 on Ras-SNO but also fails to enhance Ras-SNO GNE. This lack of enhancement then populates the biologically inactive Ras-SNO in cells, which may function to prevent the continued redox signaling of the Ras pathophysiological response. Finally, this study also demonstrates that, unlike the case with RasGEFs, an oxidant does not inhibit the catalytic action of RhoGEF—Vav or Dbs—on Rho GTPases such as Rac1, RhoA, RhoC, and Cdc42. This result explains the results of the previous study in which, despite the presence of an oxidant, the catalytic action of Dbs in cells continued to enhance RhoC GNE. PMID:24422478

  17. Inhibition of Ras for cancer treatment: the search continues

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Antonio T.; Xu, Dapeng; Der, Channing J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The RAS oncogenes (HRAS, NRAS and KRAS) comprise the most frequently mutated class of oncogenes in human cancers (33%), stimulating intensive effort in developing anti-Ras inhibitors for cancer treatment. Discussion Despite intensive effort, to date no effective anti-Ras strategies have successfully made it to the clinic. We present an overview of past and ongoing strategies to inhibit oncogenic Ras in cancer. Conclusions Since approaches to directly target mutant Ras have not been successful, most efforts have focused on indirect approaches to block Ras membrane association or downstream effector signaling. While inhibitors of effector signaling are currently under clinical evaluation, genome-wide unbiased genetic screens have identified novel directions for future anti-Ras drug discovery. PMID:22004085

  18. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eun Jee; Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah; Cho, Jin Won; Lee, Joon H.

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  19. Quadruple wild-type (WT) GIST: defining the subset of GIST that lacks abnormalities of KIT, PDGFRA, SDH, or RAS signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pantaleo, Maria A; Nannini, Margherita; Corless, Christopher L; Heinrich, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    A subset of GISTs lack mutations in the KIT/PDGFRA or RAS pathways and yet retain an intact succinate dehydrogensase (SDH) complex. We propose that these KIT/PDGFRA/SDH/RAS-P WT GIST tumors be designated as quadruple wild-type (WT) GIST. Further molecular and clinicophatological characterization of quadruple WT GIST will help to determine their prognosis as well as assist in the optimization of medical management, including clinical test of novel therapies. PMID:25165019

  20. Quadruple wild-type (WT) GIST: defining the subset of GIST that lacks abnormalities of KIT, PDGFRA, SDH, or RAS signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Maria A; Nannini, Margherita; Corless, Christopher L; Heinrich, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    A subset of GISTs lack mutations in the KIT/PDGFRA or RAS pathways and yet retain an intact succinate dehydrogensase (SDH) complex. We propose that these KIT/PDGFRA/SDH/RAS-P WT GIST tumors be designated as quadruple wild-type (WT) GIST. Further molecular and clinicophatological characterization of quadruple WT GIST will help to determine their prognosis as well as assist in the optimization of medical management, including clinical test of novel therapies. PMID:25165019

  1. Inter-cellular adhesion disruption and the RAS/RAF and beta-catenin signalling in lung cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Cadherin cell adhesion molecules play an essential role in creating tight intercellular association and their loss has been correlated with poor prognosis in human cancer. Mutational activation of protein kinases and loss of cell adhesion occur together in human lung adenocarcinoma but how these two pathways interconnect is only poorly understood. Mouse models of human lung adenocarcinoma with oncogene expression targeted to subtypes of lung epithelial cells led to formation of adenomas or adenocarcinomas that lacked metastatic potential. Conditional genetic abrogation of epithelial tumour cell adhesion in mice with benign lung tumours induced by oncogenic RAF kinase has been demonstrated to induce intratumourous vascularization (angiogenic switch), progression to invasive adenocarcinoma and micrometastasis. Importantly, breaking cell adhesion in benign oncogene-driven lung tumour cells activated β-catenin signalling and induced the expression of several genes that are normally expressed in intestine rather than the lung. I will discuss potential routes to nuclear β-catenin signalling in cancer and how nuclear β-catenin may epigenetically alter the plasticity of tumour cells during malignant progression. PMID:18492263

  2. LOXL2 induces aberrant acinar morphogenesis via ErbB2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) is a matrix-remodeling enzyme that has been shown to play a key role in invasion and metastasis of breast carcinoma cells. However, very little is known about its role in normal tissue homeostasis. Here, we investigated the effects of LOXL2 expression in normal mammary epithelial cells to gain insight into how LOXL2 mediates cancer progression. Methods LOXL2 was expressed in MCF10A normal human mammary epithelial cells. The 3D acinar morphogenesis of these cells was assessed, as well as the ability of the cells to form branching structures on extracellular matrix (ECM)-coated surfaces. Transwell-invasion assays were used to assess the invasive properties of the cells. Clinically relevant inhibitors of ErbB2, lapatinib and Herceptin (traztuzumab), were used to investigate the role of ErbB2 signaling in this model. A retrospective study on a previously published breast cancer patient dataset was carried out by using Disease Specific Genomic Analysis (DSGA) to investigate the correlation of LOXL2 mRNA expression level with metastasis and survival of ErbB2-positive breast cancer patients. Results Fluorescence staining of the acini revealed increased proliferation, decreased apoptosis, and disrupted polarity, leading to abnormal lumen formation in response to LOXL2 expression in MCF10A cells. When plated onto ECM, the LOXL2-expressing cells formed branching structures and displayed increased invasion. We noted that LOXL2 induced ErbB2 activation through reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and ErbB2 inhibition by using Herceptin or lapatinib abrogated the effects of LOXL2 on MCF10A cells. Finally, we found LOXL2 expression to be correlated with decreased overall survival and metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients with ErbB2-positive tumors. Conclusions These findings suggest that LOXL2 expression in normal epithelial cells can induce abnormal changes that resemble oncogenic transformation and cancer progression

  3. Aberrant amino acid signaling promotes growth and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinomas through Rab1A-dependent activation of mTORC1 by Rab1A

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Mei-Yin; Rao, Hui-Lan; Wang, Hui-Yun; Zheng, X.F. Steven

    2015-01-01

    mTORC1 is a master regulator of cell growth and proliferation, and an established anticancer drug target. Aberrant mTORC1 signaling is common in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Rab1A is a newly identified mTORC1 activator that mediates an alternative amino acid (AA) signaling branch to Rag GTPases. Because liver is a physiological hub for nutrient sensing and metabolic homeostasis, we investigated the possible role of Rab1A in HCC. We found that Rab1A is frequently overexpressed in HCC, which enhances hyperactive AA-mTORC1 signaling, promoting malignant growth and metastasis of HCC in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, aberrant Rab1A expression is closely associated with poor prognosis. Strikingly, aberrant Rab1A overexpression leads to increased rapamycin sensitivity, indicating that inappropriate activation of AA signaling is a cancer-driving event in HCC. Our findings further suggest that Rab1A is a valuable biomarker for prognosis and personalized mTORC1-targeted therapy in liver cancer. PMID:26308575

  4. The RalGEF-Ral Effector Signaling Network

    PubMed Central

    Neel, Nicole F.; Martin, Timothy D.; Stratford, Jeran K.; Zand, Tanya P.; Reiner, David J.; Der, Channing J.

    2011-01-01

    The high frequency of RAS mutations in human cancers (33%) has stimulated intense interest in the development of anti-Ras inhibitors for cancer therapy. Currently, the major focus of these efforts is centered on inhibitors of components involved in Ras downstream effector signaling. In particular, more than 40 inhibitors of the Raf-MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-AKT-mTOR effector signaling networks are currently under clinical evaluation. However, these efforts are complicated by the fact that Ras can utilize at least 9 additional functionally distinct effectors, with at least 3 additional effectors with validated roles in Ras-mediated oncogenesis. Of these, the guanine nucleotide exchange factors of the Ras-like (Ral) small GTPases (RalGEFs) have emerged as important effectors of mutant Ras in pancreatic, colon, and other cancers. In this review, we summarize the evidence for the importance of this effector pathway in cancer and discuss possible directions for therapeutic inhibition of aberrant Ral activation and signaling. PMID:21779498

  5. CD4+ T-Cell Decline after the Interruption of Antiretroviral Therapy in ACTG A5170 Is Predicted by Differential Expression of Genes in the Ras Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhining; Su, Zhaohui; Nau, Martin E.; Krambrink, Amy; Skiest, Daniel J.; Margolis, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Patterns of expressed genes examined in cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of seropositive persons electing to stop antiretroviral therapy in the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5170 were scrutinized to identify markers capable of predicting the likelihood of CD4+ T-cell depletion after cessation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). A5170 was a multicenter, 96-week, prospective study of HIV-infected patients with immunological preservation on ART who elected to interrupt therapy. Study entry required that the CD4 count was greater than 350 cells/mm3 within 6 months of ART initiation. Median nadir CD4 count of enrollees was 436 cells/mm3. Two cohorts, matched for clinical characteristics, were selected from A5170. Twenty-four patients with an absolute CD4 cell decline of less that 20% at week 24 (good outcome group) and 24 with a CD4 cell decline of >20% (poor outcome group) were studied. The good outcome group had a decline in CD4+ T-cell count that was 50% less than the poor outcome group. Significance analysis of microarrays identified differential gene expression (DE) in the two groups in data obtained from Affymetrix Human FOCUS GeneChips. DE was significantly higher in the poor outcome group than in the good outcome group. Prediction analysis of microarrays (PAM-R) identified genes that classified persons as to progression with greater than 80% accuracy at therapy interruption (TI) as well as at 24 weeks after TI. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) identified a set of genes in the Ras signaling pathway, associated with the downregulation of apoptosis, as significantly upregulated in the good outcome group at cessation of ART. These observations identify specific host cell processes associated with differential outcome in this cohort after TI. PMID:18724805

  6. RAS Interaction with PI3K

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Esther; Downward, Julian

    2011-01-01

    RAS proteins are small GTPases known for their involvement in oncogenesis: around 25% of human tumors present mutations in a member of this family. RAS operates in a complex signaling network with multiple activators and effectors, which allows them to regulate many cellular functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and senescence. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is one of the main effector pathways of RAS, regulating cell growth, cell cycle entry, cell survival, cytoskeleton reorganization, and metabolism. However, it is the involvement of this pathway in human tumors that has attracted most attention. PI3K has proven to be necessary for RAS-induced transformation in vitro, and more importantly, mice with mutations in the PI3K catalytic subunit p110α that block its ability to interact with RAS are highly resistant to endogenous oncogenic KRAS-induced lung tumorigenesis and HRAS-induced skin carcinogenesis. These animals also have a delayed development of the lymphatic vasculature. Many PI3K inhibitors have been developed that are now in clinical trials. However, it is a complex pathway with many feedback loops, and interactions with other pathways make the results of its inhibition hard to predict. Combined therapy with another RAS-regulated pathway such as RAF/MEK/ERK may be the most effective way to treat cancer, at least in animal models mimicking the human disease. In this review, we will summarize current knowledge about how RAS regulates one of its best-known effectors, PI3K. PMID:21779497

  7. Renewing the conspiracy theory debate: does Raf function alone to mediate Ras oncogenesis?

    PubMed

    Repasky, Gretchen A; Chenette, Emily J; Der, Channing J

    2004-11-01

    Ras proteins function as signal transducers and are mutationally activated in many human cancers. In 1993, Raf was identified as a key downstream effector of Ras signaling, and it was believed then that the primary function of Ras was simply to facilitate Raf activation. However, the subsequent discovery of other proteins that are effectors of Ras function suggested that oncogenic activities of Ras are mediated by both Raf-dependent and Raf-independent signaling. Further complexity arose with the identification of Ras effectors with putative tumor suppressor, rather than oncogenic, functions. However, the recent identification of B-raf mutations in human cancers has renewed the debate regarding whether Raf activation alone promotes Ras-mediated oncogenesis. In this article, we summarize the current knowledge of the contribution of Ras effectors in Ras-mediated oncogenesis. PMID:15519853

  8. Allosteric modulation of Ras and the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway: emerging therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Paul A.; Moody, Colleen L.; Murali, Ramachandran

    2014-01-01

    GTPases and kinases are two predominant signaling modules that regulate cell fate. Dysregulation of Ras, a GTPase, and the three eponymous kinases that form key nodes of the associated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway have been implicated in many cancers, including pancreatic cancer, a disease noted for its current lack of effective therapeutics. The K-Ras isoform of Ras is mutated in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) and there is growing evidence linking aberrant PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activity to PDAC. Although these observations suggest that targeting one of these nodes might lead to more effective treatment options for patients with pancreatic and other cancers, the complex regulatory mechanisms and the number of sequence-conserved isoforms of these proteins have been viewed as significant barriers in drug development. Emerging insights into the allosteric regulatory mechanisms of these proteins suggest novel opportunities for development of selective allosteric inhibitors with fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) helping make significant inroads. The fact that allosteric inhibitors of Ras and AKT are currently in pre-clinical development lends support to this approach. In this article, we will focus on the recent advances and merits of developing allosteric drugs targeting these two inter-related signaling pathways. PMID:25566081

  9. Allosteric modulation of Ras and the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway: emerging therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Paul A; Moody, Colleen L; Murali, Ramachandran

    2014-01-01

    GTPases and kinases are two predominant signaling modules that regulate cell fate. Dysregulation of Ras, a GTPase, and the three eponymous kinases that form key nodes of the associated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway have been implicated in many cancers, including pancreatic cancer, a disease noted for its current lack of effective therapeutics. The K-Ras isoform of Ras is mutated in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) and there is growing evidence linking aberrant PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activity to PDAC. Although these observations suggest that targeting one of these nodes might lead to more effective treatment options for patients with pancreatic and other cancers, the complex regulatory mechanisms and the number of sequence-conserved isoforms of these proteins have been viewed as significant barriers in drug development. Emerging insights into the allosteric regulatory mechanisms of these proteins suggest novel opportunities for development of selective allosteric inhibitors with fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) helping make significant inroads. The fact that allosteric inhibitors of Ras and AKT are currently in pre-clinical development lends support to this approach. In this article, we will focus on the recent advances and merits of developing allosteric drugs targeting these two inter-related signaling pathways. PMID:25566081

  10. Metabolic Dependencies in RAS-Driven Cancers.

    PubMed

    Kimmelman, Alec C

    2015-04-15

    The ability to inhibit the RAS oncogene has been the holy grail of oncology because of the critical role of this gene in a multitude of tumor types. In addition, RAS-mutant tumors are among the most aggressive and refractory to treatment. Although directly targeting the RAS oncogene has proven challenging, an alternative approach for treating RAS-driven cancers is to inhibit critical downstream events that are required for tumor maintenance. Indeed, much focus has been put on inhibiting signaling cascades downstream of RAS. Recent studies have shown that oncogenic RAS promotes a metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells, shifting them toward an anabolic metabolism necessary to produce biomass to support unconstrained proliferation. These cancers also use a diverse set of fuel sources to meet their metabolic needs and have even developed a variety of mechanisms to act as metabolic scavengers to obtain necessary metabolic substrates from both extracellular and intracellular sources. Collectively, these adaptations can create "metabolic bottlenecks" whereby tumor cells rely on particular pathways or rate-limiting metabolites. In this regard, inhibiting individual or combinations of these metabolic pathways can attenuate growth in preclinical models. Because these dependencies are tumor selective and downstream of oncogenic RAS, there is the opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Although targeting tumor metabolism is still in the early days of translation to patients, our continued advances in understanding critical metabolic adaptations in RAS-driven cancers, as well as the ability to study this altered metabolism in relevant tumor models, will accelerate the development of new therapeutic approaches. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1828-34. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers." PMID:25878364

  11. Serum-dependent transcriptional networks identify distinct functional roles for H-Ras and N-Ras during initial stages of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we compared transcriptional profiles corresponding to the initial cell cycle stages of mouse fibroblasts lacking the small GTPases H-Ras and/or N-Ras with those of matching, wild-type controls. Results Serum-starved wild-type and knockout ras fibroblasts had very similar transcriptional profiles, indicating that H-Ras and N-Ras do not significantly control transcriptional responses to serum deprivation stress. In contrast, genomic disruption of H-ras or N-ras, individually or in combination, determined specific differential gene expression profiles in response to post-starvation stimulation with serum for 1 hour (G0/G1 transition) or 8 hours (mid-G1 progression). The absence of N-Ras caused significantly higher changes than the absence of H-Ras in the wave of transcriptional activation linked to G0/G1 transition. In contrast, the absence of H-Ras affected the profile of the transcriptional wave detected during G1 progression more strongly than did the absence of N-Ras. H-Ras was predominantly functionally associated with growth and proliferation, whereas N-Ras had a closer link to the regulation of development, the cell cycle, immunomodulation and apoptosis. Mechanistic analysis indicated that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (Stat1) mediates the regulatory effect of N-Ras on defense and immunity, whereas the pro-apoptotic effects of N-Ras are mediated through ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. Conclusions Our observations confirm the notion of an absolute requirement for different peaks of Ras activity during the initial stages of the cell cycle and document the functional specificity of H-Ras and N-Ras during those processes. PMID:19895680

  12. Characterization of the Ras homologue of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Osman, A; Niles, E G; LoVerde, P T

    1999-05-15

    Ras is a member of a super-family of guanine-binding or G-proteins. Ras functions as a molecular switch in the transduction of signals generated by the activation of a variety of cell surface receptors and relays the signals to downstream effectors. Little is known about signal transduction in schistosomes. In order for Schistosoma mansoni to survive different immune responses triggered by the host as well as to migrate from the site of penetration at the skin to the final destination in portal circulation, they must receive signals from the host environment and respond to them in a way that allows their survival. We have isolated the schistosome Ras cDNA by using sequence information of the schistosome Ras homologue submitted to the Genbank database. Analysis of the encoded peptide revealed 81% identity and 92% similarity with K-Ras from various species. Ras is a single copy gene as determined by quantitative hybridization experiments. The cDNA was cloned into pGEX-4T and the expressed peptide was used to generate specific antibody reagents. Affinity purified antibodies identified a 23 kDa native protein that localizes to the subtegument. Ras is not associated with the tegument. Ras is expressed in all the developmental stages of the parasite. However, Ras is over-expressed in female worms compared to males. Schistosome Ras was also shown to be post-translationally modified by addition of farnesyl isoprenoid moiety to the cysteine residue in the C-terminal box. Using a schistosome extract in vitro SmRas farnesylation was inhibited by the farnesyl transferase inhibitor, FTI-277, at concentrations comparable to those required to inhibit K-Ras processing. These initial studies on signal transduction in schistosomes should provide a solid basis for improving our understanding of schistosome-host interactions. PMID:10376991

  13. The Tumor Suppressor DiRas3 Forms a Complex with H-Ras and C-RAF Proteins and Regulates Localization, Dimerization, and Kinase Activity of C-RAF*

    PubMed Central

    Baljuls, Angela; Beck, Matthias; Oenel, Ayla; Robubi, Armin; Kroschewski, Ruth; Hekman, Mirko; Rudel, Thomas; Rapp, Ulf R.

    2012-01-01

    The maternally imprinted Ras-related tumor suppressor gene DiRas3 is lost or down-regulated in more than 60% of ovarian and breast cancers. The anti-tumorigenic effect of DiRas3 is achieved through several mechanisms, including inhibition of cell proliferation, motility, and invasion, as well as induction of apoptosis and autophagy. Re-expression of DiRas3 in cancer cells interferes with the signaling through Ras/MAPK and PI3K. Despite intensive research, the mode of interference of DiRas3 with the Ras/RAF/MEK/ERK signal transduction is still a matter of speculation. In this study, we show that DiRas3 associates with the H-Ras oncogene and that activation of H-Ras enforces this interaction. Furthermore, while associated with DiRas3, H-Ras is able to bind to its effector protein C-RAF. The resulting multimeric complex consisting of DiRas3, C-RAF, and active H-Ras is more stable than the two protein complexes H-Ras·C-RAF or H-Ras·DiRas3, respectively. The consequence of this complex formation is a DiRas3-mediated recruitment and anchorage of C-RAF to components of the membrane skeleton, suppression of C-RAF/B-RAF heterodimerization, and inhibition of C-RAF kinase activity. PMID:22605333

  14. Differential involvement of Ras-GRF1 and Ras-GRF2 in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Bido, Simone; Solari, Nicola; Indrigo, Marzia; D’Antoni, Angela; Brambilla, Riccardo; Morari, Michele; Fasano, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent findings have shown that pharmacogenetic manipulations of the Ras-ERK pathway provide a therapeutic means to tackle l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID). First, we investigated whether a prolonged l-DOPA treatment differentially affected ERK signaling in medium spiny neurons of the direct pathway (dMSNs) and in cholinergic aspiny interneurons (ChIs) and assessed the role of Ras-GRF1 in both subpopulations. Second, using viral-assisted technology, we probed Ras-GRF1 and Ras-GRF2 as potential targets in this pathway. We investigated how selective blockade of striatal Ras-GRF1 or Ras-GRF2 expression impacted on LID (induction, maintenance, and reversion) and its neurochemical correlates. Methods We used both Ras-GRF1 knockout mice and lentiviral vectors (LVs) delivering short-hairpin RNA sequences (shRNAs) to obtain striatum-specific gene knockdown of Ras-GRF1 and Ras-GRF2. The consequences of these genetic manipulations were evaluated in the 6-hydroxydopamine mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. Escalating doses of l-DOPA were administered and then behavioral analysis with immunohistochemical assays and in vivo microdialysis were performed. Results Ras-GRF1 was found essential in controlling ERK signaling in dMSNs, but its ablation did not prevent ERK activation in ChIs. Moreover, striatal injection of LV-shRNA/Ras-GRF1 attenuated dyskinesia development and ERK-dependent signaling, whereas LV-shRNA/Ras-GRF2 was without effect, ruling out the involvement of Ras-GRF2 in LID expression. Accordingly, Ras-GRF1 but not Ras-GRF2 striatal gene-knockdown reduced l-DOPA-induced GABA and glutamate release in the substantia nigra pars reticulata, a neurochemical correlate of dyskinesia. Finally, inactivation of Ras-GRF1 provided a prolonged anti-dyskinetic effect for up to 7 weeks and significantly attenuated symptoms in animals with established LID. Interpretation Our results suggest that Ras-GRF1 is a promising target for LID

  15. The renewed battle against RAS-mutant cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuquan; Cheong, Jit Kong

    2016-05-01

    The RAS genes encode for members of a large superfamily of guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins that control diverse intracellular signaling pathways to promote cell proliferation. Somatic mutations in the RAS oncogenes are the most common activating lesions found in human cancers. These mutations invariably result in the gain-of-function of RAS by impairing GTP hydrolysis and are frequently associated with poor responses to standard cancer therapies. In this review, we summarize key findings of past and present landmark studies that have deepened our understanding of the RAS biology in the context of oncogenesis. We also discuss how emerging areas of research could further bolster a renewed global effort to target the largely undruggable oncogenic RAS and/or its activated downstream effector signaling cascades to achieve better treatment outcomes for RAS-mutant cancer patients. PMID:26892781

  16. Pharmacological modulation of oncogenic Ras by natural products and their derivatives: Renewed hope in the discovery of novel anti-Ras drugs.

    PubMed

    Quah, Shun Ying; Tan, Michelle Siying; Teh, Yuan Han; Stanslas, Johnson

    2016-06-01

    Oncogenic rat sarcoma (Ras) is linked to the most fatal cancers such as those of the pancreas, colon, and lung. Decades of research to discover an efficacious drug that can block oncogenic Ras signaling have yielded disappointing results; thus, Ras was considered "undruggable" until recently. Inhibitors that directly target Ras by binding to previously undiscovered pockets have been recently identified. Some of these molecules are either isolated from natural products or derived from natural compounds. In this review, we described the potential of these compounds and other inhibitors of Ras signaling in drugging Ras. We highlighted the modes of action of these compounds in suppressing signaling pathways activated by oncogenic Ras, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. The anti-Ras strategy of these compounds can be categorized into four main types: inhibition of Ras-effector interaction, interference of Ras membrane association, prevention of Ras-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) formation, and downregulation of Ras proteins. Another promising strategy that must be validated experimentally is enhancement of the intrinsic Ras-guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity by small chemical entities. Among the inhibitors of Ras signaling that were reported thus far, salirasib and TLN-4601 have been tested for their clinical efficacy. Although both compounds passed phase I trials, they failed in their respective phase II trials. Therefore, new compounds of natural origin with relevant clinical activity against Ras-driven malignancies are urgently needed. Apart from salirasib and TLN-4601, some other compounds with a proven inhibitory effect on Ras signaling include derivatives of salirasib, sulindac, polyamine, andrographolide, lipstatin, levoglucosenone, rasfonin, and quercetin. PMID:27016467

  17. EGF receptor specificity for phosphotyrosine-primed substrates provides signal integration with Src

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Michael J; Yun, Cai-hong; Gewinner, Christina A; Asara, John M; Johnson, Jared L; Coyle, Anthony J; Eck, Michael J; Apostolou, Irina; Cantley, Lewis C

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) contributes to many human cancers by activating the Ras-MAPK and other pathways. EGFR signaling is augmented by Src-family kinases, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we show that human EGFR preferentially phosphorylates peptide substrates that are primed by a prior phosphorylation. Utilizing peptides based on the sequence of the adaptor protein Shc1, we show that Src mediates the priming phosphorylation, promoting subsequent phosphorylation by EGFR. Importantly, the doubly phosphorylated Shc1 peptide binds more tightly to the Ras activator Grb2, a key step in activating the Ras-MAPK pathway, than singly phosphorylated peptides. Finally, a crystal structure of EGFR in complex with a primed Shc1 peptide reveals the structural basis for EGFR substrate specificity. These results provide a molecular explanation for the integration of Src and EGFR signaling with downstream effectors such as Ras. PMID:26551075

  18. R-Ras contributes to LTP and contextual discrimination.

    PubMed

    Darcy, M J; Jin, S-X; Feig, L A

    2014-09-26

    The ability to discriminate between closely related contexts is a specific form of hippocampal-dependent learning that may be impaired in certain neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Down Syndrome. However, signaling pathways regulating this form of learning are poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that the calcium-dependent exchange factor Ras-GRF1, an activator of Rac, Ras and R-Ras GTPases, is important for this form of learning and memory. Moreover, the ability to discriminate contexts was linked to the ability of Ras-GRF1 to promote high-frequency stimulation long-term potentiation (HFS-LTP) via the activation of p38 Map kinase. Here, we show that R-Ras is involved in this form of learning by using virally-delivered miRNAs targeting R-Ras into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus and observing impaired contextual discrimination. Like the loss of GRF1, knockdown of R-Ras in the CA1 also impairs the induction of HFS-LTP and p38 Map kinase. Nevertheless, experiments indicate that this involvement of R-Ras in HFS-LTP that is required for contextual discrimination is independent of Ras-GRF1. Thus, R-Ras is a novel regulator of a form of hippocampal-dependent LTP as well as learning and memory that is affected in certain forms of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25043327

  19. The RAS Problem

    Cancer.gov

    More than 30% of all human cancers, including a high percentage of lung and colon cancers and 95% of pancreatic cancers are driven by mutations and possibly amplification (increased copies) of RAS genes.

  20. RAS Ordinary Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-08-01

    Here are summarized talks from the February and March RAS Ordinary Meetings. The February meeting also enjoyed the Eddington Lecture from Prof. Lisa Kewley (Australian National University) on galaxy evolution in 3D.

  1. Ha-ras and β-catenin oncoproteins orchestrate metabolic programs in mouse liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Unterberger, Elif B; Eichner, Johannes; Wrzodek, Clemens; Lempiäinen, Harri; Luisier, Raphaëlle; Terranova, Rémi; Metzger, Ute; Plummer, Simon; Knorpp, Thomas; Braeuning, Albert; Moggs, Jonathan; Templin, Markus F; Honndorf, Valerie; Piotto, Martial; Zell, Andreas; Schwarz, Michael

    2014-10-01

    The process of hepatocarcinogenesis in the diethylnitrosamine (DEN) initiation/phenobarbital (PB) promotion mouse model involves the selective clonal outgrowth of cells harboring oncogene mutations in Ctnnb1, while spontaneous or DEN-only-induced tumors are often Ha-ras- or B-raf-mutated. The molecular mechanisms and pathways underlying these different tumor sub-types are not well characterized. Their identification may help identify markers for xenobiotic promoted versus spontaneously occurring liver tumors. Here, we have characterized mouse liver tumors harboring either Ctnnb1 or Ha-ras mutations via integrated molecular profiling at the transcriptional, translational and post-translational levels. In addition, metabolites of the intermediary metabolism were quantified by high resolution (1)H magic angle nuclear magnetic resonance. We have identified tumor genotype-specific differences in mRNA and miRNA expression, protein levels, post-translational modifications, and metabolite levels that facilitate the molecular and biochemical stratification of tumor phenotypes. Bioinformatic integration of these data at the pathway level led to novel insights into tumor genotype-specific aberrant cell signaling and in particular to a better understanding of alterations in pathways of the cell intermediary metabolism, which are driven by the constitutive activation of the β-Catenin and Ha-ras oncoproteins in tumors of the two genotypes. PMID:24535843

  2. MK2 Regulates Ras Oncogenesis through Stimulating ROS Production

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yusuke; Qi, Xiaomei

    2012-01-01

    Ras signals through both mitogenic and stress pathways and studies of Ras regulatory effects of stress pathways hold great promise to control Ras-dependent malignancies. Our previous work showed Ras activation of a stress kinase (MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 [MK2]), and here, we examine regulatory effects of MK2 on Ras oncogenesis. MK2 knockout was shown to increase Ras transformation in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in vitro and to enhance the resultant tumor growth in mice, indicating a tumor suppressor activity. In Ras-dependent and -independent human colon cancer, however, MK2-forced expression increases and MK2 depletion decreases the malignant growth, suggesting its oncogenic activity. The oncogenic activity of MK2 couples with its activation by both stress and mitogenic signals through extracellular signal–regulated kinase and p38α pathways, whereas its tumor-suppressing effect links to its stimulation only by stress downstream of p38α. Of interest, MK2 was shown to decrease intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in MEFs but increase its production in human colon cancer cells, and experiments with antioxidants revealed that ROS is required for Ras oncogenesis in both systems. These results indicate that MK2 can increase or decrease Ras oncogenesis dependent of its ROS regulatory activities. PMID:23264852

  3. Site–Specific Monoubiquitination Activates Ras by Impeding GTPase Activating Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Rachael; Lewis, Steven M.; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Wilkerson, Emily M.; Locasale, Jason W.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Kuhlman, Brian; Dohlman, Henrik G.; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell growth and differentiation are controlled by growth factor receptors coupled to the GTPase Ras. Oncogenic mutations disrupt GTPase activity leading to persistent Ras signaling and cancer progression. Recent evidence indicates that monoubiquitination of Ras leads to Ras activation. Mutation of the primary site of monoubiquitination impairs the ability of activated K–Ras to promote tumor growth. To determine the mechanism of human Ras activation we chemically ubiquitinated the protein and analyzed its function by NMR, computational modeling, and biochemical activity measurements. We established that monoubiquitination has little effect on Ras GTP binding, GTP hydrolysis, or exchange factor activation, but severely abrogates the response to GTPase activating proteins in a site–specific manner. These findings reveal a new mechanism by which Ras can trigger persistent signaling in the absence of receptor activation or an oncogenic mutation. PMID:23178454

  4. Polarization Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the polarization characteristics displayed by optical systems can be divided into two categories: geometrical and physical. Geometrical analysis calculates the change in polarization of a wavefront between pupils in an optical instrument. Physical analysis propagates the polarized fields wherever the geometrical analysis is not valid, i.e., near the edges of stops, near images, in anisotropic media, etc. Polarization aberration theory provides a starting point for geometrical design and facilitates subsequent optimization. The polarization aberrations described arise from differences in the transmitted (or reflected) amplitudes and phases at interfaces. The polarization aberration matrix (PAM) is calculated for isotropic rotationally symmetric systems through fourth order and includes the interface phase, amplitude, linear diattenuation, and linear retardance aberrations. The exponential form of Jones matrices used are discussed. The PAM in Jones matrix is introduced. The exact calculation of polarization aberrations through polarization ray tracing is described. The report is divided into three sections: I. Rotationally Symmetric Optical Systems; II. Tilted and Decentered Optical Systems; and Polarization Analysis of LIDARs.

  5. Ras and autophagy in cancer development and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schmukler, Eran; Kloog, Yoel; Pinkas-Kramarski, Ronit

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, a process of self-degradation and turnover of cellular components, plays a complex role in cancer. Evidence exists to show that autophagy may support tumor growth and cell survival, whereas it can also contribute to tumor suppression and have anti-survival characteristics in different cellular systems. Numerous studies have described the effects of various oncogenes and tumor suppressors on autophagy. The small GTPase Ras is an oncogene involved in the regulation of various cell-signaling pathways, and is mutated in 33% of human cancers. In the present review, we discuss the interplay between Ras and autophagy in relation to oncogenesis. It appears that Ras can upregulate or downregulate autophagy through several signaling pathways. In turn, autophagy can affect the tumorigenicity driven by Ras, resulting in either tumor progression or repression, depending on the cellular context. Furthermore, Ras inhibitors were shown to induce autophagy in several cancer cell lines. PMID:24583697

  6. Epigenetic silencing of the NR4A3 tumor suppressor, by aberrant JAK/STAT signaling, predicts prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chung-Min; Chang, Liang-Yu; Lin, Shu-Hui; Chou, Jian-Liang; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Zeng, Li-Han; Chuang, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Dittner, Claudia; Lin, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Jora M. J.; Huang, Yao-Ting; Ng, Enders K. W.; Cheng, Alfred S. L.; Wu, Shu-Fen; Lin, Jiayuh; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chan, Michael W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    While aberrant JAK/STAT signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer (GC), its effects on epigenetic alterations of its transcriptional targets remains unclear. In this study, by expression microarrays coupled with bioinformatic analyses, we identified a putative STAT3 target gene, NR4A3 that was downregulated in MKN28 GC daughter cells overexpressing a constitutively activated STAT3 mutant (S16), as compared to an empty vector control (C9). Bisulphite pyrosequencing and demethylation treatment showed that NR4A3 was epigenetically silenced by promoter DNA methylation in S16 and other GC cell lines including AGS cells, showing constitutive activation of STAT3. Subsequent experiments revealed that NR4A3 promoter binding by STAT3 might repress its transcription. Long-term depletion of STAT3 derepressed NR4A3 expression, by promoter demethylation, in AGS GC cells. NR4A3 re-expression in GC cell lines sensitized the cells to cisplatin, and inhibited tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, in an animal model. Clinically, GC patients with high NR4A3 methylation, or lower NR4A3 protein expression, had significantly shorter overall survival. Intriguingly, STAT3 activation significantly associated only with NR4A3 methylation in low-stage patient samples. Taken together, aberrant JAK/STAT3 signaling epigenetically silences a potential tumor suppressor, NR4A3, in gastric cancer, plausibly representing a reliable biomarker for gastric cancer prognosis. PMID:27528092

  7. Epigenetic silencing of the NR4A3 tumor suppressor, by aberrant JAK/STAT signaling, predicts prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chung-Min; Chang, Liang-Yu; Lin, Shu-Hui; Chou, Jian-Liang; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Zeng, Li-Han; Chuang, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Dittner, Claudia; Lin, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Jora M J; Huang, Yao-Ting; Ng, Enders K W; Cheng, Alfred S L; Wu, Shu-Fen; Lin, Jiayuh; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chan, Michael W Y

    2016-01-01

    While aberrant JAK/STAT signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer (GC), its effects on epigenetic alterations of its transcriptional targets remains unclear. In this study, by expression microarrays coupled with bioinformatic analyses, we identified a putative STAT3 target gene, NR4A3 that was downregulated in MKN28 GC daughter cells overexpressing a constitutively activated STAT3 mutant (S16), as compared to an empty vector control (C9). Bisulphite pyrosequencing and demethylation treatment showed that NR4A3 was epigenetically silenced by promoter DNA methylation in S16 and other GC cell lines including AGS cells, showing constitutive activation of STAT3. Subsequent experiments revealed that NR4A3 promoter binding by STAT3 might repress its transcription. Long-term depletion of STAT3 derepressed NR4A3 expression, by promoter demethylation, in AGS GC cells. NR4A3 re-expression in GC cell lines sensitized the cells to cisplatin, and inhibited tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, in an animal model. Clinically, GC patients with high NR4A3 methylation, or lower NR4A3 protein expression, had significantly shorter overall survival. Intriguingly, STAT3 activation significantly associated only with NR4A3 methylation in low-stage patient samples. Taken together, aberrant JAK/STAT3 signaling epigenetically silences a potential tumor suppressor, NR4A3, in gastric cancer, plausibly representing a reliable biomarker for gastric cancer prognosis. PMID:27528092

  8. Involvement of Ras in survival responsiveness to nitric oxide toxicity in pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyun Sik; Kim, Seong Won; Baek, Kwang Jin; Lee, Hee Sung; Kwon, Nyoun Soo; Kim, Young-Myeong; Yun, Hye-Young

    2002-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in attenuation of tumor growth by activated macrophages that generate large amount of cytotoxic/cytostatic free radicals. However, some tumor cells may survive from NO cytotoxicity and continue to proliferate to malignant tumors. Since a protooncogene product Ras was shown to be activated by NO, this study investigated the involvement of Ras in the cell survival in response to NO cytotoxicity in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Treatment with Ras inhibitor or constitutive expression of dominant negative Ras markedly increased NO-induced cell death. NO-resistant PC12 cells (PC12-NO-R) exhibited higher steady state Ras activity than the parental PC12 cells. Inducible expression using tetracycline-on (Tet-on) system of Ras mutants (dominant negative Ras or dominant active Ras) demonstrated that blockade of Ras activity increased NO-induced cell death whereas enhancement of Ras activity attenuated NO-induced cell death. Furthermore, inducible expression of NO-insensitive mutant Ras selectively increased cellular vulnerability to NO but not to ROS. NO, Ras inhibitor and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) blocker synergistically increased cell death. These observations suggest that Ras activity may be a critical factor for survival response of tumor cells to NO toxicity and pharmacological agents affecting Ras activity may enhance efficacy of NO-mediated tumor therapies. PMID:12635656

  9. RAS isoforms and mutations in cancer at a glance.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, G Aaron; Der, Channing J; Rossman, Kent L

    2016-04-01

    RAS proteins (KRAS4A, KRAS4B, NRAS and HRAS) function as GDP-GTP-regulated binary on-off switches, which regulate cytoplasmic signaling networks that control diverse normal cellular processes. Gain-of-function missense mutations in RAS genes are found in ∼25% of human cancers, prompting interest in identifying anti-RAS therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. However, despite more than three decades of intense effort, no anti-RAS therapies have reached clinical application. Contributing to this failure has been an underestimation of the complexities of RAS. First, there is now appreciation that the four human RAS proteins are not functionally identical. Second, with >130 different missense mutations found in cancer, there is an emerging view that there are mutation-specific consequences on RAS structure, biochemistry and biology, and mutation-selective therapeutic strategies are needed. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster, we provide a snapshot of the differences between RAS isoforms and mutations, as well as the current status of anti-RAS drug-discovery efforts. PMID:26985062

  10. Sustained Wnt/β-catenin signalling causes neuroepithelial aberrations through the accumulation of aPKC at the apical pole.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Saade, Murielle; Menendez, Anghara; Marti, Elisa; Pons, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    β-Catenin mediates the canonical Wnt pathway by stimulating Tcf-dependent transcription and also associates to N-cadherin at the apical complex (AC) of neuroblasts. Here, we show that while β-catenin activity is required to form the AC and to maintain the cell polarity, oncogenic mutations that render stable forms of β-catenin (sβ-catenin) maintain the stemness of neuroblasts, inhibiting their differentiation and provoking aberrant growth. In examining the transcriptional and structural roles of β-catenin, we find that while β-catenin/Tcf transcriptional activity induces atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) expression, an alternative effect of β-catenin restricts aPKC to the apical pole of neuroepithelial cells. In agreement, we show that a constitutively active form of aPKC reproduces the neuroepithelial aberrations induced by β-catenin. Therefore, we conclude that β-catenin controls the cell fate and polarity of the neuroblasts through the expression and localization of aPKC. PMID:24942669

  11. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RAS by ABL allosterically enhances effector binding

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Pamela Y.; Johnson, Christian W.; Fang, Cong; Cao, Xiaoqing; Graeber, Thomas G.; Mattos, Carla; Colicelli, John

    2015-01-01

    RAS proteins are signal transduction gatekeepers that mediate cell growth, survival, and differentiation through interactions with multiple effector proteins. The RAS effector RAS- and RAB-interacting protein 1 (RIN1) activates its own downstream effectors, the small GTPase RAB5 and the tyrosine kinase Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase (ABL), to modulate endocytosis and cytoskeleton remodeling. To identify ABL substrates downstream of RAS-to-RIN1 signaling, we examined human HEK293T cells overexpressing components of this pathway. Proteomic analysis revealed several novel phosphotyrosine peptides, including Harvey rat sarcoma oncogene (HRAS)-pTyr137. Here we report that ABL phosphorylates tyrosine 137 of H-, K-, and NRAS. Increased RIN1 levels enhanced HRAS-Tyr137 phosphorylation by nearly 5-fold, suggesting that RAS-stimulated RIN1 can drive ABL-mediated RAS modification in a feedback circuit. Tyr137 is well conserved among RAS orthologs and is part of a transprotein H-bond network. Crystal structures of HRASY137F and HRASY137E revealed conformation changes radiating from the mutated residue. Although consistent with Tyr137 participation in allosteric control of HRAS function, the mutations did not alter intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rates in vitro. HRAS-Tyr137 phosphorylation enhanced HRAS signaling capacity in cells, however, as reflected by a 4-fold increase in the association of phosphorylated HRASG12V with its effector protein RAF proto-oncogene serine/threonine protein kinase 1 (RAF1). These data suggest that RAS phosphorylation at Tyr137 allosterically alters protein conformation and effector binding, providing a mechanism for effector-initiated modulation of RAS signaling.—Ting, P. Y., Johnson, C. W., Fang, C., Cao, X., Graeber, T. G., Mattos, C., Colicelli, J. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RAS by ABL allosterically enhances effector binding. PMID:25999467

  12. Genomic classification of the RAS network identifies a personalized treatment strategy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    El-Chaar, Nader N.; Piccolo, Stephen R.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Cohen, Adam L.; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Moos, Philip J.; Bild, Andrea H.

    2014-01-01

    Better approaches are needed to evaluate a single patient's drug response at the genomic level. Targeted therapy for signaling pathways in cancer has met limited success in part due to the exceedingly interwoven nature of the pathways. In particular, the highly complex RAS network has been challenging to target. Effectively targeting the pathway requires development of techniques that measure global network activity to account for pathway complexity. For this purpose, we used a gene-expression-based biomarker for RAS network activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, and screened for drugs whose efficacy were significantly highly correlated to RAS network activity. Results identified EGFR and MEK co-inhibition as the most effective treatment for RAS-active NSCLC amongst a panel of over 360 compounds and fractions. RAS activity was identified in both RAS-mutant and wild-type lines, indicating broad characterization of RAS signaling inclusive of multiple mechanisms of RAS activity, and not solely based on mutation status. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that co-inhibition of EGFR and MEK induced apoptosis and blocked both EGFR-RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK and EGFR-PI3K-AKT-RPS6 nodes simultaneously in RAS-active, but not RAS-inactive NSCLC. These results provide a comprehensive strategy to personalize treatment of NSCLC based on RAS network dysregulation and provide proof-of-concept of a genomic approach to classify and target complex signaling networks. PMID:24908424

  13. RasGRP Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ksionda, Olga; Limnander, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Summary RasGRP proteins are activators of Ras and other related small GTPases by the virtue of functioning as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). In vertebrates, four RasGRP family members have been described. RasGRP-1 through −4 share many structural domains but there are also subtle differences between each of the different family members. Whereas SOS RasGEFs are ubiquitously expressed, RasGRP proteins are expressed in distinct patterns, such as in different cells of the hematopoietic system and in the brain. Most studies have concentrated on the role of RasGRP proteins in the development and function of immune cell types because of the predominant RasGRP expression profiles in these cells and the immune phenotypes of mice deficient for Rasgrp genes. However, more recent studies demonstrate that RasGRPs also play an important role in tumorigenesis. Examples are skin- and hematological-cancers but also solid malignancies such as melanoma or prostate cancer. These novel studies bring up many new and unanswered questions related to the molecular mechanism of RasGRP-driven oncogenesis, such as new receptor systems that RasGRP appears to respond to as well as regulatory mechanism for RasGRP expression that appear to be perturbed in these cancers. Here we will review some of the known aspects of RasGRP biology in lymphocytes and will discuss the exciting new notion that RasGRP Ras exchange factors play a role in oncogenesis downstream of various growth factor receptors. PMID:24744772

  14. Oncogenic Ras stimulates Eiger/TNF exocytosis to promote growth

    PubMed Central

    Chabu, Chiswili; Xu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in Ras deregulate cell death and proliferation to cause cancer in a significant number of patients. Although normal Ras signaling during development has been well elucidated in multiple organisms, it is less clear how oncogenic Ras exerts its effects. Furthermore, cancers with oncogenic Ras mutations are aggressive and generally resistant to targeted therapies or chemotherapy. We identified the exocytosis component Sec15 as a synthetic suppressor of oncogenic Ras in an in vivo Drosophila mosaic screen. We found that oncogenic Ras elevates exocytosis and promotes the export of the pro-apoptotic ligand Eiger (Drosophila TNF). This blocks tumor cell death and stimulates overgrowth by activating the JNK-JAK-STAT non-autonomous proliferation signal from the neighboring wild-type cells. Inhibition of Eiger/TNF exocytosis or interfering with the JNK-JAK-STAT non-autonomous proliferation signaling at various steps suppresses oncogenic Ras-mediated overgrowth. Our findings highlight important cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic roles of exocytosis during oncogenic growth and provide a new class of synthetic suppressors for targeted therapy approaches. PMID:25411211

  15. NF2 loss promotes oncogenic RAS-induced thyroid cancers via YAP-dependent transactivation of RAS proteins and sensitizes them to MEK inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E.R.; Ricarte-Filho, Julio C.; Untch, Brian R.; Landa, Iňigo; Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Voza, Francesca; Smith, Vicki E.; Ganly, Ian; Taylor, Barry S.; Persaud, Yogindra; Oler, Gisele; Fang, Yuqiang; Jhanwar, Suresh C.; Viale, Agnes; Heguy, Adriana; Huberman, Kety H.; Giancotti, Filippo; Ghossein, Ronald; Fagin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Ch22q LOH is preferentially associated with RAS mutations in papillary and in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC). The 22q tumor suppressor NF2, encoding merlin, is implicated in this interaction because of its frequent loss of function in human thyroid cancer cell lines. Nf2 deletion or Hras mutation are insufficient for transformation, whereas their combined disruption leads to murine PDTC with increased MAPK signaling. Merlin loss induces RAS signaling in part through inactivation of Hippo, which activates a YAP-TEAD transcriptional program. We find that the three RAS genes are themselves YAP-TEAD1 transcriptional targets, providing a novel mechanism of promotion of RAS-induced tumorigenesis. Moreover, pharmacological disruption of YAP-TEAD with verteporfin blocks RAS transcription and signaling, and inhibits cell growth. The increased MAPK output generated by NF2 loss in RAS-mutant cancers may inform therapeutic strategies, as it generates greater dependency on the MAPK pathway for viability. PMID:26359368

  16. Aberrant activation of canonical Notch1 signaling in the mouse uterus decreases progesterone receptor by hypermethylation and leads to infertility.

    PubMed

    Su, Ren-Wei; Strug, Michael R; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Miele, Lucio; Fazleabas, Asgerally T

    2016-02-23

    In mammalian reproduction, implantation is one of the most critical events. Failure of implantation and the subsequent decidualization contribute to more than 75% of pregnancy losses in women. Our laboratory has previously reported that inhibition of Notch signaling results in impaired decidualization in both women and a transgenic mouse model. In this study, we generated a Notch gain-of-function transgenic mouse by conditionally overexpressing the Notch1 intracellular domain (N1ICD) in the reproductive tract driven by a progesterone receptor (Pgr) -Cre. We show that the overexpression of N1ICD in the uterus results in complete infertility as a consequence of multiple developmental and physiological defects, including the absence of uterine glands and dysregulation of progesterone and estrogen signaling by a Recombination Signal Binding Protein Jκ-dependent signaling mechanism. We further show that the inhibition of progesterone signaling is caused by hypermethylation of its receptor Pgr by Notch1 overexpression through the transcription factor PU.1 and DNA methyltransferase 3b (Dnmt3b). We have generated a mouse model to study the consequence of increased Notch signaling in female reproduction and provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that Notch signaling can regulate epigenetic modification of the Pgr. PMID:26858409

  17. Aberrant activation of canonical Notch1 signaling in the mouse uterus decreases progesterone receptor by hypermethylation and leads to infertility

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ren-Wei; Strug, Michael R.; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Miele, Lucio; Fazleabas, Asgerally T.

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian reproduction, implantation is one of the most critical events. Failure of implantation and the subsequent decidualization contribute to more than 75% of pregnancy losses in women. Our laboratory has previously reported that inhibition of Notch signaling results in impaired decidualization in both women and a transgenic mouse model. In this study, we generated a Notch gain-of-function transgenic mouse by conditionally overexpressing the Notch1 intracellular domain (N1ICD) in the reproductive tract driven by a progesterone receptor (Pgr) -Cre. We show that the overexpression of N1ICD in the uterus results in complete infertility as a consequence of multiple developmental and physiological defects, including the absence of uterine glands and dysregulation of progesterone and estrogen signaling by a Recombination Signal Binding Protein Jκ-dependent signaling mechanism. We further show that the inhibition of progesterone signaling is caused by hypermethylation of its receptor Pgr by Notch1 overexpression through the transcription factor PU.1 and DNA methyltransferase 3b (Dnmt3b). We have generated a mouse model to study the consequence of increased Notch signaling in female reproduction and provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that Notch signaling can regulate epigenetic modification of the Pgr. PMID:26858409

  18. Tipping the balance between good and evil: aberrant 14-3-3ζ expression drives oncogenic TGF-β signaling in metastatic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Chevaun D; Schiemann, William P

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) readily suppresses the development of early-stage breast cancers, an activity that gives way to tumor promotion in their late-stage counterparts. The molecular mechanisms underlying this mysterious switch in TGF-β function remain murky. In addressing this conundrum, Xu et al. observed aberrant 14-3-3ζ expression to prevent the formation of tumor-suppressive Smad2/3:p53 complexes, while simultaneously driving the generation of oncogenic Smad2/3:Gli2 complexes. Once formed, Smad2/3:Gli2 complexes stimulate the expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein necessary for breast cancer metastasis to bone. This viewpoint highlights 14-3-3ζ as an essential driver of oncogenic signaling by Smad2/3 and TGF-β in metastatic breast cancers. PMID:26160166

  19. Genetic biomarkers of drug response for small-molecule therapeutics targeting the RTK/Ras/PI3K, p53 or Rb pathway in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Subramanian; Lamfers, Martine Lm; Dirven, Clemens Mf; Leenstra, Sieger

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma is the most deadly and frequently occurring primary malignant tumor of the central nervous system. Genomic studies have shown that mutated oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in glioblastoma mainly occur in three pathways: the RTK/Ras/PI3K signaling, the p53 and the Rb pathways. In this review, we summarize the modulatory effects of genetic aberrations in these three pathways to drugs targeting these specific pathways. We also provide an overview of the preclinical efforts made to identify genetic biomarkers of response and resistance. Knowledge of biomarkers will finally promote patient stratification in clinical trials, a prerequisite for trial design in the era of precision medicine. PMID:26986934

  20. The Endocrine Dyscrasia that Accompanies Menopause and Andropause Induces Aberrant Cell Cycle Signaling that Triggers Cell Cycle Reentry of Post-mitotic Neurons, Neurodysfunction, Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Craig S.; Bowen, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones are the physiological factors that regulate neurogenesis during embryogenesis and continuing through adulthood. These hormones support the formation of brain structures such as dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture of information (memories). Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories in animals (e.g. infantile amnesia). In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) also involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Since sex hormones control when and how neurons proliferate and differentiate, the endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause is a key signaling event that impacts neurogenesis and the acquisition, processing, storage and recall of memories. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in endocrine signaling with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle with neurite retraction that leads to neuron dysfunction and death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the ratio of LH:sex steroids as driving aberrant mitotic events mediated by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor, amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ, and the activation of Cdk5, a key regulator of cell cycle progression and tau phosphorylation (a cardinal feature of both neurogenesis and

  1. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei; Fairn, Gregory D; Hancock, John F

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization. PMID:26572827

  2. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization. PMID:26572827

  3. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    PubMed

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types. PMID:26568031

  4. Ras1-Mediated Modulation of Drosophila Homeotic Function in Cell and Segment Identity

    PubMed Central

    Boube, M.; Benassayag, C.; Seroude, L.; Cribbs, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Mutations of the Drosophila homeotic proboscipedia gene (pb; the Hox-A2/B2 homologue) provoke dose-sensitive defects. These were used to search for dose-sensitive dominant modifiers of pb function. Two identified interacting genes were the proto-oncogene Ras1 and its functional antagonist Gap1, prominent intermediaries in known signal transduction pathways. Ras1(+) is a positive modifier of pb activity both in normal and ectopic cell contexts, while the Ras1-antagonist Gap1 has an opposite effect. A general role for Ras1 in homeotic function is likely, since Ras1(+) activity also modulates functions of the homeotic loci Sex combs reduced and Ultrabithorax. Our data suggest that the modulation occurs by a mechanism independent of transcriptional control of the homeotic loci themselves, or of the Ras1/Gap1 genes. Taken together our data support a role for Ras1-mediated cell signaling in the homeotic control of segmental differentiation. PMID:9178011

  5. Reduction of aberrant NF-κB signalling ameliorates Rett syndrome phenotypes in Mecp2-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Noriyuki; MacDonald, Jessica L.; Ye, Julia; Molyneaux, Bradley J.; Azim, Eiman; Macklis, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the transcriptional regulator Mecp2 cause the severe X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). In this study, we investigate genes that function downstream of MeCP2 in cerebral cortex circuitry, and identify upregulation of Irak1, a central component of the NF-κB pathway. We show that overexpression of Irak1 mimics the reduced dendritic complexity of Mecp2-null cortical callosal projection neurons (CPN), and that NF-κB signalling is upregulated in the cortex with Mecp2 loss-of-function. Strikingly, we find that genetically reducing NF-κB signalling in Mecp2-null mice not only ameliorates CPN dendritic complexity but also substantially extends their normally shortened lifespan, indicating broader roles for NF-κB signalling in RTT pathogenesis. These results provide new insight into both the fundamental neurobiology of RTT, and potential therapeutic strategies via NF-κB pathway modulation. PMID:26821816

  6. Reduction of aberrant NF-κB signalling ameliorates Rett syndrome phenotypes in Mecp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Noriyuki; MacDonald, Jessica L; Ye, Julia; Molyneaux, Bradley J; Azim, Eiman; Macklis, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the transcriptional regulator Mecp2 cause the severe X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). In this study, we investigate genes that function downstream of MeCP2 in cerebral cortex circuitry, and identify upregulation of Irak1, a central component of the NF-κB pathway. We show that overexpression of Irak1 mimics the reduced dendritic complexity of Mecp2-null cortical callosal projection neurons (CPN), and that NF-κB signalling is upregulated in the cortex with Mecp2 loss-of-function. Strikingly, we find that genetically reducing NF-κB signalling in Mecp2-null mice not only ameliorates CPN dendritic complexity but also substantially extends their normally shortened lifespan, indicating broader roles for NF-κB signalling in RTT pathogenesis. These results provide new insight into both the fundamental neurobiology of RTT, and potential therapeutic strategies via NF-κB pathway modulation. PMID:26821816

  7. The hypervariable region of K-Ras4B is responsible for its specific interactions with Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sherwin J.; Nolet, Ryan P.; Calvert, Richard J.; Anderson, Lucy M.; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    K-Ras4B belongs to the family of p21 Ras GTPases, which play an important role in cell proliferation, survival and motility. The p21 Ras proteins such as K-Ras4B, K-Ras4A, H-Ras, and N-Ras, share 85% sequence homology and activate very similar signaling pathways. Only the C-terminal hypervariable regions differ significantly. A growing body of literature demonstrates that each Ras isoform possesses unique functions in normal physiological processes as well as in pathogenesis. One of the central questions in the field of Ras biology is how these very similar proteins achieve such remarkable specificity in protein-protein interactions that regulate signal transduction pathways. Here we explore specific binding of K-Ras4B to calmodulin. Using NMR techniques and isothermal titration calorimetry we demonstrate that the hypervariable region of K-Ras contributes in a major way to the interaction with calmodulin while the catalytic domain of K-Ras4B provides a way to control the interaction by nucleotide binding. The hypervariable region of K-Ras4B binds specifically to the C-terminal domain of Ca2+-loaded calmodulin with micromolar affinity, while the GTP-γ-S loaded catalytic domain of K-Ras4B may interact with the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. PMID:19583261

  8. Compartmentalized Ras Proteins Transform NIH 3T3 Cells with Different Efficiencies▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chiang-Min; Li, Huiling; Gasman, Stéphane; Huang, Jian; Schiff, Rachel; Chang, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Ras GTPases were long thought to function exclusively from the plasma membrane (PM). However, a current model suggests that Ras proteins can compartmentalize to regulate different functions, and an oncogenic H-Ras mutant that is restricted to the endomembrane can still transform cells. In this study, we demonstrated that cells transformed by endomembrane-restricted oncogenic H-Ras formed tumors in nude mice. To define downstream targets of endomembrane Ras pathways, we analyzed Cdc42, which concentrates in the endomembrane and has been shown to act downstream of Ras in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our data show that cell transformation induced by endomembrane-restricted oncogenic H-Ras was blocked when Cdc42 activity was inhibited. Moreover, H-Ras formed a complex with Cdc42 on the endomembrane, and this interaction was enhanced when H-Ras was GTP bound or when cells were stimulated by growth factors. H-Ras binding evidently induced Cdc42 activation by recruiting and/or activating Cdc42 exchange factors. In contrast, when constitutively active H-Ras was restricted to the PM by fusing to a PM localization signal from the Rit GTPase, the resulting protein did not detectably activate Cdc42 although it activated Raf-1 and efficiently induced hallmarks of Ras-induced senescence in human BJ foreskin fibroblasts. Surprisingly, PM-restricted oncogenic Ras when expressed alone could only weakly transform NIH 3T3 cells; however, when constitutively active Cdc42 was coexpressed, together they transformed cells much more efficiently than either one alone. These data suggest that efficient cell transformation requires Ras proteins to interact with Cdc42 on the endomembrane and that in order for a given Ras protein to fully transform cells, multiple compartment-specific Ras pathways need to work cooperatively. PMID:21189290

  9. Oncogenic Ras suppresses ING4-TDG-Fas axis to promote apoptosis resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Shen, Qi; Lu, Haiqi; Jiang, Zhinong; Xu, Wenxia; Feng, Lifeng; Li, Ling; Wang, Xian; Cai, Xiujun; Jin, Hongchuan

    2015-01-01

    Ras is aberrantly activated in many cancers and active DNA demethylation plays a fundamental role to establish DNA methylation pattern which is of importance to cancer development. However, it was unknown whether and how Ras regulate DNA demethylation during carcinogenesis. Here we found that Ras downregulated thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG), a DNA demethylation enzyme, by inhibiting the interaction of transcription activator ING4 with TDG promoter. TDG recruited histone lysine demethylase JMJD3 to the Fas promoter and activated its expression, thus restoring sensitivity to apoptosis. TDG suppressed in vivo tumorigenicity of xenograft pancreatic cancer. Thus, we speculate that reversing Ras-mediated ING4 inhibition to activate Fas expression is a potential therapeutic approach for Ras-driven cancers. PMID:26544625

  10. Studies of aberrant phyllotaxy1 Mutants of Maize Indicate Complex Interactions between Auxin and Cytokinin Signaling in the Shoot Apical Meristem1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byeong-ha; Johnston, Robyn; Yang, Yan; Gallavotti, Andrea; Kojima, Mikiko; Travençolo, Bruno A.N.; Costa, Luciano da F.; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Jackson, David

    2009-01-01

    One of the most fascinating aspects of plant morphology is the regular geometric arrangement of leaves and flowers, called phyllotaxy. The shoot apical meristem (SAM) determines these patterns, which vary depending on species and developmental stage. Auxin acts as an instructive signal in leaf initiation, and its transport has been implicated in phyllotaxy regulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Altered phyllotactic patterns are observed in a maize (Zea mays) mutant, aberrant phyllotaxy1 (abph1, also known as abphyl1), and ABPH1 encodes a cytokinin-inducible type A response regulator, suggesting that cytokinin signals are also involved in the mechanism by which phyllotactic patterns are established. Therefore, we investigated the interaction between auxin and cytokinin signaling in phyllotaxy. Treatment of maize shoots with a polar auxin transport inhibitor, 1-naphthylphthalamic acid, strongly reduced ABPH1 expression, suggesting that auxin or its polar transport is required for ABPH1 expression. Immunolocalization of the PINFORMED1 (PIN1) polar auxin transporter revealed that PIN1 expression marks leaf primordia in maize, similarly to Arabidopsis. Interestingly, maize PIN1 expression at the incipient leaf primordium was greatly reduced in abph1 mutants. Consistently, auxin levels were reduced in abph1, and the maize PIN1 homolog was induced not only by auxin but also by cytokinin treatments. Our results indicate distinct roles for ABPH1 as a negative regulator of SAM size and a positive regulator of PIN1 expression. These studies highlight a complex interaction between auxin and cytokinin signaling in the specification of phyllotactic patterns and suggest an alternative model for the generation of altered phyllotactic patterns in abph1 mutants. We propose that reduced auxin levels and PIN1 expression in abph1 mutant SAMs delay leaf initiation, contributing to the enlarged SAM and altered phyllotaxy of these mutants. PMID:19321707

  11. Studies of aberrant phyllotaxy1 mutants of maize indicate complex interactions between auxin and cytokinin signaling in the shoot apical meristem.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeong-ha; Johnston, Robyn; Yang, Yan; Gallavotti, Andrea; Kojima, Mikiko; Travençolo, Bruno A N; Costa, Luciano da F; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Jackson, David

    2009-05-01

    One of the most fascinating aspects of plant morphology is the regular geometric arrangement of leaves and flowers, called phyllotaxy. The shoot apical meristem (SAM) determines these patterns, which vary depending on species and developmental stage. Auxin acts as an instructive signal in leaf initiation, and its transport has been implicated in phyllotaxy regulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Altered phyllotactic patterns are observed in a maize (Zea mays) mutant, aberrant phyllotaxy1 (abph1, also known as abphyl1), and ABPH1 encodes a cytokinin-inducible type A response regulator, suggesting that cytokinin signals are also involved in the mechanism by which phyllotactic patterns are established. Therefore, we investigated the interaction between auxin and cytokinin signaling in phyllotaxy. Treatment of maize shoots with a polar auxin transport inhibitor, 1-naphthylphthalamic acid, strongly reduced ABPH1 expression, suggesting that auxin or its polar transport is required for ABPH1 expression. Immunolocalization of the PINFORMED1 (PIN1) polar auxin transporter revealed that PIN1 expression marks leaf primordia in maize, similarly to Arabidopsis. Interestingly, maize PIN1 expression at the incipient leaf primordium was greatly reduced in abph1 mutants. Consistently, auxin levels were reduced in abph1, and the maize PIN1 homolog was induced not only by auxin but also by cytokinin treatments. Our results indicate distinct roles for ABPH1 as a negative regulator of SAM size and a positive regulator of PIN1 expression. These studies highlight a complex interaction between auxin and cytokinin signaling in the specification of phyllotactic patterns and suggest an alternative model for the generation of altered phyllotactic patterns in abph1 mutants. We propose that reduced auxin levels and PIN1 expression in abph1 mutant SAMs delay leaf initiation, contributing to the enlarged SAM and altered phyllotaxy of these mutants. PMID:19321707

  12. Targeting the K-Ras/PDEδ protein-protein interaction: the solution for Ras-driven cancers or just another therapeutic mirage?

    PubMed

    Frett, Brendan; Wang, Yuanxiang; Li, Hong-Yu

    2013-10-01

    The holy grail, finally? After years of unsuccessful attempts at drugging the Ras oncogene, a recent paper by Zimmerman et al. has revealed the possibility of inhibiting Ras signaling on a clinically relevant level by blocking the K-Ras/PDEδ protein-protein interaction. The results, reported in Nature, are highlighted herein with future implications and directions to evaluate the full clinical potential of this research. PMID:23939923

  13. Prostaglandin E2 Blocks Menadione-Induced Apoptosis through the Ras/Raf/Erk Signaling Pathway in Promonocytic Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Hyun-Seok; Shehzad, Adeeb; Lee, Young Sup

    2012-01-01

    Altered oxidative stress has long been observed in cancer cells, and this biochemical property of cancer cells represents a specific vulnerability that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. The major role of an elevated oxidative stress for the efficacy of molecular targeted drugs is under investigation. Menadione is considered an attractive model for the study of oxidative stress, which can induce apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cell lines. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) via its receptors not only promotes cell survival but also reverses apoptosis and promotes cancer progression. Here, we present evidence for the biological role of PGE2 as a protective agent of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in monocytic cells. Pretreatment of HL-60 cells with PGE2 markedly ameliorated the menadione-induced apoptosis and inhibited the degradation of PARP and lamin B. The EP2 receptor antagonist AH6809 abrogated the inhibitory effect of PGE2, suggesting the role of the EP2/cAMP system. The PKA inhibitor H89 also reversed apoptosis and decreased the PKA activity that was elevated 10-fold by PGE2. The treatment of HL-60 cells with NAC or zinc chloride showed a similar protective effect as with PGE2 on menadione-treated cells. Furthermore, PGE2 activated the Ras/Raf/MEK pathway, which in turn initiated ERK activation, and ultimately protected menadione-induced apoptosis. These results imply that PGE2 via cell survival pathways may protect oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in monocytic cells. This study warrants further pre-clinical investigation as well as application towards leukemia clinics. PMID:22450688

  14. PPARγ deficiency results in severe, accelerated osteoarthritis associated with aberrant mTOR signalling in the articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Vasheghani, Faezeh; Zhang, Yue; Li, Ying-Hua; Blati, Meryem; Fahmi, Hassan; Lussier, Bertrand; Roughley, Peter; Lagares, David; Endisha, Helal; Saffar, Bahareh; Lajeunesse, Daniel; Marshall, Wayne K; Rampersaud, Y Raja; Mahomed, Nizar N; Gandhi, Rajiv; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Kapoor, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We have previously shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a transcription factor, is essential for the normal growth and development of cartilage. In the present study, we created inducible cartilage-specific PPARγ knockout (KO) mice and subjected these mice to the destabilisation of medial meniscus (DMM) model of osteoarthritis (OA) to elucidate the specific in vivo role of PPARγ in OA pathophysiology. We further investigated the downstream PPARγ signalling pathway responsible for maintaining cartilage homeostasis. Methods Inducible cartilage-specific PPARγ KO mice were generated and subjected to DMM model of OA. We also created inducible cartilage-specific PPARγ/mammalian target for rapamycin (mTOR) double KO mice to dissect the PPARγ signalling pathway in OA. Results Compared with control mice, PPARγ KO mice exhibit accelerated OA phenotype with increased cartilage degradation, chondrocyte apoptosis, and the overproduction of OA inflammatory/catabolic factors associated with the increased expression of mTOR and the suppression of key autophagy markers. In vitro rescue experiments using PPARγ expression vector reduced mTOR expression, increased expression of autophagy markers and reduced the expression of OA inflammatory/catabolic factors, thus reversing the phenotype of PPARγ KO mice chondrocytes. To dissect the in vivo role of mTOR pathway in PPARγ signalling, we created and subjected PPARγ-mTOR double KO mice to the OA model to see if the genetic deletion of mTOR in PPARγ KO mice (double KO) can rescue the accelerated OA phenotype observed in PPARγ KO mice. Indeed, PPARγ-mTOR double KO mice exhibit significant protection/reversal from OA phenotype. Significance PPARγ maintains articular cartilage homeostasis, in part, by regulating mTOR pathway. PMID:25573665

  15. Inorganic pyrophosphate generation by transforming growth factor-beta-1 is mainly dependent on ANK induction by Ras/Raf-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cailotto, Frederic; Bianchi, Arnaud; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Moulin, David; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Netter, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    ANK is a multipass transmembrane protein transporter thought to play a role in the export of intracellular inorganic pyrophosphate and so to contribute to the pathophysiology of chondrocalcinosis. As transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-β1) was shown to favor calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition, we investigated the contribution of ANK to the production of extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (ePPi) by chondrocytes and the signaling pathways involved in the regulation of Ank expression by TGF-β1. Chondrocytes were exposed to 10 ng/mL of TGF-β1, and Ank expression was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. ePPi was quantified in cell supernatants. RNA silencing was used to define the respective roles of Ank and PC-1 in TGF-β1-induced ePPi generation. Finally, selective kinase inhibitors and dominant-negative/overexpression plasmid strategies were used to explore the contribution of several signaling pathways to Ank induction by TGF-β1. TGF-β1 strongly increased Ank expression at the mRNA and protein levels, as well as ePPi production. Using small interfering RNA technology, we showed that Ank contributed approximately 60% and PC-1 nearly 20% to TGF-β1-induced ePPi generation. Induction of Ank by TGF-β1 required activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway but not of p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase or of protein kinase A. In line with the general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor calphostin C, Gö6976 (a Ca2+-dependent PKC inhibitor) diminished TGF-β1-induced Ank expression by 60%, whereas a 10% inhibition was observed with rottlerin (a PKCδ inhibitor). These data suggest a regulatory role for calcium in TGF-β1-induced Ank expression. Finally, we demonstrated that the stimulatory effect of TGF-β1 on Ank expression was inhibited by the suppression of the Ras/Raf-1 pathway, while being enhanced by their constitutive activation. Transient overexpression of Smad 7, an inhibitory Smad, failed

  16. Ras GTPases Modulate Morphogenesis, Sporulation and Cellulase Gene Expression in the Cellulolytic Fungus Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiwei; Zhang, Yanmei; Zhong, Yaohua; Qu, Yinbo; Wang, Tianhong

    2012-01-01

    Background The model cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) is capable of responding to environmental cues to compete for nutrients in its natural saprophytic habitat despite its genome encodes fewer degradative enzymes. Efficient signalling pathways in perception and interpretation of environmental signals are indispensable in this process. Ras GTPases represent a kind of critical signal proteins involved in signal transduction and regulation of gene expression. In T. reesei the genome contains two Ras subfamily small GTPases TrRas1 and TrRas2 homologous to Ras1 and Ras2 from S. cerevisiae, but their functions remain unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we have investigated the roles of GTPases TrRas1 and TrRas2 during fungal morphogenesis and cellulase gene expression. We show that both TrRas1 and TrRas2 play important roles in some cellular processes such as polarized apical growth, hyphal branch formation, sporulation and cAMP level adjustment, while TrRas1 is more dominant in these processes. Strikingly, we find that TrRas2 is involved in modulation of cellulase gene expression. Deletion of TrRas2 results in considerably decreased transcription of cellulolytic genes upon growth on cellulose. Although the strain carrying a constitutively activated TrRas2G16V allele exhibits increased cellulase gene transcription, the cbh1 and cbh2 expression in this mutant still strictly depends on cellulose, indicating TrRas2 does not directly mediate the transmission of the cellulose signal. In addition, our data suggest that the effect of TrRas2 on cellulase gene is exerted through regulation of transcript abundance of cellulase transcription factors such as Xyr1, but the influence is independent of cAMP signalling pathway. Conclusions/Significance Together, these findings elucidate the functions for Ras signalling of T. reesei in cellular morphogenesis, especially in cellulase gene expression, which contribute to deciphering the

  17. Cocaine increases Ras-guanine nucleotide-releasing factor 1 protein expression in the rat striatum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Chi; Hoffmann, Jason; Parelkar, Nikhil K; Liu, Xian-Yu; Mao, Li-Min; Fibuch, Eugene E; Wang, John Q

    2007-11-01

    Psychostimulants activate the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras-MAPK) cascade in the limbic reward circuit and thereby trigger a transcription-dependent mechanism underlying enduring synaptic plasticity related to addictive properties of drugs of abuse. The Ras-specific activator, Ras-guanine nucleotide-releasing factor (Ras-GRF), is predominantly expressed at synapses and is thought to actively regulate Ras-MAPK responses to changing synaptic signals. In this study, a possible influence of cocaine on Ras-GRF gene expression at the protein level in the rat striatum was investigated in vivo. A single systemic injection of cocaine induced an increase in Ras-GRF1 protein levels in both the dorsal (caudoputamen) and ventral (nucleus accumbens) striatum. The increase in Ras-GRF1 proteins was dose-dependent and was a delayed and transient event. In contrast to Ras-GRF1, a closely related Ras-GRF2 showed no change in its protein abundance following cocaine administration. These data identify the Ras activator, Ras-GRF1, although not Ras-GRF2, as a susceptible target to cocaine stimulation in striatal neurons. PMID:17931779

  18. Inhibition of SHP2-mediated dephosphorylation of Ras suppresses oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bunda, Severa; Burrell, Kelly; Heir, Pardeep; Zeng, Lifan; Alamsahebpour, Amir; Kano, Yoshihito; Raught, Brian; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Zadeh, Gelareh; Ohh, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ras is phosphorylated on a conserved tyrosine at position 32 within the switch I region via Src kinase. This phosphorylation inhibits the binding of effector Raf while promoting the engagement of GTPase-activating protein (GAP) and GTP hydrolysis. Here we identify SHP2 as the ubiquitously expressed tyrosine phosphatase that preferentially binds to and dephosphorylates Ras to increase its association with Raf and activate downstream proliferative Ras/ERK/MAPK signalling. In comparison to normal astrocytes, SHP2 activity is elevated in astrocytes isolated from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)-prone H-Ras(12V) knock-in mice as well as in glioma cell lines and patient-derived GBM specimens exhibiting hyperactive Ras. Pharmacologic inhibition of SHP2 activity attenuates cell proliferation, soft-agar colony formation and orthotopic GBM growth in NOD/SCID mice and decelerates the progression of low-grade astrocytoma to GBM in a spontaneous transgenic glioma mouse model. These results identify SHP2 as a direct activator of Ras and a potential therapeutic target for cancers driven by a previously ‘undruggable' oncogenic or hyperactive Ras. PMID:26617336

  19. Molecular Pathways: Targeting the Dependence of Mutant RAS Cancers on the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Grabocka, Elda; Commisso, Cosimo; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2014-01-01

    Of the genes mutated in cancer, RAS remains the most elusive to target. Recent technological advances and discoveries have greatly expanded our knowledge of the biology of oncogenic Ras and its role in cancer. As such, it has become apparent that a property that intimately accompanies RAS-driven tumorigenesis is the dependence of RAS mutant cells on a number of non-oncogenic signaling pathways. These dependencies arise as a means of adaptation to Ras-driven intracellular stresses and represent unique vulnerabilities of mutant RAS cancers. A number of studies have highlighted the dependence of mutant RAS cancers on the DNA damage response and identified the molecular pathways that mediate this process including signaling from wild-type Ras isoforms, ATR/Chk1, and DNA damage repair pathways. Here we review these findings, and discuss the combinatorial use of DNA damaging chemotherapy with blockade of wild-type H- and N-Ras signaling by farnesyltransferase inhibitors, Chk1 inhibitors, or small molecule targeting DNA damage repair as potential strategies through which the dependence of RAS cancers on the DNA damage response can be harnessed for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25424849

  20. Function of RasGRP3 in the formation and progression of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs) mediate the activation of the Ras signaling pathway that is over activated in many human cancers. The RasGRP3, an activator of H-Ras and R-Ras protein exerts oncogenic effects and the overexpression of the protein is observed in numerous malignant cancer types. Here, we investigated the putative alteration of expression and potential function of RasGRP3 in the formation and progression of human breast cancer. Methods The RasGRP3 and phosphoRasGRP3 expressions were examined in human invasive ductal adenocarcinoma derived samples and cell lines (BT-474, JIMT-1, MCF7, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-453, T-47D) both in mRNA (Q-PCR) and protein (Western blot; immunohistochemistry) levels. To explore the biological function of the protein, RasGRP3 knockdown cultures were established. To assess the role of RasGRP3 in the viability of cells, annexin-V/PI staining and MitoProbe™ DilC1 (5) assay were performed. To clarify the function of the protein in cell proliferation and in the development of chemotherapeutic resistance, CyQuant assay was performed. To observe the RasGRP3 function in tumor formation, the Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model was used. To investigate the role of the protein in Ras-related signaling Q-PCR and Western blot experiments were performed. Results RasGRP3 expression was elevated in human breast tumor tissue samples as well as in multiple human breast cancer cell lines. Down-regulation of RasGRP3 expression in breast cancer cells decreased cell proliferation, induced apoptosis in MCF7 cells, and sensitized T-47D cells to the action of drugs Tamoxifen and trastuzumab (Herceptin). Gene silencing of RasGRP3 reduced tumor formation in mouse xenografts as well. Inhibition of RasGRP3 expression also reduced Akt, ERK1/2 and estrogen receptor alpha phosphorylation downstream from IGF-I insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation confirming the functional

  1. Extracellular matrix-modulated Heartless signaling in Drosophila blood progenitors regulates their differentiation via a Ras/ETS/FOG pathway and target of rapamycin function.

    PubMed

    Dragojlovic-Munther, Michelle; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2013-12-15

    Maintenance of hematopoietic progenitors ensures a continuous supply of blood cells during the lifespan of an organism. Thus, understanding the molecular basis for progenitor maintenance is a continued focus of investigation. A large pool of undifferentiated blood progenitors are maintained in the Drosophila hematopoietic organ, the larval lymph gland, by a complex network of signaling pathways that are mediated by niche-, progenitor-, or differentiated hemocyte-derived signals. In this study we examined the function of the Drosophila fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), Heartless, a critical regulator of early lymph gland progenitor specification in the late embryo, during larval lymph gland hematopoiesis. Activation of Heartless signaling in hemocyte progenitors by its two ligands, Pyramus and Thisbe, is both required and sufficient to induce progenitor differentiation and formation of the plasmatocyte-rich lymph gland cortical zone. We identify two transcriptional regulators that function downstream of Heartless signaling in lymph gland progenitors, the ETS protein, Pointed, and the Friend-of-GATA (FOG) protein, U-shaped, which are required for this Heartless-induced differentiation response. Furthermore, cross-talk of Heartless and target of rapamycin signaling in hemocyte progenitors is required for lamellocyte differentiation downstream of Thisbe-mediated Heartless activation. Finally, we identify the Drosophila heparan sulfate proteoglycan, Trol, as a critical negative regulator of Heartless ligand signaling in the lymph gland, demonstrating that sequestration of differentiation signals by the extracellular matrix is a unique mechanism employed in blood progenitor maintenance that is of potential relevance to many other stem cell niches. PMID:23603494

  2. Extracellular matrix-modulated Heartless signaling in Drosophila blood progenitors regulates their differentiation via a Ras/ETS/FOG pathway and target of rapamycin function

    PubMed Central

    Dragojlovic-Munther, Michelle; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of hematopoietic progenitors ensures a continuous supply of blood cells during the lifespan of an organism. Thus, understanding the molecular basis for progenitor maintenance is a continued focus of investigation. A large pool of undifferentiated blood progenitors are maintained in the Drosophila hematopoietic organ, the larval lymph gland, by a complex network of signaling pathways that are mediated by niche-, progenitor-, or differentiated hemocyte-derived signals. In this study we examined the function of the Drosophila fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), Heartless, a critical regulator of early lymph gland progenitor specification in the late embryo, during larval lymph gland hematopoiesis. Activation of Heartless signaling in hemocyte progenitors by its two ligands, Pyramus and Thisbe, is both required and sufficient to induce progenitor differentiation and formation of the plasmatocyte-rich lymph gland cortical zone. We identify two transcriptional regulators that function downstream of Heartless signaling in lymph gland progenitors, the ETS protein, Pointed, and the Friend-of-GATA (FOG) protein, U-shaped, which are required for this Heartless-induced differentiation response. Furthermore, cross-talk of Heartless and target of rapamycin signaling in hemocyte progenitors is required for lamellocyte differentiation downstream of Thisbe-mediated Heartless activation. Finally, we identify the Drosophila heparan sulfate proteoglycan, Trol, as a critical negative regulator of Heartless ligand signaling in the lymph gland, demonstrating that sequestration of differentiation signals by the extracellular matrix is a unique mechanism employed in blood progenitor maintenance that is of potential relevance to many other stem cell niches. PMID:23603494

  3. Study Illuminates K-Ras4B Activation, Which May Help Predict Drug Resistance | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Until recently, researchers studying RAS, a family of proteins involved in transmitting signals within cells, believed that the exchange of guanosine 5’-diphosphate (GDP) by guanosine triphosphate (GTP) was sufficient to activate the protein. Once activated, RAS can cause unintended and overactive signaling in cells, which can lead to cell division and, ultimately, cancer.

  4. Integrating signals between cAMP and the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signalling pathways. Based on the anniversary prize of the Gesellschaft für Biochemie und Molekularbiologie Lecture delivered on 5 July 2003 at the Special FEBS Meeting in Brussels.

    PubMed

    Dumaz, Nicolas; Marais, Richard

    2005-07-01

    One of the hallmarks of cAMP is its ability to inhibit proliferation in many cell types, but stimulate proliferation in others. Clearly cAMP has cell type specific effects and the outcome on proliferation is largely attributed to crosstalk from cAMP to the RAS/RAF/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK)/ERK pathway. We review the crosstalk between these two ancient and conserved pathways, describing the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between these pathways and discussing their possible biological importance. PMID:16008550

  5. Analysis of K-Ras Nuclear Expression in Fibroblasts and Mesangial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Blázquez-Medela, Ana M.; Santos, Eugenio; López-Novoa, José M.; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Background Ras GTPases are considered cytoplasmic proteins that must be localized to cell membranes for activation, and there are few evidences of the presence of any Ras isoform in nuclei of eukaryotic cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Using conventional antibodies and inmunocytochemistry, differential centrifugation and western blot, we have observed the putative presence of K-Ras isoform in the nuclei of fibroblasts and mesangial cells. In order to avoid cross-reactions with other Ras isoforms, and using antibodies against K-Ras (R-3400, H3845-M01, sc-30) or pan-Ras (05-516, OP40) in cells that only expressed the K-Ras isoform (fibroblasts obtained from H-ras−/−,N-ras−/− mice) we also detected some nuclear positive expression. To further probe the identity of nuclear K-Ras, we have generated K-Ras knockout (K-ras−/−) embrionary fibroblasts by mating of K-ras+/− heterozygote mice. Using specific antibodies, only H- and N-Ras isoforms were observed in the cytoplasm of K-ras−/− fibroblasts. However, both K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B positive signals were detected by immunocytochemistry and Western blot with two commercial antibodies (sc-522 and sc-521 against each isoforms, respectively) in both cytoplasm and nuclei from K-ras−/− fibroblasts. Conclusions/Significance We show that the presence of K-Ras4B in fibroblast nuclei, already described by other authors, is probably due to a cross-reaction of the antibody with an undetermined nucleolar protein. Although this study also shows the possible nuclear expression of K-Ras isoform in fibroblasts or in mesangial cells, it also reveals the importance of being cautious in these studies about distribution of protein isoforms due to some important limitations imposed by the unspecificity of the antibodies or contaminations in cellular preparations. PMID:20090846

  6. Involvement of H- and N-Ras isoforms in transforming growth factor-{beta}1-induced proliferation and in collagen and fibronectin synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Salgado, Carlos . E-mail: carloms@usal.es; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Garcia-Cenador, Begona; Santos, Eugenio; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M.

    2006-07-01

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) has a relevant role in the origin and maintenance of glomerulosclerosis and tubule-interstitial fibrosis. TGF-{beta} and Ras signaling pathways are closely related: TGF-{beta}1 overcomes Ras mitogenic effects and Ras counteracts TGF-{beta} signaling. Tubule-interstitial fibrosis is associated to increases in Ras, Erk, and Akt activation in a renal fibrosis model. We study the role of N- and H-Ras isoforms, and the involvement of the Ras effectors Erk and Akt, in TGF-{beta}1-mediated extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and proliferation, using embrionary fibroblasts from double knockout (KO) mice for H- and N-Ras (H-ras {sup -/-}/N-ras {sup -/-}) isoforms and from heterozygote mice (H-ras {sup +/-}/N-ras {sup +/-}). ECM synthesis is increased in basal conditions in H-ras {sup -/-}/N-ras {sup -/-} fibroblasts, this increase being higher after stimulation with TGF-{beta}1. TGF-{beta}1-induced fibroblast proliferation is smaller in H-ras {sup -/-}/N-ras {sup -/-} than in H-ras {sup +/-}/N-ras {sup +/-} fibroblasts. Erk activation is decreased in H-ras {sup -/-}/N-ras {sup -/-} fibroblasts; inhibition of Erk activation reduces fibroblast proliferation. Akt activation is higher in double KO fibroblasts than in heterozygotes; inhibition of Akt activation also inhibits ECM synthesis. We suggest that H- and N-Ras isoforms downregulate ECM synthesis, and mediate proliferation, in part through MEK/Erk activation. PI3K-Akt pathway activation may be involved in the increase in ECM synthesis observed in the absence of H- and N-Ras.

  7. Dysregulated RasGRP1 Responds to Cytokine Receptor Input in T Cell Leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, Catherine; Ksionda, Olga; Lemmens, Ed; Coakley, Kristen; Yang, Ming; Dail, Monique; Harvey, Richard C.; Govern, Christopher; Bakker, Jeroen; Lenstra, Tineke L.; Ammon, Kristin; Boeter, Anne; Winter, Stuart S.; Loh, Mignon; Shannon, Kevin; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Wabl, Matthias; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced signaling by the small guanosine triphosphatase Ras is common in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we identified the guanine nucleotide exchange factor RasGRP1 (Rasgrp1 in mice) as a Ras activator that contributes to leukemogenesis. We found increased RasGRP1 expression in many pediatric T-ALL patients, which we did not observe in rare early T cell precursor (ETP) T-ALL patients with KRAS and NRAS mutations, such as K-RasG12D. Leukemia screens in wild-type mice, but not in mice expressing the mutant K-RasG12D that encodes a constitutively active Ras, yielded frequent retroviral insertions that led to increased Rasgrp1 expression. Rasgrp1 and oncogenic K-RasG12D promoted T-ALL through distinct mechanisms. In K-RasG12D T-ALLs, we found that enhanced Ras activation did not lead to cell cycle arrest. In mouse T-ALL cells with increased Rasgrp1 expression, we found that Rasgrp1 contributed to a previously uncharacterized cytokine receptor–activated Ras pathway that stimulated the proliferation of T-ALL cells in vivo, which was accompanied by dynamic patterns of activation of effector kinases downstream of Ras in individual T-ALLs. Reduction of Rasgrp1 abundance reduced cytokine-stimulated Ras signaling and decreased the proliferation of T-ALL in vivo, suggesting that patients with this cancer should be screened for increased abundance of RasGRP1 to customize treatment. PMID:23532335

  8. PGA1-induced apoptosis involves specific activation of H-Ras and N-Ras in cellular endomembranes.

    PubMed

    Anta, B; Pérez-Rodríguez, A; Castro, J; García-Domínguez, C A; Ibiza, S; Martínez, N; Durá, L M; Hernández, S; Gragera, T; Peña-Jiménez, D; Yunta, M; Zarich, N; Crespo, P; Serrador, J M; Santos, E; Muñoz, A; Oliva, J L; Rojas-Cabañeros, J M

    2016-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) is an inducer of cell death in cancer cells. However, the mechanism that initiates this cytotoxic response remains elusive. Here we report that PGA1 triggers apoptosis by a process that entails the specific activation of H- and N-Ras isoforms, leading to caspase activation. Cells without H- and N-Ras did not undergo apoptosis upon PGA1 treatment; in these cells, the cellular demise was rescued by overexpression of either H-Ras or N-Ras. Consistently, the mutant H-Ras-C118S, defective for binding PGA1, did not produce cell death. Molecular analysis revealed a key role for the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in the apoptotic process through the induction of calpain activity and caspase-12 cleavage. We propose that PGA1 evokes a specific physiological cell death program, through H- and N-Ras, but not K-Ras, activation at endomembranes. Our results highlight a novel mechanism that may be of potential interest for tumor treatment. PMID:27468687

  9. PGA1-induced apoptosis involves specific activation of H-Ras and N-Ras in cellular endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Anta, B; Pérez-Rodríguez, A; Castro, J; García- Domínguez, C A; Ibiza, S; Martínez, N; Durá, L M; Hernández, S; Gragera, T; Peña-Jiménez, D; Yunta, M; Zarich, N; Crespo, P; Serrador, J M; Santos, E; Muñoz, A; Oliva, J L; Rojas-Cabañeros, J M

    2016-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) is an inducer of cell death in cancer cells. However, the mechanism that initiates this cytotoxic response remains elusive. Here we report that PGA1 triggers apoptosis by a process that entails the specific activation of H- and N-Ras isoforms, leading to caspase activation. Cells without H- and N-Ras did not undergo apoptosis upon PGA1 treatment; in these cells, the cellular demise was rescued by overexpression of either H-Ras or N-Ras. Consistently, the mutant H-Ras-C118S, defective for binding PGA1, did not produce cell death. Molecular analysis revealed a key role for the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in the apoptotic process through the induction of calpain activity and caspase-12 cleavage. We propose that PGA1 evokes a specific physiological cell death program, through H- and N-Ras, but not K-Ras, activation at endomembranes. Our results highlight a novel mechanism that may be of potential interest for tumor treatment. PMID:27468687

  10. Hyaluronan suppresses prostate tumor cell proliferation through diminished expression of N-cadherin and aberrant growth factor receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, Alamelu G.; Goodrich, Nathaniel P.; McAtee, Caitlin O.; Haferbier, Katie; Oakley, Gregory G.; Wahl, James K.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2011-05-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) production has been functionally implicated in prostate tumorigenesis and metastasis. We previously used prostate tumor cells overexpressing the HA synthesizing enzyme HAS3 or the clinically relevant hyaluronidase Hyal1 to show that excess HA production suppresses tumor growth, while HA turnover accelerates spontaneous metastasis from the prostate. Here, we examined pathways responsible for effects of HAS3 and Hyal1 on tumor cell phenotype. Detailed characterization of cell cycle progression revealed that expression of Hyal1 accelerated cell cycle re-entry following synchronization, whereas HAS3 alone delayed entry. Hyal1 expressing cells exhibited a significant reduction in their ability to sustain ERK phosphorylation upon stimulation by growth factors, and in their expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. In contrast, HAS3 expressing cells showed prolonged ERK phosphorylation and increased expression of both p21 and p27, in asynchronous and synchronized cultures. Changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins were accompanied by HA-induced suppression of N-cadherin, while E-cadherin expression and {beta}-catenin expression and distribution remained unchanged. Our results are consistent with a model in which excess HA synthesis suppresses cell proliferation by promoting homotypic E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion, consequently signaling to elevate cell cycle inhibitor expression and suppress G1- to S-phase transition.

  11. RAS Synthetic Lethal Screens Revisited: Still Seeking the Elusive Prize?

    PubMed Central

    Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The RAS genes are critical oncogenic drivers activated by point mutation in some 20% of human malignancies. However, no pharmacological approaches to targeting RAS proteins directly have yet succeeded, leading to suggestions that these proteins may be “undruggable.” This has led to two alternative indirect approaches to targeting RAS function in cancer. One has been to target RAS signaling pathways downstream at tractable enzymes such as kinases, particularly in combination. The other, which is the focus of this review, has been to seek targets that are essential in cells bearing an activated RAS oncogene, but not those without. This synthetic lethal approach, while rooted in ideas from invertebrate genetics, has been inspired most strongly by the successful use of PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, in the clinic to treat BRCA defective cancers. Several large-scale screens have been carried out using RNA interference-mediated expression silencing to find genes that are uniquely essential to RAS mutant but not wild type cells. These screens have been notable for the low degree of overlap between their results, with the possible exception of proteasome components, and have yet to lead to successful new clinical approaches to the treatment of RAS mutant cancers. Possible reasons for these disappointing results are discussed here, along with a re-evaluation of the approaches taken. Based on experience to date, RAS synthetic lethality has so far fallen some way short of its original promise and remains unproven as an approach to finding effective new ways of tackling RAS mutant cancers. PMID:25878361

  12. RasGRP1 Transgenic Mice Develop Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Response to Skin Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Federico R.; Garrido, Ann A.; Sharma, Amrish; Luke, Courtney T.; Stone, James C.; Dower, Nancy A.; Cline, J. Mark; Lorenzo, Patricia S.

    2009-01-01

    Models of epidermal carcinogenesis have demonstrated that Ras is a critical molecule involved in tumor initiation and progression. Previously, we have shown that RasGRP1 increases the susceptibility of mice to skin tumorigenesis when overexpressed in the epidermis by a transgenic approach, related to its ability to activate Ras. Moreover, RasGRP1 transgenic mice develop spontaneous papillomas and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas, some of which appear to originate in sites of injury, suggesting that RasGRP1 may be responding to signals generated during the wound-healing process. In this study, we examined the response of the RasGRP1 transgenic animals to full-thickness incision wounding of the skin, and demonstrated that they respond by developing tumors along the wounded site. The tumors did not present mutations in the H-ras gene, but Rasgrp1 transgene dosage correlated with tumor susceptibility and size. Analysis of serum cytokines showed increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in transgenic animals after wounding. Furthermore, in vitro experiments with primary keratinocytes showed that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor stimulated Ras activation, although RasGRP1 was dispensable for this effect. Since granulocyte colony-stimulating factor has been recently associated with proliferation of skin cancer cells, our results may help in the elucidation of pathways that activate Ras in the epidermis during tumorigenesis in the absence of oncogenic ras mutations. PMID:19497993

  13. Aberrant Notch Signaling in the Bone Marrow Microenvironment of Acute Lymphoid Leukemia Suppresses Osteoblast-Mediated Support of Hematopoietic Niche Function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weihuan; Zimmerman, Grant; Huang, Xiaoran; Yu, Shuiliang; Myers, Jay; Wang, Yiwei; Moreton, Stephen; Nthale, Joseph; Awadallah, Amad; Beck, Rose; Xin, Wei; Wald, David; Huang, Alex Y; Zhou, Lan

    2016-03-15

    More than half of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients harbor gain-of-function mutations in the intracellular domain of Notch1. Diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow commonly occurs in T-ALL and relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, and is associated with worse prognosis. However, the mechanism of leukemia outgrowth in the marrow and the resulting biologic impact on hematopoiesis are poorly understood. Here, we investigated targetable cellular and molecular abnormalities in leukemia marrow stroma responsible for the suppression of normal hematopoiesis using a T-ALL mouse model and human T-ALL xenografts. We found that actively proliferating leukemia cells inhibited normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation and homing to the perivascular region. In addition, leukemia development was accompanied by the suppression of the endosteum-lining osteoblast population. We further demonstrated that aberrant Notch activation in the stroma plays an important role in negatively regulating the expression of CXLC12 on osteoblasts and their differentiation. Notch blockade reversed attenuated HSPC cycling, leukemia-associated abnormal blood lineage distribution, and thrombocytopenia as well as recovered osteoblast and HSPC abundance and improved the hematopoietic-supportive functions of osteoblasts. Finally, we confirmed that reduced osteoblast frequency and enhanced Notch signaling were also features of the marrow stroma of human ALL tissues. Collectively, our findings suggest that therapeutically targeting the leukemia-infiltrated hematopoietic niche may restore HSPC homeostasis and improve the outcome of ALL patients. PMID:26801976

  14. Oncolytic reovirus induces intracellular redistribution of Ras to promote apoptosis and progeny virus release.

    PubMed

    Garant, K A; Shmulevitz, M; Pan, L; Daigle, R M; Ahn, D-G; Gujar, S A; Lee, P W K

    2016-02-11

    Reovirus is a naturally oncolytic virus that preferentially replicates in Ras-transformed cells and is currently undergoing clinical trials as a cancer therapeutic. Ras transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by enhancing virion disassembly during entry, viral progeny production, and virus release through apoptosis; however, the mechanism behind the latter is not well understood. Here, we show that reovirus alters the intracellular location of oncogenic Ras to induce apoptosis of H-RasV12-transformed fibroblasts. Reovirus infection decreases Ras palmitoylation levels and causes accumulation of Ras in the Golgi through Golgi fragmentation. With the Golgi being the site of Ras palmitoylation, treatment of target cells with the palmitoylation inhibitor, 2-bromopalmitate (2BP), prompts a greater accumulation of H-RasV12 in the Golgi, and a dose-dependent increase in progeny virus release and subsequent spread. Conversely, tethering H-RasV12 to the plasma membrane (thereby preventing its movement to the Golgi) allows for efficient virus production, but results in basal levels of reovirus-induced cell death. Analysis of Ras downstream signaling reveals that cells expressing cycling H-RasV12 have elevated levels of phosphorylated JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase), and that Ras retained at the Golgi body by 2BP increases activation of the MEKK1/MKK4/JNK signaling pathway to promote cell death. Collectively, our data suggest that reovirus induces Golgi fragmentation of target cells, and the subsequent accumulation of oncogenic Ras in the Golgi body initiates apoptotic signaling events required for virus release and spread. PMID:25961930

  15. Plk2 Raps up Ras to subdue synapses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kea Joo; Hoe, Hyang-Sook

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified the activity-inducible protein kinase Plk2 as a novel overseer of the balance between Ras and Rap small GTPases. Plk2 achieves a profound level of regulatory control by interacting with and phosphorylating at least four Ras and Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs). Combined, these actions result in synergistic suppression of Ras and hyperstimulation of Rap signaling. Perturbation of Plk2 function abolished homeostatic adaptation of synapses to enhanced activity and impaired behavioral adaptation in various learning tasks, indicating that this regulation was critical for maintaining appropriate Ras/Rap levels. These studies provide insights into the highly cooperative nature of Ras and Rap regulation in neurons. However, different GEF and GAP substrates of Plk2 also controlled specific aspects of dendritic spine morphology, illustrating the ability of individual GAPs/GEFs to assemble microdomains of Ras and Rap signaling that respond to different stimuli and couple to distinct output pathways. PMID:21776418

  16. Cooperative loss of RAS feedback regulation drives myeloid leukemognesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Chen, Chi-Chao; Rillahan, Cory D.; Shen, Ronglai; Kitzing, Thomas; McNerney, Megan E.; Diaz-Flores, Ernesto; Zuber, Johannes; Shannon, Kevin; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Spector, Mona S.; Kogan, Scott C.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    RAS network activation is common in human cancers and, in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), achieved mainly through gain-of-function mutations in KRAS, NRAS, or the FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase1. In mice, we show that premalignant myeloid cells harboring a KrasG12D allele retain low Ras signaling owing to a negative feedback involving Spry4 that prevents transformation. In humans, SPRY4 is located on chromosome 5q, a region affected by large heterozygous deletion that are associated with an aggressive disease in which gain-of-function RAS pathway mutations are rare. These 5q deletions often co-occur with chromosome 17 alterations involving deletion of NF1 - another RAS negative regulator - and TP53. Accordingly, combined suppression of Spry4, Nf1 and Trp53 produces high Ras signaling and drives AML in mice. Therefore, SPRY4 is a 5q tumor suppressor whose disruption contributes to a lethal AML subtype that appears to acquire RAS pathway activation through loss of negative regulators. PMID:25822087

  17. Transplacental exposure to inorganic arsenic at a hepatocarcinogenic dose induces fetal gene expression changes in mice indicative of aberrant estrogen signaling and disrupted steroid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie . E-mail: Liu6@niehs.nih.gov; Xie Yaxiong; Cooper, Ryan; Ducharme, Danica M.K.; Tennant, Raymond; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2007-05-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic in utero in C3H mice produces hepatocellular carcinoma in male offspring when they reach adulthood. To help define the molecular events associated with the fetal onset of arsenic hepatocarcinogenesis, pregnant C3H mice were given drinking water containing 0 (control) or 85 ppm arsenic from day 8 to 18 of gestation. At the end of the arsenic exposure period, male fetal livers were removed and RNA isolated for microarray analysis using 22K oligo chips. Arsenic exposure in utero produced significant (p < 0.001) alterations in expression of 187 genes, with approximately 25% of aberrantly expressed genes related to either estrogen signaling or steroid metabolism. Real-time RT-PCR on selected genes confirmed these changes. Various genes controlled by estrogen, including X-inactive-specific transcript, anterior gradient-2, trefoil factor-1, CRP-ductin, ghrelin, and small proline-rich protein-2A, were dramatically over-expressed. Estrogen-regulated genes including cytokeratin 1-19 and Cyp2a4 were over-expressed, although Cyp3a25 was suppressed. Several genes involved with steroid metabolism also showed remarkable expression changes, including increased expression of 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-7 (HSD17{beta}7; involved in estradiol production) and decreased expression of HSD17{beta}5 (involved in testosterone production). The expression of key genes important in methionine metabolism, such as methionine adenosyltransferase-1a, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase and thioether S-methyltransferase, were suppressed. Thus, exposure of mouse fetus to inorganic arsenic during a critical period in development significantly alters the expression of various genes encoding estrogen signaling and steroid or methionine metabolism. These alterations could disrupt genetic programming at the very early life stage, which could impact tumor formation much later in adulthood.

  18. Multiple Drug Treatments That Increase cAMP Signaling Restore Long-Term Memory and Aberrant Signaling in Fragile X Syndrome Models

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Catherine H.; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Bell, Aaron J.; Hinchey, Joseph; Rosenfelt, Cory; Gertner, Michael J.; Campbell, Sean R.; Emerson, Danielle; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Ferrick, Neal J.; Chambers, Daniel B.; Langer, Steven; Sust, Steven; Malik, Aatika; Terlizzi, Allison M.; Liebelt, David A.; Ferreiro, David; Sharma, Ali; Koenigsberg, Eric; Choi, Richard J.; Louneva, Natalia; Arnold, Steven E.; Featherstone, Robert E.; Siegel, Steven J.; Zukin, R. Suzanne; McDonald, Thomas V.; Bolduc, Francois V.; Jongens, Thomas A.; McBride, Sean M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X is the most common monogenic disorder associated with intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Additionally, many patients are afflicted with executive dysfunction, ADHD, seizure disorder and sleep disturbances. Fragile X is caused by loss of FMRP expression, which is encoded by the FMR1 gene. Both the fly and mouse models of fragile X are also based on having no functional protein expression of their respective FMR1 homologs. The fly model displays well defined cognitive impairments and structural brain defects and the mouse model, although having subtle behavioral defects, has robust electrophysiological phenotypes and provides a tool to do extensive biochemical analysis of select brain regions. Decreased cAMP signaling has been observed in samples from the fly and mouse models of fragile X as well as in samples derived from human patients. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that strategies that increase cAMP signaling can rescue short term memory in the fly model and restore DHPG induced mGluR mediated long term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus to proper levels in the mouse model (McBride et al., 2005; Choi et al., 2011, 2015). Here, we demonstrate that the same three strategies used previously with the potential to be used clinically, lithium treatment, PDE-4 inhibitor treatment or mGluR antagonist treatment can rescue long term memory in the fly model and alter the cAMP signaling pathway in the hippocampus of the mouse model. PMID:27445731

  19. Multiple Drug Treatments That Increase cAMP Signaling Restore Long-Term Memory and Aberrant Signaling in Fragile X Syndrome Models.

    PubMed

    Choi, Catherine H; Schoenfeld, Brian P; Bell, Aaron J; Hinchey, Joseph; Rosenfelt, Cory; Gertner, Michael J; Campbell, Sean R; Emerson, Danielle; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Ferrick, Neal J; Chambers, Daniel B; Langer, Steven; Sust, Steven; Malik, Aatika; Terlizzi, Allison M; Liebelt, David A; Ferreiro, David; Sharma, Ali; Koenigsberg, Eric; Choi, Richard J; Louneva, Natalia; Arnold, Steven E; Featherstone, Robert E; Siegel, Steven J; Zukin, R Suzanne; McDonald, Thomas V; Bolduc, Francois V; Jongens, Thomas A; McBride, Sean M J

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X is the most common monogenic disorder associated with intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Additionally, many patients are afflicted with executive dysfunction, ADHD, seizure disorder and sleep disturbances. Fragile X is caused by loss of FMRP expression, which is encoded by the FMR1 gene. Both the fly and mouse models of fragile X are also based on having no functional protein expression of their respective FMR1 homologs. The fly model displays well defined cognitive impairments and structural brain defects and the mouse model, although having subtle behavioral defects, has robust electrophysiological phenotypes and provides a tool to do extensive biochemical analysis of select brain regions. Decreased cAMP signaling has been observed in samples from the fly and mouse models of fragile X as well as in samples derived from human patients. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that strategies that increase cAMP signaling can rescue short term memory in the fly model and restore DHPG induced mGluR mediated long term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus to proper levels in the mouse model (McBride et al., 2005; Choi et al., 2011, 2015). Here, we demonstrate that the same three strategies used previously with the potential to be used clinically, lithium treatment, PDE-4 inhibitor treatment or mGluR antagonist treatment can rescue long term memory in the fly model and alter the cAMP signaling pathway in the hippocampus of the mouse model. PMID:27445731

  20. TrkB reduction exacerbates Alzheimer's disease-like signaling aberrations and memory deficits without affecting β-amyloidosis in 5XFAD mice

    PubMed Central

    Devi, L; Ohno, M

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) significantly decrease early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether BDNF/TrkB reductions may be mechanistically involved in the pathogenesis of AD. To address this question, we generated 5XFAD transgenic mice with heterozygous TrkB knockout (TrkB+/–·5XFAD), and tested the effects of TrkB reduction on AD-like features in this mouse model during an incipient stage that shows only modest amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology and retains normal mnemonic function. TrkB+/– reduction exacerbated memory declines in 5XFAD mice at 4–5 months of age as assessed by the hippocampus-dependent spontaneous alternation Y-maze task, while the memory performance was not affected in TrkB+/– mice. Meanwhile, TrkB+/–·5XFAD mice were normal in nest building, a widely used measure for social behavior, suggesting the memory-specific aggravation of AD-associated behavioral impairments. We found no difference between TrkB+/–·5XFAD and 5XFAD control mice in cerebral plaque loads, Aβ concentrations including total Aβ42 and soluble oligomers and β-amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein. Interestingly, reductions in hippocampal expression of AMPA/NMDA glutamate receptor subunits as well as impaired signaling pathways downstream to TrkB such as CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) and Akt/GSK-3β (glycogen synthase kinase-3β) were observed in TrkB+/–·5XFAD mice but not in 5XFAD mice. Among these signaling aberrations, only Akt/GSK-3β dysfunction occurred in TrkB+/– mice, while others were synergistic consequences between TrkB reduction and subthreshold levels of Aβ in TrkB+/–·5XFAD mice. Collectively, our results indicate that reduced TrkB does not affect β-amyloidosis but exacerbates the manifestation of hippocampal mnemonic and signaling dysfunctions in early AD. PMID:25942043

  1. Influence of aberrations in microholographic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    The influence of various types of aberrations (spherical, coma, and astigmatic) of recording and readout beams on the readout signal in a microholographic recording was investigated through a numerical simulation. The simulation conditions were that the wavelength of the laser was 405 nm and the numerical aperture of the objective lenses was 0.85. The tolerance of the root-mean-square (RMS) wavefront aberrations was defined as the aberration when the normalized signal level decreased to 0.8. Among the three types of aberrations, the influence of the spherical aberration was the most significant. When both the recording and readout beams were aberrated and the signs of the aberrations were in the worst case, the tolerance of the RMS wavefront aberrations was less than half of the Maréchal's criterion. Moreover, when the RMS wavefront aberrations of the recording and readout beams were within the above tolerance, the bit intervals of 0.13 and 0.65 μm in the inplane and vertical directions, respectively, which correspond to the recording density of 91 bit/μm3 (recording capacity of 16 TB for a 120-mm-diameter optical disk having a 300-μm-thick recording layer), were shown to be feasible for confocal detection with an allowable signal-to-noise ratio.

  2. Ras-GTP dimers activate the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li-Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referred to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors. PMID:26080442

  3. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referredmore » to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.« less

  4. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referred to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.

  5. Hyperactive RAS/PI3-K/MAPK Signaling Cascade in Migration and Adhesion of Nf1 Haploinsufficient Mesenchymal Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; He, Yongzheng; Sharma, Richa; Xing, Wen; Estwick, Selina A; Wu, Xiaohua; Rhodes, Steven D; Xu, Mingjiang; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene, which affect approximately 1 out of 3000 individuals. Patients with NF1 suffer from a range of malignant and nonmalignant manifestations such as plexiform neurofibromas and skeletal abnormalities. We previously demonstrated that Nf1 haploinsufficiency in mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSPCs) results in impaired osteoblastic differentiation, which may be associated with the skeletal manifestations in NF1 patients. Here we sought to further ascertain the role of Nf1 in modulating the migration and adhesion of MSPCs of the Nf1 haploinsufficient (Nf1(+/-)) mice. Nf1(+/-) MSPCs demonstrated increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, increased migration, and increased actin polymerization as compared to wild-type (WT) MSPCs. Additionally, Nf1(+/-) MSPCs were noted to have significantly enhanced cell adhesion to fibronectin with selective affinity for CH271 with an overexpression of its complimentary receptor, CD49e. Nf1(+/-) MSPCs also showed hyperactivation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways when compared to WT MSPCs, which were both significantly reduced in the presence of their pharmacologic inhibitors, LY294002 and PD0325901, respectively. Collectively, our study suggests that both PI3-K and MAPK signaling pathways play a significant role in enhanced migration and adhesion of Nf1 haploinsufficient MSPCs. PMID:26039236

  6. Semaphorin-7a reverses the ERF-induced inhibition of EMT in Ras-dependent mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Maryline; Zaragkoulias, Andreas; Vorgia, Elena; Ioannou, Marina; Litos, Gabriele; Beug, Hartmut; Mavrothalassitis, George

    2012-10-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key process in cancer progression and metastasis, requiring cooperation of the epidermal growth factor/Ras with the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway in a multistep process. The molecular mechanisms by which Ras signaling contributes to EMT, however, remain elusive to a large extent. We therefore examined the transcriptional repressor Ets2-repressor factor (ERF)-a bona fide Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase effector-for its ability to interfere with TGF-β-induced EMT in mammary epithelial cells (EpH4) expressing oncogenic Ras (EpRas). ERF-overexpressing EpRas cells failed to undergo TGF-β-induced EMT, formed three-dimensional tubular structures in collagen gels, and retained expression of epithelial markers. Transcriptome analysis indicated that TGF-β signaling through Smads was mostly unaffected, and ERF suppressed the TGF-β-induced EMT via Semaphorin-7a repression. Forced expression of Semaphorin-7a in ERF-overexpressing EpRas cells reestablished their ability to undergo EMT. In contrast, inhibition of Semaphorin-7a in the parental EpRas cells inhibited their ability to undergo TGF-β-induced EMT. Our data suggest that oncogenic Ras may play an additional role in EMT via the ERF, regulating Semaphorin-7a and providing a new interconnection between the Ras- and the TGF-β-signaling pathways. PMID:22875994

  7. [Role of RAS in prehypertension].

    PubMed

    Inaba, Shinji; Iwai, Masaru; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2008-08-01

    Hypertension has long been recognized as a major risk factor of several cardiovascular diseases. It is well known that the renin-angiotensin system(RAS) is involved in the pathogenesis of both hypertension and hypertensive end-organ damage. Untreated hypertension is self-accelerating condition through RAS stimulation. Activation of RAS contributes to the transition from borderline hypertension to established hypertension. Recently, "the Seventh Report of Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7)" proposed a new classification of borderline blood pressure levels, as "prehypertension". The therapeutic focus has begun to shift from the therapy of established hypertension to the prevention of hypertension. This review addressed the relationship between hypertension, prehypertension and the role of RAS. PMID:18700549

  8. Nitrative and oxidative DNA damage caused by K-ras mutation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Shiho; Saito, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Noboru; Ma, Ning; Hiraku, Yusuke; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Mutated K-ras in transgenic mice caused nitrative DNA damage, 8-nitroguanine. {yields} The mutagenic 8-nitroguanine seemed to be generated by iNOS via Ras-MAPK signal. {yields} Mutated K-ras produces additional mutagenic lesions, as a new oncogenic role. -- Abstract: Ras mutation is important for carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis consists of multi-step process with mutations in several genes. We investigated the role of DNA damage in carcinogenesis initiated by K-ras mutation, using conditional transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that mutagenic 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) were apparently formed in adenocarcinoma caused by mutated K-ras. 8-Nitroguanine was co-localized with iNOS, eNOS, NF-{kappa}B, IKK, MAPK, MEK, and mutated K-ras, suggesting that oncogenic K-ras causes additional DNA damage via signaling pathway involving these molecules. It is noteworthy that K-ras mutation mediates not only cell over-proliferation but also the accumulation of mutagenic DNA lesions, leading to carcinogenesis.

  9. Rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the Ras GEF, SOS1

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Duan, Xin; Biesiada, Jacek; Seibel, William L.; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ras GTPases regulate intracellular signaling involved in cell proliferation. Elevated Ras signaling activity has been associated with human cancers. Ras activation is catalyzed by guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), of which SOS1 is a major member that transduces receptor tyrosine kinase signaling to Ras. We have developed a rational approach coupling virtual screening with experimental screening in identifying small-molecule inhibitors targeting the catalytic site of SOS1 and SOS1-regulated Ras activity. A lead inhibitor, NSC-658497, is found to bind to SOS1, competitively suppresses SOS1-Ras interaction, and dose-dependently inhibits SOS1 GEF activity. Mutagenesis and structure-activity relationship studies map the NSC-658497 site of action to the SOS1 catalytic site, and define the chemical moieties in the inhibitor essential for the activity. NSC-658497 showed dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ras, downstream signaling activities, and associated cell proliferation. These studies establish a proof of principle for rational design of small-molecule inhibitors targeting Ras GEF enzymatic activity. PMID:25455859

  10. Specific Conformational States of Ras GTPase upon Effector Binding

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To uncover the structural and dynamical determinants involved in the highly specific binding of Ras GTPase to its effectors, the conformational states of Ras in uncomplexed form and complexed to the downstream effectors Byr2, PI3Kγ, PLCε, and RalGDS were investigated using molecular dynamics and cross-comparison of the trajectories. The subtle changes in the dynamics and conformations of Ras upon effector binding require an analysis that targets local changes independent of global motions. Using a structural alphabet, a computational procedure is proposed to quantify local conformational changes. Positions detected by this approach were characterized as either specific for a particular effector, specific for an effector domain type, or as effector unspecific. A set of nine structurally connected residues (Ras residues 5–8, 32–35, 39–42, 55–59, 73–78, and 161–165), which link the effector binding site to the distant C-terminus, changed dynamics upon effector binding, indicating a potential effector-unspecific signaling route within the Ras structure. Additional conformational changes were detected along the N-terminus of the central β-sheet. Besides the Ras residues at the effector interface (e.g., D33, E37, D38, and Y40), which adopt effector-specific local conformations, the binding signal propagates from the interface to distant hot-spot residues, in particular to Y5 and D57. The results of this study reveal possible conformational mechanisms for the stabilization of the active state of Ras upon downstream effector binding and for the structural determinants responsible for effector specificity. PMID:23316125

  11. Pleiotrophin mediates hematopoietic regeneration via activation of RAS.

    PubMed

    Himburg, Heather A; Yan, Xiao; Doan, Phuong L; Quarmyne, Mamle; Micewicz, Eva; McBride, William; Chao, Nelson J; Slamon, Dennis J; Chute, John P

    2014-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are highly susceptible to ionizing radiation-mediated death via induction of ROS, DNA double-strand breaks, and apoptotic pathways. The development of therapeutics capable of mitigating ionizing radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity could benefit both victims of acute radiation sickness and patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Unfortunately, therapies capable of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution following lethal radiation exposure have remained elusive. Here, we found that systemic administration of pleiotrophin (PTN), a protein that is secreted by BM-derived endothelial cells, substantially increased the survival of mice following radiation exposure and after myeloablative BM transplantation. In both models, PTN increased survival by accelerating the recovery of BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in vivo. PTN treatment promoted HSC regeneration via activation of the RAS pathway in mice that expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-zeta (PTPRZ), whereas PTN treatment did not induce RAS signaling in PTPRZ-deficient mice, suggesting that PTN-mediated activation of RAS was dependent upon signaling through PTPRZ. PTN strongly inhibited HSC cycling following irradiation, whereas RAS inhibition abrogated PTN-mediated induction of HSC quiescence, blocked PTN-mediated recovery of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and abolished PTN-mediated survival of irradiated mice. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of PTN to improve survival after myeloablation and suggest that PTN-mediated hematopoietic regeneration occurs in a RAS-dependent manner. PMID:25250571

  12. Oncogenic Ras/Src cooperativity in pancreatic neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Shields, DJ; Murphy, EA; Desgrosellier, JS; Mielgo, A; Lau, SKM; Barnes, LA; Lesperance, J; Huang, M; Schmedt, C; Tarin, D; Lowy, AM; Cheresh, DA

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies and is characterized by activating mutations of Kras, present in 95% of patients. More than 60% of pancreatic cancers also display increased c-Src activity, which is associated with poor prognosis. Although loss of tumor suppressor function (for example, p16, p53, Smad4) combined with oncogenic Kras signaling has been shown to accelerate pancreatic duct carcinogenesis, it is unclear whether elevated Src activity contributes to Kras-dependent tumorigenesis or is simply a biomarker of disease progression. Here, we demonstrate that in the context of oncogenic Kras, activation of c-Src through deletion of C-terminal Src kinase (CSK) results in the development of invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) by 5–8 weeks. In contrast, deletion of CSK alone fails to induce neoplasia, while oncogenic Kras expression yields PDA at low frequency after a latency of 12 months. Analysis of cell lines derived from Ras/Src-induced PDA’s indicates that oncogenic Ras/Src cooperativity may lead to genomic instability, yet Ras/Src-driven tumor cells remain dependent on Src signaling and as such, Src inhibition suppresses growth of Ras/Src-driven tumors. These findings demonstrate that oncogenic Ras/Src cooperate to accelerate PDA onset and support further studies of Src-directed therapies in pancreatic cancer. PMID:21242978

  13. Inhibition of ras oncogene: a novel approach to antineoplastic therapy.

    PubMed

    Scharovsky, O G; Rozados, V R; Gervasoni, S I; Matar, P

    2000-01-01

    The most frequently detected oncogene alterations, both in animal and human cancers, are the mutations in the ras oncogene family. These oncogenes are mutated or overexpressed in many human tumors, with a high incidence in tumors of the pancreas, thyroid, colon, lung and certain types of leukemia. Ras is a small guanine nucleotide binding protein that transduces biological information from the cell surface to cytoplasmic components within cells. The signal is transduced to the cell nucleus through second messengers, and it ultimately induces cell division. Oncogenic forms of p21(ras) lead to unregulated, sustained signaling through downstream effectors. The ras family of oncogenes is involved in the development of both primary tumors and metastases making it a good therapeutic target. Several therapeutic approaches to cancer have been developed pointing to reducing the altered gene product or to eliminating its biological function: (1) gene therapy with ribozymes, which are able to break down specific RNA sequences, or with antisense oligonucleotides, (2) immunotherapy through passive or active immunization protocols, and (3) inhibition of p21(ras) farnesylation either by inhibition of farnesyl transferase or synthesis inhibition of farnesyl moieties. PMID:10895051

  14. A single amino acid change in Raf-1 inhibits Ras binding and alters Raf-1 function.

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, J R; Vojtek, A B; Cooper, J A; Morrison, D K

    1994-01-01

    Ras and Raf-1 are key proteins involved in the transmission of developmental and proliferative signals generated by receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that Raf-1 functions downstream of Ras in many signaling pathways. Although Raf-1 directly associates with GTP-bound Ras, an effect of this interaction on Raf-1 activity in vivo has not been established. To examine the biological consequence of the Ras/Raf-1 interaction in vivo, we set out to identify key residues of Raf-1 required for Ras binding. In this report, we show that a single amino acid mutation in Raf-1 (Arg89 to Leu) disrupted the interaction with Ras in vitro and in the yeast two-hybrid system. This mutation prevented Ras-mediated but not tyrosine kinase-mediated enzymatic activation of Raf-1 in the baculovirus/Sf9 expression system. Furthermore, kinase-defective Raf-1 proteins containing the Arg89-->Leu mutation were no longer dominant-inhibitory or capable of blocking Ras-mediated signal transduction in Xenopus laevis oocytes. These results demonstrate that the association of Raf-1 and Ras modulates both the kinase activity and the biological function of Raf-1 and identify Arg89 as a critical residue involved in this interaction. In addition, the finding that tyrosine kinases can stimulate the enzymatic activity of Raf-1 proteins containing a mutation at the Ras-interaction site suggests that Raf-1 can be activated by Ras-independent pathways. Images PMID:8016101

  15. Revisiting G3BP1 as a RasGAP Binding Protein: Sensitization of Tumor Cells to Chemotherapy by the RasGAP 317–326 Sequence Does Not Involve G3BP1

    PubMed Central

    Annibaldi, Alessandro; Dousse, Aline; Martin, Sophie; Tazi, Jamal; Widmann, Christian

    2011-01-01

    RasGAP is a multifunctional protein that controls Ras activity and that is found in chromosomal passenger complexes. It also negatively or positively regulates apoptosis depending on the extent of its cleavage by caspase-3. RasGAP has been reported to bind to G3BP1 (RasGAP SH3-domain-binding protein 1), a protein regulating mRNA stability and stress granule formation. The region of RasGAP (amino acids 317–326) thought to bind to G3BP1 corresponds exactly to the sequence within fragment N2, a caspase-3-generated fragment of RasGAP, that mediates sensitization of tumor cells to genotoxins. While assessing the contribution of G3BP1 in the anti-cancer function of a cell-permeable peptide containing the 317–326 sequence of RasGAP (TAT-RasGAP317–326), we found that, in conditions where G3BP1 and RasGAP bind to known partners, no interaction between G3BP1 and RasGAP could be detected. TAT-RasGAP317–326 did not modulate binding of G3BP1 to USP10, stress granule formation or c-myc mRNA levels. Finally, TAT-RasGAP317–326 was able to sensitize G3BP1 knock-out cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Collectively these results indicate that G3BP1 and its putative RasGAP binding region have no functional influence on each other. Importantly, our data provide arguments against G3BP1 being a genuine RasGAP-binding partner. Hence, G3BP1-mediated signaling may not involve RasGAP. PMID:22205990

  16. Oncogenic synergism between ErbB1, nucleolin, and mutant Ras.

    PubMed

    Farin, Keren; Schokoroy, Sari; Haklai, Roni; Cohen-Or, Ifat; Elad-Sfadia, Galit; Reyes-Reyes, Merit E; Bates, Paula J; Cox, Adrienne D; Kloog, Yoel; Pinkas-Kramarski, Ronit

    2011-03-15

    Alterations in the ErbB family of growth factor receptors, their signaling components, and mutational activation of Ras proteins are major contributors to malignant transformation. Recently, mutant Ras was shown to be capable of activating ErbB receptors in a ligand-independent manner. Furthermore, it was observed that nucleolin, a transcriptional regulator and ribosome biogenesis factor, can bind both K-Ras and the cytoplasmic tail of ErbB receptors to enhance ErbB receptor activation. However, the functional significance of these interactions to cancer pathogenesis has not been probed. Here, we show that endogenous nucleolin interacts simultaneously in vivo with endogenous Ras and ErbB1 (EGFR) in cancer cells. The C-terminal 212 amino acids of nucleolin were determined to be sufficient to interact with ErbB1 and all Ras protein isoforms (H-, N-, and K-Ras). Nucleolin partially colocalizes with Ras at the plasma membrane. Moreover, activated but not wild-type Ras facilitates nucleolin interaction with ErbB1 and stabilizes ErbB1 receptor levels. Most importantly, these three oncogenes synergistically facilitate anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Our findings suggest strategies to target nucleolin as a general approach to inhibiting ErbB- and Ras-driven cancers. PMID:21257709

  17. Activated Drosophila Ras1 is selectively suppressed by isoprenyl transferase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Kauffmann, R C; Qian, Y; Vogt, A; Sebti, S M; Hamilton, A D; Carthew, R W

    1995-01-01

    Ras CAAX (C = cysteine, A = aliphatic amino acid, and X = any amino acid) peptidomimetic inhibitors of farnesyl protein transferase suppress Ras-dependent cell transformation by preventing farnesylation of the Ras oncoprotein. These compounds are potential anticancer agents for tumors associated with Ras mutations. The peptidomimetic FTI-254 was tested for Ras1-inhibiting activity in whole animals by injection of activated Ras1val12 Drosophila larvae. FTI-254 decreased the ability of Ras1val12 to form supernumerary R7 photoreceptor cells in the compound eye of transformed flies. In contrast, it had no effect on the related supernumerary R7 phenotypes of flies transformed with either the activated sevenless receptor tyrosine kinase, Raf kinase, or a chimeric Ras1val12 protein that is membrane associated through myristylation instead of isoprenylation. Therefore, FTI-254 acts as an isoprenylation inhibitor to selectively inhibit Ras1val12 signaling activity in a whole-animal model system. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7479910

  18. Translational Dynamics of Lipidated Ras Proteins in the Presence of Crowding Agents and Compatible Osmolytes.

    PubMed

    Patra, Satyajit; Erwin, Nelli; Winter, Roland

    2016-07-18

    Ras proteins are small GTPases and are involved in transmitting signals that control cell growth, differentiation, and proliferation. Since the cell cytoplasm is crowded with different macromolecules, understanding the translational dynamics of Ras proteins in crowded environments is crucial to yielding deeper insight into their reactivity and function. Herein, the translational dynamics of lipidated N-Ras and K-Ras4B is studied in the bulk and in the presence of a macromolecular crowder (Ficoll) and the compatible osmolyte and microcrowder sucrose by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The results reveal that N-Ras forms dimers due to the presence of its lipid moiety in the hypervariable region, whereas K-Ras4B remains in its monomeric form in the bulk. Addition of a macromolecular crowding agent gradually favors clustering of the Ras proteins. In 20 wt % Ficoll N-Ras forms trimers and K-Ras4B dimers. Concentrations of sucrose up to 10 wt % foster formation of N-Ras trimers and K-Ras dimers as well. The results can be rationalized in terms of the excluded-volume effect, which enhances the association of the proteins, and, for the higher concentrations, by limited-hydration conditions. The results of this study shed new light on the association state of these proteins in a crowded environment. This is of particular interest for the Ras proteins, because their solution state-monomeric or clustered-influences their membrane-partitioning behavior and their interplay with cytosolic interaction partners. PMID:27028423

  19. Differentiation and apoptosis induction by lovastatin and γ-tocotrienol in HL-60 cells via Ras/ERK/NF-κB and Ras/Akt/NF-κB signaling dependent down-regulation of glyoxalase 1 and HMG-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chia; Liu, Tzu-Yu; Huang, Shih-Pin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Huang, Tzou-Chi

    2015-11-01

    Glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) and HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) are highly expressed in most tumor cells and little in normal cells. In this study, treatment of HL-60 cells with lovastatin induced characteristic apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. We demonstrated that lovastatin treatment inhibited Ras and Raf protein translocation to cell membrane and eliminated the phosphorylation of the downstream effectors Akt and ERK, and the subsequent NF-κB translocation into nucleus. Specific inhibitors and γ-tocotrienol confirmed the Ras/Raf/ERK/NF-κB/GLO1 and Ras/Akt/NF-κB/GLO1 pathways. Data revealed that lovastatin induced HL-60 cell death was attenuated by mevalonate treatment. We demonstrated also that γ-tocotrienol showed its apoptotic effect on the HL-60 cell through the same pathway. γ-Tocotrienol enhanced the apoptotic effect of lovastatin through the down-regulation of GLO1 and HMGCR resulting in an increase of methylglyoxal and a decrease of cholesterol and led to the apoptosis of HL-60 cells. Data also revealed that both lovastatin and gamma-tocotrienol induced significant HL-60 cell differentiation. These results suggest that both lovastatin and gamma-tocotrienol could induce differentiation and followed by apoptosis. PMID:26208883

  20. Mutation in SHOC2 promotes aberrant protein N-myristoylation and underlies Noonan-like syndrome with loose anagen hair

    PubMed Central

    Cordeddu, Viviana; Di Schiavi, Elia; Pennacchio, Len A.; Ma'ayan, Avi; Sarkozy, Anna; Fodale, Valentina; Cecchetti, Serena; Cardinale, Alessio; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Lipzen, Anna; Zampino, Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Laura; Digilio, Maria C.; Martinelli, Simone; Flex, Elisabetta; Lepri, Francesca; Bartholdi, Deborah; Kutsche, Kerstin; Ferrero, Giovanni B.; Anichini, Cecilia; Selicorni, Angelo; Rossi, Cesare; Tenconi, Romano; Zenker, Martin; Merlo, Daniela; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Iyengar, Ravi; Bazzicalupo, Paolo; Gelb, Bruce D.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2009-01-01

    N-myristoylation is a common form of co-translational protein fatty acylation resulting from the attachment of myristate to a required N-terminal glycine residue.1,2 We show that aberrantly acquired N-myristoylation of SHOC2, a leucine-rich repeat-containing protein that positively modulates RAS-MAPK signal flow,3–6 underlies a clinically distinctive condition of the neuro-cardio-facial-cutaneous disorders family. Twenty-five subjects with a relatively consistent phenotype previously termed Noonan-like syndrome with loose anagen hair [OMIM 607721]7 shared the 4A>G missense change (Ser2Gly) in SHOC2 that introduces an N-myristoylation site, resulting in aberrant targeting of SHOC2 to the plasma membrane and impaired translocation to the nucleus upon growth factor stimulation. Expression of SHOC2S2G in vitro enhanced MAPK activation in a cell type-specific fashion. Induction of SHOC2S2G in Caenorhabditis elegans engendered protruding vulva, a neomorphic phenotype previously associated with aberrant signaling. These results document the first example of an acquired N-terminal lipid modification of a protein causing human disease. PMID:19684605

  1. Cardiac remodelling and RAS inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Carlos M

    2016-06-01

    Risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes are known to augment the activity and tissue expression of angiotensin II (Ang II), the major effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Overstimulation of the RAS has been implicated in a chain of events that contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular (CV) disease, including the development of cardiac remodelling. This chain of events has been termed the CV continuum. The concept of CV disease existing as a continuum was first proposed in 1991 and it is believed that intervention at any point within the continuum can modify disease progression. Treatment with antihypertensive agents may result in regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, with different drug classes exhibiting different degrees of efficacy. The greatest decrease in left ventricular mass is observed following treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), which inhibit Ang II formation. Although ACE-Is and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) provide significant benefits in terms of CV events and stroke, mortality remains high. This is partly due to a failure to completely suppress the RAS, and, as our knowledge has increased, an escape phenomenon has been proposed whereby the human sequence of the 12 amino acid substrate angiotensin-(1-12) is converted to Ang II by the mast cell protease, chymase. Angiotensin-(1-12) is abundant in a wide range of organs and has been shown to increase blood pressure in animal models, an effect abolished by the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs. This review explores the CV continuum, in addition to examining the influence of the RAS. We also consider novel pathways within the RAS and how new therapeutic approaches that target this are required to further reduce Ang II formation, and so provide patients with additional benefits from a more complete blockade of the RAS. PMID:27105891

  2. Modeling the Transcriptional Consequences of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ablation in Ras-Initiated Squamous Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Lisa Nolan; Ryscavage, Andrew; Merlino, Glenn; Yuspa, Stuart H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose EGFR targeted therapy is in clinical use to treat squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and other cancers of lining epithelium. Ras mutations in these tumors are a negative prognostic factor for response and skin inflammation is an adverse reaction to therapy. We investigated transcriptional and biochemical changes that could account for the confounding effects of RAS activation and inflammation in a squamous tissue. Experimental Design We performed gene expression profiling on oncogenic Ras transformed and wildtype mouse and human keratinocytes with EGFR ablated chronically by genetic deletion or acutely by drug treatment and followed leads provided by pathway analysis with biochemical studies. Results We identified a 25 gene signature specific to the Ras-EGFR ablation interaction and a distinct 19 gene EGFR ablation signature on normal keratinocytes. EGFR ablation in the context of wildtype Ras reduces ontologies favoring cell cycle control and transcription while oncogenic Ras enriches ontologies for ion channels and membrane transporters, particularly focused on calcium homeostasis. Ontologies between chronic EGFR ablation and acute pharmacological ablation were unique, both with and without Ras activation. p38α is activated in response to abrogation of EGFR signaling under conditions of Ras activation in both mouse and human keratinocytes and in RAS transformed tumor orthografts of EGFR ablated mouse keratinocytes. EGFR ablation in the absence of oncogenic Ras revealed Erk and IL-1β related pathways. Conclusion These findings reveal unrecognized interactions between Ras and EGFR signaling in squamous tumor cells that could influence the therapeutic response to EGFR ablation therapy. PMID:22068661

  3. Profiling of transcripts and proteins modulated by K-ras oncogene in the lung tissues of K-ras transgenic mice by omics approaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sojung; Kang, Jungwoo; Cho, Minchul; Seo, Eunhee; Choi, Heesook; Kim, Eunjin; Kim, Junghee; Kim, Heejong; Kang, Gum Yong; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Young-Ho; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Yum, Young Na; Park, Sue-Nie; Yoon, Do-Young

    2009-01-01

    The mutated K-ras gene is involved in approximately 30% of human cancers. In order to search for K-ras oncogene-induced modulators in lung tissues of K-ras transgenic mice, we performed microarray and proteomics (LC/ESI-MS/MS) analysis. Genes (RAB27b RAS family, IL-1RA, IL-33, chemokine ligand 6, epiregulin, EGF-like domain and cathepsin) related to cancer development (Wnt signaling pathway) and inflammation (chemokine/cytokine signaling pathway, Toll receptor signaling) were up-regulated while genes (troponin, tropomodulin 2, endothelial lipase, FGFR4, integrin alpha8 and adenylate cyclase 8) related to the tumor suppression such as p53 pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway and cadherin signaling pathway were down-regulated by K-ras oncogene. Proteomics approach revealed that up-regulated proteins in lung adenomas of K-ras mice were classified as follows: proteins related to the metabolism/catabolism (increased from 7 to 22% by K-ras gene), proteins related to translation/transcription and nucleotide (from 4 to 6%), proteins related to signal transduction (from 3 to 5%), proteins related to phosphorylation (from 1 to 2%). ATP synthase, Ras oncogene family, cytochrome c oxidase, flavoprotein, TEF 1, adipoprotein A-1 BP, glutathione oxidase, fatty acid BP 4, diaphorase 1, MAPK4 and transgelin were up-regulated by K-ras oncogene. However, integrin alpha1, Ras-interacting protein (Rain), endothelin-converting enzyme-1d and splicing factor 3b were down-regulated. These studies suggest that genes related to cancer development and inflammation were up-regulated while genes related to the tumor suppression were down-regulated by K-ras, resulting in the tumor growth. Putative biomarkers such as cell cycle related genes (Cdc37), cancer cell adhesion (Glycam 1, integrin alpha8, integrin alphaX and Clec4n), signal transduction (Tlr2, IL-33, and Ccbp2), migration (Ccr1, Ccl6, and diaphorase 1 (Cyb5r3) and cancer development (epiregulin) can be useful for diagnosis and as

  4. M-Ras induces Ral and JNK activation to regulate MEK/ERK-independent gene expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ariel F.; Campos, Tania; Babcock, Justin T.; Armijo, Marisol E.; Martinez-Conde, Alfonso; Pincheira, Roxana; Quilliam, Lawrence A.

    2011-01-01

    Constitutive activation of M-Ras has previously been reported to cause morphologic and growth transformation of murine cells, suggesting that M-Ras plays a role in tumorigenesis. Cell transformation by M-Ras correlated with weak activation of the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway, although contributions from other downstream effectors were suggested. Recent studies indicate that signaling events distinct from the Raf/MEK/ERK cascade are critical for human tumorigenesis. However, it is unknown what signaling events M-Ras triggers in human cells. Using constitutively active M-Ras (Q71L) containing additional mutations within its effector binding loop, we found that M-Ras induces MEK/ERK-dependent and -independent Elk1 activation as well as PI3K/Akt and JNK/cJun activation in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Among several human cell lines examined, M-Ras-induced MEK/ERK-independent Elk1 activation was only detected in MCF-7 cells, and correlated with Rlf /M-Ras interaction and Ral /JNK activation. Supporting a role for M-Ras signaling in breast cancer, EGF activated M-Ras and promoted its interaction with endogenous Rlf. In addition, constitutive activation of M-Ras induced estrogen-independent growth of MCF-7 cells that was dependent on PI3K/Akt, MEK/ERK and JNK activation. Thus, our studies demonstrate that M-Ras signaling activity differs between human cells, highlighting the importance of defining Ras protein signaling within each cell type, especially when designing treatments for Ras-induced cancer. These findings also demonstrate that M-Ras activity may be important for progression of EGFR-dependent tumors. PMID:22121046

  5. Established and emerging fluorescence-based assays for G-protein function: Ras-superfamily GTPases.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Rafael J; Kimple, Randall J; Rossman, Kent L; Siderovski, David P; Sondek, John

    2003-06-01

    Ras and Rho GTPases are signaling proteins that regulate a variety of physiological events and are intimately linked to the progression of cancer. Recently, a variety of fluorescence-based assays have been refined to monitor activation of these GTPases. This review summarizes current fluorescence-based techniques for studying Ras superfamily GTPases with an emphasis on practical examples and high-throughput applications. These techniques are not only useful for biochemical characterization of Ras superfamily members, but will also facilitate the discovery of small molecule therapeutics designed to inhibit signal transduction mediated by GTPases. PMID:12769685

  6. Cholangiocyte N-Ras Protein Mediates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Interleukin 6 Secretion and Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Steven P.; Splinter, Patrick L.; Trussoni, Christy E.; Gajdos, Gabriella B.; Lineswala, Pooja N.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2011-01-01

    Cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells lining the bile ducts in the liver, are periodically exposed to potentially injurious microbes and/or microbial products. As a result, cholangiocytes actively participate in microbe-associated, hepatic proinflammatory responses. We previously showed that infection of cultured human cholangiocytes with the protozoan parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, or treatment with Gram-negative bacteria-derived LPS, activates NFκB in a myeloid differentiation 88 (MyD88)-dependent manner. Here, we describe a novel signaling pathway initiated by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) involving the small GTPase, Ras, that mediates cholangiocyte proinflammatory cytokine production and induction of cholangiocyte proliferation. Using cultured human cholangiocytes and a Ras activation assay, we found that agonists of plasma membrane TLRs (TLR 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6) rapidly (<10 min) activated N-Ras, but not other p21 Ras isoforms, resulting in the rapid (<15 min) phosphorylation of the downstream Ras effector, ERK1/2. RNA interference-induced depletion of TRAF6, a downstream effector of MyD88 and known activator of MAPK signaling, had no effect on N-Ras activation. Following N-Ras activation the proinflammatory cytokine, IL6, is rapidly secreted. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrated that LPS treatment induced IL6 promoter-driven luciferase which was suppressed using MEK/ERK pharmacologic inhibitors (PD98059 or U0126) and RNAi-induced depletion of N-Ras. Finally, we showed that LPS increased cholangiocyte proliferation (1.5-fold), which was inhibited by depletion of N-Ras; TLR agonist-induced proliferation was also inhibited following pretreatment with an IL6 receptor-blocking antibody. Together, our results support a novel signaling axis involving microbial activation of N-Ras likely involved in the cholangiocyte pathogen-induced proinflammatory response. PMID:21757746

  7. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A; Chan, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5'-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras-/-). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras-/- mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras-/- mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras-/- mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras-/- T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras-/- T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras-/- T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  8. Absence of K-Ras Reduces Proliferation and Migration But Increases Extracellular Matrix Synthesis in Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Cuesta, Cristina; Eleno, Nélida; Crespo, Piero; López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of Ras-GTPases in the development of renal fibrosis has been addressed in the last decade. We have previously shown that H- and N-Ras isoforms participate in the regulation of fibrosis. Herein, we assessed the role of K-Ras in cellular processes involved in the development of fibrosis: proliferation, migration, and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins synthesis. K-Ras knockout (KO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (K-ras(-/-) ) stimulated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) exhibited reduced proliferation and impaired mobility than wild-type fibroblasts. Moreover, an increase on ECM production was observed in K-Ras KO fibroblasts in basal conditions. The absence of K-Ras was accompanied by reduced Ras activation and ERK phosphorylation, and increased AKT phosphorylation, but no differences were observed in TGF-β1-induced Smad signaling. The MEK inhibitor U0126 decreased cell proliferation independently of the presence of K-ras but reduced migration and ECM proteins expression only in wild-type fibroblasts, while the PI3K-AKT inhibitor LY294002 decreased cell proliferation, migration, and ECM synthesis in both types of fibroblasts. Thus, our data unveil that K-Ras and its downstream effector pathways distinctively regulate key biological processes in the development of fibrosis. Moreover, we show that K-Ras may be a crucial mediator in TGF-β1-mediated effects in this cell type. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2224-2235, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26873620

  9. Comparison of liver oncogenic potential among human RAS isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sook In; Moon, Hyuk; Ju, Hye-Lim; Kim, Dae Yeong; Cho, Kyung Joo; Ribback, Silvia; Dombrowski, Frank; Calvisi, Diego F.; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2016-01-01

    Mutation in one of three RAS genes (i.e., HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS) leading to constitutive activation of RAS signaling pathways is considered a key oncogenic event in human carcinogenesis. Whether activated RAS isoforms possess different oncogenic potentials remains an unresolved question. Here, we compared oncogenic properties among RAS isoforms using liver-specific transgenesis in mice. Hydrodynamic transfection was performed using transposons expressing short hairpin RNA downregulating p53 and an activated RAS isoform, and livers were harvested at 23 days after gene delivery. No differences were found in the hepatocarcinogenic potential among RAS isoforms, as determined by both gross examination of livers and liver weight per body weight ratio (LW/BW) of mice expressing HRASQ61L, KRAS4BG12V and NRASQ61K. However, the tumorigenic potential differed significantly between KRAS splicing variants. The LW/BW ratio in KRAS4AG12V mice was significantly lower than in KRAS4BG12V mice (p < 0.001), and KRAS4AG12V mice lived significantly longer than KRRAS4BG12V mice (p < 0.0001). Notably, tumors from KRAS4AG12V mice displayed higher expression of the p16INK4A tumor suppressor when compared with KRAS4BG12V tumors. Forced overexpression of p16INK4A significantly reduced tumor growth in KRAS4BG12V mice, suggesting that upregulation of p16INK4A by KRAS4AG12V presumably delays tumor development driven by the latter oncogene. PMID:26799184

  10. Lead identification for the K-Ras protein: virtual screening and combinatorial fragment-based approaches

    PubMed Central

    Pathan, Akbar Ali Khan; Panthi, Bhavana; Khan, Zahid; Koppula, Purushotham Reddy; Alanazi, Mohammed Saud; Sachchidanand; Parine, Narasimha Reddy; Chourasia, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Kirsten rat sarcoma (K-Ras) protein is a member of Ras family belonging to the small guanosine triphosphatases superfamily. The members of this family share a conserved structure and biochemical properties, acting as binary molecular switches. The guanosine triphosphate-bound active K-Ras interacts with a range of effectors, resulting in the stimulation of downstream signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Efforts to target K-Ras have been unsuccessful until now, placing it among high-value molecules against which developing a therapy would have an enormous impact. K-Ras transduces signals when it binds to guanosine triphosphate by directly binding to downstream effector proteins, but in case of guanosine diphosphate-bound conformation, these interactions get disrupted. Methods In the present study, we targeted the nucleotide-binding site in the “on” and “off” state conformations of the K-Ras protein to find out suitable lead compounds. A structure-based virtual screening approach has been used to screen compounds from different databases, followed by a combinatorial fragment-based approach to design the apposite lead for the K-Ras protein. Results Interestingly, the designed compounds exhibit a binding preference for the “off” state over “on” state conformation of K-Ras protein. Moreover, the designed compounds’ interactions are similar to guanosine diphosphate and, thus, could presumably act as a potential lead for K-Ras. The predicted drug-likeness properties of these compounds suggest that these compounds follow the Lipinski’s rule of five and have tolerable absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity values. Conclusion Thus, through the current study, we propose targeting only “off” state conformations as a promising strategy for the design of reversible inhibitors to pharmacologically inhibit distinct conformations of K-Ras protein. PMID:27217775

  11. MicroRNAs: Modulators of the Ras Oncogenes in Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan; Alzahrani, Ali S

    2016-07-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) of the head and neck is one of the six most common cancers in the world. OSCC remains the most common cause of cancer deaths in Asian countries. Conventional treatments for OSCC have not improved the overall 5 years survival and therefore alternative therapeutic targets are often sought. Ras is one of the most frequently deregulated oncogenes in oral cancer. Direct targeting the ras has proven unrealistic and hence, exploring and understanding alternative pathways and/or molecules which regulate ras and its signaling that could pave the way for novel molecular targets and therapy for oral cancer. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to regulate ras oncogenes in human cancers. In this article, we address the microRNA-mediated regulation of the ras oncogenes in oral cancer. We describe extensively the tumor suppressive and oncogenic roles of miRNAs in regulation of ras oncogenes in OSCC. We also discuss the role of miRNA-mediated ras regulation in therapeutic determination of oral cancer. Complete understanding of the miRNA regulation of ras oncogenes in oral cancer may facilitate to plan better strategies for diagnosis, molecular therapeutic targeting and the overall prognosis of this common and deadly cancer. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1424-1431, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26620726

  12. CARD9 mediates Dectin-1-induced ERK activation by linking Ras-GRF1 to H-Ras for antifungal immunity.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xin-Ming; Tang, Bing; Zhu, Le-Le; Liu, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Xue-Qiang; Gorjestani, Sara; Hsu, Yen-Michael S; Yang, Long; Guan, Jian-Hong; Xu, Guo-Tong; Lin, Xin

    2014-10-20

    Dectin-1 functions as a pattern recognition receptor for sensing fungal infection. It has been well-established that Dectin-1 induces innate immune responses through caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9)-mediated NF-κB activation. In this study, we find that CARD9 is dispensable for NF-κB activation induced by Dectin-1 ligands, such as curdlan or Candida albicans yeast. In contrast, we find that CARD9 regulates H-Ras activation by linking Ras-GRF1 to H-Ras, which mediates Dectin-1-induced extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) activation and proinflammatory responses when stimulated by their ligands. Mechanistically, Dectin-1 engagement initiates spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk)-dependent Ras-GRF1 phosphorylation, and the phosphorylated Ras-GRF1 recruits and activates H-Ras through forming a complex with CARD9, which leads to activation of ERK downstream. Finally, we show that inhibiting ERK activation significantly accelerates the death of C. albicans-infected mice, and this inhibitory effect is dependent on CARD9. Together, our studies reveal a molecular mechanism by which Dectin-1 induces H-Ras activation that leads to ERK activation for host innate immune responses against fungal infection. PMID:25267792

  13. CARD9 mediates Dectin-1–induced ERK activation by linking Ras-GRF1 to H-Ras for antifungal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bing; Zhu, Le-Le; Liu, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Xue-Qiang; Gorjestani, Sara; Hsu, Yen-Michael S.; Yang, Long; Guan, Jian-Hong; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Dectin-1 functions as a pattern recognition receptor for sensing fungal infection. It has been well-established that Dectin-1 induces innate immune responses through caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9)–mediated NF-κB activation. In this study, we find that CARD9 is dispensable for NF-κB activation induced by Dectin-1 ligands, such as curdlan or Candida albicans yeast. In contrast, we find that CARD9 regulates H-Ras activation by linking Ras-GRF1 to H-Ras, which mediates Dectin-1–induced extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) activation and proinflammatory responses when stimulated by their ligands. Mechanistically, Dectin-1 engagement initiates spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk)–dependent Ras-GRF1 phosphorylation, and the phosphorylated Ras-GRF1 recruits and activates H-Ras through forming a complex with CARD9, which leads to activation of ERK downstream. Finally, we show that inhibiting ERK activation significantly accelerates the death of C. albicans–infected mice, and this inhibitory effect is dependent on CARD9. Together, our studies reveal a molecular mechanism by which Dectin-1 induces H-Ras activation that leads to ERK activation for host innate immune responses against fungal infection. PMID:25267792

  14. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  15. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, M.; Hankla, A.

    1996-07-09

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90{degree} such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system. 5 figs.

  16. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, Mark; Hankla, Allen

    1996-01-01

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90.degree. such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system.

  17. The Bisphenol A analogue Bisphenol S binds to K-Ras4B--implications for 'BPA-free' plastics.

    PubMed

    Schöpel, Miriam; Herrmann, Christian; Scherkenbeck, Jürgen; Stoll, Raphael

    2016-02-01

    K-Ras4B is a small GTPase that belongs to the Ras superfamily of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. GTPases function as molecular switches in cells and are key players in intracellular signalling. Ras has been identified as an oncogene and is mutated in more than 20% of human cancers. Here, we report that Bisphenol S binds into a binding pocket of K-Ras4B previously identified for various low molecular weight compounds. Our results advocate for more comprehensive safety studies on the toxicity of Bisphenol S, as it is frequently used for Bisphenol A-free food containers. PMID:26867649

  18. Lin28-let7 Modulates Radiosensitivity of Human Cancer Cells With Activation of K-Ras

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jee-Sun.; Kim, Jae-Jin; Byun, Ju-Yeon; Kim, In-Ah

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of targeting Lin28-let7 microRNA regulatory network for overcoming the radioresistance of cancer cells having activated K-Ras signaling. Methods and Materials: A549 lung carcinoma cells and ASPC1 pancreatic cancer cells possessing K-RAS mutation were transfected with pre-let7a microRNA or Lin28 siRNA, respectively. Clonogenic assay, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western analysis were performed. The effects of Lin28 on SQ20B cells having wild-type K-RAS, and a normal fibroblast were also assessed. Results: The overexpression of let-7a decreased expression of K-Ras and radiosensitized A549 cells. Inhibition of Lin28, a repressor of let-7, attenuated K-Ras expression and radiosensitized A549 and ASPC1 cells. Neither SQ20B cells expressing wild-type K-RAS nor HDF, the normal human fibroblasts, were radiosensitized by this approach. Conclusions: The Lin28-let7 regulatory network may be a potentially useful therapeutic target for overcoming the radioresistance of human cancers having activated K-Ras signaling.

  19. A Flt3 and Ras-dependent Pathway Primes B Cell Development by Inducing A State of IL7-responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Xi; Goetz, Christine A.; Katerndahl, Casey D.S.; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Farrar, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Ras plays an important role in B cell development. However, the stage at which Ras governs B cell development remains unclear. Moreover, the upstream receptors and downstream effectors of Ras that govern B cell differentiation remain undefined. Using mice that express a dominant negative form of Ras, we demonstrate that Ras-mediated signaling plays a critical role in the development of common lymphoid progenitors (CLP). This developmental block parallels that found in flt3−/− mice, suggesting that Flt3 is an important upstream activator of Ras in early B cell progenitors. Ras inhibition impaired proliferation of CLP and pre-pro-B cells but not pro-B cells. Rather, Ras promotes STAT5-dependent pro-B cell differentiation by enhancing IL7Rα levels and suppressing socs2 and socs3 expression. Our results suggest a model in which Flt3/Ras-dependent signals play a critical role in B cell development by priming early B cell progenitors for subsequent STAT5-dependent B cell differentiation. PMID:20065110

  20. R-Ras inhibits VEGF-induced p38MAPK activation and HSP27 phosphorylation in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Junko; Li, Fangfei; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    R-Ras is a Ras family small GTPase highly expressed in mature functional blood vessels in normal tissues. It inhibits pathological angiogenesis and promotes vessel maturation and stabilization. Previous studies suggest that R-Ras affects cellular signaling in endothelial cells, pericytes, and smooth muscle cells to regulate vessel formation and remodeling in adult tissues. R-Ras suppresses VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and vessel sprouting while promoting normalization of pathologically developing vessels in mice. R-Ras attenuates VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) activation by inhibiting internalization of the receptor upon VEGF ligand binding, leading to significant reduction of VEGFR2 autophosphorylation. Here, we show that R-Ras strongly suppresses VEGF-dependent activation of stress-activated protein kinase-2/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (SAPK2/p38MAPK) and phosphorylation of downstream heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), a regulator of actin cytoskeleton organization, in endothelial cells. The suppression of p38MAPK activation and HSP27 phosphorylation by R-Ras concurred with altered actin cytoskeleton architecture, reduced membrane protrusion, and inhibition of endothelial cell migration toward VEGF. Silencing of endogenous R-Ras by RNAi increased membrane protrusion and cell migration stimulated by VEGF, and these effects were offset by p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580. These results suggest that R-Ras regulates angiogenic activities of endothelial cells in part via inhibition of the p38MAPK-HSP27 axis of VEGF signaling. PMID:27029009

  1. Inhibitors of Ras-SOS Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoyong; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-04-19

    Activating Ras mutations are found in about 30 % of human cancers. Ras activation is regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors, such as the son of sevenless (SOS), which form protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with Ras and catalyze the exchange of GDP by GTP. This is the rate-limiting step in Ras activation. However, Ras surfaces lack any evident suitable pockets where a molecule might bind tightly, rendering Ras proteins still 'undruggable' for over 30 years. Among the alternative approaches is the design of inhibitors that target the Ras-SOS PPI interface, a strategy that is gaining increasing recognition for treating Ras mutant cancers. Herein we focus on data that has accumulated over the past few years pertaining to the design of small-molecule modulators or peptide mimetics aimed at the interface of the Ras-SOS PPI. We emphasize, however, that even if such Ras-SOS therapeutics are potent, drug resistance may emerge. To counteract this development, we propose "pathway drug cocktails", that is, drug combinations aimed at parallel (or compensatory) pathways. A repertoire of classified cancer, cell/tissue, and pathway/protein combinations would be beneficial toward this goal. PMID:26630662

  2. Inhibition of the Ras-Net (Elk-3) pathway by a novel pyrazole that affects microtubules.

    PubMed

    Wasylyk, Christine; Zheng, Hong; Castell, Christelle; Debussche, Laurent; Multon, Marie-Christine; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2008-03-01

    Net (Elk-3/SAP-2/Erp) is a transcription factor that is phosphorylated and activated by the Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) signaling pathway and is involved in wound healing, angiogenesis, and tumor growth. In a cell-based screen for small molecule inhibitors of Ras activation of Net transcriptional activity, we identified a novel pyrazole, XRP44X. XRP44X inhibits fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2)-induced Net phosphorylation by the Ras-Erk signaling upstream from Ras. It also binds to the colchicine-binding site of tubulin, depolymerizes microtubules, stimulates cell membrane blebbing, and affects the morphology of the actin skeleton. Interestingly, Combretastin-A4, which produces similar effects on the cytoskeleton, also inhibits FGF-2 Ras-Net signaling. This differs from other classes of agents that target microtubules, which have either little effect (vincristine) or no effect (docetaxel and nocodazole) on the Ras-Net pathway. XRP44X inhibits various cellular properties, including cell growth, cell cycle progression, and aortal sprouting, similar to other molecules that bind to the tubulin colchicine site. XRP44X has the potentially interesting property of connecting two important pathways involved in cell transformation and may thereby represent an interesting class of molecules that could be developed for cancer treatment. PMID:18316589

  3. The nitric oxide-sensitive p21Ras-ERK pathway mediates S-nitrosoglutathione-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujita, Maristela; Batista, Wagner L.; Ogata, Fernando T.; Monteiro, Hugo P. Arai, Roberto J.

    2008-05-16

    p21Ras protein plays a critical role in cellular signaling that induces either cell cycle progression or apoptosis. Nitric oxide (NO) has been consistently reported to activate p21Ras through the redox sensitive cysteine residue (118). In this study, we demonstrated that the p21Ras-ERK pathway regulates THP-1 monocyte/macrophage apoptosis induced by S-nitrosoglutathione (SNOG). This was apparent from studies in THP-1 cells expressing NO-insensitive p21Ras (p21Ras{sup C118S}) where the pro-apoptotic action of SNOG was almost abrogated. Three major MAP kinase pathways (ERK, JNK, and p38) that are downstream to p21Ras were investigated. It was observed that only the activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinases by SNOG in THP-1 cells was attributable to p21Ras. The inhibition of the ERK pathway by PD98059 markedly attenuated apoptosis in SNOG-treated THP-1 cells, but had a marginal effect on SNOG-treated THP-1 cells expressing NO-insensitive p21Ras. The inhibition of the JNK and p38 pathways by selective inhibitors had no marked effects on the percentage of apoptosis. The induction of p21Waf1 expression by SNOG was observed in THP-1 cells harboring mutant and wild-type p21Ras, however in cells expressing mutant Ras, the expression of p21Waf1 was significantly attenuated. The treatment of THP-1 cells expressing wild-type p21Ras with PD98059 resulted in significant attenuation of p21Waf1 expression. These results indicate that the redox sensitive p21Ras-ERK pathway plays a critical role in sensing and delivering the pro-apoptotic signaling mediated by SNOG.

  4. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates N-Ras activation on the Golgi complex of antigen-stimulated T cells.

    PubMed

    Ibiza, Sales; Pérez-Rodríguez, Andrea; Ortega, Angel; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Barreiro, Olga; García-Domínguez, Carlota A; Víctor, Víctor M; Esplugues, Juan V; Rojas, José M; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Serrador, Juan M

    2008-07-29

    Ras/ERK signaling plays an important role in T cell activation and development. We recently reported that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived NO regulates T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent ERK activation by a cGMP-independent mechanism. Here, we explore the mechanisms through which eNOS exerts this regulation. We have found that eNOS-derived NO positively regulates Ras/ERK activation in T cells stimulated with antigen on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Intracellular activation of N-, H-, and K-Ras was monitored with fluorescent probes in T cells stably transfected with eNOS-GFP or its G2A point mutant, which is defective in activity and cellular localization. Using this system, we demonstrate that eNOS selectively activates N-Ras but not K-Ras on the Golgi complex of T cells engaged with APC, even though Ras isoforms are activated in response to NO from donors. We further show that activation of N-Ras involves eNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation on Cys(118), suggesting that upon TCR engagement, eNOS-derived NO directly activates N-Ras on the Golgi. Moreover, wild-type but not C118S N-Ras increased TCR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of Cys(118) contributes to activation-induced T cell death. Our data define a signaling mechanism for the regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway based on the eNOS-dependent differential activation of N-Ras and K-Ras at specific cell compartments. PMID:18641128

  5. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates N-Ras activation on the Golgi complex of antigen-stimulated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ibiza, Sales; Pérez-Rodríguez, Andrea; Ortega, Ángel; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Barreiro, Olga; García-Domínguez, Carlota A.; Víctor, Víctor M.; Esplugues, Juan V.; Rojas, José M.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Serrador, Juan M.

    2008-01-01

    Ras/ERK signaling plays an important role in T cell activation and development. We recently reported that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived NO regulates T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent ERK activation by a cGMP-independent mechanism. Here, we explore the mechanisms through which eNOS exerts this regulation. We have found that eNOS-derived NO positively regulates Ras/ERK activation in T cells stimulated with antigen on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Intracellular activation of N-, H-, and K-Ras was monitored with fluorescent probes in T cells stably transfected with eNOS-GFP or its G2A point mutant, which is defective in activity and cellular localization. Using this system, we demonstrate that eNOS selectively activates N-Ras but not K-Ras on the Golgi complex of T cells engaged with APC, even though Ras isoforms are activated in response to NO from donors. We further show that activation of N-Ras involves eNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation on Cys118, suggesting that upon TCR engagement, eNOS-derived NO directly activates N-Ras on the Golgi. Moreover, wild-type but not C118S N-Ras increased TCR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of Cys118 contributes to activation-induced T cell death. Our data define a signaling mechanism for the regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway based on the eNOS-dependent differential activation of N-Ras and K-Ras at specific cell compartments. PMID:18641128

  6. The nitric oxide-sensitive p21Ras-ERK pathway mediates S-nitrosoglutathione-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Maristela; Batista, Wagner L; Ogata, Fernando T; Stern, Arnold; Monteiro, Hugo P; Arai, Roberto J

    2008-05-16

    p21Ras protein plays a critical role in cellular signaling that induces either cell cycle progression or apoptosis. Nitric oxide (NO) has been consistently reported to activate p21Ras through the redox sensitive cysteine residue (118). In this study, we demonstrated that the p21Ras-ERK pathway regulates THP-1 monocyte/macrophage apoptosis induced by S-nitrosoglutathione (SNOG). This was apparent from studies in THP-1 cells expressing NO-insensitive p21Ras (p21Ras(C118S)) where the pro-apoptotic action of SNOG was almost abrogated. Three major MAP kinase pathways (ERK, JNK, and p38) that are downstream to p21Ras were investigated. It was observed that only the activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinases by SNOG in THP-1 cells was attributable to p21Ras. The inhibition of the ERK pathway by PD98059 markedly attenuated apoptosis in SNOG-treated THP-1 cells, but had a marginal effect on SNOG-treated THP-1 cells expressing NO-insensitive p21Ras. The inhibition of the JNK and p38 pathways by selective inhibitors had no marked effects on the percentage of apoptosis. The induction of p21Waf1 expression by SNOG was observed in THP-1 cells harboring mutant and wild-type p21Ras, however in cells expressing mutant Ras, the expression of p21Waf1 was significantly attenuated. The treatment of THP-1 cells expressing wild-type p21Ras with PD98059 resulted in significant attenuation of p21Waf1 expression. These results indicate that the redox sensitive p21Ras-ERK pathway plays a critical role in sensing and delivering the pro-apoptotic signaling mediated by SNOG. PMID:18325324

  7. NORE1A is a Ras senescence effector that controls the apoptotic/senescent balance of p53 via HIPK2.

    PubMed

    Donninger, Howard; Calvisi, Diego F; Barnoud, Thibaut; Clark, Jennifer; Schmidt, M Lee; Vos, Michele D; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2015-03-16

    The Ras oncoprotein is a key driver of cancer. However, Ras also provokes senescence, which serves as a major barrier to Ras-driven transformation. Ras senescence pathways remain poorly characterized. NORE1A is a novel Ras effector that serves as a tumor suppressor. It is frequently inactivated in tumors. We show that NORE1A is a powerful Ras senescence effector and that down-regulation of NORE1A suppresses senescence induction by Ras and enhances Ras transformation. We show that Ras induces the formation of a complex between NORE1A and the kinase HIPK2, enhancing HIPK2 association with p53. HIPK2 is a tumor suppressor that can induce either proapoptotic or prosenescent posttranslational modifications of p53. NORE1A acts to suppress its proapoptotic phosphorylation of p53 but enhance its prosenescent acetylation of p53. Thus, we identify a major new Ras signaling pathway that links Ras to the control of specific protein acetylation and show how NORE1A allows Ras to qualitatively modify p53 function to promote senescence. PMID:25778922

  8. NORE1A is a Ras senescence effector that controls the apoptotic/senescent balance of p53 via HIPK2

    PubMed Central

    Donninger, Howard; Calvisi, Diego F.; Barnoud, Thibaut; Clark, Jennifer; Schmidt, M. Lee; Vos, Michele D.

    2015-01-01

    The Ras oncoprotein is a key driver of cancer. However, Ras also provokes senescence, which serves as a major barrier to Ras-driven transformation. Ras senescence pathways remain poorly characterized. NORE1A is a novel Ras effector that serves as a tumor suppressor. It is frequently inactivated in tumors. We show that NORE1A is a powerful Ras senescence effector and that down-regulation of NORE1A suppresses senescence induction by Ras and enhances Ras transformation. We show that Ras induces the formation of a complex between NORE1A and the kinase HIPK2, enhancing HIPK2 association with p53. HIPK2 is a tumor suppressor that can induce either proapoptotic or prosenescent posttranslational modifications of p53. NORE1A acts to suppress its proapoptotic phosphorylation of p53 but enhance its prosenescent acetylation of p53. Thus, we identify a major new Ras signaling pathway that links Ras to the control of specific protein acetylation and show how NORE1A allows Ras to qualitatively modify p53 function to promote senescence. PMID:25778922

  9. Suppression of albumin enhancer activity by H-ras and AP-1 in hepatocyte cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, J; Isom, H C

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrated, using a transient transfection assay, that the albumin enhancer increased the expression of the albumin promoter in a highly differentiated, simian virus 40 (SV40)-immortalized hepatocyte cell line, CWSV1, but was not functional in two ras-transformed cell lines (NR3 and NR4) derived from CWSV1 by stable transfection with the T24ras oncogene. A transient cotransfection assay showed that T24ras and normal c-Ha-ras were each able to inhibit the activity of the albumin enhancer in an immortal hepatocyte cell line. DNase I footprinting and gel mobility shift assays demonstrated that the DNA binding activities specific to the albumin enhancer were not decreased in the ras-transformed cells. ras also did not diminish the expression of HNF1 alpha, C/EBP alpha, HNF3 alpha, HNF3 beta, or HNF3 gamma but did significantly increase AP-1 binding activity. Three AP-1 binding sites were identified within the albumin enhancer, and DNA binding activities specific to these AP-1 sites were induced in the ras-transformed hepatocytes. Subsequent functional assays showed that overexpression of c-jun and c-fos inhibited the activity of the albumin enhancer. Site-directed mutagenesis of the AP-1 binding sites in the albumin enhancer partially abrogated the suppressing effect of ras and c-jun/c-fos on the enhancer. These functional studies therefore supported the results of the structural studies with AP-1. We conclude that the activity of the albumin enhancer is subject to regulation by ras signaling pathways and that the effect of ras on the albumin enhancer activity may be mediated by AP-1. Images PMID:8114691

  10. The K-Ras 4A isoform promotes apoptosis but does not affect either lifespan or spontaneous tumor incidence in aging mice

    SciTech Connect

    Plowman, Sarah J.; Arends, Mark J.; Brownstein, David G.; Luo Feijun; Devenney, Paul S.; Rose, Lorraine; Ritchie, Ann-Marie; Berry, Rachel L.; Harrison, David J.; Hooper, Martin L.; Patek, Charles E. . E-mail: Charles.Patek@ed.ac.uk

    2006-01-01

    Ras proteins function as molecular switches in signal transduction pathways, and, here, we examined the effects of the K-ras4A and 4B splice variants on cell function by comparing wild-type embryonic stem (ES) cells with K-ras {sup tm{delta}}{sup 4A/tm{delta}}{sup 4A} (exon 4A knock-out) ES cells which express K-ras4B only and K-ras {sup -/-} (exons 1-3 knock-out) ES cells which express neither splice variant, and intestinal epithelium from wild-type and K-ras {sup tm{delta}}{sup 4A/tm{delta}}{sup 4A} mice. RT-qPCR analysis found that K-ras4B expression was reduced in K-ras {sup tm{delta}}{sup 4A/tm{delta}}{sup 4A} ES cells but unaffected in small intestine. K-Ras deficiency did not affect ES cell growth, and K-Ras4A deficiency did not affect intestinal epithelial proliferation. K-ras {sup tm{delta}}{sup 4A/tm{delta}}{sup 4A} and K-ras {sup -/-} ES cells showed a reduced capacity for differentiation following LIF withdrawal, and K-ras {sup -/-} cells were least differentiated. K-Ras4A deficiency inhibited etoposide-induced apoptosis in ES cells and intestinal epithelial cells. However, K-ras {sup tm{delta}}{sup 4A/tm{delta}}{sup 4A} ES cells were more resistant to etoposide-induced apoptosis than K-ras {sup -/-} cells. The results indicate that (1) K-Ras4A promotes apoptosis while K-Ras4B inhibits it, and (2) K-Ras4B, and possibly K-Ras4A, promotes differentiation. The findings raise the possibility that alteration of the K-Ras4A/4B isoform ratio modulates tumorigenesis by differentially affecting stem cell survival and/or differentiation. However, K-Ras4A deficiency did not affect life expectancy or spontaneous overall tumor incidence in aging mice.

  11. 3D resolved mapping of optical aberrations in thick tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jun; Mahou, Pierre; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Débarre, Delphine

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple method for mapping optical aberrations with 3D resolution within thick samples. The method relies on the local measurement of the variation in image quality with externally applied aberrations. We discuss the accuracy of the method as a function of the signal strength and of the aberration amplitude and we derive the achievable resolution for the resulting measurements. We then report on measured 3D aberration maps in human skin biopsies and mouse brain slices. From these data, we analyse the consequences of tissue structure and refractive index distribution on aberrations and imaging depth in normal and cleared tissue samples. The aberration maps allow the estimation of the typical aplanetism region size over which aberrations can be uniformly corrected. This method and data pave the way towards efficient correction strategies for tissue imaging applications. PMID:22876353

  12. Suppression of ras-transformants (review).

    PubMed

    Kuzumaki, N

    1991-01-01

    Transforming ras genes are the oncogenes most frequently identified in human cancers. This justifies the intense interest in finding ways to suppress oncogenicity in these gene family-mediated transformants. The methods of suppression can be classified as 1) genetical, 2) biological and 3) pharmacological. Most of the reagents used for the suppression inhibit rodent transformants induced by transfected viral or activated cellular ras oncogenes, but some of the reagents are also effective when applied to natural human transformants that contain activated ras oncogenes. The growth and tumorigenicity of the ras-transformants are suppressed by the inhibition of the integration, transcription, translation or post-translational modification of the ras genes and p21 ras proteins, as well as the inhibition of the expression of genes which collaborate in the ras-transformation or the enhancement of some tumor suppressor genes. These observations offer novel approaches to the investigation of malignant transformation by ras-oncogenes, and have potential application in treatment of ras-oncogene-induced tumors. PMID:2018365

  13. The Aberration Corrected SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, David C.

    2005-09-09

    The performance of the conventional low-energy CD-SEM is limited by the aberrations inherent in the probe forming lens. Multi-pole correctors are now available which can reduce or eliminate these aberrations. An SEM equipped with such a corrector offers higher spatial resolution and more probe current from a given electron source, and other aspects of the optical performance are also improved, but the much higher numerical aperture associated with an aberration corrected lens results in a reduction in imaging depth of field.

  14. The Crosstalk of RAS with the TGF-β Family During Carcinoma Progression and its Implications for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grusch, M.; Petz, M.; Metzner, T.; Öztürk, D.; Schneller, D.; Mikulits, W.

    2010-01-01

    Both RAS and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling cascades are central in tumorigenesis and show synergisms depending on tumor stage and tissue context. In this review we focus on the interaction of RAS subeffector proteins with signaling components of the TGF-β family including those of TGF-βs, activins and bone morphogenic proteins. Compelling evidence indicates that RAS signaling is essentially involved in the switch from tumor-suppressive to tumor-promoting functions of the TGF-β family leading to enhanced cancer growth and metastatic dissemination of primary tumors. Thus, the interface of these signaling cascades is considered as a promising target for the development of novel cancer therapeutics. The current pharmacological anti-cancer concepts combating the molecular cooperation between RAS and TGF-β family signaling during carcinoma progression are critically discussed. PMID:20718708

  15. Aberrant CD8+ T-cell responses and memory differentiation upon viral infection of an ataxia-telangiectasia mouse model driven by hyper-activated Akt and mTORC1 signaling.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anthony D; Parish, Ian A; McKay, Sharen E; Kaech, Susan M; Shadel, Gerald S

    2011-06-01

    Immune system-related pathology is common in ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) patients and mice that lack the protein kinase, A-T mutated (ATM). However, it has not been studied how ATM influences immune responses to a viral infection. Using the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection model, we show that ATM(-/-) mice, despite having fewer naïve CD8⁺ T cells, effectively clear the virus. However, aberrant CD8⁺ T-cell responses are observed, including defective expansion and contraction, effector-to-memory differentiation, and a switch in viral-epitope immunodominance. T-cell receptor-activated, but not naïve, ATM(-/-) splenic CD8⁺ T cells have increased ribosomal protein S6 and Akt phosphorylation and do not proliferate well in response to IL-15, a cytokine important for memory T-cell development. Accordingly, pharmacological Akt or mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition during T-cell receptor activation alone rescues the IL-15 proliferation defect. Finally, rapamycin treatment during LCMV infection in vivo increases the number of memory T cells in ATM(-/-) mice. Altogether, these results show that CD8⁺T cells lacking ATM have hyperactive Akt and mTORC1 signaling in response to T-cell receptor activation, which results in aberrant cytokine responses and memory T-cell development. We speculate that similar signaling defects contribute to the immune system pathology of A-T, and that inhibition of Akt and/or mTORC1 may be of therapeutic value. PMID:21641396

  16. 8-Hydroxyquinoline-based inhibitors of the Rce1 protease disrupt Ras membrane localization in human cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Idrees; Hampton, Shahienaz E; Ashall, Louise; Hildebrandt, Emily R; Kutlik, Robert A; Manandhar, Surya P; Floyd, Brandon J; Smith, Haley E; Dozier, Jonathan K; Distefano, Mark D; Schmidt, Walter K; Dore, Timothy M

    2016-01-15

    Ras converting enzyme 1 (Rce1) is an endoprotease that catalyzes processing of the C-terminus of Ras protein by removing -aaX from the CaaX motif. The activity of Rce1 is crucial for proper localization of Ras to the plasma membrane where it functions. Ras is responsible for transmitting signals related to cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. The disregulation of these pathways due to constitutively active oncogenic Ras can ultimately lead to cancer. Ras, its effectors and regulators, and the enzymes that are involved in its maturation process are all targets for anti-cancer therapeutics. Key enzymes required for Ras maturation and localization are the farnesyltransferase (FTase), Rce1, and isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase (ICMT). Among these proteins, the physiological role of Rce1 in regulating Ras and other CaaX proteins has not been fully explored. Small-molecule inhibitors of Rce1 could be useful as chemical biology tools to understand further the downstream impact of Rce1 on Ras function and serve as potential leads for cancer therapeutics. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of a previously reported Rce1 inhibitor, NSC1011, has been performed to generate a new library of Rce1 inhibitors. The new inhibitors caused a reduction in Rce1 in vitro activity, exhibited low cell toxicity, and induced mislocalization of EGFP-Ras from the plasma membrane in human colon carcinoma cells giving rise to a phenotype similar to that observed with siRNA knockdowns of Rce1 expression. Several of the new inhibitors were more effective at mislocalizing K-Ras compared to a potent farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI), which is significant because of the preponderance of K-Ras mutations in cancer. PMID:26706114

  17. c-Myc inhibits Ras-mediated differentiation of pheochromocytoma cells by blocking c-Jun up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Vaqué, José P; Fernández-García, Belén; García-Sanz, Pablo; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Bretones, Gabriel; Calvo, Fernando; Crespo, Piero; Marín, María C; León, Javier

    2008-02-01

    Although mutant Ras proteins were originally described as transforming oncoproteins, they induce growth arrest, senescence, and/or differentiation in many cell types. c-Myc is an oncogenic transcription factor that cooperates with Ras in cellular transformation and oncogenesis. However, the Myc-Ras relationship in cellular differentiation is largely unknown. Here, we have analyzed the effects of c-Myc on PC12-derived cells (UR61 cell line), harboring an inducible N-Ras oncogene. In these cells, Ras activation induces neuronal-like differentiation by a process involving c-Jun activation. We found that c-Myc inhibited Ras-mediated differentiation by a mechanism that involves the blockade of c-Jun induction in response to Ras signal. Accordingly, ectopically expressed c-Jun could bypass c-Myc impediment of Ras-induced differentiation and activator protein 1 activation. Interestingly, it did not rescue the proliferative arrest elicited by Ras and did not enhance the differentiation-associated apoptosis. The blockade of Ras-mediated induction of c-Jun takes place at the level of c-Jun proximal promoter. Mutational analysis revealed that c-Myc regions involved in DNA binding and transactivation are required to block differentiation and c-Jun induction. c-Myc does not seem to require Miz-1 to inhibit differentiation and block c-Jun induction. Furthermore, Max is not required for c-Myc activity, as UR61 cells lack a functional Max gene. c-Myc-inhibitory effect on the Ras/c-Jun connection is not restricted to UR61 cells as it can occur in other cell types as K562 or HEK293. In conclusion, we describe a novel interplay between c-Myc and c-Jun that controls the ability of Ras to trigger the differentiation program of pheochromocytoma cells. PMID:18314492

  18. Aberrant expression of hSef and Sprouty4 in endometrial adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HUI; GUO, QIUFEN; WANG, XIA; WANG, CHONG; ZHAO, XINGBO; LI, MINGJIANG

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2-mediated signaling of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/RAS/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway is a critical modulator in angiogenesis and is therefore essential for the pathogenesis of endometrial carcinoma. Human similar expression to FGFs (hSef) and Sprouty4 have each been reported to be negative regulators of FGF signaling. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of hSef and Sprouty4 in human endometrial adenocarcinoma. Using immunohistochemistry analysis, the expression of hSef and Sprouty4 was detected in human endometrial adenocarcinomas. Increased hSef expression was found to be present in endometrial adenocarcinomas. In addition, decreased hSef expression was identified in the blood vessels of endometrial adenocarcinoma samples. However, the expression of Sprouty4 was downregulated in human endometrial adenocarcinoma. Aberrant expression of hSef and Sprouty4 are involved in the pathogenesis of human endometrial adenocarcinoma. PMID:26870165

  19. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, Inna; Kazanov, Dina; Lisiansky, Victoria; Starr, Alex; Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah; Arber, Nadir

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  20. The aberrantly expressed miR-193b-3p contributes to preeclampsia through regulating transforming growth factor-β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xinyao; Li, Qiaoli; Xu, Jiawei; Zhang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Huijuan; Xiang, Yuqian; Fang, Chuantao; Wang, Teng; Xia, Shihui; Zhang, Qiang; Xing, Qinghe; He, Lin; Wang, Lei; Xu, Mingqing; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. Several studies have detected some differentially expressed microRNAs in the preeclamptic placenta, but few of the identified microRNAs demonstrated consistent findings among different research studies. In this study, high-throughput microRNA sequencing (HTS) of 9 preeclamptic and 9 normal placentas was performed. Seventeen microRNAs were identified to be up-regulated, and 8 down-regulated in preeclamptic placentas. Eight differentially expressed microRNAs except one identified in our study were determined to be consistent with at least one previous study, while sixteen were newly found. We performed qRT-PCR with independent 22 preeclamptic placentas and 20 control placentas to verify the differentially expressed microRNAs, and ten microRNAs were validated. The predicted target genes of the aberrantly expressed miR-193b-3p were enriched in the following gene ontology categories: cell motility and migration, cell proliferation and angiogenesis. We also found that miR-193b-3p significantly decreased the migration and invasion of trophoblast (HTR-8/SVneo) cells and that miR-193b-3p could regulate trophoblasts migration and invasion through binding onto the 3′UTR target site of TGF-β2. In conclusion, we identified a list of differentially expressed microRNAs in PE placentas by HTS and provided preliminary evidence for the role of miR-193b-3p in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. PMID:26822621

  1. MicroRNA-based Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Mutant and Wild Type RAS in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sriganesh B.; Ruppert, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have been causally implicated in the progression and development of a wide variety of cancers. miRs modulate the activity of key cell signaling networks by regulating the translation of pathway component proteins. Thus, the pharmacological targeting of miRs that regulate cancer cell signaling networks, either by promoting (using miR-supplementation) or by suppressing (using anti-sense oligonucleotide based strategies) miR activity is an area of intense research. The RAS-Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathway represents a major miR-regulated signaling network that endows cells with some of the classical hallmarks of cancer, and is often inappropriately activated in malignancies by somatic genetic alteration through point mutation or alteration of gene copy number. In addition, recent progress indicates that many tumors may be deficient in GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) due to the collaborative action of oncogenic microRNAs. Recent studies also suggest that in tumors harboring a mutant RAS allele there is a critical role for wild type RAS proteins in determining overall RAS-ERK pathway activity. Together, these two advances comprise a new opportunity for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we evaluate miR-based therapeutic strategies for modulating RAS-ERK signaling in cancers, in particular for more direct modulation of RAS-GTP levels, with the potential to complement current strategies in order to yield more durable treatment responses. To this end, we discuss the potential for miR-based therapies focused on three prominent miRs including the pan-RAS regulator let-7 and the GAP regulator comprised of miR-206 and miR-21 (miR-206/21). PMID:26284568

  2. Differential activation of yeast adenylyl cyclase by Ras1 and Ras2 depends on the conserved N terminus.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, N; Segal, M; Marbach, I; Levitzki, A

    1995-11-21

    Although both Ras1 and Ras2 activate adenylyl cyclase in yeast, a number of differences can be observed regarding their function in the cAMP pathway. To explore the relative contribution of conserved and variable domains in determining these differences, chimeric RAS1-RAS2 or RAS2-RAS1 genes were constructed by swapping the sequences encoding the variable C-terminal domains. These constructs were expressed in a cdc25ts ras1 ras2 strain. Biochemical data show that the difference in efficacy of adenylyl cyclase activation between the two Ras proteins resides in the highly conserved N-terminal domain. This finding is supported by the observation that Ras2 delta, in which the C-terminal domain of Ras2 has been deleted, is a more potent activator of the yeast adenylyl cyclase than Ras1 delta, in which the C-terminal domain of Ras1 has been deleted. These observations suggest that amino acid residues other than the highly conserved residues of the effector domain within the N terminus may determine the efficiency of functional interaction with adenylyl cyclase. Similar levels of intracellular cAMP were found in Ras1, Ras1-Ras2, Ras1 delta, Ras2, and Ras2-Ras1 strains throughout the growth curve. This was found to result from the higher expression of Ras1 and Ras1-Ras2, which compensate for their lower efficacy in activating adenylyl cyclase. These results suggest that the difference between the Ras1 and the Ras2 phenotype is not due to their different efficacy in activating the cAMP pathway and that the divergent C-terminal domains are responsible for these differences, through interaction with other regulatory elements. PMID:7479926

  3. Accommodation to Wavefront Vergence and Chromatic Aberration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinan; Kruger, Philip B.; Li, James S.; Lin, Peter L.; Stark, Lawrence R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) provides a cue to accommodation with small pupils. However, large pupils increase monochromatic aberrations, which may obscure chromatic blur. In the present study, we examined the effect of pupil size and LCA on accommodation. Methods Accommodation was recorded by infrared optometer while observers (nine normal trichromats) viewed a sinusoidally moving Maltese cross target in a Badal stimulus system. There were two illumination conditions: white (3000 K; 20 cd/m2) and monochromatic (550 nm with 10 nm bandwidth; 20 cd/m2) and two artificial pupil conditions (3 mm and 5.7 mm). Separately, static measurements of wavefront aberration were made with the eye accommodating to targets between 0 and 4 D (COAS, Wavefront Sciences). Results Large individual differences in accommodation to wavefront vergence and to LCA are a hallmark of accommodation. LCA continues to provide a signal at large pupil sizes despite higher levels of monochromatic aberrations. Conclusions Monochromatic aberrations may defend against chromatic blur at high spatial frequencies, but accommodation responds best to optical vergence and to LCA at 3 c/deg where blur from higher order aberrations is less. PMID:21317666

  4. Stabilization of C-RAF:KSR1 complex by DiRas3 reduces availability of C-RAF for dimerization with B-RAF.

    PubMed

    Baljuls, Angela; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Rauch, Jens; Rauch, Nora; Kolch, Walter

    2016-10-01

    RAF family kinases are central components of the Ras-RAF-MEK-ERK cascade. Dimerization is a key mechanism of RAF activation in response to physiological, pathological and pharmacological signals. It is mediated by a dimer interface region in the RAF kinase domain that is also conserved in KSR, a scaffolding protein that binds RAF, MEK and ERK. The regulation of RAF dimerization is incompletely understood. Especially little is known about the molecular mechanism involved in the selection of the dimerization partner. Previously, we reported that Ras-dependent binding of the tumour suppressor DiRas3 to C-RAF inhibits the C-RAF:B-RAF heterodimerization. Here we show that DiRas3 binds to KSR1 independently of its interaction with activated Ras and RAF. Our data also suggest that depending on the local stoichiometry between DiRas3 and oncogenic Ras, DiRas3 can either enhance homodimerization of KSR1 or recruit KSR1 to the Ras:C-RAF complex and thereby reduce the availability of C-RAF for binding to B-RAF. This mechanism, which is shared between A-RAF and C-RAF, may be involved in the regulation of Ras12V-induced cell transformation by DiRas3. PMID:27368419

  5. Optimizing depuration of salmon in RAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fish cultured within water recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) can acquire "earthy" or "musty" off-flavors due to bioaccumulation of the compounds geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), respectively, which are produced by certain bacterial species present in RAS biosolids and microbial biofilms. ...

  6. R-Ras Inhibits VEGF-Induced p38MAPK Activation and HSP27 Phosphorylation in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Junko; Li, Fangfei; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    R-Ras is a Ras family small GTPase that is highly expressed in mature functional blood vessels in normal tissues. It inhibits pathological angiogenesis and promotes vessel maturation and stabilization. Previous studies suggest that R-Ras affects cellular signaling in endothelial cells, pericytes and smooth-muscle cells to regulate vessel formation and remodeling in adult tissues. R-Ras suppresses VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and vessel sprouting while promoting normalization of pathologically developing vessels in mice. It attenuates VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) activation by inhibiting internalization of the receptor upon VEGF ligand binding, leading to significant reduction of VEGFR2 autophosphorylation. Here, we show that R-Ras strongly suppresses the VEGF-dependent activation of stress-activated protein kinase-2/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (SAPK2/p38MAPK) and the phosphorylation of downstream heat-shock protein 27 (HSP27), a regulator of actin cytoskeleton organization, in endothelial cells. The suppression of p38MAPK activation and HSP27 phosphorylation by R-Ras concurred with altered actin cytoskeleton architecture, reduced membrane protrusion and inhibition of endothelial cell migration toward VEGF. Silencing of endogenous R-Ras by RNA interference increased membrane protrusion and cell migration stimulated by VEGF, and these effects were offset by p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580. These results suggest that R-Ras regulates angiogenic activities of endothelial cells in part via inhibition of the p38MAPK-HSP27 axis of VEGF signaling. PMID:27029009

  7. Aberrantly expressed miR-582-3p maintains lung cancer stem cell-like traits by activating Wnt/β-catenin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lishan; Cai, Junchao; Chen, Baixue; Wu, Shanshan; Li, Rong; Xu, Xiaonan; Yang, Yi; Guan, Hongyu; Zhu, Xun; Zhang, Le; Yuan, Jie; Wu, Jueheng; Li, Mengfeng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are involved in tumorigenesis, tumour recurrence and therapy resistance and Wnt signalling is essential for the development of the biological traits of CSCs. In non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), unlike in colon cancer, mutations in β-catenin and APC genes are uncommon; thus, the mechanism underlying the constitutive activation of Wnt signalling in NSCLC remains unclear. Here we report that miR-582-3p expression correlates with the overall- and recurrence-free-survival of NSCLC patients, and miR-582-3p has an activating effect on Wnt/β-catenin signalling. miR-582-3p overexpression simultaneously targets multiple negative regulators of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, namely, AXIN2, DKK3 and SFRP1. Consequently, miR-582-3p promotes CSC traits of NSCLC cells in vitro and tumorigenesis and tumour recurrence in vivo. Antagonizing miR-582-3p potently inhibits tumour initiation and progression in xenografted animal models. These findings suggest that miR-582-3p mediates the constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling, likely serving as a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC. PMID:26468775

  8. Aberrantly expressed miR-582-3p maintains lung cancer stem cell-like traits by activating Wnt/β-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lishan; Cai, Junchao; Chen, Baixue; Wu, Shanshan; Li, Rong; Xu, Xiaonan; Yang, Yi; Guan, Hongyu; Zhu, Xun; Zhang, Le; Yuan, Jie; Wu, Jueheng; Li, Mengfeng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are involved in tumorigenesis, tumour recurrence and therapy resistance and Wnt signalling is essential for the development of the biological traits of CSCs. In non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), unlike in colon cancer, mutations in β-catenin and APC genes are uncommon; thus, the mechanism underlying the constitutive activation of Wnt signalling in NSCLC remains unclear. Here we report that miR-582-3p expression correlates with the overall- and recurrence-free-survival of NSCLC patients, and miR-582-3p has an activating effect on Wnt/β-catenin signalling. miR-582-3p overexpression simultaneously targets multiple negative regulators of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, namely, AXIN2, DKK3 and SFRP1. Consequently, miR-582-3p promotes CSC traits of NSCLC cells in vitro and tumorigenesis and tumour recurrence in vivo. Antagonizing miR-582-3p potently inhibits tumour initiation and progression in xenografted animal models. These findings suggest that miR-582-3p mediates the constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling, likely serving as a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC. PMID:26468775

  9. Targeting RAS Membrane Association: Back to the Future for Anti-RAS Drug Discovery?

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Adrienne D.; Der, Channing J.; Philips, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    RAS proteins require membrane association for their biological activity, making this association a logical target for anti-RAS therapeutics. Lipid modification of RAS proteins by a farnesyl isoprenoid is an obligate step in that association, and is an enzymatic process. Accordingly, farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) were developed as potential anti-RAS drugs. The lack of efficacy of FTIs as anti-cancer drugs was widely seen as indicating that blocking RAS membrane association was a flawed approach to cancer treatment. However, a deeper understanding of RAS modification and trafficking has revealed that this was an erroneous conclusion. In the presence of FTIs, KRAS and NRAS, which are the RAS isoforms most frequently mutated in cancer, become substrates for alternative modification, can still associate with membranes, and can still function. Thus, FTIs failed not because blocking RAS membrane association is an ineffective approach, but because FTIs failed to accomplish that task. Recent findings regarding RAS isoform trafficking and the regulation of RAS subcellular localization have rekindled interest in efforts to target these processes. In particular, improved understanding of the palmitoylation/depalmitoylation cycle that regulates RAS interaction with the plasma membrane, endomembranes and cytosol, and of the potential importance of RAS chaperones, have led to new approaches. Efforts to validate and target other enzymatically regulated post-translational modifications are also ongoing. In this review, we revisit lessons learned, describe the current state of the art, and highlight challenging but promising directions to achieve the goal of disrupting RAS membrane association and subcellular localization for anti-RAS drug development. PMID:25878363

  10. An Active RFID Accountability System (RAS) for Constrained Wireless Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Alan M; Hanson, Gregory R; Sexton, Angela Kay; Jones Jr, J P; Freer, Eva B; Sjoreen, Andrea L

    2011-01-01

    A team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an RFID Accountability System (RAS) that allows items with active RFID tags to be tracked in environments where tags may not be able to transmit their location continuously. The system uses activators that transmit a short range signal. Active RFID tags are in a sleep state until they encounter an activator. Then they transmit a signal that is picked up by the antennas installed throughout the building. This paper presents the theory of operation, application areas, lessons learned, and key features developed over the course of seven years of development and use.

  11. The endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause induces aberrant cell cycle signaling that triggers re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle, neurodysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive disease.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Sex hormones are physiological factors that promote neurogenesis during embryonic and fetal development. During childhood and adulthood these hormones support the maintenance of brain structure and function via neurogenesis and the formation of dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture, processing and retrieval of information (memories). Not surprisingly, changes in these reproductive hormones that occur with menopause and during andropause are strongly correlated with neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of adult neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories while decreasing neurogenesis after memory formation during infancy mitigated forgetting. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in sex hormone signaling associated with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle that leads to neurite retraction, neuron dysfunction and neuron death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, gonadotropins such as luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the LH:sex steroid ratio as driving aberrant mitotic events. These include the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor; amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ; and

  12. R-Ras protein inhibits autophosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 in endothelial cells and suppresses receptor activation in tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Junko; Li, Fangfei; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2015-03-27

    Abnormal angiogenesis is associated with a broad range of medical conditions, including cancer. The formation of neovasculature with functionally defective blood vessels significantly impacts tumor progression, metastasis, and the efficacy of anticancer therapies. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) potently induces vascular permeability and vessel growth in the tumor microenvironment, and its inhibition normalizes tumor vasculature. In contrast, the signaling of the small GTPase R-Ras inhibits excessive angiogenic growth and promotes the maturation of regenerating blood vessels. R-Ras signaling counteracts VEGF-induced vessel sprouting, permeability, and invasive activities of endothelial cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of R-Ras on VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation by VEGF, the key mechanism for angiogenic stimulation. We show that tyrosine phosphorylation of VEGFR2 is significantly elevated in the tumor vasculature and dermal microvessels of VEGF-injected skin in R-Ras knockout mice. In cultured endothelial cells, R-Ras suppressed the internalization of VEGFR2, which is required for full activation of the receptor by VEGF. Consequently, R-Ras strongly suppressed autophosphorylation of the receptor at all five major tyrosine phosphorylation sites. Conversely, silencing of R-Ras resulted in increased VEGFR2 phosphorylation. This effect of R-Ras on VEGFR2 was, at least in part, dependent on vascular endothelial cadherin. These findings identify a novel function of R-Ras to control the response of endothelial cells to VEGF and suggest an underlying mechanism by which R-Ras regulates angiogenesis. PMID:25645912

  13. Ploidy status and copy number aberrations in primary glioblastomas defined by integrated analysis of allelic ratios, signal ratios and loss of heterozygosity using 500K SNP Mapping Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Gardina, Paul J; Lo, Ken C; Lee, Walter; Cowell, John K; Turpaz, Yaron

    2008-01-01

    Background Genomic hybridization platforms, including BAC-CGH and genotyping arrays, have been used to estimate chromosome copy number (CN) in tumor samples by detecting the relative strength of genomic signal. The methods rely on the assumption that the predominant chromosomal background of the samples is diploid, an assumption that is frequently incorrect for tumor samples. In addition to generally greater resolution, an advantage of genotyping arrays over CGH arrays is the ability to detect signals from individual alleles, allowing estimation of loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) and allelic ratios to enhance the interpretation of copy number alterations. Copy number events associated with LOH potentially have the same genetic consequences as deletions. Results We have utilized allelic ratios to detect patterns that are indicative of higher ploidy levels. An integrated analysis using allelic ratios, total signal and LOH indicates that many or most of the chromosomes from 24 glioblastoma tumors are in fact aneuploid. Some putative whole-chromosome losses actually represent trisomy, and many apparent sub-chromosomal losses are in fact relative losses against a triploid or tetraploid background. Conclusion These results suggest a re-interpretation of previous findings based only on total signal ratios. One interesting observation is that many single or multiple-copy deletions occur at common putative tumor suppressor sites subsequent to chromosomal duplication; these losses do not necessarily result in LOH, but nonetheless occur in conspicuous patterns. The 500 K Mapping array was also capable of detecting many sub-mega base losses and gains that were overlooked by CGH-BAC arrays, and was superior to CGH-BAC arrays in resolving regions of complex CN variation. PMID:18928532

  14. Aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling and elevated expression of stem cell proteins are associated with osteosarcoma side population cells of high tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    YI, XI-JUN; ZHAO, YU-HUA; QIAO, LI-XIANG; JIN, CHUN-LEI; TIAN, JING; LI, QIU-SHI

    2015-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, the presence of a small sub-population of cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), have a significant implication on cancer treatment and are responsible for tumor recurrence. Previous studies have reported that alterations in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling are crucial in the maintenance of CSCs. In the present study, the characteristic features and activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in CSCs from osteosarcoma, an aggressive human bone tumor, were investigated. In total, ~2.1% of the cancer stem-like side population (SP) cells were identified in the osteosarcoma samples. The results of subsequent western blot and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the protein levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1 were markedly upregulated in the fluorescence-activated cell sorted osteosarcoma SP cells. In addition, the elevated expression levels of stem cell proteins, including CD133, nestin Oct-4, Sox-2 and Nanog were significantly higher in the SP cells, which contributed to self-renewal and enhanced the proliferation rate of the SP cells. Furthermore, the SP cells were found to be highly invasive and able to form tumors in vivo. Taken together, these data suggested that the identification of novel anticancer drugs, which suppress the Wnt/β-catenin signaling and its downstream pathway may assist in eradicating osteosarcoma stem cells. PMID:26134785

  15. Aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling and elevated expression of stem cell proteins are associated with osteosarcoma side population cells of high tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xi-Jun; Zhao, Yu-Hua; Qiao, Li-Xiang; Jin, Chun-Lei; Tian, Jing; Li, Qiu-Shi

    2015-10-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, the presence of a small sub‑population of cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), have a significant implication on cancer treatment and are responsible for tumor recurrence. Previous studies have reported that alterations in the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling are crucial in the maintenance of CSCs. In the present study, the characteristic features and activation of Wnt/β‑catenin signaling in CSCs from osteosarcoma, an aggressive human bone tumor, were investigated. In total, ~2.1% of the cancer stem‑like side population (SP) cells were identified in the osteosarcoma samples. The results of subsequent western blot and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the protein levels of β‑catenin and cyclin D1 were markedly upregulated in the fluorescence‑activated cell sorted osteosarcoma SP cells. In addition, the elevated expression levels of stem cell proteins, including CD133, nestin Oct‑4, Sox‑2 and Nanog were significantly higher in the SP cells, which contributed to self‑renewal and enhanced the proliferation rate of the SP cells. Furthermore, the SP cells were found to be highly invasive and able to form tumors in vivo. Taken together, these data suggested that the identification of novel anticancer drugs, which suppress the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling and its downstream pathway may assist in eradicating osteosarcoma stem cells. PMID:26134785

  16. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Chan, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5’-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras−/−). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras−/− mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras−/− mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras−/− mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras−/− T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras−/− T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras−/− T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  17. Dysregulation of Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) expression resulted in aberrant Wnt-β-catenin signaling and cell death of the cloaca endoderm, and anorectal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ng, R C-L; Matsumaru, D; Ho, A S-H; Garcia-Barceló, M-M; Yuan, Z-W; Smith, D; Kodjabachian, L; Tam, P K-H; Yamada, G; Lui, V C-H

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian urorectal development, the urorectal septum (urs) descends from the ventral body wall to the cloaca membrane (cm) to partition the cloaca into urogenital sinus and rectum. Defective urs growth results in human congenital anorectal malformations (ARMs), and their pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. Recent studies only focused on the importance of urs mesenchyme proliferation, which is induced by endoderm-derived Sonic Hedgehog (Shh). Here, we showed that the programmed cell death of the apical urs and proximal cm endoderm is particularly crucial for the growth of urs during septation. The apoptotic endoderm was closely associated with the tempo-spatial expression of Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1), which is an inhibitor of Wnt-β-catenin signaling. In Wif1lacZ/lacZ mutant mice and cultured urorectum with exogenous Wif1, cloaca septation was defective with undescended urs and hypospadias-like phenotypes, and such septation defects were also observed in Shh−/− mutants and in endodermal β-catenin gain-of-function (GOF) mutants. In addition, Wif1 and Shh were expressed in a complementary manner in the cloaca endoderm, and Wif1 was ectopically expressed in the urs and cm associated with excessive endodermal apoptosis and septation defects in Shh−/− mutants. Furthermore, apoptotic cells were markedly reduced in the endodermal β-catenin GOF mutant embryos, which counteracted the inhibitory effects of Wif1. Taken altogether, these data suggest that regulated expression of Wif1 is critical for the growth of the urs during cloaca septation. Hence, Wif1 governs cell apoptosis of urs endoderm by repressing β-catenin signal, which may facilitate the protrusion of the underlying proliferating mesenchymal cells towards the cm for cloaca septation. Dysregulation of this endodermal Shh-Wif1-β-catenin signaling axis contributes to ARM pathogenesis. PMID:24632949

  18. A Ras GAP is essential for cytokinesis and spatial patterning in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Escalante, R; Firtel, R A

    1997-03-01

    . The inability of ddrasgap1 null cells to initiate terminal differentiation and form stalk cells is consistent with a model in which Ras functions as a mediator of inhibitory signals in cell-type differentiation at this stage. Third, DdRasGAP1 and cAMP dependent protein kinase (PKA) interact to control spatial organization within the organism. Overexpression of the PKA catalytic subunit in ddrasgap1 cells yields terminal structures that are multiply branched but lack spores. This suggests that RasGAP and PKA may mediate common pathways that regulate apical tip differentiation and organizer function, which in turn control spatial organization during multicellular development. It also suggests that DdRasGAP1 either lies downstream from PKA in the prespore to spore pathway or in a parallel pathway that is also essential for spore differentiation. Our results indicate that DdRasGAP1 plays an essential role in controlling multiple, potentially novel pathways regulating growth and differentiation in Dictyostelium and suggest a role for Ras in these processes. PMID:9056774

  19. Aberrant Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Cai, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating

  20. Relapsed neuroblastomas show frequent RAS-MAPK pathway mutations

    PubMed Central

    Eleveld, Thomas F.; Oldridge, Derek A.; Bernard, Virginie; Koster, Jan; Daage, Leo Colmet; Diskin, Sharon J.; Schild, Linda; Bentahar, Nadia Bessoltane; Bellini, Angela; Chicard, Mathieu; Lapouble, Eve; Combaret, Valérie; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Michon, Jean; Pugh, Trevor J.; Hart, Lori S.; Rader, JulieAnn; Attiyeh, Edward F.; Wei, Jun S.; Zhang, Shile; Naranjo, Arlene; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Hogarty, Michael D.; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Smith, Malcolm A.; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M.; Watkins, Thomas B. K.; Zwijnenburg, Danny A.; Ebus, Marli E.; van Sluis, Peter; Hakkert, Anne; van Wezel, Esther; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Westerhout, Ellen M.; Schulte, Johannes H.; Tytgat, Godelieve A.; Dolman, M. Emmy M.; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Caron, Huib N.; Delattre, Olivier; Khan, Javed; Versteeg, Rogier; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Molenaar, Jan J.; Maris, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of neuroblastoma patients have tumors that initially respond to chemotherapy, but a large proportion of patients will experience therapy-resistant relapses. The molecular basis of this aggressive phenotype is unknown. Whole genome sequencing of 23 paired diagnostic and relapsed neuroblastomas showed clonal evolution from the diagnostic tumor with a median of 29 somatic mutations unique to the relapse sample. Eighteen of the 23 relapse tumors (78%) showed mutations predicted to activate the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Seven events were detected only in the relapse tumor while the others showed clonal enrichment. In neuroblastoma cell lines we also detected a high frequency of activating mutations in the RAS-MAPK pathway (11/18, 61%) and these lesions predicted for sensitivity to MEK inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide the rationale for genetic characterization of relapse neuroblastoma and show that RAS-MAPK pathway mutations may function as a biomarker for new therapeutic approaches to refractory disease. PMID:26121087

  1. Renin Angiotensin Signaling in Normal Pregnancy and Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Roxanna A.; Xia, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Summary Many reports indicate that there is an increase in almost all of the components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) during an uncomplicated pregnancy, but renin activity, angiotensin II, and aldosterone decrease in preeclampsia (PE) for reasons that are unclear. PE is a life-threatening disorder of late pregnancy characterized by hypertension, proteinuria, increased soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, as well as renal and placental morphologic abnormalities. Although a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, the pathogenic mechanisms of PE remain largely undefined. Immunologic mechanisms and aberrations of the RAS have been long considered contributors to the disorder. Bridging these two concepts, numerous studies report the presence of the angiotensin II type I receptor agonistic autoantibody (AT1-AA) found circulating in preeclamptic women. This autoantibody induces many key features of the disorder through AT1 receptor signaling, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of PE. Here we review the functions of the RAS during normal pregnancy and PE, and highlight the role of AT1-AA in both animal models and in the human disorder. PMID:21266264

  2. The small GTPases Ras and Rap1 bind to and control TORC2 activity.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Ankita; Lotfi, Pouya; Chavan, Anita J; Montaño, Nieves M; Bolourani, Parvin; Weeks, Gerald; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P; Pots, Henderikus; Van Haastert, Peter J M; Kortholt, Arjan; Charest, Pascale G

    2016-01-01

    Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 (TORC2) has conserved roles in regulating cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration and has been linked to cancer metastasis. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating TORC2 activity and function in any system. In Dictyostelium, TORC2 functions at the front of migrating cells downstream of the Ras protein RasC, controlling F-actin dynamics and cAMP production. Here, we report the identification of the small GTPase Rap1 as a conserved binding partner of the TORC2 component RIP3/SIN1, and that Rap1 positively regulates the RasC-mediated activation of TORC2 in Dictyostelium. Moreover, we show that active RasC binds to the catalytic domain of TOR, suggesting a mechanism of TORC2 activation that is similar to Rheb activation of TOR complex 1. Dual Ras/Rap1 regulation of TORC2 may allow for integration of Ras and Rap1 signaling pathways in directed cell migration. PMID:27172998

  3. Ras Oncogene-Mediated Progressive Silencing of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase in Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cammarota, Francesca; de Vita, Gabriella; Salvatore, Marco; Laukkanen, Mikko O.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) is a secreted enzyme that uses superoxide anion as a substrate in a dismutase reaction that results in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Both of these reactive oxygen species affect growth signaling in cells. Although SOD3 has growth-supporting characteristics, the expression of SOD3 is downregulated in epithelial cancer cells. In the current work, we studied the mechanisms regulating SOD3 expression in vitro using thyroid cell models representing different stages of thyroid cancer. We demonstrate that a low level of RAS activation increases SOD3 mRNA synthesis that then gradually decreases with increasing levels of RAS activation and the decreasing degree of differentiation of the cancer cells. Our data indicate that SOD3 regulation can be divided into two classes. The first class involves RAS–driven reversible regulation of SOD3 expression that can be mediated by the following mechanisms: RAS GTPase regulatory genes that are responsible for SOD3 self-regulation; RAS-stimulated p38 MAPK activation; and RAS-activated increased expression of the mir21 microRNA, which inversely correlates with sod3 mRNA expression. The second class involves permanent silencing of SOD3 mediated by epigenetic DNA methylation in cells that represent more advanced cancers. Therefore, the work suggests that SOD3 belongs to the group of ras oncogene-silenced genes. PMID:26550576

  4. The small GTPases Ras and Rap1 bind to and control TORC2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ankita; Lotfi, Pouya; Chavan, Anita J.; Montaño, Nieves M.; Bolourani, Parvin; Weeks, Gerald; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P.; Pots, Henderikus; Van Haastert, Peter J. M.; Kortholt, Arjan; Charest, Pascale G.

    2016-01-01

    Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 (TORC2) has conserved roles in regulating cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration and has been linked to cancer metastasis. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating TORC2 activity and function in any system. In Dictyostelium, TORC2 functions at the front of migrating cells downstream of the Ras protein RasC, controlling F-actin dynamics and cAMP production. Here, we report the identification of the small GTPase Rap1 as a conserved binding partner of the TORC2 component RIP3/SIN1, and that Rap1 positively regulates the RasC-mediated activation of TORC2 in Dictyostelium. Moreover, we show that active RasC binds to the catalytic domain of TOR, suggesting a mechanism of TORC2 activation that is similar to Rheb activation of TOR complex 1. Dual Ras/Rap1 regulation of TORC2 may allow for integration of Ras and Rap1 signaling pathways in directed cell migration. PMID:27172998

  5. α-Ketobenzothiazole Serine Protease Inhibitors of Aberrant HGF/c-MET and MSP/RON Kinase Pathway Signaling in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhenfu; Harris, Peter K W; Karmakar, Partha; Kim, Tommy; Owusu, Ben Y; Wildman, Scott A; Klampfer, Lidija; Janetka, James W

    2016-03-17

    Upregulation of the HGF and MSP growth-factor processing serine endopeptidases HGFA, matriptase and hepsin is correlated with increased metastasis in multiple tumor types driven by c-MET or RON kinase signaling. We rationally designed P1' α-ketobenzothiazole mechanism-based inhibitors of these proteases. Structure-activity studies are presented, which resulted in the identification of potent inhibitors with differential selectivity. The tetrapeptide inhibitors span the P1-P1' substrate cleavage site via a P1' amide linker off the benzothiazole, occupying the S3' pocket. Optimized inhibitors display sub-nanomolar enzyme inhibition against one, two, or all three of HGFA, matriptase, and hepsin. Several compounds also have good selectivity against the related trypsin-like proteases, thrombin and Factor Xa. Finally, we show that inhibitors block the fibroblast (HGF)-mediated migration of invasive DU145 prostate cancer cells. In addition to prostate cancer, breast, colon, lung, pancreas, gliomas, and multiple myeloma tumors all depend on HGF and MSP for tumor survival and progression. Therefore, these unique inhibitors have potential as new therapeutics for a diverse set of tumor types. PMID:26889658

  6. Combined Inactivation of MYC and K-Ras Oncogenes Reverses Tumorigenesis in Lung Adenocarcinomas and Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Shan; Komatsubara, Kim; Chen, Joy; Horng, George; Bellovin, David I.; Giuriato, Sylvie; Wang, Craig S.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Conditional transgenic models have established that tumors require sustained oncogene activation for tumor maintenance, exhibiting the phenomenon known as “oncogene-addiction.” However, most cancers are caused by multiple genetic events making it difficult to determine which oncogenes or combination of oncogenes will be the most effective targets for their treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings To examine how the MYC and K-rasG12D oncogenes cooperate for the initiation and maintenance of tumorigenesis, we generated double conditional transgenic tumor models of lung adenocarcinoma and lymphoma. The ability of MYC and K-rasG12D to cooperate for tumorigenesis and the ability of the inactivation of these oncogenes to result in tumor regression depended upon the specific tissue context. MYC-, K-rasG12D- or MYC/K-rasG12D-induced lymphomas exhibited sustained regression upon the inactivation of either or both oncogenes. However, in marked contrast, MYC-induced lung tumors failed to regress completely upon oncogene inactivation; whereas K-rasG12D-induced lung tumors regressed completely. Importantly, the combined inactivation of both MYC and K-rasG12D resulted more frequently in complete lung tumor regression. To account for the different roles of MYC and K-rasG12D in maintenance of lung tumors, we found that the down-stream mediators of K-rasG12D signaling, Stat3 and Stat5, are dephosphorylated following conditional K-rasG12D but not MYC inactivation. In contrast, Stat3 becomes dephosphorylated in lymphoma cells upon inactivation of MYC and/or K-rasG12D. Interestingly, MYC-induced lung tumors that failed to regress upon MYC inactivation were found to have persistent Stat3 and Stat5 phosphorylation. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our findings point to the importance of the K-Ras and associated down-stream Stat effector pathways in the initiation and maintenance of lymphomas and lung tumors. We suggest that combined targeting of oncogenic

  7. Detection of two novel mutations and relatively high incidence of H-RAS mutations in Vietnamese oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Hong, Nguyen Thi; Cuc, Tran Thi Kim; Hung, Nguyen Chan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan; Ikeda, Masa-Aki; Tsuchida, Nobuo

    2009-10-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the sixth most common cancer in the world and the seventh most common cancer in Vietnam. The RAS and PI3K-AKT signaling pathways play an important role in oral carcinogenesis. Our previous study on PI3K signaling pathway showed the absence of PIK3CA and PTEN gene mutations in Vietnamese oral cancer. We thus hypothesized that the RAS could be more likely activated as an upstream effector. However, the status of RAS mutations in Vietnamese oral cancer had not been studied. In the present study, Fifty six primary tumor DNA samples were screened for mutations of hot spots in exons 1 and 2 of H-RAS and a part of the samples for exon 7 of ERK2 gene in which we previously reported a mutation in an OSCC cell line. The H-RAS mutations were detected in 10 of 56 tumors (18%). Two novel mutations were found, one was an insertion of three nucleotides (GGC) between codons 10 and 11 resulting in in-frame insertion of glycine (10(Gly)11) and the other was a missense mutation in codon 62 (GAG>GGG). We also found T81C single nucleotide polymorphism in 12 of 56 tumors (22%) and there was no mutation in exon 7 of ERK2 gene. The H-RAS mutation incidence showed significant association with advanced stages of the tumor and also with well-differentiated tumor grade. Our study is the first to report H-RAS mutation from Vietnamese ethnicity, with two novel mutations and relatively high incidence of H-RAS mutations. The results suggest that RAS is an important member in the PI3K-AKT signaling and could play an important role in the tumorigenesis of oral carcinoma. PMID:19628422

  8. NAM: The 2004 RAS National Astronomy Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Barrie; Norton, Andrew

    2004-06-01

    This year's RAS National Astronomy Meeting was held at the Open University's Milton Keynes campus from 29 March to 2 April. The event was organized by members of the OU Physics & Astronomy Department and Planetary & Space Science Research Institute. Around 450 people attended the meeting, at which more than 220 talks were presented, along with around 90 posters. Co-chairs of RAS NAM04, Barrie Jones and Andrew Norton, summarize.

  9. Nf1 Loss and Ras Hyperactivation in Oligodendrocytes Induce NOS-Driven Defects in Myelin and Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Debra A.; Rizvi, Tilat A.; Titus-Mitchell, Haley; Oberst, Rachel; Ciraolo, Georgianne M.; Vorhees, Charles V.; Robinson, Andrew P.; Miller, Stephen D.; Cancelas, Jose A.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Ratner, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Costello syndrome Rasopathy have behavioral deficits. In NF1 patients, these may correlate with white matter enlargement and aberrant myelin. To model these features, we induced Nf1 loss or HRas hyperactivation in mouse oligodendrocytes. Enlarged brain white matter tracts correlated with myelin decompaction, downregulation of claudin-11, and mislocalization of connexin-32. Surprisingly, non-cell-autonomous defects in perivascular astrocytes and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) developed, implicating a soluble mediator. Nitric oxide (NO) can disrupt tight junctions and gap junctions, and NO and NO synthases (NOS1–NOS3) were upregulated in mutant white matter. Treating mice with the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine corrected cellular phenotypes. CNP-HRasG12V mice also displayed locomotor hyperactivity, which could be rescued by antioxidant treatment. We conclude that Nf1/Ras regulates oligodendrocyte NOS and that dysregulated NO signaling in oligodendrocytes can alter the surrounding vasculature. The data suggest that anti-oxidants may improve some behavioral deficits in Rasopathy patients. PMID:24035394

  10. Inhibition of RAS in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Rabi; Campbell, Kirk N

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a progressive proteinuric renal disorder in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is a common cause of end-stage kidney disease worldwide, particularly in developed countries. Therapeutic targeting of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) is the most validated clinical strategy for slowing disease progression. DKD is paradoxically a low systematic renin state with an increased intrarenal RAS activity implicated in its pathogenesis. Angiotensin II (AngII), the main peptide of RAS, is not only a vasoactive peptide but functions as a growth factor, activating interstitial fibroblasts and mesangial and tubular cells, while promoting the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. AngII also promotes podocyte injury through increased calcium influx and the generation of reactive oxygen species. Blockade of the RAS using either angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers can attenuate progressive glomerulosclerosis in animal models, and slows disease progression in humans with DKD. In this review, we summarize the role of intrarenal RAS activation in the pathogenesis and progression of DKD and the rationale for RAS inhibition in this population. PMID:25926752

  11. ARF-GEF cytohesin-2/ARNO regulates R-Ras and α5-integrin recycling through an EHD1-positive compartment

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Joseph C.; Reviriego-Mendoza, Marta M.; Santy, Lorraine C.

    2015-01-01

    When expressed in epithelial cells, cytohesin-2/ARNO, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for ARF small GTPases, causes a robust migration response. Recent evidence suggests that cytohesin-2/ARNO acts downstream of small the GTPase R-Ras to promote spreading and migration. We hypothesized that cytohesin-2/ARNO could transmit R-Ras signals by regulating the recycling of R-Ras through ARF activation. We found that Eps15-homology domain 1 (EHD1), a protein that associates with the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), colocalizes with active R-Ras in transiently expressed HeLa cells. In addition, we show that EHD1-positive recycling endosomes are a novel compartment for cytohesin-2/ARNO. Knockdown or expression of GEF-inactive (E156K) cytohesin-2/ARNO causes R-Ras to accumulate on recycling endosomes containing EHD1 and inhibits cell spreading. E156K-ARNO also causes a reduction in focal adhesion size and number. Finally, we demonstrate that R-Ras/ARNO signaling is required for recycling of α5-integrin and R-Ras to the plasma membrane. These data establish a role for cytohesin-2/ARNO as a regulator of R-Ras and integrin recycling and suggest that ARF-regulated trafficking of R-Ras is required for R-Ras–dependent effects on spreading and adhesion formation. PMID:26378252

  12. Rasfonin, a novel 2-pyrone derivative, induces ras-mutated Panc-1 pancreatic tumor cell death in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Z; Li, L; Li, Y; Zhou, W; Cheng, J; Liu, F; Zheng, P; Zhang, Y; Che, Y

    2014-01-01

    Rasfonin is a novel 2-pyrone derivative reported to induce apoptosis in ras-dependent cells. In this study, its effects on ras-mutated pancreatic cancer cells were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Two human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1 (mutated K-ras) and BxPC-3 (wild-type K-ras) were selected to test the effects of rasfonin on cell proliferation, clone formation, migration and invasion in vitro. Immunoblotting was used to detect the expressions of EGFR-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling pathway proteins. Ras activity was measured using a pull-down ELISA kit and guanine exchange factor (GEF)/GTPase-activating proteins (GAP) activity was measured by [(3)H]-GDP radiometric ligand binding. For an in vivo study, CD1 nude mice bearing Panc-1 cells were treated with rasfonin or Salirasib (FTS). We found that rasfonin suppressed proliferation more strongly in Panc-1 cells (IC50=5.5 μM) than BxPC-3 cells (IC50=10 μM) in vitro. Clone formation, migration and invasion by Panc-1 cells were also reduced by rasfonin. Rasfonin had little effect on the farnesylation of Ras, but it strongly downregulated Ras activity and consequently phosphorylation of c-Raf/MEK/ERK. Further experiments indicated that rasfonin reduced Son of sevenless (Sos1) expression but did not alter GEF and GAP activities. The in vivo experiments also revealed that rasfonin (30 mg/kg) delayed the growth of xenograft tumors originating from Panc-1 cells. Tumor weight was ultimately decreased after 20 days of treatment of rasfonin. Rasfonin is a robust inhibitor of pancreatic cancers with the K-ras mutation. The reduction of Sos1 expression and the consequently depressed Ras-MAPK activity could be important in its anticancer activity. PMID:24853419

  13. Decreased expression of Ras-GRF1 in the brain tissue of the intractable epilepsy patients and experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiong; Wang, Liang; Xiao, Zheng; Xiao, Fei; Luo, Jing; Zhang, Xiaogang; Peng, Xi; Wang, Xuefeng; Sun, Hongbin

    2013-02-01

    Ras-guanine nucleotide-releasing factor 1 (Ras-GRF1) is present mainly at synaptosome and its expression after birth increases in parallel with the development of neuronal circuitry. Evidences suggested that Ras-GRF1 could mediate forms of synaptic plasticity and might participate in the regulation of neuronal excitability and neurite outgrowth though various signal transduction pathway. The aim of this study was to measure Ras-GRF1 expression in brain tissue of patients with drug-refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and lithium chloride-pilocarprine kindled rats using double-label immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting and to discuss the possible role of Ras-GRF1 in TLE. We randomly selected 30 temporal neocortices tissues from patients with TLE and 9 histologically normal temporal neocortices samples from controls. Meanwhile, we investigated the distribution and level of Ras-GRF1 protein expression during the different phases (the acute period, the latent period and the chronic phase) in the epileptic and control rats. Ras-GRF1 was mainly expressed in the plasma membrane and dendrite of neurons, but it was not co-expressed with GFAP-positive astrocytes in the brain tissue of patients and epileptic rats. Compared with controls, Ras-GRF1 expression was significantly decreased in TLE patients. Ras-GRF1 expression in epileptic rats was already reduced at 1 day post-seizures, then gradually decreased during the latent period and reached a minimum level during the chronic phase. These results demonstrated that the decreased expression of Ras-GRF1 could be involved in the pathogenesis of human TLE. PMID:23200899

  14. Specific cancer-associated mutations in the switch III region of Ras increase tumorigenicity by nanocluster augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Šolman, Maja; Ligabue, Alessio; Blaževitš, Olga; Jaiswal, Alok; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Hong; Lectez, Benoit; Kopra, Kari; Guzmán, Camilo; Härmä, Harri; Hancock, John F; Aittokallio, Tero; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hotspot mutations of Ras drive cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Less frequent mutations in Ras are poorly characterized for their oncogenic potential. Yet insight into their mechanism of action may point to novel opportunities to target Ras. Here, we show that several cancer-associated mutations in the switch III region moderately increase Ras activity in all isoforms. Mutants are biochemically inconspicuous, while their clustering into nanoscale signaling complexes on the plasma membrane, termed nanocluster, is augmented. Nanoclustering dictates downstream effector recruitment, MAPK-activity, and tumorigenic cell proliferation. Our results describe an unprecedented mechanism of signaling protein activation in cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08905.001 PMID:26274561

  15. Mitochondrial Activity and Cyr1 Are Key Regulators of Ras1 Activation of C. albicans Virulence Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Grahl, Nora; Demers, Elora G.; Lindsay, Allia K.; Harty, Colleen E.; Willger, Sven D.; Piispanen, Amy E.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is both a major fungal pathogen and a member of the commensal human microflora. The morphological switch from yeast to hyphal growth is associated with disease and many environmental factors are known to influence the yeast-to-hyphae switch. The Ras1-Cyr1-PKA pathway is a major regulator of C. albicans morphogenesis as well as biofilm formation and white-opaque switching. Previous studies have shown that hyphal growth is strongly repressed by mitochondrial inhibitors. Here, we show that mitochondrial inhibitors strongly decreased Ras1 GTP-binding and activity in C. albicans and similar effects were observed in other Candida species. Consistent with there being a connection between respiratory activity and GTP-Ras1 binding, mutants lacking complex I or complex IV grew as yeast in hypha-inducing conditions, had lower levels of GTP-Ras1, and Ras1 GTP-binding was unaffected by respiratory inhibitors. Mitochondria-perturbing agents decreased intracellular ATP concentrations and metabolomics analyses of cells grown with different respiratory inhibitors found consistent perturbation of pyruvate metabolism and the TCA cycle, changes in redox state, increased catabolism of lipids, and decreased sterol content which suggested increased AMP kinase activity. Biochemical and genetic experiments provide strong evidence for a model in which the activation of Ras1 is controlled by ATP levels in an AMP kinase independent manner. The Ras1 GTPase activating protein, Ira2, but not the Ras1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Cdc25, was required for the reduction of Ras1-GTP in response to inhibitor-mediated reduction of ATP levels. Furthermore, Cyr1, a well-characterized Ras1 effector, participated in the control of Ras1-GTP binding in response to decreased mitochondrial activity suggesting a revised model for Ras1 and Cyr1 signaling in which Cyr1 and Ras1 influence each other and, together with Ira2, seem to form a master-regulatory complex necessary to integrate

  16. Contribution of the R-Ras2 GTP-binding protein to primary breast tumorigenesis and late-stage metastatic disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larive, Romain M.; Moriggi, Giulia; Menacho-Márquez, Mauricio; Cañamero, Marta; Álava, Enrique De; Alarcón, Balbino; Dosil, Mercedes; Bustelo, Xosé R.

    2014-05-01

    R-Ras2 is a transforming GTPase that shares downstream effectors with Ras subfamily proteins. However, little information exists about the function of this protein in tumorigenesis and its signalling overlap with classical Ras GTPases. Here we show, by combining loss- and gain-of-function studies in breast cancer cells, mammary epithelial cells and mouse models, that endogenous R-Ras2 has a role in both primary breast tumorigenesis and the late metastatic steps of cancer cells in the lung parenchyma. R-Ras2 drives tumorigenesis in a phosphatidylinostiol-3 kinase (PI3K)-dependent and signalling autonomous manner. By contrast, its prometastatic role requires other priming oncogenic signals and the engagement of several downstream elements. R-Ras2 function is required even in cancer cells exhibiting constitutive activation of classical Ras proteins, indicating that these GTPases are not functionally redundant. Our results also suggest that application of long-term R-Ras2 therapies will result in the development of compensatory mechanisms in breast tumours.

  17. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, K.; Kastury, K.; Druck, T.

    1994-07-15

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding {open_quotes}adapter{close_quotes} proteins, which are involved in transducing signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signal recipients such as ras, because adaptor protein genes could also, logically, serve as targets of mutation, rearrangement, or other aberration in disease. Therefore, DNAs from panels of rodent-human hybrids carrying defined complements of human chromosomes were assayed for the presence of the cognate genes for NCK, SHC, and GRB2, three SH2 or SH2/SH3 (Src homology 2 and 3) domain-containing adapter proteins. Additionally, NCK and SHC genes were more narrowly localized by chromosomal in situ hybridization. The NCK locus is at chromosome region 3q21, a region involved in neoplasia-associated changes; the SHC cognate locus, SHC1, is at 1q21, and the GRB2 locus is at 17q22-qter telomeric to the HOXB and NGFR loci. Both SHC1 and GRB2 are in chromosome regions that may be duplicated in some tumor types. 41 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Calcium-dependent immediate-early gene induction in lymphocytes is negatively regulated by p21Ha-ras.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C Y; Forman, L W; Faller, D V

    1996-01-01

    The induction of immediate-early (IE) response genes, such as egr-1, c-fos, and c-jun, occurs rapidly after the activation of T lymphocytes. The process of activation involves calcium mobilization, activation of protein kinase C (PKC), and phosphorylation of tyrosine kinases. p21(ras), a guanine nucleotide binding factor, mediates T-cell signal transduction through PKC-dependent and PKC-independent pathways. The involvement of p21(ras) in the regulation of calcium-dependent signals has been suggested through analysis of its role in the activation of NF-AT. We have investigated the inductions of the IE genes in response to calcium signals in Jurkat cells (in the presence of activated p21(ras)) and their correlated consequences. The expression of activated p21(ras) negatively regulated the induction of IE genes by calcium ionophore. This inhibition of calcium-activated IE gene induction was reversed by treatment with cyclosporin A, suggesting the involvement of calcineurin in this regulation. A later result of inhibition of this activation pathway by p21(ras) was down-regulation of the activity of the transcription factor AP-1 and subsequent coordinate reductions in IL-2 gene expression and protein production. These results suggest that p2l(ras) is an essential mediator in generating not only positive but also negative modulatory mechanisms controlling the competence of T cells in response to inductive stimulations. PMID:8887687

  19. SmgGDS antagonizes BPGAP1-induced Ras/ERK activation and neuritogenesis in PC12 cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Aarthi; Low, Boon Chuan

    2013-01-01

    BPGAP1 is a Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) that regulates cell morphogenesis, cell migration, and ERK signaling by the concerted action of its proline-rich region (PRR), RhoGAP domain, and the BNIP-2 and Cdc42GAP homology (BCH) domain. Although multiple cellular targets for the PRR and RhoGAP have been identified, and their functions delineated, the mechanism by which the BCH domain regulates functions of BPGAP1 remains unclear. Here we show that its BCH domain induced robust ERK activation leading to PC12 cell differentiation by targeting specifically to K-Ras. Such stimulatory effect was inhibited, however, by both dominant-negative mutants of Mek2 (Mek2-K101A) and K-Ras (K-Ras-S17N) and also by the small G-protein GDP dissociation stimulator (SmgGDS). Consequently SmgGDS knockdown released this inhibition and resulted in a superinduction of K-Ras activation and PC12 differentiation mediated by BCH domain. These results demonstrate the versatility of the BCH domain of BPGAP1 in regulating ERK signaling by involving K-Ras and SmgGDS and support the unique role of BPGAP1 as a dual regulator for Ras and Rho signaling in cell morphogenesis and differentiation. PMID:23155002

  20. Copy number variants including RAS pathway genes-How much RASopathy is in the phenotype?

    PubMed

    Lissewski, Christina; Kant, Sarina G; Stark, Zornitza; Schanze, Ina; Zenker, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The RASopathies comprise a group of clinically overlapping developmental syndromes the common pathogenetic basis of which is dysregulated signal flow through the RAS-MAPK pathway. Mutations in several components or modifiers of the pathway have been identified in Noonan syndrome and related disorders. Over the past years copy number variants (CNVs) encompassing RAS pathway genes (PTPN11, RAF1, MEK2, or SHOC2) have been reported in children with developmental syndromes. These observations raised speculations that the associated phenotypes represent RASopathies, implying that the increased or reduced expression of the respective RAS pathway component and a consecutive dysregulation of RAS pathway signalling is responsible for the clinical picture. Herein, we present two individuals and three of their relatives harboring duplications of either 3p25.2 including the RAF1 locus or 19p13.3 including the MEK2 locus. Duplication carriers exhibited variable clinical phenotypes including non-specific facial dysmorphism, short stature, and learning difficulties. A careful review of the literature supported the impression that phenotypes associated with CNVs including RAS pathway genes commonly share non-specific symptoms with RASopathies, while the characteristic "gestalt" is lacking. Considering the known molecular pathogenesis of RASopathies, it is questionable that a modest increase in the expression of a functionally normal signaling component can mimic the effects of a qualitatively abnormal (hyperactive) mutant protein. We thus argue that current empirical and biological evidence is still insufficient to allow the conclusion that an altered copy number of a RAS pathway component is indeed the mechanism that is critical for the phenotype associated with CNVs including RASopathy genes. PMID:25974318

  1. The Fibroblast Growth Factor signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, David M; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The signaling component of the mammalian Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) family is comprised of eighteen secreted proteins that interact with four signaling tyrosine kinase FGF receptors (FGFRs). Interaction of FGF ligands with their signaling receptors is regulated by protein or proteoglycan cofactors and by extracellular binding proteins. Activated FGFRs phosphorylate specific tyrosine residues that mediate interaction with cytosolic adaptor proteins and the RAS-MAPK, PI3K-AKT, PLCγ, and STAT intracellular signaling pathways. Four structurally related intracellular non-signaling FGFs interact with and regulate the family of voltage gated sodium channels. Members of the FGF family function in the earliest stages of embryonic development and during organogenesis to maintain progenitor cells and mediate their growth, differentiation, survival, and patterning. FGFs also have roles in adult tissues where they mediate metabolic functions, tissue repair, and regeneration, often by reactivating developmental signaling pathways. Consistent with the presence of FGFs in almost all tissues and organs, aberrant activity of the pathway is associated with developmental defects that disrupt organogenesis, impair the response to injury, and result in metabolic disorders, and cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25772309

  2. CD8(+) T cells mediate RAS-induced psoriasis-like skin inflammation through IFN-γ.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Andrew J; Mohammed, Javed; Horvath, Frank J; Podolsky, Michael A; Anderson, Cherie R; Glick, Adam B

    2013-04-01

    The RAS signaling pathway is constitutively activated in psoriatic keratinocytes. We expressed activated H-RAS(V12G) in suprabasal keratinocytes of adult mice and observed rapid development of a psoriasis-like skin phenotype characterized by basal keratinocyte hyperproliferation, acanthosis, hyperkeratosis, intraepidermal neutrophil microabscesses, and increased T helper type 1 (Th1)/Th17 and T cell type 1 (Tc1)/Tc17 skin infiltration. The majority of skin-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells coexpressed IFN-γ and IL-17A. When RAS was expressed on a Rag1-/- background, microabscess formation, inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, and keratinocyte hyperproliferation were suppressed. Depletion of CD8(+), but not CD4(+), T cells reduced cutaneous and systemic inflammation, the RAS-induced increase in cutaneous Th17 and IL-17(+) γδ T cells, and epidermal hyperproliferation to levels similar to a Rag1-/- background. Reconstitution of Rag1-/- inducible RAS mice with purified CD8(+) T cells restored microabscess formation and epidermal hyperproliferation. Neutralization of IFN-γ, but not of IL-17A, in CD8(+) T-cell-reconstituted Rag1-/- mice expressing RAS blocked CD8-mediated skin inflammation, inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, and keratinocyte hyperproliferation. These results show that CD8(+) T cells can orchestrate skin inflammation with psoriasis-like pathology in response to constitutive RAS activation in keratinocytes, and this is primarily mediated through IFN-γ. PMID:23151849

  3. Combined Rational Design and a High Throughput Screening Platform for Identifying Chemical Inhibitors of a Ras-activating Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L.; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions. PMID:25825487

  4. The Ras G Domain Lacks the Intrinsic Propensity to Form Dimers.

    PubMed

    Kovrigina, Elizaveta A; Galiakhmetov, Azamat R; Kovrigin, Evgenii L

    2015-09-01

    Ras GTPase is a molecular switch controlling a number of cellular pathways including growth, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Recent reports indicated that Ras undergoes dimerization at the membrane surface through protein-protein interactions. If firmly established this property of Ras would require profound reassessment of a large amount of published data and modification of the Ras signaling paradigm. One proposed mechanism of dimerization involves formation of salt bridges between the two GTPase domains (G domains) leading to formation of a compact dimer as observed in Ras crystal structures. In this work, we interrogated the intrinsic ability of Ras to self-associate in solution by creating conditions of high local concentration through irreversibly tethering the two G domains together at their unstructured C-terminal tails. We evaluated possible self-association in this inverted tandem conjugate via analysis of the time-domain fluorescence anisotropy and NMR chemical shift perturbations. We did not observe the increased rotational correlation time expected for the G domain dimer. Variation of the ionic strength (to modulate stability of the salt bridges) did not affect the rotational correlation time in the tandem further supporting independent rotational diffusion of two G domains. In a parallel line of experiments to detect and map weak self-association of the G domains, we analyzed NMR chemical shifts perturbations at a number of sites near the crystallographic dimer interface. The nearly complete lack of chemical shift perturbations in the tandem construct supported a simple model with the independent G domains repelled from each other by their overall negative charge. These results lead us to the conclusion that self-association of the G domains cannot be responsible for homodimerization of Ras reported in the literature. PMID:26331257

  5. The Aberrant Gene-End Transcription Signal of the Matrix M Gene of Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Downregulates Fusion F Protein Expression and the F-Specific Antibody Response In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lingemann, Matthias; Surman, Sonja; Amaro-Carambot, Emérito; Schaap-Nutt, Anne; Collins, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    immunogenicity was unknown. Here, we show that the removal of this insert shifts F gene transcription from readthrough M-F mRNA to monocistronic F mRNA. This resulted in a substantial increase in the amount of F protein expressed in the cell and packaged in the virus particle. This did not affect virus replication but increased the F-specific antibody response in hamsters. Thus, in wild-type HPIV3, the aberrant M-GE signal operates a previously undescribed mechanism that reduces the expression of a major neutralization and protective antigen, resulting in reduced immunogenicity. This has implications for the design of live attenuated HPIV3 vaccines; specifically, the antibody response against F can be elevated by “repairing” the M-GE signal to achieve higher-level F antigen expression, with no effect on attenuation. PMID:25589643

  6. Identification of murine homologues of the Drosophila son of sevenless gene: potential activators of ras.

    PubMed Central

    Bowtell, D; Fu, P; Simon, M; Senior, P

    1992-01-01

    Several findings suggest that signals from tyrosine kinases are transduced, at least in part, through ras proteins. These findings include (i) blockage of the transforming activity of constitutively active tyrosine kinases by inhibiting ras function and (ii) genetic screens in Caenorhabditis elegans and in Drosophila that identified ras genes as downstream effectors of tyrosine kinases. The recently isolated Drosophila gene Son of sevenless (Sos) is postulated to act as a positive regulatory link between tyrosine kinase and ras proteins by catalyzing exchange of GDP for GTP on ras protein. Such exchange proteins have been reported in extracts of mammalian cells but have not been previously characterized at a molecular level. As Sos appears to function in this role in Drosophila, we sought to isolate a vertebrate counterpart(s). We have characterized two widely expressed murine genes with a high degree of homology to Sos. Hybridization with human DNA and RNA indicates a high degree of conservation of these genes in other vertebrates. Images PMID:1631150

  7. RAS Symposium Draws Hundreds of Attendees | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    They call themselves “rasologists”: scientists who study the RAS family of genes and the cancers that can arise due to mutations within them. This field of research is at the heart of some sobering numbers. Almost a third of all human cancers, including 95 percent of pancreatic cancers, are driven by mutated RAS genes. The American Cancer Society estimates there were 48,960 new cases of pancreatic cancer in the United States in 2015 and 40,560 deaths from the disease.

  8. Hexa (ethylene glycol) derivative of benzothiazole aniline promotes dendritic spine formation through the RasGRF1-Ras dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nathanael J; Song, Jung Min; Cho, Hyun-Ji; Sung, You Me; Lee, Taehee; Chung, Andrew; Hong, Sung-Ha; Cifelli, Jessica L; Rubinshtein, Mark; Habib, Lila K; Capule, Christina C; Turner, R Scott; Pak, Daniel T S; Yang, Jerry; Hoe, Hyang-Sook

    2016-02-01

    Our recent study demonstrated that an amyloid-β binding molecule, BTA-EG4, increases dendritic spine number via Ras-mediated signaling. To potentially optimize the potency of the BTA compounds, we synthesized and evaluated an amyloid-β binding analog of BTA-EG4 with increased solubility in aqueous solution, BTA-EG6. We initially examined the effects of BTA-EG6 on dendritic spine formation and found that BTA-EG6-treated primary hippocampal neurons had significantly increased dendritic spine number compared to control treatment. In addition, BTA-EG6 significantly increased the surface level of AMPA receptors. Upon investigation into the molecular mechanism by which BTA-EG6 promotes dendritic spine formation, we found that BTA-EG6 may exert its effects on spinogenesis via RasGRF1-ERK signaling, with potential involvement of other spinogenesis-related proteins such as Cdc42 and CDK5. Taken together, our data suggest that BTA-EG6 boosts spine and synapse number, which may have a beneficial effect of enhancing neuronal and synaptic function in the normal healthy brain. PMID:26675527

  9. c-Ha-ras down regulates the alpha-fetoprotein gene but not the albumin gene in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, K; Lawless, D; Ohe, Y; Miyao, Y; Nakabayashi, H; Kamiya, H; Miura, K; Ohtsuka, E; Tamaoki, T

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effects of transfection of the normal c-Ha-ras gene, rasGly-12, and its oncogenic mutant, rasVal-12, on expression of the alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and albumin genes in a human hepatoma cell line, HuH-7. The mutant and, to a lesser extent, the normal ras gene caused reduction of the AFP mRNA but not the albumin mRNA level in transfected HuH-7 cells. Cotransfection experiments with a rasVal-12 expression plasmid and a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene fused to AFP regulatory sequences showed that rasVal-12 suppressed the activity of enhancer and promoter regions containing A + T-rich sequences (AT motif). In contrast, rasVal-12 did not affect the promoter activity of the albumin and human hepatitis B virus pre-S1 genes even though these promoters contain homologous A + T-rich elements. ras transfection appeared to induce phosphorylation of nuclear proteins that interact with the AFP AT motif, since gel mobility analysis revealed the formation of slow-moving complexes which was reversed by phosphatase treatment. However, similar changes in complex formation were observed with the albumin and hepatitis B surface antigen pre-S1 promoters. Therefore, this effect alone cannot explain the specific down regulation of the AFP promoter and enhancer activity. ras-mediated suppression of the AFP gene may reflect the process of developmental gene regulation in which AFP gene transcription is controlled by a G-protein-linked signal transduction cascade triggered by external growth stimuli. Images PMID:1690841

  10. The RAS Problem: Turning Off a Broken Switch

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS gene is commonly mutated in cancer and researchers are working to better understand how to develop drugs that can target the RAS protein, which for many years has been considered to be “undruggable.”

  11. RAS Projects at the NCI Frederick National Lab

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Initiative involves a number of projects focusing on ways to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells by mutant RAS proteins. Projects are conducted at the FNLCR hub, with collaboration from the research community nationwide.

  12. Ras regulates alveolar macrophage formation of CXC chemokines and neutrophil activation in streptococcal M1 protein-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songen; Hwaiz, Rundk; Rahman, Milladur; Herwald, Heiko; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-06-15

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is associated with a high mortality rate. The M1 serotype of Streptococcus pyogenes is most frequently associated with STSS. Herein, we examined the role of Ras signaling in M1 protein-induced lung injury. Male C57BL/6 mice received the Ras inhibitor (farnesylthiosalicylic acid, FTS) prior to M1 protein challenge. Bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue were harvested for quantification of neutrophil recruitment, edema and CXC chemokine formation. Neutrophil expression of Mac-1 was quantified by use of flow cytometry. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Administration of FTS reduced M1 protein-induced neutrophil recruitment, edema formation and tissue damage in the lung. M1 protein challenge increased Mac-1 expression on neutrophils and CXC chemokine levels in the lung. Inhibition of Ras activity decreased M1 protein-induced expression of Mac-1 on neutrophils and secretion of CXC chemokines in the lung. Moreover, FTS abolished M1 protein-provoked gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Ras inhibition decreased chemokine-mediated neutrophil migration in vitro. Taken together, our novel findings indicate that Ras signaling is a potent regulator of CXC chemokine formation and neutrophil infiltration in the lung. Thus, inhibition of Ras activity might be a useful way to antagonize streptococcal M1 protein-triggered acute lung injury. PMID:24704370

  13. Aberration correction of unstable resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Construction of aspheric reflectors for unstable resonator lasers to provide an arbitrary laser mode inside the resonator to correct aberrations of an output beam by the construction of the shape of an end reflector opposite the output reflector of the resonator cavity, such as aberrations resulting from refraction of a beam exiting the solid of the resonator having an index of refraction greater than 1 or to produce an aberration in the output beam that will precisely compensate for the aberration of an optical train into which the resonator beam is coupled.

  14. Tyrosine 763 of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor mediates Ras-dependent activation of the JNK/SAPK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, O; Marshall, C J

    1997-01-01

    The receptor for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can mediate differentiation and proliferation of hemopoietic cells. A proliferative signal is associated with activation of the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. To determine whether other MAPK pathways are activated by G-CSF signalling, we have investigated activation of JNK/SAPK in cells proliferating in response to G-CSF. Here we show that G-CSF and interleukin-3 activate JNK/SAPK in two hemopoietic cell lines. The region of the G-CSF receptor required for G-CSF-induced JNK/SAPK activation is located within the C-terminal 68 amino acids of the cytoplasmic domain, which contains Tyr 763. Mutation of Tyr 763 to Phe completely blocks JNK/SAPK activation. However, the C-terminal 68 amino acids are not required for ERK2 activation. We show that activation of JNK/SAPK, like that of ERK2, is dependent on Ras but that higher levels of Ras-GTP are associated with activation of JNK/SAPK than with activation of ERK2. Two separate functional regions of the G-CSF receptor contribute to activation of Ras. The Y763F mutation reduces G-CSF-induced Ras activation from 30 to 35% Ras-GTP to 10 to 13% Ras-GTP. Low levels of Ras activation (10 to 13% Ras-GTP), which are sufficient for ERK2 activation, require only the 100 membrane-proximal amino acids. High levels of Ras-GTP provided by expression of oncogenic Ras are not sufficient to activate JNK/SAPK. An additional signal, also mediated by Tyr 763, is required for activation of JNK/SAPK. PMID:9032244

  15. Implication of K-ras and p53 in colorectal cancer carcinogenesis in Tunisian population cohort.

    PubMed

    Ines, Chaar; Donia, Ounissi; Rahma, Boughriba; Ben Ammar, Azza; Sameh, Amara; Khalfallah, Taher; Abdelmajid, Ben Hmida; Sabeh, Mzabi; Saadia, Bouraoui

    2014-07-01

    According to the multistep route of genetic alterations in the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence, the complex K-ras/p53 mutation is one of the first alterations to occur and represent an important genetic event in colorectal cancer (CRC). An evaluation of the mutation spectra in K-ras and p53 gene was effected in 167 Tunisian patients with sporadic CRC to determine whether our populations have similar pattern of genetic alteration as in Maghrebin's population. Mutation patterns of codon 12-13 of K-ras and exon 5-8 of p53 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and PCR-SSCP and confirmed by sequencing. Mutations in the K-ras gene were detected in 31.13 % and affect the women more than the men (p = 0.008). Immunostaining showed that expression of p21 ras was correlated with the advanced age (p = 0.004), whereas loss of signal was associated with mucinous histotype (p = 0.003). Kaplan-Meier survival curve found that patients with the K-ras mutation had a shorter survival compared with patients without mutation (p = 0.005). Alteration in p53 was seen in 17.4 % of patients and affects three hot spot codons such as 175, 245, and 248. Overexpression of p53 was seen in 34.1 % and correlated with tumor node metastasis (TNM) advanced stage (p = 0.037) and mucinous histotype (p = 0.001). A high concordance between p53 expression and alteration (p<0.005) was shown. Concomitant mutations in K-ras and p53 gene were detected in only 4 % of tumors. K-ras and p53 undergo separate pathways in colorectal tumorogenesis. Interestingly, mutations in the K-ras gene might be considered a valuable prognostic factor correlated to poor outcome. p53 gene alterations were rather low in our set, and methylation pattern of p53 is required to elucidate the molecular basis of this protein in CRC. PMID:24763823

  16. Performance of Dispersed Fringe Sensor in the Presence of Segmented Mirror Aberrations - Modeling and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Fang; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2006-01-01

    Wavefront aberrations will lower the DFS fringe visibility and DFS signal SNR. The specific effect of wavefront aberration on DFS depends on the aberration type. Due to the "pixel spatial filter" effect the extracted DFS signal can tolerate moderate amount of wavefront aberrations..By averaging piston detection results from multiple traces extracted from fringe images DFS can further increase its robustness against wavefront aberration. Line-of-sight jitter can cause significant loss of fringe visibility will affect more on the aberrated system..Modeling results have shown that gravity sag on the JWST segment mirror during I&T will lower the DHS fringe visibility by factor of 2-3X and lower the DHS signal intensity by factor of approx.5X. Under gravity sag the RMS DHS detection error approx. 100 nm.

  17. Role of p21 RAS in p210 bcr-abl transformation of murine myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Mandanas, R A; Leibowitz, D S; Gharehbaghi, K; Tauchi, T; Burgess, G S; Miyazawa, K; Jayaram, H N; Boswell, H S

    1993-09-15

    The p21 RAS product has been implicated as part of the downstream signaling of certain nonreceptor tyrosine kinase oncogenes and several growth factor receptor-ligand interactions. We have reported that the chronic myelogenous leukemia oncogene p210 bcr-abl transforms a growth-factor-dependent myeloid cell line NFS/N1.H7 to interleukin-3 (IL-3) independence. In these p210 bcr-abl-transformed cells (H7 bcr-abl.A54) and in two other murine myeloid cell lines transformed to IL-3 independence by p210 bcr-abl, endogenous p21 RAS is activated as determined by an elevated ratio of associated guanosine triphosphate (GTP)/guanosine diphosphate (GDP), assayed by thin-layer chromatography of the nucleotides eluted from p21 RAS after immunoprecipitation with the Y13-259 antibody. Treatment of p210 bcr-abl-transformed cells with a specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin A resulted in diminished tyrosine phosphorylation of p210 bcr-abl and associated proteins, without major reduction in expression of the p210 bcr-abl protein itself. Inhibition of p210 bcr-abl-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation resulted in a reduction of active p21RAS-GTP complexes in the transformed cells, in diminished expression of the nuclear early response genes c-jun and c-fos, and in lower cellular proliferation rate. To further implicate p21 RAS in these functional events downstream of p210 bcr-abl tyrosine phosphorylation, we targeted G-protein function directly by limiting the availability of GTP with the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitor, tiazofurin (TR). In p210 bcr-abl-transformed cells treated for 4 hours with TR, in which the levels of GTP were reduced by 50%, but GDP, guanosine monophosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were unaffected, p210 bcr-abl tyrosine phosphorylation was at control levels. However, expression of c-fos and c-jun nuclear proto-oncogenes were strongly inhibited and p21 RAS activity was downregulated. These findings show that p210 bcr-abl transduces

  18. The Differential Palmitoylation States of N-Ras and H-Ras Determine Their Distinct Golgi Sub-compartment Localizations

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Stephen J.; Snitkin, Harriet; Gumper, Iwona; Philips, Mark R.; Sabatini, David; Pellicer, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Despite a high degree of structural homology and shared exchange factors, effectors and GTPase activating proteins, a large body of evidence suggests functional heterogeneity among Ras isoforms. One aspect of Ras biology that may explain this heterogeneity is the differential subcellular localizations driven by the C-terminal hypervariable regions of Ras proteins. Spatial heterogeneity has been documented at the level of organelles: palmitoylated Ras isoforms (H-Ras and N-Ras) localize on the Golgi apparatus whereas K-Ras4B does not. We tested the hypothesis that spatial heterogeneity also exists at the sub-organelle level by studying the localization of differentially palmitoylated Ras isoforms within the Golgi apparatus. Using confocal, live cell fluorescent imaging and immunogold electron microscopy we found that, whereas the doubly palmitoylated H-Ras is distributed throughout the Golgi stacks, the singly palmitoylated N-Ras is polarized with a relative paucity of expression on the trans Golgi. Using palmitoylation mutants we show that the different sub-Golgi distributions of the Ras proteins are a consequence of their differential degree of palmitoylation. Thus, the acylation state of Ras proteins controls not only their distribution between the Golgi apparatus and the plasma membrane but also their distribution within the Golgi stacks. PMID:25158650

  19. K-Ras promotes the non-small lung cancer cells survival by cooperating with sirtuin 1 and p27 under ROS stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dezhi; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Yunsheng; Ou, Rongying; Li, Gang; Yang, Han; Li, Wenfeng

    2015-09-01

    Cigarette smoking might lead to lung cancer. However, the related signaling pathways at molecular level remained unknown until now. In this study, we studied the signaling processes associated between tobacco exposure and lung cancer. First, we detected and validated pathway-specific gene expression at bronchial epithelium. These proteins reflected the activation of signaling pathways relevant to tobacco exposure, including ATM, BCL2, GPX1, K-Ras, IKBKB, and SIRT1. Tobacco smoking was simulated via reactive oxygen species (ROS) pathway. ROS not only arrested cell cycle at G1/S stage but also increased expressions of Sirt1 and p27. Further studies showed that the expression of p27 was dependent on ERK1/2 activation, and p27 itself could halt cell cycle by inhibiting the activation of CDKs. Moreover, activation of K-Ras, the key regulator of Ras/ERK pathway, was tightly regulated by enzyme activity of Sirt1. Deacetylation of K-Ras by Sirt1 increased the transformation of Ras-GTP to Ras-GDP, promoting the activation of downstream of ERK1/2. In reverse, Ras/ERK pathway could also regulate Sirt1 transcription. In conclusion, inhibition of Sirt1 may be an effective strategy for the prevention of tumor progression in high-risk patients or as a therapeutic strategy in established tumors. PMID:25894374

  20. One-way membrane trafficking of SOS in receptor-triggered Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Sune M; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Jun, Jesse E; Alvarez, Steven; Triplet, Meredith G; Iwig, Jeffrey S; Yadav, Kamlesh K; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Roose, Jeroen P; Groves, Jay T

    2016-09-01

    SOS is a key activator of the small GTPase Ras. In cells, SOS-Ras signaling is thought to be initiated predominantly by membrane recruitment of SOS via the adaptor Grb2 and balanced by rapidly reversible Grb2-SOS binding kinetics. However, SOS has multiple protein and lipid interactions that provide linkage to the membrane. In reconstituted-membrane experiments, these Grb2-independent interactions were sufficient to retain human SOS on the membrane for many minutes, during which a single SOS molecule could processively activate thousands of Ras molecules. These observations raised questions concerning how receptors maintain control of SOS in cells and how membrane-recruited SOS is ultimately released. We addressed these questions in quantitative assays of reconstituted SOS-deficient chicken B-cell signaling systems combined with single-molecule measurements in supported membranes. These studies revealed an essentially one-way trafficking process in which membrane-recruited SOS remains trapped on the membrane and continuously activates Ras until being actively removed via endocytosis. PMID:27501536

  1. Regulation of an H-ras-related transcript by parathyroid hormone in rat osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. K.; Weaver, W. R.; Clohisy, J. C.; Brakenhoff, K. D.; Kahn, A. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    The rat osteosarcoma cell line UMR 106-01 is a commonly used model system for the study of osteoblast function. However, it also expresses a phenotype characteristic of transformed cells. To test whether the latter could be accounted for by aberrant oncogene expression, we probed Northern blots of UMR and other osteoblastic cells with a panel of oncogene probes. These blots, when probed with a cDNA specific for v-H-ras, revealed a 7.0-kilobase (kb) H-ras-related transcript (designated HRRT) in UMR 106-01 cells that was not expressed in other osteoblastic cells. Osteoblast-enriched calvarial cells expressed the typical 1.1-kb H-ras mRNA, which was absent in UMR cells. Additionally, Western blots of lysates of UMR cells documented the presence of three proteins immunologically related to H-rasp21. To determine whether HRRT represented a recombinant retrovirus product, Northern blots were probed with a cDNA specific for the highly conserved gag-pol region of Moloney murine leukemia virus. These blots showed parallel cross-reactivity with an apparently identical transcript of 7.0 kb. The 7.0-kb transcripts detected by both v-H-ras and gag-pol probes declined to the same extent after treatment with concentrations of PTH known to inhibit proliferation of these cells. PTH regulated the abundance of HRRT in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with greatest repression of the transcript after 8 h of treatment with 10(-8) M PTH. The decrease in HRRT could not be completely accounted for by changes in transcriptional activity, as determined by nuclear run-on assays.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  2. Allosteric modulation of Ras positions Q61 for a direct role in catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Buhrman, Greg; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Fetics, Susan; Mattos, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Ras and its effector Raf are key mediators of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signal transduction pathway. Mutants of residue Q61 impair the GTPase activity of Ras and are found prominently in human cancers. Yet the mechanism through which Q61 contributes to catalysis has been elusive. It is thought to position the catalytic water molecule for nucleophilic attack on the γ-phosphate of GTP. However, we previously solved the structure of Ras from crystals with symmetry of the space group R32 in which switch II is disordered and found that the catalytic water molecule is present. Here we present a structure of wild-type Ras with calcium acetate from the crystallization mother liquor bound at a site remote from the active site and likely near the membrane. This results in a shift in helix 3/loop 7 and a network of H-bonding interactions that propagates across the molecule, culminating in the ordering of switch II and placement of Q61 in the active site in a previously unobserved conformation. This structure suggests a direct catalytic role for Q61 where it interacts with a water molecule that bridges one of the γ-phosphate oxygen atoms to the hydroxyl group of Y32 to stabilize the transition state of the hydrolysis reaction. We propose that Raf together with the binding of Ca2+ and a negatively charged group mimicked in our structure by the acetate molecule induces the ordering of switch I and switch II to complete the active site of Ras. PMID:20194776

  3. p19ARF and RasV12 Offer Opposing Regulation of DHX33 Translation To Dictate Tumor Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yandong; Saporita, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    DHX33 is a pivotal DEAH-box RNA helicase in the multistep process of RNA polymerase I-directed transcription of the ribosomal DNA locus. We explored the regulation of DHX33 expression by RasV12 and ARF to determine DHX33's role in sensing these opposing signals to regulate ribosome biogenesis. In wild-type primary fibroblasts, RasV12 infection induced a transient increase in DHX33 protein level, as well as an rRNA transcriptional rate that was eventually suppressed by a delayed activation of the ARF/p53 pathway. DHX33 expression was exclusively controlled at the level of translation. ARF caused a dramatic reduction in polysome-associated DHX33 mRNAs, while RasV12 led to a complete shift of existing DHX33 mRNAs to actively translating polysomes. The translation of DHX33 by RasV12 was sensitive to inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, mTOR, and mitogen-activated protein and was pivotal for enhanced rRNA transcription and enhanced overall cellular protein translation. In addition, DHX33 knockdown abolished RasV12-induced rRNA transcription and protein translation and prevented both the in vitro and in vivo transforming properties of oncogenic RasV12. Our results directly implicate DHX33 as a crucial player in establishing rRNA synthesis rates in the face of RasV12 or ARF signals, adjusting ribosome biogenesis to match the appropriate growth or antigrowth signals. PMID:23401854

  4. Ha-ras oncogene expression directed by a milk protein gene promoter: tissue specificity, hormonal regulation, and tumor induction in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, A.C.; Schoenenberger, C.A.; Groner, B.; Henninghausen, L.; LeMeur, M.; Gelinger, P.

    1987-03-01

    The activated human Ha-ras oncogene was subjected to the control of the promoter region of the murine whey acidic protein (Wap) gene, which is expressed in mammary epithelial cells in response to lactogenic hormones. The Wap-ras gene was stably introduced into the mouse germ line of five transgenic mice (one male and four females). Wap-ras expression was observed in the mammary glands of lactating females in two lines derived from female founders. The tissue-directed and hormone-dependent Wap expression was conferred on the Ha-ras oncogene. The signals governing Wap expression are located within 2.5 kilobases of 5' flanking sequence. The other two lines derived from female founders did not express the chimeric gene. In the line derived from the male founder the Wap-ras gene is integrated into the Y chromosome. Expression was found in the salivary gland of male animals only. After a long latency, Wap-ras-expressing mice developed tumors. The tumors arose in tissues expressing Wap-ras - i.e., mammary or salivary glands. Compared to the corresponding nonmalignant tissues, Wap-ras expression was enhanced in the tumors.

  5. EGFR phosphorylates FAM129B to promote Ras activation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haitao; Lee, Jong-Ho; Wang, Yugang; Pang, Yilin; Zhang, Tao; Xia, Yan; Zhong, Lianjin; Lyu, Jianxin; Lu, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Ras GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are important regulators for Ras activation, which is instrumental in tumor development. However, the mechanism underlying this regulation remains elusive. We demonstrate here that activated EGFR phosphorylates the Y593 residue of the protein known as family with sequence similarity 129, member B (FAM129B), which is overexpressed in many types of human cancer. FAM129B phosphorylation increased the interaction between FAM129B and Ras, resulting in reduced binding of p120-RasGAP to Ras. FAM129B phosphorylation promoted Ras activation, increasing ERK1/2- and PKM2-dependent β-catenin transactivation and leading to the enhanced glycolytic gene expression and the Warburg effect; promoting tumor cell proliferation and invasion; and supporting brain tumorigenesis. Our studies unearthed a novel and important mechanism underlying EGFR-mediated Ras activation in tumor development. PMID:26721396

  6. Interfering with the interaction between ErbB1, nucleolin and Ras as a potential treatment for glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kloog, Yoel; Pinkas-Kramarski, Ronit

    2014-01-01

    The three oncogenes, ErbB receptors, Ras proteins and nucleolin may contribute to malignant transformation. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleolin could bind both Ras protein and ErbB receptors. We also showed that the crosstalk between the three proteins facilitates anchorage independent growth and tumor growth in nude mice, and that inhibition of this interaction in prostate and colon cancer cells reduces tumorigenicity. In the present study, we show that treatment with Ras and nucleolin inhibitors reduces the oncogenic effect induced by ErbB1 receptor in U87-MG cells. This combined treatment enhances cell death, reduces cell proliferation and cell migration. Moreover, we demonstrate a pivotal role of nucleolin in ErbB1 activation by its ligand. Nucleolin inhibitor prevents EGF-induced receptor activation and its downstream signaling followed by reduced proliferation. Furthermore, inhibition of Ras by Salirasib (FTS), mainly reduces cell viability and motility. The combined treatment, which targets both Ras and nucleolin, additively reduces tumorigenicity both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that targeting both nucleolin and Ras may represent an additional opportunity for inhibiting cancers, including glioblastoma, that are driven by these oncogenes. PMID:25261371

  7. Interfering with the interaction between ErbB1, nucleolin and Ras as a potential treatment for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Goldshmit, Yona; Trangle, Sari Schokoroy; Kloog, Yoel; Pinkas-Kramarski, Ronit

    2014-09-30

    The three oncogenes, ErbB receptors, Ras proteins and nucleolin may contribute to malignant transformation. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleolin could bind both Ras protein and ErbB receptors. We also showed that the crosstalk between the three proteins facilitates anchorage independent growth and tumor growth in nude mice, and that inhibition of this interaction in prostate and colon cancer cells reduces tumorigenicity. In the present study, we show that treatment with Ras and nucleolin inhibitors reduces the oncogenic effect induced by ErbB1 receptor in U87-MG cells. This combined treatment enhances cell death, reduces cell proliferation and cell migration. Moreover, we demonstrate a pivotal role of nucleolin in ErbB1 activation by its ligand. Nucleolin inhibitor prevents EGF-induced receptor activation and its downstream signaling followed by reduced proliferation. Furthermore, inhibition of Ras by Salirasib (FTS), mainly reduces cell viability and motility. The combined treatment, which targets both Ras and nucleolin, additively reduces tumorigenicity both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that targeting both nucleolin and Ras may represent an additional opportunity for inhibiting cancers, including glioblastoma, that are driven by these oncogenes. PMID:25261371

  8. Morrison Receives NIH Award for Major Ras/Raf Breakthroughs | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Deborah Morrison, Ph.D., laboratory chief, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research (CCR), received an NIH Director’s Award in June “for major breakthroughs in elucidating the mechanisms of Ras/Raf signaling that will be critical for diagnosis and treatment of disease,” according to the NIH Director’s Awards Ceremony brochure. She was nominated by Ira Daar, Ph.D., senior investigator, Developmental Signal Transduction Section, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, CCR.

  9. Rasfonin, a novel 2-pyrone derivative, induces ras-mutated Panc-1 pancreatic tumor cell death in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Z; Li, L; Li, Y; Zhou, W; Cheng, J; Liu, F; Zheng, P; Zhang, Y; Che, Y

    2014-01-01

    Rasfonin is a novel 2-pyrone derivative reported to induce apoptosis in ras-dependent cells. In this study, its effects on ras-mutated pancreatic cancer cells were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Two human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1 (mutated K-ras) and BxPC-3 (wild-type K-ras) were selected to test the effects of rasfonin on cell proliferation, clone formation, migration and invasion in vitro. Immunoblotting was used to detect the expressions of EGFR–Ras–Raf–MEK–ERK signaling pathway proteins. Ras activity was measured using a pull-down ELISA kit and guanine exchange factor (GEF)/GTPase-activating proteins (GAP) activity was measured by [3H]-GDP radiometric ligand binding. For an in vivo study, CD1 nude mice bearing Panc-1 cells were treated with rasfonin or Salirasib (FTS). We found that rasfonin suppressed proliferation more strongly in Panc-1 cells (IC50=5.5 μM) than BxPC-3 cells (IC50=10 μM) in vitro. Clone formation, migration and invasion by Panc-1 cells were also reduced by rasfonin. Rasfonin had little effect on the farnesylation of Ras, but it strongly downregulated Ras activity and consequently phosphorylation of c-Raf/MEK/ERK. Further experiments indicated that rasfonin reduced Son of sevenless (Sos1) expression but did not alter GEF and GAP activities. The in vivo experiments also revealed that rasfonin (30 mg/kg) delayed the growth of xenograft tumors originating from Panc-1 cells. Tumor weight was ultimately decreased after 20 days of treatment of rasfonin. Rasfonin is a robust inhibitor of pancreatic cancers with the K-ras mutation. The reduction of Sos1 expression and the consequently depressed Ras–MAPK activity could be important in its anticancer activity. PMID:24853419

  10. C/EBPβ represses p53 to promote cell survival downstream of DNA damage independent of oncogenic Ras and p19Arf

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, SJ; Zhu, S; Zhu, F; House, JS; Smart, RC

    2013-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-β (C/EBPβ) is a mediator of cell survival and tumorigenesis. When C/EBPβ−/− mice are treated with carcinogens that produce oncogenic Ras mutations in keratinocytes, they respond with abnormally elevated keratinocyte apoptosis and a block in skin tumorigenesis. Although this aberrant carcinogen-induced apoptosis results from abnormal upregulation of p53, it is not known whether upregulated p53 results from oncogenic Ras and its ability to induce p19Arf and/or activate DNA-damage response pathways or from direct carcinogen-induced DNA damage. We report that p19Arf is dramatically elevated in C/EBPβ−/− epidermis and that C/EBPβ represses a p19Arf promoter reporter. To determine whether p19Arf is responsible for the proapoptotic phenotype in C/EBPβ−/− mice, C/EBPβ−/−;p19Arf−/− mice were generated. C/EBPβ−/−;p19Arf−/− mice responded to carcinogen treatment with increased p53 and apoptosis, indicating p19Arf is not essential. To ascertain whether oncogenic Ras activation induces aberrant p53 and apoptosis in C/EBPβ−/− epidermis, we generated K14-ER:Ras; C/EBPβ−/− mice. Oncogenic Ras activation induced by 4-hydroxytamoxifen did not produce increased p53 or apoptosis. Finally, when C/EBPβ−/− mice were treated with differing types of DNA-damaging agents, including alkylating chemotherapeutic agents, they displayed aberrant levels of p53 and apoptosis. These results indicate that C/EBPβ represses p53 to promote cell survival downstream of DNA damage and suggest that inhibition of C/EBPβ may be a target for cancer cotherapy to increase the efficacy of alkylating chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:18636078

  11. Chromosome Aberrations in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry A.; Durante, M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A review of currently available data on in vivo induced chromosome damage in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts proves that, after protracted exposure of a few months or more to space radiation, cytogenetic biodosimetry analyses of blood collected within a week or two of return from space provides a reliable estimate of equivalent radiation dose and risk. Recent studies indicate that biodosimetry estimates from single spaceflights lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry and biophysical models, but very large uncertainties are associated with single individual measurements and the total sample population remains low. Retrospective doses may be more difficult to estimate because of the fairly rapid time-dependent loss of "stable" aberrations in blood lymphocytes. Also, biodosimetry estimates from individuals who participate in multiple missions, or very long (interplanetary) missions, may be complicated by an adaptive response to space radiation and/or changes in lymphocyte survival and repopulation. A discussion of published data is presented and specific issues related to space radiation biodosimetry protocols are discussed.

  12. Correction of Distributed Optical Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Olivier, S; Carrano, C; Phillion, D

    2006-02-12

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the use of multiple distributed deformable mirrors (DMs) to improve the performance of optical systems with distributed aberrations. This concept is expected to provide dramatic improvement in the optical performance of systems in applications where the aberrations are distributed along the optical path or within the instrument itself. Our approach used multiple actuated DMs distributed to match the aberration distribution. The project developed the algorithms necessary to determine the required corrections and simulate the performance of these multiple DM systems.

  13. Coating-induced wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiley, Daniel J.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1992-12-01

    The coatings which are used on telescope mirrors and other optical interfaces can have a profound effect on the image quality formed by an optical system. This paper evaluates the defocus and astigmatism which are caused by the s- and p-phase shifts of coatings. These coating-induced wavefront aberrations are usually insignificant, but can, under certain circumstances, overshadow the geometric wavefront aberrations of the system. The wavefront aberrations induced by reflection-enhanced coatings on an f/1.5 Cassegrain telescope are numerically evaluated as an example.

  14. RAS Mutations and Oncogenesis: Not all RAS Mutations are Created Equally

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark Steven; Miller, Lance D.

    2012-01-01

    Mutation in RAS proteins is one of the most common genetic alterations observed in human and experimentally induced rodent cancers. In vivo, oncogenic mutations have been shown to occur at exons 12, 13, and 61, resulting in any 1 of 19 possible point mutations in a given tumor for a specific RAS isoform. While some studies have suggested a possible role of different mutant alleles in determining tumor severity and phenotype, no general consensus has emerged on the oncogenicity of different mutant alleles in tumor formation and progression. Part of this may be due to a lack of a single, signature pathway that shows significant alterations between different mutations. Rather, it is likely that subtle differences in the activation, or lack thereof, of downstream effectors by different RAS mutant alleles may determine the eventual outcome in terms of tumor phenotype. This paper reviews our current understanding of the potential role of different RAS mutations on tumorigenesis, highlights studies in model cell culture and in vivo systems, and discusses the potential of expression array and computational network modeling to dissect out differences in activated RAS genes in conferring a transforming phenotype. PMID:22303394

  15. IAA RAS Radio Telescope Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A.; Lavrov, A.

    2007-07-01

    Institute of Applied Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IAA RAS) has three identical radio telescopes, the receiving complex of which consists of five two-channel receivers of different bands, six cryogen systems, and additional devices: four local oscillators, phase calibration generators and IF commutator. The design, hardware and data communication protocol are described. The most convenient way to join the devices of the receiving complex into the common monitoring system is to use the interface which allows to connect numerous devices to the data bus. For the purpose of data communication regulation and to exclude conflicts, a data communication protocol has been designed, which operates with complex formatted data sequences. Formation of such sequences requires considerable data processing capability. That is provided by a microcontroller chip in each slave device. The test version of the software for the central computer has been developed in IAA RAS. We are developing the Mark IV FS software extension modules, which will allow us to control the receiving complex of the radio telescope by special SNAP commands from both operator input and schedule files. We are also developing procedures of automatic measurements of SEFD, system noise temperature and other parameters, available both in VLBI and single-dish modes of operation. The system described has been installed on all IAA RAS radio telescopes at "Svetloe", "Zelenchukskaya" and "Badary" observatories. It has proved to be working quite reliably and to show the perfonmance expected.

  16. Mutations in the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway predict for antitumor activity of the inhibitor PX-866 while oncogenic Ras is a dominant predictor for resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ihle, NathanT.; Lemos, Robert; Wipf, Peter; Yacoub, Adly; Mitchell, Clint; Siwak, Doris; Mills, Gordon B.; Dent, Paul; Kirkpatrick, D Lynn.; Powis, Garth

    2008-01-01

    The novel phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI-3-kinase) inhibitor PX-866 was tested against 13 experimental human tumor xenografts derived from cell lines of various tissue origins. Mutant PI-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and loss of PTEN activity were sufficient but not necessary as predictors of sensitivity to the antitumor activity of the PI-3-K inhibitor PX-866 in the presence of wild type Ras, while mutant oncogenic Ras was a dominant determinant of resistance, even in tumors with coexisting mutations in PIK3CA. The level of activation of PI-3-kinase signaling measured by tumor phospho-Ser473-Akt was insufficient to predict in vivo antitumor response to PX-866. Reverse phase protein array (RPPA) revealed that the Ras dependent down stream targets c-Myc and cyclin B were elevated in cell lines resistant to PX-866 in vivo. Studies using an H-Ras construct to constitutively and preferentially activate the three best defined downstream targets of Ras, namely Raf, RalGDS, and PI-3-kinase, showed that mutant Ras mediates resistance through its ability to utilize multiple pathways for tumorigenesis. The identification of Ras and downstream signaling pathways driving resistance to PI-3-kinase inhibition may serve as an important guide for patient selection as inhibitors enter clinical trials, and for the development of rational combinations with other molecularly targeted agents. PMID:19117997

  17. Statins inhibited the MIP-1α expression via inhibition of Ras/ERK and Ras/Akt pathways in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Mashimo, Kenji; Takeda, Tomoya; Kino, Toshiki; Fujita, Arisa; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Sakaguchi, Katsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2016-03-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1α) is detected at high concentrations in patients with multiple myeloma. It is thought to play an important role in the etiology of multiple myeloma and osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting MIP-1α expression may be useful in developing therapeutic treatments for multiple myeloma-induced osteolysis. In this study, we investigated the potential of statins to inhibit mRNA expression and secretion of MIP-1α in mouse myeloma cells (MOPC-31C). We found that statins inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced MIP-1α mRNA expression and protein secretion in MOPC-31C cells. This inhibition was reversed when farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), intermediates of the mevalonate pathway, were combined with statins. Furthermore, statins reduced the GTP form of Ras, a phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and phosphorylated Akt. Our results indicate that statins inhibit biosynthesis of FPP and GGPP and thereby down regulate signal transduction of Ras/ERK and Ras/Akt pathways. The net effect suppresses LPS-induced MIP-1α mRNA expression and protein secretion in MOPC-31C cells. Thus, statins hold great promise for developing effective therapies against myeloma-induced osteolysis. PMID:26898421

  18. Aberrant splicing and drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    de Necochea-Campion, Rosalia; Shouse, Geoffrey P; Zhou, Qi; Mirshahidi, Saied; Chen, Chien-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has unveiled a new window into the heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In particular, recurrent mutations in spliceosome machinery and genome-wide aberrant splicing events have been recognized as a prominent component of this disease. This review will focus on how these factors influence drug resistance through altered splicing of tumor suppressor and oncogenes and dysregulation of the apoptotic signaling network. A better understanding of these factors in disease progression is necessary to design appropriate therapeutic strategies recognizing specific alternatively spliced or mutated oncogenic targets. PMID:27613060

  19. Autophagic activity dictates the cellular response to oncogenic RAS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yihua; Wang, Xiao Dan; Lapi, Eleonora; Sullivan, Alexandra; Jia, Wei; He, You-Wen; Ratnayaka, Indrika; Zhong, Shan; Goldin, Robert D.; Goemans, Christoph G.; Tolkovsky, Aviva M.; Lu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    RAS is frequently mutated in human cancers and has opposing effects on autophagy and tumorigenesis. Identifying determinants of the cellular responses to RAS is therefore vital in cancer research. Here, we show that autophagic activity dictates the cellular response to oncogenic RAS. N-terminal Apoptosis-stimulating of p53 protein 2 (ASPP2) mediates RAS-induced senescence and inhibits autophagy. Oncogenic RAS-expressing ASPP2(Δ3/Δ3) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that escape senescence express a high level of ATG5/ATG12. Consistent with the notion that autophagy levels control the cellular response to oncogenic RAS, overexpressing ATG5, but not autophagy-deficient ATG5 mutant K130R, bypasses RAS-induced senescence, whereas ATG5 or ATG3 deficiency predisposes to it. Mechanistically, ASPP2 inhibits RAS-induced autophagy by competing with ATG16 to bind ATG5/ATG12 and preventing ATG16/ATG5/ATG12 formation. Hence, ASPP2 modulates oncogenic RAS-induced autophagic activity to dictate the cellular response to RAS: to proliferate or senesce. PMID:22847423

  20. Historical aspects of aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Rose, Harald H

    2009-06-01

    A brief history of the development of direct aberration correction in electron microscopy is outlined starting from the famous Scherzer theorem established in 1936. Aberration correction is the long story of many seemingly fruitless efforts to improve the resolution of electron microscopes by compensating for the unavoidable resolution-limiting aberrations of round electron lenses over a period of 50 years. The successful breakthrough, in 1997, can be considered as a quantum step in electron microscopy because it provides genuine atomic resolution approaching the size of the radius of the hydrogen atom. The additional realization of monochromators, aberration-free imaging energy filters and spectrometers has been leading to a new generation of analytical electron microscopes providing elemental and electronic information about the object on an atomic scale. PMID:19254915

  1. The neurofibromin recruitment factor Spred1 binds to the GAP related domain without affecting Ras inactivation.

    PubMed

    Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Mercado, Ellen L; Maly, Karl; McCormick, Frank; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Legius syndrome are related diseases with partially overlapping symptoms caused by alterations of the tumor suppressor genes NF1 (encoding the protein neurofibromin) and SPRED1 (encoding sprouty-related, EVH1 domain-containing protein 1, Spred1), respectively. Both proteins are negative regulators of Ras/MAPK signaling with neurofibromin functioning as a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (GAP) and Spred1 acting on hitherto undefined components of the pathway. Importantly, neurofibromin has been identified as a key protein in the development of cancer, as it is genetically altered in a large number of sporadic human malignancies unrelated to NF1. Spred1 has previously been demonstrated to interact with neurofibromin via its N-terminal Ena/VASP Homology 1 (EVH1) domain and to mediate membrane translocation of its target dependent on its C-terminal Sprouty domain. However, the region of neurofibromin required for the interaction with Spred1 has remained unclear. Here we show that the EVH1 domain of Spred1 binds to the noncatalytic (GAPex) portion of the GAP-related domain (GRD) of neurofibromin. Binding is compatible with simultaneous binding of Ras and does not interfere with GAP activity. Our study points to a potential targeting function of the GAPex subdomain of neurofibromin that is present in all known canonical RasGAPs. PMID:27313208

  2. RAS and RHO families of GTPases directly regulate distinct phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Ralph; de Krijger, Inge; Fritsch, Kornelia; George, Roger; Reason, Beth; Kumar, Madhu S; Diefenbacher, Markus; Stamp, Gordon; Downward, Julian

    2013-05-23

    RAS proteins are important direct activators of p110α, p110γ, and p110δ type I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks), interacting via an amino-terminal RAS-binding domain (RBD). Here, we investigate the regulation of the ubiquitous p110β isoform of PI3K, implicated in G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, PTEN-loss-driven cancers, and thrombocyte function. Unexpectedly, RAS is unable to interact with p110β, but instead RAC1 and CDC42 from the RHO subfamily of small GTPases bind and activate p110β via its RBD. In fibroblasts, GPCRs couple to PI3K through Dock180/Elmo1-mediated RAC activation and subsequent interaction with p110β. Cells from mice carrying mutations in the p110β RBD show reduced PI3K activity and defective chemotaxis, and these mice are resistant to experimental lung fibrosis. These findings revise our understanding of the regulation of type I PI3K by showing that both RAS and RHO family GTPases directly regulate distinct ubiquitous PI3K isoforms and that RAC activates p110β downstream of GPCRs. PMID:23706742

  3. Human Sos1: A guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ras that binds to GRB2

    SciTech Connect

    Chardin, P. ); Camonis, J.; Gale, N.W.; Aelst, L. Van; Wigler, M.H.; Bar-Sagi, D. ); Schlessinger, J. )

    1993-05-28

    A human complementary DNA was isolated that encodes a widely expressed protein, hSos1, that is closely related to Sos, the product of the Drosophila son of sevenless gene. The hSos1 protein contains a region of significant sequence similarity to CDC25, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras from yeast. A fragment of hSos1 encoding the CDC25-related domain complemented loss of CDC25 function in yeast. This hSos1 domain specifically stimulated guanine nucleotide exchange on mammalian Ras proteins in vitro. Mammalian cells overexpressing full-length hSos1 had increased guanine nucleotide exchange activity. Thus hSos1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras. The hSos1 interacted with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) in vivo and in vitro. This interaction was mediated by the carboxyl-terminal domain of hSos1 and the Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of GRB2. These results suggest that the coupling of receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras signaling is mediated by a molecular complex consisting of GRB2 and hSos1. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Comparative analysis of radiosensitizers for K-RAS mutant rectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Kleiman, Laura B; Krebs, Angela M; Kim, Stephen Y; Hong, Theodore S; Haigis, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 40% of rectal cancers harbor activating K-RAS mutations, and these mutations are associated with poor clinical response to chemoradiotherapy. We aimed to identify small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) that synergize with ionizing radiation (IR) ("radiosensitizers") that could be incorporated into current treatment strategies for locally advanced rectal cancers (LARCs) expressing mutant K-RAS. We first optimized a high-throughput assay for measuring individual and combined effects of SMIs and IR that produces similar results to the gold standard colony formation assay. Using this screening platform and K-RAS mutant rectal cancer cell lines, we tested SMIs targeting diverse signaling pathways for radiosensitizing activity and then evaluated our top hits in follow-up experiments. The two most potent radiosensitizers were the Chk1/2 inhibitor AZD7762 and the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235. The chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which is used to treat LARC, synergized with AZD7762 and enhanced radiosensitization by AZD7762. This study is the first to compare different SMIs in combination with IR for the treatment of K-RAS mutant rectal cancer, and our findings suggest that Chk1/2 inhibitors should be evaluated in new clinical trials for LARC. PMID:24349411

  5. Isoprenoid addition to Ras protein is the critical modification for its membrane association and transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, K; Cox, A D; Hisaka, M M; Graham, S M; Buss, J E; Der, C J

    1992-01-01

    We have introduced a variety of amino acid substitutions into carboxyl-terminal CA1A2X sequence (C = cysteine; A = aliphatic; X = any amino acid) of the oncogenic [Val12]Ki-Ras4B protein to identify the amino acids that permit Ras processing (isoprenylation, proteolysis, and carboxyl methylation), membrane association, and transformation in cultured mammalian cells. While all substitutions were tolerated at the A1 position, substitutions at A2 and X reduced transforming activity. The A2 residue was important for both isoprenylation and AAX proteolysis, whereas the X residue dictated the extent and specificity of isoprenoid modification only. Differences were observed between Ras processing in living cells and farnesylation efficiency in a cell-free system. Finally, one farnesylated mutant did not undergo either proteolysis or carboxyl methylation but still displayed efficient membrane association (approximately 50%) and transforming activity, indicating that farnesylation alone can support Ras transforming activity. Since both farnesylation and carboxyl methylation are critical for yeast a-factor biological activity, the three CAAX-signaled modifications may have different contributions to the function of different CAAX-containing proteins. Images PMID:1631135

  6. The neurofibromin recruitment factor Spred1 binds to the GAP related domain without affecting Ras inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Mercado, Ellen L.; Maly, Karl; McCormick, Frank; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Legius syndrome are related diseases with partially overlapping symptoms caused by alterations of the tumor suppressor genes NF1 (encoding the protein neurofibromin) and SPRED1 (encoding sprouty-related, EVH1 domain-containing protein 1, Spred1), respectively. Both proteins are negative regulators of Ras/MAPK signaling with neurofibromin functioning as a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (GAP) and Spred1 acting on hitherto undefined components of the pathway. Importantly, neurofibromin has been identified as a key protein in the development of cancer, as it is genetically altered in a large number of sporadic human malignancies unrelated to NF1. Spred1 has previously been demonstrated to interact with neurofibromin via its N-terminal Ena/VASP Homology 1 (EVH1) domain and to mediate membrane translocation of its target dependent on its C-terminal Sprouty domain. However, the region of neurofibromin required for the interaction with Spred1 has remained unclear. Here we show that the EVH1 domain of Spred1 binds to the noncatalytic (GAPex) portion of the GAP-related domain (GRD) of neurofibromin. Binding is compatible with simultaneous binding of Ras and does not interfere with GAP activity. Our study points to a potential targeting function of the GAPex subdomain of neurofibromin that is present in all known canonical RasGAPs. PMID:27313208

  7. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in development and skeletal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Teven, Chad M.; Farina, Evan M.; Rivas, Jane; Reid, Russell R.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) and their receptors serve many functions in both the developing and adult organism. Humans contain 18 FGF ligands and four FGF receptors (FGFR). FGF ligands are polypeptide growth factors that regulate several developmental processes including cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration, morphogenesis, and patterning. FGF-FGFR signaling is also critical to the developing axial and craniofacial skeleton. In particular, the signaling cascade has been implicated in intramembranous ossification of cranial bones as well as cranial suture homeostasis. In the adult, FGFs and FGFRs are crucial for tissue repair. FGF signaling generally follows one of three transduction pathways: RAS/MAP kinase, PI3/AKT, or PLCγ. Each pathway likely regulates specific cellular behaviors. Inappropriate expression of FGF and improper activation of FGFRs are associated with various pathologic conditions, unregulated cell growth, and tumorigenesis. Additionally, aberrant signaling has been implicated in many skeletal abnormalities including achondroplasia and craniosynostosis. The biology and mechanisms of the FGF family have been the subject of significant research over the past 30 years. Recently, work has focused on the therapeutic targeting and potential of FGF ligands and their associated receptors. The majority of FGF-related therapy is aimed at age-related disorders. Increased understanding of FGF signaling and biology may reveal additional therapeutic roles, both in utero and postnatally. This review discusses the role of FGF signaling in general physiologic and pathologic embryogenesis and further explores it within the context of skeletal development. PMID:25679016

  8. Aberrant Glycosylation as Biomarker for Cancer: Focus on CD43

    PubMed Central

    de Laurentiis, Annamaria; Fiume, Giuseppe; Borrelli, Antonella; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Scala, Iris; Buonaguro, Franco Maria; Quinto, Ileana; Scala, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation is a posttranslational modification of proteins playing a major role in cell signalling, immune recognition, and cell-cell interaction because of their glycan branches conferring structure variability and binding specificity to lectin ligands. Aberrant expression of glycan structures as well as occurrence of truncated structures, precursors, or novel structures of glycan may affect ligand-receptor interactions and thus interfere with regulation of cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Indeed, aberrant glycosylation represents a hallmark of cancer, reflecting cancer-specific changes in glycan biosynthesis pathways such as the altered expression of glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Most studies have been carried out to identify changes in serum glycan structures. In most cancers, fucosylation and sialylation are significantly modified. Thus, aberrations in glycan structures can be used as targets to improve existing serum cancer biomarkers. The ability to distinguish differences in the glycosylation of proteins between cancer and control patients emphasizes glycobiology as a promising field for potential biomarker identification. In this review, we discuss the aberrant protein glycosylation associated with human cancer and the identification of protein glycoforms as cancer biomarkers. In particular, we will focus on the aberrant CD43 glycosylation as cancer biomarker and the potential to exploit the UN1 monoclonal antibody (UN1 mAb) to identify aberrant CD43 glycoforms. PMID:24689054

  9. Aberrant Expression of COT Is Related to Recurrence of Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jandee; Jeong, Seonhyang; Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Cho Rok; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Shin, Dong Yeob; Lee, Eun Jig; Chung, Woong Youn; Jo, Young Suk

    2015-01-01

    -to-strong COT expression in PTC was associated with shorter recurrence-free survival (mean follow-up duration, 14.2 ± 4.1 years; P = 0.0403). GSEA indicated that gene sets related to B-RAF-RAS (P < 0.0001, false discovery rate [FDR] q-value = 0.000) and thyroid differentiation (P = 0.048, FDR q-value = 0.05) scores were enriched in lower COT expression group and gene sets such as T-cell receptor signaling pathway and Toll-like receptor signaling pathway are coordinately upregulated in higher COT expression group (both, P < 0.0001, FDR q-value = 0.000). Aberrant expression of A-, B-, and C-RAF, and COT is frequent in PTC; increased expression of COT is correlated with recurrence of PTC. PMID:25674762

  10. Aberrant expression of COT is related to recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jandee; Jeong, Seonhyang; Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Cho Rok; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Shin, Dong Yeob; Lee, Eun Jig; Chung, Woong Youn; Jo, Young Suk

    2015-02-01

    was associated with shorter recurrence-free survival (mean follow-up duration, 14.2 ± 4.1 years; P = 0.0403). GSEA indicated that gene sets related to B-RAF-RAS (P < 0.0001, false discovery rate [FDR] q-value = 0.000) and thyroid differentiation (P = 0.048, FDR q-value = 0.05) scores were enriched in lower COT expression group and gene sets such as T-cell receptor signaling pathway and Toll-like receptor signaling pathway are coordinately upregulated in higher COT expression group (both, P < 0.0001, FDR q-value = 0.000).Aberrant expression of A-, B-, and C-RAF, and COT is frequent in PTC; increased expression of COT is correlated with recurrence of PTC. PMID:25674762

  11. Dimerize RACK1 upon transformation with oncogenic ras

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, L.-Y.; Chen, Y.-H.; Chuang, N.-N. . E-mail: zonnc@sinica.edu.tw

    2005-05-06

    From our previous studies, we learned that syndecan-2/p120-GAP complex provided docking site for Src to prosecute tyrosine kinase activity upon transformation with oncogenic ras. And, RACK1 protein was reactive with syndecan-2 to keep Src inactivated, but not when Ras was overexpressed. In the present study, we characterized the reaction between RACK1 protein and Ras. RACK1 was isolated from BALB/3T3 cells transfected with plasmids pcDNA3.1-[S-ras(Q{sub 61}K)] of shrimp Penaeus japonicus and RACK1 was revealed to react with GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K), not GDP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K). This selective interaction between RACK1 and GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) was further confirmed with RACK1 of human placenta and mouse RACK1-encoded fusion protein. We found that RACK1 was dimerized upon reaction with GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K), as well as with 14-3-3{beta} and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, as revealed by phosphorylation with Src tyrosine kinase. We reported the complex of RACK1/GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) reacted selectively with p120-GAP. This interaction was sufficient to dissemble RACK1 into monomers, a preferred form to compete for the binding of syndecan-2. These data indicate that the reaction of GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) with RACK1 in dimers may operate a mechanism to deplete RACK1 from reaction with syndecan-2 upon transformation by oncogenic ras and the RACK1/GTP-Ras complex may provide a route to react with p120-GAP and recycle monomeric RACK1 to syndecan-2.

  12. Oncogenic Ras differentially regulates metabolism and anoikis in extracellular matrix-detached cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, J A; Davison-Versagli, C A; Leliaert, A K; Pape, D J; McCallister, C; Zuo, J; Durbin, S M; Buchheit, C L; Zhang, S; Schafer, Z T

    2016-08-01

    In order for cancer cells to survive during metastasis, they must overcome anoikis, a caspase-dependent cell death process triggered by extracellular matrix (ECM) detachment, and rectify detachment-induced metabolic defects that compromise cell survival. However, the precise signals used by cancer cells to facilitate their survival during metastasis remain poorly understood. We have discovered that oncogenic Ras facilitates the survival of ECM-detached cancer cells by using distinct effector pathways to regulate metabolism and block anoikis. Surprisingly, we find that while Ras-mediated phosphatidylinositol (3)-kinase signaling is critical for rectifying ECM-detachment-induced metabolic deficiencies, the critical downstream effector is serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-1 (SGK-1) rather than Akt. Our data also indicate that oncogenic Ras blocks anoikis by diminishing expression of the phosphatase PHLPP1 (PH Domain and Leucine-Rich Repeat Protein Phosphatase 1), which promotes anoikis through the activation of p38 MAPK. Thus, our study represents a novel paradigm whereby oncogene-initiated signal transduction can promote the survival of ECM-detached cells through divergent downstream effectors. PMID:26915296

  13. Activated Ras interacts with the Ral guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator.

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, F; Fields, S; Schneider, C; Martin, G S

    1994-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify proteins that interact with Ras. The H-Ras protein was found to interact with a guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator (GDS) that has been previously shown to regulate guanine nucleotide exchange on another member of the Ras protein family, Ral. The interaction is mediated by the C-terminal, noncatalytic segment of the RalGDS and can be detected both in vivo, using the two-hybrid system, and in vitro, with purified recombinant proteins. The interaction of the RalGDS C-terminal segment with Ras is specific, dependent on activation of Ras by GTP, and blocked by a mutation that affects Ras effector function. These characteristics are similar to those previously demonstrated for the interaction between Ras and its putative effector, Raf, suggesting that the RalGDS may also be a Ras effector. Consistent with this idea, the RalGDS was found to inhibit the binding of Raf to Ras. Images PMID:7972015

  14. Interaction of Ras with phosphoinositide 3-kinase gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, I; Rodriguez-Viciana, P; Downward, J; Wetzker, R

    1997-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase gamma (PI3Kgamma) can be activated in vitro by both alpha and betagamma subunits of heterotrimeric G-proteins and does not interact with p85, the regulatory subunit of PI3Kalpha. Here we demonstrate the binding of Ras to PI3Kgamma in vitro. An N-terminal region of PI3Kgamma was identified as a binding site for Ras. After co-expression with PI3Kgamma in COS-7 cells, Ras induced only a modest increase in PI3K activity compared with the stimulation of PI3Kalpha by Ras in the same cells. PMID:9307042

  15. Activation of ras oncogenes preceding the onset of neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barbacid, M. ); Sukumar, S. )

    1990-06-01

    The identification of ras oncogenes in human and animal cancers including precancerous lesions indicates that these genes participate in the early stages of neoplastic development. Yet, these observations do not define the timing of ras oncogene activation in the multistep process of carcinogenesis. To ascertain the timing of ras oncogene activation, an animal model system was devised that involves the induction of mammary carcinomas in rats exposed at birth to the carcinogen nitrosomethylurea. High-resolution restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified ras sequences revealed the presence of both H-ras and K-ras oncogenes in normal mammary glands 2 weeks after carcinogen treatment and at least 2 months before the onset of neoplasia. These ras oncogenes can remain latent within the mammary gland until exposure to estrogens, demonstrating that activation of ras oncogenes can precede the onset of neoplasia and suggesting that normal physiological proliferative processes such as estrogen-induced mammary gland development may lead to neoplasia if the targeted cells harbor latent ras oncogenes.

  16. E-Ras improves the efficiency of reprogramming by facilitating cell cycle progression through JNK-Sp1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Jang, Seulgi; Paek, Jae-Seung; Lee, Jae-Woong; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Yang, Han-Mo; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2015-11-01

    We have previously shown that pluripotent stem cells can be induced from adult somatic cells which were exposed to protein extracts isolated from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC). Interestingly, generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells depended on the background of ES cell lines; possible by extracts from C57, but not from E14. Proteomic analysis of two different mES cell lines (C57 and E14) shows that embryonic Ras (E-Ras) is expressed differently in two mES cell lines; high level of E-Ras only in C57 mESC whose extracts allows iPS cells production from somatic cells. Here, we show that E-Ras augments the efficiency in reprogramming of fibroblast by promoting cell proliferation. We found that over-expression of E-Ras in fibroblast increased cell proliferation which was caused by specific up-regulation of cyclins D and E, not A or B, leading to the accelerated G1 to S phase transition. To figure out the common transcription factor of cyclins D and E, we used TRANSFAC database and selected SP1 as a candidate which was confirmed as enhancer of cyclins D and E by luciferase promoter assay using mutants. As downstream signaling pathways, E-Ras activated only c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) but not ERK or p38. Inhibition of JNK prevented E-Ras-mediated induction of pSP1, cyclins D, E, and cell proliferation. Finally, E-Ras transduction to fibroblast enhanced the efficiency of iPS cell generation by 4 factors (Oct4/Klf4/Sox2/C-myc), which was prevented by JNK inhibitor. In conclusion, E-Ras stimulates JNK, enhances binding of Sp1 on the promoter of cyclins D and E, leading to cell proliferation. E-Ras/JNK axis is a critical mechanism to generate iPS cells by transduction of 4 factors or by treatment of mESC protein extracts. PMID:26413787

  17. Mapping magnetism with atomic resolution using aberrated electron probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrobo, Juan; Rusz, Ján; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2015-03-01

    In this talk, we report a direct experimental real-space mapping of magnetic circular dichroism with atomic resolution in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an aberrated electron probe with customized phase distribution, we reveal with electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The aberrated probes allow the collection of EEL spectra using the transmitted beam, which results in a magnetic circular dichroic signal with intrinsically larger signal-to-noise ratios than those obtained via nanodiffraction techniques (where most of the transmitted electrons are discarded). The novel experimental setup presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution. This research was supported by DOE SUFD MSED, by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the US DOE, and by the Swedish Research Council and Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (NSC center)

  18. The IAA RAS Correlator First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkis, Igor; Melnikov, Alexey; Shantyr, Violet; Zimovsky, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 the national Russian VLBI observations were processed by the new correlator ARC (Astrometric Radiointerferometric Correlator). The ARC is a VSI-H correlator and equipped with Mark 5B playback terminals. During 2009 ARC was used to process a series of VLBI sessions, observed on stations Svetloe, Zelenchukskaya, and Badary. NGS files were formed, and EOP parameters were obtained by IAA RAS Analysis Center. The accuracies of the pole coordinates and UT1-UTC were 1-2 mas and 0.07-0.1 ms, respectively.

  19. Sexual aberration or instinctual vicissitude? Revisiting freud's "the sexual aberrations".

    PubMed

    Phillips, Sidney H

    2014-04-01

    The author reconsiders Freud's "The Sexual Aberrations," the first of his Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905), in light of contemporary psychoanalytic theory. Are the concepts of sexual aberration and norm still viable? The author argues that they are necessary but insufficient elements in current theory. He then presents a competing model in which sexuality can be reduced to a more elemental level of disturbance and wish, where it is an expression of a nonsexual wish--for example, to possess or control the object to eliminate separateness. The author presents clinical material to demonstrate this alternative model. PMID:24777366

  20. Aberrations in asymmetrical electron lenses.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J P S; Word, R C; Könenkamp, R

    2012-08-01

    Starting from well established knowledge in light-optics we explore the question if electron-optical aberration can be improved in asymmetrical electron lenses. We show that spherical as well as chromatic aberration coefficients are reduced in asymmetric electrostatic einzel lenses when the center electrode is moved away from the center position towards the entrance electrode. Relative improvements up to 40% for both the chromatic and the spherical aberration coefficients can be obtained. We use analytical and numerical calculations to confirm this result for exemplary cases of a lens with fixed length and working distance. The agreement of the two calculation methods is very good. We then derive an estimate for the electron-optical aberration coefficients from light-optics. The derived expressions for chromatic and spherical aberrations are somewhat simpler than the ones derived from electron-optics as they involve integrals only over the electrostatic potential, not over the electron paths. The estimated formulas still agree well with the electron optical calculations. Overall, we are tempted to suggest that the enormous knowledge base of light optics can provide considerable guidance for electron-optical applications. PMID:22206603

  1. P68 RNA Helicase (DDX5) Alters Activity of Cis- and Trans-Acting Factors of the Alternative Splicing of H-Ras

    PubMed Central

    Kokolo, Mariette; Bach-Elias, Montse

    2008-01-01

    Background H-Ras pre-mRNA undergoes an alternative splicing process to render two proteins, namely p21 H-Ras and p19 H-Ras, due to either the exclusion or inclusion of the alternative intron D exon (IDX), respectively. p68 RNA helicase (p68) is known to reduce IDX inclusion. Principal Findings Here we show that p68 unwinds the stem-loop IDX-rasISS1 structure and prevents binding of hnRNP H to IDX-rasISS1. We also found that p68 alters the dynamic localization of SC35, a splicing factor that promotes IDX inclusion. The knockdown of hnRNP A1, FUS/TLS and hnRNP H resulted in upregulation of the expression of the gene encoding the SC35-binding protein, SFRS2IP. Finally, FUS/TLS was observed to upregulate p19 expression and to stimulate IDX inclusion, and in vivo RNAi-mediated depletion of hnRNP H decreased p19 H-Ras abundance. Significance Taken together, p68 is shown to be an essential player in the regulation of H-Ras expression as well as in a vital transduction signal pathway tied to cell proliferation and many cancer processes. PMID:18698352

  2. Hyperactivation of Ha-ras oncogene, but not Ink4a/Arf deficiency, triggers bladder tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lan; Zheng, Xiaoyong; Huang, Hong-Ying; Shapiro, Ellen; Lepor, Herbert; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2007-02-01

    Although ras is a potent mitogenic oncogene, its tumorigenicity depends on cellular context and cooperative events. Here we show that low-level expression of a constitutively active Ha-ras in mouse urothelium induces simple urothelial hyperplasia that is resistant to progression to full-fledged bladder tumors even in the absence of Ink4a/Arf. In stark contrast, doubling of the gene dosage of the activated Ha-ras triggered early-onset, rapidly growing, and 100% penetrant tumors throughout the urinary tract. Tumor initiation required superseding a rate-limiting step between simple and nodular hyperplasia, the latter of which is marked by the emergence of mesenchymal components and the coactivation of AKT and STAT pathways as well as PTEN inactivation. These results indicate that overactivation of Ha-ras is both necessary and sufficient to induce bladder tumors along a low-grade, noninvasive papillary pathway, and they shed light on the recent findings that ras activation, via point mutation, overexpression, or intensified signaling from FGF receptor 3, occurs in 70%-90% of these tumors in humans. Our results highlight the critical importance of the dosage/strength of Ha-ras activation in dictating its tumorigenicity--a mechanism of oncogene activation not fully appreciated to date. Finally, our results have clinical implications, as inhibiting ras and/or its downstream effectors, such as AKT and STAT3/5, could provide alternative means to treat low-grade, superficial papillary bladder tumors, the most common tumor in the urinary system. PMID:17256055

  3. Transformation by v-Src: Ras-MAPK and PI3K-mTOR mediate parallel pathways.

    PubMed

    Penuel, E; Martin, G S

    1999-06-01

    An increase in the level of active, GTP-bound Ras is not necessary for transformation of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) by v-Src. This suggests that other Ras-independent pathways contribute to transformation by v-Src. To address the possibility that activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR/FRAP), represents one of these pathways, we have examined the effect of simultaneous inhibition of the Ras-MAPK and PI3K-mTOR pathways on transformation of CEF by v-Src. Transformation was assessed by the standard parameters of morphological alteration, increased hexose uptake, loss of density inhibition, and anchorage-independent growth. Inhibition of the Ras-MAPK pathway by expression of the dominant-negative Ras mutant HRasN17 or by addition of the MAPK kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD98059 reduced several of these parameters but failed to block transformation. Similarly, inhibition of the PI3K-mTOR pathway by addition of the PI3K inhibitor 2-[4-morpholinyl]-8-phenyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (LY294002) or the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, although reducing several parameters of transformation, also failed to block transformation. However, simultaneous inhibition of signaling by the Ras-MAPK pathway and the PI3K-mTOR pathway essentially blocked transformation. These data indicate that transformation of CEF by v-Src is mediated by two parallel pathways, the Ras-MAPK pathway and the PI-3K-mTOR pathway, which both contribute to transformation. The possibility that simultaneous activation of other pathways is also required is not excluded. PMID:10359590

  4. Transformation by v-Src: Ras-MAPK and PI3K-mTOR Mediate Parallel Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Penuel, Elicia; Martin, G. Steven

    1999-01-01

    An increase in the level of active, GTP-bound Ras is not necessary for transformation of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) by v-Src. This suggests that other Ras-independent pathways contribute to transformation by v-Src. To address the possibility that activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR/FRAP), represents one of these pathways, we have examined the effect of simultaneous inhibition of the Ras-MAPK and PI3K-mTOR pathways on transformation of CEF by v-Src. Transformation was assessed by the standard parameters of morphological alteration, increased hexose uptake, loss of density inhibition, and anchorage-independent growth. Inhibition of the Ras-MAPK pathway by expression of the dominant-negative Ras mutant HRasN17 or by addition of the MAPK kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD98059 reduced several of these parameters but failed to block transformation. Similarly, inhibition of the PI3K-mTOR pathway by addition of the PI3K inhibitor 2-[4-morpholinyl]-8-phenyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (LY294002) or the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, although reducing several parameters of transformation, also failed to block transformation. However, simultaneous inhibition of signaling by the Ras-MAPK pathway and the PI3K-mTOR pathway essentially blocked transformation. These data indicate that transformation of CEF by v-Src is mediated by two parallel pathways, the Ras-MAPK pathway and the PI-3K-mTOR pathway, which both contribute to transformation. The possibility that simultaneous activation of other pathways is also required is not excluded. PMID:10359590

  5. The role of antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of patients with advanced colorectal cancer according to K-RAS status.

    PubMed

    García-Alfonso, Pilar; Grande, Enrique; Polo, Eduardo; Afonso, Ruth; Reina, Juan José; Jorge, Mónica; Campos, Juan Manuel; Martínez, Virginia; Angeles, Cristina; Montagut, Clara

    2014-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. Recently, it has been found that about 40 % of patients with CRC have mutations in the K-RAS gene. Several clinical trials have showed that patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who present tumour-promoting mutations in signalling pathways involving the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which includes activating K-RAS mutations, do not respond to anti-EGFR drugs such as panitumumab and cetuximab. Hence, K-RAS status is now considered an important negative predictive factor for response to anti-EGFR drugs. Moreover, K-RAS status seems to have also a prognostic role in CRC, but this fact is somewhat controversial. Activity of antiangiogenic agents seems not to be influenced by K-RAS gene status. Tumour angiogenesis has attracted interest in attempts to improve the management of mCRC. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway is fundamental to the regulation of angiogenesis, and research has focused on developing agents that selectively target it. In this way, the anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy has provided important clinical benefits in terms of response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival to patients with mCRC. Efficacy data of bevacizumab in K-RAS wild-type patients seem to be comparable with the efficacy data observed with anti-EGFR therapies in a cross-trial comparison. Although there is a lack of prospective and randomized data in this setting, the combination of chemotherapy plus antiangiogenic agents could be considered as an effective alternative for the treatment of mCRC with independence of K-RAS gene status. Here, we review the available data we have in the literature of the use of antiangiogenic strategies in the treatment of mCRC nowadays. PMID:24793846

  6. Small molecule binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex can be exploited for inhibition of Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jon J G; Anderson, Malcolm; Blades, Kevin; Brassington, Claire; Breeze, Alexander L; Chresta, Christine; Embrey, Kevin; Fairley, Gary; Faulder, Paul; Finlay, M Raymond V; Kettle, Jason G; Nowak, Thorsten; Overman, Ross; Patel, S Joe; Perkins, Paula; Spadola, Loredana; Tart, Jonathan; Tucker, Julie A; Wrigley, Gail

    2015-03-12

    Constitutively active mutant KRas displays a reduced rate of GTP hydrolysis via both intrinsic and GTPase-activating protein-catalyzed mechanisms, resulting in the perpetual activation of Ras pathways. We describe a fragment screening campaign using X-ray crystallography that led to the discovery of three fragment binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex. The identification of tool compounds binding at each of these sites allowed exploration of two new approaches to Ras pathway inhibition by stabilizing or covalently modifying the Ras:SOS complex to prevent the reloading of Ras with GTP. Initially, we identified ligands that bound reversibly to the Ras:SOS complex in two distinct sites, but these compounds were not sufficiently potent inhibitors to validate our stabilization hypothesis. We conclude by demonstrating that covalent modification of Cys118 on Ras leads to a novel mechanism of inhibition of the SOS-mediated interaction between Ras and Raf and is effective at inhibiting the exchange of labeled GDP in both mutant (G12C and G12V) and wild type Ras. PMID:25695162

  7. Activation of RAS/ERK alone is insufficient to inhibit RXRα function and deplete retinoic acid in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ai-Guo Song, Ya-Nan; Chen, Jun; Li, Hui-Ling; Dong, Jian-Yi; Cui, Hai-Peng; Yao, Liang; Li, Xue-Feng; Gao, Wen-Ting; Qiu, Ze-Wen; Wang, Fu-Jin; Wang, Jing-Yu

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • The activation of RAS/ERK is insufficient to inhibit RXRα function and deplete RA. • The retinoid metabolism-related genes are down-regulated by ras oncogene. • The atRA has no effect on preventing hepatic tumorigenesis or curing the developed hepatic nodules. - Abstract: Activation of RAS/ERK signaling pathway, depletion of retinoid, and phosphorylation of retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα) are frequent events found in liver tumors and thought to play important roles in hepatic tumorigenesis. However, the relationships among them still remained to be elucidated. By exploring the transgenic mouse model of hepatic tumorigenesis induced by liver-specific expression of H-ras12V oncogene, the activation of RAS/ERK, the mRNA expression levels of retinoid metabolism-related genes, the contents of retinoid metabolites, and phosphorylation of RXRα were determined. RAS/ERK signaling pathway was gradually and significantly activated in hepatic tumor adjacent normal liver tissues (P) and hepatic tumor tissues (T) of H-ras12V transgenic mice compared with normal liver tissues (Wt) of wild type mice. On the contrary, the mRNA expression levels of retinoid metabolism-related genes were significantly reduced in P and T compared with Wt. Interestingly, the retinoid metabolites 9-cis-retinoic acid (9cRA) and all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), the well known ligands for nuclear transcription factor RXR and retinoic acid receptor (RAR), were significantly decreased only in T compared with Wt and P, although the oxidized polar metabolite of atRA, 4-keto-all-trans-retinoic-acid (4-keto-RA) was significantly decreased in both P and T compared with Wt. To our surprise, the functions of RXRα were significantly blocked only in T compared with Wt and P. Namely, the total protein levels of RXRα were significantly reduced and the phosphorylation levels of RXRα were significantly increased only in T compared with Wt and P. Treatment of H-ras12V transgenic mice at 5-week

  8. Tunable liquid crystal cylindrical micro-optical array for aberration compensation.

    PubMed

    Algorri, J F; Urruchi, V; Bennis, N; Sánchez-Pena, J M; Otón, J M

    2015-06-01

    A tunable aberration compensation device for rectangular micro-optical systems is proposed and demonstrated. This device, which is based in nematic liquid crystal and a micro-electrode structure, forms gradients in the index of refraction as a function of voltage. We have developed a fringe skeletonizing application in order to extract the 3D wavefront from an interference pattern. This software tool obtains the optical aberrations using Chebyshev polynomials. By using phase shifted electrical signals the aberrations can be controlled independently. A complete independent control over the spherical and coma aberration has been demonstrated. Also, an independent control over the astigmatism aberration has been demonstrated in a broad range. This device has promising applications where aberration compensation is required. The independent compensation achieved for some coefficients, such as astigmatism for example, is more than 2.4 waves. PMID:26072760

  9. Society News: Why become a Fellow of the Society? The 2010 RAS Fellowships; Using the RAS Library; Think grants! New Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    There are many arguments for joining the Society - supporting the RAS in lobbying, funding research and holding meetings, for example - but don't forget that benefits also come to individual Fellows. The RAS is pleased to announce the award of three RAS Fellowships in addition to the RAS Sir Norman Lockyer Fellowship.

  10. How To Measure Gravitational Aberration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizek, M.; Solcova, A.

    2007-08-01

    In 1905, Henri Poincaré predicted the existence of gravitational waves and assumed that their speed c[g] would be that of the speed of light c. If the gravitational aberration would also have the same magnitude as the aberration of light, we would observe several paradoxical phenomena. For instance, the orbit of two bodies of equal mass would be unstable, since two attractive forces arise that are not in line and hence form a couple. This tends to increase the angular momentum, period, and total energy of the system. This can be modelled by a system of ordinary differential equations with delay. A big advantage of computer simulation is that we can easily perform many test for various possible values of the speed of gravity [1]. In [2], Carlip showed that gravitational aberration in general relativity is almost