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Sample records for aberration corrected photoemission

  1. Hartmann characterization of the PEEM-3 aberration-corrected X-ray photoemission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Scholl, A; Marcus, M A; Doran, A; Nasiatka, J R; Young, A T; MacDowell, A A; Streubel, R; Kent, N; Feng, J; Wan, W; Padmore, H A

    2018-05-01

    Aberration correction by an electron mirror dramatically improves the spatial resolution and transmission of photoemission electron microscopes. We will review the performance of the recently installed aberration corrector of the X-ray Photoemission Electron Microscope PEEM-3 and show a large improvement in the efficiency of the electron optics. Hartmann testing is introduced as a quantitative method to measure the geometrical aberrations of a cathode lens electron microscope. We find that aberration correction leads to an order of magnitude reduction of the spherical aberrations, suggesting that a spatial resolution of below 100 nm is possible at 100% transmission of the optics when using x-rays. We demonstrate this improved performance by imaging test patterns employing element and magnetic contrast. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Progress on PEEM3 -- An Aberration Corrected X-Ray Photoemission Electron Microscope at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, A. A.; Feng, J.; DeMello, A.

    2007-01-19

    A new ultrahigh-resolution photoemission electron microscope called PEEM3 is being developed and built at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). An electron mirror combined with a much-simplified magnetic dipole separator is to be used to provide simultaneous correction of spherical and chromatic aberrations. It is installed on an elliptically polarized undulator (EPU) beamline, and will be operated with very high spatial resolution and high flux to study the composition, structure, electric and magnetic properties of complex materials. The instrument has been designed and is described. The instrumental hardware is being deployed in 2 phases. The first phase is the deployment ofmore » a standard PEEM type microscope consisting of the standard linear array of electrostatic electron lenses. The second phase will be the installation of the aberration corrected upgrade to improve resolution and throughput. This paper describes progress as the instrument enters the commissioning part of the first phase.« less

  3. Progress on PEEM3 - An Aberration Corrected X-Ray PhotoemissionElectron Microscope at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, Alastair A.; Feng, J.; DeMello, A.

    2006-05-20

    A new ultrahigh-resolution photoemission electron microscope called PEEM3 is being developed and built at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). An electron mirror combined with a much-simplified magnetic dipole separator is to be used to provide simultaneous correction of spherical and chromatic aberrations. It is installed on an elliptically polarized undulator (EPU) beamline, and will be operated with very high spatial resolution and high flux to study the composition, structure, electric and magnetic properties of complex materials. The instrument has been designed and is described. The instrumental hardware is being deployed in 2 phases. The first phase is the deployment ofmore » a standard PEEM type microscope consisting of the standard linear array of electrostatic electron lenses. The second phase will be the installation of the aberration corrected upgrade to improve resolution and throughput. This paper describes progress as the instrument enters the commissioning part of the first phase.« less

  4. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, M.; Hankla, A.

    1996-07-09

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90{degree} such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system. 5 figs.

  5. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, Mark; Hankla, Allen

    1996-01-01

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90.degree. such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system.

  6. Pulse compressor with aberration correction

    SciTech Connect

    Mankos, Marian

    In this SBIR project, Electron Optica, Inc. (EOI) is developing an electron mirror-based pulse compressor attachment to new and retrofitted dynamic transmission electron microscopes (DTEMs) and ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) cameras for improving the temporal resolution of these instruments from the characteristic range of a few picoseconds to a few nanoseconds and beyond, into the sub-100 femtosecond range. The improvement will enable electron microscopes and diffraction cameras to better resolve the dynamics of reactions in the areas of solid state physics, chemistry, and biology. EOI’s pulse compressor technology utilizes the combination of electron mirror optics and a magnetic beam separatormore » to compress the electron pulse. The design exploits the symmetry inherent in reversing the electron trajectory in the mirror in order to compress the temporally broadened beam. This system also simultaneously corrects the chromatic and spherical aberration of the objective lens for improved spatial resolution. This correction will be found valuable as the source size is reduced with laser-triggered point source emitters. With such emitters, it might be possible to significantly reduce the illuminated area and carry out ultrafast diffraction experiments from small regions of the sample, e.g. from individual grains or nanoparticles. During phase I, EOI drafted a set of candidate pulse compressor architectures and evaluated the trade-offs between temporal resolution and electron bunch size to achieve the optimum design for two particular applications with market potential: increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of UEDs, and increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of DTEMs. Specialized software packages that have been developed by MEBS, Ltd. were used to calculate the electron optical properties of the key pulse compressor components: namely, the magnetic prism, the electron mirror, and the electron lenses. In the final step, these results were

  7. Iteration of ultrasound aberration correction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasoey, Svein-Erik; Angelsen, Bjoern; Varslot, Trond

    2004-05-01

    Aberration in ultrasound medical imaging is usually modeled by time-delay and amplitude variations concentrated on the transmitting/receiving array. This filter process is here denoted a TDA filter. The TDA filter is an approximation to the physical aberration process, which occurs over an extended part of the human body wall. Estimation of the TDA filter, and performing correction on transmit and receive, has proven difficult. It has yet to be shown that this method works adequately for severe aberration. Estimation of the TDA filter can be iterated by retransmitting a corrected signal and re-estimate until a convergence criterion is fulfilled (adaptive imaging). Two methods for estimating time-delay and amplitude variations in receive signals from random scatterers have been developed. One method correlates each element signal with a reference signal. The other method use eigenvalue decomposition of the receive cross-spectrum matrix, based upon a receive energy-maximizing criterion. Simulations of iterating aberration correction with a TDA filter have been investigated to study its convergence properties. A weak and strong human-body wall model generated aberration. Both emulated the human abdominal wall. Results after iteration improve aberration correction substantially, and both estimation methods converge, even for the case of strong aberration.

  8. Optical advantages of astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooyen, De Wet; Schöttl, Peter; Bern, Gregor; Heimsath, Anna; Nitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats adapt their shape in dependence of the incidence angle of the sun on the heliostat. Simulations show that this optical correction leads to a higher concentration ratio at the target and thus in a decrease in required receiver aperture in particular for smaller heliostat fields.

  9. Aberration correction for charged particle lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Eric; Zhu, Xieqing; Rouse, John A.; Liu, Haoning

    2001-12-01

    At present, the throughput of projection-type charge particle lithography systems, such as PREVAIL and SCALPEL, is limited primarily by the combined effects of field curvature in the projection lenses and Coulomb interaction in the particle beam. These are fundamental physical limitations, inherent in charged particle optics, so there seems little scope for significantly improving the design of such systems, using conventional rotationally symmetric electron lenses. This paper explores the possibility of overcoming the field aberrations of round electron lense, by using a novel aberration corrector, proposed by Professor H. Rose of University of Darmstadt, called a hexapole planator. In this scheme, a set of round lenses is first used to simultaneously correct distortion and coma. The hexapole planator is then used to correct the field curvature and astigmatism, and to create a negative spherical aberration. The size of the transfer lenses around the planator can then be adjusted to zero the residual spherical aberration. In a way, an electron optical projection system is obtained that is free of all primary geometrical aberrations. In this paper, the feasibility of this concept has been studied with a computer simulation. The simulations verify that this scheme can indeed work, for both electrostatic and magnetic projection systems. Two design studies have been carried out. The first is for an electrostatic system that could be used for ion beam lithography, and the second is for a magnetic projection system for electron beam lithography. In both cases, designs have been achieved in which all primary third-order geometrical aberrations are totally eliminated.

  10. Correction of large amplitude wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, S. A.; Bierden, P. A.; Bifano, T. G.; Webb, R. H.; Burns, S.; Pappas, S.

    2005-12-01

    Recently, a number of research groups around the world have developed ophthalmic instruments capable of in vivo diffraction limited imaging of the human retina. Adaptive optics was used in these systems to compensate for the optical aberrations of the eye and provide high contrast, high resolution images. Such compensation uses a wavefront sensor and a wavefront corrector (usually a deformable mirror) coordinated in a closed- loop control system that continuously works to counteract aberrations. While those experiments produced promising results, the deformable mirrors have had insufficient range of motion to permit full correction of the large amplitude aberrations of the eye expected in a normal population of human subjects. Other retinal imaging systems developed to date with MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) DMs suffer similar limitations. This paper describes the design, manufacture and testing of a 6um stroke polysilicon surface micromachined deformable mirror that, coupled with an new optical method to double the effective stroke of the MEMS-DM, will permit diffraction-limited retinal imaging through dilated pupils in at least 90% of the human population. A novel optical design using spherical mirrors provides a double pass of the wavefront over the deformable mirror such that a 6um mirror displacement results in 12um of wavefront compensation which could correct for 24um of wavefront error. Details of this design are discussed. Testing of the effective wavefront modification was performed using a commercial wavefront sensor. Results are presented demonstrating improvement in the amplitude of wavefront control using an existing high degree of freedom MEMS deformable mirror.

  11. Astigmatism correction in x-ray scanning photoemission microscope with use of elliptical zone plate

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, H.; Ko, C.; Anderson, E.

    1992-03-02

    We report the impact of an elliptical, high resolution zone plate on the performance of an initially astigmatic soft x-ray scanning photoemission microscope. A zone plate with carefully calibrated eccentricity has been used to eliminate astigmatism arising from transport optics, and an improvement of about a factor of 3 in spatial resolution was achieved. The resolution is still dominated by the source size and chromatic aberrations rather than by diffraction and coma, and a further gain of about a factor of 2 in resolution is possible. Sub 100 nm photoemission microscopy with primary photoelectrons is now within reach.

  12. Aberration corrected STEM by means of diffraction gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Linck, Martin; Ercius, Peter A.; Pierce, Jordan S.

    In the past 15 years, the advent of aberration correction technology in electron microscopy has enabled materials analysis on the atomic scale. This is made possible by precise arrangements of multipole electrodes and magnetic solenoids to compensate the aberrations inherent to any focusing element of an electron microscope. In this paper, we describe an alternative method to correct for the spherical aberration of the objective lens in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using a passive, nanofabricated diffractive optical element. This holographic device is installed in the probe forming aperture of a conventional electron microscope and can be designed to removemore » arbitrarily complex aberrations from the electron's wave front. In this work, we show a proof-of-principle experiment that demonstrates successful correction of the spherical aberration in STEM by means of such a grating corrector (GCOR). Our GCOR enables us to record aberration-corrected high-resolution high-angle annular dark field (HAADF-) STEM images, although yet without advancement in probe current and resolution. Finally, improvements in this technology could provide an economical solution for aberration-corrected high-resolution STEM in certain use scenarios.« less

  13. Aberration corrected STEM by means of diffraction gratings

    DOE PAGES

    Linck, Martin; Ercius, Peter A.; Pierce, Jordan S.; ...

    2017-06-12

    In the past 15 years, the advent of aberration correction technology in electron microscopy has enabled materials analysis on the atomic scale. This is made possible by precise arrangements of multipole electrodes and magnetic solenoids to compensate the aberrations inherent to any focusing element of an electron microscope. In this paper, we describe an alternative method to correct for the spherical aberration of the objective lens in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using a passive, nanofabricated diffractive optical element. This holographic device is installed in the probe forming aperture of a conventional electron microscope and can be designed to removemore » arbitrarily complex aberrations from the electron's wave front. In this work, we show a proof-of-principle experiment that demonstrates successful correction of the spherical aberration in STEM by means of such a grating corrector (GCOR). Our GCOR enables us to record aberration-corrected high-resolution high-angle annular dark field (HAADF-) STEM images, although yet without advancement in probe current and resolution. Finally, improvements in this technology could provide an economical solution for aberration-corrected high-resolution STEM in certain use scenarios.« less

  14. Aberration correction results in the IBM STEM instrument.

    PubMed

    Batson, P E

    2003-09-01

    Results from the installation of aberration correction in the IBM 120 kV STEM argue that a sub-angstrom probe size has been achieved. Results and the experimental methods used to obtain them are described here. Some post-experiment processing is necessary to demonstrate the probe size of about 0.078 nm. While the promise of aberration correction is demonstrated, we remain at the very threshold of practicality, given the very stringent stability requirements.

  15. Correcting highly aberrated eyes using large-stroke adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, Ramkumar; Ahmad, Kamran; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2007-11-01

    To investigate the optical performance of a large-stroke deformable mirror in correcting large aberrations in highly aberrated eyes. A large-stroke deformable mirror (Mirao 52D; Imagine Eyes) and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor were used in an adaptive optics system. Closed-loop correction of the static aberrations of a phase plate designed for an advanced keratoconic eye was performed for a 6-mm pupil. The same adaptive optics system was also used to correct the aberrations in one eye each of two moderate keratoconic and three normal human eyes for a 6-mm pupil. With closed-loop correction of the phase plate, the total root-mean-square (RMS) over a 6-mm pupil was reduced from 3.54 to 0.04 microm in 30 to 40 iterations, corresponding to 3 to 4 seconds. Adaptive optics closed-loop correction reduced an average total RMS of 1.73+/-0.998 to 0.10+/-0.017 microm (higher order RMS of 0.39+/-0.124 to 0.06+/-0.004 microm) in the three normal eyes and 2.73+/-1.754 to 0.10+/-0.001 microm (higher order RMS of 1.82+/-1.058 to 0.05+/-0.017 microm) in the two keratoconic eyes. Aberrations in both normal and highly aberrated eyes were successfully corrected using the large-stroke deformable mirror to provide almost perfect optical quality. This mirror can be a powerful tool to assess the limit of visual performance achievable after correcting the aberrations, especially in eyes with abnormal corneal profiles.

  16. Generalized Alvarez lens for correction of laser aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    LaFortune, K N

    2004-12-02

    The Alvarez lens (US Patent No. 3,305,294 [1]) is a compact aberration corrector. The original design emphasized in the patent consists of a pair of adjacent optical elements that provide a variable focus. A lens system with a variable effective focal length is nothing new. Such systems are widely used in cameras, for example. It is the compactness and simplicity of operation that is the key advantage of the Alvarez lens. All of the complexity is folded into the design and fabrication of the optical elements. As mentioned in the Alvarez patent [1] and elaborated upon in Palusinski et al.more » [2], if one is willing to fold even more complexity into the optical elements, it is possible to correct higher-order aberrations as well. There is no theoretical limit to the number or degree of wavefront distortions that can be corrected. The only limitation is that there must be a fixed relative magnitude of the aberrations. Independent correction of each component of the higher-order aberrations can not be performed without additional elements and degrees of freedom [3]. Under some circumstances, coupling may be observed between different aberrations. This can be mitigated with the appropriate choice of design parameters. New methods are available today that increase the practicality of making higher-order aberration correctors [4,5,6].« less

  17. Lesion Generation Through Ribs Using Histotripsy Therapy Without Aberration Correction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yohan; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using high-intensity pulsed therapeutic ultrasound, or histotripsy, to non-invasively generate lesions through the ribs. Histotripsy therapy mechanically ablates tissue through the generation of a cavitation bubble cloud, which occurs when the focal pressure exceeds a certain threshold. We hypothesize that histotripsy can generate precise lesions through the ribs without aberration correction if the main lobe retains its shape and exceeds the cavitation initiation threshold and the secondary lobes remain below the threshold. To test this hypothesis, a 750-kHz focused transducer was used to generate lesions in tissue-mimicking phantoms with and without the presence of rib aberrators. In all cases, 8000 pulses with 16 to 18 MPa peak rarefactional pressure at a repetition frequency of 100 Hz were applied without aberration correction. Despite the high secondary lobes introduced by the aberrators, high-speed imaging showed that bubble clouds were generated exclusively at the focus, resulting in well-confined lesions with comparable dimensions. Collateral damage from secondary lobes was negligible, caused by single bubbles that failed to form a cloud. These results support our hypothesis, suggesting that histotripsy has a high tolerance for aberrated fields and can generate confined focal lesions through rib obstacles without aberration correction. PMID:22083767

  18. Lesion generation through ribs using histotripsy therapy without aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yohan; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2011-11-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using high-intensity pulsed therapeutic ultrasound, or histotripsy, to non-invasively generate lesions through the ribs. Histotripsy therapy mechanically ablates tissue through the generation of a cavitation bubble cloud, which occurs when the focal pressure exceeds a certain threshold. We hypothesize that histotripsy can generate precise lesions through the ribs without aberration correction if the main lobe retains its shape and exceeds the cavitation initiation threshold and the secondary lobes remain below the threshold. To test this hypothesis, a 750-kHz focused transducer was used to generate lesions in tissue-mimicking phantoms with and without the presence of rib aberrators. In all cases, 8000 pulses with 16 to 18 MPa peak rarefactional pressure at a repetition frequency of 100 Hz were applied without aberration correction. Despite the high secondary lobes introduced by the aberrators, high-speed imaging showed that bubble clouds were generated exclusively at the focus, resulting in well-confined lesions with comparable dimensions. Collateral damage from secondary lobes was negligible, caused by single bubbles that failed to form a cloud. These results support our hypothesis, suggesting that histotripsy has a high tolerance for aberrated fields and can generate confined focal lesions through rib obstacles without aberration correction.

  19. An electron microscope for the aberration-corrected era.

    PubMed

    Krivanek, O L; Corbin, G J; Dellby, N; Elston, B F; Keyse, R J; Murfitt, M F; Own, C S; Szilagyi, Z S; Woodruff, J W

    2008-02-01

    Improved resolution made possible by aberration correction has greatly increased the demands on the performance of all parts of high-end electron microscopes. In order to meet these demands, we have designed and built an entirely new scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The microscope includes a flexible illumination system that allows the properties of its probe to be changed on-the-fly, a third-generation aberration corrector which corrects all geometric aberrations up to fifth order, an ultra-responsive yet stable five-axis sample stage, and a flexible configuration of optimized detectors. The microscope features many innovations, such as a modular column assembled from building blocks that can be stacked in almost any order, in situ storage and cleaning facilities for up to five samples, computer-controlled loading of samples into the column, and self-diagnosing electronics. The microscope construction is described, and examples of its capabilities are shown.

  20. Nanowire growth kinetics in aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chou, Yi -Chia; Panciera, Federico; Reuter, Mark C.; ...

    2016-03-15

    Here, we visualize atomic level dynamics during Si nanowire growth using aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy, and compare with lower pressure results from ultra-high vacuum microscopy. We discuss the importance of higher pressure observations for understanding growth mechanisms and describe protocols to minimize effects of the higher pressure background gas.

  1. Intrinsic instability of aberration-corrected electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Schramm, S M; van der Molen, S J; Tromp, R M

    2012-10-19

    Aberration-corrected microscopes with subatomic resolution will impact broad areas of science and technology. However, the experimentally observed lifetime of the corrected state is just a few minutes. Here we show that the corrected state is intrinsically unstable; the higher its quality, the more unstable it is. Analyzing the contrast transfer function near optimum correction, we define an "instability budget" which allows a rational trade-off between resolution and stability. Unless control systems are developed to overcome these challenges, intrinsic instability poses a fundamental limit to the resolution practically achievable in the electron microscope.

  2. Holographic optical system for aberration corrections in laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, R. C.; Case, S. K.; Schock, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    An optical system containing multifaceted holographic optical elements (HOEs) has been developed to correct for aberrations introduced by nonflat windows in laser Doppler velocimetry. The multifacet aberration correction approach makes it possible to record on one plate many sets of adjacent HOEs that address different measurement volume locations. By using 5-mm-diameter facets, it is practical to place 10-20 sets of holograms on one 10 x 12.5-cm plate, so that the procedure of moving the entire optical system to examine different locations may not be necessary. The holograms are recorded in dichromated gelatin and therefore are nonabsorptive and suitable for use with high-power argon laser beams. Low f-number optics coupled with a 90-percent efficient distortion-correcting hologram in the collection side of the system yield high optical efficiency.

  3. Integral image rendering procedure for aberration correction and size measurement.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Holger; Ihrig, Andreas; Ebenau, Melanie; Flühs, Dirk; Spaan, Bernhard; Eichmann, Marion

    2014-05-20

    The challenge in rendering integral images is to use as much information preserved by the light field as possible to reconstruct a captured scene in a three-dimensional way. We propose a rendering algorithm based on the projection of rays through a detailed simulation of the optical path, considering all the physical properties and locations of the optical elements. The rendered images contain information about the correct size of imaged objects without the need to calibrate the imaging device. Additionally, aberrations of the optical system may be corrected, depending on the setup of the integral imaging device. We show simulation data that illustrates the aberration correction ability and experimental data from our plenoptic camera, which illustrates the capability of our proposed algorithm to measure size and distance. We believe this rendering procedure will be useful in the future for three-dimensional ophthalmic imaging of the human retina.

  4. Harmonic source wavefront aberration correction for ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dianis, Scott W.; von Ramm, Olaf T.

    2011-01-01

    A method is proposed which uses a lower-frequency transmit to create a known harmonic acoustical source in tissue suitable for wavefront correction without a priori assumptions of the target or requiring a transponder. The measurement and imaging steps of this method were implemented on the Duke phased array system with a two-dimensional (2-D) array. The method was tested with multiple electronic aberrators [0.39π to 1.16π radians root-mean-square (rms) at 4.17 MHz] and with a physical aberrator 0.17π radians rms at 4.17 MHz) in a variety of imaging situations. Corrections were quantified in terms of peak beam amplitude compared to the unaberrated case, with restoration between 0.6 and 36.6 dB of peak amplitude with a single correction. Standard phantom images before and after correction were obtained and showed both visible improvement and 14 dB contrast improvement after correction. This method, when combined with previous phase correction methods, may be an important step that leads to improved clinical images. PMID:21303031

  5. Reconstructive correction of aberrations in nuclear particle spectrographs

    SciTech Connect

    Berz, M.; Joh, K.; Nolen, J.A.

    A method is presented that allows the reconstruction of trajectories in particle spectrographs and the reconstructive correction of residual aberrations that otherwise limit the resolution. Using a computed or fitted high order transfer map that describes the uncorrected aberrations of the spectrograph, it is possible to calculate a map via an analytic recursion relation that allows the computation of the corrected data of interest such as reaction energy and scattering angle as well as the reconstructed trajectories in terms of position measurements in two planes near the focal plane. The technique is only limited by the accuracy of the positionmore » measurements, the incoherent spot sizes, and the accuracy of the transfer map. In practice the method can be expressed as an inversion of a nonlinear map and implemented in the differential algebraic framework. The method is applied to correct residual aberrations in the S800 spectrograph which is under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University and to two other high resolution spectrographs.« less

  6. Joint denoising, demosaicing, and chromatic aberration correction for UHD video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanov, Ljubomir; Philips, Wilfried; Damstra, Klaas Jan; Ellenbroek, Frank

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution video capture is crucial for numerous applications such as surveillance, security, industrial inspection, medical imaging and digital entertainment. In the last two decades, we are witnessing a dramatic increase of the spatial resolution and the maximal frame rate of video capturing devices. In order to achieve further resolution increase, numerous challenges will be facing us. Due to the reduced size of the pixel, the amount of light also reduces, leading to the increased noise level. Moreover, the reduced pixel size makes the lens imprecisions more pronounced, which especially applies to chromatic aberrations. Even in the case when high quality lenses are used some chromatic aberration artefacts will remain. Next, noise level additionally increases due to the higher frame rates. To reduce the complexity and the price of the camera, one sensor captures all three colors, by relying on Color Filter Arrays. In order to obtain full resolution color image, missing color components have to be interpolated, i.e. demosaicked, which is more challenging than in the case of lower resolution, due to the increased noise and aberrations. In this paper, we propose a new method, which jointly performs chromatic aberration correction, denoising and demosaicking. By jointly performing the reduction of all artefacts, we are reducing the overall complexity of the system and the introduction of new artefacts. In order to reduce possible flicker we also perform temporal video enhancement. We evaluate the proposed method on a number of publicly available UHD sequences and on sequences recorded in our studio.

  7. Spherical aberration correction with threefold symmetric line currents.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Shahedul; Ito, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Ryuji; Takaoka, Akio; Munro, Eric

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that N-fold symmetric line current (henceforth denoted as N-SYLC) produces 2N-pole magnetic fields. In this paper, a threefold symmetric line current (N3-SYLC in short) is proposed for correcting 3rd order spherical aberration of round lenses. N3-SYLC can be realized without using magnetic materials, which makes it free of the problems of hysteresis, inhomogeneity and saturation. We investigate theoretically the basic properties of an N3-SYLC configuration which can in principle be realized by simple wires. By optimizing the parameters of a system with beam energy of 5.5keV, the required excitation current for correcting 3rd order spherical aberration coefficient of 400 mm is less than 1AT, and the residual higher order aberrations can be kept sufficiently small to obtain beam size of less than 1 nm for initial slopes up to 5 mrad. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcranial phase aberration correction using beam simulations and MR-ARFI

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Urvi, E-mail: urvi.vyas@gmail.com; Kaye, Elena; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery is a noninvasive technique for causing selective tissue necrosis. Variations in density, thickness, and shape of the skull cause aberrations in the location and shape of the focal zone. In this paper, the authors propose a hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique to achieve aberration correction for transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. The technique uses ultrasound beam propagation simulations with MR Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging (MR-ARFI) to correct skull-caused phase aberrations. Methods: Skull-based numerical aberrations were obtained from a MR-guided focused ultrasound patient treatment and were added to all elements of the InSightec conformal bone focusedmore » ultrasound surgery transducer during transmission. In the first experiment, the 1024 aberrations derived from a human skull were condensed into 16 aberrations by averaging over the transducer area of 64 elements. In the second experiment, all 1024 aberrations were applied to the transducer. The aberrated MR-ARFI images were used in the hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique to find 16 estimated aberrations. These estimated aberrations were subtracted from the original aberrations to result in the corrected images. Each aberration experiment (16-aberration and 1024-aberration) was repeated three times. Results: The corrected MR-ARFI image was compared to the aberrated image and the ideal image (image with zero aberrations) for each experiment. The hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique resulted in an average increase in focal MR-ARFI phase of 44% for the 16-aberration case and 52% for the 1024-aberration case, and recovered 83% and 39% of the ideal MR-ARFI phase for the 16-aberrations and 1024-aberration case, respectively. Conclusions: Using one MR-ARFI image and noa priori information about the applied phase aberrations, the hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique improved the maximum MR-ARFI phase of the beam's focus.« less

  9. Active Correction of Aberrations of Low-Quality Telescope Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Chen, Yijian

    2007-01-01

    A system of active optics that includes a wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror has been demonstrated to be an effective means of partly correcting wavefront aberrations introduced by fixed optics (lenses and mirrors) in telescopes. It is envisioned that after further development, active optics would be used to reduce wavefront aberrations of about one wave or less in telescopes having aperture diameters of the order of meters or tens of meters. Although this remaining amount of aberration would be considered excessive in scientific applications in which diffraction-limited performance is required, it would be acceptable for free-space optical- communication applications at wavelengths of the order of 1 m. To prevent misunderstanding, it is important to state the following: The technological discipline of active optics, in which the primary or secondary mirror of a telescope is directly and dynamically tilted, distorted, and/or otherwise varied to reduce wavefront aberrations, has existed for decades. The term active optics does not necessarily mean the same thing as does adaptive optics, even though active optics and adaptive optics are related. The term "adaptive optics" is often used to refer to wavefront correction at speeds characterized by frequencies ranging up to between hundreds of hertz and several kilohertz high enough to enable mitigation of adverse effects of fluctuations in atmospheric refraction upon propagation of light beams. The term active optics usually appears in reference to wavefront correction at significantly lower speeds, characterized by times ranging from about 1 second to as long as minutes. Hence, the novelty of the present development lies, not in the basic concept of active or adaptive optics, but in the envisioned application of active optics in conjunction with a deformable mirror to achieve acceptably small wavefront errors in free-space optical communication systems that include multi-meter-diameter telescope mirrors that are

  10. Influence of Misalignment on High-Order Aberration Correction for Normal Human Eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hao-Xin; Xu, Bing; Xue, Li-Xia; Dai, Yun; Liu, Qian; Rao, Xue-Jun

    2008-04-01

    Although a compensation device can correct aberrations of human eyes, the effect will be degraded by its misalignment, especially for high-order aberration correction. We calculate the positioning tolerance of correction device for high-order aberrations, and within what degree the correcting effect is better than low-order aberration (defocus and astigmatism) correction. With fixed certain misalignment within the positioning tolerance, we calculate the residual wavefront rms aberration of the first-6 to first-35 terms along with the 3rd-5th terms of aberrations corrected, and the combined first-13 terms of aberrations are also studied under the same quantity of misalignment. However, the correction effect of high-order aberrations does not meliorate along with the increase of the high-order terms under some misalignment, moreover, some simple combined terms correction can achieve similar result as complex combinations. These results suggest that it is unnecessary to correct too much the terms of high-order aberrations which are difficult to accomplish in practice, and gives confidence to correct high-order aberrations out of the laboratory.

  11. High order aberration and straylight evaluation after cataract surgery with implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting monofocal intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, Florian T A; Tandogan, Tamer; Khoramnia, Ramin; Auffarth, Gerd U

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the quality of vision in respect to high order aberrations and straylight perception after implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting, monofocal intraocular lens (IOL). METHODS Twenty-one patients (34 eyes) aged 50 to 83y underwent cataract surgery with implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting IOL (Tecnis ZCB00, Abbott Medical Optics). Three months after surgery they were examined for uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), contrast sensitivity (CS) under photopic and mesopic conditions with and without glare source, ocular high order aberrations (HOA, Zywave II) and retinal straylight (C-Quant). RESULTS Postoperatively, patients achieved a postoperative CDVA of 0.0 logMAR or better in 97.1% of eyes. Mean values of high order abberations were +0.02±0.27 (primary coma components) and -0.04±0.16 (spherical aberration term). Straylight values of the C-Quant were 1.35±0.44 log which is within normal range of age matched phakic patients. The CS measurements under mesopic and photopic conditions in combination with and without glare did not show any statistical significance in the patient group observed (P≥0.28). CONCLUSION The implantation of an aspherical aberration correcting monofocal IOL after cataract surgery resulted in very low residual higher order aberration (HOA) and normal straylight. PMID:26309872

  12. Refractive Changes Induced by Spherical Aberration in Laser Correction Procedures: An Adaptive Optics Study.

    PubMed

    Amigó, Alfredo; Martinez-Sorribes, Paula; Recuerda, Margarita

    2017-07-01

    To study the effect on vision of induced negative and positive spherical aberration within the range of laser vision correction procedures. In 10 eyes (mean age: 35.8 years) under cyclopegic conditions, spherical aberration values from -0.75 to +0.75 µm in 0.25-µm steps were induced by an adaptive optics system. Astigmatism and spherical refraction were corrected, whereas the other natural aberrations remained untouched. Visual acuity, depth of focus defined as the interval of vision for which the target was still perceived acceptable, contrast sensitivity, and change in spherical refraction associated with the variation in pupil diameter from 6 to 2.5 mm were measured. A refractive change of 1.60 D/µm of induced spherical aberration was obtained. Emmetropic eyes became myopic when positive spherical aberration was induced and hyperopic when negative spherical aberration was induced (R 2 = 81%). There were weak correlations between spherical aberration and visual acuity or depth of focus (R 2 = 2% and 3%, respectively). Contrast sensitivity worsened with the increment of spherical aberration (R 2 = 59%). When pupil size decreased, emmetropic eyes became hyperopic when preexisting spherical aberration was positive and myopic when spherical aberration was negative, with an average refractive change of 0.60 D/µm of spherical aberration (R 2 = 54%). An inverse linear correlation exists between the refractive state of the eye and spherical aberration induced within the range of laser vision correction. Small values of spherical aberration do not worsen visual acuity or depth of focus, but positive spherical aberration may induce night myopia. In addition, the changes in spherical refraction when the pupil constricts may worsen near vision when positive spherical aberration is induced or improve it when spherical aberration is negative. [J Refract Surg. 2017;33(7):470-474.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Correction of ultrasonic wave aberration with a time delay and amplitude filter.

    PubMed

    Måsøy, Svein-Erik; Johansen, Tonni F; Angelsen, Bjørn

    2003-04-01

    Two-dimensional simulations with propagation through two different heterogeneous human body wall models have been performed to analyze different correction filters for ultrasonic wave aberration due to forward wave propagation. The different models each produce most of the characteristic aberration effects such as phase aberration, relatively strong amplitude aberration, and waveform deformation. Simulations of wave propagation from a point source in the focus (60 mm) of a 20 mm transducer through the body wall models were performed. Center frequency of the pulse was 2.5 MHz. Corrections of the aberrations introduced by the two body wall models were evaluated with reference to the corrections obtained with the optimal filter: a generalized frequency-dependent phase and amplitude correction filter [Angelsen, Ultrasonic Imaging (Emantec, Norway, 2000), Vol. II]. Two correction filters were applied, a time delay filter, and a time delay and amplitude filter. Results showed that correction with a time delay filter produced substantial reduction of the aberration in both cases. A time delay and amplitude correction filter performed even better in both cases, and gave correction close to the ideal situation (no aberration). The results also indicated that the effect of the correction was very sensitive to the accuracy of the arrival time fluctuations estimate, i.e., the time delay correction filter.

  14. Sextupole system for the correction of spherical aberration

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, A.V.; Kopf, D.A.

    In an electron beam device in which an electron beam is developed and then focused by a lens to a particular spot, there is provided a means for eliminating spherical aberration. A sextupole electromagnetic lens is positioned between two focusing lenses. The interaction of the sextupole with the beam compensates for spherical aberration. (GHT)

  15. Statistical estimation of ultrasonic propagation path parameters for aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Waag, Robert C; Astheimer, Jeffrey P

    2005-05-01

    Parameters in a linear filter model for ultrasonic propagation are found using statistical estimation. The model uses an inhomogeneous-medium Green's function that is decomposed into a homogeneous-transmission term and a path-dependent aberration term. Power and cross-power spectra of random-medium scattering are estimated over the frequency band of the transmit-receive system by using closely situated scattering volumes. The frequency-domain magnitude of the aberration is obtained from a normalization of the power spectrum. The corresponding phase is reconstructed from cross-power spectra of subaperture signals at adjacent receive positions by a recursion. The subapertures constrain the receive sensitivity pattern to eliminate measurement system phase contributions. The recursion uses a Laplacian-based algorithm to obtain phase from phase differences. Pulse-echo waveforms were acquired from a point reflector and a tissue-like scattering phantom through a tissue-mimicking aberration path from neighboring volumes having essentially the same aberration path. Propagation path aberration parameters calculated from the measurements of random scattering through the aberration phantom agree with corresponding parameters calculated for the same aberrator and array position by using echoes from the point reflector. The results indicate the approach describes, in addition to time shifts, waveform amplitude and shape changes produced by propagation through distributed aberration under realistic conditions.

  16. Retinal image contrast obtained by a model eye with combined correction of chromatic and spherical aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Kazuhiko; Kayanuma, Hiroyuki; Lawu, Tjundewo; Negishi, Kazuno; Yamaguchi, Takefumi; Noda, Toru

    2011-01-01

    Correcting spherical and chromatic aberrations in vitro in human eyes provides substantial visual acuity and contrast sensitivity improvements. We found the same improvement in the retinal images using a model eye with/without correction of longitudinal chromatic aberrations (LCAs) and spherical aberrations (SAs). The model eye included an intraocular lens (IOL) and artificial cornea with human ocular LCAs and average human SAs. The optotypes were illuminated using a D65 light source, and the images were obtained using two-dimensional luminance colorimeter. The contrast improvement from the SA correction was higher than the LCA correction, indicating the benefit of an aspheric achromatic IOL. PMID:21698008

  17. Numerical analysis of wavefront aberration correction using multielectrode electrowetting-based devices.

    PubMed

    Zohrabi, Mo; Cormack, Robert H; Mccullough, Connor; Supekar, Omkar D; Gibson, Emily A; Bright, Victor M; Gopinath, Juliet T

    2017-12-11

    We present numerical simulations of multielectrode electrowetting devices used in a novel optical design to correct wavefront aberration. Our optical system consists of two multielectrode devices, preceded by a single fixed lens. The multielectrode elements function as adaptive optical devices that can be used to correct aberrations inherent in many imaging setups, biological samples, and the atmosphere. We are able to accurately simulate the liquid-liquid interface shape using computational fluid dynamics. Ray tracing analysis of these surfaces shows clear evidence of aberration correction. To demonstrate the strength of our design, we studied three different input aberrations mixtures that include astigmatism, coma, trefoil, and additional higher order aberration terms, with amplitudes as large as one wave at 633 nm.

  18. Nanofocusing with aberration-corrected rotationally parabolic refractive X-ray lenses

    DOE PAGES

    Seiboth, Frank; Wittwer, Felix; Scholz, Maria; ...

    2018-01-01

    Wavefront errors of rotationally parabolic refractive X-ray lenses made of beryllium (Be CRLs) have been recovered for various lens sets and X-ray beam configurations. Due to manufacturing via an embossing process, aberrations of individual lenses within the investigated ensemble are very similar. By deriving a mean single-lens deformation for the ensemble, aberrations of any arbitrary lens stack can be predicted from the ensemble with σ¯ = 0.034λ. Using these findings the expected focusing performance of current Be CRLs are modeled for relevant X-ray energies and bandwidths and it is shown that a correction of aberrations can be realised without priormore » lens characterization but simply based on the derived lens deformation. As a result, the performance of aberration-corrected Be CRLs is discussed and the applicability of aberration-correction demonstrated over wide X-ray energy ranges.« less

  19. Correcting the wavefront aberration of membrane mirror based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Wei, Yin; Chen, Xinhua; Tang, Minxue

    2014-11-01

    Membrane mirror with flexible polymer film substrate is a new-concept ultra lightweight mirror for space applications. Compared with traditional mirrors, membrane mirror has the advantages of lightweight, folding and deployable, low cost and etc. Due to the surface shape of flexible membrane mirror is easy to deviate from the design surface shape, it will bring wavefront aberration to the optical system. In order to solve this problem, a method of membrane mirror wavefront aberration correction based on the liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) will be studied in this paper. The wavefront aberration correction principle of LCSLM is described and the phase modulation property of a LCSLM is measured and analyzed firstly. Then the membrane mirror wavefront aberration correction system is designed and established according to the optical properties of a membrane mirror. The LCSLM and a Hartmann-Shack sensor are used as a wavefront corrector and a wavefront detector, respectively. The detected wavefront aberration is calculated and converted into voltage value on LCSLM for the mirror wavefront aberration correction by programming in Matlab. When in experiment, the wavefront aberration of a glass plane mirror with a diameter of 70 mm is measured and corrected for verifying the feasibility of the experiment system and the correctness of the program. The PV value and RMS value of distorted wavefront are reduced and near diffraction limited optical performance is achieved. On this basis, the wavefront aberration of the aperture center Φ25 mm in a membrane mirror with a diameter of 200 mm is corrected and the errors are analyzed. It provides a means of correcting the wavefront aberration of membrane mirror.

  20. High resolution imaging and wavefront aberration correction in plenoptic systems.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Sevilla, J M; Rodríguez-Ramos, L F; Montilla, I; Rodríguez-Ramos, J M

    2014-09-01

    Plenoptic imaging systems are becoming more common since they provide capabilities unattainable in conventional imaging systems, but one of their main limitations is the poor bidimensional resolution. Combining the wavefront phase measurement and the plenoptic image deconvolution, we propose a system capable of improving the resolution when a wavefront aberration is present and the image is blurred. In this work, a plenoptic system is simulated using Fourier optics, and the results show that an improved resolution is achieved, even in the presence of strong wavefront aberrations.

  1. Adaptive Optics Analysis of Visual Benefit with Higher-order Aberrations Correction of Human Eye - Poster Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lixia; Dai, Yun; Rao, Xuejun; Wang, Cheng; Hu, Yiyun; Liu, Qian; Jiang, Wenhan

    2008-01-01

    Higher-order aberrations correction can improve visual performance of human eye to some extent. To evaluate how much visual benefit can be obtained with higher-order aberrations correction we developed an adaptive optics vision simulator (AOVS). Dynamic real time optimized modal compensation was used to implement various customized higher-order ocular aberrations correction strategies. The experimental results indicate that higher-order aberrations correction can improve visual performance of human eye comparing with only lower-order aberration correction but the improvement degree and higher-order aberration correction strategy are different from each individual. Some subjects can acquire great visual benefit when higher-order aberrations were corrected but some subjects acquire little visual benefit even though all higher-order aberrations were corrected. Therefore, relative to general lower-order aberrations correction strategy, customized higher-order aberrations correction strategy is needed to obtain optimal visual improvement for each individual. AOVS provides an effective tool for higher-order ocular aberrations optometry for customized ocular aberrations correction.

  2. Chromatic aberrations correction for imaging spectrometer based on acousto-optic tunable filter with two transducers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huijie; Wang, Ziye; Jia, Guorui; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Zefu

    2017-10-02

    The acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) with wide wavelength range and high spectral resolution has long crystal and two transducers. A longer crystal length leads to a bigger chromatic focal shift and the double-transducer arrangement induces angular mutation in diffracted beam, which increase difficulty in longitudinal and lateral chromatic aberration correction respectively. In this study, the two chromatic aberrations are analyzed quantitatively based on an AOTF optical model and a novel catadioptric dual-path configuration is proposed to correct both the chromatic aberrations. The test results exhibit effectiveness of the optical configuration for this type of AOTF-based imaging spectrometer.

  3. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: Correcting dynamic residual aberrations of conformal optical systems using AO technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Li, Lin; Huang, Yi-Fan; Du, Bao-Lin

    2009-07-01

    This paper analyses the dynamic residual aberrations of a conformal optical system and introduces adaptive optics (AO) correction technology to this system. The image sharpening AO system is chosen as the correction scheme. Communication between MATLAB and Code V is established via ActiveX technique in computer simulation. The SPGD algorithm is operated at seven zoom positions to calculate the optimized surface shape of the deformable mirror. After comparison of performance of the corrected system with the baseline system, AO technology is proved to be a good way of correcting the dynamic residual aberration in conformal optical design.

  4. Axial geometrical aberration correction up to 5th order with N-SYLC.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Shahedul; Ito, Hiroyuki; Takaoka, Akio; Nishi, Ryuji

    2017-11-01

    We present N-SYLC (N-fold symmetric line currents) models to correct 5th order axial geometrical aberrations in electron microscopes. In our previous paper, we showed that 3rd order spherical aberration can be corrected by 3-SYLC doublet. After that, mainly the 5th order aberrations remain to limit the resolution. In this paper, we extend the doublet to quadruplet models also including octupole and dodecapole fields for correcting these higher order aberrations, without introducing any new unwanted ones. We prove the validity of our models by analytical calculations. Also by computer simulations, we show that for beam energy of 5keV and initial angle 10mrad at the corrector object plane, beam size of less than 0.5nm is achieved at the corrector image plane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chromatic aberration correction: an enhancement to the calibration of low-cost digital dermoscopes.

    PubMed

    Wighton, Paul; Lee, Tim K; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David; Atkins, M Stella

    2011-08-01

    We present a method for calibrating low-cost digital dermoscopes that corrects for color and inconsistent lighting and also corrects for chromatic aberration. Chromatic aberration is a form of radial distortion that often occurs in inexpensive digital dermoscopes and creates red and blue halo-like effects on edges. Being radial in nature, distortions due to chromatic aberration are not constant across the image, but rather vary in both magnitude and direction. As a result, distortions are not only visually distracting but could also mislead automated characterization techniques. Two low-cost dermoscopes, based on different consumer-grade cameras, were tested. Color is corrected by imaging a reference and applying singular value decomposition to determine the transformation required to ensure accurate color reproduction. Lighting is corrected by imaging a uniform surface and creating lighting correction maps. Chromatic aberration is corrected using a second-order radial distortion model. Our results for color and lighting calibration are consistent with previously published results, while distortions due to chromatic aberration can be reduced by 42-47% in the two systems considered. The disadvantages of inexpensive dermoscopy can be quickly substantially mitigated with a suitable calibration procedure. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Design and fabrication of a freeform phase plate for high-order ocular aberration correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Allen Y.; Raasch, Thomas W.

    2005-11-01

    In recent years it has become possible to measure and in some instances to correct the high-order aberrations of human eyes. We have investigated the correction of wavefront error of human eyes by using phase plates designed to compensate for that error. The wavefront aberrations of the four eyes of two subjects were experimentally determined, and compensating phase plates were machined with an ultraprecision diamond-turning machine equipped with four independent axes. A slow-tool servo freeform trajectory was developed for the machine tool path. The machined phase-correction plates were measured and compared with the original design values to validate the process. The position of the phase-plate relative to the pupil is discussed. The practical utility of this mode of aberration correction was investigated with visual acuity testing. The results are consistent with the potential benefit of aberration correction but also underscore the critical positioning requirements of this mode of aberration correction. This process is described in detail from optical measurements, through machining process design and development, to final results.

  7. Optical aberration correction for simple lenses via sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jinlin; Huang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Simple lenses with spherical surfaces are lightweight, inexpensive, highly flexible, and can be easily processed. However, they suffer from optical aberrations that lead to limitations in high-quality photography. In this study, we propose a set of computational photography techniques based on sparse signal representation to remove optical aberrations, thereby allowing the recovery of images captured through a single-lens camera. The primary advantage of the proposed method is that many prior point spread functions calibrated at different depths are successfully used for restoring visual images in a short time, which can be generally applied to nonblind deconvolution methods for solving the problem of the excessive processing time caused by the number of point spread functions. The optical software CODE V is applied for examining the reliability of the proposed method by simulation. The simulation results reveal that the suggested method outperforms the traditional methods. Moreover, the performance of a single-lens camera is significantly enhanced both qualitatively and perceptually. Particularly, the prior information obtained by CODE V can be used for processing the real images of a single-lens camera, which provides an alternative approach to conveniently and accurately obtain point spread functions of single-lens cameras.

  8. Aberration correction in wide-field fluorescence microscopy by segmented-pupil image interferometry.

    PubMed

    Scrimgeour, Jan; Curtis, Jennifer E

    2012-06-18

    We present a new technique for the correction of optical aberrations in wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Segmented-Pupil Image Interferometry (SPII) uses a liquid crystal spatial light modulator placed in the microscope's pupil plane to split the wavefront originating from a fluorescent object into an array of individual beams. Distortion of the wavefront arising from either system or sample aberrations results in displacement of the images formed from the individual pupil segments. Analysis of image registration allows for the local tilt in the wavefront at each segment to be corrected with respect to a central reference. A second correction step optimizes the image intensity by adjusting the relative phase of each pupil segment through image interferometry. This ensures that constructive interference between all segments is achieved at the image plane. Improvements in image quality are observed when Segmented-Pupil Image Interferometry is applied to correct aberrations arising from the microscope's optical path.

  9. Temporal integration property of stereopsis after higher-order aberration correction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jian; Dai, Yun; Zhang, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Based on a binocular adaptive optics visual simulator, we investigated the effect of higher-order aberration correction on the temporal integration property of stereopsis. Stereo threshold for line stimuli, viewed in 550nm monochromatic light, was measured as a function of exposure duration, with higher-order aberrations uncorrected, binocularly corrected or monocularly corrected. Under all optical conditions, stereo threshold decreased with increasing exposure duration until a steady-state threshold was reached. The critical duration was determined by a quadratic summation model and the high goodness of fit suggested this model was reasonable. For normal subjects, the slope for stereo threshold versus exposure duration was about −0.5 on logarithmic coordinates, and the critical duration was about 200 ms. Both the slope and the critical duration were independent of the optical condition of the eye, showing no significant effect of higher-order aberration correction on the temporal integration property of stereopsis. PMID:26601010

  10. Surgical correction of an aberrant right subclavian artery in a dog.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hun-Young; Jeong, Soon-wuk

    2011-10-01

    A diagnosis of an aberrant right subclavian artery was made in a 3-month-old Boston terrier. Surgical correction was performed after confirming adequate collateral circulation. Reports of surgical correction and evaluation of the perioperative thoracic limb blood pressure are rare in dogs.

  11. Simplified projection technique to correct geometric and chromatic lens aberrations using plenoptic imaging.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Xavier; Thibault, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Plenoptic imaging has been used in the past decade mainly for 3D reconstruction or digital refocusing. It was also shown that this technology has potential for correcting monochromatic aberrations in a standard optical system. In this paper, we present an algorithm for reconstructing images using a projection technique while correcting defects present in it that can apply to chromatic aberrations and wide-angle optical systems. We show that the impact of noise on the reconstruction procedure is minimal. Trade-offs between the sampling of the optical system needed for characterization and image quality are presented. Examples are shown for aberrations in a classic optical system and for chromatic aberrations. The technique is also applied to a wide-angle full field of view of 140° (FFOV 140°) optical system. This technique could be used in order to further simplify or minimize optical systems.

  12. Spherical aberration correction in a scanning transmission electron microscope using a sculpted thin film.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Roy; Remez, Roei; Lu, Peng-Han; Jin, Lei; Lereah, Yossi; Tavabi, Amir H; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Arie, Ady

    2018-06-01

    Nearly eighty years ago, Scherzer showed that rotationally symmetric, charge-free, static electron lenses are limited by an unavoidable, positive spherical aberration. Following a long struggle, a major breakthrough in the spatial resolution of electron microscopes was reached two decades ago by abandoning the first of these conditions, with the successful development of multipole aberration correctors. Here, we use a refractive silicon nitride thin film to tackle the second of Scherzer's constraints and demonstrate an alternative method for correcting spherical aberration in a scanning transmission electron microscope. We reveal features in Si and Cu samples that cannot be resolved in an uncorrected microscope. Our thin film corrector can be implemented as an immediate low cost upgrade to existing electron microscopes without re-engineering of the electron column or complicated operation protocols and can be extended to the correction of additional aberrations. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of correction of aberration dynamics on chaos in human ocular accommodation.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Karen M; Cufflin, Matthew P; Mallen, Edward A H

    2013-11-15

    We used adaptive optics to determine the effect of monochromatic aberration dynamics on the level of chaos in the accommodation control system. Four participants viewed a stationary target while the dynamics of their aberrations were either left uncorrected, defocus was corrected, or all aberrations except defocus were corrected. Chaos theory analysis was used to discern changes in the accommodative microfluctuations. We found a statistically significant reduction in the chaotic nature of the accommodation microfluctuations during correction of defocus, but not when all aberrations except defocus were corrected. The Lyapunov exponent decreased from 0.71 ± 0.07 D/s (baseline) to 0.55 ± 0.03 D/s (correction of defocus fluctuations). As the reduction of chaos in physiological signals is indicative of stress to the system, the results indicate that for the participants included in this study, fluctuations in defocus have a more profound effect than those of the other aberrations. There were no changes in the power spectrum between experimental conditions. Hence chaos theory analysis is a more subtle marker of changes in the accommodation control system and will be of value in the study of myopia onset and progression.

  14. High speed wavefront sensorless aberration correction in digital micromirror based confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, P; Wilding, D; Soloviev, O; Verstraete, H; Bliek, L; Vdovin, G; Verhaegen, M

    2017-01-23

    The quality of fluorescence microscopy images is often impaired by the presence of sample induced optical aberrations. Adaptive optical elements such as deformable mirrors or spatial light modulators can be used to correct aberrations. However, previously reported techniques either require special sample preparation, or time consuming optimization procedures for the correction of static aberrations. This paper reports a technique for optical sectioning fluorescence microscopy capable of correcting dynamic aberrations in any fluorescent sample during the acquisition. This is achieved by implementing adaptive optics in a non conventional confocal microscopy setup, with multiple programmable confocal apertures, in which out of focus light can be separately detected, and used to optimize the correction performance with a sampling frequency an order of magnitude faster than the imaging rate of the system. The paper reports results comparing the correction performances to traditional image optimization algorithms, and demonstrates how the system can compensate for dynamic changes in the aberrations, such as those introduced during a focal stack acquisition though a thick sample.

  15. Effect of temporal location of correction of monochromatic aberrations on the dynamic accommodation response

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Karen M.; Chin, Sem Sem; Mallen, Edward A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic correction of monochromatic aberrations of the eye is known to affect the accommodation response to a step change in stimulus vergence. We used an adaptive optics system to determine how the temporal location of the correction affects the response. The system consists of a Shack-Hartmann sensor sampling at 20 Hz and a 37-actuator piezoelectric deformable mirror. An extra sensing channel allows for an independent measure of the accommodation level of the eye. The accommodation response of four subjects was measured during a +/− 0.5 D step change in stimulus vergence whilst aberrations were corrected at various time locations. We found that continued correction of aberrations after the step change decreased the gain for disaccommodation, but increased the gain for accommodation. These results could be explained based on the initial lag of accommodation to the stimulus and changes in the level of aberrations before and after the stimulus step change. Future considerations for investigations of the effect of monochromatic aberrations on the dynamic accommodation response are discussed. PMID:21258515

  16. Holographic Adaptive Laser Optics System (HALOS): Fast, Autonomous Aberration Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, G.; MacDonald, K.; Gelsinger-Austin, P.

    2013-09-01

    We present an adaptive optics system which uses a multiplexed hologram to deconvolve the phase aberrations in an input beam. This wavefront characterization is extremely fast as it is based on simple measurements of the intensity of focal spots and does not require any computations. Furthermore, the system does not require a computer in the loop and is thus much cheaper, less complex and more robust as well. A fully functional, closed-loop prototype incorporating a 32-element MEMS mirror has been constructed. The unit has a footprint no larger than a laptop but runs at a bandwidth of 100kHz over an order of magnitude faster than comparable, conventional systems occupying a significantly larger volume. Additionally, since the sensing is based on parallel, all-optical processing, the speed is independent of actuator number running at the same bandwidth for one actuator as for a million. We are developing the HALOS technology with a view towards next-generation surveillance systems for extreme adaptive optics applications. These include imaging, lidar and free-space optical communications for unmanned aerial vehicles and SSA. The small volume is ideal for UAVs, while the high speed and high resolution will be of great benefit to the ground-based observation of space-based objects.

  17. Transmissive liquid-crystal device correcting primary coma aberration and astigmatism in laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Ayano; Hibi, Terumasa; Ipponjima, Sari; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2016-03-01

    Laser scanning microscopy allows 3D cross-sectional imaging inside biospecimens. However, certain aberrations produced can degrade the quality of the resulting images. We previously reported a transmissive liquid-crystal device that could compensate for the predominant spherical aberrations during the observations, particularly in deep regions of the samples. The device, inserted between the objective lens and the microscope revolver, improved the image quality of fixed-mouse-brain slices that were observed using two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy, which was originally degraded by spherical aberration. In this study, we developed a transmissive device that corrects primary coma aberration and astigmatism, motivated by the fact that these asymmetric aberrations can also often considerably deteriorate image quality, even near the sample surface. The device's performance was evaluated by observing fluorescent beads using single-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy. The fluorescence intensity in the image of the bead under a cover slip tilted in the y-direction was increased by 1.5 times after correction by the device. Furthermore, the y- and z-widths of the imaged bead were reduced to 66% and 65%, respectively. On the other hand, for the imaged bead sucked into a glass capillary in the longitudinal x-direction, correction with the device increased the fluorescence intensity by 2.2 times compared to that of the aberrated image. In addition, the x-, y-, and z-widths of the bead image were reduced to 75%, 53%, and 40%, respectively. Our device successfully corrected several asymmetric aberrations to improve the fluorescent signal and spatial resolution, and might be useful for observing various biospecimens.

  18. Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny.

    PubMed

    Brown, L Michael; Batson, Philip E; Dellby, Niklas; Krivanek, Ondrej L

    2015-10-01

    We provide a brief history of the project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that started in Cambridge (UK) and continued in Kirkland (WA, USA), Yorktown Heights (NY, USA), and other places. We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction research and related work, partly in response to the incomplete context presented in the paper "In quest of perfection in electron optics: A biographical sketch of Harald Rose on the occasion of his 80th birthday", recently published in Ultramicroscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Correcting spherical aberrations induced by an unknown medium through determination of its refractive index and thickness.

    PubMed

    Iwaniuk, Daniel; Rastogi, Pramod; Hack, Erwin

    2011-09-26

    In imaging and focusing applications, spherical aberration induces axial broadening of the point spread function (PSF). A transparent medium between lens and object of interest induces spherical aberration. We propose a method that first obtains both the physical thickness and the refractive index of the aberration inducing medium in situ by measuring the induced focal shifts for paraxial and large angle rays. Then, the fourth order angle dependence of the optical path difference inside the medium is used to correct the spherical aberration using a phase-only spatial light modulator. The obtained measurement accuracy of 3% is sufficient for a complete compensation as demonstrated in a model microscope with NA 0.3 with glass plate induced axial broadening of the PSF by a factor of 5. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  20. Energy-based adaptive focusing of waves: application to noninvasive aberration correction of ultrasonic wavefields

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Eric; Pernot, Mathieu; Montaldo, Gabriel; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2009-01-01

    An aberration correction method based on the maximization of the wave intensity at the focus of an emitting array is presented. The potential of this new adaptive focusing technique is investigated for ultrasonic focusing in biological tissues. The acoustic intensity is maximized non invasively through the direct measurement or indirect estimation of the beam energy at the focus for a series of spatially coded emissions. For ultrasonic waves, the acoustic energy at the desired focus can be indirectly estimated from the local displacements induced in tissues by the ultrasonic radiation force of the beam. Based on the measurement of these displacements, this method allows the precise estimation of the phase and amplitude aberrations and consequently the correction of aberrations along the beam travel path. The proof of concept is first performed experimentally using a large therapeutic array with strong electronic phase aberrations (up to 2π). Displacements induced by the ultrasonic radiation force at the desired focus are indirectly estimated using the time shift of backscattered echoes recorded on the array. The phase estimation is deduced accurately using a direct inversion algorithm which reduces the standard deviation of the phase distribution from σ = 1.89 before correction to σ = 0.53 following correction. The corrected beam focusing quality is verified using a needle hydrophone. The peak intensity obtained through the aberrator is found to be −7.69 dB below the reference intensity obtained without any aberration. Using the phase correction, a sharp focus is restored through the aberrator with a relative peak intensity of −0.89 dB. The technique is tested experimentally using a linear transmit/receive array through a real aberrating layer. The array is used to automatically correct its beam quality, as it both generates the radiation force with coded excitations and indirectly estimates the acoustic intensity at the focus with speckle tracking. This

  1. Enhanced visual acuity and image perception following correction of highly aberrated eyes using an adaptive optics visual simulator.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Karolinne Maia; Vabre, Laurent; Chateau, Nicolas; Krueger, Ronald R

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the changes in visual acuity and visual perception generated by correcting higher order aberrations in highly aberrated eyes using a large-stroke adaptive optics visual simulator. A crx1 Adaptive Optics Visual Simulator (Imagine Eyes) was used to correct and modify the wavefront aberrations in 12 keratoconic eyes and 8 symptomatic postoperative refractive surgery (LASIK) eyes. After measuring ocular aberrations, the device was programmed to compensate for the eye's wavefront error from the second order to the fifth order (6-mm pupil). Visual acuity was assessed through the adaptive optics system using computer-generated ETDRS opto-types and the Freiburg Visual Acuity and Contrast Test. Mean higher order aberration root-mean-square (RMS) errors in the keratoconus and symptomatic LASIK eyes were 1.88+/-0.99 microm and 1.62+/-0.79 microm (6-mm pupil), respectively. The visual simulator correction of the higher order aberrations present in the keratoconus eyes improved their visual acuity by a mean of 2 lines when compared to their best spherocylinder correction (mean decimal visual acuity with spherocylindrical correction was 0.31+/-0.18 and improved to 0.44+/-0.23 with higher order aberration correction). In the symptomatic LASIK eyes, the mean decimal visual acuity with spherocylindrical correction improved from 0.54+/-0.16 to 0.71+/-0.13 with higher order aberration correction. The visual perception of ETDRS letters was improved when correcting higher order aberrations. The adaptive optics visual simulator can effectively measure and compensate for higher order aberrations (second to fifth order), which are associated with diminished visual acuity and perception in highly aberrated eyes. The adaptive optics technology may be of clinical benefit when counseling patients with highly aberrated eyes regarding their maximum subjective potential for vision correction. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. The correction of aberrations computed in the aperture plane of multifrequency microwave radiometer antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical/numerical approach to identifying and correcting the aberrations introduced by a general displacement of the feed from the focal point of a single offset paraboloid antenna used in deployable radiometer systems is developed. A 15 meter reflector with 18 meter focal length is assumed for the analysis, which considers far field radiation pattern quality, focal region fields, and aberrations appearing in the aperture plane. The latter are obtained by ray tracing in the transmit mode and are expressed in terms of optical notation. Attention is given to the physical restraints imposed on corrective elements by real microwave systems and to the intermediate near field aspects of the problem in three dimensions. The subject of wave fronts and caustics in the receive mode is introduced for comparative purposes. Several specific examples are given for aberration reduction at eight beamwidths of scan at a frequency of 1.414 GHz.

  3. [Lateral chromatic aberrations correction for AOTF imaging spectrometer based on doublet prism].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui-Jie; Zhou, Peng-Wei; Zhang, Ying; Li, Chong-Chong

    2013-10-01

    An user defined surface function method was proposed to model the acousto-optic interaction of AOTF based on wave-vector match principle. Assessment experiment result shows that this model can achieve accurate ray trace of AOTF diffracted beam. In addition, AOTF imaging spectrometer presents large residual lateral color when traditional chromatic aberrations correcting method is adopted. In order to reduce lateral chromatic aberrations, a method based on doublet prism is proposed. The optical material and angle of the prism are optimized automatically using global optimization with the help of user defined AOTF surface. Simulation result shows that the proposed method provides AOTF imaging spectrometer with great conveniences, which reduces the lateral chromatic aberration to less than 0.000 3 degrees and improves by one order of magnitude, with spectral image shift effectively corrected.

  4. Design for an aberration corrected scanning electron microscope using miniature electron mirrors.

    PubMed

    Dohi, Hideto; Kruit, Pieter

    2018-06-01

    Resolution of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) is determined by aberrations of the objective lens. It is well known that both spherical and chromatic aberrations can be compensated by placing a 90-degree bending magnet and an electron mirror in the beam path before the objective lens. Nevertheless, this approach has not led to wide use of these aberration correctors, partly because aberrations of the bending magnet can be a serious problem. A mirror corrector with two mirrors placed perpendicularly to the optic axis of an SEM and facing each other is proposed. As a result, only small-angle magnetic deflection is necessary to guide the electron beam around the top mirror to the bottom mirror and around the bottom mirror to the objective lens. The deflection angle, in the order of 50 mrad, is sufficiently small to avoid deflection aberrations. In addition, lateral dispersion at the sample plane can be avoided by making the deflection fields symmetric. Such a corrector system is only possible if the incoming beam can pass the top mirror at a distance in the order of millimeters, without being disturbed by the electric fields of electrodes of the mirror. It is proposed that condition can be satisfied with micro-scale electron optical elements fabricated by using MEMS technology. In the proposed corrector system, the micro-mirrors have to provide the exact negative spherical and chromatic aberrations for correcting the aberration of the objective lens. This exact tuning is accomplished by variable magnification between the micro-mirrors and the objective lens using an additional transfer lens. Extensive optical calculations are reported. Aberrations of the micro-mirrors were analyzed by numerical calculation. Dispersion and aberrations of the deflectors were calculated by using an analytical field model. Combination aberrations caused by the off-axis position of dispersive rays in the mirrors and objective lens were also analyzed. It is concluded that the proposed

  5. Non-common path aberration correction in an adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Sulai, Yusufu N; Dubra, Alfredo

    2014-09-01

    The correction of non-common path aberrations (NCPAs) between the imaging and wavefront sensing channel in a confocal scanning adaptive optics ophthalmoscope is demonstrated. NCPA correction is achieved by maximizing an image sharpness metric while the confocal detection aperture is temporarily removed, effectively minimizing the monochromatic aberrations in the illumination path of the imaging channel. Comparison of NCPA estimated using zonal and modal orthogonal wavefront corrector bases provided wavefronts that differ by ~λ/20 in root-mean-squared (~λ/30 standard deviation). Sequential insertion of a cylindrical lens in the illumination and light collection paths of the imaging channel was used to compare image resolution after changing the wavefront correction to maximize image sharpness and intensity metrics. Finally, the NCPA correction was incorporated into the closed-loop adaptive optics control by biasing the wavefront sensor signals without reducing its bandwidth.

  6. Non-common path aberration correction in an adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Sulai, Yusufu N.; Dubra, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The correction of non-common path aberrations (NCPAs) between the imaging and wavefront sensing channel in a confocal scanning adaptive optics ophthalmoscope is demonstrated. NCPA correction is achieved by maximizing an image sharpness metric while the confocal detection aperture is temporarily removed, effectively minimizing the monochromatic aberrations in the illumination path of the imaging channel. Comparison of NCPA estimated using zonal and modal orthogonal wavefront corrector bases provided wavefronts that differ by ~λ/20 in root-mean-squared (~λ/30 standard deviation). Sequential insertion of a cylindrical lens in the illumination and light collection paths of the imaging channel was used to compare image resolution after changing the wavefront correction to maximize image sharpness and intensity metrics. Finally, the NCPA correction was incorporated into the closed-loop adaptive optics control by biasing the wavefront sensor signals without reducing its bandwidth. PMID:25401020

  7. Spherical aberration correction with an in-lens N-fold symmetric line currents model.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Shahedul; Ito, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Ryuji

    2018-04-01

    In our previous works, we have proposed N-SYLC (N-fold symmetric line currents) models for aberration correction. In this paper, we propose "in-lens N-SYLC" model, where N-SYLC overlaps rotationally symmetric lens. Such overlap is possible because N-SYLC is free of magnetic materials. We analytically prove that, if certain parameters of the model are optimized, an in-lens 3-SYLC (N = 3) doublet can correct 3rd order spherical aberration. By computer simulation, we show that the required excitation current for correction is less than 0.25 AT for beam energy 5 keV, and the beam size after correction is smaller than 1 nm at the corrector image plane for initial slope less than 4 mrad. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Device and method for creating Gaussian aberration-corrected electron beams

    DOEpatents

    McMorran, Benjamin; Linck, Martin

    2016-01-19

    Electron beam phase gratings have phase profiles that produce a diffracted beam having a Gaussian or other selected intensity profile. Phase profiles can also be selected to correct or compensate electron lens aberrations. Typically, a low diffraction order produces a suitable phase profile, and other orders are discarded.

  9. Wavefront-guided correction of ocular aberrations: Are phase plate and refractive surgery solutions equal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, Linda E.; Munger, Rejean; Priest, David

    2005-08-01

    Wavefront-guided laser eye surgery has been recently introduced and holds the promise of correcting not only defocus and astigmatism in patients but also higher-order aberrations. Research is just beginning on the implementation of wavefront-guided methods in optical solutions, such as phase-plate-based spectacles, as alternatives to surgery. We investigate the theoretical differences between the implementation of wavefront-guided surgical and phase plate corrections. The residual aberrations of 43 model eyes are calculated after simulated refractive surgery and also after a phase plate is placed in front of the untreated eye. In each case, the current wavefront-guided paradigm that applies a direct map of the ocular aberrations to the correction zone is used. The simulation results demonstrate that an ablation map that is a Zernike fit of a direct transform of the ocular wavefront phase error is not as efficient in correcting refractive errors of sphere, cylinder, spherical aberration, and coma as when the same Zernike coefficients are applied to a phase plate, with statistically significant improvements from 2% to 6%.

  10. Aberration-Corrected Stem of Q-Rich Separates from the Saratov (L4) Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroud, R. M.; Chisholm, M. F.; Amari, A.; Matsuda, J.

    2012-09-01

    TEM and aberration-corrected STEM analysis of two nanodiamond- and SiC-free Saratov (L4) separates, AJ (most Q-rich) and AI (Q-rich), show that the carrier is porous carbon consisting of nanoscale graphene platelets.

  11. Simulation of ultrasonic focus aberration and correction through human tissue.

    PubMed

    Tabei, Makoto; Mast, T Douglas; Waag, Robert C

    2003-02-01

    Ultrasonic focusing in two dimensions has been investigated by calculating the propagation of ultrasonic pulses through cross-sectional models of human abdominal wall and breast. Propagation calculations used a full-wave k-space method that accounts for spatial variations in density, sound speed, and frequency-dependent absorption and includes perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary conditions. To obtain a distorted receive wavefront, propagation from a point source through the tissue path was computed. Receive focusing used an angular spectrum method. Transmit focusing was accomplished by propagating a pressure wavefront from a virtual array through the tissue path. As well as uncompensated focusing, focusing that employed time-shift compensation and time-shift compensation after backpropagation was investigated in both transmit and receive and time reversal was investigated for transmit focusing in addition. The results indicate, consistent with measurements, that breast causes greater focus degradation than abdominal wall. The investigated compensation methods corrected the receive focus better than the transmit focus. Time-shift compensation after backpropagation improved the focus from that obtained using time-shift compensation alone but the improvement was less in transmit focusing than in receive focusing. Transmit focusing by time reversal resulted in lower sidelobes but larger mainlobes than the other investigated transmit focus compensation methods.

  12. Chromatic Aberration Correction for Atomic Resolution TEM Imaging from 20 to 80 kV.

    PubMed

    Linck, Martin; Hartel, Peter; Uhlemann, Stephan; Kahl, Frank; Müller, Heiko; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Max; Niestadt, Marcel; Bischoff, Maarten; Biskupek, Johannes; Lee, Zhongbo; Lehnert, Tibor; Börrnert, Felix; Rose, Harald; Kaiser, Ute

    2016-08-12

    Atomic resolution in transmission electron microscopy of thin and light-atom materials requires a rigorous reduction of the beam energy to reduce knockon damage. However, at the same time, the chromatic aberration deteriorates the resolution of the TEM image dramatically. Within the framework of the SALVE project, we introduce a newly developed C_{c}/C_{s} corrector that is capable of correcting both the chromatic and the spherical aberration in the range of accelerating voltages from 20 to 80 kV. The corrector allows correcting axial aberrations up to fifth order as well as the dominating off-axial aberrations. Over the entire voltage range, optimum phase-contrast imaging conditions for weak signals from light atoms can be adjusted for an optical aperture of at least 55 mrad. The information transfer within this aperture is no longer limited by chromatic aberrations. We demonstrate the performance of the microscope using the examples of 30 kV phase-contrast TEM images of graphene and molybdenum disulfide, showing unprecedented contrast and resolution that matches image calculations.

  13. Phase-aberration correction with a 3-D ultrasound scanner: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Ivancevich, Nikolas M; Dahl, Jeremy J; Trahey, Gregg E; Smith, Stephen W

    2006-08-01

    We tested the feasibility of using adaptive imaging, namely phase-aberration correction, with two-dimensional (2-D) arrays and real-time, 3-D ultrasound. Because of the high spatial frequency content of aberrators, 2-D arrays, which generally have smaller pitch and thus higher spatial sampling frequency, and 3-D imaging show potential to improve the performance of adaptive imaging. Phase-correction algorithms improve image quality by compensating for tissue-induced errors in beamforming. Using the illustrative example of transcranial ultrasound, we have evaluated our ability to perform adaptive imaging with a real-time, 3-D scanner. We have used a polymer casting of a human temporal bone, root-mean-square (RMS) phase variation of 45.0 ns, full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) correlation length of 3.35 mm, and an electronic aberrator, 100 ns RMS, 3.76 mm correlation, with tissue phantoms as illustrative examples of near-field, phase-screen aberrators. Using the multilag, least-squares, cross-correlation method, we have shown the ability of 3-D adaptive imaging to increase anechoic cyst identification, image brightness, contrast-to-speckle ratio (CSR), and, in 3-D color Doppler experiments, the ability to visualize flow. For a physical aberrator skull casting we saw CSR increase by 13% from 1.01 to 1.14, while the number of detectable cysts increased from 4.3 to 7.7.

  14. Accommodation-based liquid crystal adaptive optics system for large ocular aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Mu, Quanquan; Cao, Zhaoliang; Li, Chao; Jiang, Baoguang; Hu, Lifa; Xuan, Li

    2008-12-15

    According to ocular aberration property and liquid crystal (LC) corrector characteristics, we calculated the minimum pixel demand of the LC corrector used for compensating large ocular aberrations. Then, an accommodation based optical configuration was introduced to reduce the demand. Based on this an adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging system was built. Subjects with different defocus and astigmatism were tested to prove this. For myopia lower than 5D it performs well. When myopia is as large as 8D the accommodation error increased to nearly 3D, which requires the LC corrector to have 667 x 667 pixels to get a well-corrected image.

  15. Aberration corrections for free-space optical communications in atmosphere turbulence using orbital angular momentum states.

    PubMed

    Zhao, S M; Leach, J; Gong, L Y; Ding, J; Zheng, B Y

    2012-01-02

    The effect of atmosphere turbulence on light's spatial structure compromises the information capacity of photons carrying the Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) in free-space optical (FSO) communications. In this paper, we study two aberration correction methods to mitigate this effect. The first one is the Shack-Hartmann wavefront correction method, which is based on the Zernike polynomials, and the second is a phase correction method specific to OAM states. Our numerical results show that the phase correction method for OAM states outperforms the Shark-Hartmann wavefront correction method, although both methods improve significantly purity of a single OAM state and the channel capacities of FSO communication link. At the same time, our experimental results show that the values of participation functions go down at the phase correction method for OAM states, i.e., the correction method ameliorates effectively the bad effect of atmosphere turbulence.

  16. The objective lens of the electron microscope with correction of spherical and axial chromatic aberrations.

    PubMed

    Bimurzaev, S B; Aldiyarov, N U; Yakushev, E M

    2017-10-01

    The paper describes the principle of operation of a relatively simple aberration corrector for the transmission electron microscope objective lens. The electron-optical system of the aberration corrector consists of the two main elements: an electrostatic mirror with rotational symmetry and a magnetic deflector formed by the round-shaped magnetic poles. The corrector operation is demonstrated by calculations on the example of correction of basic aberrations of the well-known objective lens with a bell-shaped distribution of the axial magnetic field. Two of the simplest versions of the corrector are considered: a corrector with a two-electrode electrostatic mirror and a corrector with a three-electrode electrostatic mirror. It is shown that using the two-electrode mirror one can eliminate either spherical or chromatic aberration of the objective lens, without changing the value of its linear magnification. Using a three-electrode mirror, it is possible to eliminate spherical and chromatic aberrations of the objective lens simultaneously, which is especially important in designing electron microscopes with extremely high resolution. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The Three-Dimensional Point Spread Function of Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lupini, A.R.; de Jonge, N.

    2012-01-01

    Aberration-correction reduces the depth of field in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and thus allows three-dimensional imaging by depth-sectioning. This imaging mode offers the potential for sub-Ångstrom lateral resolution and nanometer-scale depth sensitivity. For biological samples, which may be many microns across and where high lateral resolution may not always be needed, optimizing the depth resolution even at the expense of lateral resolution may be desired, aiming to image through thick specimens. Although there has been extensive work examining and optimizing the probe formation in two-dimensions, there is less known about the probe shape along the optical axis. Here the probe shape is examined in three-dimensions in an attempt to better understand the depth-resolution in this mode. Examples are presented of how aberrations change the probe shape in three-dimensions, and it is found that off-axial aberrations may need to be considered for focal series of large areas. It is shown that oversized or annular apertures theoretically improve the vertical resolution for 3D imaging of nanoparticles. When imaging nanoparticles of several nanometer size, regular STEM can thereby be optimized such that the vertical full width at half maximum approaches that of the aberration corrected STEM with a standard aperture. PMID:21878149

  18. Lens correction algorithm based on the see-saw diagram to correct Seidel aberrations employing aspheric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosete-Aguilar, Martha

    2000-06-01

    In this paper a lens correction algorithm based on the see- saw diagram developed by Burch is described. The see-saw diagram describes the image correction in rotationally symmetric systems over a finite field of view by means of aspherics surfaces. The algorithm is applied to the design of some basic telescopic configurations such as the classical Cassegrain telescope, the Dall-Kirkham telescope, the Pressman-Camichel telescope and the Ritchey-Chretien telescope in order to show a physically visualizable concept of image correction for optical systems that employ aspheric surfaces. By using the see-saw method the student can visualize the different possible configurations of such telescopes as well as their performances and also the student will be able to understand that it is not always possible to correct more primary aberrations by aspherizing more surfaces.

  19. Model-based sensor-less wavefront aberration correction in optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Hans R G W; Wahls, Sander; Kalkman, Jeroen; Verhaegen, Michel

    2015-12-15

    Several sensor-less wavefront aberration correction methods that correct nonlinear wavefront aberrations by maximizing the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal are tested on an OCT setup. A conventional coordinate search method is compared to two model-based optimization methods. The first model-based method takes advantage of the well-known optimization algorithm (NEWUOA) and utilizes a quadratic model. The second model-based method (DONE) is new and utilizes a random multidimensional Fourier-basis expansion. The model-based algorithms achieve lower wavefront errors with up to ten times fewer measurements. Furthermore, the newly proposed DONE method outperforms the NEWUOA method significantly. The DONE algorithm is tested on OCT images and shows a significantly improved image quality.

  20. Automated aberration correction of arbitrary laser modes in high numerical aperture systems.

    PubMed

    Hering, Julian; Waller, Erik H; Von Freymann, Georg

    2016-12-12

    Controlling the point-spread-function in three-dimensional laser lithography is crucial for fabricating structures with highest definition and resolution. In contrast to microscopy, aberrations have to be physically corrected prior to writing, to create well defined doughnut modes, bottlebeams or multi foci modes. We report on a modified Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm for spatial-light-modulator based automated aberration compensation to optimize arbitrary laser-modes in a high numerical aperture system. Using circularly polarized light for the measurement and first-guess initial conditions for amplitude and phase of the pupil function our scalar approach outperforms recent algorithms with vectorial corrections. Besides laser lithography also applications like optical tweezers and microscopy might benefit from the method presented.

  1. Apparatus for and method of correcting for aberrations in a light beam

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, Richard H.

    1996-01-01

    A technique for adjustably correcting for aberrations in a light beam is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes first means which defines a flat, circular light reflecting surface having opposite reinforced circumferential edges and a central post and which is resiliently distortable, to a limited extent, into different concave and/or convex curvatures, which may be Gaussian-like, about the central axis, and second means acting on the first means for adjustably distorting the light reflecting surface into a particular selected one of the different curvatures depending upon the aberrations to be corrected for and for fixedly maintaining the curvature selected. In the embodiment disclosed, the light reflecting surface is adjustably distorted into the selected curvature by application of particular axial moments to the central post on the opposite side from the light reflecting surface and lateral moments to the circumference of the reflecting surface.

  2. Apparatus for and method of correcting for aberrations in a light beam

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, R.H.

    1996-09-17

    A technique for adjustably correcting for aberrations in a light beam is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes first means which defines a flat, circular light reflecting surface having opposite reinforced circumferential edges and a central post and which is resiliently distortable, to a limited extent, into different concave and/or convex curvatures, which may be Gaussian-like, about the central axis, and second means acting on the first means for adjustably distorting the light reflecting surface into a particular selected one of the different curvatures depending upon the aberrations to be corrected for and for fixedly maintaining the curvature selected. In the embodiment disclosed, the light reflecting surface is adjustably distorted into the selected curvature by application of particular axial moments to the central post on the opposite side from the light reflecting surface and lateral moments to the circumference of the reflecting surface. 8 figs.

  3. Aberration-Corrected STEM Imaging Through Off-Site Remote Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, Karalee; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Jerome, Timothy Y

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in aberration-corrected electron microscopy have allowed researchers to image materials at sub- ngstr m resolution. Many of these modern instruments are designed to be operated from separate 'control' rooms, removing the effect of the operator on the instrument s physical environment. This capability also allows operation from suitable workstations, over internet connections, from literally anywhere in the world [1]. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin (UTA) have collaborated with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and JEOL Ltd. to routinely conduct research sessions in which high-resolution images and X-ray microanalytical data are acquired during after-hours research sessions,more » utilizing the JEOL 2200FS aberration-corrected STEM/TEM at ORNL from their lab in Austin. Details of the remote operation are presented here.« less

  4. Aberration-Corrected Electron Beam Lithography at the One Nanometer Length Scale

    DOE PAGES

    Manfrinato, Vitor R.; Stein, Aaron; Zhang, Lihua; ...

    2017-04-18

    Patterning materials efficiently at the smallest length scales has been a longstanding challenge in nanotechnology. Electron-beam lithography (EBL) is the primary method for patterning arbitrary features, but EBL has not reliably provided sub-4 nm patterns. The few competing techniques that have achieved this resolution are orders of magnitude slower than EBL. In this work, we employed an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope for lithography to achieve unprecedented resolution. Here we show aberration-corrected EBL at the one nanometer length scale using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and have produced both the smallest isolated feature in any conventional resist (1.7 ± 0.5 nm) andmore » the highest density patterns in PMMA (10.7 nm pitch for negative-tone and 17.5 nm pitch for positive-tone PMMA). We also demonstrate pattern transfer from the resist to semiconductor and metallic materials at the sub-5 nm scale. These results indicate that polymer-based nanofabrication can achieve feature sizes comparable to the Kuhn length of PMMA and ten times smaller than its radius of gyration. Use of aberration-corrected EBL will increase the resolution, speed, and complexity in nanomaterial fabrication.« less

  5. Imaging single atoms using secondary electrons with an aberration-corrected electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Inada, H; Nakamura, K; Wall, J

    2009-10-01

    Aberration correction has embarked on a new frontier in electron microscopy by overcoming the limitations of conventional round lenses, providing sub-angstrom-sized probes. However, improvement of spatial resolution using aberration correction so far has been limited to the use of transmitted electrons both in scanning and stationary mode, with an improvement of 20-40% (refs 3-8). In contrast, advances in the spatial resolution of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs), which are by far the most widely used instrument for surface imaging at the micrometre-nanometre scale, have been stagnant, despite several recent efforts. Here, we report a new SEM, with aberration correction, able to image single atoms by detecting electrons emerging from its surface as a result of interaction with the small probe. The spatial resolution achieved represents a fourfold improvement over the best-reported resolution in any SEM (refs 10-12). Furthermore, we can simultaneously probe the sample through its entire thickness with transmitted electrons. This ability is significant because it permits the selective visualization of bulk atoms and surface ones, beyond a traditional two-dimensional projection in transmission electron microscopy. It has the potential to revolutionize the field of microscopy and imaging, thereby opening the door to a wide range of applications, especially when combined with simultaneous nanoprobe spectroscopy.

  6. A correction method for the axial maladjustment of transmission-type optical system based on aberration theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chunmei; Huang, Fu-yu; Yin, Jian-ling; Chen, Yu-dan; Mao, Shao-juan

    2016-10-01

    The influence of aberration on misalignment of optical system is considered fully, the deficiencies of Gauss optical correction method is pointed, and a correction method for transmission-type misalignment optical system is proposed based on aberration theory. The variation regularity of single lens aberration caused by axial displacement is analyzed, and the aberration effect is defined. On this basis, through calculating the size of lens adjustment induced by the image position error and the magnifying rate error, the misalignment correction formula based on the constraints of the aberration is deduced mathematically. Taking the three lens collimation system for an example, the test is carried out to validate this method, and its superiority is proved.

  7. [Research on Residual Aberrations Correction with Adaptive Optics Technique in Patients Undergoing Orthokeratology].

    PubMed

    Gong, Rui; Yang, Bi; Liu, Longqian; Dai, Yun; Zhang, Yudong; Zhao, Haoxin

    2016-06-01

    We conducted this study to explore the influence of the ocular residual aberrations changes on contrast sensitivity(CS)function in eyes undergoing orthokeratology using adaptive optics technique.Nineteen subjects’ nineteen eyes were included in this study.The subjects were between 12 and 20years(14.27±2.23years)of age.An adaptive optics(AO)system was adopted to measure and compensate the residual aberrations through a 4-mm artificial pupil,and at the same time the contrast sensitivities were measured at five spatial frequencies(2,4,8,16,and 32 cycles per degree).The CS measurements with and without AO correction were completed.The sequence of the measurements with and without AO correction was randomly arranged without informing the observers.A two-interval forced-choice procedure was used for the CS measurements.The paired t-test was used to compare the contrast sensitivity with and without AO correction at each spatial frequency.The results revealed that the AO system decreased the mean total root mean square(RMS)from 0.356μm to 0.160μm(t=10.517,P<0.001),and the mean total higher-order RMS from 0.246μm to 0.095μm(t=10.113,P<0.001).The difference in log contrast sensitivity with and without AO correction was significant only at 8cpd(t=-2.51,P=0.02).Thereby we concluded that correcting the ocular residual aberrations using adaptive optics technique could improve the contrast sensitivity function at intermediate spatial frequency in patients undergoing orthokeratology.

  8. Optimizing wavefront-guided corrections for highly aberrated eyes in the presence of registration uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yue; Queener, Hope M.; Marsack, Jason D.; Ravikumar, Ayeswarya; Bedell, Harold E.; Applegate, Raymond A.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic registration uncertainty of a wavefront-guided correction with respect to underlying wavefront error (WFE) inevitably decreases retinal image quality. A partial correction may improve average retinal image quality and visual acuity in the presence of registration uncertainties. The purpose of this paper is to (a) develop an algorithm to optimize wavefront-guided correction that improves visual acuity given registration uncertainty and (b) test the hypothesis that these corrections provide improved visual performance in the presence of these uncertainties as compared to a full-magnitude correction or a correction by Guirao, Cox, and Williams (2002). A stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm was used to optimize the partial-magnitude correction for three keratoconic eyes based on measured scleral contact lens movement. Given its high correlation with logMAR acuity, the retinal image quality metric log visual Strehl was used as a predictor of visual acuity. Predicted values of visual acuity with the optimized corrections were validated by regressing measured acuity loss against predicted loss. Measured loss was obtained from normal subjects viewing acuity charts that were degraded by the residual aberrations generated by the movement of the full-magnitude correction, the correction by Guirao, and optimized SPGD correction. Partial-magnitude corrections optimized with an SPGD algorithm provide at least one line improvement of average visual acuity over the full magnitude and the correction by Guirao given the registration uncertainty. This study demonstrates that it is possible to improve the average visual acuity by optimizing wavefront-guided correction in the presence of registration uncertainty. PMID:23757512

  9. Investigation of focusing and correcting aberrations with binary amplitude and polarization modulation

    DOE PAGES

    Fiala, Peter; Li, Yunqi; Dorrer, Christophe

    2018-01-29

    Here, we investigate the focusing and correcting wavefront aberration of an optical wave using binary amplitude and polarization modulation. Focusing is performed by selectively modulating the field in different zones of the pupil to obtain on-axis constructive interference at a given distance. The conventional Soret zone plate (binary amplitude profile) is expanded to a polarization Soret zone plate with twice the focusing efficiency. Binary pixelated devices that approximate the sinusoidal transmission profile of a Gabor zone plate by spatial dithering are also investigated with amplitude and polarization modulation. Wavefront aberrations are corrected by modulation of the field in the pupilmore » plane to prevent destructive interference in the focal plane of an ideal focusing element. Polarization modulation improves the efficiency obtained by amplitude-only modulation, with a gain that depends on the aberration. Experimental results obtained with Cr-on-glass devices for amplitude modulation and liquid crystal devices operating in the Mauguin condition for polarization modulation are in very good agreement with simulations.« less

  10. Investigation of focusing and correcting aberrations with binary amplitude and polarization modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fiala, Peter; Li, Yunqi; Dorrer, Christophe

    Here, we investigate the focusing and correcting wavefront aberration of an optical wave using binary amplitude and polarization modulation. Focusing is performed by selectively modulating the field in different zones of the pupil to obtain on-axis constructive interference at a given distance. The conventional Soret zone plate (binary amplitude profile) is expanded to a polarization Soret zone plate with twice the focusing efficiency. Binary pixelated devices that approximate the sinusoidal transmission profile of a Gabor zone plate by spatial dithering are also investigated with amplitude and polarization modulation. Wavefront aberrations are corrected by modulation of the field in the pupilmore » plane to prevent destructive interference in the focal plane of an ideal focusing element. Polarization modulation improves the efficiency obtained by amplitude-only modulation, with a gain that depends on the aberration. Experimental results obtained with Cr-on-glass devices for amplitude modulation and liquid crystal devices operating in the Mauguin condition for polarization modulation are in very good agreement with simulations.« less

  11. A Monochromatic, Aberration-Corrected, Dual-Beam Low Energy Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2013-01-01

    The monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope (MAD-LEEM) is a novel instrument aimed at imaging of nanostructures and surfaces at sub-nanometer resolution that includes a monochromator, aberration corrector and dual beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector utilizes an electron mirror with negative aberrations that can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies. Dual flood illumination eliminates charging generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. MAD-LEEM is designed for the purpose of imaging biological and insulating specimens, which are difficult to image with conventional LEEM, Low-Voltage SEM, and TEM instruments. The MAD-LEEM instrument can also be used as a general purpose LEEM with significantly improved resolution. The low impact energy of the electrons is critical for avoiding beam damage, as high energy electrons with keV kinetic energies used in SEMs and TEMs cause irreversible change to many specimens, in particular biological materials. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which demands imaging techniques that enable DNA sequencing at high resolution and speed, and at low cost. The key advantages of the MAD-LEEM approach for this application are the low electron impact energies, the long read lengths, and the absence of heavy-atom DNA labeling. Image contrast simulations of the detectability of individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed in order to refine the optics blur and DNA base contrast requirements for this application. PMID:23582636

  12. A monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2013-07-01

    The monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope (MAD-LEEM) is a novel instrument aimed at imaging of nanostructures and surfaces at sub-nanometer resolution that includes a monochromator, aberration corrector and dual beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector utilizes an electron mirror with negative aberrations that can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies. Dual flood illumination eliminates charging generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. MAD-LEEM is designed for the purpose of imaging biological and insulating specimens, which are difficult to image with conventional LEEM, Low-Voltage SEM, and TEM instruments. The MAD-LEEM instrument can also be used as a general purpose LEEM with significantly improved resolution. The low impact energy of the electrons is critical for avoiding beam damage, as high energy electrons with keV kinetic energies used in SEMs and TEMs cause irreversible change to many specimens, in particular biological materials. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which demands imaging techniques that enable DNA sequencing at high resolution and speed, and at low cost. The key advantages of the MAD-LEEM approach for this application are the low electron impact energies, the long read lengths, and the absence of heavy-atom DNA labeling. Image contrast simulations of the detectability of individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed in order to refine the optics blur and DNA base contrast requirements for this application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Catheter Hydrophone Aberration Correction for Transcranial Histotripsy Treatment of Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Proof-of-Concept.

    PubMed

    Gerhardson, Tyler; Sukovich, Jonathan R; Pandey, Aditya S; Hall, Timothy L; Cain, Charles A; Xu, Zhen

    2017-11-01

    Histotripsy is a minimally invasive ultrasound therapy that has shown rapid liquefaction of blood clots through human skullcaps in an in vitro intracerebral hemorrhage model. However, the efficiency of these treatments can be compromised if the skull-induced aberrations are uncorrected. We have developed a catheter hydrophone which can perform aberration correction (AC) and drain the liquefied clot following histotripsy treatment. Histotripsy pulses were delivered through an excised human skullcap using a 256-element, 500-kHz hemisphere array transducer with a 15-cm focal distance. A custom hydrophone was fabricated using a mm PZT-5h crystal interfaced to a coaxial cable and integrated into a drainage catheter. An AC algorithm was developed to correct the aberrations introduced between histotripsy pulses from each array element. An increase in focal pressure of up to 60% was achieved at the geometric focus and 27%-62% across a range of electronic steering locations. The sagittal and axial -6-dB beam widths decreased from 4.6 to 2.2 mm in the sagittal direction and 8 to 4.4 mm in the axial direction, compared to 1.5 and 3 mm in the absence of aberration. After performing AC, lesions with diameters ranging from 0.24 to 1.35 mm were generated using electronic steering over a mm grid in a tissue-mimicking phantom. An average volume of 4.07 ± 0.91 mL was liquefied and drained after using electronic steering to treat a 4.2-mL spherical volume in in vitro bovine clots through the skullcap.

  14. Progress toward an aberration-corrected low energy electron microscope for DNA sequencing and surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar; N'diaye, Alpha T; Schmid, Andreas K; Persson, Henrik H J; Davis, Ronald W

    2012-11-01

    Monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscopy (MAD-LEEM) is a novel imaging technique aimed at high resolution imaging of macromolecules, nanoparticles, and surfaces. MAD-LEEM combines three innovative electron-optical concepts in a single tool: a monochromator, a mirror aberration corrector, and dual electron beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector is needed to achieve subnanometer resolution at landing energies of a few hundred electronvolts. The dual flood illumination approach eliminates charging effects generated when a conventional, single-beam LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. The low landing energy of electrons in the range of 0 to a few hundred electronvolts is also critical for avoiding radiation damage, as high energy electrons with kilo-electron-volt kinetic energies cause irreversible damage to many specimens, in particular biological molecules. The performance of the key electron-optical components of MAD-LEEM, the aberration corrector combined with the objective lens and a magnetic beam separator, was simulated. Initial results indicate that an electrostatic electron mirror has negative spherical and chromatic aberration coefficients that can be tuned over a large parameter range. The negative aberrations generated by the electron mirror can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies and provide a path to achieving subnanometer spatial resolution. First experimental results on characterizing DNA molecules immobilized on Au substrates in a LEEM are presented. Images obtained in a spin-polarized LEEM demonstrate that high contrast is achievable at low electron energies in the range of 1-10 eV and show that small changes in landing energy have a strong impact on the achievable contrast. The MAD-LEEM approach

  15. Progress toward an aberration-corrected low energy electron microscope for DNA sequencing and surface analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Schmid, Andreas K.; Persson, Henrik H. J.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2012-01-01

    Monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscopy (MAD-LEEM) is a novel imaging technique aimed at high resolution imaging of macromolecules, nanoparticles, and surfaces. MAD-LEEM combines three innovative electron–optical concepts in a single tool: a monochromator, a mirror aberration corrector, and dual electron beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector is needed to achieve subnanometer resolution at landing energies of a few hundred electronvolts. The dual flood illumination approach eliminates charging effects generated when a conventional, single-beam LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. The low landing energy of electrons in the range of 0 to a few hundred electronvolts is also critical for avoiding radiation damage, as high energy electrons with kilo-electron-volt kinetic energies cause irreversible damage to many specimens, in particular biological molecules. The performance of the key electron–optical components of MAD-LEEM, the aberration corrector combined with the objective lens and a magnetic beam separator, was simulated. Initial results indicate that an electrostatic electron mirror has negative spherical and chromatic aberration coefficients that can be tuned over a large parameter range. The negative aberrations generated by the electron mirror can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies and provide a path to achieving subnanometer spatial resolution. First experimental results on characterizing DNA molecules immobilized on Au substrates in a LEEM are presented. Images obtained in a spin-polarized LEEM demonstrate that high contrast is achievable at low electron energies in the range of 1–10 eV and show that small changes in landing energy have a strong impact on the achievable contrast. The MAD

  16. Automatic software correction of residual aberrations in reconstructed HRTEM exit waves of crystalline samples

    DOE PAGES

    Ophus, Colin; Rasool, Haider I.; Linck, Martin; ...

    2016-11-30

    We develop an automatic and objective method to measure and correct residual aberrations in atomic-resolution HRTEM complex exit waves for crystalline samples aligned along a low-index zone axis. Our method uses the approximate rotational point symmetry of a column of atoms or single atom to iteratively calculate a best-fit numerical phase plate for this symmetry condition, and does not require information about the sample thickness or precise structure. We apply our method to two experimental focal series reconstructions, imaging a β-Si 3N 4 wedge with O and N doping, and a single-layer graphene grain boundary. We use peak and latticemore » fitting to evaluate the precision of the corrected exit waves. We also apply our method to the exit wave of a Si wedge retrieved by off-axis electron holography. In all cases, the software correction of the residual aberration function improves the accuracy of the measured exit waves.« less

  17. Automatic software correction of residual aberrations in reconstructed HRTEM exit waves of crystalline samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ophus, Colin; Rasool, Haider I.; Linck, Martin

    We develop an automatic and objective method to measure and correct residual aberrations in atomic-resolution HRTEM complex exit waves for crystalline samples aligned along a low-index zone axis. Our method uses the approximate rotational point symmetry of a column of atoms or single atom to iteratively calculate a best-fit numerical phase plate for this symmetry condition, and does not require information about the sample thickness or precise structure. We apply our method to two experimental focal series reconstructions, imaging a β-Si 3N 4 wedge with O and N doping, and a single-layer graphene grain boundary. We use peak and latticemore » fitting to evaluate the precision of the corrected exit waves. We also apply our method to the exit wave of a Si wedge retrieved by off-axis electron holography. In all cases, the software correction of the residual aberration function improves the accuracy of the measured exit waves.« less

  18. Quantification by aberration corrected (S)TEM of boundaries formed by symmetry breaking phase transformations.

    PubMed

    Schryvers, D; Salje, E K H; Nishida, M; De Backer, A; Idrissi, H; Van Aert, S

    2017-05-01

    The present contribution gives a review of recent quantification work of atom displacements, atom site occupations and level of crystallinity in various systems and based on aberration corrected HR(S)TEM images. Depending on the case studied, picometer range precisions for individual distances can be obtained, boundary widths at the unit cell level determined or statistical evolutions of fractions of the ordered areas calculated. In all of these cases, these quantitative measures imply new routes for the applications of the respective materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamic Aberration Correction for Conformal Window of High-Speed Aircraft Using Optimized Model-Based Wavefront Sensorless Adaptive Optics.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bing; Li, Yan; Han, Xin-Li; Hu, Bin

    2016-09-02

    For high-speed aircraft, a conformal window is used to optimize the aerodynamic performance. However, the local shape of the conformal window leads to large amounts of dynamic aberrations varying with look angle. In this paper, deformable mirror (DM) and model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSLAO) are used for dynamic aberration correction of an infrared remote sensor equipped with a conformal window and scanning mirror. In model-based WSLAO, aberration is captured using Lukosz mode, and we use the low spatial frequency content of the image spectral density as the metric function. Simulations show that aberrations induced by the conformal window are dominated by some low-order Lukosz modes. To optimize the dynamic correction, we can only correct dominant Lukosz modes and the image size can be minimized to reduce the time required to compute the metric function. In our experiment, a 37-channel DM is used to mimic the dynamic aberration of conformal window with scanning rate of 10 degrees per second. A 52-channel DM is used for correction. For a 128 × 128 image, the mean value of image sharpness during dynamic correction is 1.436 × 10(-5) in optimized correction and is 1.427 × 10(-5) in un-optimized correction. We also demonstrated that model-based WSLAO can achieve convergence two times faster than traditional stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) method.

  20. Dynamic Aberration Correction for Conformal Window of High-Speed Aircraft Using Optimized Model-Based Wavefront Sensorless Adaptive Optics

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bing; Li, Yan; Han, Xin-li; Hu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    For high-speed aircraft, a conformal window is used to optimize the aerodynamic performance. However, the local shape of the conformal window leads to large amounts of dynamic aberrations varying with look angle. In this paper, deformable mirror (DM) and model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSLAO) are used for dynamic aberration correction of an infrared remote sensor equipped with a conformal window and scanning mirror. In model-based WSLAO, aberration is captured using Lukosz mode, and we use the low spatial frequency content of the image spectral density as the metric function. Simulations show that aberrations induced by the conformal window are dominated by some low-order Lukosz modes. To optimize the dynamic correction, we can only correct dominant Lukosz modes and the image size can be minimized to reduce the time required to compute the metric function. In our experiment, a 37-channel DM is used to mimic the dynamic aberration of conformal window with scanning rate of 10 degrees per second. A 52-channel DM is used for correction. For a 128 × 128 image, the mean value of image sharpness during dynamic correction is 1.436 × 10−5 in optimized correction and is 1.427 × 10−5 in un-optimized correction. We also demonstrated that model-based WSLAO can achieve convergence two times faster than traditional stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) method. PMID:27598161

  1. Automatic low-order aberration correction based on geometrical optics for slab lasers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Dong, Lizhi; Lai, Boheng; Yang, Ping; Liu, Yong; Kong, Qingfeng; Yang, Kangjian; Tang, Guomao; Xu, Bing

    2017-02-20

    In this paper, we present a method based on geometry optics to simultaneously correct low-order aberrations and reshape the beams of slab lasers. A coaxial optical system with three lenses is adapted. The positions of the three lenses are directly calculated based on the beam parameters detected by wavefront sensors. The initial sizes of the input beams are 1.8  mm×11  mm, and peak-to-valley (PV) values of the wavefront range up to several tens of microns. After automatic correction, the dimensions may reach nearly 22  mm×22  mm as expected, and PV values of the wavefront are less than 2 μm. The effectiveness and precision of this method are verified with experiments.

  2. Miniature optical planar camera based on a wide-angle metasurface doublet corrected for monochromatic aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Arbabi, Amir; Arbabi, Ehsan; Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Horie, Yu; Han, Seunghoon; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Optical metasurfaces are two-dimensional arrays of nano-scatterers that modify optical wavefronts at subwavelength spatial resolution. They are poised to revolutionize optics by enabling complex low-cost systems where multiple metasurfaces are lithographically stacked and integrated with electronics. For imaging applications, metasurface stacks can perform sophisticated image corrections and can be directly integrated with image sensors. Here we demonstrate this concept with a miniature flat camera integrating a monolithic metasurface lens doublet corrected for monochromatic aberrations, and an image sensor. The doublet lens, which acts as a fisheye photographic objective, has a small f-number of 0.9, an angle-of-view larger than 60° × 60°, and operates at 850 nm wavelength with 70% focusing efficiency. The camera exhibits nearly diffraction-limited image quality, which indicates the potential of this technology in the development of optical systems for microscopy, photography, and computer vision. PMID:27892454

  3. Miniature optical planar camera based on a wide-angle metasurface doublet corrected for monochromatic aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabi, Amir; Arbabi, Ehsan; Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Horie, Yu; Han, Seunghoon; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-11-01

    Optical metasurfaces are two-dimensional arrays of nano-scatterers that modify optical wavefronts at subwavelength spatial resolution. They are poised to revolutionize optics by enabling complex low-cost systems where multiple metasurfaces are lithographically stacked and integrated with electronics. For imaging applications, metasurface stacks can perform sophisticated image corrections and can be directly integrated with image sensors. Here we demonstrate this concept with a miniature flat camera integrating a monolithic metasurface lens doublet corrected for monochromatic aberrations, and an image sensor. The doublet lens, which acts as a fisheye photographic objective, has a small f-number of 0.9, an angle-of-view larger than 60° × 60°, and operates at 850 nm wavelength with 70% focusing efficiency. The camera exhibits nearly diffraction-limited image quality, which indicates the potential of this technology in the development of optical systems for microscopy, photography, and computer vision.

  4. Miniature optical planar camera based on a wide-angle metasurface doublet corrected for monochromatic aberrations

    DOE PAGES

    Arbabi, Amir; Arbabi, Ehsan; Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; ...

    2016-11-28

    Optical metasurfaces are two-dimensional arrays of nano-scatterers that modify optical wavefronts at subwavelength spatial resolution. They are poised to revolutionize optics by enabling complex low-cost systems where multiple metasurfaces are lithographically stacked and integrated with electronics. For imaging applications, metasurface stacks can perform sophisticated image corrections and can be directly integrated with image sensors. Here we demonstrate this concept with a miniature flat camera integrating a monolithic metasurface lens doublet corrected for monochromatic aberrations, and an image sensor. The doublet lens, which acts as a fisheye photographic objective, has a small f-number of 0.9, an angle-of-view larger than 60° ×more » 60°, and operates at 850 nm wavelength with 70% focusing efficiency. The camera exhibits nearly diffraction-limited image quality, which indicates the potential of this technology in the development of optical systems for microscopy, photography, and computer vision.« less

  5. Real-time 3-D contrast-enhanced transcranial ultrasound and aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Ivancevich, Nikolas M; Pinton, Gianmarco F; Nicoletto, Heather A; Bennett, Ellen; Laskowitz, Daniel T; Smith, Stephen W

    2008-09-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) transcranial ultrasound (US) and reconstructed 3-D transcranial ultrasound have shown advantages over traditional methods in a variety of cerebrovascular diseases. We present the results from a novel ultrasound technique, namely real-time 3-D contrast-enhanced transcranial ultrasound. Using real-time 3-D (RT3D) ultrasound and microbubble contrast agent, we scanned 17 healthy volunteers via a single temporal window and nine via the suboccipital window and report our detection rates for the major cerebral vessels. In 71% of subjects, both of our observers identified the ipsilateral circle of Willis from the temporal window, and in 59% we imaged the entire circle of Willis. From the suboccipital window, both observers detected the entire vertebrobasilar circulation in 22% of subjects, and in 44%, the basilar artery. After performing phase aberration correction on one subject, we were able to increase the diagnostic value of the scan, detecting a vessel not present in the uncorrected scan. These preliminary results suggest that RT3D CE transcranial US and RT3D CE transcranial US with phase aberration correction have the potential to greatly impact the field of neurosonology.

  6. Real-Time 3D Contrast-Enhanced Transcranial Ultrasound and Aberration Correction

    PubMed Central

    Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Bennett, Ellen; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) transcranial ultrasound (US) and reconstructed 3D transcranial ultrasound have shown advantages over traditional methods in a variety of cerebrovascular diseases. We present the results from a novel ultrasound technique, namely real-time 3D contrast-enhanced transcranial ultrasound. Using real-time 3D (RT3D) ultrasound and micro-bubble contrast agent, we scanned 17 healthy volunteers via a single temporal window and 9 via the sub-occipital window and report our detection rates for the major cerebral vessels. In 71% of subjects, both of our observers identified the ipsilateral circle of Willis from the temporal window, and in 59% we imaged the entire circle of Willis. From the sub-occipital window, both observers detected the entire vertebrobasilar circulation in 22% of subjects, and in 44% the basilar artery. After performing phase aberration correction on one subject, we were able to increase the diagnostic value of the scan, detecting a vessel not present in the uncorrected scan. These preliminary results suggest that RT3D CE transcranial US and RT3D CE transcranial US with phase aberration correction have the potential to greatly impact the field of neurosonology. PMID:18395321

  7. Coherence and diffraction limited resolution in microscopic OCT by a unified approach for the correction of dispersion and aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Hildebrandt, H.; Münter, Michael; Ahrens, M.; Spahr, H.; Hillmann, D.; König, P.; Hüttmann, G.

    2018-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images scattering tissues with 5 to 15 μm resolution. This is usually not sufficient for a distinction of cellular and subcellular structures. Increasing axial and lateral resolution and compensation of artifacts caused by dispersion and aberrations is required to achieve cellular and subcellular resolution. This includes defocus which limit the usable depth of field at high lateral resolution. OCT gives access the phase of the scattered light and hence correction of dispersion and aberrations is possible by numerical algorithms. Here we present a unified dispersion/aberration correction which is based on a polynomial parameterization of the phase error and an optimization of the image quality using Shannon's entropy. For validation, a supercontinuum light sources and a costume-made spectrometer with 400 nm bandwidth were combined with a high NA microscope objective in a setup for tissue and small animal imaging. Using this setup and computation corrections, volumetric imaging at 1.5 μm resolution is possible. Cellular and near cellular resolution is demonstrated in porcine cornea and the drosophila larva, when computational correction of dispersion and aberrations is used. Due to the excellent correction of the used microscope objective, defocus was the main contribution to the aberrations. In addition, higher aberrations caused by the sample itself were successfully corrected. Dispersion and aberrations are closely related artifacts in microscopic OCT imaging. Hence they can be corrected in the same way by optimization of the image quality. This way microscopic resolution is easily achieved in OCT imaging of static biological tissues.

  8. Conduction band offset at GeO{sub 2}/Ge interface determined by internal photoemission and charge-corrected x-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W. F.; Nishimula, T.; Nagashio, K.

    2013-03-11

    We report a consistent conduction band offset (CBO) at a GeO{sub 2}/Ge interface determined by internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) and charge-corrected X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). IPE results showed that the CBO value was larger than 1.5 eV irrespective of metal electrode and substrate type variance, while an accurate determination of valence band offset (VBO) by XPS requires a careful correction of differential charging phenomena. The VBO value was determined to be 3.60 {+-} 0.2 eV by XPS after charge correction, thus yielding a CBO (1.60 {+-} 0.2 eV) in excellent agreement with the IPE results. Such a large CBO (>1.5more » eV) confirmed here is promising in terms of using GeO{sub 2} as a potential passivation layer for future Ge-based scaled CMOS devices.« less

  9. Model-based aberration correction in a closed-loop wavefront-sensor-less adaptive optics system.

    PubMed

    Song, H; Fraanje, R; Schitter, G; Kroese, H; Vdovin, G; Verhaegen, M

    2010-11-08

    In many scientific and medical applications, such as laser systems and microscopes, wavefront-sensor-less (WFSless) adaptive optics (AO) systems are used to improve the laser beam quality or the image resolution by correcting the wavefront aberration in the optical path. The lack of direct wavefront measurement in WFSless AO systems imposes a challenge to achieve efficient aberration correction. This paper presents an aberration correction approach for WFSlss AO systems based on the model of the WFSless AO system and a small number of intensity measurements, where the model is identified from the input-output data of the WFSless AO system by black-box identification. This approach is validated in an experimental setup with 20 static aberrations having Kolmogorov spatial distributions. By correcting N=9 Zernike modes (N is the number of aberration modes), an intensity improvement from 49% of the maximum value to 89% has been achieved in average based on N+5=14 intensity measurements. With the worst initial intensity, an improvement from 17% of the maximum value to 86% has been achieved based on N+4=13 intensity measurements.

  10. Perfect X-ray focusing via fitting corrective glasses to aberrated optics.

    PubMed

    Seiboth, Frank; Schropp, Andreas; Scholz, Maria; Wittwer, Felix; Rödel, Christian; Wünsche, Martin; Ullsperger, Tobias; Nolte, Stefan; Rahomäki, Jussi; Parfeniukas, Karolis; Giakoumidis, Stylianos; Vogt, Ulrich; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Garrevoet, Jan; Falkenberg, Gerald; Galtier, Eric C; Ja Lee, Hae; Nagler, Bob; Schroer, Christian G

    2017-03-01

    Due to their short wavelength, X-rays can in principle be focused down to a few nanometres and below. At the same time, it is this short wavelength that puts stringent requirements on X-ray optics and their metrology. Both are limited by today's technology. In this work, we present accurate at wavelength measurements of residual aberrations of a refractive X-ray lens using ptychography to manufacture a corrective phase plate. Together with the fitted phase plate the optics shows diffraction-limited performance, generating a nearly Gaussian beam profile with a Strehl ratio above 0.8. This scheme can be applied to any other focusing optics, thus solving the X-ray optical problem at synchrotron radiation sources and X-ray free-electron lasers.

  11. Perfect X-ray focusing via fitting corrective glasses to aberrated optics

    SciTech Connect

    Seiboth, Frank; Schropp, Andreas; Scholz, Maria

    2017-03-01

    Due to their short wavelength, X-rays can in principle be focused down to a few nanometres and below. At the same time, it is this short wavelength that puts stringent requirements on X-ray optics and their metrology. Both are limited by today’s technology. In this work, we present accurate at wavelength measurements of residual aberrations of a refractive X-ray lens using ptychography to manufacture a corrective phase plate. Together with the fitted phase plate the optics shows diffraction-limited performance, generating a nearly Gaussian beam profile with a Strehl ratio above 0.8. As a result, this scheme can be applied tomore » any other focusing optics, thus solving the X-ray optical problem at synchrotron radiation sources and X-ray free-electron lasers.« less

  12. Morphology of the ferritin iron core by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Nan; Dowle, Miriam; Horniblow, Richard D.; Tselepis, Chris; Palmer, Richard E.

    2016-11-01

    As the major iron storage protein, ferritin stores and releases iron for maintaining the balance of iron in fauna, flora, and bacteria. We present an investigation of the morphology and iron loading of ferritin (from equine spleen) using aberration-corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Atom counting method, with size selected Au clusters as mass standards, was employed to determine the number of iron atoms in the nanoparticle core of each ferritin protein. Quantitative analysis shows that the nuclearity of iron atoms in the mineral core varies from a few hundred iron atoms to around 5000 atoms. Moreover, a relationship between the iron loading and iron core morphology is established, in which mineral core nucleates from a single nanoparticle, then grows along the protein shell before finally forming either a solid or hollow core structure.

  13. Identification of light elements in silicon nitride by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Idrobo, Juan C; Walkosz, Weronika; Klie, Robert F; Oğüt, Serdar

    2012-12-01

    In silicon nitride structural ceramics, the overall mechanical and thermal properties are controlled by the atomic and electronic structures at the interface between the ceramic grains and the amorphous intergranular films (IGFs) formed by various sintering additives. In the last ten years the atomic arrangements of heavy elements (rare-earths) at the Si(3)N(4)/IGF interfaces have been resolved. However, the atomic position of light elements, without which it is not possible to obtain a complete description of the interfaces, has been lacking. This review article details the authors' efforts to identify the atomic arrangement of light elements such as nitrogen and oxygen at the Si(3)N(4)/SiO(2) interface and in bulk Si(3)N(4) using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Index mismatch aberration correction over long working distances using spatial light modulation.

    PubMed

    Gjonaj, Bergin; Johnson, Patrick; Bonn, Mischa; Domke, Katrin F

    2012-11-20

    For many microscopy applications, millimeters-long free working distances (LWD) are required. However, the high resolution and contrast of LWD objectives operated in air are lost when introducing glass and/or liquid with the sample. We propose to use spatial light modulation to correct for such beam aberrations caused by refractive index mismatches. Focusing a monochromatic laser beam with a 10 mm working distance air objective (50×, 0.5 NA) through air, glass, and water, we manage to restore a sharp, intense focus (FWHM<2λ) by adaptive beam phase shaping. Our approach offers a practical and cost-effective route to high resolution and contrast microscopy using LWD air objectives, extending their usage beyond applications in air.

  15. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Perfect X-ray focusing via fitting corrective glasses to aberrated optics

    PubMed Central

    Seiboth, Frank; Schropp, Andreas; Scholz, Maria; Wittwer, Felix; Rödel, Christian; Wünsche, Martin; Ullsperger, Tobias; Nolte, Stefan; Rahomäki, Jussi; Parfeniukas, Karolis; Giakoumidis, Stylianos; Vogt, Ulrich; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Garrevoet, Jan; Falkenberg, Gerald; Galtier, Eric C.; Ja Lee, Hae; Nagler, Bob; Schroer, Christian G.

    2017-01-01

    Due to their short wavelength, X-rays can in principle be focused down to a few nanometres and below. At the same time, it is this short wavelength that puts stringent requirements on X-ray optics and their metrology. Both are limited by today's technology. In this work, we present accurate at wavelength measurements of residual aberrations of a refractive X-ray lens using ptychography to manufacture a corrective phase plate. Together with the fitted phase plate the optics shows diffraction-limited performance, generating a nearly Gaussian beam profile with a Strehl ratio above 0.8. This scheme can be applied to any other focusing optics, thus solving the X-ray optical problem at synchrotron radiation sources and X-ray free-electron lasers. PMID:28248317

  17. The application of aberration-corrected electron microscopy to the characterization of gold-based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzing, Andrew A.

    Electron microscopy has long been used to study the morphology of heterogeneous catalysts. Recent advances in electron optics now allow for the correction of the inherent spherical aberration (Cs) produced by the objective lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM, resulting in a significantly improved spatial resolution as well as the ability to use a much larger probe-current than was previously possible. In this thesis, the combination of high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging and microanalysis by x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) in an aberration-corrected STEM has been applied for the first time to the characterization of gold-based heterogeneous catalysts. Multi-variate statistical analysis (MSA) has been employed in order to further improve the STEM-XEDS spectrum image data acquired with this technique. In addition, supplemental analysis using electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) in an aberration-corrected instrument has also been attempted. These techniques have proven extremely valuable in providing complimentary information to more traditional catalyst characterization techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction in four specific problems relating to catalysis. Firstly, the atomic-scale resolution of Cs-corrected HAADF imaging has been utilized to study Au/FeOx catalysts in order to determine the size and structure of the Au clusters present on the support surface. It was discovered that, while both inactive and active catalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation contained large Au particles (> 5 nm) and individual Au atoms, the active catalyst also contained sub-nm clusters comprised of only a few Au atoms. Secondly, novel CeO2 support materials for Au and Au-Pd catalysts were synthesized by precipitation with supercritical CO2. These supports were found to produce significantly more active catalysts than those based on CeO2

  18. Space active optics: in flight aberrations correction for the next generation of large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, M.; Ferrari, M.; Hugot, E.; Lemaitre, G.

    2017-11-01

    The need for both high quality images and light structures is a constant concern in the conception of space telescopes. In this paper, we present an active optics system as a way to fulfill those two objectives. Indeed, active optics consists in controlling mirrors' deformations in order to improve the images quality [1]. The two main applications of active optics techniques are the in-situ compensation of phase errors in a wave front by using a corrector deformable mirror [2] and the manufacturing of aspherical mirrors by stress polishing or by in-situ stressing [3]. We will focus here on the wave-front correction. Indeed, the next generation of space telescopes will have lightweight primary mirrors; in consequence, they will be sensitive to the environment variations, inducing optical aberrations in the instrument. An active optics system is principally composed of a deformable mirror, a wave front sensor, a set of actuators deforming the mirror and control/command electronics. It is used to correct the wave-front errors due to the optical design, the manufacturing imperfections, the large lightweight primary mirrors' deflection in field gravity, the fixation devices, and the mirrors and structures' thermal distortions due to the local turbulence [4]. Active optics is based on the elasticity theory [5]; forces and/or load are used to deform a mirror. Like in adaptive optics, actuators can simply be placed under the optical surface [1,2], but other configurations have also been studied: a system's simplification, inducing a minimization of the number of actuators can be achieved by working on the mirror design [5]. For instance, in the so called Vase form Multimode Deformable Mirror [6], forces are applied on an external ring clamped on the pupil. With this method, there is no local effect due to the application of forces on the mirror's back face. Furthermore, the number of actuators needed to warp the mirror does not depend on the pupil size; it is a fully

  19. Nonlinear adaptive optics: aberration correction in three photon fluorescence microscopy for mouse brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinefeld, David; Paudel, Hari P.; Wang, Tianyu; Wang, Mengran; Ouzounov, Dimitre G.; Bifano, Thomas G.; Xu, Chris

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy is a well-established technique for deep-tissue imaging with subcellular resolution. Three-photon microscopy (3PM) when combined with long wavelength excitation was shown to allow deeper imaging than two-photon microscopy (2PM) in biological tissues, such as mouse brain, because out-of-focus background light can be further reduced due to the higher order nonlinear excitation. As was demonstrated in 2PM systems, imaging depth and resolution can be improved by aberration correction using adaptive optics (AO) techniques which are based on shaping the scanning beam using a spatial light modulator (SLM). In this way, it is possible to compensate for tissue low order aberration and to some extent, to compensate for tissue scattering. Here, we present a 3PM AO microscopy system for brain imaging. Soliton self-frequency shift is used to create a femtosecond source at 1675 nm and a microelectromechanical (MEMS) SLM serves as the wavefront shaping device. We perturb the 1020 segment SLM using a modified nonlinear version of three-point phase shifting interferometry. The nonlinearity of the fluorescence signal used for feedback ensures that the signal is increasing when the spot size decreases, allowing compensation of phase errors in an iterative optimization process without direct phase measurement. We compare the performance for different orders of nonlinear feedback, showing an exponential growth in signal improvement as the nonlinear order increases. We demonstrate the impact of the method by applying the 3PM AO system for in-vivo mouse brain imaging, showing improvement in signal at 1-mm depth inside the brain.

  20. Photoemissive coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Polystyrene coating is applied to holographic storage tube substrate via glow discharge polymerization in an inert environment. After deposition of styrene coating, antimony and then cesium are added to produce photoemissive layer. Technique is utilized in preparing perfectly organized polymeric films useful as single-crystal membranes.

  1. Simultaneous correction of large low-order and high-order aberrations with a new deformable mirror technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooms, F.; Camet, S.; Curis, J. F.

    2010-02-01

    A new technology of deformable mirror will be presented. Based on magnetic actuators, these deformable mirrors feature record strokes (more than +/- 45μm of astigmatism and focus correction) with an optimized temporal behavior. Furthermore, the development has been made in order to have a large density of actuators within a small clear aperture (typically 52 actuators within a diameter of 9.0mm). We will present the key benefits of this technology for vision science: simultaneous correction of low and high order aberrations, AO-SLO image without artifacts due to the membrane vibration, optimized control, etc. Using recent papers published by Doble, Thibos and Miller, we show the performances that can be achieved by various configurations using statistical approach. The typical distribution of wavefront aberrations (both the low order aberration (LOA) and high order aberration (HOA)) have been computed and the correction applied by the mirror. We compare two configurations of deformable mirrors (52 and 97 actuators) and highlight the influence of the number of actuators on the fitting error, the photon noise error and the effective bandwidth of correction.

  2. In vivo droplet vaporization for occlusion therapy and phase aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Kripfgans, Oliver D; Fowlkes, J Brian; Woydt, Michael; Eldevik, Odd P; Carson, Paul L

    2002-06-01

    The objective was to determine whether a transpulmonary droplet emulsion (90%, <6 microm diameter) could be used to form large gas bubbles (>30 microm) temporarily in vivo. Such bubbles could occlude a targeted capillary bed when used in a large number density. Alternatively, for a very sparse population of droplets, the resulting gas bubbles could serve as point beacons for phase aberration corrections in ultrasonic imaging. Gas bubbles can be made in vivo by acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) of injected, superheated, dodecafluoropentane droplets. Droplets vaporize in an acoustic field whose peak rarefactional pressure exceeds a well-defined threshold. In this new work, it has been found that intraarterial and intravenous injections can be used to introduce the emulsion into the blood stream for subsequent ADV (B- and M-mode on a clinical scanner) in situ. Intravenous administration results in a lower gas bubble yield, possibly because of filtering in the lung, dilution in the blood volume, or other circulatory effects. Results show that for occlusion purposes, a reduction in regional blood flow of 34% can be achieved. Individual point beacons with a +24 dB backscatter amplitude relative to white matter were created by intravenous injection and ADV.

  3. Studies of local polarization in complex oxide multiferroic interfaces by aberration corrected STEM-EELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Tornos, Javier; Leon, Carlos; Varela, María; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Santamaría, Jacobo

    2014-03-01

    Interfaces in complex oxide heterostructures are responsible for exciting new physics, which is directly related to the chemical, structural and electronic properties at the atomic scale. Here, we study artificial multiferroic heterostructures combining ferromagnetic La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 with ferroelectric BaTiO3 by atomic resolution aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Measurements of the atomic positions in the STEM images permit calculating relative displacements and hence, local polarization. Polarization gradients can be observed in annular bright field images which seem to be correlated to strain gradients associated with the large lattice mismatch between barriers and electrodes. Spectroscopic measurements suggest the presence of O vacancies through the ferroelectric layers. Understanding the effect of the charge carriers associated with the oxygen vacancies may be the key to control the dynamics of domain walls in these heterostructures. Acknowledgements ORNL: U.S. DOE-BES, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division. UCM: ERC Starting Investigator Award, Spanish MICINN MAT2011-27470-C02 and Consolider Ingenio 2010 - CSD2009-00013 (Imagine), CAM S2009/MAT-1756 (Phama).

  4. New insights on ion track morphology in pyrochlores by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zhang, Yanwen; Ou, Xin

    Here we demonstrate the enhanced imaging capabilities of an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope to advance the understanding of ion track structure in pyrochlore structured materials (i.e., Gd 2Ti 2O 7 and Gd 2TiZrO 7). Track formation occurs due to the inelastic transfer of energy from incident ions to electrons, and atomic-level details of track morphology as a function of energy-loss are revealed in the present work. A comparison of imaging details obtained by varying collection angles of detectors is discussed in the present work. A quantitative analysis of phase identification using high-angle annular dark field imaging is performedmore » on the ion tracks. Finally, a novel 3-dimensional track reconstruction method is provided that is based on depth dependent imaging of the ion tracks. The technique is used in extracting the atomic-level details of nanoscale features, such as the disordered ion tracks, which are embedded in relatively thicker matrix. Another relevance of the method is shown by measuring the tilt of the ion tracks relative to the electron beam incidence that helps in knowing the structure and geometry of ion tracks quantitatively.« less

  5. New insights on ion track morphology in pyrochlores by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zhang, Yanwen; Ou, Xin; ...

    2016-12-13

    Here we demonstrate the enhanced imaging capabilities of an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope to advance the understanding of ion track structure in pyrochlore structured materials (i.e., Gd 2Ti 2O 7 and Gd 2TiZrO 7). Track formation occurs due to the inelastic transfer of energy from incident ions to electrons, and atomic-level details of track morphology as a function of energy-loss are revealed in the present work. A comparison of imaging details obtained by varying collection angles of detectors is discussed in the present work. A quantitative analysis of phase identification using high-angle annular dark field imaging is performedmore » on the ion tracks. Finally, a novel 3-dimensional track reconstruction method is provided that is based on depth dependent imaging of the ion tracks. The technique is used in extracting the atomic-level details of nanoscale features, such as the disordered ion tracks, which are embedded in relatively thicker matrix. Another relevance of the method is shown by measuring the tilt of the ion tracks relative to the electron beam incidence that helps in knowing the structure and geometry of ion tracks quantitatively.« less

  6. Chromatic-aberration-corrected diffractive lenses for ultra-broadband focusing

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Peng; Mohammad, Nabil; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-02-12

    We exploit the inherent dispersion in diffractive optics to demonstrate planar chromatic-aberration-corrected lenses. Specifically, we designed, fabricated and characterized cylindrical diffractive lenses that efficiently focus the entire visible band (450 nm to 700 nm) onto a single line. These devices are essentially pixelated, multi-level microstructures. Experiments confirm an average optical efficiency of 25% for a three-wavelength apochromatic lens whose chromatic focus shift is only 1.3 μm and 25 μm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. Super-achromatic performance over the continuous visible band is also demonstrated with averaged lateral and axial focus shifts of only 1.65 μm and 73.6 μm,more » respectively. These lenses are easy to fabricate using single-step grayscale lithography and can be inexpensively replicated. Furthermore, these devices are thin (<3 μm), error tolerant, has low aspect ratio (<1:1) and offer polarization-insensitive focusing, all significant advantages compared to alternatives that rely on metasurfaces. Lastly, our design methodology offers high design flexibility in numerical aperture and focal length, and is readily extended to 2D.« less

  7. Symmetrical optical imaging system with bionic variable-focus lens for off-axis aberration correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan-Yin; Du, Jia-Wei; Zhu, Shi-Qiang

    2017-09-01

    A bionic variable-focus lens with symmetrical layered structure was designed to mimic the crystalline lens. An optical imaging system based on this lens and with a symmetrical structure that mimics the human eye structure was proposed. The refractive index of the bionic variable-focus lens increases from outside to inside. The two PDMS lenses with a certain thickness were designed to improve the optical performance of the optical imaging system and minimise the gravity effect of liquid. The paper presents the overall structure of the optical imaging system and the detailed description of the bionic variable-focus lens. By pumping liquid in or out of the cavity, the surface curvatures of the rear PDMS lens were varied, resulting in a change in the focal length. The focal length range of the optical imaging system was 20.71-24.87 mm. The optical performance of the optical imaging system was evaluated by imaging experiments and analysed by ray tracing simulations. On the basis of test and simulation results, the optical performance of the system was quite satisfactory. Off-axis aberrations were well corrected, and the image quality was greatly improved.

  8. Comparison of 3-D multi-lag cross- correlation and speckle brightness aberration correction algorithms on static and moving targets.

    PubMed

    Ivancevich, Nikolas M; Dahl, Jeremy J; Smith, Stephen W

    2009-10-01

    Phase correction has the potential to increase the image quality of 3-D ultrasound, especially transcranial ultrasound. We implemented and compared 2 algorithms for aberration correction, multi-lag cross-correlation and speckle brightness, using static and moving targets. We corrected three 75-ns rms electronic aberrators with full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) auto-correlation lengths of 1.35, 2.7, and 5.4 mm. Cross-correlation proved the better algorithm at 2.7 and 5.4 mm correlation lengths (P < 0.05). Static cross-correlation performed better than moving-target cross-correlation at the 2.7 mm correlation length (P < 0.05). Finally, we compared the static and moving-target cross-correlation on a flow phantom with a skull casting aberrator. Using signal from static targets, the correction resulted in an average contrast increase of 22.2%, compared with 13.2% using signal from moving targets. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) increased by 20.5% and 12.8% using static and moving targets, respectively. Doppler signal strength increased by 5.6% and 4.9% for the static and moving-targets methods, respectively.

  9. Correction of cell-induced optical aberrations in a fluorescence fluctuation microscope

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Charles-Edouard; Grichine, Alexei; Wang, Irène; Delon, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    We describe the effect of optical aberrations on fluorescence fluctuations microscopy (FFM), when focusing through a single living cell. FFM measurements are performed in an aqueous fluorescent solution, and prove to be a highly sensitive tool to assess the optical aberrations introduced by the cell. We demonstrate an adaptive optics (AO) system to remove the aberration-related bias in the FFM measurements. Our data show that AO is not only useful when imaging deep in tissues, but also when performing FFM measurements through a single cellular layer. PMID:23939061

  10. Aberration correction for transcranial photoacoustic tomography of primates employing adjunct image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao; Nie, Liming; Schoonover, Robert W.; Guo, Zijian; Schirra, Carsten O.; Anastasio, Mark A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-06-01

    A challenge in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) brain imaging is to compensate for aberrations in the measured photoacoustic data due to their propagation through the skull. By use of information regarding the skull morphology and composition obtained from adjunct x-ray computed tomography image data, we developed a subject-specific imaging model that accounts for such aberrations. A time-reversal-based reconstruction algorithm was employed with this model for image reconstruction. The image reconstruction methodology was evaluated in experimental studies involving phantoms and monkey heads. The results establish that our reconstruction methodology can effectively compensate for skull-induced acoustic aberrations and improve image fidelity in transcranial PAT.

  11. A Novel Concept for a Deformable Membrane Mirror for Correction of Large Amplitude Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jim; Patrick, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Very large, light weight mirrors are being developed for applications in space. Due to launch mass and volume restrictions these mirrors will need to be much more flexible than traditional optics. The use of primary mirrors with these characteristics will lead to requirements for adaptive optics capable of correcting wave front errors with large amplitude relatively low spatial frequency aberrations. The use of low modulus membrane mirrors actuated with electrostatic attraction forces is a potential solution for this application. Several different electrostatic membrane mirrors are now available commercially. However, as the dynamic range requirement of the adaptive mirror is increased the separation distance between the membrane and the electrodes must increase to accommodate the required face sheet deformations. The actuation force applied to the mirror decreases inversely proportional to the square of the separation distance; thus for large dynamic ranges the voltage requirement can rapidly increase into the high voltage regime. Experimentation with mirrors operating in the KV range has shown that at the higher voltages a serious problem with electrostatic field cross coupling between actuators can occur. Voltage changes on individual actuators affect the voltage of other actuators making the system very difficult to control. A novel solution has been proposed that combines high voltage electrodes with mechanical actuation to overcome this problem. In this design an array of electrodes are mounted to a backing structure via light weight large dynamic range flextensional actuators. With this design the control input becomes the separation distance between the electrode and the mirror. The voltage on each of the actuators is set to a uniform relatively high voltage, thus the problem of cross talk between actuators is avoided and the favorable distributed load characteristic of electrostatic actuation is retained. Initial testing and modeling of this concept

  12. Aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope with a sub-50-pm resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Tanigaki, Toshiaki, E-mail: toshiaki.tanigaki.mv@hitachi.com

    2015-02-16

    Atomic-resolution electromagnetic field observation is critical to the development of advanced materials and to the unveiling of their fundamental physics. For this purpose, a spherical-aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope has been developed. The microscope has the following superior properties: stabilized accelerating voltage, minimized electrical and mechanical fluctuation, and coherent electron emission. These properties have enabled to obtain 43-pm information transfer. On the bases of these performances, a 43-pm resolution has been obtained by correcting lens aberrations up to the third order. Observations of GaN [411] thin crystal showed a projected atomic locations with a separation of 44 pm.

  13. Visual simulation through an aspheric aberration-correcting intraocular lens in subjects with different corneal profiles using adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Alcocer, Javier; Madrid-Costa, David; García-Lázaro, Santiago; Albarrán-Diego, César; Ferrer-Blasco, Teresa

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the visual quality of the AcrySof IQ SN60WF(®) intraocular lens (IOL) when combined with different corneal profiles. Ten eyes of 10 participants with no prior history of refractive or cataract surgery were evaluated. An adaptive optics visual simulator was used to simulate the wavefront aberration pattern of an aspheric aberration-correcting IOL (AcrySof IQ SN60WF(®)). Normal corneas (group A), low and high myopic corneal ablations (groups B and C, respectively) and low and high hyperopic corneal ablations (groups D and E, respectively) were also simulated. Monocular distance visual acuities at 100, 50 and 10 per cent of contrast were measured. At 100, 50 and 10 per cent contrast, no differences were found between groups A and B (p > 0.06 for all contrasts). Group A obtained better values than groups C, D and E for all contrasts (p = 0.031, p = 0.038, p = 0.032 at 100, 50 and 10 per cent of contrast, respectively). At the same time, group B obtained better values than groups C, D and E (p = 0.041, p = 0.042, p = 0.036 at 100, 50 and 10 per cent of contrast, respectively). Within the five groups, the worst results were always obtained for group E (p = 0.017, p = 0.021 and p = 0.025 at 100, 50 and 10 per cent of contrast, respectively). The results suggest that the aspheric aberration-correcting IOL studied provides comparable results, when it is combined with normal corneas and with corneas with simulated low myopic ablations. When negative amounts of residual spherical aberration after cataract surgery are expected to be achieved, IOLs with more positive spherical aberration should be considered. © 2013 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2013 Optometrists Association Australia.

  14. Higher-order aberrations and best-corrected visual acuity in Native American children with a high prevalence of astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joseph M.; Harvey, Erin M.; Schwiegerling, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether higher-order aberrations (HOAs) in children from a highly astigmatic population differ from population norms and whether HOAs are associated with astigmatism and reduced best-corrected visual acuity. Methods Subjects were 218 Tohono O’odham Native American children 5–9 years of age. Noncycloplegic HOA measurements were obtained with a handheld Shack-Hartmann sensor (SHS). Signed (z06s to z14s) and unsigned (z06u to z14u) wavefront aberration Zernike coefficients Z(3,−3) to Z(4,4) were rescaled for a 4 mm diameter pupil and compared to adult population norms. Cycloplegic refraction and best-corrected logMAR letter visual acuity (BCVA) were also measured. Regression analyses assessed the contribution of astigmatism (J0) and HOAs to BCVA. Results The mean root-mean-square (RMS) HOA of 0.191 ± 0.072 μm was significantly greater than population norms (0.100 ± 0.044 μm. All unsigned HOA coefficients (z06u to z14u) and all signed coefficients except z09s, z10s, and z11s were significantly larger than population norms. Decreased BCVA was associated with astigmatism (J0) and spherical aberration (z12u) but not RMS coma, with the effect of J0 about 4 times as great as z12u. Conclusions Tohono O’odham children show elevated HOAs compared to population norms. Astigmatism and unsigned spherical aberration are associated with decreased acuity, but the effects of spherical aberration are minimal and not clinically significant. PMID:26239206

  15. Aberration correction considering curved sample surface shape for non-contact two-photon excitation microscopy with spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Konno, Alu; Inoue, Takashi; Okazaki, Shigetoshi

    2018-06-18

    In this paper, excitation light wavefront modulation is performed considering the curved sample surface shape to demonstrate high-quality deep observation using two-photon excitation microscopy (TPM) with a dry objective lens. A large spherical aberration typically occurs when the refractive index (RI) interface between air and the sample is a plane perpendicular to the optical axis. Moreover, the curved sample surface shape and the RI mismatch cause various aberrations, including spherical ones. Consequently, the fluorescence intensity and resolution of the obtained image are degraded in the deep regions. To improve them, we designed a pre-distortion wavefront for correcting the aberration caused by the curved sample surface shape by using a novel, simple optical path length difference calculation method. The excitation light wavefront is modulated to the pre-distortion wavefront by a spatial light modulator incorporated in the TPM system before passing through the interface, where the RI mismatch occurs. Thus, the excitation light is condensed without aberrations. Blood vessels were thereby observed up to an optical depth of 2,000 μm in a cleared mouse brain by using a dry objective lens.

  16. Comparison of analytical and numerical approaches for CT-based aberration correction in transcranial passive acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ryan M.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections are employed in transcranial ultrasound both for therapy and imaging. In this study, analytical and numerical approaches for calculating aberration corrections based on CT data were compared, with a particular focus on their application to transcranial passive imaging. Two models were investigated: a three-dimensional full-wave numerical model (Connor and Hynynen 2004 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 51 1693-706) based on the Westervelt equation, and an analytical method (Clement and Hynynen 2002 Ultrasound Med. Biol. 28 617-24) similar to that currently employed by commercial brain therapy systems. Trans-skull time delay corrections calculated from each model were applied to data acquired by a sparse hemispherical (30 cm diameter) receiver array (128 piezoceramic discs: 2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) passively listening through ex vivo human skullcaps (n  =  4) to emissions from a narrow-band, fixed source emitter (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency). Measurements were taken at various locations within the cranial cavity by moving the source around the field using a three-axis positioning system. Images generated through passive beamforming using CT-based skull corrections were compared with those obtained through an invasive source-based approach, as well as images formed without skull corrections, using the main lobe volume, positional shift, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio as metrics for image quality. For each CT-based model, corrections achieved by allowing for heterogeneous skull acoustical parameters in simulation outperformed the corresponding case where homogeneous parameters were assumed. Of the CT-based methods investigated, the full-wave model provided the best imaging results at the cost of computational complexity. These results highlight the importance of accurately modeling trans-skull propagation when calculating CT-based aberration corrections

  17. The oblique effect has an optical component: Orientation-specific contrast thresholds after correction of high-order aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Ian J.; Elliott, Sarah L.; Pallikaris, Aris; Werner, John S.; Choi, Stacey; Tahir, Humza J.

    2010-01-01

    Most of the high-order aberrations of the eye are not circularly symmetric. Hence, while it is well known that human vision is subject to cortically based orientation preference in cell tuning, the optics of the eye might also introduce some orientational anisotropy. We tested this idea by measuring contrast sensitivity at different orientations of sine-wave gratings when viewing through a closed-loop adaptive optics phoropter. Under aberration-corrected conditions, mean contrast sensitivity improved for all observers by a factor of 1.8× to 5×. The detectability of some orientations improved more than others. As expected, this orientation-specific effect varied between individuals. The sensitivity benefits were accurately predicted from MTF model simulations, demonstrating that the observed effects reflected the individual's pattern of high-order aberrations. In one observer, the orientation-specific effects were substantial: an improvement of 8× at one orientation and 2× in another orientation. The experiments confirm that, for conditions that are not diffraction limited, the optics of the eye introduce rotational asymmetry to the luminance distribution on the retina and that this impacts vision, inducing orientational anisotropy. These results suggest that the traditional view of meridional anisotropy having an entirely neural origin may be true for diffraction-limited pupils but that viewing through larger pupils introduces an additional orientation-specific optical component to this phenomenon. PMID:20884505

  18. MAGNETIC LIQUID DEFORMABLE MIRRORS FOR ASTRONOMICAL APPLICATIONS: ACTIVE CORRECTION OF OPTICAL ABERRATIONS FROM LOWER-GRADE OPTICS AND SUPPORT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F., E-mail: borra@phy.ulaval.ca

    2012-08-01

    Deformable mirrors are increasingly used in astronomy. However, they still are limited in stroke for active correction of high-amplitude optical aberrations. Magnetic liquid deformable mirrors (MLDMs) are a new technology that has the advantages of high-amplitude deformations and low costs. In this paper, we demonstrate extremely high strokes and interactuator strokes achievable by MLDMs which can be used in astronomical instrumentation. In particular, we consider the use of such a mirror to suggest an interesting application for the next generation of large telescopes. We present a prototype 91 actuator deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). This mirror usesmore » a technique that linearizes the response of such mirrors by superimposing a large and uniform magnetic field on the magnetic field produced by an array of small coils. We discuss experimental results that illustrate the performance of MLDMs. A most interesting application of MLDMs comes from the fact they could be used to correct the aberrations of large and lower optical quality primary mirrors held by simple support systems. We estimate basic parameters of the needed MLDMs, obtaining reasonable values.« less

  19. Design and commissioning of an aberration-corrected ultrafast spin-polarized low energy electron microscope with multiple electron sources.

    PubMed

    Wan, Weishi; Yu, Lei; Zhu, Lin; Yang, Xiaodong; Wei, Zheng; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Feng, Jun; Kunze, Kai; Schaff, Oliver; Tromp, Ruud; Tang, Wen-Xin

    2017-03-01

    We describe the design and commissioning of a novel aberration-corrected low energy electron microscope (AC-LEEM). A third magnetic prism array (MPA) is added to the standard AC-LEEM with two prism arrays, allowing the incorporation of an ultrafast spin-polarized electron source alongside the standard cold field emission electron source, without degrading spatial resolution. The high degree of symmetries of the AC-LEEM are utilized while we design the electron optics of the ultrafast spin-polarized electron source, so as to minimize the deleterious effect of time broadening, while maintaining full control of electron spin. A spatial resolution of 2nm and temporal resolution of 10ps (ps) are expected in the future time resolved aberration-corrected spin-polarized LEEM (TR-AC-SPLEEM). The commissioning of the three-prism AC-LEEM has been successfully finished with the cold field emission source, with a spatial resolution below 2nm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays using CT-based skull-specific aberration corrections: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan M.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays (30 cm diameter, 16 to 1372 elements, 2.48 mm receiver diameter) using CT-based aberration corrections was investigated via numerical simulations. A multi-layered ray acoustic transcranial ultrasound propagation model based on CT-derived skull morphology was developed. By incorporating skull-specific aberration corrections into a conventional passive beamforming algorithm (Norton and Won 2000 IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 38 1337–43), simulated acoustic source fields representing the emissions from acoustically-stimulated microbubbles were spatially mapped through three digitized human skulls, with the transskull reconstructions closely matching the water-path control images. Image quality was quantified based on main lobe beamwidths, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio. The effects on the resulting image quality of the source’s emission frequency and location within the skull cavity, the array sparsity and element configuration, the receiver element sensitivity, and the specific skull morphology were all investigated. The system’s resolution capabilities were also estimated for various degrees of array sparsity. Passive imaging of acoustic sources through an intact skull was shown possible with sparse hemispherical imaging arrays. This technique may be useful for the monitoring and control of transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments, particularly non-thermal, cavitation-mediated applications such as FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption or sonothrombolysis, for which no real-time monitoring technique currently exists. PMID:23807573

  1. Interaction between single gold atom and the graphene edge: A study via aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongtao; Li, Kun; Cheng, Yingchun; Wang, Qingxiao; Yao, Yingbang; Schwingenschlögl, Udo; Zhang, Xixiang; Yang, Wei

    2012-04-01

    Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms.Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional Figures for characterization of mono-layer CVD graphene samples with free edges and Pt atoms decorations and analysis of the effect of electron irradiation; supporting movie on edge evolution. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr00059h

  2. Development of a real-time wave field reconstruction TEM system (II): correction of coma aberration and 3-fold astigmatism, and real-time correction of 2-fold astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Takahiro; Kimura, Yoshihide; Takai, Yoshizo

    2018-02-01

    In this study, a function for the correction of coma aberration, 3-fold astigmatism and real-time correction of 2-fold astigmatism was newly incorporated into a recently developed real-time wave field reconstruction TEM system. The aberration correction function was developed by modifying the image-processing software previously designed for auto focus tracking, as described in the first article of this series. Using the newly developed system, the coma aberration and 3-fold astigmatism were corrected using the aberration coefficients obtained experimentally before the processing was carried out. In this study, these aberration coefficients were estimated from an apparent 2-fold astigmatism induced under tilted-illumination conditions. In contrast, 2-fold astigmatism could be measured and corrected in real time from the reconstructed wave field. Here, the measurement precision for 2-fold astigmatism was found to be ±0.4 nm and ±2°. All of these aberration corrections, as well as auto focus tracking, were performed at a video frame rate of 1/30 s. Thus, the proposed novel system is promising for quantitative and reliable in situ observations, particularly in environmental TEM applications.

  3. Genetic and pharmacological correction of aberrant dopamine synthesis using patient iPSCs with BH4 metabolism disorders.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Taizo; Imamura, Keiko; Kondo, Takayuki; Koshiba, Yasushi; Hara, Satoshi; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Furujo, Mahoko; Kinoshita, Masako; Oeda, Tomoko; Takahashi, Jun; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Inoue, Haruhisa

    2016-12-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a neurotransmitter in the brain, playing a central role in several disease conditions, including tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) metabolism disorders and Parkinson's disease (PD). BH4 metabolism disorders present a variety of clinical manifestations including motor disturbance via altered DA metabolism, since BH4 is a cofactor for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a rate-limiting enzyme for DA synthesis. Genetically, BH4 metabolism disorders are, in an autosomal recessive pattern, caused by a variant in genes encoding enzymes for BH4 synthesis or recycling, including 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS) or dihydropteridine reductase (DHPR), respectively. Although BH4 metabolism disorders and its metabolisms have been studied, it is unclear how gene variants cause aberrant DA synthesis in patient neurons. Here, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from BH4 metabolism disorder patients with PTPS or DHPR variants, corrected the gene variant in the iPSCs using the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and differentiated the BH4 metabolism disorder patient- and isogenic control iPSCs into midbrain DA neurons. We found that by the gene correction, the BH4 amount, TH protein level and extracellular DA level were restored in DA neuronal culture using PTPS deficiency iPSCs. Furthermore, the pharmacological correction by BH4 precursor sepiapterin treatment also improved the phenotypes of PTPS deficiency. These results suggest that patient iPSCs with BH4 metabolism disorders provide an opportunity for screening substances for treating aberrant DA synthesis-related disorders. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Ultrashort echo-time MRI versus CT for skull aberration correction in MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound: In vitro comparison on human calvaria.

    PubMed

    Miller, G Wilson; Eames, Matthew; Snell, John; Aubry, Jean-François

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) brain treatment systems compensate for skull-induced beam aberrations by adjusting the phase and amplitude of individual ultrasound transducer elements. These corrections are currently calculated based on a preacquired computed tomography (CT) scan of the patient's head. The purpose of the work presented here is to demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrashort echo-time magnetic resonance imaging (UTE MRI) instead of CT to calculate and apply aberration corrections on a clinical TcMRgFUS system. Phantom experiments were performed in three ex-vivo human skulls filled with tissue-mimicking hydrogel. Each skull phantom was imaged with both CT and UTE MRI. The MR images were then segmented into "skull" and "not-skull" pixels using a computationally efficient, threshold-based algorithm, and the resulting 3D binary skull map was converted into a series of 2D virtual CT images. Each skull was mounted in the head transducer of a clinical TcMRgFUS system (ExAblate Neuro, Insightec, Israel), and transcranial sonications were performed using a power setting of approximately 750 acoustic watts at several different target locations within the electronic steering range of the transducer. Each target location was sonicated three times: once using aberration corrections calculated from the actual CT scan, once using corrections calculated from the MRI-derived virtual CT scan, and once without applying any aberration correction. MR thermometry was performed in conjunction with each 10-s sonication, and the highest single-pixel temperature rise and surrounding-pixel mean were recorded for each sonication. The measured temperature rises were ∼ 45% larger for aberration-corrected sonications than for noncorrected sonications. This improvement was highly significant (p < 10(-4)). The difference between the single-pixel peak temperature rise and the surrounding-pixel mean, which reflects the sharpness of the

  5. Atomic resolution elemental mapping using energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy with chromatic aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Krause, F F; Rosenauer, A; Barthel, J; Mayer, J; Urban, K; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Brown, H G; Forbes, B D; Allen, L J

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses a novel approach to atomic resolution elemental mapping, demonstrating a method that produces elemental maps with a similar resolution to the established method of electron energy-loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Dubbed energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy (EFISTEM) this mode of imaging is, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, equivalent to tilting the probe in energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) through a cone and incoherently averaging the results. In this paper we present a proof-of-principle EFISTEM experimental study on strontium titanate. The present approach, made possible by chromatic aberration correction, has the advantage that it provides elemental maps which are immune to spatial incoherence in the electron source, coherent aberrations in the probe-forming lens and probe jitter. The veracity of the experiment is supported by quantum mechanical image simulations, which provide an insight into the image-forming process. Elemental maps obtained in EFTEM suffer from the effect known as preservation of elastic contrast, which, for example, can lead to a given atomic species appearing to be in atomic columns where it is not to be found. EFISTEM very substantially reduces the preservation of elastic contrast and yields images which show stability of contrast with changing thickness. The experimental application is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle study on strontium titanate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Demonstrating Optical Aberration Correction With a Mems Micro-Mirror Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    intensity distributions for a corrected and uncorrected MEMS reflection. The curves have been nor- malized to the peak value of the corrected wave front...demonstration: A = 632.8 mn, f = 7 mm, and L = 203 ym. For the solid curve , s = 0, while the dashed curve shows s = 7r/L, so that the change in phase...specified for Figure 8 (see page 29), so that the figures are directly comparable. The solid curve shows an intensity distribution for 01 = 0 (no

  7. The Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL) and Recent Applications of an Aberration-Corrected Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Zschech, Ehrenfried; Sinclair, Robert; Kempen, Paul Joseph

    2014-04-30

    Here, this article describes the establishment, over a period of 10 years or so, of a multi-user, institution-wide facility for the characterization of materials and devices at the nanoscale. Emphasis is placed on the type of equipment that we have found to be most useful for our users, and the business strategy that maintains its operations. A central component of our facility is an aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscope and its application is summarized in the studies of plasmon energies of silver nanoparticles, the band gap of PbS quantum dots, atomic site occupancy near grain boundaries in yttria stabilized zirconia,more » the lithiation of silicon nanoparticles, in situ observations on carbon nanotube oxidation and the electron tomography of varicella zoster virus nucleocapsids.« less

  8. Reduction of variance in spectral estimates for correction of ultrasonic aberration.

    PubMed

    Astheimer, Jeffrey P; Pilkington, Wayne C; Waag, Robert C

    2006-01-01

    A variance reduction factor is defined to describe the rate of convergence and accuracy of spectra estimated from overlapping ultrasonic scattering volumes when the scattering is from a spatially uncorrelated medium. Assuming that the individual volumes are localized by a spherically symmetric Gaussian window and that centers of the volumes are located on orbits of an icosahedral rotation group, the factor is minimized by adjusting the weight and radius of each orbit. Conditions necessary for the application of the variance reduction method, particularly for statistical estimation of aberration, are examined. The smallest possible value of the factor is found by allowing an unlimited number of centers constrained only to be within a ball rather than on icosahedral orbits. Computations using orbits formed by icosahedral vertices, face centers, and edge midpoints with a constraint radius limited to a small multiple of the Gaussian width show that a significant reduction of variance can be achieved from a small number of centers in the confined volume and that this reduction is nearly the maximum obtainable from an unlimited number of centers in the same volume.

  9. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for complex transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-Hua, Zhang; Dong-Dong, Xiao; Lin, Gu

    2016-06-01

    Lattice, charge, orbital, and spin are the four fundamental degrees of freedom in condensed matter, of which the interactive coupling derives tremendous novel physical phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (high-T c SC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in strongly correlated electronic system. Direct experimental observation of these freedoms is essential to understanding the structure-property relationship and the physics behind it, and also indispensable for designing new materials and devices. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) integrating multiple techniques of structure imaging and spectrum analysis, is a comprehensive platform for providing structural, chemical and electronic information of materials with a high spatial resolution. Benefiting from the development of aberration correctors, STEM has taken a big breakthrough towards sub-angstrom resolution in last decade and always steps forward to improve the capability of material characterization; many improvements have been achieved in recent years, thereby giving an in-depth insight into material research. Here, we present a brief review of the recent advances of STEM by some representative examples of perovskite transition metal oxides; atomic-scale mapping of ferroelectric polarization, octahedral distortions and rotations, valence state, coordination and spin ordering are presented. We expect that this brief introduction about the current capability of STEM could facilitate the understanding of the relationship between functional properties and these fundamental degrees of freedom in complex oxides. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Project, China (Grant No. 2014CB921002), the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51522212 and 51421002).

  10. 3-D transcranial ultrasound imaging with bilateral phase aberration correction of multiple isoplanatic patches: a pilot human study with microbubble contrast enhancement.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Nicoletto, Heather A; Bennett, Ellen R; Laskowitz, Daniel T; Smith, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    With stroke currently the second-leading cause of death globally, and 87% of all strokes classified as ischemic, the development of a fast, accessible, cost-effective approach for imaging occlusive stroke could have a significant impact on health care outcomes and costs. Although clinical examination and standard computed tomography alone do not provide adequate information for understanding the complex temporal events that occur during an ischemic stroke, ultrasound imaging is well suited to the task of examining blood flow dynamics in real time and may allow for localization of a clot. A prototype bilateral 3-D ultrasound imaging system using two matrix array probes on either side of the head allows for correction of skull-induced aberration throughout two entire phased array imaging volumes. We investigated the feasibility of applying this custom correction technique in five healthy volunteers with Definity microbubble contrast enhancement. Subjects were scanned simultaneously via both temporal acoustic windows in 3-D color flow mode. The number of color flow voxels above a common threshold increased as a result of aberration correction in five of five subjects, with a mean increase of 33.9%. The percentage of large arteries visualized by 3-D color Doppler imaging increased from 46% without aberration correction to 60% with aberration correction. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Transmissive liquid-crystal device for correcting primary coma aberration and astigmatism in biospecimen in two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Ayano; Hibi, Terumasa; Ipponjima, Sari; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2016-12-01

    All aberrations produced inside a biospecimen can degrade the quality of a three-dimensional image in two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy. Previously, we developed a transmissive liquid-crystal device to correct spherical aberrations that improved the image quality of a fixed-mouse-brain slice treated with an optical clearing reagent. In this study, we developed a transmissive device that corrects primary coma aberration and astigmatism. The motivation for this study is that asymmetric aberration can be induced by the shape of a biospecimen and/or by a complicated refractive-index distribution in a sample; this can considerably degrade optical performance even near the sample surface. The device's performance was evaluated by observing fluorescence beads. The device was inserted between the objective lens and microscope revolver and succeeded in improving the spatial resolution and fluorescence signal of a bead image that was originally degraded by asymmetric aberration. Finally, we implemented the device for observing a fixed whole mouse brain with a sloping surface shape and complicated internal refractive-index distribution. The correction with the device improved the spatial resolution and increased the fluorescence signal by ˜2.4×. The device can provide a simple approach to acquiring higher-quality images of biospecimens.

  12. Alpharetroviral Vector-mediated Gene Therapy for X-CGD: Functional Correction and Lack of Aberrant Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Brendel, Christian; Suerth, Julia D.; Mueller-Kuller, Uta; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Schwäble, Joachim; Pahujani, Shweta; Kunkel, Hana; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Grez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Comparative integrome analysis has revealed that the most neutral integration pattern among retroviruses is attributed to alpharetroviruses. We chose X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) as model to evaluate the potential of self-inactivating (SIN) alpharetroviral vectors for gene therapy of monogenic diseases. Therefore, we combined the alpharetroviral vector backbone with the elongation factor-1α short promoter, both considered to possess a low genotoxic profile, to drive transgene (gp91phox) expression. Following efficient transduction transgene expression was sustained and provided functional correction of the CGD phenotype in a cell line model at low vector copy number. Further analysis in a murine X-CGD transplantation model revealed gene-marking of bone marrow cells and oxidase positive granulocytes in peripheral blood. Transduction of human X-CGD CD34+ cells provided functional correction up to wild-type levels and long-term expression upon transplantation into a humanized mouse model. In contrast to lentiviral vectors, no aberrantly spliced transcripts containing cellular exons fused to alpharetroviral sequences were found in transduced cells, implying that the safety profile of alpharetroviral vectors may extend beyond their neutral integration profile. Taken together, this highlights the potential of this SIN alpharetroviral system as a platform for new candidate vectors for future gene therapy of hematopoietic disorders. PMID:23207695

  13. Lowered threshold energy for femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in a water based eye model by aberration correction with adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anja; Géneaux, Romain; Günther, Axel; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-06-01

    In femtosecond laser ophthalmic surgery tissue dissection is achieved by photodisruption based on laser induced optical breakdown. In order to minimize collateral damage to the eye laser surgery systems should be optimized towards the lowest possible energy threshold for photodisruption. However, optical aberrations of the eye and the laser system distort the irradiance distribution from an ideal profile which causes a rise in breakdown threshold energy even if great care is taken to minimize the aberrations of the system during design and alignment. In this study we used a water chamber with an achromatic focusing lens and a scattering sample as eye model and determined breakdown threshold in single pulse plasma transmission loss measurements. Due to aberrations, the precise lower limit for breakdown threshold irradiance in water is still unknown. Here we show that the threshold energy can be substantially reduced when using adaptive optics to improve the irradiance distribution by spatial beam shaping. We found that for initial aberrations with a root-mean-square wave front error of only one third of the wavelength the threshold energy can still be reduced by a factor of three if the aberrations are corrected to the diffraction limit by adaptive optics. The transmitted pulse energy is reduced by 17% at twice the threshold. Furthermore, the gas bubble motions after breakdown for pulse trains at 5 kilohertz repetition rate show a more transverse direction in the corrected case compared to the more spherical distribution without correction. Our results demonstrate how both applied and transmitted pulse energy could be reduced during ophthalmic surgery when correcting for aberrations. As a consequence, the risk of retinal damage by transmitted energy and the extent of collateral damage to the focal volume could be minimized accordingly when using adaptive optics in fs-laser surgery.

  14. Lowered threshold energy for femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in a water based eye model by aberration correction with adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anja; Géneaux, Romain; Günther, Axel; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-01-01

    In femtosecond laser ophthalmic surgery tissue dissection is achieved by photodisruption based on laser induced optical breakdown. In order to minimize collateral damage to the eye laser surgery systems should be optimized towards the lowest possible energy threshold for photodisruption. However, optical aberrations of the eye and the laser system distort the irradiance distribution from an ideal profile which causes a rise in breakdown threshold energy even if great care is taken to minimize the aberrations of the system during design and alignment. In this study we used a water chamber with an achromatic focusing lens and a scattering sample as eye model and determined breakdown threshold in single pulse plasma transmission loss measurements. Due to aberrations, the precise lower limit for breakdown threshold irradiance in water is still unknown. Here we show that the threshold energy can be substantially reduced when using adaptive optics to improve the irradiance distribution by spatial beam shaping. We found that for initial aberrations with a root-mean-square wave front error of only one third of the wavelength the threshold energy can still be reduced by a factor of three if the aberrations are corrected to the diffraction limit by adaptive optics. The transmitted pulse energy is reduced by 17% at twice the threshold. Furthermore, the gas bubble motions after breakdown for pulse trains at 5 kilohertz repetition rate show a more transverse direction in the corrected case compared to the more spherical distribution without correction. Our results demonstrate how both applied and transmitted pulse energy could be reduced during ophthalmic surgery when correcting for aberrations. As a consequence, the risk of retinal damage by transmitted energy and the extent of collateral damage to the focal volume could be minimized accordingly when using adaptive optics in fs-laser surgery. PMID:23761849

  15. Experimental demonstration of passive acoustic imaging in the human skull cavity using CT-based aberration corrections.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ryan M; O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-07-01

    Experimentally verify a previously described technique for performing passive acoustic imaging through an intact human skull using noninvasive, computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections Jones et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 4981-5005 (2013)]. A sparse hemispherical receiver array (30 cm diameter) consisting of 128 piezoceramic discs (2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) was used to passively listen through ex vivo human skullcaps (n = 4) to acoustic emissions from a narrow-band fixed source (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency) and from ultrasound-stimulated (5 cycle bursts, 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency, estimated in situ peak negative pressure 0.11-0.33 MPa, 306 kHz driving frequency) Definity™ microbubbles flowing through a thin-walled tube phantom. Initial in vivo feasibility testing of the method was performed. The performance of the method was assessed through comparisons to images generated without skull corrections, with invasive source-based corrections, and with water-path control images. For source locations at least 25 mm from the inner skull surface, the modified reconstruction algorithm successfully restored a single focus within the skull cavity at a location within 1.25 mm from the true position of the narrow-band source. The results obtained from imaging single bubbles are in good agreement with numerical simulations of point source emitters and the authors' previous experimental measurements using source-based skull corrections O'Reilly et al. [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 61, 1285-1294 (2014)]. In a rat model, microbubble activity was mapped through an intact human skull at pressure levels below and above the threshold for focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening. During bursts that led to coherent bubble activity, the location of maximum intensity in images generated with CT-based skull corrections was found to deviate by less than 1 mm, on average, from the position obtained using source-based corrections. Taken

  16. Experimental demonstration of passive acoustic imaging in the human skull cavity using CT-based aberration corrections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan M.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Experimentally verify a previously described technique for performing passive acoustic imaging through an intact human skull using noninvasive, computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections Jones et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 4981–5005 (2013)]. Methods: A sparse hemispherical receiver array (30 cm diameter) consisting of 128 piezoceramic discs (2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) was used to passively listen through ex vivo human skullcaps (n = 4) to acoustic emissions from a narrow-band fixed source (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency) and from ultrasound-stimulated (5 cycle bursts, 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency, estimated in situ peak negative pressure 0.11–0.33 MPa, 306 kHz driving frequency) Definity™ microbubbles flowing through a thin-walled tube phantom. Initial in vivo feasibility testing of the method was performed. The performance of the method was assessed through comparisons to images generated without skull corrections, with invasive source-based corrections, and with water-path control images. Results: For source locations at least 25 mm from the inner skull surface, the modified reconstruction algorithm successfully restored a single focus within the skull cavity at a location within 1.25 mm from the true position of the narrow-band source. The results obtained from imaging single bubbles are in good agreement with numerical simulations of point source emitters and the authors’ previous experimental measurements using source-based skull corrections O’Reilly et al. [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 61, 1285–1294 (2014)]. In a rat model, microbubble activity was mapped through an intact human skull at pressure levels below and above the threshold for focused ultrasound-induced blood–brain barrier opening. During bursts that led to coherent bubble activity, the location of maximum intensity in images generated with CT-based skull corrections was found to deviate by less than 1 mm, on average, from the position

  17. Reply to L.M. Brown et al. "Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny" in Ultramicroscopy 157, 88 (2015).

    PubMed

    Urban, K W; Rose, H

    2016-02-01

    We comment on a Short Communication recently published in Ultramicroscopy in which Brown et al. criticize our description of the time sequence of events in the development of aberration correction systems in electron optics during the 1990s put forward in the introduction to the Ultramicroscopy April 2015 Special Issue. We present an analysis of the published literature furnishing evidence that our description is correct. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Full-wave acoustic and thermal modeling of transcranial ultrasound propagation and investigation of skull-induced aberration correction techniques: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Adamos; Neufeld, Esra; Werner, Beat; Székely, Gábor; Kuster, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (tcFUS) is an attractive noninvasive modality for neurosurgical interventions. The presence of the skull, however, compromises the efficiency of tcFUS therapy, as its heterogeneous nature and acoustic characteristics induce significant distortion of the acoustic energy deposition, focal shifts, and thermal gain decrease. Phased-array transducers allow for partial compensation of skull-induced aberrations by application of precalculated phase and amplitude corrections. An integrated numerical framework allowing for 3D full-wave, nonlinear acoustic and thermal simulations has been developed and applied to tcFUS. Simulations were performed to investigate the impact of skull aberrations, the possibility of extending the treatment envelope, and adverse secondary effects. The simulated setup comprised an idealized model of the ExAblate Neuro and a detailed MR-based anatomical head model. Four different approaches were employed to calculate aberration corrections (analytical calculation of the aberration corrections disregarding tissue heterogeneities; a semi-analytical ray-tracing approach compensating for the presence of the skull; two simulation-based time-reversal approaches with and without pressure amplitude corrections which account for the entire anatomy). These impact of these approaches on the pressure and temperature distributions were evaluated for 22 brain-targets. While (semi-)analytical approaches failed to induced high pressure or ablative temperatures in any but the targets in the close vicinity of the geometric focus, simulation-based approaches indicate the possibility of considerably extending the treatment envelope (including targets below the transducer level and locations several centimeters off the geometric focus), generation of sharper foci, and increased targeting accuracy. While the prediction of achievable aberration correction appears to be unaffected by the detailed bone-structure, proper consideration of

  19. Wavefront correction for static and dynamic aberrations to within 1 second of the system shot in the NIF Beamlet demonstration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, R.; Kartz, M.; Behrendt, W.

    1996-10-01

    The laser wavefront of the NIF Beamlet demonstration system is corrected for static aberrations with a wavefront control system. The system operates closed loop with a probe beam prior to a shot and has a loop bandwidth of about 3 Hz. However, until recently the wavefront control system was disabled several minutes prior to the shot to allow time to manually reconfigure its attenuators and probe beam insertion mechanism to shot mode. Thermally-induced dynamic variations in gas density in the Beamlet main beam line produce significant wavefront error. After about 5-8 seconds, the wavefront error has increased to a new,more » higher level due to turbulence- induced aberrations no longer being corrected- This implies that there is a turbulence-induced aberration noise bandwidth of less than one Hertz, and that the wavefront controller could correct for the majority of turbulence-induced aberration (about one- third wave) by automating its reconfiguration to occur within one second of the shot, This modification was recently implemented on Beamlet; we call this modification the t{sub 0}-1 system.« less

  20. Separating strain from composition in unit cell parameter maps obtained from aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, T.; Remmele, T.; Korytov, M.

    2014-01-21

    Based on the evaluation of lattice parameter maps in aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy images, we propose a simple method that allows quantifying the composition and disorder of a semiconductor alloy at the unit cell scale with high accuracy. This is realized by considering, next to the out-of-plane, also the in-plane lattice parameter component allowing to separate the chemical composition from the strain field. Considering only the out-of-plane lattice parameter component not only yields large deviations from the true local alloy content but also carries the risk of identifying false ordering phenomena like formations of chains or platelets.more » Our method is demonstrated on image simulations of relaxed supercells, as well as on experimental images of an In{sub 0.20}Ga{sub 0.80}N quantum well. Principally, our approach is applicable to all epitaxially strained compounds in the form of quantum wells, free standing islands, quantum dots, or wires.« less

  1. Exploring the atomic structure of 1.8nm monolayer-protected gold clusters with aberration-corrected STEM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Jian, Nan; Ornelas, Isabel; Pattison, Alexander J; Lahtinen, Tanja; Salorinne, Kirsi; Häkkinen, Hannu; Palmer, Richard E

    2017-05-01

    Monolayer-protected (MP) Au clusters present attractive quantum systems with a range of potential applications e.g. in catalysis. Knowledge of the atomic structure is needed to obtain a full understanding of their intriguing physical and chemical properties. Here we employed aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (ac-STEM), combined with multislice simulations, to make a round-robin investigation of the atomic structure of chemically synthesised clusters with nominal composition Au 144 (SCH 2 CH 2 Ph) 60 provided by two different research groups. The MP Au clusters were "weighed" by the atom counting method, based on their integrated intensities in the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) regime and calibrated exponent of the Z dependence. For atomic structure analysis, we compared experimental images of hundreds of clusters, with atomic resolution, against a variety of structural models. Across the size range 123-151 atoms, only 3% of clusters matched the theoretically predicted Au 144 (SR) 60 structure, while a large proportion of the clusters were amorphous (i.e. did not match any model structure). However, a distinct ring-dot feature, characteristic of local icosahedral symmetry, was observed in about 20% of the clusters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Atomic resolved phase map of monolayer MoS2 retrieved by spherical aberration-corrected transport of intensity equation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaobin; Oshima, Yoshifumi

    2016-10-01

    An atomic resolution phase map, which enables us to observe charge distribution or magnetic properties at an atomic scale, has been pointed out to be retrieved by transport of intensity equation (TIE) when taking two atomic-resolved transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of small defocus difference. In this work, we firstly obtained the atomic-resolved phase maps of an exfoliated molybdenum disulfide sheet using spherical aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. We successfully observed 60° grain boundary of mechanically exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide sheet. The relative phase shift of a single molybdenum atomic column to the column consisting of two sulfur atoms was obtained to be about 0.01 rad on average, which was about half lower than the simulated TIE phase map, indicating that the individual atomic sites can be distinguished qualitatively. The appropriate condition for retrieving atomic-resolved TIE phase maps was briefly discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Analysis of Bi Distribution in Epitaxial GaAsBi by Aberration-Corrected HAADF-STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladés, N.; Sales, D. L.; Herrera, M.; Tan, C. H.; Liu, Y.; Richards, R. D.; Molina, S. I.

    2018-04-01

    The Bi content in GaAs/GaAs1 - x Bi x /GaAs heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy at a substrate temperature close to 340 °C is investigated by aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field techniques. The analysis at low magnification of high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy images, corroborated by EDX analysis, revealed planar defect-free layers and a non-homogeneous Bi distribution at the interfaces and within the GaAsBi layer. At high magnification, the qHAADF analysis confirmed the inhomogeneous distribution and Bi segregation at the GaAsBi/GaAs interface at low Bi flux and distorted dumbbell shape in areas with higher Bi content. At higher Bi flux, the size of the Bi gathering increases leading to roughly equiaxial Bi-rich particles faceted along zinc blende {111} and uniformly dispersed around the matrix and interfaces. FFT analysis checks the coexistence of two phases in some clusters: a rhombohedral pure Bi (rh-Bi) one surrounded by a zinc blende GaAs1 - x Bi x matrix. Clusters may be affecting to the local lattice relaxation and leading to a partially relaxed GaAsBi/GaAs system, in good agreement with XRD analysis.

  4. Optimized Deconvolution for Maximum Axial Resolution in Three-Dimensional Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra, Ranjan; de Jonge, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) data sets were recorded of gold nanoparticles placed on both sides of silicon nitride membranes using focal series aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The deconvolution of the 3D datasets was optimized to obtain the highest possible axial resolution. The deconvolution involved two different point spread function (PSF)s, each calculated iteratively via blind deconvolution.. Supporting membranes of different thicknesses were tested to study the effect of beam broadening on the deconvolution. It was found that several iterations of deconvolution was efficient in reducing the imaging noise. With an increasing number of iterations, the axial resolution was increased, and most of the structural information was preserved. Additional iterations improved the axial resolution by maximal a factor of 4 to 6, depending on the particular dataset, and up to 8 nm maximal, but at the cost of a reduction of the lateral size of the nanoparticles in the image. Thus, the deconvolution procedure optimized for highest axial resolution is best suited for applications where one is interested in the 3D locations of nanoparticles only. PMID:22152090

  5. CANT1 lncRNA Triggers Efficient Therapeutic Efficacy by Correcting Aberrant lncing Cascade in Malignant Uveal Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yue; Wen, Xuyang; Ding, Xia; Fan, Jiayan; Chai, Peiwei; Jia, Renbing; Ge, Shengfang; Qian, Guanxiang; Zhang, He; Fan, Xianqun

    2017-05-03

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is an intraocular malignant tumor with a high mortality rate. Recent studies have shown the functions of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in tumorigenesis; thus, targeting tumor-specific lncRNA abnormalities has become an attractive approach for developing therapeutics to treat uveal melanoma. In this study, we identified a novel nuclear CANT1 lncRNA (CASC15-New-Transcript 1) that acts as a necessary UM suppressor. CANT1 significantly reduced tumor metastatic capacity and tumor formation, either in cell culture or in animals harboring tumor xenograft. Intriguingly, XIST lncRNA serves as a potential target of CANT1, and JPX or FTX lncRNA subsequently serves as a contextual hinge to activate a novel CANT1-JPX/FTX-XIST long non-coding (lncing) pathway in UM. Moreover, CANT1 triggers the expression of JPX and FTX by directly binding to their promoters and promoting H3K4 methylation. These observations delineate a novel lncing cascade in which lncRNAs directly build a lncing cascade without coding genes that aims to modulate UM tumorigenesis, thereby specifying a novel "lncing-cascade renewal" anti-tumor therapeutic strategy by correcting aberrant lncing cascade in uveal melanoma. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Electron-beam-induced-current and active secondary-electron voltage-contrast with aberration-corrected electron probes

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Myung-Geun; Garlow, Joseph A.; Marshall, Matthew S. J.; ...

    2017-03-23

    The ability to map out electrostatic potentials in materials is critical for the development and the design of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices in modern industry. Electron holography has been an important tool for revealing electric and magnetic field distributions in microelectronics and magnetic-based memory devices, however, its utility is hindered by several practical constraints, such as charging artifacts and limitations in sensitivity and in field of view. In this article, we report electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) and secondary-electron voltage-contrast (SE-VC) with an aberration-corrected electron probe in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), as complementary techniques to electron holography, to measure electric fieldsmore » and surface potentials, respectively. These two techniques were applied to ferroelectric thin films, multiferroic nanowires, and single crystals. Electrostatic potential maps obtained by off-axis electron holography were compared with EBIC and SE-VC to show that these techniques can be used as a complementary approach to validate quantitative results obtained from electron holography analysis.« less

  7. Double-aberration corrected TEM/STEM of solid acid nanocatalysts in the development of pharmaceutical NSAIDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Shiju, N.; Brown, R.; Wright, I.; Boyes, E. D.; Gai, P. L.

    2012-07-01

    We report nanostructural and physico-chemical studies in the development of an efficient low temperature heterogeneous catalytic process for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as N-acetyl-p-aminophenol (paracetamol or acetaminophen) on tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts. Using a double-aberration corrected TEM/STEM, modified in-house for in-situ studies at the sub-Angstrom level, we directly observed in real-time, the dynamic precursor transformation to the active catalyst. We quantified the observations with catalytic activity studies for the NSAIDS. The studies have provided the direct evidence for single tungsten promoter atoms and surface WOx species of <= 0.35 nm, with nanoclusters of WOx (0.6 to 1nm), located at grain boundaries on the surface of the zirconia nanoparticles. The correlation between the nanostructure and catalytic activity indicates that the species create Brønsted acid sites highly active for the low temperature process. The results open up opportunities for developing green heterogeneous methods for pharmaceuticals.

  8. Stabilized high-accuracy correction of ocular aberrations with liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator in adaptive optics retinal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongxin; Inoue, Takashi; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    We studied the long-term optical performance of an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope that uses a liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator to correct ocular aberrations. The system achieved good compensation of aberrations while acquiring images of fine retinal structures, excepting during sudden eye movements. The residual wavefront aberrations collected over several minutes in several situations were statistically analyzed. The mean values of the root-mean-square residual wavefront errors were 23-30 nm, and for around 91-94% of the effective time the errors were below the Marechal criterion for diffraction limited imaging. The ability to axially shift the imaging plane to different retinal depths was also demonstrated.

  9. Comparison of 3-D Multi-Lag Cross-Correlation and Speckle Brightness Aberration Correction Algorithms on Static and Moving Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Dahl, Jeremy J.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    Phase correction has the potential to increase the image quality of 3-D ultrasound, especially transcranial ultrasound. We implemented and compared 2 algorithms for aberration correction, multi-lag cross-correlation and speckle brightness, using static and moving targets. We corrected three 75-ns rms electronic aberrators with full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) auto-correlation lengths of 1.35, 2.7, and 5.4 mm. Cross-correlation proved the better algorithm at 2.7 and 5.4 mm correlation lengths (P < 0.05). Static cross-correlation performed better than moving-target cross-correlation at the 2.7 mm correlation length (P < 0.05). Finally, we compared the static and moving-target cross-correlation on a flow phantom with a skull casting aberrator. Using signal from static targets, the correction resulted in an average contrast increase of 22.2%, compared with 13.2% using signal from moving targets. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) increased by 20.5% and 12.8% using static and moving targets, respectively. Doppler signal strength increased by 5.6% and 4.9% for the static and moving-targets methods, respectively. PMID:19942503

  10. Improving imaging of the air-liquid interface in living mice by aberration-corrected optical coherence tomography (mOCT) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Hildebrandt, Hinnerk; Sauer, Benjamin; Reinholz, Fred; Pieper, Mario; Mall, Markus; König, Peter; Huettmann, Gereon

    2017-04-01

    Failure in mucociliary clearance is responsible for severe diseases like cystic fibroses, primary ciliary dyskinesia or asthma. Visualizing the mucous transport in-vivo will help to understanding transport mechanisms as well as developing and validating new therapeutic intervention. However, in-vivo imaging is complicated by the need of high spatial and temporal resolution. Recently, we developed microscopy optical coherence tomography (mOCT) for non-invasive imaging of the liquid-air interface in intact murine trachea from its outside. Whereas axial resolution of 1.5 µm is achieved by the spectral width of supercontinuum light source, lateral resolution is limited by aberrations caused by the cylindric shape of the trachea and optical inhomogenities of the tissue. Therefore, we extended our mOCT by a deformable mirror for compensation of the probe induced aberrations. Instead of using a wavefront sensor for measuring aberrations, we harnessed optimization of the image quality to determine the correction parameter. With the aberration corrected mOCT ciliary function and mucus transport was measured in wild type and βENaC overexpressing mice, which served as a model for cystic fibrosis.

  11. Imaging the Atomic Position of Light Cations in a Porous Network and the Europium(III) Ion Exchange Capability by Aberration-Corrected Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mayoral, Alvaro; Hall, Reece M; Jackowska, Roksana; Readman, Jennifer E

    2016-12-23

    In the present work, ETS-10 microporous titanosilicate has been synthesized and its structure characterized by means of powder XRD and aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (C s -corrected STEM). For the first time, sodium ions have been imaged sitting inside the 7-membered rings. The ion-exchange capability has been tested by the inclusion of rare earth metals (Eu, Tb and Gd) to produce a luminescent material which has been studied by atomic-resolution C s -corrected STEM. The data produced has allowed unambiguous imaging of light atoms in a microporous framework as well as determining the cationic metal positions for the first time, providing evidence of the importance of advanced electron microscopy methods for the study of the local environment of metals within zeolitic supports providing unique information of both systems (guest and support) at the same time. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Towards atomic scale engineering of rare-earth-doped SiAlON ceramics through aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yurdakul, Hilmi; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Direct visualization of rare earths in {alpha}- and {beta}-SiAlON unit-cells is performed through Z-contrast imaging technique in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. The preferential occupation of Yb and Ce atoms in different interstitial locations of {beta}-SiAlON lattice is demonstrated, yielding higher solubility for Yb than Ce. The triangular-like host sites in {alpha}-SiAlON unit cell accommodate more Ce atoms than hexagonal sites in {beta}-SiAlON. We think that our results will be applicable as guidelines for many kinds of rare-earth-doped materials.

  13. Numerical Studies of Optimization and Aberration Correction Methods for the Preliminary Demonstration of the Parametric Ionization Cooling (PIC) Principle in the Twin Helix Muon Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, J. A.; Morozov, V. S.; Derbenev, Ya. S.

    Muon colliders have been proposed for the next generation of particle accelerators that study high-energy physics at the energy and intensity frontiers. In this paper we study a possible implementation of muon ionization cooling, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC), in the twin helix channel. The resonant cooling method of PIC offers the potential to reduce emittance beyond that achievable with ionization cooling with ordinary magnetic focusing. We examine optimization of a variety of parameters, study the nonlinear dynamics in the twin helix channel and consider possible methods of aberration correction.

  14. Changes in higher order aberrations after wavefront-guided PRK for correction of low to moderate myopia and myopic astigmatism: two-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wigledowska-Promienska, D; Zawojska, I

    2007-01-01

    To assess efficacy, safety, and changes in higher order aberrations after wavefront-guided photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in comparison with conventional PRK for low to moderate myopia with myopic astigmatism using a WASCA Workstation with the MEL 70 G-Scan excimer laser. A total of 126 myopic or myopic-astigmatic eyes of 112 patients were included in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into two groups: Group 1, the study group; and Group 2, the control group. Group 1 consisted of 78 eyes treated with wavefront-guided PRK. Group 2 consisted of 48 eyes treated with spherocylindrical conventional PRK. Two years postoperatively, in Group 1, 5% of eyes achieved an uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) of 0.05; 69% achieved a UCVA of 0.00; 18% of eyes experienced enhanced visual acuity of -0.18 and 8% of -0.30. In Group 2, 8% of eyes achieved a UCVA of 0.1; 25% achieved a UCVA of 0.05; and 67% achieved a UCVA of 0.00 according to logMAR calculation method. Total higher-order root-mean square increased by a factor 1.18 for Group 1 and 1.6 for Group 2. There was a significant increase of coma by a factor 1.74 in Group 2 and spherical aberration by a factor 2.09 in Group 1 and 3.56 in Group 2. The data support the safety and effectiveness of the wavefront-guided PRK using a WASCA Workstation for correction of low to moderate refractive errors. This method reduced the number of higher order aberrations induced by excimer laser surgery and improved uncorrected and spectacle-corrected visual acuity when compared to conventional PRK.

  15. Three-dimensional locations of gold-labeled proteins in a whole mount eukaryotic cell obtained with 3nm precision using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dukes, Madeline J; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Gray Jerome, W; de Jonge, Niels

    2011-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) maps of proteins within the context of whole cells are important for investigating cellular function. However, 3D reconstructions of whole cells are challenging to obtain using conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We describe a methodology to determine the 3D locations of proteins labeled with gold nanoparticles on whole eukaryotic cells. The epidermal growth factor receptors on COS7 cells were labeled with gold nanoparticles, and critical-point dried whole-mount cell samples were prepared. 3D focal series were obtained with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), without tilting the specimen. The axial resolution was improved with deconvolution. The vertical locations of the nanoparticles in a whole-mount cell were determined with a precision of 3nm. From the analysis of the variation of the axial positions of the labels we concluded that the cellular surface was ruffled. To achieve sufficient stability of the sample under electron beam irradiation during the recording of the focal series, the sample was carbon coated. A quantitative method was developed to analyze the stability of the ultrastructure after electron beam irradiation using TEM. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of using aberration-corrected STEM to study the 3D nanoparticle distribution in whole cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Three-dimensional locations of gold-labeled proteins in a whole mount eukaryotic cell obtained with 3 nm precision using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dukes, Madeline J.; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Jerome, W. Gray; de Jonge, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) maps of proteins within the context of whole cells are important for investigating cellular function. However, 3D reconstructions of whole cells are challenging to obtain using conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We describe a methodology to determine the 3D locations of proteins labeled with gold nanoparticles on whole eukaryotic cells. The epidermal growth factor receptors on COS7 cells were labeled with gold nanoparticles, and critical-point dried whole-mount cell samples were prepared. 3D focal series were obtained with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), without tilting the specimen. The axial resolution was improved with deconvolution. The vertical locations of the nanoparticles in a whole-mount cell were determined with a precision of 3 nm. From the analysis of the variation of the axial positions of the labels we concluded that the cellular surface was ruffled. To achieve sufficient stability of the sample under the electron beam irradiation during the recording of the focal series, the sample was carbon coated. A quantitative method was developed to analyze the stability of the ultrastructure after electron beam irradiation using TEM. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of using aberration-corrected STEM to study the 3D nanoparticle distribution in whole cells. PMID:21440635

  17. Direct observation of a stacking fault in Si(1 - x)Ge(x) semiconductors by spherical aberration-corrected TEM and conventional ADF-STEM.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Jun; Kawai, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2004-01-01

    Spherical aberration (C(S))-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and annular dark-field scanning TEM (ADF-STEM) are applied to high-resolution observation of stacking faults in Si(1 - x)Ge(x) alloy films prepared on a Si(100) buffer layer by the chemical vapor deposition method. Both of the images clarify the individual nature of stacking faults from their directly interpretable image contrast and also by using image simulation in the case of the C(S)-corrected TEM. Positions of the atomic columns obtained in the ADF-STEM images almost agree with a projection of the theoretical model studied by Chou et al. (Phys. Rev. B 32(1985): 7979). Comparison between the C(S)-corrected TEM and ADF-STEM images shows that their resolution is at a similar level, but directly interpretable image contrast is obtained in ultrathin samples for C(S)-corrected TEM and in slightly thicker samples for ADF-STEM.

  18. Restoring defect structures in 3C-SiC/Si (001) from spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope images by means of deconvolution processing.

    PubMed

    Wen, C; Wan, W; Li, F H; Tang, D

    2015-04-01

    The [110] cross-sectional samples of 3C-SiC/Si (001) were observed with a spherical aberration-corrected 300 kV high-resolution transmission electron microscope. Two images taken not close to the Scherzer focus condition and not representing the projected structures intuitively were utilized for performing the deconvolution. The principle and procedure of image deconvolution and atomic sort recognition are summarized. The defect structure restoration together with the recognition of Si and C atoms from the experimental images has been illustrated. The structure maps of an intrinsic stacking fault in the area of SiC, and of Lomer and 60° shuffle dislocations at the interface have been obtained at atomic level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Algorithms and applications of aberration correction and American standard-based digital evaluation in surface defects evaluating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fan; Cao, Pin; Yang, Yongying; Li, Chen; Chai, Huiting; Zhang, Yihui; Xiong, Haoliang; Xu, Wenlin; Yan, Kai; Zhou, Lin; Liu, Dong; Bai, Jian; Shen, Yibing

    2016-11-01

    The inspection of surface defects is one of significant sections of optical surface quality evaluation. Based on microscopic scattering dark-field imaging, sub-aperture scanning and stitching, the Surface Defects Evaluating System (SDES) can acquire full-aperture image of defects on optical elements surface and then extract geometric size and position information of defects with image processing such as feature recognization. However, optical distortion existing in the SDES badly affects the inspection precision of surface defects. In this paper, a distortion correction algorithm based on standard lattice pattern is proposed. Feature extraction, polynomial fitting and bilinear interpolation techniques in combination with adjacent sub-aperture stitching are employed to correct the optical distortion of the SDES automatically in high accuracy. Subsequently, in order to digitally evaluate surface defects with American standard by using American military standards MIL-PRF-13830B to judge the surface defects information obtained from the SDES, an American standard-based digital evaluation algorithm is proposed, which mainly includes a judgment method of surface defects concentration. The judgment method establishes weight region for each defect and adopts the method of overlap of weight region to calculate defects concentration. This algorithm takes full advantage of convenience of matrix operations and has merits of low complexity and fast in running, which makes itself suitable very well for highefficiency inspection of surface defects. Finally, various experiments are conducted and the correctness of these algorithms are verified. At present, these algorithms have been used in SDES.

  20. Axial ultrasound B-scans of the entire eye with a 20-MHz linear array: correction of crystalline lens phase aberration by applying Fermat's principle.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Tony; Chang, Alexandre; Mofid, Yassine; Pisella, Pierre-Jean; Ossant, Frederic

    2014-11-01

    In ophthalmic ultrasonography the crystalline lens is known to be the main source of phase aberration, causing a significant decrease in resolution and distortion effects on axial B-scans. This paper proposes a computationally efficient method to correct the phase aberration arising from the crystalline lens, including refraction effects using a bending ray tracing approach based on Fermat's principle. This method is used as a basis to perform eye-adapted beamforming (BF), with appropriate focusing delays for a 128-element 20-MHz linear array in both emission and reception. Implementation was achieved on an in-house developed experimental ultrasound scanning device, the ECODERM. The proposed BF was tested in vitro by imaging a wire phantom through an eye phantom consisting of a synthetic gelatin lens anatomically set up in an appropriate liquid (turpentine) to approach the in vivo velocity ratio. Both extremes of accommodation shapes of the human crystalline lens were investigated. The performance of the developed BF was evaluated in relation to that in homogeneous medium and compared to a conventional delay-and-sum (DAS) BF and a second adapted BF which was simplified to ignore the lens refraction. Global expectations provided by our method with the transducer array are reviewed by an analysis quantifying both image quality and spatial fidelity, as well as the detrimental effects of a crystalline lens in conventional reconstruction. Compared to conventional array imaging, the results indicated a two-fold improvement in the lateral resolution, greater sensitivity and a considerable reduction of spatial distortions that were sufficient to envisage reliable biometry directly in B-mode, especially phakometry.

  1. Evaluation of stacking faults and associated partial dislocations in AlSb/GaAs (001) interface by aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, C.; Ge, B. H.; Cui, Y. X.; Li, F. H.; Zhu, J.; Yu, R.; Cheng, Z. Y.

    2014-11-01

    The stacking faults (SFs) in an AlSb/GaAs (001) interface were investigated using a 300 kV spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The structure and strain distribution of the single and intersecting (V-shaped) SFs associated with partial dislocations (PDs) were characterized by the [110] HRTEM images and geometric phase analysis, respectively. In the biaxial strain maps ɛxx and ɛyy, a SF can be divided into several sections under different strain states (positive or negative strain values). Furthermore, the strain state for the same section of a SF is in contrast to each other in ɛxx and ɛyy strain maps. The modification in the strain states was attributed to the variation in the local atomic displacements for the SF in the AlSb film on the GaAs substrate recorded in the lattice image. Finally, the single SF was found to be bounded by two 30° PDs. A pair of 30° PDs near the heteroepitaxial interface reacted to form a Lomer-Cottrell sessile dislocation located at the vertices of V-shaped SFs with opposite screw components. The roles of misfit dislocations, such as the PDs, in strain relaxation were also discussed.

  2. Fine structural features of nanoscale zero-valent iron characterized by spherical aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM).

    PubMed

    Liu, Airong; Zhang, Wei-xian

    2014-09-21

    An angstrom-resolution physical model of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is generated with a combination of spherical aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) on the Fe L-edge. Bright-field (BF), high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) and secondary electron (SE) imaging of nZVI acquired by a Hitachi HD-2700 STEM show near atomic resolution images and detailed morphological and structural information of nZVI. The STEM-EDS technique confirms that the fresh nZVI comprises of a metallic iron core encapsulated with a thin layer of iron oxides or oxyhydroxides. SAED patterns of the Fe core suggest the polycrystalline structure in the metallic core and amorphous nature of the oxide layer. Furthermore, Fe L-edge of EELS shows varied structural features from the innermost Fe core to the outer oxide shell. A qualitative analysis of the Fe L(2,3) edge fine structures reveals that the shell of nZVI consists of a mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III) phase close to the Fe (0) interface and a predominantly Fe(III) at the outer surface of nZVI.

  3. Direct atomic-scale imaging of hydrogen and oxygen interstitials in pure niobium using atom-probe tomography and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Tao, Runzhe; Klie, Robert F; Seidman, David N

    2013-01-22

    Imaging the three-dimensional atomic-scale structure of complex interfaces has been the goal of many recent studies, due to its importance to technologically relevant areas. Combining atom-probe tomography and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), we present an atomic-scale study of ultrathin (~5 nm) native oxide layers on niobium (Nb) and the formation of ordered niobium hydride phases near the oxide/Nb interface. Nb, an elemental type-II superconductor with the highest critical temperature (T(c) = 9.2 K), is the preferred material for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities in next-generation particle accelerators. Nb exhibits high solubilities for oxygen and hydrogen, especially within the RF-field penetration depth, which is believed to result in SRF quality factor losses. STEM imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy followed by ultraviolet laser-assisted local-electrode atom-probe tomography on the same needle-like sample reveals the NbO(2), Nb(2)O(5), NbO, Nb stacking sequence; annular bright-field imaging is used to visualize directly hydrogen atoms in bulk β-NbH.

  4. [Impact of an Aspherical Aberration Correcting Monofocal Intraocular Lens on Patient Satisfaction for Daily Life Activities: The Heidelberg Daily Task Evaluation (DATE) Questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Kretz, F T A; Son, H; Liebing, S; Tandogan, T; Auffarth, G U

    2015-08-01

    A clinical evaluation of the functional results and its impact on daily activities of an aspherical, aberration correcting intraocular lens (IOL) was undertaken. Twenty-one patients aged from 50 to 83 years underwent cataract surgery with implantation of the aspheric IOL (Tecnis ZCB00, Abbott Medical Optics). They were evaluated 2 to 4 months after surgery for their subjective satisfaction of vision quality and its impact on performance of daily activities as well as functional results and refractive outcome. Patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire - the Heidelberg DATE (DAily Tasks Evaluation) questionnaire. Significant changes from pre- to postoperative results were found in refraction (p ≤ 0.03), with a mean prediction error of + 0.21 ± 0.43 D. UDVA and CDVA improved significantly (p < 0.01), with a postoperative CDVA of 0.0 logMAR or better in 97.1 % of eyes. All patients would recommend the procedure to a relative or a friend and 93.8 % of patients reported to be satisfied with the outcome. The implantation of the aspheric IOL Tecnis ZCB00 after cataract surgery allows the restoration of visual function, providing an optimised optical quality and a high level of patient satisfaction. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Multivariate statistical characterization of charged and uncharged domain walls in multiferroic hexagonal YMnO3 single crystal visualized by a spherical aberration-corrected STEM.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Tohei, Tetsuya; Kimura, Hideo; Yao, Qiwen; Zhao, Hongyang; Wang, Xiaolin; Chen, Dapeng; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2013-10-09

    A state-of-the-art spherical aberration-corrected STEM was fully utilized to directly visualize the multiferroic domain structure in a hexagonal YMnO3 single crystal at atomic scale. With the aid of multivariate statistical analysis (MSA), we obtained unbiased and quantitative maps of ferroelectric domain structures with atomic resolution. Such a statistical image analysis of the transition region between opposite polarizations has confirmed atomically sharp transitions of ferroelectric polarization both in antiparallel (uncharged) and tail-to-tail 180° (charged) domain boundaries. Through the analysis, a correlated subatomic image shift of Mn-O layers with that of Y layers, exhibiting a double-arc shape of reversed curvatures, have been elucidated. The amount of image shift in Mn-O layers along the c-axis is statistically significant as small as 0.016 nm, roughly one-third of the evident image shift of 0.048 nm in Y layers. Interestingly, a careful analysis has shown that such a subatomic image shift in Mn-O layers vanishes at the tail-to-tail 180° domain boundaries. Furthermore, taking advantage of the annular bright field (ABF) imaging technique combined with MSA, the tilting of MnO5 bipyramids, the very core mechanism of multiferroicity of the material, is evaluated.

  6. Camera processing with chromatic aberration.

    PubMed

    Korneliussen, Jan Tore; Hirakawa, Keigo

    2014-10-01

    Since the refractive index of materials commonly used for lens depends on the wavelengths of light, practical camera optics fail to converge light to a single point on an image plane. Known as chromatic aberration, this phenomenon distorts image details by introducing magnification error, defocus blur, and color fringes. Though achromatic and apochromatic lens designs reduce chromatic aberration to a degree, they are complex and expensive and they do not offer a perfect correction. In this paper, we propose a new postcapture processing scheme designed to overcome these problems computationally. Specifically, the proposed solution is comprised of chromatic aberration-tolerant demosaicking algorithm and post-demosaicking chromatic aberration correction. Experiments with simulated and real sensor data verify that the chromatic aberration is effectively corrected.

  7. Cosmic Aberration, and Its Correction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Because the speed of light is finite, the further we look into space, the earlier we see. A galaxy seen 50 million light years away is 50 million years ago. How far out in space and how far back in time can we expect to see, and what should it look like? To a first approximation and ignoring local galactic interactions, the Hubble model of the…

  8. Determination of aberration center of Ronchigram for automated aberration correctors in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sannomiya, Takumi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Nakamichi, Tomohiro; Hosokawa, Fumio; Nakamura, Yoshio; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2013-12-01

    A generic method to determine the aberration center is established, which can be utilized for aberration calculation and axis alignment for aberration corrected electron microscopes. In this method, decentering induced secondary aberrations from inherent primary aberrations are minimized to find the appropriate axis center. The fitness function to find the optimal decentering vector for the axis was defined as a sum of decentering induced secondary aberrations with properly distributed weight values according to the aberration order. Since the appropriate decentering vector is determined from the aberration values calculated at an arbitrary center axis, only one aberration measurement is in principle required to find the center, resulting in /very fast center search. This approach was tested for the Ronchigram based aberration calculation method for aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Both in simulation and in experiments, the center search was confirmed to work well although the convergence to find the best axis becomes slower with larger primary aberrations. Such aberration center determination is expected to fully automatize the aberration correction procedures, which used to require pre-alignment of experienced users. This approach is also applicable to automated aperture positioning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Bilateral Symmetry before and Six Months after Aberration-Free™ Correction with the SCHWIND AMARIS TotalTech Laser: Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Arbelaez, Maria Clara; Vidal, Camila; Arba-Mosquera, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the preoperative and postoperative bilateral symmetry between OD and OS eyes that have undergone femto-LASIK using the Ziemer LDV femtosecond laser system, the SCHWIND AMARIS Excimer Laser and the Aberrationfree™ profiles implemented in the SCHWIND Custom Ablation Manager software. Methods A total of 25 LASIK patients were bilaterally evaluated at the six-month follow-up visit. In all cases standard examinations, pre- and postoperative analysis with corneal wavefront topography (OPTIKON Scout) were performed. Aberration-free™ aspheric treatments were devised using the Custom Ablation Manager software and ablations were performed by means of the SCHWIND AMARIS flying-spot excimer laser system (both SCHWIND eyetech- solutions). In all cases LASIK flaps were created using an LDV femtosecond laser (Ziemer Group). The OD/OS bilateral symmetry was evaluated in terms of corneal wavefront aberration. Results Preoperatively, 11 Zernike terms showed significant bilateral (OS-vs.-OD) symmetry, and only 6 Zernike terms were significantly different. Overall, 23 out of the 25 patients showed significant bilateral symmetry, and only 2 out of 25 patients showed significant differences. None of the aberration metrics changed from pre- to postoperative values by a clinically relevant amount. At the 6-month postoperative visit, 12 Zernike terms showed significant symmetry, and 8 terms were significantly different. Overall, 22 out of 25 patients showed significant bilateral symmetry (OS vs. OD), and only 3 out of 25 patients showed significant differences. Also, this postoperative examination revealed that 6 Zernike terms lost significant OS-vs.-OD symmetry, but 4 Zernike terms gained significant symmetry. Finally, 4 patients lost significant bilaterality, and 2 patients gained significant bilaterality: bilateral symmetry between eyes was better maintained in those patients with a clear preoperative bilateral symmetry. Conclusions Aberration-Free Treatments with

  10. Photoemission-based microelectronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Forati, Ebrahim; Dill, Tyler J.; Tao, Andrea R.; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of modern microelectronic devices rely on carriers within semiconductors due to their integrability. Therefore, the performance of these devices is limited due to natural semiconductor properties such as band gap and electron velocity. Replacing the semiconductor channel in conventional microelectronic devices with a gas or vacuum channel may scale their speed, wavelength and power beyond what is available today. However, liberating electrons into gas/vacuum in a practical microelectronic device is quite challenging. It often requires heating, applying high voltages, or using lasers with short wavelengths or high powers. Here, we show that the interaction between an engineered resonant surface and a low-power infrared laser can cause enough photoemission via electron tunnelling to implement feasible microelectronic devices such as transistors, switches and modulators. The proposed photoemission-based devices benefit from the advantages of gas-plasma/vacuum electronic devices while preserving the integrability of semiconductor-based devices. PMID:27811946

  11. Photocathode device that replenishes photoemissive coating

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Nathan A.; Lizon, David C.

    2016-06-14

    A photocathode device may replenish its photoemissive coating to replace coating material that desorbs/evaporates during photoemission. A linear actuator system may regulate the release of a replenishment material vapor, such as an alkali metal, from a chamber inside the photocathode device to a porous cathode substrate. The replenishment material deposits on the inner surface of a porous membrane and effuses through the membrane to the outer surface, where it replenishes the photoemissive coating. The rate of replenishment of the photoemissive coating may be adjusted using the linear actuator system to regulate performance of the photocathode device during photoemission. Alternatively, themore » linear actuator system may adjust a plasma discharge gap between a cartridge containing replenishment material and a metal grid. A potential is applied between the cartridge and the grid, resulting in ejection of metal ions from the cartridge that similarly replenish the photoemissive coating.« less

  12. Mask-induced aberration in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Yumi; Sato, Takashi; Inanami, Ryoichi; Nakasugi, Tetsuro; Higashiki, Tatsuhiko

    2009-04-01

    We estimated aberrations using Zernike sensitivity analysis. We found the difference of the tolerated aberration with line direction for illumination. The tolerated aberration of perpendicular line for illumination is much smaller than that of parallel line. We consider this difference to be attributable to the mask 3D effect. We call it mask-induced aberration. In the case of the perpendicular line for illumination, there was a difference in CD between right line and left line without aberration. In this report, we discuss the possibility of pattern formation in NA 0.25 generation EUV lithography tool. In perpendicular pattern for EUV light, the dominant part of aberration is mask-induced aberration. In EUV lithography, pattern correction based on the mask topography effect will be more important.

  13. Effect of aberrations in human eye on contrast sensitivity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Wei; Wang, Feng-lin; Wang, Zhao-qi

    2011-06-01

    The quantitative analysis of the effect of aberrations in human eye on vision has important clinical value in the correction of aberrations. The wave-front aberrations of human eyes were measured with the Hartmann-Shack wave-front sensor and modulation transfer function (MTF) was computed from the wave-front aberrations. Contrast sensitivity function (CSF) was obtained from MTF and the retinal aerial image modulation (AIM). It is shown that the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th Zernike aberrations deteriorate contrast sensitivity function. When the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th Zernike aberrations are corrected high contrast sensitivity function can be obtained.

  14. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-04-01

    Fallout of volcanic ash to the deep South China Sea induced by the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo (Philippines): Correction Geology, v. 23, p. 885 888 (October 1995) On p. 885, the last sentence of the Introduction should be: Here we report the first in situ record of a submarine fallout of volcanic ash following one of the largest magnitude subaerial eruptions of this century, the June 15, 1991, paroxysmal explosion of Mount Pinatubo (lat 15.148, long 120.358) in the Philippines. The first sentence under the head SUBMARINE FALLOUT MONITORING AND COMPOSITION should be: Fallout of Pinatubo tephra was recorded by fully automated collection devices (sediment traps) moored in 1190 and 3730 m water depth at 14.608N, 115.108E (Fig. 1). On p. 886, center column, the second sentence under the head LINKS TO SUBAERIAL ASH-PLUME MOVEMENT should be: Ash was ejected to a maximum altitude of 35 40 km, and at about14:20 the cloud spread out laterally into a giant umbrella region between 25 and 30 km altitude.

  15. A Dust Grain Photoemission Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venturini, C. C.; Spann, J. F., Jr.; Abbas, M. M.; Comfort, R. H.

    2000-01-01

    A laboratory experiment has been developed at Marshall Space Flight Center to study the interaction of micron-sized particles with plasmas and FUV radiation. The intent is to investigate the conditions under which particles of various compositions and sizes become charged, or discharged, while exposed to an electron beam and/or UV radiation. This experiment uses a unique laboratory where a single charged micron size particle is suspended in a quadrupole trap and then subjected to a controlled environment. Tests are performed using different materials and sizes, ranging from 10 microns to 1 micron, to determine the particle's charge while being subjected to an electron beam and /or UV radiation. The focus of this presentation will be on preliminary results from UV photoemission tests, but past results from electron beam, secondary electron emission tests will also be highlighted. A monochromator is used to spectrally resolve UV in the 120 nm to 300 nm range. This enables photoemission measurements as a function of wavelength. Electron beam tests are conducted using I to 3 micron sized aluminum oxide particles subjected to energies between 100 eV to 3 KeV. It was found that for both positive and negative particles the potential tended toward neutrality over time with possible equilibrium potentials between -0.8 Volts and 0.8 Volts.

  16. Rooting Out Aberrant Behavior in Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokalis, Jerry, Jr.; Paquin, Dave

    1989-01-01

    Discusses aberrant, or disruptive, behavior in an industrial/business, classroom-based, instructor-led training setting. Three examples of aberrant behavior are described, typical case studies are provided for each, and preventive (long-term) and corrective (on-the-spot) strategies for dealing with the problems are discussed. (LRW)

  17. Theory of Photoemission in Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Svane, Axel

    2008-07-01

    A theory is presented which describes the photoemission spectra of actinide compounds starting from the atomic limit of isolated actinide ions. The multiplets of the ion are calculated and an additional term is introduced to describe the interaction with the sea of conduction electrons. This leads to complex mixed-valent ground states, which describes well the rich spectrum observed for PuSe. In particular, the three-peak feature, which is often seen in Pu and Pu compounds in the vicinity of the Fermi level originates from f{sup 6} {yields} f{sup 5} emission. The theory is further applied to PuSb, PuCoGa{sub 5} and Am.more » (author)« less

  18. Human eyes do not need monochromatic aberrations for dynamic accommodation.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Molina, Paula; Marín-Franch, Iván; Del Águila-Carrasco, Antonio J; Esteve-Taboada, Jose J; López-Gil, Norberto; Kruger, Philip B; Montés-Micó, Robert

    2017-09-01

    To determine if human accommodation uses the eye's own monochromatic aberrations to track dynamic accommodative stimuli. Wavefront aberrations were measured while subjects monocularly viewed a monochromatic Maltese cross moving sinusoidally around 2D of accommodative demand with 1D amplitude at 0.2 Hz. The amplitude and phase (delay) of the accommodation response were compared to the actual vergence of the stimulus to obtain gain and temporal phase, calculated from wavefront aberrations recorded over time during experimental trials. The tested conditions were as follows: Correction of all the subject's aberrations except defocus (C); Correction of all the subject's aberrations except defocus and habitual second-order astigmatism (AS); Correction of all the subject's aberrations except defocus and odd higher-order aberrations (HOAs); Correction of all the subject's aberrations except defocus and even HOAs (E); Natural aberrations of the subject's eye, i.e., the adaptive-optics system only corrected the optical system's aberrations (N); Correction of all the subject's aberrations except defocus and fourth-order spherical aberration (SA). The correction was performed at 20 Hz and each condition was repeated six times in randomised order. Average gain (±2 standard errors of the mean) varied little across conditions; between 0.55 ± 0.06 (SA), and 0.62 ± 0.06 (AS). Average phase (±2 standard errors of the mean) also varied little; between 0.41 ± 0.02 s (E), and 0.47 ± 0.02 s (O). After Bonferroni correction, no statistically significant differences in gain or phase were found in the presence of specific monochromatic aberrations or in their absence. These results show that the eye's monochromatic aberrations are not necessary for accommodation to track dynamic accommodative stimuli. © 2017 The Authors. Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of College of Optometrists.

  19. Characterization and modelling of the spatially- and spectrally-varying point-spread function in hyperspectral imaging systems for computational correction of axial optical aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špiclin, Žiga; Bürmen, Miran; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-03-01

    Spatial resolution of hyperspectral imaging systems can vary significantly due to axial optical aberrations that originate from wavelength-induced index-of-refraction variations of the imaging optics. For systems that have a broad spectral range, the spatial resolution will vary significantly both with respect to the acquisition wavelength and with respect to the spatial position within each spectral image. Variations of the spatial resolution can be effectively characterized as part of the calibration procedure by a local image-based estimation of the pointspread function (PSF) of the hyperspectral imaging system. The estimated PSF can then be used in the image deconvolution methods to improve the spatial resolution of the spectral images. We estimated the PSFs from the spectral images of a line grid geometric caliber. From individual line segments of the line grid, the PSF was obtained by a non-parametric estimation procedure that used an orthogonal series representation of the PSF. By using the non-parametric estimation procedure, the PSFs were estimated at different spatial positions and at different wavelengths. The variations of the spatial resolution were characterized by the radius and the fullwidth half-maximum of each PSF and by the modulation transfer function, computed from images of USAF1951 resolution target. The estimation and characterization of the PSFs and the image deconvolution based spatial resolution enhancement were tested on images obtained by a hyperspectral imaging system with an acousto-optic tunable filter in the visible spectral range. The results demonstrate that the spatial resolution of the acquired spectral images can be significantly improved using the estimated PSFs and image deconvolution methods.

  20. Vacuum scanning capillary photoemission microscopy.

    PubMed

    Aseyev, S A; Cherkun, A P; Mironov, B N; Petrunin, V V; Chekalin, S V

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of a conical capillary in a scanning probe microscopy for surface analysis. The probe can measure photoemission from a substrate by transmitting photoelectrons along the capillary as a function of probe position. The technique is demonstrated on a model substrate consisting of a gold reflecting layer on a compact disc which has been illuminated by an unfocused laser beam with a wavelength 400nm, from a femtosecond laser with a beam size of 4mm. A quartz capillary with a 2-µm aperture has been used in the experiments. The period of gold microstructure, shown to be 1.6µ, was measured by the conical probe operating in shear force mode. In shear force regime, the dielectric capillary has been used as a "classical" SPM tip, which provided images reflecting the surface topology. In a photoelectron regime photoelectrons passed through hollow tip and entered a detector. The spatial distribution of the recorded photoelectrons consisted of periodic mountain-valley strips, resembling the surface profile of the sample. Submicron spatial resolution has been achieved. This approach paves the way to study pulsed photodesorption of large organic molecular ions with high spatial and element resolution using the combination of a hollow-tip scanner with time-of-flight technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Simulation of eye-tracker latency, spot size, and ablation pulse depth on the correction of higher order wavefront aberrations with scanning spot laser systems.

    PubMed

    Bueeler, Michael; Mrochen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this theoretical work was to investigate the robustness of scanning spot laser treatments with different laser spot diameters and peak ablation depths in case of incomplete compensation of eye movements due to eye-tracker latency. Scanning spot corrections of 3rd to 5th Zernike order wavefront errors were numerically simulated. Measured eye-movement data were used to calculate the positioning error of each laser shot assuming eye-tracker latencies of 0, 5, 30, and 100 ms, and for the case of no eye tracking. The single spot ablation depth ranged from 0.25 to 1.0 microm and the spot diameter from 250 to 1000 microm. The quality of the ablation was rated by the postoperative surface variance and the Strehl intensity ratio, which was calculated after a low-pass filter was applied to simulate epithelial surface smoothing. Treatments performed with nearly ideal eye tracking (latency approximately 0) provide the best results with a small laser spot (0.25 mm) and a small ablation depth (250 microm). However, combinations of a large spot diameter (1000 microm) and a small ablation depth per pulse (0.25 microm) yield the better results for latencies above a certain threshold to be determined specifically. Treatments performed with tracker latencies in the order of 100 ms yield similar results as treatments done completely without eye-movement compensation. CONCWSIONS: Reduction of spot diameter was shown to make the correction more susceptible to eye movement induced error. A smaller spot size is only beneficial when eye movement is neutralized with a tracking system with a latency <5 ms.

  2. Third-rank chromatic aberrations of electron lenses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhixiong

    2018-02-01

    In this paper the third-rank chromatic aberration coefficients of round electron lenses are analytically derived and numerically calculated by Mathematica. Furthermore, the numerical results are cross-checked by the differential algebraic (DA) method, which verifies that all the formulas for the third-rank chromatic aberration coefficients are completely correct. It is hoped that this work would be helpful for further chromatic aberration correction in electron microscopy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Multidimensional photoemission spectroscopy—the space-charge limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönhense, B.; Medjanik, K.; Fedchenko, O.; Chernov, S.; Ellguth, M.; Vasilyev, D.; Oelsner, A.; Viefhaus, J.; Kutnyakhov, D.; Wurth, W.; Elmers, H. J.; Schönhense, G.

    2018-03-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy, especially at pulsed sources, is ultimately limited by the Coulomb interaction in the electron cloud, changing energy and angular distribution of the photoelectrons. A detailed understanding of this phenomenon is crucial for future pump-probe photoemission studies at (x-ray) free electron lasers and high-harmonic photon sources. Measurements have been performed for Ir(111) at hν = 1000 eV with photon flux densities between ˜102 and 104 photons per pulse and μm2 (beamline P04/PETRA III, DESY Hamburg), revealing space-charge induced energy shifts of up to 10 eV. In order to correct the essential part of the energy shift and restore the electron distributions close to the Fermi energy, we developed a semi-analytical theory for the space-charge effect in cathode-lens instruments (momentum microscopes, photoemission electron microscopes). The theory predicts a Lorentzian profile of energy isosurfaces and allows us to quantify the charge cloud from measured energy profiles. The correction is essential for the determination of the Fermi surface, as we demonstrate by means of ‘k-space movies’ for the prototypical high-Z material tungsten. In an energy interval of about 1 eV below the Fermi edge, the bandstructure can be restored up to substantial shifts of ˜7 eV. Scattered photoelectrons strongly enhance the inelastic background in the region several eV below E F, proving that the majority of scattering events involves a slow electron. The correction yields a gain of two orders of magnitude in usable intensity compared with the uncorrected case (assuming a tolerable shift of 250 meV). The results are particularly important for future experiments at SASE-type free electron lasers, since the correction also works for strongly fluctuating (but known) pulse intensities.

  4. 3D resolved mapping of optical aberrations in thick tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jun; Mahou, Pierre; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Débarre, Delphine

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple method for mapping optical aberrations with 3D resolution within thick samples. The method relies on the local measurement of the variation in image quality with externally applied aberrations. We discuss the accuracy of the method as a function of the signal strength and of the aberration amplitude and we derive the achievable resolution for the resulting measurements. We then report on measured 3D aberration maps in human skin biopsies and mouse brain slices. From these data, we analyse the consequences of tissue structure and refractive index distribution on aberrations and imaging depth in normal and cleared tissue samples. The aberration maps allow the estimation of the typical aplanetism region size over which aberrations can be uniformly corrected. This method and data pave the way towards efficient correction strategies for tissue imaging applications. PMID:22876353

  5. Structural Channels and Atomic-Cluster Insertion in CsxBi4Te6 (1 ≤ x ≤ 1.25) As Observed by Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruixin; Yang, Huaixin; Guo, Cong; Tian, Huanfang; Shi, Honglong; Chen, Genfu; Li, Jianqi

    2016-12-19

    Microstructural analyses based on aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) observations demonstrate that low-dimensional Cs x Bi 4 Te 6 materials, known to be a novel thermoelectric and superconducting system, contain notable structural channels that go directly along the b axis, which can be partially filled by atom clusters depending on the thermal treatment process. We successfully prepared two series of Cs x Bi 4 Te 6 single-crystalline samples using two different sintering processes. The Cs x Bi 4 Te 6 samples prepared using an air-quenching method show superconductivity at approximately 4 K, while the Cs x Bi 4 Te 6 with the same nominal compositions prepared by slowly cooling are nonsuperconductors. Moreover, atomic structural investigations of typical samples reveal that the structural channels are often empty in superconducting materials; thus, we can represent the superconducting phase as Cs 1-y Bi 4 Te 6 with considering the point defects in the Cs layers. In addition, the channels in the nonsuperconducting crystals are commonly partially occupied by triplet Bi clusters. Moreover, the average structures for these two phases are also different in their monoclinic angles (β), which are estimated to be 102.3° for superconductors and 100.5° for nonsuperconductors.

  6. Single and double photoemission and generalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyukh, Yaroslav

    2016-03-01

    A unified diagrammatic treatment of single and double electron photoemission currents is presented. The irreducible lesser density-density response function is the starting point of these derivations. Diagrams for higher order processes in which several electrons are observed in coincidence can likewise be obtained. For physically relevant situations, in which the photoemission cross-section can be written as the Fermi Golden rule, the diagrams from the nonequilibrium Green's function approach can be put in direct correspondence with the diagrams of the scattering theory.

  7. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  8. Aberrations in stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, Jacopo; Burke, Daniel; Booth, Martin J.

    2017-12-01

    Like all methods of super-resolution microscopy, stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy can suffer from the effects of aberrations. The most important aspect of a STED microscope is that the depletion focus maintains a minimum, ideally zero, intensity point that is surrounded by a region of higher intensity. It follows that aberrations that cause a non-zero value of this minimum intensity are the most detrimental, as they inhibit fluorescence emission even at the centre of the depletion focus. We present analysis that elucidates the nature of these effects in terms of the different polarisation components at the focus for two-dimensional and three-dimensional STED resolution enhancement. It is found that only certain low-order aberration modes can affect the minimum intensity at the Gaussian focus. This has important consequences for the design of adaptive optics aberration correction systems.

  9. Correcting Hubble Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, John M.; Sheahen, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the theory behind the workings of the Hubble Space Telescope, the spherical aberration in the primary mirror that caused a reduction in image quality, and the corrective device that compensated for the error. (JRH)

  10. Comparison of Aberrations After Standard and Customized Refractive Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.; He, X.; Wang, Y.

    2013-09-01

    To detect possible differences in residual wavefront aberrations between standard and customized laser refractive surgery based onmathematical modeling, the residual optical aberrations after conventional and customized laser refractive surgery were compared accordingto the ablation profile with transition zone. The results indicated that ablation profile has a significant impact on the residual aberrations.The amount of residual aberrations for conventional correction is higher than that for customized correction. Additionally, the residualaberrations for high myopia eyes are markedly larger than those for moderate myopia eyes. For a 5 mm pupil, the main residual aberrationterm is coma and yet it is spherical aberration for a 7 mm pupil. When the pupil diameter is the same as optical zone or greater, themagnitudes of residual aberrations is obviously larger than that for a smaller pupil. In addition, the magnitudes of the residual fifth orsixth order aberrations are relatively large, especially secondary coma in a 6 mm pupil and secondary spherical aberration in a 7 mm pupil.Therefore, the customized ablation profile may be superior to the conventional correction even though the transition zone and treatmentdecentration are taken into account. However, the customized ablation profile will still induce significant amount of residual aberrations.

  11. Heterojunction-Internal-Photoemission Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    New type of photodetector adds options for design of imaging devices. Heterojunction-internal-photoemission (HIP) infrared photodetectors proposed for incorporation into planar arrays in imaging devices required to function well at wavelengths from 8 to 17 micrometers and at temperatures above 65 K. Photoexcited electrons cross energy barrier at heterojunction and swept toward collection layer. Array of such detectors made by etching mesa structures. HIP layers stacked to increase quantum efficiency. Also built into integrated circuits including silicon multiplexer/readout circuits.

  12. Anterior Corneal, Posterior Corneal, and Lenticular Contributions to Ocular Aberrations.

    PubMed

    Atchison, David A; Suheimat, Marwan; Mathur, Ankit; Lister, Lucas J; Rozema, Jos

    2016-10-01

    To determine the corneal surfaces and lens contributions to ocular aberrations. There were 61 healthy participants with ages ranging from 20 to 55 years and refractions -8.25 diopters (D) to +3.25 D. Anterior and posterior corneal topographies were obtained with an Oculus Pentacam, and ocular aberrations were obtained with an iTrace aberrometer. Raytracing through models of corneas provided total corneal and surface component aberrations for 5-mm-diameter pupils. Lenticular contributions were given as differences between ocular and corneal aberrations. Theoretical raytracing investigated influence of object distance on aberrations. Apart from defocus, the highest aberration coefficients were horizontal astigmatism, horizontal coma, and spherical aberration. Most correlations between lenticular and ocular parameters were positive and significant, with compensation of total corneal aberrations by lenticular aberrations for 5/12 coefficients. Anterior corneal aberrations were approximately three times higher than posterior corneal aberrations and usually had opposite signs. Corneal topographic centers were displaced from aberrometer pupil centers by 0.32 ± 0.19 mm nasally and 0.02 ± 0.16 mm inferiorly; disregarding corneal decentration relative to pupil center was significant for oblique astigmatism, horizontal coma, and horizontal trefoil. An object at infinity, rather than at the image in the anterior cornea, gave incorrect aberration estimates of the posterior cornea. Corneal and lenticular aberration magnitudes are similar, and aberrations of the anterior corneal surface are approximately three times those of the posterior surface. Corneal decentration relative to pupil center has significant effects on oblique astigmatism, horizontal coma, and horizontal trefoil. When estimating component aberrations, it is important to use correct object/image conjugates and heights at surfaces.

  13. Novel system for picosecond photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haight, R.; Silberman, J. A.; Lilie, M. I.

    1988-09-01

    This article describes a laser-based source and detection scheme for performing time-resolved photoemission studies of materials. The pulsed laser source produces intense picosecond pulses of coherent radiation that are nearly continuously tunable from the near infrared to photon energies up to 13 eV. To achieve high sensitivity, a novel multianode time-of-flight spectrometer has been built that generates an angularly resolved intensity versus kinetic energy spectrum with better than 100-meV resolution. The source and detector provide an opportunity to study the electronic dynamics of excited systems on a picosecond time scale.

  14. Photoemission Spectroscopy of Delta- Plutonium: Experimental Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, J. G.

    2002-03-01

    The electronic structure of Plutonium, particularly delta- Plutonium, remains ill defined and without direct experimental verification. Recently, we have embarked upon a program of study of alpha- and delta- Plutonium, using synchrotron radiation from the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, USA [1]. This work is set within the context of Plutonium Aging [2] and the complexities of Plutonium Science [3]. The resonant photoemission of delta-plutonium is in partial agreement with an atomic, localized model of resonant photoemission, which would be consistent with a correlated electronic structure. The results of our synchrotron- based studies will be compared with those of recent laboratory- based works [4,5,6]. The talk will conclude with a brief discussion of our plans for the future, such as the performance of spin-resolving and dichroic photoemission measurements of Plutonium [7] and the development of single crystal ultrathin films of Plutonium. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. 1. J. Terry, R.K. Schulze, J.D. Farr, T. Zocco, K. Heinzelman, E. Rotenberg, D.K. Shuh, G. van der Laan, D.A. Arena, and J.G. Tobin, “5f Resonant Photoemission from Plutonium”, UCRL-JC-140782, Surf. Sci. Lett., accepted October 2001. 2. B.D. Wirth, A.J. Schwartz, M.J. Fluss, M.J. Caturla, M.A. Wall, and W.G. Wolfer, MRS Bulletin 26, 679 (2001). 3. S.S. Hecker, MRS Bulletin 26, 667 (2001). 4. T. Gouder, L. Havela, F. Wastin, and J. Rebizant, Europhys. Lett. 55, 705 (2001); MRS Bulletin 26, 684 (2001); Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 3378 (2000). 5. A.J. Arko, J.J. Joyce, L. Morales, J. Wills, J. Lashley, F. Wastin, and J. Rebizant, Phys. Rev. B 62, 1773 (2000). 6. L.E. Cox, O. Eriksson, and B.R. Cooper, Phys. Rev. B 46, 13571 (1992). 7. J. Tobin, D.A. Arena, B. Chung, P. Roussel, J. Terry, R.K. Schulze, J.D. Farr, T. Zocco, K. Heinzelman, E

  15. Laser correcting mirror

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    An improved laser correction mirror (10) for correcting aberrations in a laser beam wavefront having a rectangular mirror body (12) with a plurality of legs (14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28) arranged into opposing pairs (34, 36, 38, 40) along the long sides (30, 32) of the mirror body (12). Vector force pairs (49, 50, 52, 54) are applied by adjustment mechanisms (42, 44, 46, 48) between members of the opposing pairs (34, 36, 38, 40) for bending a reflective surface 13 of the mirror body 12 into a shape defining a function which can be used to correct for comatic aberrations.

  16. Photoemission and photoionization time delays and rates

    PubMed Central

    Gallmann, L.; Jordan, I.; Wörner, H. J.; Castiglioni, L.; Hengsberger, M.; Osterwalder, J.; Arrell, C. A.; Chergui, M.; Liberatore, E.; Rothlisberger, U.; Keller, U.

    2017-01-01

    Ionization and, in particular, ionization through the interaction with light play an important role in fundamental processes in physics, chemistry, and biology. In recent years, we have seen tremendous advances in our ability to measure the dynamics of photo-induced ionization in various systems in the gas, liquid, or solid phase. In this review, we will define the parameters used for quantifying these dynamics. We give a brief overview of some of the most important ionization processes and how to resolve the associated time delays and rates. With regard to time delays, we ask the question: how long does it take to remove an electron from an atom, molecule, or solid? With regard to rates, we ask the question: how many electrons are emitted in a given unit of time? We present state-of-the-art results on ionization and photoemission time delays and rates. Our review starts with the simplest physical systems: the attosecond dynamics of single-photon and tunnel ionization of atoms in the gas phase. We then extend the discussion to molecular gases and ionization of liquid targets. Finally, we present the measurements of ionization delays in femto- and attosecond photoemission from the solid–vacuum interface. PMID:29308414

  17. Large Band Gap of alpha-RuCl3 Probed by Photoemission and Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinn, Soobin; Kim, Choong Hyun; Sandilands, Luke; Lee, Kyungdong; Won, Choongjae; Oh, Ji Seop; Han, Moonsup; Chang, Young Jun; Hur, Namjung; Sato, Hitoshi; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Kim, Changyoung; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Noh, Tae Won

    The Kitaev honeycomb lattice model has attracted great attention because of its possibility to stabilize a quantum spin liquid ground state. Recently, it was proposed that alpha-RuCl3 is its material realization and the first 4 d relativistic Mott insulator from an optical spectrum and LDA + U + SO calculations. Here, we present photoemission and inverse photoemission spectra of alpha-RuCl3. The observed band gap is about 1.8 eV, which suggests that the previously assigned optical gap of 0.3 eV is misinterpreted, and that the strong peak at about 1.2 eV in the optical spectrum may be associated with an actual optical gap. Assuming a strong excitonic effect of 0.6 eV in the optical spectrum, all the structures except for the peak at 0.3 eV are consistent with our electronic spectra. When compared with LDA + U + SO calculations, the value of U should be considerably larger than the previous one, which implies that the spin-orbit coupling is not a necessary ingredient for the insulating mechanism of alpha-RuCl3. We also present angle-resolved photoemission spectra to be compared with LDA + U + SO and LDA +DMFT calculations.

  18. Resolving Nonadiabatic Dynamics of Hydrated Electrons Using Ultrafast Photoemission Anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Karashima, Shutaro; Yamamoto, Yo-Ichi; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2016-04-01

    We have studied ultrafast nonadiabatic dynamics of excess electrons trapped in the band gap of liquid water using time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Anisotropic photoemission from the first excited state was discovered, which enabled unambiguous identification of nonadiabatic transition to the ground state in 60 fs in H_{2}O and 100 fs in D_{2}O. The photoelectron kinetic energy distribution exhibited a rapid spectral shift in ca. 20 fs, which is ascribed to the librational response of a hydration shell to electronic excitation. Photoemission anisotropy indicates that the electron orbital in the excited state is depolarized in less than 40 fs.

  19. Spherical aberrations of human astigmatic corneas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huawei; Dai, Guang-Ming; Chen, Li; Weeber, Henk A; Piers, Patricia A

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate whether the average spherical aberration of human astigmatic corneas is statistically equivalent to human nonastigmatic corneas. Spherical aberrations of 445 astigmatic corneas prior to laser vision correction were retrospectively investigated to determine Zernike coefficients for central corneal areas 6 mm in diameter using CTView (Sarver and Associates). Data were divided into groups according to cylinder power (0.01 to 0.25 diopters [D], 0.26 to 0.75 D, 0.76 to 1.06 D, 1.07 to 1.53 D, 1.54 to 2.00 D, and >2.00 D) and according to age by decade. Spherical aberrations were correlated with age and astigmatic power among groups and the entire population. Statistical analyses were conducted, and P<.05 was considered statistically significant. Mean patient age was 42.6±11 years. Astigmatic corneas had an average astigmatic power of 0.78±0.58 D and mean spherical aberration was 0.25±0.13 μm for the entire population and approximately the same (0.27 μm) for individual groups, ranging from 0.23 to 0.29 μm (P>.05 for all tested groups). Mean spherical aberration of astigmatic corneas was not correlated significantly with cylinder power or age (P>.05). Spherical aberrations are similar to those of nonastigmatic corneas, permitting the use of these additional data in the design of aspheric toric intra-ocular lenses. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Brillouin micro-spectroscopy through aberrations via sensorless adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edrei, Eitan; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2018-04-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy is a powerful optical technique for non-contact viscoelastic characterizations which has recently found applications in three-dimensional mapping of biological samples. Brillouin spectroscopy performances are rapidly degraded by optical aberrations and have therefore been limited to homogenous transparent samples. In this work, we developed an adaptive optics (AO) configuration designed for Brillouin scattering spectroscopy to engineer the incident wavefront and correct for aberrations. Our configuration does not require direct wavefront sensing and the injection of a "guide-star"; hence, it can be implemented without the need for sample pre-treatment. We used our AO-Brillouin spectrometer in aberrated phantoms and biological samples and obtained improved precision and resolution of Brillouin spectral analysis; we demonstrated 2.5-fold enhancement in Brillouin signal strength and 1.4-fold improvement in axial resolution because of the correction of optical aberrations.

  1. Multiplexed aberration measurement for deep tissue imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Rui; Milkie, Daniel E.; Sun, Wenzhi; Tan, Zhongchao; Kerlin, Aaron; Chen, Tsai-Wen; Kim, Douglas S.; Ji, Na

    2014-01-01

    We describe a multiplexed aberration measurement method that modulates the intensity or phase of light rays at multiple pupil segments in parallel to determine their phase gradients. Applicable to fluorescent-protein-labeled structures of arbitrary complexity, it allows us to obtain diffraction-limited resolution in various samples in vivo. For the strongly scattering mouse brain, a single aberration correction improves structural and functional imaging of fine neuronal processes over a large imaging volume. PMID:25128976

  2. Tetragonal and collapsed-tetragonal phases of CaFe2As2 : A view from angle-resolved photoemission and dynamical mean-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Richard, Pierre; Shi, Xun; Wu, Shangfei; Zeng, Lingkun; Saparov, Bayrammurad; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Qian, Tian; Sefat, Athena S.; Biermann, Silke; Ding, Hong

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the tetragonal to collapsed-tetragonal transition of CaFe2As2 using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and dynamical mean field theory-based electronic structure calculations. We observe that the collapsed-tetragonal phase exhibits reduced correlations and a higher coherence temperature due to the stronger Fe-As hybridization. Furthermore, a comparison of measured photoemission spectra and theoretical spectral functions shows that momentum-dependent corrections to the density functional band structure are essential for the description of low-energy quasiparticle dispersions. We introduce those using the recently proposed combined "screened exchange + dynamical mean field theory" scheme.

  3. Spectral estimation for characterization of acoustic aberration.

    PubMed

    Varslot, Trond; Angelsen, Bjørn; Waag, Robert C

    2004-07-01

    Spectral estimation based on acoustic backscatter from a motionless stochastic medium is described for characterization of aberration in ultrasonic imaging. The underlying assumptions for the estimation are: The correlation length of the medium is short compared to the length of the transmitted acoustic pulse, an isoplanatic region of sufficient size exists around the focal point, and the backscatter can be modeled as an ergodic stochastic process. The motivation for this work is ultrasonic imaging with aberration correction. Measurements were performed using a two-dimensional array system with 80 x 80 transducer elements and an element pitch of 0.6 mm. The f number for the measurements was 1.2 and the center frequency was 3.0 MHz with a 53% bandwidth. Relative phase of aberration was extracted from estimated cross spectra using a robust least-mean-square-error method based on an orthogonal expansion of the phase differences of neighboring wave forms as a function of frequency. Estimates of cross-spectrum phase from measurements of random scattering through a tissue-mimicking aberrator have confidence bands approximately +/- 5 degrees wide. Both phase and magnitude are in good agreement with a reference characterization obtained from a point scatterer.

  4. Aberrations associated with rigid contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Atchison, D A

    1995-10-01

    A rigid contact lens on an eye can produce levels of spherical aberration very different from those produced by a spectacle lens in front of the eye. These levels are considerably affected by contact lens surface asphericity. Change in longitudinal spherical aberration associated with aspherizing a contact lens surface is well predicted by a simple equation for change in sagittal power of the surface. Displacing an aspheric contact lens on the eye can produce considerable defocus, which is well predicted by simple equations for change in sagittal and tangential surface powers. The best refractive correction with contact lenses can be determined only by overrefraction with a patient wearing a contact lens of power and characteristics similar to that which will be prescribed. An aspheric contact lens that moves to a considerable extent on the eye will cause more unstable vision than will a spherical lens that moves to the same extent.

  5. OF TRYPANOSOMATIDS. ENDOTRANSFORMATIONS AND ABERRATIONS].

    PubMed

    Frolov, A O; Malysheva, M N; Kostygov, A Yu

    2016-01-01

    Endotransformations and aberrations of the life cycle in the evolutionary history of trypanosomatids (Kinetoplastea: Trypanosomatidae) are analyzed. We treat the term "endotransformations" as evolutionarily fixed changes of phases and/or developmental stages of parasites. By contrast, we treat aberrations as evolutionary unstable, periodically arising deformations of developmental phases of trypanosomatids, never leading to life cycle changes. Various examples of life cycle endotransformations and aberrations in representatives of the family Trypanosomatidae are discussed.

  6. Using aberrant behaviors as reinforcers for autistic children.

    PubMed Central

    Charlop, M H; Kurtz, P F; Casey, F G

    1990-01-01

    In a series of experiments, we assessed the efficacy of using autistic children's aberrant behaviors as reinforcers to increase their correct task responding. In Experiment 1, reinforcer conditions of stereotypy, food, and varied (food or stereotypy) were compared. In Experiment 2, the conditions were delayed echolalia, food, and varied (food or delayed echolalia), and in Experiment 3, perseverative behavior was compared with stereotypy and food as potential reinforcers. A multielement design was used for all comparisons, and side-effect measures were recorded during and after teaching sessions as well as at home. Results indicated that, in general, task performance was highest when brief opportunities to engage in aberrant behaviors were provided as reinforcers. Edibles were associated with the lowest performance. Furthermore, no negative side effects (e.g., an increase in aberrant behaviors) occurred. The results are discussed in terms of suggesting a more pragmatic treatment approach by addressing the contingent use of autistic children's aberrant behaviors as reinforcers. PMID:2373653

  7. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimentalmore » fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons.« less

  8. A Evaluation of Optical Aberrations in Underwater Hologrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, J. M.

    underwater hologrammetry. The results of experimental trials which demonstrate the correction of astigmatism and field curvature are presented. Exact expressions are obtained for the aberrations in wavelength compensated holograms and are employed to determine the conditions for optimum compensation and the degree of residual aberration. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  9. Multiplet Splitting Effects on Core-Level Photoemission and Inverse-Photoemission Spectra of Uranium Intermetallic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Kozo

    1999-03-01

    The present paper discusses the role of U 5f-5f exchange interaction (J) in the inverse photoemission spectrum (IPES) and the U 4f x-ray photoemission spectrum (XPS) of uranium intermetallic compounds. The origin of the broad main peak in the IPES of UPd3 and UPd2Al3, for instance, is ascribed to the exchange coupling effects of 5f electrons. In other words, whether the ground state is of high-spin or of low-spin is directly reflected in the width of the IPES. On the other hand, the interpretation for the U 4f photoemission spectrum is not so greatly influenced by J. The full-multiplet calculations are also performed for an U4+ ion for comparison.

  10. Effects of ocular aberrations on contrast detection in noise.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo; Liu, Rong; Dai, Yun; Zhou, Jiawei; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Yudong

    2012-08-06

    We use adaptive optics (AO) techniques to manipulate the ocular aberrations and elucidate the effects of these ocular aberrations on contrast detection in a noisy background. The detectability of sine wave gratings at frequencies of 4, 8, and 16 circles per degree (cpd) was measured in a standard two-interval force-choice staircase procedure against backgrounds of various levels of white noise. The observer's ocular aberrations were either corrected with AO or left uncorrected. In low levels of external noise, contrast detection thresholds are always lowered by AO correction, whereas in high levels of external noise, they are generally elevated by AO correction. Higher levels of external noise are required to make this threshold elevation observable when signal spatial frequencies increase from 4 to 16 cpd. The linear-amplifier-model fit shows that mostly sampling efficiency and equivalent noise both decrease with AO correction. Our findings indicate that ocular aberrations could be beneficial for contrast detection in high-level noises. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. Using Aberrant Behaviors as Reinforcers for Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlop, Marjorie H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments assessed the efficacy of various reinforcers to increase correct task responding in a total of 10 autistic children, aged 6-9. Of the reinforcers used (stereotypy, delayed echolalia, perseverative behavior, and food), task performance was highest with opportunities to engage in aberrant behaviors, and lowest with edible…

  12. Photoemission of Single Dust Grains for Heliospheric Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F., Jr.; Venturini, Catherine C.; Abbas, Mian M.; Comfort, Richard H.

    2000-01-01

    Initial results of an experiment to measure the photoemission of single dust grains as a function of far ultraviolet wavelengths are presented. Coulombic forces dominate the interaction of the dust grains in the heliosphere. Knowledge of the charge state of dust grains, whether in a dusty plasma (Debye length < intergrain distance) or in the diffuse interplanetary region, is key to understanding their interaction with the solar wind and other solar system constituents. The charge state of heliospheric grains is primarily determined by primary electron and ion collisions, secondary electron emission and photoemission due to ultraviolet sunlight. We have established a unique experimental technique to measure the photoemission of individual micron-sized dust grains in vacuum. This technique resolves difficulties associated with statistical measurements of dust grain ensembles and non-static dust beams. The photoemission yield of Aluminum Oxide 3-micron grains For wavelengths from 120-300 nm with a spectral resolution of 1 nm FWHM is reported. Results are compared to interplanetary conditions.

  13. Chromosome Aberrations in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry A.; Durante, M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A review of currently available data on in vivo induced chromosome damage in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts proves that, after protracted exposure of a few months or more to space radiation, cytogenetic biodosimetry analyses of blood collected within a week or two of return from space provides a reliable estimate of equivalent radiation dose and risk. Recent studies indicate that biodosimetry estimates from single spaceflights lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry and biophysical models, but very large uncertainties are associated with single individual measurements and the total sample population remains low. Retrospective doses may be more difficult to estimate because of the fairly rapid time-dependent loss of "stable" aberrations in blood lymphocytes. Also, biodosimetry estimates from individuals who participate in multiple missions, or very long (interplanetary) missions, may be complicated by an adaptive response to space radiation and/or changes in lymphocyte survival and repopulation. A discussion of published data is presented and specific issues related to space radiation biodosimetry protocols are discussed.

  14. General theoretical description of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of van der Waals structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, B.

    2018-04-01

    We develop a general theory to model the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) of commensurate and incommensurate van der Waals (vdW) structures, formed by lattice mismatched and/or misaligned stacked layers of two-dimensional materials. The present theory is based on a tight-binding description of the structure and the concept of generalized umklapp processes, going beyond previous descriptions of ARPES in incommensurate vdW structures, which are based on continuous, low-energy models, being limited to structures with small lattice mismatch/misalignment. As applications of the general formalism, we study the ARPES bands and constant energy maps for two structures: twisted bilayer graphene and twisted bilayer MoS2. The present theory should be useful in correctly interpreting experimental results of ARPES of vdW structures and other systems displaying competition between different periodicities, such as two-dimensional materials weakly coupled to a substrate and materials with density wave phases.

  15. Adaptive optics full-field OCT: a resolution almost insensitive to aberrations (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Peng; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, A. Claude

    2016-03-01

    A Full-Field OCT (FFOCT) setup coupled to a compact transmissive liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) is used to induce or correct aberrations and simulate eye examinations. To reduce the system complexity, strict pupil conjugation was abandoned. During our work on quantifying the effect of geometrical aberrations on FFOCT images, we found that the image resolution is almost insensitive to aberrations. Indeed if the object channel PSF is distorted, its interference with the reference channel conserves the main feature of an unperturbed PSF with only a reduction of the signal level. This unique behavior is specific to the use of a spatially incoherent illumination. Based on this, the FFOCT image intensity was used as the metric for our wavefront sensorless correction. Aberration correction was first conducted on an USAF resolution target with the LSCLM as both aberration generator and corrector. A random aberration mask was induced, and the low-order Zernike Modes were corrected sequentially according to the intensity metric function optimization. A Ficus leaf and a fixed mouse brain tissue slice were also imaged to demonstrate the correction of sample self-induced wavefront distortions. After optimization, more structured information appears for the leaf imaging. And the high-signal fiber-like myelin fiber structures were resolved much more clearly after the whole correction process for mouse brain imaging. Our experiment shows the potential of this compact AO-FFOCT system for aberration correction imaging. This preliminary approach that simulates eyes aberrations correction also opens the path to a simple implementation of FFOCT adaptive optics for retinal examinations.

  16. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  17. Aberration compensation of an ultrasound imaging instrument with a reduced number of channels.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Astheimer, Jeffrey P; Waag, Robert C

    2012-10-01

    Focusing and imaging qualities of an ultrasound imaging system that uses aberration correction were experimentally investigated as functions of the number of parallel channels. Front-end electronics that consolidate signals from multiple physical elements can be used to lower hardware and computational costs by reducing the number of parallel channels. However, the signals from sparse arrays of synthetic elements yield poorer aberration estimates. In this study, aberration estimates derived from synthetic arrays of varying element sizes are evaluated by comparing compensated receive focuses, compensated transmit focuses, and compensated b-scan images of a point target and a cyst phantom. An array of 80 x 80 physical elements with a pitch of 0.6 x 0.6 mm was used for all of the experiments and the aberration was produced by a phantom selected to mimic propagation through abdominal wall. The results show that aberration correction derived from synthetic arrays with pitches that have a diagonal length smaller than 70% of the correlation length of the aberration yield focuses and images of approximately the same quality. This connection between correlation length of the aberration and synthetic element size provides a guideline for determining the number of parallel channels that are required when designing imaging systems that employ aberration correction.

  18. Static telescope aberration measurement using lucky imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Marrero, Marcos; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis Fernando; Marichal-Hernández, José Gil; Rodríguez-Ramos, José Manuel

    2012-07-01

    A procedure has been developed to compute static aberrations once the telescope PSF has been measured with the lucky imaging technique, using a nearby star close to the object of interest as the point source to probe the optical system. This PSF is iteratively turned into a phase map at the pupil using the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm and then converted to the appropriate actuation information for a deformable mirror having low actuator number but large stroke capability. The main advantage of this procedure is related with the capability of correcting static aberration at the specific pointing direction and without the need of a wavefront sensor.

  19. Theory of aberration fields for general optical systems with freeform surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fuerschbach, Kyle; Rolland, Jannick P; Thompson, Kevin P

    2014-11-03

    This paper utilizes the framework of nodal aberration theory to describe the aberration field behavior that emerges in optical systems with freeform optical surfaces, particularly φ-polynomial surfaces, including Zernike polynomial surfaces, that lie anywhere in the optical system. If the freeform surface is located at the stop or pupil, the net aberration contribution of the freeform surface is field constant. As the freeform optical surface is displaced longitudinally away from the stop or pupil of the optical system, the net aberration contribution becomes field dependent. It is demonstrated that there are no new aberration types when describing the aberration fields that arise with the introduction of freeform optical surfaces. Significantly it is shown that the aberration fields that emerge with the inclusion of freeform surfaces in an optical system are exactly those that have been described by nodal aberration theory for tilted and decentered optical systems. The key contribution here lies in establishing the field dependence and nodal behavior of each freeform term that is essential knowledge for effective application to optical system design. With this development, the nodes that are distributed throughout the field of view for each aberration type can be anticipated and targeted during optimization for the correction or control of the aberrations in an optical system with freeform surfaces. This work does not place any symmetry constraints on the optical system, which could be packaged in a fully three dimensional geometry, without fold mirrors.

  20. On the Definition of Aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghui; Wang, Guangli

    2014-12-01

    There was a groundbreaking step in the history of astronomy in 1728 when the effect of aberration was discovered by James Bradley (1693-1762). Recently, the solar acceleration, due to the variations in the aberrational effect of extragalactic sources caused by it, has been determined from VLBI observations with an uncertainty of about 0.5 mm{\\cdot}{s^{-1}}{\\cdot}{yr^{-1}} level. As a basic concept in astrometry with a nearly 300-year history, the definition of aberration, however, is still equivocal and discordant in the literature. It has been under continuing debate whether it depends on the relative motion between the observer and the observed source or only on the motion of the observer with respect to the frame of reference. In this paper, we will review the debate and the inconsistency in the definition of the aberration since the last century, and then discuss its definition in detail, which involves the discussions on the planetary aberration, the stellar aberration, the proper motion of an object during the travel time of light from the object to the observer, and the way of selecting the reference frame to express and distinguish the motions of the source and the observer. The aberration is essentially caused by the transformation between coordinate systems, and consequently quantified by the velocity of the observer with respect to the selected reference frame, independent of the motion of the source. Obviously, this nature is totally different from that of the definition given by the IAU WG NFA (Capitaine, 2007) in 2006, which is stated as, ``the apparent angular displacement of the observed position of a celestial object from its geometric position, caused by the finite velocity of light in combination with the motions of the observer and of the observed object.''

  1. Interocular high-order corneal wavefront aberration symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Marco; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Serrao, Sebastiano

    2006-04-01

    The interocular symmetry of the high-order corneal wavefront aberration (WA) in a population of myopic eyes was analyzed before and after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). The preoperative and one-year postoperative corneal aberration data (from third to seventh Zernike orders) for 4- and 7-mm pupils from right and left eyes were averaged after correcting for the effects of enantiomorphism to test for mirror symmetry. Also, the mean corneal point-spread function (PSF) for right and left eyes was calculated. Preoperatively, a moderate and high degree of correlation in the high-order corneal WA between eyes was found for 4- and 7-mm pupils, respectively. Myopic PRK did not significantly change the interocular symmetry of corneal high-order aberrations. No discernible differences in the orientation PSF between eyes were observed one year after surgery in comparison with the preoperative state over the two analyzed pupils.

  2. Measurement of Nanoplasmonic Field Enhancement with Ultrafast Photoemission.

    PubMed

    Rácz, Péter; Pápa, Zsuzsanna; Márton, István; Budai, Judit; Wróbel, Piotr; Stefaniuk, Tomasz; Prietl, Christine; Krenn, Joachim R; Dombi, Péter

    2017-02-08

    Probing nanooptical near-fields is a major challenge in plasmonics. Here, we demonstrate an experimental method utilizing ultrafast photoemission from plasmonic nanostructures that is capable of probing the maximum nanoplasmonic field enhancement in any metallic surface environment. Directly measured field enhancement values for various samples are in good agreement with detailed finite-difference time-domain simulations. These results establish ultrafast plasmonic photoelectrons as versatile probes for nanoplasmonic near-fields.

  3. Ultrafast Imaging of Chiral Surface Plasmon by Photoemission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yanan; Dabrowski, Maciej; Petek, Hrvoje

    We employ Time-Resolved Photoemission Electron Microscopy (TR-PEEM) to study surface plasmon polariton (SPP) wave packet dynamics launched by tunable (VIS-UV) femtosecond pulses of various linear and circular polarizations. The plasmonic structures are micron size single-crystalline Ag islands grown in situ on Si surfaces and characterized by Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM). The local fields of plasmonic modes enhance two and three photon photoemission (2PP and 3PP) at the regions of strong field enhancement. Imaging of the photoemission signal with PEEM electron optics thus images the plasmonic fields excited in the samples. The observed PEEM images with left and right circularly polarized light show chiral images, which is a consequence of the transverse spin momentum of surface plasmon. By changing incident light polarization, the plasmon interference pattern shifts with light ellipticity indicating a polarization dependent excitation phase of SPP. In addition, interferometric-time resolved measurements record the asymmetric SPP wave packet motion in order to characterize the dynamical properties of chiral SPP wave packets.

  4. Bulk sensitive hard x-ray photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, M., E-mail: m.patt@fz-juelich.de; Wiemann, C.; Weber, N.

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) has now matured into a well-established technique as a bulk sensitive probe of the electronic structure due to the larger escape depth of the highly energetic electrons. In order to enable HAXPES studies with high lateral resolution, we have set up a dedicated energy-filtered hard x-ray photoemission electron microscope (HAXPEEM) working with electron kinetic energies up to 10 keV. It is based on the NanoESCA design and also preserves the performance of the instrument in the low and medium energy range. In this way, spectromicroscopy can be performed from threshold to hard x-ray photoemission. Themore » high potential of the HAXPEEM approach for the investigation of buried layers and structures has been shown already on a layered and structured SrTiO{sub 3} sample. Here, we present results of experiments with test structures to elaborate the imaging and spectroscopic performance of the instrument and show the capabilities of the method to image bulk properties. Additionally, we introduce a method to determine the effective attenuation length of photoelectrons in a direct photoemission experiment.« less

  5. Photoemission Experiments for Charge Characteristics of Individual Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; West, E.; Pratico, J.; Tankosic, D.; Venturini, C. C.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission experiments with UV radiation have been performed to investigate the microphysics and charge characteristics of individual isolated dust grains of various compositions and sizes by using the electrodynamic balance facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Dust particles of 2-10 gm diameter are levitated in a vacuum chamber at pressures approximately 10(exp-5) torr and exposed to a collimated beam of UV radiation in the 120-200 nm spectral range from a deuterium lamp source with a MgF2 window. A monochromator is used to select the UV wavelength with a spectral resolution of 8 nm. The electrodynamic facility permits measurements of the charge and diameters of particles of known composition, and monitoring of photoemission rates with the incident UV radiation. Experiments have been conducted on test particles of silica and polystyrene to determine the photoelectric yields and surface equilibrium potentials when exposed to UV radiation. A brief description of an experimental procedure for photoemission studies is given and some preliminary laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual dust particles are presented.

  6. Photoemission Experiments for Charge Characteristics of Individual Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Craven, Paul D.; West, E.; Pratico, Jared; Scheianu, D.; Tankosic, D.; Venturini, C. C.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission experiments with UV radiation have been performed to investigate the microphysics and charge characteristics of individual isolated dust grains of various compositions and sizes by using the electrodynamic balance facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Dust particles of 1 - 100 micrometer diameter are levitated in a vacuum chamber at pressures approx. 10(exp -5) torr and exposed to a collimated beam of UV radiation in the 120-300 nanometers spectral range from a deuterium lamp source with a MgF2 window. A monochromator is used to select the UV radiation wavelength with a spectral resolution of 8 nanometers. The electrodynamic facility permits measurements of the charge and diameters of particles of known composition, and monitoring of photoemission rates with the incident UV radiation. Experiments have been conducted on Al2O3 and silicate particles, and in particular on JSC-1 Mars regolith simulants, to determine the photoelectron yields and surface equilibrium potentials of dust particles when exposed to UV radiation in the 120-250 micrometers spectral range. A brief discussion of the experimental procedure, the results of photoemission experiments, and comparisons with theoretical models will be presented.

  7. Adaptive compensation of aberrations in ultrafast 3D microscopy using a deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Leah R.; Albert, O.; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Vdovin, Gleb V.; Mourou, Gerard A.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2000-05-01

    3D imaging using a multiphoton scanning confocal microscope is ultimately limited by aberrations of the system. We describe a system to adaptively compensate the aberrations with a deformable mirror. We have increased the transverse scanning range of the microscope by three with compensation of off-axis aberrations.We have also significantly increased the longitudinal scanning depth with compensation of spherical aberrations from the penetration into the sample. Our correction is based on a genetic algorithm that uses second harmonic or two-photon fluorescence signal excited by femtosecond pulses from the sample as the enhancement parameter. This allows us to globally optimize the wavefront without a wavefront measurement. To improve the speed of the optimization we use Zernike polynomials as the basis for correction. Corrections can be stored in a database for look-up with future samples.

  8. Ocular wavefront aberrations in patients with macular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bessho, Kenichiro; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe G.; Gomez, Laura; Cheng, Lingyun; Koh, Hyoung Jun; Freeman, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Background There have been reports that by compensating for the ocular aberrations using adaptive optical systems it may be possible to improve the resolution of clinical retinal imaging systems beyond what is now possible. In order to develop such system to observe eyes with retinal disease, understanding of the ocular wavefront aberrations in individuals with retinal disease is required. Methods 82 eyes of 66 patients with macular disease (epiretinal membrane, macular edema, macular hole etc.) and 85 eyes of 51 patients without retinal disease were studied. Using a ray-tracing wavefront device, each eye was scanned at both small and large pupil apertures and Zernike coefficients up to 6th order were acquired. Results In phakic eyes, 3rd order root mean square errors (RMS) in macular disease group were statistically greater than control, an average of 12% for 5mm and 31% for 3mm scan diameters (p<0.021). In pseudophakic eyes, there also was an elevation of 3rd order RMS, on average 57% for 5mm and 51% for 3mm scan diameters (p<0.031). Conclusion Higher order wavefront aberrations in eyes with macular disease were greater than in control eyes without disease. Our study suggests that such aberrations may result from irregular or multiple reflecting retinal surfaces. Modifications in wavefront sensor technology will be needed to accurately determine wavefront aberration and allow correction using adaptive optics in eyes with macular irregularities. PMID:19574950

  9. Optical aberrations induced by subclinical decentrations of the ablation pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrochen, Michael; Kaemmerer, Maik; Riedel, Peter; Mierdel, Peter; Krinke, Hans-Eberhard; Seiler, Theo

    2000-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to study the effect of currently used ablation profiles along with eccentric ablations on the increase of higher order aberrations observed after PRK. Material and Methods: The optical aberrations of 10 eyes were tested before and after PRK. Refractive surgery was performed using a ArF-excimer laser system. In all cases, the ablation zone was 6 mm or larger. The spherical equivalent of the correction was ranging from -2.5 D to -6.0 D. The measured wavefront error was compared to numerical simulations done with the reduced eye model and currently used ablation profiles as well as compared with experimental results obtained from ablation on PMMA balls. Results: The aberration measurements result in a considerable change of the spherical- and coma-like wavefront errors. This result was in good correlation with the numerical simulations and the experimental results. Furthermore, it has been derived that the major contribution on the induced higher order aberrations are a result of the small decentration (less than 1.0 mm) of the ablation zone. Conclusions: Higher order spherical- and coma-like aberrations after PRK are mainly determined by the decentration of the ablation zone during laser refractive surgery. However, future laser systems should use efficient eye-tracking systems and aspherical ablation profiles to overcome this problem.

  10. Eye aberration analysis with Zernike polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molebny, Vasyl V.; Chyzh, Igor H.; Sokurenko, Vyacheslav M.; Pallikaris, Ioannis G.; Naoumidis, Leonidas P.

    1998-06-01

    New horizons for accurate photorefractive sight correction, afforded by novel flying spot technologies, require adequate measurements of photorefractive properties of an eye. Proposed techniques of eye refraction mapping present results of measurements for finite number of points of eye aperture, requiring to approximate these data by 3D surface. A technique of wave front approximation with Zernike polynomials is described, using optimization of the number of polynomial coefficients. Criterion of optimization is the nearest proximity of the resulted continuous surface to the values calculated for given discrete points. Methodology includes statistical evaluation of minimal root mean square deviation (RMSD) of transverse aberrations, in particular, varying consecutively the values of maximal coefficient indices of Zernike polynomials, recalculating the coefficients, and computing the value of RMSD. Optimization is finished at minimal value of RMSD. Formulas are given for computing ametropia, size of the spot of light on retina, caused by spherical aberration, coma, and astigmatism. Results are illustrated by experimental data, that could be of interest for other applications, where detailed evaluation of eye parameters is needed.

  11. a Study on SODIUM(110) and Other Nearly Free Electron Metals Using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyo, In-Whan

    Electronic properties of the epitaxially grown Na(110) film have been studied using angle resolved ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation as the light source. Na provides an ideal ground to study the fundamental aspects of the electron-electron interactions in metals, because of its simple Fermi surface and small pseudopotential. The absolute band structure of Na(110) using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been mapped out using the extrema searching method. The advantage of this approach is that the usual assumption of the unoccupied state dispersion is not required. We have found that the dispersion of Na(1l0) is very close to the parabolic band with the effective mass 1.21 M_{rm e} at 90 K. Self-consistent calculations of the self-energy for the homogeneous electron gas have been performed using the Green's function technique within the framework of the GW approximation, in the hope of understanding the narrowing mechanism of the bandwidth observed for all the nearly-free-electron (NFE) metals. Good agreements between the experimental data and our calculated self-energy were obtained not only for our data on k-dependency from Na(l10), but also for the total bandwidth corrections for other NFE metals, only if dielectric functions beyond the random phase approximation were used. Our findings emphasize the importance of the screening by long wavelength plasmons. Off-normal spectra of angle resolved photoemission from Na(110) show strong asymmetry of the bulk peak intensity for the wide range of photon energies. Using a simple analysis, we show this asymmetry has an origin in the interference of the surface Umklapp electrons with the normal electrons. We have also performed the detailed experimental studies of the anomalous Fermi level structure observed in the forbidden gap region of Na. This was claimed by A. W. Overhauser as the evidence of the charge density wave in the alkali metal. The possibility of this hypothesis is

  12. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of hydrated electrons near a liquid water surface.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yo-ichi; Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Tomasello, Gaia; Horio, Takuya; Karashima, Shutaro; Mitríc, Roland; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2014-05-09

    We present time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of trapped electrons near liquid surfaces. Photoemission from the ground state of a hydrated electron at 260 nm is found to be isotropic, while anisotropic photoemission is observed for the excited states of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane and I- in aqueous solutions. Our results indicate that surface and subsurface species create hydrated electrons in the bulk side. No signature of a surface-bound electron has been observed.

  13. Color correction strategies in optical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfisterer, Richard N.; Vorndran, Shelby D.

    2014-12-01

    An overview of color correction strategies is presented. Starting with basic first-order aberration theory, we identify known color corrected solutions for doublets and triplets. Reviewing the modern approaches of Robb-Mercado, Rayces-Aguilar, and C. de Albuquerque et al, we find that they confirm the existence of glass combinations for doublets and triplets that yield color corrected solutions that we already know exist. Finally we explore the use of the y, ӯ diagram in conjunction with aberration theory to identify the solution space of glasses capable of leading to color corrected solutions in arbitrary optical systems.

  14. Higher-order aberrations of lenticular opacities.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Nisha; Ormonde, Susan E; Sherwin, Trevor; McGhee, Charles N J

    2004-08-01

    To measure and quantify higher-order aberrations induced by different types of lenticular opacities. Department of Ophthalmology, University of Auckland, and Department of Ophthalmology, Auckland Public Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. Patients with lenticular opacities were recruited from outpatient clinics of a major tertiary referral center for ophthalmology. Patients were included if they had clinically evident, mild to moderate lenticular opacity with no coexisting ocular pathology. Patients were examined using standard preoperative techniques with additional assessment by wavefront aberrometry (Zywave, Bausch & Lomb) and Scheimpflug photography (EAS-1000, Nidek). For comparison, 20 eyes of 10 subjects with no lenticular opacity (control group) were recruited and assessed in an identical manner. Thirty persons were recruited and 40 eyes assessed, 20 with lenticular opacities. Ten eyes had predominantly cortical opacification, and 10 had mainly nuclear opacification. In eyes with predominantly cortical opacification, the mean logMAR uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) was 0.5 +/- 0.2 (SD) (6/18 Snellen equivalent) and the mean logMAR best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), 0.2 +/- 0.2 (6/9). Analysis of aberrometry data for a 6.0 mm pupil in this group revealed an increase in coma of cosine phase (Z(3), P =.06) and tetrafoil of cosine phase (Z(4), P =.07) compared to eyes in the control group. Eyes with predominantly nuclear opacification had a mean logMAR UCVA of 0.7 +/- 0.2 (6/30) and a logMAR BSCVA of 0.4 +/- 0.2 (6/15). Aberrometry data for this cohort for a 6.0 mm pupil showed a statistically greater amount of spherical aberration (Z(4)(0), P =.001) and tetrafoil of cosine phase (Z(4), P =.005; Z(4)(-4), P =.004). This pilot study suggests that different types of early lenticular opacities induce different wavefront aberration profiles. Predominantly cortical opacification produced an increase in coma and nuclear opacification induced an increase in

  15. Comparative Photoemission Study of Actinide (Am, Pu, Np and U) Metals, Nitrides, and Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Gouder, Thomas; Seibert, Alice; Rebizant, Jean

    2007-07-01

    Core-level and valence-band spectra of Pu and the other early actinide compounds show remarkable systematics, which can be understood in the framework of final state screening. We compare the early actinide (U, Np, Pu and Am) metals, nitrides and hydrides and a few other specific compounds (PuSe, PuS, PuCx, PuSix) prepared as thin films by sputter deposition. In choosing these systems, we combine inherent 5f band narrowing, due to 5f orbital contraction throughout the actinide series, with variations of the chemical environment in the compounds. Goal of this work was to learn more on the electronic structure of the earlymore » actinide systems and to achieve the correct interpretation of their photoemission spectra. The highly correlated nature of the 5f states in systems, which are on the verge to localization, makes this a challenging task, because of the peculiar interplay between ground state DOS and final-state effects. Their influence can be estimated by doing systematic studies on systems with different (5f) bandwidths. We conclude on the basis of such systematic experiments that final-state effects due to strong e-e correlations in narrow 5f-band systems lead to multiplet like structures, analogous to those observed in the case of systems with localized electron states. Such observations in essentially band-like 5f-systems was first surprising, but the astonishing similarity of photoemission spectra of very different chemical systems (e.g. PuSe, Pu{sub 2}C{sub 3}..) points to a common origin, relating them to atomic features rather than material dependent density of states (DOS) features. (authors)« less

  16. Characterizing probe performance in the aberration corrected STEM.

    PubMed

    Batson, P E

    2006-01-01

    Sub-Angstrom imaging using the 120 kV IBM STEM is now routine if the probe optics is carefully controlled and fully characterized. However, multislice simulation using at least a frozen phonon approximation is required to understand the Annular Dark Field image contrast. Analysis of silicon dumbbell structures in the [110] and [211] projections illustrate this finding. Using fast image acquisition, atomic movement appears ubiquitous under the electron beam, and may be useful to illuminate atomic level processes.

  17. Non-iterative Aberration Correction of a Multiple Transmitter System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    corresponds to the object being moved closer, the third and fourth rows are again at best focus with astigmatism added by rotating a pair of cylindrical...rotation within a matched pair of cylindrical lenses. While the data collect for Fig. 7 was designed to isolate defocus (a) and astigmatism (b) there...was always some combination of both present, and the algorithm is always solving for both defocus and astigmatism . This is evident from the best

  18. Aberration corrected STEM to study an ancient hair dyeing formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarche, G.; Van Elslande, E.; Castaing, J.; Walter, P.

    2014-05-01

    Lead-based chemistry was initiated in ancient Egypt for cosmetic preparation more than 4000 years ago. Here, we study a hair-dyeing recipe using lead salts described in text since Greco-Roman times. We report direct evidence about the shape and distribution of PbS nanocrystals that form within the hair during blackening.

  19. The Art of Optical Aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylde, Clarissa Eileen Kenney

    Art and optics are inseparable. Though seemingly opposite disciplines, the combination of art and optics has significantly impacted both culture and science as they are now known. As history has run its course, in the sciences, arts, and their fruitful combinations, optical aberrations have proved to be a problematic hindrance to progress. In an effort to eradicate aberrations the simple beauty of these aberrational forms has been labeled as undesirable and discarded. Here, rather than approach aberrations as erroneous, these beautiful forms are elevated to be the photographic subject in a new body of work, On the Bright Side. Though many recording methods could be utilized, this work was composed on classic, medium-format, photographic film using white-light, Michelson interferometry. The resulting images are both a representation of the true light rays that interacted on the distorted mirror surfaces (data) and the artist's compositional eye for what parts of the interferogram are chosen and displayed. A detailed description of the captivating interdisciplinary procedure is documented and presented alongside the final artwork, CCD digital reference images, and deformable mirror contour maps. This alluring marriage between the arts and sciences opens up a heretofore minimally explored aspect of the inextricable art-optics connection. It additionally provides a fascinating new conversation on the importance of light and optics in photographic composition.

  20. Distortion of ultrashort pulses caused by aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Z. L.; Kovács, A. P.; Bor, Zs.

    The effect of the primary wave aberrations (spherical aberration, astigmatism and coma) on ultrashort pulses is studied by the Nijboer-Zernike theory. The results of the geometrical and the wave optical treatments are compared.

  1. Phase aberration simulation study of MRgFUS breast treatments

    PubMed Central

    Farrer, Alexis I.; Almquist, Scott; Dillon, Christopher R.; Neumayer, Leigh A.; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.; Payne, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This simulation study evaluates the effects of phase aberration in breast MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) ablation treatments performed with a phased-array transducer positioned laterally to the breast. A quantification of these effects in terms of thermal dose delivery and the potential benefits of phase correction is demonstrated in four heterogeneous breast numerical models. Methods: To evaluate the effects of varying breast tissue properties on the quality of the focus, four female volunteers with confirmed benign fibroadenomas were imaged using 3T MRI. These images were segmented into numerical models with six tissue types, with each tissue type assigned standard acoustic properties from the literature. Simulations for a single-plane 16-point raster-scan treatment trajectory centered in a fibroadenoma in each modeled breast were performed for a breast-specific MRgFUS system. At each of the 16 points, pressure patterns both with and without applying a phase correction technique were determined with the hybrid-angular spectrum method. Corrected phase patterns were obtained using a simulation-based phase aberration correction technique to adjust each element’s transmit phase to obtain maximized constructive interference at the desired focus. Thermal simulations were performed for both the corrected and uncorrected pressure patterns using a finite-difference implementation of the Pennes bioheat equation. The effect of phase correction was evaluated through comparison of thermal dose accumulation both within and outside a defined treatment volume. Treatment results using corrected and uncorrected phase aberration simulations were compared by evaluating the power required to achieve a 20 °C temperature rise at the first treatment location. The extent of the volumes that received a minimum thermal dose of 240 CEM at 43 °C inside the intended treatment volume as well as the volume in the remaining breast tissues was also evaluated in the form of

  2. The BHVI-EyeMapper: peripheral refraction and aberration profiles.

    PubMed

    Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Bakaraju, Ravi C; Holden, Brien A

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this article was to present the optical design of a new instrument (BHVI-EyeMapper, EM), which is dedicated to rapid peripheral wavefront measurements across the visual field for distance and near, and to compare the peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles obtained in myopic eyes with and without accommodation. Central and peripheral refractive errors (M, J180, and J45) and higher-order aberrations (C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0]) were measured in 26 myopic participants (mean [±SD] age, 20.9 [±2.0] years; mean [±SD] spherical equivalent, -3.00 [±0.90] diopters [D]) corrected for distance. Measurements were performed along the horizontal visual field with (-2.00 to -5.00 D) and without (+1.00 D fogging) accommodation. Changes as a function of accommodation were compared using tilt and curvature coefficients of peripheral refraction and aberration profiles. As accommodation increased, the relative peripheral refraction profiles of M and J180 became significantly (p < 0.05) more negative and the profile of M became significantly (p < 0.05) more asymmetric. No significant differences were found for the J45 profiles (p > 0.05). The peripheral aberration profiles of C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0] became significantly (p < 0.05) less asymmetric as accommodation increased, but no differences were found in the curvature. The current study showed that significant changes in peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles occurred during accommodation in myopic eyes. With its extended measurement capabilities, that is, permitting rapid peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration measurements up to visual field angles of ±50 degrees for distance and near (up to -5.00 D), the EM is a new advanced instrument that may provide additional insights in the ongoing quest to understand and monitor myopia development.

  3. On- and off-eye spherical aberration of soft contact lenses and consequent changes of effective lens power.

    PubMed

    Dietze, Holger H; Cox, Michael J

    2003-02-01

    Soft contact lenses produce a significant level of spherical aberration affecting their power on-eye. A simple model assuming that a thin soft contact lens aligns to the cornea predicts that these effects are similar on-eye and off-eye. The wavefront aberration for 17 eyes and 33 soft contact lenses on-eye was measured with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The Zernike coefficients describing the on-eye spherical aberration of the soft contact lens were compared with off-eye ray-tracing results. Paraxial and effective lens power changes were determined. The model predicts the on-eye spherical aberration of soft contact lenses closely. The resulting power change for a +/- 7.00 D spherical soft contact lens is +/- 0.5 D for a 6-mm pupil diameter and +/- 0.1 D for a 3-mm pupil diameter. Power change is negligible for soft contact lenses corrected for off-eye spherical aberration. For thin soft contact lenses, the level of spherical aberration and the consequent power change is similar on-eye and off-eye. Soft contact lenses corrected for spherical aberration in air will be expected to be aberration-free on-eye and produce only negligibly small power changes. For soft contact lenses without aberration correction, for higher levels of ametropia and large pupils, the soft contact lens power should be determined with trial lenses with their power and p value similar to the prescribed lens. The benefit of soft contact lenses corrected for spherical aberration depends on the level of ocular spherical aberration.

  4. Analysis of nodal aberration properties in off-axis freeform system design.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haodong; Jiang, Huilin; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Chao; Liu, Tao

    2016-08-20

    Freeform surfaces have the advantage of balancing off-axis aberration. In this paper, based on the framework of nodal aberration theory (NAT) applied to the coaxial system, the third-order astigmatism and coma wave aberration expressions of an off-axis system with Zernike polynomial surfaces are derived. The relationship between the off-axis and surface shape acting on the nodal distributions is revealed. The nodal aberration properties of the off-axis freeform system are analyzed and validated by using full-field displays (FFDs). It has been demonstrated that adding Zernike terms, up to nine, to the off-axis system modifies the nodal locations, but the field dependence of the third-order aberration does not change. On this basis, an off-axis two-mirror freeform system with 500 mm effective focal length (EFL) and 300 mm entrance pupil diameter (EPD) working in long-wave infrared is designed. The field constant aberrations induced by surface tilting are corrected by selecting specific Zernike terms. The design results show that the nodes of third-order astigmatism and coma move back into the field of view (FOV). The modulation transfer function (MTF) curves are above 0.4 at 20 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) which meets the infrared reconnaissance requirement. This work provides essential insight and guidance for aberration correction in off-axis freeform system design.

  5. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: Study on the design and Zernike aberrations of a segmented mirror telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhen-Yu; Li, Lin; Huang, Yi-Fan

    2009-07-01

    The segmented mirror telescope is widely used. The aberrations of segmented mirror systems are different from single mirror systems. This paper uses the Fourier optics theory to analyse the Zernike aberrations of segmented mirror systems. It concludes that the Zernike aberrations of segmented mirror systems obey the linearity theorem. The design of a segmented space telescope and segmented schemes are discussed, and its optical model is constructed. The computer simulation experiment is performed with this optical model to verify the suppositions. The experimental results confirm the correctness of the model.

  6. A model of distributed phase aberration for deblurring phase estimated from scattering.

    PubMed

    Tillett, Jason C; Astheimer, Jeffrey P; Waag, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    Correction of aberration in ultrasound imaging uses the response of a point reflector or its equivalent to characterize the aberration. Because a point reflector is usually unavailable, its equivalent is obtained using statistical methods, such as processing reflections from multiple focal regions in a random medium. However, the validity of methods that use reflections from multiple points is limited to isoplanatic patches for which the aberration is essentially the same. In this study, aberration is modeled by an offset phase screen to relax the isoplanatic restriction. Methods are developed to determine the depth and phase of the screen and to use the model for compensation of aberration as the beam is steered. Use of the model to enhance the performance of the noted statistical estimation procedure is also described. Experimental results obtained with tissue-mimicking phantoms that implement different models and produce different amounts of aberration are presented to show the efficacy of these methods. The improvement in b-scan resolution realized with the model is illustrated. The results show that the isoplanatic patch assumption for estimation of aberration can be relaxed and that propagation-path characteristics and aberration estimation are closely related.

  7. Correlations between corneal and total wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrochen, Michael; Jankov, Mirko; Bueeler, Michael; Seiler, Theo

    2002-06-01

    Purpose: Corneal topography data expressed as corneal aberrations are frequently used to report corneal laser surgery results. However, the optical image quality at the retina depends on all optical elements of the eye such as the human lens. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlations between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations and to discuss the importance of corneal aberrations for representing corneal laser surgery results. Methods: Thirty three eyes of 22 myopic subjects were measured with a corneal topography system and a Tschernig-type wavefront analyzer after the pupils were dilated to at least 6 mm in diameter. All measurements were centered with respect to the line of sight. Corneal and total wavefront aberrations were calculated up to the 6th Zernike order in the same reference plane. Results: Statistically significant correlations (p < 0.05) between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations were found for the astigmatism (C3,C5) and all 3rd Zernike order coefficients such as coma (C7,C8). No statistically significant correlations were found for all 4th to 6th order Zernike coefficients except for the 5th order horizontal coma C18 (p equals 0.003). On average, all Zernike coefficients for the corneal aberrations were found to be larger compared to Zernike coefficients for the total wavefront aberrations. Conclusions: Corneal aberrations are only of limited use for representing the optical quality of the human eye after corneal laser surgery. This is due to the lack of correlation between corneal and total wavefront aberrations in most of the higher order aberrations. Besides this, the data present in this study yield towards an aberration balancing between corneal aberrations and the optical elements within the eye that reduces the aberration from the cornea by a certain degree. Consequently, ideal customized ablations have to take both, corneal and total wavefront aberrations, into consideration.

  8. Electronic Structure of the Kitaev Material α-RuCl3 Probed by Photoemission and Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Sinn, Soobin; Kim, Choong Hyun; Kim, Beom Hyun; Lee, Kyung Dong; Won, Choong Jae; Oh, Ji Seop; Han, Moonsup; Chang, Young Jun; Hur, Namjung; Sato, Hitoshi; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Kim, Changyoung; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Noh, Tae Won

    2016-12-21

    Recently, α-RuCl 3 has attracted much attention as a possible material to realize the honeycomb Kitaev model of a quantum-spin-liquid state. Although the magnetic properties of α-RuCl 3 have been extensively studied, its electronic structure, which is strongly related to its Kitaev physics, is poorly understood. Here, the electronic structure of α-RuCl 3 was investigated by photoemission (PE) and inverse-photoemission (IPE) spectroscopies. The band gap was directly measured from the PE and IPE spectra and was found to be 1.9 eV, much larger than previously estimated values. Local density approximation (LDA) calculations showed that the on-site Coulomb interaction U could open the band gap without spin-orbit coupling (SOC). However, the SOC should also be incorporated to reproduce the proper gap size, indicating that the interplay between U and SOC plays an essential role. Several features of the PE and IPE spectra could not be explained by the results of LDA calculations. To explain such discrepancies, we performed configuration-interaction calculations for a RuCl 6 3- cluster. The experimental data and calculations demonstrated that the 4d compound α-RuCl 3 is a J eff  = 1/2 Mott insulator rather than a quasimolecular-orbital insulator. Our study also provides important physical parameters required for verifying the proposed Kitaev physics in α-RuCl 3 .

  9. Electronic Structure of the Kitaev Material α-RuCl3 Probed by Photoemission and Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinn, Soobin; Kim, Choong Hyun; Kim, Beom Hyun; Lee, Kyung Dong; Won, Choong Jae; Oh, Ji Seop; Han, Moonsup; Chang, Young Jun; Hur, Namjung; Sato, Hitoshi; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Kim, Changyoung; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Noh, Tae Won

    2016-12-01

    Recently, α-RuCl3 has attracted much attention as a possible material to realize the honeycomb Kitaev model of a quantum-spin-liquid state. Although the magnetic properties of α-RuCl3 have been extensively studied, its electronic structure, which is strongly related to its Kitaev physics, is poorly understood. Here, the electronic structure of α-RuCl3 was investigated by photoemission (PE) and inverse-photoemission (IPE) spectroscopies. The band gap was directly measured from the PE and IPE spectra and was found to be 1.9 eV, much larger than previously estimated values. Local density approximation (LDA) calculations showed that the on-site Coulomb interaction U could open the band gap without spin-orbit coupling (SOC). However, the SOC should also be incorporated to reproduce the proper gap size, indicating that the interplay between U and SOC plays an essential role. Several features of the PE and IPE spectra could not be explained by the results of LDA calculations. To explain such discrepancies, we performed configuration-interaction calculations for a RuCl63- cluster. The experimental data and calculations demonstrated that the 4d compound α-RuCl3 is a Jeff = 1/2 Mott insulator rather than a quasimolecular-orbital insulator. Our study also provides important physical parameters required for verifying the proposed Kitaev physics in α-RuCl3.

  10. Electronic Structure of the Kitaev Material α-RuCl3 Probed by Photoemission and Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Soobin; Kim, Choong Hyun; Kim, Beom Hyun; Lee, Kyung Dong; Won, Choong Jae; Oh, Ji Seop; Han, Moonsup; Chang, Young Jun; Hur, Namjung; Sato, Hitoshi; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Kim, Changyoung; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Noh, Tae Won

    2016-01-01

    Recently, α-RuCl3 has attracted much attention as a possible material to realize the honeycomb Kitaev model of a quantum-spin-liquid state. Although the magnetic properties of α-RuCl3 have been extensively studied, its electronic structure, which is strongly related to its Kitaev physics, is poorly understood. Here, the electronic structure of α-RuCl3 was investigated by photoemission (PE) and inverse-photoemission (IPE) spectroscopies. The band gap was directly measured from the PE and IPE spectra and was found to be 1.9 eV, much larger than previously estimated values. Local density approximation (LDA) calculations showed that the on-site Coulomb interaction U could open the band gap without spin-orbit coupling (SOC). However, the SOC should also be incorporated to reproduce the proper gap size, indicating that the interplay between U and SOC plays an essential role. Several features of the PE and IPE spectra could not be explained by the results of LDA calculations. To explain such discrepancies, we performed configuration-interaction calculations for a RuCl63− cluster. The experimental data and calculations demonstrated that the 4d compound α-RuCl3 is a Jeff = 1/2 Mott insulator rather than a quasimolecular-orbital insulator. Our study also provides important physical parameters required for verifying the proposed Kitaev physics in α-RuCl3. PMID:28000731

  11. Electronic structure of Mott-insulator CaCu3Ti4O12: Photoemission and inverse photoemission study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, H. J.; Iwataki, M.; Yamazaki, S.; Usui, T.; Adachi, S.; Tsunekawa, M.; Watanabe, T.; Takegahara, K.; Kimura, S.; Matsunami, M.; Sato, H.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.

    2015-09-01

    We have performed the photoemission and inverse photoemission experiments to elucidate the origin of Mott insulating states in A-site ordered perovskite CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO). Experimental results have revealed that Cu 3d-O 2p hybridized bands, which are located around the Fermi level in the prediction of the local-density approximation (LDA) band calculations, are actually separated into the upper Hubbard band at ~1.5 eV and the lower Hubbard band at ~-1.7 eV with a band gap of ~1.5-1.8 eV. We also observed that Cu 3d peak at ~-3.8 eV and Ti 3d peak at ~3.8 eV are further away from each other than as indicated in the LDA calculations. In addition, it is found that the multiplet structure around -9 eV includes a considerable number of O 2p states. These observations indicate that the Cu 3d and Ti 3d electrons hybridized with the O 2p states are strongly correlated, which originates in the Mott-insulating states of CCTO.

  12. Revisiting Photoemission and Inverse Photoemission Spectra of Nickel Oxide from First Principles: Implications for Solar Energy Conversion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We use two different ab initio quantum mechanics methods, complete active space self-consistent field theory applied to electrostatically embedded clusters and periodic many-body G0W0 calculations, to reanalyze the states formed in nickel(II) oxide upon electron addition and ionization. In agreement with interpretations of earlier measurements, we find that the valence and conduction band edges consist of oxygen and nickel states, respectively. However, contrary to conventional wisdom, we find that the oxygen states of the valence band edge are localized whereas the nickel states at the conduction band edge are delocalized. We argue that these characteristics may lead to low electron–hole recombination and relatively efficient electron transport, which, coupled with band gap engineering, could produce higher solar energy conversion efficiency compared to that of other transition-metal oxides. Both methods find a photoemission/inverse-photoemission gap of 3.6–3.9 eV, in good agreement with the experimental range, lending credence to our analysis of the electronic structure of NiO. PMID:24689856

  13. Ocular Chromatic Aberrations and Their Effects on Polychromatic Retinal Image Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao

    Previous studies of ocular chromatic aberrations have concentrated on chromatic difference of focus (CDF). Less is known about the chromatic difference of image position (CDP) in the peripheral retina and no experimental attempt has been made to measure the ocular chromatic difference of magnification (CDM). Consequently, theoretical modelling of human eyes is incomplete. The insufficient knowledge of ocular chromatic aberrations is partially responsible for two unsolved applied vision problems: (1) how to improve vision by correcting ocular chromatic aberration? (2) what is the impact of ocular chromatic aberration on the use of isoluminance gratings as a tool in spatial-color vision?. Using optical ray tracing methods, MTF analysis methods of image quality, and psychophysical methods, I have developed a more complete model of ocular chromatic aberrations and their effects on vision. The ocular CDM was determined psychophysically by measuring the tilt in the apparent frontal parallel plane (AFPP) induced by interocular difference in image wavelength. This experimental result was then used to verify a theoretical relationship between the ocular CDM, the ocular CDF and the entrance pupil of the eye. In the retinal image after correcting the ocular CDF with existing achromatizing methods, two forms of chromatic aberration (CDM and chromatic parallax) were examined. The CDM was predicted by theoretical ray tracing and measured with the same method used to determine ocular CDM. The chromatic parallax was predicted with a nodal ray model and measured with the two-color vernier alignment method. The influence of these two aberrations on polychromatic MTF were calculated. Using this improved model of ocular chromatic aberration, luminance artifacts in the images of isoluminance gratings were calculated. The predicted luminance artifacts were then compared with experimental data from previous investigators. The results show that: (1) A simple relationship exists between

  14. Simultaneous measurements of photoemission and morphology of various Al alloys during mechanical deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, M.; Li, W.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2006-11-01

    We report simultaneous measurements of strain and photoelectron emission from high purity Al (1350), Al-Mg (5052), Al-Mn (3003), Al-Cu (2024), and Al-Mg-Si (6061) alloys under uniaxial tension due to pulsed excimer laser radiation (248nm). The emission of low-energy photoelectrons is sensitive to deformation-induced changes in surface morphology, including the formation of slip lines and slip bands. Alloy composition and surface treatment significantly influence the photoemission during deformation. Surface oxide enhances the signal-to-noise level during photoemission measurement. In the early stage of deformation (strain ⩽0.04), photoemission intensity increases gradually in a nonlinear fashion. While subsequent photoemission increases almost linearly with strain until failure in samples with thin oxide layer (˜31Å), there are two linear segments of photoemission for the samples with oxide of 45Å. The onset of strain localization corresponds to the intersection point of two linear segments, usually at a strain of 0.08-0.20. A constitutive model incorporating microstructure evolution and work hardening during tensile deformation is proposed to qualitatively interpret the growth of the photoemission as a function of strain. Photoemissions from various alloys are interpreted in the light of surface treatment, work function, composition, and microstructural development during deformation.

  15. Aberrations for Grazing Incidence Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.

    2008-01-01

    Large number of grazing incidence telescope configurations have been designed and studied. Wolte1 telescopes are commonly used in astronomical applications. Wolter telescopes consist of a paraboloidal primary mirror and a hyperboloidal or an ellipsoidal secondary mirror. There are 8 possible combinations of Wolter telescopes. Out of these possible designs only type 1 and type 2 telescopes are widely used. Type 1 telescope is typically used for x-ray applications and type 2 telescopes are used for EUV applications. Wolter-Schwarzshild (WS) telescopes offer improved image quality over a small field of view. The WS designs are stigmatic and free of third order coma and, therefore, the PSF is significantly better over a small field of view. Typically the image is more symmetric about its centroid. As for the Wolter telescopes there are 8 possible combinations of WS telescopes. These designs have not been widely used because the surface equations are complex parametric equations complicating the analysis and typically the resolution requirements are too low to take full advantage of the WS designs. There are several other design options. Most notable are wide field x-ray telescope designs. Polynomial designs were originally suggested by Burrows4 and hyperboloid-hyperboloid designs for solar physics applications were designed by Harvey5. No general aberration theory exists for grazing incidence telescopes that would cover all the design options. Several authors have studied the aberrations of grazing incidence telescopes. A comprehensive theory of Wolter type 1 and 2 telescopes has been developed. Later this theory was expanded to include all possible combinations of grazing incidence and also normal incidence paraboloid-hyperboloid and paraboloid-ellipsoid telescopes. In this article the aberration theory of Wolter type telescopes is briefly reviewed.

  16. Aberrant Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Cai, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating

  17. Measuring chromatic aberrations in imaging systems using plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Sylvain D; Roschuk, Tyler R; Maier, Stefan A; Oulton, Rupert F

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a method to measure chromatic aberrations of microscope objectives with metallic nanoparticles using white light. Extinction spectra are recorded while scanning a single nanoparticle through a lens's focal plane. We show a direct correlation between the focal wavelength and the longitudinal chromatic focal shift through our analysis of the variations between the scanned extinction spectra at each scan position and the peak extinction over the entire scan. The method has been tested on achromat and apochromat objectives using aluminum disks varying in size from 260-520 nm. Our method is straightforward, robust, low cost, and broadband with a sensitivity suitable for assessing longitudinal chromatic aberrations in high-numerical-aperture apochromatic corrected lenses.

  18. Adaptive electron beam shaping using a photoemission gun and spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxson, Jared; Lee, Hyeri; Bartnik, Adam C.; Kiefer, Jacob; Bazarov, Ivan

    2015-02-01

    The need for precisely defined beam shapes in photoelectron sources has been well established. In this paper, we use a spatial light modulator and simple shaping algorithm to create arbitrary, detailed transverse laser shapes with high fidelity. We transmit this shaped laser to the photocathode of a high voltage dc gun. Using beam currents where space charge is negligible, and using an imaging solenoid and fluorescent viewscreen, we show that the resultant beam shape preserves these detailed features with similar fidelity. Next, instead of transmitting a shaped laser profile, we use an active feedback on the unshaped electron beam image to create equally accurate and detailed shapes. We demonstrate that this electron beam feedback has the added advantage of correcting for electron optical aberrations, yielding shapes without skew. The method may serve to provide precisely defined electron beams for low current target experiments, space-charge dominated beam commissioning, as well as for online adaptive correction of photocathode quantum efficiency degradation.

  19. Sources of the monochromatic aberrations induced in human eyes after laser refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jason

    Laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) procedures correct the eye's defocus and astigmatism but also introduce higher order monochromatic aberrations. Little is known about the origins of these induced aberrations. The advent of wavefront sensor technology has made it possible to measure accurately and quickly the aberrations of normal and postoperative LASIK eyes. The goal of this thesis was to exploit this technology to better understand some of the potential mechanisms by which aberrations could be introduced during LASIK. A first step towards investigating these sources was to characterize the aberration changes in post-LASIK eyes. Higher order rms wavefront error increased after conventional and customized LASIK surgery. On average, spherical aberration approximately doubled, and significant changes in vertical and horizontal coma were observed. We examined two sources of postoperative aberrations: the creation of a microkeratome flap and the subsequent laser ablation. Higher order rms increased slightly and there was a wide variation in the response of individual Zernike modes after cutting a flap. The majority of induced spherical aberration was due to the laser ablation and not the flap-cut. Aberrations are also induced by static and dynamic decentrations of the patient's pupil. We found that ablations were typically decentered in the superotemporal direction due to shifts in pupil center location between aberration measurement (dilated) and surgical (undilated) conditions in customized LASIK eyes. There was a weak correlation between the horizontal coma theoretically induced by this offset and that measured postoperatively. Finally, dynamic eye movements during the procedure induce higher order aberrations. We found that the most problematic decentrations during LASIK are relatively slow drifts in eye position. An eye-tracking system with a 2-Hz closed-loop bandwidth could compensate for most eye movements during LASIK. One solution for reducing the

  20. First-principles photoemission spectroscopy in DNA and RNA nucleobases from Koopmans-compliant functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Linh; Borghi, Giovanni; Ferretti, Andrea; Marzari, Nicola

    The determination of spectral properties of the DNA and RNA nucleobases from first principles can provide theoretical interpretation for experimental data, but requires complex electronic-structure formulations that fall outside the domain of applicability of common approaches such as density-functional theory. In this work, we show that Koopmans-compliant functionals, constructed to enforce piecewise linearity in energy functionals with respect to fractional occupation-i.e., with respect to charged excitations-can predict not only frontier ionization potentials and electron affinities of the nucleobases with accuracy comparable or superior with that of many-body perturbation theory and high-accuracy quantum chemistry methods, but also the molecular photoemission spectra are shown to be in excellent agreement with experimental ultraviolet photoemsision spectroscopy data. The results highlight the role of Koopmans-compliant functionals as accurate and inexpensive quasiparticle approximations to the spectral potential, which transform DFT into a novel dynamical formalism where electronic properties, and not only total energies, can be correctly accounted for.

  1. Photoemission from sodium on ice: a mechanism for positive and negative charge coexistence in the mesosphere.

    PubMed

    Vondrak, Tomas; Plane, John M C; Meech, Stephen R

    2006-03-09

    Photoemission from sodium deposited on ice films is described. Deposition of 0.02 ML of sodium is found to dramatically reduce the threshold for photoemission from the ice film to (2.3+/-0.2) eV. Thus, the cross-section for photoemission reaches >10(-18) cm2 in the visible region of the spectrum. It is proposed that the initial state is a solvated electron on the ice surface, which is supported by optical transmission spectroscopy. The potential significance of these results in understanding unexplained charging phenomena in the mesosphere is discussed.

  2. Widespread spin polarization effects in photoemission from topological insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Jozwiak, C.; Chen, Y. L.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2011-06-22

    High-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) was performed on the three-dimensional topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} using a recently developed high-efficiency spectrometer. The topological surface state's helical spin structure is observed, in agreement with theoretical prediction. Spin textures of both chiralities, at energies above and below the Dirac point, are observed, and the spin structure is found to persist at room temperature. The measurements reveal additional unexpected spin polarization effects, which also originate from the spin-orbit interaction, but are well differentiated from topological physics by contrasting momentum and photon energy and polarization dependencies. These observations demonstrate significant deviations ofmore » photoelectron and quasiparticle spin polarizations. Our findings illustrate the inherent complexity of spin-resolved ARPES and demonstrate key considerations for interpreting experimental results.« less

  3. Photoemission spectra and band structures of simple metals

    SciTech Connect

    Shung, K.W.; Mahan, G.D.

    1988-08-15

    We present a detailed calculation of the angle-resolved photoemission spectra of Na. The calculation follows a theory by Mahan, which allows for the inclusion of various bulk and surface effects. We find it important to take into account various broadening effects in order to explain the anomalous structure at E/sub F/, which was found by Jensen and Plummer in the spectra of Na. The broadening effects also help to resolve the discrepancy of the conduction-band width. Efforts are made to compare our results with new measurements of Plummer and Lyo. We discuss the ambiguity concerning the sign of the crystalmore » potential and comment on charge-density waves in the systems. We have also generalized our discussions to other simple metals like K.« less

  4. Delayed photo-emission model for beam optics codes

    DOE PAGES

    Jensen, Kevin L.; Petillo, John J.; Panagos, Dimitrios N.; ...

    2016-11-22

    Future advanced light sources and x-ray Free Electron Lasers require fast response from the photocathode to enable short electron pulse durations as well as pulse shaping, and so the ability to model delays in emission is needed for beam optics codes. The development of a time-dependent emission model accounting for delayed photoemission due to transport and scattering is given, and its inclusion in the Particle-in-Cell code MICHELLE results in changes to the pulse shape that are described. Furthermore, the model is applied to pulse elongation of a bunch traversing an rf injector, and to the smoothing of laser jitter onmore » a short pulse.« less

  5. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M; Vaz, C A F; Raabe, J; Nolting, F

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg(0.66)Nb(0.33))O3-PbTiO3 and La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  6. Plasmon satellites in valence-band photoemission spectroscopy. Ab initio study of the photon-energy dependence in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, M.; Kas, J. J.; Sottile, F.; Silly, M. G.; Sirotti, F.; Rehr, J. J.; Reining, L.

    2012-09-01

    We present experimental data and theoretical results for valence-band satellites in semiconductors, using the prototypical example of bulk silicon. In a previous publication we introduced a new approach that allows us to describe satellites in valence photoemission spectroscopy, in good agreement with experiment. Here we give more details; we show how the the spectra change with photon energy, and how the theory explains this behaviour. We also describe how we include several effects which are important to obtain a correct comparison between theory and experiment, such as secondary electrons and photon cross sections. In particular the inclusion of extrinsic losses and their dependence on the photon energy are key to the description of the energy dependence of spectra.

  7. Importance of semicore states in GW calculations for simulating accurately the photoemission spectra of metal phthalocyanine molecules.

    PubMed

    Umari, P; Fabris, S

    2012-05-07

    The quasi-particle energy levels of the Zn-Phthalocyanine (ZnPc) molecule calculated with the GW approximation are shown to depend sensitively on the explicit description of the metal-center semicore states. We find that the calculated GW energy levels are in good agreement with the measured experimental photoemission spectra only when explicitly including the Zn 3s and 3p semicore states in the valence. The main origin of this effect is traced back to the exchange term in the self-energy GW approximation. Based on this finding, we propose a simplified approach for correcting GW calculations of metal phthalocyanine molecules that avoids the time-consuming explicit treatment of the metal semicore states. Our method allows for speeding up the calculations without compromising the accuracy of the computed spectra.

  8. Measurement of specimen-induced aberrations of biological samples using phase stepping interferometry.

    PubMed

    Schwertner, M; Booth, M J; Neil, M A A; Wilson, T

    2004-01-01

    Confocal or multiphoton microscopes, which deliver optical sections and three-dimensional (3D) images of thick specimens, are widely used in biology. These techniques, however, are sensitive to aberrations that may originate from the refractive index structure of the specimen itself. The aberrations cause reduced signal intensity and the 3D resolution of the instrument is compromised. It has been suggested to correct for aberrations in confocal microscopes using adaptive optics. In order to define the design specifications for such adaptive optics systems, one has to know the amount of aberrations present for typical applications such as with biological samples. We have built a phase stepping interferometer microscope that directly measures the aberration of the wavefront. The modal content of the wavefront is extracted by employing Zernike mode decomposition. Results for typical biological specimens are presented. It was found for all samples investigated that higher order Zernike modes give only a small contribution to the overall aberration. Therefore, these higher order modes can be neglected in future adaptive optics sensing and correction schemes implemented into confocal or multiphoton microscopes, leading to more efficient designs.

  9. Automatic phase aberration compensation for digital holographic microscopy based on deep learning background detection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh; Bui, Vy; Lam, Van; Raub, Christopher B; Chang, Lin-Ching; Nehmetallah, George

    2017-06-26

    We propose a fully automatic technique to obtain aberration free quantitative phase imaging in digital holographic microscopy (DHM) based on deep learning. The traditional DHM solves the phase aberration compensation problem by manually detecting the background for quantitative measurement. This would be a drawback in real time implementation and for dynamic processes such as cell migration phenomena. A recent automatic aberration compensation approach using principle component analysis (PCA) in DHM avoids human intervention regardless of the cells' motion. However, it corrects spherical/elliptical aberration only and disregards the higher order aberrations. Traditional image segmentation techniques can be employed to spatially detect cell locations. Ideally, automatic image segmentation techniques make real time measurement possible. However, existing automatic unsupervised segmentation techniques have poor performance when applied to DHM phase images because of aberrations and speckle noise. In this paper, we propose a novel method that combines a supervised deep learning technique with convolutional neural network (CNN) and Zernike polynomial fitting (ZPF). The deep learning CNN is implemented to perform automatic background region detection that allows for ZPF to compute the self-conjugated phase to compensate for most aberrations.

  10. Digital adaptive optics confocal microscopy based on iterative retrieval of optical aberration from a guidestar hologram

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Thapa, Damber; Yao, Xincheng

    2017-01-01

    Guidestar hologram based digital adaptive optics (DAO) is one recently emerging active imaging modality. It records each complex distorted line field reflected or scattered from the sample by an off-axis digital hologram, measures the optical aberration from a separate off-axis digital guidestar hologram, and removes the optical aberration from the distorted line fields by numerical processing. In previously demonstrated DAO systems, the optical aberration was directly retrieved from the guidestar hologram by taking its Fourier transform and extracting the phase term. For the direct retrieval method (DRM), when the sample is not coincident with the guidestar focal plane, the accuracy of the optical aberration retrieved by DRM undergoes a fast decay, leading to quality deterioration of corrected images. To tackle this problem, we explore here an image metrics-based iterative method (MIM) to retrieve the optical aberration from the guidestar hologram. Using an aberrated objective lens and scattering samples, we demonstrate that MIM can improve the accuracy of the retrieved aberrations from both focused and defocused guidestar holograms, compared to DRM, to improve the robustness of the DAO. PMID:28380937

  11. Double-pass measurement of human eye aberrations: limitations and practical realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letfullin, Renat R.; Belyakov, Alexey I.; Cherezova, Tatyana Y.; Kudryashov, Alexis V.

    2004-11-01

    The problem of correct eye aberrations measurement is very important with the rising widespread of a surgical procedure for reducing refractive error in the eye, so called, LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis). The double-pass technique commonly used for measuring aberrations of a human eye involves some uncertainties. One of them is loosing the information about odd human eye aberrations. We report about investigations of the applicability limit of the double-pass measurements depending upon the aberrations status introduced by human eye and actual size of the entrance pupil. We evaluate the double-pass effects for various aberrations and different pupil diameters. It is shown that for small pupils the double-pass effects are negligible. The testing and alignment of aberrometer was performed using the schematic eye, developed in our lab. We also introduced a model of human eye based on bimorph flexible mirror. We perform calculations to demonstrate that our schematic eye is capable of reproducing spatial-temporal statistics of aberrations of living eye with normal vision or even myopic or hypermetropic or with high aberrations ones.

  12. Monochromatic ocular wave aberrations in young monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Kee, Chea-su; Hung, Li-Fang; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Roorda, Austin; Smith, Earl L.

    2006-01-01

    High-order monochromatic aberrations could potentially influence vision-dependent refractive development in a variety of ways. As a first step in understanding the effects of wave aberration on refractive development, we characterized the maturational changes that take place in the high-order aberrations of infant rhesus monkey eyes. Specifically, we compared the monochromatic wave aberrations of infant and adolescent animals and measured the longitudinal changes in the high-order aberrations of infant monkeys during the early period when emmetropization takes place. Our main findings were that (1) adolescent monkey eyes have excellent optical quality, exhibiting total RMS errors that were slightly better than those for adult human eyes that have the same numerical aperture and (2) shortly after birth, infant rhesus monkeys exhibited relatively larger magnitudes of high-order aberrations predominately spherical aberration, coma, and trefoil, which decreased rapidly to assume adolescent values by about 200 days of age. The results demonstrate that rhesus monkey eyes are a good model for studying the contribution of individual ocular components to the eye’s overall aberration structure, the mechanisms responsible for the improvements in optical quality that occur during early ocular development, and the effects of high-order aberrations on ocular growth and emmetropization. PMID:16750549

  13. Research of the aberrations of human eyes with accommodation based on eye model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Wei; Wang, Feng-lin; Wang, Zhao-qi

    2011-06-01

    The variation of the wavefront aberration with accommodation was investigated based on the eye model of Gullstrand-Le Grand. The anterior lens radius was optimized at different accommodation to focus the image at the retina, and the RMS and PV wave-front error of human eye were compared at different accommodation. The PV value of wavefront aberration from 0.718 waves increases gradually to 0.904 waves and RMS value from 0.21 waves to 0.26 waves when accommodative stimuli varies from 0 to - 5 diopters. The change of PV value is 0.186 waves which is less than the Rayleigh diffraction limit λ/4, and the change of RMS is 0.05 which under Marechal diffraction limit λ/14. Therefore, the change of the wavefront aberration caused accommodation can be ignored when wavefront aberrations in the human eye are corrected with surgery or wearing glasses.

  14. Surface studies of solids using integral X-ray-induced photoemission yield

    PubMed Central

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Shi, Bing

    2016-01-01

    X-ray induced photoemission yield contains structural information complementary to that provided by X-ray Fresnel reflectivity, which presents an advantage to a wide variety of surface studies if this information is made easily accessible. Photoemission in materials research is commonly acknowledged as a method with a probing depth limited by the escape depth of the photoelectrons. Here we show that the integral hard-X-ray-induced photoemission yield is modulated by the Fresnel reflectivity of a multilayer structure and carries structural information that extends well beyond the photoelectron escape depth. A simple electric self-detection of the integral photoemission yield and Fourier data analysis permit extraction of thicknesses of individual layers. The approach does not require detection of the reflected radiation and can be considered as a framework for non-invasive evaluation of buried layers with hard X-rays under grazing incidence. PMID:27874041

  15. Surface studies of solids using integral x-ray-induced photoemission yield

    DOE PAGES

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Shi, Bing

    2016-11-22

    X-ray induced photoemission yield contains structural information complementary to that provided by X-ray Fresnel reflectivity, which presents an advantage to a wide variety of surface studies if this information is made easily accessible. Photoemission in materials research is commonly acknowledged as a method with a probing depth limited by the escape depth of the photoelectrons. Here we show that the integral hard-X-ray-induced photoemission yield is modulated by the Fresnel reflectivity of a multilayer structure and carries structural information that extends well beyond the photoelectron escape depth. A simple electric self-detection of the integral photoemission yield and Fourier data analysis permitmore » extraction of thicknesses of individual layers. The approach does not require detection of the reflected radiation and can be considered as a framework for non-invasive evaluation of buried layers with hard X-rays under grazing incidence.« less

  16. Quantitative analysis of valence photoemission spectra and quasiparticle excitations at chromophore-semiconductor interfaces.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Christopher E; Giustino, Feliciano

    2012-09-14

    Investigating quasiparticle excitations of molecules on surfaces through photoemission spectroscopy forms a major part of nanotechnology research. Resolving spectral features at these interfaces requires a comprehensive theory of electron removal and addition processes in molecules and solids which captures the complex interplay of image charges, thermal effects, and configurational disorder. Here, we develop such a theory and calculate the quasiparticle energy-level alignment and the valence photoemission spectrum for the prototype biomimetic solar cell interface between anatase TiO(2) and the N3 chromophore. By directly matching our calculated photoemission spectrum to experimental data, we clarify the atomistic origin of the chromophore peak at low binding energy. This case study sets a new standard in the interpretation of photoemission spectroscopy at complex chromophore-semiconductor interfaces.

  17. Harmonic oscillator states in aberration optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    1993-01-01

    The states of the three-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator classify optical aberrations of axis-symmetric systems due to the isomorphism between the two mathematical structures. Cartesian quanta and angular momentum classifications have their corresponding aberration classifications. The operation of concatenation of optical elements introduces a new operation between harmonic oscillator states.

  18. Effect of monochromatic aberrations on photorefractive patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Melanie C. W.; Bobier, W. R.; Roorda, A.

    1995-08-01

    Photorefractive methods have become popular in the measurement of refractive and accommodative states of infants and children owing to their photographic nature and rapid speed of measurement. As in the case of any method that measures the refractive state of the human eye, monochromatic aberrations will reduce the accuracy of the measurement. Monochromatic aberrations cannot be as easily predicted or controlled as chromatic aberrations during the measurement, and accordingly they will introduce measurement errors. This study defines this error or uncertainty by extending the existing paraxial optical analyses of coaxial and eccentric photorefraction. This new optical analysis predicts that, for the amounts of spherical aberration (SA) reported for the human eye, there will be a significant degree of measurement uncertainty introduced for all photorefractive methods. The dioptric amount of this uncertainty may exceed the maximum amount of SA present in the eye. The calculated effects on photorefractive measurement of a real eye with a mixture of spherical aberration and coma are shown to be significant. The ability, developed here, to predict photorefractive patterns corresponding to different amounts and types of monochromatic aberration may in the future lead to an extension of photorefractive methods to the dual measurement of refractive states and aberrations of individual eyes. aberration, retinal image quality,

  19. Nodal aberration theory applied to freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerschbach, Kyle; Rolland, Jannick P.; Thompson, Kevin P.

    2014-12-01

    When new three-dimensional packages are developed for imaging optical systems, the rotational symmetry of the optical system is often broken, changing its imaging behavior and making the optical performance worse. A method to restore the performance is to use freeform optical surfaces that compensate directly the aberrations introduced from tilting and decentering the optical surfaces. In order to effectively optimize the shape of a freeform surface to restore optical functionality, it is helpful to understand the aberration effect the surface may induce. Using nodal aberration theory the aberration fields induced by a freeform surface in an optical system are explored. These theoretical predications are experimentally validated with the design and implementation of an aberration generating telescope.

  20. The BHVI-EyeMapper: Peripheral Refraction and Aberration Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Bakaraju, Ravi C.; Holden, Brien A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The aim of this article was to present the optical design of a new instrument (BHVI-EyeMapper, EM), which is dedicated to rapid peripheral wavefront measurements across the visual field for distance and near, and to compare the peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles obtained in myopic eyes with and without accommodation. Methods Central and peripheral refractive errors (M, J180, and J45) and higher-order aberrations (C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0]) were measured in 26 myopic participants (mean [±SD] age, 20.9 [±2.0] years; mean [±SD] spherical equivalent, −3.00 [±0.90] diopters [D]) corrected for distance. Measurements were performed along the horizontal visual field with (−2.00 to −5.00 D) and without (+1.00 D fogging) accommodation. Changes as a function of accommodation were compared using tilt and curvature coefficients of peripheral refraction and aberration profiles. Results As accommodation increased, the relative peripheral refraction profiles of M and J180 became significantly (p < 0.05) more negative and the profile of M became significantly (p < 0.05) more asymmetric. No significant differences were found for the J45 profiles (p > 0.05). The peripheral aberration profiles of C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0] became significantly (p < 0.05) less asymmetric as accommodation increased, but no differences were found in the curvature. Conclusions The current study showed that significant changes in peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles occurred during accommodation in myopic eyes. With its extended measurement capabilities, that is, permitting rapid peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration measurements up to visual field angles of ±50 degrees for distance and near (up to −5.00 D), the EM is a new advanced instrument that may provide additional insights in the ongoing quest to understand and monitor myopia development. PMID:25105690

  1. [Monochromatic aberration in accommodation. Dynamic wavefront analysis].

    PubMed

    Fritzsch, M; Dawczynski, J; Jurkutat, S; Vollandt, R; Strobel, J

    2011-06-01

    Monochromatic aberrations may influence the visual acuity of the eye. They are not stable and can be affected by different factors. The subject of the following paper is the dynamic investigation of the changes in wavefront aberration with accommodation. Dynamic measurement of higher and lower order aberrations was performed with a WASCA Wavefront Analyzer (Carl-Zeiss-Meditec) and a specially constructed target device for aligning objects in far and near distances on 25 subjects aged from 15 to 27 years old. Wavefront aberrations showed some significant changes in accommodation. In addition to the characteristic sphere reaction accompanying miosis and changes in horizontal prism (Z(1) (1)) in the sense of a convergence movement of the eyeball also occurred. Furthermore defocus rose (Z(2) (0)) and astigmatism (Z(2) (-2)) changed. In higher-order aberrations a decrease in coma-like Zernike polynomials (Z(3) (-1), Z(3) (1)) was found. The most obvious change appeared in spherical aberration (Z(4) (0)) which increased and changed from positive to negative. In addition the secondary astigmatism (Z(4) (-2)) and quadrafoil (Z(4) (4)) rise also increased. The total root mean square (RMS), as well as the higher-order aberrations (RMS-HO) significantly increased in accommodation which is associated with a theoretical reduction of visual acuity. An analysis of the influence of pupil size on aberrations showed significant increases in defocus, spherical aberration, quadrafoil, RMS and RMS HO by increasing pupil diameter. By accommodation-associated miosis, the growing aberrations are partially compensated by focusing on near objects. Temporal analysis of the accommodation process with dynamic wavefront analysis revealed significant delays in pupil response and changing of prism in relation to the sphere reaction. In accommodation to near objects a discrete time ahead of third order aberrations in relation to the sphere response was found. Using dynamic wavefront measurement

  2. Direct surface magnetometry with photoemission magnetic x-ray dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Goodman, K.W.; Schumann, F.O.

    1997-04-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of x-ray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the {open_quotes}sum rules.{close_quotes} Unfortunately, sum rule analysis are hampered by several limitations including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al. demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data ofmore » linear and circular dichroisms. Now the authors have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus, it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together, this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source.« less

  3. High resolution photoemission investigation: The oxidation of W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morar, J. F.; Himpsel, F. J.; Hughes, G. J.; Jordan, J. L.; McFeely, F. R.; Hollinge, G.

    High resolution photoemission measurements of surface oxide layers on tungsten has revealed a set of well resolved core level shifts characteristic of individual metal oxidation states. Measurement and analysis of this type of data can provide specific and quantitative chemical information about surface oxides. The formation of bonds between transition metals and strongly electronegative elements such as oxygen and fluorine results in charge transfer with the effect of shifting the metal core electron binding energies. The magnitude of such shifts depends primarily on two factors; the amount of charge transfer and the screening ability of the metals electrons. The size of core-level shifts tend to increase with additional charge transfer and be decreased by screening. In the case of tungsten the amount of screening should be a function of oxygen content since the oxygen ties up free electrons which are effective at screening. A continuous change in the tungsten core level shifts is observed with increasing oxygen content, i.e., as the screening changes from that characteristic of a metal screened to that characteristic of an insulator unscreened.

  4. Temperature-dependent internal photoemission probe for band parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Yan-Feng; Perera, A. G. Unil

    2012-11-01

    The temperature-dependent characteristic of band offsets at the heterojunction interface was studied by an internal photoemission (IPE) method. In contrast to the traditional Fowler method independent of the temperature (T), this method takes into account carrier thermalization and carrier/dopant-induced band-renormalization and band-tailing effects, and thus measures the band-offset parameter at different temperatures. Despite intensive studies in the past few decades, the T dependence of this key band parameter is still not well understood. Re-examining a p-type doped GaAs emitter/undoped AlxGa1-xAs barrier heterojunction system disclosed its previously ignored T dependency in the valence-band offset, with a variation up to ˜-10-4 eV/K in order to accommodate the difference in the T-dependent band gaps between GaAs and AlGaAs. Through determining the Fermi energy level (Ef), IPE is able to distinguish the impurity (IB) and valence bands (VB) of extrinsic semiconductors. One important example is to determine Ef of dilute magnetic semiconductors such as GaMnAs, and to understand whether it is in the IB or VB.

  5. Photoemission experiments of a large area scandate dispenser cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huang; Liu, Xing-guang; Chen, Yi; Chen, De-biao; Jiang, Xiao-guo; Yang, An-min; Xia, Lian-sheng; Zhang, Kai-zhi; Shi, Jin-shui; Zhang, Lin-wen

    2010-09-01

    A 100-mm-diameter scandate dispenser cathode was tested as a photocathode with a 10 ns Nd:YAG laser (266 nm) on an injector test stand for linear induction accelerators. This thermionic dispenser cathode worked at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 930 °C (below or near the thermionic emission threshold) while the vacuum was better than 4×10 -7 Torr. The laser pulse was synchronized with a 120 ns diode voltage pulse stably and they were in single pulse mode. Emission currents were measured by a Faraday cup. The maximum peak current collected at the anode was about 100 A. The maximum quantum efficiency measured at low laser power was 2.4×10 -4. Poisoning effect due to residual gas was obvious and uninterrupted heating was needed to keep cathode's emission capability. The cathode was exposed to air one time between experiments and recovered after being reconditioned. Photoemission uniformity of the cathode was also explored by changing the laser spot's position.

  6. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with quantum gas microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrdt, A.; Greif, D.; Demler, E.; Knap, M.; Grusdt, F.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum gas microscopes are a promising tool to study interacting quantum many-body systems and bridge the gap between theoretical models and real materials. So far, they were limited to measurements of instantaneous correlation functions of the form 〈O ̂(t ) 〉 , even though extensions to frequency-resolved response functions 〈O ̂(t ) O ̂(0 ) 〉 would provide important information about the elementary excitations in a many-body system. For example, single-particle spectral functions, which are usually measured using photoemission experiments in electron systems, contain direct information about fractionalization and the quasiparticle excitation spectrum. Here, we propose a measurement scheme to experimentally access the momentum and energy-resolved spectral function in a quantum gas microscope with currently available techniques. As an example for possible applications, we numerically calculate the spectrum of a single hole excitation in one-dimensional t -J models with isotropic and anisotropic antiferromagnetic couplings. A sharp asymmetry in the distribution of spectral weight appears when a hole is created in an isotropic Heisenberg spin chain. This effect slowly vanishes for anisotropic spin interactions and disappears completely in the case of pure Ising interactions. The asymmetry strongly depends on the total magnetization of the spin chain, which can be tuned in experiments with quantum gas microscopes. An intuitive picture for the observed behavior is provided by a slave-fermion mean-field theory. The key properties of the spectra are visible at currently accessible temperatures.

  7. Measurement of the background in Auger-Photoemission Spectra (APECS) associated with multi-electron and inelastic valence band photoemission processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Prasad; Shastry, Karthik; Hulbert, Steven; Weiss, Alex

    2014-03-01

    Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS), in which the Auger spectra is measured in coincidence with the core level photoelectron, is capable of pulling difficult to observe low energy Auger peaks out of a large background due mostly to inelastically scattered valence band photoelectrons. However the APECS method alone cannot eliminate the background due to valence band VB photoemission processes in which the initial photon energy is shared by 2 or more electrons and one of the electrons is in the energy range of the core level photoemission peak. Here we describe an experimental method for estimating the contributions from these background processes in the case of an Ag N23VV Auger spectra obtained in coincidence with the 4p photoemission peak. A beam of 180eV photons was incident on a Ag sample and a series of coincidence measurements were made with one cylindrical mirror analyzer (CMA) set at a fixed energies between the core and the valence band and the other CMA scanned over a range corresponding to electrons leaving the surface between 0eV and the 70eV. The spectra obtained were then used to obtain an estimate of the background in the APECS spectra due to multi-electron and inelastic VB photoemission processes. NSF, Welch Foundation.

  8. Refractive and Aberration Outcomes after Customized Photorefractive Keratectomy in Comparison with Customized Femtosecond Laser

    PubMed Central

    Sajjadi, Valleh; Ghoreishi, Mohammad; Jafarzadehpour, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    To compare the refractive and visual outcomes and higher order aberrations in patients with low to moderate myopia who underwent customized photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) or femtosecond laser in situ keratomileusis (Femto-LASIK) this research performed. This study includes data of 120 consecutive eyes of 60 patients with myopia between -3.00 D and -7.00 D with or without astigmatism in two surgery groups: PRK and Femto-LASIK. Refractive, visual, and aberration outcomes of the two methods of surgery were compared after 6 months of follow-up. After six months of follow-up, sphere and cylinder were found significantly decreased and there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The mean of uncorrected distance visual acuity in LogMar format for the PRK and Femto-LASIK groups was -0.03±0.07 and -0.01±0.08, respectively, which was not significantly different between the two groups. Higher orders and spherical aberrations increased in both groups significantly, while total aberrations decreased in both groups. After surgery, no differences were observed between the two groups in the amount of aberrations. In conclusion, Both PRK and Femto-LASIK are effective and safe in correcting myopia. In this study PRK induced more spherical and higher order aberrations than Femto-LASIK. PMID:27800501

  9. Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, U D; Adhikari, S

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve is most commonly due to its damage by trauma. A ten-month old child presented with the history of a fall from a four-storey building. She developed traumatic third nerve palsy and eventually the clinical features of aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. The adduction of the eye improved over time. She was advised for patching for the strabismic amblyopia as well. Traumatic third nerve palsy may result in aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. In younger patients, motility of the eye in different gazes may improve over time. © NEPjOPH.

  10. Comparison of monochromatic aberrations in young adults with different visual acuity and refractive errors.

    PubMed

    Yazar, Seyhan; Hewitt, Alex W; Forward, Hannah; McKnight, Charlotte M; Tan, Alex; Mountain, Jenny A; Mackey, David A

    2014-03-01

    To compare the monochromatic aberrations in a large cohort of 20-year-old Australians with differing levels of visual acuity and explore the relationship between these aberrations and refractive error. Lions Eye Institute, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Cross-sectional analysis of a population-based cohort. Monochromatic aberrations were measured using a Zywave II wavefront aberrometer with natural pupils in a dark room. The logMAR corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) was measured monocularly under normal illumination. Cycloplegic autorefraction was also performed. The study enrolled 2039 eyes of 1040 participants. Data from 1007 right eyes were analyzed. The median CDVA and spherical equivalent were -0.06 logMAR (interquartile range [IQR], -0.10 to 0.00) and +0.25 diopters (D) (IQR, -0.38 to 0.63), respectively. The median 6.0 mm higher-order aberration (HOA) was 0.58 μm (IQR, 0.44 to 0.79). Coma-like aberrations and 3rd-, 4th-, and 5th-order HOAs were significantly different between subjects with a CDVA of -0.10 logMAR or better and those with a CDVA worse than -0.10 logMAR. Fourth-order aberrations Z(4,-4) (P=.024) and Z(4,-2) (P=.029) and 2nd-order aberration Z(2,0) (P<.001) differed significantly between myopic eyes, emmetropic eyes, and hyperopic eyes. Subjects with higher myopia had slightly higher total HOAs. The HOAs in this population were marginally higher than previously reported values. The findings confirm there is a difference in monochromatic aberrations between different vision and refractive groups. Results in this study will benefit decision-making processes in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quality factor analysis for aberrated laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafary, B.; Alavynejad, M.; Kashani, F. D.

    2006-12-01

    The quality factor of laser beams has attracted considerable attention and some different approaches have been reported to treat the problem. In this paper we analyze quality factor of laser beam and compare the effect of different aberrations on beam quality by expanding pure phase term of wavefront in terms of Zernike polynomials. Also we analyze experimentally the change of beam quality for different Astigmatism aberrations, and compare theoretical results with experimentally results. The experimental and theoretical results are in good agreement.

  12. Corneal spherical aberration in Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sayyari, Tarfah M.; Fawzy, Samah M.; Al-Saleh, Ahmed A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To find out the mean corneal spherical aberration and its changes with age in Saudi population. Setting AlHokama Eye Specialist Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods Three hundred (300) eyes of 185 Saudi subjects (97 men and 88 women), whose age ranged from 15 to 85 years old, with matched refractive errors, were divided into three groups according to their age, 100 for each. All the subjects were included in measuring the spherical aberration (SA) using pentacam HR (OCULUS, Germany) at the 6-mm optical zone. Results The mean corneal spherical aberration (CSA) of the fourth order (Z40) of the whole groups was 0.252 ± 0.1154 μm. Patients from 15 to 35 years old have root mean square (RMS) of CSA of 0.2068 ± 0.07151 μm, 0.2370 ± 0.08023 μm was the RMS of CSA of the patients from 35 to 50 years old, while those from 50 to 85 years old have a CSA-RMS of 0.31511 ± 0.1503 μm (P < 0.0001). A positive correlation was found between the spherical aberration (Z40) and the progress of age (r = 0.3429, P < 0.0001). The high order aberration (HOA) presented 28.1% of the total corneal aberrations. While the fourth order corneal spherical aberration constituted 57% of the HOA and 16% of the total aberration. The pupil diameter shows a negative correlation with the increase in age (P = 0.0012). Conclusion Our results showed a CSA (Z40) that is varied among the population, comparable to other studies, and significantly correlates to the progress of age. PMID:25278799

  13. Accommodation to wavefront vergence and chromatic aberration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinan; Kruger, Philip B; Li, James S; Lin, Peter L; Stark, Lawrence R

    2011-05-01

    Longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) provides a cue to accommodation with small pupils. However, large pupils increase monochromatic aberrations, which may obscure chromatic blur. In this study, we examined the effect of pupil size and LCA on accommodation. Accommodation was recorded by infrared optometer while observers (nine normal trichromats) viewed a sinusoidally moving Maltese cross target in a Badal stimulus system. There were two illumination conditions: white (3000 K; 20 cd/m) and monochromatic (550 nm with 10 nm bandwidth; 20 cd/m) and two artificial pupil conditions (3 and 5.7 mm). Separately, static measurements of wavefront aberration were made with the eye accommodating to targets between 0 and 4 D (COAS, Wavefront Sciences). Large individual differences in accommodation to wavefront vergence and to LCA are a hallmark of accommodation. LCA continues to provide a signal at large pupil sizes despite higher levels of monochromatic aberrations. Monochromatic aberrations may defend against chromatic blur at high spatial frequencies, but accommodation responds best to optical vergence and to LCA at 3 c/deg where blur from higher order aberrations is less.

  14. Accommodation to Wavefront Vergence and Chromatic Aberration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinan; Kruger, Philip B.; Li, James S.; Lin, Peter L.; Stark, Lawrence R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) provides a cue to accommodation with small pupils. However, large pupils increase monochromatic aberrations, which may obscure chromatic blur. In the present study, we examined the effect of pupil size and LCA on accommodation. Methods Accommodation was recorded by infrared optometer while observers (nine normal trichromats) viewed a sinusoidally moving Maltese cross target in a Badal stimulus system. There were two illumination conditions: white (3000 K; 20 cd/m2) and monochromatic (550 nm with 10 nm bandwidth; 20 cd/m2) and two artificial pupil conditions (3 mm and 5.7 mm). Separately, static measurements of wavefront aberration were made with the eye accommodating to targets between 0 and 4 D (COAS, Wavefront Sciences). Results Large individual differences in accommodation to wavefront vergence and to LCA are a hallmark of accommodation. LCA continues to provide a signal at large pupil sizes despite higher levels of monochromatic aberrations. Conclusions Monochromatic aberrations may defend against chromatic blur at high spatial frequencies, but accommodation responds best to optical vergence and to LCA at 3 c/deg where blur from higher order aberrations is less. PMID:21317666

  15. Investigating the Effect of Nanoscale Changes on the Chemistry and Energetics of Nanocrystals with a Novel Photoemission Spectroscopy Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Michael W.

    This dissertation explores the effect of nanometer-scale changes in structure on the energetics of photocatalytic and photovoltaic materials. Of particular interest are semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), which have interesting chemical properties that lead to novel structures and applications. Chief among these properties are quantum confinement and the high surface area-to-volume ratio, which allow for chemical tuning of the energetics and structure of NCs. This tunable energetic landscape has led to increasing application of NCs in various areas of research, including solar energy conversion, light-emitting diode technologies, and photocatalysis. However, spectroscopic methods to determine the energetics of NCs have not been well developed, due to chemical complexities of relevant NCs such as polydispersity, capping ligand effects, core-shell structures, and other chemical modifications. In this work, we demonstrate and expand the utility of photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) to probe the energetics of NCs by considering the physical processes that lead to background and secondary photoemission to enhance photoemission from the sample of interest. A new methodology for the interpretation of UP spectra was devised in order to emphasize the minute changes to the UP spectra line shape that arise from nanoscopic changes to the NCs. We applied various established subtractions that correct for photon source satellites, secondary photoelectrons, and substrate photoemission. We then investigated the effect of ligand surface coverage on the surface chemistry and density of states at the top of valence band (VB). We systematically removed ligands by increasing numbers of purification steps for two diameters of NCs and found that doing so increased photoemission density at the top of the VB, which is due to undercoordinated surface atoms. Deeper VB structure was also altered, possibly due to reorganization of the atoms in the NC. Using the new UPS interpretation methodology

  16. New developments in laser-based photoemission spectroscopy and its scientific applications: a key issues review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xingjiang; He, Shaolong; Liu, Guodong; Zhao, Lin; Yu, Li; Zhang, Wentao

    2018-06-01

    The significant progress in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in last three decades has elevated it from a traditional band mapping tool to a precise probe of many-body interactions and dynamics of quasiparticles in complex quantum systems. The recent developments of deep ultraviolet (DUV, including ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet) laser-based ARPES have further pushed this technique to a new level. In this paper, we review some latest developments in DUV laser-based photoemission systems, including the super-high energy and momentum resolution ARPES, the spin-resolved ARPES, the time-of-flight ARPES, and the time-resolved ARPES. We also highlight some scientific applications in the study of electronic structure in unconventional superconductors and topological materials using these state-of-the-art DUV laser-based ARPES. Finally we provide our perspectives on the future directions in the development of laser-based photoemission systems.

  17. Integrated experimental setup for angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy of transuranic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Kevin S.; Joyce, John J.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-09-15

    We have developed the Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) system for transuranic materials. The ARPES transuranic system is an endstation upgrade to the Laser Plasma Light Source (LPLS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The LPLS is a tunable light source for photoemission with a photon energy range covering the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and soft x-ray regions (27–140 eV). The LPLS was designed and developed for transuranic materials. Transuranic photoemission is currently not permitted at the public synchrotrons worldwide in the VUV energy range due to sample encapsulation requirements. With the addition of the ARPES capability to the LPLS system theremore » is an excellent opportunity to explore new details centered on the electronic structure of actinide and transuranic materials.« less

  18. Transition from the adiabatic to the sudden limit in core-electron photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, Lars; Michiels, John; Inglesfield, John

    1998-12-01

    Experimental results for core-electron photoemission Jk(ω) are often compared with the one-electron spectral function Ac(ɛk-ω), where ω is the photon energy, ɛk is the photoelectron energy, and the optical transition matrix elements are taken as constant. Since Jk(ω) is nonzero only for ɛk>0, we must actually compare it with Ac(ɛk-ω)θ(ɛk). For metals Ac(ω) is known to have a quasiparticle (QP) peak with an asymmetric power-law [theories of Mahan, Nozières, de Dominicis, Langreth, and others (MND)] singularity due to low-energy particle-hole excitations. The QP peak starts at the core-electron energy ɛc, and is followed by an extended satellite (shakeup) structure at smaller ω. For photon energies ω just above threshold, ωth=-ɛc, Ac(ɛk-ω)θ(ɛk) as a function of ɛk (ω constant) is cut just behind the quasiparticle peak, and neither the tail of the MND line nor the plasmon satellites are present. The sudden (high-energy) limit is given by a convolution of Ac(ω) and a loss function, i.e., by the Berglund-Spicer two-step expression. Thus Ac(ω) alone does not give the correct photoelectron spectrum, neither at low nor at high energies. We present an extension of the quantum-mechanical (QM) models developed earlier by Inglesfield, and by Bardyszewski and Hedin to calculate Jk(ω). It includes recoil and damping, as well as shakeup effects and extrinsic losses, is exact in the high-energy limit, and allows calculations of Jk(ω) including the MND line and multiple plasmon losses. The model, which involves electrons coupled to quasibosons, is motivated by detailed arguments. As an illustration we have made quantitative calculations for a semi-infinite jellium with the density of aluminum metal and an embedded atom. The coupling functions (fluctuation potentials) between the electron and the quasibosons are related to the random-phase-approximation dielectric function, and different levels of approximations are evaluated numerically. The differences

  19. Surface intervalley scattering on GaAs(110) studied with picosecond laser photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haight, R.; Silberman, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-based photoemission sources provide the unique opportunity to study dynamic electronic processes at surfaces and interfaces. Using angle-resolved, laser photoemission with < 1 ps time resolution, we have directly observed a new surface band at the X¯ point in the GaAs(110) surface Brillouin zone. The appearance of electron population in this valley occurs only as a result of scattering from the directly photoexcited valley at overlineГ. The momentum resolution of our experiment has permitted us to isolate the dynamic electron population changes at both overlineГ and X¯ and to deduce the scattering time between the two valleys.

  20. Two-Color Coherent Control of Femtosecond Above-Threshold Photoemission from a Tungsten Nanotip.

    PubMed

    Förster, Michael; Paschen, Timo; Krüger, Michael; Lemell, Christoph; Wachter, Georg; Libisch, Florian; Madlener, Thomas; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2016-11-18

    We demonstrate coherent control of multiphoton and above-threshold photoemission from a single solid-state nanoemitter driven by a fundamental and a weak second harmonic laser pulse. Depending on the relative phase of the two pulses, electron emission is modulated with a contrast of the oscillating current signal of up to 94%. Electron spectra reveal that all observed photon orders are affected simultaneously and similarly. We confirm that photoemission takes place within 10 fs. Accompanying simulations indicate that the current modulation with its large contrast results from two interfering quantum pathways leading to electron emission.

  1. Application of the Lucy–Richardson Deconvolution Procedure to High Resolution Photoemission Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Rameau, J.; Yang, H.-B.; Johnson, P.D.

    2010-07-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission has developed into one of the leading probes of the electronic structure and associated dynamics of condensed matter systems. As with any experimental technique the ability to resolve features in the spectra is ultimately limited by the resolution of the instrumentation used in the measurement. Previously developed for sharpening astronomical images, the Lucy-Richardson deconvolution technique proves to be a useful tool for improving the photoemission spectra obtained in modern hemispherical electron spectrometers where the photoelectron spectrum is displayed as a 2D image in energy and momentum space.

  2. Global Coordinates and Exact Aberration Calculations Applied to Physical Optics Modeling of Complex Optical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G.; Barnard, C.; Viswanathan, V.

    1986-11-01

    Historically, wave optics computer codes have been paraxial in nature. Folded systems could be modeled by "unfolding" the optical system. Calculation of optical aberrations is, in general, left for the analyst to do with off-line codes. While such paraxial codes were adequate for the simpler systems being studied 10 years ago, current problems such as phased arrays, ring resonators, coupled resonators, and grazing incidence optics require a major advance in analytical capability. This paper describes extension of the physical optics codes GLAD and GLAD V to include a global coordinate system and exact ray aberration calculations. The global coordinate system allows components to be positioned and rotated arbitrarily. Exact aberrations are calculated for components in aligned or misaligned configurations by using ray tracing to compute optical path differences and diffraction propagation. Optical path lengths between components and beam rotations in complex mirror systems are calculated accurately so that coherent interactions in phased arrays and coupled devices may be treated correctly.

  3. Measuring aberrations in the rat brain by coherence-gated wavefront sensing using a Linnik interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinyu; Léger, Jean-François; Binding, Jonas; Boccara, A. Claude; Gigan, Sylvain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations limit the resolution, signal intensity and achievable imaging depth in microscopy. Coherence-gated wavefront sensing (CGWS) allows the fast measurement of aberrations in scattering samples and therefore the implementation of adaptive corrections. However, CGWS has been demonstrated so far only in weakly scattering samples. We designed a new CGWS scheme based on a Linnik interferometer and a SLED light source, which is able to compensate dispersion automatically and can be implemented on any microscope. In the highly scattering rat brain tissue, where multiply scattered photons falling within the temporal gate of the CGWS can no longer be neglected, we have measured known defocus and spherical aberrations up to a depth of 400 µm. PMID:23082292

  4. Measuring aberrations in the rat brain by coherence-gated wavefront sensing using a Linnik interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinyu; Léger, Jean-François; Binding, Jonas; Boccara, A Claude; Gigan, Sylvain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2012-10-01

    Aberrations limit the resolution, signal intensity and achievable imaging depth in microscopy. Coherence-gated wavefront sensing (CGWS) allows the fast measurement of aberrations in scattering samples and therefore the implementation of adaptive corrections. However, CGWS has been demonstrated so far only in weakly scattering samples. We designed a new CGWS scheme based on a Linnik interferometer and a SLED light source, which is able to compensate dispersion automatically and can be implemented on any microscope. In the highly scattering rat brain tissue, where multiply scattered photons falling within the temporal gate of the CGWS can no longer be neglected, we have measured known defocus and spherical aberrations up to a depth of 400 µm.

  5. Higher order aberrations and relative risk of symptoms after LASIK.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Munish; Wachler, Brian S Boxer; Chan, Colin C K

    2007-03-01

    To understand what level of higher order aberrations increases the relative risk of visual symptoms in patients after myopic LASIK. This study was a retrospective comparative analysis of 103 eyes of 62 patients divided in two groups, matched for age, gender, pupil size, and spherical equivalent refraction. The symptomatic group comprised 36 eyes of 24 patients after conventional LASIK with different laser systems evaluated in our referral clinic and the asymptomatic control group consisted of 67 eyes of 38 patients following LADARVision CustomCornea wavefront LASIK. Comparative analysis was performed for uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), contrast sensitivity, refractive cylinder, and higher order aberrations. Wavefront analysis was performed with the LADARWave aberrometer at 6.5-mm analysis for all eyes. Blurring of vision was the most common symptom (41.6%) followed by double image (19.4%), halo (16.7%), and fluctuation in vision (13.9%) in symptomatic patients. A statistically significant difference was noted in UCVA (P = .001), BSCVA (P = .001), contrast sensitivity (P < .001), and manifest cylinder (P = .001) in the two groups. The percentage difference between the symptomatic and control group mean root-mean-square (RMS) values ranged from 157% to 206% or 1.57 to 2.06 times greater. Patients with visual symptoms after LASIK have significantly lower visual acuity and contrast sensitivity and higher mean RMS values for higher order aberrations than patients without symptoms. Root-mean-square values of greater than two times the normal after-LASIK population for any given laser platform may increase the relative risk of symptoms.

  6. Adaptive electron beam shaping using a photoemission gun and spatial light modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Maxson, Jared; Lee, Hyeri; Bartnik, Adam C.

    The need for precisely defined beam shapes in photoelectron sources has been well established. In this paper, we use a spatial light modulator and simple shaping algorithm to create arbitrary, detailed transverse laser shapes with high fidelity. We transmit this shaped laser to the photocathode of a high voltage dc gun. Using beam currents where space charge is negligible, and using an imaging solenoid and fluorescent viewscreen, we show that the resultant beam shape preserves these detailed features with similar fidelity. Next, instead of transmitting a shaped laser profile, we use an active feedback on the unshaped electron beam imagemore » to create equally accurate and detailed shapes. We demonstrate that this electron beam feedback has the added advantage of correcting for electron optical aberrations, yielding shapes without skew. The method may serve to provide precisely defined electron beams for low current target experiments, space-charge dominated beam commissioning, as well as for online adaptive correction of photocathode quantum efficiency degradation.« less

  7. Adaptive electron beam shaping using a photoemission gun and spatial light modulator

    DOE PAGES

    Maxson, Jared; Lee, Hyeri; Bartnik, Adam C.; ...

    2015-02-01

    The need for precisely defined beam shapes in photoelectron sources has been well established. In this paper, we use a spatial light modulator and simple shaping algorithm to create arbitrary, detailed transverse laser shapes with high fidelity. We transmit this shaped laser to the photocathode of a high voltage dc gun. Using beam currents where space charge is negligible, and using an imaging solenoid and fluorescent viewscreen, we show that the resultant beam shape preserves these detailed features with similar fidelity. Next, instead of transmitting a shaped laser profile, we use an active feedback on the unshaped electron beam imagemore » to create equally accurate and detailed shapes. We demonstrate that this electron beam feedback has the added advantage of correcting for electron optical aberrations, yielding shapes without skew. The method may serve to provide precisely defined electron beams for low current target experiments, space-charge dominated beam commissioning, as well as for online adaptive correction of photocathode quantum efficiency degradation.« less

  8. Linear phase conjugation for atmospheric aberration compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Stappaerts, Eddy A.

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric induced aberrations can seriously degrade laser performance, greatly affecting the beam that finally reaches the target. Lasers propagated over any distance in the atmosphere suffer from a significant decrease in fluence at the target due to these aberrations. This is especially so for propagation over long distances. It is due primarily to fluctuations in the atmosphere over the propagation path, and from platform motion relative to the intended aimpoint. Also, delivery of high fluence to the target typically requires low beam divergence, thus, atmospheric turbulence, platform motion, or both results in a lack of fine aimpoint control to keep the beam directed at the target. To improve both the beam quality and amount of laser energy delivered to the target, Northrop Grumman has developed the Active Tracking System (ATS); a novel linear phase conjugation aberration compensation technique. Utilizing a silicon spatial light modulator (SLM) as a dynamic wavefront reversing element, ATS undoes aberrations induced by the atmosphere, platform motion or both. ATS continually tracks the target as well as compensates for atmospheric and platform motion induced aberrations. This results in a high fidelity, near-diffraction limited beam delivered to the target.

  9. Estimate of the Coulomb correlation energy in CeAg2Ge2 from inverse photoemission and high resolution photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Soma; Arya, A.; Bendounan, Azzedine; Maniraj, M.; Thamizhavel, A.; Vobornik, I.; Dhar, S. K.; Deb, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    The occupied and the unoccupied electronic structure of CeAg2Ge2 single crystal has been studied using high resolution photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopy, respectively. High resolution photoemission reveals the clear signature of Ce 4f states in the occupied electronic structure which was not observed clearly in our earlier studies. The Coulomb correlation energy in this system has been determined experimentally from the position of the 4f states above and below the Fermi level. Theoretically, the correlation energy has been determined by using the first principles density functional calculations within the generalized gradient approximations taking into account the strong intra-atomic (on-site) interaction Hubbard Ueff term. The calculated valence band shows minor changes in the spectral shape with increasing Ueff due to the fact that the density of Ce 4f state is narrow in the occupied part and is hybridized with the Ce 5d, Ag 4d and Ge 4p states. On the other hand, substantial changes are observed in the spectral shape of the calculated conduction band with increasing Ueff since the density of Ce 4f state is very large in the unoccupied part, compared to other states. The estimated value of correlation energy for CeAg2Ge2 from the experiment and the theory is ≈ 4.2 eV. The resonant photoemission data are analyzed in the framework of the single-impurity Anderson model which further confirms the presence of the Coulomb correlation energy and small hybridization in this system.

  10. Recurrent branchial sinus tract with aberrant extension.

    PubMed

    Barret, J P

    2004-01-01

    Second branchial cysts are the commonest lesions among congenital lateral neck anomalies. Good knowledge of anatomy and embryology are necessary for proper treatment. Surgical treatment involves resection of all branchial remnants, which extend laterally in the neck, medial to the sternocleidomastoid muscle with cranial extension to the pharynx and ipsilateral tonsillar fosa. However, infections and previous surgery can distort anatomy, making the approach to branchial anomalies more difficult. We present a case of a 17-year-old patient who presented with a second branchial tract anomaly with an aberrant extension to the midline and part of the contralateral neck. Previous surgical interventions and chronic infections may have been the primary cause for this aberrant tract. All head and neck surgeons should bear in mind that aberrant presentations may exist when reoperating on chronic branchial cysts fistulas.

  11. Adapting to blur produced by ocular high-order aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Sawides, Lucie; de Gracia, Pablo; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Webster, Michael; Marcos, Susana

    2011-01-01

    The perceived focus of an image can be strongly biased by prior adaptation to a blurred or sharpened image. We examined whether these adaptation effects can occur for the natural patterns of retinal image blur produced by high-order aberrations (HOAs) in the optics of the eye. Focus judgments were measured for 4 subjects to estimate in a forced choice procedure (sharp/blurred) their neutral point after adaptation to different levels of blur produced by scaled increases or decreases in their HOAs. The optical blur was simulated by convolution of the PSFs from the 4 different HOA patterns, with Zernike coefficients (excluding tilt, defocus, and astigmatism) multiplied by a factor between 0 (diffraction limited) and 2 (double amount of natural blur). Observers viewed the images through an Adaptive Optics system that corrected their aberrations and made settings under neutral adaptation to a gray field or after adapting to 5 different blur levels. All subjects adapted to changes in the level of blur imposed by HOA regardless of which observer’s HOA was used to generate the stimuli, with the perceived neutral point proportional to the amount of blur in the adapting image. PMID:21712375

  12. Adapting to blur produced by ocular high-order aberrations.

    PubMed

    Sawides, Lucie; de Gracia, Pablo; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Webster, Michael; Marcos, Susana

    2011-06-28

    The perceived focus of an image can be strongly biased by prior adaptation to a blurred or sharpened image. We examined whether these adaptation effects can occur for the natural patterns of retinal image blur produced by high-order aberrations (HOAs) in the optics of the eye. Focus judgments were measured for 4 subjects to estimate in a forced choice procedure (sharp/blurred) their neutral point after adaptation to different levels of blur produced by scaled increases or decreases in their HOAs. The optical blur was simulated by convolution of the PSFs from the 4 different HOA patterns, with Zernike coefficients (excluding tilt, defocus, and astigmatism) multiplied by a factor between 0 (diffraction limited) and 2 (double amount of natural blur). Observers viewed the images through an Adaptive Optics system that corrected their aberrations and made settings under neutral adaptation to a gray field or after adapting to 5 different blur levels. All subjects adapted to changes in the level of blur imposed by HOA regardless of which observer's HOA was used to generate the stimuli, with the perceived neutral point proportional to the amount of blur in the adapting image.

  13. Two-photon photoemission from a copper cathode in an Χ-band photoinjector

    DOE PAGES

    Li, H.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Adolphsen, C.; ...

    2016-02-24

    This study presents two-photon photoemission from a copper cathode in an X-band photoinjector. We experimentally verified that the electron bunch charge from photoemission out of a copper cathode scales with laser intensity (I) square for 400 nm wavelength photons. We compare this two-photon photoemission process with the single photon process at 266 nm. Despite the high reflectivity (R) of the copper surface for 400 nm photons (R=0.48) and higher thermal energy of photoelectrons (two-photon at 200 nm) compared to 266 nm photoelectrons, the quantum efficiency of the two-photon photoemission process (400 nm) exceeds the single-photon process (266 nm) when themore » incident laser intensity is above 300 GW/cm 2. At the same laser pulse energy (E) and other experimental conditions, emitted charge scales inversely with the laser pulse duration. A thermal emittance of 2.7 mm-mrad per mm root mean square (rms) was measured on our cathode which exceeds by sixty percent larger compared to the theoretical predictions, but this discrepancy is similar to previous experimental thermal emittance on copper cathodes with 266 nm photons. The damage of the cathode surface of our first-generation X-band gun from both rf breakdowns and laser impacts mostly explains this result. Using a 400 nm laser can substantially simplify the photoinjector system, and make it an alternative solution for compact pulsed electron sources.« less

  14. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  15. Photoemission intensity oscillations from quantum-well states in the Ag/V(100) overlayer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milun, M.; Pervan, P.; Gumhalter, B.; Woodruff, D. P.

    1999-02-01

    Extensive measurements have been made of the photoemission intensities recorded along the surface normal from quantum-well (QW) states of pseudomorphic Ag layers on V(100) in thicknesses from 1-7 ML as a function of photon energy in the range 15-45 eV. In all cases the QW states lead to intense peaks in the photoemission spectra which show strong oscillations in intensity with photon energy, the energy period of the oscillations becoming shorter as the films become thicker. These effects are explained in terms of interference of surface and interfaces photoemission from the sharp changes in potential at the well boundaries, and a semiquantitative description is achieved via calculations based on a simple asymmetric square-well description in the Adawi formulation of surface photoemission. An alternative picture in which intensity peaks are predicted to correspond to the conditions for direct transitions from bulk states of the overlayer material at the same initial-state energy is shown to be in direct contradiction with some of our observations. The reason for this failure, and the relationship of alternative views of the physical processes, are discussed.

  16. Attosecond-controlled photoemission from metal nanowire tips in the few-electron regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, B.; Schötz, J.; Kang, M.; Okell, W. A.; Mitra, S.; Förg, B.; Zherebtsov, S.; Süßmann, F.; Burger, C.; Kübel, M.; Liu, C.; Wirth, A.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Yanagisawa, H.; Kim, D.; Kim, B.; Kling, M. F.

    2017-03-01

    Metal nanotip photoemitters have proven to be versatile in fundamental nanoplasmonics research and applications, including, e.g., the generation of ultrafast electron pulses, the adiabatic focusing of plasmons, and as light-triggered electron sources for microscopy. Here, we report the generation of high energy photoelectrons (up to 160 eV) in photoemission from single-crystalline nanowire tips in few-cycle, 750-nm laser fields at peak intensities of (2-7.3) × 1012 W/cm2. Recording the carrier-envelope phase (CEP)-dependent photoemission from the nanowire tips allows us to identify rescattering contributions and also permits us to determine the high-energy cutoff of the electron spectra as a function of laser intensity. So far these types of experiments from metal nanotips have been limited to an emission regime with less than one electron per pulse. We detect up to 13 e/shot and given the limited detection efficiency, we expect up to a few ten times more electrons being emitted from the nanowire. Within the investigated intensity range, we find linear scaling of cutoff energies. The nonlinear scaling of electron count rates is consistent with tunneling photoemission occurring in the absence of significant charge interaction. The high electron energy gain is attributed to field-induced rescattering in the enhanced nanolocalized fields at the wires apex, where a strong CEP-modulation is indicative of the attosecond control of photoemission.

  17. Computational Exploration of the Surface Properties of Cs2Te5 Photoemissive Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, Anthony; Nemeth, Karoly; Harkay, Katherine; Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    Cs2Te is a broadly used photoemissive material due to its exceptionally high quantum efficiency (~ 20%). Our group has recently predicted that the acetylation of this material (Cs2TeC2) would lower its workfunction down to about 2.4 eV from ~ 3 eV, and preserve its high quantum efficiency. Such a modification is advantageous because visible light can be used in the operation of such a photoemissive device instead of ultraviolet light. To explore other variants of Cs2Te, we conducted DFT-based computational analysis of the photoemissive properties of Cs2Te5 which is a known phase of Cs and Te. Cs2Te5 attracted our attention for its rod-like 1D Te substructures embedded in a Cs matrix. This structure is similar to Cs2TeC2 as Cs2TeC2 contains TeC2 polymeric rods in a Cs matrix. In addition to that, exploration of various Cesium Telluride phases is necessary to better understand the working of Cs2Te photocathodes. We have calculated surface energies, workfunctions, and optical absorption spectra of several different surfaces of Cs2Te5. A comparison of the properties of various Cs2Te5 surfaces and their utilization in photoemissive devices will be presented.

  18. Anti-forensics of chromatic aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Owen; Stamm, Matthew C.

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, a number of information forensic techniques have been developed to identify digital image manipulation and falsification. Recent research has shown, however, that an intelligent forger can use anti-forensic countermeasures to disguise their forgeries. In this paper, an anti-forensic technique is proposed to falsify the lateral chromatic aberration present in a digital image. Lateral chromatic aberration corresponds to the relative contraction or expansion between an image's color channels that occurs due to a lens's inability to focus all wavelengths of light on the same point. Previous work has used localized inconsistencies in an image's chromatic aberration to expose cut-and-paste image forgeries. The anti-forensic technique presented in this paper operates by estimating the expected lateral chromatic aberration at an image location, then removing deviations from this estimate caused by tampering or falsification. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate that our anti-forensic technique can be used to effectively disguise evidence of an image forgery.

  19. Human cytomegalovirus UL76 induces chromosome aberrations

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is known to induce chromosome aberrations in infected cells, which can lead to congenital abnormalities in infected fetuses. HCMV UL76 belongs to a conserved protein family from herpesviruses. Some reported roles among UL76 family members include involvement in virulence determination, lytic replication, reactivation of latent virus, modulation of gene expression, induction of apoptosis, and perturbation of cell cycle progression, as well as potential nuclease activity. Previously, we have shown that stable expression of UL76 inhibits HCMV replication in glioblastoma cells. Methods To examine chromosomal integrity and the DNA damage signal γ-H2AX in cells constitutively expressing UL76, immunofluorescent cell staining and Western blotting were performed. The comet assay was employed to assess DNA breaks in cells transiently expressing UL76. Results We report that stably transfected cells expressing UL76 developed chromosome aberrations including micronuclei and misaligned chromosomes, lagging and bridging. In mitotic cells expressing UL76, aberrant spindles were increased compared to control cells. However, cells with supernumerary centrosomes were marginally increased in UL76-expressing cells relative to control cells. We further demonstrated that UL76-expressing cells activated the DNA damage signal γ-H2AX and caused foci formation in nuclei. In addition, the number of cells with DNA breaks increased in proportion to UL76 protein levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the virus-associated protein UL76 induces DNA damage and the accumulation of chromosome aberrations. PMID:19930723

  20. Effect of age, decentration, aberrations and pupil size on subjective image quality with concentric bifocal optics.

    PubMed

    Rio, David; Woog, Kelly; Legras, Richard

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the impact of lens centration, wearer aberrations, pupil size and age on the optics of two bifocal contact lenses using image simulation. Fourteen conditions (i.e. two optical profiles with two and eight concentric zones; two conditions of centration: centred and 0.77 mm decentred; and three conditions of aberrations: 0, 0.15 and 0.35 μm RMS; three pupil sizes: 3, 4.5 and 6 mm) were tested on two populations (i.e. 20-40 and 40-60 years old) using a numerical simulation method. For each condition, images were calculated for proximities ranging from -4D to + 2D with steps of 0.25D. Subjects graded the quality of each simulated image (i.e. a target 'HEV' of 0.4 logMAR) on a continuous scale from 0 to 5. To limit the effect of the observer's own aberrations, subjects viewed the displayed images through a 3-mm pupil and their optimal correction. Both populations reported similar image quality (i.e. average absolute difference of 0.23) except for sharp and low contrast images, which obtained slightly higher grades with younger subjects, probably due to a better contrast sensitivity in this population. Typical decentration had no effect on bifocal contact lenses wearers' vision, as the ratio between areas dedicated to near and distance vision did not change. Aberrations (i.e. mainly 0.24 μm of spherical aberration on a 4.5-mm pupil) reduced the addition of the two radial zones bifocal optics and introduced a hyperopic shift (i.e. 0.50D) of the through-focus image quality for the eight radial zone bifocal lens. The combination of typical aberrations with typical decentration created the same effect as typical aberrations alone, meaning that aberration impact was stronger than decentration impact. The two radial zone bifocal lens was dependent on the pupil whereas the eight radial zone lens was not. When fitting new bifocal optics, the aberrations of the patients, as well as their pupil diameter, are the main subject dependent parameters influencing

  1. Performance evaluation of spatial compounding in the presence of aberration and adaptive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Jeremy J.; Guenther, Drake; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2003-05-01

    Spatial compounding has been used for years to reduce speckle in ultrasonic images and to resolve anatomical features hidden behind the grainy appearance of speckle. Adaptive imaging restores image contrast and resolution by compensating for beamforming errors caused by tissue-induced phase errors. Spatial compounding represents a form of incoherent imaging, whereas adaptive imaging attempts to maintain a coherent, diffraction-limited aperture in the presence of aberration. Using a Siemens Antares scanner, we acquired single channel RF data on a commercially available 1-D probe. Individual channel RF data was acquired on a cyst phantom in the presence of a near field electronic phase screen. Simulated data was also acquired for both a 1-D and a custom built 8x96, 1.75-D probe (Tetrad Corp.). The data was compounded using a receive spatial compounding algorithm; a widely used algorithm because it takes advantage of parallel beamforming to avoid reductions in frame rate. Phase correction was also performed by using a least mean squares algorithm to estimate the arrival time errors. We present simulation and experimental data comparing the performance of spatial compounding to phase correction in contrast and resolution tasks. We evaluate spatial compounding and phase correction, and combinations of the two methods, under varying aperture sizes, aperture overlaps, and aberrator strength to examine the optimum configuration and conditions in which spatial compounding will provide a similar or better result than adaptive imaging. We find that, in general, phase correction is hindered at high aberration strengths and spatial frequencies, whereas spatial compounding is helped by these aberrators.

  2. Chromatic aberration compensation in numerical reconstruction of digital holograms by Fresnel-Bluestein propagation.

    PubMed

    Hincapie, Diego; Velasquez, Daniel; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2017-12-15

    In this Letter, we present a method for chromatic compensation in numerical reconstruction of digitally recorded holograms based on Fresnel-Bluestein propagation. The proposed technique is applied to correct the chromatic aberration that arises in the reconstruction of RGB holograms of both millimeter- and micrometer-sized objects. The results show the feasibility of this strategy to remove the wavelength dependence of the size of the numerically propagated wavefields.

  3. Theoretical investigation of aberrations upon ametropic human eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Bo; Chen, Ying-Ling; Lewis, J. W. L.; Baker, Kevin

    2003-11-01

    The human eye aberrations are important for visual acuity and ophthalmic diagnostics and surgical procedures. Reported monochromatic aberration data of the normal 20/20 human eyes are scarce. There exist even fewer reports of the relation between ametropic conditions and aberrations. We theoretically investigate the monochromatic and chromatic aberrations of human eyes for refractive errors of -10 to +10 diopters. Schematic human eye models are employed using optical design software for axial, index, and refractive types of ametropia.

  4. Differentiated Effects of Sensory Activities as Abolishing Operations via Non-Contingent Reinforcement on Academic and Aberrant Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancil, G. Richmond; Haydon, Todd; Boman, Marty

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of sensory activities used as antecedent interventions on the percentage correct on academic tasks and rate of aberrant behavior in three elementary aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Study activities were conducted in an after school program for children with ASD where…

  5. Changes in Keratometric Values and Corneal High Order Aberrations After Hydrogel Inlay Implantation.

    PubMed

    Whang, Woong-Joo; Yoo, Young-Sik; Joo, Choun-Ki; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2017-01-01

    We sought to analyze surgically induced refractive change (SIRC) and change in high-order aberration after Raindrop corneal inlay insertion (ReVision Optics, Lake Forest, CA), and assess the extent to which Raindrop corneal inlay insertion could correct presbyopia. Interventional case series. Seventeen patients were included if they had a corneal thickness ≥500 μm and a stable manifest spherical equivalent refraction between 0.50 and +1.00 diopters (D). The Raindrop corneal inlay was implanted on the stromal bed of a femtosecond laser-assisted generated flap of nondominant eyes. Manifest refraction, corneal powers, and corneal high-order aberrations were measured preoperatively and at 3 and 12 months postoperatively. The SIRC by manifest refraction was 0.99 ± 0.26 D. The changes derived from simulated keratometry (K), true net power, and equivalent K reading (EKR) at 1.0-4.0 mm were greater than the SIRC (all P < .01) while the change in EKR at 6.0 mm was less than the SIRC (P < .01). The changes in EKR 5.0 mm, automated K, and EKR 4.5 mm did not differ significantly from the SIRC (P = .81, .29, and .09, respectively), and the difference was the least for EKR 5.0 mm. In analysis of high-order aberrations, only spherical aberration showed statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative on both anterior cornea and total cornea (all P < .01). Raindrop corneal inlay corrects presbyopia via increasing negative spherical aberration. The equivalent K reading at 5.0 mm accurately reflected the SIRC, and would be applicable for intraocular power prediction before cataract surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Primary aberrations in focused radially polarized vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, David P.; Brown, T. G.

    2004-02-01

    We study the effect of primary aberrations on the 3-D polarization of the electric field in a focused lowest order radially polarized beam. A full vector diffraction treatment of the focused beams is used. Attention is given to the effects of primary spherical, astigmatic, and comatic aberrations on the local polarization, Strehl ratio, and aberration induced degradation of the longitudinal field at focus

  7. Aberration Compensation in Aplanatic Solid Immersion Lens Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-08

    model and ray tracing software ( Zemax ) to understand how much aberrations are in the system and how much can be compensated by the DM. Subsequently...aberration. Table 2 shows the Zemax simulation on this particular case. With aberration compensation, the finest resolvable group is at 252 nm

  8. Corneal higher-order aberrations and higher-order Strehl ratio after aberration-free ablation profile to treat compound myopic astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Luis F

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the changes in corneal higher-order aberrations (HOAs) and their impact on corneal higher-order Strehl ratio after aberration-free ablation profile. Verter Institute, H. Olhos, São Paulo, Brazil. Prospective interventional study. Eyes that had aberration-free myopic ablation were divided into 3 groups, based on the spherical equivalent (SE). The corneal HOAs and higher-order Strehl ratios were calculated before surgery and 3 months after surgery. The postoperative uncorrected-distance visual acuity, corrected-distance visual acuity, and SE did not present statistical differences among groups (88 eyes, P > .05). For a 6 mm pupil, the corneal HOA showed a mean increase of 0.17 μm (range 0.39 to 0.56 μm) (P < .001) and the corneal higher-order Strehl ratio presented a reduction of 0.03 (from 0.25 to 0.22) (P = .001). The following consistent linear predictive model was obtained: corneal HOA induction = 1.474 - 0.032 × SE - 0.225 × OZ, where OZ is the optical zone (R(2) = 0.49, adjusted R(2) = 0.48, P < .001). The corneal HOAs and the higher-order Strehl ratios deteriorated after moderate and high myopic ablations. The worsening in corneal aberrations and optical quality were related to the magnitude of the intended correction and did not affect high-contrast visual performance. The OZ was the only modifiable parameter capable to restrain the optical quality loss. The author has no financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Jitter Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waegell, Mordecai J.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Jitter_Correct.m is a MATLAB function that automatically measures and corrects inter-frame jitter in an image sequence to a user-specified precision. In addition, the algorithm dynamically adjusts the image sample size to increase the accuracy of the measurement. The Jitter_Correct.m function takes an image sequence with unknown frame-to-frame jitter and computes the translations of each frame (column and row, in pixels) relative to a chosen reference frame with sub-pixel accuracy. The translations are measured using a Cross Correlation Fourier transformation method in which the relative phase of the two transformed images is fit to a plane. The measured translations are then used to correct the inter-frame jitter of the image sequence. The function also dynamically expands the image sample size over which the cross-correlation is measured to increase the accuracy of the measurement. This increases the robustness of the measurement to variable magnitudes of inter-frame jitter

  10. Significant relaxation of residual negative carrier in polar Alq3 film directly detected by high-sensitivity photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinjo, Hiroumi; Lim, Hyunsoo; Sato, Tomoya; Noguchi, Yutaka; Nakayama, Yasuo; Ishii, Hisao

    2016-02-01

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq3) has been widely applied as a good electron-injecting layer (EIL) in organic light-emitting diodes. High-sensitivity photoemission measurement revealed a clear photoemission by visible light, although its ionization energy is 5.7 eV. This unusual photoemission is ascribed to Alq3 anions captured by positive polarization charges. The observed electron detachment energy of the anion was about 1 eV larger than the electron affinity reported by inverse photoemission. This difference suggests that the injected electron in the Alq3 layer is energetically relaxed, leading to the reduction in injection barrier. This nature is one of the reasons why Alq3 worked well as the EIL.

  11. Wavefront correction performed by a deformable mirror of arbitrary actuator pattern within a multireflection waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingkun; Huang, Lei; Bian, Qi; Gong, Mali

    2014-09-10

    The wavefront correction ability of a deformable mirror with a multireflection waveguide was investigated and compared via simulations. By dividing a conventional actuator array into a multireflection waveguide that consisted of single-actuator units, an arbitrary actuator pattern could be achieved. A stochastic parallel perturbation algorithm was proposed to find the optimal actuator pattern for a particular aberration. Compared with conventional an actuator array, the multireflection waveguide showed significant advantages in correction of higher order aberrations.

  12. RADIATION-INDUCED CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS IN MAN

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, M.; Ottoman, R.E.; Norman, A.

    1963-10-01

    A study was made of the production and elimination of radioinduced chromosomal aberrations in leukocytes from the peripheral blood of persons exposed to chronic or acute doses of high-energy radiation. Included in the group were radiologists and laboratory scientists, for whom there were available complete records of the radiation dose received during their working life, and a number of distinguished radiologists who have practiced more than 25 yrs and who may have received substantial doses One of seven leukocytes from a distinguished radiologist contained a pair of chromosomes that could be classified as pseudo- diploid. In laboratory personnel for whommore » the doses received were significantly within the prescribed limits, the incidence of pseudo-diploid cells, of dicentrics, and of other chroNonemosomal aberrations was significantly higher than in a more or less comparable control group. (tr-auth)« less

  13. Contemporary management of aberrant right subclavian arteries.

    PubMed

    Stone, William M; Ricotta, Joseph J; Fowl, Richard J; Garg, Nitin; Bower, Thomas C; Money, Samuel R

    2011-05-01

    Aberrant origin of right subclavian arteries represents the most common of the aortic arch anomalies. This variant has few published series to guide management. Our goal was to review treatment options and results for these potentially complex reconstructions. A retrospective review was performed on all patients with a diagnosis of aberrant right subclavian artery at our institution between January 2003 and July 2009. A total of 24 patients, which comprises one of the largest series reported, including 10 males and 14 females (mean age: 46.6 years, range: 7-77), were diagnosed with an aberrant right subclavian artery. Sixteen (66%) were diagnosed incidentally, but eight (33%) had symptoms of either dysphagia, upper extremity ischemia, or both. Computed tomography was most commonly used to establish the diagnosis (19 patients, 79%). Magnetic resonance imaging established the diagnosis in three patients (12%), upper gastrointestinal barium study in one (4%), and standard angiography in one (4%). A Kommerell's diverticulum (KD) was the most common associated anomaly (seven patients, 29%). All seven patients (100%) with a KD required intervention for either symptoms or aneurysmal degeneration. Intervention was performed in 10 patients (42%), including carotid subclavian bypass in five (50%), carotid subclavian transposition in three (30%), and ascending aorta to subclavian bypass in two (20%). Four patients (40%) had additional intervention for management of aneurysmal disease of the aorta or KD, with open aortic replacement in two (20%) and aortic endografting in two (20%). There was one perioperative death (10%) in a patient undergoing aortic arch debranching with placement of an aortic endograft. In all, 18 patients survived without symptoms after a mean follow-up of 38 months. Aberrant right subclavian arteries are most commonly found incidentally with computed tomography. The presence of a KD seemed to correlate with the need for intervention. Patients with no

  14. Aberrant phenotypes in peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hastrup, N; Ralfkiaer, E; Pallesen, G

    1989-01-01

    Seventy six peripheral T cell lymphomas were examined immunohistologically to test their reactivity with a panel of monoclonal antibodies against 11 T cell associated antigens (CD1-8, CD27, UCHL1, and the T cell antigen receptor). Sixty two (82%) lymphomas showed aberrant phenotypes, and four main categories were distinguished as follows: (i) lack of one or several pan-T cell antigens (49, 64% of the cases); (ii) loss of both the CD4 and CD8 antigens (11, 15% of the cases); (iii) coexpression of the CD4 and CD8 antigens (13, 17% of the cases); and (iv) expression of the CD1 antigen (eight, 11% of the cases). No correlation was seen between the occurrence of aberrant phenotypes and the histological subtype. It is concluded that the demonstration of an aberrant phenotype is a valuable supplement to histological assessment in the diagnosis of peripheral T cell lymphomas. It is recommended that the panel of monoclonal antibodies against T cell differentiation antigens should be fairly large, as apparently any antigen may be lost in the process of malignant transformation. Images Figure PMID:2469701

  15. Amplitude mode oscillations in pump-probe photoemission spectra from a d -wave superconductor

    DOE PAGES

    Nosarzewski, B.; Moritz, B.; Freericks, J. K.; ...

    2017-11-20

    Recent developments in the techniques of ultrafast pump-probe photoemission have made possible the search for collective modes in strongly correlated systems out of equilibrium. Including inelastic scattering processes and a retarded interaction, we simulate time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) to study the amplitude mode of a d-wave superconductor, a collective mode excited through the nonlinear light-matter coupling to the pump pulse. We find that the amplitude mode oscillations of the d-wave order parameter occur in phase at a single frequency that is twice the quasi-steady-state maximum gap size after pumping. As a result, we comment on the necessary conditionsmore » for detecting the amplitude mode in trARPES experiments.« less

  16. Three-dimensional characterization of extreme ultraviolet mask blank defects by interference contrast photoemission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jingquan; Weber, Nils; Escher, Matthias; Maul, Jochen; Han, Hak-Seung; Merkel, Michael; Wurm, Stefan; Schönhense, Gerd; Kleineberg, Ulf

    2008-09-29

    A photoemission electron microscope based on a new contrast mechanism "interference contrast" is applied to characterize extreme ultraviolet lithography mask blank defects. Inspection results show that positioning of interference destructive condition (node of standing wave field) on surface of multilayer in the local region of a phase defect is necessary to obtain best visibility of the defect on mask blank. A comparative experiment reveals superiority of the interference contrast photoemission electron microscope (Extreme UV illumination) over a topographic contrast one (UV illumination with Hg discharge lamp) in detecting extreme ultraviolet mask blank phase defects. A depth-resolved detection of a mask blank defect, either by measuring anti-node peak shift in the EUV-PEEM image under varying inspection wavelength condition or by counting interference fringes with a fixed illumination wavelength, is discussed.

  17. Amplitude mode oscillations in pump-probe photoemission spectra from a d -wave superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Nosarzewski, B.; Moritz, B.; Freericks, J. K.

    Recent developments in the techniques of ultrafast pump-probe photoemission have made possible the search for collective modes in strongly correlated systems out of equilibrium. Including inelastic scattering processes and a retarded interaction, we simulate time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) to study the amplitude mode of a d-wave superconductor, a collective mode excited through the nonlinear light-matter coupling to the pump pulse. We find that the amplitude mode oscillations of the d-wave order parameter occur in phase at a single frequency that is twice the quasi-steady-state maximum gap size after pumping. As a result, we comment on the necessary conditionsmore » for detecting the amplitude mode in trARPES experiments.« less

  18. Orbital-differentiated coherence-incoherence crossover identified by photoemission spectroscopy in LiFeAs

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, H.; Yin, Z. P.; Wu, S. F.

    In the iron-based superconductors (FeSCs), orbital differentiation is an important phenomenon, whereby correlations stronger on the d xy orbital than on the d xz/d yz orbital yield quasi-particles with d xy orbital character having larger mass renormalization and abnormal temperature evolution. However, the physical origin of this orbital di erentiation is debated between the Hund's coupling induced unbinding of spin and orbital degrees of freedom and the Hubbard interaction instigated orbital selective Mott transition. Here we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to identify an orbital-dependent correlation-induced quasi-particle (QP) anomaly in LiFeAs. Lastly, the excellent agreement between our photoemission measurements and first-principlesmore » many-body theory calculations shows that the orbital-differentiated QP lifetime anomalies in LiFeAs are controlled by the Hund's coupling.« less

  19. Electronic Structures of Purple Bronze KMo6O17 Studied by X-Ray Photoemission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiaokui; Wei, Junyin; Shi, Jing; Tian, Mingliang; Chen, Hong; Tian, Decheng

    X-ray photoemission spectroscopy study has been performed for the purple bronze KMo6O17. The structures of conduction band and valence band are analogous to the results of ultraviolet photoemission spectra and are also consistent with the model of Travaglini et al., but the gap between conduction and valence band is insignificant. The shape of asymmetric and broadening line of O-1s is due to unresolved contributions from the many inequivalent oxygen sites in this crystal structure. Mo 3d core-level spectrum reveals that there are two kinds of valence states of Molybdenum (Mo+5 and Mo+6). The calculated average valence state is about +5.6, which is consistent with the expectation value from the composition of this material. The tail of Mo-3d spectrum toward higher binding energy is the consequence of the excitation of electron-hole pairs with singularity index of 0.21.

  20. DC High Voltage Conditioning of Photoemission Guns at Jefferson Lab FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Benson, S. V.; Biallas, G.

    2009-08-04

    DC high voltage photoemission electron guns with GaAs photocathodes have been used to produce polarized electron beams for nuclear physics experiments for about 3 decades with great success. In the late 1990s, Jefferson Lab adopted this gun technology for a free electron laser (FEL), but to assist with high bunch charge operation, considerably higher bias voltage is required compared to the photoguns used at the Jefferson Lab Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. The FEL gun has been conditioned above 400 kV several times, albeit encountering non-trivial challenges with ceramic insulators and field emission from electrodes. Recently, high voltage processing withmore » krypton gas was employed to process very stubborn field emitters. This work presents a summary of the high voltage techniques used to high voltage condition the Jefferson Lab FEL photoemission gun.« less

  1. One-step model of photoemission from single-crystal surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Karkare, Siddharth; Wan, Weishi; Feng, Jun; ...

    2017-02-28

    In our paper, we present a three-dimensional one-step photoemission model that can be used to calculate the quantum efficiency and momentum distributions of electrons photoemitted from ordered single-crystal surfaces close to the photoemission threshold. Using Ag(111) as an example, we also show that the model can not only calculate the quantum efficiency from the surface state accurately without using any ad hoc parameters, but also provides a theoretical quantitative explanation of the vectorial photoelectric effect. This model in conjunction with other band structure and wave function calculation techniques can be effectively used to screen single-crystal photoemitters for use as electronmore » sources for particle accelerator and ultrafast electron diffraction applications.« less

  2. Orbital-differentiated coherence-incoherence crossover identified by photoemission spectroscopy in LiFeAs

    DOE PAGES

    Miao, H.; Yin, Z. P.; Wu, S. F.; ...

    2016-11-14

    In the iron-based superconductors (FeSCs), orbital differentiation is an important phenomenon, whereby correlations stronger on the d xy orbital than on the d xz/d yz orbital yield quasi-particles with d xy orbital character having larger mass renormalization and abnormal temperature evolution. However, the physical origin of this orbital di erentiation is debated between the Hund's coupling induced unbinding of spin and orbital degrees of freedom and the Hubbard interaction instigated orbital selective Mott transition. Here we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to identify an orbital-dependent correlation-induced quasi-particle (QP) anomaly in LiFeAs. Lastly, the excellent agreement between our photoemission measurements and first-principlesmore » many-body theory calculations shows that the orbital-differentiated QP lifetime anomalies in LiFeAs are controlled by the Hund's coupling.« less

  3. Amplitude mode oscillations in pump-probe photoemission spectra from a d -wave superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosarzewski, B.; Moritz, B.; Freericks, J. K.; Kemper, A. F.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2017-11-01

    Recent developments in the techniques of ultrafast pump-probe photoemission have made possible the search for collective modes in strongly correlated systems out of equilibrium. Including inelastic scattering processes and a retarded interaction, we simulate time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) to study the amplitude mode of a d -wave superconductor, a collective mode excited through the nonlinear light-matter coupling to the pump pulse. We find that the amplitude mode oscillations of the d -wave order parameter occur in phase at a single frequency that is twice the quasi-steady-state maximum gap size after pumping. We comment on the necessary conditions for detecting the amplitude mode in trARPES experiments.

  4. Electronic Structure of Ytterbium-Doped Strontium Fluoroapatite: Photoemission and Photoabsorption Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Art J.; Van Buuren, Tony W.; Bostedt, C

    X-ray photoemission and x-ray photoabsorption were used to study the composition and the electronic structure of ytterbium-doped strontium fluoroapatite (Yb:S-FAP). High resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and Sr 3d, P 2p and 2s, Yb 4d and 4p, F 1s and O 1s core lines were used to evaluate the surface and near surface chemistry of this fluoroapatite. Element specific density of unoccupied electronic states in Yb:S-FAP were probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Yb 4d (N4,5-edge), Sr 3d (M4,5-edge), P 2p (L2,3-edge), F 1s and O 1s (K-edges) absorption edges. These results provide themore » first measurements of the electronic structure and surface chemistry of this material.« less

  5. Photoemission and Photoabsorption Investigation of the Electronic Structure of Ytterbium Doped Strontium Fluoroapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; van Buuren, T; Bostedt, C

    X-ray photoemission and x-ray photoabsorption were used to study the composition and the electronic structure of ytterbium doped strontium fluoroapatite (Yb:S-FAP). High resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure was used to evaluate the density of occupied states of this fluoroapatite. Element specific density of unoccupied electronic states in Yb:S-FAP were probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Yb 4d (N{sub 4,5}-edge), Sr 3d (M{sub 4,5}-edge), P 2p (L{sub 2,3}-edge), F 1s and O 1s (K-edges) absorption edges. These results provide the first measurements of the electronic structure and surface chemistry of this material.

  6. Automated aberration compensation in high numerical aperture systems for arbitrary laser modes (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hering, Julian; Waller, Erik H.; von Freymann, Georg

    2017-02-01

    Since a large number of optical systems and devices are based on differently shaped focal intensity distributions (point-spread-functions, PSF), the PSF's quality is crucial for the application's performance. E.g., optical tweezers, optical potentials for trapping of ultracold atoms as well as stimulated-emission-depletion (STED) based microscopy and lithography rely on precisely controlled intensity distributions. However, especially in high numerical aperture (NA) systems, such complex laser modes are easily distorted by aberrations leading to performance losses. Although different approaches addressing phase retrieval algorithms have been recently presented[1-3], fast and automated aberration compensation for a broad variety of complex shaped PSFs in high NA systems is still missing. Here, we report on a Gerchberg-Saxton[4] based algorithm (GSA) for automated aberration correction of arbitrary PSFs, especially for high NA systems. Deviations between the desired target intensity distribution and the three-dimensionally (3D) scanned experimental focal intensity distribution are used to calculate a correction phase pattern. The target phase distribution plus the correction pattern are displayed on a phase-only spatial-light-modulator (SLM). Focused by a high NA objective, experimental 3D scans of several intensity distributions allow for characterization of the algorithms performance: aberrations are reliably identified and compensated within less than 10 iterations. References 1. B. M. Hanser, M. G. L. Gustafsson, D. A. Agard, and J. W. Sedat, "Phase-retrieved pupil functions in wide-field fluorescence microscopy," J. of Microscopy 216(1), 32-48 (2004). 2. A. Jesacher, A. Schwaighofer, S. Frhapter, C. Maurer, S. Bernet, and M. Ritsch-Marte, "Wavefront correction of spatial light modulators using an optical vortex image," Opt. Express 15(9), 5801-5808 (2007). 3. A. Jesacher and M. J. Booth, "Parallel direct laser writing in three dimensions with spatially dependent

  7. Wavefront-aberration measurement and systematic-error analysis of a high numerical-aperture objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixiang; Xing, Tingwen; Jiang, Yadong; Lv, Baobin

    2018-02-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) shearing interferometer based on an amplitude chessboard grating was designed to measure the wavefront aberration of a high numerical-aperture (NA) objective. Chessboard gratings offer better diffraction efficiencies and fewer disturbing diffraction orders than traditional cross gratings. The wavefront aberration of the tested objective was retrieved from the shearing interferogram using the Fourier transform and differential Zernike polynomial-fitting methods. Grating manufacturing errors, including the duty-cycle and pattern-deviation errors, were analyzed with the Fourier transform method. Then, according to the relation between the spherical pupil and planar detector coordinates, the influence of the distortion of the pupil coordinates was simulated. Finally, the systematic error attributable to grating alignment errors was deduced through the geometrical ray-tracing method. Experimental results indicate that the measuring repeatability (3σ) of the wavefront aberration of an objective with NA 0.4 was 3.4 mλ. The systematic-error results were consistent with previous analyses. Thus, the correct wavefront aberration can be obtained after calibration.

  8. Saving SALT: repairs to the spherical aberration corrector of the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, Darragh E.; O'Connor, James; Crause, Lisa A.; Strumpfer, Francois; Strydom, Ockert J.; Brink, Janus D.; Sass, Craig; Wiid, Eben; Atad-Ettedgui, Eli

    2010-07-01

    The construction of the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) was largely completed by the end of 2005. At the beginning of 2006, it was realized that the telescope's image quality suffered from optical aberrations, chiefly a focus gradient across the focal plane, but also accompanied by astigmatism and higher order aberrations. In the previous conference in this series, a paper was presented describing the optical system engineering investigation which had been conducted to diagnose the problem. This investigation exonerated the primary mirror as the cause, as well as the science instruments, and was isolated to the interface between the telescope and a major optical sub-system, the spherical aberration corrector (SAC). This is a complex sub-system of four aspheric mirrors which corrects the spherical aberration of the 11-m primary mirror. In the last two years, a solution to this problem was developed which involved removing the SAC from the telescope, installing a modification of the SAC/telescope interface, re-aligning and testing the four SAC mirrors and re-installation on the telescope. This paper describes the plan, discusses the details and shows progress to date and the current status.

  9. Spin-Resolved Circularly Polarised Resonant Photoemission: Cu as a Model System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, N. B.

    A brief introduction to the technique of spin resolved resonant photoemission using circularly polarised soft x-rays is given. The method is illustrated by considering the simple case of Cu2+. Starting from CuO we show how the same ideas can be applied to more complex and interesting cases, such as the model compound Sr2CuO2Cl2 and an optimally doped high temperature superconductor, Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ.

  10. Three-dimensional superconducting gap in FeSe from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnirenko, Y. S.; Fedorov, A. V.; Haubold, E.; Thirupathaiah, S.; Wolf, T.; Aswartham, S.; Morozov, I.; Kim, T. K.; Büchner, B.; Borisenko, S. V.

    2018-05-01

    We present a systematic angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of the superconducting gap in FeSe. The gap function is determined in a full Brillouin zone including all Fermi surfaces and kz dependence. We find significant anisotropy of the superconducting gap in all momentum directions. While the in-plane anisotropy can be explained by both nematicity-induced pairing anisotropy and orbital-selective pairing, the kz anisotropy requires an additional refinement of the theoretical approaches.

  11. Nodal aberration theory for wild-filed asymmetric optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Cheng, Xuemin; Hao, Qun

    2016-10-01

    Nodal Aberration Theory (NAT) was used to calculate the zero field position in Full Field Display (FFD) for the given aberration term. Aiming at wide-filed non-rotational symmetric decentered optical systems, we have presented the nodal geography behavior of the family of third-order and fifth-order aberrations. Meanwhile, we have calculated the wavefront aberration expressions when one optical element in the system is tilted, which was not at the entrance pupil. By using a three-piece-cellphone lens example in optical design software CodeV, the nodal geography is testified under several situations; and the wavefront aberrations are calculated when the optical element is tilted. The properties of the nodal aberrations are analyzed by using Fringe Zernike coefficients, which are directly related with the wavefront aberration terms and usually obtained by real ray trace and wavefront surface fitting.

  12. Topological surface state of α -Sn on InSb(001) as studied by photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, M. R.; Rogalev, V. A.; Dudy, L.; Reis, F.; Adler, F.; Aulbach, J.; Collins-McIntyre, L. J.; Duffy, L. B.; Yang, H. F.; Chen, Y. L.; Hesjedal, T.; Liu, Z. K.; Hoesch, M.; Muff, S.; Dil, J. H.; Schäfer, J.; Claessen, R.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the electronic structure of the elemental topological semimetal α -Sn on InSb(001). High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission data allow us to observe the topological surface state (TSS) that is degenerate with the bulk band structure and show that the former is unaffected by different surface reconstructions. An unintentional p -type doping of the as-grown films was compensated by deposition of potassium or tellurium after the growth, thereby shifting the Dirac point of the surface state below the Fermi level. We show that, while having the potential to break time-reversal symmetry, iron impurities with a coverage of up to 0.25 monolayers do not have any further impact on the surface state beyond that of K or Te. Furthermore, we have measured the spin-momentum locking of electrons from the TSS by means of spin-resolved photoemission. Our results show that the spin vector lies fully in-plane, but it also has a finite radial component. Finally, we analyze the decay of photoholes introduced in the photoemission process, and by this gain insight into the many-body interactions in the system. Surprisingly, we extract quasiparticle lifetimes comparable to other topological materials where the TSS is located within a bulk band gap. We argue that the main decay of photoholes is caused by intraband scattering, while scattering into bulk states is suppressed due to different orbital symmetries of bulk and surface states.

  13. Thin noble metal films on Si (111) investigated by optical second-harmonic generation and photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, K.; Kristensen, T. B.; Pedersen, T. G.; Morgen, P.; Li, Z.; Hoffmann, S. V.

    2002-05-01

    Thin noble metal films (Ag, Au and Cu) on Si (111) have been investigated by optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) in combination with synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy. The valence band spectra of Ag films show a quantization of the sp-band in the 4-eV energy range from the Fermi level down to the onset of the d-bands. For Cu and Au the corresponding energy range is much narrower and quantization effects are less visible. Quantization effects in SHG are observed as oscillations in the signal as a function of film thickness. The oscillations are strongest for Ag and less pronounced for Cu, in agreement with valence band photoemission spectra. In the case of Au, a reacted layer floating on top of the Au film masks the observation of quantum well levels by photoemission. However, SHG shows a well-developed quantization of levels in the Au film below the reacted layer. For Ag films, the relation between film thickness and photon energy of the SHG resonances indicates different types of resonances, some of which involve both quantum well and substrate states.

  14. Bypassing the energy-time uncertainty in time-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randi, Francesco; Fausti, Daniele; Eckstein, Martin

    2017-03-01

    The energy-time uncertainty is an intrinsic limit for time-resolved experiments imposing a tradeoff between the duration of the light pulses used in experiments and their frequency content. In standard time-resolved photoemission, this limitation maps directly onto a tradeoff between the time resolution of the experiment and the energy resolution that can be achieved on the electronic spectral function. Here we propose a protocol to disentangle the energy and time resolutions in photoemission. We demonstrate that dynamical information on all time scales can be retrieved from time-resolved photoemission experiments using suitably shaped light pulses of quantum or classical nature. As a paradigmatic example, we study the dynamical buildup of the Kondo peak, a narrow feature in the electronic response function arising from the screening of a magnetic impurity by the conduction electrons. After a quench, the electronic screening builds up on timescales shorter than the inverse width of the Kondo peak and we demonstrate that the proposed experimental scheme could be used to measure the intrinsic time scales of such electronic screening. The proposed approach provides an experimental framework to access the nonequilibrium response of collective electronic properties beyond the spectral uncertainty limit and will enable the direct measurement of phenomena such as excited Higgs modes and, possibly, the retarded interactions in superconducting systems.

  15. Energy-resolved attosecond interferometric photoemission from Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosio, M. J.; Thumm, U.

    2018-04-01

    Photoelectron emission from solid surfaces induced by attosecond pulse trains into the electric field of delayed phase-coherent infrared (IR) pulses allows the surface-specific observation of energy-resolved electronic phase accumulations and photoemission delays. We quantum-mechanically modeled interferometric photoemission spectra from the (111) surfaces of Au and Ag, including background contributions from secondary electrons and direct emission by the IR pulse, and adjusted parameters of our model to energy-resolved photoelectron spectra recently measured at a synchrotron light source by Roth et al. [J. Electron Spectrosc. 224, 84 (2018), 10.1016/j.elspec.2017.05.008]. Our calculated spectra and photoelectron phase shifts are in fair agreement with the experimental data of Locher et al. [Optica 2, 405 (2015), 10.1364/OPTICA.2.000405]. Our model's not reproducing the measured energy-dependent oscillations of the Ag(111) photoemission phases may be interpreted as evidence for subtle band-structure effects on the final-state photoelectron-surface interaction not accounted for in our simulation.

  16. Increase of intrinsic emittance induced by multiphoton photoemission from copper cathodes illuminated by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Chenjie; Zhu, Rui; Xu, Jun; Liu, Yaqi; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Jiasen; Yu, Dapeng

    2018-05-01

    Electron sources driven by femtosecond laser have important applications in many aspects, and the research about the intrinsic emittance is becoming more and more crucial. The intrinsic emittance of polycrystalline copper cathode, which was illuminated by femtosecond pulses (FWHM of the pulse duration was about 100 fs) with photon energies above and below the work function, was measured with an extremely low bunch charge (single-electron pulses) based on free expansion method. A minimum emittance was obtained at the photon energy very close to the effective work function of the cathode. When the photon energy decreased below the effective work function, emittance increased rather than decreased or flattened out to a constant. By investigating the dependence of photocurrent density on the incident laser intensity, we found the emission excited by pulsed photons with sub-work-function energies contained two-photon photoemission. In addition, the portion of two-photon photoemission current increased with the reduction of photon energy. We attributed the increase of emittance to the effect of two-photon photoemission. This work shows that conventional method of reducing the photon energy of excited light source to approach the room temperature limit of the intrinsic emittance may be infeasible for femtosecond laser. There would be an optimized photon energy value near the work function to obtain the lowest emittance for pulsed laser pumped photocathode.

  17. Photoemission, NMR, susceptibility and specific heat in V and A15 V 3Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amamou, A.; Turek, P.; Kuentzler, R.

    1982-08-01

    We present a study on the electronic structure of V and V 3Pt, based on photoemission (XPS and UPS) measurements and on the examination of previous band calculations, specific heat, susceptibility and NMR results. Photoemission spectra on pure V, in particular the XPS one, show a good agreement with band calculations ; the He II spectrum exhibits a strong satellite which could be attributed to a simple Auger effect or to a resonant process. Photoemission on V 3Pt allows an evaluation of the partial densities of states (PDOS) ; the Vanadium PDOS is similar to that of pure element, at least for the upper part of the valence band ; meanwhile the Platinium partial EDOS is drastically modified. This can be understood in the framework of electronic structure of compounds involving early and late transition metals where the atomic structure seems to play an important role. An evaluation of the EDOS's at the Fermi level n(E F) can also be tempted and compared to those obtained from the other mentioned techniques. Therefore it is suggested that for Vanadium n(E F) is similar to that of pure element ; for Platinium n(E F) is strongly reduced. Finally the analysis of the electronic specific heat of V, Pt and V 3Pt indicates that the parameter of electron-phonon coupling determined by the Mc Millan's theory is likely underesti:ated, due to the occurence of an estimated coupling in V and V 3Pt.

  18. Fingerprints of entangled spin and orbital physics in itinerant ferromagnets via angle-resolved resonant photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Pieve, F.

    2016-01-01

    A method for mapping the local spin and orbital nature of the ground state of a system via corresponding flip excitations is proposed based on angle-resolved resonant photoemission and related diffraction patterns, obtained here via an ab initio modified one-step theory of photoemission. The analysis is done on the paradigmatic weak itinerant ferromagnet bcc Fe, whose magnetism, a correlation phenomenon given by the coexistence of localized moments and itinerant electrons, and the observed non-Fermi-Liquid behavior at extreme conditions both remain unclear. The combined analysis of energy spectra and diffraction patterns offers a mapping of local pure spin-flip, entangled spin-flip-orbital-flip excitations and chiral transitions with vortexlike wave fronts of photoelectrons, depending on the valence orbital symmetry and the direction of the local magnetic moment. Such effects, mediated by the hole polarization, make resonant photoemission a promising tool to perform a full tomography of the local magnetic properties even in itinerant ferromagnets or macroscopically nonmagnetic systems.

  19. GeneBreak: detection of recurrent DNA copy number aberration-associated chromosomal breakpoints within genes.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Evert; van Lieshout, Stef; Rausch, Christian; Ylstra, Bauke; van de Wiel, Mark A; Meijer, Gerrit A; Fijneman, Remond J A; Abeln, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    Development of cancer is driven by somatic alterations, including numerical and structural chromosomal aberrations. Currently, several computational methods are available and are widely applied to detect numerical copy number aberrations (CNAs) of chromosomal segments in tumor genomes. However, there is lack of computational methods that systematically detect structural chromosomal aberrations by virtue of the genomic location of CNA-associated chromosomal breaks and identify genes that appear non-randomly affected by chromosomal breakpoints across (large) series of tumor samples. 'GeneBreak' is developed to systematically identify genes recurrently affected by the genomic location of chromosomal CNA-associated breaks by a genome-wide approach, which can be applied to DNA copy number data obtained by array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) or by (low-pass) whole genome sequencing (WGS). First, 'GeneBreak' collects the genomic locations of chromosomal CNA-associated breaks that were previously pinpointed by the segmentation algorithm that was applied to obtain CNA profiles. Next, a tailored annotation approach for breakpoint-to-gene mapping is implemented. Finally, dedicated cohort-based statistics is incorporated with correction for covariates that influence the probability to be a breakpoint gene. In addition, multiple testing correction is integrated to reveal recurrent breakpoint events. This easy-to-use algorithm, 'GeneBreak', is implemented in R ( www.cran.r-project.org ) and is available from Bioconductor ( www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/GeneBreak.html ).

  20. Finding the hidden valence band of N  =  7 armchair graphene nanoribbons with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkovskiy, Boris V.; Usachov, Dmitry Yu; Fedorov, Alexander V.; Haberer, Danny; Ehlen, Niels; Fischer, Felix R.; Grüneis, Alexander

    2018-07-01

    To understand the optical and transport properties of graphene nanoribbons, an unambiguous determination of their electronic band structure is needed. In this work we demonstrate that the photoemission intensity of each valence sub-band, formed due to the quantum confinement in quasi-one-dimensional (1D) graphene nanoribbons, is a peaked function of the two-dimensional (2D) momentum. We resolve the long-standing discrepancy regarding the valence band effective mass () of armchair graphene nanoribbons with a width of N  =  7 carbon atoms (7-AGNRs). In particular, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy report   ≈0.2 and  ≈0.4 of the free electron mass (m e ), respectively. ARPES mapping in the full 2D momentum space identifies the experimental conditions for obtaining a large intensity for each of the three highest valence 1D sub-bands. Our detail map reveals that previous ARPES experiments have incorrectly assigned the second sub-band as the frontier one. The correct frontier valence sub-band for 7-AGNRs is only visible in a narrow range of emission angles. For this band we obtain an ARPES derived effective mass of 0.4 m e , a charge carrier velocity in the linear part of the band of 0.63  ×  106 m s‑1 and an energy separation of only  ≈60 meV to the second sub-band. Our results are of importance not only for the growing research field of graphene nanoribbons but also for the community, which studies quantum confined systems.

  1. Wavefront aberrations of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams.

    PubMed

    Liao, Keliang; Hong, Youli; Sheng, Weifan

    2014-10-01

    The effects of dynamical diffraction in x-ray diffractive optics with large numerical aperture render the wavefront aberrations difficult to describe using the aberration polynomials, yet knowledge of them plays an important role in a vast variety of scientific problems ranging from optical testing to adaptive optics. Although the diffraction theory of optical aberrations was established decades ago, its application in the area of x-ray dynamical diffraction theory (DDT) is still lacking. Here, we conduct a theoretical study on the aberration properties of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams. By treating the modulus of the complex envelope as the amplitude weight function in the orthogonalization procedure, we generalize the nonrecursive matrix method for the determination of orthonormal aberration polynomials, wherein Zernike DDT and Legendre DDT polynomials are proposed. As an example, we investigate the aberration evolution inside a tilted multilayer Laue lens. The corresponding Legendre DDT polynomials are obtained numerically, which represent balanced aberrations yielding minimum variance of the classical aberrations of an anamorphic optical system. The balancing of classical aberrations and their standard deviations are discussed. We also present the Strehl ratio of the primary and secondary balanced aberrations.

  2. Detecting independent and recurrent copy number aberrations using interval graphs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Ta; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Raphael, Benjamin J

    2014-06-15

    Somatic copy number aberrations SCNAS: are frequent in cancer genomes, but many of these are random, passenger events. A common strategy to distinguish functional aberrations from passengers is to identify those aberrations that are recurrent across multiple samples. However, the extensive variability in the length and position of SCNA: s makes the problem of identifying recurrent aberrations notoriously difficult. We introduce a combinatorial approach to the problem of identifying independent and recurrent SCNA: s, focusing on the key challenging of separating the overlaps in aberrations across individuals into independent events. We derive independent and recurrent SCNA: s as maximal cliques in an interval graph constructed from overlaps between aberrations. We efficiently enumerate all such cliques, and derive a dynamic programming algorithm to find an optimal selection of non-overlapping cliques, resulting in a very fast algorithm, which we call RAIG (Recurrent Aberrations from Interval Graphs). We show that RAIG outperforms other methods on simulated data and also performs well on data from three cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). In contrast to existing approaches that employ various heuristics to select independent aberrations, RAIG optimizes a well-defined objective function. We show that this allows RAIG to identify rare aberrations that are likely functional, but are obscured by overlaps with larger passenger aberrations. http://compbio.cs.brown.edu/software. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Assessment of refractive astigmatism and simulated therapeutic refractive surgery strategies in coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to raise the awareness of the influence of coma-like higher-order aberrations (HOAs) on power and orientation of refractive astigmatism (RA) and to explore how to account for that influence in the planning of topography-guided refractive surgery in eyes with coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics. Eleven eyes with coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics and with low lenticular astigmatism (LA) were selected for astigmatism analysis and for treatment simulations with topography-guided custom ablation. Vector analysis was used to evaluate the contribution of coma-like corneal HOAs to RA. Two different strategies were used for simulated treatments aiming to regularize irregular corneal optics: With both strategies correction of anterior corneal surface irregularities (corneal HOAs) were intended. Correction of total corneal astigmatism (TCA) and RA was intended as well with strategies 1 and 2, respectively. Axis of discrepant astigmatism (RA minus TCA minus LA) correlated strongly with axis of coma. Vertical coma influenced RA by canceling the effect of the with-the-rule astigmatism and increasing the effect of the against-the-rule astigmatism. After simulated correction of anterior corneal HOAs along with TCA and RA (strategies 1 and 2), only a small amount of anterior corneal astigmatism (ACA) and no TCA remained after strategy 1, while considerable amount of ACA and TCA remained after strategy 2. Coma-like corneal aberrations seem to contribute a considerable astigmatic component to RA in eyes with coma-like-aberrations dominant corneal optics. If topography-guided ablation is programmed to correct the corneal HOAs and RA, the astigmatic component caused by the coma-like corneal HOAs will be treated twice and will result in induced astigmatism. Disregarding RA and treating TCA along with the corneal HOAs is recommended instead.

  4. Genomic aberrations in borderline ovarian tumors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background According to the scientific literature, less than 30 borderline ovarian tumors have been karyotyped and less than 100 analyzed for genomic imbalances by CGH. Methods We report a series of borderline ovarian tumors (n = 23) analyzed by G-banding and karyotyping as well as high resolution CGH; in addition, the tumors were analyzed for microsatellite stability status and by FISH for possible 6q deletion. Results All informative tumors were microsatellite stable and none had a deletion in 6q27. All cases with an abnormal karyotype had simple chromosomal aberrations with +7 and +12 as the most common. In three tumors with single structural rearrangements, a common breakpoint in 3q13 was detected. The major copy number changes detected in the borderline tumors were gains from chromosome arms 2q, 6q, 8q, 9p, and 13q and losses from 1p, 12q, 14q, 15q, 16p, 17p, 17q, 19p, 19q, and 22q. The series included five pairs of bilateral tumors and, in two of these pairs, informative data were obtained as to their clonal relationship. In both pairs, similarities were found between the tumors from the right and left side, strongly indicating that bilaterality had occurred via a metastatic process. The bilateral tumors as a group showed more aberrations than did the unilateral ones, consistent with the view that bilaterality is a sign of more advanced disease. Conclusion Because some of the imbalances found in borderline ovarian tumors seem to be similar to imbalances already known from the more extensively studied overt ovarian carcinomas, we speculate that the subset of borderline tumors with detectable imbalances or karyotypic aberrations may contain a smaller subset of tumors with a tendency to develop a more malignant phenotype. The group of borderline tumors with no imbalances would, in this line of thinking, have less or no propensity for clonal evolution and development to full-blown carcinomas. PMID:20184781

  5. Predicting aberrant CpG island methylation

    PubMed Central

    Feltus, F. A.; Lee, E. K.; Costello, J. F.; Plass, C.; Vertino, P. M.

    2003-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing associated with aberrant methylation of promoter region CpG islands is one mechanism leading to loss of tumor suppressor function in human cancer. Profiling of CpG island methylation indicates that some genes are more frequently methylated than others, and that each tumor type is associated with a unique set of methylated genes. However, little is known about why certain genes succumb to this aberrant event. To address this question, we used Restriction Landmark Genome Scanning to analyze the susceptibility of 1,749 unselected CpG islands to de novo methylation driven by overexpression of DNA cytosine-5-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). We found that although the overall incidence of CpG island methylation was increased in cells overexpressing DNMT1, not all loci were equally affected. The majority of CpG islands (69.9%) were resistant to de novo methylation, regardless of DNMT1 overexpression. In contrast, we identified a subset of methylation-prone CpG islands (3.8%) that were consistently hypermethylated in multiple DNMT1 overexpressing clones. Methylation-prone and methylation-resistant CpG islands were not significantly different with respect to size, C+G content, CpG frequency, chromosomal location, or promoter association. We used DNA pattern recognition and supervised learning techniques to derive a classification function based on the frequency of seven novel sequence patterns that was capable of discriminating methylation-prone from methylation-resistant CpG islands with 82% accuracy. The data indicate that CpG islands differ in their intrinsic susceptibility to de novo methylation, and suggest that the propensity for a CpG island to become aberrantly methylated can be predicted based on its sequence context. PMID:14519846

  6. Predicting aberrant CpG island methylation.

    PubMed

    Feltus, F A; Lee, E K; Costello, J F; Plass, C; Vertino, P M

    2003-10-14

    Epigenetic silencing associated with aberrant methylation of promoter region CpG islands is one mechanism leading to loss of tumor suppressor function in human cancer. Profiling of CpG island methylation indicates that some genes are more frequently methylated than others, and that each tumor type is associated with a unique set of methylated genes. However, little is known about why certain genes succumb to this aberrant event. To address this question, we used Restriction Landmark Genome Scanning to analyze the susceptibility of 1,749 unselected CpG islands to de novo methylation driven by overexpression of DNA cytosine-5-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). We found that although the overall incidence of CpG island methylation was increased in cells overexpressing DNMT1, not all loci were equally affected. The majority of CpG islands (69.9%) were resistant to de novo methylation, regardless of DNMT1 overexpression. In contrast, we identified a subset of methylation-prone CpG islands (3.8%) that were consistently hypermethylated in multiple DNMT1 overexpressing clones. Methylation-prone and methylation-resistant CpG islands were not significantly different with respect to size, C+G content, CpG frequency, chromosomal location, or promoter association. We used DNA pattern recognition and supervised learning techniques to derive a classification function based on the frequency of seven novel sequence patterns that was capable of discriminating methylation-prone from methylation-resistant CpG islands with 82% accuracy. The data indicate that CpG islands differ in their intrinsic susceptibility to de novo methylation, and suggest that the propensity for a CpG island to become aberrantly methylated can be predicted based on its sequence context.

  7. Effective wavefront aberration measurement of spectacle lenses in as-worn status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhigang; Xu, Kai; Fang, Fengzhou

    2018-04-01

    An effective wavefront aberration analysis method for measuring spectacle lenses in as-worn status was proposed and verified using an experimental apparatus based on an eye rotation model. Two strategies were employed to improve the accuracy of measurement of the effective wavefront aberrations on the corneal sphere. The influences of three as-worn parameters, the vertex distance, pantoscopic angle, and face form angle, together with the eye rotation and corresponding incident beams, were objectively and quantitatively obtained. The experimental measurements of spherical single vision and freeform progressive addition lenses demonstrate the accuracy and validity of the proposed method and experimental apparatus, which provide a potential means of achieving supernormal vision correction with customization and personalization in optimizing the as-worn status-based design of spectacle lenses and evaluating their manufacturing and imaging qualities.

  8. Generalized Doppler and aberration kernel for frequency-dependent cosmological observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasini, Siavash; Pierpaoli, Elena

    2017-11-01

    We introduce a frequency-dependent Doppler and aberration transformation kernel for the harmonic multipoles of a general cosmological observable with spin weight s , Doppler weight d and arbitrary frequency spectrum. In the context of cosmic microwave background (CMB) studies, the frequency-dependent formalism allows to correct for the motion-induced aberration and Doppler effects on individual frequency maps with different masks. It also permits to deboost background radiations with non-blackbody frequency spectra, like extragalactic foregrounds and CMB spectra with primordial spectral distortions. The formalism can also be used to correct individual E and B polarization modes and account for motion-induced E/B mixing of polarized observables with d ≠1 at different frequencies. We apply the generalized aberration kernel on polarized and unpolarized specific intensity at 100 and 217 GHz and show that the motion-induced effects typically increase with the frequency of observation. In all-sky CMB experiments, the frequency-dependence of the motion-induced effects for a blackbody spectrum are overall negligible. However in a cut-sky analysis, ignoring the frequency dependence can lead to percent level error in the polarized and unpolarized power spectra over all angular scales. In the specific cut-sky used in our analysis (b >4 5 ° ,fsky≃14 % ), and for the dipole-inferred velocity β =0.00123 typically attributed to our peculiar motion, the Doppler and aberration effects can change polarized and unpolarized power spectra of specific intensity in the CMB rest frame by 1 - 2 % , but we find the polarization cross-leakage between E and B modes to be negligible.

  9. Automatic low-order aberration compensator for solid-state slab lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xin; Dong, Lizhi; Lai, Boheng; Yang, Ping; Kong, Qingfeng; Yang, Kangjian; Liu, Yong; Tang, Guomao; Xu, Bing

    2016-09-01

    Slab geometry is a promising architecture for power scaling of solid-state lasers. By propagating the laser beams along zigzag path in the gain medium, the thermal effects can be well compensated. However, in the non-zigzag direction, the thermal effects are not compensated. Among the overall aberrations in the slab lasers, the major contributors are two low-order aberrations: astigmatism and defocus, which can range up to over 100 microns (peak to valley), leading to detracted beam quality. Another problem with slab lasers is that the output beams are generally in a rectangular aperture with high aspect ratio (normally 1:10), where square beams are favorable for many applications. In order to solve these problems, we propose an automatic low-order aberration compensation system. This system is composed of three lenses fixed on a motorized rail, one is a spherical lens and the others are cylindrical lenses. Astigmatism and defocus can be compensated by merely adjusting the distances between the lenses. Two wave-front sensors are employed in this compensation system, one is used for detecting the initial parameters of the beams, and the other one is used for detecting the remaining aberrations after correction. The adjustments of the three lenses are directly calculated based on beam parameters using ray tracing method. The initial size of the beam is 3.2mm by 26mm, and peak to valley(PV) value of the wave-front is 33.07λ(λ=1064nm). After correction, the dimension becomes 40mm by 40mm, and peak to valley (PV) value of the wave-front is less than 2 microns.

  10. A Monte-Carlo Model for the Formation of Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cornforth, Michael N.; Loucas, Brad D.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    multi-centrics were also recorded. Conclusion: High-LET DNA damage affects the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations. The ratio of rings to dicentrics is correct for the genomic size cut-offs corresponding to available experimental data. The present work predicts a relative abundance of small rings following irradiation by heavy ions.

  11. Relationships between chromosome structure and chromosomal aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, Yuri; Andreev, Sergey

    An interphase nucleus of human lymphocyte was simulated by the novel Monte Carlo tech-nique. The main features of interphase chromosome structure and packaging were taken into account: different levels of chromatin organisation; nonrandom localisation of chromosomes within a nucleus; chromosome loci dynamics. All chromosomes in a nucleus were modelled as polymer globules. A dynamic pattern of intra/interchromosomal contacts was simulated. The detailed information about chromosomal contacts, such as distribution of intrachromoso-mal contacts over the length of each chromosome and dependence of contact probability on genomic separation between chromosome loci, were calculated and compared to the new exper-imental data obtained by the Hi-C technique. Types and frequencies of simple and complex radiation-induced chromosomal exchange aberrations (CA) induced by X-rays were predicted with taking formation and decay of chromosomal contacts into account. Distance dependence of exchange formation probability was calculated directly. mFISH data for human lymphocytes were analysed. The calculated frequencies of simple CA agreed with the experimental data. Complex CA were underestimated despite the dense packaging of chromosome territories within a nucleus. Possible influence of chromosome-nucleus structural organisation on the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations is discussed.

  12. Impact of Primary Spherical Aberration, Spatial Frequency and Stiles Crawford Apodization on Wavefront determined Refractive Error: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Renfeng; Bradley, Arthur; Thibos, Larry N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that pupil apodization is the basis for central pupil bias of spherical refractions in eyes with spherical aberration. Methods We employed Fourier computational optics in which we vary spherical aberration levels, pupil size, and pupil apodization (Stiles Crawford Effect) within the pupil function, from which point spread functions and optical transfer functions were computed. Through-focus analysis determined the refractive correction that optimized retinal image quality. Results For a large pupil (7 mm), as spherical aberration levels increase, refractions that optimize the visual Strehl ratio mirror refractions that maximize high spatial frequency modulation in the image and both focus a near paraxial region of the pupil. These refractions are not affected by Stiles Crawford Effect apodization. Refractions that optimize low spatial frequency modulation come close to minimizing wavefront RMS, and vary with level of spherical aberration and Stiles Crawford Effect. In the presence of significant levels of spherical aberration (e.g. C40 = 0.4 µm, 7mm pupil), low spatial frequency refractions can induce −0.7D myopic shift compared to high SF refraction, and refractions that maximize image contrast of a 3 cycle per degree square-wave grating can cause −0.75D myopic drift relative to refractions that maximize image sharpness. Discussion Because of small depth of focus associated with high spatial frequency stimuli, the large change in dioptric power across the pupil caused by spherical aberration limits the effective aperture contributing to the image of high spatial frequencies. Thus, when imaging high spatial frequencies, spherical aberration effectively induces an annular aperture defining that portion of the pupil contributing to a well-focused image. As spherical focus is manipulated during the refraction procedure, the dimensions of the annular aperture change. Image quality is maximized when the inner radius of the induced

  13. Whole eye wavefront aberrations in Mexican male subjects.

    PubMed

    Cantú, Roberto; Rosales, Marco A; Tepichín, Eduardo; Curioca, Andrée; Montes, Victor; Bonilla, Julio

    2004-01-01

    To analyze the characteristics, incidence, and appearance of wavefront aberrations in undilated, normal, unoperated eyes. Eighty-eight eyes of 44 healthy male Mexican subjects (mean age 25.32 years, range 18 to 36 yr) were divided into three groups based on uncorrected visual acuity of greater than or equal to 20/20, 20/30, or 20/40. UCVA measurements were obtained using an Acuity Max computer screen chart. Wavefront aberrations were measured with the Nidek OPD-Scan ARK 10000, Ver. 1.11b. All measurements were carried out at the same center by the same technician during a single session, following manufacturer instructions. Background illumination was 3 Lux. Wavefront aberration measurements for each group were statistically analyzed using StatView; an average eye was characterized and the resulting aberrations were simulated using MATLAB. We obtained wavefront aberration maps for the 20/20 undilated normal unoperated eyes for total, low, and high order aberration coefficients. Wavefront maps for right eyes were practically the same as those for left eyes. Higher aberrations did not contribute substantially to total wavefront analysis. Average aberrations of this "normal eye" will be used as criteria to decide the necessity of wavefront-guided ablation in our facilities. We will focus on the nearly zero average of high order aberrations in this normal whole eye as a reference to be matched.

  14. Dynamic accommodation with simulated targets blurred with high order aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Gambra, Enrique; Wang, Yinan; Yuan, Jing; Kruger, Philip B.; Marcos, Susana

    2010-01-01

    High order aberrations have been suggested to play a role in determining the direction of accommodation. We have explored the effect of retinal blur induced by high order aberrations on dynamic accommodation by measuring the accommodative response to sinusoidal variations in accommodative demand (1–3 D). The targets were blurred with 0.3 and 1 μm (for a 3-mm pupil) of defocus, coma, trefoil and spherical aberration. Accommodative gain decreased significantly when 1-μm of aberration was induced. We found a strong correlation between the relative accommodative gain (and phase lag) and the contrast degradation imposed on the target at relevant spatial frequencies. PMID:20600230

  15. Imaging characteristics of Zernike and annular polynomial aberrations.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Virendra N; Díaz, José Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The general equations for the point-spread function (PSF) and optical transfer function (OTF) are given for any pupil shape, and they are applied to optical imaging systems with circular and annular pupils. The symmetry properties of the PSF, the real and imaginary parts of the OTF, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a system with a circular pupil aberrated by a Zernike circle polynomial aberration are derived. The interferograms and PSFs are illustrated for some typical polynomial aberrations with a sigma value of one wave, and 3D PSFs and MTFs are shown for 0.1 wave. The Strehl ratio is also calculated for polynomial aberrations with a sigma value of 0.1 wave, and shown to be well estimated from the sigma value. The numerical results are compared with the corresponding results in the literature. Because of the same angular dependence of the corresponding annular and circle polynomial aberrations, the symmetry properties of systems with annular pupils aberrated by an annular polynomial aberration are the same as those for a circular pupil aberrated by a corresponding circle polynomial aberration. They are also illustrated with numerical examples.

  16. Aberration design of zoom lens systems using thick lens modules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinkai; Chen, Xiaobo; Xi, Juntong; Wu, Zhuoqi

    2014-12-20

    A systematic approach for the aberration design of a zoom lens system using a thick lens module is presented. Each component is treated as a thick lens module at the beginning of the design. A thick lens module refers to a thick lens component with a real lens structure, like lens materials, lens curvatures, lens thicknesses, and lens interval distances. All nine third-order aberrations of a thick lens component are considered during the design. The relationship of component aberrations in different zoom positions can be approximated from the aberration shift. After minimizing the aberrations of the zoom lens system, the nine third-order aberrations of every lens component can be determined. Then the thick lens structure of every lens component can be determined after optimization according to their first-order properties and third-order aberration targets. After a third optimization for minimum practical third-order aberrations of a zoom lens system, the aberration design using the thick lens module is complete, which provides a practical zoom lens system with thick lens structures. A double-sided telecentric zoom lens system is designed using the thick lens module in this paper, which shows that this method is practical for zoom lens design.

  17. 77 FR 72199 - Technical Corrections; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... changes. This correcting amendment is necessary to correct the statutory authority that is cited in one of... is necessary to correct the statutory authority that is cited in the authority citation for part 171...

  18. Unbiased Estimation of Refractive State of Aberrated Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jesson; Vasudevan, Balamurali; Himebaugh, Nikole; Bradley, Arthur; Thibos, Larry

    2011-01-01

    To identify unbiased methods for estimating the target vergence required to maximize visual acuity based on wavefront aberration measurements. Experiments were designed to minimize the impact of confounding factors that have hampered previous research. Objective wavefront refractions and subjective acuity refractions were obtained for the same monochromatic wavelength. Accommodation and pupil fluctuations were eliminated by cycloplegia. Unbiased subjective refractions that maximize visual acuity for high contrast letters were performed with a computer controlled forced choice staircase procedure, using 0.125 diopter steps of defocus. All experiments were performed for two pupil diameters (3mm and 6mm). As reported in the literature, subjective refractive error does not change appreciably when the pupil dilates. For 3 mm pupils most metrics yielded objective refractions that were about 0.1D more hyperopic than subjective acuity refractions. When pupil diameter increased to 6 mm, this bias changed in the myopic direction and the variability between metrics also increased. These inaccuracies were small compared to the precision of the measurements, which implies that most metrics provided unbiased estimates of refractive state for medium and large pupils. A variety of image quality metrics may be used to determine ocular refractive state for monochromatic (635nm) light, thereby achieving accurate results without the need for empirical correction factors. PMID:21777601

  19. Whispering gallery mode photoemission from self-assembled poly-para-phenylenevinylene microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kushida, Soh; Yamamoto, Yohei; Braam, Daniel

    2015-12-31

    Poly[2-methoxy-5-(3,7-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MDMOPPV) self-assembles to form well-defined spheres with several micrometers in diameter upon addition of a methanol vapor into a chloroform solution of MDMOPPV. The single sphere of MDMOPPV with 5.7 µm diameter exhibits whispering gallery mode (WGM) photoemission upon excitation with focused laser beam. The periodic emission lines are characterized by transverse electric and magnetic WGMs, and Q-factor reaches ∼345 at the highest.

  20. X-ray photoemission analysis of chemically modified TlBr surfaces for improved radiation detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, A. J.; Voss, L. F.; Beck, P. R.; ...

    2013-01-12

    We subjected device-grade TlBr to various chemical treatments used in room temperature radiation detector fabrication to determine the resulting surface composition and electronic structure. As-polished TlBr was treated separately with HCl, SOCl 2, Br:MeOH and HF solutions. High-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and Tl 4f, Br 3d, Cl 2p and S 2p core lines were used to evaluate surface chemistry and shallow heterojunction formation. Surface chemistry and valence band electronic structure were correlated with the goal of optimizing the long-term stability and radiation response.

  1. X-ray photoemission analysis of chemically modified TlBr surfaces for improved radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, A. J.; Voss, L. F.; Beck, P. R.; Graff, R. T.; Conway, A. M.; Nikolic, R. J.; Payne, S. A.; Lee, J.-S.; Kim, H.; Cirignano, L.; Shah, K.

    2013-04-01

    Device-grade TlBr was subjected to various chemical treatments used in room temperature radiation detector fabrication to determine the resulting surface composition and electronic structure. As-polished TlBr was treated separately with HCl, SOCl2, Br:MeOH, and HF solutions. High-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and Tl 4f, Br 3d, Cl 2p, and S 2p core lines were used to evaluate surface chemistry and shallow heterojunction formation. Surface chemistry and valence band electronic structure were correlated with the goal of optimizing the long-term stability and radiation response.

  2. Surface intervalley scattering on GaAs(110): Direct observation with picosecond laser photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haight, R.; Silberman, J. A.

    1989-02-01

    Angle-resolved laser photoemission investigations of the laser excited GaAs(110) surface have revealed a previously unobserved valley of the C3 unoccupied surface band whose minimum is at X¯ in the surface Brillouin zone. Electron population in this valley increases only as a result of scattering from the directly photoexcited valley at Γ¯. With high momentum resolution, we have isolated the dynamic electron population changes at both Γ¯ and X¯ and deduced the scattering time between the two valleys.

  3. An ultrafast electron microscope gun driven by two-photon photoemission from a nanotip cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Bormann, Reiner; Strauch, Stefanie; Schäfer, Sascha, E-mail: schaefer@ph4.physik.uni-goettingen.de

    We experimentally and numerically investigate the performance of an advanced ultrafast electron source, based on two-photon photoemission from a tungsten needle cathode incorporated in an electron microscope gun geometry. Emission properties are characterized as a function of the electrostatic gun settings, and operating conditions leading to laser-triggered electron beams of very low emittance (below 20 nm mrad) are identified. The results highlight the excellent suitability of optically driven nano-cathodes for the further development of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy.

  4. Surface-plasmon enhanced photoemission of a silver nano-patterned photocathode

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Z.; Li, R.; To, H.; ...

    2016-11-22

    Here, nano-patterned photocathodes (NPC) take advantage of plasmonic effects to resonantly increase absorption of light and localize electromagnetic field intensity on metal surfaces leading to surface-plasmon enhanced photoemission. In this paper, we report the status of NPC research at UCLA including in particular the optimization of the dimensions of a nanohole array on a silver wafer to enhance plasmonic response at 800 nm light, the development of a spectrally-resolved reflectivity measurement setup for quick nanopattern validation, and of a novel cathode plug to enable high power tests of NPCs on single crystal substrates in a high gradient radiofrequency gun.

  5. Photoemission study of tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum/aluminum oxide/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Huanjun; Zorba, Serkan; Gao Yongli

    2006-12-01

    The evolution of the interface electronic structure of a sandwich structure involving aluminum oxide and tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq), i.e. (Alq/AlO{sub x}/Alq), has been investigated with photoemission spectroscopy. Strong chemical reactions have been observed due to aluminum deposition onto the Alq substrate. The subsequent oxygen exposure releases some of the Alq molecules from the interaction with aluminum. Finally, the deposition of the top Alq layer leads to an asymmetry in the electronic energy level alignment with respect to the AlO{sub x} interlayer.

  6. Photoemission perspective on pseudogap, superconducting fluctuations, and charge order in cuprates: a review of recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishik, I. M.

    2018-06-01

    In the course of seeking the microscopic mechanism of superconductivity in cuprate high temperature superconductors, the pseudogap phase— the very abnormal ‘normal’ state on the hole-doped side— has proven to be as big of a quandary as superconductivity itself. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a powerful tool for assessing the momentum-dependent phenomenology of the pseudogap, and recent technological developments have permitted a more detailed understanding. This report reviews recent progress in understanding the relationship between superconductivity and the pseudogap, the Fermi arc phenomena, and the relationship between charge order and pseudogap from the perspective of ARPES measurements.

  7. Surface-plasmon enhanced photoemission of a silver nano-patterned photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Li, R.; To, H.; Andonian, G.; Pirez, E.; Meade, D.; Maxson, J.; Musumeci, P.

    2017-09-01

    Nano-patterned photocathodes (NPC) take advantage of plasmonic effects to resonantly increase absorption of light and localize electromagnetic field intensity on metal surfaces leading to surface-plasmon enhanced photoemission. In this paper, we report the status of NPC research at UCLA including in particular the optimization of the dimensions of a nanohole array on a silver wafer to enhance plasmonic response at 800 nm light, the development of a spectrally-resolved reflectivity measurement setup for quick nanopattern validation, and of a novel cathode plug to enable high power tests of NPCs on single crystal substrates in a high gradient radiofrequency gun.

  8. Unoccupied Surface State on Ag(110) as Revealed by Inverse Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reihl, B.; Schlittler, R. R.; Neff, H.

    1984-05-01

    By use of the new technique of k-resolved inverse photoemission spectroscopy, an unoccupied s-like surface state on Ag(110) has been detected, which lies within the projected L2'-->L1 gap of the bulk. At the X¯ point of the surface Brillouin zone, the energy of the surface state is 1.65 eV above the Fermi level EF, and exhibits a band dispersion E(k∥) towards higher energies. The surface-state emission is immediately quenched when the surface is exposed to very small amounts of oxygen or hydrogen.

  9. An innovative Yb-based ultrafast deep ultraviolet source for time-resolved photoemission experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Dallera, C.

    2014-12-15

    Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study ultrafast electronic dynamics in solids. Here, an innovative optical setup based on a 100-kHz Yb laser source is presented. Exploiting non-collinear optical parametric amplification and sum-frequency generation, ultrashort pump (hν = 1.82 eV) and ultraviolet probe (hν = 6.05 eV) pulses are generated. Overall temporal and instrumental energy resolutions of, respectively, 85 fs and 50 meV are obtained. Time- and angle-resolved measurements on BiTeI semiconductor are presented to show the capabilities of the setup.

  10. Surface-plasmon enhanced photoemission of a silver nano-patterned photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Li, R.; To, H.

    Here, nano-patterned photocathodes (NPC) take advantage of plasmonic effects to resonantly increase absorption of light and localize electromagnetic field intensity on metal surfaces leading to surface-plasmon enhanced photoemission. In this paper, we report the status of NPC research at UCLA including in particular the optimization of the dimensions of a nanohole array on a silver wafer to enhance plasmonic response at 800 nm light, the development of a spectrally-resolved reflectivity measurement setup for quick nanopattern validation, and of a novel cathode plug to enable high power tests of NPCs on single crystal substrates in a high gradient radiofrequency gun.

  11. Optical study of HgCdTe infrared photodetectors using internal photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, Yan-Feng; Unil Perera, A. G., E-mail: uperera@gsu.edu; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.

    2014-03-31

    We report a study of internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) applied to a n-type Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te/Hg{sub 1−y}Cd{sub y}Te heterojunction. An exponential line-shape of the absorption tail in HgCdTe is identified by IPE fittings of the near-threshold quantum yield spectra. The reduction of quantum yield (at higher photon energy) below the fitting value is explained as a result of carrier-phonon scatterings. In addition, the obtained bias independence of the IPE threshold indicates a negligible electron barrier at the heterojunction interface.

  12. Electronic structure of Mo1-x Re x alloys studied through resonant photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Shyam; Banik, Soma; Sharath Chandra, L. S.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Lodha, G. S.; Pandey, Sudhir K.; Phase, D. M.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-08-01

    We studied the electronic structure of Mo-rich Mo1-x Re x alloys (0≤slant x≤slant 0.4 ) using valence band photoemission spectroscopy in the photon energy range 23-70 eV and density of states calculations. Comparison of the photoemission spectra with the density of states calculations suggests that, with respect to the Fermi level E F, the d states lie mostly in the binding energy range 0 to  -6 eV, whereas s states lie in the binding energy range  -4 to  -10 eV. We observed two resonances in the photoemission spectra of each sample, one at about 35 eV photon energy and the other at about 45 eV photon energy. Our analysis suggests that the resonance at 35 eV photon energy is related to the Mo 4p-5s transition and the resonance at 45 eV photon energy is related to the contribution from both the Mo 4p-4d transition (threshold: 42 eV) and the Re 5p-5d transition (threshold: 46 eV). In the constant initial state plot, the resonance at 35 eV incident photon energy for binding energy features in the range E F (BE  =  0) to  -5 eV becomes progressively less prominent with increasing Re concentration x and vanishes for x  >  0.2. The difference plots obtained by subtracting the valence band photoemission spectrum of Mo from that of Mo1-x Re x alloys, measured at 47 eV photon energy, reveal that the Re d-like states appear near E F when Re is alloyed with Mo. These results indicate that interband s-d interaction, which is weak in Mo, increases with increasing x and influences the nature of the superconductivity in alloys with higher x.

  13. Accurate determination of the valence band edge in hard x-ray photoemission spectra using GW theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lischner, Johannes, E-mail: jlischner597@gmail.com; Department of Physics and Department of Materials and the Thomas Young Centre for Theory and Simulation of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ; Nemšák, Slavomír

    We introduce a new method for determining accurate values of the valence-band maximum in x-ray photoemission spectra. Specifically, we align the sharpest peak in the valence-band region of the experimental spectrum with the corresponding feature of a theoretical valence-band density of states curve from ab initio GW theory calculations. This method is particularly useful for soft and hard x-ray photoemission studies of materials with a mixture of valence-band characters, where strong matrix element effects can render standard methods for extracting the valence-band maximum unreliable. We apply our method to hydrogen-terminated boron-doped diamond, which is a promising substrate material for novelmore » solar cell devices. By carrying out photoemission experiments with variable light polarizations, we verify the accuracy of our analysis and the general validity of the method.« less

  14. Resonant photoemission study of pyrite-type NiS2, CoS2 and FeS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, A.; Mamiya, K.; Mizokawa, T.; Miyadai, T.; Sekiguchi, T.; Takahashi, H.; Môri, N.; Suga, S.

    1996-12-01

    The electronic structure of pyrite-type NiS2, CoS2, and FeS2 has been studied by photoemission spectroscopy. From resonant photoemission studies and configuration-interaction cluster-model analysis of the spectra, NiS2 is found to be a charge-transfer-type insulator, the band gap of which is formed between the occupied S 3p and the empty Ni 3d states. Cluster-model calculations indicate that the short Fe-S distance favors the low-spin (S=0) ground state in FeS2 compared to the high-spin FeS. Resonant photoemission results indicate a sign of electron correlation in the nonmagnetic semiconductor FeS2.

  15. Overlapped Fourier coding for optical aberration removal

    PubMed Central

    Horstmeyer, Roarke; Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Zheng, Guoan; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    We present an imaging procedure that simultaneously optimizes a camera’s resolution and retrieves a sample’s phase over a sequence of snapshots. The technique, termed overlapped Fourier coding (OFC), first digitally pans a small aperture across a camera’s pupil plane with a spatial light modulator. At each aperture location, a unique image is acquired. The OFC algorithm then fuses these low-resolution images into a full-resolution estimate of the complex optical field incident upon the detector. Simultaneously, the algorithm utilizes redundancies within the acquired dataset to computationally estimate and remove unknown optical aberrations and system misalignments via simulated annealing. The result is an imaging system that can computationally overcome its optical imperfections to offer enhanced resolution, at the expense of taking multiple snapshots over time. PMID:25321982

  16. Model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics system for large aberrations and extended objects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huizhen; Soloviev, Oleg; Verhaegen, Michel

    2015-09-21

    A model-based wavefront sensorless (WFSless) adaptive optics (AO) system with a 61-element deformable mirror is simulated to correct the imaging of a turbulence-degraded extended object. A fast closed-loop control algorithm, which is based on the linear relation between the mean square of the aberration gradients and the second moment of the image intensity distribution, is used to generate the control signals for the actuators of the deformable mirror (DM). The restoration capability and the convergence rate of the AO system are investigated with different turbulence strength wave-front aberrations. Simulation results show the model-based WFSless AO system can restore those images degraded by different turbulence strengths successfully and obtain the correction very close to the achievable capability of the given DM. Compared with the ideal correction of 61-element DM, the averaged relative error of RMS value is 6%. The convergence rate of AO system is independent of the turbulence strength and only depends on the number of actuators of DM.

  17. Absence of photoemission from the Fermi level in potassium intercalated picene and coronene films: structure, polaron, or correlation physics?

    PubMed

    Mahns, Benjamin; Roth, Friedrich; Knupfer, Martin

    2012-04-07

    The electronic structure of potassium intercalated picene and coronene films has been studied using photoemission spectroscopy. Picene has additionally been intercalated using sodium. Upon alkali metal addition core level as well as valence band photoemission data signal a filling of previously unoccupied states of the two molecular materials due to charge transfer from potassium. In contrast to the observation of superconductivity in K(x)picene and K(x)coronene (x ~ 3), none of the films studied shows emission from the Fermi level, i.e., we find no indication for a metallic ground state. Several reasons for this observation are discussed.

  18. Modified Matching Ronchi Test to Visualize Lens Aberrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassani, Kh; Ziafi, H. Hooshmand

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a modification to the matching Ronchi test to visualize lens aberrations with simple and inexpensive equipment available in educational optics labs. This method can help instructors and students to observe and estimate lens aberrations in real time. It is also a semi-quantitative tool for primary tests in research labs. In this work…

  19. Aberrated laser beams in terms of Zernike polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alda, Javier; Alonso, Jose; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    1996-11-01

    The characterization of light beams has devoted a lot of attention in the past decade. Several formalisms have been presented to treat the problem of parameter invariance and characterization in the propagation of light beam along ideal, ABCD, optical systems. The hard and soft apertured optical systems have been treated too. Also some aberrations have been analyzed, but it has not appeared a formalism able to treat the problem as a whole. In this contribution we use a classical approach to describe the problem of aberrated, and therefore apertured, light beams. The wavefront aberration is included in a pure phase term expanded in terms of the Zernike polynomials. Then, we can use the relation between the lower order Zernike polynomia and the Seidel or third order aberrations. We analyze the astigmatism, the spherical aberration and the coma, and we show how higher order aberrations can be taken into account. We have calculated the divergence, and the radius of curvature of such aberrated beams and the influence of these aberrations in the quality of the light beam. Some numerical simulations have been done to illustrate the method.

  20. Aberrant Breast in a Rare Site: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yeniay, Levent; Mulailwa, Kilongo; Asgerov, Elmir; Hoşcoşkun, Cüneyt; Zekioğlu, Osman

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant breast tissue is an anomaly in the embryogenesis of the breast that is found along the mammary ridge or out of that line. We report a case of a 71-year-old female patient with an abdominal aberrant breast tissue found incidentally in a piece of mesenteric biopsy. The histological features were consistent with breast tissue. PMID:22792115

  1. Accuracy of modal wavefront estimation from eye transverse aberration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzh, Igor H.; Sokurenko, Vyacheslav M.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of random errors in measurement of eye transverse aberrations on the accuracy of reconstructing wave aberration as well as ametropia and astigmatism parameters is investigated. The dependence of mentioned errors on a ratio between the number of measurement points and the number of polynomial coefficients is found for different pupil location of measurement points. Recommendations are proposed for setting these ratios.

  2. Structural centrosome aberrations promote non-cell-autonomous invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Ganier, Olivier; Schnerch, Dominik; Oertle, Philipp; Lim, Roderick Yh; Plodinec, Marija; Nigg, Erich A

    2018-05-02

    Centrosomes are the main microtubule-organizing centers of animal cells. Although centrosome aberrations are common in tumors, their consequences remain subject to debate. Here, we studied the impact of structural centrosome aberrations, induced by deregulated expression of ninein-like protein (NLP), on epithelial spheres grown in Matrigel matrices. We demonstrate that NLP-induced structural centrosome aberrations trigger the escape ("budding") of living cells from epithelia. Remarkably, all cells disseminating into the matrix were undergoing mitosis. This invasive behavior reflects a novel mechanism that depends on the acquisition of two distinct properties. First, NLP-induced centrosome aberrations trigger a re-organization of the cytoskeleton, which stabilizes microtubules and weakens E-cadherin junctions during mitosis. Second, atomic force microscopy reveals that cells harboring these centrosome aberrations display increased stiffness. As a consequence, mitotic cells are pushed out of mosaic epithelia, particularly if they lack centrosome aberrations. We conclude that centrosome aberrations can trigger cell dissemination through a novel, non-cell-autonomous mechanism, raising the prospect that centrosome aberrations contribute to the dissemination of metastatic cells harboring normal centrosomes. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  3. Optical aberrations measurement with a low cost optometric instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, Walter D.; Muñoz-Escrivá, L.; Pons, A.; Martínez-Corral, M.

    2002-08-01

    A simple experimental method for measuring optical aberrations of a single lens is proposed. The technique is based on the use of an optometric instrument employed for the assessment of the refractive state of the eye: the retinoscope. Experimental results for spherical aberration and astigmatism are obtained.

  4. Statistical virtual eye model based on wavefront aberration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie-Mei; Liu, Chun-Ling; Luo, Yi-Ning; Liu, Yi-Guang; Hu, Bing-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Wavefront aberration affects the quality of retinal image directly. This paper reviews the representation and reconstruction of wavefront aberration, as well as the construction of virtual eye model based on Zernike polynomial coefficients. In addition, the promising prospect of virtual eye model is emphasized. PMID:23173112

  5. Characterising a holographic modal phase mask for the detection of ocular aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, A. D.; Leyva, D. Gil; Diaz-Santana, L.; Wilkinson, T. D.; Zhong, J. J.

    2005-12-01

    The accurate measurement of the double-pass ocular wave front has been shown to have a broad range of applications from LASIK surgery to adaptively corrected retinal imaging. The ocular wave front can be accurately described by a small number of Zernike circle polynomials. The modal wave front sensor was first proposed by Neil et al. and allows the coefficients of the individual Zernike modes to be measured directly. Typically the aberrations measured with the modal sensor are smaller than those seen in the ocular wave front. In this work, we investigated a technique for adapting a modal phase mask for the sensing of the ocular wave front. This involved extending the dynamic range of the sensor by increasing the pinhole size to 2.4mm and optimising the mask bias to 0.75λ. This was found to decrease the RMS error by up to a factor of three for eye-like aberrations with amplitudes up to 0.2μm. For aberrations taken from a sample of real-eye measurements a 20% decrease in the RMS error was observed.

  6. Higher-order aberrations after wavefront-optimized photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Randleman, J. Bradley; Perez-Straziota, Claudia E.; Hu, Michelle H.; White, Alfred J.; Loft, Evan S.; Stulting, R. Doyle

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To analyze the changes in higher-order aberrations (HOAs) that occur after wavefront-optimized photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). SETTING Private practice, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. METHODS This retrospective analysis comprised eyes that had PRK or LASIK from June 2004 through October 2005. Postoperative outcome measures included 3-month uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE), changes in the root mean square (RMS) and grouped coefficient HOAs (microns) measured with a corneal analyzer, and subjective assessment of visual aberrations. RESULTS One hundred consecutive eyes of 54 patients had PRK, and 100 contemporaneous consecutive eyes of 71 patients had LASIK. The PRK and LASIK populations were similar in general demographics, preoperative HOAs, and postoperative UCVA and BSCVA. The mean MRSE was slightly hyperopic after PRK (mean +0.11 diopters [D]) and slightly myopic after LASIK (mean −0.19 D) (P<.0001). There were no statistically significant changes in RMS or grouped coefficient HOA values after PRK or LASIK, nor were there significant differences in postoperative RMS or grouped coefficient HOA values between PRK and LASIK. One percent of PRK and LASIK patients reported a subjective increase in postoperative visual aberrations; 5% reported a subjective improvement postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS Wavefront-optimized excimer laser surgery did not induce significant HOAs after PRK or LASIK. The 2 techniques were equally efficacious and had equivalent postoperative HOA profiles. PMID:19185240

  7. Multiphoton imaging microscopy at deeper layers with adaptive optics control of spherical aberration.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Juan M; Skorsetz, Martin; Palacios, Raquel; Gualda, Emilio J; Artal, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Despite the inherent confocality and optical sectioning capabilities of multiphoton microscopy, three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of thick samples is limited by the specimen-induced aberrations. The combination of immersion objectives and sensorless adaptive optics (AO) techniques has been suggested to overcome this difficulty. However, a complex plane-by-plane correction of aberrations is required, and its performance depends on a set of image-based merit functions. We propose here an alternative approach to increase penetration depth in 3-D multiphoton microscopy imaging. It is based on the manipulation of the spherical aberration (SA) of the incident beam with an AO device while performing fast tomographic multiphoton imaging. When inducing SA, the image quality at best focus is reduced; however, better quality images are obtained from deeper planes within the sample. This is a compromise that enables registration of improved 3-D multiphoton images using nonimmersion objectives. Examples on ocular tissues and nonbiological samples providing different types of nonlinear signal are presented. The implementation of this technique in a future clinical instrument might provide a better visualization of corneal structures in living eyes.

  8. Image based method for aberration measurement of lithographic tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuang; Tao, Bo; Guo, Yongxing; Li, Gongfa

    2018-01-01

    Information of lens aberration of lithographic tools is important as it directly affects the intensity distribution in the image plane. Zernike polynomials are commonly used for a mathematical description of lens aberrations. Due to the advantage of lower cost and easier implementation of tools, image based measurement techniques have been widely used. Lithographic tools are typically partially coherent systems that can be described by a bilinear model, which entails time consuming calculations and does not lend a simple and intuitive relationship between lens aberrations and the resulted images. Previous methods for retrieving lens aberrations in such partially coherent systems involve through-focus image measurements and time-consuming iterative algorithms. In this work, we propose a method for aberration measurement in lithographic tools, which only requires measuring two images of intensity distribution. Two linear formulations are derived in matrix forms that directly relate the measured images to the unknown Zernike coefficients. Consequently, an efficient non-iterative solution is obtained.

  9. Surgical and healing changes to ocular aberrations following refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jochen; Schwiegerling, Jim

    2003-07-01

    Purpose: To measure ocular aberrations before and at several time periods after LASIK surgery to determine the change to the aberration structure of the eye. Methods: A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was used to measure 88 LASIK patients pre-operatively and at 1 week and 12 months following surgery. Reconstructed wavefront errors are compared to look at induced differences. Manifest refraction was measured at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months following surgery. Sphere, cylinder, spherical aberration, and pupil diameter are analyzed. Results: A dramatic elevation in spherical aberration is seen following surgery. This elevation appears almost immediately and remains for the duration of the study. A temporary increase in pupil size is seen following surgery. Conclusions: LASIK surgery dramatically reduces defocus and astigmatism in the eye, but simultaneously increases spherical aberration levels. This increase occurs at the time of surgery and is not an effect of the healing response.

  10. Hydronephrosis by an Aberrant Renal Artery: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung Seok; Jeong, Taek Kyun; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kim, Soo Wan; Kim, Nam Ho; Choi, Ki Chul; Jeong, Yong Yeon

    2003-01-01

    Ureteropelvic junction obstruction is usually intrinsic and is most common in children. Aberrant renal arteries are present in about 30% of individuals. Aberrant renal arteries to the inferior pole cross anteriorly to the ureter and may cause hydronephrosis. To the best of our knowledge, although there are some papers about aberrant renal arteries producing ureteropelvic junction obstruction, there is no report of a case which is diagnosed by the new modalities, such as computed tomography angiogram (CTA) or magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA). We describe a 36-year-old woman with right hydronephrosis. Kidney ultrasonogram and excretory urogram revealed right hydronephrosis. CTA and MRA clearly displayed an aberrant renal artery and hydronephrosis. The patient underwent surgical exploration. For the evaluation of hydronephrosis by an aberrant renal artery, use of CTA and MRA is advocated. PMID:12760271

  11. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M.; Yi, Ming

    2016-01-15

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 10{sup 12} photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å{sup −1}, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å{sup −1}, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone ofmore » most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors.« less

  12. Rotatable spin-polarized electron source for inverse-photoemission experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stolwijk, S. D., E-mail: Sebastian.Stolwijk@wwu.de; Wortelen, H.; Schmidt, A. B.

    2014-01-15

    We present a ROtatable Spin-polarized Electron source (ROSE) for the use in spin- and angle-resolved inverse-photoemission (SR-IPE) experiments. A key feature of the ROSE is a variable direction of the transversal electron beam polarization. As a result, the inverse-photoemission experiment becomes sensitive to two orthogonal in-plane polarization directions, and, for nonnormal electron incidence, to the out-of-plane polarization component. We characterize the ROSE and test its performance on the basis of SR-IPE experiments. Measurements on magnetized Ni films on W(110) serve as a reference to demonstrate the variable spin sensitivity. Moreover, investigations of the unoccupied spin-dependent surface electronic structure of Tl/Si(111)more » highlight the capability to analyze complex phenomena like spin rotations in momentum space. Essentially, the ROSE opens the way to further studies on complex spin-dependent effects in the field of surface magnetism and spin-orbit interaction at surfaces.« less

  13. Probing the electronic and spintronic properties of buried interfaces by extremely low energy photoemission spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fetzer, Roman; Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Ohdaira, Yusuke; Naganuma, Hiroshi; Oogane, Mikihiko; Ando, Yasuo; Taira, Tomoyuki; Uemura, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Aeschlimann, Martin; Cinchetti, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) is a powerful tool to study the electronic spin and symmetry features at both surfaces and interfaces to ultrathin top layers. However, the very low mean free path of the photoelectrons usually prevents a direct access to the properties of buried interfaces. The latter are of particular interest since they crucially influence the performance of spintronic devices like magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). Here, we introduce spin-resolved extremely low energy photoemission spectroscopy (ELEPS) to provide a powerful way for overcoming this limitation. We apply ELEPS to the interface formed between the half-metallic Heusler compound Co2MnSi and the insulator MgO, prepared as in state-of-the-art Co2MnSi/MgO-based MTJs. The high accordance between the spintronic fingerprint of the free Co2MnSi surface and the Co2MnSi/MgO interface buried below up to 4 nm MgO provides clear evidence for the high interface sensitivity of ELEPS to buried interfaces. Although the absolute values of the interface spin polarization are well below 100%, the now accessible spin- and symmetry-resolved wave functions are in line with the predicted existence of non-collinear spin moments at the Co2MnSi/MgO interface, one of the mechanisms evoked to explain the controversially discussed performance loss of Heusler-based MTJs at room temperature. PMID:25702631

  14. Attosecond time-resolved streaked photoemission from Mg-covered W(110) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Qing; Thumm, Uwe

    2015-05-01

    We formulate a quantum-mechanical model for infrared-streaked photoelectron emission by an ultrashort extreme ultraviolet pulse from adsorbate-covered metal surfaces. Applying this numerical model to ultrathin Mg adsorbates on W(110) substrates, we analyze streaked photoelectron spectra and attosecond streaking time delays for photoemission from the Mg/W(110) conduction band and Mg(2p) and W(4f) core levels. Based on this analysis, we propose the use of attosecond streaking spectroscopy on adsorbate-covered surfaces with variable adsorbate thickness as a method for investigating (a) electron transport in condensed-matter systems and (b) metal-adsorbate-interface properties at subatomic length and time scales. Our calculated streaked photoemission spectra and time delays agree with recently obtained experimental data. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13491 and NSF Grant PHY-1068752.

  15. Study on photoemission surface of varied doping GaN photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jianliang; Du, Ruijuan; Ding, Huan; Gao, Youtang; Chang, Benkang

    2014-09-01

    For varied doping GaN photocathode, from bulk to surface the doping concentrations are distributed from high to low. The varied doping GaN photocathode may produce directional inside electric field within the material, so the higher quantum efficiency can be obtained. The photoemission surface of varied doping GaN photocathode is very important to the high quantum efficiency, but the forming process of the surface state after Cs activation or Cs/O activation has been not known completely. Encircling the photoemission mechanism of varied GaN photocathode, considering the experiment phenomena during the activation and the successful activation results, the varied GaN photocathode surface model [GaN(Mg):Cs]:O-Cs after activation with cesium and oxygen was given. According to GaN photocathode activation process and the change of electronic affinity, the comparatively ideal NEA property can be achieved by Cs or Cs/O activation, and higher quantum efficiency can be obtained. The results show: The effective NEA characteristic of GaN can be gotten only by Cs. [GaN(Mg):Cs] dipoles form the first dipole layer, the positive end is toward the vacuum side. In the activation processing with Cs/O, the second dipole layer is formed by O-Cs dipoles, A O-Cs dipole includes one oxygen atom and two Cs atoms, and the positive end is also toward the vacuum side thus the escape of electrons can be promoted.

  16. Nonlocal screening effects on core-level photoemission spectra investigated by large-cluster models

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, K.; Kotani, A.

    1995-08-15

    The copper 2{ital p} core-level x-ray photoemission spectrum in CuO{sub 2} plane systems is calculated by means of large-cluster models to investigate in detail the nonlocal screening effects, which were pointed out by van Veenendaal {ital et} {ital al}. [Phys. Rev. B 47, 11 462 (1993)]. Calculating the hole distributions for the initial and final states of photoemission, we show that the atomic coordination in a cluster strongly affects accessible final states. Accordingly, we point out that the interpretation for Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} given by van Veenendaal {ital et} {ital al}. is not always general. Moreover, it is shown thatmore » the spectrum can be remarkably affected by whether or not the O 2{ital p}{sub {pi}} orbits are taken into account in the calculations. We also introduce a Hartree-Fock approximation in order to treat much larger-cluster models.« less

  17. Visualizing electron dynamics in organic materials: Charge transport through molecules and angular resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kümmel, Stephan

    Being able to visualize the dynamics of electrons in organic materials is a fascinating perspective. Simulations based on time-dependent density functional theory allow to realize this hope, as they visualize the flow of charge through molecular structures in real-space and real-time. We here present results on two fundamental processes: Photoemission from organic semiconductor molecules and charge transport through molecular structures. In the first part we demonstrate that angular resolved photoemission intensities - from both theory and experiment - can often be interpreted as a visualization of molecular orbitals. However, counter-intuitive quantum-mechanical electron dynamics such as emission perpendicular to the direction of the electrical field can substantially alter the picture, adding surprising features to the molecular orbital interpretation. In a second study we calculate the flow of charge through conjugated molecules. The calculations show in real time how breaks in the conjugation can lead to a local buildup of charge and the formation of local electrical dipoles. These can interact with neighboring molecular chains. As a consequence, collections of ''molecular electrical wires'' can show distinctly different characteristics than ''classical electrical wires''. German Science Foundation GRK 1640.

  18. Tilt correction for intracavity mirror of laser with an unstable resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Xu, Bing; Yang, Wei

    2005-12-01

    The influence on outcoupled mode by introducing intracavity tilt-perturbation in confocal unstable resonator is analyzed. The intracavity mode properties and Zernike-aberration coefficient of intrcavity mirror's maladjustment are calculated theoretically. The experimental results about the relations of intracavity mirror maladjustment and the properties of mode aberration are presented by adopting Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor. The results show that the intracavity perturbation of the concave mirror has more remarkable effect on outcoupled beam-quality than that of the convex mirror. For large Fresnel-number resonator, the tilt angle of intracavity mirror has a close linear relationship with extracavity Zernike tilt coefficient. The ratio of tilt aberration coefficient approaches to the magnification of unstable resonator if equivalent perturbation is applied to concave mirror and convex mirror respectively. Furthermore, astigmatism and defocus aberration also increase with the augment of tilt aberration of beam mode. So intracavity phase-corrected elements used in unstable resonator should be close to the concave mirror. Based these results, a set of automatic control system of intracavity tilt aberration is established and the aberration-corrected results are presented and analyzed in detail.

  19. Aberration-free intraocular lenses - What does this really mean?

    PubMed

    Langenbucher, Achim; Schröder, Simon; Cayless, Alan; Eppig, Timo

    2017-09-01

    So-called aberration-free intraocular lenses (IOLs) are well established in modern cataract surgery. Usually, they are designed to perfectly refract a collimated light beam onto the focal point. We show how much aberration can be expected with such an IOL in a convergent light beam such as that found anterior to the human cornea. Additionally, the aberration in a collimated beam is estimated for an IOL that has no aberrations in the convergent beam. The convergent beam is modelled as the pencil of rays corresponding to the spherical wavefront resulting from a typical corneal power of 43m -1 . The IOLs are modelled as infinitely thin phase plates with 20m -1 optical power placed 5mm behind the cornea. Their aberrations are reported in terms of optical path length difference and longitudinal spherical aberration (LSA) of the marginal rays, as well as nominal spherical aberration (SA) calculated based on a Zernike representation of the wavefront-error at the corneal plane within a 6mm aperture. The IOL designed to have no aberrations in a collimated light beam has an optical path length difference of -1.8μm, and LSA of 0.15m -1 in the convergent beam of a typical eye. The corresponding nominal SA is 0.065μm. The IOL designed to have no aberrations in a convergent light beam has an optical path length difference of 1.8μm, and LSA of -0.15m -1 in the collimated beam. An IOL designed to have no aberrations in a collimated light beam will increase the SA of a patient's eye after implantation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  20. Wave aberrations in rhesus monkeys with vision-induced ametropias

    PubMed Central

    Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Kee, Chea-su; Hung, Li-Fang; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Huang, Juan; Roorda, Austin; Smith, Earl L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between refractive errors and high-order aberrations in infant rhesus monkeys. Specifically, we compared the monochromatic wave aberrations measured with a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor between normal monkeys and monkeys with vision-induced refractive errors. Shortly after birth, both normal monkeys and treated monkeys reared with optically induced defocus or form deprivation showed a decrease in the magnitude of high-order aberrations with age. However, the decrease in aberrations was typically smaller in the treated animals. Thus, at the end of the lens-rearing period, higher than normal amounts of aberrations were observed in treated eyes, both hyperopic and myopic eyes and treated eyes that developed astigmatism, but not spherical ametropias. The total RMS wavefront error increased with the degree of spherical refractive error, but was not correlated with the degree of astigmatism. Both myopic and hyperopic treated eyes showed elevated amounts of coma and trefoil and the degree of trefoil increased with the degree of spherical ametropia. Myopic eyes also exhibited a much higher prevalence of positive spherical aberration than normal or treated hyperopic eyes. Following the onset of unrestricted vision, the amount of high-order aberrations decreased in the treated monkeys that also recovered from the experimentally induced refractive errors. Our results demonstrate that high-order aberrations are influenced by visual experience in young primates and that the increase in high-order aberrations in our treated monkeys appears to be an optical byproduct of the vision-induced alterations in ocular growth that underlie changes in refractive error. The results from our study suggest that the higher amounts of wave aberrations observed in ametropic humans are likely to be a consequence, rather than a cause, of abnormal refractive development. PMID:17825347

  1. Chromatic aberration and the roles of double-opponent and color-luminance neurons in color vision.

    PubMed

    Vladusich, Tony

    2007-03-01

    How does the visual cortex encode color? I summarize a theory in which cortical double-opponent color neurons perform a role in color constancy and a complementary set of color-luminance neurons function to selectively correct for color fringes induced by chromatic aberration in the eye. The theory may help to resolve an ongoing debate concerning the functional properties of cortical receptive fields involved in color coding.

  2. Aberrant light directly impairs mood and learning through melanopsin-expressing neurons.

    PubMed

    LeGates, Tara A; Altimus, Cara M; Wang, Hui; Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Yang, Sunggu; Zhao, Haiqing; Kirkwood, Alfredo; Weber, E Todd; Hattar, Samer

    2012-11-22

    The daily solar cycle allows organisms to synchronize their circadian rhythms and sleep-wake cycles to the correct temporal niche. Changes in day-length, shift-work, and transmeridian travel lead to mood alterations and cognitive function deficits. Sleep deprivation and circadian disruption underlie mood and cognitive disorders associated with irregular light schedules. Whether irregular light schedules directly affect mood and cognitive functions in the context of normal sleep and circadian rhythms remains unclear. Here we show, using an aberrant light cycle that neither changes the amount and architecture of sleep nor causes changes in the circadian timing system, that light directly regulates mood-related behaviours and cognitive functions in mice. Animals exposed to the aberrant light cycle maintain daily corticosterone rhythms, but the overall levels of corticosterone are increased. Despite normal circadian and sleep structures, these animals show increased depression-like behaviours and impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation and learning. Administration of the antidepressant drugs fluoxetine or desipramine restores learning in mice exposed to the aberrant light cycle, suggesting that the mood deficit precedes the learning impairments. To determine the retinal circuits underlying this impairment of mood and learning, we examined the behavioural consequences of this light cycle in animals that lack intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. In these animals, the aberrant light cycle does not impair mood and learning, despite the presence of the conventional retinal ganglion cells and the ability of these animals to detect light for image formation. These findings demonstrate the ability of light to influence cognitive and mood functions directly through intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

  3. Optical phase aberration generation using a Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Christopher C.

    In this dissertation, a Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator is used to simulate optical aberrations in an optical system. Any optical aberration can be simulated through the use of software developed for this project. A new method of simulating atmospheric turbulence is also presented. The Earth's atmosphere is a large, non-linear, non-homogeneous medium that is constantly flowing in a random fashion that affects light as it propagates through it. The Kolmogorov model for atmospheric turbulence is a description of the nature of the wavefront perturbations introduced by the atmosphere and it is one of the most accepted models. It is supported by a variety of experimental measurements and research and is quite widely used in simulations for atmospheric imaging. This model provides a statistical description of how random fluctuations in humidity and temperature affect the refractive index of the atmosphere for imaging through atmospheric turbulence. These refractive index fluctuations in turn affect the propagation of light through the atmosphere. An adaptive optical system can be developed to correct these wavefront perturbations for an optical system. However, prior to deployment, an adaptive optical system requires calibration and full characterization in the laboratory. Creating realistic atmospheric simulations is often expensive and computationally intensive using common techniques. To combat some of these issues often the temporal properties in the simulation are neglected. This dissertation outlines a new method developed for generating atmospheric turbulence and a testbed that simulates its aberrations far more inexpensively and with greater fidelity using a Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator. This system allows the simulation of atmospheric seeing conditions ranging from very poor to very good and different algorithms may be easily employed on the device for comparison. These simulations can be dynamically generated and modified very quickly and

  4. Aberrant adhesion impacts early development in a Dictyostelium model for juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Robert J.; Myre, Michael A.; Cotman, Susan L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), also known as Batten disease, refers to a group of severe neurodegenerative disorders that primarily affect children. The most common subtype of the disease is caused by loss-of-function mutations in CLN3, which is conserved across model species from yeast to human. The precise function of the CLN3 protein is not known, which has made targeted therapy development challenging. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, loss of Cln3 causes aberrant mid-to-late stage multicellular development. In this study, we show that Cln3-deficiency causes aberrant adhesion and aggregation during the early stages of Dictyostelium development. cln3− cells form ∼30% more multicellular aggregates that are comparatively smaller than those formed by wild-type cells. Loss of Cln3 delays aggregation, but has no significant effect on cell speed or cAMP-mediated chemotaxis. The aberrant aggregation of cln3− cells cannot be corrected by manually pulsing cells with cAMP. Moreover, there are no significant differences between wild-type and cln3− cells in the expression of genes linked to cAMP chemotaxis (e.g., adenylyl cyclase, acaA; the cAMP receptor, carA; cAMP phosphodiesterase, pdsA; g-protein α 9 subunit, gpaI). However, during this time in development, cln3− cells show reduced cell-substrate and cell-cell adhesion, which correlate with changes in the levels of the cell adhesion proteins CadA and CsaA. Specifically, loss of Cln3 decreases the intracellular level of CsaA and increases the amount of soluble CadA in conditioned media. Together, these results suggest that the aberrant aggregation of cln3− cells is due to reduced adhesion during the early stages of development. Revealing the molecular basis underlying this phenotype may provide fresh new insight into CLN3 function. PMID:27669405

  5. Correcting lenticular astigmatism by reinstating the correct neuromuscular message.

    PubMed

    Yee, John William

    2013-07-01

    The spasm of the oblique muscles can contribute to lenticular astigmatism. The visual cortex interprets the tension of the oblique muscles as an eye that is in near focus mode. It overrides the response to the information generated by depth perception to bring a distant image into focus. Any excessive effort to bring it into focus will not be successful and continuing to make that effort can cause a misalignment in the tension of the rectus muscles. This in turn can directly induce corneal astigmatism and indirectly induce lenticular astigmatism. The astigmatic eye can still bring a near image into focus, but a distant image remains aberrant. The design of a special contact lens to treat lenticular astigmatism is similar to the design of a contact lens to treat corneal astigmatism by means of orthoculogy (or ortho C) as outlined in the paper Correcting Corneal Astigmatism by Reinstating the Correct Neuromuscular Message. The ortho C lens is worn for about two minutes to attend to the blur and distorted aspects of "simple myopic astigmatism". Both of these refractive errors are corrected simultaneously. Once the oblique muscles become "loose" due to a "contact lens draw", it triggers the visual cortex to reinstate the proper neuromotor message to stimulate the ciliary muscle (the muscle that controls the shape of the crystalline lens) to relax along a certain meridian-which in turn "flattens" the crystalline lens along that meridian to bring a blur and distorted image in the distance into focus. The correction only takes a few minutes because the ciliary muscle of an astigmatic eye was not compromised. The correction is not strictly due to an ortho C lens. Its design is the same for corneal astigmatism or lenticular astigmatism. The purpose of the design is to "loosen" the oblique muscles in a certain manner depending on the degree of astigmatism instead of a specific type of astigmatism. The visual cortex can discriminate whether to correct for corneal astigmatism

  6. Energy- and k -resolved mapping of the magnetic circular dichroism in threshold photoemission from Co films on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staab, Maximilian; Kutnyakhov, Dmytro; Wallauer, Robert; Chernov, Sergey; Medjanik, Katerina; Elmers, Hans Joachim; Kläui, Mathias; Schönhense, Gerd

    2017-04-01

    The magnetic circular dichroism in threshold photoemission (TPMCD) for perpendicularly magnetized fcc Co films on Pt(111) has been revisited. A complete mapping of the spectral function I (EB,kx,ky) (binding energy EB, momentum parallel to surface kx, ky) and the corresponding TPMCD asymmetry distribution AMCD(EB,kx,ky) has been performed for one-photon and two-photon photoemission using time-of-flight momentum microscopy. The experimental results allow distinguishing direct from indirect transitions. The measurements reveal clear band features of direct transitions from bulk bands that show a nontrivial asymmetry pattern. A significant homogeneous background with substantial asymmetry stemming from indirect transitions superposes direct transitions. Two-photon photoemission reveals enhanced emission intensity via an image potential state, acting as intermediate state. The image potential state enhances not only intensity but also asymmetry. The present results demonstrate that two-photon photoemission is a powerful method for mapping the spin-polarized unoccupied band structures and points out pathways for applying TPMCD as a contrast mechanism for various classes of magnetic materials.

  7. Correlation, temperature and disorder: Recent developments in the one-step description of angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Jürgen; Minár, Ján; Ebert, Hubert

    2018-04-01

    Various apparative developments extended the potential of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy tremendously during the last two decades. Modern experimental arrangements consisting of new photon sources, analyzers and detectors supply not only extremely high angle and energy resolution but also spin resolution. This provides an adequate platform to study in detail new materials like low-dimensional magnetic structures, Rashba systems, topological insulator materials or high TC superconductors. The interest in such systems has grown enormously not only because of their technological relevance but even more because of exciting new physics. Furthermore, the use of photon energies from few eV up to several keV makes this experimental technique a rather unique tool to investigate the electronic properties of solids and surfaces. The following article reviews the corresponding recent theoretical developments in the field of angle-resolved photoemission with a special emphasis on correlation effects, temperature and relativistic aspects. The most successful theoretical approach to deal with angle-resolved photoemission is the so-called spectral function or one-step formulation of the photoemission process. Nowadays, the one-step model allows for photocurrent calculations for photon energies ranging from a few eV to more than 10 keV, to deal with arbitrarily ordered and disordered systems, to account for finite temperatures, and considering in addition strong correlation effects within the dynamical mean-field theory or similar advanced approaches.

  8. Population dynamics of aberrant chromosome 1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Sabantsev, I; Spitsin, O; Agulnik, S; Ruvinsky, A

    1993-05-01

    Natural populations of two semispecies of house mouse, Mus musculus domesticus and M.m. musculus, were found to be polymorphic for an aberrant chromosome 1 bearing a large inserted block of homogeneously staining heterochromatin. Strong meiotic drive for the aberrant chromosome from M.m. musculus was previously observed in heterozygous female mice. There are at least three meiotic drive levels determined by different allelic variants of distorter. Homozygotes had low viability and females showed low fertility. Both homo- and heterozygous males had normal fertility and their segregation patterns did not deviate from normal. Computer simulations were performed of the dynamics of aberrant chromosome 1 in demes and populations. The data demonstrate that a spontaneous mutation (inversion) of an aberrant chromosome 1, once arisen, has a high probability of spreading in a population at high coefficients of meiotic drive and migration. In the long-term, the population attains a stationary state which is determined by the drive level and migration intensity. The state of stable genotypic equilibrium is independent of deme and population size, as well as of the initial concentration of the aberrant chromosome. As populations initially polymorphic for the distorters approach the stationary state, the stronger distorter is eliminated. The frequencies of the aberrant chromosome determined by computer analysis agree well with those obtained for the studied Asian M.m. musculus populations. The evolutionary pathways for the origin and fixation of the aberrant chromosome in natural populations are considered.

  9. The Mechanisms of Aberrant Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Samuel; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Chris; Knowles, Tuomas

    2012-02-01

    We discuss the development of a kinetic theory for understanding the aberrant loss of solubility of proteins. The failure to maintain protein solubility results often in the assembly of organized linear structures, commonly known as amyloid fibrils, the formation of which is associated with over 50 clinical disorders including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. A true microscopic understanding of the mechanisms that drive these aggregation processes has proved difficult to achieve. To address this challenge, we apply the methodologies of chemical kinetics to the biomolecular self-assembly pathways related to protein aggregation. We discuss the relevant master equation and analytical approaches to studying it. In particular, we derive the underlying rate laws in closed-form using a self-consistent solution scheme; the solutions that we obtain reveal scaling behaviors that are very generally present in systems of growing linear aggregates, and, moreover, provide a general route through which to relate experimental measurements to mechanistic information. We conclude by outlining a study of the aggregation of the Alzheimer's amyloid-beta peptide. The study identifies the dominant microscopic mechanism of aggregation and reveals previously unidentified therapeutic strategies.

  10. Structural defects in cubic semiconductors characterized by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Yadira; Kozak, Roksolana; Erni, Rolf; Rossell, Marta D

    2017-05-01

    The development of new electro-optical devices and the realization of novel types of transistors require a profound understanding of the structural characteristics of new semiconductor heterostructures. This article provides a concise review about structural defects which occur in semiconductor heterostructures on the basis of micro-patterned Si substrates. In particular, one- and two-dimensional crystal defects are being discussed which are due to the plastic relaxation of epitaxial strain caused by the misfit of crystal lattices. Besides a few selected examples from literature, we treat in particular crystal defects occurring in GaAs/Si, Ge/Si and β-SiC/Si structures which are studied by high-resolution annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The relevance of this article is twofold; firstly, it should provide a collection of data which are of help for the identification and characterization of defects in cubic semiconductors by means of atomic-resolution imaging, and secondly, the experimental data shall provide a basis for advancing the understanding of device characteristics with the aid of theoretical modelling by considering the defective nature of strained semiconductor heterostructures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ocular higher-order aberrations in a school children population.

    PubMed

    Papamastorakis, George; Panagopoulou, Sophia; Tsilimbaris, Militadis K; Pallikaris, Ioannis G; Plainis, Sotiris

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to explore the statistics of ocular higher-order aberrations in a population of primary and secondary school children. A sample of 557 children aged 10-15 years were selected from two primary and two secondary schools in Heraklion, Greece. Children were classified by age in three subgroups: group I (10.7±0.5 years), group II (12.4±0.5 years) and group III (14.5±0.5 years). Ocular aberrations were measured using a wavefront aberrometer (COAS, AMO Wavefront Sciences, USA) at mesopic light levels (illuminance at cornea was 4lux). Wavefront analysis was achieved for a 5mm pupil. Statistical analysis was carried out for the right eye only. The average coefficient of most high-order aberrations did not differ from zero with the exception of vertical (0.076μm) and horizontal (0.018μm) coma, oblique trefoil (-0.055μm) and spherical aberration (0.018μm). The most prominent change between the three groups was observed for the spherical aberration, which increased from 0.007μm (SE 0.005) in group I to 0.011μm (SE 0.004) in group II and 0.030μm (SE 0.004) in group III. Significant differences were also found for the oblique astigmatism and the third-order coma aberrations. Differences in the low levels of ocular spherical aberration in young children possibly reflect differences in lenticular spherical aberration and relate to the gradient refractive index of the lens. The evaluation of spherical aberration at certain stages of eye growth may help to better understand the underlying mechanisms of myopia development. Copyright © 2014 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Ocular higher-order aberrations in a school children population

    PubMed Central

    Papamastorakis, George; Panagopoulou, Sophia; Tsilimbaris, Militadis K.; Pallikaris, Ioannis G.; Plainis, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective of the study was to explore the statistics of ocular higher-order aberrations in a population of primary and secondary school children. Methods A sample of 557 children aged 10–15 years were selected from two primary and two secondary schools in Heraklion, Greece. Children were classified by age in three subgroups: group I (10.7 ± 0.5 years), group II (12.4 ± 0.5 years) and group III (14.5 ± 0.5 years). Ocular aberrations were measured using a wavefront aberrometer (COAS, AMO Wavefront Sciences, USA) at mesopic light levels (illuminance at cornea was 4 lux). Wavefront analysis was achieved for a 5 mm pupil. Statistical analysis was carried out for the right eye only. Results The average coefficient of most high-order aberrations did not differ from zero with the exception of vertical (0.076 μm) and horizontal (0.018 μm) coma, oblique trefoil (−0.055 μm) and spherical aberration (0.018 μm). The most prominent change between the three groups was observed for the spherical aberration, which increased from 0.007 μm (SE 0.005) in group I to 0.011 μm (SE 0.004) in group II and 0.030 μm (SE 0.004) in group III. Significant differences were also found for the oblique astigmatism and the third-order coma aberrations. Conclusions Differences in the low levels of ocular spherical aberration in young children possibly reflect differences in lenticular spherical aberration and relate to the gradient refractive index of the lens. The evaluation of spherical aberration at certain stages of eye growth may help to better understand the underlying mechanisms of myopia development. PMID:25288226

  13. Aberrant expression of HMB-45 in traumatized melanocytic nevi.

    PubMed

    Leleux, Todd M; Prieto, Victor G; Diwan, A Hafeez

    2012-09-01

    Assessment of histologic and immunohistochemical maturation (with HMB-45 and anti-Ki-67) may be helpful in differentiating benign melanocytic nevi (BMN) from malignant melanoma. Recently, we reported loss of maturation and aberrant immunohistochemical findings in melanocytic nevi after liquid nitrogen cryotherapy (Adeniran et al, J Am Acad Dermatol 2009;61:341-5). Herein we report a similar phenomenon identified in traumatized melanocytic nevi (TMN). We sought to evaluate the histologic and immunohistochemical findings in early and late stages of traumatized nevi. Twenty-four cases of TMN were retrieved from the pathology archives. These were then assessed by two pathologists (T.L. and A.H.D.) using HMB-45 and MIB-1 (for Ki-67) antibodies. TMN showed some of the following findings: epidermal changes (parakeratosis, ulceration, serum crust, flattening of the epidermis) and dermal changes including fibrosis and the presence of melanophages. In some cases, there was architectural disorder of the overlying melanocytes, with crowding in the basal layer, but without significant pagetoid spread. Occasionally, the dermal scar contained larger, more epithelioid-appearing melanocytes than those beneath the scar. Fifty-four percent of TMN lacked obvious immunohistochemical maturation with HMB-45, since nevus cells within the scar or directly beneath it were strongly labeled. None of the TMN showed appreciable labeling for Ki-67. The exact clinical duration between trauma and biopsy could not be determined. Loss of maturation with HMB-45 in TMN can be a diagnostic pitfall in challenging cases. Concurrent evaluation of MIB-1 expression, along with the characteristic histologic features of trauma, should allow the correct diagnosis to be reached. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The use of WaveLight® Contoura to create a uniform cornea: the LYRA Protocol. Part 1: the effect of higher-order corneal aberrations on refractive astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Motwani, Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate how higher-order corneal aberrations can cancel out, modify, or induce lower-order corneal astigmatism. Patients and methods Six representative eyes are presented that show different scenarios in which higher-order aberrations interacting with corneal astigmatism can affect the manifest refraction. WaveLight® Contoura ablation maps showing the higher-order aberrations are shown, as are results of correction with full measured correction using the LYRA (Layer Yolked Reduction of Astigmatism) Protocol. Results Higher-order corneal aberrations such as trefoil, quadrafoil, and coma can create ovalization of the central cornea, which can interact with the ovalization caused by lower-order astigmatism to either induce, cancel out, or modify the manifest refraction. Contoura processing successfully determines the linkage of these interactions resulting in full astigmatism removal. Purely lenticular astigmatism appears to be rare, but a case is also demonstrated. The author theorizes that all aberrations require cerebral compensatory processing and can be removed, supported by the facts that full removal of aberrations and its linkage with lower-order astigmatism with the LYRA Protocol has not resulted in worse or unacceptable vision for any patients. Conclusion Higher-order aberrations interacting with lower-order astigmatism is the main reason for the differences between manifest refraction and Contoura measured astigmatism, and the linkage between these interactions can be successfully treated using Contoura and the LYRA Protocol. Lenticular astigmatism is relatively rare. PMID:28553069

  15. The use of WaveLight® Contoura to create a uniform cornea: the LYRA Protocol. Part 1: the effect of higher-order corneal aberrations on refractive astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Motwani, Manoj

    2017-01-01

    To demonstrate how higher-order corneal aberrations can cancel out, modify, or induce lower-order corneal astigmatism. Six representative eyes are presented that show different scenarios in which higher-order aberrations interacting with corneal astigmatism can affect the manifest refraction. WaveLight ® Contoura ablation maps showing the higher-order aberrations are shown, as are results of correction with full measured correction using the LYRA (Layer Yolked Reduction of Astigmatism) Protocol. Higher-order corneal aberrations such as trefoil, quadrafoil, and coma can create ovalization of the central cornea, which can interact with the ovalization caused by lower-order astigmatism to either induce, cancel out, or modify the manifest refraction. Contoura processing successfully determines the linkage of these interactions resulting in full astigmatism removal. Purely lenticular astigmatism appears to be rare, but a case is also demonstrated. The author theorizes that all aberrations require cerebral compensatory processing and can be removed, supported by the facts that full removal of aberrations and its linkage with lower-order astigmatism with the LYRA Protocol has not resulted in worse or unacceptable vision for any patients. Higher-order aberrations interacting with lower-order astigmatism is the main reason for the differences between manifest refraction and Contoura measured astigmatism, and the linkage between these interactions can be successfully treated using Contoura and the LYRA Protocol. Lenticular astigmatism is relatively rare.

  16. Magnetic x-ray linear dichroism in resonant and non-resonant Gd 4f photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S.; Gammon, W.J.; Pappas, D.P.

    1997-04-01

    The enhancement of the magnetic linear dichroism in resonant 4f photoemission (MLDRPE) is studied from a 50 monolayer film of Gd/Y(0001). The ALS at beamline 7.0.1 provided the source of linearly polarized x-rays used in this study. The polarized light was incident at an angle of 30 degrees relative to the film plane, and the sample magnetization was perpendicular to the photon polarization. The linear dichroism of the 4f core levels is measured as the photon energy is tuned through the 4d-4f resonance. The authors find that the MLDRPE asymmetry is strongest at the resonance. Near the threshold the asymmetrymore » has several features which are out of phase with the fine structure of the total yield.« less

  17. Two-color field enhancement at an STM junction for spatiotemporally resolved photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xiang; Jin, Wencan; Yang, Hao

    Here, we report measurements and numerical simulations of ultrafast laser-excited carrier flow across a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) junction. The current from a nanoscopic tungsten tip across a ~1 nm vacuum gap to a silver surface is driven by a two-color excitation scheme that uses an optical delay-modulation technique to extract the two-color signal from background contributions. The role of optical field enhancements in driving the current is investigated using density functional theory and full three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain computations. We find that simulated field-enhanced two-photon photoemission (2PPE) currents are in excellent agreement with the observed exponential decay of the two-colormore » photoexcited current with increasing tip–surface separation, as well as its optical-delay dependence. The results suggest an approach to 2PPE with simultaneous subpicosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution.« less

  18. Unoccupied surface states of LaB6(001) studied by k -resolved inverse photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Osamu; Kunii, Satoru; Kakizaki, Akito

    2006-06-01

    We have measured k -resolved inverse photoemission spectra of LaB6(001) to study unoccupied surface states. The surface states are observed near the Fermi level (EF) and at 6.8eV above EF , which are originated from La5d and La4f states, respectively. The surface state near EF shows energy dispersion along the Γ - M direction of the surface Brillouin zone, which does not agree with that of a recently reported theoretical calculation. It is deduced that at a LaB6(001) surface, electrons are transferred from the subsurface to the topmost La layer. This charge redistribution can reduce surface dipole moments.

  19. Photoemission analysis of chemically modified TlBr surfaces for improved radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, A. J.; Lee, J.-S.; Stanford, J. A.; Grant, W. K.; Voss, L. F.; Beck, P. R.; Graff, R. T.; Swanberg, E. L.; Conway, A. M.; Nikolic, R. J.; Payne, S. A.; Kim, H.; Cirignano, L. J.; Shah, K.

    2013-09-01

    Device-grade TlBr was subjected to various chemical treatments used in room temperature radiation detector fabrication to determine the resulting surface composition and electronic structure. Samples of as polished TlBr were treated separately with 2%Br:MeOH, 10%HF, 10%HCl and 96%SOCl2 solutions. High-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and Tl 4f, Br 3d, Cl 2p and S 2p core lines were used to evaluate surface chemistry. Results suggest anion substitution at the surface with subsequent shallow heterojunction formation. Surface chemistry and valence band electronic structure were further correlated with the goal of optimizing the long-term stability and radiation response.

  20. Lunar sample analysis. [X-ray photoemission and Auger spectroscopy of lunar glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.; Grant, R. W.; Cirlin, E. H.

    1979-01-01

    The surface composition of two samples from the highly shocked, glass-coated lunar basalt (12054) and from four glass-coated fragments from the 1-2 mm (14161) fines were examined by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy to determine whether the agglutination process itself is responsible for the difference between their surface and bulk compositions. Auger electron spectroscopy of glass balls from the 15425 and 74001 fines were analyzed to understand the nature, extent, and behavior of volatile phases associated with lunar volcanism. Initial results indicate that (1) volatiles, in the outer few atomic layers sampled, vary considerably from ball to ball; (2) variability over the surface of individual balls is smaller; (3) the dominant volatiles on the balls are S and Zn; and (4) other volatiles commonly observed are P, Cl, and K.

  1. Multiphoton photoemission from a copper cathode illuminated by ultrashort laser pulses in an RF photoinjector.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, P; Cultrera, L; Ferrario, M; Filippetto, D; Gatti, G; Gutierrez, M S; Moody, J T; Moore, N; Rosenzweig, J B; Scoby, C M; Travish, G; Vicario, C

    2010-02-26

    In this Letter we report on the use of ultrashort infrared laser pulses to generate a copious amount of electrons by a copper cathode in an rf photoinjector. The charge yield verifies the generalized Fowler-Dubridge theory for multiphoton photoemission. The emission is verified to be prompt using a two pulse autocorrelation technique. The thermal emittance associated with the excess kinetic energy from the emission process is comparable with the one measured using frequency tripled uv laser pulses. In the high field of the rf gun, up to 50 pC of charge can be extracted from the cathode using a 80 fs long, 2 microJ, 800 nm pulse focused to a 140 mum rms spot size. Taking into account the efficiency of harmonic conversion, illuminating a cathode directly with ir laser pulses can be the most efficient way to employ the available laser power.

  2. Design of a high-bunch-charge 112-MHz superconducting RF photoemission electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, T.; Brutus, J. C.; Belomestnykh, Sergey A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Boulware, C. H.; Grimm, T. L.; Hayes, T.; Litvinenko, Vladimir N.; Mernick, K.; Narayan, G.; Orfin, P.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Severino, F.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, E.; Xiao, B.; Xie, H.; Zaltsman, A.

    2016-09-01

    High-bunch-charge photoemission electron-sources operating in a continuous wave (CW) mode are required for many advanced applications of particle accelerators, such as electron coolers for hadron beams, electron-ion colliders, and free-electron lasers. Superconducting RF (SRF) has several advantages over other electron-gun technologies in CW mode as it offers higher acceleration rate and potentially can generate higher bunch charges and average beam currents. A 112 MHz SRF electron photoinjector (gun) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory to produce high-brightness and high-bunch-charge bunches for the coherent electron cooling proof-of-principle experiment. The gun utilizes a quarter-wave resonator geometry for assuring beam dynamics and uses high quantum efficiency multi-alkali photocathodes for generating electrons.

  3. Picosecond Dynamics Of The GaAs (110) Surface Studied With Laser Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haight, R.; Silberman, J. A.; Lilie, M. I.

    1988-08-01

    A novel laser system and detection scheme is described which has been developed to investigate the transient dynamics of photoexcited electrons at material surfaces and interfaces with photoemission. The excited carrier population on the surface of GaAs (110) and the related Cr/GaAs (110) surface has been studied with 1-2 picosecond time resolution. Studies reveal a rapid rise and fall of the photexcited carrier population at the clean semiconductor surface within 15 picoseconds of excitation. For times greater than 15 picoseconds the carrier density decays slowly. Studies of the photoexcited surface after deposition of small numbers of Cr atoms reveal a remarkable decrease in the carrier density observed at the surface for a coverage as low as .006 monolayer.

  4. Short-period oscillations in photoemission from thin films of Cr(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyalikh, Denis V.; Zahn, Peter; Richter, Manuel; Dedkov, Yu. S.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2005-07-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission (PE) study of thin films of Cr grown on Fe(100) reveals thickness-dependent short-period oscillations of the PE intensity close to the Fermi energy at k‖˜0 . The oscillations are assigned to quantum-well states (QWS) caused by the nesting between the Fermi-surface sheets around the Γ and the X points in the Brillouin zone of antiferromagnetic Cr. The experimental data are confirmed by density-functional calculations applying a screened Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green’s function method. The period of the experimentally observed QWS oscillations amounts to about 2.6 monolayers and is larger than the fundamental 2-monolayer period of antiferromagnetic coupling in Cr.

  5. CO adsorption on ion bombarded Ni(111): characterization by photoemission from adsorbed xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sabrina S.; Malafsky, Geoffrey P.; Hsu, David S. Y.

    1993-11-01

    The adsorption of CO on Ni(111), ion bombarded with various fluences of 1.0 keV Ar + ions, has been investigated using photoemission from adsorbed xenon (PAX). After ion bombardment of the Ni(111) surface, various amounts of CO were adsorbed, followed by adsorption of xenon at 85 K. Two pressures of xenon were used in examining the 3d {5}/{2} peak of xenon: 5 × 10 -6 and 7 × 10 -10 Torr. PAX data taken at both pressures show that CO selectively adsorbs onto the defect (step) sites created by ion bombardment. In addition, it was found that the amount of CO which could occupy a defect site previously occupied by one Xe atom varied from 10 to 2.5, depending on the ion fluence.

  6. An ultrafast angle-resolved photoemission apparatus for measuring complex materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallwood, Christopher L.; Jozwiak, Christopher; Zhang, Wentao; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2012-12-01

    We present technical specifications for a high resolution time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy setup based on a hemispherical electron analyzer and cavity-dumped solid state Ti:sapphire laser used to generate pump and probe beams, respectively, at 1.48 and 5.93 eV. The pulse repetition rate can be tuned from 209 Hz to 54.3 MHz. Under typical operating settings the system has an overall energy resolution of 23 meV, an overall momentum resolution of 0.003 Å-1, and an overall time resolution of 310 fs. We illustrate the system capabilities with representative data on the cuprate superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ. The descriptions and analyses presented here will inform new developments in ultrafast electron spectroscopy.

  7. Electron–vibration coupling induced renormalization in the photoemission spectrum of diamondoids

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Adam; Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Thiering, Gergő; Cannuccia, Elena; Marini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The development of theories and methods devoted to the accurate calculation of the electronic quasi-particle states and levels of molecules, clusters and solids is of prime importance to interpret the experimental data. These quantum systems are often modelled by using the Born–Oppenheimer approximation where the coupling between the electrons and vibrational modes is not fully taken into account, and the electrons are treated as pure quasi-particles. Here, we show that in small diamond cages, called diamondoids, the electron–vibration coupling leads to the breakdown of the electron quasi-particle picture. More importantly, we demonstrate that the strong electron–vibration coupling is essential to properly describe the overall lineshape of the experimental photoemission spectrum. This cannot be obtained by methods within Born–Oppenheimer approximation. Moreover, we deduce a link between the vibronic states found by our many-body perturbation theory approach and the well-known Jahn–Teller effect. PMID:27103340

  8. Two-color field enhancement at an STM junction for spatiotemporally resolved photoemission

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, Xiang; Jin, Wencan; Yang, Hao; ...

    2017-06-30

    Here, we report measurements and numerical simulations of ultrafast laser-excited carrier flow across a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) junction. The current from a nanoscopic tungsten tip across a ~1 nm vacuum gap to a silver surface is driven by a two-color excitation scheme that uses an optical delay-modulation technique to extract the two-color signal from background contributions. The role of optical field enhancements in driving the current is investigated using density functional theory and full three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain computations. We find that simulated field-enhanced two-photon photoemission (2PPE) currents are in excellent agreement with the observed exponential decay of the two-colormore » photoexcited current with increasing tip–surface separation, as well as its optical-delay dependence. The results suggest an approach to 2PPE with simultaneous subpicosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution.« less

  9. Design of a high-bunch-charge 112-MHz superconducting RF photoemission electron source

    DOE PAGES

    Xin, T.; Brutus, J. C.; Belomestnykh, Sergey A.; ...

    2016-09-01

    High-bunch-charge photoemission electron-sources operating in a continuous wave (CW) mode are required for many advanced applications of particle accelerators, such as electron coolers for hadron beams, electron-ion colliders, and free-electron lasers (FELs). Superconducting RF (SRF) has several advantages over other electron-gun technologies in CW mode as it offers higher acceleration rate and potentially can generate higher bunch charges and average beam currents. A 112 MHz SRF electron photoinjector (gun) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to produce high-brightness and high-bunch-charge bunches for the Coherent electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment. Lastly, the gun utilizes a quarter-wave resonator (QWR) geometrymore » for assuring beam dynamics, and uses high quantum efficiency (QE) multi-alkali photocathodes for generating electrons.« less

  10. Synchrotron-Radiation Photoemission Study of Electronic Structures of a Cs-Doped Rubrene Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Lu, Meng-Han; Chu, Yu-Ya; Pi, Tun-Wen

    Using synchrotron-radiation photoemission spectroscopy, we have studied the electronic structure of a cesium-doped rubrene thin film. The addition of cesium atoms causes the movement of the valence-band spectra and the change in line shapes at different concentration that can be separated into four different stages. In the first stage, the cesium atoms continuously diffuse into the substrate, and the Fermi level moves in the energy gap as a result of an electron transferred from the cesium to the rubrene. The second stage, in which the shifts of the spectra are interrupted, is characterized by the introduction of two in-gap states. When increasing doping of cesium into the third stage, the spectra move again; whereas, the line shapes maintain at the stoichiometric ratio of one. In the fourth stage, new in-gap states appear, which are the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and HOMO+1 states of (rubrene)2- anion.

  11. Polarization-dependent X-ray photoemission spectroscopy for High-Tc cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagami, Kohei; Kanai, Yuina; Naimen, Sho; Fujiwara, Hidenori; Kiss, Takayuki; Tanaka, Arata; Higashiya, Atsushi; Imada, Shin; Kadono, Toshiharu; Tamasaku, Kenji; Muro, Takayuki; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Miyasaka, Shigeki; Tajima, Setsuko; Sekiyama, Akira

    2018-05-01

    We have performed photon energy (hν) and linear polarization dependent X-ray photoemission for optimal doped Pb-Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) to investigate the ground Cu 3d orbital symmetry. We identified that the bulk Cu 3d components in valence-band spectra develop with decreasing hν from 7900 eV to 460 eV. Moreover, the photoelectron intensity ratio of the valence-band spectra measured at hν = 460 eV has shown that the Cu 3dx2-y2 orbital contributions are dominant near the Fermi level (EF). Meanwhile, we revealed that the bulk Cu 2p3/2 core-level spectra without the Bi 4s component is detected at hν = 1550 eV compared with hν and linear-polarization-dependent spectra.

  12. Direct detection of density of gap states in C60 single crystals by photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussolotti, Fabio; Yang, Janpeng; Hiramoto, Masahiro; Kaji, Toshihiko; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo

    2015-09-01

    We report on the direct and quantitative evaluation of density of gap states (DOGS) in large-size C60 single crystals by using ultralow-background, high-sensitivity ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy. The charging of the crystals during photoionization was overcome using photoconduction induced by simultaneous laser irradiation. By comparison with the spectra of as-deposited and gas exposed C60 thin films the following results were found: (i) The DOGS near the highest occupied molecular orbital edge in the C60 single crystals (1019-1021states e V-1c m-3) mainly originates from the exposure to inert and ambient gas atmosphere during the sample preparation, storage, and transfer; (ii) the contribution of other sources of gap states such as structural imperfections at grain boundaries is negligible (<1018states e V-1c m-3) .

  13. Capability of insulator study by photoemission electron microscopy at SPring-8.

    PubMed

    Ohkochi, Takuo; Kotsugi, Masato; Yamada, Keisuke; Kawano, Kenji; Horiba, Koji; Kitajima, Fumio; Oura, Masaki; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro; Oshima, Masaharu; Ono, Teruo; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Muro, Takayuki; Watanabe, Yoshio

    2013-07-01

    The observation method of photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) on insulating samples has been established in an extremely simple way. Surface conductivity is induced locally on an insulating surface by continuous radiation of soft X-rays, and Au films close to the area of interest allow the accumulated charges on the insulated area to be released to ground level. Magnetic domain observations of a NiZn ferrite, local X-ray absorption spectroscopy of sapphire, high-resolution imaging of a poorly conducting Li0.9CoO2 film surface, and Au pattern evaporation on a fine rock particle are demonstrated. Using this technique, all users' experiments on poorly conducting samples have been performed successfully at the PEEM experimental station of SPring-8.

  14. High-intensity xenon plasma discharge lamp for bulk-sensitive high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Souma, S; Sato, T; Takahashi, T; Baltzer, P

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a highly brilliant xenon (Xe) discharge lamp operated by microwave-induced electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) for ultrahigh-resolution bulk-sensitive photoemission spectroscopy (PES). We observed at least eight strong radiation lines from neutral or singly ionized Xe atoms in the energy region of 8.4-10.7 eV. The photon flux of the strongest Xe I resonance line at 8.437 eV is comparable to that of the He Ialpha line (21.218 eV) from the He-ECR discharge lamp. Stable operation for more than 300 h is achieved by efficient air-cooling of a ceramic tube in the resonance cavity. The high bulk sensitivity and high-energy resolution of PES using the Xe lines are demonstrated for some typical materials.

  15. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS 2: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po -Chun; Zaki, Nader; ...

    2015-03-17

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. Thus, a suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ crystals. For suspended MoS₂, a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at Γ¯ and Κ¯ of 2.00m₀ and 0.43m₀, respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of Γ¯Κ¯ to the vicinity of Κ¯ and briefly discussmore » its possible origin.« less

  16. Interband quasiparticle scattering in superconducting LiFeAs reconciles photoemission and tunneling measurements.

    PubMed

    Hess, Christian; Sykora, Steffen; Hänke, Torben; Schlegel, Ronny; Baumann, Danny; Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr B; Harnagea, Luminita; Wurmehl, Sabine; van den Brink, Jeroen; Büchner, Bernd

    2013-01-04

    Several angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies reveal a poorly nested Fermi surface of LiFeAs, far away from a spin density wave instability, and clear-cut superconducting gap anisotropies. On the other hand a very different, more nested Fermi surface and dissimilar gap anisotropies have been obtained from quasiparticle interference (QPI) data, which were interpreted as arising from intraband scattering within holelike bands. Here we show that this ARPES-QPI paradox is completely resolved by interband scattering between the holelike bands. The resolution follows from an excellent agreement between experimental quasiparticle scattering data and T-matrix QPI calculations (based on experimental band structure data), which allows disentangling interband and intraband scattering processes.

  17. Reactive molecular beam epitaxial growth and in situ photoemission spectroscopy study of iridate superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, C. C.; Liu, Z. T.; Cai, S. H.; Wang, Z.; Xiang, P.; Zhang, K. L.; Liu, W. L.; Liu, J. S.; Wang, P.; Zheng, Y.; Shen, D. W.; You, L. X.

    2017-08-01

    High-quality (001)-oriented perovskite [(SrIrO3)m/(SrTiO3)] superlattices (m=1/2, 1, 2, 3 and ∞ ) films have been grown on SrTiO3(001) epitaxially using reactive molecular beam epitaxy. Compared to previously reported superlattices synthesized by pulsed laser deposition, our superlattices exhibit superior crystalline, interface and surface structure, which have been confirmed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The transport measurements confirm a novel insulator-metal transition with the change of dimensionality in these superlattices, and our first systematic in situ photoemission spectroscopy study indicates that the increasing strength of effective correlations induced by reducing dimensionality would be the dominating origin of this transition.

  18. Changes in Astigmatism, Densitometry, and Aberrations After SMILE for Low to High Myopic Astigmatism: A 12-Month Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Iben Bach; Ivarsen, Anders; Hjortdal, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate 12-month changes in refraction, visual outcome, corneal densitometry, and postoperative aberrations after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) for myopic astigmatism. This 12-month prospective clinical trial comprised 101 eyes (101 patients) treated with SMILE for myopic astigmatism with cylinder of 0.75 to 4.00 diopters (D). The preoperative, 1-week, and 1-, 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month examinations included measurement of manifest refraction, uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), and corrected (CDVA) distance visual acuity. Astigmatic error vector analysis was performed using Al-pin's method. Densitometry and aberrations were evaluated with Pentacam HR (Oculus Optikgeräte, Wetzlar, Germany). Preoperative spherical equivalent averaged -6.78 ± 1.90 D with 1.81 ± 1.00 D in cylinder correction. After 12 months, 74% and 93% of the eyes were within ±0.50 and ±1.00 D of the attempted refraction, respectively. The logMAR UDVA and CDVA averaged 0.03 ± 0.16 and -0.08 ± 0.09, respectively. Vector analysis showed a with-the-rule undercorrection at 12 months with a mean difference vector of 0.31 D @ 91°. There was a minor counterclockwise rotation of the axis, with an arithmetic angle of error of 0.34° ± 14°. An undercorrection of approximately 11% per diopter of attempted correction was seen at 12 months. Spherical aberrations, coma, and higher order aberrations remained stable during the postoperative period (P < .09). After 12 months, no increase in densitometry could be identified. Treatment of astigmatism with SMILE seems to be predictable and effective, but with an astigmatic undercorrection of approximately 11% and a small counterclockwise rotation of the axis. [J Refract Surg. 2017;33(1):11-17.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Detection of a Fermi-level crossing in Si(557)-Au with inverse photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton-Duffin, J. A.; MacLeod, J. M.; McLean, A. B.

    2006-06-01

    The unoccupied energy bands of the quasi-one-dimensional (1D) Si(557)-Au system have been studied with momentum-resolved inverse photoemission. A band is found that lies (0.4±0.4)eV above the Fermi level at the center of the surface Brillouin zone (Γ¯) . It disperses to higher binding energy, along the Γ Kmacr direction, and crosses the Fermi level at k‖=0.5±0.1Å-1 . The corresponding direction in real space is parallel to both the rows of silicon adatoms and the rows of embedded gold atoms that are distinctive features of this surface reconstruction. The location of the crossing is in good agreement with previously published photoemission data [Altmann , Phys. Rev. B 64, 035406 (2001); Ahn , Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 196403 (2003)], where two closely spaced bands were found to disperse from the Kmacr zone boundary to lower binding energy and then cross the Fermi level. In addition to the band mentioned above, a band was found that has parabolic dispersion along Γ Kmacr , the direction that is parallel to the rows of embedded gold atoms. The band minimum for the parabolic band lies (0.8±0.4)eV below the vacuum level and it has an effective mass m*=(1.0±0.1)me , where me is the free electron mass. Perpendicular to the rows of gold atoms, as expected for a state with quasi-1D symmetry, it has flat dispersion. This band may be an image state resonance, overlapping the silicon conduction band continuum, and it is spatially localized to the edge of the silicon terraces.

  20. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Michael; Schlaf, Rudy

    2015-08-01

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru0) and its oxide (RuO2) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru0 and RuO2 films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO2 and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.0 An interface dipole of up to -0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO2/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  1. High-order above-threshold photoemission from nanotips controlled with two-color laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiffert, Lennart; Paschen, Timo; Hommelhoff, Peter; Fennel, Thomas

    2018-07-01

    We investigate the process of phase-controlled high-order above-threshold photoemission from metallic nanotips under bichromatic laser fields. Experimental photoelectron spectra resulting from two-color excitation with a moderately intense near-infrared fundamental field (1560 nm) and its weak second harmonic show a strong sensitivity on the relative phase and clear indications for a plateau-like structure that is attributed to elastic backscattering. To explore the relevant control mechanisms, characteristic features, and particular signatures from the near-field inhomogeneity, we performed systematic quantum simulations employing a one-dimensional nanotip model. Besides rich phase-dependent structures in the simulated above-threshold ionization photoelectron spectra we find ponderomotive shifts as well as substantial modifications of the rescattering cutoff as function of the decay length of the near-field. To explore the quantum or classical nature of the observed features and to discriminate the two-color effects stemming from electron propagation and from the ionization rate we compare the quantum results to classical trajectory simulations. We show that signatures from direct electrons as well as the modulations in the plateau region mainly stem from control of the ionization probability, while the modulation in the cutoff region can only be explained by the impact of the two-color field on the electron trajectory. Despite the complexity of the phase-dependent features that render two-color strong-field photoemission from nanotips intriguing for sub-cycle strong-field control, our findings support that the recollision features in the cutoff region provide a robust and reliable method to calibrate the relative two-color phase.

  2. Characterizing the effects of regolith surface roughness on photoemission from surfaces in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, A.; Horanyi, M.; Wang, X.

    2017-12-01

    Surfaces of airless bodies and spacecraft in space are exposed to a variety of charging environments. A balance of currents due to plasma bombardment, photoemission, electron and ion emission and collection, and secondary electron emission determines the surface's charge. Photoelectron emission is the dominant charging process on sunlit surfaces in the inner solar system due to the intense solar UV radiation. This can result in a net positive surface potential, with a cloud of photoelectrons immediately above the surface, called the photoelectron sheath. Conversely, the unlit side of the body will charge negatively due the collection of the fast-moving solar wind electrons. The interaction of charged dust grains with these positively and negatively charged surfaces, and within the photoelectron and plasma sheaths may explain the occurrence of dust lofting, levitation and transport above the lunar surface. The surface potential of exposed objects is also dependent on the material properties of their surfaces. Composition and particle size primarily affect the quantum efficiency of photoelectron generation; however, surface roughness can also control the charging process. In order to characterize these effects, we have conducted laboratory experiments to examine the role of surface roughness in generating photoelectrons in dedicated laboratory experiments using solid and dusty surfaces of the same composition (CeO2), and initial comparisons with JSC-1 lunar simulant. Using Langmuir probe measurements, we explore the measured potentials above insulating surfaces exposed to UV and an electric field, and we show that the photoemission current from a dusty surface is largely reduced due to its higher surface roughness, which causes a significant fraction of the emitted photoelectrons to be re-absorbed within the surface. We will discuss these results in context of similar situations on planetary surfaces.

  3. Electron Optics for Biologists: Physical Origins of Spherical Aberrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geissler, Peter; Zadunaisky, Jose

    1974-01-01

    Reports on the physical origins of spherical aberrations in axially symmetric electrostatic lenses to convey the essentials of electon optics to those who must think critically about the resolution of the electron microscope. (GS)

  4. Magnetic coupling of Fe-porphyrin molecules adsorbed on clean and c(2×2) oxygen-reconstructed Co(100) investigated by spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, A. P.; Caruso, A. N.; Vescovo, E.; Ali, Md. E.; Tarafder, K.; Janjua, S. Z.; Sadowski, J. T.; Oppeneer, P. M.

    2013-05-01

    The spin-polarized electronic structure of iron octaethylporphyrin (FeOEP) molecules adsorbed on a pristine and on a c(2×2) oxygen-reconstructed Co(100) surface has been analyzed by means of spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy (SPPES) and first-principles density functional theory with the on-site Coulomb repulsion U term (DFT+U) calculations with and without Van der Waals corrections. The aim is to examine the magnetic exchange mechanism between the FeOEP molecules and the Co(100) substrate in the presence or absence of the oxygen mediator. The results demonstrate that the magnetic coupling from the ferromagnetic substrate to the adsorbed FeOEP molecules is ferromagnetic, whereas, the coupling is antiferromagnetic for the FeOEP on the c(2×2)O/Co(100) system. Spin-resolved partial densities of states extracted from ab initio DFT+U modeling are in fairly good comparison with the electronic spectral densities seen in angle-integrated SPPES energy dispersion curves for submonolayer coverages of FeOEP. Through combined analysis of these spectra and theoretical results, we determine that hybridization of 2p orbitals of N and O with Co 3d orbitals facilitates indirect magnetic exchange interactions between Fe and Co, whereas, a direct Fe-Co interaction involving the Fe dz2 orbital is also found for FeOEP on Co. It is observed through SPPES that the spin polarization of the photoemission-visible molecular overlayers decreases to zero as coverage is increased beyond the submonolayer regime, indicating that only interfacial magnetic coupling is at work. Microspot low-energy electron diffraction and low-energy electron microscopy were performed to characterize the physical order of the molecular coverage, revealing that FeOEP structural domains are orders of magnitude greater in size on c(2×2)O/Co(100) than on clean Co(100), which coincides with reduced scattering from the disorder and sharper features seen in SPPES.

  5. Stability of corneal topography and wavefront aberrations in young Singaporeans.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingxia; Collins, Michael J; Yeo, Anna C H

    2013-09-01

    The aim was to investigate the differences between and variations across time in corneal topography and ocular wavefront aberrations in young Singaporean myopes and emmetropes. We used a videokeratoscope and wavefront sensor to measure the ocular surface topography and wavefront aberrations of the total-eye optics in the morning, midday and late afternoon on two separate days. Topographic data were used to derive the corneal surface wavefront aberrations. Both the corneal and total wavefronts were analysed up to the fourth radial order of the Zernike polynomial expansion and were centred on the entrance pupil (5.0 mm). The participants included 12 young progressing myopes, 13 young stable myopes and 15 young age-matched emmetropes. For all subjects considered together, there were significant changes in some of the aberrations across the day, such as spherical aberration ( Z(4 0)) and vertical coma ( Z (3 - 1)) (repeated measures analysis of variance, p < 0.05). The magnitude of positive spherical aberration ( Z(4 0)) was significantly lower in the progressing myopic group than in the stable myopic (p = 0.04) and emmetropic (p = 0.02) groups. There were also significant interactions between refractive group and time of day for with and against-the-rule astigmatism ( Z(2 2)). Significantly lower fourth-order root mean square of ocular wavefront aberrations were found in the progressing myopic group compared with the stable myopes and emmetropes (p < 0.01). These differences and variations in the corneal and total aberrations may have significance for our understanding of refractive error development and for clinical applications requiring accurate wavefront measurements. © 2013 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2013 Optometrists Association Australia.

  6. Aberrant alternative splicing is another hallmark of cancer.

    PubMed

    Ladomery, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of human genes are alternatively spliced. Not surprisingly, aberrant alternative splicing is increasingly linked to cancer. Splice isoforms often encode proteins that have distinct and even antagonistic properties. The abnormal expression of splice factors and splice factor kinases in cancer changes the alternative splicing of critically important pre-mRNAs. Aberrant alternative splicing should be added to the growing list of cancer hallmarks.

  7. Dimensions of driving anger and their relationships with aberrant driving.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingru; Chan, Alan H S; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between driving anger and aberrant driving behaviours. An internet-based questionnaire survey was administered to a sample of Chinese drivers, with driving anger measured by a 14-item short Driving Anger Scale (DAS) and the aberrant driving behaviours measured by a 23-item Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ). The results of Confirmatory Factor Analysis demonstrated that the three-factor model (hostile gesture, arrival-blocking and safety-blocking) of the DAS fitted the driving anger data well. The Exploratory Factor Analysis on DBQ data differentiated four types of aberrant driving, viz. emotional violation, error, deliberate violation and maintaining progress violation. For the anger-aberration relation, it was found that only "arrival-blocking" anger was a significant positive predictor for all four types of aberrant driving behaviours. The "safety-blocking" anger revealed a negative impact on deliberate violations, a finding different from previously established positive anger-aberration relation. These results suggest that drivers with different patterns of driving anger would show different behavioural tendencies and as a result intervention strategies may be differentially effective for drivers of different profiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  9. Structural centrosome aberrations sensitize polarized epithelia to basal cell extrusion.

    PubMed

    Ganier, Olivier; Schnerch, Dominik; Nigg, Erich A

    2018-06-01

    Centrosome aberrations disrupt tissue architecture and may confer invasive properties to cancer cells. Here we show that structural centrosome aberrations, induced by overexpression of either Ninein-like protein (NLP) or CEP131/AZI1, sensitize polarized mammalian epithelia to basal cell extrusion. While unperturbed epithelia typically dispose of damaged cells through apical dissemination into luminal cavities, certain oncogenic mutations cause a switch in directionality towards basal cell extrusion, raising the potential for metastatic cell dissemination. Here we report that NLP-induced centrosome aberrations trigger the preferential extrusion of damaged cells towards the basal surface of epithelial monolayers. This switch in directionality from apical to basal dissemination coincides with a profound reorganization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, which in turn prevents the contractile ring repositioning that is required to support extrusion towards the apical surface. While the basal extrusion of cells harbouring NLP-induced centrosome aberrations requires exogenously induced cell damage, structural centrosome aberrations induced by excess CEP131 trigger the spontaneous dissemination of dying cells towards the basal surface from MDCK cysts. Thus, similar to oncogenic mutations, structural centrosome aberrations can favour basal extrusion of damaged cells from polarized epithelia. Assuming that additional mutations may promote cell survival, this process could sensitize epithelia to disseminate potentially metastatic cells. © 2018 The Authors.

  10. Spin polarization and magnetic dichroism in photoemission from core and valence states in localized magnetic systems. IV. Core-hole polarization in resonant photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Laan, Gerrit; Thole, B. T.

    1995-12-01

    A simple theory is presented for core-hole polarization probed by resonant photoemission in a two-steps approximation. After excitation from a core level to the valence shell, the core hole decays into two shallower core holes under emission of an electron. The nonspherical core hole and the final state selected cause a specific angle and spin distribution of the emitted electron. The experiment is characterized by the ground-state moments, the polarization of the light, and the spin and angular distribution of the emitted electron. The intensity is a sum over ground-state expectation values of tensor operators times the probability to create a polarized core hole using polarized light, times the probability for decay of such a core hole into the final state. We give general expressions for the angle- and spin-dependent intensities in various regimes of Coulomb and spin-orbit interaction: LS, LSJ, and jjJ coupling. The core-polarization analysis, which generalizes the use of sum rules in x-ray absorption spectroscopy where the integrated peak intensities give ground-state expectation values of the spin and orbital moment operators, makes it possible to measure different linear combinations of these operators. As an application the 2p3/23p3p decay in ferromagnetic nickel is calculated using Hartree-Fock values for the radial matrix elements and phase factors, and compared with experiment, the dichroism is smaller in the 3P final state but stronger in the 1D, 1S peak.

  11. Multifocal multiphoton microscopy with adaptive optical correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Simao; Poland, Simon; Krstajic, Nikola; Li, David; Monypenny, James; Walker, Richard; Tyndall, David; Ng, Tony; Henderson, Robert; Ameer-Beg, Simon

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a well established approach for measuring dynamic signalling events inside living cells, including detection of protein-protein interactions. The improvement in optical penetration of infrared light compared with linear excitation due to Rayleigh scattering and low absorption have provided imaging depths of up to 1mm in brain tissue but significant image degradation occurs as samples distort (aberrate) the infrared excitation beam. Multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) FLIM is a method for obtaining functional, high resolution images of biological structures. In order to achieve good statistical accuracy TCSPC typically requires long acquisition times. We report the development of a multifocal multiphoton microscope (MMM), titled MegaFLI. Beam parallelization performed via a 3D Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), increases TCSPC count rate proportional to the number of beamlets produced. A weighted 3D GS algorithm is employed to improve homogeneity. An added benefit is the implementation of flexible and adaptive optical correction. Adaptive optics performed by means of Zernike polynomials are used to correct for system induced aberrations. Here we present results with significant improvement in throughput obtained using a novel complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) 1024 pixel single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) array, opening the way to truly high-throughput FLIM.

  12. Investigation of the isoplanatic patch and wavefront aberration along the pupillary axis compared to the line of sight in the eye

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowski, Maciej; Sheehan, Matthew; Neal, Daniel; Goncharov, Alexander V.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional optical systems usually provide best image quality on axis, while showing unavoidable gradual decrease in image quality towards the periphery of the field. The optical system of the human eye is not an exception. Within a limiting boundary the image quality can be considered invariant with field angle, and this region is known as the isoplanatic patch. We investigate the isoplanatic patch of eight healthy eyes and measure the wavefront aberration along the pupillary axis compared to the line of sight. The results are used to discuss methods of ocular aberration correction in wide-field retinal imaging with particular application to multi-conjugate adaptive optics systems. PMID:22312578

  13. Optimal spiral phase modulation in Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm for wavefront reconstruction and correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baránek, M.; Běhal, J.; Bouchal, Z.

    2018-01-01

    In the phase retrieval applications, the Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm is widely used for the simplicity of implementation. This iterative process can advantageously be deployed in the combination with a spatial light modulator (SLM) enabling simultaneous correction of optical aberrations. As recently demonstrated, the accuracy and efficiency of the aberration correction using the GS algorithm can be significantly enhanced by a vortex image spot used as the target intensity pattern in the iterative process. Here we present an optimization of the spiral phase modulation incorporated into the GS algorithm.

  14. Core-Level Photoemission Investigations of the CADMIUM-TELLURIDE(100) and INDIUM-ANTIMONY(100) Surface and Interfacial Structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Peter James

    1988-12-01

    Photoemission techniques, utilizing a synchrotron light source, were used to analyze the clean (100) surfaces of the zinc-blende semiconductor materials CdTe and InSb. Several interfacial systems involving the surfaces of these materials were also studied, including the CdTe(100)-Ag interface, the CdTe(100)-Sb system, and the InSb(100)-Sn interface. High -energy electron diffraction was also employed to acquire information about of surface structure. A one-domain (2x1) structure was observed for the CdTe(100) surface. Analysis of photoemission spectra of the Cd 4d core level for this surface structure revealed two components resulting from Cd surface atoms. The total intensity of these components accounts for a full monolayer of Cd atoms on the surface. A structural model is discussed commensurate with these results. Photoemission spectra of the Cd and Te 4d core levels indicate that Ag or Sb deposited on the CdTe(100)-(2x1) surface at room temperature do not bound strongly to the surface Cd atoms. The room temperature growth characteristics for these two elements on the CdTe(100)-(2x1) are discussed. The growth at elevated substrate temperatures was also studied for Sb deposition. The InSb(100) surface differed from the CdTe(100) surface. Using molecular beam epitaxy, several structures could be generated for the InSb(100) surface, including a c(8x2), a c(4x4), an asymmetric (1x3), a symmetric (1x3), and a (1x1). Analysis of photoemission intensities and line shapes indicates that the c(4x4) surface is terminated with 1{3 over 4} monolayers of Sb atoms. The c(8x2) surface is found to be terminated with {3over 4} monolayer of In atoms. Structural models for both of these surfaces are proposed based upon the photoemission results and upon models of the similar GaAs(100) structures. The room temperature growth characteristics of grey Sn on the InSb(100)-c(4x4) and InSb(100)-c(8x2) surfaces were studied with photoemission. The discontinuity in the valence band maximum

  15. Construction of special eye models for investigation of chromatic and higher-order aberrations of eyes.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yi; Wang, Yan; Wang, Zhaoqi; Liu, Yongji; Zhang, Lin; He, Yuanqing; Chang, Shengjiang

    2014-01-01

    An achromatic element eliminating only longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) while maintaining transverse chromatic aberration (TCA) is established for the eye model, which involves the angle formed by the visual and optical axis. To investigate the impacts of higher-order aberrations on vision, the actual data of higher-order aberrations of human eyes with three typical levels are introduced into the eye model along visual axis. Moreover, three kinds of individual eye models are established to investigate the impacts of higher-order aberrations, chromatic aberration (LCA+TCA), LCA and TCA on vision under the photopic condition, respectively. Results show that for most human eyes, the impact of chromatic aberration on vision is much stronger than that of higher-order aberrations, and the impact of LCA in chromatic aberration dominates. The impact of TCA is approximately equal to that of normal level higher-order aberrations and it can be ignored when LCA exists.

  16. Sixth-order wave aberration theory of ultrawide-angle optical systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lijun; Cao, Yiqing

    2017-10-20

    In this paper, we develop sixth-order wave aberration theory of ultrawide-angle optical systems like fisheye lenses. Based on the concept and approach to develop wave aberration theory of plane-symmetric optical systems, we first derive the sixth-order intrinsic wave aberrations and the fifth-order ray aberrations; second, we present a method to calculate the pupil aberration of such kind of optical systems to develop the extrinsic aberrations; third, the relation of aperture-ray coordinates between adjacent optical surfaces is fitted with the second-order polynomial to improve the calculation accuracy of the wave aberrations of a fisheye lens with a large acceptance aperture. Finally, the resultant aberration expressions are applied to calculate the aberrations of two design examples of fisheye lenses; the calculation results are compared with the ray-tracing ones with Zemax software to validate the aberration expressions.

  17. Chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of train engine drivers.

    PubMed

    Nordenson, I; Mild, K H; Järventaus, H; Hirvonen, A; Sandström, M; Wilén, J; Blix, N; Norppa, H

    2001-07-01

    Studies of Swedish railway employees have indicated that railroad engine drivers have an increased cancer morbidity and incidence of chronic lymphatic leukemia. The drivers are exposed to relatively high magnetic fields (MF), ranging from a few to over a hundred microT. Although the possible genotoxic potential of MF is unclear, some earlier studies have indicated that occupational exposure to MF may increase chromosome aberrations in blood lymphocytes. Since an increased level of chromosomal aberrations has been suggested to predict elevated cancer risk, we performed a cytogenetic analysis on cultured (48 h) peripheral lymphocytes of Swedish train engine drivers. A pilot study of 18 engine drivers indicated a significant difference in the frequency of cells with chromosomal aberrations (gaps included or excluded) in comparison with seven concurrent referents (train dispatchers) and a control group of 16 office workers. The engine drivers had about four times higher frequency of cells with chromosome-type aberrations (excluding gaps) than the office workers (P < 0.01) and the dispatchers (P < 0.05). Seventy-eight percent of the engine drivers showed at least one cell per 100 with chromosome-type aberrations compared with 29% among the dispatchers and 31% among the office workers. In a follow-up study, another 30 engine drivers showed an increase (P < 0.05) in the frequency of cells with chromosome-type aberrations (gaps excluded) as compared with 30 referent policemen. Sixty percent of the engine drivers had one or more cells (per 100 cells) with chromosome-type aberrations compared with 30% among the policemen. In conclusion, the results of the two studies support the hypothesis that exposure to MF at mean intensities of 2-15 microT can induce chromosomal damage. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. The Etiology of Presbyopia, Contributing Factors, and Future Correction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickenbotham, Adam Lyle

    Presbyopia has been a complicated problem for clinicians and researchers for centuries. Defining what constitutes presbyopia and what are its primary causes has long been a struggle for the vision and scientific community. Although presbyopia is a normal aging process of the eye, the continuous and gradual loss of accommodation is often dreaded and feared. If presbyopia were to be considered a disease, its global burden would be enormous as it affects more than a billion people worldwide. In this dissertation, I explore factors associated with presbyopia and develop a model for explaining the onset of presbyopia. In this model, the onset of presbyopia is associated primarily with three factors; depth of focus, focusing ability (accommodation), and habitual reading (or task) distance. If any of these three factors could be altered sufficiently, the onset of presbyopia could be delayed or prevented. Based on this model, I then examine possible optical methods that would be effective in correcting for presbyopia by expanding depth of focus. Two methods that have been show to be effective at expanding depth of focus include utilizing a small pupil aperture or generating higher order aberrations, particularly spherical aberration. I compare these two optical methods through the use of simulated designs, monitor testing, and visual performance metrics and then apply them in subjects through an adaptive optics system that corrects aberrations through a wavefront aberrometer and deformable mirror. I then summarize my findings and speculate about the future of presbyopia correction.

  19. The Relationship Between High-Order Aberration and Anterior Ocular Biometry During Accommodation in Young Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Bilian; Mao, Xinjie; Jiang, Hong; He, Jichang; Liu, Che; Li, Min; Yuan, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the anterior ocular anatomic origin of high-order aberration (HOA) components using optical coherence tomography and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Methods A customized system was built to simultaneously capture images of ocular wavefront aberrations and anterior ocular biometry. Relaxed, 2-diopter (D) and 4-D accommodative states were repeatedly measured in 30 young subjects. Custom software was used to correct optical distortions and measure biometric parameters from the images. Results The anterior ocular biometry changed during 2-D accommodation, in which central lens thickness, ciliary muscle thicknesses at 1 mm posterior to the scleral spur (CMT1), and the maximum value of ciliary muscle thickness increased significantly, whereas anterior chamber depth, CMT3, radius of anterior lens surface curvature (RAL), and radius of posterior lens surface curvature (RPL) decreased significantly. The changes in the anterior ocular parameters during 4-D accommodation were similar to those for the 2-D accommodation. \\begin{document}\

  20. Pupil-segmentation-based adaptive optical correction of a high-numerical-aperture gradient refractive index lens for two-photon fluorescence endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Ji, Na

    2012-06-01

    The intrinsic aberrations of high-NA gradient refractive index (GRIN) lenses limit their image quality as well as field of view. Here we used a pupil-segmentation-based adaptive optical approach to correct the inherent aberrations in a two-photon fluorescence endoscope utilizing a 0.8 NA GRIN lens. By correcting the field-dependent aberrations, we recovered diffraction-limited performance across a large imaging field. The consequent improvements in imaging signal and resolution allowed us to detect fine structures that were otherwise invisible inside mouse brain slices.