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Sample records for aberrantly glycosylated iga

  1. DNA Methylation in Cosmc Promoter Region and Aberrantly Glycosylated IgA1 Associated with Pediatric IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Jianqian; Zhou, Nan; Liu, Xiaorong; Shen, Ying

    2015-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is one of the most common glomerular diseases leading to end-stage renal failure. Elevation of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 is a key feature of it. The expression of the specific molecular chaperone of core1ß1, 3galactosyl transferase (Cosmc) is known to be reduced in IgAN. We aimed to investigate whether the methylation of CpG islands of Cosmc gene promoter region could act as a possible mechanism responsible for down-regulation of Cosmc and related higher secretion of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1in lymphocytes from children with IgA nephropathy. Three groups were included: IgAN children (n = 26), other renal diseases (n = 11) and healthy children (n = 13). B-lymphocytes were isolated and cultured, treated or not with IL-4 or 5-Aza-2’-deoxycytidine (AZA). The levels of DNA methylation of Cosmc promotor region were not significantly different between the lymphocytes of the three children populations (P = 0.113), but there were significant differences between IgAN lymphocytes and lymphocytes of the other two children populations after IL-4 (P<0.0001) or AZA (P<0.0001). Cosmc mRNA expression was low in IgAN lymphocytes compared to the other two groups (P<0.0001). The level of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 was markedly higher in IgAN group compared to the other groups (P<0.0001). After treatment with IL-4, the levels of Cosmc DNA methylation and aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in IgAN lymphocytes were remarkably higher than the other two groups (P<0.0001) with more markedly decreased Cosmc mRNA content (P<0.0001). After treatment with AZA, the levels in IgAN lymphocytes were decreased, but was still remarkably higher than the other two groups (P<0.0001), while Cosmc mRNA content in IgAN lymphocytes were more markedly increased than the other two groups (P<0.0001). The alteration of DNA methylation by IL-4 or AZA specifically correlates in IgAN lymphocytes with alterations in Cosmc mRNA expression and with the level of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1

  2. Suppression of Adiponectin by Aberrantly Glycosylated IgA1 in Glomerular Mesangial Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tatsuyuki; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Masashi; Takiue, Keiichi; Morinaga, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Ayu; Kikumoto, Yoko; Kitamura, Shinji; Maeshima, Yohei; Makino, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) may be associated with the mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1. To identify mediators affected by aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in cultured human mesangial cells (HMCs), we generated enzymatically modified desialylated and degalactosylated (deSial/deGal) IgA1. The state of deglycosylated IgA1 was confirmed by lectin binding to Helix aspersa (HAA) and Sambucus nigra (SNA). In the cytokine array analysis, 52 proteins were upregulated and 34 were downregulated in HMCs after stimulation with deSial/deGal IgA1. Among them, the secretion of adiponectin was suppressed in HMCs after stimulation with deSial/deGal IgA1. HMCs expressed mRNAs for adiponectin and its type 1 receptor, but not the type 2 receptor. Moreover, we revealed a downregulation of adiponectin expression in the glomeruli of renal biopsy specimens from patients with IgAN compared to those with lupus nephritis. We also demonstrated that aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 was deposited in the mesangium of patients with IgAN by dual staining of HAA and IgA. Moreover, the urinary HAA/SNA ratio of lectin binding was significantly higher in IgAN compared to other kidney diseases. Since adiponectin has anti-inflammatory effects, including the inhibition of adhesion molecules and cytokines, these data suggest that the local suppression of this adipokine by aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 could be involved in the regulation of glomerular inflammation and sclerosis in IgAN. PMID:22457806

  3. Astragalus membranaceus up-regulate Cosmc expression and reverse IgA dys-glycosylation in IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Decreased Core I β3-Gal-T-specific molecular chaperone (Cosmc) expression induced IgA1 aberrant glycosylation is the main characteristic of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). This study tried to elucidate the effect of Astragalus membranaceus on Cosmc expression and IgA O-glycosylation of peripheral B lymphocytes in IgAN patients. Methods Peripheral B lymphocytes of 21 IgAN patients and 10 normal controls were isolated and cultured with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Astragalus membranaceus injection (AMI). Cosmc mRNA and protein expression levels were measured by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot. IgA1 and glycosylation level were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and VV lectin-binding method. Results Cosmc mRNA expression and IgA1 O-glycosylation level in IgAN patients was significantly lower than normal controls at baseline. Treatment of LPS could obviously inhibit Cosmc expression and increase the IgA1 secretion in peripheral B lymphocytes of IgAN patients, which resulted in a significantly increase in IgA1 aberrant glycosylation level. Addition of AMI could remarkably up regulated Cosmc expression, decrease IgA1 secretion, and reverse glycosylation level in a dose related manner. Conclusion AMI can up-regulate Cosmc expression of peripheral B lymphocytes and reverse IgA1 aberrant O-glycosylation level, which might be the underlying mechanism of AMI therapy in treating IgAN. Trial registration TCTR20140515001 (Registration Date: 2014-05-15) PMID:24942185

  4. Aberrant Glycosylation in the Human Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Adam E.; Rosenberg, Brandon N.; Edwards, Genea; Carreon, Teresia A.; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the difference in protein glycosylation and glycosylation enzyme levels between glaucomatous and control trabecular meshwork (TM). Experimental design Glaucomatous and normal donor (n=12 each) TM tissues, Lectin-fluorescence, fluorophore assisted carbohydrate analyses, and quantitative mass spectrometry were used to determine the glycosylation levels. Primary TM cells and glycosylation inhibitors were used to determine their effect on cell shape and motility. Results In contrast to elevated levels of glycoproteins determined by lectin-fluorescence, simultaneous hyper and hypo-glycosylation in glaucomatous trabecular meshwork was revealed by fluorophore assisted carbohydrate analyses. Analyses of enzymes showed elevation of Beta-glycosidase 1 and decrease in Galactosyltransferase family 6 domain containing protein 1 in the glaucomatous trabecular meshwork. Quantitative mass spectrometry identified select protein level changes between glaucomatous and normal trabecular meshwork. Primary trabecular meshwork cells were treated with inhibitors to elicit hypo-glycosylation, which affected cell shape, motility, and fluorescent tracer transport across a layer of trabecular meshwork cells. Conclusions and clinical relevance Global protein glycosylation is aberrant in glaucomatous trabecular meshwork compared to controls. The results presented here suggest that the alteration in global TM protein glycosylation encompassing cellular and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to glaucoma pathology likely mediated through changes in properties of TM cells. PMID:24458570

  5. O-glycosylation of serum IgA1 antibodies against mucosal and systemic antigens in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alice C; Molyneux, Karen; Feehally, John; Barratt, Jonathan

    2006-12-01

    In IgA nephropathy (IgAN), serum IgA1 with abnormal O-glycosylation deposits in the glomerular mesangium. The underlying mechanism of this IgA1 O-glycosylation abnormality is poorly understood, but recent evidence argues against a generic defect in B cell glycosyltransferases, suggesting that only a subpopulation of IgA1-committed B cells are affected. For investigation of whether the site of antigen encounter influences IgA1 O-glycosylation, the O-glycosylation of serum IgA1 antibodies against a systemic antigen, tetanus toxoid (TT), and a mucosal antigen, Helicobacter pylori (HP), was studied in patients with IgAN and control subjects. Serum IgA1 was purified from cohorts of patients with IgAN and control subjects with HP infection and after systemic TT immunization. The IgA1 samples were applied to HP- and TT-coated immunoplates to immobilize specific antibodies, and IgA1 O-glycosylation profiles were assessed by binding of the O-glycan-specific lectin Vicia villosa using a modified ELISA technique. Although total serum IgA1 had raised lectin binding in IgAN, the O-glycosylation of the specific IgA1 antibodies to TT and HP did not differ between patients and control subjects. In both groups, IgA1 anti-HP had higher lectin binding than IgA1 anti-TT. This study demonstrates that IgA1 O-glycosylation normally varies in different immune responses and that patients produce the full spectrum of IgA1 O-glycoforms. IgA1 with high lectin binding was produced in response to mucosal HP infection in all subjects. The raised circulating level of this type of IgA1 in IgAN is likely to be a consequence of abnormal systemic responses to mucosally encountered antigens rather than a fundamental defect in B cell O-glycosylation pathways. PMID:17093066

  6. Aberrant Glycosylation as Biomarker for Cancer: Focus on CD43

    PubMed Central

    de Laurentiis, Annamaria; Fiume, Giuseppe; Borrelli, Antonella; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Scala, Iris; Buonaguro, Franco Maria; Quinto, Ileana; Scala, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation is a posttranslational modification of proteins playing a major role in cell signalling, immune recognition, and cell-cell interaction because of their glycan branches conferring structure variability and binding specificity to lectin ligands. Aberrant expression of glycan structures as well as occurrence of truncated structures, precursors, or novel structures of glycan may affect ligand-receptor interactions and thus interfere with regulation of cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Indeed, aberrant glycosylation represents a hallmark of cancer, reflecting cancer-specific changes in glycan biosynthesis pathways such as the altered expression of glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Most studies have been carried out to identify changes in serum glycan structures. In most cancers, fucosylation and sialylation are significantly modified. Thus, aberrations in glycan structures can be used as targets to improve existing serum cancer biomarkers. The ability to distinguish differences in the glycosylation of proteins between cancer and control patients emphasizes glycobiology as a promising field for potential biomarker identification. In this review, we discuss the aberrant protein glycosylation associated with human cancer and the identification of protein glycoforms as cancer biomarkers. In particular, we will focus on the aberrant CD43 glycosylation as cancer biomarker and the potential to exploit the UN1 monoclonal antibody (UN1 mAb) to identify aberrant CD43 glycoforms. PMID:24689054

  7. Involvement of Aberrant Glycosylation in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Eiji; Ito, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most common posttranslational modification reactions and nearly half of all known proteins in eukaryotes are glycosylated. In fact, changes in oligosaccharides structures are associated with many physiological and pathological events, including cell growth, migration and differentiation, and tumor invasion. Therefore, functional glycomics, which is a comprehensive study of the structures and functions of glycans, is attracting the increasing attention of scientists in various fields of life science. In cases of thyroid cancer, the biological characters and prognosis are completely different in each type of histopathology, and their oligosaccharide structures as well as the expression of glycosyltransferases are also different. In this review, we summarized our previous papers on oligosaccharides and thyroid cancers and discussed a possible function of oligosaccharides in the carcinogenesis in thyroid cancer. PMID:20652009

  8. The glycosylation and structure of human serum IgA1, Fab, and Fc regions and the role of N-glycosylation on Fcα receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Mattu, T S; Pleass, R J; Willis, A C; Kilian, M; Wormald, M R; Lellouch, A C; Rudd, P M; Woof, J M; Dwek, R A

    1998-01-23

    The human serum immunoglobulins IgG and IgA1 are produced in bone marrow and both interact with specific cellular receptors that mediate biological events. In contrast to IgA1, the glycosylation of IgG has been well characterized, and its interaction with various Fc receptors (Fc Rs) has been well studied. In this paper, we have analyzed the glycosylation of IgA1 and IgA1 Fab and Fc as well as three recombinant IgA1 molecules, including two N-glycosylation mutants. Amino acid sequencing data of the IgA1 Fc O-glycosylated hinge region indicated that O-glycans are located at Thr228, Ser230, and Ser232, while O-glycan sites at Thr225 and Thr236 are partially occupied. Over 90% of the N-glycans in IgA1 were sialylated, in contrast to IgG, where < 10% contain sialic acid. This paper contains the first report of Fab glycosylation in IgA1, and (in contrast to IgG Fab, which contains only N-linked glycans) both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides were identified. Analysis of the N-glycans attached to recombinant IgA1 indicated that the Cα 2 N-glycosylation site contained mostly biantennary glycans, while the tailpiece site, absent in IgG, contained mostly triantennary structures. Further analysis of these data suggested that processing at one Fc N-glycosylation site affects the other. Neutrophil Fcα R binding studies, using recombinant IgA1, indicated that neither the tailpiece region nor the N-glycans in the C alpha 2 domain contribute to IgA1-neutrophil Fcα R binding. This contrasts with IgG, where removal of the Fc N-glycans reduces binding to the Fcγ R. The primary sequence and disulfide bond pattern of IgA1, together with the crystal structures of IgG1 Fc and mouse IgA Fab and the glycan sequencing data, were used to generate a molecular model of IgA1. As a consequence of both the primary sequence and S-S bond pattern, the N-glycans in IgA1 Fc are not confined within the inter-α-chain space. The accessibility of the Cα 2 N-glycans provides an explanation for the

  9. Aberrant glycosylation of Igg heavy chain in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Aurer, Igor; Lauc, Gordan; Dumić, Jerka; Rendić, Dubravko; Matisić, Danica; Milos, Marija; Heffer-Lauc, Marija; Flogel, Mirna; Labar, Boris

    2007-03-01

    Although the majority of eukaryotic proteins are glycosylated, there is a dearth of knowledge regarding protein sugar moieties and their changes in disease. Most multiple myeloma cases are characterized by production of monoclonal immunoglobulins (Ig). We studied galactosylation and sialylation of IgG heavy chains in 16 patients with IgG myeloma using lectin blotting and densitometry. In comparison to age and sex matched controls, galactosylation was reduced in multiple myeloma (median 317 vs. 362, range 153-410 vs. 309-447 relative units, p = 0.015, Student's t-test). Sialylation was stage dependent; samples from patients with stage IIA had lowest amounts of sialic acid, IIIA intermediate and IIIB highest (142.6 vs. 185.9 vs. 248.5 relative units, correlation coefficient r = 0.55). Both galactosylation and sialylation levels were independent of age, sex, treatment type, response to treatment, disease duration and IgG and b2 microglobulin concentration. These data indicate that multiple myeloma is characterized by aberrant immunoglobulin glycosylation. PMID:17598409

  10. Biosynthetic Machinery Involved in Aberrant Glycosylation: Promising Targets for Developing of Drugs Against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos-dos-Santos, Andréia; Oliveira, Isadora A.; Lucena, Miguel Clodomiro; Mantuano, Natalia Rodrigues; Whelan, Stephen A.; Dias, Wagner Barbosa; Todeschini, Adriane Regina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells depend on altered metabolism and nutrient uptake to generate and keep the malignant phenotype. The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway is a branch of glucose metabolism that produces UDP-GlcNAc and its derivatives, UDP-GalNAc and CMP-Neu5Ac and donor substrates used in the production of glycoproteins and glycolipids. Growing evidence demonstrates that alteration of the pool of activated substrates might lead to different glycosylation and cell signaling. It is already well established that aberrant glycosylation can modulate tumor growth and malignant transformation in different cancer types. Therefore, biosynthetic machinery involved in the assembly of aberrant glycans are becoming prominent targets for anti-tumor drugs. This review describes three classes of glycosylation, O-GlcNAcylation, N-linked, and mucin type O-linked glycosylation, involved in tumor progression, their biosynthesis and highlights the available inhibitors as potential anti-tumor drugs. PMID:26161361

  11. Development of a combined chemical and enzymatic approach for the mass spectrometric identification and quantification of aberrant N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Wang, Fangjun; Tan, Yexiong; Sun, Zhen; Song, Chunxia; Ye, Mingliang; Wang, Hongyang; Zou, Hanfa

    2012-02-16

    Direct mass spectrometric analysis of aberrant protein glycosylation is a challenge to the current analytical techniques. Except lectin affinity chromatography, no other glycosylation enrichment techniques are available for analysis of aberrant glycosylation. In this study, we developed a combined chemical and enzymatic strategy as an alternative for the mass spectrometric analysis of aberrant glycosylation. Sialylated glycopeptides were enriched with reverse glycoblotting, cleaved by endoglycosidase F3 and analyzed by mass spectrometry with both neutral loss triggered MS(3) in collision induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Interestingly, a great part of resulted glycopeptides were found with fucose attached to the N-acetylglucosamine (N-GlcNAc), which indicated that the aberrant glycosylation that is carrying both terminal sialylation and core fucosylation was identified. Totally, 69 aberrant N-glycosylation sites were identified in sera samples from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Following the identification, quantification of the level of this aberrant glycosylation was also carried out using stable isotope dimethyl labeling and pooled sera sample from liver cirrhosis and HCC was compared. Six glycosylation sites demonstrated elevated level of aberrancy, which demonstrated that our developed strategy was effective in both qualitative and quantitative studies of aberrant glycosylation. PMID:22202184

  12. A Cancer-specific Monoclonal Antibody Recognizes the Aberrantly Glycosylated Podoplanin

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yukinari; Kaneko, Mika Kato

    2014-01-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN/Aggrus/T1α), a platelet aggregation-inducing mucin-like sialoglycoprotein, is highly expressed in many cancers and normal tissues. A neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb; NZ-1) can block the association between podoplanin and C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) and inhibit podoplanin-induced cancer metastasis, but NZ-1 reacts with podoplanin-expressing normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells. In this study, we established a cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) against human podoplanin. Aberrantly glycosylated podoplanin including keratan sulfate or aberrant sialylation, which was expressed in LN229 glioblastoma cells, was used as an immunogen. The newly established LpMab-2 mAb recognized both an aberrant O-glycosylation and a Thr55-Leu64 peptide from human podoplanin. Because LpMab-2 reacted with podoplanin-expressing cancer cells but not with normal cells, as shown by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, it is an anti-podoplanin CasMab that is expected to be useful for molecular targeting therapy against podoplanin-expressing cancers. PMID:25080943

  13. Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition Induces Aberrant Glycosylation through Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway Activation.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Miguel C; Carvalho-Cruz, Patricia; Donadio, Joana L; Oliveira, Isadora A; de Queiroz, Rafaela M; Marinho-Carvalho, Monica M; Sola-Penna, Mauro; de Paula, Iron F; Gondim, Katia C; McComb, Mark E; Costello, Catherine E; Whelan, Stephen A; Todeschini, Adriane R; Dias, Wagner B

    2016-06-17

    Deregulated cellular metabolism is a hallmark of tumors. Cancer cells increase glucose and glutamine flux to provide energy needs and macromolecular synthesis demands. Several studies have been focused on the importance of glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway. However, a neglected but very important branch of glucose metabolism is the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP). The HBP is a branch of the glucose metabolic pathway that consumes ∼2-5% of the total glucose, generating UDP-GlcNAc as the end product. UDP-GlcNAc is the donor substrate used in multiple glycosylation reactions. Thus, HBP links the altered metabolism with aberrant glycosylation providing a mechanism for cancer cells to sense and respond to microenvironment changes. Here, we investigate the changes of glucose metabolism during epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the role of O-GlcNAcylation in this process. We show that A549 cells increase glucose uptake during EMT, but instead of increasing the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway, the glucose is shunted through the HBP. The activation of HBP induces an aberrant cell surface glycosylation and O-GlcNAcylation. The cell surface glycans display an increase of sialylation α2-6, poly-LacNAc, and fucosylation, all known epitopes found in different tumor models. In addition, modulation of O-GlcNAc levels was demonstrated to be important during the EMT process. Taken together, our results indicate that EMT is an applicable model to study metabolic and glycophenotype changes during carcinogenesis, suggesting that cell glycosylation senses metabolic changes and modulates cell plasticity. PMID:27129262

  14. Aberrant Glycosylation and Localization of Polycystin-1 Cause Polycystic Kidney in an AQP11 Knockout Model

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Katsuki; Chiga, Motoko; Rai, Tatemitsu; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Horie, Shigeo; Su, Xuefeng; Zhou, Jing; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that disruption of the aquaporin-11 (AQP11) gene in mice resulted in cystogenesis in the kidney. In this study, we aimed to clarify the mechanism of cystogenesis in AQP11(−/−) mice. To enable the analyses of AQP11 at the protein level in vivo, AQP11 BAC transgenic mice (TgAQP11) that express 3×HA-tagged AQP11 protein were generated. This AQP11 localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of proximal tubule cells in TgAQP11 mice and rescued renal cystogenesis in AQP11(−/−) mice. Therefore, we hypothesized that the absence of AQP11 in the ER could result in impaired quality control and aberrant trafficking of polycystin-1 (PC-1) and polycystin-2 (PC-2). Compared with kidneys of wild-type mice, AQP11(−/−) kidneys exhibited increased protein expression levels of PC-1 and decreased protein expression levels of PC-2. Moreover, PC-1 isolated from AQP11(−/−) mice displayed an altered electrophoretic mobility caused by impaired N-glycosylation processing, and density gradient centrifugation of kidney homogenate and in vivo protein biotinylation revealed impaired membrane trafficking of PC-1 in these mice. Finally, we showed that the Pkd1(+/−) background increased the severity of cystogenesis in AQP11(−/−) mouse kidneys, indicating that PC-1 is involved in the mechanism of cystogenesis in AQP11(−/−) mice. Additionally, the primary cilia of proximal tubules were elongated in AQP11(−/−) mice. Taken together, these data show that impaired glycosylation processing and aberrant membrane trafficking of PC-1 in AQP11(−/−) mice could be a key mechanism of cystogenesis in AQP11(−/−) mice. PMID:24854278

  15. O-linked glycosylation in maize-expressed human IgA1.

    PubMed

    Karnoup, Anton S; Turkelson, Virgil; Anderson, W H Kerr

    2005-10-01

    O-Linked glycans vary between eukaryotic cell types and play an important role in determining a glycoprotein's properties, including stability, target recognition, and potentially immunogenicity. We describe O-linked glycan structures of a recombinant human IgA1 (hIgA1) expressed in transgenic maize. Up to six proline/hydroxyproline conversions and variable amounts of arabinosylation (Pro/Hyp + Ara) were found in the hinge region of maize-expressed hIgA1 heavy chain (HC) by using a combination of matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS), chromatography, and amino acid analysis. Approximately 90% of hIgA1 was modified in this way. An average molar ratio of six Ara units per molecule of hIgA1 was revealed. Substantial sequence similarity was identified between the HC hinge region of hIgA1 and regions of maize extensin-family of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGP). We propose that because of this sequence similarity, the HC hinge region of maize-expressed hIgA1 can become a substrate for posttranslational conversion of Pro to Hyp by maize prolyl-hydroxylase(s) with the subsequent arabinosylation of the Hyp residues by Hyp-glycosyltransferase(s) in the Golgi apparatus in maize endosperm tissue. The observation of up to six Pro/Hyp hydroxylations combined with extensive arabinosylation in the hIgA1 HC hinge region is well in agreement with the Pro/Hyp hydroxylation model and the Hyp contiguity hypothesis suggested earlier in literature for plant HRGP. For the first time, the extensin-like Hyp/Pro conversion and O-linked arabinosylation are described for a recombinant therapeutic protein expressed in transgenic plants. Our findings are of significance to the field of plant biotechnology and biopharmaceutical industry-developing transgenic plants as a platform for the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins. PMID:15901675

  16. Elevated Plasma α-Defensins (HNP1–3) Levels Correlated with IgA1 Glycosylation and Susceptibility to IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Xu-jie; Cheng, Fa-juan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of glomerulonephritis. Recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) suggested that DEFA locus (which encodes α-defensins) may play a key role in IgAN. Methods. The levels of α-defensins in 169 IgAN patients and 83 healthy controls were tested by ELISA. Results. We observed that α-defensins human neutrophil peptides 1–3 (HNP1–3) in IgAN patients were elevated compared with healthy controls. The mean levels of α-defensins of 83 healthy controls and 169 IgAN patients were 50 ng/mL and 78.42 ng/mL. When the results were adjusted to the mean levels of α-defensins of IgAN patients, the percentage of individuals with high levels of α-defensins increased in IgAN patients (22.5%) compared to healthy controls (9.6%) (p = 0.013). The elevation of α-defensins in IgAN patients was independent of renal function or neutrophil count, which were major sources of α-defensins in circulation. More importantly, negative correlation was observed between galactose-deficient IgA1and α-defensins. Conclusion. As α-defensin is a lectin-like peptide, we speculated that it might be involved in IgA galactose deficiency. The data implied that patients with IgAN had higher plasma α-defensins levels and high α-defensins correlated with IgA galactose deficiency, further suggesting a pathogenic role of α-defensins in IgAN. PMID:27563166

  17. Elevated Plasma α-Defensins (HNP1-3) Levels Correlated with IgA1 Glycosylation and Susceptibility to IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Cheng, Fa-Juan; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Aim. IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of glomerulonephritis. Recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) suggested that DEFA locus (which encodes α-defensins) may play a key role in IgAN. Methods. The levels of α-defensins in 169 IgAN patients and 83 healthy controls were tested by ELISA. Results. We observed that α-defensins human neutrophil peptides 1-3 (HNP1-3) in IgAN patients were elevated compared with healthy controls. The mean levels of α-defensins of 83 healthy controls and 169 IgAN patients were 50 ng/mL and 78.42 ng/mL. When the results were adjusted to the mean levels of α-defensins of IgAN patients, the percentage of individuals with high levels of α-defensins increased in IgAN patients (22.5%) compared to healthy controls (9.6%) (p = 0.013). The elevation of α-defensins in IgAN patients was independent of renal function or neutrophil count, which were major sources of α-defensins in circulation. More importantly, negative correlation was observed between galactose-deficient IgA1and α-defensins. Conclusion. As α-defensin is a lectin-like peptide, we speculated that it might be involved in IgA galactose deficiency. The data implied that patients with IgAN had higher plasma α-defensins levels and high α-defensins correlated with IgA galactose deficiency, further suggesting a pathogenic role of α-defensins in IgAN. PMID:27563166

  18. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, T A; Dias, A M; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, J M; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, C A; Pinho, S S

    2016-03-31

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell-cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression. PMID:26189796

  19. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, TA; Dias, AM; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, JM; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, CA; Pinho, SS

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell–cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression. PMID:26189796

  20. Aberrant Glycosylation in the Left Ventricle and Plasma of Rats with Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nagai-Okatani, Chiaki; Minamino, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Targeted proteomics focusing on post-translational modifications, including glycosylation, is a useful strategy for discovering novel biomarkers. To apply this strategy effectively to cardiac hypertrophy and resultant heart failure, we aimed to characterize glycosylation profiles in the left ventricle and plasma of rats with cardiac hypertrophy. Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats, a model of hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy, were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet starting at 6 weeks. As a result, they exhibited cardiac hypertrophy at 12 weeks and partially impaired cardiac function at 16 weeks compared with control rats fed a low-salt (0.3% NaCl) diet. Gene expression analysis revealed significant changes in the expression of genes encoding glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Glycoproteome profiling using lectin microarrays indicated upregulation of mucin-type O-glycosylation, especially disialyl-T, and downregulation of core fucosylation on N-glycans, detected by specific interactions with Amaranthus caudatus and Aspergillus oryzae lectins, respectively. Upregulation of plasma α-l-fucosidase activity was identified as a biomarker candidate for cardiac hypertrophy, which is expected to support the existing marker, atrial natriuretic peptide and its related peptides. Proteomic analysis identified cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3, a master regulator of cardiac muscle function, as an O-glycosylated protein with altered glycosylation in the rats with cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that alternations in O-glycosylation affect its oligomerization and function. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of significant changes in glycosylation pattern, specifically mucin-type O-glycosylation and core defucosylation, in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, suggesting that they are potential biomarkers for these diseases. PMID:27281159

  1. Aberrant Glycosylation in the Left Ventricle and Plasma of Rats with Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Nagai-Okatani, Chiaki; Minamino, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Targeted proteomics focusing on post-translational modifications, including glycosylation, is a useful strategy for discovering novel biomarkers. To apply this strategy effectively to cardiac hypertrophy and resultant heart failure, we aimed to characterize glycosylation profiles in the left ventricle and plasma of rats with cardiac hypertrophy. Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats, a model of hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy, were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet starting at 6 weeks. As a result, they exhibited cardiac hypertrophy at 12 weeks and partially impaired cardiac function at 16 weeks compared with control rats fed a low-salt (0.3% NaCl) diet. Gene expression analysis revealed significant changes in the expression of genes encoding glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Glycoproteome profiling using lectin microarrays indicated upregulation of mucin-type O-glycosylation, especially disialyl-T, and downregulation of core fucosylation on N-glycans, detected by specific interactions with Amaranthus caudatus and Aspergillus oryzae lectins, respectively. Upregulation of plasma α-l-fucosidase activity was identified as a biomarker candidate for cardiac hypertrophy, which is expected to support the existing marker, atrial natriuretic peptide and its related peptides. Proteomic analysis identified cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3, a master regulator of cardiac muscle function, as an O-glycosylated protein with altered glycosylation in the rats with cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that alternations in O-glycosylation affect its oligomerization and function. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of significant changes in glycosylation pattern, specifically mucin-type O-glycosylation and core defucosylation, in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, suggesting that they are potential biomarkers for these diseases. PMID:27281159

  2. Quantitative analysis of aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma by AAL-enrichment and MRM mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Kim, Yong-Sam; Oh, Na Ree; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Lee, Yeon Jung; Kim, Sung Ho; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2013-11-01

    A lectin-coupled mass spectrometry (MS) approach was employed to quantitatively monitor aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma. To do this, we compared the difference in the total protein abundance of a target glycoprotein between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) plasmas and hepatitis B virus (HBV) plasmas, as well as the difference in lectin-specific protein glycoform abundance of the target glycoprotein. Capturing the lectin-specific protein glycoforms from a plasma sample was accomplished by using a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) immobilized onto magnetic beads via a biotin-streptavidin conjugate. Following tryptic digestion of both the total plasma and its AAL-captured fraction of each HCC and HBV sample, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry was conducted quantitatively by a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique. From the MRM-based analysis of the total plasmas and AAL-captured fractions, differences between HCC and HBV plasma groups in fucosylated glycoform levels of target glycoproteins were confirmed to arise from both the change in the total protein abundance of the target proteins and the change incurred by aberrant fucosylation on target glycoproteins in HCC plasma, even when no significant change occurs in the total protein abundance level. Combining the MRM-based analysis method with the lectin-capturing technique proved to be a successful means of quantitatively investigating aberrant protein glycosylation in cancer plasma samples. Additionally, it was elucidated that the differences between HCC and control groups in fucosylated biomarker candidates A1AT and FETUA mainly originated from an increase in fucosylation levels on these target glycoproteins, rather than an increase in the total protein abundance of the target glycoproteins. PMID:24027776

  3. Aberrant glycosylation of the anti-Thomsen-Friedenreich glycotope immunoglobulin G in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kodar, Kristel; Izotova, Jelena; Klaamas, Kersti; Sergeyev, Boris; Järvekülg, Lilian; Kurtenkov, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study whether alterations in the glycosylation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) specific to the Thomsen-Friedenreich glycotope (TF) have diagnostic and prognostic potential in gastric cancer. METHODS: Serum samples were obtained from patients with histologically verified gastric carcinoma (n = 89), healthy blood donors (n = 40), and patients with benign stomach diseases (n = 22). The lectin-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based glycoprofiling of TF-specific IgG (anti-TF IgG) was performed using synthetic TF-polyacrylamide conjugate as antigen, total IgG purified by affinity chromatography on protein G sepharose, and lectins of various sugar specificities: mannose-specific concanavalin A (ConA), fucose-specific Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) and sialic acid-specific Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA). The sensitivity and specificity of the differences between cancer patients and controls were evaluated by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Overall survival was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Time-dependent ROC curve statistics were applied to determine cut-off values for survival analysis. All calculations and comparisons were performed using the GraphPad Prism 5 and SPSS 15.0 software. RESULTS: The level of TF-specific IgG was significantly increased in cancer patients compared with non-cancer controls (P < 0.001). This increase was pronounced mostly in stage 1 of the disease. Cancer patients showed a higher level of ConA binding to anti-TF-IgG (P < 0.05) and a very low level of SNA lectin binding (P = 0.0001). No appreciable stage-dependency of the binding of any lectin to anti-TF IgG was found. A strong positive correlation between the binding of AAL and SNA was found in all groups studied (r = 0.71-0.72; P < 0.0001). The changes in ConA reactivity were not related to those of the fucose- or sialic acid-specific lectin. Changes in the SNA binding index and the ConA/SNA binding ratio demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity for stomach

  4. Recent advances in the understanding and management of IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Kar Neng; Leung, Joseph C.K.; Tang, Sydney C.W.

    2016-01-01

    Since its first description in 1968, IgA nephropathy has remained the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis leading to chronic kidney disease in developed countries. The clinical progression varies, and consequent end-stage renal disease occurs in 30% to 40% of patients 20 to 30 years after the first clinical presentation. Current data implicate overproduction of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 as being pivotal in the induction of renal injury. Effective and specific treatment is still lacking, and new therapeutic approaches will be developed after better understanding the disease pathogenesis.

  5. Reactivities of N-acetylgalactosamine-specific lectins with human IgA1 proteins.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jennifer S; Kulhavy, Rose; Tomana, Milan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Brown, Rhubell; Hall, Stacy; Kilian, Mogens; Poulsen, Knud; Mestecky, Jiri; Julian, Bruce A; Novak, Jan

    2007-04-01

    Lectins are proteins with specificity of binding to certain monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. They can detect abnormal glycosylation patterns on immunoglobulins in patients with various chronic inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, lectins exhibit binding heterogeneity, depending on their source and methods of isolation. To characterize potential differences in recognition of terminal N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) on IgA1, we evaluated the binding characteristics of several commercial preparations of GalNAc-specific lectins using a panel of IgA1 and, as controls, IgA2 and IgG myeloma proteins. These lectins originated from snails Helix aspersa (HAA) and Helix pomatia (HPA), and the plant Vicia villosa (VV). Only HAA and HPA bound exclusively to IgA1, with its O-linked glycans composed of GalNAc, galactose, and sialic acid. In contrast, VV reacted with sugars of both IgA subclasses and IgG, indicating that it also recognized N-linked glycans without GalNAc. Furthermore, HAA and HPA from several manufacturers differed in their ability to bind various IgA1 myeloma proteins and other GalNAc-containing glycoproteins in ELISA and Western blot. For serum samples from IgAN patients, HAA was the optimal lectin to study IgA1 glycosylation in ELISA and Western blot assays, including identification of the sites of attachment of the aberrant glycans. The galactose-deficient glycans were site-specific, localized mostly at Thr228 and/or Ser230. Because of the heterogeneity of GalNAc-specific lectins, they should be carefully characterized with appropriate substrates before undertaking any study. PMID:17275907

  6. Aberrant Glycosylation of Anchor-Optimized MUC1 Peptides Can Enhance Antigen Binding Affinity and Reverse Tolerance to Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Pathangey, Latha B; Lakshminarayanan, Vani; Suman, Vera J; Pockaj, Barbara A; Mukherjee, Pinku; Gendler, Sandra J

    2016-01-01

    Cancer vaccines have often failed to live up to their promise, although recent results with checkpoint inhibitors are reviving hopes that they will soon fulfill their promise. Although mutation-specific vaccines are under development, there is still high interest in an off-the-shelf vaccine to a ubiquitous antigen, such as MUC1, which is aberrantly expressed on most solid and many hematological tumors, including more than 90% of breast carcinomas. Clinical trials for MUC1 have shown variable success, likely because of immunological tolerance to a self-antigen and to poor immunogenicity of tandem repeat peptides. We hypothesized that MUC1 peptides could be optimized, relying on heteroclitic optimizations of potential anchor amino acids with and without tumor-specific glycosylation of the peptides. We have identified novel MUC1 class I peptides that bind to HLA-A*0201 molecules with significantly higher affinity and function than the native MUC1 peptides. These peptides elicited CTLs from normal donors, as well as breast cancer patients, which were highly effective in killing MUC1-expressing MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Each peptide elicited lytic responses in greater than 6/8 of normal individuals and 3/3 breast cancer patients. The CTLs generated against the glycosylated-anchor modified peptides cross reacted with the native MUC1 peptide, STAPPVHNV, suggesting these analog peptides may offer substantial improvement in the design of epitope-based vaccines. PMID:27367740

  7. A Study of Aberrant Glycosylation in Simulated Microgravity Using Laser Induced AutoFluorescence and Flow Cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, B. DeSales

    1999-01-01

    A number of pathologies and cellular dysfunctions including neoplasms have been correlated with autofluorescence. The complications of aging and diabetes have been associated with the accumulation of non-enzymatic glycosylations of tissue macromolecules. These products are known as the Advanced Glycosylated End Products (AGEs). A physical property associated with AGEs is the emission of 570 mn or 630 nm light energy (autofluorescence) following the absorption of 448 mm energy associated with the argon laser. This investigation sought to assess the induction of argon-laser induced autofluorescence in a variety of in vitro culture systems. Different fluorescence intensities distinguished tumor lines from normal cell populations. Laser-stimulated autofluorescence discriminated primary cultures of lymphocytes grown in the presence of excess glucose as opposed to normal glucose concentrations. The effects of deglycosylating agents upon laser-induced autofluorescence were also assessed. The studies included studies of cell cycle analysis using Propidium Iodide stained DNA of cells grown in simulated microgravity using NASA Bioreactor Vessels in media of normal and elevated glucose concentrations.

  8. Analyzing antibody activity in IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Glassock, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is a chronic kidney disease defined by deposition of IgA in the glomeruli. An abnormality in the glycosylation of the hinge region of the IgA1 isotype of IgA is fundamental to the origins of this very common form of glomerulonephritis. In this issue of the JCI, Suzuki and coworkers describe the characteristics of IgG autoantibodies to the abnormally glycosylated IgA1 secreted by immortalized B cells derived from patients with sporadic forms of IgA nephropathy (see the related article beginning on page 1668). These IgG autoantibodies displayed remarkably restricted heterogeneity. These observations offer new insights into disease pathogenesis and may lead to new methods of diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy for patients with IgA nephropathy. PMID:19504718

  9. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN. PMID:27485391

  10. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN. PMID:27485391

  11. Solid-phase synthesis of a pentavalent GalNAc-containing glycopeptide (Tn antigen) representing the nephropathy-associated IgA hinge region

    PubMed Central

    Bolscher, Jan G.M.; Brevoord, Judith; Nazmi, Kamran; Ju, Tongzhong; Veerman, Enno C.I.; van Wijk, Joanna A. E.; Cummings, Richard D.; van Die, Irma

    2010-01-01

    Incomplete or aberrant glycosylation leading to Tn antigen (GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr) expression on human glycoproteins is strongly associated with human pathological conditions, including tumors, certain autoimmune diseases, such as the idiopathic IgA nephropathy, and may modulate immune homeostasis. In addition, the Tn antigen is highly expressed by certain pathogens and plays a role in host–pathogen interactions. To enable experimental approaches to study interactions of the Tn antigen with the immune system and analyse anti-Tn antibody responses in infection or disorders, we generated a Tn-expressing resource that can be used for high-throughput screening. In consideration of IgA nephropathy in which the hinge region is incompletely glycosylated, we used this hinge sequence that encodes five potential glycosylation sites as the ideal template for the synthesis of a Tn antigen expressing glycopeptide. Inclusion of an N-terminal biotin in the peptide enabled binding to streptavidin-coated ELISA plates as monitored using Helix pomatia agglutinin or anti-Tn monoclonal antibody. We also found that the biotinylated IgA-Tn peptide is a functional acceptor for β1-3-galactosylation using recombinant T-synthase (β1-3-galactosyltransferase). Besides its immunochemical functionality as a possible diagnostic tool for IgA nephropathy, the peptide is an excellent substrate for glycan elongation and represents a novel template applicable for glycan–antigen-associated diseases. PMID:20719305

  12. Development of a Model of Early-Onset IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Keiko; Suzuki, Yusuke; Otsuji, Mareki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Kihara, Masao; Kajiyama, Tadahiro; Hashimoto, Azusa; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Brown, Rhubell; Hall, Stacy; Novak, Jan; Izui, Shozo; Hirose, Sachiko

    2012-01-01

    ddY mice spontaneously develop IgA nephropathy (IgAN) with a variable age of disease onset. Establishing a model with early-onset IgAN could aid the investigation of mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of this disease. On the basis of histologic grading in serial biopsies, we previously classified ddY mice into early-onset, late-onset, and quiescent groups. Here, we selectively mated mice with the early-onset phenotype for >20 generations and established “grouped ddY” mice that develop IgAN within 8 weeks of age. Similar to human IgAN, the prognosis was worse for male mice than females. These mice homogeneously retained genotypes of four marker loci previously associated with the early-onset phenotype, confirming a close association of these loci with early-onset IgAN in ddY mice. Grouped ddY mice comprised two sublines, however, which had distinct genotypes at a susceptibility locus for high serum IgA levels, which maps within the Ig heavy-chain gene complex. The subline bearing the Igh-2a IgA allotype had a more rapid course of fatal disease and lower oligosaccharide content, suggesting that aberrant IgA glycosylation may promote the progression of murine IgAN. Taken together, these data indicate that grouped ddY mice may be a useful model for the identification of susceptibility genes and the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of human IgAN. PMID:22797187

  13. IgA myeloma presenting as Henoch-Schönlein purpura with nephritis.

    PubMed

    Zickerman, A M; Allen, A C; Talwar, V; Olczak, S A; Brownlee, A; Holland, M; Furness, P N; Brunskill, N J; Feehally, J

    2000-09-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) are both characterized by IgA-mediated tissue injury, including mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis. Abnormalities of IgA1 glycosylation are described in IgA nephropathy and HSP nephritis. IgA-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have been inconsistently described in the serum of patients with HSP. In IgA myeloma, the paraprotein-mediated renal lesion is typically cast nephropathy; IgAN or HSP have only rarely been reported in myeloma even when an IgA paraprotein is circulating in large concentrations. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with IgA myeloma who presented with HSP including nephritis and rapidly progressive renal failure. His IgA1 had altered O-glycosylation in the pattern seen in IgAN and also contained an IgA-ANCA. This case adds further weight to the evidence that IgA1 O-glycosylation abnormalities predispose to mesangial IgA deposition and also that IgA-ANCA may have a pathogenic role in the development of HSP. PMID:10977812

  14. Immunoglobulin A multiple myeloma presenting with Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with reduced sialylation of IgA1.

    PubMed

    Van Der Helm-Van Mil, Annette H M; Smith, Alice C; Pouria, Shideh; Tarelli, Edward; Brunskill, Nigel J; Eikenboom, Heroen C J

    2003-09-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is characterized by immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) depositions in blood vessels of the skin or in glomeruli, resulting from altered hinge region O-glycosylation. Henoch-Schönlein purpura is seldom reported as a complication of IgA1 myeloma, even when the circulating IgA concentration is very high. We report two patients with IgA1 myeloma presenting with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The O-glycosylation of these patients' IgA1 was studied. Both patients showed increased binding to peanut agglutinin lectin, suggesting a low degree of sialylation of the hinge region of IgA1 that was confirmed by mass spectrometry. IgA multiple myeloma, secreting IgA1 molecules with decreased sialylation, presenting with a Henoch-Schönlein purpura-like syndrome was diagnosed. PMID:12956761

  15. Serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels in children with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mengjie; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Rong, Liping; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Lizhi; Qiu, Zeting; Mo, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is an immunopathologic diagnosis based on a renal biopsy, it is characterized by deposits of IgA-containing immune complexes in the mesangium. Adults with IgAN have a galactose-deficient IgA1 in the circulation and glomerular deposition. There are few studies on the glycosylation of serum IgA1 in children with IgAN. To measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in pediatric patients with IgAN, 72 biopsy-proven IgAN children were divided into 3 groups based on the clinical features: isolated hematuria group (24 patients), hematuria and proteinuria group (22 patients), and nephritic syndrome group (26 patients). They were also divided into 3 groups according to pathologic grading: grade I + II group (25 patients), grade III group (33 patients) and grade IV + V group (14 patients). 30 healthy children were recruited as a control group. We used vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in all groups and controls. Serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in children with IgAN were higher than controls (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 among the different clinical and pathologic grading groups. The values of the area under the curve for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels were 0.976 (95% CI, 0.953-1.000). The cutoff point for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels was 0.125, with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 83.3%, with a positive predictive value of 92.6% and a negative predictive value of 73.5% (P < 0.01). Children with IgAN presented serum galactose-deficient IgA1, which has shown no relationship with the clinical manifestations and pathologic grading of the disease. Detection of serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels by vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has a certain clinical value in diagnosis of children with IgAN. PMID:26221341

  16. Serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels in children with IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mengjie; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Rong, Liping; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Lizhi; Qiu, Zeting; Mo, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is an immunopathologic diagnosis based on a renal biopsy, it is characterized by deposits of IgA-containing immune complexes in the mesangium. Adults with IgAN have a galactose-deficient IgA1 in the circulation and glomerular deposition. There are few studies on the glycosylation of serum IgA1 in children with IgAN. To measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in pediatric patients with IgAN, 72 biopsy-proven IgAN children were divided into 3 groups based on the clinical features: isolated hematuria group (24 patients), hematuria and proteinuria group (22 patients), and nephritic syndrome group (26 patients). They were also divided into 3 groups according to pathologic grading: grade I + II group (25 patients), grade III group (33 patients) and grade IV + V group (14 patients). 30 healthy children were recruited as a control group. We used vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in all groups and controls. Serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in children with IgAN were higher than controls (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 among the different clinical and pathologic grading groups. The values of the area under the curve for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels were 0.976 (95% CI, 0.953-1.000). The cutoff point for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels was 0.125, with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 83.3%, with a positive predictive value of 92.6% and a negative predictive value of 73.5% (P < 0.01). Children with IgAN presented serum galactose-deficient IgA1, which has shown no relationship with the clinical manifestations and pathologic grading of the disease. Detection of serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels by vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has a certain clinical value in diagnosis of children with IgAN. PMID:26221341

  17. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    PubMed

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. PMID:24139501

  18. The genetics and immunobiology of IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Novak, Jan

    2014-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) represents the leading cause of kidney failure among East Asian populations and the most frequent form of primary glomerulonephritis among Europeans. Patients with IgAN develop characteristic IgA1-containing immune complexes that deposit in the glomerular mesangium, producing progressive kidney injury. Recent studies define IgAN as an autoimmune trait of complex architecture with a strong genetic determination. This Review summarizes new insights into the role of the O-glycosylation pathway, anti-glycan immune response, mucosal immunity, antigen processing and presentation, and the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of IgAN. PMID:24892706

  19. IgA Nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure . [ Top ] How is kidney disease diagnosed? A health care provider diagnoses kidney disease ... levels Control Blood Pressure and Slow Progression of Kidney Disease People with IgA nephropathy that is causing high ...

  20. IgA nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... family history of IgA nephropathy or Henoch Schonlein purpura , a form of vasculitis that affects many parts ... End-stage kidney disease Hypersensitivity vasculitis Nephrotic syndrome Purpura Urine - bloody Update Date 9/22/2015 Updated ...

  1. Purification and characterization of chimeric human IgA1 and IgA2 expressed in COS and Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Morton, H C; Atkin, J D; Owens, R J; Woof, J M

    1993-11-01

    Ag-specific chimeric human IgA molecules, of the two human subclasses, IgA1 and IgA2, have been expressed in two mammalian cell systems. Analysis of the secreted IgA molecules, purified in milligram quantities from stable Chinese hamster ovary transfectants by Ag affinity chromatography, has allowed a direct comparison of the biologic properties of the two subclasses. HPLC gel filtration analysis revealed that in both subclasses, the IgA molecules associate predominantly into dimers. The monomer units are presumed to interact noncovalently, inasmuch as no dimers are evident when the antibodies are subjected to SDS-PAGE. The recombinant antibodies are glycosylated, inasmuch as a lectin blotting procedure revealed that the H chains of both subclasses are recognized by Con A. When subjected to digestion by preparations of IgA1-specific proteases secreted by two pathogenic streptococcal strains, Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus oralis, the recombinant IgA molecules behave just as their natural equivalents. Thus, only the chimeric IgA1 molecule is cleaved, with the IgA2 remaining intact. In terms of interaction with natural effector molecules, both recombinant IgA isotypes were shown to interact with Fc alpha receptors on calcitriol-stimulated HL-60 cells with similar affinity, but neither antibody was found to interact with human C1q. The expression system described readily permits manipulation of the human IgA genes, which should lead to a fuller molecular understanding of how this important antibody mediates its function. PMID:8409433

  2. IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Ralph C.; Abramowsky, Carlos R.; Tisher, C. Craig

    1974-01-01

    From a series of 470 specimens of renal tissue examined by immunofluorescence microscopy, 20 specimens were identified and studied in detail from patients without evidence of systemic disease in which IgA was the predominant localizing immunoglobulin. All patients presented with hematuria which was recurrent or persistent, often being exacerbated by upper respiratory infection. Most of the group pursued a benign clinical course with little evidence of decline in renal function. Histopathologic changes in renal biopsy specimens of most of the group consisted of a proliferative glomerulonephritis of variable intensity. Characteristic alterations were seen by electron microscopy which included the presence of electron-dense deposits within the mesangium, the hilar regions of the glomerulus and the basement membrane of Bowman's capsule. Evidence for activation of complement by the alternate pathway at C3 was found with properdin localization in 14 of 15 specimens and with the absence of detectable Clq and C4 in 15 specimens studied for these early acting components. It is concluded that the combined clinical, morphologic and immunologic findings warrant consideration of IgA nephropathy as a distinct clinicopathologic entity. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:4601708

  3. Transient Glyco-Engineering to Produce Recombinant IgA1 with Defined N- and O-Glycans in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Dicker, Martina; Tschofen, Marc; Maresch, Daniel; König, Julia; Juarez, Paloma; Orzaez, Diego; Altmann, Friedrich; Steinkellner, Herta; Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The production of therapeutic antibodies to combat pathogens and treat diseases, such as cancer is of great interest for the biotechnology industry. The recent development of plant-based expression systems has demonstrated that plants are well-suited for the production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with defined glycosylation. Compared to immunoglobulin G (IgG), less effort has been undertaken to express immunoglobulin A (IgA), which is the most prevalent antibody class at mucosal sites and a promising candidate for novel recombinant biopharmaceuticals with enhanced anti-tumor activity. Here, we transiently expressed recombinant human IgA1 against the VP8* rotavirus antigen in glyco-engineered ΔXT/FT Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Mass spectrometric analysis of IgA1 glycopeptides revealed the presence of complex biantennary N-glycans with terminal N-acetylglucosamine present on the N-glycosylation site of the CH2 domain in the IgA1 alpha chain. Analysis of the peptide carrying nine potential O-glycosylation sites in the IgA1 alpha chain hinge region showed the presence of plant-specific modifications including hydroxyproline formation and the attachment of pentoses. By co-expression of enzymes required for initiation and elongation of human O-glycosylation it was possible to generate disialylated mucin-type core 1 O-glycans on plant-produced IgA1. Our data demonstrate that ΔXT/FT N. benthamiana plants can be engineered toward the production of recombinant IgA1 with defined human-type N- and O-linked glycans. PMID:26858738

  4. The Origin and Activities of IgA1-Containing Immune Complexes in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Knoppova, Barbora; Reily, Colin; Maillard, Nicolas; Rizk, Dana V.; Moldoveanu, Zina; Mestecky, Jiri; Raska, Milan; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Julian, Bruce A.; Novak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis, frequently leading to end-stage renal disease, as there is no disease-specific therapy. IgAN is diagnosed from pathological assessment of a renal biopsy specimen based on predominant or codominant IgA-containing immunodeposits, usually with complement C3 co-deposits and with variable presence of IgG and/or IgM. The IgA in these renal deposits is galactose-deficient IgA1, with less than a full complement of galactose residues on the O-glycans in the hinge region of the heavy chains. Research from the past decade led to the definition of IgAN as an autoimmune disease with a multi-hit pathogenetic process with contributing genetic and environmental components. In this process, circulating galactose-deficient IgA1 (autoantigen) is bound by antiglycan IgG or IgA (autoantibodies) to form immune complexes. Some of these circulating complexes deposit in glomeruli, and thereby activate mesangial cells and induce renal injury through cellular proliferation and overproduction of extracellular matrix components and cytokines/chemokines. Glycosylation pathways associated with production of the autoantigen and the unique characteristics of the corresponding autoantibodies in patients with IgAN have been uncovered. Complement likely plays a significant role in the formation and the nephritogenic activities of these complexes. Complement activation is mediated through the alternative and lectin pathways and probably occurs systemically on IgA1-containing circulating immune complexes as well as locally in glomeruli. Incidence of IgAN varies greatly by geographical location; the disease is rare in central Africa but accounts for up to 40% of native-kidney biopsies in eastern Asia. Some of this variation may be explained by genetically determined influences on the pathogenesis of the disease. Genome-wide association studies to date have identified several loci associated with IgAN. Some of these loci are associated

  5. Polarization Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the polarization characteristics displayed by optical systems can be divided into two categories: geometrical and physical. Geometrical analysis calculates the change in polarization of a wavefront between pupils in an optical instrument. Physical analysis propagates the polarized fields wherever the geometrical analysis is not valid, i.e., near the edges of stops, near images, in anisotropic media, etc. Polarization aberration theory provides a starting point for geometrical design and facilitates subsequent optimization. The polarization aberrations described arise from differences in the transmitted (or reflected) amplitudes and phases at interfaces. The polarization aberration matrix (PAM) is calculated for isotropic rotationally symmetric systems through fourth order and includes the interface phase, amplitude, linear diattenuation, and linear retardance aberrations. The exponential form of Jones matrices used are discussed. The PAM in Jones matrix is introduced. The exact calculation of polarization aberrations through polarization ray tracing is described. The report is divided into three sections: I. Rotationally Symmetric Optical Systems; II. Tilted and Decentered Optical Systems; and Polarization Analysis of LIDARs.

  6. Pneumococcal IgA1 protease subverts specific protection by human IgA1.

    PubMed

    Janoff, E N; Rubins, J B; Fasching, C; Charboneau, D; Rahkola, J T; Plaut, A G; Weiser, J N

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases may sabotage the protective effects of IgA. In vitro, both exogenous and endogenously produced IgA1 protease inhibited phagocytic killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae by capsule-specific IgA1 human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) but not IgA2. These IgA1 proteases cleaved and reduced binding of the the effector Fcα1 heavy chain but not the antigen-binding F(ab)/light chain to pneumococcal surfaces. In vivo, IgA1 protease-resistant IgA2, but not IgA1 protease-sensitive IgA1, supported 60% survival in mice infected with wild-type S. pneumoniae. IgA1 hMAbs protected mice against IgA1 protease-deficient but not -producing pneumococci. Parallel mouse sera with human IgA2 showed more efficient complement-mediated reductions in pneumococci with neutrophils than did IgA1, particularly with protease-producing organisms. After natural human pneumococcal bacteremia, purified serum IgG inhibited IgA1 protease activity in 7 of 11 patients (64%). These observations provide the first evidence in vivo that IgA1 protease can circumvent killing of S. pneumoniae by human IgA. Acquisition of IgA1 protease-neutralizing IgG after infection directs attention to IgA1 protease both as a determinant of successful colonization and infection and as a potential vaccine candidate. PMID:23820749

  7. Protein Glycosylation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Ju, Tongzhong; Cummings, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Neoplastic transformation results in a wide variety of cellular alterations that impact the growth, survival, and general behavior of affected tissue. Although genetic alterations underpin the development of neoplastic disease, epigenetic changes can exert an equally significant effect on neoplastic transformation. Among neoplasia-associated epigenetic alterations, changes in cellular glycosylation have recently received attention as a key component of neoplastic progression. Alterations in glycosylation appear to not only directly impact cell growth and survival but also facilitate tumor-induced immunomodulation and eventual metastasis. Many of these changes may support neoplastic progression, and unique alterations in tumor-associated glycosylation may also serve as a distinct feature of cancer cells and therefore provide novel diagnostic and even therapeutic targets. PMID:25621663

  8. Glycosylation Engineering of Glycoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadamoto, Reiko; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    Naturally occurring glycosylation of glycoproteins varies in glycosylation site and in the number and structure of glycans. The engineering of well-defined glycoproteins is an important technology for the preparation of pharmaceutically relevant glycoproteins and in the study of the relationship between glycans and proteins on a structure-function level. In pharmaceutical applications of glycoproteins, the presence of terminal sialic acids on glycans is particularly important for the in vivo circulatory half life, since sialic acid-terminated glycans are not recognized by asialoglycoprotein receptors. Therefore, there have been a number of attempts to control or modify cellular metabolism toward the expression of glycoproteins with glycosylation profiles similar to that of human glycoproteins. In this chapter, recent methods for glycoprotein engineering in various cell culture systems (mammalian cells, plant, yeast, and E. coli) and advances in the chemical approach to glycoprotein formation are described.

  9. Glycosylation of Skeletal Calsequestrin

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Emiliano J.; Lewis, Kevin M.; Munske, Gerhard R.; Nissen, Mark S.; Kang, ChulHee

    2012-01-01

    Calsequestrin (CASQ) serves as a major Ca2+ storage/buffer protein in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). When purified from skeletal muscle, CASQ1 is obtained in its glycosylated form. Here, we have confirmed the specific site and degree of glycosylation of native rabbit CASQ1 and have investigated its effect on critical properties of CASQ by comparison with the non-glycosylated recombinant form. Based on our comparative approach utilizing crystal structures, Ca2+ binding capacities, analytical ultracentrifugation, and light-scattering profiles of the native and recombinant rabbit CASQ1, we propose a novel and dynamic role for glycosylation in CASQ. CASQ undergoes a unique degree of mannose trimming as it is trafficked from the proximal endoplasmic reticulum to the SR. The major glycoform of CASQ (GlcNAc2Man9) found in the proximal endoplasmic reticulum can severely hinder formation of the back-to-back interface, potentially preventing premature Ca2+-dependent polymerization of CASQ and ensuring its continuous mobility to the SR. Only trimmed glycans can stabilize both front-to-front and the back-to-back interfaces of CASQ through extensive hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions. Therefore, the mature glycoform of CASQ (GlcNAc2Man1–4) within the SR can be retained upon establishing a functional high capacity Ca2+ binding polymer. In addition, based on the high resolution structures, we propose a molecular mechanism for the catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT2) mutation, K206N. PMID:22170046

  10. Selective deficiency of IgA

    MedlinePlus

    Consider genetic counseling if you have a family history of selective IgA deficiency and you plan to have children. If ... Genetic counseling may be of value to prospective parents with a family history of selective IgA deficiency.

  11. IgA nephropathy and infections.

    PubMed

    Rollino, Cristiana; Vischini, Gisella; Coppo, Rosanna

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we concentrate on the role of infections in IgA nephropathy both from a pathogenetic and clinic point of view. The current hypotheses as regards the role of infections in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy are: (a) role of particular pathogens, (b) chronic exposure to mucosal infections, (c) abnormal handling of commensal microbes (gut microbiota). We also focus on particular infections reported in association with classic IgA nephropathy (HIV, malaria, Chlamydia, Lyme disease), as well as on IgA dominant-infection-associated glomerulonephritis. This is a unique form of glomerulonephritis, where IgA deposition is dominant. It is mostly recognized in old, diabetic patients and in association with staphylococcal infection. PMID:26800970

  12. Gram-Negative Flagella Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Protein glycosylation had been considered as an eccentricity of a few bacteria. However, through advances in analytical methods and genome sequencing, it is now established that bacteria possess both N-linked and O-linked glycosylation pathways. Both glycosylation pathways can modify multiple proteins, flagellins from Archaea and Eubacteria being one of these. Flagella O-glycosylation has been demonstrated in many polar flagellins from Gram-negative bacteria and in only the Gram-positive genera Clostridium and Listeria. Furthermore, O-glycosylation has also been demonstrated in a limited number of lateral flagellins. In this work, we revised the current advances in flagellar glycosylation from Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the structural diversity of glycans, the O-linked pathway and the biological function of flagella glycosylation. PMID:24557579

  13. Cleavage of a Recombinant Human Immunoglobulin A2 (IgA2)-IgA1 Hybrid Antibody by Certain Bacterial IgA1 Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Bernard W.; Dunlop, James I.; Batten, Margaret R.; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M.

    2000-01-01

    To understand more about the factors influencing the cleavage of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) by microbial IgA1 proteases, a recombinant human IgA2/IgA1 hybrid molecule was generated. In the hybrid, termed IgA2/A1 half hinge, a seven-amino-acid sequence corresponding to one half of the duplicated sequence making up the IgA1 hinge was incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA2. Insertion of the IgA1 half hinge into IgA2 did not affect antigen binding capacity or the functional activity of the hybrid molecule, as judged by its ability to bind to IgA Fcα receptors and trigger respiratory bursts in neutrophils. Although the IgA2/A1 hybrid contained only half of the IgA1 hinge, it was found to be cleaved by a variety of different bacterial IgA1 proteases, including representatives of those that cleave IgA1 in the different duplicated halves of the hinge, namely, those of Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. sanguis, Neisseria meningitidis types 1 and 2, N. gonorrhoeae types 1 and 2, and Haemophilus influenzae type 2. Thus, for these enzymes the recognition site for IgA1 cleavage is contained within half of the IgA1 hinge region; additional distal elements, if required, are provided by either an IgA1 or an IgA2 framework. In contrast, the IgA2/A1 hybrid appeared to be resistant to cleavage with S. oralis and some H. influenzae type 1 IgA1 proteases, suggesting these enzymes require additional determinants for efficient substrate recognition. PMID:10639405

  14. Cleavage of a recombinant human immunoglobulin A2 (IgA2)-IgA1 hybrid antibody by certain bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Dunlop, J I; Batten, M R; Kilian, M; Woof, J M

    2000-02-01

    To understand more about the factors influencing the cleavage of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) by microbial IgA1 proteases, a recombinant human IgA2/IgA1 hybrid molecule was generated. In the hybrid, termed IgA2/A1 half hinge, a seven-amino-acid sequence corresponding to one half of the duplicated sequence making up the IgA1 hinge was incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA2. Insertion of the IgA1 half hinge into IgA2 did not affect antigen binding capacity or the functional activity of the hybrid molecule, as judged by its ability to bind to IgA Fcalpha receptors and trigger respiratory bursts in neutrophils. Although the IgA2/A1 hybrid contained only half of the IgA1 hinge, it was found to be cleaved by a variety of different bacterial IgA1 proteases, including representatives of those that cleave IgA1 in the different duplicated halves of the hinge, namely, those of Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. sanguis, Neisseria meningitidis types 1 and 2, N. gonorrhoeae types 1 and 2, and Haemophilus influenzae type 2. Thus, for these enzymes the recognition site for IgA1 cleavage is contained within half of the IgA1 hinge region; additional distal elements, if required, are provided by either an IgA1 or an IgA2 framework. In contrast, the IgA2/A1 hybrid appeared to be resistant to cleavage with S. oralis and some H. influenzae type 1 IgA1 proteases, suggesting these enzymes require additional determinants for efficient substrate recognition. PMID:10639405

  15. CagA, a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, promotes the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Man; Li, Fu-gang; Xie, Xi-sheng; Wang, Shao-qing; Fan, Jun-ming

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA decreased the expression of C1GALT1 and its chaperone Cosmc in DAKIKI cells. • Helicobacter pylori infection may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN via CagA. - Abstract: While Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is closely associated with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study was to investigate the effect of cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA), a major virulence factor of Hp, on the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in the B cell line DAKIKI cells. Cells were cultured and treated with recombinant CagA protein. We found that CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Moreover, CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1, which at least partly attributed to the downregulation of β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and its chaperone Cosmc. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Hp infection, at least via CagA, may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN by influencing the production and glycosylation of IgA1 in B cells.

  16. Insights on N-glycosylation of human haptoglobin and its association with cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Shang, Shuxin; Li, Wei; Qin, Xue; Liu, Yinkun

    2016-07-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most significant post-translation modifications and plays a critical role in various biological functions. Haptoglobin (Hp) is one of the acute-phase response proteins secreted by liver. Its glycosylation could be analyzed by many analytical techniques qualitatively and quantitatively. The glycosylation alterations of Hp are reported to be associated with different kinds of diseases. The main glycosylation alterations of Hp in cancer appear to be the presence of aberrantly fucosylated and sialylated structures as well as increased branching. In this mini review, we provided a brief overview of Hp structure and biological function, discussed its glycosylation alterations in different cancers, and described the existing technologies for analyzing glycosylation site and glycan of Hp. Given the importance of Hp glycosylation, its unknown and unclear biological complexity and significances, Hp glycosylation has become a major target in cancer research. Development of sensitive and specific detection of Hp glycosylation including large-scale validation may be significant steps forward to its clinical application. PMID:26873173

  17. Glycosylation of conotoxins.

    PubMed

    Gerwig, Gerrit J; Hocking, Henry G; Stöcklin, Reto; Kamerling, Johannis P; Boelens, Rolf

    2013-03-01

    Conotoxins are small peptides present in the venom of cone snails. The snail uses this venom to paralyze and capture prey. The constituent conopeptides display a high level of chemical diversity and are of particular interest for scientists as tools employed in neurological studies and for drug development, because they target with exquisite specificity membrane receptors, transporters, and various ion channels in the nervous system. However, these peptides are known to contain a high frequency and variability of post-translational modifications-including sometimes O-glycosylation-which are of importance for biological activity. The potential application of specific conotoxins as neuropharmalogical agents and chemical probes requires a full characterization of the relevant peptides, including the structure of the carbohydrate part. In this review, the currently existing knowledge of O-glycosylation of conotoxins is described. PMID:23455513

  18. Quantitative Glycoproteomics Analysis Reveals Changes in N-Glycosylation Level Associated with Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation plays an important role in epithelial cancers, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However, little is known about the glycoproteome of the human pancreas or its alterations associated with pancreatic tumorigenesis. Using quantitative glycoproteomics approach, we investigated protein N-glycosylation in pancreatic tumor tissue in comparison with normal pancreas and chronic pancreatitis tissue. The study lead to the discovery of a roster of glycoproteins with aberrant N-glycosylation level associated with pancreatic cancer, including mucin-5AC (MUC5AC), carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5), insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP3), and galectin-3-binding protein (LGALS3BP). Pathway analysis of cancer-associated aberrant glycoproteins revealed an emerging phenomenon that increased activity of N-glycosylation was implicated in several pancreatic cancer pathways, including TGF-β, TNF, NF-kappa-B, and TFEB-related lysosomal changes. In addition, the study provided evidence that specific N-glycosylation sites within certain individual proteins can have significantly altered glycosylation occupancy in pancreatic cancer, reflecting the complexity of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer-associated glycosylation events. PMID:24471499

  19. Longitudinal monitoring of immunoglobulin A glycosylation during pregnancy by simultaneous MALDI-FTICR-MS analysis of N- and O-glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Bondt, Albert; Nicolardi, Simone; Jansen, Bas C.; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Blank, Dennis; Kammeijer, Guinevere S. M.; Kozak, Radoslaw P.; Fernandes, Daryl L.; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.; van der Burgt, Yuri E. M.; Dolhain, Radboud J. E. M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a glycoprotein of which altered glycosylation has been associated with several pathologies. Conventional methods for IgA N- and O-glycosylation analysis are tedious, thus limiting such analyses to small sample sizes. Here we present a high-throughput strategy for the simultaneous analysis of serum-derived IgA1 N- and O-glycopeptides using matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (MALDI-FTICR) mass spectrometry (MS). Six non-fucosylated diantennary complex type glycoforms were detected on the Asn144-containing glycopeptide. Thirteen distinct glycoforms were identified for the Asn340-containing tailpiece glycopeptide, mainly of the diantennary complex type, and low amounts of triantennary glycoforms. Simultaneously with these N-glycopeptides, 53 compositional glycoforms of the hinge region O-glycopeptide were profiled in a single high resolution MALDI-FTICR spectrum. Since many pregnancy associated changes have been recognized for immunoglobulin G, we sought to demonstrate the clinical applicability of this method in a cohort of 29 pregnant women, from whom samples were collected at three time points during pregnancy and three time points after delivery. Pregnancy associated changes of N-glycan bisection were different for IgA1 as compared to IgG-Fc described earlier. We foresee further applications of the developed method for larger patient cohorts to study IgA N- and O-glycosylation changes in pathologies. PMID:27302155

  20. Longitudinal monitoring of immunoglobulin A glycosylation during pregnancy by simultaneous MALDI-FTICR-MS analysis of N- and O-glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Bondt, Albert; Nicolardi, Simone; Jansen, Bas C; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Blank, Dennis; Kammeijer, Guinevere S M; Kozak, Radoslaw P; Fernandes, Daryl L; Hensbergen, Paul J; Hazes, Johanna M W; van der Burgt, Yuri E M; Dolhain, Radboud J E M; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a glycoprotein of which altered glycosylation has been associated with several pathologies. Conventional methods for IgA N- and O-glycosylation analysis are tedious, thus limiting such analyses to small sample sizes. Here we present a high-throughput strategy for the simultaneous analysis of serum-derived IgA1 N- and O-glycopeptides using matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (MALDI-FTICR) mass spectrometry (MS). Six non-fucosylated diantennary complex type glycoforms were detected on the Asn144-containing glycopeptide. Thirteen distinct glycoforms were identified for the Asn340-containing tailpiece glycopeptide, mainly of the diantennary complex type, and low amounts of triantennary glycoforms. Simultaneously with these N-glycopeptides, 53 compositional glycoforms of the hinge region O-glycopeptide were profiled in a single high resolution MALDI-FTICR spectrum. Since many pregnancy associated changes have been recognized for immunoglobulin G, we sought to demonstrate the clinical applicability of this method in a cohort of 29 pregnant women, from whom samples were collected at three time points during pregnancy and three time points after delivery. Pregnancy associated changes of N-glycan bisection were different for IgA1 as compared to IgG-Fc described earlier. We foresee further applications of the developed method for larger patient cohorts to study IgA N- and O-glycosylation changes in pathologies. PMID:27302155

  1. Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Immunoglobulin ... of immunoglobulin A, one of the most common antibodies in the body. Antibodies are proteins made by ...

  2. Targeted Biomarker Discovery by High Throughput Glycosylation Profiling of Human Plasma Alpha1-Antitrypsin and Immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Koeleman, Carolien A. M.; Uh, Hae-Won; Stam, Jord C.; van Heemst, Diana; Maier, Andrea B.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation patterns are known to show vast genetic as well as physiological and pathological variation and represent a large pool of potential biomarkers. Large-scale studies are needed for the identification and validation of biomarkers, and the analytical techniques required have recently been developed. Such methods have up to now mainly been applied to complex mixtures of glycoproteins in biofluids (e.g. plasma). Here, we analyzed N-glycosylation profiles of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) enriched fractions by 96-well microtitration plate based high-throughput immuno-affinity capturing and N-glycan analysis using multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CGE-LIF). Human plasma samples were from the Leiden Longevity Study comprising 2415 participants of different chronological and biological ages. Glycosylation patterns of AAT enriched fractions were found to be associated with chronological (calendar) age and they differed between females and males. Moreover, several glycans in the AAT enriched fraction were associated with physiological parameters marking cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Pronounced differences were found between males and females in the glycosylation profiles of IgA enriched fractions. Our results demonstrate that large-scale immuno-affinity capturing of proteins from human plasma using a bead-based method combined with high-throughput N-glycan analysis is a powerful tool for the discovery of glycosylation-based biomarker candidates. PMID:24039863

  3. Lack of cleavage of immunoglobulin A (IgA) from rhesus monkeys by bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Reinholdt, J; Kilian, M

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases cleaving IgA1 and secretory IgA1 molecules in the hinge region are believed to be important virulence factors. Previous studies have indicated that IgA of humans, gorillas, and chimpanzees are the exclusive substrates of these enzymes. In a recent study, IgA from the rhesus monkey was found to be susceptible to the IgA1 protease activity of Streptococcus pneumoniae. In an attempt to reproduce this observation, we found that neither five isolates of S. pneumoniae nor other IgA1 protease-producing bacteria representing different cleavage specificities caused cleavage of rhesus monkey IgA. Hence, the rhesus monkey does not appear to be a suitable animal model for studies of IgA1 proteases as virulence factors. Images PMID:2037384

  4. Altered expression of natively glycosylated dystroglycan in pediatric solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Laura T.; Glass, Matthew; Dosunmu, Eniolami; Martin, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Altered glycosylation and/or expression of dystroglycan have been reported in forms of congenital muscular dystrophy as well as in cancers of the breast, colon, and oral epithelium. To date, however, there has been no study of the expression of dystroglycan in pediatric solid tumors. Using a combination of immunostaining on tissue microarrays and immunoblotting of snap-frozen unfixed tissues, we demonstrate a significant reduction in native α dystroglycan expression in pediatric alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), embryonal RMS, neuroblastoma (NBL), and medulloblastoma, whereas expression of β dystroglycan, which is cotranslated with α dystroglycan, is largely unchanged. Loss of native α dystroglycan expression was significantly more pronounced in stage 4 NBL than in pooled samples of stage 1 and stage 2 NBL, suggesting that loss of native α dystroglycan expression increases with advancing tumor stage. Neuroblastoma and RMS samples with reduced expression of native α dystroglycan also showed reduced laminin binding in laminin overlay experiments. Expression of natively glycosylated α dystroglycan was not altered in several other pediatric tumor types when compared with appropriate normal tissue controls. These data provide the first evidence that α dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding to α dystroglycan are altered in certain pediatric solid tumors and suggest that aberrant dystroglycan glycosylation may contribute to tumor cell biology in patients with RMS, medulloblastoma, and NBL. PMID:17640712

  5. Glycosylation of Conotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Gerwig, Gerrit J.; Hocking, Henry G.; Stöcklin, Reto; Kamerling, Johannis P.; Boelens, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Conotoxins are small peptides present in the venom of cone snails. The snail uses this venom to paralyze and capture prey. The constituent conopeptides display a high level of chemical diversity and are of particular interest for scientists as tools employed in neurological studies and for drug development, because they target with exquisite specificity membrane receptors, transporters, and various ion channels in the nervous system. However, these peptides are known to contain a high frequency and variability of post-translational modifications—including sometimes O-glycosylation—which are of importance for biological activity. The potential application of specific conotoxins as neuropharmalogical agents and chemical probes requires a full characterization of the relevant peptides, including the structure of the carbohydrate part. In this review, the currently existing knowledge of O-glycosylation of conotoxins is described. PMID:23455513

  6. The solution structures of native and patient monomeric human IgA1 reveal asymmetric extended structures: implications for function and IgAN disease

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Gar Kay; Wright, David W.; Vennard, Owen L.; Rayner, Lucy E.; Pang, Melisa; Yeo, See Cheng; Gor, Jayesh; Molyneux, Karen; Barratt, Jonathan; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Native IgA1, for which no crystal structure is known, contains an O-galactosylated 23-residue hinge region that joins its Fab and Fc regions. IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a leading cause of chronic kidney disease in developed countries. Because IgA1 in IgAN often has a poorly O-galactosylated hinge region, the solution structures of monomeric IgA1 from a healthy subject and three IgAN patients with four different O-galactosylation levels were studied. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that all four IgA1 samples were monomeric with similar sedimentation coefficients, s020,w. X-ray scattering showed that the radius of gyration (Rg) slightly increased with IgA1 concentration, indicating self-association, although their distance distribution curves, P(r), were unchanged with concentration. Neutron scattering indicated similar Rg values and P(r) curves, although IgA1 showed a propensity to aggregate in heavy water buffer. A new atomistic modelling procedure based on comparisons with 177000 conformationally-randomized IgA1 structures with the individual experimental scattering curves revealed similar extended Y-shaped solution structures for all four differentially-glycosylated IgA1 molecules. The final models indicated that the N-glycans at Asn263 were folded back against the Fc surface, the C-terminal tailpiece conformations were undefined and hinge O-galactosylation had little effect on the solution structure. The solution structures for full-length IgA1 showed extended hinges and the Fab and Fc regions were positioned asymmetrically to provide ample space for the functionally-important binding of two FcαR receptors to its Fc region. Whereas no link between O-galactosylation and the IgA1 solution structure was detected, an increase in IgA1 aggregation with reduced O-galactosylation may relate to IgAN. PMID:26268558

  7. Site-specific glycosylation of secretory immunoglobulin A from human colostrum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jincui; Guerrero, Andres; Parker, Evan; Strum, John S; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2015-03-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) is a major glycoprotein in milk and plays a key role in mediating immune protection of the gut mucosa. Although it is a highly glycosylated protein, its site-specific glycosylation and associated glycan micro-heterogeneity have still not been fully elucidated. In this study, the site-specific glycosylation of sIgA isolated from human colostrum (n = 3) was analyzed using a combination of LC-MS and LC-MS/MS and in-house software (Glycopeptide Finder). The majority of the glycans found are biantennary structures with one or more acidic Neu5Ac residues; however, a large fraction belonged to truncated complex structures with terminal GlcNAc. Multiple glycosites were identified with nearly 30 glycan compositions located at seven sites on the secretory component, six compositions at a single site on the J chain, and 16 compositions at five sites on the IgA heavy (H) chain. Site-specific heterogeneity and relative quantitation of each composition and the extent of occupation at each site were determined using nonspecific proteases. Additionally, 54 O-linked glycan compositions located at the IgA1 hinge region (HR) were identified by comparison against a theoretical O-glycopeptide library. This represents the most comprehensive report to date detailing the complexity of glycan micro-heterogeneity with relative quantitation of glycoforms for each glycosylation site on milk sIgA. This strategy further provides a general method for determining site-specific glycosylation in large protein complexes. PMID:25629924

  8. Nephrotic syndrome is a rare manifestation of IGA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Alshomar, Ahmad A

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is a rare presentation of IgA nephropathy. The degree of proteinuria in IgA nephropathy predicts poor prognosis. We herein report a teenager with IGA nephropathy, the nephrotic syndrome and segmental glomerular scars who after developing complications from high dose corticosteroid therapy was successfully treated with tacrolimus and low dose prednisone. PMID:27610069

  9. Cloning and structural analysis of two highly divergent IgA isotypes, IgA1 and IgA2 from the duck billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Vernersson, M; Belov, K; Aveskogh, M; Hellman, L

    2010-01-01

    To trace the emergence of modern IgA isotypes during vertebrate evolution we have studied the immunoglobulin repertoire of a model monotreme, the platypus. Two highly divergent IgA-like isotypes (IgA1 and IgA2) were identified and their primary structures were determined from full-length cDNAs. A comparative analysis of the amino acid sequences for IgA from various animal species showed that the two platypus IgA isotypes form a branch clearly separated from their eutherian (placental) counterparts. However, they still conform to the general structure of eutherian IgA, with a hinge region and three constant domains. This indicates that the deletion of the second domain and the formation of a hinge region in IgA did occur very early during mammalian evolution, more than 166 million years ago. The two IgA isotypes in platypus differ in primary structure and appear to have arisen from a very early gene duplication, possibly preceding the metatherian eutherian split. Interestingly, one of these isotypes, IgA1, appears to be expressed in only the platypus, but is present in the echidna based on Southern blot analysis. The platypus may require a more effective mucosal immunity, with two highly divergent IgA forms, than the terrestrial echidna, due to its lifestyle, where it is exposed to pathogens both on land and in the water. PMID:19913303

  10. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  11. [IgA deficiency and Addison's disease].

    PubMed

    Petite, J

    1982-01-30

    A case of Addison's disease and selective IgA deficiency in a 15-year-old male is discussed. The etiology of Addison's disease in this case is unknown. Investigation of HLA-antigens in the family does not yield the usual pattern of autoimmune diseases. Nevertheless, this very rare association does not appear to be fortuitous. PMID:7071576

  12. Host mucin glycosylation plays a role in bacterial adhesion in lungs of individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Packer, Nicolle H; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten

    2013-10-01

    Malfunction of the cell surface glycoprotein, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, is the molecular hallmark of cystic fibrosis (CF), causing salt imbalance across the lung epithelium and biochemical and biophysical alterations of the mucous secretion and airway surfaces. Abnormal glycosylation of both secreted and membrane-tethered airway mucins in CF hosts are reported by a substantial body of literature and correlates with bacterial infection and inflammation in CF airways, features that are linked to the CF pathology. It is established that Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other CF-typic bacteria use the altered host mucin glycosylation as receptors for adhesion by dedicated lectins and adhesins recognizing an array of the aberrantly expressed glycan determinants. This review aims to describe the aberrant mucin glycosylation phenotype observed in CF airways relative to the non-CF equivalent by summarizing the wealth of literature on this topic. The possible causes and effects of altered glycosylation in the respiratory system are discussed. Specific attention is given to the adhesion mechanisms of the opportunistic P. aeruginosa, which utilizes the molecular alterations of the lung to gain access to the normally sterile airways. Finally, the emerging glycosylation-based therapeutics that show promising potential for reducing bacterial infection in individuals with CF by molecular mimicry mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24138697

  13. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  14. Structure and function relationships in IgA.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Russell, M W

    2011-11-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) has a critical role in immune defense particularly at the mucosal surfaces, and is equipped to do so by the unique structural attributes of its heavy chain and by its ability to polymerize. Here, we provide an overview of human IgA structure, describing the distinguishing features of the IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses and mapping the sites of interaction with host receptors important for IgA's functional repertoire. Remarkably, these same interaction sites are targeted by binding proteins and proteases produced by various pathogens as a means to subvert the protective IgA response. As interest in the prospect of therapeutic IgA-based monoclonal antibodies grows, the emerging understanding of the relationship between IgA structure and function will be invaluable for maximizing the potential of these novel reagents. PMID:21937984

  15. Role of IgA receptors in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Sebastian M; Papista, Christina; Chemouny, Jonathan M; Berthelot, Laureline; Monteiro, Renato C

    2016-02-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) or Berger's disease is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis in the world and one of the first causes of end-stage renal failure. IgAN is characterized by the accumulation of immune complexes containing polymeric IgA1 in mesangial areas. The pathogenesis of this disease involves the deposition of polymeric and hypogalactosylated IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) in the mesangium. Quantitative and structural changes of Gd-IgA1 play a key role in the development of the disease due to functional abnormalities of two IgA receptors: the FcαRI (CD89) expressed by blood myeloid cells and the transferrin receptor (CD71) on mesangial cells. Abnormal Gd-IgA1 induces release of soluble CD89, which participates in the formation of circulating IgA1 complexes. These complexes are trapped by CD71 that is overexpressed on mesangial cells in IgAN patients together with the crosslinking enzyme transglutaminase 2 allowing pathogenic IgA complex formation in situ and mesangial cell activation. A humanized mouse model expressing IgA1 and CD89 develops IgAN in a similar manner as patients. In this model, a food antigen, the gliadin, was shown to be crucial for circulating IgA1 complex formation and deposition, which could be prevented by a gluten-free diet. Identification of these new partners opens new therapeutic prospects for IgAN treatment. PMID:26572664

  16. Glycosylation-Based Serum Biomarkers for Cancer Diagnostics and Prognostics

    PubMed Central

    Kirwan, Alan; Utratna, Marta; O'Dwyer, Michael E.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second most common cause of death in developed countries with approximately 14 million newly diagnosed individuals and over 6 million cancer-related deaths in 2012. Many cancers are discovered at a more advanced stage but better survival rates are correlated with earlier detection. Current clinically approved cancer biomarkers are most effective when applied to patients with widespread cancer. Single biomarkers with satisfactory sensitivity and specificity have not been identified for the most common cancers and some biomarkers are ineffective for the detection of early stage cancers. Thus, novel biomarkers with better diagnostic and prognostic performance are required. Aberrant protein glycosylation is well known hallmark of cancer and represents a promising source of potential biomarkers. Glycoproteins enter circulation from tissues or blood cells through active secretion or leakage and patient serum is an attractive option as a source for biomarkers from a clinical and diagnostic perspective. A plethora of technical approaches have been developed to address the challenges of glycosylation structure detection and determination. This review summarises currently utilised glycoprotein biomarkers and novel glycosylation-based biomarkers from the serum glycoproteome under investigation as cancer diagnostics and for monitoring and prognostics and includes details of recent high throughput and other emerging glycoanalytical techniques. PMID:26509158

  17. Corticosteroid therapy in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jicheng; Xu, Damin; Perkovic, Vlado; Ma, Xinxin; Johnson, David W; Woodward, Mark; Levin, Adeera; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Haiyan

    2012-06-01

    The benefits and risks of steroids for the treatment of IgA nephropathy remain uncertain. We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for randomized, controlled trials of corticosteroid therapy for IgA nephropathy published between 1966 and March 2011. We identified nine relevant trials that included 536 patients who had urinary protein excretion >1 g/d and normal renal function. Forty-six (8.6%) of these patients developed a kidney failure event, defined as doubling of the serum creatinine/halving of the GFR or ESRD. Overall, steroid therapy was associated with a lower risk for kidney failure (relative risk, 0.32 [95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15-0.67]; P=0.002) and a reduction in proteinuria (weighted mean difference, -0.46 g/d [95% CI, -0.63 to -0.29 g/d]), with no evidence of heterogeneity in these outcomes. Subgroup analysis suggested that the dose modifies the effect of steroids for renal protection (P for heterogeneity=0.030): Relatively high-dose and short-term therapy (prednisone >30 mg/d or high-dose pulse intravenous methylprednisolone with duration ≤1 year) produced significant renal protection, whereas low-dose, long-term steroid use did not. Steroid therapy was associated with a 55% higher risk for adverse events. The quality of included studies was low, however, limiting the generalizability of the results. In conclusion, steroids appear to provide renal protection in patients with IgA nephropathy but increase the risk for adverse events. Reliably defining the efficacy and safety of steroids in IgA nephropathy requires a high-quality trial with a large sample size. PMID:22539830

  18. Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Lynne A.; Krasnewich, Donna

    2013-01-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a rapidly growing group of inborn errors of metabolism that result from defects in the synthesis of glycans. Glycosylation is a major post-translational protein modification and an estimated 2% of the human genome encodes proteins for glycosylation. The molecular bases for the current 60…

  19. The Aberration Corrected SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, David C.

    2005-09-09

    The performance of the conventional low-energy CD-SEM is limited by the aberrations inherent in the probe forming lens. Multi-pole correctors are now available which can reduce or eliminate these aberrations. An SEM equipped with such a corrector offers higher spatial resolution and more probe current from a given electron source, and other aspects of the optical performance are also improved, but the much higher numerical aperture associated with an aberration corrected lens results in a reduction in imaging depth of field.

  20. Explanatory style and Immunoglobulin A (IgA).

    PubMed

    Brennan, F X; Charnetski, C J

    2000-01-01

    The construct of explanatory style has been related to numerous aspects of human psychology, including health. Our research has focused on the effects of various psychological variables on the immune system, in particular Immunoglobulin A (IgA). We had participants fill out the Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ), the predominant measure of explanatory style, and assayed saliva samples for secretory IgA. No relationship was observed between overall ASQ score and IgA, or composite optimism score and IgA. However, we observed significant negative correlations between both the composite pessimism score and IgA, as well as the hopelessness score and IgA. Pessimistic explanatory style may therefore be related to immune system deficits and poor health. PMID:11330488

  1. Biochemical and functional characterization of glycosylation-associated mutational landscapes in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venkitachalam, Srividya; Revoredo, Leslie; Varadan, Vinay; Fecteau, Ryan E.; Ravi, Lakshmeswari; Lutterbaugh, James; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Willis, Joseph E.; Gerken, Thomas A.; Guda, Kishore

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of aberrant protein glycosylation, a pathological alteration widespread in colorectal cancers (CRC), and the mechanisms by which it contributes to tumor progression remain largely unknown. We performed targeted re-sequencing of 430 glycosylation-associated genes in a series of patient-derived CRC cell lines (N = 31) and matched primary tumor tissues, identifying 12 new significantly mutated glycosylation-associated genes in colon cancer. In particular, we observed an enrichment of mutations in genes (B3GNT2, B4GALT2, ST6GALNAC2) involved in the biosynthesis of N- and Cores 1–3 O-linked glycans in the colon, accounting for ~16% of the CRCs tested. Analysis of independent large-scale tumor tissue datasets confirmed recurrent mutations within these genes in colon and other gastrointestinal cancers. Systematic biochemical and phenotypic characterization of the candidate wild-type and mutant glycosyltransferases demonstrated these mutations as either markedly altering protein localization, post-translational modification, encoded enzymatic activities and/or the migratory potential of colon carcinoma cells. These findings suggest that functionally deleterious mutations in glycosyltransferase genes in part underlie aberrant glycosylation, and contribute to the pathogenesis of molecular subsets of colon and other gastrointestinal malignancies. PMID:27004849

  2. Golgi glycosylation and human inherited diseases.

    PubMed

    Freeze, Hudson H; Ng, Bobby G

    2011-09-01

    The Golgi factory receives custom glycosylates and dispatches its cargo to the correct cellular locations. The process requires importing donor substrates, moving the cargo, and recycling machinery. Correctly glycosylated cargo reflects the Golgi's quality and efficiency. Genetic disorders in the specific equipment (enzymes), donors (nucleotide sugar transporters), or equipment recycling/reorganization components (COG, SEC, golgins) can all affect glycosylation. Dozens of human glycosylation disorders fit these categories. Many other genes, with or without familiar names, well-annotated pedigrees, or likely homologies will join the ranks of glycosylation disorders. Their broad and unpredictable case-by-case phenotypes cross the traditional medical specialty boundaries. The gene functions in patients may be elusive, but their common feature may include altered glycosylation that provide clues to Golgi function. This article focuses on a group of human disorders that affect protein or lipid glycosylation. Readers may find it useful to generalize some of these patient-based, translational observations to their own research. PMID:21709180

  3. Golgi Glycosylation and Human Inherited Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, Hudson H.; Ng, Bobby G.

    2011-01-01

    The Golgi factory receives custom glycosylates and dispatches its cargo to the correct cellular locations. The process requires importing donor substrates, moving the cargo, and recycling machinery. Correctly glycosylated cargo reflects the Golgi's quality and efficiency. Genetic disorders in the specific equipment (enzymes), donors (nucleotide sugar transporters), or equipment recycling/reorganization components (COG, SEC, golgins) can all affect glycosylation. Dozens of human glycosylation disorders fit these categories. Many other genes, with or without familiar names, well-annotated pedigrees, or likely homologies will join the ranks of glycosylation disorders. Their broad and unpredictable case-by-case phenotypes cross the traditional medical specialty boundaries. The gene functions in patients may be elusive, but their common feature may include altered glycosylation that provide clues to Golgi function. This article focuses on a group of human disorders that affect protein or lipid glycosylation. Readers may find it useful to generalize some of these patient-based, translational observations to their own research. PMID:21709180

  4. A bioinformatics prediction approach towards analyzing the glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/MUC1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Rajkumar S.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-02-01

    Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA or MUC1) is a heavily glycosylated, type I transmembrane glycoprotein commonly expressed by epithelial cells of duct organs. It has been shown to be aberrantly glycosylated in several diseases including cancer. Protein sequence based annotation and analysis of glycosylation profile of glycoproteins by robust computational and comprehensive algorithms provides possible insights to the mechanism(s) of anomalous glycosylation. In present report, by using a number of bioinformatics applications we studied EMA/MUC1 and explored its trans-membrane structural domain sequence that is widely subjected to glycosylation. Exploration of different extracellular motifs led to prediction of N and O-linked glycosylation target sites. Based on the putative O-linked target sites, glycosylated moieties and pathways were envisaged. Furthermore, Protein network analysis demonstrated physical interaction of EMA with a number of proteins and confirmed its functional involvement in cell growth and proliferation pathways. Gene Ontology analysis suggested an involvement of EMA in a number of functions including signal transduction, protein binding, processing & transport along with glycosylation. Thus, present study explored potential of bioinformatics prediction approach in analyzing glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of EMA/MUC1 glycoprotein.

  5. A bioinformatics prediction approach towards analyzing the glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/MUC1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Rajkumar S. Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-02-27

    Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA or MUC1) is a heavily glycosylated, type I transmembrane glycoprotein commonly expressed by epithelial cells of duct organs. It has been shown to be aberrantly glycosylated in several diseases including cancer. Protein sequence based annotation and analysis of glycosylation profile of glycoproteins by robust computational and comprehensive algorithms provides possible insights to the mechanism(s) of anomalous glycosylation. In present report, by using a number of bioinformatics applications we studied EMA/MUC1 and explored its trans-membrane structural domain sequence that is widely subjected to glycosylation. Exploration of different extracellular motifs led to prediction of N and O-linked glycosylation target sites. Based on the putative O-linked target sites, glycosylated moieties and pathways were envisaged. Furthermore, Protein network analysis demonstrated physical interaction of EMA with a number of proteins and confirmed its functional involvement in cell growth and proliferation pathways. Gene Ontology analysis suggested an involvement of EMA in a number of functions including signal transduction, protein binding, processing and transport along with glycosylation. Thus, present study explored potential of bioinformatics prediction approach in analyzing glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of EMA/MUC1 glycoprotein.

  6. Proteolytic Cleavage Driven by Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Kötzler, Miriam P; Withers, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of human host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) to its mature form was recently shown, unexpectedly, to occur in a UDP-GlcNAc-dependent fashion within the transferase active site of O-GlcNAc-transferase (OGT) (Lazarus, M. B., Jiang, J., Kapuria, V., Bhuiyan, T., Janetzko, J., Zandberg, W. F., Vocadlo, D. J., Herr, W., and Walker, S. (2013) Science 342, 1235-1239). An interesting mechanism involving formation and then intramolecular rearrangement of a covalent glycosyl ester adduct of the HCF-1 polypeptide was proposed to account for this unprecedented proteolytic activity. However, the key intermediate remained hypothetical. Here, using a model enzyme system for which the formation of a glycosyl ester within the enzyme active site has been shown unequivocally, we show that ester formation can indeed lead to proteolysis of the adjacent peptide bond, thereby providing substantive support for the mechanism of HCF-1 processing proposed. PMID:26515062

  7. Neurology of inherited glycosylation disorders

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, HH; Eklund, E A; Ng, BG; Patterson, M C

    2013-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation comprise most of the nearly 70 genetic disorders known to be caused by impaired synthesis of glycoconjugates. The effects are expressed in most organ systems, and most involve the nervous system. Typical manifestations include structural abnormalities, (eg, rapidly progressive cerebellar atrophy), myopathies (including congenital muscular dystrophies and limb-girdle dystrophies), strokes and stroke-like episodes, epileptic seizures, developmental delay, and demyelinating neuropathy. Patients can have neurological symptoms associated with coagulopathies, immune dysfunction with or without infections, and cardiac, renal, or hepatic failure, which are common features of glycosylation disorders. The diagnosis of congenital disorders of glycosylation should be considered for any patient with multisystem disease and in those with more specific phenotypic features. Measurement of concentrations of selected glycoconjugates can be used to screen for many of these disorders, and molecular diagnosis is becoming more widely available in clinical practice. Disease-modifying treatments are available for only a few disorders, but all affected individuals benefit from early diagnosis and aggressive management. PMID:22516080

  8. Abnormalities of the IgA immune system in members of unrelated pedigrees from patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schena, F P; Scivittaro, V; Ranieri, E; Sinico, R; Benuzzi, S; Di Cillo, M; Aventaggiato, L

    1993-01-01

    In the last few years many investigators have reported the recurrence of primary IgA nephropathy (IgAN) or the presence of persistent microhaematuria and/or proteinuria in family members of patients with IgAN. Our study was undertaken to investigate the relevance of abnormalities in the regulation of the IgA and IgM immune system in microhaematuric and asymptomatic family members of IgAN patients. Fifty-four out of 120 members of nine unrelated pedigrees were examined by urinalysis; polymeric IgA (pIgA), IgA rheumatoid factor (IgARF), IgA1-IgG immune complexes (IgA 1-IgG IC) and IgA 1-IgM IC, and other immunoglobulins were measured in serum samples. Moreover, we studied the production of immunoglobulins, pIgA and IgARF by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in basal conditions and after pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulation. Our data demonstrate that persistent microhaematuria was present in 24% of relatives. High serum levels of IgA, mainly pIgA and IgARF, IgA 1-IgG IC and IgA 1-IgM IC occurred in 66% of relatives. Abnormal spontaneous production of IgA by PBMC and after PWM stimulation was present in 64% of family members. Interestingly, high serum levels of IgM and abnormal production of this immunoglobulin by PBMC were observed in relatives. However, the immunological abnormalities did not correlate in any way with the presence of urinary abnormalities such as microhaematuria, which was most likely determined by an underlying glomerular alteration. PMID:8467558

  9. Salivary IgA antibody to glucosyltransferase in man.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Taubman, M A; Ebersole, J L

    1985-01-01

    Parotid salivas of 97 young adults were screened for IgA antibody to glucosyltransferase (GTF) from laboratory strains of Streptococcus mutans (serotypes c and g). Antibody levels to GTF from serotype c positively correlated with levels to serotype g GTF among these salivas. GTF's were prepared from S. mutans obtained from a subset of individuals in this population. All but one saliva showed IgA antibody activity to all of the GTF tested. In addition, the relative magnitude of each subject's antibody level was generally the highest to the GTF from their own S. mutans. Fractions, enriched for IgA by ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration, showed patterns of functional inhibition of GTF activity which were consistent with patterns of IgA antibody activity in ELISA of unfractionated salivas. These data indicate that detectable levels of IgA antibody to S. mutans GTF exist in many young adult salivas, while this IgA antibody activity reacts with GTF from different biotypes, subjects generally show the highest secretory IgA antibody levels to their own GTF, and the relative amount of IgA antibody to GTF and the ability to inhibit GTF activity are roughly correlated. PMID:2931224

  10. NEUROLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN GLYCOSYLATION DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, Hudson H.; Eklund, Erik A.; Ng, Bobby G.; Patterson, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    This review will present principles of glycosylation, describe the relevant glycosylation pathways and their related disorders, and highlight some of the neurological aspects and issues that continue to challenge researchers. Over 100 rare human genetic disorders that result from deficiencies in the different glycosylation pathways are known today. Most of these disorders impact the central and/or peripheral nervous systems. Patients typically have developmental delay/intellectual disability, hypotonia, seizures, neuropathy, and metabolic abnormalities in multiple organ systems. Between these disorders there is great clinical diversity because all cell types differentially glycosylate proteins and lipids. The patients have hundreds of mis-glycosylated products afflicting a myriad of processes including cell signaling, cell-cell interaction and cell migration. This vast complexity in glycan composition and function, along with limited analytic tools has impeded the identification of key glycosylated molecules that cause pathologies, and to date few critical target proteins have been pinpointed. PMID:25840006

  11. Exposures influencing total IgA level in colostrum.

    PubMed

    Munblit, D; Sheth, S; Abrol, P; Treneva, M; Peroni, D G; Chow, L-Y; Boner, A L; Pampura, A; Warner, J O; Boyle, R J

    2016-02-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a predominant immunoglobulin present in human breast milk and is known to play an important role in infant gut immunity maturation. Breast milk composition varies between populations, but the environmental and maternal factors responsible for these variations are still unclear. We examined the relationship between different exposures and levels of IgA in colostrum. The objective of this study was to examine whether exposures analysed influence levels of IgA in colostrum. The present study used 294 colostrum samples from the MecMilk International cohort, collected from women residing in London, Moscow and Verona. Samples were analysed in automated Abbott Architect Analyser. We found an inverse correlation between time postpartum and colostrum total IgA level (r=-0.49, P<0.001). Adjusting for maternal parity, smoking, fresh fruit and fish consumption and allergen sensitization, multiple regression model showed that IgA levels were influenced by colostrum collection time (P<0.0001) and country of collection (P<0.01). Mode of delivery influence did not appear to be significant in univariate comparisons, once adjusted for the above maternal characteristics it showed a significant influence on total IgA (P=0.01). We conclude that the concentration of IgA in colostrum drops rapidly after birth and future studies should always consider this factor in analysis. IgA concentration varied significantly between countries, with the highest level detected in Moscow and lowest in Verona. Mode of delivery effect should be confirmed on larger cohorts. Further work is needed to determine ways to correct for IgA decline over time in colostrum, and to find the cause of variations in IgA levels between the countries. PMID:26387688

  12. Comparative characterization of the iga gene encoding IgA1 protease in Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Lomholt, H; Poulsen, K; Kilian, M

    1995-02-01

    Cloning and sequencing of the IgA1 protease gene (iga) from Neisseria meningitidis strain HF13 showed an overall structure equivalent to iga genes from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae, although no region corresponding to the gonococcal alpha-peptide was evident. An additional 18 N. meningitidis and 3 H. influenzae iga genes were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction technique and sequenced corresponding approximately to the N-terminal half of the mature enzyme. Comparative analyses of a total of 29 iga genes showed that pathogenic Neisseria have iga genes with a significantly lower degree of heterogeneity than H. influenzae iga genes. Recombinational events indicated by mosaic-like structures corresponding to those found among N. gonorrhoeae protease genes were detected among N. meningitidis iga genes. One region showed characteristic differences in sequence and length which correlated with each of the different cleavage specificities. Meningococci were extremely conserved in this region with no evidence of recombination between isolates of different cleavage specificities. Sequences further downstream showed no obvious relationship with enzyme cleavage type. This region consisted of conserved areas interspersed with highly variable areas. Amino acid sequence homologies in the variable regions of meningococci reflected the antigenic types defined by using polyclonal neutralizing antibodies. PMID:7783620

  13. The influences of hinge length and composition on the susceptibility of human IgA to cleavage by diverse bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, Bernard W; Woof, Jenny M

    2005-06-15

    The influences of IgA hinge length and composition on its susceptibility to cleavage by bacterial IgA1 proteases were examined using a panel of IgA hinge mutants. The IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus sanguis strains SK4 and SK49, Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Haemophilus influenzae cleaved IgA2-IgA1 half hinge, an Ab featuring half of the IgA1 hinge incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA1 protease-resistant IgA2, whereas those of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and S. sanguis strain SK1 did not. Hinge length reduction by removal of two of the four C-terminal proline residues rendered IgA2-IgA1 half hinge resistant to all streptococcal IgA1 metalloproteinases but it remained sensitive to cleavage by the serine-type IgA1 proteases of Neisseria and Haemophilus spp. The four C-terminal proline residues could be substituted by alanine residues or transferred to the N-terminal extremity of the hinge without affect on the susceptibility of the Ab to cleavage by serine-type IgA1 proteases. However, their removal rendered the Ab resistant to cleavage by all the IgA1 proteases. We conclude that the serine-type IgA1 proteases of Neisseria and Haemophilus require the Fab and Fc regions to be separated by at least ten (or in the case of N. gonorrhoeae type I protease, nine) amino acids between Val(222) and Cys(241) (IgA1 numbering) for efficient access and cleavage. By contrast, the streptococcal IgA1 metalloproteinases require 12 or more appropriate amino acids between the Fab and Fc to maintain a minimum critical distance between the scissile bond and the start of the Fc. PMID:15944283

  14. Synthesis of oligosaccharides using per-O-trimethylsilyl-glycosyl iodides as glycosyl donor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Cui, Yanli; Zou, Rong; Cheng, Zhaodong; Yao, Weirong; Mao, Yangyi; Zhang, Yongmin

    2016-06-01

    Trimethylsilyl (TMS) protecting group has been found to be very useful for the simultaneous protection of both the glycosyl donor- and the acceptor-substrates in oligosaccharide synthesis. Thus, while the per-O-trimethylsilylated glycosyl iodides served as the glycosyl donor, those bearing selectively exposed primary hydroxyl groups were found suitable as the glycosyl acceptor for the reaction. The cheap and commercially available trialkylamine, triethylamine was found to be an effective promoter for the glycosylation. Importantly, the reaction was α-stereospecific and gave the products in 58%-78% yields. PMID:27077820

  15. IgA immunoassay for the diagnosis of bancroftian filariasis.

    PubMed

    Chanteau, S; Cartel, J L; Martin, P M

    1992-06-01

    In some parasitic infection such as toxoplasmosis, specific IgA is a highly reliable marker of active infection. In bancroftian filariasis, only 10 of 20 (50%) and 3 of 20 (15%) of the microfilaremic patients were positive for IgA anti-Brugia malayi using respectively indirect ELISA and immunocapture ELISA tests. As regard to these low sensitivities, the detection of specific IgA is unlikely to be a useful test for the diagnosis of active Wuchereria bancrofti infection. PMID:1519028

  16. Presence of secretory IgA in human periapical lesions.

    PubMed

    Torres, J O; Torabinejad, M; Matiz, R A; Mantilla, E G

    1994-02-01

    The concentration of secretory IgA in fluids present in the canals of 33 teeth was determined by the rocket immunoelectrophoresis technique. Except for the presence or absence of communication between the oral cavity and the root canals of the affected teeth, no other clinical finding showed significant statistical correlation with the presence of secretory IgA. The canals which were open to the oral flora had significantly higher concentrations of secretory IgA. Leaving canals open to the oral cavity may result in formation of periapical cysts. PMID:8006572

  17. Glycosylation enables aesculin to activate Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyun Ha; Park, Hyunsu; Park, Hee Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Hwa; Sadikot, Ruxana T; Cha, Jaeho; Joo, Myungsoo

    2016-01-01

    Since aesculin, 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin-6-O-β-glucopyranoside, suppresses inflammation, we asked whether its anti-inflammatory activity is associated with the activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key anti-inflammatory factor. Our results, however, show that aesculin marginally activated Nrf2. Since glycosylation can enhance the function of a compound, we then asked whether adding a glucose makes aesculin activate Nrf2. Our results show that the glycosylated aesculin, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin, robustly activated Nrf2, inducing the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes, such as heme oxygenase-1, glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 in macrophages. Mechanistically, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin suppressed ubiquitination of Nrf2, retarding degradation of Nrf2. Unlike aesculin, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin significantly suppressed neutrophilic lung inflammation, a hallmark of acute lung injury (ALI), in mice, which was not recapitulated in Nrf2 knockout mice, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory function of the compound largely acts through Nrf2. In a mouse model of sepsis, a major cause of ALI, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin significantly enhanced the survival of mice, compared with aesculin. Together, these results show that glycosylation could confer the ability to activate Nrf2 on aesculin, enhancing the anti-inflammatory function of aesculin. These results suggest that glycosylation can be a way to improve or alter the function of aesculin. PMID:27417293

  18. Glycosylation enables aesculin to activate Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyun Ha; Park, Hyunsu; Park, Hee Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Hwa; Sadikot, Ruxana T.; Cha, Jaeho; Joo, Myungsoo

    2016-01-01

    Since aesculin, 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin-6-O-β-glucopyranoside, suppresses inflammation, we asked whether its anti-inflammatory activity is associated with the activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key anti-inflammatory factor. Our results, however, show that aesculin marginally activated Nrf2. Since glycosylation can enhance the function of a compound, we then asked whether adding a glucose makes aesculin activate Nrf2. Our results show that the glycosylated aesculin, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin, robustly activated Nrf2, inducing the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes, such as heme oxygenase-1, glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 in macrophages. Mechanistically, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin suppressed ubiquitination of Nrf2, retarding degradation of Nrf2. Unlike aesculin, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin significantly suppressed neutrophilic lung inflammation, a hallmark of acute lung injury (ALI), in mice, which was not recapitulated in Nrf2 knockout mice, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory function of the compound largely acts through Nrf2. In a mouse model of sepsis, a major cause of ALI, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin significantly enhanced the survival of mice, compared with aesculin. Together, these results show that glycosylation could confer the ability to activate Nrf2 on aesculin, enhancing the anti-inflammatory function of aesculin. These results suggest that glycosylation can be a way to improve or alter the function of aesculin. PMID:27417293

  19. Chemoenzymatic Fc Glycosylation via Engineered Aldehyde Tags

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glycoproteins with chemically defined glycosylation sites and structures are important biopharmaceutical targets and critical tools for glycobiology. One approach toward constructing such molecules involves chemical glycosylation of aldehyde-tagged proteins. Here, we report the installation of a genetically encoded aldehyde tag at the internal glycosylation site of the crystallizable fragment (Fc) of IgG1. We replaced the natural Fc N-glycosylation sequon with a five amino-acid sequence that was efficiently converted by recombinant formylglycine generating enzyme in vitro, thereby introducing aldehyde groups for subsequent chemical elaboration. Oxime-linked glycoconjugates were synthesized by conjugating aminooxy N-acetylglucosamine to the modified Fc followed by enzymatic transfer of complex N-glycans from corresponding glycan oxazolines by an EndoS-derived glycosynthase. In this manner we generated specific Fc glycoforms without relying on natural protein glycosylation machineries. PMID:24702330

  20. Molecular Insights into the Pathogenesis of IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Robert, Thomas; Berthelot, Laureline; Cambier, Alexandra; Rondeau, Eric; Monteiro, Renato C

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the leading form of primary glomerulonephritis associated with end-stage renal failure, requiring either dialysis or renal transplantation. Microscopic hematuria and proteinuria are the most common presentations, and mesangial cell proliferation with IgA deposition are found in renal biopsies. There is growing evidence that IgAN is an immune complex (IC)-mediated disease. To date, three key molecules have been implicated in IC formation, correlating with disease progression/recurrence after transplantation: galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1), IgG anti-Gd-IgA1 antibodies, and soluble CD89 (an Fc receptor for IgA). This review examines recent data on the role of these molecular players in IgAN. Understanding these factors is essential because such knowledge could lead to improved strategies for the future management of patients with IgAN. PMID:26614735

  1. Induction of Fc receptors for IgA on murine T cell hybridoma by human monoclonal IgA and by high molecular weight IgA in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Chevailler, A; Monteiro, R C; Daëron, M; Lesavre, P

    1987-01-01

    A reproducible immunocyto-adherence assay has been developed to study the modulation of Fc receptors for IgA (Fc alpha R), using a murine T cell hybridoma (T2D4), which expresses Fc receptors for all known isotypes of secreted immunoglobulins. By using sheep red blood cells coated with the hapten 2-4-6 trinitrophenyl (TNP), as indicator cells, and a murine monoclonal IgA (MOPC 315) antibody with anti-TNP activity, we were able to study the Fc alpha R on T2D4 cells. We found that: (a) murine Fc alpha R can bind human monoclonal IgA, and this binding is isotype specific since it was inhibited by human monoclonal IgA but not by human monoclonal IgG or IgM; (b) the expression of murine Fc alpha R is unducible by human monoclonal IgA, and this effect is isotype specific since it is not observed with human monoclonal IgM or IgG (c) sera from patients with IgA nephropathy can also induce Fc alpha R expression; by contrast, no induction was observed with normal human sera, (d) in one serum from an IgA-nephropathy patient, the inducer factor was characterized by affinity chromatography on anti-IgA-Sepharose and by gel filtration: high molecular weight IgA, probably IgA aggregates or immune complexes were recognized to be responsible for the induction of murine Fc alpha R expression. PMID:3497739

  2. [Scarring linear IgA dermatosis in the adult].

    PubMed

    Kurz, K; Mahrle, G

    1986-10-15

    A 54-year-old woman had a six-months history of a scarring blistering disease with clinical signs of dermatitis herpetiformis and bullous pemphigoid. Direct immunofluorescence examination showed homogeneously linear deposits of IgA along the dermo-epidermal junction. Electron microscopic studies revealed blistering above and beneath the lamina densa. Referring to this new case of a scarring linear IgA disease we discuss some other forms of scarring bullous diseases in adults. PMID:3541412

  3. Lewisy Promotes Migration of Oral Cancer Cells by Glycosylation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ling; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Chang, Chuan-Fa; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation changes normal cellular functions and represents a specific hallmark of cancer. Lewisy (Ley) carbohydrate upregulation has been reported in a variety of cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). A high level of Ley expression is related to poor prognosis of patients with oral cancer. However, it is unclear how Ley mediates oral cancer progression. In this study, the role of Ley in OSCC was explored. Our data showed that Ley was upregulated in HSC-3 and OC-2 OSCC cell lines. Particularly, glycosylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with Ley was found in OC-2 cells, and this modification was absent upon inhibition of Ley synthesis. The absence of Ley glycosylation of EGFR weakened phosphorylation of AKT and ERK in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF). Additionally, EGF-triggered cell migration was reduced, but cell proliferation was not affected. Ley modification stabilized EGFR upon ligand activation. Conversely, absence of Ley glycosylation accelerated EGFR degradation. In summary, these results indicate that increased expression of Ley in OSCC cells is able to promote cell migration by modifying EGFR which in turn stabilizes EGFR expression and downstream signaling. Targeting Ley on EGFR could have a potential therapeutic effect on oral cancer. PMID:25799278

  4. The Treatment of IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Kar Neng; Leung, Joseph C.K.; Tang, Sydney C.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a very common glomerulonephritis worldwide. Nevertheless, treatment options for primary IgAN are still largely based on opinion or weak evidence. There is a lack of large randomized controlled trials (RCT) that provide a definitive immunosuppressive protocol for IgAN. The recent KDIGO Clinical Practice Guidelines for Glomerulonephritis have assigned low levels of evidence for almost all recommendations and suggestions related to this nephropathy. Summary In this article, we review different treatment options and emphasize that the key to therapeutic decision-making is the assessment of an individual's prognosis. The risk of disease progression is closely related to clinical parameters such as proteinuria, hypertension, and impaired glomerular filtration rate. For patients with minor urinary abnormalities, the mainstay of treatment is long-term regular follow-up to detect renal progression and hypertension. Optimized supportive care aiming to maintain proteinuria <1 g/day is preferred in the typical patient presenting with microhematuria, significant but nonnephrotic proteinuria, hypertension, and variable degrees of renal failure. The atypical patient with overt nephritic syndrome or rapidly progressive kidney injury that represents a vasculitic form of IgAN should be treated with immunosuppression. Finally, the variant of overlapping syndrome of IgAN and lipoid nephrosis that runs a good prognosis should be treated as lipoid nephrosis. Key Message The treatment of IgAN should be structured according to the clinical scenario.

  5. Metabolic Syndrome in IgA Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kaartinen, Kati; Syrjänen, Jaana; Pörsti, Ilkka; Harmoinen, Aimo; Huhtala, Heini; Mustonen, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Metabolic syndrome (MetS) may have an independent impact on the development of chronic kidney disease. This study examines the prevalence of MetS in subjects with IgA glomerulonephritis (IgAGN) and its impact on disease progression in a retrospective fashion. Patients and Methods Altogether, 174 subjects (104 males) were examined 11 years (first visit) after IgAGN diagnosis and again after 16 years (second visit; 144 subjects responded). Different glomerular filtration markers were utilized. The MetS criteria by Alberti et al. [Circulation 2009;120:1640-1645] were applied, in which the presence of any three of five risk factors (elevated waist circumference, triglycerides, glucose, existence of hypertension, or reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) constitutes the diagnosis. Results The prevalence of MetS at the first visit was 39%, corresponding to that of the general Finnish population. In univariate analyses, MetS was significantly associated with the progression of IgAGN at the second visit. However, in multivariate analyses, the existence of MetS was not a significant prognostic determinant. Conclusion The number of subjects with MetS among IgAGN patients and the general population is equal in Finland. MetS does not seem to be an independent prognostic variable. PMID:25337083

  6. Antigenic heterogeneity of IgA anti-GBM disease: new renal targets of IgA autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Ho, Julie; Gibson, Ian W; Zacharias, James; Fervenza, Fernando; Colon, Selene; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2008-10-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease is an aggressive form of glomerulonephritis, usually mediated by immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies to the noncollagenous (NC1) domain of alpha 3(IV) collagen. Less is known about the target antigen(s) in patients with atypical anti-GBM disease involving IgA autoantibodies. We report a new case of IgA anti-GBM disease in a patient with a history of proliferative lupus nephritis who presented with increasing creatinine levels, proteinuria, and hematuria, but no clinical or serological evidence of lupus recurrence. Renal biopsy showed focal and segmental necrotizing glomerulonephritis with strong linear capillary loop IgA staining by means of immunofluorescence. Serological test results were negative for IgG or IgA autoantibodies against the alpha 3NC1 domain. By means of immunoblotting, IgA from patient serum bound to 38- to 48-kd antigens collagenase-solubilized from human GBM, but not to purified NC1 domains of GBM collagen IV. The target of patient's IgA autoantibodies thus was identified as a novel GBM antigen, distinct from the alpha 3NC1 domain or other known targets of anti-GBM IgA autoantibodies. Clinical resolution was attained by means of conventional treatment with steroids and cyclophosphamide. The diversity of antigens recognized by anti-GBM IgA autoantibodies highlights the importance of renal biopsy for the reliable diagnosis of this rare condition because conventional serological immunoassays likely would yield false-negative results. PMID:18752876

  7. The Fab and Fc fragments of IgA1 exhibit a different arrangement from that in IgG: a study by X-ray and neutron solution scattering and homology modelling.

    PubMed

    Boehm, M K; Woof, J M; Kerr, M A; Perkins, S J

    1999-03-12

    Human immunoglobulin A (IgA) is an abundant antibody that mediates immune protection at mucosal surfaces as well as in plasma. The IgA1 isotype contains two four-domain Fab fragments and a four-domain Fc fragment analogous to that in immunoglobulin G (IgG), linked by a glycosylated hinge region made up of 23 amino acid residues from each of the heavy chains. IgA1 also has two 18 residue tailpieces at the C terminus of each heavy chain in the Fc fragment. X-ray scattering using H2O buffers and neutron scattering using 100 % 2H2O buffers were performed on monomeric IgA1 and a recombinant IgA1 that lacks the tailpiece (PTerm455). The radii of gyration RG from Guinier analyses were similar at 6.11-6.20 nm for IgA1 and 5.84-6.16 nm for PTerm455, and their cross-sectional radii of gyration RXS were also similar. The similarity of the RG and RXS values suggests that the tailpiece of IgA1 is not extended outwards in solution. The IgA1 RG values are higher than those for IgG, and the distance distribution function P(r) showed two distinct peaks, whereas a single peak was observed for IgG. Both results show that the hinge of IgA1 results in an extended Fab and Fc arrangement that is different from that in IgG. Automated curve-fit searches constrained by homology models for the Fab and Fc fragments were used to model the experimental IgA1 scattering curves. A translational search to optimise the relative arrangement of the Fab and Fc fragments held in a fixed orientation resembling that in IgG was not successful in fitting the scattering data. A new molecular dynamics curve-fit search method generated IgA1 hinge structures to which the Fab and Fc fragments could be connected in any orientation. A search based on these identified a limited family of IgA1 structures that gave good curve fits to the experimental data. These contained extended hinges of length about 7 nm that positioned the Fab-to-Fab centre-to-centre separation 17 nm apart while keeping the corresponding Fab

  8. Surface expression and function of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channels are controlled by asparagine-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Norbert; Black, Stefanie A G; Bladen, Chris; Chen, Lina; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2013-08-01

    Low-voltage-activated T-type calcium channels play important roles in neuronal physiology where they control cellular excitability and synaptic transmission. Alteration in T-type channel expression has been linked to various pathophysiological conditions such as pain arising from diabetic neuropathy. In the present study, we looked at the role of asparagine (N)-linked glycosylation on human Cav3.2 T-type channel expression and function. Manipulation of N-glycans on cells expressing a recombinant Cav3.2 channel revealed that N-linked glycosylation is critical for proper functional expression of the channel. Using site-directed mutagenesis to disrupt the canonical N-linked glycosylation sites of Cav3.2 channel, we show that glycosylation at asparagine N192 is critical for channel expression at the surface, whereas glycosylation at asparagine N1466 controls channel activity. Moreover, we demonstrate that N-linked glycosylation of Cav3.2 not only controls surface expression and activity of the channel but also underlies glucose-dependent potentiation of T-type Ca(2+) current. Our data suggest that N-linked glycosylation of T-type channels may play an important role in aberrant upregulation of T-type channel activity in response to glucose elevations. PMID:23503728

  9. Conformational implications of asparagine-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed Central

    Imperiali, B; Rickert, K W

    1995-01-01

    The effects of cotranslational protein modification on the process of protein folding are poorly understood. Time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer has been used to assess the impact of glycosylation on the conformational dynamics of flexible oligopeptides. The peptide sequences examined are selected from glycoproteins of known three-dimensional structure. The energy transfer modulation associated with N-linked glycosylation is consistent with the glycopeptides sampling different conformational profiles in water. Results show that glycosylation causes the modified peptides to adopt a different ensemble of conformations, and for some peptides this change may lead to conformations that are more compact and better approximate the conformation of these peptides in the final folded protein. This result further implies that cotranslational glycosylation can trigger the timely formation of structural nucleation elements and thus assist in the complex process of protein folding. PMID:7816856

  10. Harnessing Glycosylation to Improve Cellulase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Beckham, G. T.; Dai, Z.; Matthews, J. F.; Momany, M.; Payne, C. M.; Adney, W. S.; Baker, S. E.; Himmel, M. E.

    2012-06-01

    Cellulases and hemicellulases are responsible for the turnover of plant cell wall polysaccharides in the biosphere, and thus form the foundation of enzyme engineering efforts in biofuels research. Many of these carbohydrate-active enzymes from filamentous fungi contain both N-linked and O-linked glycosylation, the extent and heterogeneity of which depends on growth conditions, expression host, and the presence of glycan trimming enzymes in the secretome, all of which in turn impact enzyme activity. As the roles of glycosylation in enzyme function have not been fully elucidated, here we discuss the potential roles of glycosylation on glycoside hydrolase enzyme structure and function after secretion. We posit that glycosylation, instead of hindering cellulase engineering, can be used as an additional tool to enhance enzyme activity, given deeper understanding of its molecular-level role in biomass deconstruction.

  11. Harnessing glycosylation to improve cellulase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Dai, Ziyu; Mattews, James F.; Momany, Michelle; Payne, Christina M.; Adney, William S.; Baker, Scott E.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2012-06-11

    Cellulases and hemicellulases are responsible for the turnover of plant cell wall polysaccharides in the biosphere, and thus form the foundation of enzyme engineering efforts in biofuels research. Many of these carbohydrate-active enzymes from filamentous fungi contain both N-linked and O-linked glycosylation, the extent and heterogeneity of which depends on growth conditions, expression host, and the presence of glycan trimming enzymes in the secretome, all of which in turn impacts enzyme activity. As the roles of glycosylation in enzyme function have not been fully elucidated, here we discuss the potential roles of glycosylation on glycoside hydrolase enzyme structure and function after secretion. We posit that glycosylation, instead of hindering cellulase engineering, can be used as an additional tool to enhance enzyme activity, given deeper understanding of its molecular-level role in biomass deconstruction.

  12. Human plasma protein N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Florent; Reiding, Karli R; Jansen, Bas C; Kammeijer, Guinevere S M; Bondt, Albert; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Glycosylation is the most abundant and complex protein modification, and can have a profound structural and functional effect on the conjugate. The oligosaccharide fraction is recognized to be involved in multiple biological processes, and to affect proteins physical properties, and has consequentially been labeled a critical quality attribute of biopharmaceuticals. Additionally, due to recent advances in analytical methods and analysis software, glycosylation is targeted in the search for disease biomarkers for early diagnosis and patient stratification. Biofluids such as saliva, serum or plasma are of great use in this regard, as they are easily accessible and can provide relevant glycosylation information. Thus, as the assessment of protein glycosylation is becoming a major element in clinical and biopharmaceutical research, this review aims to convey the current state of knowledge on the N-glycosylation of the major plasma glycoproteins alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, alpha-1-antitrypsin, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-2-macroglobulin, antithrombin-III, apolipoprotein B-100, apolipoprotein D, apolipoprotein F, beta-2-glycoprotein 1, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, immunoglobulin (Ig) A, IgG, IgM, haptoglobin, hemopexin, histidine-rich glycoprotein, kininogen-1, serotransferrin, vitronectin, and zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein. In addition, the less abundant immunoglobulins D and E are included because of their major relevance in immunology and biopharmaceutical research. Where available, the glycosylation is described in a site-specific manner. In the discussion, we put the glycosylation of individual proteins into perspective and speculate how the individual proteins may contribute to a total plasma N-glycosylation profile determined at the released glycan level. PMID:26555091

  13. Glycosylated haemoglobin: measurement and clinical use.

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, I

    1984-01-01

    The discovery, biochemistry, laboratory determination, and clinical application of glycosylated haemoglobins are reviewed. Sources of error are discussed in detail. No single assay method is suitable for all purposes, and in the foreseeable future generally acceptable standards and reference ranges are unlikely to be agreed. Each laboratory must establish its own. Nevertheless, the development of glycosylated haemoglobin assays is an important advance. They offer the best available means of assessing diabetic control. PMID:6381544

  14. Aberration correction of unstable resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Construction of aspheric reflectors for unstable resonator lasers to provide an arbitrary laser mode inside the resonator to correct aberrations of an output beam by the construction of the shape of an end reflector opposite the output reflector of the resonator cavity, such as aberrations resulting from refraction of a beam exiting the solid of the resonator having an index of refraction greater than 1 or to produce an aberration in the output beam that will precisely compensate for the aberration of an optical train into which the resonator beam is coupled.

  15. Carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrate modification is a common phenomenon in nature. Many carbohydrate modifications such as some epimerization, O-acetylation, O-sulfation, O-methylation, N-deacetylation, and N-sulfation, take place after the formation of oligosaccharide or polysaccharide backbones. These modifications can be categorized as carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications (PGMs). Carbohydrate PGMs further extend the complexity of the structures and the synthesis of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. They also increase the capacity of the biological information that can be controlled by finely tuning the structures of carbohydrates. Developing efficient methods to obtain structurally defined naturally occurring oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and glycoconjugates with carbohydrate PGMs is essential for understanding the biological significance of carbohydrate PGMs. Combine with high-throughput screening methods, synthetic carbohydrates with PGMs are invaluable probes in structure-activity relationship studies. We illustrate here several classes of carbohydrates with PGMs and their applications. Recent progress in chemical, enzymatic, and chemoenzymatic syntheses of these carbohydrates and their derivatives are also presented. PMID:17340000

  16. Sites in the CH3 domain of human IgA1 that influence sensitivity to bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, Bernard W; Woof, Jenny M

    2006-09-15

    The influence of regions, other than the hinge, on the susceptibility of human IgA1 to cleavage by diverse bacterial IgA1 proteases, was examined using IgA1 mutants bearing amino acid deletions, substitutions, and domain swaps. IgA1 lacking the tailpiece retained its susceptibility to cleavage by all of the IgA1 proteases. The domain swap molecule alpha1alpha2gamma3, in which the CH3 domain of IgA1 was exchanged for that of human IgG1, was resistant to cleavage with the type 1 and 2 serine IgA1 proteases of Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Haemophilus influenzae, but remained sensitive to cleavage with the metallo-IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis. Substitution of the IgA1 Calpha3 domain motif Pro440 -Phe443 into the corresponding position in the Cgamma3 domain of alpha1alpha2gamma3 resulted now in sensitivity to the type 2 IgA1 protease of N. meningitidis, indicating the possible requirement of these amino acids for sensitivity to this protease. For the H. influenzae type 2 protease, resistance of an IgA1 mutant in which the CH3 domain residues 399-409 were exchanged with those from IgG1, but sensitivity of mutant HuBovalpha3 in which the Calpha3 domain of bovine IgA replaces that of human IgA1, suggests that CH3 domain residues Glu403, Gln406, and Thr409 influence sensitivity to this enzyme. Hence, unlike the situation with the metallo-IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus spp., the sensitivity of human IgA1 to cleavage with the serine IgA1 proteases of Neisseria and Haemophilus involves their binding to different sites specifically in the CH3 domain. PMID:16951354

  17. IgA EGFR antibodies mediate tumour killing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Boross, Peter; Lohse, Stefan; Nederend, Maaike; Jansen, Johannes Hendrik Marco; van Tetering, Geert; Dechant, Michael; Peipp, Matthias; Royle, Louise; Liew, Li Phing; Boon, Louis; van Rooijen, Nico; Bleeker, Wim K; Parren, Paul W H I; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Valerius, Thomas; Leusen, Jeanette H W

    2013-01-01

    Currently all approved anti-cancer therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of the IgG isotype, which rely on Fcgamma receptors (FcγRs) to recruit cellular effector functions. In vitro studies showed that targeting of FcαRI (CD89) by bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) or recombinant IgA resulted in more effective elimination of tumour cells by myeloid effector cells than targeting of FcγR. Here we studied the in vivo anti-tumour activity of IgA EGFR antibodies generated using the variable sequences of the chimeric EGFR antibody cetuximab. Using FcαRI transgenic mice, we demonstrated significant in vivo anti-tumour activity of IgA2 EGFR against A431 cells in peritoneal and lung xenograft models, as well as against B16F10-EGFR cells in a lung metastasis model in immunocompetent mice. IgA2 EGFR was more effective than cetuximab in a short-term syngeneic peritoneal model using EGFR-transfected Ba/F3 target cells. The in vivo cytotoxic activity of IgA2 EGFR was mediated by macrophages and was significantly decreased in the absence of FcαRI. These results support the potential of targeting FcαRI for effective antibody therapy of cancer. The study reveals that IgA antibodies directed against EGFR and engaging Fcalpha receptor (FcαRI) on effector cells, have in vivo anti-cancer activity. These data support the development of novel immunotherapeutic strategies based on targeting FcαRI. PMID:23918228

  18. Presence of circulating macromolecular IgA in patients with hematuria due to primary IgA nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Valentijn, R.M.; Kauffmann, R.H.; de la Riviere, G.B.; Daha, M.R.; Van, E.S.

    1983-03-01

    The relation between renal histologic features and the presence of circulating immune complexes was studied in 50 patients with hematuria. Primary IgA nephropathy was found in 25 patients, and various other forms of glomerulopathy were seen in the remaining 25 patients. Circulating immune complexes were detected with the 125I-C1q-binding assay, the conglutinin-binding assay, and the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay, the latter detecting specifically IgA-containing immune complex-like material. The 125I-C1q-binding assay gave negative findings for all patients except one. With the conglutinin-binding assay, immune complexes were found in a similar frequency for patients with and without IgA nephropathy. However, the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay gave positive results only in patients with primary IgA nephropathy (68 percent) and in none of the other patients. Sucrose density ultracentrifugation, as well as experiments in which the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay was performed with and without pretreatment of serum with polyethylene glycol, showed the presumed IgA immune complexes to have intermediate sedimentation coefficients (11 to 21S). The presence and level of this macromolecular IgA in the circulation correlated significantly (p less than 0.001) with the presence of hematuria in patients who had this clinical manifestation intermittently. Furthermore, a significant correlation (r . 0.69, p less than 0.0001) was found between the degree of hematuria and the degree of positive findings of the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay. This study shows that in patients presenting with hematuria, a positive finding on the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay is restricted to patients with primary IgA nephropathy and therefore could be of diagnostic value.

  19. Chromosome Aberrations in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry A.; Durante, M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A review of currently available data on in vivo induced chromosome damage in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts proves that, after protracted exposure of a few months or more to space radiation, cytogenetic biodosimetry analyses of blood collected within a week or two of return from space provides a reliable estimate of equivalent radiation dose and risk. Recent studies indicate that biodosimetry estimates from single spaceflights lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry and biophysical models, but very large uncertainties are associated with single individual measurements and the total sample population remains low. Retrospective doses may be more difficult to estimate because of the fairly rapid time-dependent loss of "stable" aberrations in blood lymphocytes. Also, biodosimetry estimates from individuals who participate in multiple missions, or very long (interplanetary) missions, may be complicated by an adaptive response to space radiation and/or changes in lymphocyte survival and repopulation. A discussion of published data is presented and specific issues related to space radiation biodosimetry protocols are discussed.

  20. Correction of Distributed Optical Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Olivier, S; Carrano, C; Phillion, D

    2006-02-12

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the use of multiple distributed deformable mirrors (DMs) to improve the performance of optical systems with distributed aberrations. This concept is expected to provide dramatic improvement in the optical performance of systems in applications where the aberrations are distributed along the optical path or within the instrument itself. Our approach used multiple actuated DMs distributed to match the aberration distribution. The project developed the algorithms necessary to determine the required corrections and simulate the performance of these multiple DM systems.

  1. Coating-induced wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiley, Daniel J.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1992-12-01

    The coatings which are used on telescope mirrors and other optical interfaces can have a profound effect on the image quality formed by an optical system. This paper evaluates the defocus and astigmatism which are caused by the s- and p-phase shifts of coatings. These coating-induced wavefront aberrations are usually insignificant, but can, under certain circumstances, overshadow the geometric wavefront aberrations of the system. The wavefront aberrations induced by reflection-enhanced coatings on an f/1.5 Cassegrain telescope are numerically evaluated as an example.

  2. Glycosylation as a marker for inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Simone; Unwin, Louise; Muniyappa, Mohankumar; Rudd, Pauline M

    2014-01-01

    Changes in serum protein glycosylation play an important role in inflammatory arthritis. Altered galactosylation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in rheumatoid arthritis attracts special attention due to the devastating nature of the disease. Studying glycosylation changes of serum proteins has been recognized as a potential strategy to provide added value regarding diagnostics, aetiopathology and therapy of inflammatory arthritic diseases. Key questions, which are approached in these fields of research, are whether or not glycosylation can be used as a complementary pre-clinical and clinical marker for disease differentiation, diagnosis, the prediction of disease course and severity as well as for the evaluation of disease therapies. These studies mainly focus on TNF antagonists, which present a new and promising way of treating inflammatory arthritis. The recent availability of new high-throughput glycoanalytical tools enables a more profound and efficient investigation in large patient cohorts and helps to gain new insights in the complex mechanism of the underlying disease pathways. PMID:24643039

  3. Glycoprotein Structural Genomics: Solving the Glycosylation Problem

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Veronica T.; Crispin, Max; Aricescu, A. Radu; Harvey, David J.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Fennelly, Janet A.; Yu, Chao; Boles, Kent S.; Evans, Edward J.; Stuart, David I.; Dwek, Raymond A.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Owens, Raymond J.; Davis, Simon J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Glycoproteins present special problems for structural genomic analysis because they often require glycosylation in order to fold correctly, whereas their chemical and conformational heterogeneity generally inhibits crystallization. We show that the “glycosylation problem” can be solved by expressing glycoproteins transiently in mammalian cells in the presence of the N-glycosylation processing inhibitors, kifunensine or swainsonine. This allows the correct folding of the glycoproteins, but leaves them sensitive to enzymes, such as endoglycosidase H, that reduce the N-glycans to single residues, enhancing crystallization. Since the scalability of transient mammalian expression is now comparable to that of bacterial systems, this approach should relieve one of the major bottlenecks in structural genomic analysis. PMID:17355862

  4. Large-Scale Organization of Glycosylation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Dong-Yup; Jeong, Hawoong

    2009-03-01

    Glycosylation is a highly complex process to produce a diverse repertoire of cellular glycans that are frequently attached to proteins and lipids. Glycans participate in fundamental biological processes including molecular trafficking and clearance, cell proliferation and apoptosis, developmental biology, immune response, and pathogenesis. N-linked glycans found on proteins are formed by sequential attachments of monosaccharides with the help of a relatively small number of enzymes. Many of these enzymes can accept multiple N-linked glycans as substrates, thus generating a large number of glycan intermediates and their intermingled pathways. Motivated by the quantitative methods developed in complex network research, we investigate the large-scale organization of such N-glycosylation pathways in a mammalian cell. The uncovered results give the experimentally-testable predictions for glycosylation process, and can be applied to the engineering of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  5. Glycoprotein B7-H3 overexpression and aberrant glycosylation in oral cancer and immune response

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jung-Tsu; Chen, Chein-Hung; Ku, Ko-Li; Hsiao, Michael; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and mortality rate of oral cancer continue to rise, partly due to the lack of effective early diagnosis and increasing environmental exposure to cancer-causing agents. To identify new markers for oral cancer, we used a sialylation probe to investigate the glycoproteins differentially expressed on oral cancer cells. Of the glycoproteins identified, B7 Homolog 3 (B7-H3) was significantly overexpressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and its overexpression correlated with larger tumor size, advanced clinical stage, and low survival rate in OSCC patients. In addition, knockdown of B7-H3 suppressed tumor cell proliferation, and restoration of B7-H3 expression enhanced tumor growth. It was also found that the N-glycans of B7-H3 from Ca9-22 oral cancer cells contain the terminal α-galactose and are more diverse with higher fucosylation and better interaction with DC-SIGN [DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3)–grabbing nonintegrin] and Langerin on immune cells than that from normal cells, suggesting that the glycans on B7-H3 may also play an important role in the disease. PMID:26438868

  6. Mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase impair IgA responses.

    PubMed

    Mitsuiki, Noriko; Yang, Xi; Bartol, Sophinus J W; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Takada, Hidetoshi; Imai, Kohsuke; Kanegane, Hirokazu; Mizutani, Shuki; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Zelm, Menno C; Ohara, Osamu; Morio, Tomohiro

    2015-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), and is characterized by markedly decreased numbers of blood B cells and an absence of all immunoglobulin isotypes. We performed whole exome sequencing in a male pediatric patient with dysgammaglobulinemia with IgA deficiency. Genetic analysis revealed a BTK missense mutation (Thr316Ala). To investigate whether a BTK mutation underlay this antibody deficiency with marked decrease of IgA in this patient, we performed functional analyses of B cells and phagocytes, and molecular analyses of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination. The BTK missense mutation resulted in B cells with reduced BTK and high IgM expression. Equal proportions of CD19(low) and CD19(normal) fractions were observed, and both included naïve and memory B cells. Calcium influx and phospholipase Cγ2 phosphorylation upon IgM stimulation were marginally impaired in CD19(low), but not in CD19(+) B cells. Similar to XLA patients, IgA transcripts showed low SHM levels, whereas IgG transcripts were hardly affected. Our analyses suggest that the BTK mutation likely underlies the disease in this case, and that hypomorphic BTK mutations can result in normal circulating B cell numbers, but specifically impair IgA responses. PMID:25589397

  7. Diagnostic Significance of Reduced IgA in Children

    PubMed Central

    Nurkic, Jasmina; Numanovic, Fatima; Arnautalic, Lejla; Tihic, Nijaz; Halilovic, Dzenan; Jahic, Mahira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The finding of reduced value of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in children is frequent in daily medical practice. It is important to correctly interpret the findings as adequate further diagnostic evaluation of the patient in order to make the determination on the significance of such findings. In children younger than 4 years always consider the transient impairment of immunoglobulins, maturation of child and his immune system can lead to an improvement in the clinical picture. In older children decreased IgA may lead to serious illnesses that need to be recognize and acknowledge through the appropriate diagnostic methods. At the University Clinical Center Tuzla, children with suspected deficient immune response due to reduced values of IgA, goes through further diagnostic evaluation at the Polyclinic for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Immunology and Department of Microbiology, as well as the Clinic of Radiology. Material and methods: Our study followed 91 patients, for the year 2013, through their medical charts and made evaluation of diagnostic and screening tests. Conclusion: The significance of this paper is to draw attention to the importance of diagnostic approach to IgA deficient pediatric patient and relevance of knowledge of individual diagnostic methods as well as to the proper interpretation of the results thereof. PMID:26543309

  8. Exploring the Glycosylation of Serum CA125

    PubMed Central

    Saldova, Radka; Struwe, Weston B.; Wynne, Kieran; Elia, Giuliano; Duffy, Michael J.; Rudd, Pauline M.

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecologic cancer affecting women. The most widely used biomarker for ovarian cancer, CA125, lacks sensitivity and specificity. Here, we explored differences in glycosylation of CA125 between serum from patients with ovarian cancer and healthy controls. We found differences between CA125 N-glycans from patient sera compared to controls. These include increases in core-fucosylated bi-antennary monosialylated glycans, as well as decreases in mostly bisecting bi-antennary and non-fucosylated glycans in patients compared to controls. Measurement of the glycosylated state of CA125 may therefore provide a more specific biomarker for patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:23896595

  9. The Genetics of IgA Nephropathy: An Overview from China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common type of primary glomerulonephritis worldwide. Highly variable data for disease prevalence and reports of familial clustering suggest the involvement of genetic factors in IgAN. As China is an area with a high prevalence of IgAN, Chinese scholars have made a considerable effort to reveal the underlying genetic architecture of IgAN. Summary In this review, we summarize recent achievements in the genetic studies of IgAN, focusing mainly on studies undertaken in China. Early association studies followed a population-based design and focused on a single variant or single gene. Subsequently, family-based designs and genetic interactions applied by Chinese scholars revealed an association of variants in MEGSIN and glycosyltransferase genes with IgAN. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used to identify multiple susceptibility loci for IgAN, and they have, for the most part, been validated in Chinese populations. Key Message More efforts should be made to explore the underlying genetic mechanisms of GWAS-identified variants. In future studies in IgAN, the application of a systems genetics approach would be helpful and productive. Facts from East and West The reported prevalence of IgAN is higher in Asia than in Europe and North America. However, differences in use of biopsy for the diagnosis of IgAN should be taken into account in analyzing data from both East and West. In Europe, IgAN affects men more frequently than women; this is not the case in Asia. Familial IgAN has been more frequently reported in Europe than in Asia. Within Europe, familial IgAN is more evident in southern than in northern populations. Changes in the pattern of serum IgA1 O-glycosylation is a common finding in IgAN patients in the East and West. SNPs within the gene coding for the enzyme C1GALT1 have been reported in Chinese and European patients. However, there is no evidence for a role of gene polymorphism of the C1GALT1

  10. The Genetics of IgA Nephropathy: An Overview from Western Countries

    PubMed Central

    Feehally, John; Barratt, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the commonest primary glomerulonephritis worldwide and a significant cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. It is widely accepted that genetic factors play a role in the pathogenesis of IgAN. However, the identity of these genetic factors remains uncertain. Summary Critical to all genetic studies is a precise phenotypic definition of the disease. It is well recognised that IgAN displays striking phenotypic variation, raising the possibility that it may not be a single disease and it may not be the same disease in different parts of the world. In this review, we discuss the challenges that this phenotypic variation poses to interpreting genetic data and the current evidence for specific gene involvement in IgAN, focusing particularly on data from European IgAN cohorts. Key Message With advances in genetic techniques, in particular next-generation sequencing, and an increased understanding of the importance of copy number variations, epigenetics and transcriptomics, it is likely that we will gain a greater understanding of the genetic basis for IgAN. However, due to the lack of consistency in epidemiological clinicopathological studies both within and between continents, this will only be achieved if we are able to more precisely phenotype IgAN populations. Facts from East and West The reported prevalence of IgAN is higher in Asia than in Europe and North America. However, differences in use of biopsy for the diagnosis of IgAN should be taken into account in analysing data from both East and West. In Europe, IgAN affects men more frequently than women; this is not the case in Asia. Familial IgAN has been more frequently reported in Europe than in Asia. Within Europe, familial IgAN is more evident in southern than in northern populations. Changes in the pattern of serum IgA1 O-glycosylation is a common finding in IgAN patients in the East and West. SNPs within the gene coding for the enzyme C1GALT1 have been

  11. Amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Batten, Margaret R; Senior, Bernard W; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-03-01

    The amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by IgA1 proteases of different species of Streptococcus were investigated. Recombinant IgA1 antibodies were generated with point mutations at proline 227 and threonine 228, the residues lying on either side of the peptide bond at which all streptococcal IgA1 proteases cleave wild-type human IgA1. The amino acid substitutions produced no major effect upon the structure of the mutant IgA1 antibodies or their functional ability to bind to Fcalpha receptors. However, the substitutions had a substantial effect upon sensitivity to cleavage with some streptococcal IgA1 proteases, with, in some cases, a single point mutation rendering the antibody resistant to a particular IgA1 protease. This effect was least marked with the IgA1 protease from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which showed no absolute requirement for either proline or threonine at residues 227 to 228. By contrast, the IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis had an absolute requirement for proline at 227 but not for threonine at 228, which could be replaced by valine. There was evidence in S. mitis that proteases from different strains may have different amino acid requirements for cleavage. Remarkably, some streptococcal proteases appeared able to cleave the hinge at a distant alternative site if substitution prevented efficient cleavage of the original site. Hence, this study has identified key residues required for the recognition of the IgA1 hinge as a substrate by streptococcal IgA1 proteases, and it marks a preliminary step towards development of specific enzyme inhibitors. PMID:12595464

  12. Historical aspects of aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Rose, Harald H

    2009-06-01

    A brief history of the development of direct aberration correction in electron microscopy is outlined starting from the famous Scherzer theorem established in 1936. Aberration correction is the long story of many seemingly fruitless efforts to improve the resolution of electron microscopes by compensating for the unavoidable resolution-limiting aberrations of round electron lenses over a period of 50 years. The successful breakthrough, in 1997, can be considered as a quantum step in electron microscopy because it provides genuine atomic resolution approaching the size of the radius of the hydrogen atom. The additional realization of monochromators, aberration-free imaging energy filters and spectrometers has been leading to a new generation of analytical electron microscopes providing elemental and electronic information about the object on an atomic scale. PMID:19254915

  13. Bronchial hyper-responsiveness in selective IgA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Athina; Mermiri, Despina; Taousani, Sofia; Triga, Maria; Nicolaidou, Polyxeni; Priftis, Kostas N

    2005-09-01

    Secretory IgA in mucosal secretions has a broad protective function. The insufficient protection provided by the respiratory mucosa in children with selective IgA deficiency (sIgAD) might facilitate the development of bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR) and consequently asthma symptoms. This study was conducted to clarify the prevalence of BHR in sIgAD children and the relationship with atopic status. A cohort of 20 children (group A) aged 6.4-20.1 yr (median: 12.6) with sIgAD (serum IgA <6 mg/dl) were evaluated for BHR using inhaled hypertonic saline test as well as for atopy by skin prick testing (SPT) to eight common aero-allergens. Seventy other children with normal levels of serum IgA, but sensitized to aero-allergens (group B) and 102 with normal IgA and negative SPTs (group C) were also evaluated. Baseline spirometry demonstrated that forced vital capacity (FVC) values in group A were significantly lower than in C. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s values were similar in all groups, but impairment of the forced expiratory flow over the middle half of the FVC was detected in group B. The prevalence of BHR was similar among group A (30.0%) and group B (35.7%) (p = 0.79) but they differed from group C (5.9%) (p = 0.005). An association between BHR and reported current (p = 0.001) but not lifetime asthma symptoms among group A was also observed. There was no association between atopy and BHR in group A but only to mites' sensitization (p = 0.03). In conclusion, these results indicate that sIgAD constitutes a risk factor for development of BHR but it appears to be related to sensitization to mites. PMID:16176396

  14. Bacterial Protein N-Glycosylation: New Perspectives and Applications*

    PubMed Central

    Nothaft, Harald; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is widespread throughout all three domains of life. Bacterial protein N-glycosylation and its application to engineering recombinant glycoproteins continue to be actively studied. Here, we focus on advances made in the last 2 years, including the characterization of novel bacterial N-glycosylation pathways, examination of pathway enzymes and evolution, biological roles of protein modification in the native host, and exploitation of the N-glycosylation pathways to create novel vaccines and diagnostics. PMID:23329827

  15. Amino acid sequence requirements in the human IgA1 hinge for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Batten, M R; Kilian, M; Woof, J M

    2002-08-01

    All the IgA1 proteases of the different pathogenic species of Streptococcus cleave the hinge of the alpha chain of human IgA1 only at one proline-threonine peptide bond. In order to study the importance of these amino acids for cleavage, several hinge mutant recombinant IgA1 antibodies were constructed. The mutations were found to be without major effect upon the structure or functional abilities of the antibodies. However, they had a major effect upon their sensitivity to cleavage by some of the IgA1 proteases. PMID:12196126

  16. Increased dimeric IgA producing B cells in the bone marrow in IgA nephropathy determined by in situ hybridisation for J chain mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, S J; Allen, A C; Pringle, J H; Feehally, J

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the possible role of the systemic IgA immune system in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy METHODS: J chain mRNA expression in the IgA cells of the bone marrow was studied. Bone marrow trephine biopsy specimens from seven patients with IgA nephropathy and seven matched controls were examined by (1) non-isotopic in situ hybridisation (ISH) and (2) combined immunofluorescence and non-isotopic ISH to identify the plasma cell type. Serum polymeric IgA was also determined using standard high pressure liquid chromatography and sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Non-isotopic ISH revealed a similar number of J chain mRNA positive cells/unit length in biopsy specimens from patients (16.5 +/- 2.7 cells/mm) and controls (17.7 +/- 2.4 cells/mm). Combined immunofluorescence and ISH revealed a greater proportion of J chain mRNA positive IgA cells in patients (7.6 +/- 1.45%) compared with controls (3 +/- 0.8%). Serum polymeric IgA was similar in both patients (91 +/- 22 mg/l) and controls (77 +/- 24 mg/l). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that excess production of dimeric IgA occurs in the bone marrow in IgA nephropathy. Images PMID:8666683

  17. IgA Protease Activity in Haemophilus parasuis in the Absence of a Recognizable IgA Protease Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Haemophilus parasuis, the bacterium responsible for Glasser’s disease, is a pathogen of significant concern in modern high-health swine production systems. Little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms of H. parasuis infection. In some Pasteurellaceae species, IgA proteases aid in d...

  18. The Autonomous Glycosylation of Large DNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Piacente, Francesco; Gaglianone, Matteo; Laugieri, Maria Elena; Tonetti, Michela G

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of surface molecules is a key feature of several eukaryotic viruses, which use the host endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to add carbohydrates to their nascent glycoproteins. In recent years, a newly discovered group of eukaryotic viruses, belonging to the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Virus (NCLDV) group, was shown to have several features that are typical of cellular organisms, including the presence of components of the glycosylation machinery. Starting from initial observations with the chlorovirus PBCV-1, enzymes for glycan biosynthesis have been later identified in other viruses; in particular in members of the Mimiviridae family. They include both the glycosyltransferases and other carbohydrate-modifying enzymes and the pathways for the biosynthesis of the rare monosaccharides that are found in the viral glycan structures. These findings, together with genome analysis of the newly-identified giant DNA viruses, indicate that the presence of glycogenes is widespread in several NCLDV families. The identification of autonomous viral glycosylation machinery leads to many questions about the origin of these pathways, the mechanisms of glycan production, and eventually their function in the viral replication cycle. The scope of this review is to highlight some of the recent results that have been obtained on the glycosylation systems of the large DNA viruses, with a special focus on the enzymes involved in nucleotide-sugar production. PMID:26690138

  19. Detection of cytoplasmic glycosylation associated with hydroxyproline.

    PubMed

    West, Christopher M; van der Wel, Hanke; Blader, Ira J

    2006-01-01

    A special class of glycosylation occurs on a proline residue of the cytoplasmic/nuclear protein Skp1 in the social amoeba Dictyostelium. For this glycosylation to occur, the proline must first be hydroxylated by the action of a soluble prolyl 4-hydroxylase acting on the protein. Cytoplasmic prolyl 4-hydroxylases are dioxygen-dependent enzymes that have low affinity for their O2 substrate and, therefore, have been implicated in O2-sensing in Dictyostelium, as well as in vertebrates and invertebrates. The sugar-hydroxyproline linkage has low abundance, is resistant to alkali cleavage and known glycosidases, and does not bind known lectins. However, initial screens for this modification can be made by assessing changes in electrophoretic mobility of candidate proteins after treatment of cells with prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors, and/or by metabolic labeling with [3H]sugar precursors. In addition, cytoplasmic hydroxylation/glycosylation can be assessed by assaying for cytoplasmic glycosyltransferases. Here we describe these methods and examples of their use in analyzing Skp1 glycosylation in Dictyostelium and the apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis in humans. PMID:17132515

  20. The Autonomous Glycosylation of Large DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Piacente, Francesco; Gaglianone, Matteo; Laugieri, Maria Elena; Tonetti, Michela G.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of surface molecules is a key feature of several eukaryotic viruses, which use the host endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to add carbohydrates to their nascent glycoproteins. In recent years, a newly discovered group of eukaryotic viruses, belonging to the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Virus (NCLDV) group, was shown to have several features that are typical of cellular organisms, including the presence of components of the glycosylation machinery. Starting from initial observations with the chlorovirus PBCV-1, enzymes for glycan biosynthesis have been later identified in other viruses; in particular in members of the Mimiviridae family. They include both the glycosyltransferases and other carbohydrate-modifying enzymes and the pathways for the biosynthesis of the rare monosaccharides that are found in the viral glycan structures. These findings, together with genome analysis of the newly-identified giant DNA viruses, indicate that the presence of glycogenes is widespread in several NCLDV families. The identification of autonomous viral glycosylation machinery leads to many questions about the origin of these pathways, the mechanisms of glycan production, and eventually their function in the viral replication cycle. The scope of this review is to highlight some of the recent results that have been obtained on the glycosylation systems of the large DNA viruses, with a special focus on the enzymes involved in nucleotide-sugar production. PMID:26690138

  1. Interleukin (IL)-21 promotes intestinal IgA response to microbiota.

    PubMed

    Cao, A T; Yao, S; Gong, B; Nurieva, R I; Elson, C O; Cong, Y

    2015-09-01

    Commensal microbiota-specific T helper type 17 (Th17) cells are enriched in the intestines, which can convert into T follicular helper (Tfh) in Peyer's patches, and are crucial for production of intestinal immunoglobulin A (IgA) against microbiota; however, the role of Th17 and Tfh cytokines in regulating the mucosal IgA response to enteric microbiota is still not completely known. In this study, we found that intestinal IgA was impaired in mice deficient in interleukin (IL)-17 or IL-21 signaling. IL-21, but not IL-17, is able to augment B-cell differentiation to IgA(+) cells as mediated by transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) and accelerate IgA class switch recombination (CSR). IL-21 and retinoic acid (RA) induce IgA(+) B-cell development and IgA production and drives autocrine TGFβ1 production to initiate IgA CSR. Repletion of T-cell-deficient TCRβxδ(-/-) mice with Th17 cells specific for commensal bacterial antigen increased the levels of IgA(+) B cells and IgA production in the intestine, which was blocked by neutralizing IL-21. Thus IL-21 functions to strongly augment IgA production under intestinal environment. Furthermore, IL-21 promotes intestinal B-cell homing through α4β7 expression, alone or with TGFβ and RA. Together, IL-21 from microbiota-specific Th17 and/or Tfh cells contributes to robust intestinal IgA levels by enhancing IgA(+) CSR, IgA production and B-cell trafficking into the intestine. PMID:25586558

  2. Interleukin (IL)-21 promotes intestinal IgA response to microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Anthony T.; Yao, Suxia; Gong, Bin; Nurieva, Roza I.; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2014-01-01

    Commensal microbiota-specific Th17 cells are enriched in the intestines, which can convert into Tfh in Peyer’s patches, and are crucial for production of intestinal IgA against microbiota, however, the role of Th17 and Tfh cytokines in regulating the mucosal IgA response to enteric microbiota is still not completely known. In this study, we found that intestinal IgA was impaired in mice deficient in IL-17 or IL-21 signaling. IL-21, but not IL-17, is able to augment B cell differentiation to IgA+ cells as mediated by TGFβ1, and accelerate IgA class switch recombination (CSR). IL-21 and retinoic acid (RA) induce IgA+ B cell development and IgA production, and drives autocrine TGFβ1 production to initiate IgA CSR. Repletion of T cell-deficient TCRβxδ−/− mice with Th17 cells specific for commensal bacterial antigen, increased levels of IgA+ B cells and IgA production in the intestine, which was blocked by neutralizing IL-21. Thus, IL-21 functions to strongly augment IgA production under intestinal environment. Furthermore, IL-21 promotes intestinal B cell homing through α4β7 expression, alone or with TGFβ and RA. Together, IL-21 from microbiota-specific Th17 and/or Tfh cells contributes to robust intestinal IgA levels by enhancing IgA+ CSR, IgA production, and B cell trafficking into the intestine. PMID:25586558

  3. Binding capacity of in vitro deglycosylated IgA1 to human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-jun; Xu, Li-xia; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2006-04-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common glomerular disease and it is characterized by deposition of IgA1 molecules in mesangium. Recent studies had demonstrated that serum and mesangial IgA1 in IgAN were deglycosylated and IgA1 could bind to human mesangial cells (HMC) through a novel receptor. The aim of the current study is to investigate and compare the binding capacities of different in vitro deglycosylated IgA1 on human mesangial cells. Serum IgA1 was purified by jacalin affinity chromatography and then was desialylated (DesIgA1) and/or degalactosylated (Des/DeGalIgA1) with neuraminidase and/or beta-galactosidase. The efficacy of deglycosylations was assessed by Peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Vicia villosa (VV) lectin. The sizes of normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1 were determined by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography and binding capacities to primary HMC were evaluated by radioligand binding assays. Normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1 could bind to HMC in a dose-dependent, saturable manner. The maximal binding capacities and binding sites/cell of DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA were significantly higher than that of normal IgA1. However, more aggregated IgA1 was found in DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1. Scatchard analysis revealed a similar Kd of normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1. The current study suggested that the binding capacities of DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1 to HMC were significantly higher than that of normal IgA1, which at least in part was due to more macromolecular IgA1 in deglycoslated IgA1. However, there were no significant differences in the affinities of normal IgA1, DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1 with HMC. Deglycosylated IgA1 might play an important role in pathogenesis of IgAN. PMID:16442846

  4. Muscular dystrophies due to glycosylation defects.

    PubMed

    Muntoni, Francesco; Torelli, Silvia; Brockington, Martin

    2008-10-01

    In the last few years, muscular dystrophies due to reduced glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (ADG) have emerged as a common group of conditions, now referred to as dystroglycanopathies. Mutations in six genes (POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, Fukutin, FKRP and LARGE) have so far been identified in patients with a dystroglycanopathy. Allelic mutations in each of these genes can result in a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from severe congenital onset with associated structural brain malformations (Walker Warburg syndrome; muscle-eye-brain disease; Fukuyama muscular dystrophy; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1D) to a relatively milder congenital variant with no brain involvement (congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C), and to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2 variants with onset in childhood or adult life (LGMD2I, LGMD2L, and LGMD2N). ADG is a peripheral membrane protein that undergoes multiple and complex glycosylation steps to regulate its ability to effectively interact with extracellular matrix proteins, such as laminin, agrin, and perlecan. Although the precise composition of the glycans present on ADG are not known, it has been demonstrated that the forced overexpression of LARGE, or its paralog LARGE2, is capable of increasing the glycosylation of ADG in normal cells. In addition, its overexpression is capable of restoring dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding properties in primary cell cultures of patients affected by different genetically defined dystroglycanopathy variants. These observations suggest that there could be a role for therapeutic strategies to overcome the glycosylation defect in these conditions via the overexpression of LARGE. PMID:19019316

  5. Sexual aberration or instinctual vicissitude? Revisiting freud's "the sexual aberrations".

    PubMed

    Phillips, Sidney H

    2014-04-01

    The author reconsiders Freud's "The Sexual Aberrations," the first of his Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905), in light of contemporary psychoanalytic theory. Are the concepts of sexual aberration and norm still viable? The author argues that they are necessary but insufficient elements in current theory. He then presents a competing model in which sexuality can be reduced to a more elemental level of disturbance and wish, where it is an expression of a nonsexual wish--for example, to possess or control the object to eliminate separateness. The author presents clinical material to demonstrate this alternative model. PMID:24777366

  6. Aberrations in asymmetrical electron lenses.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J P S; Word, R C; Könenkamp, R

    2012-08-01

    Starting from well established knowledge in light-optics we explore the question if electron-optical aberration can be improved in asymmetrical electron lenses. We show that spherical as well as chromatic aberration coefficients are reduced in asymmetric electrostatic einzel lenses when the center electrode is moved away from the center position towards the entrance electrode. Relative improvements up to 40% for both the chromatic and the spherical aberration coefficients can be obtained. We use analytical and numerical calculations to confirm this result for exemplary cases of a lens with fixed length and working distance. The agreement of the two calculation methods is very good. We then derive an estimate for the electron-optical aberration coefficients from light-optics. The derived expressions for chromatic and spherical aberrations are somewhat simpler than the ones derived from electron-optics as they involve integrals only over the electrostatic potential, not over the electron paths. The estimated formulas still agree well with the electron optical calculations. Overall, we are tempted to suggest that the enormous knowledge base of light optics can provide considerable guidance for electron-optical applications. PMID:22206603

  7. Sequence-based protein stabilization in the absence of glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Nikki Y; Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Jamaluddin, M Fairuz; Mahmud, S Halimah Binte; Raman, Suresh C; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2014-01-01

    Asparagine-linked N-glycosylation is a common modification of proteins that promotes productive protein folding and increases protein stability. Although N-glycosylation is important for glycoprotein folding, the precise sites of glycosylation are often not conserved between protein homologues. Here we show that, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, proteins upregulated during sporulation under nutrient deprivation have few N-glycosylation sequons and in their place tend to contain clusters of like-charged amino-acid residues. Incorporation of such sequences complements loss of in vivo protein function in the absence of glycosylation. Targeted point mutation to create such sequence stretches at glycosylation sequons in model glycoproteins increases in vitro protein stability and activity. A dependence on glycosylation for protein stability or activity can therefore be rescued with a small number of local point mutations, providing evolutionary flexibility in the precise location of N-glycans, allowing protein expression under nutrient-limiting conditions, and improving recombinant protein production. PMID:24434425

  8. Solving Glycosylation Disorders: Fundamental Approaches Reveal Complicated Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, Hudson H.; Chong, Jessica X.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Ng, Bobby G.

    2014-01-01

    Over 100 human genetic disorders result from mutations in glycosylation-related genes. In 2013, a new glycosylation disorder was reported every 17 days. This trend will probably continue given that at least 2% of the human genome encodes glycan-biosynthesis and -recognition proteins. Established biosynthetic pathways provide many candidate genes, but finding unanticipated mutated genes will offer new insights into glycosylation. Simple glycobiomarkers can be used in narrowing the candidates identified by exome and genome sequencing, and those can be validated by glycosylation analysis of serum or cells from affected individuals. Model organisms will expand the understanding of these mutations’ impact on glycosylation and pathology. Here, we highlight some recently discovered glycosylation disorders and the barriers, breakthroughs, and surprises they presented. We predict that some glycosylation disorders might occur with greater frequency than current estimates of their prevalence. Moreover, the prevalence of some disorders differs substantially between European and African Americans. PMID:24507773

  9. Efficient synthesis of glycosylated phenazine natural products and analogs with DISAL (methyl 3,5-dinitrosalicylate) glycosyl donors.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Jane B; Petersen, Lars; Jensen, Knud J; Nielsen, John

    2003-09-21

    Inspired by the occurrence and function of phenazines in natural products, new glycosylated analogs were designed and synthesized. DISAL (methyl 3,5-dinitrosalicylate) glycosyl donors were used in an efficient and easily-handled glycosylation protocol compatible with combinatorial chemistry. Benzoylated D-glucose, D-galactose and L-quinovose DISAL glycosyl donors were synthesized in high yields and used under mild conditions to glycosylate methyl saphenate and 2-hydroxyphenazine. The glycosides were screened for biological activity and one compound showed inhibitory activity towards topoisomerase II. PMID:14527145

  10. [Chronic bullous dermatosis in childhood (linear IgA dermatosis)].

    PubMed

    Wilk, M; Biwer, E

    1993-07-01

    A 5-year-old boy presented with disseminated, partly grouped blisters indicative of chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood (CBDC) following a gastrointestinal infection 2 weeks earlier. CBDC has long been differentiated from adult linear IgA disease. Clinical and laboratory studies revealed substantial clinical and immunological overlap between the two blistering disorders, whereas recent investigations suggest heterogeneity of the target antigen involved. Pathohistological and immunofluorescence-microscopical characteristics of a subepidermal blister and linear IgA and granular C3 deposition at the basement membrane together with the typical history and clinical signs were decisive in the differential diagnosis. The disease promptly cleared up after daily administration of 16 mg methylprednisolone-21-acetate tapering and 25 mg dapsone. Immunohistological detection of collagen IV at the base of a blister made it possible to localize the split above the lamina densa. The demonstration of collagen IV stresses the importance of immunodermatopathology in the differential diagnosis of subepidermal blistering diseases. PMID:8365883

  11. Retinoic acid acts as a selective human IgA switch factor.

    PubMed

    Seo, Goo-Young; Jang, Young-Saeng; Kim, Jini; Choe, Jongseon; Han, Hye-Ju; Lee, Jeong-Min; Kang, Seong-Ho; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Park, Seok-Rae; Kim, Woan-Sub; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2014-08-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is known to have several functions that lead to a potent mucosal IgA response. Nevertheless, its exact role in human IgA synthesis has yet to be elucidated. Thus, we investigated the role of RA in promoting IgA isotype switching in human B cells. We found that RA increased IgA production and the expression of germ-line IgA1 and IgA2 transcripts (GLTα1 and GLTα2). This induction occurred alongside an increase in the frequency of IgA1-secreting B cell clones, as assessed by limiting dilution analysis. Under the same conditions, RA did not increase IgM and IgG production. Am80, an agonist of RA receptor α (RARα), increased IgA production. In addition, RA activity was abrogated by LE540, an antagonist of RAR, suggesting that the RAR pathway is involved in RA-induced IgA production. Taken together, these results indicate that RA induces IgA isotype switching mainly through RARα in human B cells. PMID:24994461

  12. Isolation and detection of human IgA using a streptococcal IgA-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Sandin, Charlotta; Linse, Sara; Areschoug, Thomas; Woof, Jenny M; Reinholdt, Jesper; Lindahl, Gunnar

    2002-08-01

    Bacterial proteins that bind to the Fc part of IgG have found widespread use in immunology. A similar protein suitable for the isolation and detection of human IgA has not been described. Here, we show that a 50-residue synthetic peptide, designated streptococcal IgA-binding peptide (Sap) and derived from a streptococcal M protein, can be used for single-step affinity purification of human IgA. High affinity binding of IgA required the presence in Sap of a C-terminal cysteine residue, not present in the intact M protein. Passage of human serum through a Sap column caused depletion of >99% of the IgA, and elution of the column allowed quantitative recovery of highly purified IgA, for which the proportions of the IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses were the same as in whole serum. Moreover, immobilized Sap could be used for single-step purification of secretory IgA of both subclasses from human saliva, with a recovery of approximately 45%. The Sap peptide could also be used to specifically detect IgA bound to Ag. Together, these data indicate that Sap is a versatile Fc-binding reagent that may open new possibilities for the characterization of human IgA. PMID:12133959

  13. Characterization of IgA response among women with incident HPV 16 infection.

    PubMed

    Onda, Takashi; Carter, Joseph J; Koutsky, Laura A; Hughes, James P; Lee, Shu-Kuang; Kuypers, Jane; Kiviat, Nancy; Galloway, Denise A

    2003-07-20

    Previous studies have characterized the prevalence and duration of serum IgG antibodies to human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16) in a well-studied cohort of college women, using viruslike particle- (VLP) based ELISAs. In this study IgA antibodies in cervical secretions and sera were examined using a newly developed capsomer-based ELISA and the patterns observed for serum IgG, serum IgA, and cervical IgA antibodies were compared. The median time to antibody detection from the first detection of HPV 16 DNA was 10.5 months for IgA in cervical secretions and 19.1 months for serum IgA. Serum IgA antibody conversion was observed less frequently and occurred later than IgA conversion in cervical secretions (P = 0.011) or serum IgG conversion (P = 0.051). The median time to antibody reversion, following seroconversion, was 12.0 months for IgA in cervical secretions and 13.6 months for serum IgA, whereas approximately 20% of women with serum IgG antibodies reverted within 36 months. Thus, the duration of IgA in cervical secretions and sera was shorter than the duration of serum IgG (P = 0.007 and 0.001). PMID:12890634

  14. Markers for the progression of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Maixnerova, Dita; Reily, Colin; Bian, Qi; Neprasova, Michaela; Novak, Jan; Tesar, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    We have summarized the latest findings on markers for progression of immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy (IgAN), the most common primary glomerulonephritis with a high prevalence among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. The clinical predictors of renal outcome in IgAN nephropathy, such as proteinuria, hypertension, and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at the time of the diagnosis, are well known. The Oxford classification of IgAN identified four types of histological lesions (known as the MEST score) associated with the development of ESRD and/or a 50 % reduction in eGFR. In addition, the role of genetic risk factors associated with IgAN is being elucidated by genome-wide association studies, with multiple risk alleles described. Recently, biomarkers in serum (galactose-deficient IgA1, IgA/IgG autoantibodies against galactose-deficient IgA1, and soluble CD 89-IgA complexes) and urine (soluble transferrin receptor, interleukin-6/epidermal growth factor ratio, fractalkine, laminin G-like 3 peptide, κ light chains, and mannan-binding lectin) have been identified. Some of these biomarkers may represent candidates for the development of noninvasive diagnostic tests, that would be useful for detection of subclinical disease activity, monitoring disease progression, assessment of treatment, and at the same time circumventing the complications associated with renal biopsies. These advances, along with future disease-specific therapy, will be helpful in improving the treatment effectiveness, prognosis, and the quality of life in connection with IgAN. PMID:27142988

  15. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2–50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort. PMID:27187470

  16. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2-50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort. PMID:27187470

  17. How To Measure Gravitational Aberration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizek, M.; Solcova, A.

    2007-08-01

    In 1905, Henri Poincaré predicted the existence of gravitational waves and assumed that their speed c[g] would be that of the speed of light c. If the gravitational aberration would also have the same magnitude as the aberration of light, we would observe several paradoxical phenomena. For instance, the orbit of two bodies of equal mass would be unstable, since two attractive forces arise that are not in line and hence form a couple. This tends to increase the angular momentum, period, and total energy of the system. This can be modelled by a system of ordinary differential equations with delay. A big advantage of computer simulation is that we can easily perform many test for various possible values of the speed of gravity [1]. In [2], Carlip showed that gravitational aberration in general relativity is almost cancelled out by velocity-dependent interactions. This means that rays of sunlight are not parallel to the attractive gravitational force of the Sun, i.e., we do not see the Sun in the direction of its attractive force, but slightly shifted about an angle less than 20``. We show how the actual value of the gravitational aberration can be obtained by measurement of a single angle at a suitable time instant T corresponding to the perihelion of an elliptic orbit. We also derive an a priori error estimate that expresses how acurately T has to be determined to attain the gravitational aberration to a prescribed tolerance. [1] M. Křížek: Numerical experience with the finite speed of gravitational interaction, Math. Comput. Simulation 50 (1999), 237-245. [2] S. Carlip: Aberration and the speed of gravity, Phys. Lett. A 267 (2000), 81-87.

  18. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  19. Optimal Synthetic Glycosylation of a Therapeutic Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Thomas B.; Struwe, Weston B.; Gault, Joseph; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Taylor, Thomas A.; Raj, Ritu; Wals, Kim; Mohammed, Shabaz; Benesch, Justin L. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glycosylation patterns in antibodies critically determine biological and physical properties but their precise control is a significant challenge in biology and biotechnology. We describe herein the optimization of an endoglycosidase‐catalyzed glycosylation of the best‐selling biotherapeutic Herceptin, an anti‐HER2 antibody. Precise MS analysis of the intact four‐chain Ab heteromultimer reveals nonspecific, non‐enzymatic reactions (glycation), which are not detected under standard denaturing conditions. This competing reaction, which has hitherto been underestimated as a source of side products, can now be minimized. Optimization allowed access to the purest natural form of Herceptin to date (≥90 %). Moreover, through the use of a small library of sugars containing non‐natural functional groups, Ab variants containing defined numbers of selectively addressable chemical tags (reaction handles at Sia C1) in specific positions (for attachment of cargo molecules or “glycorandomization”) were readily generated.

  20. Optimal Synthetic Glycosylation of a Therapeutic Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Thomas B.; Struwe, Weston B.; Gault, Joseph; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Taylor, Thomas A.; Raj, Ritu; Wals, Kim; Mohammed, Shabaz; Benesch, Justin L. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glycosylation patterns in antibodies critically determine biological and physical properties but their precise control is a significant challenge in biology and biotechnology. We describe herein the optimization of an endoglycosidase‐catalyzed glycosylation of the best‐selling biotherapeutic Herceptin, an anti‐HER2 antibody. Precise MS analysis of the intact four‐chain Ab heteromultimer reveals nonspecific, non‐enzymatic reactions (glycation), which are not detected under standard denaturing conditions. This competing reaction, which has hitherto been underestimated as a source of side products, can now be minimized. Optimization allowed access to the purest natural form of Herceptin to date (≥90 %). Moreover, through the use of a small library of sugars containing non‐natural functional groups, Ab variants containing defined numbers of selectively addressable chemical tags (reaction handles at Sia C1) in specific positions (for attachment of cargo molecules or “glycorandomization”) were readily generated. PMID:26756880

  1. Optimal Synthetic Glycosylation of a Therapeutic Antibody.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Thomas B; Struwe, Weston B; Gault, Joseph; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Taylor, Thomas A; Raj, Ritu; Wals, Kim; Mohammed, Shabaz; Robinson, Carol V; Benesch, Justin L P; Davis, Benjamin G

    2016-02-01

    Glycosylation patterns in antibodies critically determine biological and physical properties but their precise control is a significant challenge in biology and biotechnology. We describe herein the optimization of an endoglycosidase-catalyzed glycosylation of the best-selling biotherapeutic Herceptin, an anti-HER2 antibody. Precise MS analysis of the intact four-chain Ab heteromultimer reveals nonspecific, non-enzymatic reactions (glycation), which are not detected under standard denaturing conditions. This competing reaction, which has hitherto been underestimated as a source of side products, can now be minimized. Optimization allowed access to the purest natural form of Herceptin to date (≥90 %). Moreover, through the use of a small library of sugars containing non-natural functional groups, Ab variants containing defined numbers of selectively addressable chemical tags (reaction handles at Sia C1) in specific positions (for attachment of cargo molecules or "glycorandomization") were readily generated. PMID:26756880

  2. A new synthetic access to 2-N-(glycosyl)thiosemicarbazides from 3-N-(glycosyl)oxadiazolinethiones and the regioselectivity of the glycosylation of their oxadiazolinethione precursors

    PubMed Central

    El Tamany, El Sayed H; Fattah, Mohy El Din Abdel; Aly, Mohamed R E; Boraei, Ahmed T A; Duerkop, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Glycosylations of 5-(1H-indol-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazoline-2(3H)-thione delivered various degrees of S- and/or N-glycosides depending on the reaction conditions. S-Glycosides were obtained regiospecifically by grinding oxadiazolinethiones with acylated α-D-glycosyl halides in basic alumina, whereas 3-N-(glycosyl)oxadiazolinethiones were selectively obtained by reaction with HgCl2 followed by heating the resultant chloromercuric salt with α-D-glycosyl halides in toluene under reflux. On using Et3N or K2CO3 as a base, mixtures of S- (major degree) and N-glycosides (minor degree) were obtained. Pure 3-N-(glycosyl)oxadiazolinethiones can also be selectively obtained from glycosylsulfanyloxadiazoles by the thermal S→N migration of the glycosyl moiety, which is proposed to occur by a tight-ion-pair mechanism. Thermal S→N migration of the glycosyl moiety can be used for purification of mixtures of S- or N-glycosides to obtain the pure N-glycosides. The aminolysis of the respective S- or N-glycosides with ammonia in aqueous methanol served as further confirmation of their structures. While in S-glycosides the glycosyl moiety was cleaved off again, 3-N-(glycosyl)oxadiazolinethiones showed a ring opening of the oxadiazoline ring (without affecting the glycosyl moiety) to give N-(glycosyl)thiosemicarbazides. Herewith, a new synthetic access to one of the four classes of glycosylthiosemicarbazides was found. The ultimate confirmation of new structures was achieved by X-ray crystallography. Finally, action of ammonia on benzylated 3-N-(galactosyl)oxadiazolinethione unexpectedly yielded 3-N-(galactosyl)triazolinethione. This represents a new path to the conversion of glycosyloxadiazolinethiones to new glycosyltriazolinethione nucleosides, which was until now unknown. PMID:23400104

  3. N-glycosylation requirements in neuromuscular synaptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, William; Dear, Mary Lynn; Rushton, Emma; Broadie, Kendal

    2013-01-01

    Neural development requires N-glycosylation regulation of intercellular signaling, but the requirements in synaptogenesis have not been well tested. All complex and hybrid N-glycosylation requires MGAT1 (UDP-GlcNAc:α-3-D-mannoside-β1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyl-transferase I) function, and Mgat1 nulls are the most compromised N-glycosylation condition that survive long enough to permit synaptogenesis studies. At the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), Mgat1 mutants display selective loss of lectin-defined carbohydrates in the extracellular synaptomatrix, and an accompanying accumulation of the secreted endogenous Mind the gap (MTG) lectin, a key synaptogenesis regulator. Null Mgat1 mutants exhibit strongly overelaborated synaptic structural development, consistent with inhibitory roles for complex/hybrid N-glycans in morphological synaptogenesis, and strengthened functional synapse differentiation, consistent with synaptogenic MTG functions. Synapse molecular composition is surprisingly selectively altered, with decreases in presynaptic active zone Bruchpilot (BRP) and postsynaptic Glutamate receptor subtype B (GLURIIB), but no detectable change in a wide range of other synaptic components. Synaptogenesis is driven by bidirectional trans-synaptic signals that traverse the glycan-rich synaptomatrix, and Mgat1 mutation disrupts both anterograde and retrograde signals, consistent with MTG regulation of trans-synaptic signaling. Downstream of intercellular signaling, pre- and postsynaptic scaffolds are recruited to drive synaptogenesis, and Mgat1 mutants exhibit loss of both classic Discs large 1 (DLG1) and newly defined Lethal (2) giant larvae [L(2)GL] scaffolds. We conclude that MGAT1-dependent N-glycosylation shapes the synaptomatrix carbohydrate environment and endogenous lectin localization within this domain, to modulate retention of trans-synaptic signaling ligands driving synaptic scaffold recruitment during synaptogenesis. PMID:24227656

  4. Nonenzymatic glycosylation of bovine myelin basic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hitz, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    In the CNS myelin sheath the nonenzymatic glycosylation reaction (at the early stage of the Amadori product) occurs only with the myelin basic protein and not with the other myelin proteins. This was observed in isolated bovine myelin by in vitro incubation with (/sup 14/C)-galactose and (/sup 14/C)-glucose. The respective in-vitro incorporation rates for purified bovine myelin basic protein with D-galactose, D-glucose and D-mannose were 7.2, 2.4 and 2.4 mmoles/mole myelin basic protein per day at 37/sup 0/C. A more rapid, HPLC method was devised and characterized to specifically analyze for the Amadori product. The HPLC method was correlated to the (/sup 14/C)-sugar incorporation method for myelin basic protein under a set of standard reaction conditions using (/sup 14/C)-glucose and (/sup 14/C)-mannose with HPLC values at 1/6 and 1/5 of the (/sup 14/C)-sugar incorporation method. A novel myelin basic protein purification step has been developed that yields a relativity proteolytic free preparation that is easy to work with, being totally soluble at a neutral pH. Nine new spots appear for a trypsinized glycosylated MBP in the paper peptide map of which eight correspond to positions of the (/sup 3/H)-labeled Amadori product in affinity isolated peptides. These studies provide a general characterization of and a structural basis for investigations on nonenzymatically glycosylated MBP as well as identifying MBP as the only nonenzymatically glycosylated protein in the CNS myelin sheath which may accumulate during aging, diabetes, and demyelinating diseases in general.

  5. Glycosylation Substrate Specificity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 Pilin*S

    PubMed Central

    Horzempa, Joseph; Comer, Jason E.; Davis, Sheila A.; Castric, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The β-carbon of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 pilin C-terminal Ser is a site of glycosylation. The present study was conducted to determine the pilin structures necessary for glycosylation. It was found that although Thr could be tolerated at the pilin C terminus, the blocking of the Ser carboxyl group with the addition of an Ala prevented glycosylation. Pilin from strain PA103 was not glycosylated by P. aeruginosa 1244, even when the C-terminal residue was converted to Ser. Substituting the disulfide loop region of strain PA103 pilin with that of strain 1244 allowed glycosylation to take place. Neither conversion of 1244 pilin disulfide loop Cys residues to Ala nor the deletion of segments of this structure prevented glycosylation. It was noted that the PA103 pilin disulfide loop environment was electronegative, whereas that of strain 1244 pilin had an overall positive charge. Insertion of a positive charge into the PA103 pilin disulfide loop of a mutant containing Ser at the C terminus allowed glycosylation to take place. Extending the “tail” region of the PA103 mutant pilin containing Ser at its terminus resulted in robust glycosylation. These results suggest that the terminal Ser is the major pilin glycosylation recognition feature and that this residue cannot be substituted at its carboxyl group. Although no other specific recognition features are present, the pilin surface must be compatible with the reaction apparatus for glycosylation to occur. PMID:16286455

  6. JAGN1 deficiency causes aberrant myeloid cell homeostasis and congenital neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Boztug, Kaan; Järvinen, Päivi M.; Salzer, Elisabeth; Racek, Tomas; Mönch, Sebastian; Garncarz, Wojciech; Gertz, E. Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Haslam, Stuart M.; Schieck, Lena; Puchałka, Jacek; Diestelhorst, Jana; Appaswamy, Giridharan; Lescoeur, Brigitte; Giambruno, Roberto; Bigenzahn, Johannes W.; Elling, Ulrich; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Conde, Cecilia Domínguez; Albert, Michael H.; Welte, Karl; Brandes, Gudrun; Sherkat, Roya; van der Werff ten Bosch, Jutte; Rezaei, Nima; Etzioni, Amos; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Penninger, Josef M.; Bennett, Keiryn L.; von Blume, Julia; Dell, Anne; Donadieu, Jean; Klein, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of patients with severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) may shed light on the delicate balance of factors controlling differentiation, maintenance, and decay of neutrophils. We identify 9 distinct homozygous mutations in the gene encoding Jagunal homolog 1 (JAGN1) in 14 SCN patients. JAGN1-mutant granulocytes are characterized by ultrastructural defects, paucity of granules, aberrant N-glycosylation of multiple proteins, and increased apoptosis. JAGN1 participates in the secretory pathway and is required for granulocyte-colony stimulating factor receptor-mediated signaling. JAGN1 emerges as a factor necessary in differentiation and survival of neutrophils. PMID:25129144

  7. Diversity in Protein Glycosylation among Insect Species

    PubMed Central

    Vandenborre, Gianni; Smagghe, Guy; Ghesquière, Bart; Menschaert, Gerben; Nagender Rao, Rameshwaram; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background A very common protein modification in multicellular organisms is protein glycosylation or the addition of carbohydrate structures to the peptide backbone. Although the Class of the Insecta is the largest animal taxon on Earth, almost all information concerning glycosylation in insects is derived from studies with only one species, namely the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Methodology/Principal Findings In this report, the differences in glycoproteomes between insects belonging to several economically important insect orders were studied. Using GNA (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin) affinity chromatography, different sets of glycoproteins with mannosyl-containing glycan structures were purified from the flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum), the silkworm (Bombyx mori), the honeybee (Apis mellifera), the fruit fly (D. melanogaster) and the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). To identify and characterize the purified glycoproteins, LC-MS/MS analysis was performed. For all insect species, it was demonstrated that glycoproteins were related to a broad range of biological processes and molecular functions. Moreover, the majority of glycoproteins retained on the GNA column were unique to one particular insect species and only a few glycoproteins were present in the five different glycoprotein sets. Furthermore, these data support the hypothesis that insect glycoproteins can be decorated with mannosylated O-glycans. Conclusions/Significance The results presented here demonstrate that oligomannose N-glycosylation events are highly specific depending on the insect species. In addition, we also demonstrated that protein O-mannosylation in insect species may occur more frequently than currently believed. PMID:21373189

  8. Glycosylation modulates arenavirus glycoprotein expression and function

    SciTech Connect

    Bonhomme, Cyrille J. Capul, Althea A. Lauron, Elvin J. Bederka, Lydia H. Knopp, Kristeene A. Buchmeier, Michael J.

    2011-01-20

    The glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) contains nine potential N-linked glycosylation sites. We investigated the function of these N-glycosylations by using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. All the available sites were occupied on GP1 and two of three on GP2. N-linked glycan mutations at positions 87 and 97 on GP1 resulted in reduction of expression and absence of cleavage and were necessary for downstream functions, as confirmed by the loss of GP-mediated fusion activity with T87A and S97A mutants. In contrast, T234A and E379N/A381T mutants impaired GP-mediated cell fusion without altered expression or processing. Infectivity via virus-like particles required glycans and a cleaved glycoprotein. Glycosylation at the first site within GP2, not normally utilized by LCMV, exhibited increased VLP infectivity. We also confirmed the role of the N-linked glycan at position 173 in the masking of the neutralizing epitope GP-1D. Taken together, our results indicated a strong relationship between fusion and infectivity.

  9. IgA production requires B cell interaction with subepithelial dendritic cells in Peyer's patches.

    PubMed

    Reboldi, Andrea; Arnon, Tal I; Rodda, Lauren B; Atakilit, Amha; Sheppard, Dean; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-05-13

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) induction primarily occurs in intestinal Peyer's patches (PPs). However, the cellular interactions necessary for IgA class switching are poorly defined. Here we show that in mice, activated B cells use the chemokine receptor CCR6 to access the subepithelial dome (SED) of PPs. There, B cells undergo prolonged interactions with SED dendritic cells (DCs). PP IgA class switching requires innate lymphoid cells, which promote lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR)-dependent maintenance of DCs. PP DCs augment IgA production by integrin αvβ8-mediated activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ). In mice where B cells cannot access the SED, IgA responses against oral antigen and gut commensals are impaired. These studies establish the PP SED as a niche supporting DC-B cell interactions needed for TGFβ activation and induction of mucosal IgA responses. PMID:27174992

  10. TMEM199 Deficiency Is a Disorder of Golgi Homeostasis Characterized by Elevated Aminotransferases, Alkaline Phosphatase, and Cholesterol and Abnormal Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Jos C.; Timal, Sharita; van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Michelakakis, Helen; Vicogne, Dorothée; Ashikov, Angel; Moraitou, Marina; Hoischen, Alexander; Huijben, Karin; Steenbergen, Gerry; van den Boogert, Marjolein A.W.; Porta, Francesco; Calvo, Pier Luigi; Mavrikou, Mersyni; Cenacchi, Giovanna; van den Bogaart, Geert; Salomon, Jody; Holleboom, Adriaan G.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Drenth, Joost P.H.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Wevers, Ron A.; Morava, Eva; Foulquier, François; Veltman, Joris A.; Lefeber, Dirk J.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) form a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases with aberrant protein glycosylation as a hallmark. A subgroup of CDGs can be attributed to disturbed Golgi homeostasis. However, identification of pathogenic variants is seriously complicated by the large number of proteins involved. As part of a strategy to identify human homologs of yeast proteins that are known to be involved in Golgi homeostasis, we identified uncharacterized transmembrane protein 199 (TMEM199, previously called C17orf32) as a human homolog of yeast V-ATPase assembly factor Vph2p (also known as Vma12p). Subsequently, we analyzed raw exome-sequencing data from families affected by genetically unsolved CDGs and identified four individuals with different mutations in TMEM199. The adolescent individuals presented with a mild phenotype of hepatic steatosis, elevated aminotransferases and alkaline phosphatase, and hypercholesterolemia, as well as low serum ceruloplasmin. Affected individuals showed abnormal N- and mucin-type O-glycosylation, and mass spectrometry indicated reduced incorporation of galactose and sialic acid, as seen in other Golgi homeostasis defects. Metabolic labeling of sialic acids in fibroblasts confirmed deficient Golgi glycosylation, which was restored by lentiviral transduction with wild-type TMEM199. V5-tagged TMEM199 localized with ERGIC and COPI markers in HeLa cells, and electron microscopy of a liver biopsy showed dilated organelles suggestive of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In conclusion, we have identified TMEM199 as a protein involved in Golgi homeostasis and show that TMEM199 deficiency results in a hepatic phenotype with abnormal glycosylation. PMID:26833330

  11. Mutagenesis of the human IgA1 heavy chain tailpiece that prevents dimer assembly.

    PubMed

    Atkin, J D; Pleass, R J; Owens, R J; Woof, J M

    1996-07-01

    The structural features of the human IgA1 tailpiece required for interaction with J chain in IgA dimer assembly were investigated using a protein engineering approach. Wild-type and mutant forms of IgA1 were expressed in the mouse myeloma cell line, J558L, which endogenously expresses J chain. Wild-type IgA1 was secreted as a mixture of dimers and monomers. Deletion of the entire tailpiece by stop codon introduction completely prevented dimer formation. Similarly, substitution of the penultimate residue of the tailpiece, Cys471, with serine resulted in the secretion of IgA monomers alone. Substitution of Asn459 with alanine to prevent attachment of N-linked carbohydrate to the tailpiece also resulted in markedly reduced dimer assembly. These results indicate the critical role played by the tailpiece, and Cys471 in particular, in IgA dimerization. In addition, we found tailpiece-deleted IgA1 and the Cys to Ser471 mutant IgA1 were secreted as mixtures of covalently associated monomers (alpha 2L2) and alpha L half-molecules. The tailpiece may thus play some role in promoting the association of alpha-chains required for IgA monomer assembly. PMID:8683109

  12. [The alterations of proteins glycosylation in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Chludzińska, Anna; Chrostek, Lech; Cylwik, Bogdan

    2012-08-01

    The alterations in glycosylation of serum glycoproteins were reported in several pathological conditions including rheumatic diseases. The many studies demonstrated the occurrence of some differentially glycosylated plasma immunoglobulins, especially IgG in rheumatoid arthritis. The most characteristic features are the decrease in galactose content, the presence of N-acetylglucosamine and the increase in fucose content. The structure of oligosaccharides attached to the antibody Fc region affect the pharmacokinetics and antibody effector functions of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The changes in immunoglobulin glycosylation was suggested to be important in the etiology of rheumatoid athritis and correlated with the disease severity. In addition to impaired glycosylation of imunoglubulins, in rheumatic diseases exist the disturbances in glycosylation of both acute-phase and non acute-phase response, such as alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin and alpha-2 macroglobulin. The alterations in glycosylation of these glycoproteins were also correlated with the disease activity. PMID:23009010

  13. IgA in the horse: cloning of equine polymeric Ig receptor and J chain and characterization of recombinant forms of equine IgA.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M J; Wagner, B; Irvine, R M; Woof, J M

    2010-11-01

    As in other mammals, immunoglobulin A (IgA) in the horse has a key role in immune defense. To better dissect equine IgA function, we isolated complementary DNA (cDNA) clones for equine J chain and polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR). When coexpressed with equine IgA, equine J chain promoted efficient IgA polymerization. A truncated version of equine pIgR, equivalent to secretory component, bound with nanomolar affinity to recombinant equine and human dimeric IgA but not with monomeric IgA from either species. Searches of the equine genome localized equine J chain and pIgR to chromosomes 3 and 5, respectively, with J chain and pIgR coding sequence distributed across 4 and 11 exons, respectively. Comparisons of transcriptional regulatory sequences suggest that horse and human pIgR expression is controlled through common regulatory mechanisms that are less conserved in rodents. These studies pave the way for full dissection of equine IgA function and open up possibilities for immune-based treatment of equine diseases. PMID:20631692

  14. Chemically-blocked Antibody Microarray for Multiplexed High-throughput Profiling of Specific Protein Glycosylation in Complex Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chen; Wonsidler, Joshua L.; Li, Jianwei; Du, Yanming; Block, Timothy; Haab, Brian; Chen, Songming

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we describe an effective protocol for use in a multiplexed high-throughput antibody microarray with glycan binding protein detection that allows for the glycosylation profiling of specific proteins. Glycosylation of proteins is the most prevalent post-translational modification found on proteins, and leads diversified modifications of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of proteins. Because the glycosylation machinery is particularly susceptible to disease progression and malignant transformation, aberrant glycosylation has been recognized as early detection biomarkers for cancer and other diseases. However, current methods to study protein glycosylation typically are too complicated or expensive for use in most normal laboratory or clinical settings and a more practical method to study protein glycosylation is needed. The new protocol described in this study makes use of a chemically blocked antibody microarray with glycan-binding protein (GBP) detection and significantly reduces the time, cost, and lab equipment requirements needed to study protein glycosylation. In this method, multiple immobilized glycoprotein-specific antibodies are printed directly onto the microarray slides and the N-glycans on the antibodies are blocked. The blocked, immobilized glycoprotein-specific antibodies are able to capture and isolate glycoproteins from a complex sample that is applied directly onto the microarray slides. Glycan detection then can be performed by the application of biotinylated lectins and other GBPs to the microarray slide, while binding levels can be determined using Dylight 549-Streptavidin. Through the use of an antibody panel and probing with multiple biotinylated lectins, this method allows for an effective glycosylation profile of the different proteins found in a given human or animal sample to be developed. Introduction Glycosylation of protein, which is the most ubiquitous post-translational modification on proteins, modifies

  15. Distortion of ultrashort pulses caused by aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Z. L.; Kovács, A. P.; Bor, Zs.

    The effect of the primary wave aberrations (spherical aberration, astigmatism and coma) on ultrashort pulses is studied by the Nijboer-Zernike theory. The results of the geometrical and the wave optical treatments are compared.

  16. Effect of mutations in the human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) hinge on its susceptibility to cleavage by diverse bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, Bernard W; Woof, Jenny M

    2005-03-01

    Components of the human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) hinge governing sensitivity to cleavage by bacterial IgA1 proteases were investigated. Recombinant antibodies with distinct hinge mutations were constructed from a hybrid comprised of human IgA2 bearing half of the human IgA1 hinge region. This hybrid antibody and all the mutant antibodies derived from it were resistant to cleavage by the IgA1 proteases from Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 strains but were cleaved to various degrees by those of Streptococcus pneumoniae, some Streptococcus sanguis strains, and the type 1 and 2 IgA1 proteases of Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Remarkably, those proteases that cleave a Pro-Ser peptide bond in the wild-type IgA1 hinge were able to cleave mutant antibodies lacking a Pro-Ser peptide bond in the hinge, and those that cleave a Pro-Thr peptide bond in the wild-type IgA1 hinge were able to cleave mutant antibodies devoid of a Pro-Thr peptide bond in the hinge. Thus, the enzymes can cleave alternatives to their preferred postproline peptide bond when such a bond is unavailable. Peptide sequence analysis of a representative antibody digestion product confirmed this conclusion. The presence of a cleavable peptide bond near the CH2 end of the hinge appeared to result in greater cleavage than if the scissile bond was at the CH1 end of the hinge. Proline-to-serine substitution at residue 230 in a hinge containing potentially cleavable Pro-Ser and Pro-Thr peptide bonds increased the resistance of the antibody to cleavage by many IgA1 proteases. PMID:15731049

  17. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... diabetes and to determine the proper insulin dosage for a patient. Elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin indicate uncontrolled diabetes in a patient. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  18. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... diabetes and to determine the proper insulin dosage for a patient. Elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin indicate uncontrolled diabetes in a patient. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  19. Using geometric algebra to study optical aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, J.; Ziock, H.

    1997-05-01

    This paper uses Geometric Algebra (GA) to study vector aberrations in optical systems with square and round pupils. GA is a new way to produce the classical optical aberration spot diagrams on the Gaussian image plane and surfaces near the Gaussian image plane. Spot diagrams of the third, fifth and seventh order aberrations for square and round pupils are developed to illustrate the theory.

  20. Central MHC genes affect IgA levels in the human: reciprocal effects in IgA deficiency and IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Vance B; Witt, Campbell S; French, Martyn A H; Machulla, Helmut K G; De la Concha, Emilio G; Cheong, Karey Y; Vigil, Patricia; Hollingsworth, Peter N; Warr, Kevin J; Christiansen, Frank T; Price, Patricia

    2002-05-01

    This study investigates the hypothesis that alternative alleles of one or more genes in the central major histocompatibility complex (MHC) predispose carriers to IgA deficiency (IgAD) or IgA Nephropathy (IgAN). Australian caucasian IgAD, IgAN patients, and controls were typed at HLA loci, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and microsatellites in the MHC. Alleles of the D6S273 microsatellite exhibited strong associations with IgAD and IgAN. D6S273*129 and *139 were more frequent in IgAD and less frequent in IgAN patients than controls. The reverse was true for D6S273*133 and *131. Alleles of other microsatellites exhibited weak associations with IgAD or IgAN. D6S273*129 is found on the 65.1 ancestral haplotype [HLA-B14(65),DR1], which has been reported to be increased in IgAD, but the majority of IgAD patients with D6S273*129 did not have other alleles of the haplotype. D6S273*139 is characteristic of the 8.1 ancestral haplotype (HLA-A1,B8,DR3), which was common in IgAD and rare in IgAN patients. Further studies of the 8.1 haplotype in Australian, German and Spanish caucasian subjects revealed that HLA-DR3, in the absence of -B8, is not associated with IgAD. However -B8 is associated with IgAD in the absence of -DR3, consistent with a susceptibility locus in the central MHC. Provisional mapping within this region is discussed. PMID:11975987

  1. Pivotal Role of MUC1 Glycosylation by Cigarette Smoke in Modulating Disruption of Airway Adherens Junctions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Gallup, Marianne; Zlock, Lorna; Chen, Yu Ting Feeling; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; McNamara, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke increases the risk of lung cancer by 20-fold and accounts for 87% of lung cancer deaths. In the normal airway, heavily O-glycosylated mucin-1 (MUC1) and adherens junctions (AJs) establish a structural barrier that protects the airway from infectious, inflammatory and noxious stimuli. Smoke disrupts cell-cell adhesion via its damaging effects on the AJ protein, epithelial cadherin (E-cad). Loss of E-cad is a major hallmark of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and has been reported in lung cancer where it is associated with invasion, metastasis and poor prognosis. Using organotypic cultures of primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with smoke-concentrated medium (Smk), we have demonstrated that E-cad loss is regulated through the aberrant interaction of its AJ binding partner, p120-catenin (p120ctn), and the C-terminus of MUC1 (MUC1-C). Here, we reported that even before MUC1-C became bound to p120ctn, smoke promoted the generation of a novel 400kDa glycoform of MUC1’s N-terminus (MUC1-N) differing from the 230kDa and 150kDa glycoforms in untreated control cells. The subsequent smoke-induced, time-dependent shedding of glycosylated MUC1-N exposed MUC1-C as a putative receptor for interactions with EGFR, Src and p120ctn. Smoke-induced MUC1-C glycosylation modulated MUC1-C tyrosine phosphorylation (TyrP) that was essential for MUC1-C/p120ctn interaction through dose-dependent bridging of Src/MUC1-C/galectin-3/EGFR signalosomes. Chemical deglycosylation of MUC1 using a mixture of N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin and O-glycosylation inhibitor benzyl-α-GalNAc disrupted the Src/MUC1-C/galectin-3/EGFR complexes and thereby abolished smoke-induced MUC1-C-TyrP and MUC1-C/p120ctn interaction. Similarly, inhibition of smoke-induced MUC1-N glycosylation using adenoviral shRNA directed against N-acetyl-galactosaminyl transferase-6 (GALNT6, an enzyme that controls the initiating step of O-glycosylation) successfully suppressed MUC1-C

  2. A Propos of Glycosyl Cations and the Mechanism of Chemical Glycosylation; the Current State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Bohé, Luis

    2014-01-01

    An overview of recent advances in glycosylation with particular emphasis on mechanism is presented. The mounting evidence for both the existence of glycosyl oxocarbenium ions as fleeting intermediates in some reactions, and the crucial role of the associated in counter ion in others is discussed. The extremes of the SN1 and SN2 manifolds for the glycosylation reaction are bridged by a continuum of mechanisms in which it appears likely that most examples are located. PMID:25108484

  3. Gluten exacerbates IgA nephropathy in humanized mice through gliadin-CD89 interaction.

    PubMed

    Papista, Christina; Lechner, Sebastian; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; LeStang, Marie-Bénédicte; Abbad, Lilia; Bex-Coudrat, Julie; Pillebout, Evangéline; Chemouny, Jonathan M; Jablonski, Mathieu; Flamant, Martin; Daugas, Eric; Vrtovsnik, François; Yiangou, Minas; Berthelot, Laureline; Monteiro, Renato C

    2015-08-01

    IgA1 complexes containing deglycosylated IgA1, IgG autoantibodies, and a soluble form of the IgA receptor (sCD89), are hallmarks of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Food antigens, notably gluten, are associated with increased mucosal response and IgAN onset, but their implication in the pathology remains unknown. Here, an IgAN mouse model expressing human IgA1 and CD89 was used to examine the role of gluten in IgAN. Mice were given a gluten-free diet for three generations to produce gluten sensitivity, and then challenged for 30 days with a gluten diet. A gluten-free diet resulted in a decrease of mesangial IgA1 deposits, transferrin 1 receptor, and transglutaminase 2 expression, as well as hematuria. Mice on a gluten-free diet lacked IgA1-sCD89 complexes in serum and kidney eluates. Disease severity depended on gluten and CD89, as shown by reappearance of IgAN features in mice on a gluten diet and by direct binding of the gluten-subcomponent gliadin to sCD89. A gluten diet exacerbated intestinal IgA1 secretion, inflammation, and villous atrophy, and increased serum IgA1 anti-gliadin antibodies, which correlated with proteinuria in mice and patients. Moreover, early treatment of humanized mice with a gluten-free diet prevented mesangial IgA1 deposits and hematuria. Thus, gliadin-CD89 interaction may aggravate IgAN development through induction of IgA1-sCD89 complex formation and a mucosal immune response. Hence, early-stage treatment with a gluten-free diet could be beneficial to prevent disease. PMID:25807036

  4. Parallel data acquisition of in-source fragmented glycopeptides to sequence the glycosylation sites of proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingfu; Song, Ehwang; Zhu, Rui; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-06-01

    Glycosylation plays important roles in maintaining protein stability and controlling biological processes. In recent years, the correlation between aberrant glycoproteins and many diseases has been reported. Hence, qualitative and quantitative analyses of glycoproteins are necessary to understand physiological processes. LC-MS/MS analysis of glycopeptides is faced with the low glycopeptide signal intensities and low peptide sequence identification. In our study, in-source fragmentation (ISF) was used in conjunction with LC-MS/MS to facilitate the parallel acquisition of peptide backbone sequence and glycan composition information. In ISF method, the identification of glycosylation sites depended on the detection of Y1 ion (ion of peptide backbone with an N-acetylglucosamine attached). To attain dominant Y1 ions, a range of source fragmentation voltages was studied using fetuin. A 45 V ISF voltage was found to be the most efficient voltage for the analysis of glycoproteins. ISF was employed to study the glycosylation sites of three model glycoproteins, including fetuin, α1-acid glycoprotein and porcine thyroglobulin. The approach was then used to analyze blood serum samples. Y1 ions of glycopeptides in tryptic digests of samples were detected. Y1 ions of glycopeptides with different sialic acid groups are observed at different retention times, representing the various numbers of sialic acid moieties associated with the same peptide backbone sequence. With ISF facilitating the peptide backbone sequencing of glycopeptides, identified peptide sequence coverage was increased. For example, identified fetuin sequence percentage was improved from 39 to 80% in MASCOT database searching compared to conventional CID method. The formation of Y1 ions and oxonium ions in ISF facilitates glycopeptide sequencing and glycan composition identification. PMID:26957414

  5. MUC1 Vaccines, Comprised of Glycosylated or Non-Glycosylated Peptides or Tumor-Derived MUC1, Can Circumvent Immunoediting to Control Tumor Growth in MUC1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Vani; Supekar, Nitin T.; Wei, Jie; McCurry, Dustin B.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Kosiorek, Heidi E.; Trivedi, Priyanka P.; Bradley, Judy M.; Madsen, Cathy S.; Pathangey, Latha B.; Hoelzinger, Dominique B.; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    It remains challenging to produce decisive vaccines against MUC1, a tumor-associated antigen widely expressed by pancreas, breast and other tumors. Employing clinically relevant mouse models, we ruled out such causes as irreversible T-cell tolerance, inadequate avidity, and failure of T-cells to recognize aberrantly glycosylated tumor MUC1. Instead, every tested MUC1 preparation, even non-glycosylated synthetic 9mer peptides, induced interferon gamma-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells that recognized glycosylated variants including tumor-associated MUC1. Vaccination with synthetic peptides conferred protection as long as vaccination was repeated post tumor challenge. Failure to revaccinate post challenge was associated with down-regulated tumor MUC1 and MHC molecules. Surprisingly, direct admixture of MUC1-expressing tumor with MUC1-hyperimmune T-cells could not prevent tumor outgrowth or MUC1 immunoediting, whereas ex vivo activation of the hyperimmune T-cells prior to tumor admixture rendered them curative. Therefore, surrogate T-cell preactivation outside the tumor bed, either in culture or by repetitive vaccination, can overcome tumor escape. PMID:26788922

  6. Transmission of IgA to the rabbit foetus and the suckling rat

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, W. A.; Jones, R. E.; Williams, E. W.

    1973-01-01

    The transmission of purified preparations of rabbit and human colostral IgA globulin were studied in the rabbit across the yolk-sac splanchnopleur and in the young rat across the gut. Little or no IgA was transferred in either species. PMID:4201824

  7. Neutrophils negatively regulate induction of mucosal IgA responses after sublingual immunization.

    PubMed

    Jee, J; Bonnegarde-Bernard, A; Duverger, A; Iwakura, Y; Cormet-Boyaka, E; Martin, T L; Steiner, H E; Bachman, R C; Boyaka, P N

    2015-07-01

    Induction of mucosal immunoglobulin-A (IgA) capable of providing a first line of defense against bacterial and viral pathogens remains a major goal of needle-free vaccines given via mucosal routes. Innate immune cells are known to play a central role in induction of IgA responses by mucosal vaccines, but the relative contribution of myeloid cell subsets to these responses has not firmly been established. Using an in vivo model of sublingual vaccination with Bacillus anthracis edema toxin (EdTx) as adjuvant, we examined the role of myeloid cell subsets for mucosal secretory IgA responses. Sublingual immunization of wild-type mice resulted in a transient increase of neutrophils in sublingual tissues and cervical lymph nodes. These mice later developed Ag-specific serum IgG responses, but not serum or mucosal IgA. Interestingly, EdTx failed to increase neutrophils in sublingual tissues and cervical lymph nodes of IKKβ(ΔMye) mice, and these mice developed IgA responses. Partial depletion of neutrophils before immunization of wild-type mice allowed the development of both mucosal and serum IgA responses. Finally, co-culture of B cells with neutrophils from either wild-type or IKKβ(ΔMye) mice suppressed secretion of IgA, but not IgM or IgG. These results identify a new role for neutrophils as negative regulators of IgA responses. PMID:25563500

  8. Neutrophils negatively regulate induction of mucosal IgA responses after sublingual immunization

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Junbae; Bonnegarde-Bernard, Astrid; Duverger, Alexandra; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Martin, Tara L.; Steiner, Haley E.; Bachman, Ryan C.; Boyaka, Prosper N.

    2015-01-01

    Induction of mucosal IgA capable of providing a first line of defense against bacterial and viral pathogens remains a major goal of needle-free vaccines given via mucosal routes. Innate immune cells are known to play a central role in induction of IgA responses by mucosal vaccines, but the relative contribution of myeloid cell subsets to these responses has not firmly been established. Using an in vivo model of sublingual vaccination with Bacillus anthracis edema toxin (EdTx) as adjuvant, we examined the role of myeloid cell subsets for mucosal secretory IgA responses. Sublingual immunization of wild-type mice resulted in a transient increase of neutrophils in sublingual tissues and cervical lymph nodes. These mice later developed Ag-specific serum IgG responses, but not serum or mucosal IgA. Interestingly, EdTx failed to increase neutrophils in sublingual tissues of IKKβΔMye mice, and these mice developed IgA responses. Partial depletion of neutrophils before immunization of wild-type mice allowed the development of both mucosal and serum IgA responses. Finally, co-culture of B cells with neutrophils from either wild-type or IKKβΔMye mice suppressed production of IgA, but not IgM or IgG. These results identify a new role for neutrophils as negative regulators of IgA responses. PMID:25563500

  9. Correlations between corneal and total wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrochen, Michael; Jankov, Mirko; Bueeler, Michael; Seiler, Theo

    2002-06-01

    Purpose: Corneal topography data expressed as corneal aberrations are frequently used to report corneal laser surgery results. However, the optical image quality at the retina depends on all optical elements of the eye such as the human lens. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlations between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations and to discuss the importance of corneal aberrations for representing corneal laser surgery results. Methods: Thirty three eyes of 22 myopic subjects were measured with a corneal topography system and a Tschernig-type wavefront analyzer after the pupils were dilated to at least 6 mm in diameter. All measurements were centered with respect to the line of sight. Corneal and total wavefront aberrations were calculated up to the 6th Zernike order in the same reference plane. Results: Statistically significant correlations (p < 0.05) between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations were found for the astigmatism (C3,C5) and all 3rd Zernike order coefficients such as coma (C7,C8). No statistically significant correlations were found for all 4th to 6th order Zernike coefficients except for the 5th order horizontal coma C18 (p equals 0.003). On average, all Zernike coefficients for the corneal aberrations were found to be larger compared to Zernike coefficients for the total wavefront aberrations. Conclusions: Corneal aberrations are only of limited use for representing the optical quality of the human eye after corneal laser surgery. This is due to the lack of correlation between corneal and total wavefront aberrations in most of the higher order aberrations. Besides this, the data present in this study yield towards an aberration balancing between corneal aberrations and the optical elements within the eye that reduces the aberration from the cornea by a certain degree. Consequently, ideal customized ablations have to take both, corneal and total wavefront aberrations, into consideration.

  10. Glycosylation of plant produced human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kallolimath, Somanath; Steinkellner, Herta

    2015-12-23

    Human immunoglobulins circulate as highly heterogeneously glycosylated mixture of otherwise homogeneous protein backbones. A series of studies, mainly on IgG, have unequivocally proven that antibodies modulate their effector function through sugars present in the Fc domain. However, our limited technology in producing complex proteins such as antibodies, with defined glycan structures hamper in depths studies. This review introduces a plant based expression platform enabling engineering of antibody glycans. The procedure is based on the simultaneous delivery of appropriate constructs, carrying cDNAs of target proteins (e.g. heavy and light chain of antibodies) in combination with human glycosylation enzymes into plant leaves. Harvesting of recombinant proteins one week post construct delivery allows high speed and flexibility. Major achievements include the production of functional active slialylated pentameric IgMs in tobacco leaves. The system provides a viable approach to the generation of antibodies with defined glycoforms on demand, contributing to studies on antibody glycans and the development of novel antibody based drugs. PMID:27472861

  11. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses by dietary palmitic acid and its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kunisawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Eri; Inoue, Asuka; Nagasawa, Risa; Suzuki, Yuji; Ishikawa, Izumi; Shikata, Shiori; Arita, Makoto; Aoki, Junken; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-08-15

    Enhancement of intestinal IgA responses is a primary strategy in the development of oral vaccine. Dietary fatty acids are known to regulate host immune responses. In this study, we show that dietary palmitic acid (PA) and its metabolites enhance intestinal IgA responses. Intestinal IgA production was increased in mice maintained on a PA-enriched diet. These mice also showed increased intestinal IgA responses against orally immunized Ag, without any effect on serum Ab responses. We found that PA directly stimulates plasma cells to produce Ab. In addition, mice receiving a PA-enriched diet had increased numbers of IgA-producing plasma cells in the large intestine; this effect was abolished when serine palmitoyltransferase was inhibited. These findings suggest that dietary PA regulates intestinal IgA responses and has the potential to be a diet-derived mucosal adjuvant. PMID:25031459

  12. Analysis of glycosylation motifs and glycosyltransferases in Bacteria and Archaea.

    PubMed

    Tabish, Syed; Raza, Abbas; Nasir, Arshan; Zafar, Sadia; Bokhari, Habib

    2011-01-01

    The process of glycosylation has been studied extensively in prokaryotes but many questions still remain unanswered. Glycosyltransferase is the enzyme which mediates glycosylation and has its preference for the target glycosylation sites as well as for the type of glycosylation i.e. N-linked and O-linked glycosylation. In this study we carried out the bioinformatics analysis of one of the key enzymes of pgl locus from Campylobacter jejuni, known as PglB, which is distributed widely in bacteria and AglB from archaea. Relatively little sequence similarity was observed in the archaeal AglB(s) as compared to those of the bacterial PglB(s). In addition we tried to the answer the question of as to why not all the sequins Asp-X-Ser/Thr have an equal opportunity to be glycosylated by looking at the influence of the neighboring amino acids but no significant conserved pattern of the flanking sites could be identified. The software tool was developed to predict the potential glycosylation sites in autotransporter protein, the virulence factors of gram negative bacteria, and our results revealed that the frequency of glycosylation sites was higher in adhesins (a subclass of autotransporters) relative to the other classes of autotransporters. PMID:21738312

  13. Glycosylation of Cellulases: Engineering Better Enzymes for Biofuels.

    PubMed

    Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose in plant cell walls is the largest reservoir of renewable carbon on Earth. The saccharification of cellulose from plant biomass into soluble sugars can be achieved using fungal and bacterial cellulolytic enzymes, cellulases, and further converted into fuels and chemicals. Most fungal cellulases are both N- and O-glycosylated in their native form, yet the consequences of glycosylation on activity and structure are not fully understood. Studying protein glycosylation is challenging as glycans are extremely heterogeneous, stereochemically complex, and glycosylation is not under direct genetic control. Despite these limitations, many studies have begun to unveil the role of cellulase glycosylation, especially in the industrially relevant cellobiohydrolase from Trichoderma reesei, Cel7A. Glycosylation confers many beneficial properties to cellulases including enhanced activity, thermal and proteolytic stability, and structural stabilization. However, glycosylation must be controlled carefully as such positive effects can be dampened or reversed. Encouragingly, methods for the manipulation of glycan structures have been recently reported that employ genetic tuning of glycan-active enzymes expressed from homogeneous and heterologous fungal hosts. Taken together, these studies have enabled new strategies for the exploitation of protein glycosylation for the production of enhanced cellulases for biofuel production. PMID:26613815

  14. Solution structure determination of monomeric human IgA2 by X-ray and neutron scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and constrained modelling: a comparison with monomeric human IgA1.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Patricia B; Whitty, Patrick W; Robertson, Alexis; Eaton, Julian T; Almogren, Adel; Kerr, Michael A; Woof, Jenny M; Perkins, Stephen J

    2004-05-14

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA), the most abundant human immunoglobulin, mediates immune protection at mucosal surfaces as well as in plasma. It exists as two subclasses IgA1 and IgA2, and IgA2 is found in at least two allotypic forms, IgA2m(1) or IgA2m(2). Compared to IgA1, IgA2 has a much shorter hinge region, which joins the two Fab and one Fc fragments. In order to assess its solution structure, monomeric recombinant IgA2m(1) was studied by X-ray and neutron scattering. Its Guinier X-ray radius of gyration R(G) is 5.18 nm and its neutron R(G) is 5.03 nm, both of which are significantly smaller than those for monomeric IgA1 at 6.1-6.2 nm. The distance distribution function P(r)for IgA2m(1) showed a broad peak with a subpeak and gave a maximum dimension of 17 nm, in contrast to the P(r) curve for IgA1, which showed two distinct peaks and a maximum dimension of 21 nm. The sedimentation coefficients of IgA1 and IgA2m(1) were 6.2S and 6.4S, respectively. These data show that the solution structure of IgA2m(1) is significantly more compact than IgA1. The complete monomeric IgA2m(1) structure was modelled using molecular dynamics to generate random IgA2 hinge structures, to which homology models for the Fab and Fc fragments were connected to generate 10,000 full models. A total of 104 compact best-fit IgA2m(1) models gave good curve fits. These best-fit models were modified by linking the two Fab light chains with a disulphide bridge that is found in IgA2m(1), and subjecting these to energy refinement to optimise this linkage. The averaged solution structure of the arrangement of the Fab and Fc fragments in IgA2m(1) was found to be predominantly T-shaped and flexible, but also included Y-shaped structures. The IgA2 models show full steric access to the two FcalphaRI-binding sites at the Calpha2-Calpha3 interdomain region in the Fc fragment. Since previous scattering modelling had shown that IgA1 also possessed a flexible T-shaped solution structure, such a T-shape may be

  15. The Tetraspanin CD37 Protects Against Glomerular IgA Deposition and Renal Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rops, Angelique L.; Figdor, Carl G.; van der Schaaf, Alie; Tamboer, Wim P.; Bakker, Marinka A.; Berden, Jo H.; Dijkman, Henry B.P.M.; Steenbergen, Eric J.; van der Vlag, Johan; van Spriel, Annemiek B.

    2010-01-01

    The tetraspanin protein CD37 is a leukocyte-specific transmembrane protein that is highly expressed on B cells. CD37-deficient (CD37−/−) mice exhibit a 15-fold increased level of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in serum and elevated numbers of IgA+ plasma cells in lymphoid organs. Here, we report that CD37−/− mice spontaneously develop renal pathology with characteristics of human IgA nephropathy. In young naïve CD37−/− mice, mild IgA deposition in glomeruli was observed. However, CD37−/− mice developed high titers of IgA immune complexes in serum during aging, which was associated with increased glomerular IgA deposition. Severe mesangial proliferation, fibrosis, and hyalinosis were apparent in aged CD37−/− mice, whereas albuminuria was mild. To further evaluate the role of CD37 in glomerular disease, we induced anti–glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in mice. CD37−/− mice developed higher IgA serum levels and glomerular deposits of anti-GBM IgA compared with wild-type mice. Importantly, glomerular macrophage and neutrophil influx was significantly higher in CD37−/− mice during both the heterologous and autologous phase of anti-GBM nephritis. Taken together, tetraspanin CD37 controls the formation of IgA-containing immune complexes and glomerular IgA deposition, which induces influx of inflammatory myeloid cells. Therefore, CD37 may protect against the development of IgA nephropathy. PMID:20348240

  16. The Tetraspanin Protein CD37 Regulates IgA Responses and Anti-Fungal Immunity

    PubMed Central

    van Spriel, Annemiek B.; Sofi, Mariam; Gartlan, Kate H.; van der Schaaf, Alie; Verschueren, Ineke; Torensma, Ruurd; Raymakers, Reinier A. P.; Loveland, Bruce E.; Netea, Mihai G.; Adema, Gosse J.

    2009-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) secretion by plasma cells in the immune system is critical for protecting the host from environmental and microbial infections. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of IgA+ plasma cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that the B cell–expressed tetraspanin CD37 inhibits IgA immune responses in vivo. CD37-deficient (CD37−/−) mice exhibit a 15-fold increased level of IgA in serum and significantly elevated numbers of IgA+ plasma cells in spleen, mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue, as well as bone marrow. Analyses of bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that CD37–deficiency on B cells was directly responsible for the increased IgA production. We identified high local interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in germinal centers of CD37−/− mice after immunization. Notably, neutralizing IL-6 in vivo reversed the increased IgA response in CD37−/− mice. To demonstrate the importance of CD37—which can associate with the pattern-recognition receptor dectin-1—in immunity to infection, CD37−/− mice were exposed to Candida albicans. We report that CD37−/− mice are evidently better protected from infection than wild-type (WT) mice, which was accompanied by increased IL-6 levels and C. albicans–specific IgA antibodies. Importantly, adoptive transfer of CD37−/− serum mediated protection in WT mice and the underlying mechanism involved direct neutralization of fungal cells by IgA. Taken together, tetraspanin protein CD37 inhibits IgA responses and regulates the anti-fungal immune response. PMID:19282981

  17. Critical Role of Kupffer Cell CD89 Expression in Experimental IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijun; Li, Bingyu; Huang, Mengwen; Xie, Kun; Li, Dong; Li, You; Gu, Hua; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Although IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, its etiology remains only partly understood. It is clear that the pathogenesis of IgAN involves the formation of macromolecular IgA1 complexes and increased levels of serum IgA1 and IgA1-immune complexes(IC), due to defective IgA1 clearance. Previous studies suggest that the blood and tissue myeloid cell-expressed IgA Fc receptor (FcαR/CD89) mediates IgA-IC clearance and its dysfunction, via decreased activity or excessive levels of soluble FcαR/sCD89 induces IgAN. Such a mechanism requires robust stimulation of IgAN levels via forced expression of CD89. In the absence of unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism to date, we attempted to test the extent of CD89-evoked IgAN by generating a transgenic mouse strain expressing human CD89 under the control of murine CD14 promotor. No deposition of IgA-CD89 complexes or glomerulonephritis was detected, however. Further studies showed that elimination of murine IgA was mediated by Kupffer cells. In patients, however, CD89/IgA complexes were detected, and injection of patient IgA induced IgAN-like features in CD89 Tg mice. In transgenic mice, IgAN pathogenesis involves impaired clearance of abnormal IgA via CD89, primarily by the Kupffer cells. Conditional IgAN progression in CD89 transgenic mice thus reveals important aspects of IgAN pathogenesis. PMID:27437939

  18. The genetics of glycosylation in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Power, P M; Jennings, M P

    2003-01-28

    In recent years there has been a dramatic increase in reports of glycosylation of proteins in various Gram-negative systems including Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Campylobacter jejuni, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Caulobacter crescentus, Aeromonas caviae and Helicobacter pylori. Although this growing list contains many important pathogens (reviewed by Benz and Schmidt [Mol. Microbiol. 45 (2002) 267-276]) and the glycosylations are found on proteins important in pathogenesis such as pili, adhesins and flagella the precise role(s) of the glycosylation of these proteins remains to be determined. Furthermore, the details of the glycosylation biosynthetic process have not been determined in any of these systems. The definition of the precise role of glycosylation and the mechanism of biosynthesis will be facilitated by a detailed understanding of the genes involved. PMID:12586395

  19. A selective and mild glycosylation method of natural phenolic alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Poláková, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Summary Several bioactive natural p-hydroxyphenylalkyl β-D-glucopyranosides, such as vanillyl β-D-glucopyranoside, salidroside and isoconiferin, and their glycosyl analogues were prepared by a simple reaction sequence. The highly efficient synthetic approach was achieved by utilizing acetylated glycosyl bromides as well as aromatic moieties and mild glycosylation promoters. The aglycones, p-O-acetylated arylalkyl alcohols, were prepared by the reduction of the corresponding acetylated aldehydes or acids. Various stereoselective 1,2-trans-O-glycosylation methods were studied, including the DDQ–iodine or ZnO–ZnCl2 catalyst combination. Among them, ZnO–iodine has been identified as a new glycosylation promoter and successfully applied to the stereoselective glycoside synthesis. The final products were obtained by conventional Zemplén deacetylation. PMID:27340444

  20. Is there IgA of gut mucosal origin in the serum of HIV1 infected patients?

    PubMed Central

    Quesnel, A; Moja, P; Lucht, F; Touraine, J L; Pozzetto, B; Genin, C

    1994-01-01

    This study was performed in 77 HIV1 seropositive adult patients to characterise the IgA hyperglobulinaemia seen in the serum during the course of HIV infection. It was shown that both IgA1 and IgA2 subclass concentrations were simultaneously increased but the IgA1 increase was predominant. Secretory IgA (SIgA) concentration was significantly increased and IgA activity to gliadin, bovine serum albumin, and casein could be detected and was correlated with SIgA concentration. In contrast, IgA activity to cytomegalovirus and to tetanus toxoid did not correlate with total IgA concentration. These data suggest the presence of IgA from gut mucosal origin in the serum of these patients. Hyper IgA was inversely correlated with the CD4+ cell number. The increase of all parameters studied varied according to the total IgA concentration in the serum but was also directly related to the stage of immune deficiency in patients with hyper IgA. PMID:7517378

  1. Chromosome aberrations induced by zebularine in triticale.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuhui; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yanzhi; Ma, Jieyun; Wu, Nan; Ni, Shuang; Luo, Tengxiao; Zhuang, Lifang; Chu, Chenggen; Cho, Seong-Woo; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Qi, Zengjun

    2016-07-01

    Chromosome engineering is an important approach for generating wheat germplasm. Efficient development of chromosome aberrations will facilitate the introgression and application of alien genes in wheat. In this study, zebularine, a DNA methylation transferase inhibitor, was successfully used to induce chromosome aberrations in the octoploid triticale cultivar Jinghui#1. Dry seeds were soaked in zebularine solutions (250, 500, and 750 μmol/L) for 24 h, and the 500 μmol/L treatment was tested in three additional treatment times, i.e., 12, 36, and 48 h. All treatments induced aberrations involving wheat and rye chromosomes. Of the 920 cells observed in 67 M1 plants, 340 (37.0%) carried 817 aberrations with an average of 0.89 aberrations per cell (range: 0-12). The aberrations included probable deletions, telosomes and acentric fragments (49.0%), large segmental translocations (28.9%), small segmental translocations (17.1%), intercalary translocations (2.6%), long chromosomes that could carry more than one centromere (2.0%), and ring chromosomes (0.5%). Of 510 M2 plants analyzed, 110 (21.6%) were found to carry stable aberrations. Such aberrations included 79 with varied rye chromosome numbers, 7 with wheat and rye chromosome translocations, 15 with possible rye telosomes/deletions, and 9 with complex aberrations involving variation in rye chromosome number and wheat-rye translocations. These indicated that aberrations induced by zebularine can be steadily transmitted, suggesting that zebularine is a new efficient agent for chromosome manipulation. PMID:27334255

  2. Aberrant Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Cai, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating

  3. Aberrant methylation during cervical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Virmani, A K; Muller, C; Rathi, A; Zoechbauer-Mueller, S; Mathis, M; Gazdar, A F

    2001-03-01

    We studied the pattern of aberrant methylation during the multistage pathogenesis of cervical cancers. We analyzed a total of 73 patient samples and 10 cervical cancer cell lines. In addition, tissue samples [peripheral blood lymphocytes (n = 10) and buccal epithelial cells (n = 12)] were obtained from 22 healthy volunteers. On the basis of the results of preliminary analysis, the cervical samples were grouped into three categories: (a) nondysplasia/low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN; n = 37); (b) high-grade CIN (n = 17); and (c) invasive cancer (n = 19). The methylation status of six genes was determined (p16, RARbeta, FHIT, GSTP1, MGMT, and hMLH1). Our main findings are as follows: (a) methylation was completely absent in control tissues; (b) the frequencies of methylation for all of the genes except hMLH1 were >20% in cervical cancers; (c) aberrant methylation commenced early during multistage pathogenesis and methylation of at least one gene was noted in 30% of the nondysplasia/low-grade CIN group; (d) an increasing trend for methylation was seen with increasing pathological change; (e) methylation of RARbeta and GSTP1 were early events, p16 and MGMT methylation were intermediate events, and FHIT methylation was a late, tumor-associated event; and (f) methylation occurred independently of other risk factors including papillomavirus infection, smoking history, or hormone use. Although our findings need to be extended to a larger series, they suggest that the pattern of aberrant methylation in women with or without dysplasia may help identify subgroups at increased risk for histological progression or cancer development. PMID:11297252

  4. Aberrations for Grazing Incidence Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.

    2008-01-01

    Large number of grazing incidence telescope configurations have been designed and studied. Wolte1 telescopes are commonly used in astronomical applications. Wolter telescopes consist of a paraboloidal primary mirror and a hyperboloidal or an ellipsoidal secondary mirror. There are 8 possible combinations of Wolter telescopes. Out of these possible designs only type 1 and type 2 telescopes are widely used. Type 1 telescope is typically used for x-ray applications and type 2 telescopes are used for EUV applications. Wolter-Schwarzshild (WS) telescopes offer improved image quality over a small field of view. The WS designs are stigmatic and free of third order coma and, therefore, the PSF is significantly better over a small field of view. Typically the image is more symmetric about its centroid. As for the Wolter telescopes there are 8 possible combinations of WS telescopes. These designs have not been widely used because the surface equations are complex parametric equations complicating the analysis and typically the resolution requirements are too low to take full advantage of the WS designs. There are several other design options. Most notable are wide field x-ray telescope designs. Polynomial designs were originally suggested by Burrows4 and hyperboloid-hyperboloid designs for solar physics applications were designed by Harvey5. No general aberration theory exists for grazing incidence telescopes that would cover all the design options. Several authors have studied the aberrations of grazing incidence telescopes. A comprehensive theory of Wolter type 1 and 2 telescopes has been developed. Later this theory was expanded to include all possible combinations of grazing incidence and also normal incidence paraboloid-hyperboloid and paraboloid-ellipsoid telescopes. In this article the aberration theory of Wolter type telescopes is briefly reviewed.

  5. Correcting aberration in aspheric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, K.; Khan, A. N.; Rauf, A.; Gul, A.

    2014-06-01

    New technique eases aspheric lens fabrication and overcome traditional limitation. An aspheric lens has been designed by using optical designing software to replace the achromat (Doublet) lens of eyepiece assembly of telescope. The devised physical parameters of aspheric lens have been incorporated into the CNC Aspheric machine to fabricate the lens. The antireflection coating for visible region has been carried out on lens by employing PVD technique. In this report diminished aberration effects due to non-spherical surface profile and comparison of optical parameters of achromat (doublet) and aspheric lens is presented.

  6. Micropinocytic Ingestion of Glycosylated Albumin by Isolated Microvessels: Possible Role in Pathogenesis of Diabetic Microangiopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Stuart K.; Devenny, James J.; Bitensky, Mark W.

    1981-04-01

    Microvessels isolated from rat epididymal fat exhibit differential vesicular ingestion rates for unmodified and nonenzymatically glycosylated rat albumin. While unmodified rat albumin is excluded from ingestion by endothelial micropinocytic vesicles, glycosylated albumin is avidly taken up by endocytosis. Interaction of albumin and glycosylated albumin with endothelium was studied with a double-label fluorescence assay of micropinocytosis. When glycosylated albumin was present at a concentration of 6% with respect to total albumin (the level found in ``non diabetic'' serum), only glycosylated albumin was ingested. At higher concentrations of glycosylated albumin (those found in diabetic serum), both albumin and glycosylated albumin are ingested. Glycosylation of endothelial membrane components results in stimulated ingestion of glycosylated albumin, persistent exclusion of unmodified albumin, and unaltered micropinocytic ingestion of native ferritin. These results indicate that nonenzymatic glycosylation of serum albumin may result in rapid vesicle-mediated extravasation of albumin. Chronic microvascular leakage of glycosylated albumin could contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy.

  7. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, M.; Hankla, A.

    1996-07-09

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90{degree} such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system. 5 figs.

  8. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, Mark; Hankla, Allen

    1996-01-01

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90.degree. such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system.

  9. DNA hypomethylation upregulates expression of the MGAT3 gene in HepG2 cells and leads to changes in N-glycosylation of secreted glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Klasić, Marija; Krištić, Jasminka; Korać, Petra; Horvat, Tomislav; Markulin, Dora; Vojta, Aleksandar; Reiding, Karli R.; Wuhrer, Manfred; Lauc, Gordan; Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2016-01-01

    Changes in N-glycosylation of plasma proteins are observed in many types of cancer, nevertheless, few studies suggest the exact mechanism involved in aberrant protein glycosylation. Here we studied the impact of DNA methylation on the N-glycome in the secretome of the HepG2 cell line derived from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Since the majority of plasma glycoproteins originate from the liver, the HepG2 cells represent a good model for glycosylation changes in HCC that are detectable in blood, which is an easily accessible analytic material in a clinical setting. Two different concentrations of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-2dC) differentially affected global genome methylation and induced different glycan changes. Around twenty percent of 84 glyco-genes analysed changed expression level after the 5-aza-2dC treatment as a result of global genome hypomethylation. A correlation study between the changes in glyco-gene expression and the HepG2 glycosylation profile suggests that the MGAT3 gene might be responsible for the glycan changes consistently induced by both doses of 5-aza-2dC. Core-fucosylated tetra-antennary structures were decreased in quantity likely as a result of hypomethylated MGAT3 gene promoter followed by increased expression of this gene. PMID:27073020

  10. DNA hypomethylation upregulates expression of the MGAT3 gene in HepG2 cells and leads to changes in N-glycosylation of secreted glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Klasić, Marija; Krištić, Jasminka; Korać, Petra; Horvat, Tomislav; Markulin, Dora; Vojta, Aleksandar; Reiding, Karli R; Wuhrer, Manfred; Lauc, Gordan; Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2016-01-01

    Changes in N-glycosylation of plasma proteins are observed in many types of cancer, nevertheless, few studies suggest the exact mechanism involved in aberrant protein glycosylation. Here we studied the impact of DNA methylation on the N-glycome in the secretome of the HepG2 cell line derived from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Since the majority of plasma glycoproteins originate from the liver, the HepG2 cells represent a good model for glycosylation changes in HCC that are detectable in blood, which is an easily accessible analytic material in a clinical setting. Two different concentrations of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-2dC) differentially affected global genome methylation and induced different glycan changes. Around twenty percent of 84 glyco-genes analysed changed expression level after the 5-aza-2dC treatment as a result of global genome hypomethylation. A correlation study between the changes in glyco-gene expression and the HepG2 glycosylation profile suggests that the MGAT3 gene might be responsible for the glycan changes consistently induced by both doses of 5-aza-2dC. Core-fucosylated tetra-antennary structures were decreased in quantity likely as a result of hypomethylated MGAT3 gene promoter followed by increased expression of this gene. PMID:27073020

  11. Aberrations of ellipsoidal reflectors for unit magnification.

    PubMed

    Mielenz, K D

    1974-12-01

    Ellipsoidal reflectors are useful for the 1:1 imaging of small objects without spherical and chromatic aberration. The magnitude of the off-axis aberrations of such reflectors is computed by application of Fermat's principle to the Hamiltonian point characteristic. The limiting form of the mirror aperture for which these aberrations do not exceed a set tolerance is an ellipse whose semiaxes depend on object size and angle of incidence. PMID:20134811

  12. Glycosylation, Hypogammaglobulinemia, and Resistance to Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Tae-Wook; Lusso, Paolo; Kaplan, Gerardo; Wolfe, Lynne; Memoli, Matthew J.; He, Miao; Vega, Hugo; Kim, Leo J.Y.; Huang, Yan; Hussein, Nadia; Nievas, Elma; Mitchell, Raquel; Garofalo, Mary; Louie, Aaron; Ireland, Derek C.; Grunes, Claire; Cimbro, Raffaello; Patel, Vyomesh; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Salahuddin, Daniel; Bristol, Tyler; Adams, David; Marciano, Beatriz E.; Hegde, Madhuri; Li, Yuxing; Calvo, Katherine R.; Stoddard, Jennifer; Justement, J. Shawn; Jacques, Jerome; Priel, Debra A. Long; Murray, Danielle; Sun, Peter; Kuhns, Douglas B.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Chiorini, John A.; Di Pasquale, Giovanni; Verthelyi, Daniela; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Genetic defects in MOGS, the gene encoding mannosyl-oligosaccharide glucosidase (the first enzyme in the processing pathway of N-linked oligosaccharide), cause the rare congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIb (CDG-IIb), also known as MOGS-CDG. MOGS is expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in the trimming of N-glycans. We evaluated two siblings with CDG-IIb who presented with multiple neurologic complications and a paradoxical immunologic phenotype characterized by severe hypogammaglobulinemia but limited clinical evidence of an infectious diathesis. A shortened immunoglobulin half-life was determined to be the mechanism underlying the hypogammaglobulinemia. Impaired viral replication and cellular entry may explain a decreased susceptibility to infections. PMID:24716661

  13. Treatment of progressive IgA nephropathy: an update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiming; Chen, Nan

    2013-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerular disease worldwide. About 25-30% of IgAN patients will progress to end-stage kidney disease in 20-25 years. Early-onset symptoms that are highly suggestive of progressive IgAN include massive proteinuria, hypertension, renal damage, glomerular sclerosis, crescent formation, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Progressive IgAN may progress to renal failure in a short time. Optimized supportive therapy is the fundamental treatment for progressive IgAN patients, and includes renin-angiotensin system blockers, blood pressure control, antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, statins, and allopurinol. In progressive IgAN patients whose clinical and pathological manifestations are more severe, active therapy may be considered including glucocorticoid therapy, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and other immunosuppressants. However, there are currently controversies on the definition and treatment of progressive IgAN. PMID:23689569

  14. N-glycosylation of Colorectal Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Balog, Crina I. A.; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Fung, Wesley L. J.; Koeleman, Carolien A.; McDonnell, Liam A.; Verhoeven, Aswin; Mesker, Wilma E.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of ∼1 million cases and an annual mortality rate of ∼655,000 individuals. There is an urgent need for identifying novel targets to develop more sensitive, reliable, and specific tests for early stage detection of colon cancer. Post-translational modifications are known to play an important role in cancer progression and immune surveillance of tumors. In the present study, we compared the N-glycan profiles from 13 colorectal cancer tumor tissues and corresponding control colon tissues. The N-glycans were enzymatically released, purified, and labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid. Aliquots were profiled by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-HPLC) with fluorescence detection and by negative mode MALDI-TOF-MS. Using partial least squares discriminant analysis to investigate the N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer, an excellent separation and prediction ability were observed for both HILIC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS data. For structure elucidation, information from positive mode ESI-ion trap-MS/MS and negative mode MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was combined. Among the features with a high separation power, structures containing a bisecting GlcNAc were found to be decreased in the tumor, whereas sulfated glycans, paucimannosidic glycans, and glycans containing a sialylated Lewis type epitope were shown to be increased in tumor tissues. In addition, core-fucosylated high mannose N-glycans were detected in tumor samples. In conclusion, the combination of HILIC and MALDI-TOF-MS profiling of N-glycans with multivariate statistical analysis demonstrated its potential for identifying N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer tissues and provided new leads that might be used as candidate biomarkers. PMID:22573871

  15. ECM Proteins Glycosylation and Relation to Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernodet, Nadine; Bloomberg, Ayla; Sood, Vandana; Slutsky, Lenny; Ge, Shouren; Clark, Richard; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2004-03-01

    The chemical modification and crosslinking of proteins by sugar glycosylation contribute to the aging of tissue proteins, and acceleration of this reaction during hyperglycemia is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, such as disorder of the wound healing. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) formation and protein crosslinking are irreversible processes that alter the structural and functional properties of proteins, lipid components and nucleic acids. And the mechanism, by which it happens, is not clear. Fibrinogen and fibronectin are plasma proteins, which play a major role in human wound healing. Fibrinogen converts to an insoluble fibrin "gel" following a cut, which eventually forms a clot to prevent blood loss, to direct cell adhesion and migration for forming scars. Fibronectin is a critical protein for cell adhesion and migration in wound healing. The effects of glucose on the binding of these plasma proteins from the extra cellular matrix (ECM) were followed at different concentrations by atomic force microscopy and lateral force modulation to measure the mechanical response of the samples. Glucose solutions (1, 2, and 3mg/mL) were incubated with the protein (100 mg/ml) and silicon (Si) substrates spun with sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) 28% for five days. Data showed that not only the organization of the protein on the surface was affected but also its mechanical properties. At 3 mg/mL glucose, Fn fibers were observed to be harder than those of the control, in good agreement with our hypothesis that glycosylation hardens tissues by crosslinking of proteins in the ECM and might cause fibers to break more easily.

  16. Re-thinking the functions of IgA(+) plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Gommerman, Jennifer L; Rojas, Olga L; Fritz, Jörg H

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa harbors the largest population of antibody (Ab)-secreting plasma cells (PC) in the human body, producing daily several grams of immunoglobulin A (IgA). IgA has many functions, serving as a first-line barrier that protects the mucosal epithelium from pathogens, toxins and food antigens (Ag), shaping the intestinal microbiota, and regulating host-commensal homeostasis. Signals induced by commensal colonization are central for regulating IgA induction, maintenance, positioning and function and the number of IgA(+) PC is dramatically reduced in neonates and germ-free (GF) animals. Recent evidence demonstrates that the innate immune effector molecules tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are required for IgA(+) PC homeostasis during the steady state and infection. Moreover, new functions ascribed to PC independent of Ab secretion continue to emerge, suggesting that PC, including IgA(+) PC, should be re-examined in the context of inflammation and infection. Here, we outline mechanisms of IgA(+) PC generation and survival, reviewing their functions in health and disease. PMID:25483334

  17. Opposing effects of Arkadia and Smurf on TGFbeta1-induced IgA isotype expression.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Seo, Goo-Young; Nam, Eun-Hee; Jeon, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-A; Park, Jae-Bong; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2007-10-31

    TGF-beta1 induces Ig germ-line alpha (GLalpha) transcription and subsequent class switching recombination (CSR) to IgA. In the present study, we investigated the roles of two E3-ubiquitin ligases, Smurfs (HECT type) and Arkadia (RING finger type) on TGFbeta1-induced IgA CSR. We found that over-expression of Smurf1 and Smurf2 decreased TGFbeta1-induced GLalpha promoter activity and strengthened the inhibitory effect of Smad7 on the promoter activity. Further, over-expression of Smurf1 and Smurf2 decreased both Smad3/4-mediated and Runx3-mediated GLalpha promoter activities, suggesting that the Smurfs can down-regulate the major TGF-beta1 signaling pathway and decrease GLalpha gene expression. In parallel, the over-expressed Smurf1 decreased the expression of endogenous IgA CSR-predictive transcripts (GLT(alpha), PST(alpha), and CT(alpha)) and also TGFbeta1-induced IgA secretion. Conversely over-expression of Arkadia abolished the inhibitory effect of Smad7 on TGFbeta1-induced GLT(alpha) expression and IgA secretion. Similar results were obtained in the presence of over-expressed Smad7 and Smurf1. These results indicate that Arkadia can amplify TGFbeta1-induced IgA CSR by degrading Smad7, which interacts with Smurf1. We conclude that Smurf and Arkadia have opposite roles in the regulation of TGFbeta1-induced IgA isotype expression. PMID:17978583

  18. Infant gut immunity: a preliminary study of IgA associations with breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Bridgman, S L; Konya, T; Azad, M B; Sears, M R; Becker, A B; Turvey, S E; Mandhane, P J; Subbarao, P; Scott, J A; Field, C J; Kozyrskyj, A L

    2016-02-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) plays a critical role in gut mucosal immune defense. Initially provided by breastmilk, IgA production by the infant gut is gradually stimulated by developing gut microbiota. This study reports associations between infant fecal IgA concentrations 4 months after birth, breastfeeding status and other pre/postnatal exposures in 47 infants in the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development cohort. Breastfed infants and first-born infants had higher median fecal IgA concentrations (23.11 v. 9.34 µg/g protein, P<0.01 and 22.19 v. 8.23 µg/g protein, P=0.04). IgA levels increased successively with exclusivity of breastfeeding (β-coefficient, 0.37, P<0.05). This statistical association was independent of maternal parity and household pets. In the absence of breastfeeding, female sex and pet exposure elevated fecal IgA to levels found in breastfed infants. In addition to breastfeeding, infant fecal IgA associations with pre/postnatal exposures may affect gut immunity and risk of allergic disease. PMID:26690933

  19. Anti-actin IgA antibodies in severe coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Granito, A; Muratori, P; Cassani, F; Pappas, G; Muratori, L; Agostinelli, D; Veronesi, L; Bortolotti, R; Petrolini, N; Bianchi, F B; Volta, U

    2004-01-01

    Anti-actin IgA antibodies have been found in sera of coeliacs. Our aim was to define the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-actin IgA in coeliacs before and after gluten withdrawal. One hundred and two biopsy-proven coeliacs, 95 disease controls and 50 blood donors were studied. Anti-actin IgA were evaluated by different methods: (a) antimicrofilament positivity on HEp-2 cells and on cultured fibroblasts by immunofluorescence; (b) anti-actin positivity by enzyme-linked immuosorbent assay (ELISA); and (c) presence of the tubular/glomerular pattern of anti-smooth muscle antibodies on rat kidney sections by immunofluorescence. Antimicrofilament IgA were present in 27% of coeliacs and in none of the controls. Antimicrofilament antibodies were found in 25 of 54 (46%) coeliacs with severe villous atrophy and in three of 48 (6%) with mild damage (P < 0·0001). In the 20 patients tested, antimicrofilaments IgA disappeared after gluten withdrawal in accordance with histological recovery. Our study shows a significant correlation between antimicrofilament IgA and the severity of intestinal damage in untreated coeliacs. The disappearance of antimicrofilament IgA after gluten withdrawal predicts the normalization of intestinal mucosa and could be considered a useful tool in the follow-up of severe coeliac disease. PMID:15270857

  20. Evaluation of intra- and extra-epithelial secretory IgA in chlamydial infections

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Charles W; O’Meara, Connor P; Harvie, Marina C G; Timms, Peter; Wijburg, Odilia L; Beagley, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A is an important mucosal antibody that can neutralize mucosal pathogens by either preventing attachment to epithelia (immune exclusion) or alternatively inhibit intra-epithelial replication following transcytosis by the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). Chlamydia trachomatis is a major human pathogen that initially targets the endocervical or urethral epithelium in women and men, respectively. As both tissues contain abundant secretory IgA (SIgA) we assessed the protection afforded by IgA targeting different chlamydial antigens expressed during the extra- and intra-epithelial stages of infection. We developed an in vitro model using polarizing cells expressing the murine pIgR together with antigen-specific mouse IgA, and an in vivo model using pIgR−/− mice. Secretory IgA targeting the extra-epithelial chlamydial antigen, the major outer membrane protein, significantly reduced infection in vitro by 24% and in vivo by 44%. Conversely, pIgR-mediated delivery of IgA targeting the intra-epithelial inclusion membrane protein A bound to the inclusion but did not reduce infection in vitro or in vivo. Similarly, intra-epithelial IgA targeting the secreted protease Chlamydia protease-like activity factor also failed to reduce infection. Together, these data suggest the importance of pIgR-mediated delivery of IgA targeting extra-epithelial, but not intra-epithelial, chlamydial antigens for protection against a genital tract infection. PMID:24827556

  1. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J; Julian, Bruce A; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Novak, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome-wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H-related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1-containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease. PMID:25694468

  2. Spectrum of IgA nephropathy in a single center.

    PubMed

    Das, Uttara; Dakshinamurty, Kaligotla Venkata; Prayaga, Aruna; Uppin, Megha

    2015-09-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common biopsy-proven primary glomerular disease in the world and a major contributor to the worldwide burden of endstage renal failure, with a wide geographical variation. To determine the incidence, clinical profile and histological pattern of IgAN in our institute, we reviewed all the patients who had native kidney biopsies with the diagnosis of primary IgAN during the period from 1998 to 2009 in the context of the clinical features. A total of 116 patients with IgAN were finally analyzed; 85 (73%) of the patients were male, the mean age of the patients was 29.2 ± 12.2 (range 10-70) years and the mean duration of disease was 10.4 ± 18.7 months (median: 2 months). Hypertension was present in 74 (63.2%) cases. Gross hematuria was rare. The most common clinical presentation was nephrotic syndrome, followed by chronic renal failure. The mean proteinuria level was 2.5 ± 2.3 g/day (median: 1.7 g/day) and the mean serum creatinine level was 3.04 ± 3.3 mg/dL (median:1.7 mg/dL). The morphological sub-classification (Haas): Class I was the most common (44.4%), followed by class V (23%). IgA co-deposition with C3 and lambda was the most common finding in the immunofluorescence study. The glomerular filtration rate decreased with advanced histological damage. The incidence of IgAN was 7.5%, which is lower as compared with studies from elsewhere. IgAN in our population had a more severe clinical presentation. PMID:26354591

  3. Secretory IgA: Designed for Anti-Microbial Defense

    PubMed Central

    Brandtzaeg, Per

    2013-01-01

    Prevention of infections by vaccination remains a compelling goal to improve public health. Mucosal vaccines would make immunization procedures easier, be better suited for mass administration, and most efficiently induce immune exclusion – a term coined for non-inflammatory antibody shielding of internal body surfaces, mediated principally by secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA). The exported antibodies are polymeric, mainly IgA dimers (pIgA), produced by local plasma cells (PCs) stimulated by antigens that target the mucose. SIgA was early shown to be complexed with an epithelial glycoprotein – the secretory component (SC). A common SC-dependent transport mechanism for pIgA and pentameric IgM was then proposed, implying that membrane SC acts as a receptor, now usually called the polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR). From the basolateral surface, pIg-pIgR complexes are taken up by endocytosis and then extruded into the lumen after apical cleavage of the receptor – bound SC having stabilizing and innate functions in the secretory antibodies. Mice deficient for pIgR show that this is the only receptor responsible for epithelial export of IgA and IgM. These knockout mice show a variety of defects in their mucosal defense and changes in their intestinal microbiota. In the gut, induction of B-cells occurs in gut-associated lymphoid tissue, particularly the Peyer’s patches and isolated lymphoid follicles, but also in mesenteric lymph nodes. PC differentiation is accomplished in the lamina propria to which the activated memory/effector B-cells home. The airways also receive such cells from nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue but by different homing receptors. This compartmentalization is a challenge for mucosal vaccination, as are the mechanisms used by the mucosal immune system to discriminate between commensal symbionts (mutualism), pathobionts, and overt pathogens (elimination). PMID:23964273

  4. Influence of aberrations in microholographic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    The influence of various types of aberrations (spherical, coma, and astigmatic) of recording and readout beams on the readout signal in a microholographic recording was investigated through a numerical simulation. The simulation conditions were that the wavelength of the laser was 405 nm and the numerical aperture of the objective lenses was 0.85. The tolerance of the root-mean-square (RMS) wavefront aberrations was defined as the aberration when the normalized signal level decreased to 0.8. Among the three types of aberrations, the influence of the spherical aberration was the most significant. When both the recording and readout beams were aberrated and the signs of the aberrations were in the worst case, the tolerance of the RMS wavefront aberrations was less than half of the Maréchal's criterion. Moreover, when the RMS wavefront aberrations of the recording and readout beams were within the above tolerance, the bit intervals of 0.13 and 0.65 μm in the inplane and vertical directions, respectively, which correspond to the recording density of 91 bit/μm3 (recording capacity of 16 TB for a 120-mm-diameter optical disk having a 300-μm-thick recording layer), were shown to be feasible for confocal detection with an allowable signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. Glycosylation increases the thermostability of human aquaporin 10 protein.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Fredrik; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Fischer, Gerhard; Moberg, Andreas; Pedersen, Anders; Neutze, Richard; Hedfalk, Kristina

    2011-09-01

    Human aquaporin10 (hAQP10) is a transmembrane facilitator of both water and glycerol transport in the small intestine. This aquaglyceroporin is located in the apical membrane of enterocytes and is believed to contribute to the passage of water and glycerol through these intestinal absorptive cells. Here we overproduced hAQP10 in the yeast Pichia pastoris and observed that the protein is glycosylated at Asn-133 in the extracellular loop C. This finding confirms one of three predicted glycosylation sites for hAQP10, and its glycosylation is unique for the human aquaporins overproduced in this host. Nonglycosylated protein was isolated using both glycan affinity chromatography and through mutating asparagine 133 to a glutamine. All three forms of hAQP10 where found to facilitate the transport of water, glycerol, erythritol, and xylitol, and glycosylation had little effect on functionality. In contrast, glycosylated hAQP10 showed increased thermostability of 3-6 °C compared with the nonglycosylated protein, suggesting a stabilizing effect of the N-linked glycan. Because only one third of hAQP10 was glycosylated yet the thermostability titration was mono-modal, we suggest that the presence of at least one glycosylated protein within each tetramer is sufficient to convey an enhanced structural stability to the remaining hAQP10 protomers of the tetramer. PMID:21733844

  6. Ceramide Glycosylation Catalyzed by Glucosylceramide Synthase and Cancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Yu; Li, Yu-Teh

    2014-01-01

    Glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), converting ceramide to glucosylceramide, catalyzes the first reaction of ceramide glycosylation in sphingolipid metabolism. This glycosylation by GCS is a critical step regulating the modulation of cellular activities by controlling ceramide and glycosphingolipids (GSLs). An increase of ceramide in response to stresses, such as chemotherapy, drives cells to proliferation arrest and apoptosis or autophagy; however, ceramide glycosylation promptly eliminates ceramide and consequently, these induced processes, thus protecting cancer cells. Furthermore, persistently enhanced ceramide glycosylation can increase GSLs, participating in selecting cancer cells to drug resistance. GCS is overexpressed in diverse drug-resistant cancer cells and in tumors of breast, colon, and leukemia that display poor response to chemotherapy. As ceramide glycosylation by GCS is a rate-limiting step in GSL synthesis, inhibition of GCS sensitizes cancer cells to anticancer drugs and eradicates cancer stem cells. Mechanistic studies indicate that uncoupling ceramide glycosylation can modulate gene expression, decreasing MDR1 through the cSrc/β-catenin pathway and restoring p53 expression via RNA splicing. These studies not only expand our knowledge in understanding how ceramide glycosylation affects cancer cells, but also provide novel therapeutic approaches for targeting refractory tumors. PMID:23290777

  7. Novel lectin-independent approach to detect galactose-deficient IgA1 in IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yasutake, Junichi; Suzuki, Yusuke; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Hiura, Naoko; Yanagawa, Hiroyuki; Makita, Yuko; Kaneko, Etsuji; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) is a critical effector molecule in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Although many researchers have measured serum levels of Gd-IgA1 using snail helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA) lectin-based assay, the lectin-dependent assay has some serious problems in robustness. In this study, we aimed to establish a more robust and stable enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method that uses a specific monoclonal antibody to recognize a hinge region in human Gd-IgA1 (Gd-IgA1 ELISA). Methods Rats were immunized with human Gd-IgA1 hinge region peptide to obtain Gd-IgA1-specific monoclonal antibody KM55. Gd-IgA1 ELISA for specifically detecting serum Gd-IgA1 was consequently constructed. Serum Gd-IgA1 concentrations in human subjects were measured using KM55 ELISA assay. To further confirm specificity of the Gd-IgA1-specific antibody, KM55 was also applied for immunofluorescence staining of glomerular Gd-IgA1 in paraffin-embedded sections of renal biopsy specimens. Results Measurement of serum levels of Gd-IgA1 in human subjects by Gd-IgA1 ELISA revealed increased serum Gd-IgA1 level in patients with IgAN compared with patients with other renal diseases or non-renal diseases. Importantly, the results obtained from Gd-IgA1 ELISA positively correlated with those from the HAA lectin-based assay (R = 0.75). Immunofluorescence staining of renal biopsy specimens with KM55 detected glomerular co-localization of Gd-IgA1 and IgA. Conclusion This novel lectin-independent method with KM55 for measuring serum levels of Gd-IgA1 can pave the way for more convincing diagnosis and activity assessment of IgAN, and can expedite clinical research to better understand this difficult disease. PMID:26109484

  8. Development of the gut microbiota and mucosal IgA responses in twins and gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Planer, Joseph D; Peng, Yangqing; Kau, Andrew L; Blanton, Laura V; Ndao, I Malick; Tarr, Phillip I; Warner, Barbara B; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2016-06-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA), the major class of antibody secreted by the gut mucosa, is an important contributor to gut barrier function. The repertoire of IgA bound to gut bacteria reflects both T-cell-dependent and -independent pathways, plus glycans present on the antibody's secretory component. Human gut bacterial taxa targeted by IgA in the setting of barrier dysfunction are capable of producing intestinal pathology when isolated and transferred to gnotobiotic mice. A complex reorientation of gut immunity occurs as infants transition from passively acquired IgA present in breast milk to host-derived IgA. How IgA responses co-develop with assembly of the microbiota during this period remains poorly understood. Here, we (1) identify a set of age-discriminatory bacterial taxa whose representations define a program of microbiota assembly and maturation during the first 2 postnatal years that is shared across 40 healthy twin pairs in the USA; (2) describe a pattern of progression of gut mucosal IgA responses to bacterial members of the microbiota that is highly distinctive for family members (twin pairs) during the first several postnatal months then generalizes across pairs in the second year; and (3) assess the effects of zygosity, birth mode, and breast feeding. Age-associated differences in these IgA responses can be recapitulated in young germ-free mice, colonized with faecal microbiota obtained from two twin pairs at 6 and 18 months of age, and fed a sequence of human diets that simulate the transition from milk feeding to complementary foods. Most of these responses were robust to diet, suggesting that 'intrinsic' properties of community members play a dominant role in dictating IgA responses. The approach described can be used to define gut mucosal immune development in health and disease states and to help discover ways of repairing or preventing perturbations in this facet of host immunity. PMID:27279225

  9. Mechanisms underlying the effects of LPS and activation-induced cytidine deaminase on IgA isotype expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Seok-Rae; Kim, Hyun-A; Chun, Sung-Ki; Park, Jae-Bong; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2005-06-30

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is needed for Ig class switch recombination (CSR). We explored the effect of LPS on the expression of AID during B cell differentiation, and the role of AID in IgA isotype expression. In normal spleen B cells, LPS increased AID transcription up to 48 h post-stimulation, i.e. around the time of Ig CSR. TGF-b1 and AID were required for IgA expression, and LPS contributed to TGFb1-induced IgA production largely by inducing AID. Interestingly, LPS repressed AID transcription in sIgA+ B cells but still stimulated IgA production mainly by increasing the rate of IgA secretion. Our data indicate that LPS contributes to TGFb1-induced IgA isotype expression in at least two ways: by stimulating AID transcription before CSR and by enhancing the IgA secretion rate after CSR. PMID:15995363

  10. [Disseminated tuberculosis revealing IgA nephropathy with nephrotic syndrome : A case report].

    PubMed

    Morbieu, Caroline; Michel, Pierre-Antoine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Canestri, Ana; Boffa, Jean-Jacques

    2016-07-01

    A 27-year-old man without any medical history presented concomitantly a pulmonary and urinary tuberculosis and a nephrotic syndrome with hematuria and renal failure. The renal biopsy showed increased mesangial matrix, few focal segmental lesions, and IgA deposits confirming the diagnosis of IgA nephropathy. Nephrotic syndrome remission occurred quickly after antituberculous treatment. The association between tuberculosis and IgA nephropathy has been previously reported in 9 patients. Renal outcome was always favorable with antituberculous treatment. No relapse occurred, with a maximal follow-up of 42 months. Here, we discuss this singular association and previous similar cases. PMID:26907665

  11. Cytokine, chemokine and secretory IgA levels in human milk in relation to atopic disease and IgA production in infants.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Malin F; Jenmalm, Maria C; Björkstén, Bengt

    2003-02-01

    The relationship between breast-feeding, IgA production and development of atopic disease in children is a matter of controversy. Some of this controversy might be due to individual differences in the composition of breast milk. The aim of this study was to relate the levels of cytokines, chemokines and secretory (S)-IgA antibodies in breast milk to the development of atopic manifestation and salivary IgA production in infants. Cytokine, chemokine and SIgA levels, as measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in colostrum and mature milk were analyzed in relation to the development of positive skin-prick tests (SPT), allergic symptoms and salivary IgA antibody production during the first 2 years of life in 53 infants. There was no association between levels of IL-4, -5, -6, -8, -10, -13, -16, IFN-gamma, TGF-beta1, -beta2, RANTES, eotaxin or SIgA levels in the breast milk with either SPT-positivity, development of allergic symptoms or salivary IgA levels during the first 2 years of life in the infants. Thus, differences in the composition of cytokines, chemokines and SIgA in breast milk did not, to any major degree, affect the development of a positive SPT, atopic symptoms, nor salivary IgA antibody production during the first 2 years of life. PMID:12603709

  12. Some Useful Correspondences In Aberration Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, David

    1986-10-01

    There are many correspondences between the behavior of monochromatic aberrations and chromatic aberrations. Usually the behavior of the chromatic aberrations is of a lower order than the corresponding monochromatic behavior. The cause of the 5th-order mono-chromatic astigmatism, for example, is similar in type to the cause of the chromatic variation of 3rd-order astigmatism. The stop-shift behavior of 3rd-order monochromatic coma is similar to that of first-order lateral color, and so on. These correspondences are interesting for two reasons. One is that they have not been commented on much before, despite the value of one's being aware of these relationships. Methods used to control a monochromatic aberration may also apply to the corresponding chromatic aberration, and vice-versa, for example. The other benefit to studying this topic is that the chromatic aberrations, which are of a lower order than their monochro-matic correspondences, are much easier to understand and visualize. A simple diagram can illustrate the stop-shift behavior of lateral color much more easily than trying to do the same thing with 3rd-order coma. Finally, the very important distinction between intrinsic and induced aberrations can be best illustrated with chromatic aberrations, because of their lower order.

  13. Rooting Out Aberrant Behavior in Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokalis, Jerry, Jr.; Paquin, Dave

    1989-01-01

    Discusses aberrant, or disruptive, behavior in an industrial/business, classroom-based, instructor-led training setting. Three examples of aberrant behavior are described, typical case studies are provided for each, and preventive (long-term) and corrective (on-the-spot) strategies for dealing with the problems are discussed. (LRW)

  14. Harmonic oscillator states in aberration optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    1993-01-01

    The states of the three-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator classify optical aberrations of axis-symmetric systems due to the isomorphism between the two mathematical structures. Cartesian quanta and angular momentum classifications have their corresponding aberration classifications. The operation of concatenation of optical elements introduces a new operation between harmonic oscillator states.

  15. Enhanced Aromatic Sequons Increase Oligosaccharyltransferase Glycosylation Efficiency and Glycan Homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Murray, Amber N; Chen, Wentao; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Hanson, Sarah R; Wiseman, R Luke; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M; Powers, David L; Powers, Evan T; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2015-08-20

    N-Glycosylation plays an important role in protein folding and function. Previous studies demonstrate that a phenylalanine residue introduced at the n-2 position relative to an Asn-Xxx-Thr/Ser N-glycosylation sequon increases the glycan occupancy of the sequon in insect cells. Here, we show that any aromatic residue at n-2 increases glycan occupancy in human cells and that this effect is dependent upon oligosaccharyltransferase substrate preferences rather than differences in other cellular processing events such as degradation or trafficking. Moreover, aromatic residues at n-2 alter glycan processing in the Golgi, producing proteins with less complex N-glycan structures. These results demonstrate that manipulating the sequence space surrounding N-glycosylation sequons is useful both for controlling glycosylation efficiency, thus enhancing glycan occupancy, and for influencing the N-glycan structures produced. PMID:26190824

  16. Analytical detection and characterization of biopharmaceutical glycosylation by MS.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myung Jin; Hua, Serenus; Kim, Unyong; Kim, Hyun Joong; Lee, Jua; Kim, Jae-Han; An, Hyun Joo

    2016-04-01

    Glycosylation plays an important role in ensuring the proper structure and function of most biotherapeutic proteins. Even small changes in glycan composition, structure, or location can have a drastic impact on drug safety and efficacy. Recently, glycosylation has become the subject of increased focus as biopharmaceutical companies rush to create not only biosimilars, but also biobetters based on existing biotherapeutic proteins. Against this backdrop of ongoing biopharmaceutical innovation, updated methods for accurate and detailed analysis of protein glycosylation are critical for biopharmaceutical companies and government regulatory agencies alike. This review summarizes current methods of characterizing biopharmaceutical glycosylation, including compositional mass profiling, isomer-specific profiling and structural elucidation by MS and hyphenated techniques. PMID:26964748

  17. Glycosyl dithiocarbamates: β-selective couplings without auxiliary groups.

    PubMed

    Padungros, Panuwat; Alberch, Laura; Wei, Alexander

    2014-03-21

    In this article, we evaluate glycosyl dithiocarbamates (DTCs) with unprotected C2 hydroxyls as donors in β-linked oligosaccharide synthesis. We report a mild, one-pot conversion of glycals into β-glycosyl DTCs via DMDO oxidation with subsequent ring opening by DTC salts, which can be generated in situ from secondary amines and CS2. Glycosyl DTCs are readily activated with Cu(I) or Cu(II) triflate at low temperatures and are amenable to reiterative synthesis strategies, as demonstrated by the efficient construction of a tri-β-1,6-linked tetrasaccharide. Glycosyl DTC couplings are highly β-selective despite the absence of a preexisting C2 auxiliary group. We provide evidence that the directing effect is mediated by the C2 hydroxyl itself via the putative formation of a cis-fused bicyclic intermediate. PMID:24548247

  18. Glycosyl Dithiocarbamates: β-Selective Couplings without Auxiliary Groups

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we evaluate glycosyl dithiocarbamates (DTCs) with unprotected C2 hydroxyls as donors in β-linked oligosaccharide synthesis. We report a mild, one-pot conversion of glycals into β-glycosyl DTCs via DMDO oxidation with subsequent ring opening by DTC salts, which can be generated in situ from secondary amines and CS2. Glycosyl DTCs are readily activated with Cu(I) or Cu(II) triflate at low temperatures and are amenable to reiterative synthesis strategies, as demonstrated by the efficient construction of a tri-β-1,6-linked tetrasaccharide. Glycosyl DTC couplings are highly β-selective despite the absence of a preexisting C2 auxiliary group. We provide evidence that the directing effect is mediated by the C2 hydroxyl itself via the putative formation of a cis-fused bicyclic intermediate. PMID:24548247

  19. Stability-increasing effects of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chang-Ling; Yu, Yu-Qi; Chen, Zhong-Jian; Wen, Guo-Song; Wei, Fu-Gang; Zheng, Quan; Wang, Chong-De; Xiao, Xing-Lei

    2017-01-01

    This review comprehensively summarizes the existing knowledge regarding the chemical implications of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation, the effects of acylation on the stability of acylated anthocyanins and the corresponding mechanisms. Anthocyanin glycosyl acylation commonly refers to the phenomenon in which the hydroxyl groups of anthocyanin glycosyls are esterified by aliphatic or aromatic acids, which is synthetically represented by the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups. Generally, glycosyl acylation increases the in vitro and in vivo chemical stability of acylated anthocyanins, and the mechanisms primarily involve physicochemical, stereochemical, photochemical, biochemical or environmental aspects under specific conditions. Additionally, the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups influence the stability of acylated anthocyanins to different degrees. This review could provide insight into the optimization of the stability of anthocyanins as well as the application of suitable anthocyanins in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. PMID:27507456

  20. Genetics Home Reference: ALG12-congenital disorder of glycosylation

    MedlinePlus

    ... particles and germs, marking them for destruction. A reduction in antibodies can make it difficult for affected ... called glycosylation. During this process, complex chains of sugar molecules (oligosaccharides) are added to proteins and fats ( ...

  1. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Tolis, Konstantinos E.; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D.; Panagopoulos, Georgios N.; Igoumenou, Vasilios G.; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  2. Nodal aberration theory applied to freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerschbach, Kyle; Rolland, Jannick P.; Thompson, Kevin P.

    2014-12-01

    When new three-dimensional packages are developed for imaging optical systems, the rotational symmetry of the optical system is often broken, changing its imaging behavior and making the optical performance worse. A method to restore the performance is to use freeform optical surfaces that compensate directly the aberrations introduced from tilting and decentering the optical surfaces. In order to effectively optimize the shape of a freeform surface to restore optical functionality, it is helpful to understand the aberration effect the surface may induce. Using nodal aberration theory the aberration fields induced by a freeform surface in an optical system are explored. These theoretical predications are experimentally validated with the design and implementation of an aberration generating telescope.

  3. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  4. Isolated Lymphoid Follicles are Dynamic Reservoirs for the Induction of Intestinal IgA

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, Kathryn A.; Newberry, Rodney D.

    2012-01-01

    IgA is one of the most important molecules in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis. Peyer’s patches have been traditionally recognized as sites for the induction of intestinal IgA responses, however more recent studies demonstrate that isolated lymphoid follicles (ILFs) can perform this function as well. ILF development is dynamic, changing in response to the luminal microbial burden, suggesting that ILFs play an important role providing an expandable reservoir of compensatory IgA inductive sites. However, in situations of immune dysfunction, ILFs can over-develop in response to uncontrollable enteric flora, resulting in ILF hyperplasia. The ability of ILFs to expand and respond to help control the enteric flora makes this dynamic reservoir an important arm of IgA inductive sites in intestinal immunity. PMID:22566964

  5. IgA Nephropathy in a Patient Presenting with Pseudotumor Cerebri

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Umair Syed; Bacaj, Patrick; Iqbal, Hafiz Imran; Onder, Songul

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common glomerulonephritis worldwide and typically has minimal signs for chronicity in histopathology at the time of initial presentation. Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is characterized by increased intracranial pressure in the absence of any intracranial lesions, inflammation, or obstruction. PTC has been reported in renal transplant and dialysis patients, but we are unaware of any reports of pseudotumor cerebri in patients with IgA nephropathy. We report a case of a young female who presented with signs and symptoms of pseudotumor cerebri and was subsequently diagnosed with IgA nephropathy and end-stage renal disease. To our knowledge this is the first report of IgA nephropathy presenting as end-stage renal disease in a patient who presented with pseudotumor cerebri. PMID:26989531

  6. IgA Nephropathy in a Patient Presenting with Pseudotumor Cerebri.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Umair Syed; Bacaj, Patrick; Iqbal, Hafiz Imran; Onder, Songul

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common glomerulonephritis worldwide and typically has minimal signs for chronicity in histopathology at the time of initial presentation. Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is characterized by increased intracranial pressure in the absence of any intracranial lesions, inflammation, or obstruction. PTC has been reported in renal transplant and dialysis patients, but we are unaware of any reports of pseudotumor cerebri in patients with IgA nephropathy. We report a case of a young female who presented with signs and symptoms of pseudotumor cerebri and was subsequently diagnosed with IgA nephropathy and end-stage renal disease. To our knowledge this is the first report of IgA nephropathy presenting as end-stage renal disease in a patient who presented with pseudotumor cerebri. PMID:26989531

  7. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W.; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D.; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.   PMID:26982805

  8. Hypoxic regulation of glycosylation via the N-acetylglucosamine cycle

    PubMed Central

    Shirato, Ken; Nakajima, Kazuki; Korekane, Hiroaki; Takamatsu, Shinji; Gao, Congxiao; Angata, Takashi; Ohtsubo, Kazuaki; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is an energy substrate, as well as the primary source of nucleotide sugars, which are utilized as donor substrates in protein glycosylation. Appropriate glycosylation is necessary to maintain the stability of protein, and is also important in the localization and trafficking of proteins. The dysregulation of glycosylation results in the development of a variety of disorders, such as cancer, diabetes mellitus and emphysema. Glycosylation is kinetically regulated by dynamically changing the portfolio of glycosyltransferases, nucleotide sugars, and nucleotide sugar transporters, which together form a part of what is currently referred to as the ”Glycan cycle”. An excess or a deficiency in the expression of glycosyltransferases has been shown to alter the glycosylation pattern, which subsequently leads to the onset, progression and exacerbation of a number of diseases. Furthermore, alterations in intracellular nucleotide sugar levels can also modulate glycosylation patterns. It is observed that pathological hypoxic microenvironments frequently occur in solid cancers and inflammatory foci. Hypoxic conditions dramatically change gene expression profiles, by activating hypoxia-inducible factor-1, which mediates adaptive cellular responses. Hypoxia-induced glycosyltransferases and nucleotide sugar transporters have been shown to modulate glycosylation patterns that are part of the mechanism associated with cancer metastasis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 also induces the expression of glucose transporters and various types of glycolytic enzymes, leading to shifts in glucose metabolic patterns. This fact strongly suggests that hypoxic conditions are an important factor in modulating various nucleotide sugar biosynthetic pathways. This review discusses some of the current thinking of how hypoxia alters glucose metabolic fluxes that can modulate cellular glycosylation patterns and consequently modify cellular functions, particularly from the standpoint of the N

  9. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Alison E; Jennewein, Madeleine F; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H; Alter, Galit

    2016-03-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  . PMID:26982805

  10. [Quantitative determination of IgA from human bronchial mucus (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hayem, A; Laine, A; Bailleul, V; Lebas, J

    1975-05-15

    Before quantitative analysis of bronchial mucus proteins, sputum must be transformed into a homogeneous medium: this is done by ultrasonic action and contact with cationic resin AG 50 W X 2. Then, acid mucins are fixed on Ecteola-cellulose, and proteins extracted by a phosphate/saline buffer at pH 5. IgA is estimated by electroimmunodiffusion. Reproducibility of the method is discussed: the accuracy for IgA values is 4%. PMID:238765

  11. Tear and serum antibody levels in ocular herpetic infection: diagnostic precision of secretory IgA.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, P D; Khaw, P T; McBride, B W; McGill, J I; Ward, K A

    1986-01-01

    A sensitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to evaluate the potential of herpes simplex virus (HSV) specific antibodies in the diagnosis of herpetic eye infection. The presence of HSV specific secretory IgA (sIgA) in tears was found to be diagnostic of infection. However, serum and tear HSV specific IgG and IgA were not considered reliable indicators of active infection. PMID:3741822

  12. Glycosylation of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is critical for osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yao; Weng, Yuteng; Zhang, Chenyang; Liu, Yi; Kang, Chen; Liu, Zhongshuang; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zuolin

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating osteogenesis. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a highly expressed bone extracellular matrix protein that regulates both bone development and phosphate metabolism. After glycosylation, an N-terminal fragment of DMP1 protein was identified as a new proteoglycan (DMP1-PG) in bone matrix. In vitro investigations showed that Ser89 is the key glycosylation site in mouse DMP1. However, the specific role of DMP1 glycosylation is still not understood. In this study, a mutant DMP1 mouse model was developed in which the glycosylation site S89 was substituted with G89 (S89G-DMP1). The glycosylation level of DMP1 was down-regulated in the bone matrix of S89G-DMP1 mice. Compared with wild type mice, the long bones of S89G-DMP1 mice showed developmental changes, including the speed of bone remodeling and mineralization, the morphology and activities of osteocytes, and activities of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These findings indicate that glycosylation of DMP1 is a key posttranslational modification process during development and that DMP1-PG functions as an indispensable proteoglycan in osteogenesis. PMID:26634432

  13. Glycosylation of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is critical for osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yao; Weng, Yuteng; Zhang, Chenyang; Liu, Yi; Kang, Chen; Liu, Zhongshuang; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zuolin

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating osteogenesis. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a highly expressed bone extracellular matrix protein that regulates both bone development and phosphate metabolism. After glycosylation, an N-terminal fragment of DMP1 protein was identified as a new proteoglycan (DMP1-PG) in bone matrix. In vitro investigations showed that Ser(89) is the key glycosylation site in mouse DMP1. However, the specific role of DMP1 glycosylation is still not understood. In this study, a mutant DMP1 mouse model was developed in which the glycosylation site S(89) was substituted with G(89) (S89G-DMP1). The glycosylation level of DMP1 was down-regulated in the bone matrix of S89G-DMP1 mice. Compared with wild type mice, the long bones of S89G-DMP1 mice showed developmental changes, including the speed of bone remodeling and mineralization, the morphology and activities of osteocytes, and activities of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These findings indicate that glycosylation of DMP1 is a key posttranslational modification process during development and that DMP1-PG functions as an indispensable proteoglycan in osteogenesis. PMID:26634432

  14. Definition of the bacterial N-glycosylation site consensus sequence.

    PubMed

    Kowarik, Michael; Young, N Martin; Numao, Shin; Schulz, Benjamin L; Hug, Isabelle; Callewaert, Nico; Mills, Dominic C; Watson, David C; Hernandez, Marcela; Kelly, John F; Wacker, Michael; Aebi, Markus

    2006-05-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni pgl locus encodes an N-linked protein glycosylation machinery that can be functionally transferred into Escherichia coli. In this system, we analyzed the elements in the C. jejuni N-glycoprotein AcrA required for accepting an N-glycan. We found that the eukaryotic primary consensus sequence for N-glycosylation is N terminally extended to D/E-Y-N-X-S/T (Y, X not equalP) for recognition by the bacterial oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) PglB. However, not all consensus sequences were N-glycosylated when they were either artificially introduced or when they were present in non-C. jejuni proteins. We were able to produce recombinant glycoproteins with engineered N-glycosylation sites and confirmed the requirement for a negatively charged side chain at position -2 in C. jejuni N-glycoproteins. N-glycosylation of AcrA by the eukaryotic OST in Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurred independent of the acidic residue at the -2 position. Thus, bacterial N-glycosylation site selection is more specific than the eukaryotic equivalent with respect to the polypeptide acceptor sequence. PMID:16619027

  15. Eukaryotic Oligosaccharyltransferase Generates Free Oligosaccharides during N-Glycosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Yoichiro; Buser, Reto; Ngwa, Elsy M.; Hirayama, Hiroto; Aebi, Markus; Suzuki, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Asparagine (N)-linked glycosylation regulates numerous cellular activities, such as glycoprotein quality control, intracellular trafficking, and cell-cell communications. In eukaryotes, the glycosylation reaction is catalyzed by oligosaccharyltransferase (OST), a multimembrane protein complex that is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During N-glycosylation in the ER, the protein-unbound form of oligosaccharides (free oligosaccharides; fOSs), which is structurally related to N-glycan, is released into the ER lumen. However, the enzyme responsible for this process remains unidentified. Here, we demonstrate that eukaryotic OST generates fOSs. Biochemical and genetic analyses using mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that the generation of fOSs is tightly correlated with the N-glycosylation activity of OST. Furthermore, we present evidence that the purified OST complex can generate fOSs by hydrolyzing dolichol-linked oligosaccharide, the glycan donor substrate for N-glycosylation. The heterologous expression of a single subunit of OST from the protozoan Leishmania major in S. cerevisiae demonstrated that this enzyme functions both in N-glycosylation and generation of fOSs. This study provides insight into the mechanism of PNGase-independent formation of fOSs. PMID:24062310

  16. Glycoengineering of yeasts from the perspective of glycosylation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Piirainen, Mari A; de Ruijter, Jorg C; Koskela, Essi V; Frey, Alexander D

    2014-12-25

    N-linked glycosylation of proteins is one of the most common posttranslational modifications. N-glycan structures and N-glycosylation efficiency are crucial parameters in the production of N-glycosylated proteins. Yeast cells can be seen as an attractive production host for therapeutic glycoproteins and pioneering work of glycoengineering was performed in Pichia pastoris, realizing yeast strains capable of producing defined, human-type N-glycans. Most strategies used for glycoengineering rely on the modification of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis for the generation of the substrate for Golgi-localized glycosyltransferases. However, modifications in the lipid-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis often result in the accumulation of intermediate structures and cause hypoglycosylation of client proteins. In order to ensure complete N-glycosylation, the flow of lipid-linked oligosaccharide through the biosynthetic pathway and the transfer of the oligosaccharide from the donor lipid onto the protein have to be optimized. A promising tool to improve site occupancy is the expression of protozoan oligosaccharyltransferases, which possess altered specificities for the oligosaccharide and also for the protein acceptor site. Furthermore, flipping of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide into the ER lumen can be improved by overexpression of an artificial flippase. Improving the glycosylation efficiency ensures that not only homogeneous N-glycan structures are generated, but also client proteins are fully glycosylated. PMID:24632452

  17. Genetic resistance to Teladorsagia circumcincta: IgA and parameters at slaughter in Churra sheep.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Valladares, M; Vara-Del Río, M P; Cruz-Rojo, M A; Rojo-Vázquez, F A

    2005-06-01

    SUMMARY Previous experiments have shown that genetic resistance to infection by Teladorsagia circumcincta in sheep can be measured by the level of IgA in gastric mucus, jointly with other parameters. The aim of this study has been to observe the influence of IgA on adult worms. The experiment was carried out with Churra sheep experimentally infected with T. circumcincta. At slaughter, gastric content, gastric mucus, blood samples and faeces were recovered to determine the number of eggs in utero, length of adult females, worm burden, number of L4, titre of serum pepsinogen, peripheral eosinophilia and eggs per gram (epg). IgA activity in gastric mucus, serum, nasal secretions and saliva were tested against somatic antigen from fourth-stage larvae (L4), somatic antigen from the adult stage and excretory-secretory (E/S) antigen from the adult stage. The results showed a significant correlation between serum IgA and gastric mucus (P<0.01) as well as in nasal secretions (P<0.01). We found negative correlations between IgA activity in gastric mucus with the eggs in utero and with adult female length. Furthermore there were also strong relationships between the peripheral eosinophilia with serum (P<0.01) and gastric mucus IgA activity (P<0.01). Moreover serum pepsinogen and the number of L4 at slaughter were related (P<0.01). PMID:16048640

  18. Isolated lymphoid follicles are not IgA inductive sites for recombinant Salmonella

    SciTech Connect

    Hashizume, Tomomi; Momoi, Fumiki; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi; Hosono, Akira; Kataoka, Kosuke; Shinozaki-Kuwahara, Noriko; Kweon, Mi-Na; Yamamoto, Masafumi . E-mail: yamamoto.masafumi@nihon-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    In this study, we investigated whether isolated lymphoid follicles (ILF) play a role in the regulation of intestinal IgA antibody (Ab) responses. The transfer of wild type (WT) bone marrow (BM) to lymphotoxin-{alpha}-deficient (LT{alpha}{sup -/-}) mice resulted in the formation of mature ILF containing T cells, B cells, and FDC clusters in the absence of mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. Although the ILF restored total IgA Abs in the intestine, antigen (Ag)-specific IgA responses were not induced after oral immunization with recombinant Salmonella expressing fragment C of tetanus toxin. Moreover, Ag-specific cell proliferation was not detected in the ILF. Interestingly, no IgA anti-LPS Abs were detected in the fecal extracts of LT{alpha}{sup -/-} mice reconstituted with WT BM. On the basis of these findings, ILF can be presumed to play a role in the production of IgA Abs, but lymphoid nodules are not inductive sites for the regulation of Ag-specific intestinal IgA responses to recombinant Salmonella.

  19. Frequency of IgA antibodies in pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and mucous membrane pemphigoid.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, Emanuele; Drosera, Massimo; Parodi, Aurora; Carrozzo, Marco; Gandolfo, Sergio; Rebora, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    Circulating and bound IgA antibodies can be found in the autoimmune blistering diseases, but their prevalence, clinical relevance and target antigens remain unknown. Thirty-two patients with pemphigus, 73 with bullous pemphigoid and 28 with mucous membrane pemphigoid were studied retrospectively. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) analysis of IgG, IgA, IgM and C3 was carried out for all cases. Sera were studied by standard indirect immunofluorescence, indirect immunofluorescence on salt-split skin, immunoblotting for bullous pemphigoid and mucous membrane pemphigoid and ELISA for pemphigus. With DIF, we found IgA autoantibodies in 22 of all 133 cases. Circulating IgA antibodies to skin were detected in 2 of 3 IgA-DIF-positive patients with pemphigus, in 3 of 6 with bullous pemphigoid, and in 6 of 13 with mucous membrane pemphigoid. We confirm that the IgA reactivity is more frequently associated with mucous membrane involvement, especially in cases without critical involvement (5/8). The role of IgA and its antigenic specificity in these diseases remain unclear. PMID:15370705

  20. New developments in the genetics, pathogenesis, and therapy of IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Magistroni, Riccardo; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Appel, Gerald B.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have brought notable progress in the field of IgA nephropathy. Here, we highlight important new directions and latest developments, including successful discovery of several genetic susceptibility loci, formulation of the multi-hit pathogenesis model that integrates findings from studies of galactose-deficient IgA1, anti-glycan response and immune complex-induced kidney injury, introduction of the Oxford pathology scoring system, and formalization of the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) consensus treatment guidelines. We focus on the latest genetic findings that confirm a strong contribution of inherited factors and explain some of the geo-ethnic disparities in disease susceptibility. Most IgA nephropathy susceptibility loci discovered to date encode genes involved in the maintenance of the intestinal epithelial barrier and response to mucosal pathogens. The concerted pattern of inter-population allelic differentiation across all Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) loci parallels the disease prevalence and correlates with variation in local pathogens, suggesting that multi-locus adaptation might have shaped the present-day landscape of IgA nephropathy. Importantly, the “Intestinal Immune Network for IgA Production” emerged as one of the new targets for potential therapeutic intervention. We place these findings in the context of the multi-hit pathogenesis model and existing knowledge of IgA immunobiology. Lastly, we provide our perspective on the existing treatment options, discuss areas of clinical uncertainty, and outline ongoing clinical trials and translational studies. PMID:26376134

  1. High-affinity monoclonal IgA regulates gut microbiota and prevents colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Okai, Shinsaku; Usui, Fumihito; Yokota, Shuhei; Hori-I, Yusaku; Hasegawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Kurosawa, Manabu; Okada, Seiji; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Nishiyama, Eri; Mori, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takuji; Kurokawa, Ken; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Nanno, Masanobu; Naito, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Yohei; Kato, Tamotsu; Miyauchi, Eiji; Ohno, Hiroshi; Shinkura, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the main antibody isotype secreted into the intestinal lumen. IgA plays a critical role in the defence against pathogens and in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. However, how secreted IgA regulates gut microbiota is not completely understood. In this study, we isolated monoclonal IgA antibodies from the small intestine of healthy mouse. As a candidate for an efficient gut microbiota modulator, we selected a W27 IgA, which binds to multiple bacteria, but not beneficial ones such as Lactobacillus casei. W27 could suppress the cell growth of Escherichia coli but not L. casei in vitro, indicating an ability to improve the intestinal environment. Indeed W27 oral treatment could modulate gut microbiota composition and have a therapeutic effect on both lymphoproliferative disease and colitis models in mice. Thus, W27 IgA oral treatment is a potential remedy for inflammatory bowel disease, acting through restoration of host-microbial symbiosis. PMID:27562257

  2. Vertically transmitted faecal IgA levels determine extra-chromosomal phenotypic variation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Clara; Baldridge, Megan T; Wallace, Meghan A; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Virgin, Herbert W; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2015-05-01

    The proliferation of genetically modified mouse models has exposed phenotypic variation between investigators and institutions that has been challenging to control. In many cases, the microbiota is the presumed cause of the variation. Current solutions to account for phenotypic variability include littermate and maternal controls or defined microbial consortia in gnotobiotic mice. In conventionally raised mice, the microbiome is transmitted from the dam. Here we show that microbially driven dichotomous faecal immunoglobulin-A (IgA) levels in wild-type mice within the same facility mimic the effects of chromosomal mutations. We observe in multiple facilities that vertically transmissible bacteria in IgA-low mice dominantly lower faecal IgA levels in IgA-high mice after co-housing or faecal transplantation. In response to injury, IgA-low mice show increased damage that is transferable by faecal transplantation and driven by faecal IgA differences. We find that bacteria from IgA-low mice degrade the secretory component of secretory IgA as well as IgA itself. These data indicate that phenotypic comparisons between mice must take into account the non-chromosomal hereditary variation between different breeders. We propose faecal IgA as one marker of microbial variability and conclude that co-housing and/or faecal transplantation enables analysis of progeny from different dams. PMID:25686606

  3. Silicosis and renal disease: insights from a case of IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    RICCÒ, Matteo; THAI, Elena; CELLA, Simone

    2015-01-01

    A 68-yr-old male, smoker, is admitted for proteinuria (2,800 mg/24 h) and reduced renal function (serum creatinine 2 mg/dl, GFR 35 ml/min). Renter, he started working 20-yr-old as a sandstone cave miner. Despite the high levels of silica dusts, he reported no mandatory use of airways protection devices during the first 25 yr of activity. No clinical or radiological signs of silicosis or pneumoconiosis where reported until the year of retirement (1997). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (91 mm/h) and C reactive protein (35 mg/l) suggested a pro-inflammatory status. High serum IgA was found (465 mg/dl). A renal biopsy identified glomerular sclerosis with IgA deposition, signs of diffuse vasculitis and tubular atrophia suggesting a diagnosis of IgA nephropathy. Chest X-Rays showed emphysema and diffuse nodularity suggesting diagnosis of silicosis. Chest tomography was also positive for mild signs of silicosis with silicotic nodules and without honeycombing. IgA nephropathy is the most common type of glomerulonephritis worldwide. Several clues suggest a genetic or acquired abnormality of immune system as a trigger of the increased production of IgA. In our case report, simultaneous kidney and pulmonary disease could suggest same triggers (e.g. exposure to virus, bacteria or environmental agents) inducing IgA synthesis and pulmonary immune system activation. PMID:26423329

  4. Silicosis and renal disease: insights from a case of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Riccò, Matteo; Thai, Elena; Cella, Simone

    2016-01-01

    A 68-yr-old male, smoker, is admitted for proteinuria (2,800 mg/24 h) and reduced renal function (serum creatinine 2 mg/dl, GFR 35 ml/min). Renter, he started working 20-yr-old as a sandstone cave miner. Despite the high levels of silica dusts, he reported no mandatory use of airways protection devices during the first 25 yr of activity. No clinical or radiological signs of silicosis or pneumoconiosis where reported until the year of retirement (1997). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (91 mm/h) and C reactive protein (35 mg/l) suggested a pro-inflammatory status. High serum IgA was found (465 mg/dl). A renal biopsy identified glomerular sclerosis with IgA deposition, signs of diffuse vasculitis and tubular atrophia suggesting a diagnosis of IgA nephropathy. Chest X-Rays showed emphysema and diffuse nodularity suggesting diagnosis of silicosis. Chest tomography was also positive for mild signs of silicosis with silicotic nodules and without honeycombing. IgA nephropathy is the most common type of glomerulonephritis worldwide. Several clues suggest a genetic or acquired abnormality of immune system as a trigger of the increased production of IgA. In our case report, simultaneous kidney and pulmonary disease could suggest same triggers (e.g. exposure to virus, bacteria or environmental agents) inducing IgA synthesis and pulmonary immune system activation. PMID:26423329

  5. In vivo activation of complement by IgA in a rat model.

    PubMed Central

    Stad, R K; Bogers, W M; Thoomes-van der Sluys, M E; Van Es, L A; Daha, M R

    1992-01-01

    In this study we investigated the capacity of rat IgA to activate complement (C) in vivo in a rat model. Rat monomeric (m-), dimeric (d-) and polymeric (p-) IgA MoAbs were injected intravenously and assessed for deposition of C3 and C4 on IgA. By ELISA it was shown that both d- and p-IgA bound C3 whereas no binding of C3 by m-IgA was observed. Polymeric IgA was more efficient in binding of C3 as compared with d-IgA. However, in haemolytic assays no consistent decrease of plasma complement levels was observed except for dimeric IgA which induced a marginal consumption of AP50. When rats were pre-treated with cobra venom factor (CVF) to deplete C3, no C3 deposition was found on m-, d- or p-IgA. Neither m- nor d- or p-IgA was able to bind C4 in vivo. In agreement with the results described above, large sized polymeric IgA was shown to be taken up by Kupffer cells (KC) together with C3. No C3 was detected when rats were depleted of C using CVF. Taken together, the experimental data suggest that d- and p-IgA are able to activate C via the alternative pathway in vivo. PMID:1733628

  6. Disulfide bonds and glycosylation in fungal peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Limongi, P; Kjalke, M; Vind, J; Tams, J W; Johansson, T; Welinder, K G

    1995-01-15

    Four conserved disulfide bonds and N-linked and O-linked glycans of extracellular fungal peroxidases have been identified from studies of a lignin and a manganese peroxidase from Trametes versicolor, and from Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and recombinant C. cinereus peroxidase (rCIP) expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. The eight cysteine residues are linked 1-3, 2-7, 4-5 and 6-8, and are located differently from the four conserved disulfide bridges present in the homologous plant peroxidases. CIP and rCIP were identical in their glycosylation pattern, although the extent of glycan chain heterogeneity depended on the fermentation batch. CIP and rCIP have one N-linked glycan composed only of GlcNAc and Man at residue Asn142, and two O-linked glycans near the C-terminus. The major glycoform consists of single Man residues at Thr331 and at Ser338. T. versicolor lignin isoperoxidase TvLP10 contains a single N-linked glycan composed of (GlcNAc)2Man5 bound to Asn103, whereas (GlcNAc)2Man3 was found in T. versicolor manganese isoperoxidase TvMP2 at the same position. In addition, mass spectrometry of the C-terminal peptide of TvMP2 indicated the presence of five Man residues in O-linked glycans. No phosphate was found in these fungal peroxidases. PMID:7851395

  7. Quantitative analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations.

    PubMed

    Sachs, R K; Levy, D; Hahnfeldt, P; Hlatky, L

    2004-01-01

    We review chromosome aberration modeling and its applications, especially to biodosimetry and to characterizing chromosome geometry. Standard results on aberration formation pathways, randomness, dose-response, proximity effects, transmissibility, kinetics, and relations to other radiobiological endpoints are summarized. We also outline recent work on graph-theoretical descriptions of aberrations, Monte-Carlo computer simulations of aberration spectra, software for quantifying aberration complexity, and systematic links of apparently incomplete with complete or truly incomplete aberrations. PMID:15162028

  8. Image-based EUVL aberration metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenger, Germain Louis

    A significant factor in the degradation of nanolithographic image fidelity is optical wavefront aberration. As resolution of nanolithography systems increases, effects of wavefront aberrations on aerial image become more influential. The tolerance of such aberrations is governed by the requirements of features that are being imaged, often requiring lenses that can be corrected with a high degree of accuracy and precision. Resolution of lithographic systems is driven by scaling wavelength down and numerical aperture (NA) up. However, aberrations are also affected from the changes in wavelength and NA. Reduction in wavelength or increase in NA result in greater impact of aberrations, where the latter shows a quadratic dependence. Current demands in semiconductor manufacturing are constantly pushing lithographic systems to operate at the diffraction limit; hence, prompting a need to reduce all degrading effects on image properties to achieve maximum performance. Therefore, the need for highly accurate in-situ aberration measurement and correction is paramount. In this work, an approach has been developed in which several targets including phase wheel, phase disk, phase edges, and binary structures are used to generate optical images to detect and monitor aberrations in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithographic systems. The benefit of using printed patterns as opposed to other techniques is that the lithography system is tested under standard operating conditions. Mathematical models in conjunction with iterative lithographic simulations are used to determine pupil phase wavefront errors and describe them as combinations of Zernike polynomials.

  9. Aberration correction past and present.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, P W

    2009-09-28

    Electron lenses are extremely poor: if glass lenses were as bad, we should see as well with the naked eye as with a microscope! The demonstration by Otto Scherzer in 1936 that skillful lens design could never eliminate the spherical and chromatic aberrations of rotationally symmetric electron lenses was therefore most unwelcome and the other great electron optician of those years, Walter Glaser, never ceased striving to find a loophole in Scherzer's proof. In the wartime and early post-war years, the first proposals for correcting C(s) were made and in 1947, in a second milestone paper, Scherzer listed these and other ways of correcting lenses; soon after, Dennis Gabor invented holography for the same purpose. These approaches will be briefly summarized and the work that led to the successful implementation of quadupole-octopole and sextupole correctors in the 1990 s will be analysed. In conclusion, the elegant role of image algebra in describing image formation and processing and, above all, in developing new methods will be mentioned. PMID:19687058

  10. Effect of aberrations in vortex spatial filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Joseph, Joby; Senthilkumaran, P.

    2012-11-01

    Edge enhancement is a very important operation in image processing and a spiral phase plate can be used as a radial Hilbert mask for isotropic edge enhancement. In this paper we analyze the effect of various Seidel aberrations on the performance of radial Hilbert mask or the vortex phase mask. The aberrated vortex phase mask is implemented optically with the help of a high resolution, spatial light modulator (SLM). It has also been shown that out of various aberrations astigmatism can introduce anisotropy in the Hilbert mask which causes selective edge enhancement.

  11. Fab fragment glycosylated IgG may play a central role in placental immune evasion

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jiang; Lei, Yu; Huang, Yuanping; Zhao, Yingying; Li, Jing; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Junjun; Wang, Juping; Deng, Xiaodong; Chen, Zhengshan; Korteweg, Christine; Deng, Ruishu; Yan, Meiling; Xu, Qian; Dong, Shengnan; Cai, Monghong; Luo, Lili; Huang, Guowei; Wang, Yun; Li, Qian; Lin, Changmei; Su, Meng; Yang, Chunzhang; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION How does the placenta protect the fetus from immune rejection by the mother? SUMMARY ANSWER The placenta can produce IgG that is glycosylated at one of its Fab arms (asymmetric IgG; aIgG) which can interact with other antibodies and certain leukocytes to affect local immune reactions at the junction between the two genetically distinct entities. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The placenta can protect the semi-allogenic fetus from immune rejection by the immune potent mother. aIgG in serum is increased during pregnancy and returns to the normal range after giving birth. aIgG can react to antigens to form immune complexes which do not cause a subsequent immune effector reaction, including fixing complements, inducing cytotoxicity and phagocytosis, and therefore has been called ‘blocking antibody’. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Eighty-eight human placentas, four trophoblast cell lines (TEV-1, JAR, JEG and BeWo), primary culture of human placental trophoblasts and a gene knock-out mouse model were investigated in this study. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS The general approach included the techniques of cell culture, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, immuno-electron microscopy, western blot, quantitative PCR, protein isolation, glycosylation analysis, enzyme digestion, gene sequencing, mass spectrophotometry, laser-guided microdissection, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, pulse chase assay, double and multiple staining to analyze protein and DNA and RNA analysis at the cellular and molecular levels. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Three major discoveries were made: (i) placental trophoblasts and endothelial cells are capable of producing IgG, a significant portion of which is aberrantly glycosylated at one of its Fab arms to form aIgG; (ii) the asymmetrically glycosylated IgG produced by trophoblasts and endothelial cells can react to immunoglobulin molecules of human, rat, mouse, goat and rabbit at the Fc portion; (iii) asymmetrically

  12. Protein Glycosylation in Helicobacter pylori: Beyond the Flagellins?

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Patrick S.; Ford, Rachel S.; Zebian, Najwa; Merkx-Jacques, Alexandra; Vijayakumar, Somalinga; Ratnayake, Dinath; Hayworth, Jacqueline; Creuzenet, Carole

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylation of flagellins by pseudaminic acid is required for virulence in Helicobacter pylori. We demonstrate that, in H. pylori, glycosylation extends to proteins other than flagellins and to sugars other than pseudaminic acid. Several candidate glycoproteins distinct from the flagellins were detected via ProQ-emerald staining and DIG- or biotin- hydrazide labeling of the soluble and outer membrane fractions of wild-type H. pylori, suggesting that protein glycosylation is not limited to the flagellins. DIG-hydrazide labeling of proteins from pseudaminic acid biosynthesis pathway mutants showed that the glycosylation of some glycoproteins is not dependent on the pseudaminic acid glycosylation pathway, indicating the existence of a novel glycosylation pathway. Fractions enriched in glycoprotein candidates by ion exchange chromatography were used to extract the sugars by acid hydrolysis. High performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection revealed characteristic monosaccharide peaks in these extracts. The monosaccharides were then identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The spectra are consistent with sugars such as 5,7-diacetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-L-glycero-L-manno-nonulosonic acid (Pse5Ac7Ac) previously described on flagellins, 5-acetamidino-7-acetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-L-glycero-L-manno-nonulosonic acid (Pse5Am7Ac), bacillosamine derivatives and a potential legionaminic acid derivative (Leg5AmNMe7Ac) which were not previously identified in H. pylori. These data open the way to the study of the mechanism and role of protein glycosylation on protein function and virulence in H. pylori. PMID:21984942

  13. Prion propagation in cells expressing PrP glycosylation mutants.

    PubMed

    Salamat, Muhammad K; Dron, Michel; Chapuis, Jérôme; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2011-04-01

    Infection by prions involves conversion of a host-encoded cell surface protein (PrP(C)) to a disease-related isoform (PrP(Sc)). PrP(C) carries two glycosylation sites variably occupied by complex N-glycans, which have been suggested by previous studies to influence the susceptibility to these diseases and to determine characteristics of prion strains. We used the Rov cell system, which is susceptible to sheep prions, to generate a series of PrP(C) glycosylation mutants with mutations at one or both attachment sites. We examined their subcellular trafficking and ability to convert into PrP(Sc) and to sustain stable prion propagation in the absence of wild-type PrP. The susceptibility to infection of mutants monoglycosylated at either site differed dramatically depending on the amino acid substitution. Aglycosylated double mutants showed overaccumulation in the Golgi compartment and failed to be infected. Introduction of an ectopic glycosylation site near the N terminus fully restored cell surface expression of PrP but not convertibility into PrP(Sc), while PrP(C) with three glycosylation sites conferred cell permissiveness to infection similarly to the wild type. In contrast, predominantly aglycosylated molecules with nonmutated N-glycosylation sequons, produced in cells expressing glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchorless PrP(C), were able to form infectious PrP(Sc). Together our findings suggest that glycosylation is important for efficient trafficking of anchored PrP to the cell surface and sustained prion propagation. However, properly trafficked glycosylation mutants were not necessarily prone to conversion, thus making it difficult in such studies to discern whether the amino acid changes or glycan chain removal most influences the permissiveness to prion infection. PMID:21248032

  14. [Non-enzymatic glycosylation of dietary protein in vitro].

    PubMed

    Bednykh, B S; Evdokimov, I A; Sokolov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins, based on discovered by Mayarn reaction of carbohydrate aldehyde group with a free amino group of a protein molecule, is well known to experts in biochemistry of food industry. Generated brown solid in some cases give the product marketable qualities--crackling bread--in others conversely, worsen the product. The biological effects of far-advanced products of non-enzymatic protein glycosylation reaction have not been studied enough, although it was reported previously that they are not split by digestive enzymes and couldn't be absorbed by animals. The objective of this work was to compare the depth of glycosylation of different food proteins of animal and vegetable origin. The objects of the study were proteins of animal (casein, lactoglobulin, albumin) and vegetable (soy isolate, proteins of rice flour, buckwheat, oatmeal) origin, glucose and fructose were selected as glycosylation agents, exposure 15 days at 37 degrees C. Lactoglobulin was glycosylated to a lesser extent among the proteins of animal origin while protein of oatmeal was glycosylated in the least degree among vegetable proteins. Conversely, such proteins as casein and soya isolate protein bound rather large amounts of carbohydrates. Fructose binding with protein was generally higher than the binding of glucose. The only exception was a protein of oatmeal. When of glucose and fructose simultaneously presented in the incubation medium, glucose binding usually increased while binding of fructose, in contrast, reduced. According to the total amount of carbohydrate (mcg), which is able to attach a protein (mg) the studied food proteins located in the following order: albumin (38) > soy protein isolate (23) > casein (15,) > whey protein rice flour protein (6) > protein from buckwheat flour (3) > globulin (2) > protein of oatmeal (0.3). The results obtained are to be used to select the optimal combination of proteins and carbohydrates, in which the glycosylation

  15. Glycosylated hemoglobin and hyperbaric oxygen coverage denials.

    PubMed

    Moffat, A D; Worth, E R; Weaver, L K

    2015-01-01

    Some Medicaid and Medicare fiscal intermediaries are denying hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients if the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) > 7.0%. We performed multiple PubMed searches for any diabetic wound healing clinical trial that documented HbA1c and had a wound healing endpoint. We scrutinized 30 peer-reviewed clinical trials, representing more than 4,400 patients. The average HbA1c from the intervention side of the studies was 8.6% (7.2% - 9.9%) and the control/sham side was 8.3% (6.0% - 10.6%). Twelve studies made a direct attempt to link HbA1c and wound healing. Four retrospective studies and one prospective cohort study assert that lower HbA1c favors wound healing, but review of the studies reveal design flaws that invalidate these conclusions. In total, 25 studies showed no direct correlation between HbA1c levels and wound healing. There was no randomized controlled trial (RCT) data demonstrating that HbA1c < 7.0% improves diabetic wound healing. In every study reviewed, wounds healed with high HbA1c levels that would be considered poorly controlled by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Frequently, patients lack optimal blood glucose control when they have a limb-threatening DFU. The evidence supports that denying hyperbaric oxygen to those with HbA1c > 7.0% is unfounded. PMID:26152104

  16. Glycosylated polyacrylate nanoparticles by emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Abeylath, Sampath C; Turos, Edward

    2007-08-01

    A selection of glycosylated polyacrylate nanoparticles has been prepared by radical-initiated emulsion polymerization in aqueous media. Using ethyl acrylate as a co-monomer, carbohydrate acrylates were incorporated into the poly(ethyl acrylate) framework to give stable emulsions of glyconanoparticles with an average particle size of around 40 nm. Using this technique a variety of glyconanoparticles were prepared from 3-O-acryloyl-1,2:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-glucofuranose, 1-O-acryloyl-2,3:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-mannofuranose, 6-O-acryloyl-1,2:3,4-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-galactopyranose, 2-N-acryloyl-1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine, 5-O-acryloyl-2,3-isopropylidene-1-methoxy-beta-D-ribofuranose and 4-N-acetyl-5'-O-acryloyl-2',3'-O-isopropylidene cytidine. Scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and proton NMR analysis of the emulsions indicated essentially 100% incorporation of the carbohydrate acrylate monomer into the polymer with the exception of O-benzyl- and O-benzoyl-protected carbohydrate acrylates, which gave incomplete incorporation. Formation of larger glyconanoparticles of ~80nm with (unprotected) 3-O-acryloyl-D-glucose and 5-O-acryloyl-1-methoxy-beta-D-ribofuranose revealed the influence of free hydroxyl groups in the monomer on the particle size during polymerization, a feature which is also apparently dependent on the amount of carbohydrate in the matrix. This methodology allows for a new, simple route to the synthesis of polymeric glyconanoparticles with potential applications in targeted drug delivery and materials development. PMID:18677404

  17. Glycosylated Nanoparticles as Efficient Antimicrobial Delivery Agents.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Ahmed M; Abdulkarim, Ali; Sharples, Gary J; Cameron, Neil R

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic polymer nanoparticles that can be tailored through multivalent ligand display on the surface, while at the same time allowing encapsulation of desired bioactive molecules, are especially useful in providing a versatile and robust platform in the design of specific delivery vehicles for various purposes. Glycosylated nanoparticles (glyco-NPs) of a poly(n-butyl acrylate) (pBA) core and poly(N-2-(β-d-glucosyloxy)ethyl acrylamide) (p(NβGlcEAM)) or poly(N-2-(β-D-galactosyloxy)ethyl acrylamide) (p(NβGalEAM)) corona were prepared via nanoprecipitation in aqueous solutions of preformed amphiphilic glycopolymers. Well-defined block copolymers of (poly(pentafluorophenyl acrylate) (pPFPA) and pBA were first prepared by RAFT polymerization followed by postpolymerization functionalization with aminoethyl glycosides to yield p(NβGlcEAM-b-BA) and p(NβGalEAM-b-BA), which were then used to form glyco-NPs (glucosylated and galactosylated NPs, Glc-NPs and Gal-NPs, respectively). The glyco-NPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and TEM. Encapsulation and release of ampicillin, leading to nanoparticles that we have termed "glyconanobiotics", were studied. The ampicillin-loaded glyco-NPs were found to induce aggregation of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and resulted in antibacterial activity approaching that of ampicillin itself. This glyconanobiotics strategy represents a potential new approach for the delivery of antibiotics close to the surface of bacteria by promoting bacterial aggregation. Defined release in the proximity of the bacterial envelope may thus enhance antibacterial efficiency and potentially reduce the quantities of agent required for potency. PMID:27434596

  18. Image Ellipticity from Atmospheric Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W H; Olivier, S S; Asztalos, S J; Rosenberg, L J; Baker, K L

    2007-03-06

    We investigate the ellipticity of the point-spread function (PSF) produced by imaging an unresolved source with a telescope, subject to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. It is important to quantify these effects in order to understand the errors in shape measurements of astronomical objects, such as those used to study weak gravitational lensing of field galaxies. The PSF modeling involves either a Fourier transform of the phase information in the pupil plane or a ray-tracing approach, which has the advantage of requiring fewer computations than the Fourier transform. Using a standard method, involving the Gaussian weighted second moments of intensity, we then calculate the ellipticity of the PSF patterns. We find significant ellipticity for the instantaneous patterns (up to more than 10%). Longer exposures, which we approximate by combining multiple (N) images from uncorrelated atmospheric realizations, yield progressively lower ellipticity (as 1/{radical}N). We also verify that the measured ellipticity does not depend on the sampling interval in the pupil plane using the Fourier method. However, we find that the results using the ray-tracing technique do depend on the pupil sampling interval, representing a gradual breakdown of the geometric approximation at high spatial frequencies. Therefore, ray tracing is generally not an accurate method of modeling PSF ellipticity induced by atmospheric turbulence unless some additional procedure is implemented to correctly account for the effects of high spatial frequency aberrations. The Fourier method, however, can be used directly to accurately model PSF ellipticity, which can give insights into errors in the statistics of field galaxy shapes used in studies of weak gravitational lensing.

  19. Transverse chromatic aberration after corneal refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anera, R. G.; Jiménez, J. R.; Jiménez del Barco, L.; Hita, E.

    2005-05-01

    An expression has been deduced theoretically from a schematic-eye model, for the transverse or lateral chromatic aberration (TCA) after refractive surgery. The aim was to investigate analytically how chromatic aberration varies after the emmetropization process. These changes in the TCA have been characterized from changes in corneal asphericity. The results indicate that TCA after refractive surgery diminishes as the degree of myopia increases, a trend contrary to that occurring with monochromatic aberrations, such as spherical or coma. These results can explain the fact that the real deterioration of the visual function under photopic conditions detected in those operated on for myopia is less than expected when only monochromatic aberrations are taken into account.

  20. Spherical aberration in electrically thin flat lenses.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Ramahi, Omar M

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the spherical aberration of a new generation of lenses made of flat electrically thin inhomogeneous media. For such lenses, spherical aberration is analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively, and comparison is made to the classical gradient index rod. Both flat thin and thick lenses are made of gradient index materials, but the physical mechanisms and design equations are different. Using full-wave three-dimensional numerical simulation, we evaluate the spherical aberrations using the Maréchal criterion and show that the thin lens gives significantly better performance than the thick lens (rod). Additionally, based on ray tracing formulation, third-order analysis for longitudinal aberration and optical path difference are presented, showing strong overall performance of thin lenses in comparison to classical rod lenses. PMID:27505651

  1. Aberrations of a horizontal-vertical depolarizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Stephen C.; Chipman, Russell A.; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    1992-01-01

    Ray-trace equations for uniaxial birefringent materials are used here to derive third-order estimates for aberrations that are produced in imaging through uniaxial plates and horizontal-vertical (HV) depolarizers. An HV depolarizer is a spatial pseudodepolarizer; it converts a uniform input polarization state into a continuum of spatially varying polarization states in an output beam. An HV depolarizer consists of two birefringent wedges whose crystal axes are crossed at 90 deg. The interface between the wedges is included, which leads to a spatially varying retardance that provides the spatial pseudodepolarization. In HV depolarizers, spherical aberration, astigmatism, and image doubling are the principal aberrations for on-axis objects. Only spherical aberration occurs in isotropic plates, while the presence of birefringent wedges introduces astigmatism and image doubling. It is shown that image separation is proportional to the magnitude of the retardance variation.

  2. Glomerular IgG deposition predicts renal outcome in patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Ho; Lim, Beom Jin; Han, In Mi; Han, Seung Gyu; Kwon, Young Eun; Park, Kyoung Sook; Lee, Mi Jung; Oh, Hyung Jung; Park, Jung Tak; Han, Seung Hyeok; Kang, Shin-Wook; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Glomerular IgG deposition is frequently observed in patients with IgA nephropathy. However, the association between glomerular IgG deposition and progression of IgA nephropathy is uncertain. Six hundred and twenty-seven patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy were recruited. Histological variables of the Oxford classification (Oxford-MEST) and the presence of glomerular IgG deposits were assessed. Renal progression defined as end-stage renal disease or 50% reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression analysis. Of the study population, 200 patients (31.9%) had glomerular IgG deposition on immunofluorescence staining. During a mean follow-up of 56.8±37.5 months, the rate of renal progression was significantly higher in the IgA nephropathy patients with glomerular IgG deposition compared with the IgA nephropathy patients without glomerular IgG deposition (39.8 vs 12.3 per 1000 patient-years; P<0.001). Of patients with IgG deposition, 178 (28.3%), 20 (3.2%), and 2 (0.3%) patients had mild, moderate, and marked glomerular IgG deposits, receptively. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that cumulative renal survival was significantly lower in IgA nephropathy patients with the higher intensity of glomerular IgG deposits (P<0.001). In addition, Cox regression analysis revealed that moderate and marked glomerular IgG deposits significantly predicted renal outcome independent of Oxford-MEST and clinical variables (HR, 2.97; 95% CI, 1.01-8.77; P=0.04). This study showed that that glomerular IgG deposition was independently associated with poor renal outcome in patient with IgA nephropathy. PMID:27102346

  3. Effect of age, gestation and lactation on faecal IgA and calprotectin concentrations in dogs.

    PubMed

    Grellet, Aurélien; Mila, Hanna; Heilmann, Romy M; Feugier, Alexandre; Gruetzner, Niels; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jorg M; Chastant-Maillard, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Faecal calprotectin and IgA have been suggested as non-invasive markers of gut health. Faecal calprotectin is a marker of intestinal inflammation in adults, whereas IgA has been suggested as a marker of intestinal immunity. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of gestation, lactation and age on faecal concentrations of these biomarkers. Thirty puppies, nineteen pregnant or lactating bitches and eighty-nine healthy control adult dogs were included in the study. Faeces were collected from the fourth week of gestation until the eighth week of lactation in pregnant and lactating bitches, and between 4 and 9 weeks of age in puppies. Faeces from the eighty-nine healthy control adult dogs were also collected. Faecal calprotectin and IgA concentrations were measured. Faecal calprotectin concentrations in control dogs were significantly lower than faecal calprotectin concentrations in puppies between 4 and 6 weeks of age (P < 0·001) or between 7 and 9 weeks of age (P = 0·004). Puppies between 4 and 6 weeks of age had significantly higher faecal IgA concentrations compared with puppies between 7 and 9 weeks of age (P = 0·001). Bitches during their second month of lactation had significantly lower faecal IgA concentrations compared with their first month of lactation (P = 0·049). Faecal calprotectin and IgA have been suggested as non-invasive and easily measured biomarkers of gut health in adults. However, the present study underlines that faecal IgA and calprotectin concentrations vary markedly depending of physiologic factors such as gestation, lactation and age. These factors need to be considered when these faecal biomarkers are used for evaluation of intestinal immunity or inflammation. PMID:26101610

  4. Chromosome aberrations in decondensed sperm DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Factors that could influence the chromosomal aberration frequency observed at first cleavage following in vivo exposure of germ cells to chemical mutagens are discussed. The techniques of chromosome aberration analysis following sperm DNA condensation by in vitro fertilization or fusion seem to be viable research areas for providing information of human germ cell exposures. However, the potential sensitivity of the assay needs to be better understood, and factors that can influence this sensitivity require a great deal of further study using animal models.

  5. Sensing Phase Aberrations behind Lyot Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Rémi; Pueyo, Laurent; Wallace, J. Kent; Shao, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Direct detection of young extrasolar planets orbiting nearby stars can be accomplished from the ground with extreme adaptive optics and coronagraphy in the near-infrared, as long as this combination can provide an image with a dynamic range of 107 after the data are processed. Slowly varying speckles due to residual phase aberrations that are not measured by the primary wave-front sensor are the primary obstacle to achieving such a dynamic range. In particular, non-common optical path aberrations occurring between the wave-front sensor and the coronagraphic occulting spot degrade performance the most. We analyze the passage of both low and high spatial frequency phase ripples, as well as low-order Zernike aberrations, through an apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph in order to demonstrate the way coronagraphic filtering affects various aberrations. We derive the coronagraphically induced cutoff frequency of the filtering and estimate coronagraphic contrast losses due to low-order Zernike aberrations: tilt, astigmatism, defocus, coma, and spherical aberration. Such slowly varying path errors can be measured behind a coronagraph and corrected by a slowly updated optical path delay precompensation or offset asserted on the wave front by the adaptive optics (AO) system. We suggest ways of measuring and correcting all but the lowest spatial frequency aberrations using Lyot plane wave-front data, in spite of the complex interaction between the coronagraph and those mid-spatial frequency aberrations that cause image plane speckles near the coronagraphic focal plane mask occulter's edge. This investigation provides guidance for next-generation coronagraphic instruments currently under construction.

  6. Prediction of Visual Acuity from Wavefront Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor); Ahumada, Albert J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for generating a visual acuity metric, based on wavefront aberrations (WFAs), associated with a test subject and representing classes of imperfections, such as defocus, astigmatism, coma and spherical aberrations, of the subject's visual system. The metric allows choices of different image template, can predict acuity for different target probabilities, can incorporate different and possibly subject-specific neural transfer functions, can predict acuity for different subject templates, and incorporates a model of the optotype identification task.

  7. The influence of costimulation and regulatory CD4+ T cells on intestinal IgA immune responses.

    PubMed

    Gärdby, E; Kagrdic, D; Kjerrulf, M; Bromander, A; Vajdy, M; Hörnquist, E; Lycke, N

    1998-01-01

    It is thought that IgA B-cell differentiation is highly dependent on activated CD4+ T cells. In particular, cell-cell interactions in the Peyer's patches involving CD40 and/or CD80/CD86 have been implicated in germinal-center formation and IgA B-cell development. Also soluble factors, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and TGF beta may be critical for IgA B-cell differentiation in vivo. Here we report on some paradoxical findings with regard to IgA B-cell differentiation and specific mucosal immune responses that we have recently made using gene knockout mice. More specifically, we have investigated to what extent absence of CD4+ T cells, relevant cytokines, or T-cell-B-cell interactions would influence IgA B-cell differentiation in vivo. Using CD4- or IL-4-gene knockout mice or mice made transgenic for CTLA4Ig, we found that, although specific responses were impaired, total IgA production and IgA B-cell differentiation appeared to proceed normally. However, a poor correlation was found between, on the one hand, GC formation and IgA differentiation and, on the other hand, the ability to respond to T-cell-dependent soluble protein antigens in these mice. Thus, despite the various deficiencies in CD4+ T-cell functions seemingly intact IgA B-cell development was observed. PMID:9716905

  8. Lipid advanced glycosylation: pathway for lipid oxidation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bucala, R; Makita, Z; Koschinsky, T; Cerami, A; Vlassara, H

    1993-01-01

    To address potential mechanisms for oxidative modification of lipids in vivo, we investigated the possibility that phospholipids react directly with glucose to form advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) that then initiate lipid oxidation. Phospholipid-linked AGEs formed readily in vitro, mimicking the absorbance, fluorescence, and immunochemical properties of AGEs that result from advanced glycosylation of proteins. Oxidation of unsaturated fatty acid residues, as assessed by reactive aldehyde formation, occurred at a rate that paralleled the rate of lipid advanced glycosylation. Aminoguanidine, an agent that prevents protein advanced glycosylation, inhibited both lipid advanced glycosylation and oxidative modification. Incubation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) with glucose produced AGE moieties that were attached to both the lipid and the apoprotein components. Oxidized LDL formed concomitantly with AGE-modified LDL. Of significance, AGE ELISA analysis of LDL specimens isolated from diabetic individuals revealed increased levels of both apoprotein- and lipid-linked AGEs when compared to specimens obtained from normal, nondiabetic controls. Circulating levels of oxidized LDL were elevated in diabetic patients and correlated significantly with lipid AGE levels. These data support the concept that AGE oxidation plays an important and perhaps primary role in initiating lipid oxidation in vivo. PMID:8341651

  9. N-glycosylation in Haloferax volcanii: adjusting the sweetness

    PubMed Central

    Eichler, Jerry; Arbiv, Adi; Cohen-Rosenzweig, Chen; Kaminski, Lina; Kandiba, Lina; Konrad, Zvia

    2013-01-01

    Long believed to be restricted to Eukarya, it is now known that cells of all three domains of life perform N-glycosylation, the covalent attachment of glycans to select target protein asparagine residues. Still, it is only in the last decade that pathways of N-glycosylation in Archaea have been delineated. In the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii, a series of Agl (archaeal glycosylation) proteins is responsible for the addition of an N-linked pentasaccharide to modified proteins, including the surface (S)-layer glycoprotein, the sole component of the surface layer surrounding the cell. The S-layer glycoprotein N-linked glycosylation profile changes, however, as a function of surrounding salinity. Upon growth at different salt concentrations, the S-layer glycoprotein is either decorated by the N-linked pentasaccharide introduced above or by both this pentasaccharide as well as a tetrasaccharide of distinct composition. Recent efforts have identified Agl5–Agl15 as components of a second Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway responsible for generating the tetrasaccharide attached to S-layer glycoprotein when growth occurs in 1.75 M but not 3.4 M NaCl-containing medium. PMID:24399998

  10. Glycosylation of closely spaced acceptor sites in human glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Shrimal, Shiteshu; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    Summary Asparagine-linked glycosylation of proteins by the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) occurs when acceptor sites or sequons (N-x≠P-T/S) on nascent polypeptides enter the lumen of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Metazoan organisms assemble two isoforms of the OST that have different catalytic subunits (STT3A or STT3B) and partially non-overlapping cellular roles. Potential glycosylation sites move past the STT3A complex, which is associated with the translocation channel, at the protein synthesis elongation rate. Here, we investigated whether close spacing between acceptor sites in a nascent protein promotes site skipping by the STT3A complex. Biosynthetic analysis of four human glycoproteins revealed that closely spaced sites are efficiently glycosylated by an STT3B-independent process unless the sequons contain non-optimal sequence features, including extreme close spacing between sequons (e.g. NxTNxT) or the presence of paired NxS sequons (e.g. NxSANxS). Many, but not all, glycosylation sites that are skipped by the STT3A complex can be glycosylated by the STT3B complex. Analysis of a murine glycoprotein database revealed that closely spaced sequons are surprisingly common, and are enriched for paired NxT sites when the gap between sequons is less than three residues. PMID:24105266

  11. Impact of glycosylation on the unimpaired functions of the sperm

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    One of the key factors of early development is the specification of competence between the oocyte and the sperm, which occurs during gametogenesis. However, the starting point, growth, and maturation for acquiring competence during spermatogenesis and oogenesis in mammals are very different. Spermatogenesis includes spermiogenesis, but such a metamorphosis is not observed during oogenesis. Glycosylation, a ubiquitous modification, is a preliminary requisite for distribution of the structural and functional components of spermatids for metamorphosis. In addition, glycosylation using epididymal or female genital secretory glycans is an important process for the sperm maturation, the acquisition of the potential for fertilization, and the acceleration of early embryo development. However, nonemzymatic unexpected covalent bonding of a carbohydrate and malglycosylation can result in falling fertility rates as shown in the diabetic male. So far, glycosylation during spermatogenesis and the dynamics of the plasma membrane in the process of capacitation and fertilization have been evaluated, and a powerful role of glycosylation in spermatogenesis and early development is also suggested by structural bioinformatics, functional genomics, and functional proteomics. Further understanding of glycosylation is needed to provide a better understanding of fertilization and embryo development and for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools for infertility. PMID:26473106

  12. Detection of Protein Glycosylation Using Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    PubMed

    Cowcher, David P; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Brewster, Victoria L; Ashton, Lorna; Deckert, Volker; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-02-16

    The correct glycosylation of biopharmaceutical glycoproteins and their formulations is essential for them to have the desired therapeutic effect on the patient. It has recently been shown that Raman spectroscopy can be used to quantify the proportion of glycosylated protein from mixtures of native and glycosylated forms of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase). Here we show the first steps toward not only the detection of glycosylation status but the characterization of glycans themselves from just a few protein molecules at a time using tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS). While this technique generates complex data that are very dependent on the protein orientation, with the careful development of combined data preprocessing, univariate and multivariate analysis techniques, we have shown that we can distinguish between the native and glycosylated forms of RNase. Many glycoproteins contain populations of subtly different glycoforms; therefore, with stricter orientation control, we believe this has the potential to lead to further glycan characterization using TERS, which would have use in biopharmaceutical synthesis and formulation research. PMID:26813024

  13. Studying N-linked glycosylation of receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Itkonen, Harri M; Mills, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alterations have been identified as a frequent event in cancer. This is often associated with increased flux through glycolysis, and also a secondary pathway to glycolysis, hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). HBP provides substrate for N-linked glycosylation, which occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. N-linked glycosylation supports protein folding and correct sorting of proteins to plasma membrane and secretion. This process generates complex glycoforms, which can be recognized by other proteins and glycosylation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) can also regulate their plasma-membrane retention time. Of special interest for experimental biologists, plants produce proteins, termed lectins, which bind with high specificity to glyco-conjugates. For the purposes of molecular biology, plant lectins can be conjugated to different moieties, such as agarose beads, which enable precipitation of specifically glycosylated proteins. In this chapter, we describe in detail how to perform pull-down experiments with commercially available lectins to identify changes in the glycosylation of RTKs. PMID:25319893

  14. Differential O-glycosylation in cortical and medullary thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Georgina; Lascurain, Ricardo; Hernández-Cruz, Pedro; Tetaert, Daniel; Degand, Pierre; Gorocica, Patricia; Espinosa, Blanca; Zenteno, Edgar; Chávez, Raúl

    2006-08-01

    Differentiation of T lymphocytes is characterized by variable expression of CD8/CD4 co-receptor molecules and changes in the glycosylation pattern. In this work, O-glycosylation was analyzed in microsomes from murine thymocytes purified with the PNA and Amaranthus leucocarpus (ALL) lectins, specific for the T antigen (Gal beta1,3GalNAc1,0 Ser/Thr) in cortical and medullary thymocytes, respectively. Three peptides were used as acceptors for UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferase (GalNAc transferase); the peptide motif TTSAPTTS was the best glycosylated one. Cortical ALL-PNA+ thymocytes showed two-fold higher GalNAc transferase activity than ALL+PNA- thymocytes; however, capillary electrophoresis showed a higher proportion of di- versus mono-glycosylated peptides for ALL+PNA- than for ALL-PNA+. We compared the GalNAc transferase activity of thymocytes from dexamethasone-treated mice versus control mice. GalNAc transferase activity was six-fold higher in thymocytes from control mice than from dexamethasone-treated mice; the rate of di-glycosylated peptides for dexamethosone-resistant ALL+ was two-fold higher than for ALL- thymocytes. Our results confirm an upregulated biosynthesis of O-glycosidically linked glycans on T cell surface glycoproteins, and suggest that the modification of GalNAc transferase activity plays a relevant role during the maturation process of thymic cells. PMID:16762509

  15. Small Glycosylated Lignin Oligomers Are Stored in Arabidopsis Leaf Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Dima, Oana; Morreel, Kris; Vanholme, Bartel; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; Boerjan, Wout

    2015-01-01

    Lignin is an aromatic polymer derived from the combinatorial coupling of monolignol radicals in the cell wall. Recently, various glycosylated lignin oligomers have been revealed in Arabidopsis thaliana. Given that monolignol oxidation and monolignol radical coupling are known to occur in the apoplast, and glycosylation in the cytoplasm, it raises questions about the subcellular localization of glycosylated lignin oligomer biosynthesis and their storage. By metabolite profiling of Arabidopsis leaf vacuoles, we show that the leaf vacuole stores a large number of these small glycosylated lignin oligomers. Their structural variety and the incorporation of alternative monomers, as observed in Arabidopsis mutants with altered monolignol biosynthesis, indicate that they are all formed by combinatorial radical coupling. In contrast to the common believe that combinatorial coupling is restricted to the apoplast, we hypothesized that the aglycones of these compounds are made within the cell. To investigate this, leaf protoplast cultures were cofed with 13C6-labeled coniferyl alcohol and a 13C4-labeled dimer of coniferyl alcohol. Metabolite profiling of the cofed protoplasts provided strong support for the occurrence of intracellular monolignol coupling. We therefore propose a metabolic pathway involving intracellular combinatorial coupling of monolignol radicals, followed by oligomer glycosylation and vacuolar import, which shares characteristics with both lignin and lignan biosynthesis. PMID:25700483

  16. FCRLA is a resident endoplasmic reticulum protein that associates with intracellular Igs, IgM, IgG and IgA

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Teresa; Kulemzin, Sergei V.; Reshetnikova, Evdokia S.; Chikaev, Nikolai A.; Volkova, Olga Y.; Mechetina, Ludmila V.; Zhao, Meina; Davis, Randall S.; Taranin, Alexander V.; Najakshin, Alexander M.; Hendershot, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    Fc receptor-like A (FCRLA) is an unusual member of the extended Fc receptor family. FCRLA has homology to receptors for the Fc portion of Ig (FCR) and to other FCRL proteins. However, unlike these other family representatives, which are typically transmembrane receptors with extracellular ligand-binding domains, FCRLA has no predicted transmembrane domain or N-linked glycosylation sites and is an intracellular protein. We show by confocal microscopy and biochemical assays that FCRLA is a soluble resident endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein, but it does not possess the amino acid sequence KDEL as an ER retention motif in its C-terminus. Using a series of deletion mutants, we found that its ER retention is most likely mediated by the amino terminal partial Ig-like domain. We have identified ER-localized Ig as the FCRLA ligand. FCRLA is unique among the large family of Fc receptors, in that it is capable of associating with multiple Ig isotypes, IgM, IgG and IgA. Among hemopoietic cells, FCRLA expression is restricted to the B lineage and is most abundant in germinal center B lymphocytes. The studies reported here demonstrate that FCRLA is more broadly expressed among human B lineage cells than originally reported; it is found at significant levels in resting blood B cells and at varying levels in all B-cell subsets in tonsil. PMID:21149418

  17. Dectin-1 Is Essential for Reverse Transcytosis of Glycosylated SIgA-Antigen Complexes by Intestinal M Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rochereau, Nicolas; Drocourt, Daniel; Perouzel, Eric; Pavot, Vincent; Redelinghuys, Pierre; Brown, Gordon D.; Tiraby, Gerard; Roblin, Xavier; Verrier, Bernard; Genin, Christian; Corthésy, Blaise; Paul, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal microfold (M) cells possess a high transcytosis capacity and are able to transport a broad range of materials including particulate antigens, soluble macromolecules, and pathogens from the intestinal lumen to inductive sites of the mucosal immune system. M cells are also the primary pathway for delivery of secretory IgA (SIgA) to the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. However, although the consequences of SIgA uptake by M cells are now well known and described, the mechanisms whereby SIgA is selectively bound and taken up remain poorly understood. Here we first demonstrate that both the Cα1 region and glycosylation, more particularly sialic acid residues, are involved in M cell–mediated reverse transcytosis. Second, we found that SIgA is taken up by M cells via the Dectin-1 receptor, with the possible involvement of Siglec-5 acting as a co-receptor. Third, we establish that transcytosed SIgA is taken up by mucosal CX3CR1+ dendritic cells (DCs) via the DC-SIGN receptor. Fourth, we show that mucosal and systemic antibody responses against the HIV p24-SIgA complexes administered orally is strictly dependent on the expression of Dectin-1. Having deciphered the mechanisms leading to specific targeting of SIgA-based Ag complexes paves the way to the use of such a vehicle for mucosal vaccination against various infectious diseases. PMID:24068891

  18. Accommodation to Wavefront Vergence and Chromatic Aberration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinan; Kruger, Philip B.; Li, James S.; Lin, Peter L.; Stark, Lawrence R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) provides a cue to accommodation with small pupils. However, large pupils increase monochromatic aberrations, which may obscure chromatic blur. In the present study, we examined the effect of pupil size and LCA on accommodation. Methods Accommodation was recorded by infrared optometer while observers (nine normal trichromats) viewed a sinusoidally moving Maltese cross target in a Badal stimulus system. There were two illumination conditions: white (3000 K; 20 cd/m2) and monochromatic (550 nm with 10 nm bandwidth; 20 cd/m2) and two artificial pupil conditions (3 mm and 5.7 mm). Separately, static measurements of wavefront aberration were made with the eye accommodating to targets between 0 and 4 D (COAS, Wavefront Sciences). Results Large individual differences in accommodation to wavefront vergence and to LCA are a hallmark of accommodation. LCA continues to provide a signal at large pupil sizes despite higher levels of monochromatic aberrations. Conclusions Monochromatic aberrations may defend against chromatic blur at high spatial frequencies, but accommodation responds best to optical vergence and to LCA at 3 c/deg where blur from higher order aberrations is less. PMID:21317666

  19. Genomics and disease progression in IgA nephritis.

    PubMed

    Woo, Keng Thye; Lau, Yeow Kok; Choong, Hui Lin; Tan, Han Khim; Foo, Marjorie Wy; Lee, Evan Jc; Anantharaman, Vathsala; Lee, Grace Sl; Yap, Hui Kim; Yi, Zhao; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Wong, Kok Seng; Chan, Choong Meng

    2013-12-01

    Apart from clinical, histological and biochemical indices, genomics are now being employed to unravel the pathogenetic mechanisms in the disease progression of IgA nephritis (IgAN). The results of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism have been controversial. Those patients with the DD genotype seem to have a poorer prognosis. However, with high dose angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy, the ACE gene polymorphism status of a patient may no longer be a matter for concern as those with the DD genotype would also respond favourably to high dose ARB therapy. Association studies with gene sequencing and haplotypes have suggested that multiple genes are involved in the pathogenesis of IgAN. Some workers have reported a synergistic effect in the combined analysis of AGT-M235T and ACE I/D polymorphism. With the use of deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) microarray, tens of thousands of gene expressions genome-wide can be examined together simultaneously. A locus of familial IgAN has been described with strong evidence of linkage to IgAN1 on chromosome 6q22-23. Two other loci were reported at 4q26-31 and 17q12-22. DNA microarray techniques could also help in the identification of specific pathogenic genes that are up- or down-regulated and this may allow genome wide analyses of these genes and their role in the pathogenesis and progression of IgAN. Recently, using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) more loci for disease susceptibility for IgAN have been identified at 17p13, 8p23, 22q12, 1q32 and 6p21. PMID:24463829

  20. A novel human IgA monoclonal antibody protects against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Balu, Sucharitha; Reljic, Rajko; Lewis, Melanie J; Pleass, Richard J; McIntosh, Richard; van Kooten, Cees; van Egmond, Marjolein; Challacombe, Stephen; Woof, Jenny M; Ivanyi, Juraj

    2011-03-01

    Abs have been shown to be protective in passive immunotherapy of tuberculous infection using mouse experimental models. In this study, we report on the properties of a novel human IgA1, constructed using a single-chain variable fragment clone (2E9), selected from an Ab phage library. The purified Ab monomer revealed high binding affinities for the mycobacterial α-crystallin Ag and for the human FcαRI (CD89) IgA receptor. Intranasal inoculations with 2E9IgA1 and recombinant mouse IFN-γ significantly inhibited pulmonary H37Rv infection in mice transgenic for human CD89 but not in CD89-negative littermate controls, suggesting that binding to CD89 was necessary for the IgA-imparted passive protection. 2E9IgA1 added to human whole-blood or monocyte cultures inhibited luciferase-tagged H37Rv infection although not for all tested blood donors. Inhibition by 2E9IgA1 was synergistic with human rIFN-γ in cultures of purified human monocytes but not in whole-blood cultures. The demonstration of the mandatory role of FcαRI (CD89) for human IgA-mediated protection is important for understanding of the mechanisms involved and also for translation of this approach toward development of passive immunotherapy of tuberculosis. PMID:21257971

  1. Prominent role for plasmacytoid dendritic cells in mucosal T cell-independent IgA induction.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Hiroyuki; Abe, Yukiko; Asano, Jumpei; Sato, Taku; Liu, Jiajia; Iwata, Makoto; Ohteki, Toshiaki

    2011-02-25

    Although both conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are present in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), the roles of pDCs in the gut remain largely unknown. Here we show a critical role for pDCs in T cell-independent (TI) IgA production by B cells in the GALT. When pDCs of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches (PPs) (which are representative GALT) were cultured with naive B cells to induce TI IgA class switch recombination (CSR), IgA production was substantially higher than in cocultures of these cells with cDCs. IgA production was dependent on APRIL and BAFF production by pDCs. Importantly, pDC expression of APRIL and BAFF was dependent on stromal cell-derived type I IFN signaling under steady-state conditions. Our findings provide insight into the molecular basis of pDC conditioning to induce mucosal TI IgA production, which may lead to improvements in vaccination strategies and treatment for mucosal-related disorders. PMID:21333555

  2. Low molecular weight IgM in selective IgA deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Kwitko, A O; Roberts-Thomson, P J; Shearman, D J

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-nine persons with selective IgA deficiency were studied. These comprised 27 subjects found by population screening and 12 by other means. Low molecular weight (LMW) serum IgM was sought in 28 of the 39 persons. Nine of the 28 (32%) had LMW IgM detectable by a sensitive gel filtration technique. Of 17 patients discovered by screening, five (29%) had LMW IgM. In the nine positive persons, LMW IgM constituted up to 17% of the total serum IgM concentration. Eight of the nine IgA deficient persons with LMW IgM, had clinical disease while associated disease in the entire IgA deficient population was less frequent. Serum immune complexes were demonstrated in five of seven subjects with LMW IgM using a C1q-dependent radioimmunoassay; four of these had immune complex associated disorders, three with polyarthritis and one with glomerulonephritis. Because circulating immune complexes are frequently detected in IgA deficient persons without disease, it is proposed that the presence of LMW serum IgM in IgA deficiency may be associated with disease due to the formation of specific pathogenic immune complexes. PMID:7172505

  3. Cholera toxin B suppresses allergic inflammation through induction of secretory IgA.

    PubMed

    Smits, H H; Gloudemans, A K; van Nimwegen, M; Willart, M A; Soullié, T; Muskens, F; de Jong, E C; Boon, L; Pilette, C; Johansen, F-E; Hoogsteden, H C; Hammad, H; Lambrecht, B N

    2009-07-01

    In healthy individuals, humoral immune responses to allergens consist of serum IgA and IgG4, whereas cellular immune responses are controlled by regulatory T (Treg) cells. In search of new compounds that might prevent the onset of allergies by stimulating this type of immune response, we have focused on the mucosal adjuvant, cholera toxin B (CTB), as it induces the formation of Treg cells and production of IgA. Here, we have found that CTB suppresses the potential of dendritic cells to prime for Th2 responses to inhaled allergen. When we administered CTB to the airways of naïve and allergic mice, it strongly suppressed the salient features of asthma, such as airway eosinophilia, Th2 cytokine synthesis, and bronchial hyperreactivity. This beneficial effect was only transferable to other mice by transfer of B but not of T lymphocytes. CTB caused a transforming growth factor-beta-dependent rise in antigen-specific IgA in the airway luminal secretions, which was necessary for its preventive and curative effect, as all effects of CTB were abrogated in mice lacking the luminal IgA transporting polymeric Ig receptor. Not only do these findings show a novel therapeutic avenue for allergy, they also help to explain the complex relationship between IgA levels and risk of developing allergy in humans. PMID:19404246

  4. Taming the Reactivity of Glycosyl Iodides To Achieve Stereoselective Glycosidation.

    PubMed

    Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-19

    Although glycosyl iodides have been known for more than 100 years, it was not until the 21st century that their full potential began to be harnessed for complex glycoconjugate synthesis. Mechanistic studies in the late 1990s probed glycosyl iodide formation by NMR spectroscopy and revealed important reactivity features embedded in protecting-group stereoelectronics. Differentially protected sugars having an anomeric acetate were reacted with trimethylsilyl iodide (TMSI) to generate the glycosyl iodides. In the absence of C-2 participation, generation of the glycosyl iodide proceeded by inversion of the starting anomeric acetate stereochemistry. Once formed, the glycosyl iodide readily underwent in situ anomerization, and in the presence of excess iodide, equilibrium concentrations of α- and β-iodides were established. Reactivity profiles depended upon the identity of the sugar and the protecting groups adorning it. Consistent with the modern idea of disarmed versus armed sugars, ester protecting groups diminished the reactivity of glycosyl iodides and ether protecting groups enhanced the reactivity. Thus, acetylated sugars were slower to form the iodide and anomerize than their benzylated analogues, and these disarmed glycosyl iodides could be isolated and purified, whereas armed ether-protected iodides could only be generated and reacted in situ. All other things being equal, the β-iodide was orders of magnitude more reactive than the thermodynamically more stable α-iodide, consistent with the idea of in situ anomerization introduced by Lemieux in the mid-20th century. Glycosyl iodides are far more reactive than the corresponding bromides, and with the increased reactivity comes increased stereocontrol, particularly when forming α-linked linear and branched oligosaccharides. Reactions with per-O-silylated glycosyl iodides are especially useful for the synthesis of α-linked glycoconjugates. Silyl ether protecting groups make the glycosyl iodide so reactive

  5. Mucin-Type O-Glycosylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Henrique O; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Catarina; Gomes, Joana; Magalhães, Ana; Reis, Celso A

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation plays a crucial role in several physiological and pathological processes of the gastric tissue. Modifications in enzymes responsible for key glycosylation steps and the consequent abnormal biosynthesis and expression of their glycan products constitute well-established molecular hallmarks of disease state. This review addresses the major role played by mucins and associated O-glycan structures in Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa and the subsequent establishment of a chronic infection, with concomitant drastic alterations of the gastric epithelium glycophenotype. Furthermore, alterations of mucin expression pattern and glycan signatures occurring in preneoplastic lesions and in gastric carcinoma are also described, as well as their impact throughout the gastric carcinogenesis cascade and in cancer progression. Altogether, mucin-type O-glycosylation alterations may represent promising biomarkers with potential screening and prognostic applications, as well as predictors of cancer patients' response to therapy. PMID:27409642

  6. Polar Glycosylated and Lateral Non-Glycosylated Flagella from Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-1 (Serotype O11).

    PubMed

    Fulton, Kelly M; Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Twine, Susan M; Tomás, Juan M; Merino, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Polar and but not lateral flagellin proteins from Aeromonas hydrophila strain AH-1 (serotype O11) were found to be glycosylated. Top-down mass spectrometry studies of purified polar flagellins suggested the presence of a 403 Da glycan of mass. Bottom-up mass spectrometry studies showed the polar flagellin peptides to be modified with 403 Da glycans in O-linkage. The MS fragmentation pattern of this putative glycan was similar to that of pseudaminic acid derivative. Mutants lacking the biosynthesis of pseudaminic acid (pseB and pseI homologues) were unable to produce polar flagella but no changes were observed in lateral flagella by post-transcriptional regulation of the flagellin. Complementation was achieved by reintroduction of the wild-type pseB and pseI. We compared two pathogenic features (adhesion to eukaryotic cells and biofilm production) between the wild-type strain and two kinds of mutants: mutants lacking polar flagella glycosylation and lacking the O11-antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but with unaltered polar flagella glycosylation. Results suggest that polar flagella glycosylation is extremely important for A. hydrophila AH-1 adhesion to Hep-2 cells and biofilm formation. In addition, we show the importance of the polar flagella glycosylation for immune stimulation of IL-8 production via toll-"like" receptor 5 (TLR5). PMID:26633358

  7. Polar Glycosylated and Lateral Non-Glycosylated Flagella from Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-1 (Serotype O11)

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Kelly M.; Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Twine, Susan M.; Tomás, Juan M.; Merino, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Polar and but not lateral flagellin proteins from Aeromonas hydrophila strain AH-1 (serotype O11) were found to be glycosylated. Top-down mass spectrometry studies of purified polar flagellins suggested the presence of a 403 Da glycan of mass. Bottom-up mass spectrometry studies showed the polar flagellin peptides to be modified with 403 Da glycans in O-linkage. The MS fragmentation pattern of this putative glycan was similar to that of pseudaminic acid derivative. Mutants lacking the biosynthesis of pseudaminic acid (pseB and pseI homologues) were unable to produce polar flagella but no changes were observed in lateral flagella by post-transcriptional regulation of the flagellin. Complementation was achieved by reintroduction of the wild-type pseB and pseI. We compared two pathogenic features (adhesion to eukaryotic cells and biofilm production) between the wild-type strain and two kinds of mutants: mutants lacking polar flagella glycosylation and lacking the O11-antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but with unaltered polar flagella glycosylation. Results suggest that polar flagella glycosylation is extremely important for A. hydrophila AH-1 adhesion to Hep-2 cells and biofilm formation. In addition, we show the importance of the polar flagella glycosylation for immune stimulation of IL-8 production via toll-“like” receptor 5 (TLR5). PMID:26633358

  8. N-glycosylation in Regulation of the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Hilary; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Protein N-glycosylation can influence the nervous system in a variety of ways by affecting functions of glycoproteins involved in nervous system development and physiology. The importance of N-glycans for different aspects of neural development has been well documented. For example, some N-linked carbohydrate structures were found to play key roles in neural cell adhesion and axonal targeting during development. At the same time, the involvement of glycosylation in the regulation of neural physiology remains less understood. Recent studies have implicated N-glycosylation in the regulation of neural transmission, revealing novel roles of glycans in synaptic processes and the control of neural excitability. N-Glycans were found to markedly affect the function of several types of synaptic proteins involved in key steps of synaptic transmission, including neurotransmitter release, reception and uptake. Glycosylation also regulates a number of channel proteins, such as TRP channels that control responses to environmental stimuli and voltage-gated ion channels, the principal determinants of neuronal excitability. Sialylated carbohydrate structures play a particularly prominent part in the modulation of voltage gated ion channels. Sialic acids appear to affect channel functions via several mechanisms, including charge interactions, as well as other interactions that probably engage steric effects and interactions with other molecules. Experiments also indicated that some structural features of glycans can be particularly important for their function. Since glycan structures can vary significantly between different cell types and depends on the metabolic state of the cell, it is important to analyze glycan functions using in vivo approaches. While the complexity of the nervous system and intricacies of glycosylation pathways can create serious obstacles for in vivo experiments in vertebrates, recent studies have indicated that more simple and experimentally

  9. Characterization of N-linked protein glycosylation in Helicobacter pullorum.

    PubMed

    Jervis, Adrian J; Langdon, Rebecca; Hitchen, Paul; Lawson, Andrew J; Wood, Alison; Fothergill, Joanne L; Morris, Howard R; Dell, Anne; Wren, Brendan; Linton, Dennis

    2010-10-01

    The first bacterial N-linked glycosylation system was discovered in Campylobacter jejuni, and the key enzyme involved in the coupling of glycan to asparagine residues within the acceptor sequon of the glycoprotein is the oligosaccharyltransferase PglB. Emerging genome sequence data have revealed that pglB orthologues are present in a subset of species from the Deltaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria, including three Helicobacter species: H. pullorum, H. canadensis, and H. winghamensis. In contrast to C. jejuni, in which a single pglB gene is located within a larger gene cluster encoding the enzymes required for the biosynthesis of the N-linked glycan, these Helicobacter species contain two unrelated pglB genes (pglB1 and pglB2), neither of which is located within a larger locus involved in protein glycosylation. In complementation experiments, the H. pullorum PglB1 protein, but not PglB2, was able to transfer C. jejuni N-linked glycan onto an acceptor protein in Escherichia coli. Analysis of the characterized C. jejuni N-glycosylation system with an in vitro oligosaccharyltransferase assay followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry demonstrated the utility of this approach, and when applied to H. pullorum, PglB1-dependent N glycosylation with a linear pentasaccharide was observed. This reaction required an acidic residue at the -2 position of the N-glycosylation sequon, as for C. jejuni. Attempted insertional knockout mutagenesis of the H. pullorum pglB2 gene was unsuccessful, suggesting that it is essential. These first data on N-linked glycosylation in a second bacterial species demonstrate the similarities to, and fundamental differences from, the well-studied C. jejuni system. PMID:20581208

  10. A non-glycosylated extracellular superoxide dismutase variant.

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, A; Edlund, T; Hjalmarsson, K; Marklund, S L; Sandström, J; Strömqvist, M; Tibell, L

    1992-01-01

    The secretory tetrameric extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is the only glycosylated SOD isoenzyme. The importance of the carbohydrate moiety for the properties of the enzyme is unknown. An expression vector defining nonglycosylated EC-SOD (ngEC-SOD) was constructed by mutagenesis of the codon for Asn-89 into a codon for Gln. The vector was transfected into Chinese hamster ovary DXB-11 cells and ngEC-SOD was isolated to 70% purity from the culture media of selected clones. The absence of glycosylation was established by the lack of affinity for various lectins, the absence of staining with the periodic acid-Schiff reagent, the change in mobility and composition of the tryptic peptide containing the mutated glycosylation site, and the reduction in apparent molecular mass upon SDS/PAGE and size-exclusion chromatography. The tetrameric state was retained. The heparin affinity, a fundamental and distinguishing property of EC-SOD, was found to be slightly increased. The enzymic activity was essentially retained. The major difference from native glycosylated enzyme in physical properties was a marked reduction in solubility. Like glycosylated EC-SOD, ngEC-SOD was, after intravenous injection into rabbits, rapidly sequestered by the vessel endothelium, and was promptly released into plasma after injection of heparin. The only difference from glycosylated EC-SOD in this behaviour, was a slightly more rapid elimination of the mutant enzyme from the vasculature. It is concluded that no specific biological role for the EC-SOD carbohydrate moiety could be revealed. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1463450

  11. Development of an ELISA for sensitive and specific detection of IgA autoantibodies against BP180 in pemphigoid diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pemphigoids are rare diseases associated with IgG, IgE and IgA autoantibodies against collagen XVII/BP180. An entity of the pemphigoid group is the lamina lucida-type of linear IgA disease (IgA pemphigoid) characterized by IgA autoantibodies against BP180. While for the detection of IgG and IgE autoantibodies specific to collagen XVII several ELISA systems have been established, no quantitative immunoassay has been yet developed for IgA autoantibodies. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop an ELISA to detect IgA autoantibodies against collagen XVII in the sera of patients with pemphigoids. Methods We expressed a soluble recombinant form of the collagen XVII ectodomain in mammalian cells. Reactivity of IgA autoantibodies from patients with IgA pemphigoid was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis. ELISA test conditions were determined by chessboard titration experiments. The sensitivity, specificity and the cut-off were determined by receiver-operating characteristics analysis. Results The optimized assay was carried out using sera from patients with IgA pemphigoid (n = 30) and healthy donors (n = 105). By receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, an area under the curve of 0.993 was calculated, indicating an excellent discriminatory capacity. Thus, a sensitivity and specificity of 83.3% and 100%, respectively, was determined for a cut-off point of 0.48. As additional control groups, sera from patients with bullous pemphigoid (n = 31) and dermatitis herpetiformis (n = 50), a disease associated with IgA autoantibodies against epidermal transglutaminase, were tested. In 26% of bullous pemphigoid patients, IgA autoantibodies recognized the ectodomain of collagen XVII. One of 50 (2%) of dermatitis herpetiformis patients sera slightly topped the cut-off value. Conclusions We developed the first ELISA for the specific and sensitive detection of serum IgA autoantibodies specific to collagen XVII in patients

  12. Cocoa and cocoa fibre differentially modulate IgA and IgM production at mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Massot-Cladera, Malen; Franch, Àngels; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castell, Margarida

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that a 10 % cocoa (C10) diet, containing polyphenols and fibre among others, modifies intestinal and systemic Ig production. The present study aimed at evaluating the impact of C10 on IgA and IgM production in the intestinal and extra-intestinal mucosal compartments, establishing the involvement of cocoa fibre (CF) in such effects. Mechanisms by which C10 intake may affect IgA synthesis in the salivary glands were also studied. To this effect, rats were fed either a standard diet, a diet containing C10, CF or inulin. Intestinal (the gut wash (GW), Peyer's patches (PP) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN)) and extra-intestinal (salivary glands) mucosal tissues and blood samples were collected for IgA and IgM quantification. The gene expressions of IgA production- and homing-related molecules were studied in the salivary glands. The C10 diet decreased intestinal IgA and IgM production. Although the CF diet decreased the GW IgA concentration, it increased PP, MLN and serum IgA concentrations. Both the C10 and the CF diets produced a down-regulatory effect on IgA secretion in the extra-intestinal tissues. The C10 diet interacted with the mechanisms involved in IgA synthesis, whereas the CF showed particular effects on the homing and transcytosis of IgA across the salivary glands. Overall, CF was able to up-regulate IgA production in the intestinal-inductor compartments, whereas it down-regulated its production at the mucosal-effector ones. Further studies must be directed to ascertain the mechanisms involved in the effect of particular cocoa components on gut-associated lymphoid tissue. PMID:26975903

  13. The Structural Biology of Enzymes Involved in Natural Product Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shanteri; Phillips, George N.

    2012-01-01

    The glycosylation of microbial natural products often dramatically influences the biological and/or pharmacological activities of the parental metabolite. Over the past decade, crystal structures of several enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and attachment of novel sugars found appended to natural products have emerged. In many cases, these studies have paved the way to a better understanding of the corresponding enzyme mechanism of action and have served as a starting point for engineering variant enzymes to facilitate to production of differentially-glycosylated natural products. This review specifically summarizes the structural studies of bacterial enzymes involved in biosynthesis of novel sugar nucleotides. PMID:22688446

  14. Assembly of naturally occurring glycosides, evolved tactics, and glycosylation methods.

    PubMed

    Yu, Biao; Sun, Jiansong; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2012-08-21

    Glycosylation of proteins and lipids is critical to many life processes. Secondary metabolites (or natural products), such as flavonoids, steroids, triterpenes, and antibiotics, are also frequently modified with saccharides. The resulting glycosides include diverse structures and functions, and some of them have pharmacological significance. The saccharide portions of the glycosides often have specific structural characteristics that depend on the aglycones. These molecules also form heterogeneous "glycoform" mixtures where molecules have similar glycosidic linkages but the saccharides vary in the length and type of monosaccharide unit. Thus, it is difficult to purify homogeneous glycosides in appreciable amounts from natural sources. Chemical synthesis provides a feasible access to the homogeneous glycosides and their congeners. Synthesis of a glycoside involves the synthesis of the aglycone, the saccharide, the connection of these two parts, and the overall manipulation of protecting groups. However, most synthetic efforts to date have focused on the aglycones, treating the attachment of saccharides onto the aglycones as a dispensable topic. The synthesis of the aglycone and the synthesis of the saccharide belong to two independent categories of chemistry, and different types of the aglycones and saccharides pose as specific synthetic subjects in their own disciplines. The only reaction that integrates the broad chemistry of glycoside synthesis is the glycosidic bond formation between the saccharide and the aglycone. Focusing on this glycosylation reaction in this Account, we string together our experience with the synthesis of the naturally occurring glycosides. We briefly describe the synthesis of 18 glycosides, including glycolipids, phenolic glycosides, steroid glycosides, and triterpene glycosides. Each molecule represents a prototypical structure of a family of the natural glycosides with interesting biological activities, and we emphasize the general

  15. Human Milk Bacterial and Glycosylation Patterns Differ by Delivery Mode.

    PubMed

    Hoashi, Marina; Meche, Lawrence; Mahal, Lara K; Bakacs, Elizabeth; Nardella, Deanna; Naftolin, Frederick; Bar-Yam, Naomi; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G

    2016-07-01

    Mammals have evolved to nourish their offspring exclusively with maternal milk for around half of the lactation period, a crucial developmental window. In view of oral-breast contact during lactation and the differences in oral microbiota between cesarean section (C-section) and vaginally delivered infants, we expected differences in milk composition by delivery mode. We performed a cross-sectional study of banked human milk and found changes related to time since delivery in bacterial abundance and glycosylation patterns only in milk from women who delivered vaginally. The results warrant further research into the effects of delivery mode on milk microbes, milk glycosylation, and postpartum infant development. PMID:26711314

  16. Oligomerization status influences subcellular deposition and glycosylation of recombinant butyrylcholinesterase in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jeannine D; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Castilho, Alexandra; Gruber, Clemens; Werner, Stefan; Mach, Lukas; Klimyuk, Victor; Mor, Tsafrir S; Steinkellner, Herta

    2014-01-01

    Plants have a proven track record for the expression of biopharmaceutically interesting proteins. Importantly, plants and mammals share a highly conserved secretory pathway that allows similar folding, assembly and posttranslational modifications of proteins. Human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is a highly sialylated, tetrameric serum protein, investigated as a bioscavenger for organophosphorous nerve agents. Expression of recombinant BChE (rBChE) in Nicotiana benthamiana results in accumulation of both monomers as well as assembled oligomers. In particular, we show here that co-expression of BChE with a novel gene-stacking vector, carrying six mammalian genes necessary for in planta protein sialylation, resulted in the generation of rBChE decorated with sialylated N-glycans. The N-glycosylation profile of monomeric rBChE secreted to the apoplast largely resembles the plasma-derived orthologue. In contrast, rBChE purified from total soluble protein extracts was decorated with a significant portion of ER-typical oligomannosidic structures. Biochemical analyses and live-cell imaging experiments indicated that impaired N-glycan processing is due to aberrant deposition of rBChE oligomers in the endoplasmic reticulum or endoplasmic-reticulum-derived compartments. In summary, we show the assembly of rBChE multimers, however, also points to the need for in-depth studies to explain the unexpected subcellular targeting of oligomeric BChE in plants. PMID:24618259

  17. Glycosylation of Glycolipids in Cancer: Basis for Development of Novel Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Daniotti, Jose L.; Vilcaes, Aldo A.; Torres Demichelis, Vanina; Ruggiero, Fernando M.; Rodriguez-Walker, Macarena

    2013-01-01

    Altered networks of gene regulation underlie many pathologies, including cancer. There are several proteins in cancer cells that are turned either on or off, which dramatically alters the metabolism and the overall activity of the cell, with the complex machinery of enzymes involved in the metabolism of glycolipids not being an exception. The aberrant glycosylation of glycolipids on the surface of the majority of cancer cells, associated with increasing evidence about the functional role of these molecules in a number of cellular physiological pathways, has received considerable attention as a convenient immunotherapeutic target for cancer treatment. This has resulted in the development of a substantial number of passive and active immunotherapies, which have shown promising results in clinical trials. More recently, antibodies to glycolipids have also emerged as an attractive tool for the targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents, thereby providing a rationale for future therapeutic interventions in cancer. This review first summarizes the cellular and molecular bases involved in the metabolic pathway and expression of glycolipids, both in normal and tumor cells, paying particular attention to sialosylated glycolipids (gangliosides). The current strategies in the battle against cancer in which glycolipids are key players are then described. PMID:24392350

  18. Clinicopathologic correlations in a series of 143 patients with IgA glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, J; Pasternack, A; Helin, H; Nikkilä, M

    1985-01-01

    In an unselected series of patients with IgA glomerulonephritis, old age, high blood pressure, and high urinary protein excretion at the time of renal biopsy were found to correlate with impaired renal function, whereas sex, estimated duration of the disease, or high serum IgA levels did not. The following clinical features were favorable prognostic signs: asymptomatic proteinuria, macroscopic hematuria, and isolated microscopic hematuria. The degree of diffuse mesangial alteration and the presence of segmental glomerular lesions correlated clearly with the subsequent clinical outcome. Vascular lesions, i.e. arteriosclerosis and renal vascular deposition of C3, were most often present in patients with severe glomerulopathy. The presence of electron-dense deposits in glomerular capillary walls was also an unfavorable prognostic finding. Renal biopsy findings of interstitial infiltrates of inflammatory cells and IgA distributed along glomerular capillary walls were usually associated with extrarenal manifestations of the disease. PMID:4014321

  19. Regulation of IgA responses in cattle, humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Estes, D Mark

    2010-12-15

    Secretory IgA (SIgA) constitutes the largest component of the humoral immune system of the body with gram quantities of this isotype produced by mammals on a daily basis. Secretory IgA (SIgA) antibodies function by both blocking pathogen/commensal entry at mucosal surfaces and virus neutralization. Several pathways of induction of IgA responses have been described which depend on T cells (T cell dependent or TD) pathways or are independent of T cells (T-independent or TI) and are mediated by dendritic cells (DCs) and/or epithelial cells. Many elements of IgA regulation readily cross species barriers (adjuvants, soluble and cognate factors) and are highly conserved whereas other pathways may be more specific to any given species and must be evaluated. Regulation of IgA production in cattle is not completely understood and thus we have focused in part on highly conserved factors such as transforming growth factor beta, Type I and Type 2 interferons, neuropeptides which interdigitate mucosal tissues (vasoactive intestinal peptide or VIP), and a small peptide (IgA inducing peptide or IGIP) which can serve as targets for modulation and increasing SIgA virus-specific antibodies. We have evaluated the potential utility of modulating these factors in vitro in regulation of qualitative aspects of antibodies of the IgM, IgG and IgA isotypes at mucosal surfaces and in secretions of the upper and lower respiratory tract to a virus of economic and public health importance, foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). IgA responses in cattle are essential for host defense in response to various infectious agents. In cattle, IgA is not released into the colostrum, as is the case for other mammals but only IgG1 is selectively transported. In previous studies in cattle, IgA has been shown to be regulated by several cytokines including IFN-gamma, Type I interferons such as IFN-alpha and IFN-tau, transforming growth factor beta, IgA inducing peptide and other potential factors such as APRIL

  20. Evolution of the Iga Heavy Chain Gene in the Genus Mus

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, B. A.; Golde, T. E.; Schwartz, R. L.; Rudikoff, S.

    1988-01-01

    To examine questions of immunoglobulin gene evolution, the IgA α heavy chain gene from Mus pahari, an evolutionarily distant relative to Mus musculus domesticus, was cloned and sequenced. The sequence, when compared to the IgA gene of BALB/c or human, demonstrated that the IgA gene is evolving in a mosaic fashion with the hinge region accumulating mutations most rapidly and the third domain at a considerably lower frequency. In spite of this pronounced accumulation of mutations, the hinge region appears to maintain the conformation of a random coil. A marked propensity to accumulate replacement over silent site changes in the coding regions was noted, as was a definite codon bias. The possibility that these two phenomena are interrelated is discussed. PMID:2842228

  1. Activation of rat complement by soluble and insoluble rat IgA immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Rits, M; Hiemstra, P S; Bazin, H; Van Es, L A; Vaerman, J P; Daha, M R

    1988-12-01

    The ability of rat monoclonal IgA, specific for 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNA), to activate the complement (C) system of the rat was investigated using aggregated IgA or IgA immune complexes (IC). IgA was coated onto a solid phase, and tested for its capacity to bind C3 upon incubation at 37 degrees C in normal rat serum (NRS) in the presence of Mg-EGTA. Binding of C3 was observed dependent on the dose of dimeric (d-), polymeric (p-) and secretory IgA tested. In contrast, little C3 fixation was observed in this system with monomeric (m-) rat IgA or with mouse m- and d-IgA (MOPC315). Soluble and insoluble rat IgA IC were prepared using dinitrophenylated rat serum albumin (DNP8RSA) as antigen (Ag), and assessed for C activation. It was shown that insoluble IC (immune precipitates; IP) containing m-, d- or pIgA of rat origin activate the alternative pathway of rat C, as demonstrated by their capacity to induce C consumption in NRS in the presence of Mg-EGTA. When p- and m-IgA IP were compared for their capacity to activate C, it was found that p-IgA activated C four times as efficiently as m-IgA IP (at 2 mg/ml). Soluble rat IgA IC were prepared in an excess of DNP8RSA, fractionated by gel filtration on Sepharose 6B, and analyzed for C activation and antibody (Ab)/Ag ratio. In contrast to m-IgA IP, soluble m-IgA did not activate C. On the other hand soluble d-IgA IC activated C dependent on their concentration and size: at a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml high-molecular weight d-IgA IC with a high Ab/Ag ratio were four times as efficient as low-molecular weight IC with a low Ab/Ag ratio, and twice as efficient as IP prepared at equivalence. To demonstrate the induction by IgA of the assembly of the terminal membrane attack complex, trinitrophenyl (TNP)-conjugated rat red blood cells (TNP-RRBC) coated with d- or p-IgA were shown to be lysed in NRS in the presence of Mg-EGTA. No lysis of m-IgA-coated TNP-RRBC was observed. The results in this study demonstrate that both soluble and

  2. Analysis of congenital disorder of glycosylation-Id in a yeast model system shows diverse site-specific under-glycosylation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Jamaluddin, Muhammad Fairuz; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2012-11-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of proteins in eukaryotes. Mutations in the human ALG3 gene cause changed levels and altered glycan structures on mature glycoproteins and are the cause of a severe congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG-Id). Diverse glycoproteins are also under-glycosylated in Saccharomyces cerevisae alg3 mutants. Here we analyzed site-specific glycosylation occupancy in this yeast model system using peptide-N-glycosidase F to label glycosylation sites with an asparagine-aspartate conversion that creates a new endoproteinase AspN cleavage site, followed by proteolytic digestion, and detection of peptides and glycopeptides by LC-ESI-MS/MS. We used this analytical method to identify and measure site-specific glycosylation occupancy in alg3 mutant and wild type yeast strains. We found decreased site-specific N-glycosylation occupancy in the alg3 knockout strain preferentially at Asn-Xaa-Ser sequences located in secondary structural elements, features previously associated with poor glycosylation efficiency. Furthermore, we identified 26 previously experimentally unverified glycosylation sites. Our results provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of disease in CDG-Id, and our methodology will be useful in site-specific glycosylation analysis in many model systems and clinical applications. PMID:23038983

  3. Treatment of IgA nephropathy with renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Claudio; Sarcina, Cristina; Ferrario, Francesca

    2016-08-01

    IgA Nephropathy leads young people to dialysis more often than other glomerular diseases, because often diagnosis and therapy are made late. Nephrologists waive to treat IgAN pts with chronic renal insufficiency, believing that treatment may not be effective and safe. Moreover, studies in IgAN pts with reduced renal function are lacking. Small studies seem to indicate a possible utility of RAS blockers and corticosteroids in these patients. Recently, VALIGA study showed that corticosteroids and immunosuppressants were more frequently used in pts with eGFR <30 ml/min than in those with eGFR >30 ml/min (60 vs. 44 %, respectively; p = 0.004). The goal of treating IgAN pts is to obtain a time-average proteinuria <1 g/day, regardless of the degree of renal function and histological damage. RASB and corticosteroids seem to be able to obtain this result. However, it's important to pay attention to the appearance of adverse events of CS. In the literature, major side effects occurred in 29 of 463 (6.2 %) patients enrolled in RCTs. However, scarce informations are obtained about the safety of CS in patients with reduced renal function. To better evaluate this aspect, we considered three studies, that used similar schemes of therapy and included patients with different degrees of renal function (1: GFR 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2), 2: 81 ml/min/1.73 m(2), 3: 34 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). The occurrence of adverse events increased with the worsening of renal function (2.3, 5.7 and 15.4 % in studies 1, 2 and 3 respectively). The aim of the treatment for a patient with an eGFR <30 is to slow the progression and to delay the need for dialysis. Therefore, in stage CKD 2, 3 and 4 with a proteinuria >1 g/day a 6-month course of corticosteroids could be useful and safe. PMID:26743078

  4. IgA nephropathy in Brazil: apropos of 600 cases.

    PubMed

    Soares, Maria Fernanda; Caldas, M L R; Dos-Santos, W L C; Sementilli, A; Furtado, P; Araújo, S; Pegas, K L; Petterle, R R; Franco, M F

    2015-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is th e commonest primary glomerular disease worldwide. Studies on its prevalence in Brazil are however scarce. Databases and clinical records from 10 reference centres were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical and laboratory features at the moment of the biopsy were retrieved (age, gender, presence of hematuria, serum creatinine [mg/dL], proteinuria [g/24 h]). Renal biopsy findings were classified according to Haas single grade classification scheme and the Oxford Classification of IgAN. 600 cases of IgAN were identified, of which 568 (94.7 %) were on native kidneys. Male to female ratio was 1.24:1. Patients averaged 32.76 ± 15.12 years old (range 4-89, median 32). Proteinuria and hematuria were observed, respectively in 56.63 and 72.29 % of patients. The association of both these findings occurred in 37.95 % of the cases. Serum creatinine averaged 1.65 ± 0.67 mg/dL (median 1.5 mg/dL) at diagnosis. Segmental sclerosis and mesangial hypercellularity were the main glomerular findings (47.6 and 46.2 %) The commonest combination by Oxford Classification of IgAN, was M0 E0 S0 T0 (22.4 %). Chronic tubulo-interstitial lesions with an extension wider than 25 % of the renal cortex could be identified in 32.2 % of the cases. Tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis were more strongly associated with higher 24-h proteinuria and serum creatinine levels. Segmental sclerosis (S1) showed a stronger tendency of association with the presence of tubulo-interstitial lesions (T1 and T2) than other glomerular variables. To the best of our knowledge this is the largest series of IgAN in Brazil. It depicts the main biopsy findings and their possible clinical correlates. Our set of data is comparable to previous reports. PMID:26435893

  5. Circulating IgA immune complexes in patients with psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.P.; Peck, G.L.; Lawley, T.J.

    1983-06-01

    The sera of 21 patients with psoriasis were examined for the presence of IgA-containing circulating immune complexes (CIC) using the Raji IgA radioimmunoassay. In addition, the Raji IgG radioimmunoassay and 125I-Clq binding assay were used to detect IgG- and IgM-containing CIC. Twenty-five patients with other hyperkeratotic skin disorders were studied as controls. Patients were studied before institution of systemic therapy with etretinate (20 patients) or 13-cis-retinoic acid (1 patient). In addition, sera of 15 of the patients treated with etretinate were studied before, during, and after therapy. The extent of pretreatment disease involvement as well as response to therapy were evaluated in a blinded fashion. Fourteen of 21 (67%) patients with psoriasis had evidence of IgA-containing CIC at some time during the course of their disease, as compared to only 1 of 25 patients with other hyperkeratotic skin disorders. In contrast, only 2 of 19 (11%) had evidence of IgG-containing CIC using the Raji IgG assay, and only 1 of 19 (5%) had evidence of IgG- or IgM-containing CIC using the 125I-Clq binding assay. A positive correlation was found between the extent of pretreatment disease involvement and the level of IgA-containing CIC by linear regression analysis (p . 0.01). There was, however, no correlation between clinical improvement and the presence or level of IgA-containing CIC in 15 patients followed during therapy. Sucrose density gradient analysis of the IgA-containing CIC found in 2 of these patients demonstrated IgA-containing CIC in the 9S to 13S region. The finding of IgA-containing CIC in a significant number of patients with psoriasis and the relative absence of IgG- or IgM-containing CIC suggest that IgA-containing CIC may play a role in psoriasis.

  6. Identification of the N-linked glycosylation sites of vitamin K-dependent carboxylase and the effect of glycosylation on carboxylase function†

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Jian-Ke; Zheng, Mei-Yan; Pope, R. Marshall; Straight, David L.; Stafford, Darrel W.

    2014-01-01

    The vitamin K-dependent carboxylase is an integral membrane protein which is required for the post-translational modification of a variety of vitamin K-dependent proteins. Previous studies have suggested carboxylase is a glycoprotein with N-linked glycosylation sites. In the present study, we identified the N-glycosylation sites of carboxylase by mass spectrometric peptide mapping analyses combined with site-directed mutagenesis. Our mass spectrometric results show that the N-linked glycosylation in carboxylase occurs at positions N459, N550, N605, and N627. Eliminating these glycosylation sites by changing asparagine to glutamine caused the mutant carboxylase to migrate faster in SDS-PAGE gel analyses, adding further evidence that these sites are glycosylated. In addition, the mutation studies identified N525, a site not recoverable by mass spectroscopy analysis, as a glycosylation site. Furthermore, the potential glycosylation site at N570 is glycosylated only if all the five natural glycosylation sites are simultaneously mutated. Removal of the oligosaccharides by glycosidase from wild-type carboxylase or by eliminating the functional glycosylation sites by site-directed mutagenesis did not affect either the carboxylation or epoxidation activity when the small pentapeptide FLEEL was used as substrate, suggesting that N-linked glycosylation is not required for the enzymatic function of carboxylase. In contrast, when site N570 and the five natural glycosylation sites were mutated simultaneously, the resulting carboxylase protein was degraded. Our results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is not essential for carboxylase enzymatic activity but it is important for protein folding and stability. PMID:17144668

  7. Multiple aberrant hormone receptors in Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Ghorayeb, Nada; Bourdeau, Isabelle; Lacroix, André

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms regulating cortisol production when ACTH of pituitary origin is suppressed in primary adrenal causes of Cushing's syndrome (CS) include diverse genetic and molecular mechanisms. These can lead either to constitutive activation of the cAMP system and steroidogenesis or to its regulation exerted by the aberrant adrenal expression of several hormone receptors, particularly G-protein coupled hormone receptors (GPCR) and their ligands. Screening for aberrant expression of GPCR in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (BMAH) and unilateral adrenal tumors of patients with overt or subclinical CS demonstrates the frequent co-expression of several receptors. Aberrant hormone receptors can also exert their activity by regulating the paracrine secretion of ACTH or other ligands for those receptors in BMAH or unilateral tumors. The aberrant expression of hormone receptors is not limited to adrenal CS but can be implicated in other endocrine tumors including primary aldosteronism and Cushing's disease. Targeted therapies to block the aberrant receptors or their ligands could become useful in the future. PMID:25971648

  8. Aberration in proper motions for Galactic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.-C.; Xie, Y.; Zhu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Accelerations of both the solar system barycenter (SSB) and stars in the MilkyWay cause a systematic observational effect on the stellar proper motions, which was first studied by J. Kovalevsky (2003). This paper intends to extend that work and aims to estimate the magnitude and significance of the aberration in proper motions of stars, especially in the region near the Galactic center (GC). We adopt two models for the Galactic rotation curve to evaluate the aberrational effect on the Galactic plane. We show that the effect of aberration in proper motions depends on the galactocentric distance of stars; it is dominated by the acceleration of stars in the central region of the Galaxy. Then we investigate the applicability of the theoretical expressions: if the orbital period of stars is only a fraction of the light time from the star to the SSB, the expression with approximation proposed by Kovalevsky is not appropriate. With a more suitable formulation, we found that the aberration has no effect on the determination of the stellar orbits on the celestial sphere. In the future this aberrational effect under consideration should be considered with high-accurate astrometry, particularly in constructing the Gaia celestial reference system realized by Galactic stars.

  9. Levels and complexity of IgA antibody against oral bacteria in samples of human colostrum.

    PubMed

    Petrechen, L N; Zago, F H; Sesso, M L T; Bertoldo, B B; Silva, C B; Azevedo, K P; de Lima Pereira, S A; Geraldo-Martins, V R; Ferriani, V P L; Nogueira, R D

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans (SM) have three main virulence antigens: glucan binding protein B (gbpB), glucosyltransferase (Gtf) and antigens I/II (Ag I/II) envolved in the capacity of those bacteria to adhere and accumulate in the dental biofilm. Also, the glycosyltransferases 153 kDa of Streptococcus gordonii (SGO) and 170kDa of Streptococcus sanguinis (SSA) were important antigens associated with the accumulation of those bacterias. Streptococcus mitis (SMI) present IgA1 protease of 202 kDa. We investigated the specificity and levels IgA against those antigens of virulence in samples of human colostrum. This study involved 77 samples of colostrum that were analyzed for levels of immunoglobulian A, M and G by Elisa. The specificity of IgA against extracts of SM and initials colonizators (SSA, SMI, SGO) were analyzed by the Western blot. The mean concentration of IgA was 2850.2 (±2567.2) mg/100 mL followed by IgM and IgG (respectively 321.8±90.3 and 88.3±51.5), statistically different (p<0.05). Results showed that the majority of samples had detectable levels of IgA antibodies to extracts of bacteria antigens and theirs virulence antigens. To SM, the GbpB was significantly lower detected than others antigens of SM (p<0.05). High complexities of response to Ags were identified in the samples. There were no significant differences in the mean number of IgA-reactive Ags between the antigens (p>0.4). So, the breast milk from first hours after birth presented significant levels of IgA specific against important virulence of antigens those oral streptococci, which can disrupt the installation and accumulation process of these microorganisms in the oral cavity. PMID:25175558

  10. Structural requirements for the interaction of human IgA with the human polymeric Ig receptor.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Melanie J; Pleass, Richard J; Batten, Margaret R; Atkin, Julie D; Woof, Jenny M

    2005-11-15

    Transport of polymeric IgA onto mucosal surfaces to become secretory IgA is mediated by the polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR). To study the interaction of human dimeric IgA (dIgA) (the predominant form of IgA polymer) with the human pIgR (hpIgR), we generated recombinant wild-type dIgA1 and dIgA2m(1) and various mutant dIgA1 and analyzed their interaction with a recombinant human secretory component and membrane-expressed hpIgR. We found that wild-type dIgA1 and dIgA2m(1) bound to recombinant human secretory component with similar affinity and were transcytosed by the hpIgR to the same extent. Mutation of the IgA Calpha2 domain residue Cys311 to Ser reduced binding to hpIgR, possibly through disruption of noncovalent interactions between the Calpha2 domain and domain 5 of the receptor. Within the Calpha3 domain of IgA1, we found that combined mutation of residues Phe411, Val413, and Thr414, which lie close to residues previously implicated in hpIgR binding, abolished interaction with the receptor. Mutation of residue Lys377, located very close to this same region, perturbed receptor interaction. In addition, 4 aa (Pro440-Phe443), which lie on a loop at the domain interface and form part of the binding site for human FcalphaRI, appear to contribute to hpIgR binding. Lastly, use of a monomeric IgA1 mutant lacking the tailpiece revealed that the tailpiece does not occlude hpIgR-binding residues in IgA1 monomers. This directed mutagenesis approach has thus identified motifs lying principally across the upper surface of the Calpha3 domain (i.e., that closest to Calpha2) critical for human pIgR binding and transcytosis. PMID:16272325

  11. The Role of Interleukin-6 in Mucosal IgA Antibody Responses in Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, Alistair J.; Husband, Alan J.; Ramshaw, Ian A.; Bao, Shisan; Matthaei, Klaus I.; Koehler, Georges; Kopf, Manfred

    1994-04-01

    In mice with targeted disruption of the gene that encodes interleukin-6 (IL-6), greatly reduced numbers of immunoglobulin A (IgA)-producing cells were observed at mucosae and grossly deficient local antibody responses were recorded after mucosal challenge with either ovalbumin or vaccinia virus. The IgA response in the lungs was completely restored after intranasal infection with recombinant vaccinia viruses engineered to express IL-6. These findings demonstrate a critical role for IL-6 in vivo in the development of local IgA antibody responses and illustrate the effectiveness of vector-directed cytokine gene therapy.

  12. Intestinal IgA production and its role in host-microbe interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gutzeit, Cindy; Magri, Giuliana; Cerutti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Complex and diverse communities of bacteria establish mutualistic and symbiotic relationships with the gut after birth. The intestinal immune system responds to bacterial colonization by acquiring a state of hypo-responsiveness against commensals and active readiness against pathogens. The resulting homeostatic balance involves a continuous dialog between the microbiota and lymphocytes with the intermediation of epithelial and dendritic cells. This dialog causes massive production of immunoglobulin A (IgA), a non-inflammatory antibody specialized in mucosal protection. Here, we discuss recent advances on the regulation of intestinal IgA responses and their role in host-microbe interaction. PMID:24942683

  13. Intestinal IgA production and its role in host-microbe interaction.

    PubMed

    Gutzeit, Cindy; Magri, Giuliana; Cerutti, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    Complex and diverse communities of bacteria establish mutualistic and symbiotic relationships with the gut after birth. The intestinal immune system responds to bacterial colonization by acquiring a state of hypo-responsiveness against commensals and active readiness against pathogens. The resulting homeostatic balance involves a continuous dialog between the microbiota and lymphocytes with the intermediation of epithelial and dendritic cells. This dialog causes massive production of immunoglobulin A (IgA), a non-inflammatory antibody specialized in mucosal protection. Here, we discuss recent advances on the regulation of intestinal IgA responses and their role in host-microbe interaction. PMID:24942683

  14. Prospects for aberration corrected electron precession.

    PubMed

    Own, C S; Sinkler, W; Marks, L D

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in aberration control in the TEM have yielded a tremendous enhancement of direct imaging capabilities for studying atomic structures. However, aberration correction also has substantial benefits for achieving ultra-resolution in the TEM through reciprocal space techniques. Several tools are available that allow very accurate detection of the electron distribution in surfaces allowing precise atomic-scale characterization through statistical inversion techniques from diffraction data. The precession technique now appears to extend this capability to the bulk. This article covers some of the progress in this area and details requirements for a next-generation analytical diffraction instrument. An analysis of the contributions offered by aberration correction for precision electron precession is included. PMID:17207934

  15. An aberrant precision account of autism

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Rebecca P.; Rees, Geraint; Friston, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by problems with social-communication, restricted interests and repetitive behavior. A recent and thought-provoking article presented a normative explanation for the perceptual symptoms of autism in terms of a failure of Bayesian inference (Pellicano and Burr, 2012). In response, we suggested that when Bayesian inference is grounded in its neural instantiation—namely, predictive coding—many features of autistic perception can be attributed to aberrant precision (or beliefs about precision) within the context of hierarchical message passing in the brain (Friston et al., 2013). Here, we unpack the aberrant precision account of autism. Specifically, we consider how empirical findings—that speak directly or indirectly to neurobiological mechanisms—are consistent with the aberrant encoding of precision in autism; in particular, an imbalance of the precision ascribed to sensory evidence relative to prior beliefs. PMID:24860482

  16. Properties of second-order geometrical aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammatin, A. P.

    1994-08-01

    This paper analyzes the properties of second-order aberrations that arise in centered optical systems that contain an aspherical surface whose sagittal equation contains a term proportional to the cube of the distance from a surface point to the optical axis. It is shown that the second-order spherical aberration decreases from the center of the field to its edge. No astigmatism appears in wide, oblique beams in the central part of the field. Coma increases linearly from zero at the center of the field to a value equal to the spherical aberration, and then remains constant over the field. A proof is given of the possibility of correcting the image curvature by using an aspherical surface of the type described above.

  17. Optical mechanism for aberration of starlight.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Robert A

    2012-07-01

    We present a physical-optics-based theory for aberration of starlight and show that the influence of the moving sensor on the incident stellar wavefront combined with a finite velocity of light within the sensor can fully account for the aberration phenomena. Our treatment differs from all previous derivations because we include wavefront-imaging physics within the sensor model. Our predictions match existing Earth-based aberration measurements but differ from predictions of the special relativistic-based theory for larger velocities. We derive design parameters for an experiment using an Earth-based sensor containing a refractive optical medium that would experimentally differentiate between these two theories and yield an independent experimental test of time dilation. PMID:22751386

  18. Aberrant immunophenotypes of mantle cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Wohlschlaeger, Ch; Lange, K; Merz, H; Feller, A C

    2003-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphomas (MCL) are characterized by cytomorphological criteria, a distinct immunophenotype and a characteristic chromosomal aberration (t(11;14)). In morphological variants of MCL the immunohistochemical constellation with CD5-positivity and CD23-negativity is a helpful and decisive diagnostic aid to differentiate MCL from other B-cell-lymphomas, e.g. lymphocytic lymphomas (B-CLL). In this study the morphological, immunophenotypical, and genetical features of 50 MCL were analysed. Five cases revealed an aberrant immunophenotype with lacking expression of CD5 (n = 3) and positive reactivity to CD23 (n = 2) while cyclin D1 expression could be demonstrated in all 5 cases. These constellations show that there is, besides morphological subgroups, a small group of MCL with aberrant immunophenotypes, which has to be taken into account in the differential diagnosis to lymphocytic lymphoma and other lymphomas. PMID:12688344

  19. Characterization of the ligand binding site of the bovine IgA Fc receptor (bFc alpha R).

    PubMed

    Morton, H Craig; Pleass, Richard J; Woof, Jenny M; Brandtzaeg, Per

    2004-12-24

    Recently, we identified a bovine IgA Fc receptor (bFc alpha R), which shows high homology to the human myeloid Fc alpha R, CD89. IgA binding has previously been shown to depend on several specific residues located in the B-C and F-G loops of the membrane-distal extracellular domain 1 of CD89. To compare the ligand binding properties of these two Fc alpha Rs, we have mapped the IgA binding site of bFc alpha R. We show that, in common with CD89, Tyr-35 in the B-C loop is essential for IgA binding. However, in contrast to earlier observations on CD89, mutation of residues in the F-G loop did not significantly inhibit IgA binding. PMID:15485844

  20. Recent developments in the enzymatic O-glycosylation of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    The glycosylation of bioactive compounds, such as flavonoids, is of particular relevance, as it modulates many of their pharmacokinetic parameters. This article reviews the literature between 2010 and the end of 2015 that deals with the enzymatic O-glycosylation of this class of compounds. Enzymes of glycosyltransferase family 1 remain the biocatalysts of choice for glycodiversification of flavonoids, in spite of relatively low yields. Transfers of 14 different sugars, in addition to glucose, were reported. Several Escherichia coli strains were metabolically engineered to enable a (more efficient) synthesis of the required donor during in vivo glycosylations. For the transfer of glucose, enzymes of glycoside hydrolase families 13 and 70 were successfully assayed with several flavonoids. The number of acceptor substrates and of regiospecificities characterized so far is smaller than for glycosyltransferases. However, their glycosyl donors are much cheaper and yields are considerably higher. A few success stories of enzyme engineering were reported. These improved the catalytic efficiency as well as donor, acceptor, or product ranges. Currently, the development of appropriate high-throughput screening systems appears to be the major bottleneck for this powerful technology. PMID:27029191

  1. A glycogene mutation map for discovery of diseases of glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Lars; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Joshi, Hiren J; Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Have, Christian Theil; Kong, Yun; Wang, Shengjun; Sparso, Thomas; Grarup, Niels; Vester-Christensen, Malene Bech; Schjoldager, Katrine; Freeze, Hudson H; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Henrissat, Bernard; Mandel, Ulla; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H; Bennett, Eric P

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of proteins and lipids involves over 200 known glycosyltransferases (GTs), and deleterious defects in many of the genes encoding these enzymes cause disorders collectively classified as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs). Most known CDGs are caused by defects in glycogenes that affect glycosylation globally. Many GTs are members of homologous isoenzyme families and deficiencies in individual isoenzymes may not affect glycosylation globally. In line with this, there appears to be an underrepresentation of disease-causing glycogenes among these larger isoenzyme homologous families. However, genome-wide association studies have identified such isoenzyme genes as candidates for different diseases, but validation is not straightforward without biomarkers. Large-scale whole-exome sequencing (WES) provides access to mutations in, for example, GT genes in populations, which can be used to predict and/or analyze functional deleterious mutations. Here, we constructed a draft of a functional mutational map of glycogenes, GlyMAP, from WES of a rather homogenous population of 2000 Danes. We cataloged all missense mutations and used prediction algorithms, manual inspection and in case of carbohydrate-active enzymes family GT27 experimental analysis of mutations to map deleterious mutations. GlyMAP (http://glymap.glycomics.ku.dk) provides a first global view of the genetic stability of the glycogenome and should serve as a tool for discovery of novel CDGs. PMID:25267602

  2. Deciphering a pathway of Halobacterium salinarum N-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Kandiba, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Genomic analysis points to N-glycosylation as being a common posttranslational modification in Archaea. To date, however, pathways of archaeal N-glycosylation have only been described for few species. With this in mind, the similarities of N-linked glycans decorating glycoproteins in the haloarchaea Haloferax volcanii and Halobacterium salinarum directed a series of bioinformatics, genetic, and biochemical experiments designed to describe that Hbt. salinarum pathway responsible for biogenesis of one of the two N-linked oligosaccharides described in this species. As in Hfx. volcanii, where agl (archaeal glycosylation) genes that encode proteins responsible for the assembly and attachment of a pentasaccharide to target protein Asn residues are clustered in the genome, Hbt. salinarum also contains a group of clustered homologous genes (VNG1048G-VNG1068G). Introduction of these Hbt. salinarum genes into Hfx. volcanii mutant strains deleted of the homologous sequence restored the lost activity. Moreover, transcription of the Hbt. salinarum genes in the native host, as well as in vitro biochemical confirmation of the predicted functions of several of the products of these genes provided further support for assignments made following bioinformatics and genetic experiments. Based on the results obtained in this study, the first description of an N-glycosylation pathway in Hbt. salinarum is offered. PMID:25461760

  3. Deciphering a pathway of Halobacterium salinarum N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Kandiba, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2015-02-01

    Genomic analysis points to N-glycosylation as being a common posttranslational modification in Archaea. To date, however, pathways of archaeal N-glycosylation have only been described for few species. With this in mind, the similarities of N-linked glycans decorating glycoproteins in the haloarchaea Haloferax volcanii and Halobacterium salinarum directed a series of bioinformatics, genetic, and biochemical experiments designed to describe that Hbt. salinarum pathway responsible for biogenesis of one of the two N-linked oligosaccharides described in this species. As in Hfx. volcanii, where agl (archaeal glycosylation) genes that encode proteins responsible for the assembly and attachment of a pentasaccharide to target protein Asn residues are clustered in the genome, Hbt. salinarum also contains a group of clustered homologous genes (VNG1048G-VNG1068G). Introduction of these Hbt. salinarum genes into Hfx. volcanii mutant strains deleted of the homologous sequence restored the lost activity. Moreover, transcription of the Hbt. salinarum genes in the native host, as well as in vitro biochemical confirmation of the predicted functions of several of the products of these genes provided further support for assignments made following bioinformatics and genetic experiments. Based on the results obtained in this study, the first description of an N-glycosylation pathway in Hbt. salinarum is offered. PMID:25461760

  4. A new colorimetric method for the estimation of glycosylated hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Nayak, S S; Pattabiraman, T N

    1981-02-01

    A new colorimetric method, based on the phenol sulphuric acid reaction of carbohydrates, is described for the determination of glycosylated hemoglobin. Hemolyzates were treated with 1 mol/l oxalic acid in 2 mol/l Hcl for 4 h at 100 degrees C, the protein was precipitated with trichloroacetic acid, and the free sugars and hydroxymethyl furfural in the protein free supernatant were treated with phenol and sulphuric acid to form the color. The new method is compared to the thiobarbituric acid method and the ion-exchange chromatographic method for the estimation of glycosylated hemoglobin in normals and diabetics. The increase in glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients as estimated by the phenol-sulphuric acid method was more significant (P less than 0.001) than the increase observed by the thiobarbituric acid method (P less than 0.01). The correlation between the phenol-sulphuric acid method and the column method was better (r = 0.91) than the correlation between the thiobarbituric acid method and the column method (r = 0.84). No significant correlation between fasting and postprandial blood sugar level and glycosylated hemoglobin level as determined by the two colorimetric methods was observed in diabetic patients. PMID:7226519

  5. Genetics Home Reference: ALG6-congenital disorder of glycosylation

    MedlinePlus

    ... so they can perform a wider variety of functions. The enzyme produced from the ALG6 gene transfers a simple ... reduced or no activity. Without a properly functioning enzyme, glycosylation ... are needed for normal function in many organs and tissues, including the brain, ...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. 864.7470 Section 864.7470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. 864.7470 Section 864.7470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. 864.7470 Section 864.7470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  9. Spontaneous expression of a low affinity Fc receptor for IgA (Fc alpha R) on human B cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Millet, I; Briere, F; Vincent, C; Rousset, F; Andreoni, C; De Vries, J E; Revillard, J P

    1989-01-01

    Expression of receptors for IgA (Fc alpha Rs) was investigated on a panel of 35 human B cell lines by labelling with human secretory IgA (0.5 mg/ml) and flow cytometry analysis after staining with fluoresceinated goat anti-human secretory component and/or anti-alpha chain F(ab')2 fragments. Receptors for IgA could be demonstrated on one out of nine Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines, three out of five myeloma cell lines and five out of 21 lymphoblastoid cell lines. The percentage of Fc alpha R-positive cells within the same B cell line varied upon repeated examination. Human dimeric IgA1 lambda myeloma protein revealed the same number of IgA receptor positive cells as did secretory IgA, whereas monomeric IgA did not bind to Fc alpha R. Detection of Fc alpha R was not inhibited when the tests were carried out in the presence of human dimeric IgG, IgM, asialo-orosomucoid, and secretory component but it was abrogated by pre-treatment of the cells with trypsin. The binding characteristics of Fc alpha Rs were studied on the myeloma cell line Esteve, using 125I-labelled human dimeric IgA and secretory IgA. The binding was dose-dependent with rapid kinetics and specific inhibition by unlabelled secretory IgA. Scatchard plot analysis resulted in an equilibrium constant K ranging from 3.2 to 4.7 x 10(6) M/l. No correlation was observed between Fc alpha R expression and differentiation stage, monoclonality, polyclonality of the cell lines, or Ig class produced by the B cells. PMID:2788048

  10. TGF-β1 improves mucosal IgA dysfunction and dysbiosis following intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Yu; Liu, Zi-Meng; Zhang, Hu-Fei; Li, Yun-Sheng; Wen, Shi-Hong; Shen, Jian-Tong; Huang, Wen-Qi; Liu, Ke-Xuan

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) severely disrupts gut barriers and leads to high mortality in the critical care setting. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 plays a pivotal role in intestinal cellular and immune regulation. However, the effects of TGF-β1 on intestinal I/R injury remain unclear. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effects of TGF-β1 on gut barriers after intestinal I/R and the molecular mechanisms. Intestinal I/R model was produced in mice by clamping the superior mesenteric artery for 1 hr followed by reperfusion. Recombinant TGF-β1 was intravenously infused at 15 min. before ischaemia. The results showed that within 2 hrs after reperfusion, intestinal I/R disturbed intestinal immunoglobulin A class switch recombination (IgA CSR), the key process of mucosal IgA synthesis, and resulted in IgA dysfunction, as evidenced by decreased production and bacteria-binding capacity of IgA. Meanwhile, the disruptions of intestinal microflora and mucosal structure were exhibited. Transforming growth factor-β1 activated IgA CSR as evidenced by the increased activation molecules and IgA precursors. Strikingly, TGF-β1 improved intestinal mucosal IgA dysfunction, dysbiosis and epithelial damage at the early stage after reperfusion. In addition, SB-431542, a specific inhibitor of activating mothers against decapentaplegic homologue (SMAD) 2/3, totally blocked the inductive effect of TGF-β1 on IgA CSR and almost abrogated the above protective effects on intestinal barriers. Taken together, our study demonstrates that TGF-β1 protects intestinal mucosal IgA immunity, microbiota and epithelial integrity against I/R injury mainly through TGF-β receptor 1/SMAD 2/3 pathway. Induction of IgA CSR may be involved in the protection conferred by TGF-β1. PMID:26820382

  11. Identification of novel plasma glycosylation-associated markers of aging

    PubMed Central

    Catera, Mariangela; Borelli, Vincenzo; Malagolini, Nadia; Chiricolo, Mariella; Venturi, Giulia; Reis, Celso A.; Osorio, Hugo; Abruzzo, Provvidenza M.; Capri, Miriam; Monti, Daniela; Ostan, Rita; Franceschi, Claudio; Dall'Olio, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The pro- or anti-inflammatory activities of immunoglobulins G (IgGs) are controlled by the structure of the glycan N-linked to Asn297 of their heavy chain. The age-associated low grade inflammation (inflammaging) is associated with increased plasmatic levels of agalactosylated IgGs terminating with N-acetylglucosamine (IgG-G0) whose biogenesis has not been fully explained. Although the biosynthesis of glycans is in general mediated by glycosyltransferases associated with internal cell membranes, the extracellular glycosylation of circulating glycoproteins mediated by plasmatic glycosyltransferases has been recently demonstrated. In this study we have investigated the relationship between plasmatic glycosyltransferases, IgG glycosylation and inflammatory and aging markers. In cohorts of individuals ranging from infancy to centenarians we determined the activity of plasmatic β4 galactosyltransferase(s) (B4GALTs) and of α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6GAL1, the glycosylation of IgG, the GlycoAge test (a glycosylation-based marker of aging) and the plasma level of inflammatory and liver damage markers. Our results show that: 1) plasmatic B4GALTs activity is a new marker of aging, showing a linear increase throughout the whole age range. 2) plasmatic ST6GAL1 was high only in children and in people above 80, showing a quadratic relationship with age. 3) Neither plasmatic glycosyltransferase correlated with markers of liver damage. 4) plasmatic ST6GAL1 showed a positive association with acute phase proteins in offspring of short lived parents, but not in centenarians or in their offspring. 5) Although the glycosylation of IgGs was not correlated with the level of the two plasmatic glycosyltransferases, it showed progressive age-associated changes consistent with a shift toward a pro-inflammatory glycotype. PMID:26840264

  12. Insights into complexity of congenital disorders of glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Goreta, Sandra Supraha; Dabelic, Sanja; Dumic, Jerka

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical and biological properties of glycoconjugates are strongly determined by the specific structure of its glycan parts. Glycosylation, the covalent attachment of sugars to proteins and lipids, is very complex and highly-coordinated process involving > 250 gene products. Deficiency of glycosylation enzymes or transporters results in impaired glycosylation, and consequently pathological modulation of many physiological processes. Inborn defects of glycosylation enzymes, caused by the specific mutations, lead to the development of rare, but severe diseases – congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs). Up today, there are more than 45 known CDGs. Their clinical manifestations range from very mild to extremely severe (even lethal) and unfortunately, only three of them can be eff ectively treated nowadays. CDG symptoms highly vary, though some are common for several CDG types but also for other unrelated diseases, especially neurological ones, leaving the possibility that many CDGs cases are under- or mis-diagnosed. Glycan analysis of serum transferrin (by isoelectric focusing or more sophisticated methods, such as HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) or MALDI (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization)) or serum N-glycans (by MS), enzyme activity assays and DNA sequence analysis are the most frequently used methods for CDG screening and identification, since no specific tests are available yet. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the clinical, biochemical and genetic characteristic of distinct CDGs, as well as existing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, aiming to contribute to the awareness on the existence of these rare diseases and encourage the eff orts to elucidate its genetic background, improve diagnostics and develop new strategies for their treatment. PMID:22838182

  13. Identification of novel plasma glycosylation-associated markers of aging.

    PubMed

    Catera, Mariangela; Borelli, Vincenzo; Malagolini, Nadia; Chiricolo, Mariella; Venturi, Giulia; Reis, Celso A; Osorio, Hugo; Abruzzo, Provvidenza M; Capri, Miriam; Monti, Daniela; Ostan, Rita; Franceschi, Claudio; Dall'Olio, Fabio

    2016-02-16

    The pro- or anti-inflammatory activities of immunoglobulins G (IgGs) are controlled by the structure of the glycan N-linked to Asn297 of their heavy chain. The age-associated low grade inflammation (inflammaging) is associated with increased plasmatic levels of agalactosylated IgGs terminating with N-acetylglucosamine (IgG-G0) whose biogenesis has not been fully explained. Although the biosynthesis of glycans is in general mediated by glycosyltransferases associated with internal cell membranes, the extracellular glycosylation of circulating glycoproteins mediated by plasmatic glycosyltransferases has been recently demonstrated. In this study we have investigated the relationship between plasmatic glycosyltransferases, IgG glycosylation and inflammatory and aging markers. In cohorts of individuals ranging from infancy to centenarians we determined the activity of plasmatic β4 galactosyltransferase(s) (B4GALTs) and of α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6GAL1, the glycosylation of IgG, the GlycoAge test (a glycosylation-based marker of aging) and the plasma level of inflammatory and liver damage markers. Our results show that: 1) plasmatic B4GALTs activity is a new marker of aging, showing a linear increase throughout the whole age range. 2) plasmatic ST6GAL1 was high only in children and in people above 80, showing a quadratic relationship with age. 3) Neither plasmatic glycosyltransferase correlated with markers of liver damage. 4) plasmatic ST6GAL1 showed a positive association with acute phase proteins in offspring of short lived parents, but not in centenarians or in their offspring. 5) Although the glycosylation of IgGs was not correlated with the level of the two plasmatic glycosyltransferases, it showed progressive age-associated changes consistent with a shift toward a pro-inflammatory glycotype. PMID:26840264

  14. A Case of Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation Ia Presented with Recurrent Pericardial Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Işıkay, Sedat; Başpınar, Osman; Yılmaz, Kutluhan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inherited deficiency of phosophomannomutase (PMM2) causes a human glycosylation disorder known as Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation Ia. Case Presentation: Herein, we describe a case of congenital disorder of glycosylation Ia, presented with recurrent pericardial effusion and unusual findings of inverted nipples, fat pads, reduced deep-tendon reflexes and multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation Ia should be considered in children with developmental delay, those with multi-system disease involving neurologic, gastrointestinal, ophthalmologic, cardiac or endocrine systems. On the other hand, severe cardiac involvement may also be a feature of Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation Ia and diagnosed patients should also be evaluated in this respect. PMID:25793077

  15. Aberration averaging using point spread function for scanning projection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooki, Hiroshi; Noda, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Koichi

    2000-07-01

    Scanning projection system plays a leading part in current DUV optical lithography. It is frequently pointed out that the mechanically induced distortion and field curvature degrade image quality after scanning. On the other hand, the aberration of the projection lens is averaged along the scanning direction. This averaging effect reduces the residual aberration significantly. The aberration averaging based on the point spread function and phase retrieval technique in order to estimate the effective wavefront aberration after scanning is described in this paper. Our averaging method is tested using specified wavefront aberration, and its accuracy is discussed based on the measured wavefront aberration of recent Nikon projection lens.

  16. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields. II. Diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, V N

    2000-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld theory is applied to diffraction of a spherical wave by a grating. The grating equation is obtained from the aberration-free diffraction pattern, and its aberrations are shown to be the same as the conventional aberrations obtained by using Fermat's principle. These aberrations are shown to be not associated with the diffraction process. Moreover, it is shown that the irradiance distribution of a certain diffraction order is the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the grating aperture as a whole aberrated by the aberration of that order. PMID:11140481

  17. Absolute Quantitation of Glycosylation Site Occupancy Using Isotopically Labeled Standards and LC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhikai; Go, Eden P.; Desaire, Heather

    2014-06-01

    N-linked glycans are required to maintain appropriate biological functions on proteins. Underglycosylation leads to many diseases in plants and animals; therefore, characterizing the extent of glycosylation on proteins is an important step in understanding, diagnosing, and treating diseases. To determine the glycosylation site occupancy, protein N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) is typically used to detach the glycan from the protein, during which the formerly glycosylated asparagine undergoes deamidation to become an aspartic acid. By comparing the abundance of the resulting peptide containing aspartic acid against the one containing non-glycosylated asparagine, the glycosylation site occupancy can be evaluated. However, this approach can give inaccurate results when spontaneous chemical deamidation of the non-glycosylated asparagine occurs. To overcome this limitation, we developed a new method to measure the glycosylation site occupancy that does not rely on converting glycosylated peptides to their deglycosylated forms. Specifically, the overall protein concentration and the non-glycosylated portion of the protein are quantified simultaneously by using heavy isotope-labeled internal standards coupled with LC-MS analysis, and the extent of site occupancy is accurately determined. The efficacy of the method was demonstrated by quantifying the occupancy of a glycosylation site on bovine fetuin. The developed method is the first work that measures the glycosylation site occupancy without using PNGase F, and it can be done in parallel with glycopeptide analysis because the glycan remains intact throughout the workflow.

  18. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Studies on the Complexation of Antidiabetic Drugs with Glycosylated Serum Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seedher, N.; Kanojia, M.

    2013-11-01

    Glycosylation decreases the association constant values and hence the binding affinity of human serum albumin (HSA) for the antidiabetic drugs under study. The percentage of HAS-bound drug at physiological temperature was only about 21-38 % as compared to 46-74 % for non-glycosylated HSA. Thus the percentage of free drug available for an antihyperglycemic effect was about double (62-79 %) compared to the values for non-glycosylated HSA. Much higher free drug concentrations available for pharmacological effect can lead to the risk of hypoglycemia. Hydrophobic interactions were predominantly involved in the binding. In the binding of gliclazide, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions were involved. Site specificity for glycosylated HSA was the same as that for non-glycosylated HSA; gliclazide and repaglinide bind only at site II whereas glimepiride and glipizide bind at both sites I and II. Glycosylation, however, caused conformational changes in albumin, and the binding region within site II was different for glycosylated and non-glycosylated albumin. Stern-Volmer analysis also indicated the conformational changes in albumin as a result of glycosylation and showed that the dynamic quenching mechanism was valid for fluorescence of both glycosylated and non-glycosylated HSA.

  19. Development of recombinant human IgA for anticardiolipin antibodies assay standardization.

    PubMed

    Knappik, Achim; Capuano, Francesco; Frisch, Christian; Ylera, Francisco; Bonelli, Fabrizio

    2009-09-01

    Controls and calibrators in autoimmune assays are typically developed from patient sera. However, the use of sera is accompanied by a number of disadvantages, such as lack of monospecificity, lack of assay comparability, and supply limitations. Ideally, the control reagent would be an antigen-specific human monoclonal antibody preparation that is defined and pure, easy to produce without any supply limitations, and of defined isotype (IgG, IgM, or IgA). The generation of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies has been complicated, but recent advances in development of fully human antibodies by means of in vitro antibody gene library selection has opened a way for the isolation of human antibodies to virtually any antigen, including self-antigens. Such antibodies can be converted to any isotype by gene cloning. Here we developed a set of human monoclonal IgA antibodies specific for the cardiolipin-beta2-glycoprotein 1 complex, using the HuCAL technology. We evaluated the IgA variants of those antibodies for their use as standards in IgA anticardiolipin antibody assays and compared these reagents with serum controls. Such recombinant antibodies may ultimately replace patient sera as assay control and calibration reagents. PMID:19758150

  20. IL-1β in eosinophil-mediated small intestinal homeostasis and IgA production

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Y; Wen, T; Mingler, MK; Caldwell, JM; Wang, YH; Chaplin, DD; Lee, EH; Jang, MH; Woo, SY; Seoh, JY; Miyasaka, M; Rothenberg, ME

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that reside in the gastrointestinal (GI) lamina propria, where their basal function remains largely unexplored. In this study, by examining mice with a selective deficiency of systemic eosinophils (by lineage ablation) or GI eosinophils (eotaxin-1/2 double–deficient or CC chemokine receptor 3–deficient), we show that eosinophils support immunoglobulin A (IgA) class switching, maintain intestinal mucus secretions, affect intestinal microbial composition, and promote the development of Peyer’s patches. Eosinophil-deficient mice showed reduced expression of mediators of secretory IgA production, including intestinal interleukin 1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase, lymphotoxin (LT) α, and LT-β, and reduced levels of retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t–positive (ROR-γt+) innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) while maintaining normal levels of APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand), BAFF (B cell–activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family), and TGF-β (transforming growth factor β). GI eosinophils expressed a relatively high level of IL-1β, and IL-1β–deficient mice manifested the altered gene expression profiles observed in eosinophil-deficient mice and decreased levels of IgA+ cells and ROR-γt+ ILCs. On the basis of these collective data, we propose that eosinophils are required for homeostatic intestinal immune responses including IgA production and that their affect is mediated via IL-1β in the small intestine. PMID:25563499

  1. Polymeric IgA myeloma, hyperlipidaemia and xanthomatosis: a further case and review

    PubMed Central

    Roberts-Thomson, P. J.; Onitiri, A. C.; Venables, G. S.; Lewis, B.

    1975-01-01

    A patient is described who had myeloma of the polymeric IgA variety, together with a striking hyperlipidaemia and xanthomatosis. Investigations into the protein and lipid abnormality failed to demonstrate any mechanism for the hyperlipidaemia. A review of the literature, however, validates this clinical entity and some of the suggested explanations are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:1099570

  2. IL-1β in eosinophil-mediated small intestinal homeostasis and IgA production.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y; Wen, T; Mingler, M K; Caldwell, J M; Wang, Y H; Chaplin, D D; Lee, E H; Jang, M H; Woo, S Y; Seoh, J Y; Miyasaka, M; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-07-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that reside in the gastrointestinal (GI) lamina propria, where their basal function remains largely unexplored. In this study, by examining mice with a selective deficiency of systemic eosinophils (by lineage ablation) or GI eosinophils (eotaxin-1/2 double deficient or CC chemokine receptor 3 deficient), we show that eosinophils support immunoglobulin A (IgA) class switching, maintain intestinal mucus secretions, affect intestinal microbial composition, and promote the development of Peyer's patches. Eosinophil-deficient mice showed reduced expression of mediators of secretory IgA production, including intestinal interleukin 1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase, lymphotoxin (LT) α, and LT-β, and reduced levels of retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t-positive (ROR-γt(+)) innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), while maintaining normal levels of APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand), BAFF (B cell-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family), and TGF-β (transforming growth factor β). GI eosinophils expressed a relatively high level of IL-1β, and IL-1β-deficient mice manifested the altered gene expression profiles observed in eosinophil-deficient mice and decreased levels of IgA(+) cells and ROR-γt(+) ILCs. On the basis of these collective data, we propose that eosinophils are required for homeostatic intestinal immune responses including IgA production and that their affect is mediated via IL-1β in the small intestine. PMID:25563499

  3. Plasmaphresis therapy for pulmonary hemorrhage in a pediatric patient with IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Dae-Kyoon; Lee, Sang-Taek

    2015-01-01

    IgA nephropathy usually presents as asymptomatic microscopic hematuria or proteinuria or episodic gross hematuria after upper respiratory infection. It is an uncommon cause of end-stage renal failure in childhood. Pulmonary hemorrhage associated with IgA nephropathy is an unusual life-threatening manifestation in pediatric patients and is usually treated with aggressive immunosuppression. Pulmonary hemorrhage and renal failure usually occur concurrently, and the pulmonary manifestation is believed to be caused by the same immune process. We present the case of a 14-year-old patient with IgA nephropathy who had already progressed to end-stage renal failure in spite of immunosuppression and presented with pulmonary hemorrhage during oral prednisone treatment. His lung disease was comparable to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and was successfully treated with plasmapheresis followed by oral prednisone. This case suggests that pulmonary hemorrhage may develop independently of renal manifestation, and that plasmapheresis should be considered as adjunctive therapy to immunosuppressive medication for treating IgA nephropathy with pulmonary hemorrhage. PMID:26576186

  4. A case of IgA deficiency with anti-IgA antibodies and autoimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Pierre, P G; Ferrant, A; Michaux, J L; Vaerman, J P; Van den Bosshe, L

    1994-01-01

    The case of a young woman with autoimmune thrombocytopenia, complete IgA deficiency and anti-IgA antibodies is presented and the role of the AH 8-1 supratype (HLA B8, DR3) is discussed. Such an association necessitates use of IgA-free blood products in order to avoid anaphylactic reactions. PMID:8152904

  5. Determining the accommodative response from wavefront aberrations.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Janice; Roorda, Austin; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate some of the methods used to calculate objective refractions from wavefront aberrations, to determine their applicability for accommodation research. A wavefront analyzer was used to measure the ocular aberrations of 13 emmetropes and 17 myopes at distance, and 4 near target vergences: 2, 3, 4, and 5 D. The accommodative response was calculated using the following techniques: least squares fitting (Zernike defocus), paraxial curvature matching (Seidel defocus), and 5 optical quality metrics (PFWc, PFSc, PFCc, NS, and VSMTF). We also evaluated a task-specific method of determining optimum focus that used a through-focus procedure to select the image that best optimized both contrast amplitude and gradient (CAG). Neither Zernike nor Seidel defocus appears to be the best method for determining the accommodative response from wavefront aberrations. When the eye has negative spherical aberration, Zernike defocus tends to underestimate, whereas Seidel defocus tends to overestimate the accommodative response. A better approach is to first determine the best image plane using a suitable optical quality metric and then calculate the accommodative error relative to this plane. Of the metrics evaluated, both NS and VSMTF were reasonable choices, with the CAG algorithm being a less preferred alternate. PMID:20616123

  6. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Notari, Alessio E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es

    2013-04-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  7. Anti-forensics of chromatic aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Owen; Stamm, Matthew C.

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, a number of information forensic techniques have been developed to identify digital image manipulation and falsification. Recent research has shown, however, that an intelligent forger can use anti-forensic countermeasures to disguise their forgeries. In this paper, an anti-forensic technique is proposed to falsify the lateral chromatic aberration present in a digital image. Lateral chromatic aberration corresponds to the relative contraction or expansion between an image's color channels that occurs due to a lens's inability to focus all wavelengths of light on the same point. Previous work has used localized inconsistencies in an image's chromatic aberration to expose cut-and-paste image forgeries. The anti-forensic technique presented in this paper operates by estimating the expected lateral chromatic aberration at an image location, then removing deviations from this estimate caused by tampering or falsification. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate that our anti-forensic technique can be used to effectively disguise evidence of an image forgery.

  8. Aberration features in directional dark matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu

    2012-08-01

    The motion of the Earth around the Sun causes an annual change in the magnitude and direction of the arrival velocity of dark matter particles on Earth, in a way analogous to aberration of stellar light. In directional detectors, aberration of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) modulates the pattern of nuclear recoil directions in a way that depends on the orbital velocity of the Earth and the local galactic distribution of WIMP velocities. Knowing the former, WIMP aberration can give information on the latter, besides being a curious way of confirming the revolution of the Earth and the extraterrestrial provenance of WIMPs. While observing the full aberration pattern requires extremely large exposures, we claim that the annual variation of the mean recoil direction or of the event counts over specific solid angles may be detectable with moderately large exposures. For example, integrated counts over Galactic hemispheres separated by planes perpendicular to Earth's orbit would modulate annually, resulting in Galactic Hemisphere Annual Modulations (GHAM) with amplitudes larger than the usual non-directional annual modulation.

  9. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catena, Riccardo; Notari, Alessio

    2013-04-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles alm's via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  10. Optical advantages of astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooyen, De Wet; Schöttl, Peter; Bern, Gregor; Heimsath, Anna; Nitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats adapt their shape in dependence of the incidence angle of the sun on the heliostat. Simulations show that this optical correction leads to a higher concentration ratio at the target and thus in a decrease in required receiver aperture in particular for smaller heliostat fields.

  11. Designing refractive beam shapers via aberration theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Shealy, David

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we use aberration theory to design a refractive laser beam shaper in the configuration of two-aspheric lenses, whose analytical equations are known, but rather complicated. Specifically, we use results from third order aberration theory to obtain the parameters of the refracting laser beam shaper from the transverse aberration, which are then used as a starting point for further optimization by using optical design software. This approach was developed during the beginning of the twentieth century, works well for systems with a low numerical aperture, and allows one to define the following parameters of an optical system: radii of curvature, indices of refraction, thicknesses or air gaps, and conic constants of second order aspheric surfaces. We shall consider surfaces of the second-order spherical and conic sections and shall consider the example of designing of a two-lens beam shaper of the Keplerian 1-to-1 telescopic design providing a theoretical flat phase front and a flat-top irradiance profile of the output beam, where the ray mapping function from the input aperture to the output aperture is known from the literature. Explicit expression for third order longitudinal aberration and the Seidel coefficients are expressed in terms beam waist and input beam geometrical parameter, indices, lens radii and conic constants.

  12. Corneal Aberrations Before and After Photorefractive Keratectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Nicola; De Bernardo, Maddalena; Lanza, Michele; Borrelli, Maria; Fusco, Fabrizia; Flagiello, Antimo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether - and which - higher-order corneal aberrations, up to the sixth order, are induced by photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Methods 197 eyes of 197 patients have been examined with a corneal aberrometer for a 3.5 and a 6.0 mm pupil simulation, both before and 1, 3, 6 months after myopic PRK treatment ranging from −15.25 D to -0.5 D (mean −5.31±2.95 D). The statistical evaluation was performed using a paired Student's T-test. Results After PRK there is a clear-cut increase in almost all the higher-order corneal aberrations for both a 3.5 and a 6.0 mm pupil simulation. These aberrations tend to normalize after 3 and 6 months mainly for a 3.5 mm simulation, whereas such normalization is not present for a 6.0 mm simulation. Conclusions PRK induces significant aberrations both for 3.5 and 6 mm pupils, 1 month after PRK, but a trend towards normalization is evident at the 6 month follow-up for the smaller pupil size.

  13. [The number of aberrations in aberrant cells as a parameter of chromosomal instability. 1. Characterization of dose dependency].

    PubMed

    Kutsokon', N K; Bezrukov, V F; Lazarenko, L M; Rashydov, N M; Hrodzyns'kyĭ, D M

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of chromosome instability (CI) is of great importance in view of pollution of the environment by genotoxic factors. Frequency of aberrant cells, spectrum of chromosome aberrations, damages of aberrant cell and distribution of aberrations in the cells are the most conventional parameters of CI. We have carried out the comparative analysis of the frequency of aberrant cells and the dynamics of aberrant cell damages induced by different mutagenic factors (alpha-irradiation from 241Am, gamma-irradiation from 60Co and tioTEPA) in Allium-test. This comparative analysis denotes that the studied parameters have different dynamics characterizing different mechanisms of CI in Allium cepa L. PMID:14569619

  14. IgG, IgA, and lysozyme in Martina Franca donkey jennies and their foals.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Maria C; Dall'Ara, Paola; Gloria, Alessia; Servida, Francesco; Sala, Elisabetta; Robbe, Domenico

    2014-04-01

    Because immune transfer from jenny to donkey foal is mostly unknown, the aim of the present study was to evaluate, from 5 days before to 10 days after foaling, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, and lysozyme peripartal concentrations in serum and mammary secretions of 10 healthy, spontaneously foaling Martina Franca jennies and in serum of their mature, viable, healthy foals, in the first 10 days after birth. The results showed that, in jennies, mammary secretion of IgG levels (ranging between 16 and 75 mg/mL) and IgA (0.9-2 mg/mL), and IgG (6.8-13.5 mg/mL) and IgA (0.5-2.4 mg/mL) serum concentrations were not different along the time of study. Also, IgG concentrations in serum of foals did not show significant differences although a high level was observed at 12 hours after birth (8 mg/mL), and IgA concentrations in serum of foals did not show any significant difference, although a high level was observed at 12 hours after birth (1.2 mg/mL). Lysozyme increased significantly at Day 2 after parturition in mammary secretions of jennies (551.9 μg/mL) and at 12 hours in serum of foals (25.9 μg/mL). The study demonstrated that the pattern of passive immune transfer in donkey foals seems to be similar to that reported for the horse foal, with IgG predominating IgA in serum and mammary secretions of the jenny and also in serum of foals. The most significant early increase in foals' serum concerns lysozyme, which probably plays an important role in the innate immunity of the donkey foal in the first challenging hours after birth. PMID:24462298

  15. Glomerular tip adhesions predict the progression of IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis-like lesions have been proposed to be predictive factors for IgA nephropathy. This single center, retrospective cohort study was designed to clarify which clinical and pathological factors are predictive of decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at 5 and 10 years in IgA nephropathy patients. Methods Of the 229 patients with IgA nephropathy who were admitted to Aichi Medical University Hospital between 1986 and 2010, 57 were included in this study during the 5 to 10 years after renal biopsy. Clinical, laboratory, and pathological parameters were analyzed by multiple linear regression analysis with backward elimination to determine independent risk factors. After identifying such factors, we compared patients with and without each factor using the Student’s t test, Wilcoxon test, or Mann–Whitney U test. Results Four variables were identified as predictive factors for progression of IgA nephropathy: initial eGFR (p = 0.0002), glomerular tip adhesion (p = 0.004), global sclerosis (p = 0.019), and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.024). The annual decrease in eGFR of patients with (n = 9) or without glomerular tip adhesions (n = 48) was 4.13 ± 3.58 and 1.49 ± 2.89 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively (p = 0.015). Serum total cholesterol levels were 231 ± 45 mg/dl and 196 ± 42 mg/dl, respectively (two-sided p = 0.064; one-sided p = 0.032). Conclusions The presence of glomerular tip adhesions predicts the progression of IgA nephropathy. High levels of serum total cholesterol may affect glomerular tip adhesions. PMID:24308295

  16. Intra-tumour IgA1 is common in cancer and is correlated with poor prognosis in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Charlotte; Jirström, Karin; Lehn, Sophie; Nodin, Björn; Marko-Varga, György; Blixt, Ola; Danielsson, Lena; Jansson, Bo

    2016-08-01

    A high frequency of IgA1-positive tumour cells was found in tissue micro-arrays of oesophagus, colon, testis, lung, breast, bladder and ovarian cancer. IgA1 was observed in the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. A correlation was found between intra-tumour IgA1 and poor overall survival in a large cohort of bladder cancer patients (n = 99, p = 0.011, log-rank test). The number of IgA1-positive tumour cells was also found to be higher in female than male bladder cancer patients. The presence of IgA1 was confirmed in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded ovarian carcinoma samples using LC-MS/MS analysis. Uptake of IgA1 was also observed in breast cancer and melanoma cell lines when cultivated in the presence of serum from healthy individuals, indicating a possible origin of the IgA1 antibodies in cancer cells. PMID:27579449

  17. Lactoferrin Combined with Retinoic Acid Stimulates B1 Cells to Express IgA Isotype and Gut-homing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong-Ho; Jin, Bo-Ra; Kim, Hyeon-Jin; Seo, Goo-Young; Jang, Young-Saeng; Kim, Sun-Jin; An, Sun-Jin; Park, Seok-Rae; Kim, Woan-Sub

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that TGF-β1 and retinoic acid (RA) cause IgA isotype switching in mice. We recently found that lactoferrin (LF) also has an activity of IgA isotype switching in spleen B cells. The present study explored the effect of LF on the Ig production by mouse peritoneal B cells. LF, like TGF-β1, substantially increased IgA production in peritoneal B1 cells but little in peritoneal B2 cells. In contrast, LF increased IgG2b production in peritoneal B2 cells much more strongly than in peritoneal B1 cells. LF in combination with RA further enhanced the IgA production and, interestingly, this enhancement was restricted to IgA isotype and B1 cells. Similarly, the combination of the two molecules also led to expression of gut homing molecules α4β7 and CCR9 on peritoneal B1 cells, but not on peritoneal B2 cells. Thus, these results indicate that LF and RA can contribute to gut IgA response through stimulating IgA isotype switching and expression of gut-homing molecules in peritoneal B1 cells. PMID:25713507

  18. IgA mesangial deposits in C3H/HeJ mice after oral immunization with ferritin or bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Genin, C; Laurent, B; Sabatier, J C; Colon, S; Berthoux, F C

    1986-01-01

    In order to study an experimental model of IgA nephropathy, C3H/HeJ mice which are high IgA responders were strongly immunized orally with ferritin and compared to syngeneic C3H/eB. C3H/HeJ exhibited a significant increase of total IgA level in the serum and of IgA deposits in the mesangium. However the low level of IgA antibody to ferritin detected in the serum and the unsuccessful search for ferritin and antibody to ferritin in the glomeruli suggest that strong oral immunization of C3H/HeJ mice leads to high level of non specific IgA in the serum and deposition of IgA in the kidney. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3516467

  19. Journey into muscular dystrophies caused by abnormal glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Muntoni, Francesco

    2004-09-01

    An increasing number of genes encoding for putative or demonstrated glycosyltransferases are being associated with muscular dystrophies of variable severity, ranging from severe congenital onset and associated structural eye and brain changes, to relatively mild forms with onset into adulthood. Five of these genes (POMT1; POMGnT1; FXRP; Fukutin; LARGE) encode for proteins involved in the glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan and, indeed, abnormal glycosylation of this molecule is a common finding in all the respective conditions (Walker Warburg syndrome; Muscle-Eye-Brain disease; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C and Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 21; Fukuyama muscular dystrophy; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1D). A 6th gene, GNE, responsible for the hereditary form of inclusion body myositis, encodes for a glycosyltransferase the substrate(s) of which is, however, still unclear. This article provides an overview of the clinical, biochemical and genetic features of this group of disorders. PMID:15605948

  20. The dystroglycanopathies: the new disorders of O-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul T

    2005-09-01

    It has become clear in the past half decade that a number of forms of congenital muscular dystrophy are in fact congenital disorders of glycosylation. Genes for Walker Warburg syndrome, muscle-eye-brain disease, Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy 1C and 1D, and limb girdle muscular dystrophy 21 have been identified, and gene mutations resulting in these diseases all cause the underglycosylation of alpha dystroglycan with O-linked carbohydrates. Unlike congenital disorders of glycosylation involving the N-linked pathway, these O-linked disorders possess distinctive muscle, eye, and brain phenotypes. Studies using mice and patient tissues strongly suggest that underglycosylation of dystroglycan inhibits the binding extracellular matrix proteins, effectively divorcing this important cell adhesion molecule from its extracellular environment. Moreover, defects in dystroglycan alone can account for most, if not all, cellular pathology. Thus, these disorders are now collectively referred to as dystroglycanopathies. PMID:16584074

  1. Bridging the Gap between Glycosylation and Vesicle Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Peter; Ungar, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation is recognized as a vitally important posttranslational modification. The structure of glycans that decorate proteins and lipids is largely dictated by biosynthetic reactions occurring in the Golgi apparatus. This biosynthesis relies on the relative distribution of glycosyltransferases and glycosidases, which is maintained by retrograde vesicle traffic between Golgi cisternae. Tethering of vesicles at the Golgi apparatus prior to fusion is regulated by Rab GTPases, coiled-coil tethers termed golgins and the multisubunit tethering complex known as the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex. In this review we discuss the mechanisms involved in vesicle tethering at the Golgi apparatus and highlight the importance of tethering in the context of glycan biosynthesis and a set of diseases known as congenital disorders of glycosylation. PMID:27014691

  2. Glycosylation status of vitamin D binding protein in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rehder, Douglas S; Nelson, Randall W; Borges, Chad R

    2009-10-01

    On the basis of the results of activity studies, previous reports have suggested that vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is significantly or even completely deglycosylated in cancer patients, eliminating the molecular precursor of the immunologically important Gc macrophage activating factor (GcMAF), a glycosidase-derived product of DBP. The purpose of this investigation was to directly determine the relative degree of O-linked trisaccharide glycosylation of serum-derived DBP in human breast, colorectal, pancreatic, and prostate cancer patients. Results obtained by electrospray ionization-based mass spectrometric immunoassay showed that there was no significant depletion of DBP trisaccharide glycosylation in the 56 cancer patients examined relative to healthy controls. These results suggest that alternative hypotheses regarding the molecular and/or structural origins of GcMAF must be considered to explain the relative inability of cancer patient serum to activate macrophages. PMID:19642159

  3. Glycosylation status of vitamin D binding protein in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Rehder, Douglas S; Nelson, Randall W; Borges, Chad R

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the results of activity studies, previous reports have suggested that vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is significantly or even completely deglycosylated in cancer patients, eliminating the molecular precursor of the immunologically important Gc macrophage activating factor (GcMAF), a glycosidase-derived product of DBP. The purpose of this investigation was to directly determine the relative degree of O-linked trisaccharide glycosylation of serum-derived DBP in human breast, colorectal, pancreatic, and prostate cancer patients. Results obtained by electrospray ionization-based mass spectrometric immunoassay showed that there was no significant depletion of DBP trisaccharide glycosylation in the 56 cancer patients examined relative to healthy controls. These results suggest that alternative hypotheses regarding the molecular and/or structural origins of GcMAF must be considered to explain the relative inability of cancer patient serum to activate macrophages. PMID:19642159

  4. Glycosylation of ribonuclease A catalysed by rabbit liver extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Khalkhall, Z; Marshall, R D

    1975-01-01

    Crude extracts of rabbit liver catalyse in vitro the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine to bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A. The enzymic activity is contained in rough endoplasmic reticulum. It has an absolute requirement for a bivalent metal ion: Co-2+ greater than Mn-2+ greater than Ni-2+. Mg-2+ is ineffective. There is enzymic activity in the absence of detergent, but increased activity is observed in the presence of Triton X-100. The site of glycosylation of ribonuclease A is asparagine-34, and glycosylation occurs only at this point. These findings agree with the hypothesis that the sequence Asn-X-Thr(Ser) (where X may be one of a number of types of amino acid) is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for N-acetylglucosaminylation of a protein-bound asparagine residue. PMID:1156375

  5. Glycosylation of Therapeutic Proteins: An Effective Strategy to Optimize Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Solá, Ricardo J.; Griebenow, Kai

    2009-01-01

    During their development and administration, protein-based drugs routinely display suboptimum therapeutic efficacies due to their poor physicochemical and pharmacological properties. These innate liabilities have driven the development of molecular level strategies to improve the therapeutic behavior of protein drugs. Among, the currently developed approaches, glycoengineering is one of the most promising due fact that it has been shown to simultaneously afford improvements over most of the parameters necessary for optimization of protein drug in vivo efficacy (e.g., in vitro and in vivo molecular stability, pharmacodynamic responses, and pharmacokinetic profiles) while allowing for targeting to the desired site of action. The intent of this article is to provide an account of the effects that glycosylation has on the therapeutic efficacy of protein drugs and to describe the current understanding of the mechanisms by which glycosylation leads to such effects. PMID:20055529

  6. Review of Glycosylation Engineering of Biopharmaceuticals: Methods and Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Jefferis, Roy

    2013-01-01

    The glycoform profile of a glycoprotein is non-templated, i.e., is not encoded within the genome or otherwise predetermined; however, it is estimated that ~50% of human genes having an open reading frame encode a –N-X-S/T- amino acid sequence, where X represents any amino acid other than proline, that comprises a potential site (sequon) for N-linked glycosylation of the translated protein. N-linked glycosylation is both a co- and post-translational modification. The complex oligosaccharide GlcNAc2Man9Glu3 may be added at a –N-X-S/T- sequon as the polypeptide chain emerges from the ribosome tunnel. Local secondary structure determines whether oligosaccharide is added and the extent of addition. Higher occupancy is observed for –N-X-T- sequons than at –N-X-S- sequons, and the efficiency of addition can be further influenced by adjacent amino acid residues.

  7. Innate lymphoid cells regulate intestinal epithelial cell glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yoshiyuki; Obata, Takashi; Kunisawa, Jun; Sato, Shintaro; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Lamichhane, Aayam; Takeyama, Natsumi; Kamioka, Mariko; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Matsuki, Takahiro; Setoyama, Hiromi; Imaoka, Akemi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Domino, Steven E; Kulig, Paulina; Becher, Burkhard; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Sasakawa, Chihiro; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Benno, Yoshimi; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-09-12

    Fucosylation of intestinal epithelial cells, catalyzed by fucosyltransferase 2 (Fut2), is a major glycosylation mechanism of host-microbiota symbiosis. Commensal bacteria induce epithelial fucosylation, and epithelial fucose is used as a dietary carbohydrate by many of these bacteria. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate the induction of epithelial fucosylation are unknown. Here, we show that type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) induced intestinal epithelial Fut2 expression and fucosylation in mice. This induction required the cytokines interleukin-22 and lymphotoxin in a commensal bacteria-dependent and -independent manner, respectively. Disruption of intestinal fucosylation led to increased susceptibility to infection by Salmonella typhimurium. Our data reveal a role for ILC3 in shaping the gut microenvironment through the regulation of epithelial glycosylation. PMID:25214634

  8. Possible difference in glycosylation of the thyrotropin receptor among species.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, S; Akamizu, T; Mori, T

    1994-05-16

    Residue 113 of the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) is a possible asparagine-linked glycosylation site in the human TSHR, but not in rat or dog TSHR. Russo et al. (Mol Endocrinol 5:29-33) reported that mutation of this residue in the human TSHR diminished TSH binding activity after transfection. To investigate the difference in the role of residue 113 of the TSHR among species, we created a mutant at residue 113 in the rat TSHR, transfected Cos-7 cells with the mutant DNA and measured TSH binding and TSH- and Graves' IgG-stimulated cAMP and phosphoinositide signals. No difference was found in the activities of the mutant transfectant from the wild type receptor transfectant. These results might suggest a real difference in glycosylation of the TSHR among species. PMID:8185569

  9. Altered glycosylation of complexed native IgG molecules is associated with disease activity of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sjöwall, C; Zapf, J; von Löhneysen, S; Magorivska, I; Biermann, M; Janko, C; Winkler, S; Bilyy, R; Schett, G; Herrmann, M; Muñoz, L E

    2015-05-01

    In addition to the redundancy of the receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulins, glycans result in potential ligands for a plethora of lectin receptors found in immune effector cells. Here we analysed the exposure of glycans containing fucosyl residues and the fucosylated tri-mannose N-type core by complexed native IgG in longitudinal serum samples of well-characterized patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Consecutive serum samples of a cohort of 15 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus during periods of increased disease activity and remission were analysed. All patients fulfilled the 1982 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. Sera of 15 sex- and age-matched normal healthy blood donors served as controls. The levels and type of glycosylation of complexed random IgG was measured with lectin enzyme-immunosorbent assays. After specifically gathering IgG complexes from sera, biotinylated lectins Aleuria aurantia lectin and Lens culinaris agglutinin were employed to detect IgG-associated fucosyl residues and the fucosylated tri-mannose N-glycan core, respectively. In sandwich-ELISAs, IgG-associated IgM, IgA, C1q, C3c and C-reactive protein (CRP) were detected as candidates for IgG immune complex constituents. We studied associations of the glycan of complexed IgG and disease activity according to the physician's global assessment of disease activity and the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index 2000 documented at the moment of blood taking. Our results showed significantly higher levels of Aleuria aurantia lectin and Lens culinaris agglutinin binding sites exposed on IgG complexes of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus than on those of normal healthy blood donors. Disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus correlated with higher exposure of Aleuria aurantia lectin-reactive fucosyl residues by immobilized IgG complexes. Top levels of Aleuria aurantia lectin-reactivity were found in samples taken during the

  10. Primary aberrations in focused radially polarized vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, David P.; Brown, T. G.

    2004-02-01

    We study the effect of primary aberrations on the 3-D polarization of the electric field in a focused lowest order radially polarized beam. A full vector diffraction treatment of the focused beams is used. Attention is given to the effects of primary spherical, astigmatic, and comatic aberrations on the local polarization, Strehl ratio, and aberration induced degradation of the longitudinal field at focus

  11. The role of protein N-glycosylation in neural transmission

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Hilary; Panin, Vladislav M

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have explored the function of N-linked glycosylation in the nervous system, demonstrating essential roles of carbohydrate structures in neural development. The function of N-glycans in neural physiology remains less understood; however, increasing evidence indicates that N-glycans can play specific modulatory roles controlling neural transmission and excitability of neural circuits. These roles are mediated via effects on synaptic proteins involved in neurotransmitter release, transporters that regulate nerotransmitter concentrations, neurotransmitter receptors, as well as via regulation of proteins that control excitability and response to milieu stimuli, such as voltage-gated ion channels and transient receptor potential channels, respectively. Sialylated N-glycan structures are among the most potent modulators of cell excitability, exerting prominent effects on voltage gated Na+ and K+ channels. This modulation appears to be underlain by complex molecular mechanisms involving electrostatic effects, as well as interaction modes based on more specific steric effects and interactions with lectins and other molecules. Data also indicate that particular features of N-glycans, such as their location on a protein and structural characteristics, can be specifically associated with the effect of glycosylation. These features and their functional implications can vary between different cell types, which highlight the importance of in vivo analyses of glycan functions. Experimental challenges are associated with the overwhelming complexity of the nervous system and glycosylation pathways in vertebrates, and thus model organisms like Drosophila should help elucidate evolutionarily conserved mechanisms underlying glycan functions. Recent studies supported this notion and shed light on functions of several glycosylation genes involved in the regulation of the nervous system. PMID:24643084

  12. Glycosylation defects: a new mechanism for muscular dystrophy?

    PubMed

    Grewal, Prabhjit K; Hewitt, Jane E

    2003-10-15

    Recently, post-translational modification of proteins has been defined as a new area of focus for muscular dystrophy research by the identification of a group of disease genes that encode known or putative glycosylation enzymes. Walker-Warburg Syndrome (WWS) and muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB) are caused by mutations in two genes involved in O-mannosylation, POMT1 and POMGnT1, respectively. Fukuyama muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is due to mutations in fukutin, a putative phospholigand transferase. Congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C and limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I are allelic, both being due to mutations in the gene-encoding fukutin-related protein (FKRP). Finally, the causative gene in the myodystrophy (myd) mouse is a putative bifunctional glycosyltransferase (Large). WWS, MEB, FCMD and the myd mouse are also associated with neuronal migration abnormalities (often type II lissencephaly) and ocular or retinal defects. A deficiency in post-translational modification of alpha-dystroglycan is a common feature of all these muscular dystrophies and is thought to involve O-glycosylation pathways. This abnormally modified alpha-dystroglycan is deficient in binding to extracellular matrix ligands, including laminin and agrin. Selective deletion of dystroglycan in the central nervous system (CNS) produces brain abnormalities with striking similarities to WWS, MEB, FCMD and the myd mouse. Thus, impaired dystroglycan function is strongly implicated in these diseases. However, it is unlikely that these five glycosylation enzymes only have a role in glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan and it is important that other protein targets are identified. PMID:12925572

  13. Reduced Apolipoprotein Glycosylation in Patients with the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Savinova, Olga V.; Fillaus, Kristi; Jing, Linhong; Harris, William S.; Shearer, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the apolipoprotein composition of the three major lipoprotein classes in patients with metabolic syndrome to healthy controls. Methods Very low density (VLDL), intermediate/low density (IDL/LDL, hereafter LDL), and high density lipoproteins (HDL) fractions were isolated from plasma of 56 metabolic syndrome subjects and from 14 age-sex matched healthy volunteers. The apolipoprotein content of fractions was analyzed by one-dimensional (1D) gel electrophoresis with confirmation by a combination of mass spectrometry and biochemical assays. Results Metabolic syndrome patients differed from healthy controls in the following ways: (1) total plasma - apoA1 was lower, whereas apoB, apoC2, apoC3, and apoE were higher; (2) VLDL - apoB, apoC3, and apoE were increased; (3) LDL - apoC3 was increased, (4) HDL -associated constitutive serum amyloid A protein (SAA4) was reduced (p<0.05 vs. controls for all). In patients with metabolic syndrome, the most extensively glycosylated (di-sialylated) isoform of apoC3 was reduced in VLDL, LDL, and HDL fractions by 17%, 30%, and 25%, respectively (p<0.01 vs. controls for all). Similarly, the glycosylated isoform of apoE was reduced in VLDL, LDL, and HDL fractions by 15%, 26%, and 37% (p<0.01 vs. controls for all). Finally, glycosylated isoform of SAA4 in HDL fraction was 42% lower in patients with metabolic syndrome compared with controls (p<0.001). Conclusions Patients with metabolic syndrome displayed several changes in plasma apolipoprotein composition consistent with hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL cholesterol levels. Reduced glycosylation of apoC3, apoE and SAA4 are novel findings, the pathophysiological consequences of which remain to be determined. PMID:25118169

  14. Facile Diastereoseparation of Glycosyl Sulfoxides by Chiral Stationary Phase.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tohru; Asahata, Mai; Nasu, Akihito; Shichibu, Yukatsu; Konishi, Katsuaki; Monde, Kenji

    2016-07-01

    Separation of the diastereomers of glycosyl sulfoxides differing in the sulfur chirality has been difficult. This article presents a fast and scalable method for their diastereoseparation using a chiral stationary phase. The usefulness of this method was demonstrated in a 500-mg scale separation within 20 min, and in the separation of trisaccharyl sulfoxide diastereomers. Chirality 28:534-539, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27296702

  15. A theoretical estimate for nucleotide sugar demand towards Chinese Hamster Ovary cellular glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Ioscani Jimenez; Polizzi, Karen M.; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation greatly influences the safety and efficacy of many of the highest-selling recombinant therapeutic proteins (rTPs). In order to define optimal cell culture feeding strategies that control rTP glycosylation, it is necessary to know how nucleotide sugars (NSs) are consumed towards host cell and rTP glycosylation. Here, we present a theoretical framework that integrates the reported glycoproteome of CHO cells, the number of N-linked and O-GalNAc glycosylation sites on individual host cell proteins (HCPs), and the carbohydrate content of CHO glycosphingolipids to estimate the demand of NSs towards CHO cell glycosylation. We have identified the most abundant N-linked and O-GalNAc CHO glycoproteins, obtained the weighted frequency of N-linked and O-GalNAc glycosites across the CHO cell proteome, and have derived stoichiometric coefficients for NS consumption towards CHO cell glycosylation. By combining the obtained stoichiometric coefficients with previously reported data for specific growth and productivity of CHO cells, we observe that the demand of NSs towards glycosylation is significant and, thus, is required to better understand the burden of glycosylation on cellular metabolism. The estimated demand of NSs towards CHO cell glycosylation can be used to rationally design feeding strategies that ensure optimal and consistent rTP glycosylation. PMID:27345611

  16. Maf-dependent bacterial flagellin glycosylation occurs before chaperone binding and flagellar T3SS export

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jennifer L; Lowry, Rebecca C; Couto, Narciso A S; Wright, Phillip C; Stafford, Graham P; Shaw, Jonathan G

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial swimming is mediated by rotation of a filament that is assembled via polymerization of flagellin monomers after secretion via a dedicated flagellar Type III secretion system. Several bacteria decorate their flagellin with sialic acid related sugars that is essential for motility. Aeromonas caviae is a model organism for this process as it contains a genetically simple glycosylation system and decorates its flagellin with pseudaminic acid (Pse). The link between flagellin glycosylation and export has yet to be fully determined. We examined the role of glycosylation in the export and assembly process in a strain lacking Maf1, a protein involved in the transfer of Pse onto flagellin at the later stages of the glycosylation pathway. Immunoblotting, established that glycosylation is not required for flagellin export but is essential for filament assembly since non-glycosylated flagellin is still secreted. Maf1 interacts directly with its flagellin substrate in vivo, even in the absence of pseudaminic acid. Flagellin glycosylation in a flagellin chaperone mutant (flaJ) indicated that glycosylation occurs in the cytoplasm before chaperone binding and protein secretion. Preferential chaperone binding to glycosylated flagellin revealed its crucial role, indicating that this system has evolved to favour secretion of the polymerization competent glycosylated form. PMID:24527847

  17. A theoretical estimate for nucleotide sugar demand towards Chinese Hamster Ovary cellular glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Del Val, Ioscani Jimenez; Polizzi, Karen M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation greatly influences the safety and efficacy of many of the highest-selling recombinant therapeutic proteins (rTPs). In order to define optimal cell culture feeding strategies that control rTP glycosylation, it is necessary to know how nucleotide sugars (NSs) are consumed towards host cell and rTP glycosylation. Here, we present a theoretical framework that integrates the reported glycoproteome of CHO cells, the number of N-linked and O-GalNAc glycosylation sites on individual host cell proteins (HCPs), and the carbohydrate content of CHO glycosphingolipids to estimate the demand of NSs towards CHO cell glycosylation. We have identified the most abundant N-linked and O-GalNAc CHO glycoproteins, obtained the weighted frequency of N-linked and O-GalNAc glycosites across the CHO cell proteome, and have derived stoichiometric coefficients for NS consumption towards CHO cell glycosylation. By combining the obtained stoichiometric coefficients with previously reported data for specific growth and productivity of CHO cells, we observe that the demand of NSs towards glycosylation is significant and, thus, is required to better understand the burden of glycosylation on cellular metabolism. The estimated demand of NSs towards CHO cell glycosylation can be used to rationally design feeding strategies that ensure optimal and consistent rTP glycosylation. PMID:27345611

  18. [cAMP cascade in regulation of protein glycosylation].

    PubMed

    Surman, Magdalena; Janik, Marcelina

    2014-01-01

    O- and N-glycosylation are the most common and complex of the post-translational modifications. Both are enzymatic processes and it was suggested that both could be regulated by cAMP cascade at the early stages. N-glycosylation starts with the formation of lipid-linked oligosaccharides and this process is catalysed by crucial glycosyltransferase - dolichol phosphate mannose synthase. The results of several studies strongly suggest that the cAMP acting through a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A-mediated protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle may modulate activation of this enzyme. It was shown that cAMP can also up regulate another enzyme involved in phosphodolichole synthesis - cis-prenyltransferase. The mechanism acting here is the alteration of the rate of its gene expression. cAMP cascade is also involved in regulation of O-glycosylation since phosphorylation of human glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase results in depletion of O-GlcNAc structure formation. These observation suggested an important role of GPCRs and their ligand in regulation of N- and O-glycan synthesis. PMID:26263760

  19. The role of glycosylation in flavonol-induced pollen germination.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L P; Strenge, D; Miller, K D

    1998-01-01

    Flavonols are small (C15) plant-specific molecules that are required for petunia and maize pollen to germinate. They exist in two chemical forms: the aglycone or glycosyl conjugates. Flavonol-deficient pollen is biochemically complemented by flavonol aglycones but not by the glycosylated forms that accumulate in wild type (WT) pollen. Coincident with the biochemical induction of germination, the added flavonol aglycone is rapidly converted to a galactoside and then to a glucosyl galactoside (diglycoside) that is identical to the compound present in WT pollen. A flavonol 3-O-galactosyltransferase (F3GalTase) activity has been identified that controls the formation of glycosylated flavonols in pollen. Importantly, this enzyme also catalyzes the reverse reaction, i.e. the production of the flavonol aglycone from the galactoside and UDP (Fig. 1). F3GalTase/RevGalTase therefore has the potential to control the level of the bioactive flavonol species and as a result, pollen germination. PMID:9781293

  20. Roles for major histocompatibility complex glycosylation in immune function

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Sean O.

    2013-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) glycoprotein family, also referred to as human leukocyte antigens, present endogenous and exogenous antigens to T lymphocytes for recognition and response. These molecules play a central role in enabling the immune system to distinguish self from non-self, which is the basis for protective immunity against pathogenic infections and disease while at the same time representing a serious obstacle for tissue transplantation. All known MHC family members, like the majority of secreted, cell surface, and other immune-related molecules, carry asparagine (N)-linked glycans. The immune system has evolved increasing complexity in higher-order organisms along with a more complex pattern of protein glycosylation, a relationship that may contribute to immune function beyond the early protein quality control events in the endoplasmic reticulum that are commonly known. The broad MHC family maintains peptide sequence motifs for glycosylation at sites that are highly conserved across evolution, suggesting importance, yet functional roles for these glycans remain largely elusive. In this review, we will summarize what is known about MHC glycosylation and provide new insight for additional functional roles for this glycoprotein modification in mediating immune responses. PMID:22461020

  1. Altered glycosylation pattern of proteins in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Guevara, J; Espinosa, B; Zenteno, E; Vázguez, L; Luna, J; Perry, G; Mena, R

    1998-10-01

    Post-translational modifications due to glycosylation of proteins in human brains from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) were analyzed using lectin histochemistry. Results indicate a significant increase in the production of O-glycosylated (containing Galbeta1,3GalNAc alpha1,0 Ser/Thr or GalNAc alpha1,0 Ser/Thr) proteins in neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles which are the major histopathological hallmarks of AD brains. These alterations were determined by positive labelling with lectins obtained from Amaranthus leucocarpus (ALL) and Macrobrachium rosenbergii (MRL) respectively. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the lectin-staining labelled specifically both neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques. In contrast, lectins labelling was restricted to microvessels in normal control brains. These results provide evidence that modifications of the specific glycosylation patterns are closely related with the presence of the hallmark lesions of this disease, suggesting that an abnormal enzymatic processing of proteins may be an early event in the neuronal degeneration which characterises AD. PMID:9786241

  2. Flagellar Glycosylation in Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis▿

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Andrew E.; Twine, Susan M.; Fulton, Kelly M.; Titball, Richard W.; Essex-Lopresti, Angela E.; Atkins, Timothy P.; Prior, Joann L.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylation of proteins is known to impart novel physical properties and biological roles to proteins from both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In this study, gel-based glycoproteomics were used to identify glycoproteins of the potential biothreat agent Burkholderia pseudomallei and the closely related but nonpathogenic B. thailandensis. Top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry (MS) analyses identified that the flagellin proteins of both species were posttranslationally modified by novel glycans. Analysis of proteins from two strains of each species demonstrated that B. pseudomallei flagellin proteins were modified with a glycan with a mass of 291 Da, while B. thailandensis flagellin protein was modified with related glycans with a mass of 300 or 342 Da. Structural characterization of the B. thailandensis carbohydrate moiety suggests that it is an acetylated hexuronic acid. In addition, we have identified through mutagenesis a gene from the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen biosynthetic cluster which is involved in flagellar glycosylation, and inactivation of this gene eliminates flagellar glycosylation and motility in B. pseudomallei. This is the first report to conclusively demonstrate the presence of a carbohydrate covalently linked to a protein in B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis, and it suggests new avenues to explore in order to examine the marked differences in virulence between these two species. PMID:21602339

  3. Hormone induced changes in lactase glycosylation in developing rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit Kaur; Mahmood, Safrun; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2008-11-01

    Lactase exists in both soluble and membrane-bound forms in suckling rat intestine. The distribution of lactase and its glycosylated isoforms in response to thyroxine or cortisone administration has been studied in suckling rats. 75% of lactase activity was detected, associated with brush borders, compared to 24% in the soluble fraction of 8-day-old rats. Thyroxine treatment enhanced soluble lactase activity to 34%, whereas particulate fraction was reduced to 67% compared to controls. Cortisone administration reduced soluble lactase activity from 24% in controls to 12% with a concomitant increase in membrane-bound activity to 89%. Western blot analysis revealed lactase signal, corresponding to 220 kDa in both the soluble and membrane fractions, which corroborated the enzyme activity data. The elution pattern of papain solubilized lactase from agarose-Wheat Germ agglutinin, or Concanavalin A or Jacalin agglutinin columns was different in the suckling and adult rat intestines. Also the elution profile of lactase activity from agarose-lectin columns was modulated in cortisone, thyroxine, and insulin injected pups, which suggests differences in glycosylated isoforms of lactase under these conditions. These findings suggest the role of these hormones in inducing changes in lactase glycosylation during postnatal development of intestine, which may contribute to adult-type hypolactasia in rats. PMID:18712286

  4. Effects of Glycosylation on the Stability of Protein Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    SOLÁ, RICARDO J.; GRIEBENOW, KAI

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades, protein-based therapeutics have substantially expanded the field of molecular pharmacology due to their outstanding potential for the treatment of disease. Unfortunately, protein pharmaceuticals display a series of intrinsic physical and chemical instability problems during their production, purification, storage, and delivery that can adversely impact their final therapeutic efficacies. This has prompted an intense search for generalized strategies to engineer the long-term stability of proteins during their pharmaceutical employment. Due to the well known effect that glycans have in increasing the overall stability of glycoproteins, rational manipulation of the glycosylation parameters through glycoengineering could become a promising approach to improve both the in vitro and in vivo stability of protein pharmaceuticals. The intent of this review is therefore to further the field of protein glycoengineering by increasing the general understanding of the mechanisms by which glycosylation improves the molecular stability of protein pharmaceuticals. This is achieved by presenting a survey of the different instabilities displayed by protein pharmaceuticals, by addressing which of these instabilities can be improved by glycosylation, and by discussing the possible mechanisms by which glycans induce these stabilization effects. PMID:18661536

  5. The Association Between Glycosylation of Immunoglobulin G and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Youxin; Klarić, Lucija; Yu, Xinwei; Thaqi, Kujtim; Dong, Jing; Novokmet, Mislav; Wilson, Jim; Polasek, Ozren; Liu, Youqin; Krištić, Jasminka; Ge, Siqi; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Wu, Lijuan; Zhou, Yong; Ugrina, Ivo; Song, Manshu; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Xiuhua; Zeng, Qiang; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Lauc, Gordan; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract More than half of all known proteins, and almost all membrane and extra-cellular proteins have oligosaccharide structures or glycans attached to them. Defects in glycosylation pathways are directly involved in at least 30 severe human diseases. A multiple center cross-sectional study (China, Croatia, and Scotland) was carried out to investigate the possible association between hypertension and IgG glycosylation. A hydrophilic interaction chromatography of fluorescently labeled glycans was used to analyze N-glycans attached to IgG in plasma samples from a total of 4757 individuals of Chinese Han, Croatian, and Scottish ethnicity. Five glycans (IgG with digalactosylated glycans) significantly differed in participants with prehypertension or hypertension compared to those with normal blood pressure, while additional 17 glycan traits were only significantly differed in participants with hypertension compared to those of normal blood pressure. These glycans were also significant correlated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) or diastolic blood pressure (DBP). The present study demonstrated for the 1st time an association between hypertension and IgG glycome composition. These findings suggest that the individual variation in N-glycosylation of IgG contributes to pathogenesis of hypertension, presumably via its effect on pro- and/or anti-inflammatory pathways. PMID:27124023

  6. Synthesis, characterization and X-ray structure of glycosyl-1,2-isoxazoles and glycosyl-1,2-isoxazolines prepared via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaamoussi, Issam; Fichtali, Ismail; Ben Tama, Abdeslem; El Hadrami, El Mestafa; Armentano, Donatella; De Munno, Giovani; Julve, Miguel; Stiriba, Salah-Eddine

    2013-09-01

    A convenient preparative method of a series of glycosyl-1,2-isoxazoles (6-11) and glycosyl-1,2-isoxazolines (15-20) by a simple and efficient 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of a series of aryl nitrile oxide, generated in situ from aryl oximes (4-5), with a variety of O-propargyl glycosyles (1-3) or O-allyl glycosyles (12-14) respectively, is reported. The carbohydrate-containing 1,2-isoxazoles and 1,2-isoxazolines compounds were isolated in excellent yields (81-91%) and they were fully characterized by 1H, 13C NMR and mass spectrometry. The relative stereochemistry of the glycosyl-1,2-isoxazole 10 was confirmed by single crystal X-ray analysis. The molecular structure of 10 confirms the retention of both, the anomeric stereochemistry of the D-fructose as well as the placement of the acetal groups.

  7. A challenging case due to uncommon aberrancies.

    PubMed

    Waleed, Mohammad; Raza, Ali; Minhaj, Tariq; Houghton, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    A 71-year-old man was referred to a rapid access chest pain clinic by his general practitioner. He presented with a 6-month history of twice weekly central chest pain lasting 2-3 min with walking and exertion, relieved with rest or co-codamol tablets. After initial investigations and a positive myoview scan, he was listed for an elective coronary angiogram. Unfortunately, the procedure was abandoned due to unclear course of the guide wire and a possible aberrant aortic course. Further non-invasive tests were arranged to clarify the anatomy of the vessels. After getting a clear idea of the aberrancies, coronary angiogram was replanned, and the patient underwent successful angiography with angioplasty to one of the coronary arteries, without any complications. PMID:26404545

  8. The correction of electron lens aberrations.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, P W

    2015-09-01

    The progress of electron lens aberration correction from about 1990 onwards is chronicled. Reasonably complete lists of publications on this and related topics are appended. A present for Max Haider and Ondrej Krivanek in the year of their 65th birthdays. By a happy coincidence, this review was completed in the year that both Max Haider and Ondrej Krivanek reached the age of 65. It is a pleasure to dedicate it to the two leading actors in the saga of aberration corrector design and construction. They would both wish to associate their colleagues with such a tribute but it is the names of Haider and Krivanek (not forgetting Joachim Zach) that will remain in the annals of electron optics, next to that of Harald Rose. I am proud to know that both regard me as a friend as well as a colleague. PMID:26025209

  9. Aberrant phenotypes in Kikuchi’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xue-Jing; Zhou, Xiao-Ge; Xie, Jian-Lan; Zheng, Xiao-Dan; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Initial reports emphasized the immunophenotypic similarities between benign and malignant T cell populations, while some previous studies indicating that aberrant T-cell antigen loss is a good marker for detecting malignant T-cell proliferation. Recently, we found a very interesting and thought-provoking phenomenon: In benign disease-28 of 38 (73.7%) cases of Kikuchi’s disease also showed aberrant phenotypes with loss of pan-T cell antigens, which makes the differential diagnosis between Kikuchi’s disease and T cell lymphoma more challenging. In our study, 38 cases of Kikuchi’s disease and 30 cases of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH) were studied by EliVision immunohistochemical staining. As well as TCR gene rearrangement using PCR was negative in 10 tested cases of the Kikuchi’s disease. Among these cases, the most common antigen deficiency was CD5 (22 cases), then CD7 (11 cases), CD2 (8 cases) and CD3 (2 cases). Compared with proliferative and xanthomatous types of Kikuchi’s disease, antigens tended to be lost in necrotizing type. Based on follow-up data, a correlation was not found between the occurrence of aberrant phenotypes and prognosis. In RLH, obvious pan-T cell antigen loss was also not found. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate distinct patterns of antigen loss in Kikuchi’s disease, suggesting that T cell antigen loss is not reliable as an auxiliary diagnostic standard for T cell lymphoma. PMID:25337197

  10. Role of the polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 in ovarian cancer progression: possible implications in abnormal mucin O-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Morin, Chantale; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have identified the polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 (GALNT3) gene as notably hypomethylated in low-malignant potential (LMP) and high-grade (HG) serous epithelial ovarian tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. Here we show that GALNT3 is strongly overexpressed in HG serous EOC tumors as compared to normal ovarian tissue. Moreover, the GALNT3 expression significantly correlated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) intervals in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients with advanced disease. Knockdown of the GALNT3 expression in EOC cells led to sharp decrease of cell proliferation and induced S-phase cell cycle arrest. Additionally, GALNT3 suppression significantly inhibited EOC cell migration and invasion. Gene expression profiling and consecutive network and pathway analyses confirmed these findings, as numerous genes and pathways known previously to be implicated in ovarian tumorigenesis, including EOC tumor invasion and metastasis, were found to be downregulated upon GALNT3 suppression, while some tumor suppressor genes were induced. Moreover, GALNT3 downregulation was associated with reduced MUC1 protein expression in EOC cells, probably related to destabilization of the MUC1 protein due to lack of GALNT3 glycosylation activity. GALNT3 knockdown was also accompanied with increase of the cell adhesion molecules β-catenin and E-cadherin, which are normally suppressed by MUC1 in cancer, thus supporting the role of the GALNT3-MUC1 axis in EOC invasion. Taken together, our data are indicative for a strong oncogenic potential of the GALNT3 gene in advanced EOC and identify this transferase as a novel EOC biomarker and putative EOC therapeutic target. Our findings also suggest that GALNT3 overexpression might contribute to EOC progression through aberrant mucin O-glycosylation PMID:24504219

  11. Toxicological Effects of Nickel Chloride on IgA+ B Cells and sIgA, IgA, IgG, IgM in the Intestinal Mucosal Immunity in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bangyuan; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Huang, Jianying

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the toxicological effects of dietary NiCl2 on IgA+ B cells and the immunoglobulins including sIgA, IgA, IgG and IgM in the small intestine and cecal tonsil of broilers by the methods of immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Two hundred and forty one-day-old avian broilers were randomly divided into four groups and fed on a control diet and three experimental diets supplemented with 300, 600, and 900 mg/kg NiCl2 for 42 days. Compared with the control group, the IgA+ B cell number and the sIgA, IgA, IgG, and IgM contents in the NiCl2-treated groups were significantly decreased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). It was concluded that dietary NiCl2 in the excess of 300 mg/kg had negative effects on the IgA+ B cell number and the abovementioned immunoglobulin contents in the small intestine and the cecal tonsil. NiCl2-reduced sIgA, IgA, IgG and IgM contents is due to decrease in the population and/or the activation of B cell. The results suggest that NiCl2 at high levels has intestinal mucosal humoral immunotoxicity in animals. PMID:25116637

  12. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  13. Chromatic variation of aberration: the role of induced aberrations and raytrace direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, A.; Nobis, T.; Shafer, D.; Gross, H.

    2015-09-01

    The design and optimization process of an optical system contains several first order steps. The definition of the appropriate lens type and the fixation of the raytrace direction are some of them. The latter can be understood as a hidden assumption rather than an aware design step. This is usually followed by the determination of the paraxial lens layout calculated for the primary wavelength. It is obvious, that for this primary wavelength the paraxial calculations are independent of raytrace direction. Today, most of the lens designs are specified not to work only for one wavelength, but in a certain wavelength range. Considering such rays of other wavelengths, one can observe that depending on the direction there will already occur differences in the first order chromatic aberrations and additionally in the chromatic variation of the third-order aberrations. The reason for this effect are induced aberrations emerging from one surface to the following surfaces by perturbed ray heights and ray angles. It can be shown, that the total amount of surface-resolved first order chromatic aberrations and the chromatic variation of the five primary aberrations can be split into an intrinsic part and an induced part. The intrinsic part is independent of the raytrace direction whereas the induced part is not.

  14. 3D resolved mapping of optical aberrations in thick tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jun; Mahou, Pierre; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Débarre, Delphine

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple method for mapping optical aberrations with 3D resolution within thick samples. The method relies on the local measurement of the variation in image quality with externally applied aberrations. We discuss the accuracy of the method as a function of the signal strength and of the aberration amplitude and we derive the achievable resolution for the resulting measurements. We then report on measured 3D aberration maps in human skin biopsies and mouse brain slices. From these data, we analyse the consequences of tissue structure and refractive index distribution on aberrations and imaging depth in normal and cleared tissue samples. The aberration maps allow the estimation of the typical aplanetism region size over which aberrations can be uniformly corrected. This method and data pave the way towards efficient correction strategies for tissue imaging applications. PMID:22876353

  15. Serum and salivary IgA antibody responses to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans in orofacial granulomatosis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Savage, N W; Barnard, K; Shirlaw, P J; Rahman, D; Mistry, M; Escudier, M P; Sanderson, J D; Challacombe, S J

    2004-03-01

    Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is a condition of unknown aetiology with histological and, in some cases, clinical association with Crohn's disease (CD). However, the exact relationship between OFG and CD remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine whether OFG could be distinguished immunologically from CD by comparing non-specific and specific aspects of humoral immunity in serum, whole saliva and parotid saliva in three groups of patients: (a) OFG only (n = 14), (b) those with both oral and gut CD (OFG + CD) (n = 12) and (c) CD without oral involvement (n = 22) and in healthy controls (n = 29). Non-specific immunoglobulin (IgA, SigA, IgA subclasses and IgG) levels and antibodies to whole cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serum, whole saliva and parotid saliva. Serum IgA and IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses were raised in all patient groups (P < 0.01). Salivary IgA (and IgG) levels were raised in OFG and OFG + CD (P < 0.01) but not in the CD group. Parotid IgA was also raised in OFG and OFG + CD but not in CD. The findings suggest that serum IgA changes reflect mucosal inflammation anywhere in the GI tract but that salivary IgA changes reflect involvement of the oral cavity. Furthermore, the elevated levels of IgA in parotid saliva suggest involvement of the salivary glands in OFG. Serum IgA antibodies to S. cerevisiae were raised markedly in the two groups with gut disease while serum IgA (or IgG) antibodies to C. albicans were elevated significantly in all three patient groups (P < 0.02). No differences were found with antibodies to S. mutans. Whole saliva IgA antibodies to S. cerevisiae (and C. albicans) were raised in the groups with oral involvement. These findings suggest that raised serum IgA antibodies to S. cerevisiae may reflect gut inflammation while raised SIgA antibodies to S. cerevisiae or raised IgA or IgA2 levels in saliva reflect oral but

  16. Development of intestinal mucin 2, IgA, and polymeric Ig receptor expressions in broiler chickens and Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Eicher, Susan D; Applegate, Todd J

    2015-02-01

    Intestinal mucin 2 (MUC2), a major gel-forming mucin, represents a primary barrier component of mucus layers and a target site for secretory IgA. Polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR) expressed on the basolateral surface of epithelium is used to transport polymeric IgA from the lamina propria into luminal mucins to establish the first lines of intestinal defense. To determine the spatio-temporal expression of MUC2, IgA, and pIgR in broiler chickens and Pekin ducks, intestinal tissues (n=6/age) were dissected from late embryonic days up to 21 d posthatch. In the intestinal tissues, MUC2 was expressed with a rapid increase at hatching, followed by steady expression through 21 d posthatch both in chickens and ducks. IgA expression was low during the first week following hatching for both species. From the second week posthatch, IgA was rapidly expressed in the chickens, arriving at steady expression in the third week after hatching. However, in ducks, IgA expression during the 2 to 3 wk posthatch period was relatively slow. The expression of pIgR was greatly increased after hatching for both species, but its expression in ducks was relatively delayed. In addition, intestinal pIgR expression was highly correlated with MUC2 and IgA expressions in chickens but just moderately correlated in ducks. The relatively slow and late expression of IgA and pIgR as well as their moderate correlation may or may not account for the susceptibility of ducklings to mucosal pathogens at a young age. PMID:25589081

  17. Vitamin K1-induced localized scleroderma (morphea) with linear deposition of IgA in the basement membrane zone.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Llamazares, J; Ahmed, I

    1998-02-01

    We describe a 45-year-old white man in whom distinctive clinical and histologic features of localized scleroderma developed at sites of injection of vitamin K1 (phytonadione). A direct immunofluorescence test demonstrated prominent linear deposition of IgA along the basement membrane zone. No circulating antibasement membrane zone IgA antibodies were identified on indirect immunofluorescence testing. We believe that the unusual immunofluorescence finding in our patient is nonspecific and represents an epiphenomenon caused by cutaneous injury. PMID:9486707

  18. Specific IgA Enhances the Transcytosis and Excretion of Hepatitis A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Counihan, Natalie A.; Anderson, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) replicates in the liver, and is excreted from the body in feces. However, the mechanisms of HAV transport from hepatocytes to the gastrointestinal tract are poorly understood, mainly due to lack of suitable in vitro models. Here, we use a polarized hepatic cell line and in vivo models to demonstrate vectorial transport of HAV from hepatocytes into bile via the apical cell membrane. Although this transport is specific for HAV, the rate of fecal excretion in inefficient, accounting for less than 1% of input virus from the bloodstream per hour. However, we also found that the rate of HAV excretion was enhanced in the presence of HAV-specific IgA. Using mice lacking the polymeric IgA receptor (pIgR−/−), we show that a proportion of HAV:IgA complexes are transported via the pIgR demonstrating a role for specific antibody in pathogen excretion. PMID:26911447

  19. O-Glycosylation as a Novel Control Mechanism of Peptidoglycan Hydrolase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Rolain, Thomas; Bernard, Elvis; Beaussart, Audrey; Degand, Hervé; Courtin, Pascal; Egge-Jacobsen, Wolfgang; Bron, Peter A.; Morsomme, Pierre; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Hols, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Acm2, the major autolysin of Lactobacillus plantarum, is a tripartite protein. Its catalytic domain is surrounded by an O-glycosylated N-terminal region rich in Ala, Ser, and Thr (AST domain), which is of low complexity and unknown function, and a C-terminal region composed of five SH3b peptidoglycan (PG) binding domains. Here, we investigate the contribution of these two accessory domains and of O-glycosylation to Acm2 functionality. We demonstrate that Acm2 is an N-acetylglucosaminidase and identify the pattern of O-glycosylation (21 mono-N-acetylglucosamines) of its AST domain. The O-glycosylation process is species-specific as Acm2 purified from Lactococcus lactis is not glycosylated. We therefore explored the functional role of O-glycosylation by purifying different truncated versions of Acm2 that were either glycosylated or non-glycosylated. We show that SH3b domains are able to bind PG and are responsible for Acm2 targeting to the septum of dividing cells, whereas the AST domain and its O-glycosylation are not involved in this process. Notably, our data reveal that the lack of O-glycosylation of the AST domain significantly increases Acm2 enzymatic activity, whereas removal of SH3b PG binding domains dramatically reduces this activity. Based on this antagonistic role, we propose a model in which access of the Acm2 catalytic domain to its substrate may be hindered by the AST domain where O-glycosylation changes its conformation and/or mediates interdomain interactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that O-glycosylation is shown to control the activity of a bacterial enzyme. PMID:23760506

  20. A combined method for producing homogeneous glycoproteins with eukaryotic N-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Flavio; Huang, Wei; Li, Cishan; Schulz, Benjamin L.; Lizak, Christian; Palumbo, Alessandro; Numao, Shin; Neri, Dario; Aebi, Markus; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2010-01-01

    We describe a novel method for producing homogeneous eukaryotic N-glycoproteins. The method involves the engineering and functional transfer of the C. jejuni glycosylation machinery in E. coli to express glycosylated proteins with the key GlcNAc-Asn linkage. The bacterial glycans were then trimmed and remodeled in vitro by enzymatic transglycosylation to fulfill a eukaryotic N-glycosylation. It provides a potentially general platform for producing eukaryotic N-glycoproteins. PMID:20190762

  1. Characterization of nephritogenic IgA immune complexes separated by polyethylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, H.; Rifai, A.

    1986-03-05

    The size of IgA immune complexes (IgA-IC) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of experimental IgA nephropathy. The ability of different concentrations (3.5%, 5% and 7% w/v) of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to selectively precipitate IgA-IC with defined size, was examined using convalently cross-linked /sup 125/I-radiolabelled IgA-IC. These complexes were prepared with purified IgA anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) antibodies and bis-DNP-pimelic acid ester. Size analysis of IgA-IC by gradient polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (GPAGE) revealed a composition of 33% large-size (> 2 x 10/sup 6/ mw), 39% intermediate-size (4-20 x 10/sup 5/ mw), and 28% mixture of dimer and monomer IgA. The standard 3.5% PEG precipitated less than 7% of large- and intermediate-size IgA-IC. In contrast, 5% and 7% PEG precipitated 40% and 100% of large-size complexes, respectively. The 7% PEG was also effective in precipitating (40%) of the intermediate-size complexes. The correlation between PEG concentration and size of the precipitated IgA-IC was further confirmed by GPAGE and quantitative autoradiography of resolubilized PEG precipitates of discrete size IgA-IC obtained by gel filtration. They conclude the standard 3.5% PEG is inappropriate for precipitation of IgA-IC and recommend the use of 7% PEG for the detection of intermediate- and large-size IgA-IC.

  2. A comparison of salivary IgA in children with Down syndrome and their family members.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Karthika; Milne, Trudy J; Drummond, Bernadette K; Cullinan, Mary P; Coates, Dawn E

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare total IgA in the whole saliva of children with Down syndrome with levels in sibling and parent groups. IgA measurements were presented as the concentration in saliva (μg/ml) and also adjusted for salivary flow rate (SFR; μg/min). Twenty children with Down syndrome, ten siblings and twenty parents were recruited. Stimulated whole saliva was collected from the participants and SFR calculated. The measurement of salivary IgA (sIgA) was carried out using an indirect competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. The difference in the mean SFR between children with Down syndrome, parents and siblings were not statistically significant. The mean salivary concentration of IgA was higher in children with Down syndrome (95.1μg/ml) compared with siblings (48.3μg/ml; p=0.004). When adjusted for SFR children with Down syndrome had mean sIgA levels of 98.8μg/min and the siblings 48.6μg/min (p=0.008). The children with Down syndrome had sIgA levels similar to those of the parents (92.5μg/ml; 93.2μg/min). There was a positive correlation between age and sIgA concentration in the siblings (p=0.008) but not for children with Down syndrome (p=0.363). This suggests that under similar environmental influences, the levels of sIgA in children with Down syndrome are higher than in the siblings, from a very young age. PMID:27023400

  3. Identification of residues in the CH2/CH3 domain interface of IgA essential for interaction with the human fcalpha receptor (FcalphaR) CD89.

    PubMed

    Pleass, R J; Dunlop, J I; Anderson, C M; Woof, J M

    1999-08-13

    Cellular receptors for IgA (FcalphaR) mediate important protective functions. An extensive panel of site-directed mutant IgAs was used to identify IgA residues critical for FcalphaR (CD89) binding and triggering. Although a tailpiece-deleted IgA1 was able to bind and trigger CD89, antibodies featuring CH3 domain exchanges between human IgA1 and IgG1 could not, indicating that both domains but not the tailpiece are required for FcalphaR recognition. To further investigate the role of the interdomain region, numerous IgA1s, each with a point substitution in either of two interdomain loops (Leu-257-Gly-259 in Calpha2; Pro-440-Phe-443 in Calpha3), were generated. With only one exception (G259R), substitutions produced either ablation (L257R, P440A, A442R, F443R) or marked reduction (P440R) in CD89 binding and triggering. Further support for involvement of these interdomain loops was provided by interspecies comparisons of IgA. Thus a human IgA1 mutant, LA441-442MN, which mimicked the mouse IgA loop sequence through substitution of two adjacent residues in the Calpha3 loop, was found, like mouse IgA, not to bind CD89. In contrast, bovine IgA1, identical to human IgA1 within these interdomain loops despite numerous differences elsewhere in the Fc region, did bind CD89. We have thus identified motifs in the interdomain region of IgA Fc critical for FcalphaR binding and triggering, significantly enhancing present understanding of the molecular basis of the IgA-FcalphaR interaction. PMID:10438530

  4. Serum Immunoglobulin A (IgA) Level Is a Potential Biomarker Indicating Cirrhosis during Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sha; Sun, QinQin; Mao, WeiLin; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Serum immunoglobulins (Igs) are frequently elevated in patients with chronic liver disease, but currently there is a lack of sufficient data on serum Igs in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (CHB) infection. This study aimed to evaluate serum IgA, IgG, and IgM levels in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis and to analyze, if altered, immunoglobulin levels that were associated with cirrhosis progress. Methods. A cohort of 174 CHB patients including 104 with cirrhosis (32 decompensated and 72 compensated) and 70 without cirrhosis and 55 healthy controls were enrolled. Serum immunoglobulin levels and biochemical and virological parameters were determined in the enrollment blood samples. Results. Serum IgA levels were significantly increased in cirrhosis group compared with noncirrhosis group and healthy controls (all P < 0.001). Furthermore, serum IgA concentrations in decompensated cirrhosis patients were significantly higher than that of compensated patients (P = 0.002). Multivariate analysis suggested that serum IgA, platelets, and albumin were independent predictors for cirrhosis (all P < 0.001). Conclusions. Elevated IgA levels may function as an independent factor indicating cirrhosis, and there appears to be a strong association between increasing serum IgA level and disease progressing in patients with chronic HBV infection. PMID:27123003

  5. Salivary IgA from the sublingual compartment as a novel noninvasive proxy for intestinal immune induction.

    PubMed

    Aase, A; Sommerfelt, H; Petersen, L B; Bolstad, M; Cox, R J; Langeland, N; Guttormsen, A B; Steinsland, H; Skrede, S; Brandtzaeg, P

    2016-07-01

    Whole-saliva IgA appears like an attractive noninvasive readout for intestinal immune induction after enteric infection or vaccination, but has failed to show consistent correlation with established invasive markers and IgA in feces or intestinal lavage. For reference, we measured antibodies in samples from 30 healthy volunteers who were orally infected with wild-type enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. The response against these bacteria in serum, lavage, and lymphocyte supernatants (antibody-in-lymphocyte-supernatant, ALS) was compared with that in targeted parotid and sublingual/submandibular secretions. Strong correlation occurred between IgA antibody levels against the challenge bacteria in sublingual/submandibular secretions and in lavage (r=0.69, P<0.0001) and ALS (r=0.70, P<0.0001). In sublingual/submandibular secretions, 93% responded with more than a twofold increase in IgA antibodies against the challenge strain, whereas the corresponding response in parotid secretions was only 67% (P=0.039). With >twofold ALS as a reference, the sensitivity of a >twofold response for IgA in sublingual/submandibular secretion was 96%, whereas it was only 67% in the parotid fluid. To exclude that flow rate variations influenced the results, we used albumin as a marker. Our data suggested that IgA in sublingual/submandibular secretions, rather than whole saliva with its variable content of parotid fluid, is a preferential noninvasive proxy for intestinal immune induction. PMID:26509875

  6. Glycosylation Is a Major Regulator of Phenylpropanoid Availability and Biological Activity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Le Roy, Julien; Huss, Brigitte; Creach, Anne; Hawkins, Simon; Neutelings, Godfrey

    2016-01-01

    The phenylpropanoid pathway in plants is responsible for the biosynthesis of a huge amount of secondary metabolites derived from phenylalanine and tyrosine. Both flavonoids and lignins are synthesized at the end of this very diverse metabolic pathway, as well as many intermediate molecules whose precise biological functions remain largely unknown. The diversity of these molecules can be further increased under the action of UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) leading to the production of glycosylated hydroxycinnamates and related aldehydes, alcohols and esters. Glycosylation can change phenylpropanoid solubility, stability and toxic potential, as well as influencing compartmentalization and biological activity. (De)-glycosylation therefore represents an extremely important regulation point in phenylpropanoid homeostasis. In this article we review recent knowledge on the enzymes involved in regulating phenylpropanoid glycosylation status and availability in different subcellular compartments. We also examine the potential link between monolignol glycosylation and lignification by exploring co-expression of lignin biosynthesis genes and phenolic (de)glycosylation genes. Of the different biological roles linked with their particular chemical properties, phenylpropanoids are often correlated with the plant's stress management strategies that are also regulated by glycosylation. UGTs can for instance influence the resistance of plants during infection by microorganisms and be involved in the mechanisms related to environmental changes. The impact of flavonoid glycosylation on the color of flowers, leaves, seeds and fruits will also be discussed. Altogether this paper underlies the fact that glycosylation and deglycosylation are powerful mechanisms allowing plants to regulate phenylpropanoid localisation, availability and biological activity. PMID:27303427

  7. Engineering the Pattern of Protein Glycosylation Modulates the Thermostability of a GH11 Xylanase*

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Maldonado, Raquel; Vieira, Davi Serradella; Alponti, Juliana Sanchez; Bonneil, Eric; Thibault, Pierre; Ward, Richard John

    2013-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is a common post-translational modification, the effect of which on protein conformational and stability is incompletely understood. Here we have investigated the effects of glycosylation on the thermostability of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A (XynA) expressed in Pichia pastoris. Intact mass analysis of the heterologous wild-type XynA revealed two, three, or four Hex8–16GlcNAc2 modifications involving asparagine residues at positions 20, 25, 141, and 181. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the XynA modified with various combinations of branched Hex9GlcNAc2 at these positions indicated a significant contribution from protein-glycan interactions to the overall energy of the glycoproteins. The effect of glycan content and glycosylation position on protein stability was evaluated by combinatorial mutagenesis of all six potential N-glycosylation sites. The majority of glycosylated enzymes expressed in P. pastoris presented increased thermostability in comparison with their unglycosylated counterparts expressed in Escherichia coli. Steric effects of multiple glycosylation events were apparent, and glycosylation position rather than the number of glycosylation events determined increases in thermostability. The MD simulations also indicated that clustered glycan chains tended to favor less stabilizing glycan-glycan interactions, whereas more dispersed glycosylation patterns favored stabilizing protein-glycan interactions. PMID:23846692

  8. Determination of Glycosylation Sites and Site-specific Heterogeneity in Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    An, Hyun Joo; Froehlich, John W.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. At least 50% of human proteins are glycosylated with some estimates being as high as 70%. Glycoprotein analysis requires determining both the sites of glycosylation as well as the glycan structures associated with each site. Recent advances have led to the development of new analytical methods that employ mass spectrometry extensively making it possible to obtain the glycosylation site and the site microheterogeneity. These tools will be important for the eventual development of glycoproteomics. PMID:19700364

  9. Relationship of the quaternary structure of human secretory IgA to neutralization of influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tadaki; Kawaguchi, Akira; Ainai, Akira; Tamura, Shin-ichi; Ito, Ryo; Multihartina, Pretty; Setiawaty, Vivi; Pangesti, Krisna Nur Andriana; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Secretory IgA (S-IgA) antibodies, the major contributors to humoral mucosal immunity to influenza virus infection, are polymeric Igs present in many external secretions. In the present study, the quaternary structures of human S-IgA induced in nasal mucosa after administration of intranasal inactivated influenza vaccines were characterized in relation to neutralization potency against influenza A viruses. Human nasal IgA antibodies have been shown to contain at least five quaternary structures. Direct and real-time visualization of S-IgA using high-speed atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated that trimeric and tetrameric S-IgA had six and eight antigen-binding sites, respectively, and that these structures exhibited large-scale asynchronous conformational changes while capturing influenza HA antigens in solution. Furthermore, trimeric, tetrameric, and larger polymeric structures, which are minor fractions in human nasal IgA, displayed increased neutralizing potency against influenza A viruses compared with dimeric S-IgA, suggesting that the larger polymeric than dimeric forms of S-IgA play some important roles in protection against influenza A virus infection in the human upper respiratory tract. PMID:26056267

  10. Secretory IgA induces tolerogenic dendritic cells through SIGNR1 dampening autoimmunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Diana, Julien; Moura, Ivan C; Vaugier, Céline; Gestin, Aurélie; Tissandie, Emilie; Beaudoin, Lucie; Corthésy, Blaise; Hocini, Hakim; Lehuen, Agnès; Monteiro, Renato C

    2013-09-01

    IgA plays ambivalent roles in the immune system. The balance between inhibitory and activating responses relies on the multimerization status of IgA and interaction with their cognate receptors. In mucosal sites, secretory IgA (SIgA) protects the host through immune-exclusion mechanisms, but its function in the bloodstream remains unknown. Using bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, we found that both human and mouse SIgA induce tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) following binding to specific ICAM-3 grabbing nonintegrin receptor 1. This interaction was dependent on Ca(2+) and mannose residues. SIgA-primed DCs (SIgA-DCs) are resistant to TLR-dependent maturation. Although SIgA-DCs fail to induce efficient proliferation and Th1 differentiation of naive responder T cells, they generate the expansion of regulatory T cells through IL-10 production. SIgA-DCs are highly potent in inhibiting autoimmune responses in mouse models of type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. This discovery may offer new insights about mucosal-derived DC immunoregulation through SIgA opening new therapeutic approaches to autoimmune diseases. PMID:23926325

  11. Detection of secretory IgM in tears of IgA deficient individuals.

    PubMed

    Kuizenga, A; Stolwijk, T R; van Agtmaal, E J; van Haeringen, N J; Kijlstra, A

    1990-10-01

    Tears from normal (n = 5) and serum IgA deficient (n = 3) individuals were investigated for the presence of secretory Immunoglobulin A (sIgA), sIgM and free secretory component (SC) by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) using 10-15% gradient minigels (PhastSystem), followed by immunoblotting using various immunological probes. Tear samples were treated in denaturing (SDS) sample buffer under non-reducing as well as reducing conditions, prior to analysis. All normal tear samples contained sIgA as well as free SC (estimated MW: 82kD) but only traces of IgM. Tears from the three serum IgA deficient subjects lacked sIgA but did contain free SC. In two of them sIgM was clearly detected and after treatment of tears with reducing agent, IgM (mu) heavy chain fragments (estimated MW: 78kD) were identified and could be distinguished from other tear proteins after SDS-PAGE. These findings indicate lacrimal secretion of free secretory component, even in the absence of its ligand. On the ocular surface, sIgM may play a compensatory role in IgA deficiency. PMID:2125905

  12. Saliva and sera IgA and IgG in Egyptian Giardia-infected children.

    PubMed

    El-Gebaly, Naglaa Saad M; Halawa, Eman Fawzy; Moussa, Hanaa M Ezzat; Rabia, Ibrahim; Abu-Zekry, Maha

    2012-08-01

    Giardiasis is a gastrointestinal infection of wide distribution that is more prevalent in childhood. Easy and rapid diagnosis of giardiasis is essential for reduction of this infection. This cross-sectional study included 62 children in which collection of saliva, stool and serum samples was performed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique was evaluated to detect IgA and IgG responses in both saliva and serum samples. Twenty-two children were positive for Giardia duodenalis infection by direct examination of faecal specimens, 20 non-infected and 20 infected with other parasites. Salivary and serum IgA and IgG responses against G. duodenalis infection were significantly higher in Giardia parasitized than non-Giardia parasitized children (p < 0.001). This concludes that specific salivary IgA may serve as a diagnostic tool and specific salivary IgG as a screening tool in monitoring the exposure of various populations to Giardia duodenalis. The advantage of salivary assays over serum immunoglobulin assay is being easy and non-invasive in sampling technique which is important especially for young children. PMID:22402609

  13. Neuropathies associated with IgG and IgA monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Nobile-Orazio, E; Casellato, C; Di Troia, A

    2002-10-01

    Neuropathy has been frequently reported in patients with monoclonal gammopathy, particularly those with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). While the neuropathy associated with IgM-MGUS is well characterized and is often associated with a reactivity of the monoclonal protein with neural antigens, the relationship between the neuropathy and IgG and IgA MGUS is less clear. We review here the clinical, electrophysiological and pathogenetic features of neuropathies associated with IgG and IgA M-proteins in order to determine whether they represent distinct clinical entities and, most importantly, whether the finding of an IgG or IgA monoclonal gammopathy in a patient with neuropathy should led to different diagnostic or therapeutical approaches. This review will mainly focus on neuropathies associated with MGUS since the disclosure of a malignant monoclonal gammopathy, including multiple or osteosclerotic myeloma, lymphoma or primary amyloidosis, in a patient with neuropathy usually divert the therapeutical decisions to the hematologist for an appropriate therapy of the underlying life threatening condition. PMID:12407307

  14. Production of Functionally Active and Immunogenic Non-Glycosylated Protective Antigen from Bacillus anthracis in Nicotiana benthamiana by Co-Expression with Peptide-N-Glycosidase F (PNGase F) of Flavobacterium meningosepticum

    PubMed Central

    Mamedov, Tarlan; Chichester, Jessica A.; Jones, R. Mark; Ghosh, Ananya; Coffin, Megan V.; Herschbach, Kristina; Prokhnevsky, Alexey I.; Streatfield, Stephen J.; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis has long been considered a potential biological warfare agent, and therefore, there is a need for a safe, low-cost and highly efficient anthrax vaccine with demonstrated long-term stability for mass vaccination in case of an emergency. Many efforts have been made towards developing an anthrax vaccine based on recombinant protective antigen (rPA) of B. anthracis, a key component of the anthrax toxin, produced using different expression systems. Plants represent a promising recombinant protein production platform due to their relatively low cost, rapid scalability and favorable safety profile. Previous studies have shown that full-length rPA produced in Nicotiana benthamiana (pp-PA83) is immunogenic and can provide full protection against lethal spore challenge; however, further improvement in the potency and stability of the vaccine candidate is necessary. PA of B. anthracis is not a glycoprotein in its native host; however, this protein contains potential N-linked glycosylation sites, which can be aberrantly glycosylated during expression in eukaryotic systems including plants. This glycosylation could affect the availability of certain key epitopes either due to masking or misfolding of the protein. Therefore, a non-glycosylated form of pp-PA83 was engineered and produced in N. benthamiana using an in vivo deglycosylation approach based on co-expression of peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) from Flavobacterium meningosepticum. For comparison, versions of pp-PA83 containing point mutations in six potential N-glycosylation sites were also engineered and expressed in N. benthamiana. The in vivo deglycosylated pp-PA83 (pp-dPA83) was shown to have in vitro activity, in contrast to glycosylated pp-PA83, and to induce significantly higher levels of toxin-neutralizing antibody responses in mice compared with glycosylated pp-PA83, in vitro deglycosylated pp-PA83 or the mutated versions of pp-PA83. These results suggest that pp-dPA83 may offer advantages

  15. Production of Functionally Active and Immunogenic Non-Glycosylated Protective Antigen from Bacillus anthracis in Nicotiana benthamiana by Co-Expression with Peptide-N-Glycosidase F (PNGase F) of Flavobacterium meningosepticum.

    PubMed

    Mamedov, Tarlan; Chichester, Jessica A; Jones, R Mark; Ghosh, Ananya; Coffin, Megan V; Herschbach, Kristina; Prokhnevsky, Alexey I; Streatfield, Stephen J; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis has long been considered a potential biological warfare agent, and therefore, there is a need for a safe, low-cost and highly efficient anthrax vaccine with demonstrated long-term stability for mass vaccination in case of an emergency. Many efforts have been made towards developing an anthrax vaccine based on recombinant protective antigen (rPA) of B. anthracis, a key component of the anthrax toxin, produced using different expression systems. Plants represent a promising recombinant protein production platform due to their relatively low cost, rapid scalability and favorable safety profile. Previous studies have shown that full-length rPA produced in Nicotiana benthamiana (pp-PA83) is immunogenic and can provide full protection against lethal spore challenge; however, further improvement in the potency and stability of the vaccine candidate is necessary. PA of B. anthracis is not a glycoprotein in its native host; however, this protein contains potential N-linked glycosylation sites, which can be aberrantly glycosylated during expression in eukaryotic systems including plants. This glycosylation could affect the availability of certain key epitopes either due to masking or misfolding of the protein. Therefore, a non-glycosylated form of pp-PA83 was engineered and produced in N. benthamiana using an in vivo deglycosylation approach based on co-expression of peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) from Flavobacterium meningosepticum. For comparison, versions of pp-PA83 containing point mutations in six potential N-glycosylation sites were also engineered and expressed in N. benthamiana. The in vivo deglycosylated pp-PA83 (pp-dPA83) was shown to have in vitro activity, in contrast to glycosylated pp-PA83, and to induce significantly higher levels of toxin-neutralizing antibody responses in mice compared with glycosylated pp-PA83, in vitro deglycosylated pp-PA83 or the mutated versions of pp-PA83. These results suggest that pp-dPA83 may offer advantages

  16. Detecting independent and recurrent copy number aberrations using interval graphs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsin-Ta; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Raphael, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Somatic copy number aberrations (SCNAs) are frequent in cancer genomes, but many of these are random, passenger events. A common strategy to distinguish functional aberrations from passengers is to identify those aberrations that are recurrent across multiple samples. However, the extensive variability in the length and position of SCNAs makes the problem of identifying recurrent aberrations notoriously difficult. Results: We introduce a combinatorial approach to the problem of identifying independent and recurrent SCNAs, focusing on the key challenging of separating the overlaps in aberrations across individuals into independent events. We derive independent and recurrent SCNAs as maximal cliques in an interval graph constructed from overlaps between aberrations. We efficiently enumerate all such cliques, and derive a dynamic programming algorithm to find an optimal selection of non-overlapping cliques, resulting in a very fast algorithm, which we call RAIG (Recurrent Aberrations from Interval Graphs). We show that RAIG outperforms other methods on simulated data and also performs well on data from three cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). In contrast to existing approaches that employ various heuristics to select independent aberrations, RAIG optimizes a well-defined objective function. We show that this allows RAIG to identify rare aberrations that are likely functional, but are obscured by overlaps with larger passenger aberrations. Availability: http://compbio.cs.brown.edu/software. Contact: braphael@brown.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24931984

  17. Modeling human congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIa in the mouse: conservation of asparagine-linked glycan-dependent functions in mammalian physiology and insights into disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Tan, J; Sutton-Smith, M; Ditto, D; Panico, M; Campbell, R M; Varki, N M; Long, J M; Jaeken, J; Levinson, S R; Wynshaw-Boris, A; Morris, H R; Le, D; Dell, A; Schachter, H; Marth, J D

    2001-12-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are recent additions to the repertoire of inherited human genetic diseases. Frequency of CDGs is unknown since most cases are believed to be misdiagnosed or unrecognized. With few patients identified and heterogeneity in disease signs noted, studies of animal models may provide increased understanding of pathogenic mechanisms. However, features of mammalian glycan biosynthesis and species-specific variations in glycan repertoires have cast doubt on whether animal models of human genetic defects in protein glycosylation will reproduce pathogenic events and disease signs. We have introduced a mutation into the mouse germline that recapitulates the glycan biosynthetic defect responsible for human CDG type IIa (CDG-IIa). Mice lacking the Mgat2 gene were deficient in GlcNAcT-II glycosyltransferase activity and complex N-glycans, resulting in severe gastrointestinal, hematologic, and osteogenic abnormalities. With use of a lectin-based diagnostic screen for CDG-IIa, we found that all Mgat2-null mice died in early postnatal development. However, crossing the Mgat2 mutation into a distinct genetic background resulted in a low frequency of survivors. Mice deficient in complex N-glycans exhibited most CDG-IIa disease signs; however, some signs were unique to the aged mouse or are prognostic in human CDG-IIa. Unexpectedly, analyses of N-glycan structures in Mgat2-null mice revealed a novel oligosaccharide branch on the "bisecting" N-acetylglucosamine. These genetic, biochemical, and physiologic studies indicate conserved functions for N-glycan branches produced in the Golgi apparatus among two mammalian species and suggest possible therapeutic approaches to GlcNAcT-II deficiency. Our findings indicate that human genetic disease due to aberrant protein glycosylation can be modeled in the mouse to gain insights into N-glycan-dependent physiology and the pathogenesis of CDG-IIa. PMID:11805078

  18. Peripheral Aberrations and Image Quality for Contact Lens Correction

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Thibos, Larry N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Contact lenses reduced the degree of hyperopic field curvature present in myopic eyes and rigid contact lenses reduced sphero-cylindrical image blur on the peripheral retina, but their effect on higher order aberrations and overall optical quality of the eye in the peripheral visual field is still unknown. The purpose of our study was to evaluate peripheral wavefront aberrations and image quality across the visual field before and after contact lens correction. Methods A commercial Hartmann-Shack aberrometer was used to measure ocular wavefront errors in 5° steps out to 30° of eccentricity along the horizontal meridian in uncorrected eyes and when the same eyes are corrected with soft or rigid contact lenses. Wavefront aberrations and image quality were determined for the full elliptical pupil encountered in off-axis measurements. Results Ocular higher-order aberrations increase away from fovea in the uncorrected eye. Third-order aberrations are larger and increase faster with eccentricity compared to the other higher-order aberrations. Contact lenses increase all higher-order aberrations except 3rd-order Zernike terms. Nevertheless, a net increase in image quality across the horizontal visual field for objects located at the foveal far point is achieved with rigid lenses, whereas soft contact lenses reduce image quality. Conclusions Second order aberrations limit image quality more than higher-order aberrations in the periphery. Although second-order aberrations are reduced by contact lenses, the resulting gain in image quality is partially offset by increased amounts of higher-order aberrations. To fully realize the benefits of correcting higher-order aberrations in the peripheral field requires improved correction of second-order aberrations as well. PMID:21873925

  19. Chromosomal aberrations in ISS crew members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Christian; Goedecke, Wolfgang; Antonopoulos, Alexandra

    2012-07-01

    High energy radiation is a major risk factor in manned space missions. Astronauts and cosmonauts are exposed to ionising radiations of cosmic and solar origin, while on the Earth's surface people are well protected by the atmosphere and a deflecting magnetic field. There are now data available describing the dose and the quality of ionising radiation on-board of the International Space Station (ISS). Nonetheless, the effect of increased radiation dose on mutation rates of ISS crew members are hard to predict. Therefore, direct measurements of mutation rates are required in order to better estimate the radiation risk for longer duration missions. The analysis of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes is a well established method to measure radiation-induced mutations. We present data of chromosome aberration analyses from lymphocyte metaphase spreads of ISS crew members participating in short term (10-14 days) or long term (around 6 months) missions. From each subject we received two blood samples. The first sample was drawn about 10 days before launch and a second one within 3 days after return from flight. From lymphocyte cultures metaphase plates were prepared on glass slides. Giemsa stained and in situ hybridised metaphases were scored for chromosome changes in pre-flight and post-flight blood samples and the mutation rates were compared. Results obtained in chromosomal studies on long-term flight crew members showed pronounced inter-individual differences in the response to elevated radiation levels. Overall slight but significant elevations of typical radiation induced aberrations, i.e., dicentric chromosomes and reciprocal translocations have been observed. Our data indicate no elevation of mutation rates due to short term stays on-board the ISS.

  20. Optimization of a colorimetric assay for glycosylated human serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Bohney, J.P.; Feldhoff, R.C.

    1986-05-01

    The thiobarbituric acid (TBA) assay has been used for several years to quantitate the amount of glucose which has been non-enzymatically linked to hemoglobin and other proteins. The ketoamine-protein adduct is converted to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) by mild hydrolysis with oxalic acid. Reaction of HMF with TBA yields a colored product which has an absorbance maximum at 443 nm. Several modifications of the original procedure has been published, but none permit the unambiguous quantitation of glycosylated human serum albumin (glc-HSA). Problems relate to reagent preparation and stability, the time and temperature of hydrolysis, the choice of standards, and background color corrections. The authors have found that maximum color yield occurs after hydrolysis in an autoclave for 2 h. This increases the sensitivity 3-fold and cuts the assay time in half relative to hydrolysis for 4.5 h at 100/sup 0/C. A NaBH/sub 4/ reduction of a parallel protein sample must be performed to correct for variable background color associated with different sample sources and amounts. HMF can be used as a standard, however, corrections must be made for HMF degradation. Fructose is a better standard, but HMF formation from fructose is faster than formation from glc-HSA. This may result in an underestimate of percent glycosylation. The best standard appears to be glc-HSA prepared with (/sup 3/H)glucose. It appears that with proper controls and standards the TBA assay can be used to determine actual rather than relative percent glycosylation.

  1. How does mild hypothermia affect monoclonal antibody glycosylation?

    PubMed

    Sou, Si Nga; Sellick, Christopher; Lee, Ken; Mason, Alison; Kyriakopoulos, Sarantos; Polizzi, Karen M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2015-06-01

    The application of mild hypothermic conditions to cell culture is a routine industrial practice used to improve recombinant protein production. However, a thorough understanding of the regulation of dynamic cellular processes at lower temperatures is necessary to enhance bioprocess design and optimization. In this study, we investigated the impact of mild hypothermia on protein glycosylation. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing a monoclonal antibody (mAb) were cultured at 36.5°C and with a temperature shift to 32°C during late exponential/early stationary phase. Experimental results showed higher cell viability with decreased metabolic rates. The specific antibody productivity increased by 25% at 32°C and was accompanied by a reduction in intracellular nucleotide sugar donor (NSD) concentrations and a decreased proportion of the more processed glycan structures on the mAb constant region. To better understand CHO cell metabolism at 32°C, flux balance analysis (FBA) was carried out and constrained with exometabolite data from stationary phase of cultures with or without a temperature shift. Estimated fluxomes suggested reduced fluxes of carbon species towards nucleotide and NSD synthesis and more energy was used for product formation. Expression of the glycosyltransferases that are responsible for N-linked glycan branching and elongation were significantly lower at 32°C. As a result of mild hypothermia, mAb glycosylation was shown to be affected by both NSD availability and glycosyltransferase expression. The combined experimental/FBA approach generated insight as to how product glycosylation can be impacted by changes in culture temperature. Better feeding strategies can be developed based on the understanding of the metabolic flux distribution. PMID:25545631

  2. Accuracy of serum IgM and IgA monoclonal protein measurements by densitometry.

    PubMed

    Tseng, C Howard; Chang, Chin-Yung; Liu, Kevin S; Liu, Frank J

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported that proper dilution of sera that contain IgG monoclonal proteins (M-proteins) is necessary for accurate quantitation of serum albumin and M-protein concentrations separated by serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) using the Beckman PARAGON agarose electrophoresis system. We now report the significance of pre-electrophoretic serum dilution for M-protein quantitation of sera from patients with IgA and IgM monoclonal gammopathy. We measured M-proteins by SPE in 82 serum samples from 29 patients with IgA and 72 samples from 23 patients with IgM monodonal gammopathy. The serum M-protein concentrations (mean +/- SD) at 1:5, 1:10, and 1:20 dilutions (v/v) for all samples of both types were 49.7 +/- 12.9, 49.1 +/- 13.1, and 47.8 +/- 13.0 g/L, respectively. Thirty-two (20.8%) of 154 sera showed varying degrees of increase in M-protein concentrations with serum dilutions higher than 1:5; only 8 (5.2%) showed an increase 3 SDs. By SPE, the M-protein concentration (mean +/- SD) of these 8 sera at 1:5, 1:10, and 1:20 dilutions were 52.6 +/- 7.8, 57.1 +/- 7.2, and 57.6 +/- 7.1 g/L, respectively; the albumin concentrations (mean +/- SD) were 41.4 +/- 4.4, 37.9 +/- 3.8, and 37.1 +/- 2.9 g/L, respectively. The corresponding albumin concentration (mean +/- SD) was 36.8 +/- 3.7 g/L, assayed by the bromcresol green dye-binding method. These 8 samples were obtained from 3 patients, 2 with IgM kappa and 1 with IgA lambda monoclonal gammopathy. On the electrophoresis membranes, the M-protein bands of these 8 samples were narrow, thin, and dense; upon scanning, they appeared taller and thinner than the corresponding albumin bands. The samples of this subset contained relatively high concentrations of M-protein and total serum protein. We conclude that a pre-electrophoretic dilution of 1:5 (v/v) is adequate for most sera with IgA or IgM M-proteins. However, 1:10 or 1:20 dilution is occasionally required for a subset of sera with IgA or IgM M-proteins that show an

  3. Plasma cells in primary melanoma. Prognostic significance and possible role of IgA.

    PubMed

    Bosisio, Francesca M; Wilmott, James S; Volders, Nathalie; Mercier, Marjorie; Wouters, Jasper; Stas, Marguerite; Blokx, Willeke Am; Massi, Daniela; Thompson, John F; Scolyer, Richard A; van Baren, Nicolas; van den Oord, Joost J

    2016-04-01

    Melanoma is not only one of the most immunogenic cancers but also one of the most effective cancers at subverting host immunity. The role of T lymphocytes in tumor immunity has been extensively studied in melanoma, whereas less is known about the importance of B lymphocytes. The effects of plasma cells (PCs), in particular, are still obscure. The aim of this study was to characterize pathological features and clinical outcome of primary cutaneous melanomas associated with PCs. Moreover, we investigated the origins of the melanoma-associated PCs. Finally, we studied the outcome of patients with primary melanomas with PCs. We reviewed 710 melanomas to correlate the presence of PCs with histological prognostic markers. Immunohistochemistry for CD138 and heavy and light chains was performed in primary melanomas (PM) and in loco-regional lymph nodes (LN), both metastatic and not metastatic. In three PM and nine LN with frozen material, VDJ-rearrangement was analyzed by Gene Scan Analysis. Survival analysis was performed on a group of 85 primary melanomas >2 mm in thickness. Forty-one cases (3.7%) showed clusters/sheets of PCs. PC-rich melanomas occurred at an older age and were thicker, more often ulcerated and more mitotically active (P<0.05). PCs were polyclonal and often expressed IgA in addition to IgG. In LN, clusters/sheets of IgA+ PCs were found both in the sinuses and subcapsular areas. Analysis of VDJ-rearrangements showed the IgA to be oligoclonal. Melanomas with clusters/sheets of PCs had a significantly worse survival compared with melanomas without PCs while, interestingly, melanomas with sparse PCs were associated with a better clinical outcome (P=0.002). In conclusion, melanomas with sheets/clusters of PCs are associated with worse prognosis. IgG and IgA are the isotypes predominantly produced by these PCs. IgA oligoclonality suggests an antigen-driven response that facilitates melanoma progression by a hitherto unknown mechanism. PMID:26867783

  4. Transplantation of endothelial progenitor cells in treating rats with IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic options in IgAN are still limited. The aim of this study is to explore the feasibility of using endothelial progenitor cell to treat IgAN in rat model. Methods Rat bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) obtained with density gradient centrifugation were cultured in vitro, and induced into endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). EPCs were identified by surface marker CD34, CD133 and VEGFR2 (FLK-1) and by Dil-Ac-LDL/FITC-UEA-1 double staining. EPCs were labeled with PKH26 prior to transplantation. Rat model of IgAN was established by oral administration of bovine serum albumin together with lipopolysaccharide via the caudal vein and subcutaneous injection of CCL4. Kidney paraffin sections were stained by H&E and PAS. Immunofluorescence was used to assess IgA deposition in the glomeruli. Peritubular capillary (PTC) density was determined by CD31 staining. Monocyte chemoattrant protein-1 (MCP-1), hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and CD105 were also measured by immunohistochemistry, western blotting and real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR. Results The transplanted BM-EPCs were successfully located in IgAN rat kidney. After transplantation, Urinary red blood cell, urine protein, BUN, Scr and IgA serum level were significantly decreased, so were the areas of glomerular extracellular matrix and the IgA deposition in the glomeruli. In addition, PTC density was elevated. And the expression levels of HIF-1α and MCP-1 were significantly down-regulated, while the expression of CD105 was up-regulated. All these changes were not observed in control groups. Conclusion The BM-EPCs transplantation significantly decreases the expansion of glomerular extracellular matrix and the deposition of IgA in the glomeruli; lowers the expression of inflammatory factors; increases PTC density; improves ischemic-induced renal tissue hypoxia, all of which improves the renal function and slows the progress of IgA nephropathy. PMID:25012471

  5. GALNT1-Mediated Glycosylation and Activation of Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Maintains the Self-Renewal and Tumor-Initiating Capacity of Bladder Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chong; Du, Ying; Yang, Zhao; He, Luyun; Wang, Yanying; Hao, Lu; Ding, Mingxia; Yan, Ruping; Wang, Jiansong; Fan, Zusen

    2016-03-01

    The existence of bladder cancer stem cells (BCSC) has been suggested to underlie bladder tumor initiation and recurrence. Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling has been implicated in promoting cancer stem cell (CSC) self-renewal and is activated in bladder cancer, but its impact on BCSC maintenance is unclear. In this study, we generated a mAb (BCMab1) against CD44(+) human bladder cancer cells that recognizes aberrantly glycosylated integrin α3β1. The combination of BCMab1 with an anti-CD44 antibody identified a BCMab1(+)CD44(+) cell subpopulation as BCSCs with stem cell-like properties. Gene expression analysis revealed that the hedgehog pathway was activated in the BCMab1(+)CD44(+) subpopulation and was required for BCSC self-renewal. Furthermore, the glycotransferase GALNT1 was highly expressed in BCMab1(+)CD44(+) cells and correlated with clinicopathologic features of bladder cancers. Mechanistically, GALNT1 mediated O-linked glycosylation of SHH to promote its activation, which was essential for the self-renewal maintenance of BCSCs and bladder tumorigenesis. Finally, intravesical instillation of GALNT1 siRNA and the SHH inhibitor cyclopamine exerted potent antitumor activity against bladder tumor growth. Taken together, our findings identify a BCSC subpopulation in human bladder tumors that appears to be responsive to the inhibition of GALNT1 and SHH signaling, and thus highlight a potential strategy for preventing the rapid recurrence typical in patients with bladder cancer. PMID:26676748

  6. Hexapod kinematics for secondary mirror aberration control .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.

    This work deals with active correction of the aberrations in a telescope by moving the secondary mirror. A special attention is dedicated to the case of a secondary mirror whose motions are controlled by a 6-6 Stewart Platform (generally called by astronomers simply "hexapod", even if this term is more general). The kinematics of the device is studied. The non trivial forward kinematics problem is solved by an iterative algorithm fitting the necessities of an active optics system and fast enough to be used in a closed loop feedback control.

  7. Aberrations in Fresnel Lenses and Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don

    1999-01-01

    The NASA/MSFC Shooting Star program revealed a number of technical problems that must be solved before solar thermal propulsion can become a reality. The fundamental problem of interest here is the collection of solar energy. This is the first step in the propulsion process and indeed the most important. Everything else depends on the efficiency and focusing ability of the collection lens or mirror. An initial model of Fresnel lens behavior using a wave optics approach has been completed and the results were encouraging enough to warrant an experimental investigation. This experimental investigation confirmed some of the effects predicted and produced invaluable photographic evidence of coherence based diffraction and aberration.

  8. Aberrant splicing and drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    de Necochea-Campion, Rosalia; Shouse, Geoffrey P; Zhou, Qi; Mirshahidi, Saied; Chen, Chien-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has unveiled a new window into the heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In particular, recurrent mutations in spliceosome machinery and genome-wide aberrant splicing events have been recognized as a prominent component of this disease. This review will focus on how these factors influence drug resistance through altered splicing of tumor suppressor and oncogenes and dysregulation of the apoptotic signaling network. A better understanding of these factors in disease progression is necessary to design appropriate therapeutic strategies recognizing specific alternatively spliced or mutated oncogenic targets. PMID:27613060

  9. Glycal assembly by the in situ generation of glycosyl dithiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Padungros, Panuwat; Alberch, Laura; Wei, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Glycal assembly offers an expedient entry into β-linked oligosaccharides, but epoxyglycal donors can be capricious in their reactivities. Treatment with Et(2)NH and CS(2) enables their in situ conversion into glycosyl dithiocarbamates, which can be activated by copper triflate for coupling with complex or sterically congested acceptors. The coupling efficiency can be further enhanced by in situ benzoylation, as illustrated in an 11-step synthesis of a branched hexasaccharide from glucals in 28% isolated yield and just four chromatographic purifications. PMID:22686424

  10. Glycosylation-mediated phenylpropanoid partitioning in Populus tremuloides cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Phenylpropanoid-derived phenolic glycosides (PGs) and condensed tannins (CTs) comprise large, multi-purpose non-structural carbon sinks in Populus. A negative correlation between PG and CT concentrations has been observed in several studies. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the relationship is not known. Results Populus cell cultures produce CTs but not PGs under normal conditions. Feeding salicyl alcohol resulted in accumulation of salicins, the simplest PG, in the cells, but not higher-order PGs. Salicin accrual reflected the stimulation of a glycosylation response which altered a number of metabolic activities. We utilized this suspension cell feeding system as a model for analyzing the possible role of glycosylation in regulating the metabolic competition between PG formation, CT synthesis and growth. Cells accumulated salicins in a dose-dependent manner following salicyl alcohol feeding. Higher feeding levels led to a decrease in cellular CT concentrations (at 5 or 10 mM), and a negative effect on cell growth (at 10 mM). The competition between salicin and CT formation was reciprocal, and depended on the metabolic status of the cells. We analyzed gene expression changes between controls and cells fed with 5 mM salicyl alcohol for 48 hr, a time point when salicin accumulation was near maximum and CT synthesis was reduced, with no effect on growth. Several stress-responsive genes were up-regulated, suggestive of a general stress response in the fed cells. Salicyl alcohol feeding also induced expression of genes associated with sucrose catabolism, glycolysis and the Krebs cycle. Transcript levels of phenylalanine ammonia lyase and most of the flavonoid pathway genes were reduced, consistent with down-regulated CT synthesis. Conclusions Exogenous salicyl alcohol was readily glycosylated in Populus cell cultures, a process that altered sugar utilization and phenolic partitioning in the cells. Using this system, we identified candidate genes

  11. Effect of the glycosylation of flavonoids on interaction with protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hui; Wu, Donghui; Wang, Hongxian; Xu, Ming

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, two flavonoid aglycones (baicalein, quercetin) and their glycosides (baicalin, quercitrin) were studied for their ability to bind protein by quenching the protein intrinsic fluorescence. From the spectra obtained, the bimolecular quenching constants, the apparent static binding constants, and binding sites values were calculated. The glycosylation of flavonoids decreases the binding affinity with protein. For quercetin and quercitrin, the binding constants for BSA were 3.65 × 10 7 and 6.47 × 10 3 L mol -1, respectively. For baicalein and baicalin, the binding constants were 4.54 × 10 8 and 1.63 × 10 6 L mol -1, respectively.

  12. Anti-CD20 IgA can protect mice against lymphoma development: evaluation of the direct impact of IgA and cytotoxic effector recruitment on CD20 target cells

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Virginie; Laffleur, Brice; Debin, Arnaud; Cuvillier, Armelle; van Egmond, Marjolein; Drocourt, Daniel; Imbertie, Laurent; Pangault, Céline; Tarte, Karin; Tiraby, Gérard; Cogné, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Background While most antibody-based therapies use IgG because of their well-known biological properties, some functional limitations of these antibodies call for the development of derivatives with other therapeutic functions. Although less abundant than IgG in serum, IgA is the most abundantly produced Ig class in humans. Besides the specific targeting of its dimeric form to mucosal areas, IgA was shown to recruit polymorphonuclear neutrophils against certain targets more efficiently than does IgG1. Design and Methods In this study, we investigated the various pathways by which anti-tumor effects can be mediated by anti-CD20 IgA against lymphoma cells. Results We found that polymeric human IgA was significantly more effective than human IgG1 in mediating direct killing or growth inhibition of target cells in the absence of complement. We also demonstrated that this direct killing was able to indirectly induce the classical pathway of the complement cascade although to a lesser extent than direct recruitment of complement by IgG. Recruitment of the alternative complement pathway by specific IgA was also observed. In addition to activating complement for lysis of lymphoma cell lines or primary cells from patients with lymphoma, we showed that monomeric anti-CD20 IgA can effectively protect mice against tumor development in a passive immunization strategy and we demonstrated that this protective effect may be enhanced in mice expressing the human FcαRI receptor on their neutrophils. Conclusions We show that anti-CD20 IgA antibodies have original therapeutic properties against lymphoma cells, with strong direct effects, ability to recruit neutrophils for cell cytotoxicity and even recruitment of complement, although largely through an indirect way. PMID:22689689

  13. Supplemental β-carotene increases IgA-secreting cells in mammary gland and IgA transfer from milk to neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Sugimoto, Miki; Ikeda, Shuntaro; Kume, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    Mortality of neonates continues to be a major problem in humans and animals. IgA provides protection against microbial antigens at mucosal surfaces. Although β-carotene supplementation has been expected to enhance retinoic acid-mediated immune response in neonates, the exact mechanism by which β-carotene enhances IgA production is still unclear. We investigated the effect of supplemental β-carotene for maternal mice during pregnancy and lactation on IgA antibody-secreting cells (ASC) in mammary gland and guts and on IgA transfer from milk to neonatal mice. Pregnant mice were fed untreated or 50 mg/kg β-carotene-supplemented diets from 6·5 d postcoitus (dpc) to 14 d postpartum (dpp). Supplemental β-carotene increased the numbers of IgA ASC in mammary gland (P < 0·05) and ileum (P < 0·001), and also mRNA expression of IgA C-region in ileum (P < 0·05) of maternal mice at 14 dpp, but few IgA ASC were detected in mammary gland at 17·5 dpc. IgA concentration in stomach contents, which represents milk IgA level, was significantly higher (P < 0·01) in neonatal mice born to β-carotene-supplemented mothers at 7 and 14 dpp, and IgA concentration in serum, stomach contents and faeces increased (P < 0·001) drastically with age. These results suggest that β-carotene supplementation for maternal mice during pregnancy and lactation is useful for enhancing IgA transfer from maternal milk to neonates owing to the increase in IgA ASC in mammary gland and ileum during lactation. PMID:20727240

  14. Lymphocyte chromosomal aberration assay in radiation biodosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Agrawala, Paban K.; Adhikari, J. S.; Chaudhury, N. K.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiations, whether medical, occupational or accidental, leads to deleterious biological consequences like mortality or carcinogenesis. It is considered that no dose of ionizing radiation exposure is safe. However, once the accurate absorbed dose is estimated, one can be given appropriate medical care and the severe consequences can be minimized. Though several accurate physical dose estimation modalities exist, it is essential to estimate the absorbed dose in biological system taking into account the individual variation in radiation response, so as to plan suitable medical care. Over the last several decades, lots of efforts have been taken to design a rapid and easy biological dosimeter requiring minimum invasive procedures. The metaphase chromosomal aberration assay in human lymphocytes, though is labor intensive and requires skilled individuals, still remains the gold standard for radiation biodosimetry. The current review aims at discussing the human lymphocyte metaphase chromosomal aberration assay and recent developments involving the application of molecular cytogenetic approaches and other technological advancements to make the assay more authentic and simple to use even in the events of mass radiation casualties. PMID:21829315

  15. Memory aberrations, transliminality, and delusional ideation.

    PubMed

    Dagnall, Neil; Munley, Gary; Parker, Andrew

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated the relationships between cognitive-perceptual personality dimensions (transliminality and delusional ideation) and self-report measures of memory error (Oblivion Scale and the Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire). 100 full- and part-time psychology undergraduate students completed the measures (18 men and 82 women; M = 19.3 yr., SD = 4.4). A positive correlation was found between transliminality and reported memory aberrations (Oblivion Scale scores) and also between transliminality and Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire scores. Correlations were positive between Peters, et al. Delusions Inventory and the self-report memory measures. Transliminality and Peters, et al. Delusions Inventory scores predicted the number of memory aberrations or slips reported on the Oblivion Scale and Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire. To explore whether transliminality explained additional variance to that accounted for by the Peters, et al. Delusions Inventory, forward regression was applied and showed aspects of transliminality not accounted for by Peters, et al. Delusions Inventory did not explain additional variance within the self-report memory measures. PMID:18459357

  16. Eye aberration analysis with Zernike polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molebny, Vasyl V.; Chyzh, Igor H.; Sokurenko, Vyacheslav M.; Pallikaris, Ioannis G.; Naoumidis, Leonidas P.

    1998-06-01

    New horizons for accurate photorefractive sight correction, afforded by novel flying spot technologies, require adequate measurements of photorefractive properties of an eye. Proposed techniques of eye refraction mapping present results of measurements for finite number of points of eye aperture, requiring to approximate these data by 3D surface. A technique of wave front approximation with Zernike polynomials is described, using optimization of the number of polynomial coefficients. Criterion of optimization is the nearest proximity of the resulted continuous surface to the values calculated for given discrete points. Methodology includes statistical evaluation of minimal root mean square deviation (RMSD) of transverse aberrations, in particular, varying consecutively the values of maximal coefficient indices of Zernike polynomials, recalculating the coefficients, and computing the value of RMSD. Optimization is finished at minimal value of RMSD. Formulas are given for computing ametropia, size of the spot of light on retina, caused by spherical aberration, coma, and astigmatism. Results are illustrated by experimental data, that could be of interest for other applications, where detailed evaluation of eye parameters is needed.

  17. Effects of optical aberration on chromotomographic reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervo, Ryan; Hawks, Michael; Perram, Glen; Fickus, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    Chromotomography is a form of hyperspectral imaging that utilizes a spinning diffractive element to resolve a rapidly evolving scene. The system captures both spatial dimensions and the spectral dimension at the same time. Advanced algorithms take the recorded dispersed images and use them to construct the data cube in which each reconstructed image is the recorded scene at a specific wavelength. A simulation tool has been developed which uses Zemax to accurately trace rays through real or proposed optical systems. The simulation is used here to explore the limitations of tomographic reconstruction in both idealized and aberrated imaging systems. Results of the study show the accuracy of reconstructed images depends upon the content of the original target scene, the number of projections measured, and the angle through which the prism is rotated. For cases studied here, 20 projections are sufficient to achieve image quality 99.5±1% of the max value. Reconstructed image quality degrades with aberrations, but no worse than equivalent conventional imagers.

  18. Relationships between chromosome structure and chromosomal aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, Yuri; Andreev, Sergey

    An interphase nucleus of human lymphocyte was simulated by the novel Monte Carlo tech-nique. The main features of interphase chromosome structure and packaging were taken into account: different levels of chromatin organisation; nonrandom localisation of chromosomes within a nucleus; chromosome loci dynamics. All chromosomes in a nucleus were modelled as polymer globules. A dynamic pattern of intra/interchromosomal contacts was simulated. The detailed information about chromosomal contacts, such as distribution of intrachromoso-mal contacts over the length of each chromosome and dependence of contact probability on genomic separation between chromosome loci, were calculated and compared to the new exper-imental data obtained by the Hi-C technique. Types and frequencies of simple and complex radiation-induced chromosomal exchange aberrations (CA) induced by X-rays were predicted with taking formation and decay of chromosomal contacts into account. Distance dependence of exchange formation probability was calculated directly. mFISH data for human lymphocytes were analysed. The calculated frequencies of simple CA agreed with the experimental data. Complex CA were underestimated despite the dense packaging of chromosome territories within a nucleus. Possible influence of chromosome-nucleus structural organisation on the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations is discussed.

  19. Correcting Aberrations in Complex Magnet Systems for Muon Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

    2011-03-01

    Designing and simulating complex magnet systems needed for cooling channels in both neutrino factories and muon colliders requires innovative techniques to correct for both chromatic and spherical aberrations. Optimizing complex systems, such as helical magnets for example, is also difficult but essential. By using COSY INFINITY, a differential algebra based code, the transfer and aberration maps can be examined to discover what critical terms have the greatest influence on these aberrations.

  20. Aberrations caused by mechanical misalignments in electrostatic quadrupole lens systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranova, L. A.; Read, F. H.

    Image aberrations resulting from small misalignments in quadrupole lenses multiplets have been analysed. Analytical formulas for the coefficients of the beam displacement, astigmatism and coma associated with misalignments in a general quadrupole lens system have been derived. Numerical computations of systems of three and four quadrupole lenses have also been carried out. The aberration figures obtained for systems with and without a mechanical defect are compared. The aberration coefficients that have been obtained can be used for estimating tolerance limits for lens misalignments.

  1. Similarity of fine specificity of IgA anti-gliadin antibodies between patients with celiac disease and humanized α1KI mice.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Daniel; Champier, Gaël; Cuvillier, Armelle; Cogné, Michel; Pekáriková, Aneta; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena; Hoffmanová, Iva; Drastich, Pavel; Mothes, Thomas; Tučková, Ludmila

    2011-04-13

    Gliadins, and primarily α-gliadins containing several sequences such as aa 31-49, aa 56-88 (33-mer), aa 57-68, and aa 69-82, are critical in the induction of immune response or toxic reaction leading to the development of celiac disease (CLD). The role of IgA anti-gliadin antibodies (IgA AGA) is unknown. To this end, we prepared several humanized monoclonal IgA AGA using transgenic α1KI mice. Employing Pepscan with overlapping decapeptides of α-gliadin we observed a robust similarity between the specificity of humanized mouse monoclonal IgA AGA and IgA AGA from patients with florid CLD. The common immunodominant region included several sequential epitopes localized in the N-terminal part of α-gliadin (QFQGQQQPFPPQQPYPQPQPFP, aa 29-50, and QPFPSQQPYLQL, aa 47-58). Notably, IgA AGA produced by clones 8D12, 15B9, 9D12, and 18E2 had significant reactivity against sequences localized in the 33-mer, LQLQPFPQPQ (aa 56-65) and PQLPYPQPQPFL (aa 69-80). Humanized mouse monoclonal IgA AGA that have a known specificity are suitable as standard in ELISAs to detect serum IgA AGA of CLD patients and for studying the AGA pathogenic role in CLD, especially for analyzing the translocation of complex of specific IgA antibodies and individual gliadin peptides through enterocyte barrier. PMID:21366336

  2. Glycosylation of resveratrol protects it from enzymic oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Regev-Shoshani, Gilly; Shoseyov, Oded; Bilkis, Itzhak; Kerem, Zohar

    2003-01-01

    Plant polyphenols, including dietary polyphenols such as resveratrol, are important components in the plant antioxidant and defence systems. They are also known to exert beneficial effects on human health through diet. As they are produced, these polyphenols may be subjected to deleterious enzymic oxidation by the plant polyphenol oxidases. They are generally synthesized as glycosides like 5,4'-dihydroxystilbene-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, the 3-glucoside of resveratrol. The effects of the glycosylation and methylation of the parent resveratrol on its enzymic oxidation were studied. Methyl and glucosyl derivatives were synthesized using simple one-step methodologies. The kinetics of their enzymic oxidation by tyrosinases were defined. Substitution at the p-hydroxy group, by either glucose or methyl, abolished enzymic oxidation by both mushroom and grape tyrosinases. Substitution at the m-hydroxy group with methyl had a small effect, but substitution with glucose resulted in a much lower affinity of the enzymes for the glycoside. We suggest that glycosylation of polyphenols in nature helps to protect these vital molecules from enzymic oxidation, extending their half-life in the cell and maintaining their beneficial antioxidant capacity and biological properties. PMID:12697026

  3. Glycosylation differences between the normal and pathogenic prion protein isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Pauline M.; Endo, Tama; Colominas, Cristina; Groth, Darlene; Wheeler, Susan F.; Harvey, David J.; Wormald, Mark R.; Serban, Hana; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Kobata, Akira; Dwek, Raymond A.

    1999-01-01

    Prion protein consists of an ensemble of glycosylated variants or glycoforms. The enzymes that direct oligosaccharide processing, and hence control the glycan profile for any given glycoprotein, are often exquisitely sensitive to other events taking place within the cell in which the glycoprotein is expressed. Alterations in the populations of sugars attached to proteins can reflect changes caused, for example, by developmental processes or by disease. Here we report that normal (PrPC) and pathogenic (PrPSc) prion proteins (PrP) from Syrian hamsters contain the same set of at least 52 bi-, tri-, and tetraantennary N-linked oligosaccharides, although the relative proportions of individual glycans differ. This conservation of structure suggests that the conversion of PrPC into PrPSc is not confined to a subset of PrPs that contain specific sugars. Compared with PrPC, PrPSc contains decreased levels of glycans with bisecting GlcNAc residues and increased levels of tri- and tetraantennary sugars. This change is consistent with a decrease in the activity of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnTIII) toward PrPC in cells where PrPSc is formed and argues that, in at least some cells forming PrPSc, the glycosylation machinery has been perturbed. The reduction in GnTIII activity is intriguing both with respect to the pathogenesis of the prion disease and the replication pathway for prions. PMID:10557270

  4. The C-Glycosylation of Flavonoids in Cereals*♦

    PubMed Central

    Brazier-Hicks, Melissa; Evans, Kathryn M.; Gershater, Markus C.; Puschmann, Horst; Steel, Patrick G.; Edwards, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoids normally accumulate in plants as O-glycosylated derivatives, but several species, including major cereal crops, predominantly synthesize flavone-C-glycosides, which are stable to hydrolysis and are biologically active both in planta and as dietary components. An enzyme (OsCGT) catalyzing the UDP-glucose-dependent C-glucosylation of 2-hydroxyflavanone precursors of flavonoids has been identified and cloned from rice (Oryza sativa ssp. indica), with a similar protein characterized in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). OsCGT is a 49-kDa family 1 glycosyltransferase related to known O-glucosyltransferases. The recombinant enzyme C-glucosylated 2-hydroxyflavanones but had negligible O-glucosyltransferase activity with flavonoid acceptors. Enzyme chemistry studies suggested that OsCGT preferentially C-glucosylated the dibenzoylmethane tautomers formed in equilibrium with 2-hydroxyflavanones. The resulting 2-hydroxyflavanone-C-glucosides were unstable and spontaneously dehydrated in vitro to yield a mixture of 6C- and 8C-glucosyl derivatives of the respective flavones. In contrast, in planta, only the respective 6C-glucosides accumulated. Consistent with this selectivity in glycosylation product, a dehydratase activity that preferentially converted 2-hydroxyflavanone-C-glucosides to the corresponding flavone-6C-glucosides was identified in both rice and wheat. Our results demonstrate that cereal crops synthesize C-glucosylated flavones through the concerted action of a CGT and dehydratase acting on activated 2-hydroxyflavanones, as an alternative means of generating flavonoid metabolites. PMID:19411659

  5. RNA-Seq analysis of glycosylation related gene expression in STZ-induced diabetic rat kidney

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The UT-A1 urea transporter is crucial to the kidney’s ability to generate the concentrated urine. Native UT-A1 from kidney inner medulla (IM) is a heavily glycosylated protein with two glycosylation forms of 97 and 117 kDa. In diabetes, protein abundance, particularly the 117 kD isoform, is si...

  6. Phosphomannose Isomerase Inhibitors Improve N-Glycosylation in Selected Phosphomannomutase-deficient Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vandana; Ichikawa, Mie; He, Ping; Bravo, Yalda; Dahl, Russell; Ng, Bobby G.; Cosford, Nicholas D. P.; Freeze, Hudson H.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are rare genetic disorders due to impaired glycosylation. The patients with subtypes CDG-Ia and CDG-Ib have mutations in the genes encoding phosphomannomutase 2 (PMM2) and phosphomannose isomerase (MPI or PMI), respectively. PMM2 (mannose 6-phosphate → mannose 1-phosphate) and MPI (mannose 6-phosphate ⇔ fructose 6-phosphate) deficiencies reduce the metabolic flux of mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) into glycosylation, resulting in unoccupied N-glycosylation sites. Both PMM2 and MPI compete for the same substrate, Man-6-P. Daily mannose doses reverse most of the symptoms of MPI-deficient CDG-Ib patients. However, CDG-Ia patients do not benefit from mannose supplementation because >95% Man-6-P is catabolized by MPI. We hypothesized that inhibiting MPI enzymatic activity would provide more Man-6-P for glycosylation and possibly benefit CDG-Ia patients with residual PMM2 activity. Here we show that MLS0315771, a potent MPI inhibitor from the benzoisothiazolone series, diverts Man-6-P toward glycosylation in various cell lines including fibroblasts from CDG-Ia patients and improves N-glycosylation. Finally, we show that MLS0315771 increases mannose metabolic flux toward glycosylation in zebrafish embryos. PMID:21949237

  7. Comprehensive identification of novel proteins and N-glycosylation sites in royal jelly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Royal jelly (RJ) is a proteinaceous secretion produced from the hypopharyngeal and mandibular glands of nurse bees. It plays vital roles in honeybee biology and in the improvement of human health. However, some proteins remain unknown in RJ, and mapping N-glycosylation modification sites on RJ proteins demands further investigation. We used two different liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry techniques, complementary N-glycopeptide enrichment strategies, and bioinformatic approaches to gain a better understanding of novel and glycosylated proteins in RJ. Results A total of 25 N-glycosylated proteins, carrying 53 N-glycosylation sites, were identified in RJ proteins, of which 42 N-linked glycosylation sites were mapped as novel on RJ proteins. Most of the glycosylated proteins were related to metabolic activities and health improvement. The 13 newly identified proteins were also mainly associated with metabolic processes and health improvement activities. Conclusion Our in-depth, large-scale mapping of novel glycosylation sites represents a crucial step toward systematically revealing the functionality of N-glycosylated RJ proteins, and is potentially useful for producing a protein with desirable pharmacokinetic and biological activity using a genetic engineering approach. The newly-identified proteins significantly extend the proteome coverage of RJ. These findings contribute vital and new knowledge to our understanding of the innate biochemical nature of RJ at both the proteome and glycoproteome levels. PMID:24529077

  8. Automated measurement of site-specific N-glycosylation occupancy with SWATH-MS.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2015-07-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of proteins catalyzed by oligosaccharyltransferase that is important in regulating many aspects of protein function. Analysis of protein glycosylation, including glycoproteomic measurement of the site-specific extent of glycosylation, remains challenging. Here, we developed methods combining enzymatic deglycosylation and protease digestion with SWATH-MS to enable automated measurement of site-specific occupancy at many glycosylation sites. Deglycosylation with peptide-endoglycosidase H, leaving a remnant N-acetylglucosamine on asparagines previously carrying high-mannose glycans, followed by trypsin digestion allowed robust automated measurement of occupancy at many sites. Combining deglycosylation with the more general peptide-N-glycosidase F enzyme with AspN protease digest allowed robust automated differentiation of nonglycosylated and deglycosylated forms of a given glycosylation site. Ratiometric analysis of deglycosylated peptides and the total intensities of all peptides from the corresponding proteins allowed relative quantification of site-specific glycosylation occupancy between yeast strains with various isoforms of oligosaccharyltransferase. This approach also allowed robust measurement of glycosylation sites in human salivary glycoproteins. This method for automated relative quantification of site-specific glycosylation occupancy will be a useful tool for research with model systems and clinical samples. PMID:25737293

  9. Biosynthesis of Conjugate Vaccines Using an O-Linked Glycosylation System

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chao; Sun, Peng; Liu, Bo; Liang, Haoyu; Peng, Zhehui; Dong, Yan; Wang, Dongshu; Liu, Xiankai; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Conjugate vaccines are known to be one of the most effective and safest types of vaccines against bacterial pathogens. Previously, vaccine biosynthesis has been performed by using N-linked glycosylation systems. However, the structural specificity of these systems for sugar substrates has hindered their application. Here, we report a novel protein glycosylation system (O-linked glycosylation via Neisseria meningitidis) that can transfer virtually any glycan to produce a conjugate vaccine. We successfully established this system in Shigella spp., avoiding the construction of an expression vector for polysaccharide synthesis. We further found that different protein substrates can be glycosylated using this system and that the O-linked glycosylation system can also effectively function in other Gram-negative bacteria, including some strains whose polysaccharide structure was not suitable for conjugation using the N-linked glycosylation system. The results from a series of animal experiments show that the conjugate vaccine produced by this O-linked glycosylation system offered a potentially protective antibody response. Furthermore, we elucidated and optimized the recognition motif, named MOOR, for the O-glycosyltransferase PglL. Finally, we demonstrated that the fusion of other peptides recognized by major histocompatibility complex class II around MOOR had no adverse effects on substrate glycosylation, suggesting that this optimized system will be useful for future vaccine development. Our results expand the glycoengineering toolbox and provide a simpler and more robust strategy for producing bioconjugate vaccines against a variety of pathogens. PMID:27118590

  10. RFT1-congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG) syndrome: a cause of early-onset severe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Aeby, Alec; Prigogine, Cynthia; Vilain, Catheline; Malfilatre, Geneviève; Jaeken, Jaak; Lederer, Damien; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    RFT1-congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG) syndrome, a recessive N-glycosylation disorder caused by mutation in the RFT1 gene, is a very rare subtype of CDG syndrome associated with deafness, developmental delay, and non-specific epilepsy. The aim of this report is to describe the electroclinical presentation of epilepsy associated with this condition. [Published with video sequences online]. PMID:26892341

  11. Effects of glycosylation on antigenicity and immunogenicity of classical swine fever virus envelope proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) harbors three envelope glycoproteins (E(rns), E1 and E2). Previous studies have demonstrated that removal of specific glycosylation sites within these proteins yielded attenuated and immunogenic CSFV mutants. Here we analyzed the effects of lack of glycosylation of...

  12. Comparison of Aberrations After Standard and Customized Refractive Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.; He, X.; Wang, Y.

    2013-09-01

    To detect possible differences in residual wavefront aberrations between standard and customized laser refractive surgery based onmathematical modeling, the residual optical aberrations after conventional and customized laser refractive surgery were compared accordingto the ablation profile with transition zone. The results indicated that ablation profile has a significant impact on the residual aberrations.The amount of residual aberrations for conventional correction is higher than that for customized correction. Additionally, the residualaberrations for high myopia eyes are markedly larger than those for moderate myopia eyes. For a 5 mm pupil, the main residual aberrationterm is coma and yet it is spherical aberration for a 7 mm pupil. When the pupil diameter is the same as optical zone or greater, themagnitudes of residual aberrations is obviously larger than that for a smaller pupil. In addition, the magnitudes of the residual fifth orsixth order aberrations are relatively large, especially secondary coma in a 6 mm pupil and secondary spherical aberration in a 7 mm pupil.Therefore, the customized ablation profile may be superior to the conventional correction even though the transition zone and treatmentdecentration are taken into account. However, the customized ablation profile will still induce significant amount of residual aberrations.

  13. Enhancing activity of N-glycosylation for constitutive proteins secretions in non-polarized cells

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Nobutake; Ohno, Yuji; Fukuda, Takahiro; Manome, Yosinobu; Saito, Saburo

    2009-04-17

    Several fusion proteins of mouse Interleukins (mILs) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were expressed in fibroblast and epithelial cells. Among these proteins, the mIL-31 derivative was the most efficiently secreted into the medium in a N-glycosylation-dependent manner. From the analysis of deletion mutants, the minimal structure for constitutive secretions consisted of a signal peptide and N-glycosylation. Introduction of the signal sequence from mIL-31 to human p53 protein failed to secrete the products, but further addition of the N-glycosylation site resulted in constitutive secretion of biologically active p53 protein into the medium in the N-glycosylated form. In this report, we showed the importance of N-glycosylation for constitutive protein secretions, especially using non-polarized cells.

  14. The effect of glycosylation on cytotoxicity of Ibaraki virus nonstructural protein NS3

    PubMed Central

    URATA, Maho; WATANABE, Rie; IWATA, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of Ibaraki virus nonstructural protein NS3 was confirmed, and the contribution of glycosylation to this activity was examined by using glycosylation mutants of NS3 generated by site-directed mutagenesis. The expression of NS3 resulted in leakage of lactate dehydrogenase to the culture supernatant, suggesting the cytotoxicity of this protein. The lack of glycosylation impaired the transport of NS3 to the plasma membrane and resulted in reduced cytotoxicity. Combined with the previous observation that NS3 glycosylation was specifically observed in mammalian cells (Urata et al., Virus Research 2014), it was suggested that the alteration of NS3 cytotoxicity through modulating glycosylation is one of the strategies to achieve host specific pathogenisity of Ibaraki virus between mammals and vector arthropods. PMID:26178820

  15. Rapid Assays for Lectin Toxicity and Binding Changes that Reflect Altered Glycosylation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Pamela; Sundaram, Subha

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation engineering is used to generate glycoproteins, glycolipids or proteoglycans with a more defined complement of glycans on their glycoconjugates. For example, a mammalian cell glycosylation mutant lacking a specific glycosyltransferase generates glycoproteins, and/or glycolipids, and/or proteoglycans, with truncated glycans missing the sugar transferred by that glycosyltransferase, and also missing those sugars that would be added subsequently. In some cases, an alternative glycosyltransferase may then use the truncated glycans as acceptors, thereby generating a new or different glycan subset in the mutant cell. Another type of glycosylation mutant arises from gain-of-function mutations that, for example, activate a silent glycosyltransferase gene. In this case, glycoconjugates will have glycans with additional sugar(s) that are more elaborate than the glycans of wild type cells. Mutations in other genes that affect glycosylation, such as nucleotide sugar synthases or transporters, will alter the glycan complement in more general ways that usually affect several types of glycoconjugates. There are now many strategies for generating a precise mutation in a glycosylation gene in a mammalian cell. Large-volume cultures of mammalian cells may also give rise to spontaneous mutants in glycosylation pathways. This article will focus on how to rapidly characterize mammalian cells with an altered glycosylation activity. The key reagents for the protocols described are plant lectins that bind mammalian glycans with varying avidities, depending on the specific structure of those glycans. Cells with altered glycosylation generally become resistant or hypersensitive to lectin toxicity, and have reduced or increased lectin or antibody binding. Here we describe rapid assays to compare the cytotoxicity of lectins in a lectin resistance test, and the binding of lectins or antibodies by flow cytometry in a glycan-binding assay. Based on these tests, glycosylation changes

  16. In silico designing of hyper-glycosylated analogs for the human coagulation factor IX.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Fahimeh; Zomorodipour, Alireza; Karkhane, Ali Asghar; Khorramizadeh, M Reza

    2016-07-01

    N-glycosylation is a process during which a glycan moiety attaches to the asparagine residue in the N-glycosylation consensus sequence (Asn-Xxx-Ser/Thr), where Xxx can be any amino acid except proline. Introduction of a new N-glycosylation site into a protein backbone leads to its hyper-glycosylation, and may improve the protein properties such as solubility, folding, stability, and secretion. Glyco-engineering is an approach to facilitate the hyper-glycosylation of recombinant proteins by application of the site-directed mutagenesis methods. In this regard, selection of a suitable location on the surface of a protein for introduction of a new N-glycosylation site is a main concern. In this work, a computational approach was conducted to select suitable location(s) for introducing new N-glycosylation sites into the human coagulation factor IX (hFIX). With this aim, the first 45 residues of mature hFIX were explored to find out suitable positions for introducing either Asn or Ser/Thr residues, to create new N-glycosylation site(s). Our exploration lead to detection of five potential positions, for hyper-glycosylation. For each suggested position, an analog was defined and subjected for N-glycosylation efficiency prediction. After generation of three-dimensional structures, by homology-based modeling, the five designed analogs were examined by molecular dynamic (MD) simulations, to predict their stability levels and probable structural distortions caused by amino acid substitutions, relative to the native counterpart. Three out of five suggested analogs, namely; E15T, K22N, and R37N, reached equilibration state with relatively constant Root Mean Square Deviation values. Additional analysis on the data obtained during MD simulations, lead us to conclude that, R37N is the only qualified analog with the most similar structure and dynamic behavior to that of the native counterpart, to be considered for further experimental investigations. PMID:27356208

  17. Site-Specific N-Glycosylation of Recombinant Pentameric and Hexameric Human IgM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moh, Edward S. X.; Lin, Chi-Hung; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2016-04-01

    Glycosylation is known to play an important role in IgG antibody structure and function. Polymeric IgM, the largest known antibody in humans, displays five potential N-glycosylation sites on each heavy chain monomer. IgM can exist as a pentamer with a connecting singly N-glycosylated J-chain (with a total of 51 glycosylation sites) or as a hexamer (60 glycosylation sites). In this study, the N-glycosylation of recombinant pentameric and hexameric IgM produced by the same human cell type and culture conditions was site-specifically profiled by RP-LC-CID/ETD-MS/MS using HILIC-enriched tryptic and GluC glycopeptides. The occupancy of all putative N-glycosylation sites on the pentameric and hexameric IgM were able to be determined. Distinct glycosylation differences were observed between each of the five N-linked sites on the IgM heavy chains. While Asn171, Asn332, and Asn395 all had predominantly complex type glycans, differences in glycan branching and sialylation were observed between the sites. Asn563, a high mannose-rich glycosylation site that locates in the center of the IgM polymer, was only approximately 60% occupied in both the pentameric and hexameric IgM forms, with a difference in relative abundance of the glycan structures between the pentamer and hexamer. This study highlights the information obtained by characterization of the site-heterogeneity of a highly glycosylated protein of high molecular mass with quaternary structure, revealing differences that would not be seen by global glycan or deglycosylated peptide profiling.

  18. Site-Specific N-Glycosylation of Recombinant Pentameric and Hexameric Human IgM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moh, Edward S. X.; Lin, Chi-Hung; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2016-07-01

    Glycosylation is known to play an important role in IgG antibody structure and function. Polymeric IgM, the largest known antibody in humans, displays five potential N-glycosylation sites on each heavy chain monomer. IgM can exist as a pentamer with a connecting singly N-glycosylated J-chain (with a total of 51 glycosylation sites) or as a hexamer (60 glycosylation sites). In this study, the N-glycosylation of recombinant pentameric and hexameric IgM produced by the same human cell type and culture conditions was site-specifically profiled by RP-LC-CID/ETD-MS/MS using HILIC-enriched tryptic and GluC glycopeptides. The occupancy of all putative N-glycosylation sites on the pentameric and hexameric IgM were able to be determined. Distinct glycosylation differences were observed between each of the five N-linked sites on the IgM heavy chains. While Asn171, Asn332, and Asn395 all had predominantly complex type glycans, differences in glycan branching and sialylation were observed between the sites. Asn563, a high mannose-rich glycosylation site that locates in the center of the IgM polymer, was only approximately 60% occupied in both the pentameric and hexameric IgM forms, with a difference in relative abundance of the glycan structures between the pentamer and hexamer. This study highlights the information obtained by characterization of the site-heterogeneity of a highly glycosylated protein of high molecular mass with quaternary structure, revealing differences that would not be seen by global glycan or deglycosylated peptide profiling.

  19. Sugar and Spice Make Bacteria Not Nice: Protein Glycosylation and Its Influence in Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Kinsella, Rachel L; Feldman, Mario F

    2016-08-14

    Protein glycosylation is a post-translational modification that occurs across the whole tree of life. In the recent years, multiple N- and O-glycosylation mechanisms have been identified and characterized in diverse bacterial species, including human pathogens. This review focuses on bacterial protein glycosylation and its impact in pathogenesis. Bacteria carry N- and O-glycosylation systems that are mediated by an oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase). In OTase-dependent glycosylation mechanisms, an oligosaccharide is synthesized on a lipid carrier and subsequently transferred to proteins en bloc by an OTase. Multiple proteins are glycosylated using this mechanism. OTase-independent glycosylation refers to the pathway in which Protein N- and O-glycosyltransferases (PGTases) sequentially add monosaccharides onto the target proteins. This pathway is employed for glycosylation of flagella and autotransporters. By exploiting glycosylation machineries, it is now possible to generate tailor-made glycoconjugates by attaching polysaccharides derived from lipopolysaccharide or capsule biosynthesis onto a protein of choice. These glycoproteins can be used in developing vaccines and diagnostics of bacterial infections. Furthermore, both N- and O-glycosylation systems are promising targets for antibiotic development. Recently, the discovery of GTase toxins produced by bacterial pathogens and secreted into the host cells has greatly expanded. These proteins are a key factor in host-pathogen interactions and are required by certain pathogenic bacteria to establish a successful infection. The exact functions of bacterial glycoproteins in pathogenesis are just starting to emerge. Understanding these roles is key for new opportunities in the prevention of bacterial infections, which is crucial in times when antibiotic resistance continues to increase. PMID:27107636

  20. Tiul1 and TGIF are Involved in Downregulation of TGFbeta1-induced IgA Isotype Expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Hoon; Nam, Eun-Hee; Seo, Goo-Young; Seo, Su Ryeon; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2009-12-01

    TGF-beta1 is well known to induce Ig germ-line alpha (GLalpha) transcription and subsequent IgA isotype class switching recombination (CSR). Homeodomain protein TG-interacting factor (TGIF) and E3-ubiquitin ligases TGIF interacting ubiquitin ligase 1 (Tiul1) are implicated in the negative regulation of TGF-beta signaling. In the present study, we investigated the roles of Tiul1 and TGIF in TGFbeta1-induced IgA CSR. We found that over-expression of Tiul1 decreased TGFbeta1-induced GLalpha promoter activity and strengthened the inhibitory effect of Smad7 on the promoter activity. Likewise, overexpression of TGIF also diminished GLalpha promoter activity and further strengthened the inhibitory effect of Tiul1, suggesting that Tiul1 and TGIF can down-regulate TGFbeta1-induced GLalpha expression. In parallel, overexpression of Tiul1 decreased the expression of endogenous IgA CSR-predicitive transcripts (GLT(alpha), PST(alpha), and CT(alpha)) and TGFbeta1-induced IgA secretion, but not GLT(gamma3) and IgG3 secretion. Here, over-expressed TGIF further strengthened the inhibitory effect of Tiul1. These results suggest that Tiul1 and TGIF act as negatively regulators in TGFbeta1-induced IgA isotype expression. PMID:20157612

  1. Effect of native Lactobacillus murinus LbP2 administration on total fecal IgA in healthy dogs

    PubMed Central

    Delucchi, Luis; Fraga, Martín; Perelmuter, Karen; Cella, Claudia Della; Zunino, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine the effect of Lactobacillus murinus strain LbP2 on canine fecal immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels. Seven dogs were orally treated with a 3-mL suspension of L. murinus LbP2 containing 5 × 109 colony-forming units on alternate days for 2 wk. Six dogs were treated with 3 mL of phosphate-buffered saline as placebo. Fecal samples were taken from the rectal ampulla on days 0 and 16, and the total canine fecal IgA concentration was determined with an immunoperoxidase assay kit. The IgA levels of individual dogs were compared with the nonparametric Wilcoxon test. Differences were considered significant when the P-value was less than 0.05. An increase in the total fecal IgA concentration was observed in the 7 dogs after treatment with L. murinus LbP2 (P = 0.01796). No differences were detected between the initial total fecal IgA values and those obtained at the end of placebo treatment. Thus, after oral administration L. murinus LbP2 showed potential immunomodulatory effects, an important property to assess in a microorganism being considered for use as a probiotic. PMID:24688179

  2. IgH loci of American alligator and saltwater crocodile shed light on IgA evolution.

    PubMed

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-07-01

    Immunoglobulin loci of two representatives of the order Crocodylia were studied from full genome sequences. Both Alligator mississippiensis and Crocodylus porosus have 13 genes for the heavy chain constant regions of immunoglobulins. The IGHC locus contains genes encoding four immunoglobulins M (IgM), one immunoglobulin D (IgD), three immunoglobulins A (IgA), three immunoglobulins Y (IgY), and two immunoglobulins D2 (IgD2). IgA and IgD2 genes were found in reverse transcriptional orientation compared to the other Ig genes. The IGHD gene contains 11 exons, four of which containing stop codons or sequence alterations. As described in other reptiles, the IgD2 is a chimeric Ig with IgA- and IgD-related domains. This work clarifies the origin of bird IgA and its evolutionary relationship with amphibian immunoglobulin X (IgX) as well as their links with mammalian IgA. PMID:23558556

  3. Variable Region Identical IgA and IgE to Cryptococcus neoformans Capsular Polysaccharide Manifest Specificity Differences*

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Nakouzi, Antonio; Pohl, Mary Ann; Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years several groups have shown that isotype switching from IgM to IgG to IgA can affect the affinity and specificity of antibodies sharing identical variable (V) regions. However, whether the same applies to IgE is unknown. In this study we compared the fine specificity of V region-identical IgE and IgA to Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide and found that these differed in specificity from each other. The IgE and IgA paratopes were probed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 15N-labeled peptide mimetics of cryptococcal polysaccharide antigen (Ag). IgE was found to cleave the peptide at a much faster rate than V region-identical IgG subclasses and IgA, consistent with an altered paratope. Both IgE and IgA were opsonic for C. neoformans and protected against infection in mice. In summary, V-region expression in the context of the ϵ constant (C) region results in specificity changes that are greater than observed for comparable IgG subclasses. These results raise the possibility that expression of certain V regions in the context of α and ϵ C regions affects their function and contributes to the special properties of those isotypes. PMID:25778397

  4. Alternative splicing of the human IgA Fc receptor CD89 in neutrophils and eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Pleass, R J; Andrews, P D; Kerr, M A; Woof, J M

    1996-09-15

    Receptors for the Fc portion of IgA (Fc alpha R) trigger important immunological elimination processes against IgA-coated targets. Investigation of human Fc alpha R (CD89) transcripts in neutrophils, eosinophils and a monocyte-like cell line, THP-1, with the use of reverse transcriptase PCR, Northern blotting and RNase protection analysis, has provided evidence in these cell types for at least two distinct transcripts generated by alternative splicing. The cDNAs derived from the two major transcripts of both neutrophils and eosinophils have been cloned and sequenced. For both cell types, the larger clone represents the previously described full-length receptor, whereas the second, shorter, splice variant lacks the entire second, membrane-proximal, Ig-like domain. Stable CHO-K1 transfectants have been obtained for both full-length and truncated variant neutrophil receptors. Whereas the full-length receptor is recognized by a panel of five anti-Fc alpha R monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), the shorter variant is bound weakly by only two of the antibodies, suggesting that the epitopes recognized by the majority of the mAbs lie at least in part in the second Ig-like domain of Fc alpha R. Both full-length and splice variant forms of the receptor bind secretory IgA, but the weak binding to serum IgA seen with the full-length receptor is not evident with the shorter variant. Alternative splicing might therefore serve as a means of diversifying Fc alpha R structure and function. PMID:8836118

  5. HLA has strongest association with IgA nephropathy in genome-wide analysis.

    PubMed

    Feehally, John; Farrall, Martin; Boland, Anne; Gale, Daniel P; Gut, Ivo; Heath, Simon; Kumar, Ashish; Peden, John F; Maxwell, Patrick H; Morris, David L; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Vyse, Timothy J; Zawadzka, Anna; Rees, Andrew J; Lathrop, Mark; Ratcliffe, Peter J

    2010-10-01

    Demographic and family studies support the existence of a genetic contribution to the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, but results from genetic association studies of candidate genes are inconsistent. To systematically survey common genetic variation in this disease, we performed a genome-wide analysis in a cohort of patients with IgA nephropathy selected from the UK Glomerulonephritis DNA Bank. We used two groups of controls: parents of affected individuals and previously genotyped, unaffected, ancestry-matched individuals from the 1958 British Birth Cohort and the UK Blood Service. We genotyped 914 affected or family controls for 318,127 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Filtering for low genotype call rates and inferred non-European ancestry left 533 genotyped individuals (187 affected children) for the family-based association analysis and 244 cases and 4980 controls for the case-control analysis. A total of 286,200 SNPs with call rates >95% were available for analysis. Genome-wide analysis showed a strong signal of association on chromosome 6p in the region of the MHC (P = 1 × 10(-9)). The two most strongly associated SNPs showed consistent association in both family-based and case-control analyses. HLA imputation analysis showed that the strongest association signal arose from a combination of DQ loci with some support for an independent HLA-B signal. These results suggest that the HLA region contains the strongest common susceptibility alleles that predispose to IgA nephropathy in the European population. PMID:20595679

  6. Long-Term Outcomes of IgA Nephropathy Presenting with Minimal or No Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Isabel; Ballarín, José Antonio; Arce, Yolanda; Jiménez, Sara; Quereda, Carlos; Olea, Teresa; Martínez-Ara, Jorge; Segarra, Alfons; Bernis, Carmen; García, Asunción; Goicoechea, Marian; García de Vinuesa, Soledad; Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Praga, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The long-term outcome of patients with IgA nephropathy who present with normal renal function, microscopic hematuria, and minimal or no proteinuria is not well described. Here, we studied 141 Caucasian patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy who had minor abnormalities at presentation and a median follow-up of 108 months. None of the patients received corticosteroids or immunosuppressants. We reviewed renal biopsies using the Oxford classification criteria. In this sample, 46 (32%) patients had mesangial proliferation, whereas endocapillary proliferation, focal glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial abnormalities were uncommon. Serum creatinine increases >50% and >100% were observed in five (3.5%) patients and one (0.7%) patient, respectively; no patients developed ESRD. After 10, 15, and 20 years, 96.7%, 91.9%, and 91.9% of patients maintained serum creatinine values less than a 50% increase, respectively. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, the presence of segmental glomerulosclerosis was the only factor that significantly associated with a >50% increase in serum creatinine. Clinical remission occurred in 53 (37.5%) patients after a median of 48 months. Proteinuria>0.5 and >1.0 g/24 h developed in 21 (14.9%) and 6 (4.2%) patients, respectively. Median proteinuria at the end of follow-up was 0.1 g/24 h, with 41 (29.1%) patients having no proteinuria. At presentation, 23 (16.3%) patients were hypertensive compared with 30 (21.3%) patients at the end of follow-up; 59 (41.8%) patients were treated with renin-angiotensin blockers because of hypertension or increasing proteinuria. In summary, the long-term prognosis for Caucasian patients with IgA nephropathy who present with minor urinary abnormalities and normal renal function is excellent. PMID:22956820

  7. Patterns of Chromosomal Aberrations in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Grade, Marian; Difilippantonio, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are a defining feature of solid tumors. Such cytogenetic alterations are mainly classified into structural chromosomal aberrations and copy number alterations, giving rise to aneuploid karyotypes. The increasing detection of these genetic changes allowed the description of specific tumor entities and the associated patterns of gene expression. In fact, tumor-specific landscapes of gross genomic copy number changes, including aneuploidies of entire chromosome arms and chromosomes result in a global deregulation of the transcriptome of cancer cells. Furthermore, the molecular characterization of cytogenetic abnormalities has provided insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and has, in a few instances, led to the clinical implementation of effective diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as treatment strategies that target a specific genetic abnormality. PMID:26376875

  8. Patterns of Chromosomal Aberrations in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Grade, Marian; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Camps, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are a defining feature of solid tumors. Such cytogenetic alterations are mainly classified into structural chromosomal aberrations and copy number alterations, giving rise to aneuploid karyotypes. The increasing detection of these genetic changes allowed the description of specific tumor entities and the associated patterns of gene expression. In fact, tumor-specific landscapes of gross genomic copy number changes, including aneuploidies of entire chromosome arms and chromosomes result in a global deregulation of the transcriptome of cancer cells. Furthermore, the molecular characterization of cytogenetic abnormalities has provided insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and has, in a few instances, led to the clinical implementation of effective diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as treatment strategies that target a specific genetic abnormality. PMID:26376875

  9. Overlapped Fourier coding for optical aberration removal

    PubMed Central

    Horstmeyer, Roarke; Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Zheng, Guoan; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    We present an imaging procedure that simultaneously optimizes a camera’s resolution and retrieves a sample’s phase over a sequence of snapshots. The technique, termed overlapped Fourier coding (OFC), first digitally pans a small aperture across a camera’s pupil plane with a spatial light modulator. At each aperture location, a unique image is acquired. The OFC algorithm then fuses these low-resolution images into a full-resolution estimate of the complex optical field incident upon the detector. Simultaneously, the algorithm utilizes redundancies within the acquired dataset to computationally estimate and remove unknown optical aberrations and system misalignments via simulated annealing. The result is an imaging system that can computationally overcome its optical imperfections to offer enhanced resolution, at the expense of taking multiple snapshots over time. PMID:25321982

  10. Chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes from car painters.

    PubMed

    Silva, J M; Santos-Mello, R

    1996-05-01

    In the present paper we report the results of biological monitoring of a group of 25 car painters working in different automobile shops in Brasília. There was a significantly higher frequency of aneuplodies and chromosome deletions in the peripheral lymphocytes of car painters than in control subjects. We also detected a significant correlation between the time worked as a car painter and the frequency of aneuploidy. Smoking habits do not represent a significant factor in terms of production of the various types of chromosome aberrations among car painters. These results permitted us to conclude that the individuals studied represent a risk group and should be medically followed up with judicious periodic examinations. PMID:8637507

  11. Congenital Aberrant Tearing: A Re-Look

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marilyn T.; Strömland, Kerstin; Ventura, Liana

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Congenital aberrant tearing is characterized by tearing when eating (“crocodile tears”), lack of emotional tearing, or both. Most reported cases are associated with Duane syndrome. In our previous studies we observed aberrant tearing in individuals with thalidomide embryopathy and Möbius sequence. This report summarizes the literature on the subject and adds 3 new studies that give information on this unusual condition. Methods Twenty-eight individuals with Möbius sequence were interviewed about tearing symptoms at a support group meeting in Italy. In Sweden 30 adults primarily from the original thalidomide series were reexamined. In this latter study, a Schirmer test was done at baseline and repeated 5 minutes after eating. Twenty families in Brazil who have children with Möbius sequence were questioned about tearing symptoms and exposure to misoprostol during pregnancy. Results In the 28 Italian individuals, either “crocodile tears” or lack of emotional tearing was noted in 7 cases. In the thalidomide study, 10 of 30 patients had tearing when eating and 7 had no emotional tearing. Low Schirmer scores or increased tearing after eating was noted in a few asymptomatic individuals. Among the 20 Brazilian children with Möbius sequence, 10 had some tearing abnormality. Conclusion Congenital anomalous lacrimation is rare but usually associated with Duane syndrome or abduction deficits, as in Möbius sequence and, less frequently, facial nerve palsy. Studies implicate an early insult in development at 4 to 6 weeks. At that time the facial nerve, sixth nerve, and lacrimal nucleus are in close proximity in the embryo. PMID:19277226

  12. Dabigatran-Related Nephropathy in a Patient with Undiagnosed IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Escoli, Rachele; Santos, Paulo; Andrade, Sequeira; Carvalho, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran is a direct thrombin inhibitor used as an alternative to warfarin for long term anticoagulation. Warfarin-related nephropathy is an increasingly recognized entity, but recent evidence suggests that dabigatran can cause a WRN-like syndrome. We describe a case of a biopsy-proven anticoagulant nephropathy related to dabigatran in a patient with IgA nephropathy and propose that, despite the base glomerular disease, acute kidney injury was due to tubular obstruction by red blood cells and heme-associated tubular injury, and through a mechanism involving inhibition of anticoagulation cascade and barrier abnormalities caused by molecular mechanisms. PMID:26347498

  13. Dabigatran-Related Nephropathy in a Patient with Undiagnosed IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Escoli, Rachele; Santos, Paulo; Andrade, Sequeira; Carvalho, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran is a direct thrombin inhibitor used as an alternative to warfarin for long term anticoagulation. Warfarin-related nephropathy is an increasingly recognized entity, but recent evidence suggests that dabigatran can cause a WRN-like syndrome. We describe a case of a biopsy-proven anticoagulant nephropathy related to dabigatran in a patient with IgA nephropathy and propose that, despite the base glomerular disease, acute kidney injury was due to tubular obstruction by red blood cells and heme-associated tubular injury, and through a mechanism involving inhibition of anticoagulation cascade and barrier abnormalities caused by molecular mechanisms. PMID:26347498

  14. Erythema elevatum diutinum in association with IgA monoclonal gammopathy: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Patnala, Guru Prasad; Sunandini, Anila P.; Rayavarapu, Rama; Yandapalli, Padmasri Somala

    2016-01-01

    Erythema elevatum diutinum (EED) is a rare form of vasculitis characterized clinically by red-violet brown papules, plaques, and nodules mainly involving the extensor surfaces; histologically by leukocytoclastic vasculitis in early lesions, and fibrosis and cholesterolosis in late lesions. EED has been associated with many systemic disorders including infections, autoimmune disorders, and both benign and malignant hematological disorders. As it is a rare form of vasculitis and only 250 cases reported till date, we report a case of EED in association with IgA monoclonal gammopathy with partial response to dapsone treatment. PMID:27559509

  15. Binding and transepithelial transport of immunoglobulins by intestinal M cells: demonstration using monoclonal IgA antibodies against enteric viral proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Weltzin, R.; Lucia-Jandris, P.; Michetti, P.; Fields, B.N.; Kraehenbuhl, J.P.; Neutra, M.R.

    1989-05-01

    M cells of intestinal epithelia overlying lymphoid follicles endocytose luminal macromolecules and microorganisms and deliver them to underlying lymphoid tissue. The effect of luminal secretory IgA antibodies on adherence and transepithelial transport of antigens and microorganisms by M cells is unknown. We have studied the interaction of monoclonal IgA antibodies directed against specific enteric viruses, or the hapten trinitrophenyl (TNP), with M cells. To produce monospecific IgA antibodies against mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) and reovirus type 1, Peyer's patch cells from mucosally immunized mice were fused with myeloma cells, generating hybridomas that secreted virus-specific IgA antibodies in monomeric and polymeric forms. One of two anti-MMTV IgA antibodies specifically bound the viral surface glycoprotein gp52, and 3 of 10 antireovirus IgA antibodies immunoprecipitated sigma 3 and mu lc surface proteins. 35S-labeled IgA antibodies injected intravenously into rats were recovered in bile as higher molecular weight species, suggesting that secretory component had been added on passage through the liver. Radiolabeled or colloidal gold-conjugated mouse IgA was injected into mouse, rat, and rabbit intestinal loops containing Peyer's patches. Light microscopic autoradiography and EM showed that all IgA antibodies (antivirus or anti-TNP) bound to M cell luminal membranes and were transported in vesicles across M cells. IgA-gold binding was inhibited by excess unlabeled IgA, indicating that binding was specific. IgG-gold also adhered to M cells and excess unlabeled IgG inhibited IgA-gold binding; thus binding was not isotype-specific. Immune complexes consisting of monoclonal anti-TNP IgA and TNP-ferritin adhered selectively to M cell membranes, while TNP-ferritin alone did not.

  16. Expression of Arg-Gingipain RgpB Is Required for Correct Glycosylation and Stability of Monomeric Arg-Gingipain RgpA from Porphyromonas gingivalis W50

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Minnie; Hashim, Ahmed; Aduse-Opoku, Joseph; Paramonov, Nikolay; Hounsell, Elizabeth F.; Curtis, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Arg-gingipains are extracellular cysteine proteases produced by the gram-negative periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and are encoded by rgpA and rgpB. Three Arg-gingipains, heterodimeric high-molecular-mass Arg-gingipain HRgpA comprising the α-catalytic chai