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Sample records for aberration coma astigmatism

  1. Transmissive liquid-crystal device correcting primary coma aberration and astigmatism in laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Ayano; Hibi, Terumasa; Ipponjima, Sari; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2016-03-01

    Laser scanning microscopy allows 3D cross-sectional imaging inside biospecimens. However, certain aberrations produced can degrade the quality of the resulting images. We previously reported a transmissive liquid-crystal device that could compensate for the predominant spherical aberrations during the observations, particularly in deep regions of the samples. The device, inserted between the objective lens and the microscope revolver, improved the image quality of fixed-mouse-brain slices that were observed using two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy, which was originally degraded by spherical aberration. In this study, we developed a transmissive device that corrects primary coma aberration and astigmatism, motivated by the fact that these asymmetric aberrations can also often considerably deteriorate image quality, even near the sample surface. The device's performance was evaluated by observing fluorescent beads using single-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy. The fluorescence intensity in the image of the bead under a cover slip tilted in the y-direction was increased by 1.5 times after correction by the device. Furthermore, the y- and z-widths of the imaged bead were reduced to 66% and 65%, respectively. On the other hand, for the imaged bead sucked into a glass capillary in the longitudinal x-direction, correction with the device increased the fluorescence intensity by 2.2 times compared to that of the aberrated image. In addition, the x-, y-, and z-widths of the bead image were reduced to 75%, 53%, and 40%, respectively. Our device successfully corrected several asymmetric aberrations to improve the fluorescent signal and spatial resolution, and might be useful for observing various biospecimens.

  2. Higher Order Aberration and Astigmatism in Children with Hyperopic Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the changes in corneal higher-order aberration (HOA) during amblyopia treatment and the correlation between HOA and astigmatism in hyperopic amblyopia children. Methods In this retrospective study, a total of 72 eyes from 72 patients ranging in age from 38 to 161 months were included. Patients were divided into two groups based on the degree of astigmatism. Corneal HOA was measured using a KR-1W aberrometer at the initial visit and at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. Correlation analysis was performed to assess the association between HOA and astigmatism. Results A total of 72 patients were enrolled in this study, 37 of which were classified as belonging to the higher astigmatism group, while 35 were assigned to the lower astigmatism group. There was a statistically significant difference in success rate between the higher and lower astigmatism groups. In both groups, all corneal HOAs were significantly reduced during amblyopia treatment. When comparing the two groups, a significant difference in coma HOA at the 12-month follow-up was detected (p = 0.043). In the Pearson correlation test, coma HOA at the 12-month follow-up demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with astigmatism and a stronger correlation with astigmatism in the higher astigmatism group than in the lower astigmatism group (coefficient values, 0.383 and 0.284 as well as p = 0.021 and p = 0.038, respectively). Conclusions HOA, particularly coma HOA, correlated with astigmatism and could exert effects in cases involving hyperopic amblyopia. PMID:26865804

  3. Optical advantages of astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooyen, De Wet; Schöttl, Peter; Bern, Gregor; Heimsath, Anna; Nitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats adapt their shape in dependence of the incidence angle of the sun on the heliostat. Simulations show that this optical correction leads to a higher concentration ratio at the target and thus in a decrease in required receiver aperture in particular for smaller heliostat fields.

  4. Visual instrument image quality metrics and the effects of coma and astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Mouroulis, P; Zhang, H P

    1992-01-01

    We examine subjective contrast and edge sharpness discrimination in the presence of different amounts of coma, astigmatism, and combinations of these two aberrations. We also examine the correlation between subjective results and objective image quality measures. These include the integral of the modulation transfer function (MTF) across the frequency range of interest (MTFa), the Strehl ratio, the variance of the wave-front aberration, and the radius of 84% encircled energy of the point-spread function (R84). For the target orientation that is most affected by the aberrations, we find that the MTFa and R84 give good correlation, while the Strehl ratio and the variance do not. In addition, we find that the MTFa correlates with subjective results for all target orientations. We discuss the implications of the results on the automated assessment of the image quality of visual instruments. PMID:1738049

  5. Impact of astigmatism and high-order aberrations on subjective best focus.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Susana; Velasco-Ocana, Miriam; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Sawides, Lucie; Hernandez, Martha; Marin, Gildas

    2015-08-01

    We studied the role of native astigmatism and ocular aberrations on best-focus setting and its shift upon induction of astigmatism in 42 subjects (emmetropes, myopes, hyperopes, with-the-rule [WTR] and against-the-rule [ATR] myopic astigmats). Stimuli were presented in a custom-developed adaptive optics simulator, allowing correction for native aberrations and astigmatism induction (+1 D; 6-mm pupil). Best-focus search consisted on randomized-step interleaved staircase method. Each subject searched best focus for four different images, and four different conditions (with/without aberration correction, with/without astigmatism induction). The presence of aberrations induced a significant shift in subjective best focus (0.4 D; p < 0.01), significantly correlated (p = 0.005) with the best-focus shift predicted from optical simulations. The induction of astigmatism produced a statistically significant shift of the best-focus setting in all groups under natural aberrations (p = 0.001), and in emmetropes and in WTR astigmats under corrected aberrations (p < 0.0001). Best-focus shift upon induced astigmatism was significantly different across groups, both for natural aberrations and AO-correction (p < 0.0001). Best focus shifted in opposite directions in WTR and ATR astigmats upon induction of astigmatism, symmetrically with respect to the best-focus shift in nonastigmatic myopes. The shifts are consistent with a bias towards vertical and horizontal retinal blur in WTR and ATR astigmats, respectively, indicating adaptation to native astigmatism. PMID:26237300

  6. Higher-order aberrations and best-corrected visual acuity in Native American children with a high prevalence of astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joseph M.; Harvey, Erin M.; Schwiegerling, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether higher-order aberrations (HOAs) in children from a highly astigmatic population differ from population norms and whether HOAs are associated with astigmatism and reduced best-corrected visual acuity. Methods Subjects were 218 Tohono O’odham Native American children 5–9 years of age. Noncycloplegic HOA measurements were obtained with a handheld Shack-Hartmann sensor (SHS). Signed (z06s to z14s) and unsigned (z06u to z14u) wavefront aberration Zernike coefficients Z(3,−3) to Z(4,4) were rescaled for a 4 mm diameter pupil and compared to adult population norms. Cycloplegic refraction and best-corrected logMAR letter visual acuity (BCVA) were also measured. Regression analyses assessed the contribution of astigmatism (J0) and HOAs to BCVA. Results The mean root-mean-square (RMS) HOA of 0.191 ± 0.072 μm was significantly greater than population norms (0.100 ± 0.044 μm. All unsigned HOA coefficients (z06u to z14u) and all signed coefficients except z09s, z10s, and z11s were significantly larger than population norms. Decreased BCVA was associated with astigmatism (J0) and spherical aberration (z12u) but not RMS coma, with the effect of J0 about 4 times as great as z12u. Conclusions Tohono O’odham children show elevated HOAs compared to population norms. Astigmatism and unsigned spherical aberration are associated with decreased acuity, but the effects of spherical aberration are minimal and not clinically significant. PMID:26239206

  7. Distortion of ultrashort pulses caused by aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Z. L.; Kovács, A. P.; Bor, Zs.

    The effect of the primary wave aberrations (spherical aberration, astigmatism and coma) on ultrashort pulses is studied by the Nijboer-Zernike theory. The results of the geometrical and the wave optical treatments are compared.

  8. Astigmatism

    MedlinePlus

    ... a type of refractive error of the eye. Refractive errors cause blurred vision and are the most common reason ... causes vision to be out of focus. The cause of astigmatism is unknown. It is usually present from birth. ...

  9. Optimum form of posterior chamber intraocular lenses to minimize aberrational astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Takei, K; Hommura, S; Okajima, H

    1995-01-01

    To optically determine the optimum form for a posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL), we calculated the aberrational astigmatism induced by tilt and decentration of the PCIOL using an exact raytracing. First, the position and the radii of curvatures of the IOL were determined to make an emmetropic eye model using a paraxial raytracing. Next, the chief rays originating from the fovea centralis were traced backward through the tilted and/or decentrated PC IOL, the center of the pupil and the cornea, using trigonometric raytracing. Finally, the maximum and minimum aberrational astigmatism were calculated based on the Coddington's Equations for the sagittal and the tangential foci of the ray. All the refractive parameters in Gullstrand's No. 1 schematic eye were adopted. The effect of varying anterior corneal asphericity on the results was also examined. Four forms of polymethylmethacrylate PC IOLs (refractive index: 1.491) were analyzed; a plano-convex IOL with the curved surface facing the cornea, and three bi-convex forms with the ratio of anterior-to-posterior radii of curvatures of 1:4, 1:2 and 1:1, respectively. The 1:4 bi-convex form showed the lowest values for the maximum aberrational astigmatism calculated at every combination of tilt and decentration except 0 degrees tilt and/or 0 mm decentration. The aberrational astigmatism with the 1:4 bi-convex form of PC IOL did not exceed 1.0 D at the maximum tilt and decentration. The variation of anterior corneal asphericity did not influence the results. We conclude that the 1:4 bi-convex form of PC IOL minimizes the postoperative astigmatism induced by tilt and/or decentration of the lens. PMID:8926647

  10. Effects of astigmatic aberration in holographic generation of Laguerre-Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Yoko; Ohtani, Takumi; Nishihara, Noboru; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2001-05-01

    The Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam is an optical beam with a phase singularity that propagates along its axis. We have previously reported the fabrication of blazed transmission phase holograms to generate beams with phase singularities. A common problem encountered in the generation of a phase singularity with high charge is that the singularity tends to split into m individual charge 1 singularities, where m is the charge of the original singularity. We have found through numerical simulation that astigmatic aberration can cause a higher-charge phase singularity to split. We have also found that strong astigmatic aberrations make the resulting beam close to a Hermite-Gaussian beam rather than an LG beam. Experimental investigation of these phenomena agree with the numerical simulation.

  11. Coma aberrations in combined two- and three-dimensional STED nanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Antonello, Jacopo; Kromann, Emil B.; Burke, Daniel; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Booth, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopes, like all super-resolution methods, are sensitive to aberrations. Of particular importance are aberrations that affect the quality of the depletion focus, which requires a point of near-zero intensity surrounded by strong illumination. We present analysis, modeling, and experimental measurements that show the effects of coma aberrations on depletion patterns of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) STED configurations. Specifically, we find that identical coma aberrations create focal shifts in opposite directions in 2D and 3D STED. This phenomenon could affect the precision of microscopic measurements and has ramifications for the efficacy of combined 2D/3D STED systems. PMID:27472636

  12. Coma aberrations in combined two- and three-dimensional STED nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Jacopo; Kromann, Emil B; Burke, Daniel; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Booth, Martin J

    2016-08-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopes, like all super-resolution methods, are sensitive to aberrations. Of particular importance are aberrations that affect the quality of the depletion focus, which requires a point of near-zero intensity surrounded by strong illumination. We present analysis, modeling, and experimental measurements that show the effects of coma aberrations on depletion patterns of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) STED configurations. Specifically, we find that identical coma aberrations create focal shifts in opposite directions in 2D and 3D STED. This phenomenon could affect the precision of microscopic measurements and has ramifications for the efficacy of combined 2D/3D STED systems. PMID:27472636

  13. Computation of astigmatic and trefoil figure errors and misalignments for two-mirror telescopes using nodal-aberration theory.

    PubMed

    Ju, Guohao; Yan, Changxiang; Gu, Zhiyuan; Ma, Hongcai

    2016-05-01

    In active optics systems, one concern is how to quantitatively separate the effects of astigmatic and trefoil figure errors and misalignments that couple together in determining the total aberration fields when wavefront measurements are available at only a few field points. In this paper, we first quantitatively describe the impact of mount-induced trefoil deformation on the net aberration fields by proposing a modified theoretical formulation for the field-dependent aberration behavior of freeform surfaces based on the framework of nodal aberration theory. This formulation explicitly expresses the quantitative relationships between the magnitude of freeform surfaces and the induced aberration components where the freeform surfaces can be located away from the aperture stop and decentered from the optical axis. On this basis, and in combination with the mathematical presentation of nodal aberration theory for the effects of misalignments, we present the analytic expressions for the aberration fields of two-mirror telescopes in the presence of astigmatic primary mirror figure errors, mount-induced trefoil deformations on both mirrors, and misalignments. We quantitatively separate these effects using the analytical expressions with wavefront measurements at a few field points and pointing errors. Valuable insights are provided on how to separate these coupled effects in the computation process. Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to demonstrate the correctness and accuracy of the analytic method presented in this paper. PMID:27140345

  14. Coma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Coma Information Page ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  15. Corneal astigmatism change and wavefront aberration evaluation after cataract surgery: “Single” versus “paired opposite” clear corneal incisions

    PubMed Central

    Razmjoo, Hasan; Koosha, Nima; Vaezi, Mohammad Hadi; Rahimi, Behrooz; Peyman, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Correcting the pre-existing astigmatism is an optimal goal in cataract surgery. The aim of this study is to compare the astigmatic correcting effect of a single regular 3.2 mm clear corneal incision (CCI) with paired opposite CCI in cataract patients and effect of these incisions on optical aberrations using the wavefront quantitative analysis. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial study undertaken in an ophthalmology referral center on 50 patients planned for cataract surgery who were randomized to either single 3.2 mm CCI or paired opposite CCI group. Post-operative evaluation was performed at 12 weeks and included refraction, keratometery, corneal topography and wavefront analysis. Corneal astigmatism and post-operative values were compared in two groups. Results: The mean pre-operative corneal astigmatism was 2.58 ± 1.03 D in the single incision group and 2.70 ± 0.94 D in the paired opposite incisions group. After 12 weeks of surgery, the corneal astigmatism was reached to 2.15 ± 0.82 D in single incision group and 1.63 ± 1.21 in the paired opposite incisions group. There was a statistically significant difference in two arms of treatment regarding to surgically induced astigmatism after 3 months. The mean post-operative total and higher order aberrations and values were not significantly different in two groups. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that paired opposite incisions is an effective procedure for reducing pre-existing corneal astigmatism in cataract surgery. Paired incisions did not show any beneficial effect regarding wavefront aberrations compared with conventional single incision method. PMID:25221766

  16. Relationship between wave aberrations and histological features in ex vivo porcine crystalline lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Eva; Bueno, Juan M.; Schwarz, Christina; Artal, Pablo

    2010-09-01

    Wave aberrations of isolated ex vivo porcine crystalline lenses were measured by using a point-diffraction interferometer. This method allowed us to gain greater insight into the detailed aberration structure of eye lenses showing systematic presence of some dominant aberrations. In order of significance, astigmatism together with spherical aberration, coma, and trefoil are the main aberrations present in all lenses. We found a high correlation between the axis of both astigmatism and trefoil with the Y-shaped suture planes of the lens, revealing a subtle relationship between the induced aberrations and the histological features.

  17. Aberrations caused by mechanical misalignments in electrostatic quadrupole lens systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranova, L. A.; Read, F. H.

    Image aberrations resulting from small misalignments in quadrupole lenses multiplets have been analysed. Analytical formulas for the coefficients of the beam displacement, astigmatism and coma associated with misalignments in a general quadrupole lens system have been derived. Numerical computations of systems of three and four quadrupole lenses have also been carried out. The aberration figures obtained for systems with and without a mechanical defect are compared. The aberration coefficients that have been obtained can be used for estimating tolerance limits for lens misalignments.

  18. Prediction of Visual Acuity from Wavefront Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor); Ahumada, Albert J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for generating a visual acuity metric, based on wavefront aberrations (WFAs), associated with a test subject and representing classes of imperfections, such as defocus, astigmatism, coma and spherical aberrations, of the subject's visual system. The metric allows choices of different image template, can predict acuity for different target probabilities, can incorporate different and possibly subject-specific neural transfer functions, can predict acuity for different subject templates, and incorporates a model of the optotype identification task.

  19. 3D holographic head mounted display using holographic optical elements with astigmatism aberration compensation.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Han-Ju; Kim, Hee-Jae; Kim, Seong-Bok; Zhang, HuiJun; Li, BoNi; Ji, Yeong-Min; Kim, Sang-Hoo; Park, Jae-Hyeung

    2015-12-14

    We propose a bar-type three-dimensional holographic head mounted display using two holographic optical elements. Conventional stereoscopic head mounted displays may suffer from eye fatigue because the images presented to each eye are two-dimensional ones, which causes mismatch between the accommodation and vergence responses of the eye. The proposed holographic head mounted display delivers three-dimensional holographic images to each eye, removing the eye fatigue problem. In this paper, we discuss the configuration of the bar-type waveguide head mounted displays and analyze the aberration caused by the non-symmetric diffraction angle of the holographic optical elements which are used as input and output couplers. Pre-distortion of the hologram is also proposed in the paper to compensate the aberration. The experimental results show that proposed head mounted display can present three-dimensional see-through holographic images to each eye with correct focus cues. PMID:26698993

  20. Modeling aberrations in the Advanced Camera for Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houairi, K.; Casertano, S.; Lallo, M.; Makidon, R. B.

    2006-10-01

    We present an analysis of the optical model for HST and ACS that shows the possible impact of misalignments of various optical elements on apparent image aberrations. The analysis was aimed at identifying possible causes for apparent variations in coma and astigmatism seen on orbital time scales in HST images. Results indicate that any combinations of mirrors and motions that reproduce the observed coma and astigmatism changes, also predict either large shifts in the image, which is not observed, or require unrealistically large movements of the elements.

  1. Higher-order pupil aberrations in wide-angle and panoramic optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Hamid R.; Maxwell, Jonathan

    1996-08-01

    In optical systems with modest fields of view, pupil spherical aberration and pupil coma are the principal pupil aberrations of significance, but at extreme fields of view, astigmatic effects and field curvature and distortion effects of the pupil imagery play a part in understanding the subtleties of oblique object-image imagery. Biogon and fisheye wide angle lens systems have been investigated for their pupil aberration properties, along with the investigation of similar effects in a panoramic optical system.

  2. Image transfer with spatial coherence for aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Fumio; Sawada, Hidetaka; Shinkawa, Takao; Sannomiya, Takumi

    2016-08-01

    The formula of spatial coherence involving an aberration up to six-fold astigmatism is derived for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Transfer functions for linear imaging are calculated using the newly derived formula with several residual aberrations. Depending on the symmetry and origin of an aberration, the calculated transfer function shows characteristic symmetries. The aberrations that originate from the field's components, having uniformity along the z direction, namely, the n-fold astigmatism, show rotational symmetric damping of the coherence. The aberrations that originate from the field's derivatives with respect to z, such as coma, star, and three lobe, show non-rotational symmetric damping. It is confirmed that the odd-symmetric wave aberrations have influences on the attenuation of an image via spatial coherence. Examples of image simulations of haemoglobin and Si [211] are shown by using the spatial coherence for an aberration-corrected electron microscope. PMID:27155359

  3. Some Useful Correspondences In Aberration Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, David

    1986-10-01

    There are many correspondences between the behavior of monochromatic aberrations and chromatic aberrations. Usually the behavior of the chromatic aberrations is of a lower order than the corresponding monochromatic behavior. The cause of the 5th-order mono-chromatic astigmatism, for example, is similar in type to the cause of the chromatic variation of 3rd-order astigmatism. The stop-shift behavior of 3rd-order monochromatic coma is similar to that of first-order lateral color, and so on. These correspondences are interesting for two reasons. One is that they have not been commented on much before, despite the value of one's being aware of these relationships. Methods used to control a monochromatic aberration may also apply to the corresponding chromatic aberration, and vice-versa, for example. The other benefit to studying this topic is that the chromatic aberrations, which are of a lower order than their monochro-matic correspondences, are much easier to understand and visualize. A simple diagram can illustrate the stop-shift behavior of lateral color much more easily than trying to do the same thing with 3rd-order coma. Finally, the very important distinction between intrinsic and induced aberrations can be best illustrated with chromatic aberrations, because of their lower order.

  4. Optical design methods to suppress aberrations which are caused by change of object distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Shunsuke; Shibuya, Masato; Maehara, Kazuhisa; Oka, Mikio; Nakadate, Suezou

    2011-10-01

    An object distance range within which fine image can be obtained by focus adjustment is limited since aberrations are caused by change of object distance. We have developed a novel optical design method to suppress variation of coma, astigmatism and field curvature induced by change of object distance. Variation of astigmatism and field curvature can be suppressed by introducing appropriate distortion. Also variation of coma caused by change of object distance can be suppressed by using spherical image surface which pivot is located at the center of exit pupil.

  5. Observation of lens aberrations for high resolution electron microscopy II: simple expressions for optimal estimates.

    PubMed

    Saxton, W Owen

    2015-04-01

    This paper lists simple closed-form expressions estimating aberration coefficients (defocus, astigmatism, three-fold astigmatism, coma / misalignment, spherical aberration) on the basis of image shift or diffractogram shape measurements as a function of injected beam tilt. Simple estimators are given for a large number of injected tilt configurations, optimal in the sense of least-squares fitting of all the measurements, and so better than most reported previously. Standard errors are given for most, allowing different approaches to be compared. Special attention is given to the measurement of the spherical aberration, for which several simple procedures are given, and the effect of foreknowledge of this on other aberration estimates is noted. Details and optimal expressions are also given for a new and simple method of analysis, requiring measurements of the diffractogram mirror axis direction only, which are simpler to make than the focus and astigmatism measurements otherwise required. PMID:25728295

  6. Corneal primary aberrations compensation by oblique light incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, Julian; Mas, David; Kasprzak, Henryk T.

    2009-07-01

    The eye is not a centered system. The line of sight connects the fovea with the center of the pupil and is usually tilted in the temporal direction. Thus, off-axis optical aberrations, mainly coma and oblique astigmatism, are introduced at the fovea. Tabernero et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 24(10), 3274-3283 (2007)] showed that a horizontal tilt of the crystalline lens generates a horizontal coma aberration that is compensated by the oblique light incidence on the eye. Here we suggest that corneal astigmatism may also play a role in compensation of oblique aberrations, and we propose a simple model to analyze such a possibility. A theoretical Kooijman eye model with a slight (~0.6 D) with-the-rule astigmatism is analyzed. Light rays at different incidence angles to the optical axis are considered, and the corresponding point spread functions (PSFs) at the retina are calculated. A quality criterion is used to determine the incidence angle that provides the narrowest and highest PSF energy peak. We show that the best image is obtained for a tilted incidence angle compatible with mean values of the angle kappa. This suggests that angle kappa, lens tilt, and corneal astigmatism may combine to provide a passive compensation mechanism to minimize aberrations on the fovea.

  7. Alignment of two mirror astronomical telescopes (the astigmatic component)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Tobias; Thompson, Kevin; Rolland, Jannick

    2008-07-01

    The effects of alignment perturbations on the aberration fields of two mirror astronomical telescopes are discussed. It is demonstrated that expressions describing alignment induced field-linear astigmatism, published by McLeod based on the work of Schroeder, can be obtained using nodal aberration theory. Rather than merely providing a different derivation for alignment induced astigmatism, it is shown that nodal theory can provide several insights that are significant for the development of effective alignment techniques. In the example of a specific telescope sited on Mt. Hopkins (Ritchey- Chretien), two approaches to identify misalignments of the secondary mirror are demonstrated. One approach utilizes the eccentricity of defocused star images and their orientation angles to calculate the misalignment of the secondary mirror after axial coma is removed. A second approach based on the location of the two zeros of the astigmatic aberration field is then shown to give equivalent results, but at the same time ensuring a complete model of all possible effects of misalignment on the performance of the telescope.

  8. Tunable liquid crystal cylindrical micro-optical array for aberration compensation.

    PubMed

    Algorri, J F; Urruchi, V; Bennis, N; Sánchez-Pena, J M; Otón, J M

    2015-06-01

    A tunable aberration compensation device for rectangular micro-optical systems is proposed and demonstrated. This device, which is based in nematic liquid crystal and a micro-electrode structure, forms gradients in the index of refraction as a function of voltage. We have developed a fringe skeletonizing application in order to extract the 3D wavefront from an interference pattern. This software tool obtains the optical aberrations using Chebyshev polynomials. By using phase shifted electrical signals the aberrations can be controlled independently. A complete independent control over the spherical and coma aberration has been demonstrated. Also, an independent control over the astigmatism aberration has been demonstrated in a broad range. This device has promising applications where aberration compensation is required. The independent compensation achieved for some coefficients, such as astigmatism for example, is more than 2.4 waves. PMID:26072760

  9. Aberration analysis and efficiency improvement of a bidirectional optical subassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Huang, Zhangdi; Yu, Ziyan; Qian, Xiaoshi; Xu, Fei; Chen, Beckham; Lu, Yanqing

    2009-10-01

    An approach to improve the coupling efficiency of bidirectional optical subassembly (BOSA) modules is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. We analyzed the wavefront aberration coefficients of a typical BOSA. It was found that the 45-deg wavelength filter induces coma and astigmatism, and then it further deteriorates the laser diode to fiber coupling. We measured the BOSA efficiencies based on a series of different filters. For a typical 0.5-mm filter, 25% coupling efficiency improvement was achieved by optimizing the filter parameters.

  10. Phase and group velocity of focused, pulsed Gaussian beams in the presence and absence of primary aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Balázs; Horváth, Zoltán L.; Porras, Miguel A.

    2015-06-01

    This work presents a study on the phase- and group-velocity variations of focused, pulsed Gaussian beams during the propagation through the focal region along the optical axis. In the aberration-free case, it is discussed how the wavelength dependence of beam properties alters the group velocity, and how a chromatic aberration-like effect can arise even when focusing is performed with an element that does not have chromatic aberration. It is also examined what effects primary spherical aberration, astigmatism, coma, curvature of field and distortion, along with chromatic aberration, have on the phase- and group-velocity changes occurring during propagation through focus.

  11. Low-order aberration sensitivity of eighth-order coronagraph masks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaklan, Stuart B.; Green, Joseph J.

    2005-01-01

    In a recent paper, Kuchner, Crepp, and Ge describe new image-plane coronagraph mask designs that reject to eighth order the leakage of starlight caused by image motion at the mask, resulting in a substantial relaxation of image centroiding requirements compared to previous fourth-order and second-order masks. They also suggest that the new masks are effective at rejecting leakage caused by low-order aberrations (e.g., focus, coma, and astigmatism). In this paper, we derive the sensitivity of eighth-order masks to aberrations of any order and provide simulations of coronagraph behavior in the presence of optical aberrations.We find that the masks leak light as the fourth power of focus, astigmatism, coma, and trefoil. This has tremendous performance advantages for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph.

  12. Transient increase of higher-order aberrations after lateral rectus recession in children.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyoung Yul; Hong, Samin; Song, Won Kyoung; Chung, Seung Ah; Lee, Jong Bok

    2011-05-01

    The changes of higher-order aberrations (HOAs) after bilateral lateral rectus muscle recession were evaluated. Forty eyes of 20 children were enrolled and their wavefront information was assessed until postoperative 3 months. Even though the root mean square (RMS) of total aberration was not changed, the RMS of HOA was transiently increased at postoperative 1 week and returned to baseline level after 1 month. Among individual Zernike coefficient, secondary astigmatism, quadrafoil, secondary coma, secondary trefoil, and pentafoil showed similar tendency with the RMS of HOA. However, coma, trefoil, and spherical aberration were not changed. Regarding recession amount, it did not correlate with any Zernike coefficient. In summary, our data imply that the HOAs are transiently increased after lateral rectus recession surgery. These results are in collusion with previous reports that strabismus surgery induced transient corneal astigmatism. PMID:21488198

  13. Measurement of the atmospheric primary aberrations by a 4-aperture differential image motion monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shomali, Ramin; Nasiri, Sadollah; Darudi, Ahmad

    2011-05-01

    The present paper investigates and discusses the ability of the Hartmann test with a 4-aperture differential image motion monitor (DIMM) to measure the atmospheric primary aberrations which, in turn, can be used for the calculation of the atmospheric coherence time. Through performing numerical simulations, we show that the 4-aperture DIMM is able to measure the defocus and astigmatism terms correctly whereas its results are not reliable for the coma. The most important limitations in the measurement of the primary aberrations by the 4-aperture DIMM are the centroid displacements of the spots which are caused by the higher order aberrations. This effect is negligible in the calculation of the defocus and astigmatisms, whereas it cannot be ignored in the calculation of the coma.

  14. Low-Order Aberration Sensitivity of Eighth-Order Coronagraph Masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaklan, Stuart B.; Green, Joseph J.

    2005-07-01

    In a recent paper, Kuchner, Crepp, and Ge describe new image-plane coronagraph mask designs that reject to eighth order the leakage of starlight caused by image motion at the mask, resulting in a substantial relaxation of image centroiding requirements compared to previous fourth-order and second-order masks. They also suggest that the new masks are effective at rejecting leakage caused by low-order aberrations (e.g., focus, coma, and astigmatism). In this paper, we derive the sensitivity of eighth-order masks to aberrations of any order and provide simulations of coronagraph behavior in the presence of optical aberrations. We find that the masks leak light as the fourth power of focus, astigmatism, coma, and trefoil. This has tremendous performance advantages for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph.

  15. Aberration measurement of projection optics in lithographic tools by use of an alternating phase-shifting mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Wang, Xiangzhao; Ma, Mingying; Zhang, Dongqing; Shi, Weijie; Hu, Jianming

    2006-01-01

    As a critical dimension shrinks, the degradation in image quality caused by wavefront aberrations of projection optics in lithographic tools becomes a serious problem. It is necessary to establish a technique for a fast and accurate in situ aberration measurement. We introduce what we believe to be a novel technique for characterizing the aberrations of projection optics by using an alternating phase-shifting mask. The even aberrations, such as spherical aberration and astigmatism, and the odd aberrations, such as coma, are extracted from focus shifts and image displacements of the phase-shifted pattern, respectively. The focus shifts and the image displacements are measured by a transmission image sensor. The simulation results show that, compared with the accuracy of the previous straightforward measurement technique, the accuracy of the coma measurement increases by more than 30% and the accuracy of the spherical-aberration measurement increases by approximately 20%.

  16. Correlations between corneal and total wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrochen, Michael; Jankov, Mirko; Bueeler, Michael; Seiler, Theo

    2002-06-01

    Purpose: Corneal topography data expressed as corneal aberrations are frequently used to report corneal laser surgery results. However, the optical image quality at the retina depends on all optical elements of the eye such as the human lens. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlations between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations and to discuss the importance of corneal aberrations for representing corneal laser surgery results. Methods: Thirty three eyes of 22 myopic subjects were measured with a corneal topography system and a Tschernig-type wavefront analyzer after the pupils were dilated to at least 6 mm in diameter. All measurements were centered with respect to the line of sight. Corneal and total wavefront aberrations were calculated up to the 6th Zernike order in the same reference plane. Results: Statistically significant correlations (p < 0.05) between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations were found for the astigmatism (C3,C5) and all 3rd Zernike order coefficients such as coma (C7,C8). No statistically significant correlations were found for all 4th to 6th order Zernike coefficients except for the 5th order horizontal coma C18 (p equals 0.003). On average, all Zernike coefficients for the corneal aberrations were found to be larger compared to Zernike coefficients for the total wavefront aberrations. Conclusions: Corneal aberrations are only of limited use for representing the optical quality of the human eye after corneal laser surgery. This is due to the lack of correlation between corneal and total wavefront aberrations in most of the higher order aberrations. Besides this, the data present in this study yield towards an aberration balancing between corneal aberrations and the optical elements within the eye that reduces the aberration from the cornea by a certain degree. Consequently, ideal customized ablations have to take both, corneal and total wavefront aberrations, into consideration.

  17. Ocular higher-order aberrations and mesopic pupil size in individuals screened for refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hashemian, Seyed Javad; Soleimani, Mohammad; Foroutan, Alireza; Joshaghani, Mahmood; Ghaempanah, Mohammad Jafar; Jafari, Mohammad Ebrahim; Yaseri, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    AIM To study the distribution of ocular higher-order aberrations(HOAs) and mesopic pupil size in individuals screened for refractive surgery. METHODS Ocular HOAs and mesopic pupil size were studied in 2 458 eyes of 1 240 patients with myopia, myopic astigmatism and compound myopic astigmatism and 215 eyes of 110 patients with hyperopia, hyperopic astigmatism and compound hyperopic astigmatism using the Zywave aberrometer (Busch& Lomb). All patients had correctable refractive errors without a history of refractive surgery or underlying diseases. Root-mean-square values of HOAs, total spherical aberration, total coma and mesopic pupil size were analyzed. Ocular HOAs were measured across a ≥ 6.0 mm pupil, and pupil size measurements were performed under the mesopic condition. RESULTS The mean values of HOAs, total spherical aberration and total coma in the myopic group were 0.369µm, ±0.233, 0.133± 0.112µm and 0.330±0.188µm, respectively. In the hyperopic group the mean values of HOAs, total spherical aberration and total coma were 0.418µm ±0.214, 0.202±0.209µm and 0.343±0.201µm, respectively. Hyperopes showed greater total HOAs (P<0.01) and total spherical aberration (P<0.01) compared to myopes. In age-matched analysis, only the amount of total spherical aberration was higher in the hyperopic group (P=0.05). Mesopic pupil size in the myopic group was larger (P≤0.05). CONCLUSION The results suggested that significant levels of HOAs were found in both groups which are important for planning refractive surgeries on Iranians. There were significantly higher levels of total spherical aberration in hyperopes compared to myopes. Mesopic pupil size was larger in myopic group. PMID:22762055

  18. Influence of misalignment and aberrations on antenna received power in free-space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Liying; Yang, Yuqiang; Ma, Jing; Zheng, Guoxian

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of wavefront aberrations on antenna received power in free-space laser communications, an aberration attenuation factor is proposed, based on which the power penalty at the receiver due to misalignment and primary aberrations is investigated. It is shown that antenna received power decreases gradually with increasing misalignment and aberrations. A comparison shows that tilt (misalignment) has greater influence than other primary aberrations. When the rms aberration value is 0.1λ, the received power penalties caused by tilt, astigmatism, coma, curvature, and spherical aberrations are about 40%, 36%, 35%, 24%, and 23%, respectively. In addition, the obscuration ratio of the transmitter antenna has a noticeable but relatively minor influence on the aberration attenuation factor.

  19. Aberrations of a facet-type transmission grating for cosmic x-ray and XUV spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Beuermann, K P; Bräuninger, H; Trümper, J

    1978-08-01

    The aberrations of various types of curved constant-period transmission gratings are discussed, using Fermat's principle. We show that optimal performance is achieved with a grating assembled from individual facets which form a nonclosed surface. For this geometry, primary coma and astigmatism are proportional to the facet size and, hence, may be adapted to the angular resolution of a Wolter-type telescope. PMID:20203778

  20. Properties of second-order geometrical aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammatin, A. P.

    1994-08-01

    This paper analyzes the properties of second-order aberrations that arise in centered optical systems that contain an aspherical surface whose sagittal equation contains a term proportional to the cube of the distance from a surface point to the optical axis. It is shown that the second-order spherical aberration decreases from the center of the field to its edge. No astigmatism appears in wide, oblique beams in the central part of the field. Coma increases linearly from zero at the center of the field to a value equal to the spherical aberration, and then remains constant over the field. A proof is given of the possibility of correcting the image curvature by using an aspherical surface of the type described above.

  1. Influence of aberrations in microholographic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    The influence of various types of aberrations (spherical, coma, and astigmatic) of recording and readout beams on the readout signal in a microholographic recording was investigated through a numerical simulation. The simulation conditions were that the wavelength of the laser was 405 nm and the numerical aperture of the objective lenses was 0.85. The tolerance of the root-mean-square (RMS) wavefront aberrations was defined as the aberration when the normalized signal level decreased to 0.8. Among the three types of aberrations, the influence of the spherical aberration was the most significant. When both the recording and readout beams were aberrated and the signs of the aberrations were in the worst case, the tolerance of the RMS wavefront aberrations was less than half of the Maréchal's criterion. Moreover, when the RMS wavefront aberrations of the recording and readout beams were within the above tolerance, the bit intervals of 0.13 and 0.65 μm in the inplane and vertical directions, respectively, which correspond to the recording density of 91 bit/μm3 (recording capacity of 16 TB for a 120-mm-diameter optical disk having a 300-μm-thick recording layer), were shown to be feasible for confocal detection with an allowable signal-to-noise ratio.

  2. Analysis of nodal aberration properties in off-axis freeform system design.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haodong; Jiang, Huilin; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Chao; Liu, Tao

    2016-08-20

    Freeform surfaces have the advantage of balancing off-axis aberration. In this paper, based on the framework of nodal aberration theory (NAT) applied to the coaxial system, the third-order astigmatism and coma wave aberration expressions of an off-axis system with Zernike polynomial surfaces are derived. The relationship between the off-axis and surface shape acting on the nodal distributions is revealed. The nodal aberration properties of the off-axis freeform system are analyzed and validated by using full-field displays (FFDs). It has been demonstrated that adding Zernike terms, up to nine, to the off-axis system modifies the nodal locations, but the field dependence of the third-order aberration does not change. On this basis, an off-axis two-mirror freeform system with 500 mm effective focal length (EFL) and 300 mm entrance pupil diameter (EPD) working in long-wave infrared is designed. The field constant aberrations induced by surface tilting are corrected by selecting specific Zernike terms. The design results show that the nodes of third-order astigmatism and coma move back into the field of view (FOV). The modulation transfer function (MTF) curves are above 0.4 at 20 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) which meets the infrared reconnaissance requirement. This work provides essential insight and guidance for aberration correction in off-axis freeform system design. PMID:27557003

  3. Lens aberration measurement and analysis using a novel pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Byung-Ho; Cho, Byeong-Ho; Park, Jong O.; Kim, Dong-Seok; Baek, SungJin; Jeong, JongHo; Nam, ByungSub; Hwang, Young J.; Song, Young Jin

    2001-09-01

    Lens aberration of the exposure tool causes pattern deformation and position shift. As design rule shrinks, the ratio of printed feature size to applied wavelength for optical lithography is driven inexorably toward resolution limit. In this study, we devised an efficient method to evaluate lens aberration using multi-ring pattern on an attenuated phase-shift mask. Adoption of multi-ring pattern can cut down measurement time and improve measurement repeatability. These patterns are uniformly distributed through entire field in 7 by 7 manner. Lens aberration was evaluated by multi-ring pattern array under conventional or off-axis illumination with KrF stepper of NA 0.65. Multi-ring critical dimension (CD) data was discussed together with the issue of lens aberration such as coma, astigmatism, field curvature, etc. We can apply this new measurement technique to select better lens system efficiently. multi-ring, field size, pattern deformation

  4. Perceptual Adaptation to the Correction of Natural Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Vinas, Maria; Sawides, Lucie; de Gracia, Pablo; Marcos, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Background The visual system adjusts to changes in the environment, as well as to changes within the observer, adapting continuously to maintain a match between visual coding and visual environment. We evaluated whether the perception of oriented blur is biased by the native astigmatism, and studied the time course of the after-effects following spectacle correction of astigmatism in habitually non-corrected astigmats. Methods and Findings We tested potential shifts of the perceptual judgments of blur orientation in 21 subjects. The psychophysical test consisted on a single interval orientation identification task in order to measure the perceived isotropic point (astigmatism level for which the image did not appear oriented to the subject) from images artificially blurred with constant blur strength (B = 1.5 D), while modifying the orientation of the blur according to the axis of natural astigmatism of the subjects. Measurements were performed after neutral (gray field) adaptation on naked eyes under full correction of low and high order aberrations. Longitudinal measurements (up to 6 months) were performed in three groups of subjects: non-astigmats and corrected and uncorrected astigmats. Uncorrected astigmats were provided with proper astigmatic correction immediately after the first session. Non-astigmats did not show significant bias in their perceived neutral point, while in astigmatic subjects the perceived neutral point was significantly biased, typically towards their axis of natural astigmatism. Previously uncorrected astigmats shifted significantly their perceived neutral point towards more isotropic images shortly (2 hours) after astigmatic correction wear, and, once stabilized, remained constant after 6 months. The shift of the perceived neutral point after correction of astigmatism was highly correlated with the amount of natural astigmatism. Conclusions Non-corrected astigmats appear to be naturally adapted to their astigmatism, and astigmatic

  5. Facts about Astigmatism

    MedlinePlus

    ... is astigmatism corrected? Astigmatism can be corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses, or surgery. Individual lifestyles affect the way astigmatism is treated. Eyeglasses are the simplest and safest way to correct ...

  6. Influence of wave-front aberrations on bit error rate in inter-satellite laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuqiang; Han, Qiqi; Tan, Liying; Ma, Jing; Yu, Siyuan; Yan, Zhibin; Yu, Jianjie; Zhao, Sheng

    2011-06-01

    We derive the bit error rate (BER) of inter-satellite laser communication (lasercom) links with on-off-keying systems in the presence of both wave-front aberrations and pointing error, but without considering the noise of the detector. Wave-front aberrations induced by receiver terminal have no influence on the BER, while wave-front aberrations induced by transmitter terminal will increase the BER. The BER depends on the area S which is truncated out by the threshold intensity of the detector (such as APD) on the intensity function in the receiver plane, and changes with root mean square (RMS) of wave-front aberrations. Numerical results show that the BER rises with the increasing of RMS value. The influences of Astigmatism, Coma, Curvature and Spherical aberration on the BER are compared. This work can benefit the design of lasercom system.

  7. Optical alignment influenced aberrations in laser beam delivery systems and their correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaggs, Michael; Haas, Gil

    2015-03-01

    Industrial high power laser systems are often evaluated based upon spatial profile of the beam before they are brought to focus for processing materials. It is therefore often assumed that if the raw beam profile is good that the focus is equally as good. The possibility of having good optics and poor alignment or bad optics and good alignment and therefore not achieve a good focal spot is quite high due to the fact that a raw beam spatial profile does not manifest third order aberrations. In such instances the focal spot will contain aberrations when there are slightly misaligned, poor quality, high power optics in the system such as a beam expander or eye piece and objective of a 3-axis galvo. Likewise, if the beam itself is not on axis, the third order aberrations of astigmatism and coma are likely to appear but again not be seen in the unfocused beams spatial profile. The third order aberrations of astigmatism, coma and spherical aberration can significantly alter both the size and spatial profile at the focus resulting in out of spec performance. The impact of beam and zoom expanders and their alignment in beam delivery systems is investigated by measuring both the far field unfocused and the far field focus beams using an all passive beam waist analyzer system.

  8. Geometrical theory of aberrations near the axis in classical off-axis reflecting telescopes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seunghyuk; Prata, Aluizio

    2005-11-01

    A geometrical theory of aberrations for the vicinity of the focus of arbitrary off-axis sections of conic mirrors is derived. It is shown that an off-axis conic mirror introduces linear astigmatism in the image. However, in classical two-mirror telescopes this aberration can be eliminated by tilting the secondary parent mirror axis. It is also shown that the practical geometrical-optics performance of a classical off-axis two-mirror telescope with no linear astigmatism is equivalent to the performance of an on-axis system, proving that both systems have identical third-order coma. To demonstrate the applicability of the theory developed in a practical system, a fast (i.e., f/2), compact, obstruction-free classical off-axis Cassegrain telescope is designed. PMID:16302396

  9. Comparison of higher order aberrations in patients with various refractive errors

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Saim; Humayun, Sadia; Fawad, Aisha; Ishaq, Mazhar; Arzoo, Sabahat; Mashhadi, Fawad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the mean root mean square (RMS) of total higher order aberrations (HOAs), coma and spherical aberrations in individuals with myopia, hypermetropia and myopic astigmatism. Methods: This prospective analytical study was conducted at Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan from Jan 2014 to Dec 2014. Two hundred eyes of 121 patients with age ranging from 18-40 years were included in the study. Patients were divided into 4 group namely Low myopia, High myopia, Astigmatism and Hypermetropia on the basis of refractive error. Included were the patients who had refractive error more than ± 0.5D and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 0.00 or better. Patients who had history of surgery and / or eye disease were excluded from the study. Visual acuity (VA), Spherical equivalent (SE) of refractive error, RMS value of total HOAs, coma and spherical aberrations were evaluated. HOAs were measured with aberrometer (Wavelight analyzer version 1073) at 6 mm pupil size. Results: Age of the patients ranged from 18 years to 40 years with mean age of 29.10±10.6 years. Seventy one (35.5%) were males and 129 (64.5%) were female. Mean RMS value of HOAs, coma and spherical aberrations was calculated in all four groups. RMS of total HOAs and spherical aberrations in hypermetropia was 0.96±0.96 and 0.30±0.42 respectively and it was higher than other three groups. Conclusions: In overall comparison the mean RMS of total HOAs and spherical aberrations was significantly increased in hypermetropia group and there was a statistically significant negative correlation of SE of hypermetropia with RMS of total HOAs and spherical aberration. PMID:26430409

  10. Using nodal aberration theory to understand the aberrations of multiple unobscured three mirror anastigmatic (TMA) telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Kevin P.; Fuerschbach, Kyle; Schmid, Tobias; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2009-08-01

    The alignment of three mirror anastigmatic (TMA) telescopes has been studied since their invention in the 60s. Recently, Thompson et al.1 reported that other than the conventional uniform coma over the field caused by misalignment, TMA telescopes display only one other misalignment induced aberration, field-asymmetric, field-linear astigmatism. Currently, an instrument with three TMAs is under development as the primary spectrometer on the James Webb Space Telescope. This paper will report on the application of Nodal Aberration Theory (NAT) to understanding the optical design of an optical system with multiple TMAs as a first step towards investigating and potentially independently analyzing the sensitivities to alignment of this key instrument.

  11. Astigmatism in reflector antennas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogdell, J. R.; Davis, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Astigmatic phase error in large parabolic reflector antennas is discussed. A procedure for focusing an antenna and diagnosing the presence and degree of astigmatism is described. Theoretical analysis is conducted to determine the nature of this error in such antennas.

  12. Effects of Induced Astigmatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.; Walton, Howard N.

    1968-01-01

    The relationship of astigmatism to reading and the possible detrimental effects it might have on reading were investigated. The greatest incidence of astigmatism was for the with-the-rule type ranging from .50 to 1.00 diopter. This type of astigmatism was induced in 35 seniors from the Los Angeles College of Optometry by placing cylindrical lenses…

  13. Using aberration test patterns to optimize the performance of EUV aerial imaging microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Miyakawa, Ryan; Naulleau, Patrick; Han, Hak-Seung; Huh, Sungmin

    2009-06-16

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a prototype EUV-wavelength zoneplate microscope that provides high quality aerial image measurements of EUV reticles. To simplify and improve the alignment procedure we have created and tested arrays of aberration-sensitive patterns on EUV reticles and we have compared their images collected with the AIT to the expected shapes obtained by simulating the theoretical wavefront of the system. We obtained a consistent measure of coma and astigmatism in the center of the field of view using two different patterns, revealing a misalignment condition in the optics.

  14. Sensing Phase Aberrations behind Lyot Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Rémi; Pueyo, Laurent; Wallace, J. Kent; Shao, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Direct detection of young extrasolar planets orbiting nearby stars can be accomplished from the ground with extreme adaptive optics and coronagraphy in the near-infrared, as long as this combination can provide an image with a dynamic range of 107 after the data are processed. Slowly varying speckles due to residual phase aberrations that are not measured by the primary wave-front sensor are the primary obstacle to achieving such a dynamic range. In particular, non-common optical path aberrations occurring between the wave-front sensor and the coronagraphic occulting spot degrade performance the most. We analyze the passage of both low and high spatial frequency phase ripples, as well as low-order Zernike aberrations, through an apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph in order to demonstrate the way coronagraphic filtering affects various aberrations. We derive the coronagraphically induced cutoff frequency of the filtering and estimate coronagraphic contrast losses due to low-order Zernike aberrations: tilt, astigmatism, defocus, coma, and spherical aberration. Such slowly varying path errors can be measured behind a coronagraph and corrected by a slowly updated optical path delay precompensation or offset asserted on the wave front by the adaptive optics (AO) system. We suggest ways of measuring and correcting all but the lowest spatial frequency aberrations using Lyot plane wave-front data, in spite of the complex interaction between the coronagraph and those mid-spatial frequency aberrations that cause image plane speckles near the coronagraphic focal plane mask occulter's edge. This investigation provides guidance for next-generation coronagraphic instruments currently under construction.

  15. Different aberrations raise contrast thresholds for single-letter identification in line with their effect on cross-correlation-based confusability.

    PubMed

    Young, Laura K; Love, Gordon D; Smithson, Hannah E

    2013-01-01

    We previously showed that different types of aberration defocus, coma, and secondary astigmatism affect reading performance via different mechanisms. In this paper, we show the contrary result that, for identification of isolated letters, the effects of rendering different types of aberration can be described by a single cross-correlation-based metric. Aberrations reduce the effective resolution of an optical system, quantified by the high-frequency fall-off of the modulation transfer function. They additionally cause spatial-frequency-dependent phase and contrast changes, which have a size-dependent effect on letter forms. We used contrast threshold as our performance measure, instead of distance acuity, to separate the effects of form alterations from those of resolution limits. This measure is additionally appropriate in comparing single-letter-based performance to reading at a fixed distance. The relationship between a cross-correlation-based measure of letter confusability and performance was the same for all three types of aberration. For reading, we had found a different relationship for coma than for defocus and secondary astigmatism. We conclude that even when two tasks--letter identification and reading--use the same component stimulus set, the combination of multiple letters in a reading task produces functional differences between the effects of these aberrations that are not present for isolated letters. PMID:23788460

  16. Objective evaluation of refractive data and astigmatism: quantification and analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaye, S B

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to present methods to improve the analysis of refractive data. A comparison of methods is used to analyse refractive powers using individual powers and aggregate data. Equations are also developed for the representation of the average power of a lens or refractive data as a univariate measure, which includes spherical, coma, and/or other aberrations. The equations provide a precise representation of refractive power, which is useful for comparing individual and aggregate data. Average lens power in the principal meridian can be adequately computed as can the average lens power through orthogonal and oblique meridians, providing a good univariate representation of astigmatism and refractive power. Although these formulae are perhaps not as easy to use as, for example, the spherical equivalent, they are more precise and superior in principle involving fewer approximations and are not subject to systematic bias. These effects are of significance when dealing with high-powered lenses such as intraocular lenses or the cornea. They need to be taken into account particularly for calculations of intraocular lens power, toric intraocular lenses, and cornea refractive surgery, especially if outcomes are to be improved. Such issues are of particular importance when dealing with aggregate data and determining statistical significance of treatment effects. PMID:24336294

  17. Tubular astigmatism-tunable fluidic lens.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Daniel; Zappe, Hans

    2016-06-15

    We demonstrate a new means to fabricate three-dimensional liquid lenses which may be tuned in focal length and astigmatism. Using actuation by electrowetting-on-dielectrics, astigmatism in arbitrary directions may be tuned independently, with almost no cross talk between orthogonal orientations. The lens is based on electrodes structured on planar polyimide foils and subsequently rolled, enabling high-resolution patterning of complex electrodes along the azimuthal and radial directions of the lens. Based on a design established through fluidic and optical simulations, the astigmatism tuning is experimentally verified by a change of the corresponding Zernike coefficients measured using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. It was seen that the back focal length can be tuned by 5 mm and 0° and 45° astigmatism by 3 μm through application of voltages in the range of 50  Vrms. It was observed that the cross talk with other aberrations is very low, suggesting a novel means for astigmatism control in imaging systems. PMID:27304276

  18. Improved astigmatic focus error detection method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    1992-01-01

    All easy-to-implement focus- and track-error detection methods presently used in magneto-optical (MO) disk drives using pre-grooved media suffer from a side effect known as feedthrough. Feedthrough is the unwanted focus error signal (FES) produced when the optical head is seeking a new track, and light refracted from the pre-grooved disk produces an erroneous FES. Some focus and track-error detection methods are more resistant to feedthrough, but tend to be complicated and/or difficult to keep in alignment as a result of environmental insults. The astigmatic focus/push-pull tracking method is an elegant, easy-to-align focus- and track-error detection method. Unfortunately, it is also highly susceptible to feedthrough when astigmatism is present, with the worst effects caused by astigmatism oriented such that the tangential and sagittal foci are at 45 deg to the track direction. This disclosure outlines a method to nearly completely eliminate the worst-case form of feedthrough due to astigmatism oriented 45 deg to the track direction. Feedthrough due to other primary aberrations is not improved, but performance is identical to the unimproved astigmatic method.

  19. Astigmatism in cataract surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Luntz, M. H.; Livingston, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    We report on our investigation into astigmatism in 40 eyes following a corneal cataract incision closed with a continuous 10/0 nylon monofilament suture (Ethilon). Immediately after surgery there was astigmatism caused by the nylon suture (suture-induced astigmatism), its severity depending on the tightness of the suture. It ranged from 1 to 10-5 dioptres, the mean value 4-09 dioptres with a standard deviation of +/-2-5. Removing the nylon suture eliminated this astigmatism and within a few weeks the corneal astigmatism correction in 48% of eyes returned to the preoperative level. In 80% of eyes the difference between the final postoperative corneal astigmatism (4 months after removing the continuous suture) and the preoperative astigmatism was 0-75 dioptres or less and the maximum change was 1-5 dioptres. In 40% of eyes the axis of the cylinder changed from a horizontal to an oblique axis but did not change from a with- to against-the-rule axis. The degree of astigmatism remained constant while the suture was in place and in 50% of eyes was equal to or less than 3 dioptres. The mean of the spherical equivalents was 11-31 dioptres with a standard deviation of +/-1-25. A spectacle correction 14 days after operation prescribed either as the mean spherical equivalent (11-50 dioptres) or according to the patient's refraction will give satisfactory vision until the suture is removed 4 months after operation. The degree of astigmatism following a corneal section and continuous nylon suture compares very favourably with astigmatism following other suturing techniques for cataract. Images PMID:326304

  20. Polarization-based compensation of astigmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Dola Roy; Bhattacharya, Kallol; Chakraborty, Ajay K.; Ghosh, Raja

    2004-02-01

    One approach to aberration compensation of an imaging system is to introduce a suitable phase mask at the aperture plane of an imaging system. We utilize this principle for the compensation of astigmatism. A suitable polarization mask used on the aperture plane together with a polarizer-retarder combination at the input of the imaging system provides the compensating polarization-induced phase steps at different quadrants of the apertures masked by different polarizers. The aberrant phase can be considerably compensated by the proper choice of a polarization mask and suitable selection of the polarization parameters involved. The results presented here bear out our theoretical expectation.

  1. Plasma channels during filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse with wavefront astigmatism in air

    SciTech Connect

    Dergachev, A A; Kandidov, V P; Shlenov, S A; Ionin, A A; Mokrousova, D V; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Shustikova, A P

    2014-12-31

    We have demonstrated experimentally and numerically the possibility of controlling parameters of plasma channels formed during filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse by introducing astigmatism in the laser beam wavefront. It is found that weak astigmatism increases the length of the plasma channel in comparison with the case of aberration-free focusing and that strong astigmatism can cause splitting of the plasma channel into two channels located one after another on the filament axis. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  2. Plasma channels during filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse with wavefront astigmatism in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dergachev, A. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kandidov, V. P.; Mokrousova, D. V.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Shlenov, S. A.; Shustikova, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    We have demonstrated experimentally and numerically the possibility of controlling parameters of plasma channels formed during filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse by introducing astigmatism in the laser beam wavefront. It is found that weak astigmatism increases the length of the plasma channel in comparison with the case of aberration-free focusing and that strong astigmatism can cause splitting of the plasma channel into two channels located one after another on the filament axis.

  3. Optimal incision sites to reduce corneal aberration variations after small incision phacoemulsification cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ling; Zhao, Jiang-Yue; Zhang, Jin-Song; Meng, Jie; Wang, Ming-Wu; Yang, Ya-Jing; Yu, Jia-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the effect of steep meridian small incision phacoemulsification cataract surgery on anterior, posterior and total corneal wavefront aberration. METHODS Steep meridian small incision phacoemulsification cataract surgery was performed in age-related cataract patients which were divided into three groups according to the incision site: 12 o'clock, 9 o'clock and between 9 and 12 o'clock (BENT) incision groups. The preoperative and 3-month postoperative root mean square (RMS) values of anterior, posterior and total corneal wavefront aberration including coma, spherical aberration, and total higher-order aberrations (HOAs), were measured by Pentacam scheimpflug imaging. The mean preoperative and postoperative corneal wavefront aberrations were documented. RESULTS Total corneal aberration and total lower-order aberrations decreased significantly in three groups after operation. RMS value of total HOAs decreased significantly postoperatively in the 12 o'clock incision group (P<0.001). Corneal spherical aberration was statistically significantly lower after steep meridian small incision phacoemulsification cataract surgery in BENT incision group (P<0.05) and Pearson correlation analysis indicated that spherical aberration changes had no significant relationship with total astigmatism changes in all three corneal incision location. CONCLUSION Corneal incision of phacoemulsification cataract surgery can affect corneal wavefront aberration. The 12 o'clock corneal incision eliminated more HOAs and the spherical aberrations decreased in BENT incision group obviously when we selected steep meridian small incision. Cataract lens replacement using wavefront-corrected intraocular lens combined with optimized corneal incision site would improve ocular aberration results. PMID:27162725

  4. Coma full-field display for freeform imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Aaron; Thompson, Kevin P.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2015-10-01

    With the recent advances in optical fabrication technology, the manufacturing of freeform optical surfaces is no longer prohibitive. To spur the development of freeform systems, however, optical designers must be given the necessary tools to efficiently design, analyze, and tolerance these systems. The process for designing freeform imaging systems is enhanced by the knowledge of the individual aberration contributions across the full field-of-view. As shown in the recent aberration theory for freeform surfaces, identifying the field dependence of the dominant aberrations is critical for a controlled freeform optimization. Coma, an often system-limiting aberration and an aberration that has recently been directly addressed with freeform surfaces, is of specific interest. Currently, a coma full-field display (FFD) of a system can be generated in commercial ray-tracing software by fitting the wavefront at the exit pupil with Zernike polynomials, but this process can involve tracing thousands of rays. Moreover, the circular coma FFDs are inherently separate from the elliptical coma FFDs. In this research, we use nodal aberration theory to develop a method to generate a coma FFD that requires only a few (less than 10) rays per field point to be traced through the optical system. Both the magnitude and orientation of the coma aberrations at the image plane are shown in our FFDs, including the effects of elliptical coma. These coma FFDs save computation time during the design and offer valuable insight to the designer. Examples of the plots will be shown for multiple freeform optical systems.

  5. Eye aberration analysis with Zernike polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molebny, Vasyl V.; Chyzh, Igor H.; Sokurenko, Vyacheslav M.; Pallikaris, Ioannis G.; Naoumidis, Leonidas P.

    1998-06-01

    New horizons for accurate photorefractive sight correction, afforded by novel flying spot technologies, require adequate measurements of photorefractive properties of an eye. Proposed techniques of eye refraction mapping present results of measurements for finite number of points of eye aperture, requiring to approximate these data by 3D surface. A technique of wave front approximation with Zernike polynomials is described, using optimization of the number of polynomial coefficients. Criterion of optimization is the nearest proximity of the resulted continuous surface to the values calculated for given discrete points. Methodology includes statistical evaluation of minimal root mean square deviation (RMSD) of transverse aberrations, in particular, varying consecutively the values of maximal coefficient indices of Zernike polynomials, recalculating the coefficients, and computing the value of RMSD. Optimization is finished at minimal value of RMSD. Formulas are given for computing ametropia, size of the spot of light on retina, caused by spherical aberration, coma, and astigmatism. Results are illustrated by experimental data, that could be of interest for other applications, where detailed evaluation of eye parameters is needed.

  6. Propagation properties of partially polarized Gaussian Schell-model beams through an astigmatic lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Liuzhan; Wang, Beizhan; Lu, Baida

    2005-09-01

    Based on the beam coherent-polarization (BCP) matrix approach and propagation law of partially coherent beams, analytical propagation equations of partially polarized Gaussian Schell-model (PGSM) beams through an astigmatic lens are derived, which enables us to study the propagation-induced polarization changes and irradiance distributions at any propagation distance of PGSM beams through an astigmatic lens within the framework of the paraxial approximation. Detailed numerical results for a PGSM beam passing through an astigmatic lens are presented. A comparison with the aberration-free case is made, and shows that the astigmatism affects the propagation properties of PGSM beams.

  7. Characterisation of the effects of optical aberrations in single molecule techniques

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Benjamin C.; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Schwartz, Noah; Rolfe, Daniel J.; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa; Lo Schiavo, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Optical aberrations degrade image quality in fluorescence microscopy, including for single-molecule based techniques. These depend on post-processing to localize individual molecules in an image series. Using simulated data, we show the impact of optical aberrations on localization success, accuracy and precision. The peak intensity and the proportion of successful localizations strongly reduces when the aberration strength is greater than 1.0 rad RMS, while the precision of each of those localisations is halved. The number of false-positive localisations exceeded 10% of the number of true-positive localisations at an aberration strength of only ~0.6 rad RMS when using the ThunderSTORM package, but at greater than 1.0 rad RMS with the Radial Symmetry package. In the presence of coma, the localization error reaches 100 nm at ~0.6 rad RMS of aberration strength. The impact of noise and of astigmatism for axial resolution are also considered. Understanding the effect of aberrations is crucial when deciding whether the addition of adaptive optics to a single-molecule microscope could significantly increase the information obtainable from an image series. PMID:27231619

  8. Characterisation of the effects of optical aberrations in single molecule techniques.

    PubMed

    Coles, Benjamin C; Webb, Stephen E D; Schwartz, Noah; Rolfe, Daniel J; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa; Lo Schiavo, Valentina

    2016-05-01

    Optical aberrations degrade image quality in fluorescence microscopy, including for single-molecule based techniques. These depend on post-processing to localize individual molecules in an image series. Using simulated data, we show the impact of optical aberrations on localization success, accuracy and precision. The peak intensity and the proportion of successful localizations strongly reduces when the aberration strength is greater than 1.0 rad RMS, while the precision of each of those localisations is halved. The number of false-positive localisations exceeded 10% of the number of true-positive localisations at an aberration strength of only ~0.6 rad RMS when using the ThunderSTORM package, but at greater than 1.0 rad RMS with the Radial Symmetry package. In the presence of coma, the localization error reaches 100 nm at ~0.6 rad RMS of aberration strength. The impact of noise and of astigmatism for axial resolution are also considered. Understanding the effect of aberrations is crucial when deciding whether the addition of adaptive optics to a single-molecule microscope could significantly increase the information obtainable from an image series. PMID:27231619

  9. Sources of the monochromatic aberrations induced in human eyes after laser refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jason

    Laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) procedures correct the eye's defocus and astigmatism but also introduce higher order monochromatic aberrations. Little is known about the origins of these induced aberrations. The advent of wavefront sensor technology has made it possible to measure accurately and quickly the aberrations of normal and postoperative LASIK eyes. The goal of this thesis was to exploit this technology to better understand some of the potential mechanisms by which aberrations could be introduced during LASIK. A first step towards investigating these sources was to characterize the aberration changes in post-LASIK eyes. Higher order rms wavefront error increased after conventional and customized LASIK surgery. On average, spherical aberration approximately doubled, and significant changes in vertical and horizontal coma were observed. We examined two sources of postoperative aberrations: the creation of a microkeratome flap and the subsequent laser ablation. Higher order rms increased slightly and there was a wide variation in the response of individual Zernike modes after cutting a flap. The majority of induced spherical aberration was due to the laser ablation and not the flap-cut. Aberrations are also induced by static and dynamic decentrations of the patient's pupil. We found that ablations were typically decentered in the superotemporal direction due to shifts in pupil center location between aberration measurement (dilated) and surgical (undilated) conditions in customized LASIK eyes. There was a weak correlation between the horizontal coma theoretically induced by this offset and that measured postoperatively. Finally, dynamic eye movements during the procedure induce higher order aberrations. We found that the most problematic decentrations during LASIK are relatively slow drifts in eye position. An eye-tracking system with a 2-Hz closed-loop bandwidth could compensate for most eye movements during LASIK. One solution for reducing the

  10. Measuring higher order optical aberrations of the human eye: techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, L Alberto V; Castro, J C; Carvalho, L Antonio V

    2002-11-01

    In the present paper we discuss the development of "wave-front", an instrument for determining the lower and higher optical aberrations of the human eye. We also discuss the advantages that such instrumentation and techniques might bring to the ophthalmology professional of the 21st century. By shining a small light spot on the retina of subjects and observing the light that is reflected back from within the eye, we are able to quantitatively determine the amount of lower order aberrations (astigmatism, myopia, hyperopia) and higher order aberrations (coma, spherical aberration, etc.). We have measured artificial eyes with calibrated ametropia ranging from +5 to -5 D, with and without 2 D astigmatism with axis at 45 degrees and 90 degrees. We used a device known as the Hartmann-Shack (HS) sensor, originally developed for measuring the optical aberrations of optical instruments and general refracting surfaces in astronomical telescopes. The HS sensor sends information to a computer software for decomposition of wave-front aberrations into a set of Zernike polynomials. These polynomials have special mathematical properties and are more suitable in this case than the traditional Seidel polynomials. We have demonstrated that this technique is more precise than conventional autorefraction, with a root mean square error (RMSE) of less than 0.1 micro m for a 4-mm diameter pupil. In terms of dioptric power this represents an RMSE error of less than 0.04 D and 5 degrees for the axis. This precision is sufficient for customized corneal ablations, among other applications. PMID:12426641

  11. Degenerate astigmatic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtois, Jérémie; Mohamed, Ajmal; Romanini, Daniele

    2013-10-01

    At the output of a high-finesse cavity a succession of Lissajous patterns may be observed as the cavity length is finely tuned inside a “degenerate region” around a reentrant spherical configuration. This behavior is ascribed to a small parasitic astigmatism of the cavity mirrors. Simple geometrical optics modeling confirms this hypothesis, and then a more realistic analysis using transverse Gaussian modes reveals that the Lissajous patterns correspond to an organization of the astigmatism-split modes into a finer substructure of degenerate modes relative to that of a reentrant spherical cavity. This provides a thorough understanding of the field patterns observed in the degenerate region, including an intriguing spatial symmetry of the patterns corresponding to opposite displacements with respect to a specific central cavity length. This investigation represents a generalization of the theory of reentrant spherical cavities to the astigmatic case.

  12. Higher-Order Aberrations when wearing Sphere and Toric Soft Contact Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, David A.; Merchea, Mohinder M.; Richdale, Kathryn; Mack, Carla J.; Barr, Joseph T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the on-eye effect of spherical and toric contact lens design on higher-order aberrations (HOA). Methods Thirty eyes (15 subjects) entered a masked, randomized, cross-over study. Each eye was fitted with the spherical and toric lens of the following brands in random order: Acuvue Advance, Biomedics 55, Frequency 55, and SofLens 66. HOAs were measured using the Zywave II Aberrometer over a 6-mm aperture up to fifth order. A linear model accounting for the fixed effect of lens type and random effects of subject and eye was created. Paired t-tests were completed between lens brands within the spherical and toric lenses and between the spherical and toric lens within each brand. Best-corrected visual acuity (VA) was measured and compared. Results No clinically meaningful differences in total HOAs were found between brands or between the spherical and toric lens within a brand. Positive spherical aberration (SA) was reduced by all spherical and toric lenses compared to wearing no lens by 0.07 to 0.23 μm (p<0.0001). Frequency toric induced the greatest change in SA. The thin-zone design lens (Acuvue Advance for Astigmatism) had a statistically different amount of vertical coma (−0.04 μm) than the three prism-balast toric lenses (0.11 to 0.23 μm; p<0.0001). SofLens toric had the greatest amount of vertical coma, but better VA than Acuvue Advance for Astigmatism and Frequency toric. With the exception of Acuvue Advance for Astigmatism, toric lenses had greater absolute magnitude of vertical coma than their sphere counterparts (all p<0.002). No other significant HOA differences were observed. Conclusions Toric contact lenses with prism-ballast designs demonstrated more vertical coma, but better VA. Positive SA was reduced by spherical and toric contact lenses. The visual quality effect of lens design and material on induced HOAs warrants further investigation. PMID:19156015

  13. The vector behavior of aberrations in high numerical aperture (0.9 < NA < 3.1) laser focusing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Sseunhyeun

    This dissertation investigates vector behavior of aberrations for high numerical aperture optical systems using a solid immersion lens (SIL). In order to analyze the system, this dissertation introduces the illumination system transfer function (ISTF), which is a map in the space of the exit pupil that shows reflection and transmission properties of individual plane waves that are emitted from corresponding points in the exit pupil. A vector analysis using ISTF presents the role of propagating and evanescent energy in the SIL systems, where the boundary between the them is defined by total internal reflection. The behavior of third-order aberrations such as coma and astigmatism, are dramatically affected by polarization in high NA systems. The irradiance distribution exhibits significantly different characteristics, depending on how coma or astigmatism is aligned with the incident linear polarized light. Vector effects including diffraction, polarization, and aberration, are used to analyze tolerances along with a comparison to geometrical optics. Apodization in amplitude and phase of the angular spectrum is generated in high NA focusing systems due to the difference in vector transmission and reflection for each plane wave. The size of the incident gaussian beam is effectively reduced at the exit pupil by the amplitude apodization and causes a spot size increase in image space. The apodization in phase is called gap-induced aberration due to its dependence on the air gap. The gap- induced aberration does not come from lens surface imperfection, and it exhibits multiple orders of spherical aberration and astigmatism. The apodization in amplitude and phase is well characterized by separable supergaussian functions, where each function depends on the refractive index of the SIL n SIL and the air gap height h. The best defocus, based on characteristics of gap-induced aberration, is suggested to be a good compensator only for low nSIL and h. The system performance, as

  14. Myxedema coma.

    PubMed

    Kwaku, Maxwell P; Burman, Kenneth D

    2007-01-01

    Untreated or unrecognized hypothyroidism may progress to severe decompensated hypothyroidism or myxedema coma. Relatively few cases are reported in the literature since the first case was apparently reported from the St. Thomas Hospital in London in 1879. The paucity of cases may be due to either underreporting or improvement in the diagnosis and treatment of uncomplicated hypothyroidism. However, despite the ready availability of sensitive thyrotropin assays, the recognition and treatment of myxedema coma remains a challenge. Although thyroid hormone treatment is highly effective when combined with ventilatory and hemodynamic support in the intensive care unit setting, controversies abound on the optimal and most effective choice of thyroid hormone preparation: thyroxine and triiodothyronine and in what amount. Accumulated evidence now shows that proper use of either thyroxine alone or in combination with triiodothyronine may be effective therapy. PMID:17712058

  15. The Visual Impact of Zernike and Seidel Forms of Monochromatic Aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xu; Bradley, Arthur; Ravikumar, Sowmya; Thibos, Larry N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To examine the impact on visual acuity of different aberrations modes (e.g. coma, astigmatism, spherical aberration (SA)) and different aberration basis functions (Zernike or Seidel). Methods Computational optics was used to generate retinal images degraded by either the Zernike or Seidel forms of 2nd through 4th order aberrations for an eye with a 5mm pupil diameter. High contrast, photopic visual acuity was measured using method of constant stimuli for letters displayed on a computer-controlled, linearized, quasi-monochromatic (λ=556 nm) display. Results Minimum angle of resolution (MAR) varied linearly with the magnitude (root mean square error, RMS) of all modes of aberration. The impact of individual Zernike lower and higher order aberrations (HOAs) varied significantly with mode, e.g. arc minutes of MAR/micron of RMS slopes varied from 7 (spherical defocus) to 0.5 (quadrafoil). Seidel forms of these aberrations always had a smaller visual impact. Notably, Seidel spherical aberration (SA) had 1/17th the impact of Zernike SA with the same wavefront variance, and about 1/4th the impact of Zernike SA with matching levels of r4 wavefront error. With lower order components removed, HOAs near the center of the Zernike pyramid do not have a large visual impact. Conclusions The majority of the visual impact of high levels of 4th order Zernike aberrations can be attributed to the 2nd order terms within these polynomials. Therefore, the impact of SA can be minimized by balancing it with a defocus term that flattens the central wavefront (paraxial focus) or maximizes the area of the pupil with a flat wavefront. Over this wide range of aberration types and levels, image quality metrics based upon the PSF and OTF can predict VA as reliably as VA measures can predict retests of VA, and thus such metrics may become valuable predictors of both VA and, via optimization, refractions. PMID:20351600

  16. AO-OCT for in vivo mouse retinal imaging: Application of adaptive lens in wavefornt sensorless aberration correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Pugh, Edward N.; Sarunic, Marinko V.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate Adaptive optics - Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) with modal sensorless Adaptive Optics correction with the use of novel Adaptive Lens (AL) applied for in-vivo imaging of mouse retinas. The AL can generate low order aberrations: defocus, astigmatism, coma and spherical aberration that were used in an adaptive search algorithm. Accelerated processing of the OCT data with a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) permitted real time extraction of image projection total intensity for arbitrarily selected retinal depth plane to be optimized. Wavefront sensorless control is a viable option for imaging biological structures for which AOOCT cannot establish a reliable wavefront that could be corrected by wavefront corrector. Image quality improvements offered by adaptive lens with sensorless AO-OCT was evaluated on in vitro samples followed by mouse retina data acquired in vivo.

  17. Subwavelength-grating-induced wavefront aberrations: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, Karlton; Chipman, Russell A.

    2007-01-01

    The on-axis wavefront aberrations of a one-dimensional sub-wavelength grating anti-reflection coating on a f/1.7 lens surface is dominated by defocus, astigmatism, and piston. The astigmatism is 0.02 waves and the magnitude of the piston approaches 1 wave peak-to-valley. The difference in aberrations between orthogonally polarized wavefronts, or the retardance aberration, shows 0.01 waves of astigmatism like variation and more than 0.01 waves of retardance induced defocus like variation.

  18. Use of the Abbe sine condition to quantify alignment aberrations in optical imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burge, James H.; Zhao, Chunyu; Lu, Sheng Huei

    2010-08-01

    Violation of Abbe's sine condition is well-known to cause coma in axisymmetric imaging systems, and generally any offense against the sine condition (OSC) will cause aberrations that have linear dependence on the field angle. A well-corrected imaging system must obey the Abbe sine condition. A misaligned optical system can have particular forms of the OSC which are evaluated here. The lowest order non-trivial effects of misalignment have quadratic pupil dependence which causes a combination of astigmatism and focus that have linear field dependence. Higher order terms can arise from complex systems, but the effects of misalignment are nearly always dominated by the lowest order effects which can be fully characterized by measuring images on axis and the on-axis offense against the sine condition. By understanding the form of the on-axis images and the OSC, the state of alignment can be determined.

  19. On-axis spectral shifts and spectral switches of Gaussian Schell-model beams focused by an astigmatic aperture lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao; Pan, Liuzhan; Ding, Chaoliang; Lü, Baida

    2008-10-01

    Starting from the propagation law of partially coherent light, the on-axis spectral shifts and spectral switches of Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams focused by an astigmatic aperture lens are studied. It is shown that, as compared with an aberration-free case whose spectral shifts and spectral switches are induced by spatial correlation and aperture diffraction, the spectral shifts and spectral switches of GSM beams also depend upon the astigmatism of the lens for an astigmatism case. Detailed numerical calculations are made to illustrate the behavior of spectral shifts and spectral switches of GSM beams focused by an astigmatic aperture lens.

  20. Astigmatic Bessel laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khonina, S. N.; Kotlyar, V. V.; Soifer, V. A.; Jefimovs, K.; Pääkkönen, P.; Turunen, J.

    2004-05-01

    The oblique incidence of a He-Ne laser beam onto a phase-only diffractive optical element (DOE) that simultaneously produces several unimode different-order Bessel beams propagating at various angles with respect to the optical axis is studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that, under obliquely incident illumination of a DOE that forms Bessel beams, the resulting astigmatic diffraction pattern can be used to unambiguously identify the direction of the Bessel beam's phase rotation and the order of the Bessel mode.

  1. Primary aberrations in focused radially polarized vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, David P.; Brown, T. G.

    2004-02-01

    We study the effect of primary aberrations on the 3-D polarization of the electric field in a focused lowest order radially polarized beam. A full vector diffraction treatment of the focused beams is used. Attention is given to the effects of primary spherical, astigmatic, and comatic aberrations on the local polarization, Strehl ratio, and aberration induced degradation of the longitudinal field at focus

  2. Coating-induced wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiley, Daniel J.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1992-12-01

    The coatings which are used on telescope mirrors and other optical interfaces can have a profound effect on the image quality formed by an optical system. This paper evaluates the defocus and astigmatism which are caused by the s- and p-phase shifts of coatings. These coating-induced wavefront aberrations are usually insignificant, but can, under certain circumstances, overshadow the geometric wavefront aberrations of the system. The wavefront aberrations induced by reflection-enhanced coatings on an f/1.5 Cassegrain telescope are numerically evaluated as an example.

  3. Amblyopia in Astigmatic Infants and Toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Velma; Harvey, Erin M.; Clifford-Donaldson, Candice E.; Green, Tina K.; Miller, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine if reduced astigmatism-corrected acuity for vertical (V) and/or horizontal (H) gratings and/or meridional amblyopia (MA) are present prior to age three years in children who have with-the-rule astigmatism. Methods Subjects were 448 children, 6 months through 2 years of age with no known ocular abnormalities other than with-the-rule astigmatism, who were recruited through Women, Infants and Children clinics on the Tohono O’odham reservation. Children were classified as non-astigmats (≤ 2.00 D) or astigmats (> 2.00 D) based on right eye (RE) non-cycloplegic autorefraction measurements (Welch Allyn SureSight). RE astigmatism-corrected grating acuity for V and H stimuli was measured using the Teller Acuity Card procedure while children wore cross-cylinder lenses to correct their astigmatism or plano lenses if they had no astigmatism. Results Astigmatism-corrected acuity for both V and H gratings was significantly poorer in the astigmats than in the non-astigmats, and the reduction in acuity for astigmats was present for children in all three age groups examined (6 months to <1 year, 1 to <2 years, 2 to <3 years). There was no significant difference in V-H grating acuity (no evidence of MA) for the astigmatic group as a whole, or when data were analyzed for each age group. Conclusions Even in the youngest age group, astigmats tested with astigmatism correction showed reduced acuity for both V and H gratings, which suggests that astigmatism is having a negative influence on visual development. We found no evidence of orientation-related differences in astigmatism-corrected grating acuity, indicating either that MA does not develop prior to age 3 years, or that most of the astigmatic children had a type of astigmatism, i.e., hyperopic, that has proven to be less likely than myopic or mixed astigmatism to result in MA. PMID:20351602

  4. Coma-compensation telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacFarlane, Malcolm J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A telescope for eliminating on axis coma due to tilt of the secondary mirror in infrared astronomy. The secondary mirror of a reflecting telescope is formed to cause field coma to always be equal and opposite at the optical axis of the telescope to tilt coma regardless of the angle through the secondary mirror is tilted with respect to the optical axis.

  5. Amblyopia in astigmatic children: patterns of deficits.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Erin M; Dobson, Velma; Miller, Joseph M; Clifford-Donaldson, Candice E

    2007-02-01

    Neural changes that result from disruption of normal visual experience during development are termed amblyopia. To characterize visual deficits specific to astigmatism-related amblyopia, we compared best-corrected visual performance in 330 astigmatic and 475 non-astigmatic kindergarten through 6th grade children. Astigmatism was associated with deficits in letter, grating and vernier acuity, high and middle spatial frequency contrast sensitivity, and stereoacuity. Although grating acuity, vernier acuity, and contrast sensitivity were reduced across stimulus orientation, astigmats demonstrated orientation-dependent deficits (meridional amblyopia) only for grating acuity. Astigmatic children are at risk for deficits across a range of visual functions. PMID:17184807

  6. Aberrations of a horizontal-vertical depolarizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Stephen C.; Chipman, Russell A.; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    1992-01-01

    Ray-trace equations for uniaxial birefringent materials are used here to derive third-order estimates for aberrations that are produced in imaging through uniaxial plates and horizontal-vertical (HV) depolarizers. An HV depolarizer is a spatial pseudodepolarizer; it converts a uniform input polarization state into a continuum of spatially varying polarization states in an output beam. An HV depolarizer consists of two birefringent wedges whose crystal axes are crossed at 90 deg. The interface between the wedges is included, which leads to a spatially varying retardance that provides the spatial pseudodepolarization. In HV depolarizers, spherical aberration, astigmatism, and image doubling are the principal aberrations for on-axis objects. Only spherical aberration occurs in isotropic plates, while the presence of birefringent wedges introduces astigmatism and image doubling. It is shown that image separation is proportional to the magnitude of the retardance variation.

  7. Optical aberrations measurement with a low cost optometric instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, Walter D.; Muñoz-Escrivá, L.; Pons, A.; Martínez-Corral, M.

    2002-08-01

    A simple experimental method for measuring optical aberrations of a single lens is proposed. The technique is based on the use of an optometric instrument employed for the assessment of the refractive state of the eye: the retinoscope. Experimental results for spherical aberration and astigmatism are obtained.

  8. Use of pupil mapping for measurement of linearly field-dependent aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampen, Sara Michelle

    Rather than measuring aberrations at several locations across the field to quantify the alignment of an optical system, we show how a simple measurement of the pupil mapping can be used to measure the off-axis performance of the system. This method uses the Abbe sine condition to relate the mapping between the entrance and the exit pupils, where the violations of the generalized sine condition are used to determine the pupil mapping error. From this pupil mapping, the linearly field-dependent aberrations can be calculated. One of the advantages to this method is that all of the test equipment can be aligned to the center of the field while making measurements of the off-axis performance, which reduces the uncertainty of the measurement. This advantage is particularly evident with systems or sub-systems that have large inherent aberrations where off-axis alignment tolerances are very tight. Additionally, in the Sine Condition Test (SCTest), the test equipment can be designed to compensate for the native Siedel coma in the system. This makes it more straightforward to measure the linearly field dependence of the aberrations. By reducing or removing coma, the measurement uncertainty is further reduced. This work begins by explaining the background of the Abbe sine condition, derivation of the pupil mapping error, and an overview of linearly field-dependent astigmatism that arises from misalignment. Next, the general method of implementation is discussed, and expanded further by exploring the two different source options: a point source with a grating or a flat-panel display. Experimental results from proof of concept systems are shown for both cases. Next, this dissertation explains how the SCTest can be implemented on more complex systems. Last, this dissertation shows how the linear aberrations, along with constant field-dependent aberrations, can be used to align a system. Here, the application of the alignment version of the SCTest on a three mirror anastigmat

  9. Anions in Cometary Comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of IP/Halley. The anions 0-, OH-, C-, CH- and CN- have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu (Chaizy et al. 1991). Organic molecular anions are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas-phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been explored. We present details of the first attempt to model the chemistry of anions in cometary comae. Based on the combined chemical and hydro dynamical model of Rodgers & Charnley (2002), we investigate the role of large carbon-chain anions in cometary coma chemistry. We calculate the effects of these anions on coma thermodynamics, charge balance and examine their impact on molecule formation.

  10. Non-toric extended depth of focus contact lenses for astigmatism and presbyopia correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Yaish, Shai; Zlotnik, Alex; Yehezkel, Oren; Lahav-Yacouel, Karen; Belkin, Michael; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Testing whether the extended depth of focus technology embedded on non-toric contact lenses is a suitable treatment for both astigmatism and presbyopia. Methods: The extended depth of focus pattern consisting of microndepth concentric grooves was engraved on a surface of a mono-focal soft contact lens. These grooves create an interference pattern extending the focus from a point to a length of about 1mm providing a 3.00D extension in the depth of focus. The extension in the depth of focus provides high quality focused imaging capabilities from near through intermediate and up to far ranges. Due to the angular symmetry of the engraved pattern the extension in the depth of focus can also resolve regular as well as irregular astigmatism aberrations. Results: The contact lens was tested on a group of 8 astigmatic and 13 subjects with presbyopia. Average correction of 0.70D for astigmatism and 1.50D for presbyopia was demonstrated. Conclusions: The extended depth of focus technology in a non-toric contact lens corrects simultaneously astigmatism and presbyopia. The proposed solution is based upon interference rather than diffraction effects and thus it is characterized by high energetic efficiency to the retina plane as well as reduced chromatic aberrations.

  11. The effects of turbulent aberrations on an optical communication system based on orbital angular momentum-carrying beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi-xin; Xu, Jian-cai; Wang, Jian-yu; Jia, Jian-jun

    2009-07-01

    A photon communication system based on orbital angular momentum (OAM)-carrying beams is studied. We compartmentalize the atmospheric aberration into tilt,coma, astigmatism as well as defous. We numerically analyze the effects of tilt on the orbital angular momentum of communication beams and find that the tilt aberration can induce the noisy OAM. With the increasing of parameters P, L, the probability of initial OAM goes down while the effective number of noise OAM increases. At the same time, the peaks of the induced OAM probability (max-probability) are different as the P, L, changes. The increase of zenith angle damages the probability and leads to noisy OAM. This can also be applied to the impact of refractive index structure parameter. We also numerically analyze the effects which receiving-radius puts on the receiving probability of initial OAM through tilt aberration. Under the influence of tilt, the receiving probability of previous orbital angular momentum slashs with the receiving-radius becoming large.

  12. Iso-sciatic point: novel approach to distinguish shadowing 3-D mask effects from scanner aberrations in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leunissen, Leonardus H. A.; Gronheid, Roel; Gao, Weimin

    2006-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) uses a reflective mask with a multilayer coating. Therefore, the illumination is an off-axis ring field system that is non-telecentric on the mask side. This non-zero angle of incidence combined with the three-dimensional mask topography results in the so-called "shadowing effect". The shadowing causes the printed CD to depend on the orientation as well as on the position in the slit and it will significantly influence the image formation [1,2]. In addition, simulations show that the Bossung curves are asymmetrical due to 3-D mask effects and their best focus depends on the shadowing angle [3]. Such tilts in the Bossung curves are usually associated with aberrations in the optical system. In this paper, we describe an approach in which both properties can be disentangled. Bossung curve simulations with varying effective angles of incidence (between 0 and 6 degrees) show that at discrete defocus offsets, the printed linewidth is independent of the incident angle (and thus independent of the shadowing effect), the so-called iso-sciatic (constant shadowing) point. For an ideal optical system this means that the size of a printed feature with a given mask-CD and orientation does not change through slit. With a suitable test structure it is possible to use this effect to distinguish between mask topography and imaging effects from aberrations through slit. Simulations for the following aberrations tested the approach: spherical, coma and astigmatism.

  13. A simple method for astigmatic compensation of folded resonator without Brewster window.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wen; Xiaojun, Zhang; Yonggang, Wang; Liqun, Sun; Hanben, Niu

    2014-02-10

    A folded resonator requires an oblique angle of incidence on the folded curved mirror, which introduces astigmatic distortions that limit the performance of the lasers. We present a simple method to compensate the astigmatism of folded resonator without Brewster windows for the first time to the best of our knowledge. Based on the theory of the propagation and transformation of Gaussian beams, the method is both effective and reliable. Theoretical results show that the folded resonator can be compensated astigmatism completely when the following two conditions are fulfilled. Firstly, when the Gaussian beam with a determined size beam waist is obliquely incident on an off-axis concave mirror, two new Gaussian beam respectively in the tangential and sagittal planes are formed. Another off-axis concave mirror is located at another intersection point of the two new Gaussian beams. Secondly, adjusting the incident angle of the second concave mirror or its focal length can make the above two Gaussian beam coincide in the image plane of the second concave mirror, which compensates the astigmatic aberration completely. A side-pumped continues-wave (CW) passively mode locked Nd:YAG laser was taken as an example of the astigmatically compensated folded resonators. The experimental results show good agreement with the theoretical predictions. This method can be used effectively to design astigmatically compensated cavities resonator of high-performance lasers. PMID:24663523

  14. Digital refraction distortion correction with an astigmatic coherence sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Daniel L.; Stack, Ronald A.; Brady, David J.

    2002-10-01

    We demonstrate the sensing and correction of an isoplanatic refractive distortion (not lens aberrations), using the complete measurement of the partially coherent field in an aperture that the previously described astigmatic coherence sensor provides. Isoplanatic distortions, and in general distortions that do not cause energy loss, maintain the orthogonality of the coherent modes. We use the fact that a common distortion will occur to all coherent modes to separate the distortion from the source behind it, rather than requiring a reference source at a different wavelength. Digital deconvolution was performed on the full four-dimensional partially coherent field for simultaneously computing the distortion and the source intensity distribution.

  15. Lithographic characterization of low-order aberrations in a 0.3-NAEUV microfield exposure tool

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; Cain, Jason; Dean, Kim; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2006-03-01

    Although tremendous progress has been made in the crucial area of fabrication of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection optics, the realization diffraction-limited high numerical aperture (NA) optics (above 0.2 NA) remains a concern. The highest NA EUV optics available to date are the 0.3-NA Microfield Exposure Tool (MET) optics used in an experimental exposure station at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [1] and commercial METs [2] at Intel and SEMATECH-North. Even though these optics have been interferometrically demonstrated to achieve diffraction-limited wavefront quality, the question remains as to whether or not such performance levels can be maintained after installation of the optics into the exposure tool. Printing-based quantitative aberration measurements provide a convenient mechanism for the characterization of the optic wavefront error in the actual lithography tool. We present the lithographic measurement of low-order aberrations in the Berkeley MET tool, including a quantitative measurement of astigmatism and spherical error and a qualitative measurement of coma. The lithographic results are directly compared to interferometry results obtained from the same optic. Measurements of the Berkeley MET indicate either an alignment drift or errors in the interferometry on the order of 0.5 to 1 nm.

  16. The child in coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewinn, E. B.

    1978-01-01

    Children in coma continue to pose medical, social, economic, ethical, moral, and legal problems. Modern life-support technology has aggravated these problems. Coma is viewed as a pathological state of unconsciousness from which the patient has not achieved arousal, and which calls for vigorous action to help him regain consciousness. There are two variables that have an especially important bearing on the ability to achieve arousal. These are: the character of the brain injury that caused the coma, and environmental factors that affect the patient after the injury.

  17. Anterior and Posterior Corneal Astigmatism after Refractive Lenticule Extraction for Myopic Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Mayumi; Igarashi, Akihito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the amount and the axis orientation of anterior and posterior corneal astigmatism after refractive lenticule extraction (ReLEx) for myopic astigmatism. Methods. We retrospectively examined 53 eyes of 53 consecutive patients (mean age ± standard deviation, 33.2 ± 6.5 years) undergoing ReLEx to correct myopic astigmatism (manifest cylinder = 0.5 diopters (D)). Power vector analysis was performed with anterior and posterior corneal astigmatism measured with a rotating Scheimpflug system (Pentacam HR, Oculus) and refractive astigmatism preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Results. Anterior corneal astigmatism was significantly decreased, measuring 1.42 ± 0.73 diopters (D) preoperatively and 1.11 ± 0.53 D postoperatively (p < 0.001, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Posterior corneal astigmatism showed no significant change, falling from 0.44 ± 0.12 D preoperatively to 0.42 ± 0.13 D postoperatively (p = 0.18). Refractive astigmatism decreased significantly, from 0.92 ± 0.51 D preoperatively to 0.27 ± 0.44 D postoperatively (p < 0.001). The anterior surface showed with-the-rule astigmatism in 51 eyes (96%) preoperatively and 48 eyes (91%) postoperatively. By contrast, the posterior surface showed against-the-rule astigmatism in all eyes preoperatively and postoperatively. Conclusions. The surgical effects were largely attributed to the astigmatic correction of the anterior corneal surface. Posterior corneal astigmatism remained unchanged even after ReLEx for myopic astigmatism. PMID:26097749

  18. Effect of aberrations in vortex spatial filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Joseph, Joby; Senthilkumaran, P.

    2012-11-01

    Edge enhancement is a very important operation in image processing and a spiral phase plate can be used as a radial Hilbert mask for isotropic edge enhancement. In this paper we analyze the effect of various Seidel aberrations on the performance of radial Hilbert mask or the vortex phase mask. The aberrated vortex phase mask is implemented optically with the help of a high resolution, spatial light modulator (SLM). It has also been shown that out of various aberrations astigmatism can introduce anisotropy in the Hilbert mask which causes selective edge enhancement.

  19. What Is a Coma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Back-to-School Butterflies? ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What Is a Coma? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Is ...

  20. Distribution of Posterior Corneal Astigmatism According to Axis Orientation of Anterior Corneal Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Kimiya; Kamiya, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the distribution of posterior corneal astigmatism in eyes with with-the-rule (WTR) and against-the-rule (ATR) anterior corneal astigmatism. Methods We retrospectively examined six hundred eight eyes of 608 healthy subjects (275 men and 333 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 55.3 ± 20.2 years). The magnitude and axis orientation of anterior and posterior corneal astigmatism were determined with a rotating Scheimpflug system (Pentacam HR, Oculus) when we divided the subjects into WTR and ATR anterior corneal astigmatism groups. Results The mean magnitudes of anterior and posterior corneal astigmatism were 1.14 ± 0.76 diopters (D), and 0.37 ± 0.19 D, respectively. We found a significant correlation between the magnitudes of anterior and posterior corneal astigmatism (Pearson correlation coefficient r = 0.4739, P<0.001). In the WTR anterior astigmatism group, we found ATR astigmatism of the posterior corneal surface in 402 eyes (96.6%). In the ATR anterior astigmatism group, we found ATR posterior corneal astigmatism in 82 eyes (73.9%). Especially in eyes with ATR anterior corneal astigmatism of 1 D or more and 1.5 D or more, ATR posterior corneal astigmatism was found in 28 eyes (59.6%) and 9 eyes (42.9%), respectively. Conclusions WTR anterior astigmatism and ATR posterior astigmatism were found in approximately 68% and 91% of eyes, respectively. The magnitude and the axis orientation of posterior corneal astigmatism were not constant, especially in eyes having high ATR anterior corneal astigmatism, as is often the case in patients who have undergone toric IOL implantation. PMID:25625283

  1. Diamond burr superficial keratectomy with mitomycin C for corneal scarring and high corneal astigmatism after pterygium excision

    PubMed Central

    Ozgurhan, Engin Bilge; Kara, Necip; Yildirim, Aydin; Alkin, Zeynep; Bozkurt, Ercument; Demirok, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper is to report the successful treatment of corneal scarring and high corneal astigmatism secondary to previous pterygium surgery with diamond burr superficial keratectomy using mitomycin C. Methods Four patients with corneal scarring and high corneal astigmatism related to previous pterygium surgery underwent diamond burr superficial keratectomy with application of mitomycin C. Anterior segment photography and corneal topographic analysis were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively in all patients. Results Six months after surgery, corneal astigmatism and corneal aberrations were reduced in all patients. A clear cornea was achieved in all cases. No complications were noted during the follow-up period. Conclusion Diamond burr superficial keratectomy with application of mitomycin C is a potentially effective and simple procedure for treating patients with corneal scarring and high corneal astigmatism secondary to previous pterygium surgery. PMID:23737657

  2. Adaptive temporal and wavefront aberration correction for ultrafast lasers with a membrane deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Leah Bruner

    Two adaptive optic systems for correction of either temporal phase error and wavefront errors for ultrafast pulses are demonstrated. These systems consists of a computer controlled micromachined membrane deformable mirror (MMDM) and a genetic learning algorithm (GA). Nonlinear excitation such as two-photon fluorescence or second harmonic generation are used as feedback to the GA to determine the appropriate correction to apply to the mirror. Two MMDMs are used, a 30 x 8 mm, 39 actuator linear MMDM for pulse-shaping applications and a 15 mm diameter, 37 actuator wavefront MMDM. Linear pre-compensation of self-phase modulation (SPM) was experimentally demonstrated utilizing the linear MMDM in a linear pulse-shaper for ultrafast pulses. The nonlinear nature of SPM makes arbitrary polynomial compensation necessary. Pre-compensation of SPM generated in an optical fiber by a 10 fs pulse reduced the pulse from 30fs to 20fs. We demonstrates adaptive correction with the wavefront MMDM by corrected for coma and astigmatism in a reflective multiphoton scanning microscope. An f1, parabola produces a very tight focus with no aberration when it is perfectly aligned. However, when beam scanning is used for two-dimensional imaging the image is severely aberrated. The MMDM and the GA are able to find the best possible wavefront for aberration correction for each scanning position. The horizontal scanning range was increased from 60 mum without the adaptive correction to 170 mum, ≈3 times the uncorrected scanning range, and the vertical scanning range was increased by a comparable amount. This resulted in an increase in scanning area of 9 times. The wavefront MMDM was also used for adaptive correction of spherical aberration from focusing from air, deep into a water-based sample. This depth-based aberration results from an index of refraction mismatch between the sample and the immersion medium of the objective and occurs regardless of beam scanning or sample scanning. By

  3. Astigmatism

    MedlinePlus

    ... easily diagnosed by a standard eye exam with refraction test . Special tests are not usually required. Children or adults who cannot respond to a normal refraction test can have their refraction measured by a ...

  4. Extended depth of focus intra-ocular lens: a solution for presbyopia and astigmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, Alex; Raveh, Ido; Ben Yaish, Shai; Yehezkel, Oren; Belkin, Michael; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Subjects after cataract removal and intra-ocular lens (IOL) implantation lose their accommodation capability and are left with a monofocal visual system. The IOL refraction and the precision of the surgery determine the focal distance and amount of astigmatic aberrations. We present a design, simulations and experimental bench testing of a novel, non-diffractive, non-multifocal, extended depth of focus (EDOF) technology incorporated into an IOL that allows the subject to have astigmatic and chromatic aberrations-free continuous focusing ability from 35cm to infinity as well as increased tolerance to IOL decentration. Methods: The EDOF element was engraved on a surface of a monofocal rigid IOL as a series of shallow (less than one micron deep) concentric grooves around the optical axis. These grooves create an interference pattern extending the focus from a point to a length of about one mm providing a depth of focus of 3.00D (D stands for Diopters) with negligible loss of energy at any point of the focus while significantly reducing the astigmatic aberration of the eye and that generated during the IOL implantation. The EDOF IOL was tested on an optical bench simulating the eye model. In the experimental testing we have explored the characteristics of the obtained EDOF capability, the tolerance to astigmatic aberrations and decentration. Results: The performance of the proposed IOL was tested for pupil diameters of 2 to 5mm and for various spectral illuminations. The MTF charts demonstrate uniform performance of the lens for up to 3.00D at various illumination wavelengths and pupil diameters while preserving a continuous contrast of above 25% for spatial frequencies of up to 25 cycles/mm. Capability of correcting astigmatism of up to 1.00D was measured. Conclusions: The proposed EDOF IOL technology was tested by numerical simulations as well as experimentally characterized on an optical bench. The new lens is capable of solving presbyopia and astigmatism

  5. Astigmatic phase correction for the magneto-optic spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Carcole, E; Davis, J A; Cottrell, D M

    1995-08-10

    We report a simple low-cost technique for evaluating the phase distortion in a magneto-optic spatial light modulator. We find that the dominant distortion is caused by astigmatism and is easily compensated by encoding of the complex-conjugate pattern onto the device. Two experimental results are shown. First, the focused spot size from a Fresnel lens is sharpened when the aberrations are corrected. Second, we show that the pattern that generates a first-order Bessel-function nondiffracting beam does not work unless the aberrations are corrected. PMID:21052357

  6. Criteria for admissible values of smooth aberrations for nondiffractive laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Malashko, Ya I; Khabibulin, V M

    2014-04-28

    We have derived analytical expressions, verified by the methods of numerical simulation, to evaluate the angular divergence of nondiffractive laser beams containing smooth aberrations, i.e., spherical defocusing, astigmatism and toroid. Using these expressions we have formulated the criteria for admissible values of smooth aberrations. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  7. Polarization-induced astigmatism caused by topographic masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruoff, Johannes; Neumann, Jens Timo; Schmitt-Weaver, Emil; van Setten, Eelco; le Masson, Nicolas; Progler, Chris; Geh, Bernd

    2007-10-01

    With the continuous shrink of feature sizes the pitch of the mask comes closer to the wave length of light. It has been recognized that in this case polarization effects of the mask become much more pronounced and deviations in the diffraction efficiencies from the well-known Kirchhoff approach can no longer be neglected. It is not only the diffraction efficiencies that become polarization-dependent, also the phases of the diffracted orders tend to deviate from Kirchhoff theory when calculated rigorously. This also happens for large structures, where these phase deviations can mimic polarization dependent wave front aberrations, which in the case of polarized illumination can lead to non-negligible focus shifts that depend on the orientation and the features size themselves. This orientation dependence results in a polarization induced astigmatism offset, which can be of the same order of magnitude or even larger as polarization effects stemming from the lens itself. Hence, for correctly predicting polarization induced astigmatism offsets, one has to both consider lens and mask effects at the same time. In this paper we present a comprehensive study of polarized induced phase effects of topographic masks and develop a simple theoretical model that accurately describes the observed effects.

  8. A design of PAL with astigmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yefei; Xiang, Huazhong; Zhu, Tianfeng; Chen, Jiabi

    2015-08-01

    Progressive addition lens (PAL) is designed for those who suffer from myopia and presbyopia to have a clear vision from a far distance to a nearby distance. Additionally there are many people that also suffer from astigmatism and need to be corrected. The cylinder power can't be simply added to the diopter of the PAL directly, because the diopter of the PAL needs to be changed smoothly. A methods has been proposed in this article to solve the problem, the freeform surface height of a PAL without astigmatism and the cylindrical lens surface height for the correction of astigmatism are calculated separately. The both two surface heights were added together, then the final surface is produced and shown with the both properties of PALs and cylindrical lenses used to correct the astigmatism.

  9. Capturing the Coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image shows comet Tempel 1, as seen by the Deep Impact spacecraft on June 21, 2005. It was taken using the clear filter of the spacecraft's medium resolution imager camera. The spacecraft was 11,564,081.7 kilometers (7,185,920 miles) away from the comet. Twelve images were combined together, and a logarithmic stretch was applied to enhance the coma of the comet.

  10. Photochemistry of Cometary Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, D. C.; Lu, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Relevant physico-chemical processes must be identified and understood to provide the framework within which observations of comets can be understood and inferences about their composition can be made. Analyses of observations of comets (e.g., Halley, Borrelly, LINEAR WM1, Hale-Bopp, Hyakutake) have provided valuable insights into the intrinsic properties of their nuclei (e.g., composition, active surface fraction, surface properties, temperature) and the important physical and chemical processes that occur in their comae. The latest results detailing these processes will be discussed, including the thermodynamics (e.g., temperature and velocity structure), photo- and gas-phase chemistry (e.g., composition, gas and electron energetics), and interactions between gaseous species and dust (composition in distributed sources, gas-grain reactions, mass-loading and energy balance of both gas phase and dust particles), concentrating on the collision-dominated inner coma. Special consideration is given to the determination of parent species from the plethora of molecules and atoms seen in cometary comae, concentrating on observations of S2, Na, CS, C2, C3, NS, and HCN/HNC in recent comets.

  11. Coma cluster of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 34' x 34' on the sky, of the Coma cluster, aka Abell 1656. This is a particularly rich cluster of individual galaxies (over 1000 members), most prominently the two giant ellipticals, NGC 4874 (right) and NGC 4889 (left). The remaining members are mostly smaller ellipticals, but spiral galaxies are also evident in the 2MASS image. The cluster is seen toward the constellation Coma Berenices, but is actually at a distance of about 100 Mpc (330 million light years, or a redshift of 0.023) from us. At this distance, the cluster is in what is known as the 'Hubble flow,' or the overall expansion of the Universe. As such, astronomers can measure the Hubble Constant, or the universal expansion rate, based on the distance to this cluster. Large, rich clusters, such as Coma, allow astronomers to measure the 'missing mass,' i.e., the matter in the cluster that we cannot see, since it gravitationally influences the motions of the member galaxies within the cluster. The near-infrared maps the overall luminous mass content of the member galaxies, since the light at these wavelengths is dominated by the more numerous older stellar populations. Galaxies, as seen by 2MASS, look fairly smooth and homogeneous, as can be seen from the Hubble 'tuning fork' diagram of near-infrared galaxy morphology. Image mosaic by S. Van Dyk (IPAC).

  12. Subwavelength-grating-induced wavefront aberrations: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, Karlton; Chipman, Russell A.

    2007-07-01

    The on-axis wavefront aberrations of a one-dimensional subwavelength-grating antireflection coating on an f/1.7 lens surface are shown to be small with noticeable contributions of defocus, astigmatism, and piston. The astigmatism is 0.02 wave, and the magnitude of the piston approaches one wave peak-to-valley. The difference in aberrations between orthogonally polarized wavefronts, or the retardance aberration, shows 0.01 wave of astigmatismlike variation and more than 0.01 wave of retardance-induced defocuslike variation. A small coupling between polarization states occurs in the form of the familiar Maltese cross, yielding a maximum of 3% coupling in the four diagonal edges of the pupil.

  13. Minimizing camera-eye optical aberrations during the 3D reconstruction of retinal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldana-Iuit, Javier; Martinez-Perez, M. Elena; Espinosa-Romero, Arturo; Diaz-Uribe, Rufino

    2010-05-01

    3D reconstruction of blood vessels is a powerful visualization tool for physicians, since it allows them to refer to qualitative representation of their subject of study. In this paper we propose a 3D reconstruction method of retinal vessels from fundus images. The reconstruction method propose herein uses images of the same retinal structure in epipolar geometry. Images are preprocessed by RISA system for segmenting blood vessels and obtaining feature points for correspondences. The correspondence points process is solved using correlation. The LMedS analysis and Graph Transformation Matching algorithm are used for outliers suppression. Camera projection matrices are computed with the normalized eight point algorithm. Finally, we retrieve 3D position of the retinal tree points by linear triangulation. In order to increase the power of visualization, 3D tree skeletons are represented by surfaces via generalized cylinders whose radius correspond to morphological measurements obtained by RISA. In this paper the complete calibration process including the fundus camera and the optical properties of the eye, the so called camera-eye system is proposed. On one hand, the internal parameters of the fundus camera are obtained by classical algorithms using a reference pattern. On the other hand, we minimize the undesirable efects of the aberrations induced by the eyeball optical system assuming that contact enlarging lens corrects astigmatism, spherical and coma aberrations are reduced changing the aperture size and eye refractive errors are suppressed adjusting camera focus during image acquisition. Evaluation of two self-calibration proposals and results of 3D blood vessel surface reconstruction are presented.

  14. Dwarfs in Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger poster version

    This false-color mosaic of the central region of the Coma cluster combines infrared and visible-light images to reveal thousands of faint objects (green). Follow-up observations showed that many of these objects, which appear here as faint green smudges, are dwarf galaxies belonging to the cluster. Two large elliptical galaxies, NGC 4889 and NGC 4874, dominate the cluster's center. The mosaic combines visible-light data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (color coded blue) with long- and short-wavelength infrared views (red and green, respectively) from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

  15. Chemistry in cometary comae.

    PubMed

    Irvine, W M; Dickens, J E; Lovell, A J; Schloerb, F P; Senay, M; Bergin, E A; Jewitt, D; Matthews, H E

    1998-01-01

    Significant gas-phase chemistry occurs in the comae of bright comets, as is demonstrated here for the case of Comet Hale-Bopp. The abundance ratio of the two isomers, hydrogen cyanide and hydrogen isocyanide, is shown to vary with heliocentric distance in a way that is consistent with production of HNC by ion-molecule chemistry initiated by the photoionization of water. Likewise, the first maps of emission from HCO+ show an abundance and an extended distribution that are consistent with the same chemical model. PMID:9809016

  16. Chemistry in cometary comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Dickens, J. E.; Lovell, A. J.; Schloerb, F. P.; Senay, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Jewitt, D.; Matthews, H. E.

    1998-01-01

    Significant gas-phase chemistry occurs in the comae of bright comets, as is demonstrated here for the case of Comet Hale-Bopp. The abundance ratio of the two isomers, hydrogen cyanide and hydrogen isocyanide, is shown to vary with heliocentric distance in a way that is consistent with production of HNC by ion-molecule chemistry initiated by the photoionization of water. Likewise, the first maps of emission from HCO+ show an abundance and an extended distribution that are consistent with the same chemical model.

  17. Correcting variable third-order astigmatism introduced by conformal aspheric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Michael R.

    1998-09-01

    Conformal dome surfaces may enhance the overall performance of missile systems employing optical sensors by providing a more aerodynamically shaped airframe, however realistic implementation of these highly aspheric surfaces is currently limited by the severe image aberrations they introduce to the transmitted wavefront. This paper proposes an optical correction technique designed to combat the large magnitude and varying nature of third order astigmatism introduced by conformal missile domes. The newly developed technique utilizes axial translation of crossed cylindrical elements to provide variable astigmatism correction as a function of sensor gimbal angle. Theoretical motivation for the optical correction technique is provided, and its performance is assessed in a sample conformal dome and optical sensor systems.

  18. Peripheral refraction and higher-order aberrations with cycloplegia and fogging lenses using the BHVI-EyeMapper

    PubMed Central

    Bakaraju, Ravi Chandra; Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Thomas, Varghese; Holden, Brien Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if a fogging lens ameliorates accommodative effects driven by the closed-view design of the BHVI-EyeMapper (EM) instrument. We compared cycloplegic refraction and higher-order aberration measurements of the EM with those obtained with a fogging lens. Methods Twenty-six, young, participants (15F, 25 ± 5 years, range: 18–35 years, SE: +0.25 D and −3.50 D) with good ocular health were recruited. Five independent measurements of on- and off-axis refraction and higher-order aberrations were recorded across the horizontal visual field, under two conditions: non-cycloplegic measurements with +1.00 D fogging lens and cycloplegia, always in the same sequence. The contralateral eye was occluded during the measurements. Two drops of 1% Tropicamide delivered within 5 min facilitated cycloplegic measurements. All participants were refracted 30 min after installation of the second drop. Results Mean spherical equivalent measures of the non-cycloplegic condition were significantly more myopic than their cycloplegic counterparts (p < 0.05); approximately by 0.50 D centrally, increasing to 1.00 D towards the periphery. The horizontal astigmatic component, J180, demonstrated small but statistically significant differences between the test conditions. Differences were predominant for eccentricities greater than 30°, in both nasal and temporal meridians. The oblique astigmatic component, J45, was not significantly different between the test conditions. The primary spherical aberration coefficient C(4, 0) was significantly less positive for the non-cycloplegic state than its cycloplegic counterpart. This result held true across the entire horizontal visual field. The horizontal coma and trefoil coefficients C(3, 1) and C(3, 3) were not significantly different between the two conditions. Conclusions The use of +1.00 D fogging lens without cycloplegia did not provide complete relaxation of accommodation. The discrepancies between cycloplegic and non

  19. Neuroimaging after coma.

    PubMed

    Tshibanda, Luaba; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Boly, Mélanie; Soddu, Andrea; Bruno, Marie-Aurelie; Moonen, Gustave; Laureys, Steven; Noirhomme, Quentin

    2010-01-01

    Following coma, some patients will recover wakefulness without signs of consciousness (only showing reflex movements, i.e., the vegetative state) or may show non-reflex movements but remain without functional communication (i.e., the minimally conscious state). Currently, there remains a high rate of misdiagnosis of the vegetative state (Schnakers et. al. BMC Neurol, 9:35, 8) and the clinical and electrophysiological markers of outcome from the vegetative and minimally conscious states remain unsatisfactory. This should incite clinicians to use multimodal assessment to detect objective signs of consciousness and validate para-clinical prognostic markers in these challenging patients. This review will focus on advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, and functional MRI (fMRI studies in both "activation" and "resting state" conditions) that were recently introduced in the assessment of patients with chronic disorders of consciousness. PMID:19862509

  20. Comparison of Astigmatic Correction after Femtosecond Lenticule Extraction and Small-Incision Lenticule Extraction for Myopic Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Kobashi, Hidenaga; Kamiya, Kazutaka; Ali, Mohamed A.; Igarashi, Akihito; Elewa, Mohamed Ehab M.; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare postoperative astigmatic correction between femtosecond lenticule extraction (FLEx) and small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) in eyes with myopic astigmatism. Methods We examined 26 eyes of 26 patients undergoing FLEx and 26 eyes of 26 patients undergoing SMILE to correct myopic astigmatism (manifest astigmatism of 1 diopter (D) or more). Visual acuity, cylindrical refraction, the predictability of the astigmatic correction, and the astigmatic vector components using Alpin’s method, were compared between the two groups 3 months postoperatively. Results We found no statistically significant difference in manifest cylindrical refraction (p=0.74) or in the percentage of eyes within ± 0.50 D of their refraction (p=0.47) after the two surgical procedures. Moreover, no statistically significant difference was detected between the groups in astigmatic vector components, namely, surgically induced astigmatism (0.80), target induced astigmatism (p=0.87), astigmatic correction index (p=0.77), angle of error (p=0.24), difference vector (p=0.76), index of success (p=0.91), flattening effect (p=0.79), and flattening index (p=0.84). Conclusions Both FLEx and SMILE procedures are essentially equivalent in correcting myopic astigmatism using vector analysis, suggesting that the lifting or non-lifting of the flap does not significantly affect astigmatic outcomes after these surgical procedures. PMID:25849381

  1. Polarization Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the polarization characteristics displayed by optical systems can be divided into two categories: geometrical and physical. Geometrical analysis calculates the change in polarization of a wavefront between pupils in an optical instrument. Physical analysis propagates the polarized fields wherever the geometrical analysis is not valid, i.e., near the edges of stops, near images, in anisotropic media, etc. Polarization aberration theory provides a starting point for geometrical design and facilitates subsequent optimization. The polarization aberrations described arise from differences in the transmitted (or reflected) amplitudes and phases at interfaces. The polarization aberration matrix (PAM) is calculated for isotropic rotationally symmetric systems through fourth order and includes the interface phase, amplitude, linear diattenuation, and linear retardance aberrations. The exponential form of Jones matrices used are discussed. The PAM in Jones matrix is introduced. The exact calculation of polarization aberrations through polarization ray tracing is described. The report is divided into three sections: I. Rotationally Symmetric Optical Systems; II. Tilted and Decentered Optical Systems; and Polarization Analysis of LIDARs.

  2. On the calibration of astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry for microflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cierpka, C.; Rossi, M.; Segura, R.; Kähler, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry (APTV) is a method to determine three components (3C) of the velocity field in a volume (3D) using a single camera. The depth position of the particles is coded by optical distortions caused by a cylindrical lens in the optical setup. This technique is particularly suited for microfluidic applications as measurement errors due to spatial averaging and depth of correlation, typically encountered with μPIV approaches, are eliminated so that the measurement precision is enhanced. Unfortunately, the current state of the technique is limited by the small measurement region achievable with the current calibration procedures as well as by higher order image aberrations (Cierpka et al 2010 Meas. Sci. Technol. 21 045401). In order to extend the size of the measurement volume and to account for all image aberrations, a new intrinsic calibration procedure, based on the imaging function of the particles, is proposed in the paper at hand. It provides an extended measurement depth, taking into account all image aberrations. In this work, the calibration procedure was applied to a μPIV arrangement but could also be implemented on macroscopic experimental setups. The calibration procedure is qualified with synthetic data as well as Poiseuille flow in a straight rectangular micro-channel with a cross-sectional area of 200 × 500 µm2. The three-dimensional velocity distribution of the whole channel was resolved via APTV with uncertainties of 0.9% and 3.7% of the centerline velocity, uc, for the in-plane and out-of-plane components, respectively. Further investigations using different cylindrical-lens focal lengths, magnifications and particle sizes provide information about achievable measurement depths and help to design and adapt the optimal system for the desired experiment.

  3. Transverse chromatic aberration after corneal refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anera, R. G.; Jiménez, J. R.; Jiménez del Barco, L.; Hita, E.

    2005-05-01

    An expression has been deduced theoretically from a schematic-eye model, for the transverse or lateral chromatic aberration (TCA) after refractive surgery. The aim was to investigate analytically how chromatic aberration varies after the emmetropization process. These changes in the TCA have been characterized from changes in corneal asphericity. The results indicate that TCA after refractive surgery diminishes as the degree of myopia increases, a trend contrary to that occurring with monochromatic aberrations, such as spherical or coma. These results can explain the fact that the real deterioration of the visual function under photopic conditions detected in those operated on for myopia is less than expected when only monochromatic aberrations are taken into account.

  4. Comparison of Aberrations After Standard and Customized Refractive Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.; He, X.; Wang, Y.

    2013-09-01

    To detect possible differences in residual wavefront aberrations between standard and customized laser refractive surgery based onmathematical modeling, the residual optical aberrations after conventional and customized laser refractive surgery were compared accordingto the ablation profile with transition zone. The results indicated that ablation profile has a significant impact on the residual aberrations.The amount of residual aberrations for conventional correction is higher than that for customized correction. Additionally, the residualaberrations for high myopia eyes are markedly larger than those for moderate myopia eyes. For a 5 mm pupil, the main residual aberrationterm is coma and yet it is spherical aberration for a 7 mm pupil. When the pupil diameter is the same as optical zone or greater, themagnitudes of residual aberrations is obviously larger than that for a smaller pupil. In addition, the magnitudes of the residual fifth orsixth order aberrations are relatively large, especially secondary coma in a 6 mm pupil and secondary spherical aberration in a 7 mm pupil.Therefore, the customized ablation profile may be superior to the conventional correction even though the transition zone and treatmentdecentration are taken into account. However, the customized ablation profile will still induce significant amount of residual aberrations.

  5. Surgical and healing changes to ocular aberrations following refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jochen; Schwiegerling, Jim

    2003-07-01

    Purpose: To measure ocular aberrations before and at several time periods after LASIK surgery to determine the change to the aberration structure of the eye. Methods: A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was used to measure 88 LASIK patients pre-operatively and at 1 week and 12 months following surgery. Reconstructed wavefront errors are compared to look at induced differences. Manifest refraction was measured at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months following surgery. Sphere, cylinder, spherical aberration, and pupil diameter are analyzed. Results: A dramatic elevation in spherical aberration is seen following surgery. This elevation appears almost immediately and remains for the duration of the study. A temporary increase in pupil size is seen following surgery. Conclusions: LASIK surgery dramatically reduces defocus and astigmatism in the eye, but simultaneously increases spherical aberration levels. This increase occurs at the time of surgery and is not an effect of the healing response.

  6. Relation between uncorrected astigmatism and visual acuity in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Archana; Pesala, Veerendranath; Garg, Prashant; Bharadwaj, Shrikant R

    2013-04-01

    PURPOSE.: The end point of astigmatic correction after cataract surgery will depend on how uncorrected astigmatism impacts distance and near vision of pseudophakic eyes. This study determined the impact of induced astigmatism and pupil size on the distance and near acuity of otherwise emmetropic pseudophakic eyes implanted with monofocal intraocular lenses. METHODS.: Monocular high-contrast distance (4 m) and near (40 cm) logMAR acuity was determined in 15 subjects (mean ± 1 SD, 57.9 ± 9.0 years) without astigmatism and with 2.5 diopters (D) myopic to 2.0 D hyperopic astigmatic lenses induced in 0.5-D steps at 0-, 45-, 90-, and 135-degree axes. This experiment was repeated for the same range of induced astigmatism with 1.5-, 3-, and 6-mm artificial pupil diameters placed before one eye of 10 subjects dilated with 10% phenylephrine HCl. RESULTS.: Distance acuity deteriorated with astigmatism for all axes tested (p < 0.01). Near acuity deteriorated with hyperopic astigmatism (p < 0.1), whereas it improved with up to 1 D of myopic astigmatism before saturating for all axes tested (p < 0.01). Distance and near acuity improved with a reduction in pupil diameter (p < 0.01). The change in distance and near acuity with induced astigmatism was smaller for 1.5-mm than for 3-mm and 6-mm pupil diameters (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS.: Partial restoration of near acuity with uncorrected myopic astigmatism comes with a proportional loss of distance acuity in pseudophakic eyes. Uncorrected myopic astigmatism more than 1 D results in a large loss of distance acuity at no additional benefit to near acuity. Both distance and near acuities with and without astigmatism are benefited with a reduction in pupil diameter. Uncorrected hyperopic astigmatism results in deterioration of both distance and near acuities of pseudophakic eyes. PMID:23458979

  7. EUV phase-shifting masks and aberration monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yunfei; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2002-07-01

    Rigorous electromagnetic simulation with TEMPEST is used to examine the use of phase-shifting masks in EUV lithography. The effects of oblique incident illumination and mask patterning by ion-mixing of multilayers are analyzed. Oblique incident illumination causes streamers at absorber edges and causes position shifting in aerial images. The diffraction waves between ion-mixed and pristine multilayers are observed. The phase-shifting caused by stepped substrates is simulated and images show that it succeeds in creation of phase-shifting effects. The diffraction process at the phase boundary is also analyzed. As an example of EUV phase-shifting masks, a coma pattern and probe based aberration monitor is simulated and aerial images are formed under different levels of coma aberration. The probe signal rises quickly as coma increases as designed.

  8. Electron Vortex Production and Control Using Aberration Induced Diffraction Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, T. C.; Weyland, M.; Paganin, D. M.; Simula, T. P.; Eastwood, S. A.; Morgan, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    An aberration corrected electron microscope is used to create electron diffraction catastrophes, containing arrays of intensity zeros threading vortex cores. Vortices are ascribed to these arrays using catastrophe theory, scalar diffraction integrals, and experimentally retrieved phase maps. From measured wave function phases, obtained using focal-series phase retrieval, the orbital angular momentum density is mapped for highly astigmatic electron probes. We observe vortex rings and topological reconnections of nodal lines by tracking the vortex cores using the retrieved phases.

  9. Relationship between age, corneal astigmatism, and ocular dimensions with reference to astigmatism in eyes undergoing routine cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Collier Wakefield, O; Annoh, R; Nanavaty, M A

    2016-04-01

    PurposeTo assess the relationship between age, corneal astigmatism, and ocular dimensions with reference to astigmatism correction during cataract surgery.MethodsIn this cross-sectional study of right eyes of 2247 consecutive patients attending cataract surgery preassessment, data on patient demographics, axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and keratometric astigmatism were collected. Astigmatism was further analyzed as against-the-rule (ATR: steepest meridian 180±30°), with-the-rule (WTR: 90±30°), and oblique (OB: 30-60°or 120-150°).ResultsMean age, AL, and ACD were 72.28±13.84 years, 23.99±1.85 mm and 3.08 ±0.52 mm, respectively. In all, 20.4% eyes had ≤0.50 diopters (D), 55.2% had 0.51-1.50 D, 7.9% had 2.01-3.00 D, and 3.7% eyes had >3.00 D of astigmatism. Overall, 44.2% of eyes had corneal astigmatism >1.00 D. Average astigmatism in age ranges 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80-89, and 90+ years were 0.82, 1.04, 1.04, 1.02, 1.15 and 2.01 D, respectively. The magnitude of preoperative astigmatism positively correlated with age (P<0.0001), with increasing and decreasing prevalence of ATR and WTR astigmatism, respectively, with advancing age. The magnitude of ATR astigmatism inversely correlates to AL (P<0.0001). ATR astigmatism is more prevalent with increasing magnitude of astigmatism (P<0.0001).ConclusionsA majority of patients for cataract surgery have astigmatism between 0.51 and 1.5 D. ATR astigmatism increases, whereas WTR decreases with age. ATR astigmatism inversely correlates to AL. With increasing age, the magnitude of astigmatism increases and ATR astigmatism becomes increasingly prevalent. The likelihood of a patient requiring astigmatic correction increases with age. PMID:26795412

  10. Optical aberrations and alignment of the eye with age.

    PubMed

    Berrio, Esther; Tabernero, Juan; Artal, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    We explored the relative changes in ocular, corneal, and internal aberrations associated with normal aging with special emphasis in the role of ocular alignment and lens shape factor in the balance of aberrations. Ocular and corneal aberrations together with the angle kappa were measured for a 5-mm pupil diameter in 46 eyes with low refractive errors and ages ranging between 20 and 77 years. The root mean square (RMS) of the higher order ocular and corneal aberrations increased with age at a rate of 0.0032 μm/year and 0.0015 μm/year, respectively. While in young eyes the partial compensation of aberrations by the internal surfaces was clear, no significant difference was found between corneal and ocular RMS in the older group. The ocular spherical aberration (0.0011 μm/year) and horizontal coma (0.0017 μm/year) increased moderately with age. This is not due to changes in the optical alignment, since angle kappa did not vary significantly with age. Age-related variations in the radii of curvature of the crystalline lens modify slightly its shape factor, reducing the compensation of lateral coma. This suggests that geometrical changes in the crystalline lens with age contribute to modify its aberration structure, reducing the compensation mechanism and explaining most of the measured increment of ocular aberrations with age. PMID:21196516

  11. Alignment induced aberration fields of next generation telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Tobias; Thompson, Kevin; Rolland, Jannick

    2008-08-01

    There is a long list of new ground-based optical telescopes being considered around the world. While many are conventional Cassegrain and Ritchey-Chretien designs, some are from a family of three mirror anastigmatic (TMA) telescopes that are configured with an offset field (but still obscured) that trace back to designs developed in the 1970s for military applications. The nodal theory of aberrations, developed in the late 1970s, provides valuable insights into the response of TMA telescopes to alignment errors. Here it is shown for the first time that the alignment limiting aberration in any TMA telescope is a 3rd order astigmatism term with a new field dependence, termed field-asymmetric, field-linear 3rd order astigmatism. It is also shown that a TMA telescope under assembly that is only measured to have excellent/perfect performance onaxis is not aligned in any significant way. This is because the new astigmatic term is always zero on-axis, even though it is large over the field of view. Knowledge of this intrinsic misalignment aberration field for any TMA telescope aids greatly in ensuring it can be aligned successfully. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), is used an example of a relevant TMA system.

  12. Internal energy flows of coma-affected singular beams in low-numerical-aperture systems.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Monika; Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Senthilkumaran, P

    2015-04-01

    The circulating phase gradient component of a singular beam gets modified when focused by a low-numerical-aperature system suffering from coma aberration. The gradient due to this coma aberration splits the higher charge vortex into elementary vortices and distributes them spatially. This splitting depends on the charge and polarity of the incident singular beam as well as the sign and magnitude of the aberration coefficient. The transverse component of the Poynting vector field distribution at the focal plane is decomposed into the curl or solenoidal component and divergence or irrotational component using the Helmholtz-Hodge decomposition technique. The solenoidal component that relates to the orbital angular momentum carries the circulating energy, while the irrotational component shows the sources and sinks of the energy. Intriguing results of the study of energy flow around the edge dislocations apart from the point phase defects in the irrotational components are also presented. PMID:26366760

  13. On multisoliton solutions of the constant astigmatism equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlaváč, Adam

    2015-09-01

    We introduce an algebraic formula producing infinitely many exact solutions of the constant astigmatism equation {z}{yy}+{(1/z)}{xx}+2=0 from a given seed. A construction of corresponding surfaces of constant astigmatism is then a matter of routine. As a special case, we consider multisoliton solutions of the constant astigmatism equation defined as counterparts of famous multisoliton solutions of the sine-Gordon equation. A few particular examples are surveyed as well.

  14. Characterization of a tunable astigmatic fluidic lens with adaptive optics correction for compact phoropter application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Huang, Chieh-Tse

    2014-07-01

    Fluidically controlled lenses which adaptively correct prescribed refractive error without mechanically moving parts are extensively applied in the ophthalmic applications. Capable of variable-focusing properties, however, the associated aberrations due to curvature change and refractive index mismatch can inherently degrade image quality severely. Here we present the experimental study of the aberrations in tunable astigmatic lens and use of adaptive optics to compensate for the wavefront errors. Characterization of the optical properties of the individual lenses is carried out by Shack-Hartmann measurements. An adaptive optics (AO) based scheme is demonstrated for three injected fluidic volumes, resulting in a substantial reduction of the wavefront errors from -0.12, -0.25, -0.32 to 0.01, -0.01, -0.20 μm, respectively, corresponding to the optical power tenability of 0.83 to 1.84 D. Furthermore, an integrated optical phoroptor consisting of adjustable astigmatic lenses and AO correction is demonstrated such that an induced refraction error of -1 D cylinder at 180° of a model eye vision is experimentally corrected.

  15. Changes of Corneal Wavefront Aberrations in Dry Eye Patients after Treatment with Artificial Lubricant Drops

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ning; Lin, Fangyu; Huang, Zhu; He, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the corneal aberration changes in dry eye patients after treatment with artificial eye drops. Methods. Thirty mild to moderate dry eye patients treated with artificial eye drops and twenty comparable dry eye patients were recruited as controls. Anterior corneal aberrations over 3 mm and 5 mm analytical zones including total, 3rd to 5th high order aberrations (HOAs), spherical aberration (SA), and vertical (V-coma) and horizontal coma (H-coma) obtained from corneal topography data at baseline and 2 weeks after treatment were evaluated. Results. For 3 mm zone, trefoils, V-coma, H-coma terms, and 3rd and 5th HOAs were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in the treatment group. For 5 mm zone, instillation of eye drops reduced H-coma, SA terms, 3rd to 5th orders, and total HOAs all showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05). The root mean square analysis of the Zernike terms also showed similar statistical results. For control group, all individual terms and total HOAs did not have significant changes over 3 mm and 5 mm zones (p > 0.05). Conclusions. Treatment with artificial eye drops can effectively improve the corneal optical quality of dry eye patients by ameliorating the HOAs of anterior corneal surface. PMID:27051526

  16. Kinematic models of cometary comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacconi-Garman, Lowell Evan

    As a first step towards understanding the kinematics of cometary comae, an analysis was undertaken of the 18-cm OH lines in comets. This work builds on past OH excitation and kinematic studies to meld them into a complete and self-consistent model for a cometary coma. The kinematics were modeled via the vectorial formalism and the powerful Monte Carlo technique was used in an effort to reproduce the high sensitivity, high spectral resolution 18-cm OH line profiles of Comets Halley, Giacobini-Zinner, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Wilson which were obtained at the 43 meter telescope of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. For the first time a zeroth order A-doublet quenching correction was applied to the 18-cm data and the long standing UV/radio gas production rate disparity was accounted for. Gas expansion velocities and coma anisotropies were derived from observations covering a wide range of heliocentric distances and gas production rates. The inferred ratio of dayside gas emission to nightside gas emission for all comets in this study, except P/Giacobini-Zinner, is approx. two. This value is consistent with that derived from in situ observations of the neutral gas in the coma of Comet Halley and is independent of both gas productivity and heliocentric distance. For P/Giacobini-Zinner, anomalously high gas outflow anisotropies were inferred for which there is no clear explanation.

  17. Triangular laser resonators with astigmatic compensation.

    PubMed

    Skettrup, T; Meelby, T; Faerch, K; Frederiksen, S L; Pedersen, C

    2000-08-20

    The magnitudes and locations of the beam waists in both the sagittal and the tangential planes have been found by means of the ABCD matrix method for a triangular resonator. Equilateral and isosceles resonators are discussed, and curves are given from which resonators with astigmatism-free beams can be designed. A frequency-doubled triangular Nd ring laser has been constructed after this design, and it is demonstrated that this laser emits a single longitudinal mode with a circular TEM(00) Gaussian beam. PMID:18350014

  18. Current Approaches for Management of Postpenetrating Keratoplasty Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Feizi, Sepehr; Zare, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    A successful corneal graft requires both clarity and an acceptable refraction. A clear corneal graft may be an optical failure if high astigmatism limits visual acuity. Intraoperative measures to reduce postkeratoplasty astigmatism include round and central trephination of cornea with an adequate size, appropriate sutures with evenly distributed tension, and perfect graft-host apposition. Suture manipulation has been described for minimising early postoperative astigmatism. If significant astigmatism remains after suture removal, which cannot be corrected by optical means, then further surgical procedures containing relaxing incisions, compression sutures, laser refractive surgery, insertion of intrastromal corneal ring segments, wedge resection, and toric intraocular lens implantation can be performed. When astigmatism cannot be reduced using one or more abovementioned approaches, repeat penetrating keratoplasty should inevitably be considered. However, none of these techniques has emerged as an ideal one, and corneal surgeons may require combining two or more approaches to exploit the maximum advantages. PMID:21811668

  19. Accommodation in Astigmatic Children During Visual Task Performance

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Erin M.; Miller, Joseph M.; Apple, Howard P.; Parashar, Pavan; Twelker, J. Daniel; Crescioni, Mabel; Davis, Amy L.; Leonard-Green, Tina K.; Campus, Irene; Sherrill, Duane L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the accuracy and stability of accommodation in uncorrected children during visual task performance. Methods. Subjects were second- to seventh-grade children from a highly astigmatic population. Measurements of noncycloplegic right eye spherical equivalent (Mnc) were obtained while uncorrected subjects performed three visual tasks at near (40 cm) and distance (2 m). Tasks included reading sentences with stimulus letter size near acuity threshold and an age-appropriate letter size (high task demands) and viewing a video (low task demand). Repeated measures ANOVA assessed the influence of astigmatism, task demand, and accommodative demand on accuracy (mean Mnc) and variability (mean SD of Mnc) of accommodation. Results. For near and distance analyses, respectively, sample size was 321 and 247, mean age was 10.37 (SD 1.77) and 10.30 (SD 1.74) years, mean cycloplegic M was 0.48 (SD 1.10) and 0.79 diopters (D) (SD 1.00), and mean astigmatism was 0.99 (SD 1.15) and 0.75 D (SD 0.96). Poor accommodative accuracy was associated with high astigmatism, low task demand (video viewing), and high accommodative demand. The negative effect of accommodative demand on accuracy increased with increasing astigmatism, with the poorest accommodative accuracy observed in high astigmats (≥3.00 D) with high accommodative demand/high hyperopia (1.53 D and 2.05 D of underaccommodation for near and distant stimuli, respectively). Accommodative variability was greatest in high astigmats and was uniformly high across task condition. No/low and moderate astigmats showed higher variability for the video task than the reading tasks. Conclusions. Accuracy of accommodation is reduced in uncorrected children with high astigmatism and high accommodative demand/high hyperopia, but improves with increased visual task demand (reading). High astigmats showed the greatest variability in accommodation. PMID:25103265

  20. Lack of oblique astigmatism in the chicken eye.

    PubMed

    Maier, Felix M; Howland, Howard C; Ohlendorf, Arne; Wahl, Siegfried; Schaeffel, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Primate eyes display considerable oblique off-axis astigmatism which could provide information on the sign of defocus that is needed for emmetropization. The pattern of peripheral astigmatism is not known in the chicken eye, a common model of myopia. Peripheral astigmatism was mapped out over the horizontal visual field in three chickens, 43 days old, and in three near emmetropic human subjects, average age 34.7years, using infrared photoretinoscopy. There were no differences in astigmatism between humans and chickens in the central visual field (chicks -0.35D, humans -0.65D, n.s.) but large differences in the periphery (i.e. astigmatism at 40° in the temporal visual field: humans -4.21D, chicks -0.63D, p<0.001, unpaired t-test). The lack of peripheral astigmatism in chicks was not due to differences in corneal shape. Perhaps related to their superior peripheral optics, we found that chickens had excellent visual performance also in the far periphery. Using an automated optokinetic nystagmus paradigm, no difference was observed in spatial visual performance with vision restricted to either the central 67° of the visual field or to the periphery beyond 67°. Accommodation was elicited by stimuli presented far out in the visual field. Transscleral images of single infrared LEDs showed no sign of peripheral astigmatism. The chick may be the first terrestrial vertebrate described to lack oblique astigmatism. Since corneal shape cannot account for the difference in astigmatism in humans and chicks, it must trace back to the design of the crystalline lens. The lack of peripheral astigmatism in chicks also excludes a role in emmetropization. PMID:25701740

  1. Correlation between Post-LASIK Starburst Symptom and Ocular Wavefront Aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Ji; Mu, Guo-Guang; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Wang-Yan

    2006-06-01

    Monochromatic aberrations in post laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) eyes are measured. The data are categorized into reference group and starburst group according to the visual symptoms. Statistic analysis has been made to find the correlation between the ocular wavefront aberrations and the starburst symptom. The rms aberrations of the 3rd and 4th orders for the starburst group are significantly larger than those for the reference group. The starburst symptom shows a strong correlation with vertical coma, total coma, spherical aberrations. For 3-mm pupil size and 5.8-mm pupil size, the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the starburst group are lower than those of the reference group, but their visual acuities are close. MTF and PSF analyses are made for two groups, and the results are consistent with the statistical analysis, which means the difference between the two groups is mainly due to the third- and fourth-order Zernike aberrations.

  2. Astigmatism induced by conventional spherical ablation after PRK and LASIK in myopia with astigmatism < 1.00 D

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Steven M; Mifflin, Mark D; Edmonds, Jason N; Simpson, Rachel G; Moshirfar, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate surgically-induced astigmatism after spherical ablation in photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for myopia with astigmatism < 1.00 D. Methods The charts of patients undergoing spherical PRK or LASIK for the correction of myopia with minimal astigmatism of <1.00 D from 2002 to 2012 at the John A Moran Eye Center in Salt Lake City, UT, were retrospectively reviewed. Astigmatism was measured by manifest refraction. The final astigmatic refractive outcome at 6 months postoperatively was compared with the initial refraction by Alpins vector analysis. Results For PRK, average cylinder increased from 0.39 ± 0.25 (0.00–0.75) preoperatively to 0.55 ± 0.48 (0.00–1.75) postoperatively (P = 0.014), compared with an increase in LASIK eyes from 0.40 ± 0.27 (0.00–0.75) preoperatively to 0.52 ± 0.45 (0.00–2.00) postoperatively (P = 0.041). PRK eyes experienced an absolute value change in cylinder of 0.41 ± 0.32 (0.00–1.50) and LASIK eyes experienced a change of 0.41 ± 0.31 (0.00–1.50, P = 0.955). Mean surgically-induced astigmatism was 0.59 ± 0.35 (0.00–1.70) in PRK eyes, with an increase in surgically-induced astigmatism of 0.44 D for each additional 1.00 D of preoperative cylinder; in LASIK eyes, mean surgically-induced astigmatism was 0.55 ± 0.32 (0.00–1.80, P = 0.482), with an increase in surgically-induced astigmatism of 0.29 D for each 1.00 D of preoperative cylinder. Conclusion Spherical ablation can induce substantial astigmatism even in eyes with less than one diopter of preoperative astigmatism in both PRK and LASIK. No significant difference in the magnitude of surgically-induced astigmatism was found between eyes treated with PRK and LASIK, although surgically-induced astigmatism was found to increase with greater levels of preoperative astigmatism in both PRK and LASIK. PMID:23277735

  3. Comet coma sample return instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.; Brownlee, Don E.; Burnett, Donald S.; Tsou, Peter; Uesugi, K. T.

    1994-01-01

    The sample collection technology and instrument concept for the Sample of Comet Coma Earth Return Mission (SOCCER) are described. The scientific goals of this Flyby Sample Return are to return to coma dust and volatile samples from a known comet source, which will permit accurate elemental and isotopic measurements for thousands of individual solid particles and volatiles, detailed analysis of the dust structure, morphology, and mineralogy of the intact samples, and identification of the biogenic elements or compounds in the solid and volatile samples. Having these intact samples, morphologic, petrographic, and phase structural features can be determined. Information on dust particle size, shape, and density can be ascertained by analyzing penetration holes and tracks in the capture medium. Time and spatial data of dust capture will provide understanding of the flux dynamics of the coma and the jets. Additional information will include the identification of cosmic ray tracks in the cometary grains, which can provide a particle's process history and perhaps even the age of the comet. The measurements will be made with the same equipment used for studying micrometeorites for decades past; hence, the results can be directly compared without extrapolation or modification. The data will provide a powerful and direct technique for comparing the cometary samples with all known types of meteorites and interplanetary dust. This sample collection system will provide the first sample return from a specifically identified primitive body and will allow, for the first time, a direct method of matching meteoritic materials captured on Earth with known parent bodies.

  4. Interferometric measurement of actual oblique astigmatism of ophthalmic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wihardjo, Erning

    1995-03-01

    A technique for measuring oblique astigmatism error of ophthalmic lenses is described. The technique is based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which allows us to simulate the actual conditions of the eye. The effects of the lens power, the pupilary aperture size and the viewing distance in calculating a projected pupil zone on the lens are discussed. The projected pupil size on the lens affects the measurement result of the oblique astigmatism error. Conversion of the interferogram to astigmatism error in diopters is given.

  5. Optical imaging module for astigmatic detection system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Min; Cheng, Chung-Hsiang; Molnar, Gabor; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Huang, Kuang-Yuh; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Hwu, En-Te

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an optical imaging module design for an astigmatic detection system (ADS) is presented. The module is based on a commercial optical pickup unit (OPU) and it contains a coaxial illuminant for illuminating a specimen. Furthermore, the imaging module facilitates viewing the specimen and the detection laser spot of the ADS with a lateral resolution of approximately 1 μm without requiring the removal of an element of the OPU. Two polarizers and one infrared filter are used to eliminate stray laser light in the OPU and stray light produced by the illuminant. Imaging modules designed for digital versatile disks (DVDs) and Blu-ray DVDs were demonstrated. Furthermore, the module can be used for imaging a small cantilever with approximate dimensions of 2 μm (width) × 5 μm (length), and therefore, it has the potential to be used in high-speed atomic force microscopy. PMID:27250434

  6. Aberrations for Grazing Incidence Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.

    2008-01-01

    Large number of grazing incidence telescope configurations have been designed and studied. Wolte1 telescopes are commonly used in astronomical applications. Wolter telescopes consist of a paraboloidal primary mirror and a hyperboloidal or an ellipsoidal secondary mirror. There are 8 possible combinations of Wolter telescopes. Out of these possible designs only type 1 and type 2 telescopes are widely used. Type 1 telescope is typically used for x-ray applications and type 2 telescopes are used for EUV applications. Wolter-Schwarzshild (WS) telescopes offer improved image quality over a small field of view. The WS designs are stigmatic and free of third order coma and, therefore, the PSF is significantly better over a small field of view. Typically the image is more symmetric about its centroid. As for the Wolter telescopes there are 8 possible combinations of WS telescopes. These designs have not been widely used because the surface equations are complex parametric equations complicating the analysis and typically the resolution requirements are too low to take full advantage of the WS designs. There are several other design options. Most notable are wide field x-ray telescope designs. Polynomial designs were originally suggested by Burrows4 and hyperboloid-hyperboloid designs for solar physics applications were designed by Harvey5. No general aberration theory exists for grazing incidence telescopes that would cover all the design options. Several authors have studied the aberrations of grazing incidence telescopes. A comprehensive theory of Wolter type 1 and 2 telescopes has been developed. Later this theory was expanded to include all possible combinations of grazing incidence and also normal incidence paraboloid-hyperboloid and paraboloid-ellipsoid telescopes. In this article the aberration theory of Wolter type telescopes is briefly reviewed.

  7. Development and treatment of astigmatism-related amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Erin M

    2009-06-01

    Blur induced by uncorrected astigmatism during early development can result in amblyopia, as evidenced by reduced best-corrected vision relative to normal, in measures of grating acuity, vernier acuity, contrast sensitivity across a range of spatial frequencies, recognition acuity, and stereoacuity. In addition, uncorrected astigmatism during early development can result in meridional amblyopia, or best-corrected visual deficits that are greater for, or are present only for, specific stimulus orientations. Astigmatism-related amblyopia can be successfully treated with optical correction in children as old as school age, but the amblyopia may not be completely eliminated with optical treatment alone, and the age at which optical treatment is most effective has yet to be determined. Future research on determining the period of susceptibility of the visual system to negative effects of uncorrected astigmatism and exploration of alternative or complimentary treatment methods, in addition to optical correction, are warranted. PMID:19430327

  8. Corneal wavefront aberration measurements to detect keratoconus patients.

    PubMed

    Gobbe, Marine; Guillon, Michel

    2005-06-01

    Distortions of the cornea associated with keratoconus are the manifestations of increased level, compared to normal, of higher order aberrations. It is highly relevant to use corneal aberrations to describe the optical quality of the cornea. The aim of the current study was to develop a keratoconus detection scheme based on Zernike coefficients. The results showed that the best detector to differentiate between suspected keratoconus and normal corneas was vertical coma (Z(3)(-1)) (specificity 71.9%; sensitivity 89.3%). The results demonstrated an improved use of videokeratoscope as a diagnostic tool for keratoconus detection that can be used for all types of videokeratoscopes. PMID:16318836

  9. Amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Syed; Ayoub, Walaa; Hassan, Mona; Wisgerhof, Max

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was found to have bradycardia, hypothermia and respiratory failure 3 weeks after initiation of amiodarone therapy for atrial fibrillation. Thyroid-stimulating hormone was found to be 168 μIU/mL (nl. 0.3-5 μIU/mL) and free thyroxine (FT4) was <0.2 ng/dL (nl. 0.8-1.8 ng/dL). He received intravenous fluids, vasopressor therapy and stress dose steroids; he was intubated and admitted to the intensive care unit. He received 500 μg of intravenous levothyroxine in the first 18 h of therapy, and 150 µg intravenous daily thereafter. Haemodynamic improvement, along with complete recovery of mental status, occurred after 48 h. Twelve hours after the initiation of therapy, FT4 was 0.96 ng/dL. The patient was maintained on levothyroxine 175 (g POorally daily. A thyroid ultrasound showed diffuse heterogeneity. The 24 hour excretion of iodine was 3657 (mcg (25-756 ( mcg). The only two cases of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma in the literature report patient death despite supportive therapy and thyroid hormone replacement. This case represents the most thoroughly investigated case of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma with a history significant for subclinical thyroid disease. PMID:24729111

  10. Amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Syed; Ayoub, Walaa; Hassan, Mona; Wisgerhof, Max

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was found to have bradycardia, hypothermia and respiratory failure 3 weeks after initiation of amiodarone therapy for atrial fibrillation. Thyroid-stimulating hormone was found to be 168 μIU/mL (nl. 0.3–5 μIU/mL) and free thyroxine (FT4) was <0.2 ng/dL (nl. 0.8–1.8 ng/dL). He received intravenous fluids, vasopressor therapy and stress dose steroids; he was intubated and admitted to the intensive care unit. He received 500 μg of intravenous levothyroxine in the first 18 h of therapy, and 150 µg intravenous daily thereafter. Haemodynamic improvement, along with complete recovery of mental status, occurred after 48 h. Twelve hours after the initiation of therapy, FT4 was 0.96 ng/dL. The patient was maintained on levothyroxine 175 (g POorally daily. A thyroid ultrasound showed diffuse heterogeneity. The 24 hour excretion of iodine was 3657 (mcg (25–756 ( mcg). The only two cases of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma in the literature report patient death despite supportive therapy and thyroid hormone replacement. This case represents the most thoroughly investigated case of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma with a history significant for subclinical thyroid disease. PMID:24729111

  11. Lens customization method to minimize aberration in integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Matheus; Kim, Jonghyun; Hong, Keehoon; Lee, Byoungho

    2015-10-01

    Conventionally the elemental lenses of the lens-array used in integral imaging have spherical surface profiles, thus they suffer from intrinsic lens aberrations such as spherical aberration and astigmatism. Aberrations affect the ability of the lens to focus light in a single point, or to collimate light from a point source. In integral imaging, this results in a loss of image quality of the reconstructed image due to distortions. The viewing characteristics of the integral imaging system, such as viewing angle and image resolution, are also affected by aberrations. We propose the use of a custom made aspherical lens-array which was specifically designed to minimize distortions due to aberrations and hence improve the reconstructed image quality. Ray optics calculations are used in order to analyze the aberrations and find the initial lens surface profile. Lens optimization is performed with the aid of numerical simulation software. The designed lens-array is compared to a conventional spherical lens-array of same properties. The design, optimization, and fabrication processes are described and the experiments are presented and compared with the computer simulations.

  12. Effect of lens aberration on oblique-illumination stepper system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pei-yang; Qian, Qi-De; Langston, Joseph C.

    1993-08-01

    In this paper, detailed simulation and some experimental studies on stepper lens aberration effect in the case of oblique illumination source are presented. The results are compared to that of conventional illumination source. Due to the unique feature of oblique illumination source imaging, i.e., imaging by using only zero and first diffraction order light, both stepper resolution limit and depth of focus (DOF) are extended. As a result, the effect of lens aberration in resist printing are also different from that of conventional illumination source. Unlike the conventional illumination source, the net effect of stepper lens aberration in resist printing depends not only on both the amount and type of the lens aberration, but also on the mask feature pattern. In the case of lens distortion, unlike the other types of lens aberration, the oblique illumination source does not show any improvement as compared to that of conventional illumination source. It does not show pattern dependent distortion either. In the experiment, an effect of a stepper lens aberration in resist printing for both conventional illumination and quadrapole illumination sources (mostly astigmatism) were measured. The results were in agreement with our simulation results.

  13. Higher order aberration comparison between two aspherical intraocular lenses: MC6125AS and Akreos advanced optics

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Korouji, Sara; Farjadnia, Mahgol; Naderan, Mohammad; Rajabi, Mohammad Bagher; Khosravi, Bahram; Tabatabaie, Seyed Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    AIM To compare higher order aberrations in two aspherical intraocular lenses (IOLs): Akreos advanced optics (AO) and Dr. Schmidt Microcrystalline 6125 aspheric anterior surface (MC6125AS) with each other. METHODS Forty eyes of 39 patients underwent phacoemulsification and Akreos AO and MC6125AS were implanted in their eyes in a random manner. Three months post-operatively, higher order aberrations including spherical aberration, coma aberration, and total aberrations were measured and compared. RESULTS The total aberration was 0.24±0.17 in eyes with Dr. Schmidt and 0.20±0.01 in eyes with Akreos AO (P=0.361). The mean of coma aberration was 0.17±0.21 and 0.09±0.86 in Dr. Schmidt and Akreos lenses, respectively (P=0.825). Total spherical aberration was almost the same in both groups (Mean: 0.05, P=0.933). Best corrected visual acuity in Akreos AO (0.10±0.68) and Dr. Schmidt (0.09±0.67) did not differ significantly (P=0.700). CONCLUSION There is no statistically significant difference in the higher order aberrations between these two aspherical lenses. PMID:26086009

  14. Aberration corrected aspheric grating for far ultraviolet spectrographs - Conventional approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Content, David; Trout, Catherine; Davila, Pam; Wilson, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Two approaches to reducing optical aberrations of concave grating spectrographs have been used, holographically controlling the groove curvature and spacing and reshaping the optical substrate while ruling the grooves conventionally. The latter approach, slightly deforming an ellipsoidal grating blank, can lead to diffraction-limited performance at a single FUV wavelength. When such a grating is used in a slitted Rowland circle spectrograph, the result is an extremely efficient spectrograph with spectral resolving power of about 30,000 and low astigmatism. Optical fabrication technology has advanced to the point where these exotic surface gratings are becoming practical.

  15. Pattern of astigmatism in a clinical setting in Maldives☆

    PubMed Central

    Marasini, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background Patterns of refractive errors have never been reported in Maldives. This study aims to dissect astigmatism and provide a general view in context of this island country. Methods A clinic based cross sectional study was designed with 277 patients, aged ≥3.5 years and with a primary astigmatism of ≥−1.00 diopters (D). They underwent complete eye examination and a vector analysis was done. Results Mean age was 28.58 (SD 19.15) years. Astigmatic magnitude depended on age (p < 0.05) but not on gender (p > 0.05). Severity of visual impairment after refractive correction was very less, with only 2.2% having visual acuity ≤6/60. Mean spherical, spherical equivalent and astigmatic refraction were −1.35 (SD 2.94 D), −2.40 (SD 3.04) and −2.12 (SD 1.11 D), respectively. Between fellow eyes, refractive and corneal astigmatism highly correlated (0.83 and 0.73). Fifty eyes (18.1%) had an astigmatic error of ≥−3.00 D which peaked in the second and third decades of life (p < 0.0001) and was corneal in origin (p < 0.0001). Internal J45 and J0 tended to be more negative with increasing age, showing a trend toward against the rule astigmatism. Correlation between corneal and refractive J0 and J45 were 0.88 and 0.62 (p < 0.0001). With the rule astigmatism was more common followed by against the rule and oblique. Conclusion In conclusion, this study inferred that among patients with relatively higher magnitude of astigmatism attending to the clinics in Maldives, younger patients are affected more, which could possibly link to the environment, genetics and nutrition. The probable association between nutrition and astigmatism needs to be investigated to fill the gap in literature. PMID:25800279

  16. The fabrication of toroidal and coma-corrected toroidal diffraction gratings from spherical master gratings using elastically-deformable substrates - A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Martin C. E.; Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Lemaitre, Gerard; Tondello, Giuseppe; Naletto, Giampiero

    1991-01-01

    A technique has been developed which permits toroidal, and coma-corrected toroidal, diffraction gratings to be replicated from spherical master gratings by the use of elastically-deformable substrates. Toroidal gratings correct for astigmatism and, thus, make it possible to construct stigmatic spectrometers that employ a single reflective diffraction grating. These spectrometers are particularly useful for the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength range, where reflection coefficients are low, since the single optical surface provides for dispersion, focusing, and astigmatism correction. The fabrication procedures for the pure toroidal, and coma-corrected toroidal, gratings are described, and initial test results are presented. The use of the toroidal gratings in a high-resolution sounding-rocket EUV spectroheliometer, and in both the coronal diagnostics spectrometer and the ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer on the ESA/NASA solar and heliospheric observatory mission, is described briefly, and the use of this technique for the fabrication of a coma-corrected toroidal grating for the prime Rowland spectrograph of the FUSE/Lyman mission is briefly discussed.

  17. Use of field aberrations in the alignment of the Large Binocular Telescope optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakich, A.; Hill, J. M.; Biddick, C. J.; Miller, D. L.; Leibold, T.

    2008-07-01

    It is now well-known that measurement of field-aberration, and in particular the asymmetric field-astigmatism, is required to break the degeneracy of tip-induced and de-centre-induced aberration that exists when only on-axis misalignment aberrations are considered. This paper discusses the application of the measurement of field-aberrations to the alignment of LBT optics. This application ranges from the use of wide field out-of-focus images to determine corrector tip for the red and blue prime-focus correctors, to the use of data acquired by off-axis Shack-Hartman wavefront sensors to actively reposition the hexapod-mounted primary and secondary mirrors so as to simultaneously remove both de-centre and tip/tilt such that the only remaining field-astigmatism has rotational symmetry about the centre of the detector. Also introduced is a novel method to calculate the misalignment aberrations based on an extension of the plate-diagram analysis. It is shown that this method is readily applicable to the calculation of misalignment aberrations for systems of three-or-more powered mirrors, with almost no more computational difficulty than that of the two-mirror case. Results are discussed, as well as work in progress in this area.

  18. Three Methods for Correction of Astigmatism during Phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad-Rabei, Hossein; Mohammad-Rabei, Elham; Espandar, Goldis; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Jafarinasab, Mohammad Reza; Hashemian, Seyed Javad; Feizi, Sepehr

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the safety and efficacy of three methods for correcting pre-existing astigmatism during phacoemulsification. Methods: This prospective, comparative, non-randomized study was conducted from March 2010 to January 2011, and included patients with keratometric astigmatism ≥1.25 D undergoing cataract surgery. Astigmatism was corrected using the following approaches: limbal relaxing incisions (LRI) on the steep meridian, extension and suturing of the phaco incision created at the steep meridian (extended-on-axis incision, EOAI), and toric intraocular lens (tIOL) implantation. Keratometric and refractive astigmatism were evaluated 1, 8, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Results: Eighty-three eyes of 72 patients (35 male and 37 female) with mean age of 62.4 ± 14.3 (range, 41-86) years were enrolled. The astigmatism was corrected by using the LRI, EOAI and tIOL implantation methods in 17, 33 and 33 eyes, respectively. Postoperative uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) was significantly improved in all three groups. The difference in postoperative UDVA was not statistically significant among the study groups throughout follow-up except at week 24, when UCVA was significantly better in the tIOL group as compared to the EOAI group (P = 0.024). There is no statistically significant difference of correction index and index of success between three groups at week 24 (P = 0.085 and P = 0.085 respectively). Conclusion: There was no significant difference in astigmatism reduction among the three methods of astigmatism correction during phacoemulsification. Each of these methods can be used at the discretion of the surgeon. PMID:27413496

  19. [Circulatory survival of irreversible comas].

    PubMed

    Cartier, F; Chevet, D; Garré, M; Launois, B; Thomas, R; Le Pollès, R

    1975-01-18

    On the basis of a series of 53 cases of irreversible coma maintained in circulatory survival with the aim of removing the kidneys, the authors discuss the mode of treatment, with particular reference to the intravenous fluids used and the use of medications influencing the circulation. Fluid and electrolytes given must be adjusted hourly to ensure the exact replacement of urinary losses. Isoprotenerol is the only medication usually necessary. In the event of circulatory insufficiency, which is difficult to foresee and hence prevent, immediate volume expansion in a short a time as possible and isoprotenerol most frequently correct the situation (14 out of 17 cases). Thus effective circulation may be maintained until the kidneys are removed (48 out of 53 cases). 92 p.cent of the grafted kidneys functioned from the first day onwards. PMID:1093120

  20. In-line-focus monitoring technique using lens aberration effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Sawano, Toshio; Yao, Teruyoshi; Kobayashi, Katsuyoshi; Asai, Satoru

    2005-05-01

    Process windows have become narrower as nano-processing technology has advanced. The semiconductor industry, faced with this situation, has had to impose extremely severe tool controls. Above all, with the advent of 90-nm device production, demand has arisen for strict levels of control that exceed the machine specifications of ArF exposure systems. Consequently, high-accuracy focus control and focus monitoring techniques for production wafers will be necessary in order for this to be achieved for practical use. Focus monitoring techniques that measure pattern placement errors and resist features using special reticle and mark have recently been proposed. Unfortunately, these techniques have several disadvantages. They are unable to identify the direction of a focus error, and there are limits on the illumination conditions. Furthermore, they require the use of a reticle that is more expensive than normal and they suffer from a low level of measurement accuracy. To solve these problems, the authors examined methods of focus control and focus error measurement for production wafers that utilize the lens aberration of the exposure tool system. The authors call this method FMLA (focus monitoring using lens aberration). In general, astigmatism causes a difference in the optimum focal point between the horizontal and vertical patterns in the same image plane. If a focus error occurs, regardless of the reason, a critical dimension (CD) difference arises between the sparse horizontal and vertical lines. In addition, this CD difference decreases or increases monotonously with the defocus value. That is to say, it is possible to estimate the focus errors to measure the vertical and horizontal line CD formed by exposure tool with astigmatism. In this paper, the authors examined the FMLA technique using astigmatism. First, focus monitoring accuracy was investigated. Using normal scholar type simulation, FMLA was able to detect a 32.3-nm focus error when 10-mλ astigmatism was

  1. Small Incision Lenticule Extraction for Postkeratoplasty Myopia and Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Osama; Shehata, Kitty; Abdalla, Moones F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the visual and refractive outcomes after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) for treating myopia and myopic astigmatism after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). Design. Case-series. Methods. Ten eyes of 10 patients with previous PKP and residual myopic astigmatism for whom pentacam imaging and thickness measurements were acceptable for laser vision correction. Manifest refraction (MR), uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) were obtained preoperatively and one day, one week, and one, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Cases were operated on the VisuMax® femtosecond laser platform with 500 kHz repetition rate. Results. The mean correction ratio for spherical errors was 0.84 ± 0.19 D and for the mean refractive spherical equivalent (MRSE) was 0.79 ± 0.13 D. Vector analysis showed a mean astigmatism reduction at the intended axis of 67 ± 25.25%, a correction index of 0.81 ± 0.21, and an overall mean percentage of success of astigmatism surgery of 53 ± 37.9%. The postoperative MRSE was stable throughout the 6-month follow-up period. The efficacy index was 0.93 and the safety index was 1.12. Conclusion. SMILE for correction of post-PKP myopia and astigmatism is effective, safe, and stable with moderate accuracy and predictability. Centration of the treatment within the grafts was easily performed. PMID:27446606

  2. Small Incision Lenticule Extraction for Postkeratoplasty Myopia and Astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Massoud, Tamer H; Ibrahim, Osama; Shehata, Kitty; Abdalla, Moones F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the visual and refractive outcomes after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) for treating myopia and myopic astigmatism after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). Design. Case-series. Methods. Ten eyes of 10 patients with previous PKP and residual myopic astigmatism for whom pentacam imaging and thickness measurements were acceptable for laser vision correction. Manifest refraction (MR), uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) were obtained preoperatively and one day, one week, and one, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Cases were operated on the VisuMax® femtosecond laser platform with 500 kHz repetition rate. Results. The mean correction ratio for spherical errors was 0.84 ± 0.19 D and for the mean refractive spherical equivalent (MRSE) was 0.79 ± 0.13 D. Vector analysis showed a mean astigmatism reduction at the intended axis of 67 ± 25.25%, a correction index of 0.81 ± 0.21, and an overall mean percentage of success of astigmatism surgery of 53 ± 37.9%. The postoperative MRSE was stable throughout the 6-month follow-up period. The efficacy index was 0.93 and the safety index was 1.12. Conclusion. SMILE for correction of post-PKP myopia and astigmatism is effective, safe, and stable with moderate accuracy and predictability. Centration of the treatment within the grafts was easily performed. PMID:27446606

  3. High order aberration and straylight evaluation after cataract surgery with implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting monofocal intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, Florian T A; Tandogan, Tamer; Khoramnia, Ramin; Auffarth, Gerd U

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the quality of vision in respect to high order aberrations and straylight perception after implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting, monofocal intraocular lens (IOL). METHODS Twenty-one patients (34 eyes) aged 50 to 83y underwent cataract surgery with implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting IOL (Tecnis ZCB00, Abbott Medical Optics). Three months after surgery they were examined for uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), contrast sensitivity (CS) under photopic and mesopic conditions with and without glare source, ocular high order aberrations (HOA, Zywave II) and retinal straylight (C-Quant). RESULTS Postoperatively, patients achieved a postoperative CDVA of 0.0 logMAR or better in 97.1% of eyes. Mean values of high order abberations were +0.02±0.27 (primary coma components) and -0.04±0.16 (spherical aberration term). Straylight values of the C-Quant were 1.35±0.44 log which is within normal range of age matched phakic patients. The CS measurements under mesopic and photopic conditions in combination with and without glare did not show any statistical significance in the patient group observed (P≥0.28). CONCLUSION The implantation of an aspherical aberration correcting monofocal IOL after cataract surgery resulted in very low residual higher order aberration (HOA) and normal straylight. PMID:26309872

  4. The Spot of Arago and its role in aberration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbschloe, D. R.

    1983-12-01

    The Spot of Arago is the bright diffraction spot in the center of the shadow behind a circular obstacle. Because this pattern is the result of diffraction at the edge of the obstacle, the spot contains information about the incident beam. If the incident beam contains aberrations, the shape and intensity of the diffraction pattern should change. For points on and near the optical axis, analytical solutions to the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral are possible for a circular obscuration and an annular aperture illuminated by a plane wave of uniform or gaussian intensity distribution and containing defocus and/or spherical aberration. Computer studies of these cases show excellent agreement with experiment. The amount of defocus and spherical aberration can be deduced by intensity measurements and shift in positions of on axis intensity extrema behind an annular aperture. An empirical study of astigmatism revealed a predictable change in the diffraction pattern allowing for the verification of the aberration to within .05 wavelengths. The Spot of Arago is inherent in many optical systems due to the geometry of components. The technique of aberration determination by changes in the diffraction pattern should be useful in such systems.

  5. Efficacy of Wavefront-guided Photorefractive Keratectomy with Iris Registration for Management of Moderate to High Astigmatism by Advanced Personalized Treatment Nomogram

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadpour, Mehrdad; Hashemi, Hassan; Jabbarvand, Mahmoud; Rahmatnejad, Kamran; Sabet, Fatemeh Alsadat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) using the advanced personalized treatment (APT) nomogram for correction of moderate to high astigmatism. Methods: This prospective interventional case series included 60 consecutive eyes of 30 patients undergoing wavefront-guided PRK (Zyoptix 217 Z100 excimer laser, Bausch & Lomb, Munich, Germany) using the APT nomogram and iris registration for myopic astigmatism. Mitomycin-C was applied intraoperatively in all eyes. Ophthalmic examination was performed preoperatively and 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Results: Preoperatively, mean sphere was -1.68 ± 2.08 diopters (D), mean refractive astigmatism was -3.04 ± 1.05 D and mean spherical equivalent (SE) was -3.12 ± 1.77 D. Six months postoperatively, mean sphere was + 0.60 ± 0.64 D (P < 0.005), mean cylinder was -0.43 ± 0.46 D (P < 0.005) and mean SE was + 0.28 ± 0.48 D (P < 0.005). Hyperopic overcorrection (≥ +1.0 D) occurred in 3 (5%) eyes. Postoperatively, root mean square (RMS) of higher order aberrations (HOAs) was significantly increased (P = 0.041). RMS of spherical aberration (Z [4, 0]) showed no significant change after surgery (P = 0.972). Conclusion: Considering the acceptable residual refractive error, low rate of hyperopic overcorrection, acceptable uncorrected visual acuity, and low risk of postoperative corneal haze, PRK using the APT nomogram with iris registration and mitomycin-C use is a safe and effective modality for treatment of moderate to high astigmatism. PMID:27413491

  6. Goos-Hänchen and Imbert-Fedorov shifts for astigmatic Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornigotti, Marco; Aiello, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    In this work we investigate the role of the beam astigmatism in the Goos-Hänchen and Imbert-Fedorov shift. As a case study, we consider a Gaussian beam focused by an astigmatic lens and we calculate explicitly the corrections to the standard formulas for beam shifts due to the astigmatism induced by the lens. Our results show that the different focusing in the longitudinal and transverse direction introduced by an astigmatic lens may enhance the angular part of the shift.

  7. Interaction of axial and oblique astigmatism in theoretical and physical eye models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Thibos, Larry N

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between oblique and axial astigmatism was investigated analytically (generalized Coddington's equations) and numerically (ray tracing) for a theoretical eye model with a single refracting surface. A linear vector-summation rule for power vector descriptions of axial and oblique astigmatism was found to account for their interaction over the central 90° diameter of the visual field. This linear summation rule was further validated experimentally using a physical eye model measured with a laboratory scanning aberrometer. We then used the linear summation rule to evaluate the relative contributions of axial and oblique astigmatism to the total astigmatism measured across the central visual field. In the central visual field, axial astigmatism dominates because the oblique astigmatism is negligible near the optical axis. At intermediate eccentricities, axial and oblique astigmatism may have equal magnitude but orthogonal axes, which nullifies total astigmatism at two locations in the visual field. At more peripheral locations, oblique astigmatism dominates axial astigmatism, and the axes of total astigmatism become radially oriented, which is a trait of oblique astigmatism. When eccentricity is specified relative to a foveal line-of-sight that is displaced from the eye's optical axis, asymmetries in the visual field map of total astigmatism can be used to locate the optical axis empirically and to estimate the relative contributions of axial and oblique astigmatism at any retinal location, including the fovea. We anticipate the linear summation rule will benefit many topics in vision science (e.g., peripheral correction, emmetropization, meridional amblyopia) by providing improved understanding of how axial and oblique astigmatism interact to produce net astigmatism. PMID:27607493

  8. Solutions for stability and astigmatism in high power laser resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narro, R.; Arronte, M.; de Posada, E.; Ponce, L.; Rodríguez, E.

    2009-09-01

    A method is proposed for the design of fundamental mode high power resonators, with joined stability zones. A parameter is created which gives the minimum length a laser resonator should have while having at the same time the broadest stabilities zones. For multimode and large mode volume resonators, a configuration is introduced for maximizing the laser overall efficiency due to the compensation of the astigmatism induced by the flash lamp pumping heating. The later configuration proposes a dual-active medium resonator, with 90 degree rotation around the optical axis between the astigmatic thermal lenses of the mediums. The reliability of this configuration is corroborated experimentally using a Nd:YAG dual-active medium resonator. It is found that in the pumping power range where the astigmatism compensation is possible, the overall efficiency is constant, even when increasing the excitation power with the consequent increase of the thermal lens dioptric power.

  9. Quasi-Bessel beams from asymmetric and astigmatic illumination sources.

    PubMed

    Müller, Angelina; Wapler, Matthias C; Schwarz, Ulrich T; Reisacher, Markus; Holc, Katarzyna; Ambacher, Oliver; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2016-07-25

    We study the spatial intensity distribution and the self-reconstruction of quasi-Bessel beams produced from refractive axicon lenses with edge emitting laser diodes as asymmetric and astigmatic illumination sources. Comparing these to a symmetric mono-mode fiber source, we find that the asymmetry results in a transition of a quasi-Bessel beam into a bow-tie shaped pattern and eventually to a line shaped profile at a larger distance along the optical axis. Furthermore, we analytically estimate and discuss the effects of astigmatism, substrate modes and non-perfect axicons. We find a good agreement between experiment, simulation and analytic considerations. Results include the derivation of a maximal axicon angle related to astigmatism of the illuminating beam, impact of laser diode beam profile imperfections like substrate modes and a longitudinal oscillation of the core intensity and radius caused by a rounded axicon tip. PMID:27464190

  10. Models for Cometary Comae Containing Negative Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of IP/Halley. The anions O(-), OH(-), C(-), CH(-) and CN(-) have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu [I]. Organic molecular anions such as C4H(-) and C6H(-) are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been fully explored. We present details of our new models for the chemistry of cometary comae that include atomic and molecular anions. We calculate the impact of these anions on the charge balance and examine their importance for cometary coma chemistry.

  11. Chemical and Hydrodynamical Models of Cometary Comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Multi-fluid modelling of the outflowing gases which sublimate from cometary nuclei as they approach the Sun is necessary for understanding the important physical and chemical processes occurring in this complex plasma. Coma chemistry models can be employed to interpret observational data and to ultimately determine chemical composition and structure of the nuclear ices and dust. We describe a combined chemical and hydrodynamical model [1] in which differential equations for the chemical abundances and the energy balance are solved as a function of distance from the cometary nucleus. The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of 1P/Halley. The anions O(-), OH(-), C(-), CH(-) and CN(-) have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu [2]. Organic molecular anions such as C4H(-) and C6H(-) are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas-phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been fully explored. We present details of new models for the chemistry of cometary comae that include atomic and molecular anions and calculate the impact of these anions on the coma physics and chemistry af the coma.

  12. A new method to measure low-order aberrations based on wavefront slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiong; Liu, Wenguang; Jiang, Zongfu

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we discuss a new method to detect low-order aberration with large peak-valley value. This method also depends on wavefront slope measurements but only need measurements of 6 spots, which means that only 6 pieces of lens are used in detective process, and the mathematical algorithm involved in the calculation process is different from zonal or modal estimation used in Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor. To evaluate the accuracy of this method we simulate this optical measurement process by using the Zemax simulation software and Matlab calculation software. Simulation results show that the reconstructed errors of Zernike aberration coefficients are higher for a larger peakvalley (PV) value of wavefront distortions. The maximal errors of aberration coefficients can be keep lower than 1% for aberrations with different combinations of defocus, astigmatism at 0° ,astigmatism at 45° and some high-order terms.. The new measurement method can be used to direct measure low-order aberrations for laser beam with large transverse area and do not need beam contracting system.

  13. Actively compensation of low order aberrations by refractive shaping system for high power slab lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zheng-wei; Guo, Ya-ding; Chen, Zhong-zheng; Li, Shuai; Xu, Yi-ting; Xu, Jian; Wang, Bao-shan; Gong, Ke-ling; Gao, Hong-wei; Bo, Yong; Peng, Qin-jun; Cui, Da-fu; Xu, Zu-yan

    2015-12-01

    We present a compact refractive shaping system for actively compensating low order aberrations of high power slab lasers. The shaping system includes three spherical lenses and two cylindrical lenses. Both theoretical and experimental investigations were performed to evaluate the compensation capability of the refractive shaping system. For a typical input beam with large low order aberrations of peak-to-valley (PV)=66.10λ and root-mean-square (RMS)=16.05λ, adjusting the distance between lenses, the wavefront aberrations are reduced to PV=0.48λ, RMS=0.10λ for the theoretical simulation and PV=0.50λ, RMS=0.11λ for the experimental result, respectively. It indicates that the main low order aberrations of defocus and 0° astigmatism can be significantly compensated by actively adjusting the distance between lenses and the experimental result agree well with the theoretical simulation.

  14. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  15. Epiblepharon of the lower eyelid: classification and association with astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Khwarg, S I; Lee, Y J

    1997-12-01

    To determine a classification system for epiblepharon of the lower eyelid and to evaluate a possible correlation between lower lid epiblepharon and astigmatism. Three morphologic characteristics (skin fold, cilia touching the cornea and corneal erosion) were observed by slit-lamp biomicroscopic examination and Polaroid pictures in 186 eyes of 102 patients with epiblepharon of the lower lid. In 112 eyes, cycloplegic refractions performed. A classification system reflecting the severity of epiblepharon was then sought, and the incidences and type of astigmatism were evaluated. Epiblepharon of the lower lid could be classified according to the height of skin fold, the area of cornea touched by cilia and the area of corneal erosion. There was significant agreement between these three classifications. The incidence of astigmatism of 0.5D or more was 54%; most was 'with-the-rule', regardless of a patient's age. In addition to the representative nature of other characteristics, skin fold height can be easily measured without the need for slit-lamp examination in children and is closely related with the amount of skin which should be excised during surgery to correct epiblepharon. A classification system using skin fold height may therefore be the most appropriate method. In addition, there may be a correlation between lower lid epiblepharon and astigmatism. PMID:9510654

  16. Characteristics of Astigmatism in a Population of Tunisian School-Children

    PubMed Central

    Chebil, Ahmed; Jedidi, Lina; Chaker, Nibrass; Kort, Fedra; Limaiem, Rym; Mghaieth, Fatma; El Matri, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the characteristics of astigmatism in a cross-sectional study of schoolchildren in Tunisia. Materials and Methods: A random cluster design was used to recruit children from primary schools across urban and rural settings in Tunisia, from 2008 to 2010. A total of 6192 students aged 6–14-years old were enrolled. All students whose uncorrected visual acuity was worse than 20/20 underwent a complete ophthalmic examination. Astigmatism was defined as the cylinder power of 0.75 diopter (D) or greater. Results: The prevalence of astigmatism was 6.67%. Mean cylinder power was - 1.89 ± 0.79D. The prevalence of astigmatism increased statistically significantly with age (P = 0.032). The prevalence of astigmatism was not significantly related to gender (P = 0.051). Of those with cylinder, 63.6%, 17.8%, and 18.6% schoolchildren had with with-the-rule, against-the-rule, and oblique astigmatism, respectively. ATR astigmatism was significantly higher in males (P = 0.033). There was no significant association between the student's area of residence and astigmatism (P = 0.059). Conclusion: Comparisons with other studies show that the prevalence of astigmatism in Tunisia is higher than in some countries. The prevalence of astigmatism increased with age but not gender. The majority of schoolchildren had with-the-rule astigmatism. PMID:26180472

  17. Correction of low corneal astigmatism in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Pia; Pastore, Marco Rocco; Zanei, Andrea; Umari, Ingrid; Messai, Meriem; Negro, Corrado; Tognetto, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate and compare aspheric toric intraocular lens (IOL) implantation and aspheric monofocal IOL implantation with limbal relaxing incisions (LRI) to manage low corneal astigmatism (1.0-2.0 D) in cataract surgery. METHODS A prospective randomized comparative clinical study was performed. There were randomly recruited 102 eyes (102 patients) with cataracts associated with corneal astigmatism and divided into two groups. The first group received toric IOL implantation and the second one monofocal IOL implantation with peripheral corneal relaxing incisions. Outcomes considered were: visual acuity, postoperative residual astigmatism, endothelial cell count, the need for spectacles, and patient satisfaction. To determine the postoperative toric axis, all patients who underwent the toric IOL implantation were further evaluated using an OPD Scan III (Nidek Co, Japan). Follow-up lasted 6mo. RESULTS The mean uncorrected distance visual acuity (UCVA) and the best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) demonstrated statistically significant improvement after surgery in both groups. At the end of the follow-up the UCVA was statistically better in the patients with toric IOL implants compared to those patients who underwent implantation of monofocal IOL plus LRI. The mean residual refractive astigmatism was of 0.4 D for the toric IOL group and 1.1 D for the LRI group (P<0.01). No difference was observed in the postoperative endothelial cell count between the two groups. CONCLUSION The two surgical procedures demonstrated a significant decrease in refractive astigmatism. Toric IOL implantation was more effective and predictable compared to the limbal relaxing incision. PMID:26309869

  18. Modeling the coma of 2060 Chiron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boice, D. C.; Konno, I.; Stern, S. Alan; Huebner, W. F.

    1991-01-01

    Observations of comet-like activity and a resolved coma have established that 2060 Chiron is a comet. Determinations of its radius range from 65 to 200 km. This unusually large size for a comet suggests that the atmosphere of Chiron is intermediate to the tightly bound, thin atmospheres typical of planets and satellite and the greatly extended atmospheres in free expansion typical of cometary comae. Under certain conditions it may gravitationally bind an atmosphere that is thick compared to its size, while a significant amount of gas escapes to an extensive exosphere. These attributes coupled with reports of sporadic outbursts at large heliocentric distances and the identification of CN in the coma make Chiron a challenging object to model. Simple models of gas production and the dusty coma were recently presented but a general concensus on many basic features has not emerged. Development was begun on a more complete coma model of Chiron. The objectives are to report progress on this model and give the preliminary results for understanding Chiron.

  19. Coma Chemistry of Sun-grazing Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Gicquel, Adeline

    2014-11-01

    The recent apparition of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON), and its disruption during perihelion passage, has motivated numerous observations of the associated variations in the gas and dust composition. More generally, comet ISON has regenerated interest in the physics and chemistry of Sun-grazing comets. Chemical models of cometary comae have typically always been developed to model comets at about 1 AU and beyond [1]. Apart from one early coma chemistry model [2], which calculated the coma chemistry of a comet at 0.125 AU with assumed single-fluid physics, there have been no detailed studies of coma chemistry at the small heliocentric distances experienced by comet ISON and other Sun-grazing comets.In this contribution we will discuss the various physical and chemical processes that have to be considered when modeling the comae of Sun-grazing comets. We will present comet models in which the physical and chemical structures of the multi-fluid flow are calculated self-consistently [3] as a function of decreasing heliocentric distance.[1] Rodgers, S.D., Charnley S.B., Boice, D.C. & Huebner, W.F. (2004) In COMETS II, Eds. Festou, M., Keller, H.U. & Weaver, H.A., University of Arizona Press, 505-522 [2] Swift, M.B. & Mitchell, G.F. (1978) Icarus, 47, 412 [3] Rodgers, S.D. & Charnley, S.B. (2002) MNRAS, 330, 660This work was supported by NASA's Planetary Atmospheres and Planetary Astronomy Programs.

  20. Active Optical Control of Quasi-Static Aberrations for ATST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. C.; Upton, R.; Rimmele, T. R.; Hubbard, R.; Barden, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) requires active control of quasi-static telescope aberrations in order to achieve the image quality set by its science requirements. Four active mirrors will be used to compensate for optical misalignments induced by changing gravitational forces and thermal gradients. These misalignments manifest themselves primarily as low-order wavefront aberrations that will be measured by a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. When operating in closed-loop with the wavefront sensor, the active optics control algorithm uses a linear least-squares reconstructor incorporating force constraints to limit force applied to the primary mirror while also incorporating a neutral-point constraint on the secondary mirror to limit pointing errors. The resulting system compensates for astigmatism and defocus with rigid-body motion of the secondary mirror and higher-order aberrations with primary mirror bending modes. We demonstrate this reconstruction method and present simulation results that apply the active optics correction to aberrations generated by finite-element modeling of thermal and gravitational effects over a typical day of ATST operation. Quasi-static wavefront errors are corrected to within limits set by wavefront sensor noise in all cases with very little force applied to the primary mirror surface and minimal pointing correction needed.

  1. Acute Effect of Cigarette Smoking on Pupil Size and Ocular Aberrations: A Pre- and Postsmoking Study

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Uzeyir; Gundogan, Fatih C.; Dinc, Umut Aslı; Yolcu, Umit; Ilhan, Abdullah; Altun, Salih

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the acute effects of cigarette smoking on photopic and mesopic pupil sizes and wavefront aberrations. Methods. Cigarette smoker volunteers were recruited in the study. Photopic and mesopic pupil sizes and total ocular aberrations were measured before smoking and immediately after smoking. All volunteers were asked to smoke a single cigarette containing 1.0 mg nicotine. Pupil sizes and total ocular aberrations were assessed by optical path difference scanning system (OPD-Scan II ARK-10000, NIDEK). Only the right eyes were considered for statistical analysis. The changes of pupil size and total ocular aberrations after smoking were tested for significance by Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results. Mean photopic pupil size decreased from 3.52 ± 0.73 mm to 3.29 ± 0.58 mm (P = 0.001) after smoking. Mean mesopic pupil size was also decreased from 6.42 ± 0.75 mm to 6.14 ± 0.75 mm after smoking (P = 0.001). There was a decrease in all the measured components of aberrations (total wavefront aberration, higher-order aberration, total coma, total trefoil, total tetrafoil, total spherical aberration and total higher-order aberration) after smoking; however the differences were insignificant for all (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Our results indicate that pupil constricts after smoking. On the other hand, smoking does not alter ocular aberrations. PMID:25699189

  2. Generalized design of a zero-geometric-loss, astigmatism-free, modified four-objective multipass matrix system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yin; Sun, LiQun; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Zilong

    2016-02-20

    During this study we constructed a generalized parametric modified four-objective multipass matrix system (MMS). We used an optical system comprising four asymmetrical spherical mirrors to improve the alignment process. The use of a paraxial equation for the design of the front transfer optics yielded the initial condition for modeling our MMS. We performed a ray tracing simulation to calculate the significant aberration of the system (astigmatism). Based on the calculated meridional and sagittal focus positions, the complementary focusing mirror was easily designed to provide an output beam free of astigmatism. We have presented an example of a 108-transit multipass system (5×7 matrix arrangement) with a relatively larger numerical aperture source (xenon light source). The whole system exhibits zero theoretical geometrical loss when simulated with Zemax software. The MMS construction strategy described in this study provides an anastigmatic output beam and the generalized approach to design a controllable matrix spot pattern on the field mirrors. Asymmetrical reflective mirrors aid in aligning the whole system with high efficiency. With the generalized design strategy in terms of optics configuration and asymmetrical fabrication method in this paper, other kinds of multipass matrix system coupled with different sources and detector systems also can be achieved. PMID:26906598

  3. FK Comae, King of Spin: the Movie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    FK Comae is an ultra-fast rotating, single yellow giant, product of a recent W UMa merger. Extraordinary levels of FUV and X-ray emission rate FK Comae a coronal powerhouse on par with the most extreme short-period RS CVn binaries. As a single star, FK Comae has clear advantages as a laboratory for exploring high-energy activity. We will bring to bear Hubble's powerful Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, together with Chandra HETGS and groundbased Zeeman Doppler Imaging, to trace -- over two stellar rotations -- spatial relationships between bright FUV patches, extended X-ray emission zones, and the photospheric dark spots, to inform ideas of coronal structure and heating at the outer limits of magnetospheric activity among the coronal cool stars.

  4. Comet coma sample return via Giotto II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    A comet coma sample return is possible with a low-cost flyby mission. Collecting coma materials and returning them to earth can be accomplished in a free-return trajectory. Intact capture of coma dust, preserving the cometary dust mineralogy, is possible at low encounter speeds. Samples from a known cometary source can then be compared with the wealth of information on meteorites and interplanetary dust. Sample return via Giotto II is a unique, low-cost NASA/ESA cooperative opportunity. With ESA providing the Giotto spacecraft and payload and NASA the sample return capability, first-class science can be accomplished at a very low cost for both NASA and ESA. This paper focuses on the sample return aspects, including sample return objectives, sample collection techniques, experimental work to verify collection concepts, and some of the characteristics of the cometary targets for sample return.

  5. FK Comae: King of Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Korhonen, H.; Harper, G. M.; Brown, A.; Redfield, S.

    2004-12-01

    Fast-rotating early-G giants often display ultraviolet profiles of ``hot lines,'' like O VI (3×105 K), up to twice as broad as anticipated from the photospheric υsin {i}. This peculiar behavior has been attributed to highly extended coronal outer atmospheres. FUSE recently has contributed fundamentally to the exploration of these ``super-rotational'' effects by observing the fascinating object FK Comae Berenices (G5 III). It is prototype of a class of rapidly rotating single giants which display spectacular emission activity from X-rays to radio. FK Com has a spin period of only 2.4 d, and a remarkable υsin {i} of 160 km s-1. The origins of such ultra-fast--rotating stars are controversial. They might result from a coalesced contact binary, cannibalism of a ``hot Jupiter,'' or simply represent the top of the natural spin distribution of moderate-mass Hertzsprung gap giants. In February 2004, FUSE obtained a 13 ks exposure of FK Com in the 920--1180 Å range, the first UV observation of this unusual object since the IUE era a decade ago, and by far the best quality spectrum to date. The FUV emissions of O VI λ 1031 and C III λ 977 are enormously broad, asymmetric, but nearly identical in shape, aside from a blue-shifted absorption component in the latter. The FHWM's are a remarkable 600 km s-1, about twice the broadest FUV profile of any late-type star observed up to that point. The blueshifted C III feature might represent a wind at ˜ 3×104 K, or alternatively a scattering structure in the highly extended coronal envelope, something like the ``prominences'' seen already in Hα . The asymmetric O VI profile might indicate an outflow at higher ˜ 3× 105 K temperatures; or simply reflects a skewed distribution of high-altitude activity in the equatorial zones of FK Com. The relationship between the hot lines and photospheric active regions---deduced from contemporaneous optical Doppler mapping---also will be discussed. This work was supported by FUSE Guest

  6. The Three Sources of Gas in the Comae of Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, W. F.

    1995-01-01

    Surface water ice on a comet nucleus is the major source of coma gas. Dust, entrained by coma gas, fragments and vaporizes, forming a second, distributed source of coma gas constituents. Ice species more volatile than water ice below the surface of the nucleus are a third source of coma gas. Vapors from these ices, produced by heat penetrating into the nucleus, diffuse through pores outward into the coma. The second and third sources provide minor, but sometimes easily detectible, gaseous species in the coma. We present mixing ratios of observed minor coma constituents relative to water vapor as a function of heliocentric and cometocentric distances and compare these ratios with model predictions, assuming the sources of the minor species are either coma dust or volatile ices in the nucleus.

  7. Correlation Between Stereoacuity and Experimentally Induced Graded Monocular and Binocular Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Puthran, Neelam; Gagal, Bhavna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stereopsis, the highest grade of binocular single vision, is affected by various factors, such as mis-alignment of visual axes, refractive errors especially anisometropia and astigmatism, both of which may result in amblyopia. There are very few studies in literature regarding the relationship between stereoacuity and refractive errors, especially astigmatism. Aim The present study was conducted to determine the correlation between stereoacuity and experimentally induced graded astigmatism in emmetropes. Materials and Methods A randomized study was conducted on 2000 individuals of either gender, between the ages of 8-35 years, at tertiary care centre attached to a medical college during the period of August 2012 to August 2014, All subjects were emmetropic with normal binocular single vision. Participants were randomly divided into four groups of 500 individuals each. Two groups were subjected to induced myopic astigmatism, either uni-ocularly or binocularly, using + 1.0 D and + 2.0 D cylinders at varying axes i.e., 450, 900 and 1800. Similarily, the remaining two groups were subjected to induced hypermetropic astigmatism, using - 1.0 D and - 2.0D cylinders at varying axes i.e. 450, 900 and 1800. Near stereoacuity was determined by the Titmus Fly Stereo Test, both before and after induction of astigmatism. Statistical analysis was done using paired t-test and ANOVA. Results The mean stereoacuity in emmetropes was 28.81±4.97 seconds of arc. There was a decrease in stereoacuity with increase in dioptric power of astigmatism (p<0.001). Oblique astigmatism reduced the stereoacuity maximally, while stereoacuity was least affected at 180o axis. Hypermetropic astigmatism caused more deterioration in stereoacuity than myopic astigmatism. A gross reduction in stereoacuity was noted in induced monocular astigmatism as against binocular astigmatism. Conclusion This study suggests that stereoacuity is significantly affected by even minor degrees of monocular or

  8. The Aberration Corrected SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, David C.

    2005-09-09

    The performance of the conventional low-energy CD-SEM is limited by the aberrations inherent in the probe forming lens. Multi-pole correctors are now available which can reduce or eliminate these aberrations. An SEM equipped with such a corrector offers higher spatial resolution and more probe current from a given electron source, and other aspects of the optical performance are also improved, but the much higher numerical aperture associated with an aberration corrected lens results in a reduction in imaging depth of field.

  9. Prediction of Recovery from Coma After CPR

    MedlinePlus

    AAN Summary of Evidence-based Guideline for PATIENTS AND THEIR FAMILIES PREDICTION OF RECOVERY FROM COMA AFTER CPR This summary will provide you ... of certainty. CLINICAL EXAM FINDINGS There is strong evidence* that the following findings from the clinical exam ...

  10. Functional MRI and Outcome in Traumatic Coma

    PubMed Central

    Giacino, Joseph T.; Wu, Ona

    2013-01-01

    Advances in task-based functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI), and arterial-spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI have occurred at a rapid pace in recent years. These techniques for measuring brain function have great potential to improve the accuracy of prognostication for civilian and military patients with traumatic coma. In addition, fMRI, rs-fMRI, and ASL have provided novel insights into the pathophysiology of traumatic disorders of consciousness, as well as mechanisms of recovery from coma. However, functional neuroimaging techniques have yet to achieve widespread clinical use as prognostic tests for patients with traumatic coma. Rather, a broad spectrum of methodological hurdles currently limits the feasibility of clinical implementation. In this review, we discuss the basic principles of fMRI, rs-fMRI and ASL and their potential applications as prognostic tools for patients with traumatic coma. We also discuss future strategies for overcoming the current barriers to clinical implementation. PMID:23881623

  11. New red jewels in Coma Berenices

    SciTech Connect

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Hearty, Frederick R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Cargile, Phillip A.; Pepper, Joshua; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Siverd, Robert J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Cottaar, Michiel; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Jackson, Kelly M.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; and others

    2014-02-20

    We have used Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III (SDSS-III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) radial velocity observations in the near-infrared H-band to explore the membership of the nearby (86.7 ± 0.9 pc) open cluster Coma Berenices (Melotte 111), concentrating on the poorly populated low-mass end of the main sequence. Using SDSS-III APOGEE radial velocity measurements, we confirm the membership of eight K/M dwarf members, providing the first confirmed low-mass members of the Coma Berenices cluster. Using R ∼ 2000 spectra from IRTF-SpeX, we confirm the independently luminosity classes of these targets, and find their metallicities to be consistent with the known solar mean metallicity of Coma Berenices and of M dwarfs in the solar neighborhood. In addition, the APOGEE spectra have enabled measurement of vsin i for each target and detection for the first time of the low-mass secondary components of the known binary systems Melotte 111 102 and Melotte 111 120, as well as identification of the previously unknown binary system 2MASS J12214070+2707510. Finally, we use Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope photometry to measure photometric variability and rotation periods for a subset of the Coma Berenices members.

  12. Coma Patient Monitoring System Using Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankalp, Meenu

    2011-12-01

    COMA PATIENT MONITORING SYSTEM provides high quality healthcare services in the near future. To provide more convenient and comprehensive medical monitoring in big hospitals since it is tough job for medical personnel to monitor each patient for 24 hours.. The latest development in patient monitoring system can be used in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), Critical Care Unit (CCU), and Emergency Rooms of hospital. During treatment, the patient monitor is continuously monitoring the coma patient to transmit the important information. Also in the emergency cases, doctor are able to monitor patient condition efficiently to reduce time consumption, thus it provides more effective healthcare system. So due to importance of patient monitoring system, the continuous monitoring of the coma patient can be simplified. This paper investigates about the effects seen in the patient using "Coma Patient Monitoring System" which is a very advanced product related to physical changes in body movement of the patient and gives Warning in form of alarm and display on the LCD in less than one second time. It also passes a sms to a person sitting at the distant place if there exists any movement in any body part of the patient. The model for the system uses Keil software for the software implementation of the developed system.

  13. On the enigma of FK Comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F.; Basri, G.

    1981-01-01

    Stellar chromospheric and coronal activity appears ubiquitous among late type stars to the left of the TR-wind boundary line (Linksy and Haisch 1979). The level of activity as measured by the X-ray surface flux is linearly proportional to the stellar angular velocity, with the exception of slowly rotating dwarfs (Walter 1981, 1982; Walter and Bowyer 1981). The peculiar rapidly rotating G giant FK Comae (Merrill 1948) appears to fit into this pattern. Line widths indicate V sin i = 120 + or - 20 km s(-1) (Bopp and Stencel 1981). FK Comae has strong Ca II H and K and H alpha emission, strong transition region UV lines (Bopp and Stencel 1981), and an X-ray surface flux in good agreement with its rapid rotation (Walter 1981). Yet, FK Comae is an enigmatic star. It is a rapid rotator, but it is not clear why it is a rapid rotator. There is no direct evidence for duplicity; indeed, the upper limit of 20 km s(-1) on the K velocity puts tight constraints on any binary configuration, especially if sin i approx 1, as indicated by the large V sin i. Bopp and Stencel (1981) have suggested that FK Comae is an example of a coalesced W UMa system (Webbink 1976), wherein the orbital angular momentum has become rotational angular momentum of the coalesced star.

  14. Comparison of Whole Eye vs. First-Surface Astigmatism in Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Rachel; Marsack, Jason D.; Leach, Norman E.; Herring, Ralph J.; Anderson, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) have structural differences in the cornea and lens, as compared to the general population. This study investigates objectively measured refractive and corneal astigmatism, as well as calculated internal astigmatism in subjects with and without DS. Methods Refractive (Grand Seiko autorefraction) and anterior corneal astigmatism (difference between steep and flat keratometry obtained with Zeiss Atlas corneal topography) were measured in 128 subjects with DS (mean age = 24.8±8.7 yrs) and 137 controls without DS (mean age = 24.9±9.9 yrs), with 1 eye randomly selected for analysis per subject. Refractive astigmatism and corneal astigmatism were converted to vector notation (J0, J45) to calculate internal astigmatism (Refractive – Corneal) and then converted back to minus cylinder form. Results Mean refractive astigmatism was significantly greater in subjects with DS than controls (−1.94±1.30DC vs −0.66±0.60DC, t=−10.16, p<0.001), as was mean corneal astigmatism (1.70±1.04DC vs 1.02±0.63DC, t=6.38, p<0.001) and mean internal astigmatism (−1.07±0.68DC vs −0.77±0.41DC, t=−4.21, p<0.001). A positive linear correlation between corneal and refractive astigmatism was observed for both study populations for both the J0 and J45 vectors (p<0.001 for all comparisons, R2 range = 0.31 to 0.74). The distributions of astigmatism orientation differed significantly between the two study populations when compared across all three types of astigmatism (Chi-Square, p<0.001). Conclusions This study demonstrates that corneal astigmatism is predictive of overall refractive astigmatism in individuals with DS, as it is in the general population. The greater magnitudes of astigmatism and wider variation of astigmatism orientation in individuals with DS for refractive, corneal, and calculated internal astigmatism is likely attributable to previously reported differences in the structure of the cornea and internal optical components

  15. Stability properties of a rotating astigmatic optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habraken, Steven J. M.; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2009-02-01

    We study the effects of rotation on the stability properties of an astigmatic two-mirror cavity. We show that rotation can both stabilize and destabilize a cavity and investigate the effects of such a rotationally-induced transition on the spatial structure and the orbital angular momentum of the cavity modes. Our method relies on the connection between ray and wave optics and is exact within the time-dependent paraxial approximation.

  16. Chemical Recycling of HCN in Cometary Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Kawakita, Hideyo; Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Mumma, Michael J.; Kobayashi, Hitomi; Ogawa, Sayuri

    2014-11-01

    Modeling is essential to understand the important physical and chemical processes that occur in cometary comae, especially the relationship between putative parent and daughter molecules, such as, HCN and CN. Photochemistry is a major source of ions and electrons that further initiate key gas-phase reactions, contributing to the plethora of molecules and atoms observed in comets. The effects of photoelectrons that interact via impacts are important to the overall excitation and dissociation processes in the inner coma. We consider the relevant processes in the collision-dominated, inner coma of a comet within a global modeling framework to understand observations of HCN and CN. The CN source(s) must be able to produce highly collimated jets, be consistent with the observed CN parent scale length, and have a production rate consistent with the observed CN production. HCN fulfills these conditions in some comets (e.g., 1P/Halley, Hale-Bopp) while it does not in others (e.g., 8P/Tuttle, 6P/d’Arrest, 73P/S-W3, 2P/Encke, 9P/Temple 1 and C/2007 W1).We investigate the chemistry of HCN with our chemical kinetics coma model including a network with other possible CN parents, as well as a dust component that may be a potential source of CN. It is seen that the major destruction pathways of HCN are via photo dissociation (into H and CN) and protonation with water group ions - primarily H3O+. We point out the intriguing “recycling” of HCN via protonation reactions with H3O+, H2O+, OH+, and subsequent dissociative recombination. It seems that HCN molecules observed in the coma can consist of those initially released from the nucleus and those that are freshly formed at different locations in the coma via these protonation/dissociation reactions. We will investigate implications for reconciling discrepancies between observations of HCN and CN in cometary comae.Acknowledgements: We appreciate support from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program. This program is partially

  17. Changes in visual function following optical treatment of astigmatism-related amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Erin M; Dobson, Velma; Miller, Joseph M; Clifford-Donaldson, Candice E

    2008-03-01

    Effects of optical correction on best-corrected grating acuity (vertical (V), horizontal (H), oblique (O)), vernier acuity (V, H, O), contrast sensitivity (1.5, 6.0, and 18.0 cy/deg spatial frequency, V and H), and stereoacuity were evaluated prospectively in 4- to 13-year-old astigmats and a non-astigmatic age-matched control group. Measurements made at baseline (eyeglasses dispensed for astigmats), 6 weeks, and 1 year showed greater improvement in astigmatic than non-astigmatic children for all measures. Treatment effects occurred by 6 weeks, and did not differ by cohort (<8 vs. >or= 8 years), but astigmatic children did not attain normal levels of visual function. PMID:18261760

  18. Correlation between contrast sensitivity and higher-order aberration based on pupil diameter after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Takefumi; Negishi, Kazuno; Ohnuma, Kazuhiko; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between contrast sensitivity and calculated higher-order aberrations based on individual natural pupil diameter after cataract surgery. Methods This prospective study included 120 eyes from 92 patients who were randomized to receive one of four lenses, including three aspheric lenses (Acrysof SN60WF, Tecnis ZA9000, and Hoya Py60AD) and one spherical lens (Acrysof SN60AT). Contrast sensitivity, higher-order aberrations of the whole eye, and pupil diameter under photopic and mesopic conditions were measured 1 month postoperatively. Higher-order aberrations were decomposed into Zernike coefficients, calculated according to individual pupil diameter. The correlation between higher-order aberrations and contrast sensitivity was evaluated. Results There were no significant differences in contrast sensitivity function between the four types of lenses under photopic conditions. However, the contrast sensitivity function and area under log contrast sensitivity function in the aspheric lenses were significantly better than in the spherical lens under mesopic conditions. Under mesopic conditions, spherical aberration in eyes with aspheric lenses was significantly lower than in eyes with spherical lenses (P < 0.05). Under photopic conditions, coma aberration had a significant negative correlation with contrast sensitivity at 12 cycles/degree. Under mesopic conditions, spherical aberration had a significant negative correlation with contrast sensitivity at 3, 6, and 12 cycles/degree with glare, and with contrast sensitivity at 6 and 18 cycles/degree without glare. Conclusion In terms of influence on visual function, coma aberration may be more significant under photopic conditions and spherical aberration under mesopic conditions. PMID:22205829

  19. Wavefront aberration function in terms of R. V. Shack's vector product and Zernike polynomial vectors.

    PubMed

    Gray, Robert W; Rolland, Jannick P

    2015-10-01

    Previous papers have shown how, for rotationally symmetric optical imaging systems, nodes in the field dependence of the wavefront aberration function develop when a rotationally symmetric optical surface within an imaging optical system is decentered and/or tilted. In this paper, we show how Shack's vector product (SVP) can be used to express the wavefront aberration function and to define vectors in terms of the Zernike polynomials. The wavefront aberration function is then expressed in terms of the Zernike vectors. It is further shown that SVP fits within the framework of two-dimensional geometric algebra (GA). Within the GA framework, an equation for the third-order node locations for the binodal astigmatism term that emerge in the presence of tilts and decenters is then demonstrated. A computer model of a three-mirror telescope system is used to demonstrate the validity of the mathematical development. PMID:26479937

  20. Application of polymer graded-index materials for aberration correction of progressive addition lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitanoki, Yuki; Tagaya, Akihiro; Koike, Yasuhiro

    2009-02-01

    Graded-index (GRIN) progressive addition lens (PAL) was successfully fabricated, and GRIN's potential for aberration correction of PAL was confirmed. GRIN material was prepared by partial diffusion of methyl methacrylate (MMA (nd at polymer = 1.492)) monomer into cross-linked benzyl methacrylate (BzMA (nd at polymer=1.568)) flat gel, and GRINPAL was prepared by polymerization of the GRIN material attached to a mold of commercially available PAL. GRIN polymer materials have been used for various applications such as rod lenses and optical fibers. GRIN represents gradual change of refractive index in a material, which adds or reduces light focusing power of the material. PAL is a multifocal spectacle lens for presbyopia. However, some localized aberrations (especially astigmatism) in PAL have not yet been reduced satisfactorily for decades by optimizing surface geometry of a lens. In this research, we propose to employ GRIN materials for astigmatism reduction of PALs. BzMA flat gel was prepared by UV polymerization of BzMA, crosslinking agent ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) and photopolymerization initiator DAROCURE 1173. MMA monomer was diffused into BzMA flat gel from a portion of periphery for several hours. The obtained GRIN material was attached to a mold of commercially available PAL and polymerized by UV. As a result, reduction of astigmatism was confirmed locally in the fabricated PAL and GRIN-PAL using lens meter. In conclusion, GRIN-PAL was successfully fabricated. The validity of GRIN employment for the astigmatism reduction in PAL was demonstrated experimentally.

  1. Success rates in the correction of astigmatism with toric and spherical soft contact lens fittings

    PubMed Central

    Kurna, Sevda Aydin; Şengör, Tomris; Ün, Murat; Aki, Suat

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate success rates in the correction of astigmatism with toric and spherical soft contact lens fitting. Methods: 30 patients with soft toric lenses having more than 1.25 D of corneal astigmatism (25 eyes; Group A) or having 0.75–1.25 D of corneal astigmatism (22 eyes; Group B) and 30 patients with soft spheric lenses having 0.75–1.25 D of corneal astigmatism (28 eyes; Group C) or less than 0.75 D of corneal astigmatism (23 eyes; Group D) were included in the study. Corrected and uncorrected monocular visual acuity measurement with logMAR, biomicroscopic properties, autorefractometry and corneal topography were performed for all patients immediately before and at least 20 minutes after the application of contact lenses. Success of contact lens fitting was evaluated by three parameters: astigmatic neutralization, visual success, and retinal deviation. Results: After soft toric lens application, spheric dioptres, cylindric and keratometric astigmatism, and retinal deviation decreased significantly in Groups A and B (P < 0.05). In Group C, spheric dioptres and retinal deviation decreased (P < 0.05), while cylindric and keratometric astigmatism did not change significantly (P > 0.05). In Group D, spheric dioptres, retinal deviation, and cylindric astigmatism decreased (P < 0.05). Keratometric astigmatism did not change significantly (P > 0.05) and astigmatic neutralization even increased. Conclusions: Visual acuity and residual spherical equivalent refraction remained between tolerable limits with the use of toric and spheric contact lenses. Spherical lenses failed to mask corneal toricity during topography, while toric lenses caused central neutralization and decrease in corneal cylinder in low and moderate astigmatic eyes. PMID:20856589

  2. Transverse-mode astigmatism in a diode-pumped unstable resonator Nd:YVO(4) laser.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y J; Fanning, C G; Siegman, A E

    1997-02-20

    We have observed a sizable astigmatism in the output beam from a diode-pumped unstable resonator Nd:YVO(4) laser operating in a single polarization and a single-longitudinal and transverse mode. The anisotropic index of refraction of the vanadate crystal has been identified as the source of this astigmatism. A theoretical prediction of the eigenmode astigmatism based on this index anisotropy is consistent with our experimental measurements. PMID:18250780

  3. The mass of the Coma cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The, Lih-Sin

    The dynamical mass determination of galaxies and systems of galaxies shows a large excess of mass above what is directly observed. This excess of mass indicates the presence of dark matter. The nature of this dark matter is still unknown and dark matter in the outer regions of large stellar structures such as clusters of galaxies might provide enough matter to close the universe. The mass distribution of the Coma cluster is investigated. It is shown that optical data alone are unable to distinguish between a wide range of possible mass distribution for the Coma cluster. Low-mass models must have larger density than high-mass models and require that the galaxies move on near-circular orbits, whereas high-mass models require the galaxy orbits to be predominantly radial. The optical data constrain the amount of dark matter very poorly. The x ray data can also be used for a mass determination of the Coma cluster. These data may require the mass of the cluster to be more concentrated to the core than a light-traces-mass model if the central temperature of the gas is high. The above analysis, and most other approaches, assume the existence of dark matter. An alternative approach was proposed by Milgrom (1983a,b,c): the Newtonian law of motion breaks down in a weak field, and must be modified. The present analysis shows that this model is also consistent with optical and x ray data on the Coma cluster, although a good fit required values for Milgrom's universal parameter ao to be 2h1.5 (Ho) = 50 h km/s/Mpc) higher than those inferred from the rotation curves of spiral galaxies. Finally, whether the model of an expanding cluster dominated by a massive binary galaxy is consistent with optical data on the surface density and velocity dispersion of the Coma cluster is investigated. The evolution of the model is simulated for a wide variety of initial conditions. This model is not a viable representation of the Coma cluster.

  4. Another collision for the Coma cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1996-01-01

    The wavelet transform analysis of the Rosat position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) images of the Coma cluster are presented. The analysis shows, on small scales, a substructure dominated by two extended sources surrounding the two bright clusters NGC 4874 and NGC 4889. On scales of about 2 arcmin to 3 arcmin, the analysis reveals a tail of X-ray emission originating near the cluster center, curving to the south and east for approximately 25 arcmin and ending near the galaxy NGC 4911. The results are interpreted in terms of a merger of a group, having a core mass of approximately 10(exp 13) solar mass, with the main body of the Coma cluster.

  5. Coma due to malplaced external ventricular drain.

    PubMed

    Chai, Feng Yih; Farizal, Fadzil; Jegan, Thanabalan

    2013-01-01

    Ventriculostomy or external ventricular drain (EVD) placement by free-hand technique has a high malplacement rate. It is a blind procedure that often requires multiple attempts and revisions. To date, no neurological complication due to EVD malplacement has been reported in the literature. In this report, we present the first case of coma induced by a malplaced EVD and the patient regained consciousness after the drain was adjusted. Our discussion focused on various techniques that can improve the accuracy of EVD insertion. EVD insertion under image guidance provides better accuracy with limited disadvantages. We hypothesized that the patient's coma was due to the mass effect and irritation of the malplaced EVD exerted onto the ventral periaqueductal grey matter and the ascending neurons from upper brainstem. PMID:24101284

  6. Thiopentone induced coma after severe birth asphyxia.

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, J A; Wilkinson, A R

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of inducing a prolonged coma in severely asphyxiated newborn babies by the infusion of high dose thiopentone. In six severely asphyxiated babies the electroencephalograph (EEG) and blood pressure were monitored continuously. Thiopentone was infused at a rate sufficient to suppress completely the EEG providing the mean blood pressure remained above 35 mm Hg; it was continued until there was no evidence of cerebral oedema for 24 hours. In two the infusion was stopped prematurely because of hypotension that was unresponsive to treatment. In the other four a deep coma was maintained for a median duration of 127 hours. All developed pharmacodynamic tolerance to the thiopentone and showed non-linear elimination kinetics. Three babies died; the three survivors have moderate to severe handicap. It was concluded that with full intensive care it is possible to induce a deep coma; the outcome does not seem to be improved, however, and the incidence of complications was high. PMID:3789788

  7. Chemical Recycling of Molecules in Cometary Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Kawakita, Hideyo; Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Hitomi

    2015-08-01

    Modeling is essential to understand the important physical and chemical processes that occur in cometary comae, especially the relationship between native and sibling molecules, such as, HCN and CN. Photochemistry is a major source of ions and electrons that further initiate key gas-phase reactions, leading to the plethora of molecules and atoms observed in comets. The effects of photoelectrons that react via impacts are important to the overall ionization in the inner coma. We have found that many molecules undergo protonation reactions with primarily water, followed by electron recombination resulting in the original molecules in a vibrationally excited state. These excited molecules spontaneously emit photons back to the ground state. We identify this series of reactions as chemical “recycling.” We discuss the importance of this mechanism for HCN, NH3, and water in comets. We also identify other relevant processes in the collision-dominated, inner coma of a comet within a global modeling framework to better understand observations and in situ measurements of cometary species, especially relationships between native and sibling molecules for the Rosetta Mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.Acknowledgements: We appreciate support from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program under Grant No. 0908529. This program is partially supported by the MEXT Supported Program for the Strategic Research Foundation at Private Universities, 2014-2018.

  8. Propagation of the Lissajous singularity dipole through an astigmatic lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haitao; Gao, Zenghui; Zou, Xuefang; Huang, Weigang; Wang, Fanhou

    2013-11-01

    The propagation was investigated of a pair of Lissajous singularities of opposite singularity index called the Lissajous singularity dipole (LSD) through an astigmatic lens. It is shown that after passing through the lens the positions of the singularities are inverted and more than two LSDs occur. Changes in the degree of polarization of the LSDs as well as in the shape of the Lissajous figures also occur. In addition, Lissajous singularities may take place at the focal plane, and a single Lissajous singularity may appear and vanish under certain conditions. The results are compared with those of previous work.

  9. FK Comae, King of Spin: the Movie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    FK Comae is an ultra-fast rotating, single yellow giant, product of a recent W UMa merger. Extraordinary levels of FUV and X-ray emission rate FK Comae a coronal powerhouse on par with the most extreme of the better known activity heavyweights: short-period RS CVn binaries. As a single star, FK Comae has clear advantages as a laboratory for exploring the outer limits of magnetospheric activity among the coronal cool stars. FK Comae has a long history of attention at optical and X-ray wavelengths, thanks to its generously spotted surface, and proclivity to flare regularly at high energies. FUSE discovered ultra-broad, redshifted profiles of O VI and C III, but unfortunately the singular observation could not be repeated, thanks to the satellite's flaky attitude system. The remarkable FUV spectrum was taken just a few months before STIS failed in 2004, so there was no opportunity to turn the more powerful gaze of Hubble to the task. Now, finally, the amazing sensitivity of Cosmic Origins Spectrograph can be brought to bear: a single orbit can capture an FUV spectrum of FK Comae with S/N at instrumental limits for bright lines, and digging down to faint Fe XXI 1354 {bridge to the coordinated Chandra HETGS pointing we also are proposing}.We will trace how the bright FUV regions relate spatially to the photospheric dark spots, to inform ideas of coronal structure and heating in these advanced objects. We will probe whether a global magnetosphere exists, and whether the field lines are loaded with hot coronal gas {>10 MK}, as well as the cooler 0.3 MK material already suggested by highly broadened FUSE O VI. Further, we will test whether the striking 100 km/s redshifts of the FUV lines, and similar shifts seen in Ne X by Chandra HETGS, are caused by a massive coronal outflow {perhaps implicated in magnetic braking}. Our method is to exploit, on the one hand, emission-line "Doppler imaging," whereby bright surface regions are mapped onto specific locations in the global

  10. Astigmatism after cataract surgery: nylon versus Mersilene. Five-year data.

    PubMed

    Drews, R C

    1995-01-01

    This is a follow-up of a previous study that evaluated astigmatism after cataract surgery. In that study with a six-month follow-up, there was no statistically significant difference in astigmatism between eyes with nylon sutures and those with polyester fiber (Mersilene) sutures. This article reports the five-year data on this series of eyes. PMID:7722909

  11. A CO2-rich coma model applied to the neutral coma of Comet West

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, G. F.; Swift, M. B.; Huntress, W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Models of the cometary coma in which the dominant volatile is CO2 have been constructed for a range of heliocentric distances. Model coma abundances of C2, C3, and CN are compared with the abundances observed in Comet West and are found to be in good agreement. Furthermore, the variation with heliocentric distance of C2, C3, and CN model abundances agree well with the observed variation in Comet West. The present work lends detailed support to a previous suggestion that a substance more volatile than water, such as CO2, controls the evaporation of the nucleus of Comet West. The implications for cometary formation are briefly discussed.

  12. Astigmatism error modification for absolute shape reconstruction using Fourier transform method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuhang; Li, Qiang; Gao, Bo; Liu, Ang; Xu, Kaiyuan; Wei, Xiaohong; Chai, Liqun

    2014-12-01

    A method is proposed to modify astigmatism errors in absolute shape reconstruction of optical plane using Fourier transform method. If a transmission and reflection flat are used in an absolute test, two translation measurements lead to obtain the absolute shapes by making use of the characteristic relationship between the differential and original shapes in spatial frequency domain. However, because the translation device cannot guarantee the test and reference flats rigidly parallel to each other after the translations, a tilt error exists in the obtained differential data, which caused power and astigmatism errors in the reconstructed shapes. In order to modify the astigmatism errors, a rotation measurement is added. Based on the rotation invariability of the form of Zernike polynomial in circular domain, the astigmatism terms are calculated by solving polynomial coefficient equations related to the rotation differential data, and subsequently the astigmatism terms including error are modified. Computer simulation proves the validity of the proposed method.

  13. Comparison of the Astigmatic Power of Toric Intraocular Lenses Using Three Toric Calculators

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Ju; Lee, Hun; Woo, Young Jae; Kim, Eung Kweon; Seo, Kyoung Yul; Kim, Ha Yan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the astigmatic power of toric intraocular lenses (IOLs) obtained from the AcrySof, TECNIS, and iTrace toric calculator in patients with preoperative with-the-rule (WTR) or against-the-rule (ATR) corneal astigmatism. Materials and Methods Fifty eyes with cataract and corneal astigmatism greater than 0.75 diopters were enrolled in each group (WTR and ATR). Keratometric values were measured using autokeratometry, an IOLMaster, and an iTrace, which incorporated corneal topography and ray-tracing aberrometry. Based on measured keratometric values, the astigmatic power of each toric IOL was calculated using three toric calculators. Results Bland-Altman plots showed good agreement between six pairwise corneal astigmatism values in both groups. The TECNIS calculator tended to suggest a higher astigmatic power of the toric IOL than the AcrySof calculator. With the higher astigmatism and keratometric values from the IOLMaster, in both groups, calculations from the AcrySof and TECNIS calculators resulted in higher calculated astigmatic powers than those from same calculators with autokeratometry-measured values, demonstrating good agreement. With the higher calculated astigmatic power values, the values from the iTrace toric calculator using keratometric values obtained from iTrace ray tracing wavefront aberrometry or iTrace simulated keratometry showed fair to moderate agreement with those from the other calculator-keratometry pairs in both groups. Conclusion To achieve the best refractive outcome after toric IOL implantation, understanding the differences in keratometric values between instruments and in calculated astigmatic power among toric calculator programs is necessary. Moreover, systemic analysis of each toric calculator in conjunction with postoperative data is required. PMID:26069135

  14. Quasi two-dimensional astigmatic solitons in soft chiral metastructures.

    PubMed

    Laudyn, Urszula A; Jung, Paweł S; Karpierz, Mirosław A; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a non-homogeneous layered structure encompassing dual spatial dispersion: continuous diffraction in one transverse dimension and discrete diffraction in the orthogonal one. Such dual diffraction can be balanced out by one and the same nonlinear response, giving rise to light self-confinement into astigmatic spatial solitons: self-focusing can compensate for the spreading of a bell-shaped beam, leading to quasi-2D solitary wavepackets which result from 1D transverse self-localization combined with a discrete soliton. We demonstrate such intensity-dependent beam trapping in chiral soft matter, exhibiting one-dimensional discrete diffraction along the helical axis and one-dimensional continuous diffraction in the orthogonal plane. In nematic liquid crystals with suitable birefringence and chiral arrangement, the reorientational nonlinearity is shown to support bell-shaped solitary waves with simple astigmatism dependent on the medium birefringence as well as on the dual diffraction of the input wavepacket. The observations are in agreement with a nonlinear nonlocal model for the all-optical response. PMID:26975651

  15. An astigmatic corrected target-aligned solar concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lando, Mordechai; Kagan, Jacob; Linyekin, Boris; Sverdalov, Ludmila; Pecheny, Grigory; Achiam, Yaakov

    2000-06-01

    Highly concentrated solar energy is required for solar pumping of solid state lasers, and for other applications. High concentration may be obtained by a combination of a primary concentrator with f/ D>2 in addition to a non-imaging concentrator. We have designed and constructed a novel tower primary concentrator. A 3.4 m diameter primary mirror, composed of 61 segments, was mounted on a commercial two-axis positioner. Unlike the common zenith mounting, the positioner fixed axis is directed southwards, pointing at 32° above the horizon. With this novel mounting, the concentrator is the first implementation of the astigmatic corrected target aligned (ACTA) design which flattens the irradiation density variation during the day. The primary mirror segments are each mounted on a separate two-axis mount, and aligned to compensate for astigmatism. The segments are spherically curved with R=17 m radius of curvature, while their vertexes are placed on an R/2=8.5 m radius spherical cap. A four-segment plane mirror reflects the light towards a horizontal focal plane. We have measured the absorbed solar power into a 89×91 mm 2 rectangular aperture and found good agreement with optical design calculations. Peak solar concentration in the focal plane exceeded 400 suns.

  16. Quasi two-dimensional astigmatic solitons in soft chiral metastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudyn, Urszula A.; Jung, Paweł S.; Karpierz, Mirosław A.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-03-01

    We investigate a non-homogeneous layered structure encompassing dual spatial dispersion: continuous diffraction in one transverse dimension and discrete diffraction in the orthogonal one. Such dual diffraction can be balanced out by one and the same nonlinear response, giving rise to light self-confinement into astigmatic spatial solitons: self-focusing can compensate for the spreading of a bell-shaped beam, leading to quasi-2D solitary wavepackets which result from 1D transverse self-localization combined with a discrete soliton. We demonstrate such intensity-dependent beam trapping in chiral soft matter, exhibiting one-dimensional discrete diffraction along the helical axis and one-dimensional continuous diffraction in the orthogonal plane. In nematic liquid crystals with suitable birefringence and chiral arrangement, the reorientational nonlinearity is shown to support bell-shaped solitary waves with simple astigmatism dependent on the medium birefringence as well as on the dual diffraction of the input wavepacket. The observations are in agreement with a nonlinear nonlocal model for the all-optical response.

  17. Quasi two-dimensional astigmatic solitons in soft chiral metastructures

    PubMed Central

    Laudyn, Urszula A.; Jung, Paweł S.; Karpierz, Mirosław A.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a non-homogeneous layered structure encompassing dual spatial dispersion: continuous diffraction in one transverse dimension and discrete diffraction in the orthogonal one. Such dual diffraction can be balanced out by one and the same nonlinear response, giving rise to light self-confinement into astigmatic spatial solitons: self-focusing can compensate for the spreading of a bell-shaped beam, leading to quasi-2D solitary wavepackets which result from 1D transverse self-localization combined with a discrete soliton. We demonstrate such intensity-dependent beam trapping in chiral soft matter, exhibiting one-dimensional discrete diffraction along the helical axis and one-dimensional continuous diffraction in the orthogonal plane. In nematic liquid crystals with suitable birefringence and chiral arrangement, the reorientational nonlinearity is shown to support bell-shaped solitary waves with simple astigmatism dependent on the medium birefringence as well as on the dual diffraction of the input wavepacket. The observations are in agreement with a nonlinear nonlocal model for the all-optical response. PMID:26975651

  18. A two-stage method to correct aberrations induced by slide slant in bright-field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yilun; Bradley, Andrew P

    2016-08-01

    To achieve optimal image quality in bright field microscopy, the slide surface should be perpendicular to the optical axis of the microscope. However, in the recently proposed "slanted scan" slide acquisition technique, scan speed is increased by purposely slanting the slide by a small angle (of 3-5°) so that multiple focal depths can be imaged simultaneously. In this case, the slanted slide introduces a bend in the point spread function (PSF), resulting in a coma and other aberrations that degrade image quality. In this paper, we propose a two-stage deconvolution method specifically designed to correct the aberrations induced by a slanted scan, but with general applicability to high-resolution bright-field microscopy. Specifically, we initially apply phase deconvolution to correct the dominating coma aberration, before applying a conventional semi-blind deconvolution method to further improve image resolution and contrast. We also propose a novel method to estimate the degree of coma aberration and the PSF of the optics utilising actual cytology specimens. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated quantitatively on simulated data, against a ground-truth (object) image, and qualitatively on cervical cytology specimens. Results demonstrate both improved convergence speed of the two-stage approach, especially when correcting the bend in the PSF, and a resultant image quality that is comparable to a conventionally (flat) scanned specimen. PMID:27182660

  19. Nonpolytropic model for the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusco-Femiano, R.; Hughes, John P.

    1994-01-01

    In this article we demonstrate, for the first time, how a physically motivated static model for both the gas and galaxies in the Coma Cluster of galaxies can jointly fit all available X-ray and optical imaging and spectroscopic data. The principal assumption of this nonpolytropic model (Cavaliere & Fusco-Femiano 1981, hereafter CFF), is that the intracluster gas temperature is proportional to the square of the galaxy velocity dispersion everywhere throughout the cluster; no other assumption about the gas temperature distribution is required. After demonstrating that the CFF nonpolytropic model is an adequate representation of the gas and galaxy distributions, the radial velocity dispersion profile, and the gas temperature distribution, we derive the following information about the Coma Cluster: 1. The central temperature is about 9 keV and the central density is 2.8 x 10(exp -3)/cm(exp 3) for the X-ray emitting plasma; 2. The binding mass of the cluster is approximately 2 x 10(exp 15) solar mass within 5 Mpc for (H(sub 0) = 50 km/sec/Mpc), with a mass-to-light ratio of approximately 160 solar mass/solar luminosity; 3. The contribution of the gas to the total virial mass increases with distance from the cluster center, and we estimate that this ratio is no greater than approximately 50% within 5 Mpc. The ability of the CFF nonpolytropic model to describe the current X-ray and optical data for the Coma Cluster suggests that a significant fraction of the thermal energy contained in the hot gas in this as well as other rich galaxy clusters may have come from the interaction between the galaxies and the ambient cluster medium. interaction between the galaxies and the ambient cluster medium.

  20. Thermodynamics of the Coma Cluster Outskirts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Mantz, A.; Matsushita, K.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Sanders, J. S.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, T.; Takei, Y.; Walker, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    We present results from a large mosaic of Suzaku observations of the Coma Cluster, the nearest and X-ray brightest hot (~8 keV), dynamically active, non-cool core system, focusing on the thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium on large scales. For azimuths not aligned with an infalling subcluster toward the southwest, our measured temperature and X-ray brightness profiles exhibit broadly consistent radial trends, with the temperature decreasing from about 8.5 keV at the cluster center to about 2 keV at a radius of 2 Mpc, which is the edge of our detection limit. The southwest merger significantly boosts the surface brightness, allowing us to detect X-ray emission out to ~2.2 Mpc along this direction. Apart from the southwestern infalling subcluster, the surface brightness profiles show multiple edges around radii of 30-40 arcmin. The azimuthally averaged temperature profile, as well as the deprojected density and pressure profiles, all show a sharp drop consistent with an outwardly-propagating shock front located at 40 arcmin, corresponding to the outermost edge of the giant radio halo observed at 352 MHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The shock front may be powering this radio emission. A clear entropy excess inside of r 500 reflects the violent merging events linked with these morphological features. Beyond r 500, the entropy profiles of the Coma Cluster along the relatively relaxed directions are consistent with the power-law behavior expected from simple models of gravitational large-scale structure formation. The pressure is also in agreement at these radii with the expected values measured from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich data from the Planck satellite. However, due to the large uncertainties associated with the Coma Cluster measurements, we cannot yet exclude an entropy flattening in this system consistent with that seen in more relaxed cool core clusters.

  1. THERMODYNAMICS OF THE COMA CLUSTER OUTSKIRTS

    SciTech Connect

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Walker, S. A.; Mantz, A.; Matsushita, K.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, T.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Takei, Y.

    2013-09-20

    We present results from a large mosaic of Suzaku observations of the Coma Cluster, the nearest and X-ray brightest hot ({approx}8 keV), dynamically active, non-cool core system, focusing on the thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium on large scales. For azimuths not aligned with an infalling subcluster toward the southwest, our measured temperature and X-ray brightness profiles exhibit broadly consistent radial trends, with the temperature decreasing from about 8.5 keV at the cluster center to about 2 keV at a radius of 2 Mpc, which is the edge of our detection limit. The southwest merger significantly boosts the surface brightness, allowing us to detect X-ray emission out to {approx}2.2 Mpc along this direction. Apart from the southwestern infalling subcluster, the surface brightness profiles show multiple edges around radii of 30-40 arcmin. The azimuthally averaged temperature profile, as well as the deprojected density and pressure profiles, all show a sharp drop consistent with an outwardly-propagating shock front located at 40 arcmin, corresponding to the outermost edge of the giant radio halo observed at 352 MHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The shock front may be powering this radio emission. A clear entropy excess inside of r{sub 500} reflects the violent merging events linked with these morphological features. Beyond r{sub 500}, the entropy profiles of the Coma Cluster along the relatively relaxed directions are consistent with the power-law behavior expected from simple models of gravitational large-scale structure formation. The pressure is also in agreement at these radii with the expected values measured from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich data from the Planck satellite. However, due to the large uncertainties associated with the Coma Cluster measurements, we cannot yet exclude an entropy flattening in this system consistent with that seen in more relaxed cool core clusters.

  2. [Blood propionic acid with hyperammonemic coma].

    PubMed

    Stöckler, S; Kastner, U; Pokits, B; Müller, W; Roscher, A

    1987-01-01

    We report on a mature male newborn who presented clinically on the 2nd day of live with poor feeding and acidotic breathing. Laboratory findings like severe metabolic acidosis, hyperammonemia, hyperglycinemia, ketonuria and elevated urinary excretion of lactate and propionate suggested the presence of organoacidopathia. Propionic acidemia, however could be diagnosed definitively only when the characteristic urinary and blood metabolites were found during the state of a hyperammonemic coma provoked by a fully oral protein regimen. The diagnosis was affirmed by reduced propionate fixation and by reduced propionyl-CoA-carboxylase shown in the patient's skin fibroblasts. PMID:3682709

  3. Optical aberrations, retinal image quality and eye growth: Experimentation and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yibin

    2007-12-01

    subsequently elongated. The performance of some focus measures was very poor when non-defocus aberrations exceeded a certain level; presumably, these non-defocus aberrations might interfere with the eye's ability to interpret defocus. In anisomyopic human adults, more myopic eyes had larger anterior and vitreous chambers, greater astigmatism, and more positive spherical aberration. However, compared to isometropes, only interocular differences in spherical equivalent refractive errors were significantly increased.

  4. [The coma awakening unit, between intensive care and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Mimouni, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    After intensive care and before classic neurological rehabilitation is possible, patients in an altered state of consciousness are cared for at early stages in so-called coma awakening units. The care involves, on the one hand, the complex support of the patient's awakening from coma as a neurological and existential process, and on the other, support for their families. PMID:26365640

  5. A method for evaluating aberration in the crossover image in mask irradiation optics of electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohda, Yasunari; Ohta, Hiroya; Saitou, Norio

    2002-02-01

    A method for evaluating aberration in the crossover image in a cell projection lithography system has been developed. In an electron-beam lithography system of projection-type such as a cell projection lithography system, the aberration in the crossover image causes the electron beam to pass off-axis in the electron optics. Optical simulation has quantitatively shown that the aberration in the crossover image causes an electron-beam blur and a positioning error on a writing sample. The evaluating method consists of four square apertures and a mark-detection function in a cell projection system. By measuring each position of the images of the four square apertures on the writing sample at difference focuses, the aberration can be calculated. The field curvature and the astigmatism in a cell projection system were evaluated by using this method. The field curvature agrees with the simulation. In addition, the measurement of the effect of beam alignment is also demonstrated. It is thus concluded that the method can effectively evaluate the aberration in the crossover image. This method is also useful for other projection-type lithographies of charged particles—like ion and electron beams.

  6. Mirror-based broadband scanner with minimized aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiun-Yann; Tzeng, Yu-Yi; Huang, Chen-Han; Chui, Hsiang-Chen; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2009-02-01

    To obtain specific biochemical information in optical scanning microscopy, labeling technique is routinely required. Instead of the complex and invasive sample preparation procedures, incorporating spectral acquisition, which commonly requires a broadband light source, provides another mechanism to enhance molecular contrast. But most current optical scanning system is lens-based and thus the spectral bandwidth is limited to several hundred nanometers due to anti-reflection coating and chromatic aberration. The spectral range of interest in biological research covers ultraviolet to infrared. For example, the absorption peak of water falls around 3 μm, while most proteins exhibit absorption in the UV-visible regime. For imaging purpose, the transmission window of skin and cerebral tissues fall around 1300 and 1800 nm, respectively. Therefore, to extend the spectral bandwidth of an optical scanning system from visible to mid-infrared, we propose a system composed of metallic coated mirrors. A common issue in such a mirror-based system is aberrations induced by oblique incidence. We propose to compensate astigmatism by exchanging the sagittal and tangential planes of the converging spherical mirrors in the scanning system. With the aid of an optical design software, we build a diffraction-limited broadband scanning system with wavefront flatness better than λ/4 at focal plane. Combined with a mirror-based objective this microscopic system will exhibit full spectral capability and will be useful in microscopic imaging and therapeutic applications.

  7. X ray archeology in the Coma cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Simon D. M.; Briel, Ulrich G.; Henry, J. Patrick

    1993-01-01

    Images of X-ray emission from hot gas within the Coma cluster of galaxies are presented. These maps, made with the Rosat satellite, have high signal to noise ratio and allow cluster structure to be analyzed in unprecedented detail. They show greater structural irregularity than could be anticipated from earlier observations of Coma. Emission is detected from a number of bright cluster galaxies in addition to the two known previously. In four cases there is evidence that these galaxies lie at the center of an extended subconcentration within the cluster, possibly the remnant of their associated groups. For at least two galaxies the images show direct evidence for ongoing disruption of their gaseous atmosphere. The luminosity associated with these galaxies is comparable to that detected around similar ellipticals in much poorer environments. Emission is easily detected and appears to become more regular at large radii. The data show that this archetype of a rich and regular galaxy cluster was formed by the merging of several distinct subunits which are not yet fully destroyed.

  8. The Spinning Corona of FK Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Vinay

    2010-09-01

    FK Comae is an ultra-fast rotating, single yellow giant, product of a recent W UMa merger. Extraordinary levels of FUV and X-ray emission rate FK Comae a coronal powerhouse on par with the most extreme of the better known activity heavyweights: short-period RS CVn binaries. As a single star, FK Comae has clear advantages as a laboratory for exploring the outer limits of magnetospheric activity among the coronal cool stars. FK Comae has a long history of attention at optical and X-ray wavelengths, thanks to its generously spotted surface, and proclivity to flare regularly at high energies. FUSE discovered ultra-broad, redshifted profiles of OVI and CIII, but unfortunately the singular observation could not be repeated, thanks to the satellite's flaky attitude system. The remarkable FUV spectrum was taken just a few months before STIS failed in 2004, so there was no opportunity to turn the more powerful gaze of Hubble to the task. Now, finally, the amazing sensitivity of Cosmic Origins Spectrograph can be brought to bear: a single orbit can capture an FUV spectrum of FK Comae with S/N at instrumental limits for bright lines, and digging down to faint FeXXI 1354 {bridge to the coordinated Chandra HETGS pointing we are carrying out}.We will trace how the bright FUV regions relate spatially to the photospheric dark spots, to inform ideas of coronal structure and heating in these advanced objects. We will probe whether a global magnetosphere exists, and whether the field lines are loaded with hot coronal gas {>10 MK}, as well as the cooler 0.3 MK material already suggested by highly broadened FUSE OVI. Further, we will test whether the striking 100 km/s redshifts of the FUV lines, and similar shifts seen in NeX by Chandra HETGS, are caused by persistent coronal flows {outflows, perhaps implicated in magnetic braking; or inflows, like "coronal rain" on the Sun}. Our method is to exploit, on the one hand, emission-line "Doppler imaging," whereby bright surface regions are

  9. Risk Factors for Astigmatism in the Vision in Preschoolers (VIP) Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiayan; Maguire, Maureen G.; Ciner, Elise; Kulp, Marjean Taylor; Cyert, Lynn A.; Quinn, Graham E.; Orel-Bixler, Deborah; Moore, Bruce; Ying, Gui-Shuang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine demographic and refractive risk factors for astigmatism in the Vision in Preschoolers (VIP) Study. Methods Three- to 5-year old Head Start preschoolers (N=4,040) from 5 clinical centers underwent comprehensive eye examinations by study-certified optometrists and ophthalmologists, including monocular visual acuity (VA) testing, cover testing, and cycloplegic retinoscopy. Astigmatism was defined as the presence of ≥ +1.5 diopters (D) cylinder in either eye, measured with cycloplegic refraction. The associations of risk factors with astigmatism were evaluated using the odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) from logistic regression models. Results Among 4,040 VIP Study participants over-representing children with vision disorders, 687 (17%) had astigmatism, and majority of astigmatism was with-the-rule (83.8%). In multivariate analyses, African-American (OR=1.65, 95% CI: 1.22–2.24), Hispanic (OR=2.25, 95% CI: 1.62–3.12) and Asian children (OR=1.76, 95% CI: 1.06–2.93) were more likely to have astigmatism compared with non-Hispanic white children, while American Indian children were less likely to have astigmatism than Hispanic, African American and Asian children (P<0.0001). Refractive error was associated with astigmatism in a non-linear manner, with an OR of 4.50 (95% CI: 3.00 – 6.76) for myopia (≤ −1.0D in spherical equivalent), and 1.55 (95% CI: 1.29 –1.86) for hyperopia (≥ +2.0D) when compared to children without refractive error (> −1.0D, < +2.0D). There was a trend of an increasing percentage of astigmatism among older children (linear trend p=0.06). The analysis for risk factors of with-the-rule astigmatism provided similar results. Conclusions Among Head Start preschoolers, Hispanic ethnicity, African-American and Asian race, myopic and hyperopic refractive error were associated with an increased risk of astigmatism, consistent with findings from the population-based Multi-ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease

  10. Shack-Hartmann sensor based optical quality testing of whole slide imaging systems for digital pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, S. M.; Hulsken, Bas; van Vliet, Lucas J.; Stallinga, Sjoerd

    2015-03-01

    Whole Slide Imaging (WSI) systems are used in the emerging field of digital pathology for capturing high-resolution images of tissue slides at high throughput. We present a technique to measure the optical aberrations of WSI systems using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor as a function of field position. The resulting full-field aberration maps for the lowest order astigmatism and coma are analyzed using nodal aberration theory. According to this theory two coefficients describe the astigmatism and coma inherent to the optical design and another six coefficients are needed to describe the cumulative effects of all possible misalignments on astigmatism and coma. The nodal aberration theory appears to fit well to the experimental data. We have measured and analyzed the full-field aberration maps for two different objective lens-tube lens assemblies and found that only the optical design related astigmatism coefficient differed substantially between the two cases, but in agreement with expectations. We have also studied full-field aberration maps for intentional decenter and tilt and found that these affect the misalignment coefficient for constant coma (decenter) and the misalignment coefficient for linear astigmatism (tilt), while keeping all other nodal aberration theory coefficients constant.

  11. ROSAT observations of Coma Cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, K. L.; White, S. D. M.

    1995-01-01

    The approximately 86 ks ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) image of the Coma Cluster is deeper than any previous X-ray observation of a galaxy cluster. We search for X-ray emission from 35 individual galaxies in a magnitude-limited sample, all of which lie within 20 arcmins of the optical axis in at least one of the four Coma pointings. We detect seven galaxies in the 0.4-2.4 keV band at a significance level exceeding 3 sigma, and a further four at above 2 sigma. Although we can set only upper limits on the individual flux from each of the other galaxies, we are able to measure their mean flux by stacking the observations. The X-ray luminosities of the seven detections range from 6.2 x 10(exp 40) to 1.5 x 10(exp 42) ergs/s (0.4-2.4 keV for H(sub 0) = 50 km/s/Mpc). For galaxies with a blue absolute magnitude of about -21 we find a mean X-ray luminosity of 1.3 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s. The ratio of X-ray to optical luminosity is substantially smaller for such subjects than for the brightest galaxies in the cluster. The X-ray luminosities of the four brightest galaxies are ill-defined, however, because of ambiguity in distinguishing galaxy emission from cluster emission. Each object appears to be related to significant structure in the diffuse intracluster medium. We also investigate emission in the softer 0.2-0.4 keV band where detections are less significant because of the higher background, and we discuss the properties of a number of interesting individual sources. The X-ray luminosities of the Coma galaxies are similar to those of galaxies in the Virgo Cluster and in other regions with relatively low galaxy density. We conclude that large-scale environmental effects do not significantly enhance or suppress the average X-ray emission from galaxies, but that individual objects vary in luminosity substantially in a way which may depend on the detailed history of their environment.

  12. A computational investigation of the impact of aberrated Gaussian laser pulses on electron beam properties in laser-wakefield acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, P.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2011-05-15

    Critical to the performance of any future accelerator based on the laser wakefield accelerator is the response of the system to perturbations from ideal. In this paper, we use particle-in-cell simulation using a modified version of the OSIRIS 2.0 framework to demonstrate that comatic optical aberrations in a nominally Gaussian laser pulse are self-corrected by the plasma response, leading to stable propagation and therefore little variation in peak energy, energy spread, or peak current of the accelerated bunch, even for serious aberrations. However, the comatic aberration does lead to enhanced transverse beam emittance in the direction of the coma. Although this may be deleterious to the performance of an accelerator, one useful outcome is that the increased oscillation amplitude of electrons in the wake structure may lead to increased synchrotron radiation emission, which would be partially polarized in the direction of coma.

  13. Self-Compensation of Astigmatism in Mode-Cleaners for Advanced Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, P.; Zhao, Chunnong; Ju, Li; Blair, David G.

    2006-03-01

    Using a conventional mode-cleaner with the output beam taken through a diagonal mirror it is impossible to achieve a non-astigmatic output. The geometrical astigmatism of triangular mode-cleaners for gravitational wave detectors can be self-compensated by thermally induced astigmatism in the mirrors substrates. We present results from finite element modelling of the temperature distribution of the suspended mode-cleaner mirrors and the associated beam profiles. We use these results to demonstrate and present a self-compensated mode-cleaner design. We show that the total astigmatism of the output beam can be reduced to 5×10-3 for ±10% variation of input power about a nominal value when using the end mirror of the cavity as output coupler.

  14. Flumazenil, naloxone and the 'coma cocktail'.

    PubMed

    Sivilotti, Marco L A

    2016-03-01

    Flumazenil and naloxone are considered to be pharmacologically ideal antidotes. By competitive binding at the molecular target receptors, they are highly specific antagonists of two important drug classes, the benzodiazepines and opioids, respectively. Both antidotes enjoy rapid onset and short duration after parenteral administration, are easily titrated and are essentially devoid of agonist effects. Yet only naloxone is widely used as a component of the 'coma cocktail', a sequence of empirical treatments to correct altered mental status, while experts discourage the use of flumazenil for such patients. This review contrasts the history, indications, published evidence and novel applications for each antidote in order to explain this disparity in the clinical use of these 'ideal' antidotes. PMID:26469689

  15. SOCCER: Comet Coma Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.; Uesugi, K. T.; Tsou, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Comets, being considered the most primitive bodies in the solar system, command the highest priority among solar system objects for studying solar nebula evolution and the evolution of life through biogenic elements and compounds. Sample Of Comet Coma Earth Return (SOCCER), a joint effort between NASA and the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) in Japan, has two primary science objectives: (1) the imaging of the comet nucleus and (2) the return to Earth of samples of volatile species and intact dust. This effort makes use of the unique strengths and capabilities of both countries in realizing this important quest for the return of samples from a comet. This paper presents an overview of SOCCER's science payloads, engineering flight system, and its mission operations.

  16. Galaxy orbits in the Coma cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millington, S. J. C.; Peach, J. V.

    1986-07-01

    The authors have repeated calculations by Fuchs & Materne (1982) of the variation of the velocity dispersion with radius in the Coma cluster using the new data of Godwin, Metcalfe & Peach on the galaxy surfacedensity. The authors find that the data are best represented by a model of constant velocity anisotropy (possibly by isotropy). This is contrary to Fuchs & Materne's result but agrees with the self-consistent model calculations of Kent & Gunn. The total cluster mass is 3.5×1015M_sun; and the blue mass-to-light ratio of material within 2.7 Mpc of the cluster centre is 240 (H0 = 50 km s-1Mpc-1), with a major uncertainty in M/L lying in uncertainties as to the contributions to the luminosity from galaxies fainter than b = 20.5 and from intergalactic light.

  17. Probing turbulence in the Coma galaxy cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuecker, P.; Finoguenov, A.; Miniati, F.; Böhringer, H.; Briel, U. G.

    2004-11-01

    Spatially-resolved gas pressure maps of the Coma galaxy cluster are obtained from a mosaic of XMM-Newton observations in the scale range between a resolution of 20 kpc and an extent of 2.8 Mpc. A Fourier analysis of the data reveals the presence of a scale-invariant pressure fluctuation spectrum in the range between 40 and 90 kpc and is found to be well described by a projected Kolmogorov/Oboukhov-type turbulence spectrum. Deprojection and integration of the spectrum yields the lower limit of ˜ 10 percent of the total intracluster medium pressure in turbulent form. The results also provide observational constraints on the viscosity of the gas. Based on observations with XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA).

  18. Aberration correction of unstable resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Construction of aspheric reflectors for unstable resonator lasers to provide an arbitrary laser mode inside the resonator to correct aberrations of an output beam by the construction of the shape of an end reflector opposite the output reflector of the resonator cavity, such as aberrations resulting from refraction of a beam exiting the solid of the resonator having an index of refraction greater than 1 or to produce an aberration in the output beam that will precisely compensate for the aberration of an optical train into which the resonator beam is coupled.

  19. Endozepine-4 levels are increased in hepatic coma

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Vacante, Marco; Drago, Filippo; Bertino, Gaetano; Motta, Massimo; Giordano, Maria; Malaguarnera, Michele

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the serum levels of endozepine-4, their relation with ammonia serum levels, the grading of coma and the severity of cirrhosis, in patients with hepatic coma. METHODS: In this study we included 20 subjects with Hepatic coma, 20 subjects with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) and 20 subjects control. All subjects underwent blood analysis, Child Pugh and Model for End - stage liver disease (MELD) assessment, endozepine-4 analysis. RESULTS: Subjects with hepatic coma showed significant difference in endozepine-4 (P < 0.001) and NH3 levels (P < 0.001) compared both to MHE and controls patients. Between NH3 and endozepine-4 we observed a significant correlation (P = 0.009; Pearson correlation 0.570). There was a significant correlation between endozepine-4 and MELD (P = 0.017; Pearson correlation = 0.529). In our study blood ammonia concentration was noted to be raised in patients with hepatic coma, with the highest ammonia levels being found in those who were comatose. We also found a high correlation between endozepine-4 and ammonia (P < 0.001). In patients with grade IV hepatic coma, endozepine levels were significantly higher compared to other groups. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that an increased level of endozepine in subjects with higher levels of MELD was observed. In conclusion, data concerning involvement of the GABA-ergic system in HE coma could be explained by stage-specific alterations. PMID:26290636

  20. Brain Connectivity in Pathological and Pharmacological Coma

    PubMed Central

    Noirhomme, Quentin; Soddu, Andrea; Lehembre, Rémy; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Boveroux, Pierre; Boly, Mélanie; Laureys, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) tend to support the view that awareness is not related to activity in a single brain region but to thalamo-cortical connectivity in the frontoparietal network. Functional neuroimaging studies have shown preserved albeit disconnected low-level cortical activation in response to external stimulation in patients in a “vegetative state” or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome. While activation of these “primary” sensory cortices does not necessarily reflect conscious awareness, activation in higher-order associative cortices in minimally conscious state patients seems to herald some residual perceptual awareness. PET studies have identified a metabolic dysfunction in a widespread frontoparietal “global neuronal workspace” in DOC patients including the midline default mode network (“intrinsic” system) and the lateral frontoparietal cortices or “extrinsic system.” Recent studies have investigated the relation of awareness to the functional connectivity within intrinsic and extrinsic networks, and with the thalami in both pathological and pharmacological coma. In brain damaged patients, connectivity in all default network areas was found to be non-linearly correlated with the degree of clinical consciousness impairment, ranging from healthy controls and locked-in syndrome to minimally conscious, vegetative, coma, and brain dead patients. Anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness was also shown to correlate with a global decrease in cortico-cortical and thalamo-cortical connectivity in both intrinsic and extrinsic networks, but not in auditory, or visual networks. In anesthesia, unconsciousness was also associated with a loss of cross-modal interactions between networks. These results suggest that conscious awareness critically depends on the functional integrity of thalamo-cortical and cortico-cortical frontoparietal connectivity within and between “intrinsic” and “extrinsic” brain

  1. Brain connectivity in pathological and pharmacological coma.

    PubMed

    Noirhomme, Quentin; Soddu, Andrea; Lehembre, Rémy; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Boveroux, Pierre; Boly, Mélanie; Laureys, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) tend to support the view that awareness is not related to activity in a single brain region but to thalamo-cortical connectivity in the frontoparietal network. Functional neuroimaging studies have shown preserved albeit disconnected low-level cortical activation in response to external stimulation in patients in a "vegetative state" or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome. While activation of these "primary" sensory cortices does not necessarily reflect conscious awareness, activation in higher-order associative cortices in minimally conscious state patients seems to herald some residual perceptual awareness. PET studies have identified a metabolic dysfunction in a widespread frontoparietal "global neuronal workspace" in DOC patients including the midline default mode network ("intrinsic" system) and the lateral frontoparietal cortices or "extrinsic system." Recent studies have investigated the relation of awareness to the functional connectivity within intrinsic and extrinsic networks, and with the thalami in both pathological and pharmacological coma. In brain damaged patients, connectivity in all default network areas was found to be non-linearly correlated with the degree of clinical consciousness impairment, ranging from healthy controls and locked-in syndrome to minimally conscious, vegetative, coma, and brain dead patients. Anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness was also shown to correlate with a global decrease in cortico-cortical and thalamo-cortical connectivity in both intrinsic and extrinsic networks, but not in auditory, or visual networks. In anesthesia, unconsciousness was also associated with a loss of cross-modal interactions between networks. These results suggest that conscious awareness critically depends on the functional integrity of thalamo-cortical and cortico-cortical frontoparietal connectivity within and between "intrinsic" and "extrinsic" brain networks. PMID:21191476

  2. The relation between superior phacoemulsification incision and steep axis on astigmatic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Özyol, Erhan; Özyol, Pelin

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the relation between superior phacoemulsification incision and different steep axis on astigmatism outcomes. This prospective, randomized study comprised three groups each with 24 eyes with age-related cataracts and underwent 3.0 mm superior clear corneal incision (CCI). The three groups of the patients were divided by the location of the steep axis. The steep axis was between 0 and 30° in group 1, 31-60° in group 2, 61-90° in group 3. The degree was accepted as the distance from the steep axis to the distal aspect of the wound. Outcome measures were including the changes in mean total astigmatism, surgically-induced astigmatism (SIA), axis deviation, uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Astigmatism was measured by manuel keratometry readings before surgery and day-1, week-1, week-2, week-4 and week-8 postoperatively. The surgically-induced astigmatism was calculated by the vector analysis using the Holladay-Cravy-Koch method. The magnitude of mean total astigmatism was lowest in group 1 and highest in group 3 at 8th week. Surgically-induced astigmatism was 0.52 diopter (D), 0.88 D, 1.03 D in group 1, group 2, and group 3 respectively. The change in SIA was significant in group 1 (P < 0.05). The change in the astigmatic axis deviation was highest in group 1 (31.5 ± 31.3, P < 0.05). The mean UCVA and BCVA were not significant pre and postoperatively between groups (P > 0.05). Axis deviation and SIA were stable after the week-1 and week-2 examinations respectively. Cataract surgery with CCI on or near the steep axis is resulted in decreased SIA and increased axis deviation. PMID:22825889

  3. Which EEG patterns in coma are nonconvulsive status epilepticus?

    PubMed

    Trinka, Eugen; Leitinger, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is common in patients with coma with a prevalence between 5% and 48%. Patients in deep coma may exhibit epileptiform EEG patterns, such as generalized periodic spikes, and there is an ongoing debate about the relationship of these patterns and NCSE. The purposes of this review are (i) to discuss the various EEG patterns found in coma, its fluctuations, and transitions and (ii) to propose modified criteria for NCSE in coma. Classical coma patterns such as diffuse polymorphic delta activity, spindle coma, alpha/theta coma, low output voltage, or burst suppression do not reflect NCSE. Any ictal patterns with a typical spatiotemporal evolution or epileptiform discharges faster than 2.5 Hz in a comatose patient reflect nonconvulsive seizures or NCSE and should be treated. Generalized periodic diacharges or lateralized periodic discharges (GPDs/LPDs) with a frequency of less than 2.5 Hz or rhythmic discharges (RDs) faster than 0.5 Hz are the borderland of NCSE in coma. In these cases, at least one of the additional criteria is needed to diagnose NCSE (a) subtle clinical ictal phenomena, (b) typical spatiotemporal evolution, or (c) response to antiepileptic drug treatment. There is currently no consensus about how long these patterns must be present to qualify for NCSE, and the distinction from nonconvulsive seizures in patients with critical illness or in comatose patients seems arbitrary. The Salzburg Consensus Criteria for NCSE [1] have been modified according to the Standardized Terminology of the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society [2] and validated in three different cohorts, with a sensitivity of 97.2%, a specificity of 95.9%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 96.3% in patients with clinical signs of NCSE. Their diagnostic utility in different cohorts with patients in deep coma has to be studied in the future. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". PMID:26148985

  4. Minimizing Surgically Induced Astigmatism at the Time of Cataract Surgery Using a Square Posterior Limbal Incision

    PubMed Central

    Ernest, Paul; Hill, Warren; Potvin, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the surgically induced astigmatism from clear corneal and square posterior limbal incisions at the time of cataract surgery. Methods. Surgically induced astigmatism was calculated for a set of eyes after cataract surgery using a temporal 2.2 mm square posterior limbal incision. Results were compared to similar available data from surgeons using clear corneal incisions of similar size. Results. Preoperative corneal astigmatism averaged 1.0 D and was not significantly different between the incision types. Surgically induced astigmatism with the 2.2 mm posterior limbal incision averaged 0.25 ± 0.14 D, significantly lower in magnitude than the aggregate surgically induced astigmatism produced by the 2.2 mm clear corneal incision (0.68 ± 0.49 D). Conclusion. The 2.2 mm square posterior limbal incision induced significantly less, and significantly less variable, surgically induced astigmatism relative to a similar-sized clear corneal incision. This is likely to improve refractive outcomes, particularly important with regard to premium intraocular lenses. PMID:22132310

  5. The atomic carbon distribution in the coma of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, T. N.; Feldman, P. D.; Dymond, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    The radial distribution of CO, OI, Ci, and CII emissions in the coma of comet Halley were measured by a long-slit far ultraviolet spectrograph aboard a sounding rocket on 26 Feb. and 13 Mar. 1986. While the CO profiles strongly suggest that CO is vaporized directly from the nucleus, the observed carbon distribution is not consistent with a radial outflow model of CO, suggesting an additional source of atomic carbon in the inner coma. Based on the in situ plasma measurements from the Vega and Giotto spacecraft, it is possible that this additional source of carbon could be the recombination of ionized CO in the inner coma.

  6. Adaptive compensation of lower order thermal aberrations in concave-convex power oscillators under variable pump conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, Steven M.; Moshe, Inon

    2000-09-01

    A Nd:Cr:GSGG concave-convex power oscillator was developed that utilized both an adaptive mirror comprised of spherical and cylindrical optical elements together with a Faraday rotator to dynamically eliminate lower order aberrations (thermal focusing, astigmatism, and bipolar focusing). An adaptively controlled collimating lens corrected for shifts in the mode-waist position. The addition of a polarizer and a reentrant mirror totally eliminated thermal birefringence losses. The techniques developed are attractive in any solid state laser that must work under changing pump power conditions.

  7. Saving SALT: repairs to the spherical aberration corrector of the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, Darragh E.; O'Connor, James; Crause, Lisa A.; Strumpfer, Francois; Strydom, Ockert J.; Brink, Janus D.; Sass, Craig; Wiid, Eben; Atad-Ettedgui, Eli

    2010-07-01

    The construction of the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) was largely completed by the end of 2005. At the beginning of 2006, it was realized that the telescope's image quality suffered from optical aberrations, chiefly a focus gradient across the focal plane, but also accompanied by astigmatism and higher order aberrations. In the previous conference in this series, a paper was presented describing the optical system engineering investigation which had been conducted to diagnose the problem. This investigation exonerated the primary mirror as the cause, as well as the science instruments, and was isolated to the interface between the telescope and a major optical sub-system, the spherical aberration corrector (SAC). This is a complex sub-system of four aspheric mirrors which corrects the spherical aberration of the 11-m primary mirror. In the last two years, a solution to this problem was developed which involved removing the SAC from the telescope, installing a modification of the SAC/telescope interface, re-aligning and testing the four SAC mirrors and re-installation on the telescope. This paper describes the plan, discusses the details and shows progress to date and the current status.

  8. Photographic simulation of off-axis blurring due to chromatic aberration in spectacle lenses.

    PubMed

    Doroslovački, Pavle; Guyton, David L

    2015-02-01

    Spectacle lens materials of high refractive index (nd) tend to have high chromatic dispersion (low Abbé number [V]), which may contribute to visual blurring with oblique viewing. A patient who noted off-axis blurring with new high-refractive-index spectacle lenses prompted us to do a photographic simulation of the off-axis aberrations in 3 readily available spectacle lens materials, CR-39 (nd = 1.50), polyurethane (nd = 1.60), and polycarbonate (nd = 1.59). Both chromatic and monochromatic aberrations were found to cause off-axis image degradation. Chromatic aberration was more prominent in the higher-index materials (especially polycarbonate), whereas the lower-index CR-39 had more astigmatism of oblique incidence. It is important to consider off-axis aberrations when a patient complains of otherwise unexplained blurred vision with a new pair of spectacle lenses, especially given the increasing promotion of high-refractive-index materials with high chromatic dispersion. PMID:25727601

  9. Transverse-mode astigmatism in a diode-pumped unstable resonator Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.; Fanning, C.G.; Siegman, A.E.

    1997-02-01

    We have observed a sizable astigmatism in the output beam from a diode-pumped unstable resonator Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser operating in a single polarization and a single-longitudinal and transverse mode. The anisotropic index of refraction of the vanadate crystal has been identified as the source of this astigmatism. A theoretical prediction of the eigenmode astigmatism based on this index anisotropy is consistent with our experimental measurements. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  10. Astronomical Coma Image Restoration Through the Use of Localized Deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Steve

    2008-05-01

    This paper discusses an image restoration technique to effectively post-process astronomical images to remove coma artifacts. Coma is a common problem for imprecise optical systems that manifest its self as distortions that worsen near the edge of the image. Conventional full-image deconvolution techniques will not remove this artifact because the coma exhibits a positionally variant distortion of the image, i.e., the optical point spread function (PSF) varies as a function of position at the focal plane. Coma repair is accomplished by partitioning the image into small blocks, estimating the PSF of the block, applying the Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm to each block and then reassembly of the blocks into the final image.

  11. Between My Body and My "Dead Body": Narratives of Coma.

    PubMed

    Meoded Danon, Limor

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on narrative research that focuses on corporeal experience during coma and during the rehabilitation process. Seventeen participants from different areas of Israel who had been in various kinds of coma states reveal what the corporeal experience of coma is. The participants are divided into three types of narrative protagonists--"dead-alive," "rational," and "emissaries." Each of the participants redefined the boundaries of the body, especially in cases when they spoke of experiences they did not understand as corporeal, for example, out-of-body experiences, near-death experiences, or experiences of being between the earthly and unearthly. Their struggle to find suitable words to tell their coma stories emphasizes these boundaries between experiencing and telling, which crossed the normative discursive border of the medical establishment and illustrates the ambiguous nature of human existence. PMID:25810464

  12. [Intracranial hypertension in severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Blanc, P L; Bedock, B; Jay, S; Martin, A; Marc, J M

    1994-11-19

    We observed two cases of severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma and shock. In one case, coma was present at admission and in the second occurred within 15 hours. In both cases, intracranial hypertension was confirmed with an extradural captor. These findings are in agreement with observations of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Clinical data suggest that brain oedema may occur after a latency period but that clinical expression is much more rare, perhaps favoured by treatment (excessive rehydratation, alkalinization, too sharp drop in blood glucose level). In our cases, despite major fluid infusion, shock persisted requiring norepinephrine. This shock could have been the expression of the severe ketoacidosis or have resulted from an underlying infection. In case of sudden onset coma, a regularly encountered manifestation of brain oedema, respiratory assistance and mannitol infusion must be instituted rapidly. With this type of management, it should be possible to improve the severe prognosis of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:7899292

  13. Sublimating grains model of cometary coma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Tozzi, G. P.; Brucato, J. R.

    Billion years of space weathering produces a crust of organic matter (see e.g. Kanuchova et al. 2012) that will be released when a comet enter for the first time in the inner Solar System. New comets, coming form the Oort Colud at their first passage close to the Sun, are particularly important because they are not differentiated by the Solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of ice organic matter close to the surface. When a comet approach to the Sun, its activity is driven by the sublimation of these nucleus ices: if the heliocentric distances, R_H , is greater than 3 AU the sublimation of CO and CO_2 ices is the main source of comet activity, otherwise at shorter distances, the sublimation of water become the most important mechanism of activity. These gases, escaping from the nucleus, drag in the coma grains that can be refractory dust (silicates, carbon), water ice and/or organic ices. Oort comets at their first passage in the inner Solar System, should produce an halo of organic or water icy particles. Our group has been monitoring new, inbound, bright Oort comets (C/2011 F1, C/2012 S1, C/2012 K1, C/2013 V5, C/2012 F3, C/2013 US10, C/2013 X1) to search for these icy grains. The method consists in detecting the cloud of sublimating grains in the inner coma by using the Sigma Af function (Tozzi et al. 2007) directly from images. However this over-population of grains, beside the sublimation, can be also due to short time activity (outburst) or too big grains expanding at very slow velocity, as it has been found in comet 67P/C-G (Tozzi eta al, 2011, A&A, 531, 54). To disentangle between the phenomena it is necessary to monitor the comet both at short timescale, for the outbursts (by repeating the observations after few nights), and at long term (weeks-months). If the cloud does not expand with the decreasing of the heliocentric distance there is high probability that we are in presence of organic and/or water ice grains. We can disentangle

  14. Ray vector fields, prismatic effect, and thick astigmatic optical systems.

    PubMed

    Harris, W F

    1996-06-01

    The application of the concept of ray vector fields to optical systems is reexamined. Paraxial or linear optics defines a four-dimensional ray vector field for any optical system: the vector field maps the incident ray vector into the emergent ray vector. In the case of thin systems, including thin astigmatic lenses, one can define a vector field of reduced dimensionality: the vector field is two-dimensional and maps the ray's incident position into the change in reduced direction. When the index of refraction is the same before and after a thin system, the change in reduced direction is the reduced deflection through the system or the reduced prismatic effect. Contrary to what has recently been claimed, this type of two-dimensional vector field does not apply in general to thick systems. However, a number of different types of two-dimensional vector fields can be defined for various particular classes of optical systems. Thick systems differ qualitatively from thin systems. They do not have equivalent thin lenses and cannot generally be replaced by thin lenses. Equations are derived for the change in reduced direction and deflection for a ray through optical systems in general and through separated two- and three-lens systems in particular. PMID:8807654

  15. Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, Glenn C.; Clark, Benton C.; Knocke, Philip C.; OHara, Bonnie J.; Adams, Larry; Niemann, Hasso B.; Alexander, Merle; Veverka, Joseph; Goldstein, Raymond; Huebner, Walter; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Cometary exploration remains of great importance to virtually all of space science. Because comets are presumed to be remnants of the early solar nebula, they are expected to provide fundamental knowledge as to the origin and development of the solar system as well as to be key to understanding of the source of volatiles and even life itself in the inner solar system. Clearly the time for a detailed study of the composition of these apparent messages from the past has come. A comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, is now being studied as a candidate for the new Discovery program. This mission is a highly-focussed and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission. The C4 mission will concentrate on measurements that will produce an understanding of the composition and physical makeup of a cometary nucleus. The core science goals of the C4 mission are 1) to determine the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of a cometary nucleus and 2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. A related goal is to obtain temporal information about the development of the cometary coma as a function of time and orbital position. The four short-period comets -- Tempel 1, Tempel 2, Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and Wirtanen -which all appear to have acceptable dust production rates, were identified as candidate targets. Mission opportunities have been identified beginning as early as 1998. Tempel I with a launch in 1999, however, remains the baseline comet for studies of and planning the C4 mission. The C4 mission incorporates two science instruments and two engineering instruments in the payload to obtain the desired measurements. The science instruments include an advanced version of the Cometary Ice and Dust Experiment (CIDEX), a mini-CIDEX with a sample collection system, an X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer and a Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatograph, and a simplified version of the Neutral

  16. How to convert the obliquely crossed to non-crossed astigmatism? A simple method using vector analysis.

    PubMed

    Vojniković, Bozo; Gabrić, Nikica; Dekaris, Iva

    2013-04-01

    The authors discussed about the problem of special form in astigmatism classification. This special type of astigmatism is the form of obliquely crossed astigmatism. In which the meridians, major and minor, are not right angles. In this astigmatism is not possible to prescribing for cylindrical (toric) spectacle lens. Authors describe the Thompson formula for oblique crossed cylinder and observe that this formula is to complicate for calculation new cylinder power. In this reason, the authors create the new formula and simple procedure for this calculation. This simple formula based on vector analysis and read: DM3 = DM2 x cos2 beta. PMID:23841133

  17. A novel color-LED corneal topographer to assess astigmatism in pseudophakic eyes

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Tiago B; Ribeiro, Filomena J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the accuracy of corneal astigmatism evaluation measured by four techniques, Orbscan IIz®, Lenstar LS900®, Cassini®, and Total Cassini (anterior + posterior surface), in pseudophakic eyes. Patients and methods A total of 30 patients (46 eyes) who had undergone cataract surgery with the implantation of a monofocal intraocular lens (AcrySof IQ) were assessed after surgery. For each eye, subjective assessment of astigmatism and its axis was performed. Minimum, maximum, and mean keratometry and astigmatism and its axis were evaluated using the four measurement techniques. All measurements were compared with the subjective measurements. Agreement between each measurement technique and subjective assessment was evaluated using Bland–Altman plots. Linear regressions were performed and compared. Results Linear regression analysis of astigmatism axis showed very high R2 for all models, with Total Cassini showing the least difference to the unit slope (0.052) and the least difference to a null constant (3.790), although not statistically different from the other models. Regarding astigmatism value, the Cassini and Total Cassini models were similar and statistically better than the Lenstar model. Cassini and Total Cassini showed better J0 compared with Orbscan. Conclusion On linear regression models, Cassini and Total Cassini showed the best performance regarding astigmatism value. Cassini and Total Cassini also showed the least J0 deviation from the Cartesian origin compared with Orbscan, which had the lowest performance. Total corneal measurement with the color LED topographer seems to be a better technique for astigmatism assessment. PMID:27574391

  18. Changes in falling risk depending on induced axis directions of astigmatism on static posture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Yeob; Moon, Byeong-Yeon; Cho, Hyun Gug

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] To assess the changes in falling risk depending on the induced axis direction of astigmatism using cylindrical lenses in a static posture. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty subjects (10 males, 10 females; mean age, 23.4 ± 2.70 years) fully corrected by subjective refraction participated. To induce myopic simple astigmatism conditions, cylindrical lenses of +0.50, +1.00, +1.50, +2.00, +3.00, +4.00, and +5.00 D were used. The direction of astigmatic axes were induced under five conditions with increased cylindrical powers:, 180°, 90°, and 45° on both eyes; 180°/90° right/left eye, and 45°/135° right/left eye. Changes in the fall risk index were analyzed using the TETRAX biofeedback system. Measurements were performed for 32 seconds for each condition. [Results] The fall risk index increased significantly from C+4.00 D in 180°/90° right/left eye, C+3.00 D in 45°/135° right/left eye, and C+3.00 D in 45° on both eyes versus corrected emmetropia. Among the five axis conditions with the same cylindrical power lenses, the increase in the fall risk index was highest at 45° in both eyes. [Conclusion] Uncorrected oblique astigmatism may increase falling risk compared to with-the-rule and against-the-rule astigmatism. Clinical specialists should consider appropriate correction of astigmatism for preventing falls, especially for uncorrected oblique astigmatism. PMID:26180360

  19. Changes in falling risk depending on induced axis directions of astigmatism on static posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Yeob; Moon, Byeong-Yeon; Cho, Hyun Gug

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To assess the changes in falling risk depending on the induced axis direction of astigmatism using cylindrical lenses in a static posture. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty subjects (10 males, 10 females; mean age, 23.4 ± 2.70 years) fully corrected by subjective refraction participated. To induce myopic simple astigmatism conditions, cylindrical lenses of +0.50, +1.00, +1.50, +2.00, +3.00, +4.00, and +5.00 D were used. The direction of astigmatic axes were induced under five conditions with increased cylindrical powers:, 180°, 90°, and 45° on both eyes; 180°/90° right/left eye, and 45°/135° right/left eye. Changes in the fall risk index were analyzed using the TETRAX biofeedback system. Measurements were performed for 32 seconds for each condition. [Results] The fall risk index increased significantly from C+4.00 D in 180°/90° right/left eye, C+3.00 D in 45°/135° right/left eye, and C+3.00 D in 45° on both eyes versus corrected emmetropia. Among the five axis conditions with the same cylindrical power lenses, the increase in the fall risk index was highest at 45° in both eyes. [Conclusion] Uncorrected oblique astigmatism may increase falling risk compared to with-the-rule and against-the-rule astigmatism. Clinical specialists should consider appropriate correction of astigmatism for preventing falls, especially for uncorrected oblique astigmatism. PMID:26180360

  20. Chromosome Aberrations in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry A.; Durante, M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A review of currently available data on in vivo induced chromosome damage in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts proves that, after protracted exposure of a few months or more to space radiation, cytogenetic biodosimetry analyses of blood collected within a week or two of return from space provides a reliable estimate of equivalent radiation dose and risk. Recent studies indicate that biodosimetry estimates from single spaceflights lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry and biophysical models, but very large uncertainties are associated with single individual measurements and the total sample population remains low. Retrospective doses may be more difficult to estimate because of the fairly rapid time-dependent loss of "stable" aberrations in blood lymphocytes. Also, biodosimetry estimates from individuals who participate in multiple missions, or very long (interplanetary) missions, may be complicated by an adaptive response to space radiation and/or changes in lymphocyte survival and repopulation. A discussion of published data is presented and specific issues related to space radiation biodosimetry protocols are discussed.

  1. Cometary Matter Analyser (COMA/CRAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, K.; Igenbergs, E.; Klein, J. W.; Krueger, F. R.; Kuczera, H.; Morfill, G.; Palme, H.; Roessler, K.; Weishaupt, U.; Zerrull, R.; Schmidt, R.; Strazulla, G.; Brownlee, D.; Clark, B.; Hanner, M.; Johnson, R.; Utterback, N.; Zinner, E.

    1994-01-01

    This project was part of an international program under which the chemical composition of cometary dust particles was to be measured 'in situ' during a rendezvous and flyby mission of a Mariner Mark 2 space probe and a comet (depending on the time of launch). Two necessary tasks, preliminary hardware development and interface definition, have been completed within the projects submitted for approval. As a result a model close to the flight configuration has been created, which was to be made available to the flight hardware contractor and his purposes. The Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission was abandoned after joint resolution adopted by NASA and the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology in 1992. Since an instrument like CoMA is an important contribution both to future cometary rendezvous missions, such as ROSETTA, as well as for accompanying laboratory activities, this project was terminated in a 'qualified conclusion'. In the process, components suitable for the laboratory developed from the preliminary units were produced and put into operation.

  2. Tracking the recovery of consciousness from coma

    PubMed Central

    Laureys, Steven; Boly, Mélanie; Maquet, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Predicting the chances of recovery of consciousness and communication in patients who survive their coma but transit in a vegetative state or minimally conscious state (MCS) remains a major challenge for their medical caregivers. Very few studies have examined the slow neuronal changes underlying functional recovery of consciousness from severe chronic brain damage. A case study in this issue of the JCI reports an extraordinary recovery of functional verbal communication and motor function in a patient who remained in MCS for 19 years (see the related article beginning on page 2005). Diffusion tensor MRI showed increased fractional anisotropy (assumed to reflect myelinated fiber density) in posteromedial cortices, encompassing cuneus and precuneus. These same areas showed increased glucose metabolism as studied by PET scanning, likely reflecting the neuronal regrowth paralleling the patient’s clinical recovery. This case shows that old dogmas need to be oppugned, as recovery with meaningful reduction in disability continued in this case for nearly 2 decades after extremely severe traumatic brain injury. PMID:16823480

  3. The Cores of Elliptical Galaxies in Coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucey, John

    1995-07-01

    The cores of galaxies are astrophysically unique. They canhost high energy nuclei, star formation and perhaps even blackholes. HST observations have established that the cores ofellipticals are related to their global properties, and so canbe used as diagnostics of the physical processes occurring atthe time of formation. HST images of galaxy cores havedistinguished two different types of core luminosity profiles:`soft' and `hard' types. It is suggested that luminous, slowlyrotating galaxies have `soft' cores and the less luminousdisky galaxies have `hard' cores. This can be interpreted interms of a formation scenario based on a merger hierarchy inwhich the low luminosity systems experience highly dissipativemergers, but as the luminous systems are assembled the mergersbecome increasingly stellar. In this picture, the type of corea galaxy generates is intimately related to its evolutionaryhistory, i.e. the degree of interaction/merging experiencedand the availability of cold gas. In turn, this should notonly depend on luminosity but also on the galaxy's localenvironment. Here we propose to test the gaseous/stellarmerger picture by imaging a set of Coma cluster ellipticalsfrom a wide range of cluster radii. In the gas poorenvironment of the cluster core there may be insufficent coldgas for the low luminosity galaxies to form `hard' cores.Similarly, at the cluster turnround radius even luminousgalaxies may have experienced a dissipative core formation andpossess

  4. Correction of Distributed Optical Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Olivier, S; Carrano, C; Phillion, D

    2006-02-12

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the use of multiple distributed deformable mirrors (DMs) to improve the performance of optical systems with distributed aberrations. This concept is expected to provide dramatic improvement in the optical performance of systems in applications where the aberrations are distributed along the optical path or within the instrument itself. Our approach used multiple actuated DMs distributed to match the aberration distribution. The project developed the algorithms necessary to determine the required corrections and simulate the performance of these multiple DM systems.

  5. Toric intraocular lenses for correction of astigmatism in keratoconus and after corneal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mol, Ilse EMA; Van Dooren, Bart TH

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the results of cataract extraction with toric intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in patients with preexisting astigmatism from three corneal conditions (keratoconus, postkeratoplasty, and postpterygium surgery). Methods Cataract patients with topographically stable, fairly regular (although sometimes very high) corneal astigmatism underwent phacoemulsification with implantation of a toric IOL (Zeiss AT TORBI 709, Alcon Acrysof IQ toric SN6AT, AMO Tecnis ZCT). Postoperative astigmatism and refractive outcomes, as well as visual acuities, vector reduction, and complications were recorded for all eyes. Results This study evaluated 17 eyes of 16 patients with a mean age of 60 years at the time of surgery. Mean follow-up in this study was 12 months. The corrected distance Snellen visual acuity (with spectacles or contact lenses) 12 months postoperatively was 20/32 or better in 82% of eyes. The mean corneal astigmatism was 6.7 diopters (D) preoperatively, and 1.5 D of refractive cylinder at 1-year follow-up. No vision-compromising intra- or postoperative complications occurred and decentration or off-axis alignment of toric IOLs were not observed. Conclusion Phacoemulsification with toric IOL implantation was a safe and effective procedure in the three mentioned corneal conditions. Patient selection, counseling, and IOL placement with optimal astigmatism correction are crucial. PMID:27382249

  6. Preoperative corneal astigmatism among adult patients with cataract in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isyaku, Mohammed; Ali, Syed A; Hassan, Sadiq

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence and nature of corneal astigmatism among patients with cataract has not been well-documented in the resident African population. This retrospective study was undertaken to investigate preexisting corneal astigmatism in adult patients with cataract. We analyzed keratometric readings acquired by manual Javal-Schiotz keratometry before surgery between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011. There were 3,169 patients (3286 eyes) aged between 16 and 110 years involved with a Male to female ratio of 1.4:1. Mean keratometry in diopters was K1 = 43.99 and K2 = 43.80. Mean corneal astigmatism was 1.16 diopter and a majority (45.92%) of eyes had astigmatism between 1.00 and 1.99 diopters. Two-thirds of the eyes (66.9%) in this study had preoperative corneal astigmatism equal to or above 1.00 diopter. Findings will help local cataract surgeons to estimate the potential demand for toric intraocular lenses. PMID:25494254

  7. Application of the astigmatic method to the thickness measurement of glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingchao; Ding, Rui; Yan, Xi; Li, Li; Han, Zhiping

    2011-06-01

    We developed a high accuracy thickness measurement system for glass substrates based on the optical design of the astigmatic method. Reflective optical measurement systems are the most widely used glass thickness measurement methods in current industrial production practice. The incline of glass in reflective optical measurement system is the main factor of inaccuracy of thickness data. Compared with reflective optical measurement system, we found our design could effectively eliminate errors of glass thickness caused by slightly shifts of glass tilt. The astigmatic optical system includes a laser diode, a cylindrical lens, and a quadrant detector. This method measures the astigmatic focusing error signal induced form the measured glass placed in the astigmatic optical system. The astigmatic focusing error signal is converted into the thickness of the glass substrate. The proposed glass thickness measurement system is verified by using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). On the validation of our system using tri-ordinate measuring machine, the accuracy of the proposed system is 0.2 μm, with a standard deviation of 0.7μm within the thickness measuring range of 1.2mm.

  8. Convergence Insufficiency, Accommodative Insufficiency, Visual Symptoms, and Astigmatism in Tohono O'odham Students

    PubMed Central

    Twelker, J. Daniel; Miller, Joseph M.; Campus, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To determine rate of convergence insufficiency (CI) and accommodative insufficiency (AI) and assess the relation between CI, AI, visual symptoms, and astigmatism in school-age children. Methods. 3rd–8th-grade students completed the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) and binocular vision testing with correction if prescribed. Students were categorized by astigmatism magnitude (no/low: <1.00 D, moderate: 1.00 D to <3.00 D, and high: ≥3.00 D), presence/absence of clinical signs of CI and AI, and presence of symptoms. Analyses determine rate of clinical CI and AI and symptomatic CI and AI and assessed the relation between CI, AI, visual symptoms, and astigmatism. Results. In the sample of 484 students (11.67 ± 1.81 years of age), rate of symptomatic CI was 6.2% and symptomatic AI 18.2%. AI was more common in students with CI than without CI. Students with AI only (p = 0.02) and with CI and AI (p = 0.001) had higher symptom scores than students with neither CI nor AI. Moderate and high astigmats were not at increased risk for CI or AI. Conclusions. With-the-rule astigmats are not at increased risk for CI or AI. High comorbidity rates of CI and AI and higher symptoms scores with AI suggest that research is needed to determine symptomatology specific to CI. PMID:27525112

  9. Distribution and Repeatability of Corneal Astigmatism Measurements (Magnitude and Axis) Evaluated With Color Light Emitting Diode Reflection Topography

    PubMed Central

    Asimellis, George

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and investigate the distribution and repeatability of anterior corneal surface astigmatism measurements (axis and magnitude) using a novel corneal topographer. Methods: Anterior corneal surface astigmatism was investigated in a total of 195 eyes using a novel multicolored spot reflection topographer (Cassini; i-Optics). Two patient groups were studied, a younger-age group A and an older-age group B. Three consecutive acquisitions were obtained from each eye. The repeatability of measurement was assessed using Bland–Altman plot analysis and is reported as the coefficient of repeatability. Results: Group A (average age 34.3 years) had on average with-the-rule astigmatism, whereas the older-age group B (average age 72.3 years) had on average against-the-rule astigmatism. Average astigmatism magnitude measurement repeatability in group A was 0.4 diopters (D) and in group B 0.4 D. Average astigmatism axis measurement repeatability in group A was 5.4 degrees and in group B 5.5 degrees. The axis measurement repeatability improved with increasing magnitude of astigmatism: in the subgroups with astigmatism between 3.0 and 6.0 D, the axis repeatability was 1.4 degrees (group A) and 1.2 degrees (group B), whereas in the subgroups with astigmatism larger than 6.0 D, the repeatability was 1.1 and 0.6 degrees, respectively. Conclusions: This novel corneal topography device seems to offer high precision in reporting corneal astigmatism. This study reaffirms the established trend of a corneal astigmatism shift from an average “with-the-rule” to “against-the-rule” with aging. PMID:26057324

  10. Historical aspects of aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Rose, Harald H

    2009-06-01

    A brief history of the development of direct aberration correction in electron microscopy is outlined starting from the famous Scherzer theorem established in 1936. Aberration correction is the long story of many seemingly fruitless efforts to improve the resolution of electron microscopes by compensating for the unavoidable resolution-limiting aberrations of round electron lenses over a period of 50 years. The successful breakthrough, in 1997, can be considered as a quantum step in electron microscopy because it provides genuine atomic resolution approaching the size of the radius of the hydrogen atom. The additional realization of monochromators, aberration-free imaging energy filters and spectrometers has been leading to a new generation of analytical electron microscopes providing elemental and electronic information about the object on an atomic scale. PMID:19254915

  11. Testing chameleon gravity with the Coma cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terukina, Ayumu; Lombriser, Lucas; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C.

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel method to test the gravitational interactions in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. When gravity is modified, this is typically accompanied by the introduction of an additional scalar degree of freedom, which mediates an attractive fifth force. The presence of an extra gravitational coupling, however, is tightly constrained by local measurements. In chameleon modifications of gravity, local tests can be evaded by employing a screening mechanism that suppresses the fifth force in dense environments. While the chameleon field may be screened in the interior of the cluster, its outer region can still be affected by the extra force, introducing a deviation between the hydrostatic and lensing mass of the cluster. Thus, the chameleon modification can be tested by combining the gas and lensing measurements of the cluster. We demonstrate the operability of our method with the Coma cluster, for which both a lensing measurement and gas observations from the X-ray surface brightness, the X-ray temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are available. Using the joint observational data set, we perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the parameter space describing the different profiles in both the Newtonian and chameleon scenarios. We report competitive constraints on the chameleon field amplitude and its coupling strength to matter. In the case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a specific choice of the coupling, we find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |fR0| < 6 × 10-5, which is currently the tightest constraint on cosmological scales.

  12. Testing chameleon gravity with the Coma cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Lombriser, Lucas; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C. E-mail: lucas.lombriser@port.ac.uk E-mail: david.bacon@port.ac.uk E-mail: bob.nichol@port.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel method to test the gravitational interactions in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. When gravity is modified, this is typically accompanied by the introduction of an additional scalar degree of freedom, which mediates an attractive fifth force. The presence of an extra gravitational coupling, however, is tightly constrained by local measurements. In chameleon modifications of gravity, local tests can be evaded by employing a screening mechanism that suppresses the fifth force in dense environments. While the chameleon field may be screened in the interior of the cluster, its outer region can still be affected by the extra force, introducing a deviation between the hydrostatic and lensing mass of the cluster. Thus, the chameleon modification can be tested by combining the gas and lensing measurements of the cluster. We demonstrate the operability of our method with the Coma cluster, for which both a lensing measurement and gas observations from the X-ray surface brightness, the X-ray temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are available. Using the joint observational data set, we perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the parameter space describing the different profiles in both the Newtonian and chameleon scenarios. We report competitive constraints on the chameleon field amplitude and its coupling strength to matter. In the case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a specific choice of the coupling, we find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |f{sub R0}| < 6 × 10{sup −5}, which is currently the tightest constraint on cosmological scales.

  13. An optical tomography PSF almost insensitive to aberrations: the benefit of a spatial incoherent illumination (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Peng; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, A. Claude

    2016-03-01

    An aberrated imaging system PSF is broadened; this broadening is responsible of the blurring of the images. A lot of effort has been carried out to correct the effects of aberrations on OCT images for eye examination or biological samples. We have worked on quantifying the effect of geometrical aberrations on Full-Field OCT images and found that there is mostly no loss of resolution but a decrease of the signal level. This is obviously why we use these signals as metric to correct the wavefront distortion. Moreover we found that this absence of blurring, which is due to the fact that we record the dot product of a diffraction limited reference signal and the distorted sample signal, is specific to the use of an incoherent illumination and did not show up with OCT approaches that use spatially coherent sources. More precisely the loss in signal is roughly proportional to the square root of the Strehl ratio: for example, a Strehl ratio of 1/9, which is considered to give a low quality image, would only be 1/3 in Full-Field OCT while keeping the sharpness of the image. Using both an USAF resolution target and a transmissive SLM we have demonstrated this unique feature of sharpness conservation. It was also confirmed by using biological samples. We think that we can thus restrict the aberration corrections in eye examination to the main aberrations (e.g. focus and astigmatism) that will increase the speed of the correction.

  14. High Resolution Spectroscopy of Two FK Comae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    The FK Comae stars are a class of extremely rapidly rotating G-K giants that exhibit among the brightest UV and X-ray emission seen in late type stars. Previous IUE and optical observations have indicated that the activity (the extreme surface fluxes) in FK Comae may be qualitatively different from that in "normal" late type stars, and that the other four members of the class are far less bizarre than FK Comae itself. A definitive method for determining the structure of the outer atmospheres of these stars, and deciding whether the heating mechanism is normal chromospheric heating or accretion heating is by analysis of high resolution SWP spectra. We propose, in collaboration with S. Rucinski, to obtain 16-20 hour collaborative NASA-ESA SWP-HI spectra of FK Comae, which exhibits Hot and MgII line widths of ˜500 kms^-1, and HD 36705, which appears to be a far less bizarre member of this class. These observations would be the first high dispersion SWP spectra ever obtained of FK Comae stars.

  15. Analyses of surgically induced astigmatism and axis deviation in microcoaxial phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Özyol, Erhan; Özyol, Pelin

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) and axis deviation after coaxial microincision superotemporal clear corneal phacoemulsification incision in eyes with differently located steep axis. This prospective, comparative study included four groups of 45 eyes with age-related cataracts; each group underwent 2.2-mm superotemporal clear corneal incision (CCI) cataract surgery. The four groups of patients were divided by location of the steep axis. Groups were matched according to symmetry of the steep axis for both right and left eyes as follows--0°-45° of steep axis for right eyes, and 136°-180° for left eyes (group 1); 46°-90° for right eyes and 91°-135° for left eyes (group 2); 91°-135° for right eyes and 46°-90° for left eyes (group 3); and 136°-180° for right eyes and 0°-45° for left eyes (group 4). Outcome measures included changes in mean total astigmatism, SIA, and axis deviation. Astigmatism was measured by manual keratometry readings before surgery and week 1, week 4, week 8, and week 12 postoperatively. SIA was calculated by the vector analysis (Holladay-Cravy-Koch method). The magnitude of mean total astigmatism was lowest in group 3 and highest in group 1 at week 12. SIA was 0.39 diopters (D), 0.22 D, 0.17 D, and 0.28 D in group 1, group 2, group 3, and group 4, respectively. The change in astigmatic axis deviation was highest in group 3 (23.6 ± 16.6) (P < 0.05). Axis deviation and SIA were stable after week 4. Planning of CCI on or near the steep axis can help decrease corneal astigmatism. PMID:24081915

  16. Broadband astigmatism-corrected spectrometer design using a toroidal lens and a special filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xianying; Chen, Siying; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, He; Guo, Pan; Mu, Taotao; Yang, Jian; Bu, Zhichao

    2015-01-01

    In the paper, a method to obtain a broadband, astigmatism-corrected spectrometer based on the existing Czerny-Turner spectrometer is proposed. The theories of astigmatism correction using a toroidal lens and a special filter are described in detail. Performance comparisons of the modified spectrometer and the traditional spectrometer are also presented. Results show that with the new design the RMS spot radius in sagittal view is one-eightieth of that in the traditional spectrometer over a broadband spectral range from 300 to 700 nm, without changing or moving any optical elements in the traditional spectrometer.

  17. Efficacy of Nasya (nasal medication) in coma: A case study.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, Rajkala S; Patil, Panchakshari D; Thakar, Anup B

    2016-01-01

    For emergency conditions, Ayurveda has never been given importance in recent times. However, there are certain emergency conditions where biomedicine has limitations but, Ayurveda can provide solution. Classics have many references regarding management of acute conditions like syncope, coma, episodic conditions of bronchial asthma, epilepsy, etc., In the present study, a 61 year female patient had a two year history of hypertension and was suffering with coma. She was treated with an Ayurvedic treatment modality. Nasya (nasal medication) of Trikaṭu cūrṇa (powder) for seven days, followed by dhūmapāna (~fumigation) with saṅkhyāsthāpana (consciousness restorative) drugs for seven days was administered. The outcome of this management was appreciable, as it resulted in positive changes in Glasgow Coma Scale (GSCS) from 3 to 11. PMID:27621522

  18. An analysis of the coma of comet Bennett 1970 II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheimer, M.

    1978-01-01

    Brightness profiles for emission features of H2O(+) in comet Bennett 1970 II are analyzed, taking into account the role of chemical reactions in the coma. By comparing the rates of transport processes derived from the brightness profile with known chemical rate constants, upper limits on the abundances and production rates of H2O, CH4, NH3, and other possible coma constituents are found. The derived upper limit on the H2O production rate inside 10 to the 4th power km is less than the observed OH production rate averaged over the coma of this comet. It is concluded that the brightness profiles of H2O(+) and OH in comet Bennett 1970 II which are presently available are inconsistent with production of OH primarily by photodissociation of H2O molecules sublimating from the nucleus. The existence of an extended source of H2O is not ruled out.

  19. EXTINCTION IN THE COMA OF COMET 17P/HOLMES

    SciTech Connect

    Lacerda, Pedro; Jewitt, David

    2012-11-20

    On 2007 October 29, the outbursting comet 17P/Holmes passed within 0.''79 of a background star. We recorded the event using optical, narrowband photometry and detect a 3%-4% dip in stellar brightness bracketing the time of closest approach to the comet nucleus. The detected dimming implies an optical depth {tau} Almost-Equal-To 0.04 at 1.''5 from the nucleus and an optical depth toward the nucleus center {tau}{sub n} < 13.3. At the time of our observations, the coma was optically thick only within {rho} {approx}< 0.''01 from the nucleus. By combining the measured extinction and the scattered light from the coma, we estimate a dust red albedo p{sub d} = 0.006 {+-} 0.002 at {alpha} = 16 Degree-Sign phase angle. Our measurements place the most stringent constraints on the extinction optical depth of any cometary coma.

  20. Efficacy of Nasya (nasal medication) in coma: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Ramteke, Rajkala S.; Patil, Panchakshari D.; Thakar, Anup B.

    2016-01-01

    For emergency conditions, Ayurveda has never been given importance in recent times. However, there are certain emergency conditions where biomedicine has limitations but, Ayurveda can provide solution. Classics have many references regarding management of acute conditions like syncope, coma, episodic conditions of bronchial asthma, epilepsy, etc., In the present study, a 61 year female patient had a two year history of hypertension and was suffering with coma. She was treated with an Ayurvedic treatment modality. Nasya (nasal medication) of Trikaṭu cūrṇa (powder) for seven days, followed by dhūmapāna (~fumigation) with saṅkhyāsthāpana (consciousness restorative) drugs for seven days was administered. The outcome of this management was appreciable, as it resulted in positive changes in Glasgow Coma Scale (GSCS) from 3 to 11. PMID:27621522

  1. Flip-flops of FK Comae Berenices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackman, T.; Pelt, J.; Mantere, M. J.; Jetsu, L.; Korhonen, H.; Granzer, T.; Kajatkari, P.; Lehtinen, J.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2013-05-01

    Context.FK Comae Berenices is a rapidly rotating magnetically active star, the light curve of which is modulated by cool spots on its surface. It was the first star where the "flip-flop" phenomenon was discovered. Since then, flip-flops in the spot activity have been reported in many other stars. Follow-up studies with increasing length have shown, however, that the phenomenon is more complex than was thought right after its discovery. Aims: Therefore, it is of interest to perform a more thorough study of the evolution of the spot activity in FK Com. In this study, we analyse 15 years of photometric observations with two different time series analysis methods, with a special emphasis on detecting flip-flop type events from the data. Methods: We apply the continuous period search and carrier fit methods on long-term standard Johnson-Cousins V-observations from the years 1995-2010. The observations were carried out with two automated photometric telescopes, Phoenix-10 and Amadeus T7 located in Arizona. Results: We identify complex phase behaviour in 6 of the 15 analysed data segments. We identify five flip-flop events and two cases of phase jumps, where the phase shift is Δφ < 0.4. In addition we see two mergers of spot regions and two cases where the apparent phase shifts are caused by spot regions drifting with respect to each other. Furthermore we detect variations in the rotation period corresponding to a differential rotation coefficient of |k| > 0.031. Conclusions: The flip-flop cannot be interpreted as a single phenomenon, where the main activity jumps from one active longitude to another. In some of our cases the phase shifts can be explained by differential rotation: two spot regions move with different angular velocity and even pass each other. Comparison between the methods show that the carrier fit utility is better in retrieving slow evolution especially from a low amplitude light curve, while the continuous period search is more sensitive in case of

  2. Sexual aberration or instinctual vicissitude? Revisiting freud's "the sexual aberrations".

    PubMed

    Phillips, Sidney H

    2014-04-01

    The author reconsiders Freud's "The Sexual Aberrations," the first of his Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905), in light of contemporary psychoanalytic theory. Are the concepts of sexual aberration and norm still viable? The author argues that they are necessary but insufficient elements in current theory. He then presents a competing model in which sexuality can be reduced to a more elemental level of disturbance and wish, where it is an expression of a nonsexual wish--for example, to possess or control the object to eliminate separateness. The author presents clinical material to demonstrate this alternative model. PMID:24777366

  3. Aberrations in asymmetrical electron lenses.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J P S; Word, R C; Könenkamp, R

    2012-08-01

    Starting from well established knowledge in light-optics we explore the question if electron-optical aberration can be improved in asymmetrical electron lenses. We show that spherical as well as chromatic aberration coefficients are reduced in asymmetric electrostatic einzel lenses when the center electrode is moved away from the center position towards the entrance electrode. Relative improvements up to 40% for both the chromatic and the spherical aberration coefficients can be obtained. We use analytical and numerical calculations to confirm this result for exemplary cases of a lens with fixed length and working distance. The agreement of the two calculation methods is very good. We then derive an estimate for the electron-optical aberration coefficients from light-optics. The derived expressions for chromatic and spherical aberrations are somewhat simpler than the ones derived from electron-optics as they involve integrals only over the electrostatic potential, not over the electron paths. The estimated formulas still agree well with the electron optical calculations. Overall, we are tempted to suggest that the enormous knowledge base of light optics can provide considerable guidance for electron-optical applications. PMID:22206603

  4. Complete recovery after severe myxoedema coma complicated by status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Fjølner, Jesper; Søndergaard, Esben; Kampmann, Ulla; Nielsen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of life-threatening myxoedema presenting with hypothermia, hypotension, bradycardia, pericardial effusion and deep coma. The condition was complicated by prolonged status epilepticus. The optimal treatment strategy has been debated over the years and the literature is briefly reviewed. Treatment with l-thyroxine (LT4) monotherapy without initial loading dose and with no l-triiodothyronine (LT3) treatment was successful with full recovery after hospitalisation for more than a month. Myxoedema coma is a rare, reversible condition with a high mortality and should be considered as a differential diagnosis in medical emergencies. PMID:25809434

  5. Spectroscopic Investigations of Fragment Species in the Coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Paul D.; Cochran, Anita L.; Combi, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The content of the gaseous coma of a comet is dominated by fragment species produced by photolysis of the parent molecules issuing directly from the icy nucleus of the comet. Spectroscopy of these species provides complementary information on the physical state of the coma to that obtained from observations of the parent species. Extraction of physical parameters requires detailed molecular and atomic data together with reliable high-resolution spectra and absolute fluxes of the primary source of excitation, the Sun. The large database of observations, dating back more than a century, provides a means to assess the chemical and evolutionary diversity of comets.

  6. Hco+ in the Coma of Comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, A. J.; Schloerb, F. P.; Bergin, E. A.; Dickens, J. E.; De Vries, C. H.; Senay, M. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1997-05-01

    Maps of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) in the millimeter-wave emission of the ion HCO^+ revealed a local minimum near the nucleus position, with a maximum about 100,000 km in the antisolar direction. These observed features of the HCO^+ emission require a low abundance of HCO^+ due to enhanced destruction in the inner coma of the comet, within a region of low electron temperature (T_e). To set constraints on the formation of HCO^+ in the coma, as well as the location and magnitude of the transition to higher T_e, the data are compared with the results of ion-molecule chemistry models.

  7. HCO+ in the coma of comet Hale-Bopp.

    PubMed

    Lovell, A J; Schloerb, F P; Bergin, E A; Dickens, J E; Devries, C H; Senay, M C; Irvine, W M

    Maps of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) in the millimeter-wave emission of the ion HCO+ revealed a local minimum near the nucleus position, with a maximum about 100,000 km in the antisolar direction. These observed features of the HCO+ emission require a low abundance of HCO+ due to enhanced destruction in the inner coma of the comet, within a region of low electron temperature (Te). To set constraints on the formation of HCO+ in the coma, as well as the location and magnitude of the transition to higher Te, the data are compared with the results of ion-molecule chemistry models. PMID:11543348

  8. HCO+ in the coma of comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, A. J.; Schloerb, F. P.; Bergin, E. A.; Dickens, J. E.; Devries, C. H.; Senay, M. C.; Irvine, W. M.; Ferris, J. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Maps of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) in the millimeter-wave emission of the ion HCO+ revealed a local minimum near the nucleus position, with a maximum about 100,000 km in the antisolar direction. These observed features of the HCO+ emission require a low abundance of HCO+ due to enhanced destruction in the inner coma of the comet, within a region of low electron temperature (Te). To set constraints on the formation of HCO+ in the coma, as well as the location and magnitude of the transition to higher Te, the data are compared with the results of ion-molecule chemistry models.

  9. Electrodynamics of submicron dust in the cometary coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, M. K.; Hassan, M. H. A.

    1983-05-01

    Electromagnetic forces derived from the solar wind fields act strongly on submicron dust grains in the cometary coma. The grain charge and thus the forces are sensitive to composition and cometary plasma conditions, as well as to grain size. For dielectric grains of 0.1 μm and conducting grains of 0.3 μm or less, the electromagnetic forces dominate over radiation pressure. The stronger accelerations may produce fan-like structures as sometimes observed. They would also cause grains to circumvent the shields designed to protect the Giotto and Vega spacecrafts speeding through comet Halley's dust coma.

  10. How To Measure Gravitational Aberration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizek, M.; Solcova, A.

    2007-08-01

    In 1905, Henri Poincaré predicted the existence of gravitational waves and assumed that their speed c[g] would be that of the speed of light c. If the gravitational aberration would also have the same magnitude as the aberration of light, we would observe several paradoxical phenomena. For instance, the orbit of two bodies of equal mass would be unstable, since two attractive forces arise that are not in line and hence form a couple. This tends to increase the angular momentum, period, and total energy of the system. This can be modelled by a system of ordinary differential equations with delay. A big advantage of computer simulation is that we can easily perform many test for various possible values of the speed of gravity [1]. In [2], Carlip showed that gravitational aberration in general relativity is almost cancelled out by velocity-dependent interactions. This means that rays of sunlight are not parallel to the attractive gravitational force of the Sun, i.e., we do not see the Sun in the direction of its attractive force, but slightly shifted about an angle less than 20``. We show how the actual value of the gravitational aberration can be obtained by measurement of a single angle at a suitable time instant T corresponding to the perihelion of an elliptic orbit. We also derive an a priori error estimate that expresses how acurately T has to be determined to attain the gravitational aberration to a prescribed tolerance. [1] M. Křížek: Numerical experience with the finite speed of gravitational interaction, Math. Comput. Simulation 50 (1999), 237-245. [2] S. Carlip: Aberration and the speed of gravity, Phys. Lett. A 267 (2000), 81-87.

  11. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  12. Observation of lasing modes with exotic localized wave patterns from astigmatic large-Fresnel-number cavities.

    PubMed

    Lu, T H; Lin, Y C; Liang, H C; Huang, Y J; Chen, Y F; Huang, K F

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the lasing modes in large-Fresnel-number laser systems with astigmatism effects. Experimental results reveal that numerous lasing modes are concentrated on exotic patterns corresponding to intriguing geometries. We theoretically use the quantum operator algebra to construct the wave representation for manifesting the origin of the localized wave patterns. PMID:20125716

  13. Normalisation of asymmetric astigmatism after intralesional steroid injection for upper eye lid hemangioma in childhood.

    PubMed

    Langmann, A; Lindner, S

    1994-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas affect about 5% (3%-8%) of the population, showing a predilection for the face. After a phase of rapid enlargement between the 3rd and the 9th month of life, 70% regress by the age of six after a period of stability. 43%-60% of the children with eye lid hemangiomas develop strabismic, anisometropic, or deprivation amblyopia. Previous studies found the majority of cases resulting from anisometropia (especially asymmetric astigmatism) rather than strabism or occlusion of the visual axis. Several methods of treatment--surgical excision, irradiation, sclerosing agents, systemic steroids, ligation, cryotherapy--have been used but all with a risk of local or systemic complications. Local injections of steroids are a simple method of therapy with a high rate of resolution of hemangiomas, but still with a high degree of bad visual output because of persistent astigmatism. In four children with asymmetric astigmatism (axis of astigmatism towards the hemangioma) in which the injection was given at the beginning of the phase of enlargement, amblyopia could be avoided by preventing corneal steepening from becoming permanent. PMID:7835197

  14. Modified pocket incision: a simplified technique for astigmatism control and wound closure.

    PubMed

    Kansas, P G

    1989-01-01

    Advantages of small incision cataract surgery are widely known whether performed with phacoemulsification or manual fragmentation (phacofracture). A modified pocket incision technique that allows predictable astigmatism control without reliance on expensive intraoperative keratometers is described. This technique requires less dissection than the pocket incision and is less likely to bleed. PMID:2646435

  15. Prevalence of Corneal Astigmatism and Anterior Segmental Biometry Characteristics Before Surgery in Chinese Congenital Cataract Patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Duoru; Chen, Jingjing; Liu, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xiaohang; Long, Erping; Luo, Lixia; Lin, Zhuoling; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Li; Chen, Hui; Liu, Jinchao; Chen, Weirong; Lin, Haotian; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and the distribution characteristics of corneal astigmatism (CA) and anterior segment biometry before surgery in Chinese congenital cataract (CC) patients are not completely understood. This study involved 400 CC patients from the Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center enrolled from February 2011 to August 2015. Data on CA, keratometry, central corneal thickness (CCT) and anterior chamber depth (ACD) were measured by the Pentacam Scheimpflug System. The mean age of patients was 54.27 months, and the ratio of boys to girls was 1.53:1. The mean CA was 2.03 diopters (D), and 39.25% of subjects had CA values ≥2 D. The most frequent (71.8%) diagnosis was with-the-rule astigmatism. Oblique astigmatism was present in 16.2% of cases, and 12% of cases had against-the-rule astigmatism. The mean keratometry measurement of cataractous eyes in bilateral patients was significantly larger than that in unilateral patients. Girls had a larger mean keratometry but a thinner CCT than did boys. The CA, CCT, and ACD of cataractous eyes were significantly larger than those of non-cataractous eyes in unilateral patients. The CA, mean keratometry, CCT, and ACD in CC patients varied with age, gender, and laterality. Fully understanding these characteristics may help inform guidelines and treatment decisions in CC patients. PMID:26912400

  16. Prevalence of Corneal Astigmatism and Anterior Segmental Biometry Characteristics Before Surgery in Chinese Congenital Cataract Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Duoru; Chen, Jingjing; Liu, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xiaohang; Long, Erping; Luo, Lixia; Lin, Zhuoling; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Li; Chen, Hui; Liu, Jinchao; Chen, Weirong; Lin, Haotian; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and the distribution characteristics of corneal astigmatism (CA) and anterior segment biometry before surgery in Chinese congenital cataract (CC) patients are not completely understood. This study involved 400 CC patients from the Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center enrolled from February 2011 to August 2015. Data on CA, keratometry, central corneal thickness (CCT) and anterior chamber depth (ACD) were measured by the Pentacam Scheimpflug System. The mean age of patients was 54.27 months, and the ratio of boys to girls was 1.53:1. The mean CA was 2.03 diopters (D), and 39.25% of subjects had CA values ≥2 D. The most frequent (71.8%) diagnosis was with-the-rule astigmatism. Oblique astigmatism was present in 16.2% of cases, and 12% of cases had against-the-rule astigmatism. The mean keratometry measurement of cataractous eyes in bilateral patients was significantly larger than that in unilateral patients. Girls had a larger mean keratometry but a thinner CCT than did boys. The CA, CCT, and ACD of cataractous eyes were significantly larger than those of non-cataractous eyes in unilateral patients. The CA, mean keratometry, CCT, and ACD in CC patients varied with age, gender, and laterality. Fully understanding these characteristics may help inform guidelines and treatment decisions in CC patients. PMID:26912400

  17. Accurate method for measuring oblique astigmatism and oblique power of ophthalmic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wihardjo, Erning; Silva, Donald E.

    1991-12-01

    The measurement of oblique astigmatism error and its oblique power of ophthalmic lens under identical conditions of the human visual system--such as the distance from the center rotation of the eye to the back vertex surface of the lens--viewing distance, and lens aperture using a Mach Zehnder interferometer is describe.

  18. Optical-vortex pair creation and annihilation and helical astigmatism of a nonplanar ring resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Heckenberg, N.R.; Vaupel, M.; Malos, J.T.; Weiss, C.O.

    1996-09-01

    The creation and annihilation of pairs of optical vortices have been studied in transitions between patterns produced in a photorefractive oscillator. Smooth metamorphosis between stable patterns occurs through pair creation or annihilation but can be modeled using superposition of modes taking into account lifting of degeneracy of helical modes by helical astigmatism of the resonator. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. The role of sideport incision in astigmatism change after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Theodoulidou, Sofia; Asproudis, Ioannis; Kalogeropoulos, Christos; Athanasiadis, Aristidis; Aspiotis, Miltiadis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the changes in corneal astigmatism after cataract surgery when the sideport incision is performed at a predetermined location away from the tunnel incision. Setting General Hospital of Piraeus “Tzaneio”, Attiki, Greece. Materials and methods A total of 333 eyes with corneal astigmatism ≤1.5 diopters (D) underwent cataract surgery. A three-step superotemporal clear corneal incision for the right eye and a superonasal clear corneal incision for the left eye (3.0 mm) was made, while the sideport incision was located at <90°, 90°–110°, and >110°. Keratometric data were measured with corneal topography EyeSys Vista 2000 pre- and postoperatively at the 1st and 6th month. Surgically induced astigmatism was calculated by vector analysis. We noted all cases in which a change >0.5 D in corneal astigmatic power occurred, as well as a change >20° in axis torque, despite axis direction. Results After multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted, cases with >110° distance between the tunnel and sideport incision had 2.22 times (P=0.021) greater likelihood for having changed >0.5 D in astigmatic power at the 1st month and 3.45 times (P=0.031) at the 6th month postoperatively, as compared with cases with a 90°–110° distance between the tunnel and sideport incision. As for the change in the astigmatic axis, cases with <90° distance had a 4.18 times greater likelihood for having a change >20° (P<0.001) (preoperative to 1st month) as compared with cases having 90°–110° of distance. Conclusion For surgeons that operate only from the superior position, we propose that in order to produce an incision that is as “astigmatically neutral” as possible, they should perform the sideport incision at a 90°–110° distance. PMID:26346741

  20. Polarization Aberrations in Astronomical Telescopes: The Point Spread Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckinridge, James B.; Lam, Wai Sze T.; Chipman, Russell A.

    2015-05-01

    and coronagraph applications. (4) Part of the aberration is a polarization-dependent astigmatism, with a magnitude of 22 milliwaves, which enlarges the PSF image. (5) The orthogonally polarized components of unpolarized sources contain different wavefront aberrations, which differ by approximately 32 milliwaves. This implies that a wavefront correction system cannot optimally correct the aberrations for all polarizations simultaneously. (6) The polarization aberrations couple small parts of each polarization component of the light (~10-4) into the orthogonal polarization where these components cause highly distorted secondary, or "ghost" PSF images. (7) The radius of the spatial extent of the 90% encircled energy of these two ghost PSF image is twice as large as the radius of the Airy diffraction pattern. Coronagraphs for terrestrial exoplanet science are expected to image objects 10-10, or 6 orders of magnitude less than the intensity of the instrument-induced "ghost" PSF image, which will interfere with exoplanet measurements. A polarization aberration expansion which approximates the Jones pupil of the example telescope in six polarization terms is presented in the appendix. Individual terms can be associated with particular polarization defects. The dependence of these terms on angles of incidence, numerical aperture, and the Taylor series representation of the Fresnel equations lead to algebraic relations between these parameters and the scaling of the polarization aberrations. These "design rules" applicable to the example telescope are collected in § 5. Currently, exoplanet coronagraph masks are designed and optimized for scalar diffraction in optical systems. Radiation from the "ghost" PSF image leaks around currently designed image plane masks. Here, we show a vector-wave or polarization optimization is recommended. These effects follow from a natural description of the optical system in terms of the Jones matrices associated with each ray path of interest

  1. Map-based trigonometric parallaxes of open clusters: Coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George

    1995-01-01

    This is the fourth study in a series to determine the direct trigonometric parallaxes of four of the nearest open star clusters, the Hyades, the Pleiades, the Praesepe, and the nearby cluster in Coma (Gatewood et al. 1990; Gatewood et al. 1992); Gatewood & Kiewiet de Jonge 1994). The results for the open star cluster in Coma are compared with those of the other three clusters, and the members are found to be significantly subluminous. The trigonometric parallax of the cluster is estimated from that of three members studied with the Multichannel Astrometric Photometer (MAP) at the Thaw Refractor of the University of Pittsburgh's Allegheny Observatory. The weighted mean parallax of the cluster is +13.53 +/- 0.54 mass (0.00054 min), corresponding to a distance modulus of 4.34 +/- 0.09 mag. The U-B excess of the Coma cluster members may be used to adjust the observed absolute magnitudes and the B-V measurements as suggested by Sandage & Eggen (1959). The agreement obtained in this manner suggests that, like subdwarf stars, the stars of the Coma cluster appear subluminous because of line blanketing. One of the three members observed in this study was recognized as a member by its parallax and is the faintest known member of the cluster.

  2. Sulfur and nitrogen reactions for cometary comae ion chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.

    1992-01-01

    The low pressure reactions of sulfur dioxide, carbon disulfide, and hydrazine with H2O+ and H3O+ were studied by the ion cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potentially important for sulphur chemistry in cometary comae. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels are presented.

  3. PCA/HEXTE Observations of Coma and A2319

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rephaeli, Yoel

    1998-01-01

    The Coma cluster was observed in 1996 for 90 ks by the PCA and HEXTE instruments aboard the RXTE satellite, the first simultaneous, pointing measurement of Coma in the broad, 2-250 keV, energy band. The high sensitivity achieved during this long observation allows precise determination of the spectrum. Our analysis of the measurements clearly indicates that in addition to the main thermal emission from hot intracluster gas at kT=7.5 keV, a second spectral component is required to best-fit the data. If thermal, it can be described with a temperature of 4.7 keV contributing about 20% of the total flux. The additional spectral component can also be described by a power-law, possibly due to Compton scattering of relativistic electrons by the CMB. This interpretation is based on the diffuse radio synchrotron emission, which has a spectral index of 2.34, within the range allowed by fits to the RXTE spectral data. A Compton origin of the measured nonthermal component would imply that the volume-averaged magnetic field in the central region of Coma is B =0.2 micro-Gauss, a value deduced directly from the radio and X-ray measurements (and thus free of the usual assumption of energy equipartition). Barring the presence of unknown systematic errors in the RXTE source or background measurements, our spectral analysis yields considerable evidence for Compton X-ray emission in the Coma cluster.

  4. A preliminary model of the coma of 2060 Chiron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Konno, I.; Stern, S. Alan; Huebner, Walter F.

    1992-01-01

    We have included gravity in our fluid dynamic model with chemical kinetics of dusty comet comae and applied it with two dust sizes to 2060 Chiron. A progress report on the model and preliminary results concerning gas/dust dynamics and chemistry is given.

  5. Coma chemical composition at the Abydos landing site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, A.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G.; Andrews, D.; Barber, S.; Wright, I.

    2015-10-01

    The Ptolemy instrument, onboard the Rosetta Philae Lander, made measurements of the chemical composition of the coma mid-bounce, just after the non-nominal landing on the surface, and subsequently at the Abydos landing site. This presentation will discuss Ptolemy's operations throughout this 45 hour period and the results obtained.

  6. Modeling Coma Gas Jets in Comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lederer, S. M.; Campins, H.

    2001-01-01

    We present an analysis of OH, CN, and C2 jets observed in Comet Hale-Bopp. The relative contributions from and composition of the coma gas sources, and the parameters describing the active areas responsible for the gas jets will be discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Visual and optical performance of eyes with different corneal spherical aberration implanted with aspheric intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xian-Hui; Zheng, Qin-Xiang; Wang, Na; Chen, Ding; Zhao, Juan; Li, Jin; Zhao, Yun-E

    2012-01-01

    AIM To compare the visual and optical performance of eyes with different corneal spherical aberration (SA) implanted with spherical aberration-free intraocular lens (IOLs). METHODS Thirty-six patients with different corneal SA had phacoemulsification with implantation of spherical aberration-free IOLs. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the value of preoperative corneal SA. Eyes with corneal SA <0.10µm were assigned to group A, those with 0.10 ≤corneal SA <0.20µm to Group B, and those with 0.20≤ corneal SA <0.35µm to Group C. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), contrast sensitivity, corneal SA, total ocular aberrations, and depth of focus were recorded 3 months postoperatively. Distance-corrected near and intermediate visual acuity was studied to measure depth of focus. RESULTS BCVA and contrast sensitivity were similar between groups. There were no significant differences in distance-corrected near or intermediate visual acuity. Corneal SA was similar before and 3 months after surgery in the 3 groups. With a 5.0mm pupil diameter, root mean square values for total ocular higher-order aberrations (HOAs) were lower in groups A and B than in group C. Total ocular SA was lower in group A than in groups B and C. SA was also lower in group B than in group C. Coma and trefoil were similar between the groups. CONCLUSION Implantation of spherical aberration-free IOLs in eyes with different corneal SA results in similar visual performance at BCVA, contrast sensitivity and depth of focus. PMID:22773981

  8. Simultaneous correction of large low-order and high-order aberrations with a new deformable mirror technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooms, F.; Camet, S.; Curis, J. F.

    2010-02-01

    A new technology of deformable mirror will be presented. Based on magnetic actuators, these deformable mirrors feature record strokes (more than +/- 45μm of astigmatism and focus correction) with an optimized temporal behavior. Furthermore, the development has been made in order to have a large density of actuators within a small clear aperture (typically 52 actuators within a diameter of 9.0mm). We will present the key benefits of this technology for vision science: simultaneous correction of low and high order aberrations, AO-SLO image without artifacts due to the membrane vibration, optimized control, etc. Using recent papers published by Doble, Thibos and Miller, we show the performances that can be achieved by various configurations using statistical approach. The typical distribution of wavefront aberrations (both the low order aberration (LOA) and high order aberration (HOA)) have been computed and the correction applied by the mirror. We compare two configurations of deformable mirrors (52 and 97 actuators) and highlight the influence of the number of actuators on the fitting error, the photon noise error and the effective bandwidth of correction.

  9. Using geometric algebra to study optical aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, J.; Ziock, H.

    1997-05-01

    This paper uses Geometric Algebra (GA) to study vector aberrations in optical systems with square and round pupils. GA is a new way to produce the classical optical aberration spot diagrams on the Gaussian image plane and surfaces near the Gaussian image plane. Spot diagrams of the third, fifth and seventh order aberrations for square and round pupils are developed to illustrate the theory.

  10. Phacoemulsification with corneal astigmatism correction with the use of a toric intraocular lens in a case of megalocornea.

    PubMed

    Rękas, Marek; Pawlik, Rafał; Kluś, Adam; Różycki, Radosław; Szaflik, Jacek Paweł; Ołdak, Monika

    2011-08-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old patient with megalocornea and coexisting corneal astigmatism. The corneal diameter in the right eye was 15.0 mm and in the left eye, 14.9 mm. In both eyes, a nuclear sclerotic cataract developed, with the tendency toward cortical mass swelling in the right eye. The aim of surgical treatment was to remove the cataract with simultaneous correction of corneal astigmatism by implanting an Acrysof toric intraocular lens (IOL). Intraocular lens stabilization was obtained by suturing it to an capsular tension ring (CTR) in the anterior chamber. The IOL-CTR complex was rotated into the lens capsule and aligned with the steep meridian of corneal astigmatism. The surgical technique provides a stable refractive and functional effect in patients with megalocornea and coexisting cataract and corneal astigmatism. PMID:21782100

  11. Effect of Pupil Size on Optical Quality Parameters in Astigmatic Eyes Using a Double-Pass Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Yanome, Kyohei; Igarashi, Akihito; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To objectively determine the effects of pupil size on optical quality parameters in astigmatic eyes using a double-pass instrument. Methods. We examined twenty-two eyes of 22 healthy volunteers (mean age ± standard deviation, 27.1 ± 2.8 years) who had no ophthalmic diseases other than refractive errors (manifest cylinder ≤0.25 diopters (D)). After we fully corrected cycloplegic refraction, we created with-the-rule astigma tism of 1, 2, and 3 diopters in these eyes and then quantitatively assessed the modulation transfer function (MTF) cutoff frequency and the Strehl2D ratio with 2-, 4-, and 6-mm pupil sizes using the Optical Quality Analysis System. Results. The MTF cutoff frequency and the Strehl2D ratio decreased significantly as the amount of astigmatism increased at each pupil size (P < 0.001 for 2, 4, and 6 mm, analysis of variance). They also decreased significantly with an increase in pupil size at each diopter of astigmatism (P < 0.001 for 0, 1, 2, and 3 D). Multiple comparisons demonstrated a significant difference between measurements made for a 2-mm pupil and for a 6-mm pupil at each diopter of astigmatism (P < 0.001 for 0, 1, 2, and 3 D, Dunnett test) and those made for a 4-mm pupil and for a 6-mm pupil at each diopter of astigmatism (P < 0.001 for 0 D, P < 0.05 1, 2, and 3 D). Conclusions. Eyes with larger pupils had lower optical quality even when they were astigmatic. It may be necessary to correct the preexisting astigmatism to acquire excellent visual performance, especially in astigmatic eyes with larger pupils. PMID:23865038

  12. Modeling of astigmatic-elliptical beam shaping during fs-laser waveguide writing including beam truncation and diffraction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz De la Cruz, A.; Ferrer, A.; del Hoyo, J.; Siegel, J.; Solis, J.

    2011-08-01

    In this work, we report a model for accurately calculating the focal volumes corresponding to astigmatic elliptical beams used in fs-laser waveguide writing. The model is based on the use of the ABCD matrix formalism for the propagation of a Gaussian beam. The code includes the effects of propagation on the astigmatic elliptical beam, and the effects of beam truncation and diffraction at the entrance pupil of the focusing objective due to beam clipping when overfilling the pupil. The results predict that for a given astigmatism value and propagation distance it is possible to efficiently suppress the astigmatic focus closer to the surface. This explains previous experimental results where single structure waveguides with controllable aspect-ratio were fabricated using astigmatic-elliptical beams. Furthermore, we investigate the respective roles of astigmatism and beam propagation, as well as the strong impact of truncation and diffraction effects caused by clipping the beam at the pupil of the focusing optics. Finally, based on the results from our model, we present some practical considerations in terms of beam propagation and phase wrapping constraints.

  13. Myxoedema coma in the setting of hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state.

    PubMed

    Spyridoulias, Alexander; Riaz, Muhammad Shakeel

    2016-01-01

    Decompensated hypothyroidism is a rare endocrine emergency but a differential that should be considered in patients presenting critically unwell with systemic illness. We report a case of myxoedema coma in a woman presenting with respiratory failure, hypotension, hypothermia and a reduced level of consciousness, all of which are poor prognostic features in decompensated hypothyroidism. The patient was admitted to critical care for mechanical ventilation and cardiovascular support and treated with a combination of insulin, liothyronine and levothyroxine, making a good recovery. We wanted to highlight this case of myxoedema coma occurring in the context of a hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state (HHS), as the former condition is normally associated with hypoglycaemia, hyponatraemia and hypo-osmolality. Decompensated hypothyroidism should be considered in presentations of HHS as well as with other metabolic derangements, as delays in thyroid hormone replacement are associated with poorer outcomes. It has multisystem effects challenging its recognition and we discuss potential complications and their management. PMID:26759401

  14. Thermal correction of astigmatism in the gravitational wave observatory GEO 600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittel, H.; Lück, H.; Affeldt, C.; Dooley, K. L.; Grote, H.; Leong, J. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Schreiber, E.; Slutsky, J.; Strain, K.; Was, M.; Willke, B.; Danzmann, K.

    2014-03-01

    The output port of GEO 600 is dominated by unwanted higher order modes (HOMs). The current thermal actuation system, a ring heater behind one of the folding mirrors, causes a significant amount of astigmatism, which produces HOMs. We have built and installed an astigmatism correction system, based on heating this folding mirror at the sides (laterally). With these side heaters and the ring heater behind the mirror, it is possible to tune its radius of curvature in the horizontal and the vertical degree of freedom. We use this system to match the mirrors in the two arms of GEO 600 to each other, thereby reducing the contrast defect. The use of the side heaters reduces the power of the HOMs at the output of GEO 600 by approximately 37%.

  15. Experimentally determining the locations of two astigmatic images for an underwater light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pao-Keng; Liu, Jian-You; Ying, Shang-Ping

    2015-05-01

    Images formed by an underwater object from light rays refracted in the sagittal and tangential planes are located at different positions for an oblique viewing position. The overlapping of these two images from the observer's perspective will thus prevent the image-splitting astigmatism from being directly observable. In this work, we present a heuristic method to experimentally visualize the astigmatism. A point light source is used as an underwater object and the emerging wave front is recorded using a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor. The wave front is found to deform from a circular paraboloid to an elliptic paraboloid as the viewing position changes from normal to oblique. Using geometric optics, we derive an analytical expression for the image position as a function of the rotating angle of an arm used to carry the wave-front sensor in our experimental setup. The measured results are seen to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  16. Revisiting the eye opening response of the Glasgow Coma Scale.

    PubMed

    Rabiu, Taopheeq Bamidele

    2011-01-01

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), introduced by Teasdale and Jenneth in 1974, has received tremendous acclaim from clinicians and has been extensively used in clinical practice for the evaluation of the level of consciousness. The author notes that some traumatic brain injury patients close eyes in response to painful stimuli as opposed to the eye opening response to pain of the GCS. A revision of the eye opening response subsection of the GCS is suggested. PMID:21633551

  17. Astigmatism and gain guiding in Kerr-lens mode-locked lasers.

    PubMed

    Gatz, S; Herrmann, J

    1995-04-15

    The effects of astigmatism and the radial variation of the gain on Kerr-lens mode-locking (KLM) are studied with the help of an extended ABCD matrix formalism. A dramatic broadening of the allowed cavity parameter region is predicted that permits KLM in almost the whole stability region. The cavity design for KLM with an aperture differs significantly from the design for KLM without an aperture, because of the saturable diffraction loss. PMID:19859342

  18. Beam width evolution of astigmatic hollow Gaussian beams in highly nonlocal nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen-Feng; Jiang, Xue-Song; Yang, Zhen-Jun; Li, Jian-Xing; Zhang, Shu-Min

    We investigate the beam width evolution of astigmatic hollow Gaussian beams propagating in highly nonlocal nonlinear media. The input-power-induced different evolutions of the beam width are illustrated: (i) the beam widths in two transverse directions are compressed or broadened at the same time; (ii) the beam width in one transverse direction keeps invariant, and the other is compressed or broadened; (iii) furthermore, the beam width in one transverse direction is compressed, whereas it in the other transverse direction is broadened.

  19. Detecting higher-order wavefront errors with an astigmatic hybrid wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Barwick, Shane

    2009-06-01

    The reconstruction of wavefront errors from measurements over subapertures can be made more accurate if a fully characterized quadratic surface can be fitted to the local wavefront surface. An astigmatic hybrid wavefront sensor with added neural network postprocessing is shown to have this capability, provided that the focal image of each subaperture is sufficiently sampled. Furthermore, complete local curvature information is obtained with a single image without splitting beam power. PMID:19488150

  20. Disconnection of the Ascending Arousal System in Traumatic Coma

    PubMed Central

    Edlow, Brian L.; Haynes, Robin L.; Takahashi, Emi; Klein, Joshua P.; Cummings, Peter; Benner, Thomas; Greer, David M.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Wu, Ona; Kinney, Hannah C.; Folkerth, Rebecca D.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic coma is associated with disruption of axonal pathways throughout the brain but the specific pathways involved in humans are incompletely understood. In this study, we used high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) to map the connectivity of axonal pathways that mediate the 2 critical components of consciousness – arousal and awareness – in the postmortem brain of a 62-year-old woman with acute traumatic coma and in 2 control brains. HARDI tractography guided tissue sampling in the neuropathological analysis. HARDI tractography demonstrated complete disruption of white matter pathways connecting brainstem arousal nuclei to the basal forebrain and thalamic intralaminar and reticular nuclei. In contrast, hemispheric arousal pathways connecting the thalamus and basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex were only partially disrupted, as were the cortical “awareness pathways.” Neuropathologic examination, which utilized β-amyloid precursor protein and fractin immunomarkers, revealed axonal injury in the white matter of the brainstem and cerebral hemispheres that corresponded to sites of HARDI tract disruption. Axonal injury was also present within the grey matter of the hypothalamus, thalamus, basal forebrain, and cerebral cortex. We propose that traumatic coma may be a subcortical disconnection syndrome related to the disconnection of specific brainstem arousal nuclei from the thalamus and basal forebrain. PMID:23656993

  1. Radical formation in the coma from photodissociation of ice grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, William M.; Gerth, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Long ago visual observations of comets suggested that there are jets in comets but it has only been recently that A'Hearn et al. have proven that some of these jets are due to emission from the CN radical. Recent studies in the lab have shown that CN radicals can be ejected directly into the gas phase from the photolysis of frozen vapors if the parent molecular has been excited to repulsive excited state. This later observation suggests that the jets that have been observed may be due to photodissociation of icy grains in the coma. A theory of radical formation from icy grains is presented. It is shown that direct formation of free radicals in the coma is an effective way to produce radicals from icy grains in the coma. The model predicts that icy grains could produce from 6 to 800,000 OH radicals/s per grain depending upon whether the radius of the grain is 0.3 to 100 micron.

  2. Cometary coma chemical composition (C4) mission. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Clark, B. C.; Niemann, H. B.; Alexander, M.; Knocke, P. C.; O'Hara, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cometary missions are of enormous fundamental importance for many different space science disciplines, including exobiology. Comets are presumed relics of the earliest, most primitive material in the solar nebula and are related to the planetesimals. They undoubtedly provided a general enrichment of volatiles to the inner solar system (contributing to atmospheres and oceans) and may have been key to the origin of life. A Discovery class, comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, was selected for further study by NASA earlier this year. The C4 Mission is a highly focused and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission, concentrating exclusively on measurements which will lead to an understanding of the chemical composition and make-up of the cometary nucleus. The scientific goals of the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission are to rendezvous with a short-period comet and (1) to determine the elemental, chemical, and isotopic composition of the nucleus and (2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. Further, it is a goal to obtain preliminary data on the development of the coma (dust and gas composition) as a function of time and orbital position.

  3. Correlation among auto-refractor, wavefront aberration, and subjective manual refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Ren, Qiushi

    2005-01-01

    Three optometry methods which include auto-refractor, wavefront aberrometer and subjective manual refraction were studied and compared in measuring low order aberrations of 60 people"s 117 normal eyes. Paired t-test and linear regression were used to study these three methods" relationship when measuring myopia with astigmatism. In order to make the analysis more clear, we divided the 117 normal eyes into different groups according to their subjective manual refraction and redid the statistical analysis. Correlations among three methods show significant in sphere, cylinder and axis in all groups, with sphere"s correlation coefficients largest(R>0.98, P<0.01) and cylinder"s smallest (0.900.01). Auto-refractor had significant change from the other two methods when measuring cylinder (P<0.01). The results after grouping differed a little from the analysis among total people. Although three methods showed significant change from each other in certain parameters, the amplitude of these differences were not large, which indicated that the coherence of auto-refractor, wavefront aberrometer and subjective refraction is good. However, we suggested that wavefront aberration measurement could be a good starting point of optometry, subjective refraction is still necessary for refinement.

  4. Causes of focus-error feedthrough in optical-disk systems: astigmatic and obscuration methods.

    PubMed

    Bernacki, B E; Mansuripur, M

    1994-02-10

    High-density magneto-optical recording systems require sensitive and robust focus position sensors that are immune to transient changes in the amplitude and the phase of the light diffracted from pregrooved media during the seek operation. The false focus-error signal produced by track crossing during seeking is termed feedthrough. Total immunity to feedthrough is never achieved, although some focus-error detection methods, notably the obscuration method, perform better in this regard. The astigmatic focus-error detection method is usually operated with a large astigmatic foci separation distance to facilitate detector alignment and to permit push-pull tracking, which increases pattern noise and contributes to its poor resistance to feedthrough. Pattern noise is caused by the projection of the intensity pattern at the exit pupil of the objective lens onto the detector plane, at which it produces false focus-error signals. The obscuration method, a diffraction-limited method of focus-error sensing, evens out his pattern noise and is therefore more resistant to feedthrough. We present numerical modeling results that compare the feedthrough performance of the astigmatic and the obscuration methods of focus-error detection. PMID:20862069

  5. Improving near vision in presbyopic eyes by selective treatment of high-order aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, Mounir A; Allam, Waleed A; Khalifa, Ahmed M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Evaluation of improving near vision in presbyopic patients with low to moderate myopia with selective treatment of high-order aberrations (HOAs) using the ORK-CAM software aberrometer and a SCHWIND ESIRIS excimer laser. In this study, all HOAs except vertical coma were treated and the effect on near visual function was evaluated. Setting Horus Vision Correction Center, Alexandria, Egypt. Methods Twenty-six presbyopic patients (52 eyes) with low to moderate myopia were divided into two groups, A and B. The ORK-CAM software aberrometer was used in both groups to measure HOAs and design wavefront-guided treatment. All included eyes had total coma >0.2 μm. The Moria M2 mechanical microkeratome was used for flap making in both groups. Wavefront-guided laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis using ESIRIS laser was done for all eyes. In Group A (30 eyes) all HOAs were treated. In Group B (22 eyes) vertical coma was left untreated. Postoperative uncorrected distance visual acuity (UCVA), best corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA), uncorrected near acuity (UCNA), distance corrected near acuity (DCNA), best corrected near acuity with addition for near vision (BCNA), manifest refractive spherical equivalent (MRSE), HOAs, and contrast sensitivity for both groups were done preoperatively and at 3 months postoperatively. Results Mean age was 47.46 and 45.2 years for groups A and B, respectively. Mean preoperative MRSE was −2.37 and −2.87 D and mean preoperative total HOAs was 0.35 and 0.38 μm in groups A and B, respectively. There was no significant difference between groups regarding age, sex, preoperative MRSE, and preoperative total HOAs. After 3 months, there was no significant difference between groups in terms of UCVA, BCVA, MRSE, and contrast sensitivity. Analysis of postoperative HOAs showed significant difference in vertical coma between the two groups (P < 0.001). DCNA was significantly better in Group B (P < 0.01). Conclusion Treating low to moderate

  6. Use of a Toric Intraocular Lens and a Limbal-Relaxing Incision for the Management of Astigmatism in Combined Glaucoma and Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Allister

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We report the surgical management of a patient with glaucoma undergoing cataract surgery with high preexisting astigmatism. A combination of techniques was employed for her astigmatism management. Methods A 76-year-old female with 5.5 dpt of corneal astigmatism underwent surgery in her left eye consisting of one-site trabeculectomy, phacoemulsification, toric intraocular lens implantation and a single inferior limbal-relaxing incision. Results Intraocular pressure control was achieved with no medication at 11 mm Hg; before the filtering procedure, the pressure was 16 mm Hg on two topical drugs. Astigmatism was reduced to 0.75 dpt, and both corrected and uncorrected visual acuity improved. Conclusions Astigmatism management can have a good outcome in combined procedures. We encourage surgeons to address astigmatism in the preoperative planning of patients undergoing glaucoma surgery associated with phacoemulsification. PMID:27293408

  7. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. VIII. BARRED DISK GALAXIES IN THE CORE OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, Irina; Jogee, Shardha; Weinzirl, Tim; Erwin, Peter; Trentham, Neil; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Kleijn, Gijs V.; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Balcells, Marc; Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Mobasher, Bahram; Peng, Eric W. E-mail: sj@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2012-02-20

    We use high-resolution ({approx}0.''1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z {approx} 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the densest environment in the nearby universe. Our study helps to constrain the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments and provides a comparison point for studies in lower density environments and at higher redshifts. Our results are: (1) we characterize the fraction and properties of bars in a sample of 32 bright (M{sub V} {approx}< -18, M{sub *} > 10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun }) S0 galaxies, which dominate the population of massive disk galaxies in the Coma core. We find that the measurement of a bar fraction among S0 galaxies must be handled with special care due to the difficulty in separating unbarred S0s from ellipticals, and the potential dilution of the bar signature by light from a relatively large, bright bulge. The results depend sensitively on the method used: the bar fraction for bright S0s in the Coma core is 50% {+-} 11%, 65% {+-} 11%, and 60% {+-} 11% based on three methods of bar detection, namely, strict ellipse fit criteria, relaxed ellipse fit criteria, and visual classification. (2) We compare the S0 bar fraction across different environments (the Coma core, A901/902, and Virgo) adopting the critical step of using matched samples and matched methods in order to ensure robust comparisons. We find that the bar fraction among bright S0 galaxies does not show a statistically significant variation (within the error bars of {+-}11%) across environments which span two orders of magnitude in galaxy number density (n {approx} 300-10,000 galaxies Mpc{sup -3}) and include rich and poor clusters, such as the core of Coma, the A901/902 cluster, and Virgo. We speculate that the bar fraction among S0s is not significantly enhanced in rich clusters compared to low

  8. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. VIII. Barred Disk Galaxies in the Core of the Coma Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinova, Irina; Jogee, Shardha; Weinzirl, Tim; Erwin, Peter; Trentham, Neil; Ferguson, Henry C.; Hammer, Derek; den Brok, Mark; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Goudfrooij, Paul; Guzmán, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Peletier, Reynier F.; Peng, Eric W.; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    2012-02-01

    We use high-resolution (~0farcs1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z ~ 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the densest environment in the nearby universe. Our study helps to constrain the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments and provides a comparison point for studies in lower density environments and at higher redshifts. Our results are: (1) we characterize the fraction and properties of bars in a sample of 32 bright (M V <~ -18, M * > 109.5 M ⊙) S0 galaxies, which dominate the population of massive disk galaxies in the Coma core. We find that the measurement of a bar fraction among S0 galaxies must be handled with special care due to the difficulty in separating unbarred S0s from ellipticals, and the potential dilution of the bar signature by light from a relatively large, bright bulge. The results depend sensitively on the method used: the bar fraction for bright S0s in the Coma core is 50% ± 11%, 65% ± 11%, and 60% ± 11% based on three methods of bar detection, namely, strict ellipse fit criteria, relaxed ellipse fit criteria, and visual classification. (2) We compare the S0 bar fraction across different environments (the Coma core, A901/902, and Virgo) adopting the critical step of using matched samples and matched methods in order to ensure robust comparisons. We find that the bar fraction among bright S0 galaxies does not show a statistically significant variation (within the error bars of ±11%) across environments which span two orders of magnitude in galaxy number density (n ~ 300-10,000 galaxies Mpc-3) and include rich and poor clusters, such as the core of Coma, the A901/902 cluster, and Virgo. We speculate that the bar fraction among S0s is not significantly enhanced in rich clusters compared to low-density environments for two reasons. First, S0s in rich clusters

  9. Acoustically-tuned optical spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sklar, E.

    1981-01-01

    Lens arrangement corrects for aberrations and gives resolution of 0.7 seconds of arc. In spectrometer, light from telescope is relayed by doublet lens to acoustically tuned optical filter. Selected wavelengths are relayed by triplet lens to charge coupled device camera. Intervening cylindrical lens, tilted at 12 degree angle, corrects for astigmatism and coma introduced by two element birefringent crystal in filter.

  10. Influence of eye micromotions on spatially resolved refractometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzh, Igor H.; Sokurenko, Vyacheslav M.; Osipova, Irina Y.

    2001-01-01

    The influence eye micromotions on the accuracy of estimation of Zernike coefficients form eye transverse aberration measurements was investigated. By computer modeling, the following found eye aberrations have been examined: defocusing, primary astigmatism, spherical aberration of the 3rd and the 5th orders, as well as their combinations. It was determined that the standard deviation of estimated Zernike coefficients is proportional to the standard deviation of angular eye movements. Eye micromotions cause the estimation errors of Zernike coefficients of present aberrations and produce the appearance of Zernike coefficients of aberrations, absent in the eye. When solely defocusing is present, the biggest errors, cased by eye micromotions, are obtained for aberrations like coma and astigmatism. In comparison with other aberrations, spherical aberration of the 3rd and the 5th orders evokes the greatest increase of the standard deviation of other Zernike coefficients.

  11. Zernike expansion coefficients: rescaling and decentring for different pupils and evaluation of corneal aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comastri, Silvia A.; Perez, Liliana I.; Pérez, Gervasio D.; Martin, Gabriel; Bastida, Karina

    2007-03-01

    An analytical method to convert the set of Zernike coefficients that fits the wavefront aberration for a pupil into another corresponding to a contracted and horizontally translated pupil is proposed. The underlying selection rules are provided and the resulting conversion formulae for a seventh-order expansion are given. These formulae are applied to calculate corneal aberrations referred to a given pupil centre in terms of those referred to the keratometric vertex supplied by the SN CT1000 topographer. Four typical cases are considered: a sphere and three eyes—normal, keratoconic and post-LASIK. When the pupil centre is fixed and the pupil diameter decreases from 6 mm to the photopic natural one, leaving aside piston, tilt and defocus, the difference between the root mean square wavefront error computed with the formulae and the topographer is less than 0.04 µm. When the pupil diameter is kept equal to the natural one and the pupil centre is displaced, coefficients vary according to the eye. For a 0.3 mm pupil shift, the variation of coma is at most 0.35 µm and that of spherical aberration 0.01 µm.

  12. Chromosome aberrations induced by zebularine in triticale.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuhui; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yanzhi; Ma, Jieyun; Wu, Nan; Ni, Shuang; Luo, Tengxiao; Zhuang, Lifang; Chu, Chenggen; Cho, Seong-Woo; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Qi, Zengjun

    2016-07-01

    Chromosome engineering is an important approach for generating wheat germplasm. Efficient development of chromosome aberrations will facilitate the introgression and application of alien genes in wheat. In this study, zebularine, a DNA methylation transferase inhibitor, was successfully used to induce chromosome aberrations in the octoploid triticale cultivar Jinghui#1. Dry seeds were soaked in zebularine solutions (250, 500, and 750 μmol/L) for 24 h, and the 500 μmol/L treatment was tested in three additional treatment times, i.e., 12, 36, and 48 h. All treatments induced aberrations involving wheat and rye chromosomes. Of the 920 cells observed in 67 M1 plants, 340 (37.0%) carried 817 aberrations with an average of 0.89 aberrations per cell (range: 0-12). The aberrations included probable deletions, telosomes and acentric fragments (49.0%), large segmental translocations (28.9%), small segmental translocations (17.1%), intercalary translocations (2.6%), long chromosomes that could carry more than one centromere (2.0%), and ring chromosomes (0.5%). Of 510 M2 plants analyzed, 110 (21.6%) were found to carry stable aberrations. Such aberrations included 79 with varied rye chromosome numbers, 7 with wheat and rye chromosome translocations, 15 with possible rye telosomes/deletions, and 9 with complex aberrations involving variation in rye chromosome number and wheat-rye translocations. These indicated that aberrations induced by zebularine can be steadily transmitted, suggesting that zebularine is a new efficient agent for chromosome manipulation. PMID:27334255

  13. The coma cluster after lunch: Has a galaxcy group passed through the cluster core?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Roettiger, Kurt; Ledlow, Michael; Klypin, Anatoly

    1994-01-01

    We propose that the Coma cluster has recently undergone a collision with the NGC 4839 galaxy group. The ROSAT X-ray morphology, the Coma radio halo, the presence of poststarburst galaxies in the bridge between Coma and NGC 4839, the usually high velocity dispersion for the NGC 4839 group, and the position of a large-scale galaxy filament to the NE of Coma are all used to argue that the NGC 4839 group passed through the core of Coma approximately 2 Gyr ago. We present a new Hydro/N-body simulation of the merger between a galaxy group and a rich cluster that reproduces many of the observed X-ray and optical properties of Coma/NGC 4839.

  14. A Rare Case of Myxedema Coma with Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS).

    PubMed

    Dixit, Siddharth; Dutta, Manoj Kumar; Namdeo, Mayank

    2015-05-01

    Myxedema coma or hypothyroid crisis is an endocrine emergency and needs ICU management. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is another medical emergency which needs high degree of clinical suspicion else mortality can be high. There is a paradox in co existence of myxedema coma and NMS. While one is hypometabolic state another is hypermetabolic state and both can be precipitated by antipsychotics use. Hypothermia and flaccidity commonly expected in myxedema coma may mask fever and rigidity of classical NMS contributing to diagnostic problem and treatment delay. Scientific literature on coexistance of myxedema coma and NMS is sparse. We hereby report first case with coexisting myxedema coma and NMS in a patient of schizophrenia treated with antipsychotic, where classical symptoms of NMS were masked by myxedema coma. Prompt diagnosis and effective management by a team resulted in favourable outcome in our patient. This case is reported to alert intensive care physicians to atypical manifestations of NMS in presence of hypothyroidism. PMID:26155541

  15. A Rare Case of Myxedema Coma with Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS)

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Manoj Kumar; Namdeo, Mayank

    2015-01-01

    Myxedema coma or hypothyroid crisis is an endocrine emergency and needs ICU management. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is another medical emergency which needs high degree of clinical suspicion else mortality can be high. There is a paradox in co existence of myxedema coma and NMS. While one is hypometabolic state another is hypermetabolic state and both can be precipitated by antipsychotics use. Hypothermia and flaccidity commonly expected in myxedema coma may mask fever and rigidity of classical NMS contributing to diagnostic problem and treatment delay. Scientific literature on coexistance of myxedema coma and NMS is sparse. We hereby report first case with coexisting myxedema coma and NMS in a patient of schizophrenia treated with antipsychotic, where classical symptoms of NMS were masked by myxedema coma. Prompt diagnosis and effective management by a team resulted in favourable outcome in our patient. This case is reported to alert intensive care physicians to atypical manifestations of NMS in presence of hypothyroidism. PMID:26155541

  16. Aberrant Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Cai, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating

  17. Aberrant methylation during cervical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Virmani, A K; Muller, C; Rathi, A; Zoechbauer-Mueller, S; Mathis, M; Gazdar, A F

    2001-03-01

    We studied the pattern of aberrant methylation during the multistage pathogenesis of cervical cancers. We analyzed a total of 73 patient samples and 10 cervical cancer cell lines. In addition, tissue samples [peripheral blood lymphocytes (n = 10) and buccal epithelial cells (n = 12)] were obtained from 22 healthy volunteers. On the basis of the results of preliminary analysis, the cervical samples were grouped into three categories: (a) nondysplasia/low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN; n = 37); (b) high-grade CIN (n = 17); and (c) invasive cancer (n = 19). The methylation status of six genes was determined (p16, RARbeta, FHIT, GSTP1, MGMT, and hMLH1). Our main findings are as follows: (a) methylation was completely absent in control tissues; (b) the frequencies of methylation for all of the genes except hMLH1 were >20% in cervical cancers; (c) aberrant methylation commenced early during multistage pathogenesis and methylation of at least one gene was noted in 30% of the nondysplasia/low-grade CIN group; (d) an increasing trend for methylation was seen with increasing pathological change; (e) methylation of RARbeta and GSTP1 were early events, p16 and MGMT methylation were intermediate events, and FHIT methylation was a late, tumor-associated event; and (f) methylation occurred independently of other risk factors including papillomavirus infection, smoking history, or hormone use. Although our findings need to be extended to a larger series, they suggest that the pattern of aberrant methylation in women with or without dysplasia may help identify subgroups at increased risk for histological progression or cancer development. PMID:11297252

  18. Correcting aberration in aspheric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, K.; Khan, A. N.; Rauf, A.; Gul, A.

    2014-06-01

    New technique eases aspheric lens fabrication and overcome traditional limitation. An aspheric lens has been designed by using optical designing software to replace the achromat (Doublet) lens of eyepiece assembly of telescope. The devised physical parameters of aspheric lens have been incorporated into the CNC Aspheric machine to fabricate the lens. The antireflection coating for visible region has been carried out on lens by employing PVD technique. In this report diminished aberration effects due to non-spherical surface profile and comparison of optical parameters of achromat (doublet) and aspheric lens is presented.

  19. Focal properties of a plane grating in a convergent beam.

    PubMed

    Hall, J T

    1966-06-01

    Focusing from a plane grating can be accomplished by using convergent radiation incident on the grating in such a manner that any incident angle alpha(n), the resulting diffraction angle beta(n), will be on the same side of the grating normal. The theory for the focal properties is developed by applying Fermat's principle of least time to selected terms resulting from a finite series expansion of the system's distance function. Derivations are given for finding the focal curve equation, astigmatism, and coma, of the most usable configuration of the optical components. Discussions of the aberrations disclose methods for eliminating the astigmatism and reducing the coma. PMID:20049009

  20. Asymmetric wavefront aberrations and pupillary shapes induced by electrical stimulation of ciliary nerve in cats measured with compact wavefront aberrometer.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Suguru; Mihashi, Toshifumi; Kanda, Hiroyuki; Hirohara, Yoko; Endo, Takao; Morimoto, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Fujikado, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the changes in the wavefront aberrations and pupillary shape in response to electrical stimulation of the branches of the ciliary nerves in cats. Seven eyes of seven cats were studied under general anesthesia. Trains of monophasic pulses (current, 0.1 to 1.0 mA; duration, 0.5 ms/phase; frequency, 5 to 40 Hz) were applied to the lateral or medial branch of the short ciliary nerve near the posterior pole of the eye. A pair of electrodes was hooked onto one or both branch of the short ciliary nerve. The electrodes were placed about 5 mm from the scleral surface. The wavefront aberrations were recorded continuously for 2 seconds before, 8 seconds during, and for 20 seconds after the electrical stimulation. The pupillary images were simultaneously recorded during the stimulation period. Both the wavefront aberrations and the pupillary images were obtained 10 times/sec with a custom-built wavefront aberrometer. The maximum accommodative amplitude was 1.19 diopters (D) produced by electrical stimulation of the short ciliary nerves. The latency of the accommodative changes was very short, and the accommodative level gradually increased up to 4 seconds and reached a plateau. When only one branch of the ciliary nerve was stimulated, the pupil dilated asymmetrically, and the oblique astigmatism and one of the asymmetrical wavefront terms was also altered. Our results showed that the wavefront aberrations and pupillary dilations can be measured simultaneously and serially with a compact wavefront aberrometer. The asymmetric pupil dilation and asymmetric changes of the wavefront aberrations suggest that each branch of the ciliary nerve innervates specific segments of the ciliary muscle and dilator muscle of the pupil. PMID:25144536

  1. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, M.; Hankla, A.

    1996-07-09

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90{degree} such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system. 5 figs.

  2. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, Mark; Hankla, Allen

    1996-01-01

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90.degree. such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system.

  3. Beam spot shift in a dynamic astigmatism correction type (DQ-DAF) electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Y.; Sukeno, M.; Suzuki, H.

    This paper presents the results of an investigation to avoid the convergence error in color CRT guns operating with a dynamic focus correction. The dynamic spot shift as well as the spot coma can be avoided at the same time with a proper arrangement of the quadrupole and main lenses with an oblique incidence of the side beam. The design confirmation is also presented.

  4. Aberrations of ellipsoidal reflectors for unit magnification.

    PubMed

    Mielenz, K D

    1974-12-01

    Ellipsoidal reflectors are useful for the 1:1 imaging of small objects without spherical and chromatic aberration. The magnitude of the off-axis aberrations of such reflectors is computed by application of Fermat's principle to the Hamiltonian point characteristic. The limiting form of the mirror aperture for which these aberrations do not exceed a set tolerance is an ellipse whose semiaxes depend on object size and angle of incidence. PMID:20134811

  5. Formation of C3 and C2 in Cometary Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Comets are remnants from the Solar System formation. They reside at large distances from the Sun and are believed to store deep freeze imprints of the chemical and physical conditions at the time the Solar System formed. The main ice component of a comet is H2O followed by CO and CO2 with additional small amounts of molecules with varying complexity. Comets also contain large amounts of dust. If a comet approaches the Sun the ices begin to sublimate giving rise to the cometary coma. The molecules producing the coma can be observed in the infrared, the radio wavelength range and at optical wavelengths. To constrain the formation of the Solar System, models require knowledge of the composition for a statistically significant number of comets. This favors optical observations of e.g. C3 (tricarbon) and C2 (dicarbon) since these species allow observations even of relatively faint comets and do not require space missions (infrared observations). However, one has to link these observed photodissociation product species (daughter species) to the molecules that originally sublimated from the comet nucleus surface, i.e. the so-called parent molecules, as e.g. C2H2 (acetylene) for C2. However, for C3 no parent molecules have been identified so far. This thesis investigates the formation of C3 and C2 radicals in cometary comae due to photodissociation of observed and in the literature proposed hydrocarbon parent molecules. For this purpose a one-dimensional multi-fluid coma chemistry model has been improved and applied. This work added new photo reactions to the model, updated the hydrocarbon photo rate coefficients and quantified their uncertainty. A sensitivity analysis has been carried out to determine the reactions whose uncertainty most affect the model output uncertainty. Special attention should be paid to these so-called key reactions in future laboratory experiments and quantum chemical computations to reduce the model output uncertainty more effectively. This will

  6. Cataract Surgery in Eyes with Low Corneal Astigmatism: Implantation of the Acrysof IQ Toric SN6AT2 Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Aujla, Jaskirat S; Vincent, Stephen J; White, Shane; Panchapakesan, Jai

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the refractive and visual outcomes following cataract surgery and implantation of the AcrySof IQ Toric SN6AT2 intraolcular lens (IOL) (Alcon Laboratories, Inc., Fort Worth, TX, USA) in patients with low corneal astigmatism. Methods: This study is a retrospective, consecutive, single surgeon series of 98 eyes of 88 patients (with low preoperative corneal astigmatism) undergoing cataract surgery and implantation of the AcrySof IQ Toric SN6AT2 IOL. Postoperative measurements were obtained 1-month postsurgery. Main outcome measures were monocular distance visual acuity and residual refractive astigmatism. Results: Mean preoperative corneal astigmatic power vector (APV) was 0.38±0.09 D. Following surgery and implantation of the toric IOL, mean postoperative refractive APV was 0.13±0.10 D. Mean postoperative distance uncorrected visual acuity was 0.08±0.09 logMAR. Postoperative spherical equivalent refraction (SER) resulted in a mean of –0.23±0.22 D, with 96% of eyes falling within 0.50 D of the target SER. Conclusion: The AcrySof IQ Toric SN6AT2 IOL is a safe and effective option for eyes undergoing cataract surgery with low levels of preoperative corneal astigmatism. PMID:25667733

  7. Right Median Nerve Electrical Stimulation for Acute Traumatic Coma Patients.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jin; Wang, Lei; Gao, Guoyi; Cooper, Edwin; Jiang, Jiyao

    2015-10-15

    The right median nerve as a peripheral portal to the central nervous system can be electrically stimulated to help coma arousal after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The present study set out to examine the efficacy and safety of right median nerve electrical stimulation (RMNS) in a cohort of 437 comatose patients after severe TBI from August 2005 to December 2011. The patients were enrolled 2 weeks after their injury and assigned to the RMNS group (n=221) receiving electrical stimulation for 2 weeks or the control group (n = 216) treated by standard management according to the date of birth in the month. The baseline data were similar. After the 2-week treatment, the RMNS-treated patients demonstrated a more rapid increase of the mean Glasgow Coma Score, although statistical significance was not reached (8.43 ± 4.98 vs. 7.47 ± 5.37, p = 0.0532). The follow-up data at 6-month post-injury showed a significantly higher proportion of patients who regained consciousness (59.8% vs. 46.2%, p = 0.0073). There was a lower proportion of vegetative persons in the RMNS group than in the control group (17.6% vs. 22.0%, p = 0.0012). For persons regaining consciousness, the functional independence measurement (FIM) score was higher among the RMNS group patients (91.45 ± 8.65 vs. 76.23 ± 11.02, p < 0.001). There were no unique complications associated with the RMNS treatment. The current study, although with some limitations, showed that RMNS may serve as an easy, effective, and noninvasive technique to promote the recovery of traumatic coma in the early phase. PMID:25664378

  8. Properties of dust in the coma of Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Hadamcik, Edith; Sen, Asole Kumar; Lasue, Jeremie; Fulle, Marco; Gupta, R.

    The last apparition of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko before the Rosetta spacecraft ren-dezvous in 2014 has taken place in 2008-2009. Observations have therefore been carried out to optimize the mission. In this context, observations of solar light scattered by dust, with em-phasis on polarimetric data, provide comparisons between the dust properties within different regions of the coma and with other comets. Efforts carried out both in India (December 2008 and April-May 2009) and in France (March 2009) have allowed us, with polarimetric imaging techniques, to follow the variations of the intensity and polarization of the scattered light from about 2 months before perihelion to 2 months after perihelion [1,2]. The interpretation of the observational results i) favors the presence of relatively large absorbing particles in the coma before perihelion, ii) reveals an increase in intensity and polarization a couple of weeks after per-ihelion, tentatively related to a significant ejection of small micron-or submicron-sized grains (possibly in the form of fluffy aggregates), and iii) suggests that these different types of particles originate from different parts of the nucleus that suffers noticeable seasonal effects. Although it needs to be kept in mind that remote observations do not allow the detection of local changes in the innermost coma, the implication of these results will be discussed in the context of the Rosetta mission strategy. E.g. during close-up approach, large absorbing particles could be harmful to the spacecraft, especially the optics; also, it would be of major interest to study the increase in activity after perihelion. [1] Levasseur-Regourd A.C., Hadamcik E., Sen A.K., Gupta R., Lasue J. In: Icy bodies in the solar system, IAU 263, Cambridge University Press, in press 2010. [2] Hadamcik E., Sen A.K., Levasseur-Regourd, A.C., Gupta R., Lasue J., AA, submitted, 2010

  9. The kinetics and dynamics of the coma of Halley's comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    This grant to the University of Michigan supported the efforts of Michael R. Combi to serve as a co-investigator in collaboration with a larger effort by the principal investigator, William Smyth of Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. The overall objective of this project was to analyze in a self-consistent manner unique optical O((sup 1)D) and NH2 ultra-high resolution line profile data of excellent quality and other supporting lower-resolution spectral data for the coma of comet P/Halley by using highly developed and physically-based cometary coma models in order to determine and explain in terms of physical processes the actual dynamics and photochemical kinetics that occur in the coma. The justification for this work is that it provides a valuable and underlying physical base from which to interpret significantly different types of coma observations in a self-consistent manner and hence bring into agreement (or avoid) apparent inconsistencies that arise from non-physically based interpretations. The level of effort for the Michigan component amounted to less than three person-months over a planned period of three years. The period had been extended at no extra cost to four years because the Michigan grant and the AER contract did not have coincident time periods. An effort of somewhat larger scope was undertaken by the PI. The importance of the O((sup 1)D) profiles is that they provide a direct trace of the water distribution in comets. The line profile shape is produced by the convolution of the outflow velocity and thermal dispersion of the parent water molecules with the photokinetic ejection of the oxygen atoms upon photodissociation of the parent water molecules. Our understanding of the NH2 and its precursor ammonia are important for comet-to-comet composition variations as they relate to the cosmo-chemistry of the early solar nebula. Modeling of the distribution of NH2 is necessary in order to infer the ammonia production rates from NH2

  10. Gamma hydroxybutyrate--a coma inducing recreational drug.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, J M; Stell, I

    1997-01-01

    The effects of gamma hydroxybutyrate, a coma inducing recreational drug, are described and illustrated by case reports of five patients presenting to accident and emergency (A&E). All had depressed levels of consciousness. There was strong circumstantial evidence of gamma hydroxybutyrate ingestion in all cases, and laboratory evidence in two. All recovered and supportive treatment. gamma Hydroxybutyrate has become a fashionable recreational drug. The majority of people who have ingested it will recover spontaneously without long term sequelae but its toxic effects may be dramatic while they last, particularly when it is taken with other drugs or alcohol. Images Figure 3 Figure 1 PMID:9248920

  11. Evolution of near UV Halley's spectrum in the inner coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousselot, Phillippe; Clairemidi, Jacques; Vernotte, F.; Moreels, Guy

    1992-01-01

    A direct way to observe the photodissociation of water vapor in a cometary coma is to detect the OH prompt emission. This emission is shifted of delta lambda = 4 nm with respect to the OH 309 nm fluorescence band. The extended data set obtained with the three-channel spectrometer on-board Vega 2 reveals at short distance of the nucleus (i.e., less than 600 km) an excess of emission on the right wing of the OH band which may be interpreted as being mainly due to prompt emission.

  12. Coma dust scattering concepts applied to the Rosetta mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Uwe; Rinaldi, Giovanna

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes basic concepts, as well as providing a framework, for the interpretation of the light scattered by the dust in a cometary coma as observed by instruments on a spacecraft such as Rosetta. It is shown that the expected optical depths are small enough that single scattering can be applied. Each of the quantities that contribute to the scattered intensity is discussed in detail. Using optical constants of the likely coma dust constituents, olivine, pyroxene and carbon, the scattering properties of the dust are calculated. For the resulting observable scattering intensities several particle size distributions are considered, a simple power law, power laws with a small particle cut off and a log-normal distributions with various parameters. Within the context of a simple outflow model, the standard definition of Afρ for a circular observing aperture is expanded to an equivalent Afρ for an annulus and specific line-of-sight observation. The resulting equivalence between the observed intensity and Afρ is used to predict observable intensities for 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko at the spacecraft encounter near 3.3 AU and near perihelion at 1.3 AU. This is done by normalizing particle production rates of various size distributions to agree with observed ground based Afρ values. Various geometries for the column densities in a cometary coma are considered. The calculations for a simple outflow model are compared with more elaborate Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Calculation (DSMC) models to define the limits of applicability of the simpler analytical approach. Thus our analytical approach can be applied to the majority of the Rosetta coma observations, particularly beyond several nuclear radii where the dust is no longer in a collisional environment, without recourse to computer intensive DSMC calculations for specific cases. In addition to a spherically symmetric 1-dimensional approach we investigate column densities for the 2-dimensional DSMC model on the

  13. Automated surface photometry for the Coma Cluster galaxies: The catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Okamura, S.; Tarusawa, K.

    1995-01-01

    A homogeneous photometry catalog is presented for 450 galaxies with B(sub 25.5) less than or equal to 16 mag located in the 9.8 deg x 9.8 deg region centered on the Coma Cluster. The catalog is based on photographic photometry using an automated surface photometry software for data reduction applied to B-band Schmidt plates. The catalog provides accurate positions, isophotal and total magnitudes, major and minor axes, and a few other photometric parameters including rudimentary morphology (early of late type).

  14. Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Coma Cluster Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secker, Jeff

    1995-12-01

    I have analyzed deep R- and B-band CCD images of the central ~ 700 arcmin(2) of the Coma cluster (Abell 1656, v = 7000 km/s, richness-class 2), using a statistically rigorous and automated method for the detection, photometry and classification of faint objects on digital images. The dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies are confined to a well-defined sequence in the color range given by 0.7 <= (B-R) <= 1.9 mag; within this interval and complete to R = 22.5 mag, there are 2535 dE candidates in the cluster core, and 694 objects on the associated control field (2.57x less area). I detected a significant metallicity gradient in the radial distribution of dE galaxies, which goes as Z ~ R(-0.32) outwards from the cluster center at NGC 4874. As well, there is a strong color-luminosity correlation, in the sense that more luminous dE galaxies are redder in the mean. These observations are consistent with a model in which the intracluster gas exerted a confinement pressure (greatest near the cluster core), impeding the outflow of supernovae-driven metal-rich gas from the young dE galaxies. The spatial distribution of faint dEs is well fit by a standard King model with a core radius R_c = 18.7 arcmin ( =~ 0.44 Mpc), significantly larger than found for the brightest dEs and giant cluster galaxies, and consistent with tidal disruption of faint dEs in the dense cluster core. The composite luminosity function for Coma galaxies was modeled as the sum of a log-normal distribution for the giant galaxies and a Schechter function for the dE galaxies. Decomposing the galaxy luminosity function in this manner, I found that the early-type dwarf-to-giant ratio (EDGR) for the Coma cluster core is identical with that of the Virgo cluster. I proposed that the presence of substructure is an important factor in determining the cluster's EDGR, since during the merger of two or more richness-class 1 galaxy clusters, the total number of dwarf and giant galaxies will be conserved. Thus, this low EDGR

  15. Analysis of CCD images of the coma of comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    The modeling analysis objective of this project is to make use of the skill acquired in the development of Monte Carlo particle trajectory models for the distributions of gas species in cometary comae as a basis for a new dust coma model. This model will include a self-consistent picture of the time-dependent dusty-gas dynamics of the inner coma and the three-dimensional time-dependent trajectories of the dust particles under the influence of solar gravity and solar radiation pressure in the outer coma. Our purpose is to use this model as a tool to analyze selected images from two sets of data of the comet P/Halley with the hope that we can help to understand the effects of a number of important processes on the spatial morphology of the observed dust coma. The study will proceed much in the same way as our study of the spatially extended hydrogen coma where we were able to understand the spatial morphology of the Lyman-alpha coma in terms of the partial thermalization of the hot H atoms produced by the photodissociation of cometary H2O and OH. The processes of importance to the observed dust coma include: (1) the dust particle size distribution function; (2) the terminal velocities of various sized dust particles in the inner coma; (3) the radiation scattering properties of dust particles, which are important both in terms of the observed scattered radiation and the radiation pressure acceleration on dust particles; (4) the fragmentation and/or vaporization of dust particles; (5) the relative importance of CHON and silicate dust particles as they contribute both to the dusty-gas dynamics in the inner coma (that produce the dust particle terminal velocities) and to the observed spatial morphology of the outer dust coma; and (6) the time and direction dependence of the source of dust.

  16. Effect of Single Administration of Coffee on Pupil Size and Ocular Wavefront Aberration Measurements in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Bardak, Handan; Gunay, Murat; Mumcu, Ugur; Bardak, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    No study has so far evaluated the impact of coffee drinking on ocular wavefront aberration (OWA) measurements. This study presents novel findings regarding the OWA of the eye following coffee intake. We aimed to evaluate the acute changes in pupil size and OWA of the eye after single administration of coffee. A total of 30 otherwise healthy participants were included in this prospective study. All subjects drank a cup of coffee containing 57 mg caffeine. Measurements of pupil size, total coma (TC), total trefoil (TF), total spherical aberration (TSA), and total higher order aberration (HOA) were performed before and at 5 minutes, at 30 minutes, and at 4 hours after coffee drinking using a wavefront aberrometer device (Irx3, Imagine Eyes, Orsay, France). The mean age of the study population was 20.30 ± 2.74 years. Pupil size did not show a significant change during the measurements (p > 0.05). A significant increase was observed in TF and HOA measurements following coffee intake (p = 0.029 and p = 0.009, resp.). Single administration of coffee results in significant increase in TF and total HOAs in healthy subjects without any effect on pupil diameter. Ultrastructural changes in the cornea following coffee intake might be of relevance to the alterations in ocular aberrations in healthy subjects. PMID:27437402

  17. Effect of Single Administration of Coffee on Pupil Size and Ocular Wavefront Aberration Measurements in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bardak, Handan; Gunay, Murat; Mumcu, Ugur; Bardak, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    No study has so far evaluated the impact of coffee drinking on ocular wavefront aberration (OWA) measurements. This study presents novel findings regarding the OWA of the eye following coffee intake. We aimed to evaluate the acute changes in pupil size and OWA of the eye after single administration of coffee. A total of 30 otherwise healthy participants were included in this prospective study. All subjects drank a cup of coffee containing 57 mg caffeine. Measurements of pupil size, total coma (TC), total trefoil (TF), total spherical aberration (TSA), and total higher order aberration (HOA) were performed before and at 5 minutes, at 30 minutes, and at 4 hours after coffee drinking using a wavefront aberrometer device (Irx3, Imagine Eyes, Orsay, France). The mean age of the study population was 20.30 ± 2.74 years. Pupil size did not show a significant change during the measurements (p > 0.05). A significant increase was observed in TF and HOA measurements following coffee intake (p = 0.029 and p = 0.009, resp.). Single administration of coffee results in significant increase in TF and total HOAs in healthy subjects without any effect on pupil diameter. Ultrastructural changes in the cornea following coffee intake might be of relevance to the alterations in ocular aberrations in healthy subjects. PMID:27437402

  18. Analysis of pupil and corneal wave aberration data supplied by the SN CT 1000 topography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comastri, S. A.; Martin, G.; Pfortner, T.

    2006-11-01

    Ocular aberrations depend on pupil size and centring and the retinal image quality under natural conditions differs from that corresponding to laboratory ones. In the present article, pupil and wave aberration data supplied by the Shin Nippon CT 1000 (SN CT 1000) topography system are analysed. Two groups of eyes under natural viewing conditions are considered ((260+/-20) lux at the eye under study). The first group consists of 10 normal eyes (-1.25 to 3 D sphere; 0 to -1.75 D cylinder) of five young subjects (age between 18 and 33 years). For this group, five determinations per eye are performed and the repeatability of results is analysed. Pupil centre is displaced from corneal vertex towards the temporal region, the largest displacement being (0.5+/-0.1) mm. The variation of pupil diameter in each eye is less than 21% while the inter-subject variability is large since diameters are between (3+/-0.3) and (5.3+/-0.6) mm. Aberrations are evaluated for two different pupil sizes, the natural one and a fictitious one of 6 mm. The corneal higher-order root-mean square wavefront error (RMSHO) for a 6 mm pupil centred in the corneal vertex, averaged across all eyes, is (0.37+/-0.06) [mu]m while, considering the natural pupil diameter, the average in each eye is significantly lower, up to eight times smaller. The fourth-order spherical aberration is an important aberration in the considered eyes, its maximum value for a 6 mm pupil being (0.38+/-0.02) [mu]m. The second group consists of 24 eyes of 12 subjects (age between 25 and 68 years) such that four eyes are of normal adults (1.25 to +6 D sphere; 0 to -0.5 D cylinder), eight have astigmatisms (-5.5 to +3.25 D sphere; -1.5 to -4.5 D cylinder), six have post-refractive surgery (+0.5 to +3.5 D sphere; -0.5 to -4 D cylinder) and six have keratoconus (-9.5 to +1 D sphere; -1 to -4.5 D cylinder). For this group only one determination per eye is performed. Pupil centre is displaced from corneal vertex towards the temporal

  19. Rooting Out Aberrant Behavior in Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokalis, Jerry, Jr.; Paquin, Dave

    1989-01-01

    Discusses aberrant, or disruptive, behavior in an industrial/business, classroom-based, instructor-led training setting. Three examples of aberrant behavior are described, typical case studies are provided for each, and preventive (long-term) and corrective (on-the-spot) strategies for dealing with the problems are discussed. (LRW)

  20. Harmonic oscillator states in aberration optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    1993-01-01

    The states of the three-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator classify optical aberrations of axis-symmetric systems due to the isomorphism between the two mathematical structures. Cartesian quanta and angular momentum classifications have their corresponding aberration classifications. The operation of concatenation of optical elements introduces a new operation between harmonic oscillator states.

  1. Astigmatic multifocus microscopy enables deep 3D super-resolved imaging

    PubMed Central

    Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Abrahamsson, Sara; Mazenq, Laurent; Lecestre, Aurélie; Calmon, Pierre-François; Cerf, Aline; Nöllmann, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a 3D super-resolution microscopy method that enables deep imaging in cells. This technique relies on the effective combination of multifocus microscopy and astigmatic 3D single-molecule localization microscopy. We describe the optical system and the fabrication process of its key element, the multifocus grating. Then, two strategies for localizing emitters with our imaging method are presented and compared with a previously described deep 3D localization algorithm. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the method by imaging the nuclear envelope of eukaryotic cells reaching a depth of field of ~4µm. PMID:27375935

  2. Wide measurement range scanning heterodyne interferometer utilizing astigmatic position sensing scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Youngkyu; Kim, Kyoung-Eop; Kim, Seong-Jin; Park, June-Gyu; Joo, Young-Hun; Shin, Bu Hyun; Lee, Seung-Yop; Cho, Kyuman

    2011-08-01

    A scanning heterodyne I/Q-interferometer scheme is proposed to overcome phase ambiguity caused by the periodic nature of its phase-dependent signal. A position sensing scheme using an astigmatic method in the confocal arrangement has been interfaced to the interferometer to retrieve the real phase value during a scanning process. The experimental results show that the vertical measurement range can be expanded up to 16μm. The potential of this interferometer on the scanning microscopy of a rough surface is discussed.

  3. A Michelson controlled-not gate with a single-lens astigmatic mode converter.

    PubMed

    Souza, C E R; Khoury, A Z

    2010-04-26

    We propose and demonstrate experimentally a single lens design for an astigmatic mode converter that transforms the transverse mode of paraxial optical beams. As an application, we implement a controlled-not gate based on a Michelson interferometer in which the photon polarization is the control bit and the first order transverse mode is the target. As a further application, we also build a transverse mode parity sorter which can be useful for quantum information processing as a measurement device for the transverse mode qubit. PMID:20588767

  4. Effects of thermal lensing on stability and astigmatic compensation of a Z-fold laser cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.G.; Lee, W.K.; Wong, S.P.; Zhou, J.Y.; Yu, Z.X.

    1996-12-01

    The {ital ABCD} transfer matrix method is used to study the stability of a Z-fold cavity with two concave and two flat mirrors and a Brewster-cut crystal. Analytical solutions of stable regions of the cavity without thermal lensing have been obtained. The influences of thermal lensing on stability, beam waists, and astigmatic compensation are discussed. By use of a Ti:sapphire laser with a Z-fold cavity, lasing action was achieved in the predicted stable subregions that are accessible. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  5. [Astigmatism following cataract surgery: comparison following wound closure with nylon suture and Mersilene].

    PubMed

    Bigar, F

    1990-05-01

    Mersilene (polyester fiber) is stronger and less elastic than nylon suture material. In contrast to nylon, Mersilene does not appear to be susceptible to biodegradation in the long term. After a follow-up period of 6 months, the regression of surgically induced astigmatism following extracapsular cataract extraction and lens implantation with a conventional 150 degree corneoscleral incision was in the same range with nylon monofilament 10-0 and Mersilene 10-0. With nylon single sutures (14 patients) there was a reduction from 3.5 and with Mersilene (12 patients) from 3.9 to 0.9 diopters. PMID:2195225

  6. Performance comparison between Shack-Hartmann and astigmatic hybrid wavefront sensors.

    PubMed

    Barwick, Shane

    2009-12-20

    Simulations on Kolmogorov phase screens are employed to compare the relative performance of an astigmatic hybrid wavefront sensor (AHS) to that of a Shack-Hartmann sensor (SHS). The AHS is shown to improve phase reconstruction accuracy when the subaperture phase contains significant energy in curvature modes and a moderate to high number of photons are collected. Dual use of the AHS and SHS may extend enhanced reconstruction to low signal levels. The AHS is also shown to have a small benefit for tilt-only reconstruction when the beam has sufficient power. PMID:20029599

  7. Six-month results of hyperopic and astigmatic LASIK in eyes with primary and secondary hyperopia.

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, R L; Hardten, D R; Houtman, D M; Witte, B; Preschel, N; Chu, Y R; Samuelson, T W; Linebarger, E J

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the safety and efficacy of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for hyperopia and hyperopic astigmatism and develop a LASIK nomogram for primary hyperopia or hyperopia secondary to myopic refractive surgery using the VISX STAR S2. METHODS: Prospective evaluation of LASIK in 46 primary eyes and 29 secondary eyes with fogged manifest sphere from +0.5 diopters (D) to +6.0 D and cylinder from 0 to +5.0 D. RESULTS: Mean manifest spherical equivalent (SE) in patients with primary hyperopia was +2.50 D +/- 0.93 preoperatively and +0.70 D +/- 1.19 at 6 months. At 6 months, 79% of primary hyperopes had uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) of 20/40 or better; 63% were within +/- 1 D of emmetropia. One primary hyperope lost 2 lines of best spectacle-corrected vision (BCVA) at 1 month. Complications included transient epithelial defect (6.5%), epithelial cells in the interface (4.3%), diffuse lamellar keratitis (4.3%), haze (2.2%), and mild irregular astigmatism (2.2%). In those with secondary hyperopia, mean manifest SE was +1.70 D +/- 0.82 preoperatively and -0.27 D +/- 0.95 at 6 months. At 6 months, 83% of secondary hyperopes had UCVA of 20/40 or better; 74% were within +/- 1 D of emmetropia. No secondary hyperope lost > or = 2 lines of BCVA. Complications included intraoperative bleeding (3.4%), intraoperative epithelial defect (3.4%), transient interface debris (3.4%), significant dry eye (3.4%), blood in interface (3.4%), irregular astigmatism (6.9%), slight decentration (6.9%), trace haze (6.9%), mild epithelial ingrowth not requiring removal (3.4%), or corneal irregularity (3.4%). CONCLUSION: These early data suggest that LASIK for hyperopia from +0.5 to +6 D and astigmatism from 0 to +5 D using the VISX STAR S2 benefits from a nomogram adjusted for preoperative refraction, age, and prior refractive surgery and is safe and effective. Patients with secondary hyperopia achieved more correction than those with primary hyperopia, although the accuracy and

  8. Astigmatic multifocus microscopy enables deep 3D super-resolved imaging.

    PubMed

    Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Abrahamsson, Sara; Mazenq, Laurent; Lecestre, Aurélie; Calmon, Pierre-François; Cerf, Aline; Nöllmann, Marcelo

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a 3D super-resolution microscopy method that enables deep imaging in cells. This technique relies on the effective combination of multifocus microscopy and astigmatic 3D single-molecule localization microscopy. We describe the optical system and the fabrication process of its key element, the multifocus grating. Then, two strategies for localizing emitters with our imaging method are presented and compared with a previously described deep 3D localization algorithm. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the method by imaging the nuclear envelope of eukaryotic cells reaching a depth of field of ~4µm. PMID:27375935

  9. Influence of astigmatism on the fabrication of diffractive structures by use of focused ion-beam milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yongqi; Bryan, Ngoi Kok Ann

    2004-08-01

    Astigmatism exists in a focused-ion-beam (FIB) system and causes the shape of a beam spot to change from a normal circle to an ellipse. This variation influences the fabrication of diffractive structures by use of programmable controlled milling of a FIB. It is analyzed combined with the fabrication of blazed gratings and Fresnel diffractive lenses. Fabrication errors caused by a beam spot with astigmatism is discussed in detail for four cases of the long axis of an ellipse (a) in accordance with the X axis, (b) in accordance with the Y axis, (c) at 45° with the X axis, and (d) at -45° with the X axis. Finally, a method is given for correction of the astigmatism and how to determine the circularity of the beam spot qualitatively.

  10. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Tolis, Konstantinos E.; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D.; Panagopoulos, Georgios N.; Igoumenou, Vasilios G.; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  11. Nodal aberration theory applied to freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerschbach, Kyle; Rolland, Jannick P.; Thompson, Kevin P.

    2014-12-01

    When new three-dimensional packages are developed for imaging optical systems, the rotational symmetry of the optical system is often broken, changing its imaging behavior and making the optical performance worse. A method to restore the performance is to use freeform optical surfaces that compensate directly the aberrations introduced from tilting and decentering the optical surfaces. In order to effectively optimize the shape of a freeform surface to restore optical functionality, it is helpful to understand the aberration effect the surface may induce. Using nodal aberration theory the aberration fields induced by a freeform surface in an optical system are explored. These theoretical predications are experimentally validated with the design and implementation of an aberration generating telescope.

  12. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  13. Negative ions in the coma of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaizy, P.; Reme, H.; Sauvaud, J. A.; D'Uston, C.; Lin, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    The detection of negatively charged cometary ions in the inner coma of Comet Halley is reported. These ions are observed in three broad mass peaks at 7-19, 22-65, and 85-110 AMU, with densities reaching greater than about 1/cu cm, about 0.05/cu cm, and about 0.04/cu cm, respectively, at a distance of about 2300 km from the nucleus. The ion species thought to be present include O(-), OH(-), C(-), CH(-), CN(-) and heavier complex CHO molecular ions. As negative ions are easily destroyed by solar radiation at about 1 AU, an efficient production mechanism, so far unidentified, is required to account for the observed densities. The detection of negative ions in the coma near 1 AU implies that negative ions should also be present in similar neutral gas and dust environment farther away from the sun. If the negative-ion densities are large enough, they could play an important part in physical processes such as radiative transfer or charge exchange.

  14. Substructure in the Coma Cluster: Giants versus Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Scott A.; Colless, Matthew; Bridges, Terry J.; Carter, Dave; Mobasher, Bahram; Poggianti, Bianca M.

    2002-03-01

    The processes that form and shape galaxy clusters, such as infall, mergers, and dynamical relaxation, tend to generate distinguishable differences between the distributions of a cluster's giant and dwarf galaxies. Thus, the dynamics of dwarf galaxies in a cluster can provide valuable insights into its dynamical history. With this in mind, we look for differences between the spatial and velocity distributions of giant (b<18) and dwarf (b>18) galaxies in the Coma cluster. Our redshift sample contains new measurements from the 2dF and WYFFOS spectrographs, making it more complete at faint magnitudes than any previously studied sample of Coma galaxies. It includes 745 cluster members-452 giants and 293 dwarfs. We find that the line-of-sight velocity distribution of the giants is significantly non-Gaussian, but not that for the dwarfs. A battery of statistical tests of both the spatial and localized velocity distributions of the galaxies in our sample finds no strong evidence for differences between the giant and dwarf populations. These results rule out the cluster as a whole having moved significantly toward equipartition, and they are consistent with the cluster having formed via mergers between dynamically relaxed subclusters.

  15. X-ray archaeology in the Coma cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Simon D. M.; Briel, Ulrich G.; Henry, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    We present images of X-ray emission from hot gas within the Coma cluster of galaxies. These maps, made with the ROSAT satellite, have much higher SNR than any previous X-ray image of a galaxy cluster, and allow cluster structure to be analyzed in unprecedented detail. They show greater structural irregularity than might have been anticipated from earlier observations of Coma. Emission is detected from a number of bright cluster galaxies in addition to the two known previously. In four cases, there is evidence that these galaxies lie at the center of an extended subconcentration within the cluster, possibly the remnant of their associated groups. For at least two galaxies, the images show direct evidence for ongoing disruption of their gaseous atmosphere. The luminosity associated with these galaxies is comparable to that detected around similar ellipticals in much poorer environments. Emission is easily detected to the limit of our field, about 1 deg from the cluster center, and appears to become more regular at large radii. The data show clearly that this archetype of a rich and regular galaxy cluster was, in fact, formed by the merging of several distinct subunits which are not yet fully destroyed.

  16. Long-term outcomes of wedge resection at the limbus for high irregular corneal astigmatism after repaired corneal laceration

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jun; Zheng, Guang-Ying; Wen, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Zhu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinical value of wedge resection at corneal limbus in patients with traumatic corneal scarring and high irregular astigmatism. METHODS Patients with traumatic corneal astigmatism received wedge resection at least 6mo after suture removal from corneal wound. The uncorrected distance visual acuities (UCVA) and best corrected distance visual acuities (BCVA), pre- and post-operation astigmatism, spherical equivalent (SE), safety and complications were evaluated. RESULTS Ten eyes (10 patients) were enrolled in this study. Mean follow-up time after wedge resection was 37.8±15.4mo (range, 20-61mo). The mean UCVA improved from +1.07±0.55 logMAR to +0.43±0.22 logMAR (P=0.000) and the mean BCVA from +0.50±0.30 logMAR to +0.15±0.17 logMAR (P=0.000). The mean astigmatism power measured by retinoscopy was -2.03±2.27 D postoperatively and -2.83±4.52 D preoperatively (P=0.310). The mean SE was -0.74±1.61 D postoperatively and -0.64±1.89 D preoperatively (P=0.601). Two cases developed mild pannus near the sutures. No corneal perforation, infectious keratitis or wound gape occurred. CONCLUSION Corneal-scleral limbal wedge resection with compression suture is a safe, effective treatment for poor patients with high irregular corneal astigmatism after corneal-scleral penetrating injury. Retinoscopy can prove particularly useful for high irregular corneal astigmatism when other measurements are not amenable. PMID:27366685

  17. Gas Dynamics and Kinetics in the Cometary Coma: Theory and Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.; Harris, Walter M.; Smyth, William H.

    2005-01-01

    Our ability to describe the physical state of the expanding coma affects fundamental areas of cometary study both directly and indirectly. In order to convert measured abundances of gas species in the coma to gas production rates, models for the distribution and kinematics of gas species in the coma are required. Conversely, many different types of observations, together with laboratory data and theory, are still required to determine coma model attributes and parameters. Accurate relative and absolute gas production rates and their variations with time and from comet to comet are crucial to our basic understanding of the composition and structure of cometary nuclei and their place in the solar system. We review the gas dynamics and kinetics of cometary comae from both theoretical and observational perspectives, which are important for understanding the wide variety of physical conditions that are encountered.

  18. Apparatus for and method of correcting for astigmatism in a light beam reflected off of a light reflecting surface

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, R.H.; Sweatt, W.

    1985-11-21

    A technique for adjustably correcting for astigmatism in a light beam is disclosed herein. This technique defines a flat, rectangular light reflecting surface having opposite reinforced side edges and which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, into different concave and/or convex cylindrical curvatures about a particular axis and provides for adjustably bending the light reflecting surface into one of different curvatures depending upon the astigmatism to be corrected and for fixedly maintaining the curvature selected. In the embodiment disclosed, the light reflecting surface is adjustably bendable into the selected cylindrical curvature by application of a particular bending moment to the reinforced side edges of the light reflecting surface.

  19. Optimization of nonimaging focusing heliostat in dynamic correction of astigmatism for a wide range of incident angles.

    PubMed

    Chong, Kok-Keong

    2010-05-15

    To overcome astigmatism has always been a great challenge in designing a heliostat capable of focusing the sunlight on a small receiver throughout the year. In this Letter, a nonimaging focusing heliostat with a dynamic adjustment of facet mirrors in a group manner has been analyzed for optimizing the astigmatic correction in a wide range of incident angles. This what is to the author's knowledge a new heliostat is not only designed to serve the purpose of concentrating sunlight to several hundreds of suns, but also to significantly reduce the variation of the solar flux distribution with the incident angle. PMID:20479826

  20. A microfluidic fluorescence measurement system using an astigmatic diffractive microlens array

    SciTech Connect

    Schonbrun, E.; Steinvurzel, P.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-01-12

    We demonstrate an opto-fluidic detection system based on an array of astigmatic diffractive microlenses integrated into a microfluidic flow focus device. Each astigmatic microlens produces a line excitation across the channel and collects fluorescence emission from the linear detection regions. The linear excitation spot results in uniform excitation across the channel and high time resolution in the direction of the flow. Collected fluorescence from each integrated microlens is relayed to a sub-region on a fast CMOS camera. By analyzing the signal from individual microlenses, we demonstrate counting and resolution of 500 nm and 1.1 μm beads at rates of up to 8,300 per second at multiple locations. In addition, a cross-correlation analysis of the signals from different microlenses yields the velocity dispersion of beads traveling through the channel at peak speeds as high as 560 mm/s. Arrays of specifically designed diffractive optics promise to increase the resolution and functionality of opto-fluidic analysis such as flow cytometry and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

  1. Quantitative analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations.

    PubMed

    Sachs, R K; Levy, D; Hahnfeldt, P; Hlatky, L

    2004-01-01

    We review chromosome aberration modeling and its applications, especially to biodosimetry and to characterizing chromosome geometry. Standard results on aberration formation pathways, randomness, dose-response, proximity effects, transmissibility, kinetics, and relations to other radiobiological endpoints are summarized. We also outline recent work on graph-theoretical descriptions of aberrations, Monte-Carlo computer simulations of aberration spectra, software for quantifying aberration complexity, and systematic links of apparently incomplete with complete or truly incomplete aberrations. PMID:15162028

  2. Image-based EUVL aberration metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenger, Germain Louis

    A significant factor in the degradation of nanolithographic image fidelity is optical wavefront aberration. As resolution of nanolithography systems increases, effects of wavefront aberrations on aerial image become more influential. The tolerance of such aberrations is governed by the requirements of features that are being imaged, often requiring lenses that can be corrected with a high degree of accuracy and precision. Resolution of lithographic systems is driven by scaling wavelength down and numerical aperture (NA) up. However, aberrations are also affected from the changes in wavelength and NA. Reduction in wavelength or increase in NA result in greater impact of aberrations, where the latter shows a quadratic dependence. Current demands in semiconductor manufacturing are constantly pushing lithographic systems to operate at the diffraction limit; hence, prompting a need to reduce all degrading effects on image properties to achieve maximum performance. Therefore, the need for highly accurate in-situ aberration measurement and correction is paramount. In this work, an approach has been developed in which several targets including phase wheel, phase disk, phase edges, and binary structures are used to generate optical images to detect and monitor aberrations in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithographic systems. The benefit of using printed patterns as opposed to other techniques is that the lithography system is tested under standard operating conditions. Mathematical models in conjunction with iterative lithographic simulations are used to determine pupil phase wavefront errors and describe them as combinations of Zernike polynomials.

  3. Four-year follow-up of corneal aberrations and visual functions of myopic patients after laser in situ keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tai-Xiang; Chen, Yong-Tao; Dan, Ting-Ting; Shi, Rong; Linghu, Shao-Rong; Li, Hai-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report on 4-year follow-up of corneal higher-order aberrations and daily visual functions of myopic patients after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods: One hundred thirty four eyes of 67 patients who underwent LASIK guided by aspherical ablation were included in this study. The vision, corneal spherical aberration (SphA) and Coma were recorded before LASIK and at 6 month and 4 year after LASIK. The evaluation of the questionnaire about daily visual functions was performed by the same physician after LASIK. Results: No eye decreased the BCVA during 4 year follow-up. The effect index and safety index were 1.08±0.16, 1.11±0.17 and 1.12±0.16, 1.13±0.14 respectively at 6 month and 4 year post-LASIK. After LASIK the corneal SphA and Coma were significantly increased, however the difference between 6 month and 4 year post-LASIK was no statistical significance. Most patients (94.3%-92.4%) felt satisfaction or high satisfaction about the ability to perform each daily visual function after LASIK. Meanwhile there was still about 7.4%-9.2% patients who complained that they could not drive at night. Further analysis showed that the score of driving at night was negative correlation with corneal SphA (r=-0.645, p=0.040; r=-0.688, p=0.040 at 6 month and 4 year post-LASIK respectively). Conclusions: Our four-year follow-up outcomes indicated that the myopic patients after LASIK had the long-term stable corneal aberration and satisfaction of daily visual functions. PMID:26870114

  4. Aberration correction past and present.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, P W

    2009-09-28

    Electron lenses are extremely poor: if glass lenses were as bad, we should see as well with the naked eye as with a microscope! The demonstration by Otto Scherzer in 1936 that skillful lens design could never eliminate the spherical and chromatic aberrations of rotationally symmetric electron lenses was therefore most unwelcome and the other great electron optician of those years, Walter Glaser, never ceased striving to find a loophole in Scherzer's proof. In the wartime and early post-war years, the first proposals for correcting C(s) were made and in 1947, in a second milestone paper, Scherzer listed these and other ways of correcting lenses; soon after, Dennis Gabor invented holography for the same purpose. These approaches will be briefly summarized and the work that led to the successful implementation of quadupole-octopole and sextupole correctors in the 1990 s will be analysed. In conclusion, the elegant role of image algebra in describing image formation and processing and, above all, in developing new methods will be mentioned. PMID:19687058

  5. A spectroscopic and photometric study of FK Comae in 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Buzasi, Derek L.; Nations, Harold L.

    1993-01-01

    Results of an observational campaign, coordinated between visual photometry, optical spectroscopy, and UV spectroscopy, to elucidate the characteristics of FK Comae are presented. The photometry showed complicated but systematic behavior. Photospheric absorption lines were distorted by a Doppler-shifted bump caused by dark starspots resulting in small apparent radial velocity variations. No radial velocity variations characteristic of orbital motion were seen to a level of 3 km/s. Broad emission in H-alpha was modulated at the photospheric rotational amplitude, implying an origin no farther from the rotational axis than 1 stellar radius. The strengths of Ca II lines are modulated in phase with H-alpha but do not have velocity-modulated wings like H-alpha.

  6. Thermal instability in the inner coma of a comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milikh, G. M.; Sharma, A. S.

    1995-01-01

    The spacecraft and ground based observations of comet Halley inner coma showed a localized ion density depletion region whose origin is not well understood. Although it has been linked to a thermal instability associated with negative ions, the photodetachment lifetime of negative ions (approximately 1 sec) is too short compared to the electron attachment time scale (approximately 100 sec) for this process to have a significant effect. A mechanism for the ion density depletion based on the thermal instability of the cometary plasma due to the excitation of rotational and vibrational levels of water molecules is proposed. The electron energy losses due to these processes peak near 4000 K (0.36 eV) and at temperatures higher than this value a localized cooling leads to further cooling (thermal instability) due to the increased radiation loss. The resulting increase in recombination leads to an ion density depletion and the estimates for this depletion at comet Halley agree with the observations.

  7. Electron energetics in the inner coma of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gan, LU; Cravens, T. E.

    1990-01-01

    A quasi-two-dimensional model of the spatial and energy distribution of electrons in the inner coma of Comet Halley has been constructed from a spherically symmetric ion density profile based on Giotto measurements, using the two-stream electron transport method and the time-dependent electron energy equation. A sharp jump in the electron temperature was found to be present at a cometocentric distance of about 15,000 km. This thermal boundary separates an inner region where cooling processes are dominant from an outer region where heat transport is more important. Both thermal and suprathermal electron populations exist inside the thermal boundary with comparable kinetic pressures. Outside the thermal boundary, a cloud electron population does not exist, and the electrons are almost isothermal along the magnetic field lines.

  8. Electron energetics in the inner coma of Comet Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, L.; Cravens, T. E.

    1990-05-01

    A quasi-two-dimensional model of the spatial and energy distribution of electrons in the inner coma of Comet Halley has been constructed from a spherically symmetric ion density profile based on Giotto measurements, using the two-stream electron transport method and the time-dependent electron energy equation. A sharp jump in the electron temperature was found to be present at a cometocentric distance of about 15,000 km. This thermal boundary separates an inner region where cooling processes are dominant from an outer region where heat transport is more important. Both thermal and suprathermal electron populations exist inside the thermal boundary with comparable kinetic pressures. Outside the thermal boundary, a cloud electron population does not exist, and the electrons are almost isothermal along the magnetic field lines.

  9. Molecular parentage of radical species in the comae of comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin K.

    Understanding the chemical composition of comets is of great interest to the scientific community. In this work, an integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph is used to detect emissions of C2, C3, CH, CN, and NH2. The azimuthal average profile (line integral of the column density as a function of radial distance from the center of the nucleus) is simulated by the Haser model. The Haser model simulates the outgassing and photo-dissociate of molecular species in the coma. In this work, the lifetime of the parent molecule in the photo-dissociation chain is set as a free parameter. The best fit parent lifetimes for observations of comets 4P/Faye, 10P/Tempel 2, and C/2009 P1 Garradd are obtained. The results are compared to parent lifetimes cited in other studies. HCN as a likely dominant parent for CN is eliminated. Constraints on likely parent molecules for C3 and NH 2 are discussed.

  10. Image Ellipticity from Atmospheric Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W H; Olivier, S S; Asztalos, S J; Rosenberg, L J; Baker, K L

    2007-03-06

    We investigate the ellipticity of the point-spread function (PSF) produced by imaging an unresolved source with a telescope, subject to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. It is important to quantify these effects in order to understand the errors in shape measurements of astronomical objects, such as those used to study weak gravitational lensing of field galaxies. The PSF modeling involves either a Fourier transform of the phase information in the pupil plane or a ray-tracing approach, which has the advantage of requiring fewer computations than the Fourier transform. Using a standard method, involving the Gaussian weighted second moments of intensity, we then calculate the ellipticity of the PSF patterns. We find significant ellipticity for the instantaneous patterns (up to more than 10%). Longer exposures, which we approximate by combining multiple (N) images from uncorrelated atmospheric realizations, yield progressively lower ellipticity (as 1/{radical}N). We also verify that the measured ellipticity does not depend on the sampling interval in the pupil plane using the Fourier method. However, we find that the results using the ray-tracing technique do depend on the pupil sampling interval, representing a gradual breakdown of the geometric approximation at high spatial frequencies. Therefore, ray tracing is generally not an accurate method of modeling PSF ellipticity induced by atmospheric turbulence unless some additional procedure is implemented to correctly account for the effects of high spatial frequency aberrations. The Fourier method, however, can be used directly to accurately model PSF ellipticity, which can give insights into errors in the statistics of field galaxy shapes used in studies of weak gravitational lensing.

  11. Analysis of dust in the coma of comet 67P using VIRTIS-M observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, G.; Tozzi, G. P.; Fink, U.; Doose, L.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Leyrat, C.; Piccioni, G.; Blecka, M.; Ciarniello, M.; Irwin, P.; Combi, M.; Palomba, E.; Migliorini, A.; Capria, M. T.; Faggi, S.; Tosi, F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a preliminary overview of the analysis on the dust spectrophotometry in the inner coma of comet 67/P that was obtained during the escort phase (started on December 2014) with the imaging spectrometer VIRTIS-M onboard the Rosetta mission [1]. The morphology and behavior of the dust coma has been monitored by VIRTIS-M from the arrival at the comet (~August 2014) throughout the early escort phase. The data reveal intricate details and numerous radial jets coming from different regions on the surface. On March 15, 2015, VIRTIS-M performed a set of 22 coma observations, each about 23 minutes in duration and offset from the nucleus by about 1 km. The 22 observations lasted about 12 hours and thus covered a complete rotation of the comet. The maps of the dust distribution in the coma reveal three major structures: a roughly uniform background dusty coma, several enhanced radiance jet features and a region that shows a thermal radiation component between 3.5 and 5.0 μm. (Figure 1 and Figure 2) The jets features can be traced back to several region of the comet, neck,body and head. We shall analyse the three major structures to provide the basis to understand coma composition and properties and the relation between gas and dust. We will discuss the morphology of the background coma, the jet and the enhanced thermal radiation. We will also examine correlations between the water vapor column density and the coma/ jet /thermal radiation intensity. For the thermal radiation component there are several explanations, viz: stray instrumental scattered light or instrumental ghosts from heated part of the nucleus, or thermal rad iation emanating from the nucleus and scattered by the dust in closest proximity or a region of small particles in the coma heated by solar radiation.

  12. Spherical aberration in electrically thin flat lenses.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Ramahi, Omar M

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the spherical aberration of a new generation of lenses made of flat electrically thin inhomogeneous media. For such lenses, spherical aberration is analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively, and comparison is made to the classical gradient index rod. Both flat thin and thick lenses are made of gradient index materials, but the physical mechanisms and design equations are different. Using full-wave three-dimensional numerical simulation, we evaluate the spherical aberrations using the Maréchal criterion and show that the thin lens gives significantly better performance than the thick lens (rod). Additionally, based on ray tracing formulation, third-order analysis for longitudinal aberration and optical path difference are presented, showing strong overall performance of thin lenses in comparison to classical rod lenses. PMID:27505651

  13. Chromosome aberrations in decondensed sperm DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Factors that could influence the chromosomal aberration frequency observed at first cleavage following in vivo exposure of germ cells to chemical mutagens are discussed. The techniques of chromosome aberration analysis following sperm DNA condensation by in vitro fertilization or fusion seem to be viable research areas for providing information of human germ cell exposures. However, the potential sensitivity of the assay needs to be better understood, and factors that can influence this sensitivity require a great deal of further study using animal models.

  14. The dust coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as seen by OSIRIS onboard Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubiana, C.; Bertini, I.; Bodewits, D.; Davidsson, B.; Güttler, C.; Lara, L. M.; Moreno, F.; Cremonese, G.; La Forgia, F.; Oklay, N.; Pajola, M.; Sierks, H.

    2015-10-01

    The dust coma of 67P was detected and monitored by OSIRIS, the scientific camera onboard Rosetta, since the beginning of the post-hibernation operations in March 2014. A complete description of the coma during the approach phase to the comet was presented in [5], including the detection of a sudden cometary outburst at the end of April 2014. OSIRIS images acquired at the end of the approach (July 2014) and during the escort phase were used to characterize dust particles present in the comet's inner coma ([4], [3], [2], [1]).

  15. Accommodation to Wavefront Vergence and Chromatic Aberration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinan; Kruger, Philip B.; Li, James S.; Lin, Peter L.; Stark, Lawrence R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) provides a cue to accommodation with small pupils. However, large pupils increase monochromatic aberrations, which may obscure chromatic blur. In the present study, we examined the effect of pupil size and LCA on accommodation. Methods Accommodation was recorded by infrared optometer while observers (nine normal trichromats) viewed a sinusoidally moving Maltese cross target in a Badal stimulus system. There were two illumination conditions: white (3000 K; 20 cd/m2) and monochromatic (550 nm with 10 nm bandwidth; 20 cd/m2) and two artificial pupil conditions (3 mm and 5.7 mm). Separately, static measurements of wavefront aberration were made with the eye accommodating to targets between 0 and 4 D (COAS, Wavefront Sciences). Results Large individual differences in accommodation to wavefront vergence and to LCA are a hallmark of accommodation. LCA continues to provide a signal at large pupil sizes despite higher levels of monochromatic aberrations. Conclusions Monochromatic aberrations may defend against chromatic blur at high spatial frequencies, but accommodation responds best to optical vergence and to LCA at 3 c/deg where blur from higher order aberrations is less. PMID:21317666

  16. Astigmatism management in cataract surgery with Precizon® toric intraocular lens: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Carolina; Menezes, Carlos; Firmino-Machado, J; Rodrigues, Pedro; Lume, Miguel; Tenedório, Paula; Menéres, Pedro; Brochado, Maria do Céu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the visual and refractive outcomes and rotational stability of the new aspheric Precizon® toric intraocular lens (IOL) for the correction of corneal astigmatism in cataract surgery. Setting Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Geral de Santo António – Centro Hospitalar do Porto, EPE and Hospital de Pedro Hispano, Matosinhos, Portugal. Design This was a prospective clinical study. Patients and methods A total of 40 eyes of 27 patients with corneal astigmatism greater than 1.0 diopter (D) underwent cataract surgery with implantation of Precizon® toric IOL. IOL power calculation was performed using optical coherence biometry (IOLMaster®). Outcomes of uncorrected (UDVA) and best-spectacle corrected distance visual acuities (BCDVA), refraction, and IOL rotation were analyzed at the 1st week, 1st, 3rd, and 6th month’s evaluations. Results The median postoperative UDVA was better than preoperative best-spectacle corrected distance visual acuity (0.02 [0.06] logMAR vs 0.19 [0.20] logMAR, P<0.001). At 6 months, postoperative UDVA was 0.1 logMAR or better in 95% of the eyes. At last follow-up, the mean spherical equivalent was reduced from −3.35±3.10 D to −0.02±0.30 D (P<0.001) with 97.5% of the eyes within ±0.50 D of emmetropia. The mean preoperative keratometric cylinder was 2.34±0.95 D and the mean postoperative refractive cylinder was 0.24±0.27 D (P<0.001). The mean IOL rotation was 2.43°±1.55°. None of the IOLs required realignment. Conclusion Precizon® toric IOL revealed very good rotational stability and performance regarding predictability, efficacy, and safety in the correction of preexisting regular corneal astigmatism associated with cataract surgery. PMID:26855559

  17. Binocular open-view system to perform estimations of aberrations and scattering in the human eye.

    PubMed

    García-Guerra, Carlos E; Aldaba, Mikel; Arjona, Montserrat; Pujol, Jaume

    2015-11-10

    We present a system that integrates a double-pass (DP) instrument and a Hartmann-Shack (HS) wavefront sensor to provide information not only on aberrations, but also on the scattering that occurs in the human eye. A binocular open-view design permits evaluations to be made under normal viewing conditions. Furthermore, the system is able to compensate for both the spherical and astigmatic refractive errors that occur during measurements by using devices with configurable optical power. The DP and HS techniques provide comparable data after estimating wavefront slopes with respect to the intersections of an ideal grid and compensating for residual errors caused by the optical defects of the measuring system. Once comparable data is obtained, it is possible to use this combined manner of assessment to provide information on scattering. Measurements in an artificial eye suggest that the characteristics of the ocular fundus may induce deviations of DP with respect to the HS data. These differences were quantified in terms of the modulation transfer function in young, healthy eyes measured in infrared light to demonstrate the potential use of the system in visual optics studies. PMID:26560778

  18. Modeling of the general astigmatic Gaussian beam and its propagation through 3D optical systems.

    PubMed

    Kochkina, Evgenia; Wanner, Gudrun; Schmelzer, Dennis; Tröbs, Michael; Heinzel, Gerhard

    2013-08-20

    The paper introduces the complete model of the general astigmatic Gaussian beam as the most general case of the Gaussian beam in the fundamental mode. This includes the laws of propagation, reflection, and refraction as well as the equations for extracting from the complex-valued beam description its real-valued parameters, such as the beam spot radii and the radii of curvature of the wavefront. The suggested model is applicable to the case of an oblique incidence of the beam at any 3D surface that can be approximated by the second-order equation at the point of incidence. Thus it can be used in simulations of a large variety of 3D optical systems. The provided experimental validation of the model shows good agreement with simulations. PMID:24085008

  19. Advanced astigmatism-corrected Czerny-Turner imaging spectrometer in spectral broadband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Hai-fang

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports an advanced Czerny-Turner optical structure which is used for the application in imaging spectrometers. To obtain the excellent imaging quality, a cylindrical lens with a wedge angle is used between the focusing mirror and the imaging plane to remove astigmatism in broadband. It makes the advanced optical system presents high resolution over the full bandwidth and decreases the cost. An example of the imaging spectrometer in the waveband of 260nm~520nm has been designed to prove our theory. It yields the excellent modulation transfer functions (MTF) of all fields of view which are more than 0.75 over the broadband under the required Nyquist frequency (20lp/mm).

  20. The origin of the Gouy phase anomaly and its generalization to astigmatic wavefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, T. D.; Wolf, E.

    2010-09-01

    One of the most poorly understood subjects in physical optics is the origin of the Gouy phase (sometimes called "the phase anomaly near focus"). This is evident from the large number of publications on the subject, many of which attribute it to quite different causes. In this paper we show that the Gouy phase anomaly can be clearly understood from elementary properties of normal congruences of light rays and from the relationship between geometrical optics and physical optics. We also show that the Gouy phase anomaly may be regarded as a degenerate case of a rapid π/2 phase change that is found to occur at each focal line of an astigmatic pencil of rays. The intensity distribution in the region of the phase changes is also presented. Furthermore, symmetry relations for both the phase anomaly and the intensity distribution are derived.

  1. Slow tool servo diamond turning of optical freeform surface for astigmatic contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Chieh; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Chou, Hsiao-Yu; Wang, Pei-Jen; Tsai, Din Ping

    2011-09-01

    Three ultra-precision machining processes namely fast tool servo, slow tool servo and diamond milling, are frequently used to produce optical freeform surface. Slow tool servo machining has the advantages of no extra attachment and fast setting-up, however the three dimensional tool shape compensation and tool-path generation must be conducted carefully for getting high form accuracy and fine surface finish. This research aimed to develop a model of three dimensional tool shape compensation for generating 3D tool path in slow tool servo diamond turning of asymmetrically toric surface for astigmatic contact lens. The form accuracy of freeform surface was measured by ultra-high accuracy 3D profilometer (UA3P) with user define function. After correction, the form error is less than 0.5μm both in X- and Y-direction and the surface roughness is less than 5nm.

  2. Extended wavelet transformation to digital holographic reconstruction: application to the elliptical, astigmatic Gaussian beams.

    PubMed

    Remacha, Clément; Coëtmellec, Sébastien; Brunel, Marc; Lebrun, Denis

    2013-02-01

    Wavelet analysis provides an efficient tool in numerous signal processing problems and has been implemented in optical processing techniques, such as in-line holography. This paper proposes an improvement of this tool for the case of an elliptical, astigmatic Gaussian (AEG) beam. We show that this mathematical operator allows reconstructing an image of a spherical particle without compression of the reconstructed image, which increases the accuracy of the 3D location of particles and of their size measurement. To validate the performance of this operator we have studied the diffraction pattern produced by a particle illuminated by an AEG beam. This study used mutual intensity propagation, and the particle is defined as a chirped Gaussian sum. The proposed technique was applied and the experimental results are presented. PMID:23385926

  3. Comparison of surgically induced astigmatism between one-handed and two-handed cataract surgery techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Asushi; Kurosaka, Daijiro; Yoshida, Aktoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) between one-handed and two-handed cataract surgery techniques. Methods Eighty-eight eyes of 44 patients with no ocular disease other than cataract, who underwent cataract surgery by a single surgeon, were selected for this study. Cataract surgery was performed by coaxial phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation via a 2.4 mm transconjunctival single-plane sclerocorneal incision at the 12 o’clock position. In each patient, one eye was subjected to coaxial phacoemulsification using a one-handed technique while the fellow eye was subjected to coaxial phacoemulsification using a two-handed technique. For the two-handed technique, a corneal side port was created at the 2 o’clock position. The appropriate incision meridian was identified by a preoperative axis mark. SIA was calculated using the Alpins method. Results Mean SIA was 0.40 ± 0.28 diopters (D) in the one-handed technique group and 0.39 ± 0.25 D in the two-handed technique group. No statistically significant difference was found in the mean SIA score. The mean torque value was −0.05 ± 0.26 D in the one-handed technique group and 0.11 ± 0.37 D in the two-handed technique group. Mean torque was significantly lower (P<0.05) in the one-handed technique group than in the two-handed technique group. Conclusion The results indicate that the corneal side port in two-handed cataract surgery has a rotating effect on the axis of astigmatism. PMID:24124349

  4. Reproducibility of corneal astigmatism measurements with a hand held keratometer in preschool children.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, E M; Miller, J M; Dobson, V

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate the overall accuracy and reproducibility of the Alcon portable autokeratometer (PAK) measurements in infants and young children. METHODS--The accuracy of the Alcon PAK in measuring toric reference surfaces (1, 3, 5, and 7 D) under various suboptimal measurement conditions was assessed, and the reproducibility of PAK measurements of corneal astigmatism in newborn infants (n = 5), children (n = 19, age 3-5 years), and adults (n = 14) was evaluated. RESULTS--Measurements of toric reference surfaces indicated (a) no significant effect of distance (17-30 mm) on accuracy of measurements, (b) no systematic relation between amount of toricity and accuracy of measurements, (c) no systematic relation between angle of measurement and accuracy, (d) no difference in accuracy of measurements when the PAK is hand held in comparison with when it is mounted, (e) no difference in accuracy of measurements when axis of toricity is oriented obliquely than when it is oriented horizontally, with respect to the PAK, and (f) a small positive bias (+0.16 D) in measurement of spherical equivalent. The PAK did not prove useful for screening newborns. However, measurements were successfully obtained from 18/19 children and 14/14 adults. There was no significant difference in median measurement deviation (deviation of a subject's five measurements from his/her mean) between children (0.21 D) and adults (0.13 D). CONCLUSIONS--The PAK produces accurate measurements of surface curvature under a variety of suboptimal conditions. Variability of PAK measurements in preschool children is small enough to suggest that it would be useful for screening for corneal astigmatism in young children. PMID:8534668

  5. One-Step Transepithelial Topography-Guided Ablation in the Treatment of Myopic Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Chen, Shihao; Chen, Xiangjun; Stojanovic, Filip; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Ting; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate one-step topography-guided transepithelial ablation in the treatment of low to moderate myopic astigmatism using a 1KHz excimer laser. Methods Retrospective study of 117 consecutive eyes available for evaluation 12 months after surgery. Pre- and post-operative visual and refractive data as well as post-operative pain and haze were analyzed. A novel technique integrating custom refractive- and epithelial- ablation in a single uninterrupted procedure was used. Results The mean pre-operative spherical equivalent (SE) and the mean cylinder were: –3.22 diopters (D) ±1.54 (SD) (range –0.63 to –7.25 D) and –0.77 D ±0.65 (range 0 to –4.50 D), respectively. At 12 months after surgery: no eyes lost ≥2 lines of corrected distant visual acuity (CDVA). Safety and efficacy indexes were 1.27 and 1.09, respectively. Uncorrected distant visual acuity (UDVA) was ≥20/20 in 96.6% of the eyes. Manifest refraction spherical equivalent was within ±0.5 D of the desired refraction in 93.2% of the eyes. Average root mean square (RMS) wavefront error measured at central 6 mm, increased from 0.38 pre-operatively to 0.47 µm post-operatively. Refractive stability was achieved and sustained 1 month after surgery. No visually significant haze was registered during the observation period. Post-operative pain was reported in 4.5% of patients. Conclusions One-step transepithelial topography-guided treatment for low to moderate myopia and astigmatism performed with a 1 KHz laser, provided safe, effective, predictable and stable results with low pain and no visually significant haze. PMID:23799124

  6. Streaming Clumps Ejection Model and the Heterogeneous Inner Coma of Comet Wild 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. C.; Economou, T. E.; Green, S. F.; Sandford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    The conventional concept of cometary comae is that they are dominated by fine particulates released individually by sublimation of surface volatiles and subsequent entrainment in the near-surface gas. It has long been recognized that such particulates could be relatively large, with early estimates that objects perhaps up to one meter in size may be levitated from the surface of the typical cometary nucleus. However, the general uniformity and small average particulate size of observed comae and the relatively smooth, monotonic increases and decreases in particle density during the Giotto flythrough of comet Halley s coma in 1986 reinforced the view that the bulk of the particles are released at the surface, are fine-sized and inert. Jets have been interpreted as geometrically constrained release of these particulates. With major heterogeneities observed during the recent flythrough of the inner coma of comet Wild 2, these views deserve reconsideration.

  7. Cometary science. Time variability and heterogeneity in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Hässig, M; Altwegg, K; Balsiger, H; Bar-Nun, A; Berthelier, J J; Bieler, A; Bochsler, P; Briois, C; Calmonte, U; Combi, M; De Keyser, J; Eberhardt, P; Fiethe, B; Fuselier, S A; Galand, M; Gasc, S; Gombosi, T I; Hansen, K C; Jäckel, A; Keller, H U; Kopp, E; Korth, A; Kührt, E; Le Roy, L; Mall, U; Marty, B; Mousis, O; Neefs, E; Owen, T; Rème, H; Rubin, M; Sémon, T; Tornow, C; Tzou, C-Y; Waite, J H; Wurz, P

    2015-01-23

    Comets contain the best-preserved material from the beginning of our planetary system. Their nuclei and comae composition reveal clues about physical and chemical conditions during the early solar system when comets formed. ROSINA (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis) onboard the Rosetta spacecraft has measured the coma composition of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with well-sampled time resolution per rotation. Measurements were made over many comet rotation periods and a wide range of latitudes. These measurements show large fluctuations in composition in a heterogeneous coma that has diurnal and possibly seasonal variations in the major outgassing species: water, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. These results indicate a complex coma-nucleus relationship where seasonal variations may be driven by temperature differences just below the comet surface. PMID:25613892

  8. The origin of low mass particles within and beyond the dust coma envelopes of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Rabinowitz, D.; Tuzzolino, A. J.; Ksanfomality, L. V.; Sagdeev, R. Z.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements from the Dust Counter and Mass Analyzer (DUCMA) instruments on VEGA-1 and -2 revealed unexpected fluxes of low mass (up to 10 to the minus 13th power g) dust particles at very great distances from the nucleus (300,000 to 600,000 km). These particles are detected in clusters (10 sec duration), preceded and followed by relatively long time intervals during which no dust is detected. This cluster phenomenon also occurs inside the envelope boundaries. Clusters of low mass particles are intermixed with the overall dust distribution throughout the coma. The clusters account for many of the short-term small-scale intensity enhancements previously ascribed to microjets in the coma. The origin of these clusters appears to be emission from the nucleus of large conglomerates which disintegrate in the coma to yield clusters of discrete, small particles continuing outward to the distant coma.

  9. Sequestration and Microvascular Congestion Are Associated With Coma in Human Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ponsford, Mark J.; Medana, Isabelle M.; Prapansilp, Panote; Hien, Tran Tinh; Lee, Sue J.; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Esiri, Margaret M.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of coma in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains poorly understood. Obstruction of the brain microvasculature because of sequestration of parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs) represents one mechanism that could contribute to coma in cerebral malaria. Quantitative postmortem microscopy of brain sections from Vietnamese adults dying of malaria confirmed that sequestration in the cerebral microvasculature was significantly higher in patients with cerebral malaria (CM; n = 21) than in patients with non-CM (n = 23). Sequestration of pRBCs and CM was also significantly associated with increased microvascular congestion by infected and uninfected erythrocytes. Clinicopathological correlation showed that sequestration and congestion were significantly associated with deeper levels of premortem coma and shorter time to death. Microvascular congestion and sequestration were highly correlated as microscopic findings but were independent predictors of a clinical diagnosis of CM. Increased microvascular congestion accompanies coma in CM, associated with parasite sequestration in the cerebral microvasculature. PMID:22207648

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HI observations of Coma Supercluster (Gavazzi+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; O'Neil, K.; Boselli, A.; van Driel, W.

    2006-11-01

    Using the refurbished 305-m Arecibo Gregorian radio telescope, we observed 35 galaxies in the Coma Supercluster, (plus 13 in the Virgo cluster) (see Sect. 2) in February 2004 and January-March 2005. (2 data files).

  11. Post-perihelion coma monitoring of comet Hale-Bopp at ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnhardt, H.; Bonfils, X.; Petit, Y.; Hainaut, O.; Delahodde, C.; Jorda, L.; Rauer, H.; Colas, F.; Manfroid, J.; Marchis, F.; Schulz, R.; Tanabe, R.; Tozzi, G. P.

    2002-11-01

    The post-perihelion coma activity of Comet C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp is monitored at ESO telescopes in La Silla and Paranal since Sept. 1997. Imaging through broadband filters in the visible and near-IR wavelength ranges allows to investigate the evolution of the dust coma, namely the appearance of jets, fans, shells and clouds. Long-term evolution: the comet had a porcupine-like embedded fan coma in autumn 1997 that evolved into a northern fan plus shell pattern in 1998 and remains like this since. Thus, the evolution of the coma structure post-perihelion was similar to that pre-perihelion at about the same heliocentric distances, but is occurred in reversed order. This long-term evolution can be characterized by quasi-continuous dust emission from a few (minimum 4) active regions (producing the fan structures) on the nucleus that is modulated by occasional, repetitive and short-term activity increases (generating shell features in the coma). Outbursts: a number of outbursts and unusual activity patterns occurred in the coma of the comet post-perihelion that are documented through the appearance of complex "palm-tree-like" structures of temporary nature in association with outbursts in the visual lightcurve of the comet and a series of 3 dust clouds resembling "mini-comets" and passing through the northern coma at projected velocities of 30-50m/s. The similarity of coma patterns and cometary viewing geometry from Earth before and after perihelion suggests that some nuclear regions had enhanced long-term activity, possibly driven by super-volatile ices at larger (>10AU) heliocentric distances and that the orientation of the rotation axis of the nucleus did not change much over the past 7 years.

  12. [Coma following chemotherapy: is 5FU implicated? Discussion about on case-report].

    PubMed

    Heluwaert, Frédéric; Santre, Charles; Martin, Claude; Hilleret, Marie-Noëlle; Martin, Denis

    2006-02-01

    5FU is one of the most frequently used antioncogenic and cytostatic drug in digestive oncology. It may cause severe adverse events, such as encephalopathy, possibly based on hyperammoniemia, and may lead to coma. We report here the case of a coma with a favorable outcome following 5FU chemotherapy. As any other etiologic findings came to light, hyperammoniemia was discussed as a credible cause. PMID:16565673

  13. Robust control of burst suppression for medical coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westover, M. Brandon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Medical coma is an anesthetic-induced state of brain inactivation, manifest in the electroencephalogram by burst suppression. Feedback control can be used to regulate burst suppression, however, previous designs have not been robust. Robust control design is critical under real-world operating conditions, subject to substantial pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameter uncertainty and unpredictable external disturbances. We sought to develop a robust closed-loop anesthesia delivery (CLAD) system to control medical coma. Approach. We developed a robust CLAD system to control the burst suppression probability (BSP). We developed a novel BSP tracking algorithm based on realistic models of propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We also developed a practical method for estimating patient-specific pharmacodynamics parameters. Finally, we synthesized a robust proportional integral controller. Using a factorial design spanning patient age, mass, height, and gender, we tested whether the system performed within clinically acceptable limits. Throughout all experiments we subjected the system to disturbances, simulating treatment of refractory status epilepticus in a real-world intensive care unit environment. Main results. In 5400 simulations, CLAD behavior remained within specifications. Transient behavior after a step in target BSP from 0.2 to 0.8 exhibited a rise time (the median (min, max)) of 1.4 [1.1, 1.9] min; settling time, 7.8 [4.2, 9.0] min; and percent overshoot of 9.6 [2.3, 10.8]%. Under steady state conditions the CLAD system exhibited a median error of 0.1 [-0.5, 0.9]%; inaccuracy of 1.8 [0.9, 3.4]%; oscillation index of 1.8 [0.9, 3.4]%; and maximum instantaneous propofol dose of 4.3 [2.1, 10.5] mg kg-1. The maximum hourly propofol dose was 4.3 [2.1, 10.3] mg kg-1 h-1. Performance fell within clinically acceptable limits for all measures. Significance. A CLAD system designed using robust control theory achieves clinically acceptable

  14. Robust control of burst suppression for medical coma

    PubMed Central

    Westover, M Brandon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N

    2015-01-01

    Objective Medical coma is an anesthetic-induced state of brain inactivation, manifest in the electroencephalogram by burst suppression. Feedback control can be used to regulate burst suppression, however, previous designs have not been robust. Robust control design is critical under real-world operating conditions, subject to substantial pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameter uncertainty and unpredictable external disturbances. We sought to develop a robust closed-loop anesthesia delivery (CLAD) system to control medical coma. Approach We developed a robust CLAD system to control the burst suppression probability (BSP). We developed a novel BSP tracking algorithm based on realistic models of propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We also developed a practical method for estimating patient-specific pharmacodynamics parameters. Finally, we synthesized a robust proportional integral controller. Using a factorial design spanning patient age, mass, height, and gender, we tested whether the system performed within clinically acceptable limits. Throughout all experiments we subjected the system to disturbances, simulating treatment of refractory status epilepticus in a real-world intensive care unit environment. Main results In 5400 simulations, CLAD behavior remained within specifications. Transient behavior after a step in target BSP from 0.2 to 0.8 exhibited a rise time (the median (min, max)) of 1.4 [1.1, 1.9] min; settling time, 7.8 [4.2, 9.0] min; and percent overshoot of 9.6 [2.3, 10.8]%. Under steady state conditions the CLAD system exhibited a median error of 0.1 [−0.5, 0.9]%; inaccuracy of 1.8 [0.9, 3.4]%; oscillation index of 1.8 [0.9, 3.4]%; and maximum instantaneous propofol dose of 4.3 [2.1, 10.5] mg kg−1. The maximum hourly propofol dose was 4.3 [2.1, 10.3] mg kg−1 h−1. Performance fell within clinically acceptable limits for all measures. Significance A CLAD system designed using robust control theory achieves clinically acceptable

  15. 'Is she alive? Is she dead?' Representations of chronic disorders of consciousness in Douglas Coupland's Girlfriend in a Coma.

    PubMed

    Colbeck, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Depictions of coma have come to dominate literary and filmic texts over the last half century, a phenomenon coinciding with advancements in medical technology that have led to remarkable increases in the survival rates of patients with chronic disorders of consciousness. Authors of coma fiction are preoccupied with the imagined subjective experience of coma, often creating complex, dream-like worlds from which the protagonist must escape if survival is to be achieved. However, such representations appear to conflict with medical case studies and patient narratives that reveal that most often survivors of coma have no recollection of the coma itself. Providing a close reading of Douglas Coupland's Girlfriend in a Coma (1998) against the context of medical literature and diagnoses, this article examines how the coma patient is represented, often depicting the realities of a prolonged vegetative state, in contrast with other popular representations of coma. It explores how the author develops a work of 'fantastic' fiction (a genre defined by the structuralist critic Tzvetan Todorov), using the condition of coma as a metaphor for a postmodern existential crisis, while simultaneously employing mimetic techniques that raise important medical, ethical and philosophical questions surrounding the ontological status of the comatose patient. It is argued that coma fiction, even in its misrepresentation of the condition, can help us to engage with and interrogate how we think about chronic disorders of consciousness, thereby providing a valuable insight into our attitudes towards illness and mortality. PMID:26988694

  16. MMN and novelty P3 in coma and other altered states of consciousness: a review.

    PubMed

    Morlet, Dominique; Fischer, Catherine

    2014-07-01

    In recent decades, there has been a growing interest in the assessment of patients in altered states of consciousness. There is a need for accurate and early prediction of awakening and recovery from coma. Neurophysiological assessment of coma was once restricted to brainstem auditory and primary cortex somatosensory evoked potentials elicited in the 30 ms range, which have both shown good predictive value for poor coma outcome only. In this paper, we review how passive auditory oddball paradigms including deviant and novel sounds have proved their efficiency in assessing brain function at a higher level, without requiring the patient's active involvement, thus providing an enhanced tool for the prediction of coma outcome. The presence of an MMN in response to deviant stimuli highlights preserved automatic sensory memory processes. Recorded during coma, MMN has shown high specificity as a predictor of recovery of consciousness. The presence of a novelty P3 in response to the subject's own first name presented as a novel (rare) stimulus has shown a good correlation with coma awakening. There is now a growing interest in the search for markers of consciousness, if there are any, in unresponsive patients (chronic vegetative or minimally conscious states). We discuss the different ERP patterns observed in these patients. The presence of novelty P3, including parietal components and possibly followed by a late parietal positivity, raises the possibility that some awareness processes are at work in these unresponsive patients. PMID:24281786

  17. Multiple aberrant hormone receptors in Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Ghorayeb, Nada; Bourdeau, Isabelle; Lacroix, André

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms regulating cortisol production when ACTH of pituitary origin is suppressed in primary adrenal causes of Cushing's syndrome (CS) include diverse genetic and molecular mechanisms. These can lead either to constitutive activation of the cAMP system and steroidogenesis or to its regulation exerted by the aberrant adrenal expression of several hormone receptors, particularly G-protein coupled hormone receptors (GPCR) and their ligands. Screening for aberrant expression of GPCR in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (BMAH) and unilateral adrenal tumors of patients with overt or subclinical CS demonstrates the frequent co-expression of several receptors. Aberrant hormone receptors can also exert their activity by regulating the paracrine secretion of ACTH or other ligands for those receptors in BMAH or unilateral tumors. The aberrant expression of hormone receptors is not limited to adrenal CS but can be implicated in other endocrine tumors including primary aldosteronism and Cushing's disease. Targeted therapies to block the aberrant receptors or their ligands could become useful in the future. PMID:25971648

  18. Aberration in proper motions for Galactic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.-C.; Xie, Y.; Zhu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Accelerations of both the solar system barycenter (SSB) and stars in the MilkyWay cause a systematic observational effect on the stellar proper motions, which was first studied by J. Kovalevsky (2003). This paper intends to extend that work and aims to estimate the magnitude and significance of the aberration in proper motions of stars, especially in the region near the Galactic center (GC). We adopt two models for the Galactic rotation curve to evaluate the aberrational effect on the Galactic plane. We show that the effect of aberration in proper motions depends on the galactocentric distance of stars; it is dominated by the acceleration of stars in the central region of the Galaxy. Then we investigate the applicability of the theoretical expressions: if the orbital period of stars is only a fraction of the light time from the star to the SSB, the expression with approximation proposed by Kovalevsky is not appropriate. With a more suitable formulation, we found that the aberration has no effect on the determination of the stellar orbits on the celestial sphere. In the future this aberrational effect under consideration should be considered with high-accurate astrometry, particularly in constructing the Gaia celestial reference system realized by Galactic stars.

  19. Evaluation of the orientation of the steepest meridian of regular astigmatism among highly myopic Egyptian patients seeking non-ablative surgical correction of the refractive error

    PubMed Central

    Refai, Tamer Adel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: LASIK surgery is currently the preferred procedure to correct low to moderate myopia. The aim of this study was to determine the orientation of the steepest meridian of regular astigmatism in order to determine the relative incidence of vertical, horizontal, and oblique regular astigmatism among highly myopic Egyptian patients seeking non-ablative surgical correction of the refractive error. Methods: One hundred and one eyes of 68 highly myopic patients who were seeking refractive surgery were included in this consecutive case series study. The refractive errors were measured using an autorefractometer and confirmed by trial. We measured the uncorrected and best corrected visual acuity in Snellen lines. Keratometry, central corneal thickness, and anterior chamber depth also were measured. The cylinder power in diopters and the axis in degrees were reported. Astigmatism was graded as with the rule (i.e., vertical meridian steeper), against the rule (i.e., horizontal meridian steeper), and oblique astigmatism. The number and the percentage of eyes with the rule, against the rule, and oblique astigmatism were calculated, and the chi-squared test was performed to analyze the data. Results: The spherical refractive error ranged from −6.5 to −24.5 diopters (−13.45 ± 4.60). The cylinder power (Cyl) ranged from −0.25 to −7.5 diopters (−2.23 ± 1.28). The uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) in Snellen lines ranged from 0.01 – 0.1 (0.03 ± 0.02). The mean for best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in Snellen lines was 0.40 (± 0.23). The steepest meridian was vertical (i.e., with-the-rule astigmatism) in 44 eyes (43.56%), horizontal (i.e., against-the-rule astigmatism) in 27 eyes (26.73%), and oblique (i.e., oblique astigmatism) in 30 eyes (29.70%). Conclusions: The incidence of with-the-rule astigmatism in patients with high myopia was found to be much lower than in previous studies for non-myopic patients, with a higher incidence for against

  20. A Massive Warm Baryonic Halo in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonamente, Massimiliano; Joy, Marshall K.; Lieu, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Several deep PSPC observations of the Coma Cluster reveal a very large scale halo of soft X-ray emission, substantially in excess of the well-known radiation from the hot intracluster medium. The excess emission, previously reported in the central region of the cluster using lower sensitivity Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) and ROSAT data, is now evident out to a radius of 2.6 Mpc, demonstrating that the soft excess radiation from clusters is a phenomenon of cosmological significance. The X-ray spectrum at these large radii cannot be modeled nonthermally but is consistent with the original scenario of thermal emission from warm gas at approx. 10(exp 6) K. The mass of the warm gas is on par with that of the hot X-ray-emitting plasma and significantly more massive if the warm gas resides in low-density filamentary structures. Thus, the data lend vital support to current theories of cosmic evolution, which predict that at low redshift approx. 30%-40% of the baryons reside in warm filaments converging at clusters of galaxies.

  1. A Giant Warm Baryonic Halo for the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonamente, Max; Lieu, Richard; Joy, Marshall K.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several deep PSPC observations of the Coma cluster unveil a very large-scale halo of soft X-ray emission, substantially in excess of the well know radiation from the hot intra-cluster medium. The excess emission, previously reported in the central cluster regions through lower-sensitivity EUVE and ROSAT data, is now evident out to a radius of 2.5 Mpc, demonstrating that the soft excess radiation from clusters is a phenomenon of cosmological significance. The spectrum at these large radii cannot be modeled non-thermally, but is consistent with the original scenario of thermal emission at warm temperatures. The mass of this plasma is at least on par with that of the hot X-ray emitting plasma, and significantly more massive if the plasma resides in low-density filamentary structures. Thus the data lend vital support to current theories of cosmic evolution, which predict greater than 50 percent by mass of today's baryons reside in warm-hot filaments converging at clusters of galaxies.

  2. Evidence for two types of sources creating Halley's coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousselot, P.; Vernotte, F.; Clairemidi, J.; Moreels, G.

    1992-07-01

    Monochromatic composite images of Halley's coma in a 50 deg angular sector of radial extent 40,000 km are constructed in taking advantage of the spatial scanning capability of the Vega 2 three channel spectrometer. These images show the existence of two well contrasted jets which are identified in the solar dust scattered continuum as well as in the molecular emissions. The spatial distribution of dust scattered intensity in the UV at 377 nm and the visible at 482 nm are compared in computing an image of the I377/I482 intensity ratio. The image shows that the ratio is slightly bluer in a region located between 10,000 and 25,000 km which appears as a result of jet spreading. The existence of a region connected with the jets where the color of dust is bluer is interpreted as the result of fragmentation of dust grains transported inside jets from the nucleus to distances of 10,000 to 25,000 km. The fragmentation processes would produce a local source of tiny submicronic particles of radius a less than 0.4 micrometers and would also be followed by a release of gas. The results presented provide a strong argument for the existence of an extended source connected with the jets. It is coherent with the detection of a CO source at 10,000 km by the Giotto NMS spectrometer 5 days later.

  3. Myxedema Coma: A New Look into an Old Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Vivek; Misgar, Raiz Ahmad; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Roychowdhury, Pradip; Pandit, Kaushik; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2011-01-01

    Myxedema crisis is a severe life threatening form of decompensated hypothyroidism which is associated with a high mortality rate. Infections and discontinuation of thyroid supplements are the major precipitating factors while hypothermia may not play a major role in tropical countries. Low intracellular T3 leads to cardiogenic shock, respiratory depression, hypothermia and coma. Patients are identified on the basis of a low index of suspicion with a careful history and examination focused on features of hypothyroidism and precipitating factors. Arrythmias and coagulation disorders are increasingly being identified in myxedema crisis. Thyroid replacement should be initiated as early as possible with careful attention to hypotension, fluid replacement and steroid replacement in an intensive care facility. Studies have shown that replacement of thyroid hormone through ryles tube with a loading dose and maintenance therapy is as efficacious as intravenous therapy. In many countries T3 is not available and oral therapy with T4 can be used effectively without major significant difference in outcomes. Hypotension, bradycardia at presentation, need for mechanical ventilation, hypothermia unresponsive to treatment, sepsis, intake of sedative drugs, lower GCS and high APACHE II scores and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores more than 6 are significant predictors of mortality in myxedema crisis. Early intervention in hypothyroid patients developing sepsis and other precipitating factors and ensuring continued intake of thyroid supplements may prevent mortality and morbidity associated with myxedema crisis. PMID:21941682

  4. Seizure and coma following Kratom (Mitragynina speciosa Korth) exposure.

    PubMed

    Nelsen, Jamie L; Lapoint, Jeff; Hodgman, Michael J; Aldous, Kenneth M

    2010-12-01

    Reports of toxicity secondary to Kratom are rare and lack of diagnostic testing in human specimens has prevented confirmatory explanation of observed clinical effects. We present a novel case of serious human toxicity following Kratom use confirmed via quantitative analysis of urine by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. A 64 year-old male was witnessed to have a seizure at home following kratom consumption. Upon arrival to the emergency department (ED), the patient was unresponsive. While in the ED, the patient sustained a second seizure. He was intubated to protect his airway. The remainder of his hospital course was uneventful. A urine specimen was collected shortly after admission and sent for analysis. The mitragynine concentration in the urine was 167 ± 15 ng/ml. We report a rare case of Kratom toxicity characterized by a seizure and coma confirmed by urinary analysis of mitragynine by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The proposed mechanism for this reaction is unclear but suggested mechanisms include adenosine binding or stimulation of adrenergic and/or serotonergic receptors similar to tramadol. PMID:20411370

  5. Prospects for aberration corrected electron precession.

    PubMed

    Own, C S; Sinkler, W; Marks, L D

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in aberration control in the TEM have yielded a tremendous enhancement of direct imaging capabilities for studying atomic structures. However, aberration correction also has substantial benefits for achieving ultra-resolution in the TEM through reciprocal space techniques. Several tools are available that allow very accurate detection of the electron distribution in surfaces allowing precise atomic-scale characterization through statistical inversion techniques from diffraction data. The precession technique now appears to extend this capability to the bulk. This article covers some of the progress in this area and details requirements for a next-generation analytical diffraction instrument. An analysis of the contributions offered by aberration correction for precision electron precession is included. PMID:17207934

  6. An aberrant precision account of autism

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Rebecca P.; Rees, Geraint; Friston, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by problems with social-communication, restricted interests and repetitive behavior. A recent and thought-provoking article presented a normative explanation for the perceptual symptoms of autism in terms of a failure of Bayesian inference (Pellicano and Burr, 2012). In response, we suggested that when Bayesian inference is grounded in its neural instantiation—namely, predictive coding—many features of autistic perception can be attributed to aberrant precision (or beliefs about precision) within the context of hierarchical message passing in the brain (Friston et al., 2013). Here, we unpack the aberrant precision account of autism. Specifically, we consider how empirical findings—that speak directly or indirectly to neurobiological mechanisms—are consistent with the aberrant encoding of precision in autism; in particular, an imbalance of the precision ascribed to sensory evidence relative to prior beliefs. PMID:24860482

  7. Optical mechanism for aberration of starlight.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Robert A

    2012-07-01

    We present a physical-optics-based theory for aberration of starlight and show that the influence of the moving sensor on the incident stellar wavefront combined with a finite velocity of light within the sensor can fully account for the aberration phenomena. Our treatment differs from all previous derivations because we include wavefront-imaging physics within the sensor model. Our predictions match existing Earth-based aberration measurements but differ from predictions of the special relativistic-based theory for larger velocities. We derive design parameters for an experiment using an Earth-based sensor containing a refractive optical medium that would experimentally differentiate between these two theories and yield an independent experimental test of time dilation. PMID:22751386

  8. Aberrant immunophenotypes of mantle cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Wohlschlaeger, Ch; Lange, K; Merz, H; Feller, A C

    2003-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphomas (MCL) are characterized by cytomorphological criteria, a distinct immunophenotype and a characteristic chromosomal aberration (t(11;14)). In morphological variants of MCL the immunohistochemical constellation with CD5-positivity and CD23-negativity is a helpful and decisive diagnostic aid to differentiate MCL from other B-cell-lymphomas, e.g. lymphocytic lymphomas (B-CLL). In this study the morphological, immunophenotypical, and genetical features of 50 MCL were analysed. Five cases revealed an aberrant immunophenotype with lacking expression of CD5 (n = 3) and positive reactivity to CD23 (n = 2) while cyclin D1 expression could be demonstrated in all 5 cases. These constellations show that there is, besides morphological subgroups, a small group of MCL with aberrant immunophenotypes, which has to be taken into account in the differential diagnosis to lymphocytic lymphoma and other lymphomas. PMID:12688344

  9. Astigmatism compensation in digital holographic microscopy using complex-amplitude correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamrin, Khairul Fikri; Rahmatullah, Bahbibi; Samuri, Suzani Mohamad

    2015-07-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a promising tool for a three-dimensional imaging of microscopic particles. It offers the possibility of wavefront processing by manipulating amplitude and phase of the recorded digital holograms. With a view to compensate for aberration in the reconstructed particle images, this paper discusses a new approach of aberration compensation based on complex amplitude correlation and the use of a priori information. The approach is applied to holograms of microscopic particles flowing inside a cylindrical micro-channel recorded using an off-axis digital holographic microscope. The approach results in improvements in the image and signal qualities.

  10. The Correlation Analysis between Corneal Biomechanical Properties and the Surgically Induced Corneal High-Order Aberrations after Small Incision Lenticule Extraction and Femtosecond Laser In Situ Keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenjing; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background. To investigate the correlation between corneal biomechanics and the surgically induced corneal high-order aberrations (HOAs) after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and femtosecond laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK). Methods. A total of 150 right myopic eyes that underwent SMILE or FS-LASIK surgery were included in this retrospective study, 75 eyes in each group. The corneal hysteresis (CH) and the corneal resistance factor (CRF) with the corneal HOAs of the anterior, posterior, and total cornea were assessed preoperatively and three months postoperatively. Multivariate linear regression was applied to determine the correlations. Results. The preoperative CRF was significantly correlated with the induced 3rd–6th-order HOAs and spherical aberration of the anterior surface and the total cornea after SMILE and FS-LASIK surgeries (P < 0.05), postoperatively. The CRF was significantly correlated with the induced vertical coma of the anterior and posterior surfaces and the total cornea after SMILE surgery (P < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between the CRF and the induced posterior corneal horizontal coma after FS-LASIK surgery (P = 0.013). Conclusions. The corneal biomechanics affect the surgically induced corneal HOAs after SMILE and FS-LASIK surgery, which may be meaningful for screening the patients preoperatively and optimizing the visual qualities postoperatively. PMID:26483975

  11. Apparatus for and method of correcting for astigmatism in a light beam reflected off of a light reflecting surface

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, Richard H.; Sweatt, William

    1987-01-01

    A technique for adjustably correcting for astigmatism in a light beam is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes first means which defines a flat, rectangular light reflecting surface having opposite reinforced side edges and which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, into different concave and/or convex cylindrical curvatures about a particular axis and second means acting on the first means for adjustably bending the light reflecting surface into a particular selected one of the different curvatures depending upon the astigmatism to be corrected for and for fixedly maintaining the curvature selected. In the embodiment disclosed, the light reflecting surface is adjustably bendable into the selected cylindrical curvature by application of a particular bending moment to the reinforced side edges of the light reflecting surface.

  12. Clinical outcomes of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis to treat moderate-to-high astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Schallhorn, Steven C; Venter, Jan A; Hannan, Stephen J; Hettinger, Keith A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the refractive and visual outcomes of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in eyes with myopic astigmatism and cylindrical component ≥2.0 diopter (D). Methods In this retrospective study, 611 eyes that underwent LASIK for simple or compound myopic astigmatism were analyzed. Preoperative refractive cylinder ranged from −2.00 D to −6.00 D (mean −2.76±0.81 D), and the sphere was between 0.00 D and −9.75 D (mean −2.79±2.32 D). Predictability, visual outcomes, and vector analysis of changes in refractive astigmatism were evaluated. Results At 3 months after LASIK, 83.8% of eyes had uncorrected distance visual acuity of 20/20 or better, 90.3% had manifest spherical equivalent within ±0.50 D, and 79.1% had residual refractive cylinder within ±0.50 D of intended correction. The mean correction ratio for refractive cylinder was 0.92±0.14, the mean error of angle was −0.45°±2.99°, and the mean error vector was 0.37±0.38 D. A statistically significant correlation was found between the error of magnitude (arithmetic difference in the magnitudes between surgically induced refractive correction and intended refractive correction) and the intended refractive correction (r=0.26, P<0.01). Conclusion Wavefront-guided LASIK for the correction of myopic astigmatism is safe, effective, and predictable. PMID:26203219

  13. Management of moderate and severe corneal astigmatism with AcrySof® toric intraocular lens implantation – Our experience

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Javed Hussain; Koul, Archana; Dutta, Ranjan; Shroff, Noshir Minoo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Visual performance following toric intraocular lens implantation for cataract with moderate and severe astigmatism. Setting Cataract services, Shroff Eye Centre, New Delhi, India. Design Case series. Method This prospective study included 64 eyes of 40 patients with more than 1.50 dioptre (D) of pre-existing corneal astigmatism undergoing phacoemulsification with implantation of the AcrySof® toric IntraOcular Lens (IOL). The unaided visual acuity (UCVA), best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), residual refractive sphere and refractive cylinders were evaluated. Toric IOL axis and alignment error was measured by slit lamp method and Adobe Photoshop (version 7) method. Patient satisfaction was evaluated using a satisfaction questionnaire at 3 months. Results The mean residual refractive astigmatism was 0.57 D at the final follow-up of 3 months. Mean alignment error was 3.44 degrees (SD = 2.60) by slit lamp method and 3.88 degrees (SD = 2.86) by Photoshop method. Forty-six (71.9%) eyes showed misalignment of 5 degrees or less, and 60 (93.8%) eyes showed misalignment of 10 degrees or less. The mean log MAR UCVA at 1st post-op day was 0.172 (SD = 0.02), on 7th post-op day was 0.138 (SD = 0.11), and on 30th post-op day was 0.081 (SD = 0.11). The mean log MAR BCVA at three months was −0.04 (SD = 0.76). Conclusion We believe that implantation of AcrySof® toric IOL is an effective, safe and predictable method to correct high amounts of corneal astigmatism during cataract surgery. PMID:26586976

  14. Visual performance in cataract patients with low levels of postoperative astigmatism: full correction versus spherical equivalent correction

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Robert P; Houtman, Diane M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether visual performance could be improved in pseudophakic subjects by correcting low levels of postoperative astigmatism. Methods An exploratory, noninterventional study was conducted using subjects who had been implanted with an aspheric intraocular lens and had 0.5–0.75 diopter postoperative astigmatism. Monocular visual performance using full correction was compared with visual performance using spherical equivalent correction. Testing consisted of high- and low-contrast visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and reading acuity and speed using the Radner Reading Charts. Results Thirty-eight of 40 subjects completed testing. Visual acuities at three contrast levels (100%, 25%, and 9%) were significantly better using full correction than when using spherical equivalent correction (all P < 0.001). For contrast sensitivity testing under photopic, mesopic, and mesopic with glare conditions, only one out of twelve outcomes demonstrated a significant improvement with full correction compared with spherical equivalent correction (at six cycles per degree under mesopic without glare conditions, P = 0.046). Mean reading speed was numerically faster with full correction across all print sizes, reaching statistical significance at logarithm of the reading acuity determination (logRAD) 0.2, 0.7, and 1.1 (P < 0.05). Statistically significant differences also favored full correction in logRAD score (P = 0.0376), corrected maximum reading speed (P < 0.001), and logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution/logRAD ratio (P < 0.001). Conclusions In this study of pseudophakic subjects with low levels of postoperative astigmatism, full correction yielded significantly better reading performance and high- and low-contrast visual acuity than spherical equivalent correction, suggesting that cataractous patients may benefit from surgical correction of low levels of preoperative corneal astigmatism. PMID:22399846

  15. Development of an objective tool for the diagnosis of myxedema coma.

    PubMed

    Chiong, Yien V; Bammerlin, Elaine; Mariash, Cary N

    2015-09-01

    Myxedema coma, a rare entity, with a reported 25%-65% mortality had no objective criteria for making the diagnosis when we began our study. We developed an objective screening tool for myxedema coma to more easily identify patients and examine the best treatment method in future prospective studies to reduce the mortality of this entity. We conducted a retrospective chart review to find all patients aged ≥18 years admitted with myxedema coma from January 1, 2005 through June 13, 2010 at Indiana University Health Methodist Hospital. On the basis of both our retrospective chart review and on literature accounts, we identified 6 criteria to diagnose myxedema coma. We identified 10 patients initially diagnosed with myxedema coma and established a control group consisting of 13 patients identified with altered mental status and increased thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. The 6 variables we created for the screening tool were heart rate, temperature, Glasgow coma scale, TSH, free thyroxine, and precipitating factors. The screening tool has a sensitivity and specificity of about 80%. We ran a logistic regression model using the 10 study patients and 13 controls with the 6 variables. No variables alone significantly contributed to the model. However, the overall model was highly significant (P = 0.012), providing strong support for a scoring system that uses these variables simultaneously. This screening tool enables physicians to rapidly diagnose myxedema coma to expedite treatment. A more refined diagnostic tool may be used in future clinical studies designed to determine the optimal treatment. PMID:25647622

  16. Compressed spectral arrays of patients with fulminant hepatic failure in hepatic coma undergoing liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Takeichi, Takayuki; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Kim, Ildeok; Inomata, Yukihiro; Kasahara, Mureo; Ohwada, Susumu; Morishita, Yasuo; Tanaka, Koichi

    2002-08-01

    Assessing the coma status of patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is important for determining the reversibility of brain damage and for properly timing liver transplantation. The compressed spectral array (CSA) method is a frequency analysis technique that processes electroencephalogram signals by computer to facilitate on-line interpretation. This method has been used to monitor the consciousness levels of neurointensive care unit patients. In this study, we determined whether CSA could be used to assess the coma status of patients with FHF, and whether CSA provided information that was useful in deciding when to proceed with liver transplantation. CSA recording was carried out in 17 FHF patients with encephalopathy (coma grade III-IV) who underwent living-related liver transplantation between August 1997 and May 1999. Recording was performed with a Neuromonitor OEE-72044 (NIHON KOHDEN, Osaka, Japan) every 24 h before and after transplantation, until the patients regained consciousness. The CSAs of healthy controls were distributed almost equally between 0 and 16 Hz. The CSAs of FHF patients in hepatic coma were classified into three patterns. Eight of the 17 patients showed very prominent slow waves of about 2 Hz (group A), and seven patients showed strongly suppressed rapid waves between 8 and 16 Hz (group B). The remaining two patients showed CSA patterns that were similar to those of healthy controls, even though these patients were comatose (group C). Abnormal CSA patterns were observed in 15 of the 17 patients (88%). Group B patients seemed to have higher coma grades than did group A patients. Sixteen patients underwent liver transplantation, completely recovered from hepatic encephalopathy, and subsequently showed CSA patterns similar to those of healthy controls. One patient died without regaining consciousness. These results suggest that CSA is useful in assessing the coma status of FHF patients and in evaluating electrophysiological recovery

  17. Aberration averaging using point spread function for scanning projection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooki, Hiroshi; Noda, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Koichi

    2000-07-01

    Scanning projection system plays a leading part in current DUV optical lithography. It is frequently pointed out that the mechanically induced distortion and field curvature degrade image quality after scanning. On the other hand, the aberration of the projection lens is averaged along the scanning direction. This averaging effect reduces the residual aberration significantly. The aberration averaging based on the point spread function and phase retrieval technique in order to estimate the effective wavefront aberration after scanning is described in this paper. Our averaging method is tested using specified wavefront aberration, and its accuracy is discussed based on the measured wavefront aberration of recent Nikon projection lens.

  18. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields. II. Diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, V N

    2000-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld theory is applied to diffraction of a spherical wave by a grating. The grating equation is obtained from the aberration-free diffraction pattern, and its aberrations are shown to be the same as the conventional aberrations obtained by using Fermat's principle. These aberrations are shown to be not associated with the diffraction process. Moreover, it is shown that the irradiance distribution of a certain diffraction order is the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the grating aperture as a whole aberrated by the aberration of that order. PMID:11140481

  19. Determining the accommodative response from wavefront aberrations.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Janice; Roorda, Austin; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate some of the methods used to calculate objective refractions from wavefront aberrations, to determine their applicability for accommodation research. A wavefront analyzer was used to measure the ocular aberrations of 13 emmetropes and 17 myopes at distance, and 4 near target vergences: 2, 3, 4, and 5 D. The accommodative response was calculated using the following techniques: least squares fitting (Zernike defocus), paraxial curvature matching (Seidel defocus), and 5 optical quality metrics (PFWc, PFSc, PFCc, NS, and VSMTF). We also evaluated a task-specific method of determining optimum focus that used a through-focus procedure to select the image that best optimized both contrast amplitude and gradient (CAG). Neither Zernike nor Seidel defocus appears to be the best method for determining the accommodative response from wavefront aberrations. When the eye has negative spherical aberration, Zernike defocus tends to underestimate, whereas Seidel defocus tends to overestimate the accommodative response. A better approach is to first determine the best image plane using a suitable optical quality metric and then calculate the accommodative error relative to this plane. Of the metrics evaluated, both NS and VSMTF were reasonable choices, with the CAG algorithm being a less preferred alternate. PMID:20616123

  20. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Notari, Alessio E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es

    2013-04-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  1. Anti-forensics of chromatic aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Owen; Stamm, Matthew C.

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, a number of information forensic techniques have been developed to identify digital image manipulation and falsification. Recent research has shown, however, that an intelligent forger can use anti-forensic countermeasures to disguise their forgeries. In this paper, an anti-forensic technique is proposed to falsify the lateral chromatic aberration present in a digital image. Lateral chromatic aberration corresponds to the relative contraction or expansion between an image's color channels that occurs due to a lens's inability to focus all wavelengths of light on the same point. Previous work has used localized inconsistencies in an image's chromatic aberration to expose cut-and-paste image forgeries. The anti-forensic technique presented in this paper operates by estimating the expected lateral chromatic aberration at an image location, then removing deviations from this estimate caused by tampering or falsification. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate that our anti-forensic technique can be used to effectively disguise evidence of an image forgery.

  2. Aberration features in directional dark matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu

    2012-08-01

    The motion of the Earth around the Sun causes an annual change in the magnitude and direction of the arrival velocity of dark matter particles on Earth, in a way analogous to aberration of stellar light. In directional detectors, aberration of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) modulates the pattern of nuclear recoil directions in a way that depends on the orbital velocity of the Earth and the local galactic distribution of WIMP velocities. Knowing the former, WIMP aberration can give information on the latter, besides being a curious way of confirming the revolution of the Earth and the extraterrestrial provenance of WIMPs. While observing the full aberration pattern requires extremely large exposures, we claim that the annual variation of the mean recoil direction or of the event counts over specific solid angles may be detectable with moderately large exposures. For example, integrated counts over Galactic hemispheres separated by planes perpendicular to Earth's orbit would modulate annually, resulting in Galactic Hemisphere Annual Modulations (GHAM) with amplitudes larger than the usual non-directional annual modulation.

  3. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catena, Riccardo; Notari, Alessio

    2013-04-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles alm's via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  4. Designing refractive beam shapers via aberration theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Shealy, David

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we use aberration theory to design a refractive laser beam shaper in the configuration of two-aspheric lenses, whose analytical equations are known, but rather complicated. Specifically, we use results from third order aberration theory to obtain the parameters of the refracting laser beam shaper from the transverse aberration, which are then used as a starting point for further optimization by using optical design software. This approach was developed during the beginning of the twentieth century, works well for systems with a low numerical aperture, and allows one to define the following parameters of an optical system: radii of curvature, indices of refraction, thicknesses or air gaps, and conic constants of second order aspheric surfaces. We shall consider surfaces of the second-order spherical and conic sections and shall consider the example of designing of a two-lens beam shaper of the Keplerian 1-to-1 telescopic design providing a theoretical flat phase front and a flat-top irradiance profile of the output beam, where the ray mapping function from the input aperture to the output aperture is known from the literature. Explicit expression for third order longitudinal aberration and the Seidel coefficients are expressed in terms beam waist and input beam geometrical parameter, indices, lens radii and conic constants.

  5. Corneal Aberrations Before and After Photorefractive Keratectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Nicola; De Bernardo, Maddalena; Lanza, Michele; Borrelli, Maria; Fusco, Fabrizia; Flagiello, Antimo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether - and which - higher-order corneal aberrations, up to the sixth order, are induced by photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Methods 197 eyes of 197 patients have been examined with a corneal aberrometer for a 3.5 and a 6.0 mm pupil simulation, both before and 1, 3, 6 months after myopic PRK treatment ranging from −15.25 D to -0.5 D (mean −5.31±2.95 D). The statistical evaluation was performed using a paired Student's T-test. Results After PRK there is a clear-cut increase in almost all the higher-order corneal aberrations for both a 3.5 and a 6.0 mm pupil simulation. These aberrations tend to normalize after 3 and 6 months mainly for a 3.5 mm simulation, whereas such normalization is not present for a 6.0 mm simulation. Conclusions PRK induces significant aberrations both for 3.5 and 6 mm pupils, 1 month after PRK, but a trend towards normalization is evident at the 6 month follow-up for the smaller pupil size.

  6. Superhumps in Cataclysmic Binaries. IX. AL Comae Berenices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Augusteijn, Thomas; Harvey, David A.; Skillman, David R.; Abbott, Timothy M. C.; Thorstensen, John

    1996-09-01

    We report photometry of the 1995 superoutburst of the dwarf nova AL Comae Berenices. The overall eruption light curve was striking, suggestive of two superoutbursts in rapid succession. During the first week of eruption, the light curve sported a period of 81.63 +/- 0.07 m. This signal declined quickly in amplitude, and was replaced by a stronger signal at 82.55 +/- 0.03 m. The latter bears all the earmarks of a "common superhump," a feature usually seen in SU UMa-type dwarf novae in superoutburst. This superhump endured at least 40 d, with no secular period change. We re-examined the quiescent light curves to search for a stable photometric signal which might signify the true binary period. We found a stable double-humped waveform with a fundamental period of 81.6025 +/- 0.0001 m -- the shortest period yet seen among dwarf novae, and probably very nearly the shortest period attainable by any binary star with a hydrogen-rich secondary. In orbital period and quiescent light curve, as well as in the eruption light curve, the star is a virtual twin of WZ Sge. There are also large-amplitude waves with a period in the range of 83-90 m; these "quiescent superhumps" are rarely found in cataclysmic variables, and require an origin somewhat different from that of the common superhumps characteristic of SU UMa stars in eruption. We speculate that they arise from instability at the 2:1 orbital resonance in the accretion disk, and that the secondary has ben whittled down to <0.04 solar mass. (SECTION: Stars)

  7. Aspects of neurosurgical assessment using the Glasgow Coma Scale.

    PubMed

    Ellis, A; Cavanagh, S J

    1992-06-01

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) has become a cornerstone of the neurological/surgical assessment of patients used by both nursing and medical staff. Since its development in the 1970s it has been used in a variety of clinical situations to monitor changes in a number of key neurological functions, including level of consciousness, pupil reaction and limb movement. During this time, however, there have been suggestions that there are problems with some of the measurement principles underlying its use, which in part has stimulated the development of other neuro-assessment tools. Irrespective of measurement device, there is always the possibility of error or incorrect assessment. In the field of neurosurgery, as with other high dependency environments, a patient's condition can change rapidly. Additionally, there is the association of certain assessment responses with nursing and medical interventions. Thus, accuracy in all aspects of assessment and recording is paramount. Despite the growing body of literature surrounding the GCS, little is known about the pattern of errors made by nursing staff using the GCS to assess neurosurgical patients. This study compared the assessment findings of Registered General Nurses (RGNs), Enrolled Nurses and Student Nurses after viewing videotaped neuro-assessments of patients in a high dependency unit. The criterion for judging the accuracy of subject's assessments was established by a panel of experts. As expected, RGNs had the highest proportion of correct assessments and students the least. Subjects were identified as having difficulty in determining the relative amounts of weakness that a patient exhibited, and in correctly distinguishing between flexion and extension. PMID:1611292

  8. Efficacy, safety, predictability, aberrations and corneal biomechnical parameters after SMILE and FLEx: Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Cao, Nan-Jue; Xia, Li-Kun

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify possible differences of efficacy, safety, predictability, higher-order aberrations and corneal biomechnical parameters after small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and femtosecond lenticule extraction (FLEx). METHODS A systematic literature retrieval was conducted in Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library, up to October, 2015. The included studies were subject to a Meta-analysis. Comparison between SMILE and FLEx was measured as pooled odds ratio (OR) or weighted mean differences (WMD). Of 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to analyze data. RESULTS A total of seven studies were included. Firstly, there were no differences in uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) 20/20 or better (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 0.69 to 2.69; P=0.37) and logMAR UDVA (WMD, -0.02; 95% CI, -0.05 to 0.01; P=0.17) after SMILE versus FLEx. We found no differences in corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) unchanged (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.46 to 2.11; P=0.97) and logMAR CDVA (WMD, -0.00; 95% CI, -0.01 to 0.01; P=0.90) either. Secondly, we found no differences in refraction within ±1.00 D (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.13 to 7.28; P=0.99) and ±0.50 D (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 0.62 to 4.28; P=0.33) of target postoperatively. Thirdly, for higher-order aberrations, we found no differences in the total higher-order aberrations (WMD, -0.04; 95% CI, -0.09 to 0.01; P=0.14), coma (WMD, -0.04; 95% CI, -0.09 to 0.01; P=0.11), spherical (WMD, 0.01; 95% CI, -0.02 to 0.03; P=0.60) and trefoil (WMD, -0.00; 95% CI, -0.04 to 0.03; P=0.76). Furthermore, for corneal biomechanical parameters, we also found no differences (WMD, 0.08; 95% CI, -0.17 to 0.33; P=0.54) after SMILE versus FLEx. CONCLUSION There are no statistically differences in efficacy, safety, predictability, higher-order aberrations and corneal biomechnical parameters postoperative between SMILE and FLEx. PMID:27275436

  9. [The number of aberrations in aberrant cells as a parameter of chromosomal instability. 1. Characterization of dose dependency].

    PubMed

    Kutsokon', N K; Bezrukov, V F; Lazarenko, L M; Rashydov, N M; Hrodzyns'kyĭ, D M

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of chromosome instability (CI) is of great importance in view of pollution of the environment by genotoxic factors. Frequency of aberrant cells, spectrum of chromosome aberrations, damages of aberrant cell and distribution of aberrations in the cells are the most conventional parameters of CI. We have carried out the comparative analysis of the frequency of aberrant cells and the dynamics of aberrant cell damages induced by different mutagenic factors (alpha-irradiation from 241Am, gamma-irradiation from 60Co and tioTEPA) in Allium-test. This comparative analysis denotes that the studied parameters have different dynamics characterizing different mechanisms of CI in Allium cepa L. PMID:14569619

  10. Very deep spectroscopy of the Coma cluster line of sight: exploring new territories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, C.; Le Brun, V.; Biviano, A.; Durret, F.; Lamareille, F.; Pelló, R.; Ilbert, O.; Mazure, A.; Trilling, R.; Ulmer, M. P.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Environmental effects are known to have an important influence on cluster galaxies, but studies at very faint magnitudes (R>21) are almost exclusively based on imaging. We present here a very deep spectroscopic survey of galaxies on the line of sight to the Coma cluster. Aims: After a series of papers based on deep multi-band imaging of the Coma cluster, we explore spectroscopically part of the central regions of Coma, in order to confirm and generalize previous results, concerning in particular the galaxy luminosity function, red sequence, stellar populations and the most likely formation scenario for the Coma cluster. Methods: We have obtained reliable VIMOS redshifts for 715 galaxies in the direction of the Coma cluster centre in the unprecedented magnitude range 21 ≤ R ≤ 23, corresponding to the absolute magnitude range -14 ≤ MR ≤ -12. Results: We confirm the substructures previously identified in Coma, and identify three new substructures. We detect a large number of groups behind Coma, in particular a large structure at z 0.5, the SDSS Great Wall, and a large and very young previously unknown structure at z 0.054, which we named the background massive group (BMG). These structures account for the mass maps derived from a recent weak lensing analysis. The orbits of dwarf galaxies are probably anisotropic and radial, and could originate from field galaxies radially falling into the cluster along the numerous cosmological filaments surrounding Coma. Spectral characteristics of Coma dwarf galaxies show that red or absorption line galaxies have larger stellar masses and are older than blue or emission line galaxies. R ≤ 22 galaxies show less prominent absorption lines than R ≥ 22 galaxies. This trend is less clear for field galaxies, which are similar to R ≥ 22 Coma galaxies. This suggests that part of the faint Coma galaxies could have been recently injected from the field following the NGC 4911 group infall. We present a list of five ultra

  11. Abundant molecular oxygen in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, A.; Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H.; Bar-Nun, A.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Bochsler, P.; Briois, C.; Calmonte, U.; Combi, M.; de Keyser, J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Fiethe, B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gasc, S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Hansen, K. C.; Hässig, M.; Jäckel, A.; Kopp, E.; Korth, A.; Le Roy, L.; Mall, U.; Maggiolo, R.; Marty, B.; Mousis, O.; Owen, T.; Rème, H.; Rubin, M.; Sémon, T.; Tzou, C.-Y.; Waite, J. H.; Walsh, C.; Wurz, P.

    2015-10-01

    The composition of the neutral gas comas of most comets is dominated by H2O, CO and CO2, typically comprising as much as 95 per cent of the total gas density. In addition, cometary comas have been found to contain a rich array of other molecules, including sulfuric compounds and complex hydrocarbons. Molecular oxygen (O2), however, despite its detection on other icy bodies such as the moons of Jupiter and Saturn, has remained undetected in cometary comas. Here we report in situ measurement of O2 in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, with local abundances ranging from one per cent to ten per cent relative to H2O and with a mean value of 3.80 +/- 0.85 per cent. Our observations indicate that the O2/H2O ratio is isotropic in the coma and does not change systematically with heliocentric distance. This suggests that primordial O2 was incorporated into the nucleus during the comet's formation, which is unexpected given the low upper limits from remote sensing observations. Current Solar System formation models do not predict conditions that would allow this to occur.

  12. Dark energy and the structure of the Coma cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Byrd, G. G.; Merafina, M.

    2013-05-01

    Context. We consider the Coma cluster of galaxies as a gravitationally bound physical system embedded in the perfectly uniform static dark energy background as implied by ΛCDM cosmology. Aims: We ask if the density of dark energy is high enough to affect the structure of a large and rich cluster of galaxies. Methods: We base our work on recent observational data on the Coma cluster, and apply our theory of local dynamical effects of dark energy, including the zero-gravity radius RZG of the local force field as the key parameter. Results: 1) Three masses are defined that characterize the structure of a regular cluster: the matter mass MM, the dark-energy effective mass MDE (<0), and the gravitating mass MG (=MM + MDE). 2) A new matter-density profile is suggested that reproduces the observational data well for the Coma cluster in the radius range from 1.4 Mpc to 14 Mpc and takes the dark energy background into account. 3) Using this profile, we calculate upper limits for the total size of the Coma cluster, R ≤ RZG ≈ 20 Mpc, and its total matter mass, MM ≲ MM(RZG) = 6.2 × 1015 M⊙. Conclusions: The dark energy antigravity affects the structure of the Coma cluster strongly at large radii R ≳ 14 Mpc and should be considered when its total mass is derived.

  13. THE DIFFUSE SOFT EXCESS EMISSION IN THE COMA CLUSTER FROM THE ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bonamente, M.; Lieu, R.; Bulbul, E.

    2009-05-10

    ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) data near the North Galactic Pole was analyzed in order to study the large-scale distribution of soft X-ray emission from the Coma cluster. These ROSAT data constitute the only available X-ray observations of Coma that feature an in situ-temporally and spatially contiguous-background, with unlimited and continuous radial coverage. These unique characteristics of the RASS data are used to deliver a final assessment on whether the soft excess previously detected in the Coma cluster is due to background subtraction errors, or not. This paper confirms the presence of soft X-ray excess associated with Coma, and reports the detection of 1/4 keV band excess out to 5 Mpc from the cluster center, the largest soft excess halo discovered to date. We propose that the emission is related to filaments that converge toward Coma, and generated either by nonthermal radiation caused by accretion shocks, or by thermal emission from the filaments themselves.

  14. Abundant molecular oxygen in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Bieler, A; Altwegg, K; Balsiger, H; Bar-Nun, A; Berthelier, J-J; Bochsler, P; Briois, C; Calmonte, U; Combi, M; De Keyser, J; van Dishoeck, E F; Fiethe, B; Fuselier, S A; Gasc, S; Gombosi, T I; Hansen, K C; Hässig, M; Jäckel, A; Kopp, E; Korth, A; Le Roy, L; Mall, U; Maggiolo, R; Marty, B; Mousis, O; Owen, T; Rème, H; Rubin, M; Sémon, T; Tzou, C-Y; Waite, J H; Walsh, C; Wurz, P

    2015-10-29

    The composition of the neutral gas comas of most comets is dominated by H2O, CO and CO2, typically comprising as much as 95 per cent of the total gas density. In addition, cometary comas have been found to contain a rich array of other molecules, including sulfuric compounds and complex hydrocarbons. Molecular oxygen (O2), however, despite its detection on other icy bodies such as the moons of Jupiter and Saturn, has remained undetected in cometary comas. Here we report in situ measurement of O2 in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, with local abundances ranging from one per cent to ten per cent relative to H2O and with a mean value of 3.80 ± 0.85 per cent. Our observations indicate that the O2/H2O ratio is isotropic in the coma and does not change systematically with heliocentric distance. This suggests that primordial O2 was incorporated into the nucleus during the comet's formation, which is unexpected given the low upper limits from remote sensing observations. Current Solar System formation models do not predict conditions that would allow this to occur. PMID:26511578

  15. Jet Morphology and Coma Analysis of 103P/Hartley 2: Temporal Evolution and Interspecies Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Charles M.; Pierce, Donna M.; Cochran, Anita L.

    2014-11-01

    We present our results on an expanded study of the jet and coma behavior of comet 103P/Hartley 2 (a continuation of original results presented in Vaughan et al. 2012). We observed Hartley 2 pre- and post-perihelion in 2010 using the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph on the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. Data for CN, C2, C3, CH, and NH2 were collected over six nights from 15 July to 10 November. The spectral data were used to create coma maps for each of the observed species, and the maps were processed using radial and azimuthal division techniques to create enhanced images of the coma to examine coma morphological features. To compliment the ongoing investigation of Hartley 2 as studied by the EPOXI flyby mission, we use findings from other researchers (Belton et al. 2012; Syal et al. 2012; Thomas et al. 2012) to identify dust jet locations on the nucleus and compare the computed jet directions to the radical densities in the coma at our observation times. We also calculate production rates and mixing ratios with water for suspected parent species. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation Graduate K-12 (GK-12) STEM Fellows program (Award No. DGE-0947419) and NASA’s Planetary Atmospheres program (Award No. NNX14AH18G).

  16. Serum levels of short-chain fatty acids in cirrhosis and hepatic coma.

    PubMed

    Clausen, M R; Mortensen, P B; Bendtsen, F

    1991-12-01

    Short-chain fatty acids cause reversible coma in animals and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the hepatic coma in humans. The concentrations of short-chain fatty acids in peripheral venous blood were significantly elevated in 15 patients with hepatic encephalopathy caused by cirrhosis (362 +/- 83 mumol/L; mean +/- S.E.M.) compared with 17 cirrhotic patients without encephalopathy (178 +/- 57 mumol/L) and 11 normal individuals (60 +/- 8 mumol/L). However, no correlation between the depth of coma and the level of short-chain fatty acids was found after repetitive measurements in the coma group. Compared with normal individuals, all short-chain fatty acids, except valerate, were elevated in patients with hepatic encephalopathy, whereas only the concentrations of isobutyrate and isovalerate were significantly elevated in cirrhotic patients without encephalopathy. The concentrations of short-chain fatty acids in 21 nonencephalopathic cirrhotic patients who underwent catheterization were equally distributed in the aorta (187 +/- 56 mumol/L), the hepatic vein (212 +/- 75 mumol/L), the azygos vein (140 +/- 37 mumol/L) and the renal vein (135 +/- 43 mumol/L) compared with peripheral venous blood (178 +/- 57 mumol/L). This study does not support the idea that short-chain fatty acids are of major importance in the pathogenesis of hepatic coma in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:1959851

  17. Prognostically important EEG coma patterns in diffuse anoxic and traumatic encephalopathies in adults.

    PubMed

    Synek, V M

    1988-04-01

    Because of the paucity in the English literature of a detailed and universally accepted EEG grading scale relating to survival after diffuse traumatic and anoxic brain insults, prognostically oriented EEG patterns including recently described abnormalities are presented and discussed. The significance of these patterns may also apply in cases of coma of other etiologies, which can present morphologically similar features. EEG patterns have been classified into five major grades based on an internationally accepted scale. Individual patterns have been more clearly defined on the basis of the morphology of dominant activities, their distribution, persistence, and reactivity to external stimulation. Favorable outcome with survival seems to occur with both grade 1 and the "reactive type" of grade 2 abnormalities, with preservation of normal sleep features, and with frontal monorhythmic delta activity. Prognostically uncertain patterns are "nonreactive" grade 2 abnormalities, diffuse delta activity with grade 3 abnormality, and the "reactive type of alpha pattern coma." The following patterns are suggested to be prognostically malignant if persistent: grade 3 abnormality with small amplitude, diffuse, irregular delta activity; grade 4 ("burst suppression pattern"), in particular when epileptiform discharges are present and with "low-output EEG"; and grade 5 ("isoelectric EEG"). Fatal outcome is also common with the "nonreactive type of alpha pattern coma" and the recently reported "theta pattern coma." These patterns are presented in the illustrations. It is intended that this more detailed subdivision will promote understanding between electroencephalographers using visual EEG assessment in cases of coma. PMID:3074973

  18. The distribution of early- and late-type galaxies in the Coma cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Okamura, S.; Turner, E. L.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial distribution and the morohology-density relation of Coma cluster galaxies are studied using a new homogeneous photmetric sample of 450 galaxies down to B = 16.0 mag with quantitative morphology classification. The sample covers a wide area (10 deg X 10 deg), extending well beyond the Coma cluster. Morphological classifications into early- (E+SO) and late-(S) type galaxies are made by an automated algorithm using simple photometric parameters, with which the misclassification rate is expected to be approximately 10% with respect to early and late types given in the Third Reference Catalogue of Bright Galaxies. The flattened distribution of Coma cluster galaxies, as noted in previous studies, is most conspicuously seen if the early-type galaxies are selected. Early-type galaxies are distributed in a thick filament extended from the NE to the WSW direction that delineates a part of large-scale structure. Spiral galaxies show a distribution with a modest density gradient toward the cluster center; at least bright spiral galaxies are present close to the center of the Coma cluster. We also examine the morphology-density relation for the Coma cluster including its surrounding regions.

  19. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF OH AND CN RADICALS IN THE COMA OF COMET ENCKE

    SciTech Connect

    Ihalawela, Chandrasiri A.; Pierce, Donna M.; Dorman, Garrett R.; Cochran, Anita L. E-mail: ci856509@ohio.edu E-mail: grd33@msstate.edu

    2011-11-10

    Multiple potential parent species have been proposed to explain CN abundances in comet comae, but the parent has not been definitively identified for all comets. This study examines the spatial distribution of CN radicals in the coma of comet Encke and determines the likelihood that CN is a photodissociative daughter of HCN in the coma. Comet Encke is the shortest orbital period (3.3 years) comet known and also has a low dust-to-gas ratio based on optical observations. Observations of CN were obtained from 2003 October 22 to 24, using the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. To determine the parent of CN, the classical vectorial model was modified by using a cone shape in order to reproduce Encke's highly aspherical and asymmetric coma. To test the robustness of the modified model, the spatial distribution of OH was also modeled. This also allowed us to obtain CN/OH ratios in the coma. Overall, we find the CN/OH ratio to be 0.009 {+-} 0.004. The results are consistent with HCN being the photodissociative parent of CN, but we cannot completely rule out other possible parents such as CH{sub 3}CN and HC{sub 3}N. We also found that the fan-like feature spans {approx}90 Degree-Sign , consistent with the results of Woodney et al..

  20. Non-astigmatic imaging with matched pairs of spherically bent reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Bitter, Manfred Ludwig; Hill, Kenneth Wayne; Scott, Steven Douglas; Feder, Russell; Ko, Jinseok; Rice, John E.; Ince-Cushman, Alexander Charles; Jones, Frank

    2012-07-10

    Arrangements for the point-to-point imaging of a broad spectrum of electromagnetic radiation and ultrasound at large angles of incidence employ matched pairs of spherically bent reflectors to eliminate astigmatic imaging errors. Matched pairs of spherically bent crystals or spherically bent multi-layers are used for X-rays and EUV radiation; and matched pairs of spherically bent mirrors that are appropriate for the type of radiation are used with microwaves, infrared and visible light, or ultrasound. The arrangements encompass the two cases, where the Bragg angle--the complement to the angle of incidence in optics--is between 45.degree. and 90.degree. on both crystals/mirrors or between 0.degree. and 45.degree. on the first crystal/mirror and between 45.degree. and 90.degree. on the second crystal/mirror, where the angles of convergence and divergence are equal. For x-rays and EUV radiation, also the Bragg condition is satisfied on both spherically bent crystals/multi-layers.

  1. LASIK and PRK in hyperopic astigmatic eyes: is early retreatment advisable?

    PubMed Central

    Frings, Andreas; Richard, Gisbert; Steinberg, Johannes; Druchkiv, Vasyl; Linke, Stephan Johannes; Katz, Toam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the refractive and keratometric stability in hyperopic astigmatic laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) or photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) during the first 6 months after surgery. Patients and methods This retrospective cross-sectional study included 97 hyperopic eyes; 55 were treated with LASIK and 42 with PRK. Excimer ablation for all eyes was performed using the ALLEGRETTO excimer laser platform using a mitomycin C for PRK and a mechanical microkeratome for LASIK. Keratometric and refractive data were analyzed during three consecutive follow-up intervals (6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months). The corneal topography was obtained using Scheimpflug topography, and subjective refractions were acquired by expert optometrists according to a standardized protocol. Results After 3 months, mean keratometry and spherical equivalent were stable after LASIK, whereas PRK-treated eyes presented statistically significant (P<0.001) regression of hyperopia. In eleven cases, hyperopic regression of >1 D occurred. The optical zone diameter did not correlate with the development of regression. Conclusion After corneal laser refractive surgery, keratometric changes are followed by refractive changes and they occur up to 6 months after LASIK and for at least 6 months after PRK, and therefore, caution should be applied when retreatment is planned during the 1st year after surgery because hyperopic refractive regression can lead to suboptimal visual outcome. Keratometric and refractive stability is earlier achieved after LASIK, and therefore, retreatment may be independent of late regression. PMID:27099463

  2. Comparison of surgically induced astigmatism in various incisions in manual small incision cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jauhari, Nidhi; Chopra, Deepak; Chaurasia, Rajan Kumar; Agarwal, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    AIM To determine the surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) in Straight, Frown and Inverted V shape (Chevron) incisions in manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS). METHODS A prospective cross sectional study was done on a total of 75 patients aged 40y and above with senile cataract. The patients were randomly divided into three groups (25 each). Each group received a particular type of incision (Straight, Frown or Inverted V shape incisions). Manual SICS with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation was performed. The patients were compared 4wk post operatively for uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and SIA. All calculations were performed using the SIA calculator version 2.1, a free software program. The study was analyzed using SPSS version 15.0 statistical analysis software. RESULTS The study found that 89.5% of patients in Straight incision group, 94.2% in Frown incision group and 95.7% in Inverted V group attained BCVA post-operatively in the range of 6/6 to 6/18. Mean SIA was minimum (-0.88±0.61D×90 degrees) with Inverted V incision which was statistically significant. CONCLUSION Inverted V (Chevron) incision gives minimal SIA. PMID:25540754

  3. Inspection focus technology of space tridimensional mapping camera based on astigmatic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Liping

    2010-10-01

    The CCD plane of the space tridimensional mapping camera will be deviated from the focal plane(including the CCD plane deviated due to camera focal length changed), under the condition of space environment and vibration, impact when satellite is launching, image resolution ratio will be descended because defocusing. For tridimensional mapping camera, principal point position and focal length variation of the camera affect positioning accuracy of ground target, conventional solution is under the condition of vacuum and focusing range, calibrate the position of CCD plane with code of photoelectric encoder, when the camera defocusing in orbit, the magnitude and direction of defocusing amount are obtained by photoelectric encoder, then the focusing mechanism driven by step motor to compensate defocusing amount of the CCD plane. For tridimensional mapping camera, under the condition of space environment and vibration, impact when satellite is launching, if the camera focal length changes, above focusing method has been meaningless. Thus, the measuring and focusing method was put forward based on astigmation, a quadrant detector was adopted to measure the astigmation caused by the deviation of the CCD plane, refer to calibrated relation between the CCD plane poison and the asrigmation, the deviation vector of the CCD plane can be obtained. This method includes all factors caused deviation of the CCD plane, experimental results show that the focusing resolution of mapping camera focusing mechanism based on astigmatic method can reach 0.25 μm.

  4. Understanding and managing coma stimulation: are we doing everything we can?

    PubMed

    Gerber, Carolyn S

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of people surviving with traumatic brain injury is rising at a remarkable pace. Unfortunately, patients also experience some form of coma and significant deficits (ie, cognitive, functional, etc). The focus is shifting from saving these patients to trying to figure out what else can be done for them? In the past, patients were medically maintained, stabilized, and then sent to rehabilitation centers for coma stimulation, in the hope of waking up their reticular activating system. Today, healthcare professionals are being encouraged to research and explore the possibility of implementing structured coma stimulation programs as early as 72 hours postinjury in the intensive care unit. Starting early is of paramount importance to a patient's survival, quality of life, and overall long-term prognosis. The goal of this article is to educate healthcare professionals (in the hospital setting) about managing and implementing structured sensory stimulation sessions. PMID:15875441

  5. Using an integral-field unit spectrograph to study radical species in cometary coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Pierce, Donna M.; Vaughan, Charles M.; Cochran, Anita

    2015-01-01

    We have observed several comets using an integral-field unit spectrograph (the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph) on the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory. Full-coma spectroscopic images were obtained for various radical species (C2, C3, CN, NH2). Various coma enhancements were used to identify and characterize coma morphological features. The azimuthal average profiles and the Haser model were used to determine production rates and possible parent molecules. Here, we present the work completed to date, and we compare our results to other comet taxonomic surveys. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation Graduate K-12 (GK-12) STEM Fellows program (Award No. DGE-0947419), NASA's Planetary Atmospheres program (Award No. NNX14AH18G), and the Fund for Astrophysical Research, Inc.

  6. Using an integral-field unit spectrograph to study radical species in cometary coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Pierce, Donna; Cochran, Anita; Vaughan, Charles

    2014-11-01

    We have observed several comets using an integral-field unit spectrograph (the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph) on the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory. Full-coma spectroscopic images were obtained for various radical species (C2, C3, CN, NH2). Various coma enhancements were used to identify and characterize coma morphological features. The azimuthal average profiles and the Haser model were used to determine production rates and possible parent molecules. Here, we present the work completed to date, and we compare our results to other comet taxonomic surveys. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation Graduate K-12 (GK-12) STEM Fellows program (Award No. DGE-0947419), NASA’s Planetary Atmospheres program (Award No. NNX14AH18G), and the Fund for Astrophysical Research, Inc.

  7. Successful steroid treatment of coma induced by severe spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Shunsaku; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Taiki; Shimato, Shinji; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome characterized by low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and postural headaches. It is a rare condition which may sometimes present with severe symptoms such as stupor or coma. The standard treatment protocol includes conservative measures such as bed rest, hydration, and steroids. However, severe cases may require invasive measures such as epidural blood patch (EBP), continuous epidural saline infusion, epidural fibrin glue, or surgical repair of the dural defect. In this report, we describe a case of severe SIH resulting in coma that exhibited dramatic improvement on intravenous administration of steroids. This is the first report of severe SIH causing coma that was treated non-invasively by steroids only. PMID:27303109

  8. ALP conversion and the soft X-ray excess in the outskirts of the Coma cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kraljic, David; Rummel, Markus; Conlon, Joseph P. E-mail: Markus.Rummel@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    It was recently found that the soft X-ray excess in the center of the Coma cluster can be fitted by conversion of axion-like-particles (ALPs) of a cosmic axion background (CAB) to photons. We extend this analysis to the outskirts of Coma, including regions up to 5 Mpc from the center of the cluster. We extract the excess soft X-ray flux from ROSAT All-Sky Survey data and compare it to the expected flux from ALP to photon conversion of a CAB. The soft X-ray excess both in the center and the outskirts of Coma can be simultaneously fitted by ALP to photon conversion of a CAB. Given the uncertainties of the cluster magnetic field in the outskirts we constrain the parameter space of the CAB. In particular, an upper limit on the CAB mean energy and a range of allowed ALP-photon couplings are derived.

  9. Successful steroid treatment of coma induced by severe spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shunsaku; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Taiki; Shimato, Shinji; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome characterized by low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and postural headaches. It is a rare condition which may sometimes present with severe symptoms such as stupor or coma. The standard treatment protocol includes conservative measures such as bed rest, hydration, and steroids. However, severe cases may require invasive measures such as epidural blood patch (EBP), continuous epidural saline infusion, epidural fibrin glue, or surgical repair of the dural defect. In this report, we describe a case of severe SIH resulting in coma that exhibited dramatic improvement on intravenous administration of steroids. This is the first report of severe SIH causing coma that was treated non-invasively by steroids only. PMID:27303109

  10. Dwarf galaxies in the coma cluster: Star formation properties and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Derek M.

    The infall regions of galaxy clusters are unique laboratories for studying the impact of environment on galaxy evolution. This intermediate region links the low-density field environment and the dense core of the cluster, and is thought to host recently accreted galaxies whose star formation is being quenched by external processes associated with the cluster. In this dissertation, we measure the star formation properties of galaxies at the infall region of the nearby rich cluster of galaxies, Coma. We rely primarily on Ultraviolet (UV) data owing to its sensitivity to recent star formation and we place more emphasis on the properties of dwarf galaxies. Dwarf galaxies are good tracers of external processes in clusters but their evolution is poorly constrained as they are intrinsically faint and hence more challenging to detect. We make use of deep GALEX far-UV and near-UV observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster. This area of the cluster has supporting photometric coverage at optical and IR wavelengths in addition to optical spectroscopic data that includes deep redshift coverage of dwarf galaxies in Coma. Our GALEX observations were the deepest exposures taken for a local galaxy cluster. The depth of these images required alternative data analysis techniques to overcome systematic effects that limit the default GALEX pipeline analysis. Specifically, we used a deblending method that improved detection efficiency by a factor of ˜2 and allowed reliable photometry a few magnitudes deeper than the pipeline catalog. We performed deep measurements of the total UV galaxy counts in our field that were used to measure the source confusion limit for crowded GALEX fields. The star formation properties of Coma members were studied for galaxies that span from starbursts to passive galaxies. Star-forming galaxies in Coma tend to have lower specific star formation rates, on average, as compared to field galaxies. We show that the majority of these galaxies are likely

  11. Peritoneal dialysis in an infant with type 1 diabetes and hyperosmolar coma.

    PubMed

    Multari, G; Werner, B; Cervoni, M; Lubrano, R; Costantino, F; Demiraj, V; Pozzilli, P

    2001-02-01

    Hyperosmolar coma which is characterized by severe hyperglycemia in absence of chetosis is very rare in pediatric age with only 11 cases reported in the literature. The outcome of the condition is usually poor with mental retardation being the most common event. Here a case of hyperosmolar coma is described in a female of three months of age who was treated with peritoneal dialysis 11 hours after admittance to hospital. This female patient has been receiving insulin from three months of age and today at the age of 10 years she leads a normal life despite being on insulin therapy. A very low level of C-peptide (<0.3 ng/ml) clearly confirms she is affected by Type 1 diabetes. To our knowledge this is the first case report of hyperosmolar coma in a neonate with Type 1 diabetes who survived this condition without late neurological consequences. PMID:11263466

  12. Low encounter speed comet COMA sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Yen, C. W.; Albee, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Comets, being considered the most primitive bodies in the solar system, command the highest priority among solar-system objects for studying solar nebula evolution and the evolution of life through biogenic elements and compounds. The study of comets, and more especially, of material from them, provides an understanding of the physical, chemical, and mineralogical processes operative in the formation and earliest development of the solar systems. These return samples will provide valuable information on comets and serve as a rosetta stone for the analytical studies conducted on interplanetary dust particles over the past two decades, and will provide much needed extraterrestrial samples for the planetary materials community since the Apollo program. Lander sample return missions require rather complex spacecraft, intricate operations, and costly propulsion systems. By contrast, it is possible to take a highly simplified approach for sample capture and return in the case of a comet. In the past, we have considered Earth free-return trajectory to the comet, in which passive collectors intercept dust and volatiles from the cometary coma. However, standard short period cometary free-return trajectories results in the comet to the spacecraft encounter speeds in the range of 10 km/s. At these speeds the kinetic energy of the capture process can render significant modification of dust structure, change of solid phase as well as the lost of volatiles components. This paper presents a class of new missions with trajectories with significant reduction of encounter speeds by incorporating gravity assists and deep space maneuvering. Low encounter speed cometary flyby sample return will enable a marked increase in the value of the return science. Acquiring thousands of samples from a known comet and thousands of images of a comet nucleus would be space firsts. Applying new approach in flight mechanics to generate a new class of low encounter speed cometary sample return

  13. Results from the worldwide coma morphology campaign for comet ISON (C/2012 S1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Mueller, Beatrice E. A.; Knight, Matthew M.; Farnham, Tony L.; Briol, John; Brosch, Noah; Caruso, John; Gao, Xing; Gomez, Edward; Lister, Tim; Hergenrother, Carl; Hoban, Susan; Prouty, Roy; Holloway, Mike; Howes, Nick; Guido, Ernesto; Hui, Man-To; Jones, Joseph H.; Penland, Tyler B.; Thomas, Samuel R.; Wyrosdick, Jim; Kiselev, Nikolai; Ivanova, Aleksandra V.; Kaye, Thomas G.; Eluo, Jean-Baptist Kikwaya; Lau, Betty P. S.; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Martin, José Luis; Moskvitin, Alexander S.; Nicolini, Martino; Ottum, Brian D.; Pruzenski, Chris; Vogel, David C.; Kellett, Leo; Rapson, Valerie; Schmid, Joel; Doyle, Brandon; Dimino, Frank; Carlino, Stephanie; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant; Sutaria, Firoza; Schleicher, David G.; Snodgrass, Colin; Tezcan, Cihan T.; Yorukoglu, Onur; Trowbridge, David; Whitmer, Dennis; Ye, Quan-Zhi

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of a global coma morphology campaign for comet C/2012 S1 (ISON), which was organized to involve both professional and amateur observers. In response to the campaign, many hundreds of images, from nearly two dozen groups were collected. Images were taken primarily in the continuum, which help to characterize the behavior of dust in the coma of comet ISON. The campaign received images from January 12 through November 22, 2013 (an interval over which the heliocentric distance decreased from 5.1 AU to 0.35 AU), allowing monitoring of the long-term evolution of coma morphology during comet ISON's pre-perihelion leg. Data were contributed by observers spread around the world, resulting in particularly good temporal coverage during November when comet ISON was brightest but its visibility was limited from any one location due to the small solar elongation. We analyze the northwestern sunward continuum coma feature observed in comet ISON during the first half of 2013, finding that it was likely present from at least February through May and did not show variations on diurnal time scales. From these images we constrain the grain velocities to ~10 m s-1, and we find that the grains spent 2-4 weeks in the sunward side prior to merging with the dust tail. We present a rationale for the lack of continuum coma features from September until mid-November 2013, determining that if the feature from the first half of 2013 was present, it was likely too small to be clearly detected. We also analyze the continuum coma morphology observed subsequent to the November 12 outburst, and constrain the first appearance of new features in the continuum to later than November 13.99 UT.

  14. Deep UV Luminosity Functions at the Infall Region of the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, D. M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Salim, S.; Smith, R.; Jenkins, L.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Ferguson, H.

    2011-01-01

    We have used deep GALEX observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster to measure the faintest UV luminosity functions (LFs) presented for a rich galaxy cluster thus far. The Coma UV LFs are measured to M(sub uv) = -10.5 in the GALEX FUV and NUV bands, or 3.5 mag fainter than previous studies, and reach the dwarf early-type galaxy population in Coma for the first time. The Schechter faint-end slopes (alpha approximately equal to -1.39 in both GALEX bands) are shallower than reported in previous Coma UV LF studies owing to a flatter LF at faint magnitudes. A Gaussian-plus-Schechter model provides a slightly better parametrization of the UV LFs resulting in a faint-end slope of alpha approximately equal to -1.15 in both GALEX bands. The two-component model gives faint-end slopes shallower than alpha = -1 (a turnover) for the LFs constructed separately for passive and star forming galaxies. The UV LFs for star forming galaxies show a turnover at M(sub UV) approximately equal to -14 owing to a deficit of dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma with stellar masses below M(sub *) = 10(sup 8) solar mass. A similar turnover is identified in recent UV LFs measured for the Virgo cluster suggesting this may be a common feature of local galaxy clusters, whereas the field UV LFs continue to rise at faint magnitudes. We did not identify an excess of passive galaxies as would be expected if the missing dwarf star forming galaxies were quenched inside the cluster. In fact, the LFs for both dwarf passive and star forming galaxies show the same turnover at faint magnitudes. We discuss the possible origin of the missing dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma and their expected properties based on comparisons to local field galaxies.

  15. Chill-coma recovery time, age and sex determine lipid profiles in Ceratitis capitata tissues.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Lereis, Luciana Mercedes; Fagali, Natalia Soledad; Rabossi, Alejandro; Catalá, Ángel; Quesada-Allué, Luis Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The remodeling of membrane composition by changes in phospholipid head groups and fatty acids (FA) degree of unsaturation has been associated with the maintenance of membrane homeostasis under stress conditions. Overall lipid levels and the composition of cuticle lipids also influence insect stress resistance and tissue protection. In a previous study, we demonstrated differences in survival, behavior and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene expression between subgroups of Ceratitis capitata flies that had a reversible recovery from chill-coma and those that developed chilling-injury. Here, we analyzed lipid profiles from comparable subgroups of 15 and 30-day-old flies separated according to their recovery time after a chill-coma treatment. Neutral and polar lipid classes of chill-coma subgroups were separated by thin layer chromatography and quantified by densitometry. FA composition of polar lipids of chill-coma subgroups and non-stressed flies was evaluated using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Higher amounts of neutral lipids such as triglycerides, diacylglycerol, wax esters, sterol esters and free esters were found in male flies that recovered faster from chill-coma compared to slower flies. A multivariate analysis revealed changes in patterns of storage and cuticle lipids among subgroups both in males and females. FA unsaturation increased after cold exposure, and was higher in thorax of slower subgroups compared to faster subgroups. The changes in neutral lipid patterns and FA composition depended on recovery time, sex, age and body-part, and were not specifically associated with the development of chilling-injury. An analysis of phospholipid classes showed that the phosphatidylcholine to lysophosphatidylcholine ratio (PC/LPC) was significantly higher, or showed a tendency, in subgroups that may have developed chilling-injury compared to those with a reversible recovery from coma. PMID:26868723

  16. A challenging case due to uncommon aberrancies.

    PubMed

    Waleed, Mohammad; Raza, Ali; Minhaj, Tariq; Houghton, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    A 71-year-old man was referred to a rapid access chest pain clinic by his general practitioner. He presented with a 6-month history of twice weekly central chest pain lasting 2-3 min with walking and exertion, relieved with rest or co-codamol tablets. After initial investigations and a positive myoview scan, he was listed for an elective coronary angiogram. Unfortunately, the procedure was abandoned due to unclear course of the guide wire and a possible aberrant aortic course. Further non-invasive tests were arranged to clarify the anatomy of the vessels. After getting a clear idea of the aberrancies, coronary angiogram was replanned, and the patient underwent successful angiography with angioplasty to one of the coronary arteries, without any complications. PMID:26404545

  17. The correction of electron lens aberrations.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, P W

    2015-09-01

    The progress of electron lens aberration correction from about 1990 onwards is chronicled. Reasonably complete lists of publications on this and related topics are appended. A present for Max Haider and Ondrej Krivanek in the year of their 65th birthdays. By a happy coincidence, this review was completed in the year that both Max Haider and Ondrej Krivanek reached the age of 65. It is a pleasure to dedicate it to the two leading actors in the saga of aberration corrector design and construction. They would both wish to associate their colleagues with such a tribute but it is the names of Haider and Krivanek (not forgetting Joachim Zach) that will remain in the annals of electron optics, next to that of Harald Rose. I am proud to know that both regard me as a friend as well as a colleague. PMID:26025209

  18. Repeatability of the Dust and Gas Morphological Structures in the Coma of Comet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejoly, Cassandra; Samarasinha, N. H.; Ojha, L.; Schleicher, D. G.

    2013-10-01

    Comet 1P/Halley is the most famous comet in history and has been observed for over two millennia, making it one of the most extensively studied comets. The morphology in the coma of comet 1P/Halley originates due to the activity at the nucleus and could be used as a probe of the nuclear rotation and the activity. We will present the results from a study summarizing the evolution of coma morphology of comet 1P/Halley observed from ground between October 1985 and June 1986. The results to be presented include analysis of dust features as well as gas (CN) features in the coma and comparisons will be made between their spatial and temporal evolution. About 80 CN images and 300 continuum images from the Small Bodies Node of the NASA Planetary Data System were analyzed using image enhancement techniques that were not available n the 1980s. This enables us to see coma structure never observed before in comet 1P/Halley. Because of the comet's proximity to Earth, most of our best signal-to-noise images were taken in the March-April interval of 1986. Despite the limited coverage of preceding and following months, there is a sufficient number of images to monitor morphological evolution over many months. The initial synodic periods as a function of time used to phase the images together were extrapolated from the lightcurves of the active coma (Schleicher et al. 1990, AJ, 100, 896-912). We will present the periods of repeatability of individual coma features measured using the position angle at different spatial distances from the nucleus in adjacent cycles. Separate features appear to have slightly different periods of repeatability, perhaps depending on the corresponding source regions on the nucleus and/or projection effects. The periods of repeatability of coma morphologies will be presented as a function of time from the perihelion. These results will ultimately be used in detailed modeling of the coma morphologies of comet 1P/Halley over the 1985-1986 apparition in

  19. Inner coma imaging of Comet Levy (1990c) with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, H. A.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Feldman, P. D.; Arpigny, C.; Baum, W. A.; Brandt, J. C.; Light, R. M.; Westphal, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    HST observations of Comet Levy at geocentric and heliocentric distances of about 1 AU show a highly asymmetrical coma in which the sunward-facing hemisphere is brighter than the tailward one by a factor of 2; this is in keeping with dayside volatile sublimation. Radial brightness profiles perpendicular to the sun-comet line are found to be highly symmetric about the nucleus. Detailed image analysis reveals indications of a hemispherical dust arc which propagates through the coma at an average projected velocity of about 0.16 km/sec. It is suggested that periodic occurrences of such dust arcs could account for the temporal variability in IUE continuum photometry.

  20. Analysis of hydrogen H-alpha observations of the coma of Comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.; Marconi, M. L.; Scherb, Frank; Roesler, Fred L.

    1993-01-01

    The Monte Carlo Particle Trajectory Model of Combi and Smyth (1988) is used here to analyze observations of the H-alpha coma of Comet Halley. The solar excitation mechanism for the H-alpha emissions line is described. The H2O production rates derived for the H-alpha brightness measurements are shown to be very consistent with the H2O production rates determined from other Comet Halley observations of the H, O, and OH comae. Revised H2O production rates determined from 6300 A brightness measurements are presented.

  1. The Hertzsprung-gap giant 31 Comae in 2013: Magnetic field and activity indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ana P.; Konstantinova-Antova, Renada; Aurière, Michel; Petit, Pascal; Charbonnel, Corinne

    2014-08-01

    We have observed the giant star 31 Comae in April and May 2013 with the spectropolarimeter Narval at Pic du Midi Observatory, France. 31 Comae is a single, rapidly rotating giant with rotational period ~6.8 d and vsini ~ 67 km/s. We present measurements and discuss variability of the longitudinal magnetic field (Bl), spectral activity indicators Hα, CaII H&K, Ca II IR triplet and evolutionary status. Our future aim is to perform a Zeeman-Doppler imaging study for the star.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. X. (den Brok+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Brok, M.; Peletier, R. F.; Seth, A.; Balcells, M.; Dominguez, L.; Graham, A. W.; Carter, D.; Erwin, P.; Ferguson, H. C.; Goudfrooij, P.; Guzman, R.; Hoyos, C.; Jogee, S.; Lucey, J.; Phillipps, S.; Puzia, T.; Valentijn, E.; Kleijn, G. V.; Weinzirl, T.

    2015-05-01

    The Coma ACS Survey (Carter et al., 2008ApJS..176..424C) provides data in two passbands for 25 fields pointed at the core of the Coma cluster and at the outskirts. The exposure times in the two passbands, F814W and F475W (which are roughly equivalent to the IC and g band) were ~1400 and ~2600s. The original envisaged coverage of the cluster was much larger than 25 fields, but due to the ACS failure in 2008 January the survey was not completed. (2 data files).

  3. Near infrared observations of galaxies in the Coma supercluster and in the Cancer cluster. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Trinchieri, G.; Boselli, A.

    1990-11-01

    New near infrared observations of 110 galaxies in the Coma/A1367 supercluster region, and 40 galaxies in the Cancer cluster are presented. These observations are part of an ongoing investigation of the properties of normal galaxies and of their near-IR emission, which aims at obtaining homogeneous, multifrequency data for a large sample of galaxies in different density environments. The addition of these observations to the sample presented in Gavazzi and Trinchieri (1989) raises the number of Coma/A1367 galaxies with near-IR data to 275. The measurements, together with data published by Bothun et al. (1985), give a sample of 45 spirals in the Cancer cluster.

  4. Aberrant phenotypes in Kikuchi’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xue-Jing; Zhou, Xiao-Ge; Xie, Jian-Lan; Zheng, Xiao-Dan; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Initial reports emphasized the immunophenotypic similarities between benign and malignant T cell populations, while some previous studies indicating that aberrant T-cell antigen loss is a good marker for detecting malignant T-cell proliferation. Recently, we found a very interesting and thought-provoking phenomenon: In benign disease-28 of 38 (73.7%) cases of Kikuchi’s disease also showed aberrant phenotypes with loss of pan-T cell antigens, which makes the differential diagnosis between Kikuchi’s disease and T cell lymphoma more challenging. In our study, 38 cases of Kikuchi’s disease and 30 cases of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH) were studied by EliVision immunohistochemical staining. As well as TCR gene rearrangement using PCR was negative in 10 tested cases of the Kikuchi’s disease. Among these cases, the most common antigen deficiency was CD5 (22 cases), then CD7 (11 cases), CD2 (8 cases) and CD3 (2 cases). Compared with proliferative and xanthomatous types of Kikuchi’s disease, antigens tended to be lost in necrotizing type. Based on follow-up data, a correlation was not found between the occurrence of aberrant phenotypes and prognosis. In RLH, obvious pan-T cell antigen loss was also not found. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate distinct patterns of antigen loss in Kikuchi’s disease, suggesting that T cell antigen loss is not reliable as an auxiliary diagnostic standard for T cell lymphoma. PMID:25337197

  5. Therapeutic options to enhance coma arousal after traumatic brain injury: state of the art of current treatments to improve coma recovery.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Giulia

    2014-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability. Optimizing the recovery from coma is a priority in seeking to improve patients' functional outcomes. Standards of care have not been established: pharmacological interventions, right median nerve and sensory stimulation, dorsal column stimulation (DCS), deep brain stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and cell transplantation have all been utilized with contrasting results. The aim of this review is to clarify the indications for the various techniques and to guide the clinical practice towards an earlier coma arousal. A systematic bibliographic search was undertaken using the principal search engines (Pubmed, Embase, Ovid and Cochrane databases) to locate the most pertinent studies. Traumatic injury is a highly individualized process, and subsequent impairments are dependent on multiple factors: this heterogeneity influences and determines therapeutic responses to the various interventions. PMID:24090192

  6. The Coma Recovery Scale Modified Score: a new scoring system for the Coma Recovery Scale-revised for assessment of patients with disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Sattin, Davide; Minati, Ludovico; Rossi, Davide; Covelli, Venusia; Giovannetti, Ambra M; Rosazza, Cristina; Bersano, Anna; Nigri, Anna; Leonardi, Matilde

    2015-12-01

    The differential diagnosis between vegetative state and minimally conscious state is still complex and the development of an evaluation systems is one of the challenging tasks for researchers and professionals. The Coma Recovery Scale-revised is considered the gold standard for clinical/behavioral assessment and for the differential diagnosis of patients with disorder of consciousness. However, the scale presents some limitations in that (i) scores may partially overlap between different diagnoses and (ii) there is an underlying assumption that if a patient is able to show higher-level behaviors, he/she is also able to show lower-level responses. In the present study, a procedure to calculate a modified Coma Recovery Scale-revised score is presented that attempts to avoid these problems. To exemplify this new scoring approach, 60 patients with disorder of consciousness were studied and the results showed the usefulness of the Modified Score. PMID:26465775

  7. Effect of auditory stimulation on traumatic coma duration in intensive care unit of Medical Sciences University of Mazandarn, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari; Araghiyansc, Fereshteh; Jafari, Hadayat; Gorgi, Ali Morad Heidari; Yazdani, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sensory deprivation is one of the common complications of coma patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a familiar voice to consciousness level in coma patients. Methods: A total of 13 patients with traumatic coma (8 ≥ Glasgow's coma scale [GCS]) admitted in ICU ward were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups. The experimental group was treated twice a daily each time 15 min with a familiar recorded MP3 sound for 2 weeks. The control group received only natural voices of environment. GCS applied to evaluate patients’ level of consciousness. Finding: Findings showed that duration to reach GCS = 15 was significantly shorter in the experimental group (χ2 = 12/96, P < 0/001). Conclusion: These findings imply that providing familiar auditory stimulation programs for coma patients in the ICU could be effective. PMID:24665243

  8. Coma imaging of comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf at Calar Alto in late July to mid August 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehnhardt, Hermann; Vanysek, Vladimir; Birkle, K.; Hopp, U.

    1992-01-01

    Comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf was observed on 1989/07/28+30 and on 1989/08/04+12(+14) with the 3.5 m telescope and the 0.8 m Schmidt camera at Calar Alto/Spain. The images exhibit a narrow plasma tail pointing into anti-solar direction. On 1989/07/30 a triple tail was found which can be interpreted as tail ray event. The coma isophotes show prominent asymmetries with the nucleus located on the tailward side of the isophote foci and with a slightly higher brightness in the Northern Hemisphere of the coma. A strong curved jet feature was detected in the coma on 1989/07/30. The jet extended at least 30,000 km into the sunward coma hemisphere. The rotation period of about 1.3 days, estimated from the curvature of the coma jet, needs verification by other observations.

  9. Evidence-based improvement of the National Trauma Triage Protocol: The Glasgow Coma Scale versus Glasgow Coma Scale motor subscale

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joshua B.; Forsythe, Raquel M.; Stassen, Nicole A.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Sperry, Jason L.; Gestring, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ideal triage uses simple criteria to identify severely injured patients. Glasgow Coma Scale motor (GCSm) may be easier for field use and was considered for the National Trauma Triage Protocol (NTTP). This study evaluated performance of the NTTP if GCSm is substituted for the current GCS score ≤ 13 criterion. METHODS Subjects in the National Trauma Data Bank undergoing scene transport were included. Presence of NTTP physiologic (Step 1) and anatomic (Step 2) criteria was determined. GCSm score ≤ 5 was defined as a positive criterion. Trauma center need (TCN) was defined as Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15, intensive care unit admission, urgent operation, or emergency department death. Test characteristics were calculated to predict TCN. Area under the curve was compared between GCSm and GCS scores, individually and within the NTTP. Logistic regression was used to determine the association of GCSm score ≤ 5 and GCS score ≤ 13 with TCN after adjusting for other triage criteria. Predicted versus actual TCN was compared. RESULTS There were 811,143 subjects. Sensitivity was lower (26.7% vs. 30.3%), specificity was higher (95.1% vs. 93.1%), and accuracy was similar (66.1% vs. 66.3%) for GCSm score ≤ 5 compared with GCS score ≤ 13. Incorporated into the NTTP Steps 1 + 2, GCSm score ≤ 5 traded sensitivity (60.4% vs. 62.1%) for specificity (67.1% vs. 65.7%) with similar accuracy (64.2% vs. 64.2%) to GCS score ≤ 13. There was no difference in the area under the curve between GCSm score ≤ 5 and GCS score ≤ 13 when incorporated into the NTTP Steps 1 + 2 (p = 0.10). GCSm score ≤ 5 had a stronger association with TCN (odds ratio, 3.37; 95% confidence interval, 3.27–3.48; p < 0.01) than GCS score ≤ 13 (odds ratio, 3.03; 95% confidence interval, 2.94–3.13; p < 0.01). GCSm had a better fit of predicted versus actual TCN than GCS at the lower end of the scales. CONCLUSION GCSm score ≤ 5 increases specificity at the expense of sensitivity

  10. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  11. Chromatic variation of aberration: the role of induced aberrations and raytrace direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, A.; Nobis, T.; Shafer, D.; Gross, H.

    2015-09-01

    The design and optimization process of an optical system contains several first order steps. The definition of the appropriate lens type and the fixation of the raytrace direction are some of them. The latter can be understood as a hidden assumption rather than an aware design step. This is usually followed by the determination of the paraxial lens layout calculated for the primary wavelength. It is obvious, that for this primary wavelength the paraxial calculations are independent of raytrace direction. Today, most of the lens designs are specified not to work only for one wavelength, but in a certain wavelength range. Considering such rays of other wavelengths, one can observe that depending on the direction there will already occur differences in the first order chromatic aberrations and additionally in the chromatic variation of the third-order aberrations. The reason for this effect are induced aberrations emerging from one surface to the following surfaces by perturbed ray heights and ray angles. It can be shown, that the total amount of surface-resolved first order chromatic aberrations and the chromatic variation of the five primary aberrations can be split into an intrinsic part and an induced part. The intrinsic part is independent of the raytrace direction whereas the induced part is not.

  12. 3D resolved mapping of optical aberrations in thick tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jun; Mahou, Pierre; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Débarre, Delphine

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple method for mapping optical aberrations with 3D resolution within thick samples. The method relies on the local measurement of the variation in image quality with externally applied aberrations. We discuss the accuracy of the method as a function of the signal strength and of the aberration amplitude and we derive the achievable resolution for the resulting measurements. We then report on measured 3D aberration maps in human skin biopsies and mouse brain slices. From these data, we analyse the consequences of tissue structure and refractive index distribution on aberrations and imaging depth in normal and cleared tissue samples. The aberration maps allow the estimation of the typical aplanetism region size over which aberrations can be uniformly corrected. This method and data pave the way towards efficient correction strategies for tissue imaging applications. PMID:22876353

  13. 3D multifocus astigmatism and compressed sensing (3D MACS) based superresolution reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaqing; Sun, Mingzhai; Gumpper, Kristyn; Chi, Yuejie; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule based superresolution techniques (STORM/PALM) achieve nanometer spatial resolution by integrating the temporal information of the switching dynamics of fluorophores (emitters). When emitter density is low for each frame, they are located to the nanometer resolution. However, when the emitter density rises, causing significant overlapping, it becomes increasingly difficult to accurately locate individual emitters. This is particularly apparent in three dimensional (3D) localization because of the large effective volume of the 3D point spread function (PSF). The inability to precisely locate the emitters at a high density causes poor temporal resolution of localization-based superresolution technique and significantly limits its application in 3D live cell imaging. To address this problem, we developed a 3D high-density superresolution imaging platform that allows us to precisely locate the positions of emitters, even when they are significantly overlapped in three dimensional space. Our platform involves a multi-focus system in combination with astigmatic optics and an ℓ1-Homotopy optimization procedure. To reduce the intrinsic bias introduced by the discrete formulation of compressed sensing, we introduced a debiasing step followed by a 3D weighted centroid procedure, which not only increases the localization accuracy, but also increases the computation speed of image reconstruction. We implemented our algorithms on a graphic processing unit (GPU), which speeds up processing 10 times compared with central processing unit (CPU) implementation. We tested our method with both simulated data and experimental data of fluorescently labeled microtubules and were able to reconstruct a 3D microtubule image with 1000 frames (512×512) acquired within 20 seconds. PMID:25798314

  14. 3D multifocus astigmatism and compressed sensing (3D MACS) based superresolution reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiaqing; Sun, Mingzhai; Gumpper, Kristyn; Chi, Yuejie; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-03-01

    Single molecule based superresolution techniques (STORM/PALM) achieve nanometer spatial resolution by integrating the temporal information of the switching dynamics of fluorophores (emitters). When emitter density is low for each frame, they are located to the nanometer resolution. However, when the emitter density rises, causing significant overlapping, it becomes increasingly difficult to accurately locate individual emitters. This is particularly apparent in three dimensional (3D) localization because of the large effective volume of the 3D point spread function (PSF). The inability to precisely locate the emitters at a high density causes poor temporal resolution of localization-based superresolution technique and significantly limits its application in 3D live cell imaging. To address this problem, we developed a 3D high-density superresolution imaging platform that allows us to precisely locate the positions of emitters, even when they are significantly overlapped in three dimensional space. Our platform involves a multi-focus system in combination with astigmatic optics and an ℓ 1-Homotopy optimization procedure. To reduce the intrinsic bias introduced by the discrete formulation of compressed sensing, we introduced a debiasing step followed by a 3D weighted centroid procedure, which not only increases the localization accuracy, but also increases the computation speed of image reconstruction. We implemented our algorithms on a graphic processing unit (GPU), which speeds up processing 10 times compared with central processing unit (CPU) implementation. We tested our method with both simulated data and experimental data of fluorescently labeled microtubules and were able to reconstruct a 3D microtubule image with 1000 frames (512×512) acquired within 20 seconds. PMID:25798314

  15. Aberration analysis of the putative projector for Lorenzo Lotto's Husband and wife: image analysis through computer ray-tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Dirk; Stork, David G.

    2008-02-01

    A recent theory claims that the late-Italian Renaissance painter Lorenzo Lotto secretly built a concave-mirror projector to project an image of a carpet onto his canvas and trace it during the execution of Husband and wife (c. 1543). Key evidence adduced to support this claim includes "perspective anomalies" and changes in "magnification" that the theory's proponents ascribe to Lotto refocusing his projector to overcome its limitations in depth of field. We find, though, that there are important geometrical constraints upon such a putative optical projector not incorporated into the proponents' analyses, and that when properly included, the argument for the use of optics loses its force. We used Zemax optical design software to create a simple model of Lotto's studio and putative projector, and incorporated the optical properties proponents inferred from geometrical properties of the depicted carpet. Our central contribution derives from including the 116-cm-wide canvas screen; we found that this screen forces the incident light to strike the concave mirror at large angles (>= 15°) and that this, in turn, means that the projected image would reveal severe off-axis aberrations, particularly astigmatism. Such aberrations are roughly as severe as the defocus blur claimed to have led Lotto to refocus the projector. In short, we find that the projected images would not have gone in and out of focus in the way claimed by proponents, a result that undercuts their claim that Lotto used a projector for this painting. We speculate on the value of further uses of sophisticated ray-tracing analyses in the study of fine arts.

  16. Design and Performance Assessment of a Stable Astigmatic Herriott Cell for Trace Gas Measurements on Airborne Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyroff, Christoph; Fried, Alan; Richter, Dirk; Walega, James G.; Zahniser, Mark S.; McManus, J. Barry

    2005-01-01

    The present paper discusses a new, more stable, astigmatic Herriott cell employing carbon fiber stabilizing rods. Laboratory tests using a near-IR absorption feature of CO at 1564.168-nm revealed a factor of two improvement in measurement stability compared with the present commercial design when the sampling pressure was changed by +/-2 Torr around 50 Torr. This new cell should significantly enhance our efforts to measure trace gases employing pathlengths of 100 to 200-meters on airborne platforms with minimum detectable line center absorbances of less than 10(exp -6).

  17. Design and performance of an astigmatism-compensated self-mode-locked ring-cavity Ti:sapphire laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.; Dai, J.; Wang, Q.

    1996-12-31

    Based on the nonlinear ABCD matrix and the renormalized q-parameter for Gaussian-beam propagation, self-focusing in conjunction with a spatial gain profile for self-mode locking in a ring-cavity Ti:sapphire laser is analyzed. In the experiment, an astigmatism-compensated self-mode-locked ring-cavity Ti:sapphire laser is demonstrated, and self-mode-locked operation is achieved in both bidirection and unidirection with pulse durations as short as 36 fs and 32 fs, respectively. The experimental observations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  18. Two well-corrected four-mirror telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D.

    1974-01-01

    A study has been conducted of a configuration resembling that of a Cassegrain telescope with two nested mirrors in the plane of the primary and two nested mirrors in the plane of the secondary. The focal plane was located in the plane of the first and the third mirror. The four surfaces available in the device for corrections made it possible to correct for third-order spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism, and distortion.

  19. H-ATLAS: the far-infrared properties of galaxies in and around the Coma cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, C.; Davies, J. I.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.; Eales, S.; Bourne, N.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R.; Maddox, S.; Sansom, A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Davis, T.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a far-infrared survey of the Coma cluster and the galaxy filament it resides within. Our survey covers an area of ˜150 deg2 observed by Herschel H-ATLAS (Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey) in five bands at 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm. The SDSS spectroscopic survey (mr ≤ 17.8) is used to define an area (within the virial radius) and redshift selected (4268 < v < 9700 km s-1) sample of 744 Coma cluster galaxies - the Coma Cluster Catalogue. For comparison, we also define a sample of 951 galaxies in the connecting filament - the Coma Filament Catalogue. The optical positions and parameters are used to define appropriate apertures to measure each galaxy's far-infrared emission. We have detected 99 of 744 (13 per cent) and 422 of 951 (44 per cent) of the cluster and filament galaxies in the SPIRE 250 μm band. We consider the relative detection rates of galaxies of different morphological types finding that it is only the S0/Sa population that shows clear differences between the cluster and filament. We find no differences between the dust masses and temperatures of cluster and filament galaxies with the exception of early-type galaxy dust temperatures, which are significantly hotter in the cluster than in the filament (X-ray heating?). From a chemical evolution model, we find no evidence for different evolutionary processes (gas loss or infall) between galaxies in the cluster and filament.

  20. Spatial and temporal variations in the column density distribution of comet Halley's CN coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Rita; Schlosser, W.; Meisser, W.; Koczet, P.; Celnik, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Mean radial column density profiles of comet P/Halley's CN coma were derived by combining photographic and photoelectric observations. The shape of the profiles as well as their temporal variations were analyzed in detail and compared with the results of other CN observations of the comet.