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Sample records for aberration-corrected electron microscopy

  1. Nanowire growth kinetics in aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yi-Chia; Panciera, Federico; Reuter, Mark C; Stach, Eric A; Ross, Frances M

    2016-04-14

    We visualize atomic level dynamics during Si nanowire growth using aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy, and compare with lower pressure results from ultra-high vacuum microscopy. We discuss the importance of higher pressure observations for understanding growth mechanisms and describe protocols to minimize effects of the higher pressure background gas. PMID:27041654

  2. Seeing Inside Materials by Aberration-Corrected Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    The recent successful correction of lens aberrations in the electron microscope has improved resolution by more than a factor of two in just a few years, bringing many benefits for the study of materials. These benefits extend significantly beyond enhanced resolution alone. Aberration correction gives higher resolution by allowing the objective lens to have a wider aperture, which also results in a reduced depth of field. This effect can be used to only focus specific sections inside materials for the first time. In this contribution we describe recent results exploiting this capability. Additionally, we show how combining the microscopy data with first-principles theory gives new insights into materials properties. We cover two applications, both involving heavy atoms in a lighter host. The first shows how single Hf atoms can be mapped in three dimensions inside the 1 nm-wide SiO2 region of a high dielectric constant device structure, and how a link to macroscopic device properties results through theoretical calculations. The second example is from the field of nanoscience, where individual Au atoms are imaged inside Si nanowires grown by a vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. The majority of Au atoms are probably injected by the highly energetic electron beam. However, their observed sites and atomic configurations represent at least meta-stable configurations and match well to results from density functional calculations.

  3. Aberration Corrected Photoemission Electron Microscopy with Photonics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Joseph P. S.

    Photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) uses photoelectrons excited from material surfaces by incident photons to probe the interaction of light with surfaces with nanometer-scale resolution. The point resolution of PEEM images is strongly limited by spherical and chromatic aberration. Image aberrations primarily originate from the acceleration of photoelectrons and imaging with the objective lens and vary strongly in magnitude with specimen emission characteristics. Spherical and chromatic aberration can be corrected with an electrostatic mirror, and here I develop a triode mirror with hyperbolic geometry that has two adjacent, field-adjustable regions. I present analytic and numerical models of the mirror and show that the optical properties agree to within a few percent. When this mirror is coupled with an electron lens, it can provide a large dynamic range of correction and the coefficients of spherical and chromatic aberration can be varied independently. I report on efforts to realize a triode mirror corrector, including design, characterization, and alignment in our microscope at Portland State University (PSU). PEEM may be used to investigate optically active nanostructures, and we show that photoelectron emission yields can be identified with diffraction, surface plasmons, and dielectric waveguiding. Furthermore, we find that photoelectron micrographs of nanostructured metal and dielectric structures correlate with electromagnetic field calculations. We conclude that photoemission is highly spatially sensitive to the electromagnetic field intensity, allowing the direct visualization of the interaction of light with material surfaces at nanometer scales and over a wide range of incident light frequencies.

  4. Polyvinylidene fluoride molecules in nanofibers, imaged at atomic scale by aberration corrected electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolla, Dinesh; Gorse, Joseph; Kisielowski, Christian; Miao, Jiayuan; Taylor, Philip L.; Chase, George G.; Reneker, Darrell H.

    2015-12-01

    Atomic scale features of polyvinylidene fluoride molecules (PVDF) were observed with aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. Thin, self-supporting PVDF nanofibers were used to create images that show conformations and relative locations of atoms in segments of polymer molecules, particularly segments near the surface of the nanofiber. Rows of CF2 atomic groups, at 0.25 nm intervals, which marked the paths of segments of the PVDF molecules, were seen. The fact that an electron microscope image of a segment of a PVDF molecule depended upon the particular azimuthal direction, along which the segment was viewed, enabled observation of twist around the molecular axis. The 0.2 nm side-by-side distance between the two fluorine atoms attached to the same carbon atom was clearly resolved. Morphological and chemical changes produced by energetic electrons, ranging from no change to fiber scission, over many orders of magnitude of electrons per unit area, promise quantitative new insights into radiation chemistry. Relative movements of segments of molecules were observed. Promising synergism between high resolution electron microscopy and molecular dynamic modeling was demonstrated. This paper is at the threshold of growing usefulness of electron microscopy to the science and engineering of polymer and other molecules.Atomic scale features of polyvinylidene fluoride molecules (PVDF) were observed with aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. Thin, self-supporting PVDF nanofibers were used to create images that show conformations and relative locations of atoms in segments of polymer molecules, particularly segments near the surface of the nanofiber. Rows of CF2 atomic groups, at 0.25 nm intervals, which marked the paths of segments of the PVDF molecules, were seen. The fact that an electron microscope image of a segment of a PVDF molecule depended upon the particular azimuthal direction, along which the segment was viewed, enabled observation of

  5. Identification of light elements in silicon nitride by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Idrobo, Juan C; Walkosz, Weronika; Klie, Robert F; Oğüt, Serdar

    2012-12-01

    In silicon nitride structural ceramics, the overall mechanical and thermal properties are controlled by the atomic and electronic structures at the interface between the ceramic grains and the amorphous intergranular films (IGFs) formed by various sintering additives. In the last ten years the atomic arrangements of heavy elements (rare-earths) at the Si(3)N(4)/IGF interfaces have been resolved. However, the atomic position of light elements, without which it is not possible to obtain a complete description of the interfaces, has been lacking. This review article details the authors' efforts to identify the atomic arrangement of light elements such as nitrogen and oxygen at the Si(3)N(4)/SiO(2) interface and in bulk Si(3)N(4) using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. PMID:22726263

  6. Polyvinylidene fluoride molecules in nanofibers, imaged at atomic scale by aberration corrected electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lolla, Dinesh; Gorse, Joseph; Kisielowski, Christian; Miao, Jiayuan; Taylor, Philip L; Chase, George G; Reneker, Darrell H

    2016-01-01

    Atomic scale features of polyvinylidene fluoride molecules (PVDF) were observed with aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. Thin, self-supporting PVDF nanofibers were used to create images that show conformations and relative locations of atoms in segments of polymer molecules, particularly segments near the surface of the nanofiber. Rows of CF2 atomic groups, at 0.25 nm intervals, which marked the paths of segments of the PVDF molecules, were seen. The fact that an electron microscope image of a segment of a PVDF molecule depended upon the particular azimuthal direction, along which the segment was viewed, enabled observation of twist around the molecular axis. The 0.2 nm side-by-side distance between the two fluorine atoms attached to the same carbon atom was clearly resolved. Morphological and chemical changes produced by energetic electrons, ranging from no change to fiber scission, over many orders of magnitude of electrons per unit area, promise quantitative new insights into radiation chemistry. Relative movements of segments of molecules were observed. Promising synergism between high resolution electron microscopy and molecular dynamic modeling was demonstrated. This paper is at the threshold of growing usefulness of electron microscopy to the science and engineering of polymer and other molecules. PMID:26369731

  7. The first observation of titanate nanotubes by spherical aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, L.; Tanemura, S.; Jiang, T.; Tanemura, M.; Yoshida, K.; Tanaka, N.; Xu, G.

    2009-07-01

    Multi-wall titanate nanotubes (MW-TNNTs) with high aspect ratio, large surface area and good uniformity were produced by alkaline hydrothermal treatment of grounded TiO 2 aerogels and further by applying freeze-drying. Not only the crystal phase and diameter, but also morphology of the starting materials impact on the aspect ratio and transformation efficiency of the obtained nanotubes. Other parameters, such as pH value during neutralization process and drying method for the final products, are important to control length and dispersion of MW-TNNTs. By spherical aberration corrected high-resolution transmission-electron-microscopy (Cs-corrected HRTEM) with lateral space resolution of 0.14 nm at 200 kV accelerating voltage and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS), the detailed structural analysis of MW-TNNTs reveals that (1) diameters of inner and outer tubes are about 4-7 nm and 10 nm, respectively, (2) numbers of layers are different from part to part along the longitudinal tube axis, (3) the walls of the tubes have interlayer spacing of 0.70-0.80 nm and the lateral fringes which are vertical to the walls have spacing of 0.32 nm, (4) each layer of MW-TNNT is the nanosheet composed by the arrayed TiO 6 octahedrons, and respective octahedron being slightly strained, and (5) no chirality of MW-TNNT tubular structure is observed.

  8. Aberration Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of (Ca , Sr)Fe2O5 Brownmillerite superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Debangshu; Stone, Greg; Moon, Eun Ju; Young, Joshua; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Rondinelli, James; May, Steven; Alem, Nasim

    The brownmillerite phase A2B2O5 consists of ordered oxygen vacancies in alternate perovskite layers forming chiral tetrahedral chains. The handedness of these tetrahedral chains control the polarization of the structure. The current study focuses on 1-1 brownmillerite superlattices grown on a SrTiO3 substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. The B-site in this structure is iron throughout the superlattice film, while the A-site alternates between calcium and strontium in the superlattice layers. In this study, we use atomic resolution aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to investigate the structure and chemistry of the film-substrate interface as well as the chemical structure of the superlattice. Atom positions are determined to measure displacement vectors of A-site cations in the superlattice structure. D.M., G.A.S., V.G. and N.A. were supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1420620. E.J.M. and S.J.M. were supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1151649.

  9. Bright-field imaging of compound semiconductors using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Toshihiro; Lu, Jing; McCartney, Martha R.; Smith, David J.

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the observation of six different zincblende compound semiconductors in [110] projection using large-collection-angle bright-field (LABF) imaging with an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Phase contrast is completely suppressed when the collection semi-angle is set equal to the convergence semi-angle and there are no reversals in image contrast with changes in defocus or thickness. The optimum focus for imaging closely separated pairs of atomic columns (‘dumbbells’) is unique and easily recognized, and the positions of atomic columns occupied by heavier atoms always have darker intensity than those occupied by lighter atoms. Thus, the crystal polarity of compound semiconductors can be determined unambiguously. Moreover, it is concluded that the LABF imaging mode will be highly beneficial for studying other more complicated heterostructures at the atomic scale.

  10. Polyvinylidene fluoride molecules in nanofibers, imaged at atomic scale by aberration corrected electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reneker, Darrell; Gorse, Joseph; Lolla, Dinesh; Kisielowski, Christian; Miao, Jiayuan; Taylor, Philip; Chase, George

    Atomic scale features of polyvinylidene fluoride molecules (PVDF) were observed. Electron micrographs of thin, self-supporting PVDF nanofibers showed conformations and relative locations of atoms in segments of polymer molecules. Rows of CF2 atomic groups, at 0.25 nm intervals, marked the paths of segments of the PVDF molecules. The fact that an electron microscope image of a segment of a PVDF molecule depended upon the particular azimuthal direction, along which the segment was viewed, enabled observation of twist around the molecular axis. The 0.2 nm side-by-side distance between the two fluorine atoms attached to the same carbon atom was clearly resolved. Morphological and chemical changes produced by energetic electrons, ranging from no change to fiber scission, over many orders of magnitude of electrons per unit area, provide quantitative new insights into radiation chemistry. Relative movements of segments of molecules were observed. Synergism between high resolution electron micrographs and images created by molecular dynamic modeling was demonstrated. This paper is at the threshold of growing usefulness of electron microscopy to the science and engineering of polymer and other molecules. Support from Coalescence Filtration Nanofiber Consortium and from the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  11. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for complex transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-Hua, Zhang; Dong-Dong, Xiao; Lin, Gu

    2016-06-01

    Lattice, charge, orbital, and spin are the four fundamental degrees of freedom in condensed matter, of which the interactive coupling derives tremendous novel physical phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (high-T c SC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in strongly correlated electronic system. Direct experimental observation of these freedoms is essential to understanding the structure-property relationship and the physics behind it, and also indispensable for designing new materials and devices. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) integrating multiple techniques of structure imaging and spectrum analysis, is a comprehensive platform for providing structural, chemical and electronic information of materials with a high spatial resolution. Benefiting from the development of aberration correctors, STEM has taken a big breakthrough towards sub-angstrom resolution in last decade and always steps forward to improve the capability of material characterization; many improvements have been achieved in recent years, thereby giving an in-depth insight into material research. Here, we present a brief review of the recent advances of STEM by some representative examples of perovskite transition metal oxides; atomic-scale mapping of ferroelectric polarization, octahedral distortions and rotations, valence state, coordination and spin ordering are presented. We expect that this brief introduction about the current capability of STEM could facilitate the understanding of the relationship between functional properties and these fundamental degrees of freedom in complex oxides. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Project, China (Grant No. 2014CB921002), the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51522212 and 51421002).

  12. Separating strain from composition in unit cell parameter maps obtained from aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, T.; Remmele, T.; Korytov, M.; Markurt, T.; Albrecht, M.; Duff, A.; Lymperakis, L.; Neugebauer, J.; Chèze, C.

    2014-01-21

    Based on the evaluation of lattice parameter maps in aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy images, we propose a simple method that allows quantifying the composition and disorder of a semiconductor alloy at the unit cell scale with high accuracy. This is realized by considering, next to the out-of-plane, also the in-plane lattice parameter component allowing to separate the chemical composition from the strain field. Considering only the out-of-plane lattice parameter component not only yields large deviations from the true local alloy content but also carries the risk of identifying false ordering phenomena like formations of chains or platelets. Our method is demonstrated on image simulations of relaxed supercells, as well as on experimental images of an In{sub 0.20}Ga{sub 0.80}N quantum well. Principally, our approach is applicable to all epitaxially strained compounds in the form of quantum wells, free standing islands, quantum dots, or wires.

  13. Long-range chemical orders in Au-Pd nanoparticles revealed by aberration-corrected electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nelayah, Jaysen; Nguyen, Nhat Tai; Alloyeau, Damien; Wang, Guillaume Yangshu; Ricolleau, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Despite the importance of gold-palladium nanoalloys in heterogeneous catalysis, the phase stability of Au-Pd alloys still remains unclear. We report here on the alloying and chemical ordering in epitaxially-grown and post-annealed gold-palladium nanoparticles (NPs) using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Au-Pd NPs with a controlled size, composition and structure were grown by pulsed laser deposition on freshly-cleaved NaCl(001) single crystals heated at 300 °C. After transfer to an amorphous carbon support, the NPs were annealed in vacuum at elevated temperatures above 400 °C for a few hours (6-10 hours) to promote chemical ordering. The as-grown NPs were mostly monocrystalline with a chemically-disordered face-centered cubic structure. Upon high-temperature annealing, a high degree of chemical ordering was observed in nanometer-sized NPs. Electron microscopy measurements showed that both L10 and L12 orders are stabilized in the Au-rich region of the Au-Pd phase diagram. These ordered phases exist at temperatures as high as 600 °C. Moreover, compositional analysis of single annealed particles revealed that the observed chemical ordering occurs in parallel to a two-tiered Ostwald ripening process. Due to this ripening process, a clear dependence between chemical composition and particle size is established during annealing with an enrichment in Pd as the NPs grow in size. Our results, besides clarifying some controversial aspects about long-range order in Au-Pd alloys, shed light on the structural stability of Au-Pd nanoalloys at elevated temperatures. PMID:25079393

  14. Direct imaging of light elements by annular dark-field aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lotnyk, Andriy Poppitz, David; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2014-02-17

    In this report, we show that an annular dark-field detector in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope allows the direct observation of light element columns in crystalline lattices. At specific imaging conditions, an enhancement of the intensities of light element columns in the presence of heavy element columns is observed. Experimental results are presented for imaging the nitrogen and carbon atomic columns at the GaN-SiC interface and within the GaN and SiC compounds. The crystal polarity of GaN at the interface is identified. The obtained findings are discussed and are well supported by image simulations.

  15. Prospects for aberration corrected electron precession.

    PubMed

    Own, C S; Sinkler, W; Marks, L D

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in aberration control in the TEM have yielded a tremendous enhancement of direct imaging capabilities for studying atomic structures. However, aberration correction also has substantial benefits for achieving ultra-resolution in the TEM through reciprocal space techniques. Several tools are available that allow very accurate detection of the electron distribution in surfaces allowing precise atomic-scale characterization through statistical inversion techniques from diffraction data. The precession technique now appears to extend this capability to the bulk. This article covers some of the progress in this area and details requirements for a next-generation analytical diffraction instrument. An analysis of the contributions offered by aberration correction for precision electron precession is included. PMID:17207934

  16. Controlled polarity of sputter-deposited aluminum nitride on metals observed by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harumoto, T.; Sannomiya, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Muraishi, S.; Shi, J.; Nakamura, Y.; Sawada, H.; Tanaka, T.; Tanishiro, Y.; Takayanagi, K.

    2013-02-28

    The polarity determination process of sputter-deposited aluminum nitride (AlN) on metals has been analyzed using aberration corrected atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscope. Direct growth of c-axis orientated AlN on face centered cubic metals (fcc) (111) with the local epitaxy has been observed, and the polarity was determined at the AlN/metal interface. We found that the AlN polarity can be controlled by the base metal layer: N-polarity AlN grows on Pt(111) while Al-polarity AlN forms on Al(111). Based on these results, the growth mechanism of AlN on metals is discussed.

  17. Nanoscale Energy-Filtered Scanning Confocal Electron Microscopy Using a Double-Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I.; Nellist, Peter D.; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2010-05-21

    We demonstrate that a transmission electron microscope fitted with two spherical-aberration correctors can be operated as an energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscope. A method for establishing this mode is described and initial results showing 3D chemical mapping with nanoscale sensitivity to height and thickness changes in a carbon film are presented. Importantly, uncorrected chromatic aberration does not limit the depth resolution of this technique and moreover performs an energy-filtering role, which is explained in terms of a combined depth and energy-loss response function.

  18. Effect of oxygen stoichiometry in LuFe2O(4-δ) and its microstructure observed by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, H X; Tian, H F; Wang, Z; Qin, Y B; Ma, C; Li, J Q; Cheng, Z Y; Yu, R; Zhu, J

    2012-10-31

    A series of oxygen deficient LuFe(2)O(4-δ) materials have been prepared under a controlled oxygen partial-pressure atmosphere. Measurements of magnetization reveal that the increase of oxygen deficiencies could evidently depress the ferrimagnetic phase transition temperature (T(N)). In additional to the well-known charge ordering within the (11(-)0) crystal plane, a visible structural modulation with q = (0,1/4.2,7/8) commonly appears on the (100) plane in the oxygen deficient samples. An aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy study on the oxygen deficient samples demonstrates the presence of oxygen vacancies and local structural distortion. The atomic structural features in correlation with the structural modulation, distortion of the FeO(5) polyhedron and the (001) twinning domains have been also examined. PMID:23032863

  19. A ‘jump-to-coalescence’ mechanism during nanoparticle growth revealed by in situ aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neng, Wan; Shuang-ying, Lei; Jun, Xu; Martini, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we used in situ aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM) to observe the coalescence of gold nanoparticles. We observed a critical edge-to-edge distance {d}ec∼ 0.5 {nm} below which the two particles will coalesce rapidly (jump-to-coalescence). A model based on the single-atom-triggered rapid particle contraction was proposed and verified by first-principles calculations, in which evident energy decrease was detected when adding a gold atom between two gold nanoparticles. Our ex situ TEM study of sputtering-deposited gold nanoparticles on different substrates with varied time also supports the jump-to-contact mechanism. This observation afforded physical insight into the fundamental growth mechanism during dynamic particle coalescence processes.

  20. Morphological evolution of InAs/InP quantum wires through aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sales, D L; Varela, M; Pennycook, S J; Galindo, P L; González, L; González, Y; Fuster, D; Molina, S I

    2010-08-13

    Evolution of the size, shape and composition of self-assembled InAs/InP quantum wires through the Stranski-Krastanov transition has been determined by aberration-corrected Z-contrast imaging. High resolution compositional maps of the wires in the initial, intermediate and final formation stages are presented. (001) is the main facet at their very initial stage of formation, which is gradually reduced in favour of [114] or [118], ending with the formation of mature quantum wires with {114} facets. Significant changes in wire dimensions are measured when varying slightly the amount of InAs deposited. These results are used as input parameters to build three-dimensional models that allow calculation of the strain energy during the quantum wire formation process. The observed morphological evolution is explained in terms of the calculated elastic energy changes at the growth front. Regions of the wetting layer close to the nanostructure perimeters have higher strain energy, causing migration of As atoms towards the quantum wire terraces, where the structure is partially relaxed; the thickness of the wetting layer is reduced in these zones and the island height increases until the (001) facet is removed. PMID:20647625

  1. Local symmetry breaking of a thin crystal structure of β-Si3N4 as revealed by spherical aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwang Su; Zhang, Zaoli; Kaiser, Ute

    2012-06-01

    This report is an extension of the study for structural imaging of 5-6 nm thick β-Si(3)N(4) [0001] crystal with a spherical aberration corrected transmission electron microscope by Zhang and Kaiser [2009. Structure imaging of β-Si(3)N(4) by spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Ultramicroscopy 109, 1114-1120]. In this work, a local symmetry breaking with an uneven resolution of dumbbells in the six-membered rings revealed in the reported images in the study of Zhang and Kaiser has been analyzed in detail. It is found that this local asymmetry in the image basically is not relevant to a slight mistilt of the specimen and/or a beam tilt (coma). Rather the certain variation of the tetrahedral bond length of Si-N(4) in the crystal structure is found to be responsible for the uneven resolution with a local structural variation from region to region. This characteristic of the variation is also supposed to give a distorted lattice of apparently 2°-2.5° deviations from the perfect hexagonal unit cell as observed in the reported image in the work of Zhang and Kaiser. It is discussed that this variation may prevail only in a thin specimen with a thickness ranging ~≤ 5-6 nm. At the same time, it is noted that the average of the bond length variation is close to the fixed length known in a bulk crystal of β-Si(3)N(4). PMID:22499470

  2. A Site-isolated Mononuclear Iridium Complex Catalyst Supported on MgO: Characterization by Spectroscopy and Aberration-corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, A.; Ortalan, V; Browning, N; Gates , B

    2010-01-01

    Supported mononuclear iridium complexes with ethene ligands were prepared by the reaction of Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}(acac) (acac is CH{sub 3}COCHCOCH{sub 3}) with highly dehydroxylated MgO. Characterization of the supported species by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and infrared (IR) spectroscopies showed that the resultant supported organometallic species were Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, formed by the dissociation of the acac ligand from Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}(acac) and bonding of the Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} species to the MgO surface. Direct evidence of the site-isolation of these mononuclear complexes was obtained by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); the images demonstrate the presence of the iridium complexes in the absence of any clusters. When the iridium complexes were probed with CO, the resulting IR spectra demonstrated the formation of Ir(CO){sub 2} complexes on the MgO surface. The breadth of the {nu}{sub CO} bands demonstrates a substantial variation in the metal-support bonding, consistent with the heterogeneity of the MgO surface; the STEM images are not sufficient to characterize this heterogeneity. The supported iridium complexes catalyzed ethene hydrogenation at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a flow reactor, and EXAFS spectra indicated that the mononuclear iridium species remained intact. STEM images of the used catalyst confirmed that almost all of the iridium complexes remained intact, but this method was sensitive enough to detect a small degree of aggregation of the iridium on the support.

  3. Evaluation of stacking faults and associated partial dislocations in AlSb/GaAs (001) interface by aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, C.; Ge, B. H.; Cui, Y. X.; Li, F. H.; Zhu, J.; Yu, R.; Cheng, Z. Y.

    2014-11-15

    The stacking faults (SFs) in an AlSb/GaAs (001) interface were investigated using a 300 kV spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The structure and strain distribution of the single and intersecting (V-shaped) SFs associated with partial dislocations (PDs) were characterized by the [110] HRTEM images and geometric phase analysis, respectively. In the biaxial strain maps ε{sub xx} and ε{sub yy}, a SF can be divided into several sections under different strain states (positive or negative strain values). Furthermore, the strain state for the same section of a SF is in contrast to each other in ε{sub xx} and ε{sub yy} strain maps. The modification in the strain states was attributed to the variation in the local atomic displacements for the SF in the AlSb film on the GaAs substrate recorded in the lattice image. Finally, the single SF was found to be bounded by two 30° PDs. A pair of 30° PDs near the heteroepitaxial interface reacted to form a Lomer-Cottrell sessile dislocation located at the vertices of V-shaped SFs with opposite screw components. The roles of misfit dislocations, such as the PDs, in strain relaxation were also discussed.

  4. Adaptive aberration correction using a triode hyperbolic electron mirror.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J P S; Word, R C; Könenkamp, R

    2011-01-01

    A converging electron mirror can be used to compensate spherical and chromatic aberrations in an electron microscope. This paper presents an analytical solution to a novel triode (three electrode) hyperbolic mirror as an improvement to the well-known diode (two electrode) hyperbolic mirror for aberration correction. A weakness of the diode mirror is a lack of flexibility in changing the chromatic and spherical aberration coefficients independently without changes in the mirror geometry. In order to remove this limitation, a third electrode can be added. We calculate the optical properties of the resulting triode mirror analytically on the basis of a simple model field distribution. We present the optical properties-the object/image distance, z(0), and the coefficients of spherical and chromatic aberration, C(s) and C(c), of both mirror types from an analysis of electron trajectories in the mirror field. From this analysis, we demonstrate that while the properties of both designs are similar, the additional parameters in the triode mirror improve the range of aberration that can be corrected. The triode mirror is also able to provide a dynamic adjustment range of chromatic aberration for fixed spherical aberration and focal length, or any permutation of these three parameters. While the dynamic range depends on the values of aberration correction needed, a nominal 10% tuning range is possible for most configurations accompanied by less than 1% change in the other two properties. PMID:21930022

  5. Direct imaging of crystal structure and defects in metastable Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} by quantitative aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Ulrich; Lotnyk, Andriy Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2014-03-24

    Knowledge about the atomic structure and vacancy distribution in phase change materials is of foremost importance in order to understand the underlying mechanism of fast reversible phase transformation. In this Letter, by combining state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with image simulations, we are able to map the local atomic structure and composition of a textured metastable Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin film deposited by pulsed laser deposition with excellent spatial resolution. The atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy investigations display the heterogeneous defect structure of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase. The obtained results are discussed. Highly oriented Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin films appear to be a promising approach for further atomic-resolution investigations of the phase change behavior of this material class.

  6. Image transfer with spatial coherence for aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Fumio; Sawada, Hidetaka; Shinkawa, Takao; Sannomiya, Takumi

    2016-08-01

    The formula of spatial coherence involving an aberration up to six-fold astigmatism is derived for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Transfer functions for linear imaging are calculated using the newly derived formula with several residual aberrations. Depending on the symmetry and origin of an aberration, the calculated transfer function shows characteristic symmetries. The aberrations that originate from the field's components, having uniformity along the z direction, namely, the n-fold astigmatism, show rotational symmetric damping of the coherence. The aberrations that originate from the field's derivatives with respect to z, such as coma, star, and three lobe, show non-rotational symmetric damping. It is confirmed that the odd-symmetric wave aberrations have influences on the attenuation of an image via spatial coherence. Examples of image simulations of haemoglobin and Si [211] are shown by using the spatial coherence for an aberration-corrected electron microscope. PMID:27155359

  7. The atomic structural dynamics of γ-Al2O3 supported Ir-Pt nanocluster catalysts prepared from a bimetallic molecular precursor: a study using aberration-corrected electron microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Small, Matthew W; Sanchez, Sergio I; Menard, Laurent D; Kang, Joo H; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2011-03-16

    This study describes a prototypical, bimetallic heterogeneous catalyst: compositionally well-defined Ir-Pt nanoclusters with sizes in the range of 1-2 nm supported on γ-Al(2)O(3). Deposition of the molecular bimetallic cluster [Ir(3)Pt(3)(μ-CO)(3)(CO)(3)(η-C(5)Me(5))(3)] on γ-Al(2)O(3), and its subsequent reduction with hydrogen, provides highly dispersed supported bimetallic Ir-Pt nanoparticles. Using spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (C(s)-STEM) and theoretical modeling of synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements, our studies provide unambiguous structural assignments for this model catalytic system. The atomic resolution C(s)-STEM images reveal strong and specific lattice-directed strains in the clusters that follow local bonding configurations of the γ-Al(2)O(3) support. Combined nanobeam diffraction (NBD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) data suggest the polycrystalline γ-Al(2)O(3) support material predominantly exposes (001) and (011) surface planes (ones commensurate with the zone axis orientations frequently exhibited by the bimetallic clusters). The data reveal that the supported bimetallic clusters exhibit complex patterns of structural dynamics, ones evidencing perturbations of an underlying oblate/hemispherical cuboctahedral cluster-core geometry with cores that are enriched in Ir (a result consistent with models based on surface energetics, which favor an ambient cluster termination by Pt) due to the dynamical responses of the M-M bonding to the specifics of the adsorbate and metal-support interactions. Taken together, the data demonstrate that strong temperature-dependent charge-transfer effects occur that are likely mediated variably by the cluster-support, cluster-adsorbate, and intermetallic bonding interactions. PMID:21341654

  8. Materials Characterization in the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Varela del Arco, Maria; Lupini, Andrew R; van Benthem, Klaus; Borisevich, Albina Y; Chisholm, Matthew F; Shibata, Naoya; Abe, E.; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2005-01-01

    In the nanoscience era, the properties of many exciting new materials and devices will depend on the details of their composition down to the level of single atoms. Thus the characterization of the structure and electronic properties of matter at the atomic scale is becoming ever more vital for economic and technological as well as for scientific reasons. The combination of atomic-resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) represents a powerful method to link the atomic and electronic structure to macroscopic properties, allowing materials, nanoscale systems, and interfaces to be probed in unprecedented detail. Z-contrast STEM uses electrons that have been scattered to large angles for imaging. The relative intensity of each atomic column is roughly proportional to Z{sup 2}, where Z is the atomic number. Recent developments in correcting the aberrations of the lenses in the electron microscope have pushed the achievable spatial resolution and the sensitivity for imaging and spectroscopy in the STEM into the sub-Angstrom (sub-{angstrom}) regime, providing a new level of insight into the structure/property relations of complex materials. Images acquired with an aberration-corrected instrument show greatly improved contrast. The signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high to allow sensitivity even to single atoms in both imaging and spectroscopy. This is a key achievement because the detection and measurement of the response of individual atoms has become a challenging issue to provide new insight into many fields, such as catalysis, ceramic materials, complex oxide interfaces, or grain boundaries. In this article, the state-of-the-art for the characterization of all of these different types of materials by means of aberration-corrected STEM and EELS are reviewed.

  9. Historical aspects of aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Rose, Harald H

    2009-06-01

    A brief history of the development of direct aberration correction in electron microscopy is outlined starting from the famous Scherzer theorem established in 1936. Aberration correction is the long story of many seemingly fruitless efforts to improve the resolution of electron microscopes by compensating for the unavoidable resolution-limiting aberrations of round electron lenses over a period of 50 years. The successful breakthrough, in 1997, can be considered as a quantum step in electron microscopy because it provides genuine atomic resolution approaching the size of the radius of the hydrogen atom. The additional realization of monochromators, aberration-free imaging energy filters and spectrometers has been leading to a new generation of analytical electron microscopes providing elemental and electronic information about the object on an atomic scale. PMID:19254915

  10. Multi-focus microscopy for aberration-corrected multi-color three-dimensional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsson, Sara

    Due to the classical conflict between spatial and temporal resolution, microscopy studies of fast events in living samples are often performed in 2D even when 3D imaging would be desirable and could provide new insights to biological function. This dissertation describes an instant 3D imaging system - a multi-focus microscope (MFM) - which provides high- resolution, aberration-corrected, multi-color fluorescence images of multiple focal planes simultaneously. Forming an instant focal series eliminates the need for multiple camera exposures and mechanical refocusing, allowing 3D imaging limited only by sample signal strength and the camera read-out rate for a single frame. A module containing the MFM optical components can easily be appended to the camera port of a commercial wide-field microscope. The excellent resolution and sensitivity of MFM is demonstrated on two different 3D biological imaging problems; neuronal imaging in the entire C.elegans embryo and mRNA imaging in cultured mammalian cells.

  11. An aberration corrected photoemission electron microscope at the advanced light source

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.; MacDowell, A.A.; Duarte, R.; Doran, A.; Forest, E.; Kelez, N.; Marcus, M.; Munson, D.; Padmore, H.; Petermann, K.; Raoux, S.; Robin, D.; Scholl, A.; Schlueter, R.; Schmid, P.; Stohr, J.; Wan, W.; Wei, D.H.; Wu, Y.

    2003-11-01

    Design of a new aberration corrected Photoemission electron microscope PEEM3 at the Advanced Light Source is outlined. PEEM3 will be installed on an elliptically polarized undulator beamline and will be used for the study of complex materials at high spatial and spectral resolution. The critical components of PEEM3 are the electron mirror aberration corrector and aberration-free magnetic beam separator. The models to calculate the optical properties of the electron mirror are discussed. The goal of the PEEM3 project is to achieve the highest possible transmission of the system at resolutions comparable to our present PEEM2 system (50 nm) and to enable significantly higher resolution, albeit at the sacrifice of intensity. We have left open the possibility to add an energy filter at a later date, if it becomes necessary driven by scientific need to improve the resolution further.

  12. Depth Sectioning with the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Borisevich, Albina Y; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    The ability to correct the aberrations of the probe-forming lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope provides not only a significant improvement in transverse resolution but in addition brings depth resolution at the nanometer scale. Aberration correction therefore opens up the possibility of 3D imaging by optical sectioning. Here we develop a definition for the depth resolution for scanning transmission electron microscope depth sectioning and present initial results from this method. Objects such as catalytic metal clusters and single atoms on various support materials are imaged in three dimensions with a resolution of several nanometers. Effective focal depth is determined by statistical analysis and the contributing factors are discussed. Finally, current challenges and future capabilities available through new instruments are discussed.

  13. In situ observation on hydrogenation of Mg-Ni films using environmental transmission electron microscope with aberration correction

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Junko; Yoshida, Kenta; Sasaki, Yukichi; Uchiyama, Naoki; Akiba, Etsuo

    2014-08-25

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to observe the hydrogenation of Mg-Ni films in a hydrogen atmosphere of 80–100 Pa. An aberration-corrected environmental TEM with a differential pumping system allows us to reveal the Angstrom-scale structure of the films in the initial stage of hydrogenation: first, nucleation and growth of Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} crystals with a lattice spacing of 0.22 nm in an Mg-rich amorphous matrix of the film occurs within 20 s after the start of the high-resolution observation, then crystallization of MgH{sub 2} with a smaller spacing of 0.15 nm happens after approximately 1 min. Our in situ TEM method is also applicable to the analysis of other hydrogen-related materials.

  14. Observations of Carbon Nanotube Oxidation in an Aberration-Corrected, Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ai Leen; Gidcumb, Emily; Zhou, Otto; Sinclair, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We report the first direct study on the oxidation of carbon nanotubes at the resolution of an aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM), as we locate and identify changes in the same nanotubes as they undergo oxidation at increasing temperatures in-situ in the ETEM. Contrary to earlier reports that CNT oxidation initiates at the end of the tube and proceeds along its length, our findings show that only the outside graphene layer is being removed and on occasion, the interior inner wall is oxidized, presumably due to oxygen infiltrating into the hollow nanotube through an open end or breaks in the tube. We believe that this work provides the foundation for much scientific understanding of the mechanism underlying the nanotube oxidation process, as well as guidelines to manipulate their structure or prevent their oxidation. PMID:23360330

  15. Sub-Angstrom Low Voltage Performance of a Monochromated, Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.; Russo, Christopher J.; Benner, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Lowering the electron energy in the transmission electron microscope allows for a significant improvement in contrast of light elements, and reduces knock-on damage for most materials. If low-voltage electron microscopes are defined as those with accelerating voltages below 100 kV, the introduction of aberration correctors and monochromators to the electron microscope column enables Ångstrom-level resolution, which was previously reserved for higher voltage instruments. Decreasing electron energy has three important advantages: 1) knock-on damage is lower, which is critically important for sensitive materials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes; 2) cross sections for electron-energy-loss spectroscopy increase, improving signal-to-noise for chemical analysis; 3) elastic scattering cross sections increase, improving contrast in high-resolution, zero-loss images. The results presented indicate that decreasing the acceleration voltage from 200 kV to 80 kV in a monochromated, aberration-corrected microscope enhances the contrast while retaining sub-angstrom resolution. These improvements in low-voltage performance are expected to produce many new results and enable a wealth of new experiments in materials science. PMID:20598206

  16. Bayesian-based aberration correction and numerical diffraction for improved lensfree on-chip microscopy of biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alexander; Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Jin, Chao; Wang, Xiao Yu

    2015-05-15

    Lensfree on-chip microscopy is an emerging imaging technique that can be used to visualize and study biological specimens without the need for imaging lens systems. Important issues that can limit the performance of lensfree on-chip microscopy include interferometric aberrations, acquisition noise, and image reconstruction artifacts. In this study, we introduce a Bayesian-based method for performing aberration correction and numerical diffraction that accounts for all three of these issues to improve the effective numerical aperture (NA) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed microscopic image. The proposed method was experimentally validated using the USAF resolution target as well as real waterborne Anabaena flos-aquae samples, demonstrating improvements in NA by ∼25% over the standard method, and improvements in SNR of 2.8 and 8.2 dB in the reconstructed image when compared to the reconstructed images produced using the standard method and a maximum likelihood estimation method, respectively. PMID:26393707

  17. The Aberration Corrected SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, David C.

    2005-09-09

    The performance of the conventional low-energy CD-SEM is limited by the aberrations inherent in the probe forming lens. Multi-pole correctors are now available which can reduce or eliminate these aberrations. An SEM equipped with such a corrector offers higher spatial resolution and more probe current from a given electron source, and other aspects of the optical performance are also improved, but the much higher numerical aperture associated with an aberration corrected lens results in a reduction in imaging depth of field.

  18. In-situ Study of Dynamic Phenomena at Metal Nanosolder Interfaces Using Aberration Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microcopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Controlling metallic nanoparticle (NP) interactions plays a vital role in the development of new joining techniques (nanosolder) that bond at lower processing temperatures but remain viable at higher temperatures. The pr imary objective of this project is t o develop a fundamental understanding of the actual reaction processes, associated atomic mechanisms, and the resulting microstructure that occur during thermally - driven bond formation concerning metal - metal nano - scale (%3C50nm) interfaces. In this LDRD pr oject, we have studied metallic NPs interaction at the elevated temperatures by combining in - situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM ) using an aberration - corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (AC - STEM) and atomic - scale modeling such as m olecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Various metallic NPs such as Ag, Cu and Au are synthesized by chemical routines. Numerous in - situ e xperiments were carried out with focus of the research on study of Ag - Cu system. For the first time, using in - situ STEM he ating experiments , we directly observed t he formation of a 3 - dimensional (3 - D) epitaxial Cu - Ag core - shell nanoparticle during the thermal interaction of Cu and Ag NPs at elevated temperatures (150 - 300 o C). The reaction takes place at temperatures as low as 150 o C and was only observed when care was taken to circumvent the effects of electron beam irradiation during STEM imaging. Atomic - scale modeling verified that the Cu - Ag core - shell structure is energetically favored, and indicated that this phenomenon is a nano - scale effect related to the large surface - to - volume ratio of the NPs. The observation potentially can be used for developing new nanosolder technology that uses Ag shell as the "glue" that stic ks the particles of Cu together. The LDRD has led to several journal publications and numerous conference presentations, and a TA. In addition, we have developed new TEM characterization techniques and phase

  19. Imaging screw dislocations at atomic resolution by aberration-corrected electron optical sectioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Lozano, J. G.; Pennycook, T. J.; Jones, L.; Hirsch, P. B.; Nellist, P. D.

    2015-06-01

    Screw dislocations play an important role in materials' mechanical, electrical and optical properties. However, imaging the atomic displacements in screw dislocations remains challenging. Although advanced electron microscopy techniques have allowed atomic-scale characterization of edge dislocations from the conventional end-on view, for screw dislocations, the atoms are predominantly displaced parallel to the dislocation line, and therefore the screw displacements are parallel to the electron beam and become invisible when viewed end-on. Here we show that screw displacements can be imaged directly with the dislocation lying in a plane transverse to the electron beam by optical sectioning using annular dark field imaging in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Applying this technique to a mixed [a+c] dislocation in GaN allows direct imaging of a screw dissociation with a 1.65-nm dissociation distance, thereby demonstrating a new method for characterizing dislocation core structures.

  20. Progress on PEEM3 - An Aberration Corrected X-Ray PhotoemissionElectron Microscope at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, Alastair A.; Feng, J.; DeMello, A.; Doran, A.; Duarte,R.; Forest, E.; Kelez, N.; Marcus, M.A.; Miller, T.; Padmore, H.A.; Raoux, S.; Robin, D.; Scholl, A.; Schlueter, R.; Schmid, P.; Stohr, J.; Wan, W.; Wei, D.H.; Wu, Y.

    2006-05-20

    A new ultrahigh-resolution photoemission electron microscope called PEEM3 is being developed and built at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). An electron mirror combined with a much-simplified magnetic dipole separator is to be used to provide simultaneous correction of spherical and chromatic aberrations. It is installed on an elliptically polarized undulator (EPU) beamline, and will be operated with very high spatial resolution and high flux to study the composition, structure, electric and magnetic properties of complex materials. The instrument has been designed and is described. The instrumental hardware is being deployed in 2 phases. The first phase is the deployment of a standard PEEM type microscope consisting of the standard linear array of electrostatic electron lenses. The second phase will be the installation of the aberration corrected upgrade to improve resolution and throughput. This paper describes progress as the instrument enters the commissioning part of the first phase.

  1. The Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL) and Recent Applications of an Aberration-Corrected Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope**

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Robert; Kempen, Paul Joseph; Chin, Richard; Koh, Ai Leen

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the establishment, over a period of ten years or so, of a multi-user, institution-wide facility for the characterization of materials and devices at the nano-scale. Emphasis is placed on the type of equipment that we have found to be most useful for our users, and the business strategy that maintains its operations. A central component of our facility is an aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscope and its application is summarized in the studies of plasmon energies of silver nanoparticles, the band gap of PbS quantum dots, atomic site occupancy near grain boundaries in yttria stabilized zirconia, the lithiation of silicon nanoparticles, in situ observations on carbon nanotube oxidation and the electron tomography of varicella zoster virus nucleocapsids. PMID:25364299

  2. Aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope with a sub-50-pm resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Tanigaki, Toshiaki Shimakura, Tomokazu; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Furutsu, Tadao; Shinada, Hiroyuki; Osakabe, Nobuyuki; Müller, Heiko; Haider, Maximilian; Tonomura, Akira

    2015-02-16

    Atomic-resolution electromagnetic field observation is critical to the development of advanced materials and to the unveiling of their fundamental physics. For this purpose, a spherical-aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope has been developed. The microscope has the following superior properties: stabilized accelerating voltage, minimized electrical and mechanical fluctuation, and coherent electron emission. These properties have enabled to obtain 43-pm information transfer. On the bases of these performances, a 43-pm resolution has been obtained by correcting lens aberrations up to the third order. Observations of GaN [411] thin crystal showed a projected atomic locations with a separation of 44 pm.

  3. Device and method for creating Gaussian aberration-corrected electron beams

    DOEpatents

    McMorran, Benjamin; Linck, Martin

    2016-01-19

    Electron beam phase gratings have phase profiles that produce a diffracted beam having a Gaussian or other selected intensity profile. Phase profiles can also be selected to correct or compensate electron lens aberrations. Typically, a low diffraction order produces a suitable phase profile, and other orders are discarded.

  4. Open-loop wavefront sensing scheme for specimen aberrations correction in two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andilla, Jordi; Porcar-Guezenec, Rafael; Levecq, Xavier; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2011-07-01

    The recent linkage between adaptive optics, a technique borrowed from astronomy and various imaging devices, has enabled to push forward their imaging capabilities by improving its contrast and resolution. A specific case is nonlinear microscopy (NLM) that, although it brings several inherent advantages (compared to linear fluorescence techniques) due to its nonlinear dependence on the excitation beam, its enhanced capabilities can be limited by the sample inhomogeneous structure. In this work, we demonstrate how these imaging capabilities can be enhanced by, employing adaptive optics in a two step correction process. Firstly, a closed-loop methodology aided by Shack-Hartman Wavefront sensing scheme is implemented for compensating the aberrations produced by the laser and the optical elements before the high numerical aperture microscope objective, resulting in a one-time calibration process. Then the residual aberrations are produced by the microscope objective and the sample. These are measured in a similar way as it is done in astronomy (employing a laser guide-star), using the two-photon excited fluorescence. The properties of this incoherent emission produced inside a test sample are compared to a genetically modified Caenorhabditis. elegans nematode expressing GFP showing that the emission of this protein (at 810nm) can be sensed efficiently with our WFS by modifying the exposure time. Therefore the recorded wavefront will capture the sample aberrations which are used to shape a deformable mirror in an open-loop configuration. This correction principle is demonstrated in a test sample by correcting aberrations in a "single-shot" resulting in a reduced sample exposure.

  5. Design and Performance Characteristics of the ORNL AdvancedMicroscopy Laboratory and JEOL 2200FS-AC Aberration-CorrectedSTEM/TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.; O'Keefe, Michael A.; Mishina, S.

    2005-02-15

    At ORNL, the new Advanced Microscopy Laboratory (AML) has recently been completed, with two aberration-corrected instruments installed, and two more planned in the near future to fill the 4-laboratory building. The installed JEOL 2200FS-AC has demonstrated aTEM information limit of 0.9A. This limit is expected given the measured instrument parameters (HT and OL power supply stabilities, beam energy spread, etc.), and illustrates that the environmental influences are not adversely affecting the instrument performance. In STEM high-angle annular dark-field (HA-ADF) mode, images of a thin Si crystal in<110>zone axis orientation, after primary aberrations in the illuminating beam were optimally corrected, showed a significant vibration effect. The microscope is fitted with three magnetically levitated turbo pumps (one on the column at about the specimen position,and two near floor level) that pump the Omega energy filter and detector chamber. These pumps run at 48,000 rpm, precisely equivalent to 800Hz. It was determined that the upper turbo pump was contributing essentially all of the 800Hz signal to the image, and in fact that the pump was defective. After replacing the pump with one significantly quieter than the original, the Si atomic column image and associated diffractogram(Fig. 4b) show a much-reduced effect of the 800Hz signal, but still some residual effect from the turbo pump. The upper pump will be removed from the main column to an adjacent frame on the floor, and will have a large-diameter, well-damped, pump line to the original connection to the column to effectively isolate the pump from the column. If the 800Hz signal results from mechanical vibrations, they will be damped, and if the signal results from acoustic coupling to the column, it can be damped by appropriate acoustic materials.

  6. Simultaneous fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field imaging with aberration correction over a wide field-of-view with Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jaebum; Kim, Jinho; Ou, Xiaoze; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to acquire both fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field images with correction for the spatially varying aberrations over a microscope's wide field-of-view (FOV). First, the procedure applies Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to retrieve the amplitude and phase of a sample, at a resolution that significantly exceeds the cutoff frequency of the microscope objective lens. At the same time, FPM algorithm is able to leverage on the redundancy within the set of acquired FPM bright-field images to estimate the microscope aberrations, which usually deteriorate in regions further away from the FOV's center. Second, the procedure acquires a raw wide-FOV fluorescence image within the same setup. Lack of moving parts allows us to use the FPM-estimated aberration map to computationally correct for the aberrations in the fluorescence image through deconvolution. Overlaying the aberration-corrected fluorescence image on top of the high-resolution bright-field image can be done with accurate spatial correspondence. This can provide means to identifying fluorescent regions of interest within the context of the sample's bright-field information. An experimental demonstration successfully improves the bright-field resolution of fixed, stained and fluorescently tagged HeLa cells by a factor of 4.9, and reduces the error caused by aberrations in a fluorescence image by 31%, over a field of view of 6.2 mm by 9.3 mm. For optimal deconvolution, we show the fluorescence image needs to have a signal-to-noise ratio of ~18.

  7. Restoring defect structures in 3C-SiC/Si (001) from spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope images by means of deconvolution processing.

    PubMed

    Wen, C; Wan, W; Li, F H; Tang, D

    2015-04-01

    The [110] cross-sectional samples of 3C-SiC/Si (001) were observed with a spherical aberration-corrected 300 kV high-resolution transmission electron microscope. Two images taken not close to the Scherzer focus condition and not representing the projected structures intuitively were utilized for performing the deconvolution. The principle and procedure of image deconvolution and atomic sort recognition are summarized. The defect structure restoration together with the recognition of Si and C atoms from the experimental images has been illustrated. The structure maps of an intrinsic stacking fault in the area of SiC, and of Lomer and 60° shuffle dislocations at the interface have been obtained at atomic level. PMID:25637810

  8. Electron Microscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  9. Possibilities and limitations of advanced transmission electron microscopy for carbon-based nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Carla; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2015-01-01

    Summary A major revolution for electron microscopy in the past decade is the introduction of aberration correction, which enables one to increase both the spatial resolution and the energy resolution to the optical limit. Aberration correction has contributed significantly to the imaging at low operating voltages. This is crucial for carbon-based nanomaterials which are sensitive to electron irradiation. The research of carbon nanomaterials and nanohybrids, in particular the fundamental understanding of defects and interfaces, can now be carried out in unprecedented detail by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM). This review discusses new possibilities and limits of AC-TEM at low voltage, including the structural imaging at atomic resolution, in three dimensions and spectroscopic investigation of chemistry and bonding. In situ TEM of carbon-based nanomaterials is discussed and illustrated through recent reports with particular emphasis on the underlying physics of interactions between electrons and carbon atoms. PMID:26425406

  10. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J; Colliex, C.

    2012-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  11. Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) Through-Focus Imaging for Three-Dimensional Atomic Analysis of Bismuth Segregation on Copper [001]/33° Twist Bicrystal Grain Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Wade, Charles Austin; McLean, Mark J; Vinci, Richard P; Watanabe, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) through-focus imaging (TFI) has been used to determine the three-dimensional atomic structure of Bi segregation-induced brittle Cu grain boundaries (GBs). With TFI, it is possible to observe single Bi atom distributions along Cu [001] twist GBs using an aberration-corrected STEM operating at 200 kV. The depth resolution is ~5 nm. Specimens with GBs intentionally inclined with respect to the microscope's optic axis were used to investigate Bi segregant atom distributions along and through the Cu GB. It was found that Bi atoms exist at most once per Cu unit cell along the GB, meaning that no continuous GB film is present. Therefore, the reduced fracture toughness of this particular Bi-doped Cu boundary would not be caused by fracture of Bi-Bi bonds. PMID:27145975

  12. Aberration correction past and present.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, P W

    2009-09-28

    Electron lenses are extremely poor: if glass lenses were as bad, we should see as well with the naked eye as with a microscope! The demonstration by Otto Scherzer in 1936 that skillful lens design could never eliminate the spherical and chromatic aberrations of rotationally symmetric electron lenses was therefore most unwelcome and the other great electron optician of those years, Walter Glaser, never ceased striving to find a loophole in Scherzer's proof. In the wartime and early post-war years, the first proposals for correcting C(s) were made and in 1947, in a second milestone paper, Scherzer listed these and other ways of correcting lenses; soon after, Dennis Gabor invented holography for the same purpose. These approaches will be briefly summarized and the work that led to the successful implementation of quadupole-octopole and sextupole correctors in the 1990 s will be analysed. In conclusion, the elegant role of image algebra in describing image formation and processing and, above all, in developing new methods will be mentioned. PMID:19687058

  13. Optical advantages of astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooyen, De Wet; Schöttl, Peter; Bern, Gregor; Heimsath, Anna; Nitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats adapt their shape in dependence of the incidence angle of the sun on the heliostat. Simulations show that this optical correction leads to a higher concentration ratio at the target and thus in a decrease in required receiver aperture in particular for smaller heliostat fields.

  14. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by inmore » this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.« less

  15. Cationic surface reconstructions on cerium oxide nanocrystals: an aberration-corrected HRTEM study.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, Umananda M; Ross, Ian M; Sayle, Thi X T; Sayle, Dean C; Parker, Stephen C; Reid, David; Seal, Sudipta; Kumar, Amit; Möbus, Günter

    2012-01-24

    Instabilities of nanoscale ceria surface facets are examined on the atomic level. The electron beam and its induced atom migration are proposed as a readily available probe to emulate and quantify functional surface activity, which is crucial for, for example, catalytic performance. In situ phase contrast high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with spherical aberration correction is shown to be the ideal tool to analyze cationic reconstruction. Hydrothermally prepared ceria nanoparticles with particularly enhanced {100} surface exposure are explored. Experimental analysis of cationic reconstruction is supported by molecular dynamics simulations where the Madelung energy is shown to be directly related to the binding energy, which enables one to generate a visual representation of the distribution of "reactive" surface oxygen. PMID:22148265

  16. Aberration corrected environmental STEM (AC ESTEM) for dynamic in-situ gas reaction studies of nanoparticle catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyes, E. D.; Gai, P. L.

    2014-06-01

    Environmental scanning transmission electron microscopy (ESTEM) with aberration correction (AC) has recently been added to the capabilities of the more established ETEM for analysis of heterogeneous nanoparticle based catalysts. It has helped to reveal the importance and potentially unique properties of individual atoms as active sites in their own right as well as pathways between established nanoparticles. A new capability is introduced for dynamic in-situ experiments under controlled conditions of specimen temperature and gas environment related to real world conditions pertinent to a range of industrial and societal priorities for new and improved chemical processes, materials, fuels, pharmaceutical products and processes, and in control or remediation of environmental emissions.

  17. Aberration corrected imaging of a carbon nanotube encapsulated Lindqvist Ion and correlation with Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, J.; Bichoutskaia, E.; Liu, Z.; Kuganathan, N.; Faulques, E.; Suenaga, K.; Shannon, I. J.

    2012-07-01

    80 kV aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM) of discrete [W6O19]2- polyoxometalate ions mounted within double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) allow high precision structural studies to be performed. W atom column separations within the octahedral W6 tungsten template can be visualized with sufficient clarity that correlation with full-scale density functional theory (DFT) can be achieved. Calculations performed on the gas phase and DWNT-mounted [W6O19]2- anions show good agreement, in the latter case, with measured separations between pairs of W2 atom columns imaged within equatorial WO6 octahedra and single W atoms within axial WO6 octahedra. Structural data from the tilted chiral encapsulating DWNT was also determined simultaneously with the anion structural measurements, allowing the nanotube conformation to be addressed in the DFT calculations.

  18. Three-Dimensional Structural Analysis of MgO-Supported Osmium Clusters by Electron Microscopy with Single-Atom Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Aydin, C.; Kulkarni, Apoorva; Chi, Miaofang; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2013-05-10

    Size, shape, nuclearity: Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to determine the 3D structures of MgO-supported Os3, Os4, Os5, and Os10 clusters, which have structures nearly matching those of osmium carbonyl compounds with known crystal structures. The samples are among the best-defined supported catalysts.

  19. Site-isolated Iridium Complexes on MgO Powder: Individual Ir Atoms Imaged by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, A.; Ortalan, V; D. Browning, N; C. Gates , B

    2009-01-01

    Iridium complexes were synthesized on MgO powder by adsorption of Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}(acac) [acac = acetonylacetonate]; images determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy show individual Ir atoms, demonstrating that the supported complexes were site-isolated.

  20. Aberration corrected STEM of iron rhodium nanoislands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, M. J.; Hage, F. S.; Loving, M.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Lewis, L. H.; Marrows, C. H.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2014-06-01

    Iron-rhodium (FeRh) nanoislands of equiatomic composition have been analysed using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) electron energy loss spec-troscopy(EELS) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF) techniques. Previous magne-tometry results have lead to a hypothesis that at room temperature the core of the islands are antiferromagnetic while the shell has a small ferromagnetic signal. The causes of this effect are most likely to be a difference in composition at the edges or a strain on the island that stretches the lattice and forces the ferromagnetic transition. The results find, at the film-substrate interface, an iron-rich layer ~ 5 Å thick that could play a key role in affecting the magnetostructural transition around the interfacial region and account for the room temperature ferromagnetism.

  1. Photoemission electron microscopy of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Sebastian; Wardini, Jenna; Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Word, Robert C.; Kevek, Josh; Minot, Ethan; Koenenkamp, Rolf

    2012-10-01

    A study of chemical vapor deposited graphene on copper foil is conducted using an aberration-corrected photoemission electron microscope (PEEM). We demonstrate the efficacy such a PEEM has in identifying multi-layer graphene, defects and cracking. A model is developed to describe the observed reduction in photoemission rate where electrons originate from the copper foil and scatter through the graphene. A survey of several multi-layer feature line profiles demonstrates the reduced photoemission rate as the number of graphene layers increases. A mean-free-path length of l=3.8±0.8 nm is inferred assuming the layer spacing in graphene is δz=0.35 nm. The PEEM's high spatial resolution and surface sensitivity combined with no electron beam damage are promising for characterizing biosensors and other nanoscale graphene devices.

  2. Phase aberration correction by correlation in digital holographic adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Yu, Xiao; Kim, Myung K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a phase aberration correction method based on the correlation between the complex full-field and guide-star holograms in the context of digital holographic adaptive optics (DHAO). Removal of a global quadratic phase term before the correlation operation plays an important role in the correction. Correlation operation can remove the phase aberration at the entrance pupil plane and automatically refocus the corrected optical field. Except for the assumption that most aberrations lie at or close to the entrance pupil, the presented method does not impose any other constraints on the optical systems. Thus, it greatly enhances the flexibility of the optical design for DHAO systems in vision science and microscopy. Theoretical studies show that the previously proposed Fourier transform DHAO (FTDHAO) is just a special case of this general correction method, where the global quadratic phase term and a defocus term disappear. Hence, this correction method realizes the generalization of FTDHAO into arbitrary DHAO systems. The effectiveness and robustness of this method are demonstrated by simulations and experiments. PMID:23669707

  3. Atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy through 50-nm-thick silicon nitride membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandra, Ranjan; Jonge, Niels de; Demers, Hendrix

    2011-02-28

    Silicon nitride membranes can be used for windows of environmental chambers for in situ electron microscopy. We report that aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) achieved atomic resolution on gold nanoparticles placed on both sides of a 50-nm-thick silicon nitride membrane at 200 keV electron beam energy. Spatial frequencies of 1/1.2 A were visible for a beam semi-angle of 26.5 mrad. Imaging though a 100-nm-thick membrane was also tested. The achieved imaging contrast was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations of the STEM imaging of a sample of with a representative geometry and composition.

  4. Structural investigation of precipitates with Cu and Zn atomic columns in Al-Mg-Si alloys by aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Takeshi; Marioara, Calin D.; Andersen, Sigmund J.; Lefebvre, Williams; Holmestad, Randi

    2014-06-01

    Precipitates in Al-Mg-Si alloys with Cu addition (~0.1 wt%) and Zn addition (~1 wt%) were investigated by aberration corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). Most precipitates had no overall unit cell but contained ordered network of Si atomic columns for both the Cu and the Zn containing precipitates. It was found that both Cu and Zn atomic columns are located at specific sites and producing characteristic local configurations on the Si atomic columns.

  5. Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

    2008-04-01

    The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative electron

  6. Atomic-Scale Observation of Migration and Coalescence of Au Nanoclusters on YSZ Surface by Aberration-Corrected STEM

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junjie; Wang, Zhongchang; Chen, Chunlin; Huang, Sumei

    2014-01-01

    Unraveling structural dynamics of noble metal nanoclusters on oxide supports is critical to understanding reaction process and origin of catalytic activity in heterogeneous catalysts. Here, we show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy can provide direct atomic-resolution imaging of surface migration, coalescence, and atomic rearrangement of Au clusters on an Y:ZrO2 (YSZ) support. The high resolution enables us to reveal migration and coalescence process of Au clusters at the atomic scale, and to demonstrate that the coalesced clusters undergo a cooperative atomic rearrangement, which transforms the coherent into incoherent Au/YSZ interface. This approach can help to elucidate atomistic mechanism of catalytic activities and to develop novel catalysts with enhanced functionality. PMID:24980655

  7. Electron microscopy of gold nanoparticles at atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Azubel, Maia; Koivisto, Jaakko; Malola, Sami; Bushnell, David; Hura, Greg L.; Koh, Ai Leen; Tsunoyama, Hironori; Tsukuda, Tatsuya; Pettersson, Mika; Häkkinen, Hannu; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    Structure determination of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is necessary for understanding their physical and chemical properties, and only one AuNP larger than 1 nm in diameter, an Au102NP, has been solved to atomic resolution. Whereas the Au102NP structure was determined by X-ray crystallography, other large AuNPs have proved refractory to this approach. Here we report the structure determination of an Au68NP at atomic resolution by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM), performed with the use of a minimal electron dose, an approach that should prove applicable to metal NPs in general. The structure of the Au68NP was supported by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and by comparison of observed infrared (IR) absorption spectra with calculations by density functional theory (DFT). PMID:25146285

  8. Probing core-electron orbitals by scanning transmission electron microscopy and measuring the delocalization of core-level excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jong Seok; Odlyzko, Michael L.; Xu, Peng; Jalan, Bharat; Mkhoyan, K. Andre

    2016-04-01

    By recording low-noise energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy maps from crystalline specimens using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is possible to probe core-level electron orbitals in real space. Both the 1 s and 2 p orbitals of Sr and Ti atoms in SrTi O3 are probed, and their projected excitation potentials are determined. This paper also demonstrates experimental measurement of the electronic excitation impact parameter and the delocalization of an excitation due to Coulombic beam-orbital interaction.

  9. Tomographic diffractive microscopy and multiview profilometry with flexible aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Bailleul, J; Simon, B; Debailleul, M; Colicchio, B; Haeberlé, O

    2014-02-01

    We have developed a tomographic diffractive microscope in reflection, which permits observation of sample surfaces with an improved lateral resolution, compared to a conventional holographic microscope. From the same set of data, high-precision measurements can be performed on the shape of the reflective surface by reconstructing the phase of the diffracted field. Doing so allows for several advantages compared to classical holographic interferometric measurements: improvement in lateral resolution, easier phase unwrapping, reduction of the coherent noise, combined with the high-longitudinal precision provided by interferometric phase measurements. We demonstrate these capabilities by imaging various test samples. PMID:24514193

  10. Metal resist for extreme ultraviolet lithography characterized by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Sato, Yuta; Koshino, Masanori; Suenaga, Kazu; Itani, Toshiro

    2016-03-01

    We characterized the structures of metal resists used in EUV lithography by low-voltage aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). This study presents the first atomic-level observation of resist components in resist film. The structures of metal (zirconium or titanium) oxide cores are unambiguously identified, and the local elemental distribution in the resist film is obtained. The initial size of zirconium oxide cores is well maintained in the resist film. However, titanium oxide cores tend to aggregate to form an indefinite structure. The spatial distribution of metal cores may influence lithographic characteristics.

  11. Atomic Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy of Defects in Hexagonal Boron Nitride and Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Ashley; Alem, Nasim; Song, Chengyu; Ciston, Jim; Zettl, Alex

    2014-03-01

    Monolayer sheets of sp2-bonded materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) have been studied extensively due to their properties including high mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, stability, interesting electronic properties, and potential for integration into novel devices. Understanding the atomic scale structure of defects in these materials is important because defects can significantly affect the physical properties in these materials. In particular, understanding the dynamics of these defects explains much about the material's stability. We have synthesized h-BN and graphene using low pressure chemical vapor deposition and imaged defects using atomic resolution aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy.

  12. Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-10-12

    Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

  13. Automated computational aberration correction method for broadband interferometric imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Pande, Paritosh; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; South, Fredrick A; Boppart, Stephen A

    2016-07-15

    Numerical correction of optical aberrations provides an inexpensive and simpler alternative to the traditionally used hardware-based adaptive optics techniques. In this Letter, we present an automated computational aberration correction method for broadband interferometric imaging techniques. In the proposed method, the process of aberration correction is modeled as a filtering operation on the aberrant image using a phase filter in the Fourier domain. The phase filter is expressed as a linear combination of Zernike polynomials with unknown coefficients, which are estimated through an iterative optimization scheme based on maximizing an image sharpness metric. The method is validated on both simulated data and experimental data obtained from a tissue phantom, an ex vivo tissue sample, and an in vivo photoreceptor layer of the human retina. PMID:27420526

  14. Towards Aberration Correction of Transcranial Ultrasound Using Acoustic Droplet Vaporization

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Kevin J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the first experiments demonstrating the transcranial acoustic formation of stable gas bubbles that can be used for transcranial ultrasound aberration correction. It is demonstrated that the gas bubbles can be formed transcranially by phase-transitioning single, superheated, micron-size, liquid dodecafluoropentane droplets with ultrasound, a process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). ADV was performed at 550 kHz, where the skull is less attenuating and aberrating, allowing for higher-amplitudes to be reached at the focus. Additionally, it is demonstrated that time-reversal focusing at 1 MHz can be used to correct for transcranial aberrations with a single gas bubble acting as a point beacon. Aberration correction was performed using a synthetic aperture approach and verified by the realignment of the scattered waveforms. Under the conditions described below, time-reversal aberration correction using gas bubbles resulted in a gain of 1.9 ± 0.3 in an introduced focusing factor. This is a small fraction of the gain anticipated from complete transmit-receive of a fully-populated two-dimensional array with sub-wavelength elements. PMID:17935872

  15. Understanding the structure of nanocatalysts with high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, L. D.; Rivas, J.; José-Yacamán, M.

    2014-03-01

    Nanomaterials including nanoparticles, nanowires and nanotubes play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. Thanks to the rapid improvement of the electron microscopic techniques and with the advent of aberration corrected electron microscopy as well as theoretical methodologies, the potential effects induced by nanocatalysts are better understood than before by unravelling their atomic structure. A brief introduction to advanced electron microscopic techniques namely aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) is presented and subsequently two examples of nanocatalysts are considered in the present review. The first example will focus on the study of bimetallic/core-shell nanoalloys. In heterogeneous catalysis, catalysts containing two or more metals might show significantly different catalytic properties compared to the parent metals and thus are widely utilized in several catalytic reactions. Atom-by-atom insights of the nanoalloy based catalysts ex: Au-Pd will be described in the present review using a combination of advanced electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. A related example on the understanding of bimetallic clusters by HAADF-STEM will also be presented in addition to nanoparticles. In the second case understanding the structure of transition metal chalcogenide based nanocatalysts by HRTEM and aberration corrected STEM, for the case of MoS2 will be discussed. MoS2-based catalysts serve as model catalysts and are employed in the hydrodesulphurisations (HDS) reactions in the removal of sulphur from gasoline and related petrochemical products. They have been studied in various forms including nanowires, nanotubes and nanoplates. Their structure, atomic insights and as a consequence elucidation of their corresponding catalytic activity are thus important.

  16. Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny.

    PubMed

    Brown, L Michael; Batson, Philip E; Dellby, Niklas; Krivanek, Ondrej L

    2015-10-01

    We provide a brief history of the project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that started in Cambridge (UK) and continued in Kirkland (WA, USA), Yorktown Heights (NY, USA), and other places. We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction research and related work, partly in response to the incomplete context presented in the paper "In quest of perfection in electron optics: A biographical sketch of Harald Rose on the occasion of his 80th birthday", recently published in Ultramicroscopy. PMID:26094204

  17. Atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis by annular dark-field electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Nicolosi, Valeria; Pennycook, Timothy J; Corbin, George J; Dellby, Niklas; Murfitt, Matthew F; Own, Christopher S; Szilagyi, Zoltan S; Oxley, Mark P; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-03-25

    Direct imaging and chemical identification of all the atoms in a material with unknown three-dimensional structure would constitute a very powerful general analysis tool. Transmission electron microscopy should in principle be able to fulfil this role, as many scientists including Feynman realized early on. It images matter with electrons that scatter strongly from individual atoms and whose wavelengths are about 50 times smaller than an atom. Recently the technique has advanced greatly owing to the introduction of aberration-corrected optics. However, neither electron microscopy nor any other experimental technique has yet been able to resolve and identify all the atoms in a non-periodic material consisting of several atomic species. Here we show that annular dark-field imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope optimized for low voltage operation can resolve and identify the chemical type of every atom in monolayer hexagonal boron nitride that contains substitutional defects. Three types of atomic substitutions were found and identified: carbon substituting for boron, carbon substituting for nitrogen, and oxygen substituting for nitrogen. The substitutions caused in-plane distortions in the boron nitride monolayer of about 0.1 A magnitude, which were directly resolved, and verified by density functional theory calculations. The results demonstrate that atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis of all radiation-damage-resistant atoms present in, and on top of, ultra-thin sheets has now become possible. PMID:20336141

  18. Voids and Mn-rich inclusions in a (Ga,Mn)As ferromagnetic semiconductor investigated by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, A.; Sadowski, J.; Kasama, T.; Domagała, J.; Mathieu, R.; Dietl, T.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.

    2011-04-01

    Voids adjacent to cubic (ZnS-type) and hexagonal (NiAs-type) Mn-rich nanocrystals are characterized using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy in an annealed Ga0.995Mn0.005As magnetic semiconductor specimen grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Nanobeam electron diffraction measurements suggest that the nanocrystals exhibit deviations in lattice parameter as compared to bulk MnAs. After annealing at 903 K, the magnetic transition temperature of the specimen is likely to be dominated by the presence of cubic ferromagnetic nanocrystals. In situ annealing inside the electron microscope is used to study the nucleation, coalescence, and grain growth of individual nanocrystals.

  19. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by in this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.

  20. Perspective: 4D ultrafast electron microscopy--Evolutions and revolutions.

    PubMed

    Shorokhov, Dmitry; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2016-02-28

    In this Perspective, the evolutionary and revolutionary developments of ultrafast electron imaging are overviewed with focus on the "single-electron concept" for probing methodology. From the first electron microscope of Knoll and Ruska [Z. Phys. 78, 318 (1932)], constructed in the 1930s, to aberration-corrected instruments and on, to four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM), the developments over eight decades have transformed humans' scope of visualization. The changes in the length and time scales involved are unimaginable, beginning with the micrometer and second domains, and now reaching the space and time dimensions of atoms in matter. With these advances, it has become possible to follow the elementary structural dynamics as it unfolds in real time and to provide the means for visualizing materials behavior and biological functions. The aim is to understand emergent phenomena in complex systems, and 4D UEM is now central for the visualization of elementary processes involved, as illustrated here with examples from past achievements and future outlook. PMID:26931672

  1. Aberration correction during real time in vivo imaging of bone marrow with sensorless adaptive optics confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhibin; Wei, Dan; Wei, Ling; He, Yi; Shi, Guohua; Wei, Xunbin; Zhang, Yudong

    2014-08-01

    We have demonstrated adaptive correction of specimen-induced aberration during in vivo imaging of mouse bone marrow vasculature with confocal fluorescence microscopy. Adaptive optics system was completed with wavefront sensorless correction scheme based on stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm. Using image sharpness as the optimization metric, aberration correction was performed based upon Zernike polynomial modes. The experimental results revealed the improved signal and resolution leading to a substantially enhanced image contrast with aberration correction. The image quality of vessels at 38- and 75-μm depth increased three times and two times, respectively. The corrections allowed us to detect clearer bone marrow vasculature structures at greater contrast and improve the signal-to-noise ratio.

  2. Holographic optical system for aberration corrections in laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, R. C.; Case, S. K.; Schock, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    An optical system containing multifaceted holographic optical elements (HOEs) has been developed to correct for aberrations introduced by nonflat windows in laser Doppler velocimetry. The multifacet aberration correction approach makes it possible to record on one plate many sets of adjacent HOEs that address different measurement volume locations. By using 5-mm-diameter facets, it is practical to place 10-20 sets of holograms on one 10 x 12.5-cm plate, so that the procedure of moving the entire optical system to examine different locations may not be necessary. The holograms are recorded in dichromated gelatin and therefore are nonabsorptive and suitable for use with high-power argon laser beams. Low f-number optics coupled with a 90-percent efficient distortion-correcting hologram in the collection side of the system yield high optical efficiency.

  3. Spherical Aberration Corrections for the Electrostatic Gridded Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin,A.

    2008-05-01

    Two methods of spherical aberration corrections of an electrostatic gridded lens have been studied with ray tracing simulations. Both methods are based on modifying electrostatic field on the periphery of the lens. In a simplest case such modification is done by extending the part of the grid support on its radial periphery in axial direction. In alternative method the electric field on the radial periphery of the lens is modified by applying an optimum voltage on an electrically isolated correcting electrode. It was demonstrated, that for a given focal length the voltage on this lens can be optimized for minimum aberration The performance of lenses is presented as a lens contribution to the beam RMS normalized emittance.

  4. Atomic-Scale Imaging and Spectroscopy for In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jungjohann, K. L.; Evans, James E.; Aguiar, Jeff; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-06-04

    Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle, and demonstrate characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution based catalysis and biological research.

  5. Three-Dimensional Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Biological Specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2–3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. PMID:20082729

  6. Extended Depth of Field for High-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hovden, Robert; Xin, Huolin L.; Muller, David A.

    2010-12-02

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) provide sub-Angstrom lateral resolution; however, the large convergence angle greatly reduces the depth of field. For microscopes with a small depth of field, information outside of the focal plane quickly becomes blurred and less defined. It may not be possible to image some samples entirely in focus. Extended depth-of-field techniques, however, allow a single image, with all areas in focus, to be extracted from a series of images focused at a range of depths. In recent years, a variety of algorithmic approaches have been employed for bright-field optical microscopy. Here, we demonstrate that some established optical microscopy methods can also be applied to extend the ~6 nm depth of focus of a 100 kV 5th-order aberration-corrected STEM (α{sub max} = 33 mrad) to image Pt-Co nanoparticles on a thick vulcanized carbon support. These techniques allow us to automatically obtain a single image with all the particles in focus as well as a complimentary topography map.

  7. Extended depth of field for high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Robert; Xin, Huolin L; Muller, David A

    2011-02-01

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) provide sub-Angstrom lateral resolution; however, the large convergence angle greatly reduces the depth of field. For microscopes with a small depth of field, information outside of the focal plane quickly becomes blurred and less defined. It may not be possible to image some samples entirely in focus. Extended depth-of-field techniques, however, allow a single image, with all areas in focus, to be extracted from a series of images focused at a range of depths. In recent years, a variety of algorithmic approaches have been employed for bright-field optical microscopy. Here, we demonstrate that some established optical microscopy methods can also be applied to extend the ∼ 6 nm depth of focus of a 100 kV 5th-order aberration-corrected STEM (α max = 33 mrad) to image Pt-Co nanoparticles on a thick vulcanized carbon support. These techniques allow us to automatically obtain a single image with all the particles in focus as well as a complimentary topography map. PMID:21122192

  8. Picometre-precision analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy images of platinum nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Yankovich, Andrew B; Berkels, Benjamin; Dahmen, W; Binev, P; Sanchez, S I; Bradley, S A; Li, Ao; Szlufarska, Izabela; Voyles, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Measuring picometre-scale shifts in the positions of individual atoms in materials provides new insight into the structure of surfaces, defects and interfaces that influence a broad variety of materials' behaviour. Here we demonstrate sub-picometre precision measurements of atom positions in aberration-corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy images based on the non-rigid registration and averaging of an image series. Non-rigid registration achieves five to seven times better precision than previous methods. Non-rigidly registered images of a silica-supported platinum nanocatalyst show pm-scale contraction of atoms at a (111)/(111) corner towards the particle centre and expansion of a flat (111) facet. Sub-picometre precision and standardless atom counting with <1 atom uncertainty in the same scanning transmission electron microscopy image provide new insight into the three-dimensional atomic structure of catalyst nanoparticle surfaces, which contain the active sites controlling catalytic reactions. PMID:24916914

  9. Picometre-precision analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy images of platinum nanocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.; Berkels, Benjamin; Dahmen, W.; Binev, P.; Sanchez, S. I.; Bradley, S. A.; Li, Ao; Szlufarska, Izabela; Voyles, Paul M.

    2014-06-01

    Measuring picometre-scale shifts in the positions of individual atoms in materials provides new insight into the structure of surfaces, defects and interfaces that influence a broad variety of materials’ behaviour. Here we demonstrate sub-picometre precision measurements of atom positions in aberration-corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy images based on the non-rigid registration and averaging of an image series. Non-rigid registration achieves five to seven times better precision than previous methods. Non-rigidly registered images of a silica-supported platinum nanocatalyst show pm-scale contraction of atoms at a ()/() corner towards the particle centre and expansion of a flat () facet. Sub-picometre precision and standardless atom counting with <1 atom uncertainty in the same scanning transmission electron microscopy image provide new insight into the three-dimensional atomic structure of catalyst nanoparticle surfaces, which contain the active sites controlling catalytic reactions.

  10. Resolving 45-pm-separated Si-Si atomic columns with an aberration-corrected STEM.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Hidetaka; Shimura, Naoki; Hosokawa, Fumio; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    Si-Si atomic columns separated by 45 pm were successfully resolved with a 300-kV aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) equipped with a cold-field emission gun. Using a sufficiently small Gaussian effective source size and a 0.4-eV energy spread at 300 kV, the focused electron probe on the specimen was simulated to be sub-50 pm. Image simulation showed that the present probe condition was sufficient to resolve 45 pm Si-Si dumbbells. A silicon crystalline specimen was observed from the [114] direction with a high-angle annular dark field STEM and the intensity profile showed 45 pm separation. A spot corresponding to (45 pm)(-1) was confirmed in the power spectrum of the Fourier transform. PMID:25825509

  11. Isoplanatic patch size for aberration correction in ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilkington, Wayne C.

    Methods and experimental results are described for determination of the region size in an aberrating medium over which a single set of aberration estimates can achieve satisfactory b-scan resolution ( i.e., the isoplanatic patch) using time-shift compensation for aberration correction of ultrasonic transmit and receive beams. Based on twenty percent allowable increases in the -12 dB width of the receive or transmit beam focus using cross-correction compared to self-correction, the isoplanatic patch sizes were found to between 3 and 5 millimeters laterally for a linearly-scanned transducer, and at least 12 millimeters axially for a target distance of 55 millimeters and aberration comparable to human abdominal wall. These sizes depend on the aberration severity, reference site axial position, and allowable resolution degradation with cross-correction. The lateral isoplanatic patch size of a linearly scanned image can be more than doubled to match that of a beam-steered acquisition using aberration estimate position matching relative to the tissue surface. Further expansion of the lateral isoplanatic patch size by an additional 50 to 100 percent for both scanning methods is also shown through propagation path matched cross-correction mapping of aberration estimates. The specific mapping required to achieve the best propagation path match depends on the axial distribution of the aberrating structures, the focal depth being imaged, and the cross-correction distance. The effectiveness of alternate methods to derive propagation path matching maps with and without a priori knowledge of aberrator spatial distribution are contrasted; and a means to dynamically adjust correction maps to maximize isoplanatic patch sizes is proposed and verified. Lateral cross-correction mapping and the map changes required for each cross-correction distance can all be implemented with simple shifting of aberration estimates within the transducer aperture. Therefore, use of optimally mapped

  12. Soil microstructure and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, P.; Fryer, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the process of comparing Martian soils with terrestial soils, high resolution electron microscopy and associated techniques should be used to examine the finer soil particles, and various techniques of electron and optical microscopy should be used to examine the undisturbed structure of Martian soils. To examine the structure of fine grained portions of the soil, transmission electron microscopy may be required. A striking feature of many Martian soils is their red color. Although the present-day Martian climate appears to be cold, this color is reminiscent of terrestial tropical red clays. Their chemical contents are broadly similar.

  13. Electronic Blending in Virtual Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maybury, Terrence S.; Farah, Camile S.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual microscopy (VM) is a relatively new technology that transforms the computer into a microscope. In essence, VM allows for the scanning and transfer of glass slides from light microscopy technology to the digital environment of the computer. This transition is also a function of the change from print knowledge to electronic knowledge, or as…

  14. Direct observation of atomic columns in a Bi-2223 polycrystal by aberration-corrected STEM using a low accelerating voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Takuro; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kikuchi, Masashi; Zhang, Weizhu; Takeguchi, Masaki; Kimoto, Koji

    2014-05-01

    Aberration correction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) enables an atomic-scale probe size of ˜0.1 nm at a low accelerating voltage of 80 kV that avoids knock-on damage in materials including light elements such as oxygen. We used this advanced method of microscopy to directly observe atomic columns in a (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10+δ (Bi-2223) superconducting wire produced by a powder-in-tube method. Using the atomic-number (Z) contrast mechanism, incoherent high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging clearly showed the atomic columns. Atomic displacements toward the boundary with a maximum magnitude of ˜0.26 nm enable each atomic layer to be continuous at edge grain boundaries (EGBs). The grains tend to be terminated with deficient (Bi,Pb)-O single layers at c-axis twist boundaries (TWBs) and small-angle asymmetrical tilt boundaries (ATBs); a quantitative HAADF analysis showed that the occupancies of the (Bi,Pb) sites around these boundaries are ˜0.66 and ˜0.72, respectively. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping successfully visualized atomic columns in the half-unit cell intergrowth of (Bi,Pb)2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) and (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca3Cu4O12+δ (Bi-2234) phases. Furthermore, the HAADF analysis indicated that the occupancy of the (Bi,Pb) sites is modulated between ˜0.88 and 1.0 along the diagonal direction of the primitive perovskite cell with the same period as the structural modulation.

  15. Four-dimensional electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-04-01

    The discovery of the electron over a century ago and the realization of its dual character have given birth to one of the two most powerful imaging instruments: the electron microscope. The electron microscope's ability to resolve three-dimensional (3D) structures on the atomic scale is continuing to affect different fields, including materials science and biology. In this Review, we highlight recent developments and inventions made by introducing the fourth dimension of time in electron microscopy. Today, ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) enables a resolution that is 10 orders of magnitude better than that of conventional microscopes, which are limited by the video-camera rate of recording. After presenting the central concept involved, that of single-electron stroboscopic imaging, we discuss prototypical applications, which include the visualization of complex structures when unfolding on different length and time scales. The developed UEM variant techniques are several, and here we illucidate convergent-beam and near-field imaging, as well as tomography and scanning-pulse microscopy. We conclude with current explorations in imaging of nanomaterials and biostructures and an outlook on possible future directions in space-time, 4D electron microscopy. PMID:20378810

  16. Four-Dimensional Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-04-01

    The discovery of the electron over a century ago and the realization of its dual character have given birth to one of the two most powerful imaging instruments: the electron microscope. The electron microscope’s ability to resolve three-dimensional (3D) structures on the atomic scale is continuing to affect different fields, including materials science and biology. In this Review, we highlight recent developments and inventions made by introducing the fourth dimension of time in electron microscopy. Today, ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) enables a resolution that is 10 orders of magnitude better than that of conventional microscopes, which are limited by the video-camera rate of recording. After presenting the central concept involved, that of single-electron stroboscopic imaging, we discuss prototypical applications, which include the visualization of complex structures when unfolding on different length and time scales. The developed UEM variant techniques are several, and here we illucidate convergent-beam and near-field imaging, as well as tomography and scanning-pulse microscopy. We conclude with current explorations in imaging of nanomaterials and biostructures and an outlook on possible future directions in space-time, 4D electron microscopy.

  17. Electron microscopy characterization of Li-based cathode materials for battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Patrick; Klie, Robert

    2014-03-01

    The role of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in materials characterization is examined with respect to Li-based cathode materials for battery applications. STEM-based methods are quickly becoming the most promising characterization tools for these materials, owed largely to the wide-range of techniques available on advanced STEM instruments, including the direct imaging of both heavy and light elements, and both energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) and electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopies. The current talk with focus on structural and chemical characterization of a Li-based cathode material, both in a pristine and irradiated state. Focus will remain on the nucleation of structural transitions, while also characterizing relevant parameters such as the manganese valence and oxygen presence. Various imaging modes, including high/low angle annular dark field (H/LAADF) and annular bright field (ABF), in conjunction with EELS, will be used extensively for this analysis.

  18. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, A; Baum, P

    2016-07-22

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample's oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available. PMID:27463670

  19. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A.; Baum, P.

    2016-07-01

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample’s oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available.

  20. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-02-20

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  1. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  2. Electron Diffraction Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bendersky, Leonid A.; Gayle, Frank W.

    2001-01-01

    Electron diffraction via the transmission electron microscope is a powerful method for characterizing the structure of materials, including perfect crystals and defect structures. The advantages of electron diffraction over other methods, e.g., x-ray or neutron, arise from the extremely short wavelength (≈2 pm), the strong atomic scattering, and the ability to examine tiny volumes of matter (≈10 nm3). The NIST Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory has a history of discovery and characterization of new structures through electron diffraction, alone or in combination with other diffraction methods. This paper provides a survey of some of this work enabled through electron microscopy.

  3. Correlative Fluorescence and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schirra, Randall T.; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associate with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology have led to rapid improvement in the protocols and have ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation – integration. PMID:25271959

  4. Interfacial atomic structure analysis at sub-angstrom resolution using aberration-corrected STEM

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The atomic structure of a SiGe/Si epitaxial interface grown via molecular beam epitaxy on a single crystal silicon substrate was investigated using an aberration-corrected scanning transmittance electron microscope equipped with a high-angle annular dark-field detector and an energy-dispersive spectrometer. The accuracy required for compensation of the various residual aberration coefficients to achieve sub-angstrom resolution with the electron optics system was also evaluated. It was found that the interfacial layer was composed of a silicon single crystal, connected coherently to epitaxial SiGe nanolaminates. In addition, the distance between the dumbbell structures of the Si and Ge atoms was approximately 0.136 nm at the SiGe/Si interface in the [110] orientation. The corresponding fast Fourier transform exhibited a sub-angstrom scale point resolution of 0.78 Å. Furthermore, the relative positions of the atoms in the chemical composition line scan signals could be directly interpreted from the corresponding incoherent high-angle annular dark-field image. PMID:25426003

  5. Direct Detectors for Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, R. N.; Moldovan, G.; Kirkland, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    There is interest in improving the detectors used to capture images in transmission electron microscopy. Detectors with an improved modulation transfer function at high spatial frequencies allow for higher resolution in images at lower magnification, which leads to an increased effective field of view. Detectors with improved detective quantum efficiency are important for low dose applications. One way in which these performance enhancements can be achieved is through direct detection, where primary electrons are converted directly into suitable electrical signals by the detector rather than relying on an indirect electron to photon conversion before detection. In this paper we present the characterisation of detector performance for a number of different direct detection technologies, and compare these technologies to traditional indirect detectors. Overall our results show that direct detection enables a significant improvement in all aspects of detector performance.

  6. High Speed, Radiation Hard CMOS Pixel Sensors for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Joseph, John; Krieger, Brad

    CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors are currently being established as the technology of choice for new generation digital imaging systems in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). A careful sensor design that couples μm-level pixel pitches with high frame rate readout and radiation hardness to very high electron doses enables the fabrication of direct electron detectors that are quickly revolutionizing high-resolution TEM imaging in material science and molecular biology. This paper will review the principal characteristics of this novel technology and its advantages over conventional, optically-coupled cameras, and retrace the sensor development driven by the Transmission Electron Aberration corrected Microscope (TEAM) project at the LBNL National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), illustrating in particular the imaging capabilities enabled by single electron detection at high frame rate. Further, the presentation will report on the translation of the TEAM technology to a finer feature size process, resulting in a sensor with higher spatial resolution and superior radiation tolerance currently serving as the baseline for a commercial camera system.

  7. Atomic-resolution study of dislocation structures and interfaces in poly-crystalline thin film CdTe using aberration-corrected STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulauskas, Tadas; Colegrove, Eric; Buurma, Chris; Kim, Moon; Klie, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Commercial success of CdTe-based thin film photovoltaic devices stems from its nearly ideal direct band gap which very effectively couples to Sun's light spectrum as well as ease of manufacturing and low cost of these modules. However, to further improve the conversion efficiency beyond 20 percent, it is important to minimize the harmful effects of grain boundaries and lattice defects in CdTe. Direct atomic-scale characterization is needed in order identify the carrier recombination centers. Likewise, it is necessary to confirm that passivants in CdTe, such as Cl, are able to diffuse and bind to the target defects. In this study, we characterize dislocation structures and grain boundaries in poly-crystalline CdTe using aberration-corrected cold-field emission scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The chemical composition of Shockley partial, Frank and Lomer-Cottrell dislocations is examined via atomic column-resolved X-ray energy dispersive (XEDS) and electron energy-loss spectroscopies (EELS). Segregation of Cl towards dislocation cores and grain boundaries is shown in CdCl2 treated samples. We also investigate interfaces in ultra-high-vacuum bonded CdTe bi-crystals with pre-defined misorientation angles which are intended to mimic grain boundaries. Funded by: DOE EERE Sunshot Award EE0005956.

  8. Electron microscopy of pharmaceutical systems.

    PubMed

    Klang, Victoria; Valenta, Claudia; Matsko, Nadejda B

    2013-01-01

    During the last decades, the focus of research in pharmaceutical technology has steadily shifted towards the development and optimisation of nano-scale drug delivery systems. As a result, electron microscopic methods are increasingly employed for the characterisation of pharmaceutical systems such as nanoparticles and microparticles, nanoemulsions, microemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, different types of vesicles, nanofibres and many more. Knowledge of the basic properties of these systems is essential for an adequate microscopic analysis. Classical transmission and scanning electron microscopic techniques frequently have to be adapted for an accurate analysis of formulation morphology, especially in case of hydrated colloidal systems. Specific techniques such as environmental scanning microscopy or cryo preparation are required for their investigation. Analytical electron microscopic techniques such as electron energy-loss spectroscopy or energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are additional assets to determine the elemental composition of the systems, but are not yet standard tools in pharmaceutical research. This review provides an overview of pharmaceutical systems of interest in current research and strategies for their successful electron microscopic analysis. Advantages and limitations of the different methodological approaches are discussed and recent findings of interest are presented. PMID:22921788

  9. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  10. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-27

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM. PMID:27215823

  11. A Hemispherical Sparse Phased Array Design For Low Frequency Transcranial Focused Ultrasound Applications Without Skull-Specific Phase Aberration Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiangtao; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-05-01

    A sparse large-element hemispherical phased array scheme was investigated for low frequency transcranial focused ultrasound applications without skull-specific phase aberration correction. The simulated transcranial focused beams in brain from the randomly distributed sparse array elements (0.25 MHz, 125 mm radius of curvature, 250 mm diameter, 50% sparsity of 953 square elements of 10 mm spacing) could be steered without skull specific aberration correction at 0.25 MHz. The 28 foci were on average 1.7±1.2 mm shifted from their intended locations. The average -3 dB beam width and length were 3.3±1.2 mm and 6.3±2.2 mm, respectively. The sidelobe levels ranged from 28% to 62% of the peak pressure values. The focal beam was steerable 35 mm laterally away from the transducer center axis and 30 mm axially in the transducer center axis when the sidelobe pressure values were 50% of or less than the peak pressure values. This allows the array to be mechanically aimed to one quarter of the brain and then electronically steered. The sparse array design offers a tradeoff between the best beam steering range and the manageable number of elements for a practical clinical system.

  12. Correlative Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doory; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Sigal, Yaron M.; Babcock, Hazen P.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence light microscopy and electron microscopy allows the imaging of spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in the context of cellular ultrastructure. Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows the location of molecules to be determined with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. However, correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) still remains challenging because the optimal specimen preparation and imaging conditions for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and EM are often not compatible. Here, we have developed several experiment protocols for correlative stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and EM methods, both for un-embedded samples by applying EM-specific sample preparations after STORM imaging and for embedded and sectioned samples by optimizing the fluorescence under EM fixation, staining and embedding conditions. We demonstrated these methods using a variety of cellular targets. PMID:25874453

  13. Electron microscopy and forensic practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrlý, Marek; Turková, Ivana

    2013-05-01

    Electron microanalysis in forensic practice ranks among basic applications used in investigation of traces (latents, stains, etc.) from crime scenes. Applying electron microscope allows for rapid screening and receiving initial information for a wide range of traces. SEM with EDS/WDS makes it possible to observe topography surface and morphology samples and examination of chemical components. Physical laboratory of the Institute of Criminalistics Prague use SEM especially for examination of inorganic samples, rarely for biology and other material. Recently, possibilities of electron microscopy have been extended considerably using dual systems with focused ion beam. These systems are applied mainly in study of inner micro and nanoparticles , thin layers (intersecting lines in graphical forensic examinations, analysis of layers of functional glass, etc.), study of alloys microdefects, creating 3D particles and aggregates models, etc. Automated mineralogical analyses are a great asset to analysis of mineral phases, particularly soils, similarly it holds for cathode luminescence, predominantly colour one and precise quantitative measurement of their spectral characteristics. Among latest innovations that are becoming to appear also at ordinary laboratories are TOF - SIMS systems and micro Raman spectroscopy with a resolution comparable to EDS/WDS analysis (capable of achieving similar level as through EDS/WDS analysis).

  14. Synthesis and Cs-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Multimetallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Subarna; Bhattarai, Nabraj; Velázquez-Salazar, Jesus; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Subarna Khanal Team

    2014-03-01

    Multimetallic nanoparticles have been attracted greater attention both in materials science and nanotechnology due to its unique electronic, optical, biological, and catalytic properties lead by physiochemical interactions among different atoms and phases. The distinct features of multimetallic nanoparticles enhanced synergetic properties, large surface to volume ratio and quantum size effects ultimately lead to novel and wide range of possibilities for different applications than monometallic counterparts. For instance, PtPd, Pt/Cu, Au-Au3Cu, AgPd/Pt, AuCu/Pt and many other multimetallic nanoparticles have raised interest for their various applications in fuel cells, ethanol and methanol oxidation reactions, hydrogen storage, and so on. The nanostructures were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-corrected STEM), in combination with high angle annular dark field (HAADF), bright field (BF), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) detectors. These techniques allowed us to probe the structure at the atomic level of the nanoparticles revealing new structural information and elemental composition of the nanoparticles. The authors would like to acknowledge NSF grants DMR-1103730, ``Alloys at the Nanoscale: The Case of Nanoparticles Second Phase'' and NSF PREM Grant # DMR 0934218.

  15. Few-layer graphene as a support film for transmission electron microscopy imaging of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    McBride, James R; Lupini, Andrew R; Schreuder, Michael A; Smith, Nathanael J; Pennycook, Stephen J; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2009-12-01

    One consistent limitation for high-resolution imaging of small nanoparticles is the high background signal from the amorphous carbon support film. With interest growing for smaller and smaller nanostructures, state of the art electron microscopes are becoming necessary for rudimentary tasks, such as nanoparticle sizing. As a monolayer of carbon, free-standing graphene represents the ultimate support film for nanoparticle imaging. In this work, conventional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were used to assess the benefits and feasibility of few-layer graphene support films. Suspensions of few-layer graphene to produce the support films were prepared by simple sonication of exfoliated graphite. The greatest benefit was observed for conventional HRTEM, where lattice resolved imaging of sub 2 nm CdSe nanocrystals was achieved. The few-layer graphene films were also used as a support film for C(s)-corrected STEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy of CuInSe(2) nanocrystals. PMID:20356171

  16. Adaptive Optics Analysis of Visual Benefit with Higher-order Aberrations Correction of Human Eye - Poster Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lixia; Dai, Yun; Rao, Xuejun; Wang, Cheng; Hu, Yiyun; Liu, Qian; Jiang, Wenhan

    2008-01-01

    Higher-order aberrations correction can improve visual performance of human eye to some extent. To evaluate how much visual benefit can be obtained with higher-order aberrations correction we developed an adaptive optics vision simulator (AOVS). Dynamic real time optimized modal compensation was used to implement various customized higher-order ocular aberrations correction strategies. The experimental results indicate that higher-order aberrations correction can improve visual performance of human eye comparing with only lower-order aberration correction but the improvement degree and higher-order aberration correction strategy are different from each individual. Some subjects can acquire great visual benefit when higher-order aberrations were corrected but some subjects acquire little visual benefit even though all higher-order aberrations were corrected. Therefore, relative to general lower-order aberrations correction strategy, customized higher-order aberrations correction strategy is needed to obtain optimal visual improvement for each individual. AOVS provides an effective tool for higher-order ocular aberrations optometry for customized ocular aberrations correction.

  17. New Views of Materials through Aberration-corrected STEM

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J; Varela del Arco, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The successful correction of third-order and, more recently, fifth-order aberrations has enormously enhanced the capabilities of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), by not only achieving record resolution, but also allowing near 100% efficiency for electron energy loss spectroscopy, and higher currents for two-dimensional spectrum imaging. These advances have meant that the intrinsic advantages of the STEM, incoherent imaging and simultaneous collection of multiple complementary images can now give new insights into many areas of materials physics. Here, we review a number of examples, mostly from the field of complex oxides, and look towards new directions for the future.

  18. Aberration-corrected X-ray spectrum imaging and Fresnel contrast to differentiate nanoclusters and cavities in helium-irradiated alloy 14YWT

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Parish, Chad M

    2014-01-01

    Helium accumulation negatively impacts structural materials used in neutron-irradiated environments, such as fission and fusion reactors. Next-generation fission and fusion reactors will require structural materials, such as steels, resistant to large neutron doses yet see service temperatures in the range most affected by helium embrittlement. Previous work has indicated the difficulty of experimentally differentiating nanometer-sized helium bubbles from the Ti-Y-O rich nanoclustsers (NCs) in radiation-tolerant nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). Because the NCs are expected to sequester helium away from grain boundaries and reduce embrittlement, experimental methods to study simultaneously the NC and bubble populations are needed. In this study, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) results combining high-collection-efficiency X-ray spectrum images (SIs), multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA), and Fresnel-contrast bright-field STEM imaging have been used for such a purpose. Results indicate that Fresnel-contrast imaging, with careful attention to TEM-STEM reciprocity, differentiates bubbles from NCs, and MVSA of X-ray SIs unambiguously identifies NCs. Therefore, combined Fresnel-contrast STEM and X-ray SI is an effective STEM-based method to characterize helium-bearing NFAs.

  19. Aberration-corrected X-ray spectrum imaging and Fresnel contrast to differentiate nanoclusters and cavities in helium-irradiated alloy 14YWT.

    PubMed

    Parish, Chad M; Miller, Michael K

    2014-04-01

    Helium accumulation negatively impacts structural materials used in neutron-irradiated environments, such as fission and fusion reactors. Next-generation fission and fusion reactors will require structural materials, such as steels, that are resistant to large neutron doses yet see service temperatures in the range most affected by helium embrittlement. Previous work has indicated the difficulty of experimentally differentiating nanometer-sized cavities such as helium bubbles from the Ti-Y-O rich nanoclusters (NCs) in radiation-tolerant nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). Because the NCs are expected to sequester helium away from grain boundaries and reduce embrittlement, experimental methods to study simultaneously the NC and bubble populations are needed. In this study, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) results combining high-collection-efficiency X-ray spectrum images (SIs), multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA), and Fresnel-contrast bright-field STEM imaging, have been used for such a purpose. Fresnel-contrast imaging, with careful attention to TEM-STEM reciprocity, differentiates bubbles from NCs. MVSA of X-ray SIs unambiguously identifies NCs. Therefore, combined Fresnel-contrast STEM and X-ray SI is an effective STEM-based method to characterize helium-bearing NFAs. PMID:24598435

  20. Migration of Single Iridium Atoms and Tri-iridium Clusters on MgO Surfaces. Aberration-Corrected STEM Imaging and ab-initio Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Chang W.; Iddir, Hakim; Uzun, Alper; Curtiss, Larry A.; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.; Ortalan, Volkan

    2015-11-06

    To address the challenge of fast, direct atomic-scale visualization of the diffusion of atoms and clusters on surfaces, we used aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with high scan speeds (as little as ~0.1 s per frame) to visualize the diffusion of (1) a heavy atom (Ir) on the surface of a support consisting of light atoms, MgO(100), and (2) an Ir3 cluster on MgO(110). Sequential Z-contrast images elucidate the diffusion mechanisms, including the hopping of Ir1 and the rotational migration of Ir3 as two Ir atoms remain anchored to the surface. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provided estimates of the diffusion energy barriers and binding energies of the iridium species to the surfaces. The results show how the combination of fast-scan STEM and DFT calculations allow real-time visualization and fundamental understanding of surface diffusion phenomena pertaining to supported catalysts and other materials.

  1. Reply to L.M. Brown et al. "Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny" in Ultramicroscopy 157, 88 (2015).

    PubMed

    Urban, K W; Rose, H

    2016-02-01

    We comment on a Short Communication recently published in Ultramicroscopy in which Brown et al. criticize our description of the time sequence of events in the development of aberration correction systems in electron optics during the 1990s put forward in the introduction to the Ultramicroscopy April 2015 Special Issue. We present an analysis of the published literature furnishing evidence that our description is correct. PMID:26624509

  2. Structural characterization of interfaces in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions by transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Chang, L. Y.; Choi, S.-Y.; Kirkland, A. I.; Kohn, A.; Wang, S. G.; Petford-Long, A. K.; Ward, R. C. C.

    2010-07-01

    We present a detailed structural characterization of the interfaces in Fe/MgO/Fe layers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning TEM, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. When fabricated into magnetic tunnel junctions, these epitaxial devices exhibit large tunnel magnetoresistance ratios (e.g., 318% at 10 K), though still considerably lower than the values predicted theoretically. The reason for this discrepancy is being debated and has been attributed to the structure of, and defects at the interface, namely, the relative position of the atoms, interface oxidation, strain, and structural asymmetry of the interfaces. In this structural study, we observed that Fe is bound to O at the interfaces. The interfaces are semicoherent and mostly sharp with a minor degree of oxidation. A comparison of the two interfaces shows that the top MgO/Fe interface is rougher.

  3. Advanced electron microscopy characterization of tri-layer rare-earth oxide superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Patrick; Disa, Ankit; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Klie, Robert; University of Illinois-Chicago Team; Yale University Team

    2015-03-01

    Rare-earth nickelates are known to display complex electronic and magnetic behaviors owed to a very localized and sensitive Ni-site atomic and electronic structure. Toward realizing the goal of manipulating of the energetic ordering of Ni d orbitals and 2D conduction, the present work focuses on the experimental characterization of thin film superlattice structures consisting of alternating layers of LaTiO3 and LaNiO3 sandwiched between a dull insulator, LaAlO3. Using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM)-based methods, properties such as interfacial sharpness, electron transfer, O presence, and local electronic structure can be probed at the atomic scale, and will be discussed at length. By combining both energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and electronic energy loss (EEL) spectroscopies in an aberration-corrected STEM, it is possible to attain energy and spatial resolutions of 0.35 eV and 100 pm, respectively. Focus of the talk will remain not only on the aforementioned properties, but will also include details and parameters of the acquisitions to facilitate future characterization at this level.

  4. Aberration-Corrected Stem of Q-Rich Separates from the Saratov (L4) Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroud, R. M.; Chisholm, M. F.; Amari, A.; Matsuda, J.

    2012-09-01

    TEM and aberration-corrected STEM analysis of two nanodiamond- and SiC-free Saratov (L4) separates, AJ (most Q-rich) and AI (Q-rich), show that the carrier is porous carbon consisting of nanoscale graphene platelets.

  5. Four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lobastov, Vladimir A.; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2005-01-01

    Electron microscopy is arguably the most powerful tool for spatial imaging of structures. As such, 2D and 3D microscopies provide static structures with subnanometer and increasingly with ångstrom-scale spatial resolution. Here we report the development of 4D ultrafast electron microscopy, whose capability imparts another dimension to imaging in general and to dynamics in particular. We demonstrate its versatility by recording images and diffraction patterns of crystalline and amorphous materials and images of biological cells. The electron packets, which were generated with femtosecond laser pulses, have a de Broglie wavelength of 0.0335 Å at 120 keV and have as low as one electron per pulse. With such few particles, doses of few electrons per square ångstrom, and ultrafast temporal duration, the long sought after but hitherto unrealized quest for ultrafast electron microscopy has been realized. Ultrafast electron microscopy should have an impact on all areas of microscopy, including biological imaging. PMID:15883380

  6. Calculations of spherical aberration-corrected imaging behaviour.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lan Yun; Chen, Fu Rong; Kirkland, Angus I; Kai, Ji Jung

    2003-01-01

    Different optimal operating conditions for a C3-corrected transmission electron microscope were compared for both conventional field emission sources and for the next generation of monochromated instruments. In particular, the contrast transfer functions and corresponding wave aberration functions for two previously proposed optimal conditions in which C3 is adjusted to compensate, respectively, C5 or Cc are critically compared. The results indicate that in the presence of a small positive C5 the former provides flat transfer to the information limit whereas the latter shows oscillatory transfer at high spatial frequencies, which is more pronounced for the monochromated instrument. The effects of this behaviour were further investigated through multislice simulations of Si [110] and diamond [110] under the C5-limited condition. These confirm that for the former structure with an interatomic separation of 0.14 nm this aberration has little influence, but that for the latter with a sub-0.1 nm interatomic separation its presence leads to a restricted defocus range over which the structure is faithfully resolved. PMID:14599096

  7. Harmonic source wavefront aberration correction for ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dianis, Scott W.; von Ramm, Olaf T.

    2011-01-01

    A method is proposed which uses a lower-frequency transmit to create a known harmonic acoustical source in tissue suitable for wavefront correction without a priori assumptions of the target or requiring a transponder. The measurement and imaging steps of this method were implemented on the Duke phased array system with a two-dimensional (2-D) array. The method was tested with multiple electronic aberrators [0.39π to 1.16π radians root-mean-square (rms) at 4.17 MHz] and with a physical aberrator 0.17π radians rms at 4.17 MHz) in a variety of imaging situations. Corrections were quantified in terms of peak beam amplitude compared to the unaberrated case, with restoration between 0.6 and 36.6 dB of peak amplitude with a single correction. Standard phantom images before and after correction were obtained and showed both visible improvement and 14 dB contrast improvement after correction. This method, when combined with previous phase correction methods, may be an important step that leads to improved clinical images. PMID:21303031

  8. Studies of a magnetically focused electrostatic mirror. II. Aberration corrections

    PubMed

    Tsai

    2000-02-01

    A magnetically focused electrostatic mirror is shown to be able to correct the spherical and chromatic aberrations of a probe forming system simultaneously. The probe forming system comprises a uniform magnetic lens and a uniform electrostatic mirror. Previous theoretical investigations showed that the spherical and chromatic aberration coefficients of these two components are the same values but with opposite sign, whose combination will therefore be free from aberrations. The experimental arrangement used a solenoid to produce a uniform magnetic field, and a series of plate electrodes to produce a uniform electrostatic field. These fields are shown to satisfy the experimental requirements. By deliberately changing the extraction voltage to defocus the electron beam, the author is able to observe correction of chromatic aberration by one order of magnitude. By deliberately changing the lens field and the mirror field, the author is able to observe the reduction of the asymmetry caused by the spherical aberration, which the author believes also indicates correction by one order of magnitude. PMID:10652006

  9. PLS photoemission electron microscopy beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tai-Hee; Kim, Ki-jeong; Hwang, C. C.; Rah, S.; Park, C. Y.; Kim, Bongsoo

    2001-07-01

    The performance of a recently commissioned beamline at the Pohang Light Source (PLS) is described. The beamline, which is located at 4B1 at PLS, is a Varied Line Spacing (VLS) Plane Grating Monochromator (PGM) beamline. VLS PGM has become very popular because of the simple scanning mechanism and the fixed exit slit. The beamline which takes 3 mrad horizontal beam fan from bending magnet, covers the energy range 200-1000 eV for Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) experiments. Simplicity of the optics and high flux with medium resolution were the design goals for these applications. The beamline consists of a horizontal focusing mirror, a vertical focusing mirror, VLS plane grating and exit slit. The source of PLS could be used as a virtual entrance slit because of its small size and stability. The flux and the resolution of the beamline at the experimental station have been measured using an ion chamber and a calibrated photodiode. Test images of PEEM from a standard sample were taken to illustrate the further performance of the beamline and PEEM station.

  10. Pushing the envelope of in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramachandramoorthy, Rajaprakash; Bernal, Rodrigo; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2015-05-26

    Recent major improvements to the transmission electron microscope (TEM) including aberration-corrected electron optics, light-element-sensitive analytical instrumentation, sample environmental control, and high-speed and sensitive direct electron detectors are becoming more widely available. When these advances are combined with in situ TEM tools, such as multimodal testing based on microelectromechanical systems, key measurements and insights on nanoscale material phenomena become possible. In particular, these advances enable metrology that allows for unprecedented correlation to quantum mechanics and the predictions of atomistic models. In this Perspective, we provide a summary of recent in situ TEM research that has leveraged these new TEM capabilities as well as an outlook of the opportunities that exist in the different areas of in situ TEM experimentation. Although these advances have improved the spatial and temporal resolution of TEM, a critical analysis of the various in situ TEM fields reveals that further progress is needed to achieve the full potential of the technology. PMID:25942405

  11. Analytical transmission electron microscopy in materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    Microcharacterization of materials on a scale of less than 10 nm has been afforded by recent advances in analytical transmission electron microscopy. The factors limiting accurate analysis at the limit of spatial resolution for the case of a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are examined in this paper.

  12. Temporal integration property of stereopsis after higher-order aberration correction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jian; Dai, Yun; Zhang, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Based on a binocular adaptive optics visual simulator, we investigated the effect of higher-order aberration correction on the temporal integration property of stereopsis. Stereo threshold for line stimuli, viewed in 550nm monochromatic light, was measured as a function of exposure duration, with higher-order aberrations uncorrected, binocularly corrected or monocularly corrected. Under all optical conditions, stereo threshold decreased with increasing exposure duration until a steady-state threshold was reached. The critical duration was determined by a quadratic summation model and the high goodness of fit suggested this model was reasonable. For normal subjects, the slope for stereo threshold versus exposure duration was about −0.5 on logarithmic coordinates, and the critical duration was about 200 ms. Both the slope and the critical duration were independent of the optical condition of the eye, showing no significant effect of higher-order aberration correction on the temporal integration property of stereopsis. PMID:26601010

  13. Temporal integration property of stereopsis after higher-order aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Dai, Yun; Zhang, Yudong

    2015-11-01

    Based on a binocular adaptive optics visual simulator, we investigated the effect of higher-order aberration correction on the temporal integration property of stereopsis. Stereo threshold for line stimuli, viewed in 550nm monochromatic light, was measured as a function of exposure duration, with higher-order aberrations uncorrected, binocularly corrected or monocularly corrected. Under all optical conditions, stereo threshold decreased with increasing exposure duration until a steady-state threshold was reached. The critical duration was determined by a quadratic summation model and the high goodness of fit suggested this model was reasonable. For normal subjects, the slope for stereo threshold versus exposure duration was about -0.5 on logarithmic coordinates, and the critical duration was about 200 ms. Both the slope and the critical duration were independent of the optical condition of the eye, showing no significant effect of higher-order aberration correction on the temporal integration property of stereopsis. PMID:26601010

  14. Using advanced electron microscopy for the characterization of catalytic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrz, William D.

    Catalysis will continue to be vitally important to the advancement and sustainability of industrialized societies. Unfortunately, the petroleum-based resources that currently fuel the energy and consumer product needs of an advancing society are becoming increasingly difficult and expensive to extract as supplies diminish and the quality of sources degrade. Therefore, the development of sustainable energy sources and the improvement of the carbon efficiency of existing chemical processes are critical. Further challenges require that these initiatives are accomplished in an environmentally friendly fashion since the effects of carbon-based emissions are proving to be a serious threat to global climate stability. In this dissertation, materials being developed for sustainable energy and process improvement initiatives are studied. Our approach is to use materials characterization, namely advanced electron microscopy, to analyze the targeted systems at the nano- or Angstrom-scale with the goal of developing useful relationships between structure, composition, crystalline order, morphology, and catalytic performance. One area of interest is the complex Mo-V-M-O (M=Te, Sb, Ta, Nb) oxide system currently being developed for the selective oxidation/ammoxidation of propane to acrylic acid or acrylonitrile, respectively. Currently, the production of acrylic acid and acrylonitrile rely on propylene-based processes, yet significant cost savings could be realized if the olefin-based feeds could be replaced by paraffin-based ones. The major challenge preventing this feedstock replacement is the development of a suitable paraffin-activating catalyst. Currently, the best candidate is the Mo-V-Nb-Te-O complex oxide catalyst that is composed of two majority phases that are commonly referred to as M1 and M2. However, there is a limited understanding of the roles of each component with respect to how they contribute to catalyst stability and the reaction mechanism. Aberration-corrected

  15. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  16. The future of electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifies to the importance of modern microscopy.

  17. The future of electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifiesmore » to the importance of modern microscopy.« less

  18. Energy-based adaptive focusing of waves: application to noninvasive aberration correction of ultrasonic wavefields

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Eric; Pernot, Mathieu; Montaldo, Gabriel; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2009-01-01

    An aberration correction method based on the maximization of the wave intensity at the focus of an emitting array is presented. The potential of this new adaptive focusing technique is investigated for ultrasonic focusing in biological tissues. The acoustic intensity is maximized non invasively through the direct measurement or indirect estimation of the beam energy at the focus for a series of spatially coded emissions. For ultrasonic waves, the acoustic energy at the desired focus can be indirectly estimated from the local displacements induced in tissues by the ultrasonic radiation force of the beam. Based on the measurement of these displacements, this method allows the precise estimation of the phase and amplitude aberrations and consequently the correction of aberrations along the beam travel path. The proof of concept is first performed experimentally using a large therapeutic array with strong electronic phase aberrations (up to 2π). Displacements induced by the ultrasonic radiation force at the desired focus are indirectly estimated using the time shift of backscattered echoes recorded on the array. The phase estimation is deduced accurately using a direct inversion algorithm which reduces the standard deviation of the phase distribution from σ = 1.89 before correction to σ = 0.53 following correction. The corrected beam focusing quality is verified using a needle hydrophone. The peak intensity obtained through the aberrator is found to be −7.69 dB below the reference intensity obtained without any aberration. Using the phase correction, a sharp focus is restored through the aberrator with a relative peak intensity of −0.89 dB. The technique is tested experimentally using a linear transmit/receive array through a real aberrating layer. The array is used to automatically correct its beam quality, as it both generates the radiation force with coded excitations and indirectly estimates the acoustic intensity at the focus with speckle tracking. This

  19. Defects in paramagnetic Co-doped ZnO films studied by transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, A.; Duchamp, M.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ney, A.; Ney, V.; Galindo, P. L.; Kaspar, T. C.; Chambers, S. A.

    2013-12-28

    We study planar defects in epitaxial Co:ZnO dilute magnetic semiconductor thin films deposited on c-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), as well as the Co:ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface, using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Co:ZnO samples that were deposited using pulsed laser deposition and reactive magnetron sputtering are both found to contain extrinsic stacking faults, incoherent interface structures, and compositional variations within the first 3–4 Co:ZnO layers next to the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. The stacking fault density is in the range of 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. We also measure the local lattice distortions around the stacking faults. It is shown that despite the relatively high density of planar defects, lattice distortions, and small compositional variation, the Co:ZnO films retain paramagnetic properties.

  20. Smart microscope: an adaptive optics learning system for aberration correction in multiphoton confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Albert, O; Sherman, L; Mourou, G; Norris, T B; Vdovin, G

    2000-01-01

    Off-axis aberrations in a beam-scanning multiphoton confocal microscope are corrected with a deformable mirror. The optimal mirror shape for each pixel is determined by a genetic learning algorithm, in which the second-harmonic or two-photon fluorescence signal from a reference sample is maximized. The speed of the convergence is improved by use of a Zernike polynomial basis for the deformable mirror shape. This adaptive optical correction scheme is implemented in an all-reflective system by use of extremely short (10-fs) optical pulses, and it is shown that the scanning area of an f:1 off-axis parabola can be increased by nine times with this technique. PMID:18059779

  1. Local sample thickness determination via scanning transmission electron microscopy defocus series.

    PubMed

    Beyer, A; Straubinger, R; Belz, J; Volz, K

    2016-05-01

    The usable aperture sizes in (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) have significantly increased in the past decade due to the introduction of aberration correction. In parallel with the consequent increase of convergence angle the depth of focus has decreased severely and optical sectioning in the STEM became feasible. Here we apply STEM defocus series to derive the local sample thickness of a TEM sample. To this end experimental as well as simulated defocus series of thin Si foils were acquired. The systematic blurring of high resolution high angle annular dark field images is quantified by evaluating the standard deviation of the image intensity for each image of a defocus series. The derived dependencies exhibit a pronounced maximum at the optimum defocus and drop to a background value for higher or lower values. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the curve is equal to the sample thickness above a minimum thickness given by the size of the used aperture and the chromatic aberration of the microscope. The thicknesses obtained from experimental defocus series applying the proposed method are in good agreement with the values derived from other established methods. The key advantages of this method compared to others are its high spatial resolution and that it does not involve any time consuming simulations. PMID:26224521

  2. John Wheatley Award Talk: Picometer Resolution Electron Microscopy a New Tool to Tailor Materials at the Atomic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2011-04-01

    During the last decade Electron Microscopy has seen dramatic advances mainly due to the spherical aberration correction on the lenses and into the hardware for analyzing and recording signals. For the first time it is possible to study nanostructures at the atomic level in a reliable way many interesting outstanding problems on materials science can be attacked with the new tools, in particular the structure of matter at nanoscale has been a long standing problem. Nanoparticles have many significant technological affiliations in catalysis in medicine and others, all of which depend on the properties of nanosized matter. Advances in characterization is opening a new era in which is possible for the first time to come late structure with properties for nanoscale material. In this presentation,we will discuss some recent advances of the structure of nanoparticles using aberration corrected STEM and recent advances on the study of Bimetallic nanoparticles, we will show that the distribution of metals is more complicated that the simple Alloy or core-shell model. We have used picometer resolution images match with energy loss spectroscopy. It is found that the structure is in many cases 3 layer one, the first metal at the core a second metal in an intermediate layer and the external shell being the first metal again, this has very interesting implications for the optimization of metallic catalysis. Other examples will presented on this talk. The authors would like to thank THE WELCH FOUNDATION AGENCY PROJECT # AX-1615. Controlling the Shape and Particles Using Wet Chemistry Methods and Its Application to Synthesis of Hollow Bimetallic Nanostructures.

  3. Resolution measures in molecular electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Penczek, Pawel A.

    2011-01-01

    Resolution measures in molecular electron microscopy provide means to evaluate quality of macromolecular structures computed from sets of their two-dimensional line projections. When the amount of detail in the computed density map is low there are no external standards by which the resolution of the result can be judged. Instead, resolution measures in molecular electron microscopy evaluate consistency of the results in reciprocal space and present it as a one-dimensional function of the modulus of spatial frequency. Here we provide description of standard resolution measures commonly used in electron microscopy. We point out that the organizing principle is the relationship between these measures and the Spectral Signal-to-Noise Ratio of the computed density map. Within this framework it becomes straightforward to describe the connection between the outcome of resolution evaluations and the quality of electron microscopy maps, in particular, the optimum filtration, in the Wiener sense, of the computed map. We also provide a discussion of practical difficulties of evaluation of resolution in electron microscopy, particularly in terms of its sensitivity to data processing operations used during structure determination process in single particle analysis and in electron tomography. PMID:20888958

  4. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  5. Electron Microscopy Characterization of Hybrid Metallic Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, Daisuke; Akase, Zentaro

    In order to understand the excellent properties of nanoscale hybridized materials, it is very important to investigate the microstructures and interfaces of these materials at the nanometer scale. In this chapter, we present the basic principles of transmission electron microscopy and its applications to these materials. In addition to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) and high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), analytical electron microscopy, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energyloss spectroscopy (EELS) as well as elemental mapping methods using these spectroscopy techniques will be presented. Also, the electron holographic technique for characterization of magnetic fields of nanohybridized materials will be explained. In addition to electron microscopic observation techniques, recently developed specimen preparation techniques, which are indispensable for obtaining homogeneous and thin films of nanohybridized materials, will be presented. In particular, a focused ion beam (FIB) method will be emphasized. The nanohybridized materials discussed in this chapter include carbon-based core-shell structure, nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials, nanocomposite magnets, and high-T c superconducting oxides. Application data will be provided in order to explain the usefulness of these analytical techniques for characterization of nanohybridized materials.

  6. Electron Microscopy of the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Leeson, T. S.

    1965-01-01

    The use of the electron microscope has added much to our knowledge of the cell. The fine structure of the component parts of the nucleus and the cytoplasm is described, and their functions are indicated. The nature and structural modifications of the plasma membrane are illustrated with particular reference to function. To illustrate the interrelationships of the nucleus and cytoplasm, the theory of protein secretion is discussed, the secretion of a particular protein or polypeptide being determined by a particular nucleotide sequence in the desoxyribonucleic acid of a chromosome, that is, by a gene. This information is transferred from nucleus to cytoplasm. It is in the cytoplasm that the majority of the work is performed while the nucleus directs the work of the cell. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 25Fig. 26 PMID:5829410

  7. Real-Time 3D Contrast-Enhanced Transcranial Ultrasound and Aberration Correction

    PubMed Central

    Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Bennett, Ellen; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) transcranial ultrasound (US) and reconstructed 3D transcranial ultrasound have shown advantages over traditional methods in a variety of cerebrovascular diseases. We present the results from a novel ultrasound technique, namely real-time 3D contrast-enhanced transcranial ultrasound. Using real-time 3D (RT3D) ultrasound and micro-bubble contrast agent, we scanned 17 healthy volunteers via a single temporal window and 9 via the sub-occipital window and report our detection rates for the major cerebral vessels. In 71% of subjects, both of our observers identified the ipsilateral circle of Willis from the temporal window, and in 59% we imaged the entire circle of Willis. From the sub-occipital window, both observers detected the entire vertebrobasilar circulation in 22% of subjects, and in 44% the basilar artery. After performing phase aberration correction on one subject, we were able to increase the diagnostic value of the scan, detecting a vessel not present in the uncorrected scan. These preliminary results suggest that RT3D CE transcranial US and RT3D CE transcranial US with phase aberration correction have the potential to greatly impact the field of neurosonology. PMID:18395321

  8. Optical microscopy versus scanning electron microscopy in urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Marickar, Y M Fazil; Lekshmi, P R; Varma, Luxmi; Koshy, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Stone analysis is incompletely done in many clinical centers. Identification of the stone component is essential for deciding future prophylaxis. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) still remains a distant dream for routine hospital work. It is in this context that optical microscopy is suggested as an alternate procedure. The objective of this article was to assess the utility of an optical microscope which gives magnification of up to 40x and gives clear picture of the surface of the stones. In order to authenticate the morphological analysis of urinary stones, SEM and elemental distribution analysis were performed. A total of 250 urinary stones of different compositions were collected from stone clinic, photographed, observed under an optical microscope, and optical photographs were taken at different angles. Twenty-five representative samples among these were gold sputtered to make them conductive and were fed into the SEM machine. Photographs of the samples were taken at different angles at magnifications up to 4,000. Elemental distribution analysis (EDAX) was done to confirm the composition. The observations of the two studies were compared. The different appearances of the stones under optical illuminated microscopy were mostly standardized appearances, namely bosselations of pure whewellite, spiculations of weddellite, bright yellow colored appearance of uric acid, and dirty white amorphous appearance of phosphates. SEM and EDAX gave clearer pictures and gave added confirmation of the stone composition. From the references thus obtained, it was possible to confirm the composition by studying the optical microscopic pictures. Higher magnification capacity of the SEM and the EDAX patterns are useful to give reference support for performing optical microscopy work. After standardization, routine analysis can be performed with optical microscopy. The advantage of the optical microscope is that, it

  9. Active Pixel Sensors for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denes, P.; Bussat, J.-M.; Lee, Z.; Radmillovic, V.

    2007-09-01

    The technology used for monolithic CMOS imagers, popular for cell phone cameras and other photographic applications, has been explored for charged particle tracking by the high-energy physics community for several years. This technology also lends itself to certain imaging detector applications in electron microscopy. We have been developing such detectors for several years at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and we and others have shown that this technology can offer excellent point-spread function, direct detection and high readout speed. In this paper, we describe some of the design constraints peculiar to electron microscopy and summarize where such detectors could play a useful role.

  10. [Pili annulati. A scanning electron microscopy study].

    PubMed

    Lalević-Vasić, B; Polić, D

    1988-01-01

    A case of ringed hair studied by light and electron microscopy is reported. The patient, a 20-year old girl, had been presenting with the hair abnormality since birth. At naked eye examination the hairs were dry, 6 to 7 cm long, and they showed dull and shining areas giving the scalp hair a scintillating appearance (fig. 1). Several samples of hair were taken and examined by light microscopy under white and polarized light. Hair shafts and cryo-fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS. 1. Light microscopy. Lesions were found in every hair examined. There were abnormal, opaque and fusiform areas alternating with normal areas all along the hair shaft (fig. 2). The abnormal areas resulted from intracortical air-filled cavities. Fractures similar to those of trichorrhexis nodosa were found in the opaque areas of the distal parts of the hairs. 2. Scanning electron microscopy. A. Hair shaft surface. The abnormal areas showed a longitudinal, "curtain-like" folding of the cuticular cells which had punctiform depressions on their surface and worn free edges (fig. 4, 5, 6); trichorrhexis-type fractures were seen in the distal parts of the hair shafts (fig. 7, 8). Normal areas regularly presented with longitudinal, superficial, short and non-systematized depressions (fig. 9); the cuticular cells were worn, and there were places where the denuded cortex showed dissociated cortical fibres (fig. 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3415147

  11. Wet electron microscopy with quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Timp, Winston; Watson, Nicki; Sabban, Alon; Zik, Ory; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-09-01

    Wet electron microscopy (EM) is a new imaging method with the potential to allow higher spatial resolution of samples. In contrast to most EM methods, it requires little time to perform and does not require complicated equipment or difficult steps. We used this method on a common murine macrophage cell line, IC-21, in combination with various stains and preparations, to collect high resolution images of the actin cytoskeleton. Most importantly, we demonstrated the use of quantum dots in conjunction with this technique to perform light/electron correlation microscopy. We found that wet EM is a useful tool that fits into a niche between the simplicity of light microscopy and the high spatial resolution of EM. PMID:16989089

  12. The rapidly changing face of electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John Meurig; Leary, Rowan K.; Eggeman, Alexander S.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2015-07-01

    This short but wide-ranging review is intended to convey to chemical physicists and others engaged in the interfaces between solid-state chemistry and solid-state physics the growing power and extensive applicability of multiple facets of the technique of electron microscopy.

  13. Deciphering the physics and chemistry of perovskites with transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Polking, Mark J

    2016-03-17

    Perovskite oxides exhibit rich structural complexity and a broad range of functional properties, including ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, and superconductivity. The development of aberration correction for the transmission electron microscope and concurrent progress in electron spectroscopy, electron holography, and other techniques has fueled rapid progress in the understanding of the physics and chemistry of these materials. New techniques based on the transmission electron microscope are first surveyed, and the applications of these techniques for the study of the structure, chemistry, electrostatics, and dynamics of perovskite oxides are then explored in detail, with a particular focus on ferroelectric materials. PMID:26762871

  14. Photon-induced near field electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Tae; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2013-09-01

    Ultrafast electron microscopy in the space and time domains utilizes a pulsed electron probe to directly map structural dynamics of nanomaterials initiated by an optical pump pulse, in imaging, di raction, spectroscopy, and their combinations. It has demonstrated its capability in the studies of phase transitions, mechanical vibrations, and chemical reactions. Moreover, electrons can directly interact with photons via the near eld component of light scattering by nanostructures, and either gain or lose light quanta discretely in energy. By energetically selecting those electrons that exchanged photon energies, we can map this photon-electron interaction, and the technique is termed photon-induced near eld electron microscopy (PINEM). Here, we give an account of the theoretical understanding of PINEM. Experimentally, nanostructures such as a sphere, cylinder, strip, and triangle have been investigated. Theoretically, time-dependent Schrodinger and Dirac equations for an electron under light are directly solved to obtain analytical solutions. The interaction probability is expressed by the mechanical work done by an optical wave on a traveling electron, which can be evaluated analytically by the near eld components of the Rayleigh scattering for small spheres and thin cylinders, and numerically by the discrete dipole approximation for other geometries. Application in visualization of plasmon elds is discussed.

  15. Adaptive, spatially-varying aberration correction for real-time holographic projectors.

    PubMed

    Kaczorowski, Andrzej; Gordon, George S D; Wilkinson, Timothy D

    2016-07-11

    A method of generating an aberration- and distortion-free wide-angle holographically projected image in real time is presented. The target projector is first calibrated using an automated adaptive-optical mechanism. The calibration parameters are then fed into the hologram generation program, which applies a novel piece-wise aberration correction algorithm. The method is found to offer hologram generation times up to three orders of magnitude faster than the standard method. A projection of an aberration- and distortion-free image with a field of view of 90x45 degrees is demonstrated. The implementation on a mid-range GPU achieves high resolution at a frame rate up to 12fps. The presented methods are automated and can be performed on any holographic projector. PMID:27410846

  16. Chemistry of coal from electron microscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, C.A.; Hsieh, K.C.; Fraser, H.

    1986-04-01

    Well established techniques of analytical electron microscopy have applications to the chemistry of coal. The techniques use one or another of several interactions which occur when electrons are incident on a specimen. Two such interactions are discussed in this paper: 1: X-ray emission spectroscopy and 2: Electron energy loss spectroscopy. Both methods are used in the study of metallic and ceramic systems. The principles of the technique are illustrated by applications to metallic and ceramic systems; initial applications to coal are then described.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  18. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques E; Castro, Luis Antonio Suita de

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  19. Observation of Cu nanometre scale clusters formed in Fe85Si2B8P4Cu1 nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloy by a spherical aberration-corrected TEM/STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, Masahiko; Matsuura, Makoto; Zhang, Yan; Makino, Akihiro

    2015-05-01

    Microstructure of a nanocrystalline soft magnetic Fe85Si2B8P4Cu1 alloy (NANOMET®) was investigated by the state of the art spherical aberration-corrected TEM/STEM. Observation by TEM shows that the microstructure of NANOMET® heat treated at 738 K for 600 s which exhibits the optimum soft magnetic properties has homogeneously distributed bcc-Fe nanocrystallites with the average grain size of 30 nm embedded in an amorphous matrix. Elemental mappings indicate that P is excluded from bcc-Fe grains and enriched outside the grains, which causes to retard the grain growth of bcc-Fe crystallites. The aberration-corrected STEM-EDS analysis with the ultrafine electron probe successfully proved that Cu atoms form nanometre scale clusters inside and/or outside the bcc-Fe nanocrystallites.

  20. Adaptive temporal and wavefront aberration correction for ultrafast lasers with a membrane deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Leah Bruner

    Two adaptive optic systems for correction of either temporal phase error and wavefront errors for ultrafast pulses are demonstrated. These systems consists of a computer controlled micromachined membrane deformable mirror (MMDM) and a genetic learning algorithm (GA). Nonlinear excitation such as two-photon fluorescence or second harmonic generation are used as feedback to the GA to determine the appropriate correction to apply to the mirror. Two MMDMs are used, a 30 x 8 mm, 39 actuator linear MMDM for pulse-shaping applications and a 15 mm diameter, 37 actuator wavefront MMDM. Linear pre-compensation of self-phase modulation (SPM) was experimentally demonstrated utilizing the linear MMDM in a linear pulse-shaper for ultrafast pulses. The nonlinear nature of SPM makes arbitrary polynomial compensation necessary. Pre-compensation of SPM generated in an optical fiber by a 10 fs pulse reduced the pulse from 30fs to 20fs. We demonstrates adaptive correction with the wavefront MMDM by corrected for coma and astigmatism in a reflective multiphoton scanning microscope. An f1, parabola produces a very tight focus with no aberration when it is perfectly aligned. However, when beam scanning is used for two-dimensional imaging the image is severely aberrated. The MMDM and the GA are able to find the best possible wavefront for aberration correction for each scanning position. The horizontal scanning range was increased from 60 mum without the adaptive correction to 170 mum, ≈3 times the uncorrected scanning range, and the vertical scanning range was increased by a comparable amount. This resulted in an increase in scanning area of 9 times. The wavefront MMDM was also used for adaptive correction of spherical aberration from focusing from air, deep into a water-based sample. This depth-based aberration results from an index of refraction mismatch between the sample and the immersion medium of the objective and occurs regardless of beam scanning or sample scanning. By

  1. Probing interfacial electronic structures in atomic layer LaMnO{sub3} and SrTiO{sub 3} superlattices.

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, A. B.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Zhai, X.; Wen, J. G.; May, S. J.; Petrov, I.; Bhattacharya, A.; Abbamonte, P.; Eckstein, J. N.; Zuo, J.-M.; Univ. of Illinois; LBNL

    2010-01-01

    The interfacial electronic structure characterization of a m x (LaMnO{sub 3})/n x (SrTiO{sub 3}) superlattice based on scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Evidence of interfacial band alignment and electron transfer are presented based on the observation of O K edge of individual transition metal and oxygen atomic columns. Electron probe aberration correction was essential for the high spatial resolution mapping of interfacial electronic states.

  2. Phase aberration correction by multi-stencils fast marching method using sound speed image in ultrasound computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Lin, Hongxiang; Imoto, Haruka; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Umemura, Shin-Ichiro; Sakuma, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-04-01

    Reflection image from ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) system can be obtained by synthetic aperture technique, however its quality is decreased by phase aberration caused by inhomogeneous media. Therefore, phase aberration correction is important to improve image quality. In this study, multi-stencils fast marching method (MSFMM) is employed for phase correction. The MSFMM is an accurate and fast solution of Eikonal equation which considers the refraction. The proposed method includes two steps. First, the MSFMM is used to compute sound propagation time from each element to each image gird point using sound speed image of USCT. Second, synthetic aperture technique is employed to obtain reflection image using the computed propagation time. To evaluate the proposed method, both numerical simulation and phantom experiment were conducted. With regard to numerical simulation, both quantitative and qualitative comparisons between reflection images with and without phase aberration correction were given. In the quantitative comparison, the diameters of point spread function (PSF) in reflection images of a two layer structure were presented. In the qualitative comparison, reflection images of simple circle and complex breast modes with phase aberration correction show higher quality than that without the correction. In respect to phantom experiment, a piece of breast phantom with artificial glandular structure inside was scanned by a USCT prototype, and the artificial glandular structure is able to be visible more clearly in the reflection image with phase aberration correction than in that without the correction. In this study, a phase aberration correction method by the MSFMM are proposed for reflection image of the USCT.

  3. Atomic scale dynamics of a solid state chemical reaction directly determined by annular dark-field electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pennycook, Timothy J.; Jones, Lewys; Pettersson, Henrik; Coelho, João; Canavan, Megan; Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz; Nicolosi, Valeria; Nellist, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic processes, such as solid-state chemical reactions and phase changes, are ubiquitous in materials science, and developing a capability to observe the mechanisms of such processes on the atomic scale can offer new insights across a wide range of materials systems. Aberration correction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has enabled atomic resolution imaging at significantly reduced beam energies and electron doses. It has also made possible the quantitative determination of the composition and occupancy of atomic columns using the atomic number (Z)-contrast annular dark-field (ADF) imaging available in STEM. Here we combine these benefits to record the motions and quantitative changes in the occupancy of individual atomic columns during a solid-state chemical reaction in manganese oxides. These oxides are of great interest for energy-storage applications such as for electrode materials in pseudocapacitors. We employ rapid scanning in STEM to both drive and directly observe the atomic scale dynamics behind the transformation of Mn3O4 into MnO. The results demonstrate we now have the experimental capability to understand the complex atomic mechanisms involved in phase changes and solid state chemical reactions. PMID:25532123

  4. Immunogold Labeling for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Martin W; Fišerová, Jindřiška

    2016-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopes are useful biological tools that can be used to image the surface of whole organisms, tissues, cells, cellular components, and macromolecules. Processes and structures that exist at surfaces can be imaged in pseudo, or real 3D at magnifications ranging from about 10× to 1,000,000×. Therefore a whole multicellular organism, such as a fly, or a single protein embedded in one of its cell membranes can be visualized. In order to identify that protein at high resolution, or to see and quantify its distribution at lower magnifications, samples can be labeled with antibodies. Any surface that can be exposed can potentially be studied in this way. Presented here is a generic method for immunogold labeling for scanning electron microscopy, using two examples of specimens: isolated nuclear envelopes and the cytoskeleton of mammalian culture cells. Various parameters for sample preparation, fixation, immunogold labeling, drying, metal coating, and imaging are discussed so that the best immunogold scanning electron microscopy results can be obtained from different types of specimens. PMID:27515090

  5. Chromatic-aberration-corrected diffractive lenses for ultra-broadband focusing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Peng; Mohammad, Nabil; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-02-12

    We exploit the inherent dispersion in diffractive optics to demonstrate planar chromatic-aberration-corrected lenses. Specifically, we designed, fabricated and characterized cylindrical diffractive lenses that efficiently focus the entire visible band (450 nm to 700 nm) onto a single line. These devices are essentially pixelated, multi-level microstructures. Experiments confirm an average optical efficiency of 25% for a three-wavelength apochromatic lens whose chromatic focus shift is only 1.3 μm and 25 μm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. Super-achromatic performance over the continuous visible band is also demonstrated with averaged lateral and axial focus shifts of only 1.65 μm and 73.6 μm,more » respectively. These lenses are easy to fabricate using single-step grayscale lithography and can be inexpensively replicated. Furthermore, these devices are thin (<3 μm), error tolerant, has low aspect ratio (<1:1) and offer polarization-insensitive focusing, all significant advantages compared to alternatives that rely on metasurfaces. Lastly, our design methodology offers high design flexibility in numerical aperture and focal length, and is readily extended to 2D.« less

  6. Chromatic-aberration-corrected diffractive lenses for ultra-broadband focusing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Mohammad, Nabil; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    We exploit the inherent dispersion in diffractive optics to demonstrate planar chromatic-aberration-corrected lenses. Specifically, we designed, fabricated and characterized cylindrical diffractive lenses that efficiently focus the entire visible band (450 nm to 700 nm) onto a single line. These devices are essentially pixelated, multi-level microstructures. Experiments confirm an average optical efficiency of 25% for a three-wavelength apochromatic lens whose chromatic focus shift is only 1.3 μm and 25 μm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. Super-achromatic performance over the continuous visible band is also demonstrated with averaged lateral and axial focus shifts of only 1.65 μm and 73.6 μm, respectively. These lenses are easy to fabricate using single-step grayscale lithography and can be inexpensively replicated. Furthermore, these devices are thin (<3 μm), error tolerant, has low aspect ratio (<1:1) and offer polarization-insensitive focusing, all significant advantages compared to alternatives that rely on metasurfaces. Our design methodology offers high design flexibility in numerical aperture and focal length, and is readily extended to 2D. PMID:26868264

  7. Chromatic-aberration-corrected diffractive lenses for ultra-broadband focusing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Mohammad, Nabil; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    We exploit the inherent dispersion in diffractive optics to demonstrate planar chromatic-aberration-corrected lenses. Specifically, we designed, fabricated and characterized cylindrical diffractive lenses that efficiently focus the entire visible band (450 nm to 700 nm) onto a single line. These devices are essentially pixelated, multi-level microstructures. Experiments confirm an average optical efficiency of 25% for a three-wavelength apochromatic lens whose chromatic focus shift is only 1.3 μm and 25 μm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. Super-achromatic performance over the continuous visible band is also demonstrated with averaged lateral and axial focus shifts of only 1.65 μm and 73.6 μm, respectively. These lenses are easy to fabricate using single-step grayscale lithography and can be inexpensively replicated. Furthermore, these devices are thin (<3 μm), error tolerant, has low aspect ratio (<1:1) and offer polarization-insensitive focusing, all significant advantages compared to alternatives that rely on metasurfaces. Our design methodology offers high design flexibility in numerical aperture and focal length, and is readily extended to 2D. PMID:26868264

  8. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Shiju, N. R.; Brown, D. R.; Boyes, E. D.; Gai, P. L.

    2010-07-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 Å = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  9. A lateral chromatic aberration correction system for ultrahigh-definition color video camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Takayuki; Shimamoto, Hiroshi; Funatsu, Ryohei; Mitani, Kohji; Nojiri, Yuji

    2006-02-01

    We have developed color camera for an 8k x 4k-pixel ultrahigh-definition video system, which is called Super Hi- Vision, with a 5x zoom lens and a signal-processing system incorporating a function for real-time lateral chromatic aberration correction. The chromatic aberration of the lens degrades color image resolution. So in order to develop a compact zoom lens consistent with ultrahigh-resolution characteristics, we incorporated a real-time correction function in the signal-processing system. The signal-processing system has eight memory tables to store the correction data at eight focal length points on the blue and red channels. When the focal length data is inputted from the lens control units, the relevant correction data are interpolated from two of eights correction data tables. This system performs geometrical conversion on both channels using this correction data. This paper describes that the correction function can successfully reduce the lateral chromatic aberration, to an amount small enough to ensure the desired image resolution was achieved over the entire range of the lens in real time.

  10. Electron Microscopy of Young Candida albicans Chlamydospores

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sara E.; Spurlock, Ben O.; Michaels, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    One- to three-day-old cultures of Candida albicans bearing chlamydospores were grown and harvested by a special technique, free of agar, and prepared for ultramicrotomy and electron microscopy. These young chlamydospores exhibited a subcellular structure similar to that of the yeast phase, e.g., cytoplasmic membrane, ribosomes, and mitochondria. Other structural characteristics unique to chlamydospores were a very thick, layered cell wall, the outer layer of which was continuous with the outer layer of the suspensor cell wall and was covered by hair-like projections; membrane bound organelles; and large lipoid inclusions. Only young chlamydospores less than 3 to 4 days old exhibited these ultrastructural characteristics. Images PMID:4368664

  11. Electron microscopy methods for studying plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Alison J; Prior, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy allows direct visualization of the underlying organization of cell surface components on a nano-scale. Immuno-gold labelling of isolated plasma membranes generates point patterns that enable mapping of protein and lipid distributions. 2D spatial statistics reveals the extent to which these distributions are clustered or dispersed and allows the extent of co-localization between different cell surface components to be precisely determined. This approach has been successfully applied to the study of signalling network organization and the consequences of physiological changes in modulating cell surface function. PMID:25331134

  12. Synthesis and electron microscopy characterization of bimetallic nanoparticles and atomically controlled Au nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Nabraj

    The properties of metal nanoparticles are controlled by their composition, shape, size and crystalline structure. Nanoparticles and nanoclusters with controlled shape and size were synthesized and investigated using atomic resolution images from aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and mass spectrometry (MS). Gold-palladium (Au-Pd) core-shell nanocube and triangular nanoparticles were prepared by a seed-mediated growth process and the growth mechanism was studied by varying the volume of Pd precursors added to the Au seed solution. The atomic resolution STEM images revealed that the nanocube is formed from a single-crystal Au seed with rapid growth along <111> directions while the triangular nanoparticles were obtained with growth preferentially along <110> directions rather than <111> direction. The strain generated by the lattice mismatch between fcc-Au and fcc-Pd, is released by Shockley partial dislocations (SPD), combined with stacking faults (SF) that appear at the final (outer) Pd layer. Then, as the shell grows the SPDs and SFs appear at the interface and combine with misfit dislocations, which finally diffuse to the free surfaces due to the alloying of Au into the Pd shell. In related work, magneto-plasmonic gold-cobalt (Au-Co) nanoparticles of diameter 4-nm were generated by a phase-transfer process and investigated by STEM, where the Z-contrast imaging and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed inhomogeneous alloying between Au and Co at the nanoscale. The observed ferromagnetic behavior carries significance in biomedical applications. In addition, selected metallic (Au144(SR)60) and bimetallic (CuAu144) nanoclusters were obtained with thiolate-ligand protection and characterized using optical, MS, and STEM techniques. The optical spectrum and MS results established the monodispersity and purity of the nanoclusters. Another important aspect is that the emergence of broad strong plasmonic band centered near 520

  13. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to generate a first, noisy image using a low electron dose. This image was analyzed automatically, and a software algorithm generated a sparse pattern of regions of the image that require additional sampling. A second scan generated a sparse image of only these regions, but using a highly increased electron dose. By applying a selective low-pass filter and combining both datasets, a single image was generated. The resulting image exhibited a factor of ≈3 better SNR than an image acquired with uniform sampling on a Cartesian grid and the same total acquisition time. This result implies that the required electron dose (or acquisition time) for the adaptive scanning method is a factor of ten lower than for uniform scanning. PMID:27150131

  14. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to generate a first, noisy image using a low electron dose. This image was analyzed automatically, and a software algorithm generated a sparse pattern of regions of the image that require additional sampling. A second scan generated a sparse image of only these regions, but using a highly increased electron dose. By applying a selective low-pass filter and combining both datasets, a single image was generated. The resulting image exhibited a factor of ≈3 better SNR than an image acquired with uniform sampling on a Cartesian grid and the same total acquisition time. This result implies that the required electron dose (or acquisition time) for the adaptive scanning method is a factor of ten lower than for uniform scanning. PMID:27150131

  15. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-05-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to generate a first, noisy image using a low electron dose. This image was analyzed automatically, and a software algorithm generated a sparse pattern of regions of the image that require additional sampling. A second scan generated a sparse image of only these regions, but using a highly increased electron dose. By applying a selective low-pass filter and combining both datasets, a single image was generated. The resulting image exhibited a factor of ≈3 better SNR than an image acquired with uniform sampling on a Cartesian grid and the same total acquisition time. This result implies that the required electron dose (or acquisition time) for the adaptive scanning method is a factor of ten lower than for uniform scanning.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy of structural disorder in two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pinshane Yeh

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of two-dimensional materials (2D) offers an unprecedented opportunity to study disordered systems down to the single-atom level. The reduced dimensionality of these systems provides a two-fold opportunity: first, 2D materials serve as model systems for exploring direct correlations between the structure and properties of individual atomic features. Second, these studies enable the development of new 2D materials and devices with precisely tailored optical, electronic, and mechanical properties. The experiments presented in this thesis show the first atomic-resolution images of extended one- and two-dimensional disorder in 2D materials and the extraordinary range of consequences they have on the local materials properties. The thesis begins with studies that probe the structure and properties of the 1D defects that make up grain boundaries in atomically-thin layers of graphene and molybdenum disulfide. These experiments span length scales across five orders of magnitude to image every atom at the grain boundaries through atomic-resolution scanning TEM and rapidly map the location, orientation, and shape of several hundred grains with dark-field TEM. Correlating these images with local probes of electrical, mechanical, and optical properties reveals that grain boundaries have effects that range from the unmeasurable to the extreme. A second set of projects utilizes aberration-corrected electron microscopy of a newly discovered 2D polymorph of SiO2 to conduct some of the first atomic resolution studies of glass. Images of the atomic structure of 2D SiO2 strikingly resemble Zachariasen's foundational cartoon models of glasses and reveal distributions of medium-range ordering that will be critical for refining theoretical models for how and why glasses form. Additional experiments use the electron beam to excite and image atomic rearrangements in this 2D SiO2, producing dramatic videos that visualize the structural building blocks

  17. Scanning electron microscopy studies of bacterial cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinger, Tracy; Blust, Brittni; Calabrese, Joseph; Tzolov, Marian

    2012-02-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is a powerful tool to study the morphology of bacteria. We have used conventional scanning electron microscope to follow the modification of the bacterial morphology over the course of the bacterial growth cycle. The bacteria were fixed in vapors of Glutaraldehyde and ruthenium oxide applied in sequence. A gold film of about 5 nm was deposited on top of the samples to avoid charging and to enhance the contrast. We have selected two types of bacteria Alcaligenes faecalis and Kocuria rhizophila. Their development was carefully monitored and samples were taken for imaging in equal time intervals during their cultivation. These studies are supporting our efforts to develop an optical method for identification of the Gram-type of bacterial cultures.

  18. Electron Microscopy of Botrytis cinerea Conidia

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Patricia M.; Sjaholm, Virginia E.; Sommer, N. F.

    1966-01-01

    Buckley, Patricia M. (University of California, Davis), Virginia E. Sjaholm, and N. F. Sommer. Electron microscopy of Botrytis cinerea conidia. J. Bacteriol. 91:2037–2044. 1966.—Sections of germinating and nongerminating Botrytis cinerea conidia were examined with an electron microscope. Uranyl acetate or lead citrate provided contrast between membranes and cytoplasm. Membrane-bounded, dense inclusions previously unreported in dormant spores were termed “storage bodies.” Whorled structures, spherules, granules, and membrane loops were seen within these inclusions. The various forms assumed by the enclosed materials closely resemble phospholipid inclusions described for other cells. It is suggested that the inclusions provide material for the assembly of membranous organelles during germination. Utilization of the stored material apparently results in extensive vacuolization in advanced germinants. Images PMID:5949251

  19. Electron microscopy of compound oxide laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakins, Daniel E.; LeBret, Joel B.; Norton, M. G.; Bahr, David F.; Dumm, John Q.

    2003-06-01

    Oxide single crystals, such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium orthovanadate (YVO4), are important host crystals for solid-state laser applications. These crystals are often grown by the Czochralski process and are doped with neodymium during growth. The microstructure of the resultant crystal affects the overall laser performance and it is necessary to be able to characterize grown-in defects in the material. Scanning electron microscopy has been used to examine the fracture surfaces of YAG and has shown the presence of microscopic voids, which act as stress concentrators and in some cases appear to be the cause of fracture. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to characterize various defects in both YAG and YVO4 crystals. The defects found depend on the growth conditions, specifically the Nd concentration in the crystal and the position within the boule. One of the most common defects identified in both materials were microscopic spherical particles. In YAG these particles appeared to be located primarily in the core regions and analysis of high resolution images indicate that they are due to regions that are both compositionally and orientationally different from the matrix phase. Direct observation of dislocations in YVO4 was made using TEM. In YAG only indirect evidence for dislocations could be found from the observation of river marks on fracture surfaces.

  20. Electron Microscopy of Chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, K. D.

    1965-01-01

    Gibson, K. D. (St. Mary's Hospital Medical School, London, England). Electron microscopy of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides. J. Bacteriol. 90:1059–1072. 1965.—Fixed and stained chromatophores and whole cells of anaerobically grown Rhodopseudomonas spheroides were examined in thin sections in the electron microscope. Both purified chromatophores and intracellular membrane-bound vesicles had exactly the same appearance, namely that of spheres or ellipsoids with a thin electron-dense shell surrounding an electron-lucent interior. The distribution of diameters in the two types of structure was also found to be the same, and was compatible with a normal distribution, with a mean of 570 A and a standard deviation 40 A. Negatively stained chromatophores appeared like discs or collapsed spheres. The presence of invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane in this species was confirmed, and a new structure resembling a twin chromatophore was observed. The bearing of these results on theories of the origin of chromatophores is discussed, and it is concluded that they offer some support for each one of the three main theories about the origin of particulate organelles. Images PMID:5847796

  1. Quantitative characterization of electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ruskin, Rachel S.; Yu, Zhiheng; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    A new generation of direct electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) promises significant improvement over previous detectors in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, the performance of these new detectors needs to be carefully monitored in order to optimize imaging conditions and check for degradation over time. We have developed an easy-to-use software tool, FindDQE, to measure MTF and DQE of electron detectors using images of a microscope’s built-in beam stop. Using this software, we have determined the DQE curves of four direct electron detectors currently available: the Gatan K2 Summit, the FEI Falcon I and II, and the Direct Electron DE-12, under a variety of total dose and dose rate conditions. We have additionally measured the curves for the Gatan US4000 and TVIPS F416 scintillator-based cameras. We compare the results from our new method with published curves. PMID:24189638

  2. Atomic-column scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis of misfit dislocations in GaSb/GaAs quantum dots

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chisholm, Matthew F.; Fernandez-Delgado, N.; Herrera, M.; Kamarudin, M. A.; Zhuang, Q. D.; Hayne, M.; Molina, S. I.

    2016-05-17

    The structural quality of GaSb/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) has been analyzed at atomic scale by aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. In particular, we have studied the misfit dislocations that appear because of the high-lattice mismatch in the heterostructure. Our results have shown the formation of Lomer dislocations not only at the interface between the GaSb QDs and the GaAs substrate, but also at the interface with the GaAs capping layer, which is not a frequent observation. The analysis of these dislocations points to the existence of chains of dislocation loops around the QDs. The dislocation core ofmore » the observed defects has been characterized, showing that they are reconstructed Lomer dislocations, which have less distortion at the dislocation core in comparison to unreconstructed ones. As a result, strain measurements using geometric phase analysis show that these dislocations may not fully relax the strain due to the lattice mismatch in the GaSb QDs.« less

  3. Imaging individual lanthanum atoms in zeolite Y by scanning transmission electron microscopy: evidence of lanthanum pair sites

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Pinghong; Lu, Jing; Aydin, C.; Debefve, Louise M.; Browning, Nigel D.; Chen, Cong-Yan; Gates, Bruce C.

    2015-09-01

    Images of La-exchanged NaY zeolite obtained with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that about 80% of the La cations were present as site-isolated species, with the remainder in pair sites. The distance between La cations in the pair sites ranged from 1.44 to 3.84 Å, consistent with the presence of pairs of cations tilted at various angles with respect to the support surface. The actual distance between La cations in the pair sites is inferred to be approximately 3.84 Å, which is shorter than the distance between the nearest Al sites in the zeolite (4.31 Å). The results therefore suggest the presence of dimeric structures of La cations bridged with OH groups, and the presence of such species has been inferred previously on the basis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (W. Grünert, U. Sauerlandt, R. Schlögl, H.G. Karge, J. Phys. Chem., 97 (1993) 1413).

  4. Transcranial phase aberration correction using beam simulations and MR-ARFI

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Urvi Kaye, Elena; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery is a noninvasive technique for causing selective tissue necrosis. Variations in density, thickness, and shape of the skull cause aberrations in the location and shape of the focal zone. In this paper, the authors propose a hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique to achieve aberration correction for transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. The technique uses ultrasound beam propagation simulations with MR Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging (MR-ARFI) to correct skull-caused phase aberrations. Methods: Skull-based numerical aberrations were obtained from a MR-guided focused ultrasound patient treatment and were added to all elements of the InSightec conformal bone focused ultrasound surgery transducer during transmission. In the first experiment, the 1024 aberrations derived from a human skull were condensed into 16 aberrations by averaging over the transducer area of 64 elements. In the second experiment, all 1024 aberrations were applied to the transducer. The aberrated MR-ARFI images were used in the hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique to find 16 estimated aberrations. These estimated aberrations were subtracted from the original aberrations to result in the corrected images. Each aberration experiment (16-aberration and 1024-aberration) was repeated three times. Results: The corrected MR-ARFI image was compared to the aberrated image and the ideal image (image with zero aberrations) for each experiment. The hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique resulted in an average increase in focal MR-ARFI phase of 44% for the 16-aberration case and 52% for the 1024-aberration case, and recovered 83% and 39% of the ideal MR-ARFI phase for the 16-aberrations and 1024-aberration case, respectively. Conclusions: Using one MR-ARFI image and noa priori information about the applied phase aberrations, the hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique improved the maximum MR-ARFI phase of the beam's focus.

  5. Application of polymer graded-index materials for aberration correction of progressive addition lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitanoki, Yuki; Tagaya, Akihiro; Koike, Yasuhiro

    2009-02-01

    Graded-index (GRIN) progressive addition lens (PAL) was successfully fabricated, and GRIN's potential for aberration correction of PAL was confirmed. GRIN material was prepared by partial diffusion of methyl methacrylate (MMA (nd at polymer = 1.492)) monomer into cross-linked benzyl methacrylate (BzMA (nd at polymer=1.568)) flat gel, and GRINPAL was prepared by polymerization of the GRIN material attached to a mold of commercially available PAL. GRIN polymer materials have been used for various applications such as rod lenses and optical fibers. GRIN represents gradual change of refractive index in a material, which adds or reduces light focusing power of the material. PAL is a multifocal spectacle lens for presbyopia. However, some localized aberrations (especially astigmatism) in PAL have not yet been reduced satisfactorily for decades by optimizing surface geometry of a lens. In this research, we propose to employ GRIN materials for astigmatism reduction of PALs. BzMA flat gel was prepared by UV polymerization of BzMA, crosslinking agent ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) and photopolymerization initiator DAROCURE 1173. MMA monomer was diffused into BzMA flat gel from a portion of periphery for several hours. The obtained GRIN material was attached to a mold of commercially available PAL and polymerized by UV. As a result, reduction of astigmatism was confirmed locally in the fabricated PAL and GRIN-PAL using lens meter. In conclusion, GRIN-PAL was successfully fabricated. The validity of GRIN employment for the astigmatism reduction in PAL was demonstrated experimentally.

  6. High voltage electron microscopy of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.

    1973-01-01

    Lunar pyroxenes from Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 were investigated. The iron-rich and magnesium-rich pyroxene specimens were crushed to a grain size of ca. 50 microns and studied by a combination of X-ray and electron diffraction, electron microscopy, 57 Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography techniques. Highly ordered, uniform electron-dense bands, corresponding to exsolution lamellae, with average widths of ca. 230A to 1000A dependent on the source specimen were observed. These were?qr separated by wider, less-dense interband spacings with average widths of ca. 330A to 3100A. In heating experiments, splitting of the dense bands into finer structures, leading finally to obliteration of the exsolution lamellae was recorded. The extensive exsolution is evidence for significantly slower cooling rates, or possibly annealing, at temperatures in the subsolidus range, adding evidence that annealing of rock from the surface of the moon took place at ca. 600 C. Correlation of the band structure with magnetic ordering at low temperatures and iron clustering within the bands was studied.

  7. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C44H90 paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol.

  8. Hexamethyldisilazane for scanning electron microscopy of Gastrotricha.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, R; Litvaitis, M K

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated treatment with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) as an alternative to critical-point drying (CPD) for preparing microscopic Gastrotricha for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We prepared large marine (2 mm) and small freshwater (100 microm) gastrotrichs using HMDS as the primary dehydration solvent and compared the results to earlier investigations using CPD. The results of HMDS dehydration are similar to or better than CPD for resolution of two important taxonomic features: cuticular ornamentation and patterns of ciliation. The body wall of both sculpted (Lepidodermella) and smooth (Dolichodasys) gastrotrichs retained excellent morphology as did the delicate sensory and locomotory cilia. The only unfavorable result of HMDS dehydration was an occasional coagulation of gold residue when the solvent had not fully evaporated before sputter-coating. We consider HMDS an effective alternative for preparing of gastrotrichs for SEM because it saves time and expense compared to CPD. PMID:10810982

  9. Electric fields in Scanning Electron Microscopy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arat, K. T.; Bolten, J.; Klimpel, T.; Unal, N.

    2016-03-01

    The electric field distribution and charging effects in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were studied by extending a Monte-Carlo based SEM simulator by a fast and accurate multigrid (MG) based 3D electric field solver. The main focus is on enabling short simulation times with maintaining sufficient accuracy, so that SEM simulation can be used in practical applications. The implementation demonstrates a gain in computation speed, when compared to a Gauss-Seidel based reference solver is roughly factor of 40, with negligible differences in the result (~10-6 𝑉). In addition, the simulations were compared with experimental SEM measurements using also complex 3D sample, showing that i) the modelling of e-fields improves the simulation accuracy, and ii) multigrid method provide a significant benefit in terms of simulation time.

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of tinea nigra*

    PubMed Central

    Guarenti, Isabelle Maffei; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Leitão, Aline Hatzenberger; Rocha, Nara Moreira; Silva, Ricardo Marques e

    2014-01-01

    Tinea nigra is a rare superficial mycosis caused by Hortaea werneckii. This infection presents as asymptomatic brown to black maculae mostly in palmo-plantar regions. We performed scanning electron microscopy of a superficial shaving of a tinea nigra lesion. The examination of the outer surface of the sample showed the epidermis with corneocytes and hyphae and elimination of fungal filaments. The inner surface of the sample showed important aggregation of hyphae among keratinocytes, which formed small fungal colonies. The ultrastructural findings correlated with those of dermoscopic examination - the small fungal aggregations may be the dark spicules seen on dermoscopy - and also allowed to document the mode of dissemination of tinea nigra, showing how hyphae are eliminated on the surface of the lesion. PMID:24770516

  11. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Fine precipitation scenarios of AlZnMg(Cu) alloys revealed by advanced atomic-resolution electron microscopy study Part I: Structure determination of the precipitates in AlZnMg(Cu) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.Z.; Chen, J.H.; Yuan, D.W.; Wu, C.L.; Zhu, J.; Cheng, Z.Y.

    2015-01-15

    Although they are among the most important precipitation-hardened materials for industry applications, the high-strength AlZnMg(Cu) alloys have thus far not yet been understood adequately about their underlying precipitation scenarios in relation with the properties. This is partly due to the fact that the structures of a number of different precipitates involved in electron microscopy in association with quantitative image simulations have to be employed; a systematic study of these hardening precipitates in different alloys is also necessary. In Part I of the present study, it is shown that there are five types of structurally different precipitates including the equilibrium η-phase precipitate. Using two state-of-the-art atomic-resolution imaging techniques in electron microscopy in association with quantitative image simulations, we have determined and clarified all the unknown precipitate structures. It is demonstrated that atomic-resolution imaging can directly suggest approximate structure models, whereas quantitative image analysis can refine the structure details that are much smaller than the resolution of the microscope. This combination is crucially important for solving the difficult structure problems of the strengthening precipitates in AlZnMg(Cu) alloys. - Highlights: Part I: • We determine and verify all the key precipitate structures in AlMgZn(Cu) alloys. • We employ aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). • We use aberration-corrected high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) for the investigations. • We obtain atomic-resolution images of the precipitates and model their structures. • We refine all precipitate structures with quantitative image simulation analysis. Part II: • The hardening precipitates in AlZnMg alloys shall be classified into two groups. • Two precipitation scenarios coexist in the alloys. • The precipitation behavior of such an alloy depends on the alloy's composition. • Very detailed phase

  13. High order aberration and straylight evaluation after cataract surgery with implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting monofocal intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, Florian T A; Tandogan, Tamer; Khoramnia, Ramin; Auffarth, Gerd U

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the quality of vision in respect to high order aberrations and straylight perception after implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting, monofocal intraocular lens (IOL). METHODS Twenty-one patients (34 eyes) aged 50 to 83y underwent cataract surgery with implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting IOL (Tecnis ZCB00, Abbott Medical Optics). Three months after surgery they were examined for uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), contrast sensitivity (CS) under photopic and mesopic conditions with and without glare source, ocular high order aberrations (HOA, Zywave II) and retinal straylight (C-Quant). RESULTS Postoperatively, patients achieved a postoperative CDVA of 0.0 logMAR or better in 97.1% of eyes. Mean values of high order abberations were +0.02±0.27 (primary coma components) and -0.04±0.16 (spherical aberration term). Straylight values of the C-Quant were 1.35±0.44 log which is within normal range of age matched phakic patients. The CS measurements under mesopic and photopic conditions in combination with and without glare did not show any statistical significance in the patient group observed (P≥0.28). CONCLUSION The implantation of an aspherical aberration correcting monofocal IOL after cataract surgery resulted in very low residual higher order aberration (HOA) and normal straylight. PMID:26309872

  14. Image restoration in cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Penczek, Pawel A

    2010-01-01

    Image restoration techniques are used to obtain, given experimental measurements, the best possible approximation of the original object within the limits imposed by instrumental conditions and noise level in the data. In molecular electron microscopy (EM), we are mainly interested in linear methods that preserve the respective relationships between mass densities within the restored map. Here, we describe the methodology of image restoration in structural EM, and more specifically, we will focus on the problem of the optimum recovery of Fourier amplitudes given electron microscope data collected under various defocus settings. We discuss in detail two classes of commonly used linear methods, the first of which consists of methods based on pseudoinverse restoration, and which is further subdivided into mean-square error, chi-square error, and constrained based restorations, where the methods in the latter two subclasses explicitly incorporates non-white distribution of noise in the data. The second class of methods is based on the Wiener filtration approach. We show that the Wiener filter-based methodology can be used to obtain a solution to the problem of amplitude correction (or "sharpening") of the EM map that makes it visually comparable to maps determined by X-ray crystallography, and thus amenable to comparative interpretation. Finally, we present a semiheuristic Wiener filter-based solution to the problem of image restoration given sets of heterogeneous solutions. We conclude the chapter with a discussion of image restoration protocols implemented in commonly used single particle software packages. PMID:20888957

  15. Sub-Angstrom electron microscopy for sub-Angstrom nano-metrology

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.

    2004-01-18

    The revolution in nanoscale science and technology requires instrumentation for observation and metrology - we must be able to see and measure what we build. Because nano-devices operate on the level of a few molecules, or even a few atoms, accurate atomic-scale imaging is called for. High-resolution aberration-corrected electron microscopes (both TEM and STEM) can provide valuable measurements at the sub-Angstrom level. Over the next decade, extension of TEM and STEM resolutions to half-Angstrom levels by next-generation aberration-corrected electron microscopes will advance the capabilities of these essential tools for atomic-scale structural characterization. Because improvements in resolution allow for separation of atom columns in many more projection directions, these microscopes will provide much improved three-dimensional characterization of the shape and internal structure of nanodevices and catalyst nanoparticles (perhaps even true 3-D imaging), and hence provide essential feedback in the nano-theory/construction/measurement loop.

  16. Advanced electron microscopy characterization of multimetallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Subarna Raj

    Research in noble metal nanoparticles has led to exciting progress in a versatile array of applications. For the purpose of better tailoring of nanoparticles activities and understanding the correlation between their structures and properties, control over the composition, shape, size and architecture of bimetallic and multimetallic nanomaterials plays an important role on revealing their new or enhanced functions for potentials application. Advance electron microscopy techniques were used to provide atomic scale insights into the structure-properties of different materials: PtPd, Au-Au3Cu, Cu-Pt, AgPd/Pt and AuCu/Pt nanoparticles. The objective of this work is to understand the physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials and describe synthesis, characterization, surface properties and growth mechanism of various bimetallic and multimetallic nanoparticles. The findings have provided us with novel and significant insights into the physical and chemical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. Different synthesis routes allowed us to synthesize bimetallic: Pt-Pd, Au-Au3Cu, Cu-Pt and trimetallic: AgPd/Pt, AuCu/Pt, core-shell and alloyed nanoparticles with monodispersed sizes, controlled shapes and tunable surface properties. For example, we have synthesized the polyhedral PtPd core-shell nanoparticles with octahedral, decahedral, and triangular plates. Decahedral PtPd core-shell structures are novel morphologies for this system. For the first time we fabricated that the Au core and Au3Cu alloyed shell nanoparticles passivated with CuS2 surface layers and characterized by Cs-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The analysis of the high-resolution micrographs reveals that these nanoparticles have decahedral structure with shell periodicity, and that each of the particles is composed by Au core and Au3Cu ordered superlattice alloyed shell surrounded by CuS 2 surface layer. Additionally, we have described both experimental and theoretical methods of

  17. Electron microscopy of seed-storage globulins.

    PubMed

    Tulloch, P A; Blagrove, R J

    1985-09-01

    The quaternary structures of a range of seed globulins, including examples of both the so-called 7 S and 11 S types, have been examined by electron microscopy. The legume 7 S proteins, phaseolin (bean), beta-conglycinin (soybean), and vicilin (pea), appear as flat discs of diameter ca. 8.5 nm and thickness ca. 3.5 nm formed by association of three subunit domains. Phaseolin converts to an 18 S tetramer at acid pH, and images recorded under these conditions suggest that four of the 7 S protomer discs associate to form the faces of a regular tetrahedron. The classical 11 S seed globulins, cucurbitin (pumpkin) and legumin (pea), are approximately spherical molecules of diameter ca. 8.8 nm composed of six subunits. In contrast, the hexameric 10 S storage protein from lupin seed, conglutin gamma, appears toroidal in shape with outer diameter ca. 10.3 nm and thickness ca. 2.2 nm. These results indicate that constraints imposed on seed proteins by their role in sustaining the germinating plant may have allowed a variety of different globulin structures to accumulate in the protein-storage bodies of seeds. PMID:4037802

  18. Imaging Cytoskeleton Components by Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Svitkina, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex of detergent-insoluble components of the cytoplasm playing critical roles in cell motility, shape generation, and mechanical properties of a cell. Fibrillar polymers—actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments—are major constituents of the cytoskeleton, which constantly change their organization during cellular activities. The actin cytoskeleton is especially polymorphic, as actin filaments can form multiple higher order assemblies performing different functions. Structural information about cytoskeleton organization is critical for understanding its functions and mechanisms underlying various forms of cellular activity. Because of the nanometer-scale thickness of cytoskeletal fibers, electron microscopy (EM) is a key tool to determine the structure of the cytoskeleton. This article describes application of rotary shadowing (or metal replica) EM for visualization of the cytoskeleton. The procedure is applicable to thin cultured cells growing on glass coverslips and consists of detergent extraction of cells to expose their cytoskeleton, chemical fixation to provide stability, ethanol dehydration and critical point drying to preserve three-dimensionality, rotary shadowing with platinum to create contrast, and carbon coating to stabilize replicas. This technique provides easily interpretable three-dimensional images, in which individual cytoskeletal fibers are clearly resolved, and individual proteins can be identified by immunogold labeling. More importantly, replica EM is easily compatible with live cell imaging, so that one can correlate the dynamics of a cell or its components, e.g., expressed fluorescent proteins, with high resolution structural organization of the cytoskeleton in the same cell. PMID:26498781

  19. Quantitative characterization of electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruskin, Rachel S; Yu, Zhiheng; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2013-12-01

    A new generation of direct electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) promises significant improvement over previous detectors in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, the performance of these new detectors needs to be carefully monitored in order to optimize imaging conditions and check for degradation over time. We have developed an easy-to-use software tool, FindDQE, to measure MTF and DQE of electron detectors using images of a microscope's built-in beam stop. Using this software, we have determined the DQE curves of four direct electron detectors currently available: the Gatan K2 Summit, the FEI Falcon I and II, and the Direct Electron DE-12, under a variety of total dose and dose rate conditions. We have additionally measured the curves for the Gatan US4000 and TVIPS TemCam-F416 scintillator-based cameras. We compare the results from our new method with published curves. PMID:24189638

  20. Probing Structural and Electronic Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Plemmons, DA; Suri, PK; Flannigan, DJ

    2015-05-12

    In this Perspective, we provide an overview,of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). We begin by briefly discussing the emergence of methods for probing ultrafast structural dynamics and the information that can be obtained. Distinctions are drawn between the two main types a probes for femtosecond (fs) dynamics fast electrons and X-ray photons and emphasis is placed on hour the nature of charged particles is exploited in ultrafast electron-based' experiments:. Following this, we describe the versatility enabled by the ease with which electron trajectories and velocities can be manipulated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM): hardware configurations, and we emphasize how this is translated to the ability to measure scattering intensities in real, reciprocal, and energy space from presurveyed and selected rianoscale volumes. Owing to decades of ongoing research and development into TEM instrumentation combined with advances in specimen holder technology, comprehensive experiments can be conducted on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. Next, we describe the basic operating concepts, of UEM, and we emphasize that its development has led to extension of several of the formidable capabilities of TEM into the fs domain, dins increasing the accessible temporal parameter spade by several orders of magnitude. We then divide UEM studies into those conducted in real (imaging), reciprocal (diffraction), and energy (spectroscopy) spate. We begin each of these sections by providing a brief description of the basic operating principles and the types of information that can be gathered followed by descriptions of how these approaches are applied in UM, the type of specimen parameter space that can be probed, and an example of the types of dynamics that can be resolved. We conclude with an Outlook section, wherein we share our perspective on some future directions of the field pertaining to continued instrument development and

  1. Structural examination of lithium niobate ferroelectric crystals by combining scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, P. V.; Ped'ko, B. B.; Kuznecova, Yu. V.

    2016-02-01

    The structure of lithium niobate single crystals is studied by a complex technique that combines scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. By implementing the piezoresponse force method on an atomic force microscope, the domain structure of lithium niobate crystals, which was not revealed without electron beam irradiation, is visualized

  2. Chromatic Aberration Correction for Atomic Resolution TEM Imaging from 20 to 80 kV.

    PubMed

    Linck, Martin; Hartel, Peter; Uhlemann, Stephan; Kahl, Frank; Müller, Heiko; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Max; Niestadt, Marcel; Bischoff, Maarten; Biskupek, Johannes; Lee, Zhongbo; Lehnert, Tibor; Börrnert, Felix; Rose, Harald; Kaiser, Ute

    2016-08-12

    Atomic resolution in transmission electron microscopy of thin and light-atom materials requires a rigorous reduction of the beam energy to reduce knockon damage. However, at the same time, the chromatic aberration deteriorates the resolution of the TEM image dramatically. Within the framework of the SALVE project, we introduce a newly developed C_{c}/C_{s} corrector that is capable of correcting both the chromatic and the spherical aberration in the range of accelerating voltages from 20 to 80 kV. The corrector allows correcting axial aberrations up to fifth order as well as the dominating off-axial aberrations. Over the entire voltage range, optimum phase-contrast imaging conditions for weak signals from light atoms can be adjusted for an optical aperture of at least 55 mrad. The information transfer within this aperture is no longer limited by chromatic aberrations. We demonstrate the performance of the microscope using the examples of 30 kV phase-contrast TEM images of graphene and molybdenum disulfide, showing unprecedented contrast and resolution that matches image calculations. PMID:27563976

  3. Chromatic Aberration Correction for Atomic Resolution TEM Imaging from 20 to 80 kV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linck, Martin; Hartel, Peter; Uhlemann, Stephan; Kahl, Frank; Müller, Heiko; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Max.; Niestadt, Marcel; Bischoff, Maarten; Biskupek, Johannes; Lee, Zhongbo; Lehnert, Tibor; Börrnert, Felix; Rose, Harald; Kaiser, Ute

    2016-08-01

    Atomic resolution in transmission electron microscopy of thin and light-atom materials requires a rigorous reduction of the beam energy to reduce knockon damage. However, at the same time, the chromatic aberration deteriorates the resolution of the TEM image dramatically. Within the framework of the SALVE project, we introduce a newly developed Cc/Cs corrector that is capable of correcting both the chromatic and the spherical aberration in the range of accelerating voltages from 20 to 80 kV. The corrector allows correcting axial aberrations up to fifth order as well as the dominating off-axial aberrations. Over the entire voltage range, optimum phase-contrast imaging conditions for weak signals from light atoms can be adjusted for an optical aperture of at least 55 mrad. The information transfer within this aperture is no longer limited by chromatic aberrations. We demonstrate the performance of the microscope using the examples of 30 kV phase-contrast TEM images of graphene and molybdenum disulfide, showing unprecedented contrast and resolution that matches image calculations.

  4. Ballistic-electron-emission Microscopy of Semiconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. Douglas; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh

    1997-01-01

    Balistic-electron-emission microscopy has developed from its beginning as a probe of Schottky barriers into a powerful nanometer-scale method for characterizing semiconductor interfaces and hot-electron transport.

  5. [Aberration corrected intraocular lens for microincision cataract surgery (MICS). Intraindividual comparison with a conventional lens - 1-year follow-up].

    PubMed

    Möglich, M; Häberle, H; Pham, D T; Wirbelauer, C

    2009-10-01

    Microincision cataract surgery (MICS) is an important advancement in the field of cataract surgery. This article compares an aberration corrected hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens (IOL) having a hydrophobic surface for MICS with a one-piece hydrophobic acrylic IOL with respect to capsule sac stability, image quality, and after-cataract formation over the course of 1 year. The operations were performed as bimanual MICS or coaxial phacoemulsification. Overall the results after implantation of the IOL by MICS can be regarded as positive in comparison to the standard operation. PMID:18836727

  6. Microstructural study on degradation mechanism of layered LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2 cathode materials by analytical transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Na Yeon; Yim, Taeeun; Song, Jun Ho; Yu, Ji-Sang; Lee, Zonghoon

    2016-03-01

    Electrochemical performance of lithium ion batteries is associated with structural and chemical stability of electrode materials. In the case of nickel-rich layered cathode materials LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2, cation mixing, which results from the migration of transition metal ions into vacant lithium sites, is accelerated owing to similar ionic radii between nickel and lithium. However, the inevitable lattice distortions and chemical evolution have not been investigated intensely. In this paper, we report the structural evolution localized at surface regions through electron diffraction and high resolution imaging analyses with aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Repetition of volumetric change generates cracks and voids associated with deterioration of electrochemical performance. Structural change is related with (003) intensity in electron diffraction and it can be presented by dark field transmission electron microscopy imaging at a glance. Drastic structural degradation during early cycling shows relation with rapid capacity and voltage fade. Electron energy loss spectroscopy elucidates that the structural evolution caused by the migration of Ni ions accompanies chemical modification of Mn ions and creation of hole states at the O2p level. This study provides an insight into correlating structural and chemical evolution with degradation mechanism on battery performances of LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2 cathode materials.

  7. Imaging Bioorthogonal Groups in Their Ultrastructural Context with Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    van Elsland, Daphne M; van Kasteren, Sander I

    2016-08-01

    Spitting image: Herein a recent paper on the imaging of bioorthogonal groups using three-dimensional electron microscopy is discussed. The work has demonstrated electron microscopy imaging as a technique suitable for gaining structural information on bioorthogonal groups in their cellular context. PMID:27346592

  8. Detecting magnetic ordering with atomic size electron probes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Rusz, Ján; Spiegelberg, Jakob; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Cantoni, Claudia; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2016-05-27

    While magnetism originates at the atomic scale, the existing spectroscopic techniques sensitive to magnetic signals only produce spectra with spatial resolution on a larger scale. However, recently, it has been theoretically argued that atomic size electron probes with customized phase distributions can detect magnetic circular dichroism. Here, we report a direct experimental real-space detection of magnetic circular dichroism in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an atomic size-aberrated electron probe with a customized phase distribution, we reveal the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The novel experimental setupmore » presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution.« less

  9. In-situ transmission electron microscopy and first-principles study of Au (100) surface dislocation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Jansen, J.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Zandbergen, H. W.; Gajewski, G.; Pao, C. W.; Srolovitz, D. J.

    2013-02-01

    In-situ aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations are employed to elucidate the electron beam induced dynamics of surface dislocations on ~ 4 nm × 6 nm sized Au (100) terraces located on top of hillock shaped Au at room temperature and 77 K at video rate (20 frames/s). At room temperature, very small terraces (< 4 × 5 atoms) sink into the lower terrace forming surface dislocations associated with a (5 × 1) surface reconstruction unit cell. This injection occurs provided that the number of atoms of the terrace fits the number of extra atoms required to form the surface dislocation. The surface dislocation consists of either 5 or 3 (Type I and Type II) hexagonally stacked atom rows. While the surface dislocations tend to reside near terrace edges, in ~ 20% of the video frames, the surface dislocation resides near the center of the terrace. The occurrence of Type I or Type II structures depends on the terrace width. DFT calculations show that Type I surface dislocations are more stable than Type II, for dislocations that do not span the entire terrace width, in agreement with observations. Surface dislocations are observed to flip by 90° during the experimental observations; the pathway and energy barrier (1.01 eV) for such flips is clarified through DFT calculations. At 77 K, no injections are observed, but surface dislocations do rarely form from an unreconstructed surface. In addition to dislocation flipping, multiple, dynamic dislocation configurations were observed in conjunction with terrace growth along the dislocation direction.

  10. Graphene-enabled electron microscopy and correlated super-resolution microscopy of wet cells

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Michal; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Moon, Seonah; Xu, Ke

    2015-01-01

    The application of electron microscopy to hydrated biological samples has been limited by high-vacuum operating conditions. Traditional methods utilize harsh and laborious sample dehydration procedures, often leading to structural artefacts and creating difficulties for correlating results with high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, we utilize graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon meshwork, as the thinnest possible impermeable and conductive membrane to protect animal cells from vacuum, thus enabling high-resolution electron microscopy of wet and untreated whole cells with exceptional ease. Our approach further allows for facile correlative super-resolution and electron microscopy of wet cells directly on the culturing substrate. In particular, individual cytoskeletal actin filaments are resolved in hydrated samples through electron microscopy and well correlated with super-resolution results. PMID:26066680

  11. Transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays using CT-based skull-specific aberration corrections: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ryan M.; O'Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-07-01

    The feasibility of transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays (30 cm diameter, 16 to 1372 elements, 2.48 mm receiver diameter) using CT-based aberration corrections was investigated via numerical simulations. A multi-layered ray acoustic transcranial ultrasound propagation model based on CT-derived skull morphology was developed. By incorporating skull-specific aberration corrections into a conventional passive beamforming algorithm (Norton and Won 2000 IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 38 1337-43), simulated acoustic source fields representing the emissions from acoustically-stimulated microbubbles were spatially mapped through three digitized human skulls, with the transskull reconstructions closely matching the water-path control images. Image quality was quantified based on main lobe beamwidths, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio. The effects on the resulting image quality of the source’s emission frequency and location within the skull cavity, the array sparsity and element configuration, the receiver element sensitivity, and the specific skull morphology were all investigated. The system’s resolution capabilities were also estimated for various degrees of array sparsity. Passive imaging of acoustic sources through an intact skull was shown possible with sparse hemispherical imaging arrays. This technique may be useful for the monitoring and control of transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments, particularly non-thermal, cavitation-mediated applications such as FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption or sonothrombolysis, for which no real-time monitoring techniques currently exist.

  12. Transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays using CT-based skull-specific aberration corrections: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan M.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays (30 cm diameter, 16 to 1372 elements, 2.48 mm receiver diameter) using CT-based aberration corrections was investigated via numerical simulations. A multi-layered ray acoustic transcranial ultrasound propagation model based on CT-derived skull morphology was developed. By incorporating skull-specific aberration corrections into a conventional passive beamforming algorithm (Norton and Won 2000 IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 38 1337–43), simulated acoustic source fields representing the emissions from acoustically-stimulated microbubbles were spatially mapped through three digitized human skulls, with the transskull reconstructions closely matching the water-path control images. Image quality was quantified based on main lobe beamwidths, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio. The effects on the resulting image quality of the source’s emission frequency and location within the skull cavity, the array sparsity and element configuration, the receiver element sensitivity, and the specific skull morphology were all investigated. The system’s resolution capabilities were also estimated for various degrees of array sparsity. Passive imaging of acoustic sources through an intact skull was shown possible with sparse hemispherical imaging arrays. This technique may be useful for the monitoring and control of transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments, particularly non-thermal, cavitation-mediated applications such as FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption or sonothrombolysis, for which no real-time monitoring technique currently exists. PMID:23807573

  13. Aberration-corrected concave grating for the mid-infrared spectrometer aboard the Infrared Telescope in Space.

    PubMed

    Onaka, T

    1995-02-01

    A mechanically ruled aberration-corrected concave grating was developed for use in the low-resolution mid-infrared spectrometer aboard the cryogenically cooled Infrared Telescope in Space. The design and the performance testing of the grating are reported. The spectrometer requires a wide spectral range (4.5-11.7 µm) and a wide field of view (8 × 8 arcmin) with a low wavelength resolution (Δλ ≤ 0.3 µm). The aberration-corrected concave grating provides a flat focal plane with a small aberration in the spatial direction compared with those caused by the finite size of the entrance slit. It also permits a simple design for the spectrometer, which is advantageous for applications in space cryogenic instruments. The measurements of the wavelength resolution and the spatial resolution are shown to be in good agreement with the predicted performance. The diffraction efficiency of the grating is more than 80% at the blaze wavelength (6 µm) and fairly high (>30%) over the entire wavelength range in question. The grating produces polarization of less than 10% for λ < 6.4 µm and of 10-20% for 6.7 µm <λ 9.7 µm. These results indicate the potential applicability of this type of grating to the wide-field IR spectroscopic observations. PMID:20963166

  14. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  15. Silicon Nitride Windows for Electron Microscopy of Whole Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ring, E. A.; Peckys, D. B.; Dukes, M. J.; Baudoin, J. P.; de Jonge, N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Silicon microchips with thin electron transparent silicon nitride windows provide a sample support that accommodates both light-, and electron microscopy of whole eukaryotic cells in vacuum or liquid, with minimum sample preparation steps. The windows are robust enough that cellular samples can be cultured directly onto them, with no addition of a supporting film, and no need to embed or section the sample, as is typically required in electron microscopy. By combining two microchips, a microfluidic chamber can be constructed for the imaging of samples in liquid in the electron microscope. We provide microchip design specifications, a fabrication outline, instructions on how to prepare them for biological samples, and examples of images obtained using different light-, and electron microscopy modalities. The use of these microchips is particularly advantageous for correlative light-, and electron microscopy. PMID:21770941

  16. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications. PMID:27601992

  17. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications. PMID:27601992

  18. Ion-induced electron emission microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Weller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    An ion beam analysis system that creates multidimensional maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the secondary electrons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted secondary electrons are collected in a strong electric field perpendicular to the sample surface and (optionally) projected and refocused by the electron lenses found in a photon emission electron microscope, amplified by microchannel plates and then their exact position is sensed by a very sensitive X Y position detector. Position signals from this secondary electron detector are then correlated in time with nuclear, atomic or electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these secondary electrons in the fit place.

  19. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  20. Plasma Cleaning and Its Applications for Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isabell, Thomas C.; Fischione, Paul E.; O'Keefe, Catherine; Guruz, Murat U.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    1999-03-01

    The effectiveness of applying a high-frequency, low-energy, reactive gas plasma for the removal of hydrocarbon contamination from specimens and components for electron microscopy has been investigated with a variety of analytical techniques. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of specimens that have been plasma cleaned shows an elimination of the carbonaceous contamination from the specimen. With extended cleaning times the removal of existing carbon contamination debris due to previously conducted microanalysis is shown. Following plasma cleaning, specimens may be examined in the electron microscope for several hours without exhibiting evidence of recontamination. The effectiveness of plasma cleaning is not limited to applications for TEM specimens. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) specimens that have been plasma cleaned likewise show an elimination of carbonaceous contamination. Furthermore, other electron microscopy parts and accessories, such as aperture strips, specimen clamping rings, and Wehnelts, among others, can benefit from plasma cleaning.

  1. Electron microscopy study of zeolite ZK-14; a synthetic chabazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartlidge, S.; Wessicken, R.; Nissen, H.-U.

    1983-03-01

    The defect structure of zeolite (K+, TMA+) — ZK-14, a synthetic chabazite, has been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SEM together with TEM bright field (BF) and dark field (DF) micrographs indicate that the hexagonal, platelet ZK-14 crystals are built up of crystalline blocks joined by twinning along (00.1). High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals faulting of the ideal AABBCC single 6-ring stacking sequence of ZK-14. This is consistent with an observed line broadening in its X-ray powder diffraction profile. Channel apertures are imaged, even for thick specimens.

  2. Phase contrast in high resolution electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rose, H.H.

    1975-09-23

    This patent relates to a device for developing a phase contrast signal for a scanning transmission electron microscope. The lens system of the microscope is operated in a condition of defocus so that predictable alternate concentric regions of high and low electron density exist in the cone of illumination. Two phase detectors are placed beneath the object inside the cone of illumination, with the first detector having the form of a zone plate, each of its rings covering alternate regions of either higher or lower electron density. The second detector is so configured that it covers the regions of electron density not covered by the first detector. Each detector measures the number of electrons incident thereon and the signal developed by the first detector is subtracted from the signal developed by the record detector to provide a phase contrast signal. (auth)

  3. Strain-induced growth of oriented graphene layers revealed by in situ transmission electron microscopy observation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Neng; Pan, Wei; Lin, Tao

    2016-06-22

    We report on the observation of the strain-induced oriented alignment of graphene layers during the in situ 80 keV e-beam irradiation of an amorphous carbon structure using an aberration corrected (Cs-corrected) electron transmission microscope. E-beam irradiation promoted the amorphous-to-ordered structure transformation and contributed to the formation of small sized graphene flakes by local structure reconstruction. In the mean time, graphene flakes were driven to rotate and re-orient along the strain direction under the uni-axial stress conditions, which finally connected with each other and produced a high oriented structure. Our observations suggest that strain engineering could be an effective method in tuning the microstructure and properties especially in layer-structured materials. PMID:27150490

  4. Comparison of 3-D Multi-Lag Cross-Correlation and Speckle Brightness Aberration Correction Algorithms on Static and Moving Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Dahl, Jeremy J.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    Phase correction has the potential to increase the image quality of 3-D ultrasound, especially transcranial ultrasound. We implemented and compared 2 algorithms for aberration correction, multi-lag cross-correlation and speckle brightness, using static and moving targets. We corrected three 75-ns rms electronic aberrators with full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) auto-correlation lengths of 1.35, 2.7, and 5.4 mm. Cross-correlation proved the better algorithm at 2.7 and 5.4 mm correlation lengths (P < 0.05). Static cross-correlation performed better than moving-target cross-correlation at the 2.7 mm correlation length (P < 0.05). Finally, we compared the static and moving-target cross-correlation on a flow phantom with a skull casting aberrator. Using signal from static targets, the correction resulted in an average contrast increase of 22.2%, compared with 13.2% using signal from moving targets. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) increased by 20.5% and 12.8% using static and moving targets, respectively. Doppler signal strength increased by 5.6% and 4.9% for the static and moving-targets methods, respectively. PMID:19942503

  5. Comparison of analytical and numerical approaches for CT-based aberration correction in transcranial passive acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ryan M.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections are employed in transcranial ultrasound both for therapy and imaging. In this study, analytical and numerical approaches for calculating aberration corrections based on CT data were compared, with a particular focus on their application to transcranial passive imaging. Two models were investigated: a three-dimensional full-wave numerical model (Connor and Hynynen 2004 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 51 1693-706) based on the Westervelt equation, and an analytical method (Clement and Hynynen 2002 Ultrasound Med. Biol. 28 617-24) similar to that currently employed by commercial brain therapy systems. Trans-skull time delay corrections calculated from each model were applied to data acquired by a sparse hemispherical (30 cm diameter) receiver array (128 piezoceramic discs: 2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) passively listening through ex vivo human skullcaps (n  =  4) to emissions from a narrow-band, fixed source emitter (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency). Measurements were taken at various locations within the cranial cavity by moving the source around the field using a three-axis positioning system. Images generated through passive beamforming using CT-based skull corrections were compared with those obtained through an invasive source-based approach, as well as images formed without skull corrections, using the main lobe volume, positional shift, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio as metrics for image quality. For each CT-based model, corrections achieved by allowing for heterogeneous skull acoustical parameters in simulation outperformed the corresponding case where homogeneous parameters were assumed. Of the CT-based methods investigated, the full-wave model provided the best imaging results at the cost of computational complexity. These results highlight the importance of accurately modeling trans-skull propagation when calculating CT-based aberration corrections

  6. [Electron microscopy study of artificial vitreous gel].

    PubMed

    Ehgartner, E M; Schmut, O; Hofmann, H

    1986-04-01

    Artificial gels prepared from Cu2+-ions and hyaluronic acid were studied in the electron microscope and compared with the native vitreous body. Additionally, the authors attempted to produce transparent gels from the native constituents of the vitreous body, namely collagen and hyaluronic acid. Mixing of solutions of these constituents formed no gels but white precipitates. The ultrastructure of these precipitates was also studied in the electron microscope. PMID:3723971

  7. Photoemission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum’s magnetosome chains

    SciTech Connect

    Keutner, Christoph; von Bohlen, Alex; Berges, Ulf; Espeter, Philipp; Schneider, Claus M.; Westphal, Carsten

    2014-10-07

    Magnetotactic bacteria are of great interdisciplinary interest, since a vast field of applications from magnetic recording media to medical nanorobots is conceivable. A key feature for a further understanding is the detailed knowledge about the magnetosome chain within the bacteria. We report on two preparation procedures suitable for UHV experiments in reflective geometry. Further, we present the results of scanning electron microscopy, as well as the first photoemission electron microscopy experiments, both accessing the magnetosomes within intact magnetotactic bacteria and compare these to scanning electron microscopy data from the literature. From the images, we can clearly identify individual magnetosomes within their chains.

  8. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM. PMID:26206941

  9. Entanglement-assisted electron microscopy based on a flux qubit

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Nagatani, Yukinori

    2014-02-10

    A notorious problem in high-resolution biological electron microscopy is radiation damage caused by probe electrons. Hence, acquisition of data with minimal number of electrons is of critical importance. Quantum approaches may represent the only way to improve the resolution in this context, but all proposed schemes to date demand delicate control of the electron beam in highly unconventional electron optics. Here we propose a scheme that involves a flux qubit based on a radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device, inserted in a transmission electron microscope. The scheme significantly improves the prospect of realizing a quantum-enhanced electron microscope for radiation-sensitive specimens.

  10. Electron microscopy - A glimpse into the future.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.

    1972-01-01

    A forecast attempt is presented on future advances in electron microscopic studies of membrane systems. A review of recent advances and present trends is followed by a discussion of prerequisites to further progress. Special attention is given to research areas of particular promise.

  11. Quantitative Phase Retrieval in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Robert Alexander

    Phase retrieval in the transmission electron microscope offers the unique potential to collect quantitative data regarding the electric and magnetic properties of materials at the nanoscale. Substantial progress in the field of quantitative phase imaging was made by improvements to the technique of off-axis electron holography. In this thesis, several breakthroughs have been achieved that improve the quantitative analysis of phase retrieval. An accurate means of measuring the electron wavefront coherence in two-dimensions was developed and pratical applications demonstrated. The detector modulation-transfer function (MTF) was assessed by slanted-edge, noise, and the novel holographic techniques. It was shown the traditional slanted-edge technique underestimates the MTF. In addition, progress was made in dark and gain reference normalization of images, and it was shown that incomplete read-out is a concern for slow-scan CCD detectors. Last, the phase error due to electron shot noise was reduced by the technique of summation of hologram series. The phase error, which limits the finest electric and magnetic phenomena which can be investigated, was reduced by over 900 % with no loss of spatial resolution. Quantitative agreement between the experimental root-mean-square phase error and the analytical prediction of phase error was achieved.

  12. Electron Microscopy of Biological Materials at the Nanometer Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourkoutis, Lena Fitting; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-08-01

    Electron microscopy of biological matter uses three different imaging modalities: (a) electron crystallography, (b) single-particle analysis, and (c) electron tomography. Ideally, these imaging modalities are applied to frozen-hydrated samples to ensure an optimal preservation of the structures under scrutiny. Cryo-electron microscopy of biological matter has made important advances in the past decades. It has become a research tool that further expands the scope of structural research into unique areas of cell and molecular biology, and it could augment the materials research portfolio in the study of soft and hybrid materials. This review addresses how researchers using transmission electron microscopy can derive structural information at high spatial resolution from fully hydrated specimens, despite their sensitivity to ionizing radiation, despite the adverse conditions of high vacuum for samples that have to be kept in aqueous environments, and despite their low contrast resulting from weakly scattering building blocks.

  13. Correlated light and electron microscopy: ultrastructure lights up!

    PubMed

    de Boer, Pascal; Hoogenboom, Jacob P; Giepmans, Ben N G

    2015-06-01

    Microscopy has gone hand in hand with the study of living systems since van Leeuwenhoek observed living microorganisms and cells in 1674 using his light microscope. A spectrum of dyes and probes now enable the localization of molecules of interest within living cells by fluorescence microscopy. With electron microscopy (EM), cellular ultrastructure has been revealed. Bridging these two modalities, correlated light microscopy and EM (CLEM) opens new avenues. Studies of protein dynamics with fluorescent proteins (FPs), which leave the investigator 'in the dark' concerning cellular context, can be followed by EM examination. Rare events can be preselected at the light microscopy level before EM analysis. Ongoing development-including of dedicated probes, integrated microscopes, large-scale and three-dimensional EM and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy-now paves the way for broad CLEM implementation in biology. PMID:26020503

  14. Transmission electron microscopy of mercury metal.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Dalaver H; Sougrat, Rachid

    2016-09-01

    Transmission electron microcopy (TEM) analysis of liquid metals, especially mercury (Hg), is difficult to carry out because their specimen preparation poses a daunting task due to the unique surface properties of these metals. This paper reports a cryoTEM study on Hg using a novel specimen preparation technique. Hg metal is mixed with water using sonication and quenched in liquid ethane cryogen. This technique permits research into the morphological, phase and structural properties of Hg at nanoscale dimensions. PMID:27018645

  15. Multimodal dyes: toward correlative two-photon and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolze, Frédéric; Ftouni, Hussein; Nicoud, Jean-François; Leoni, Piero; Schwab, Yannick; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Mafouana, Rodrigues R.

    2013-03-01

    Nowadays, many crucial biological questions involve the observation of biological samples at different scales. Thus, optical microscopy can be associated to magnetic nuclear imaging allowing access to data from the cellular to the organ level, or can be associated to electron microscopy to reach the sub cellular level. We will describe here the design, synthesis and characterization of new bimodal probes, which can be used as dye in two-photon excited microscopy (TPEM) and electron dense markers in scanning and transmission electron microscopy (EM). In a first part, we will describe new molecular dyes with small organic systems grafted on metal atoms (Pt, Au). Such systems show good twophoton induced fluorescence and two-photon images of HeLa cells will be presented. In a second part, we will present hybrid organic-inorganic fluorescent systems with diketopyrrolopyrole-based dye grafted on iron oxide-silica core shell nanoparticles by peptide bond. Such systems present high two-photon absorption cross sections and good fluorescence quantum yields. These nanoparticles are rapidly internalized in HeLa cells and high quality two-photon images were performed with low laser power. Then we will present our results on correlative light-electron microscopy were twophoton and electron microscopy (both scanning and transmission) images were obtained on the same biological sample.

  16. Sub-micron spatial resolution of a micro-XAFS electrostatic microscope with bending magnet radiation: Performance assessments and prospects for aberration correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonner, B. P.; Dunham, D.

    1994-08-01

    The X-ray photoemission electron microscope (XPEEM) has been shown to be a valuable tool for small-area X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, and for state-selected imaging. The instrument currently in regular operation on bending-magnet monochromators uses electrostatic optics to create an image of a sample surface in vacuum. The instrument can be operated on a wide variety of X-ray and VUV beamlines, and the spectral resolution is determined by the beamline monochromator. The spatial resolution is determined primarily by the aberrations of the immersion lens accelerating field and the objective lens, although other factors such as surface roughness play an important, though less fundamental role. We have tested the spatial resolution of micro-XAFS with a high quality test object, consisting of a free-standing circular zone plate made of gold. These tests confirm the assessment that chromatic aberration limits the performance of the optics, because of the wide range of kinetic energies of secondary electrons produced in XAFS spectroscopy, and the highly asymmetric intensity distribution of these secondaries. One attempt at solving the chromatic aberration problem is the use of an energy filter, which solves the problem by allowing only a narrow band of electrons to produce an image. We describe an alternative approach, based on chromatic aberration correction, which has great potential for an XPEEM instrument with extremely high transmission, and spatial resolution below 10 nm. We also point out the performance improvements to be expected when XPEEM is adapted to high-throughput undulator beamlines.

  17. Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barwick, Brett; Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2009-12-17

    In materials science and biology, optical near-field microscopies enable spatial resolutions beyond the diffraction limit, but they cannot provide the atomic-scale imaging capabilities of electron microscopy. Given the nature of interactions between electrons and photons, and considering their connections through nanostructures, it should be possible to achieve imaging of evanescent electromagnetic fields with electron pulses when such fields are resolved in both space (nanometre and below) and time (femtosecond). Here we report the development of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), and the associated phenomena. We show that the precise spatiotemporal overlap of femtosecond single-electron packets with intense optical pulses at a nanostructure (individual carbon nanotube or silver nanowire in this instance) results in the direct absorption of integer multiples of photon quanta (nhomega) by the relativistic electrons accelerated to 200 keV. By energy-filtering only those electrons resulting from this absorption, it is possible to image directly in space the near-field electric field distribution, obtain the temporal behaviour of the field on the femtosecond timescale, and map its spatial polarization dependence. We believe that the observation of the photon-induced near-field effect in ultrafast electron microscopy demonstrates the potential for many applications, including those of direct space-time imaging of localized fields at interfaces and visualization of phenomena related to photonics, plasmonics and nanostructures. PMID:20016598

  18. Electron microscopy of biomaterials based on hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Suvorova, E. I. Klechkovskaya, V. V.; Komarov, V. F.; Severin, A. V.; Melikhov, I. V.; Buffat, P. A.

    2006-10-15

    Three types of biomaterials based on hydroxyapatite are synthesized and investigated. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals or microcrystals precipitated from low-temperature aqueous solutions serve as the initial material used for preparing spherical porous granules approximately 300-500 {mu}m in diameter. Sintering of hydroxyapatite crystals at a temperature of 870 deg. C for 2 h or at 1000 deg. C (for 3 h) + 1200 deg. C (for 2 h) brings about the formation of solid ceramics with different internal structures. According to the electron microscopic data, the ceramic material prepared at 870 deg. C is formed by agglomerated hydroxyapatite nanocrystals, whereas the ceramics sintered at 1200 deg. C (with a bending strength of the order of 100 MPa) are composed of crystal blocks as large as 2 {mu}m. It is established that all the biomaterials have a single-phase composition and consist of the hydroxyapatite with a structure retained up to a temperature of 1200 deg. C.

  19. Contributed Review: Review of integrated correlative light and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, F. J.; Otto, C.

    2015-01-15

    New developments in the field of microscopy enable to acquire increasing amounts of information from large sample areas and at an increased resolution. Depending on the nature of the technique, the information may reveal morphological, structural, chemical, and still other sample characteristics. In research fields, such as cell biology and materials science, there is an increasing demand to correlate these individual levels of information and in this way to obtain a better understanding of sample preparation and specific sample properties. To address this need, integrated systems were developed that combine nanometer resolution electron microscopes with optical microscopes, which produce chemically or label specific information through spectroscopy. The complementary information from electron microscopy and light microscopy presents an opportunity to investigate a broad range of sample properties in a correlated fashion. An important part of correlating the differences in information lies in bridging the different resolution and image contrast features. The trend to analyse samples using multiple correlated microscopes has resulted in a new research field. Current research is focused, for instance, on (a) the investigation of samples with nanometer scale distribution of inorganic and organic materials, (b) live cell analysis combined with electron microscopy, and (c) in situ spectroscopic and electron microscopy analysis of catalytic materials, but more areas will benefit from integrated correlative microscopy.

  20. Contributed Review: Review of integrated correlative light and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, F. J.; Otto, C.

    2015-01-01

    New developments in the field of microscopy enable to acquire increasing amounts of information from large sample areas and at an increased resolution. Depending on the nature of the technique, the information may reveal morphological, structural, chemical, and still other sample characteristics. In research fields, such as cell biology and materials science, there is an increasing demand to correlate these individual levels of information and in this way to obtain a better understanding of sample preparation and specific sample properties. To address this need, integrated systems were developed that combine nanometer resolution electron microscopes with optical microscopes, which produce chemically or label specific information through spectroscopy. The complementary information from electron microscopy and light microscopy presents an opportunity to investigate a broad range of sample properties in a correlated fashion. An important part of correlating the differences in information lies in bridging the different resolution and image contrast features. The trend to analyse samples using multiple correlated microscopes has resulted in a new research field. Current research is focused, for instance, on (a) the investigation of samples with nanometer scale distribution of inorganic and organic materials, (b) live cell analysis combined with electron microscopy, and (c) in situ spectroscopic and electron microscopy analysis of catalytic materials, but more areas will benefit from integrated correlative microscopy.

  1. Persistent misconceptions about incoherence in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, D

    2011-06-01

    Incoherence in electron microscopic imaging occurs when during the observation the microscope and the object are subject to fluctuations. In order to speed up the computer simulation of the images, approximations are used that are considered as valid. In this paper we will question the validity of these approximations and show that in specific cases they can lead to erroneous results. It is shown in particular in the case of one single vibrating atom that the thermal diffuse scattering that causes the signal in HAADF STEM is not only dependent on Z but also on the mean square displacement of the atom so that it can even be large for light atoms in soft matter, provided the right HAADF aperture is used. In HREM imaging the diffuse scattering leaks out of the coherent (elastic) wave and is redistributed in the background. This might explain the mismatch in elastic contrast (Stobbs factor) especially for crystals with a thickness beyond the extinction distance, where also the HAADF signal saturates and the elastic (coherent) component vanishes. PMID:21664551

  2. Electron microscopy of low iodinated thyroglobulin molecules.

    PubMed

    Berg, G; Ekholm, R

    1975-04-29

    Thyroglobulin molecules were studied in the electron microscope with negative staining technique. In a first series of experiments samples of thyroglobulin varying in iodine content from 0.5 to 0.03% were prepared from the thyroids of mice and rats kept on iodine-poor diets. All samples contained thyroglobulin molecules of the normal ovoid shape, not deviating in size or shape from molecules obtained from normal thyroids. However, in addition, another type of molecule having a cylindrical shape was observed in all samples. The proportion of these cylindrical molecules increased from a few per cent in the moderately iodine-poor thyroglobulin samples to more than 80% in the highly iodine-deficient thyroglobulin (0.03%). In a second series of experiments extremely iodine-poor thyroglobulin (smaller than 0.005%) was obtained from propylthiouracil-treated rats. In these preparations practically all molecules had a cylindrical shape. These samples also contained smaller particles interpreted to be dissociation products. The cylindrical molecules were of two types, one appearing compact and measuring 250 times 135 A (length times diameter) and the other appearing porous and having a length of 145 and a diameter of 205 A. It is concluded that the cylindrical molecules represent non- or low-iodinated thyroglobulin and it is suggested that the porous cylindrical molecule is an unfolded form of the compact cylinder. PMID:1138879

  3. Anisotropic aberration correction using region of interest based digital adaptive optics in Fourier domain OCT

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Kamali, Tschackad; Platzer, René; Unterhuber, Angelika; Drexler, Wolfgang; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a numerical technique is presented to compensate for anisotropic optical aberrations, which are usually present across the lateral field of view in the out of focus regions, in high resolution optical coherence tomography and microscopy (OCT/OCM) setups. The recorded enface image field at different depths in the tomogram is digitally divided into smaller sub-regions or the regions of interest (ROIs), processed individually using subaperture based digital adaptive optics (DAO), and finally stitched together to yield a final image with a uniform diffraction limited resolution across the entire field of view (FOV). Using this method, a sub-micron lateral resolution is achieved over a depth range of 218 μmfor a nano-particle phantom sample imaged using a fiber based point scanning spectral domain (SD) OCM system with a limited depth of focus (DOF) of ~7 μmat a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.6. Thus, an increase in DOF by ~30x is demonstrated in this case. The application of this method is also shown in ex vivo mouse adipose tissue. PMID:25908999

  4. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Itokawa Regolith Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In a remarkable engineering achievement, the JAXA space agency successfully recovered the Hayabusa space-craft in June 2010, following a non-optimal encounter and sur-face sampling mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa. These are the first direct samples ever obtained and returned from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special op-portunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal sur-faces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the effects of space weathering. Here we report on our preliminary TEM measurements on two Itokawa samples. Methods: We were allocated particles RA-QD02-0125 and RA-QD02-0211. Both particles were embedded in low viscosity epoxy and thin sections were prepared using ultramicrotomy. High resolution images and electron diffraction data were ob-tained using a JEOL 2500SE 200 kV field-emission scanning-transmission electron microscope. Quantitative maps and anal-yses were obtained using a Thermo thin-window energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectrometer. Results: Both particles are olivine-rich (Fo70) with µm-sized inclusions of FeS and have microstructurally complex rims. Par-ticle RA-QD02-0125 is rounded and has numerous sub-µm grains attached to its surface including FeS, albite, olivine, and rare melt droplets. Solar flare tracks have not been observed, but the particle is surrounded by a continuous 50 nm thick, stuctur-ally disordered rim that is compositionally similar to the core of the grain. One of the surface adhering grains is pyrrhotite show-ing a S-depleted rim (8-10 nm thick) with nanophase Fe metal grains (<5 nm) decorating the outermost surface. The pyrrhotite displays a complex superstructure in its core that is absent in the S-depleted rim. Particle RA-QD02-0211 contains solar flare particle tracks (2x109 cm-2) and shows a structurally disordered rim 100 nm thick. The track density corresponds to a surface exposure of 103-104 years based on the track production rate

  5. Photon gating in four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohammed T.; Liu, Haihua; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) is a pivotal tool for imaging of nanoscale structural dynamics with subparticle resolution on the time scale of atomic motion. Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), a key UEM technique, involves the detection of electrons that have gained energy from a femtosecond optical pulse via photon–electron coupling on nanostructures. PINEM has been applied in various fields of study, from materials science to biological imaging, exploiting the unique spatial, energy, and temporal characteristics of the PINEM electrons gained by interaction with a “single” light pulse. The further potential of photon-gated PINEM electrons in probing ultrafast dynamics of matter and the optical gating of electrons by invoking a “second” optical pulse has previously been proposed and examined theoretically in our group. Here, we experimentally demonstrate this photon-gating technique, and, through diffraction, visualize the phase transition dynamics in vanadium dioxide nanoparticles. With optical gating of PINEM electrons, imaging temporal resolution was improved by a factor of 3 or better, being limited only by the optical pulse widths. This work enables the combination of the high spatial resolution of electron microscopy and the ultrafast temporal response of the optical pulses, which provides a promising approach to attain the resolution of few femtoseconds and attoseconds in UEM. PMID:26438835

  6. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  7. Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Buck, Edgar C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-02-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryo-electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in the collapse of hydrated gel-like EPS into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  8. The CryoCapsule: Simplifying correlative light to electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Heiligenstein, Xavier; Heiligenstein, Jérôme; Delevoye, Cédric; Hurbain, Ilse; Bardin, Sabine; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Régnier, Gilles; Salamero, Jean; Antony, Claude; Raposo, Graca

    2014-01-01

    Correlating complementary multiple scale images of the same object is a straightforward means to decipher biological processes. Light and electron microscopy are the most commonly used imaging techniques, yet despite their complementarity, the experimental procedures available to correlate them are technically complex. We designed and manufactured a new device adapted to many biological specimens, the CryoCapsule, that simplifies the multiple sample preparation steps, which at present separate live cell fluorescence imaging from contextual high-resolution electron microscopy, thus opening new strategies for full correlative light to electron microscopy. We tested the biological application of this highly optimized tool on three different specimens: the in-vitro Xenopus laevis mitotic spindle, melanoma cells over-expressing YFP-langerin sequestered in organized membranous subcellular organelles and a pigmented melanocytic cell in which the endosomal system was labeled with internalized fluorescent transferrin. PMID:24533564

  9. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: comparative analysis by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dohnalkova, Alice C; Marshall, Matthew J; Arey, Bruce W; Williams, Kenneth H; Buck, Edgar C; Fredrickson, James K

    2011-02-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigation of microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations, and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions by conventional electron microscopy approaches with imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding the nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment. PMID:21169451

  10. Laboratory design for high-performance electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Turner, John H.; Hetherington, Crispin J.D.; Cullis, A.G.; Carragher, Bridget; Jenkins, Ron; Milgrim, Julie; Milligan,Ronald A.; Potter, Clinton S.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.; Degenhardt, Lynn; Sides, William H.

    2004-04-23

    Proliferation of electron microscopes with field emission guns, imaging filters and hardware spherical aberration correctors (giving higher spatial and energy resolution) has resulted in the need to construct special laboratories. As resolutions improve, transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) become more sensitive to ambient conditions. State-of-the-art electron microscopes require state-of-the-art environments, and this means careful design and implementation of microscope sites, from the microscope room to the building that surrounds it. Laboratories have been constructed to house high-sensitive instruments with resolutions ranging down to sub-Angstrom levels; we present the various design philosophies used for some of these laboratories and our experiences with them. Four facilities are described: the National Center for Electron Microscopy OAM Laboratory at LBNL; the FEGTEM Facility at the University of Sheffield; the Center for Integrative Molecular Biosciences at TSRI; and the Advanced Microscopy Laboratory at ORNL.

  11. Microscopy with slow electrons: from LEEM to XPEEM

    ScienceCinema

    Bauer, Ernst [Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, United States

    2010-01-08

    The short penetration and escape depth of electrons with energies below 1 keV make them ideally suited for the study of surfaces and ultrathin films. The combination of the low energy electrons and the high lateral resolution of a microscope produces a powerful method for the characterization of nanostructures on bulk samples, in particular if the microscope is equipped with an imaging energy filter and connected to a synchrotron radiation source. Comprehensive characterization by imaging, diffraction, and spectroscope of the structural, chemical, and magnetic properties is then possible. The Talk will describe the various imaging techniques in using reflected and emitted electrons in low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM), with an emphasis on magnetic materials with spin-polarized LEEM and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism PEEM. The talk with end with an outlook on future possibilities.

  12. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Viktoria; Barlag, Britta; Nietschke, Monika; Hensel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded markers such as fluorescent proteins or self-labelling enzyme tags allow observations in living cells. Various genetically encoded tags are available for FM and SRM, but only few tags are suitable for CLEM. Here, we describe the red fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) as a multimodal marker for CLEM. TMR is used as fluorochrome coupled to ligands of genetically encoded self-labelling enzyme tags HaloTag, SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag in FM and SRM. We demonstrate that TMR can additionally photooxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) to an osmiophilic polymer visible on TEM sections, thus being a marker suitable for FM, SRM and TEM. We evaluated various organelle markers with enzymatic tags in mammalian cells labelled with TMR-coupled ligands and demonstrate the use as efficient and versatile DAB photooxidizer for CLEM approaches. PMID:26643905

  13. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liss, Viktoria; Barlag, Britta; Nietschke, Monika; Hensel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded markers such as fluorescent proteins or self-labelling enzyme tags allow observations in living cells. Various genetically encoded tags are available for FM and SRM, but only few tags are suitable for CLEM. Here, we describe the red fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) as a multimodal marker for CLEM. TMR is used as fluorochrome coupled to ligands of genetically encoded self-labelling enzyme tags HaloTag, SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag in FM and SRM. We demonstrate that TMR can additionally photooxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) to an osmiophilic polymer visible on TEM sections, thus being a marker suitable for FM, SRM and TEM. We evaluated various organelle markers with enzymatic tags in mammalian cells labelled with TMR-coupled ligands and demonstrate the use as efficient and versatile DAB photooxidizer for CLEM approaches. PMID:26643905

  14. Simultaneous Correlative Scanning Electron and High-NA Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Effting, Andries P. J.; Voorneveld, Philip W.; Lucas, Miriam S.; Hardwick, James C.; Wepf, Roger A.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM) analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown. PMID:23409024

  15. Helium ion microscopy and energy selective scanning electron microscopy - two advanced microscopy techniques with complementary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenburg, C.; Jepson, M. A. E.; Boden, Stuart A.; Bagnall, Darren M.

    2014-06-01

    Both scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and helium ion microscopes (HeIM) are based on the same principle of a charged particle beam scanning across the surface and generating secondary electrons (SEs) to form images. However, there is a pronounced difference in the energy spectra of the emitted secondary electrons emitted as result of electron or helium ion impact. We have previously presented evidence that this also translates to differences in the information depth through the analysis of dopant contrast in doped silicon structures in both SEM and HeIM. Here, it is now shown how secondary electron emission spectra (SES) and their relation to depth of origin of SE can be experimentally exploited through the use of energy filtering (EF) in low voltage SEM (LV-SEM) to access bulk information from surfaces covered by damage or contamination layers. From the current understanding of the SES in HeIM it is not expected that EF will be as effective in HeIM but an alternative that can be used for some materials to access bulk information is presented.

  16. Prospects of atomic resolution imaging with an aberration-corrected STEM.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, K

    2001-01-01

    We investigated high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images obtained from a microscope equipped with a spherical aberration corrector. The probe size (full-width at half-maximum) is reduced to 0.76 A at 200 kV by assuming the fifth-order spherical aberration coefficient C5 = 100 mm. For the simulation we have used the recently developed scheme for a STEM image simulation based on the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) multislice algorithm. The peak-to-background (P/B) ratio of the high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) image is significantly improved at a thin specimen region. Although the P/B ratio becomes worse at a thicker region, the resolution is kept high even at such a region. An almost true HAADF signal will be obtained even from a weak-scattering phosphorous column in InP [001] when the background is subtracted. In the bright-field image the coherent character of elastic scattering is suppressed by averaging over a large convergence angle, making the specimen effectively self-luminous. The claim that HAADF imaging is relatively insensitive to a defocus as well as a specimen thickness is valid only qualitatively, and a detailed image simulation will be required for a quantitative analysis as in the case of the conventional transmission electron microscope. It was noted that the delta function approximation for the object function may not be applicable for a very fine probe, and that the achievable resolution of the HAADF imaging will be limited by the widths of the high-angle thermal diffuse scattering potential. PMID:11592674

  17. Ultrastructural Analysis of Drosophila Ovaries by Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hurd, Thomas R; Sanchez, Carlos G; Teixeira, Felipe K; Petzold, Chris; Dancel-Manning, Kristen; Wang, Ju-Yu S; Lehmann, Ruth; Liang, Feng-Xia A

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster ovary is a powerful, genetically tractable system through which one can elucidate the principles underlying cellular function and organogenesis in vivo. In order to understand the intricate process of oogenesis at the subcellular level, microscopic analysis with the highest possible resolution is required. In this chapter, we describe the preparation of ovaries for ultrastructural analysis using transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy. We discuss and provide protocols for chemical fixation of Drosophila ovaries that facilitate optimal imaging with particular attention paid to preserving and resolving mitochondrial membrane morphology and structure. PMID:26324436

  18. Surface morphology of Trichinella spiralis by scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.W.; Ledbetter, M.C.

    1980-02-01

    The surface morphology of larval and adult Trichinella spiralis was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of fixed, dried, and metal-coated specimens. The results are compared with those found earlier by various investigators using light and transmission electron microscopy. Some morphological features reported here are revealed uniquely by SEM. These include the pores of the cephalic sense organs, the character of secondary cuticular folds, variations of the hypodermal gland cell openings or pores, and the presence of particles on the copulatory bell.

  19. Ultrastructural Analysis of Drosophila Ovaries by Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Thomas R.; Sanchez, Carlos G.; Teixeira, Felipe K.; Petzold, Chris; Dancel-Manning, Kristen; Wang, Ju-Yu S.; Lehmann, Ruth; Liang, Feng-Xia A.

    2016-01-01

    i. Summary The Drosophila melanogaster ovary is a powerful, genetically tractable system through which one can elucidate the principles underlying cellular function and organogenesis in vivo. In order to understand the intricate process of oogenesis at the subcellular level, microscopic analysis with the highest possible resolution is required. In this chapter, we describe the preparation of ovaries for ultrastructural analysis using transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy. We discuss and provide protocols for chemical fixation of Drosophila ovaries that facilitate optimal imaging with particular attention paid to preserving and resolving mitochondrial membrane morphology and structure. PMID:26324436

  20. Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Helium Bubbles in Aged Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A J; Wall, M A; Zocco, T G; Blobaum, K M

    2004-11-02

    The self-irradiation damage generated by alpha decay of plutonium results in the formation of lattice defects, helium, and uranium atoms. Over time, microstructural evolution resulting from the self-irradiation may influence the physical and mechanical properties of the material. In order to assess microstructural changes, we have developed and applied procedures for the specimen preparation, handling, and transmission electron microscopy characterization of Pu alloys. These transmission electron microscopy investigations of Pu-Ga alloys ranging in age up to 42-years old reveal the presence of nanometer-sized helium bubbles. The number density of bubbles and the average size have been determined for eight different aged materials.

  1. Directed evolution of APEX2 for electron microscopy and proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Stephanie S.; Martell, Jeffrey D.; Kamer, Kimberli J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-01-01

    APEX is an engineered peroxidase that functions both as an electron microscopy tag, and as a promiscuous labeling enzyme for live-cell proteomics. Because the limited sensitivity of APEX precludes applications requiring low APEX expression, we used yeast display evolution to improve its catalytic efficiency. Our evolved APEX2 is far more active in cells, enabling the superior enrichment of endogenous mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins and the use of electron microscopy to resolve the sub-mitochondrial localization of calcium uptake regulatory protein MICU1. PMID:25419960

  2. Attosecond electron pulses for 4D diffraction and microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Peter; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution, we consider the advancement of ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy to cover the attosecond time domain. The concept is centered on the compression of femtosecond electron packets to trains of 15-attosecond pulses by the use of the ponderomotive force in synthesized gratings of optical fields. Such attosecond electron pulses are significantly shorter than those achievable with extreme UV light sources near 25 nm (≈50 eV) and have the potential for applications in the visualization of ultrafast electron dynamics, especially of atomic structures, clusters of atoms, and some materials. PMID:18000040

  3. Dynamic Aberration Correction for Conformal Window of High-Speed Aircraft Using Optimized Model-Based Wavefront Sensorless Adaptive Optics.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bing; Li, Yan; Han, Xin-Li; Hu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    For high-speed aircraft, a conformal window is used to optimize the aerodynamic performance. However, the local shape of the conformal window leads to large amounts of dynamic aberrations varying with look angle. In this paper, deformable mirror (DM) and model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSLAO) are used for dynamic aberration correction of an infrared remote sensor equipped with a conformal window and scanning mirror. In model-based WSLAO, aberration is captured using Lukosz mode, and we use the low spatial frequency content of the image spectral density as the metric function. Simulations show that aberrations induced by the conformal window are dominated by some low-order Lukosz modes. To optimize the dynamic correction, we can only correct dominant Lukosz modes and the image size can be minimized to reduce the time required to compute the metric function. In our experiment, a 37-channel DM is used to mimic the dynamic aberration of conformal window with scanning rate of 10 degrees per second. A 52-channel DM is used for correction. For a 128 × 128 image, the mean value of image sharpness during dynamic correction is 1.436 × 10(-5) in optimized correction and is 1.427 × 10(-5) in un-optimized correction. We also demonstrated that model-based WSLAO can achieve convergence two times faster than traditional stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) method. PMID:27598161

  4. Double-aberration corrected TEM/STEM of solid acid nanocatalysts in the development of pharmaceutical NSAIDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Shiju, N.; Brown, R.; Wright, I.; Boyes, E. D.; Gai, P. L.

    2012-07-01

    We report nanostructural and physico-chemical studies in the development of an efficient low temperature heterogeneous catalytic process for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as N-acetyl-p-aminophenol (paracetamol or acetaminophen) on tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts. Using a double-aberration corrected TEM/STEM, modified in-house for in-situ studies at the sub-Angstrom level, we directly observed in real-time, the dynamic precursor transformation to the active catalyst. We quantified the observations with catalytic activity studies for the NSAIDS. The studies have provided the direct evidence for single tungsten promoter atoms and surface WOx species of <= 0.35 nm, with nanoclusters of WOx (0.6 to 1nm), located at grain boundaries on the surface of the zirconia nanoparticles. The correlation between the nanostructure and catalytic activity indicates that the species create Brønsted acid sites highly active for the low temperature process. The results open up opportunities for developing green heterogeneous methods for pharmaceuticals.

  5. Nano-fEM: Protein Localization Using Photo-activated Localization Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Richards, Jackson; Hollopeter, Gunther; Hobson, Robert J.; Davis, Wayne M.; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2012-01-01

    Mapping the distribution of proteins is essential for understanding the function of proteins in a cell. Fluorescence microscopy is extensively used for protein localization, but subcellular context is often absent in fluorescence images. Immuno-electron microscopy, on the other hand, can localize proteins, but the technique is limited by a lack of compatible antibodies, poor preservation of morphology and because most antigens are not exposed to the specimen surface. Correlative approaches can acquire the fluorescence image from a whole cell first, either from immuno-fluorescence or genetically tagged proteins. The sample is then fixed and embedded for electron microscopy, and the images are correlated 1-3. However, the low-resolution fluorescence image and the lack of fiducial markers preclude the precise localization of proteins. Alternatively, fluorescence imaging can be done after preserving the specimen in plastic. In this approach, the block is sectioned, and fluorescence images and electron micrographs of the same section are correlated 4-7. However, the diffraction limit of light in the correlated image obscures the locations of individual molecules, and the fluorescence often extends beyond the boundary of the cell. Nano-resolution fluorescence electron microscopy (nano-fEM) is designed to localize proteins at nano-scale by imaging the same sections using photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) and electron microscopy. PALM overcomes the diffraction limit by imaging individual fluorescent proteins and subsequently mapping the centroid of each fluorescent spot 8-10. We outline the nano-fEM technique in five steps. First, the sample is fixed and embedded using conditions that preserve the fluorescence of tagged proteins. Second, the resin blocks are sectioned into ultrathin segments (70-80 nm) that are mounted on a cover glass. Third, fluorescence is imaged in these sections using the Zeiss PALM microscope. Fourth, electron dense structures are imaged

  6. Breaking resolution limits in ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Peter; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction are powerful techniques for the study of the time-resolved structures of molecules, materials, and biological systems. Central to these approaches is the use of ultrafast coherent electron packets. The electron pulses typically have an energy of 30 keV for diffraction and 100–200 keV for microscopy, corresponding to speeds of 33–70% of the speed of light. Although the spatial resolution can reach the atomic scale, the temporal resolution is limited by the pulse width and by the difference in group velocities of electrons and the light used to initiate the dynamical change. In this contribution, we introduce the concept of tilted optical pulses into diffraction and imaging techniques and demonstrate the methodology experimentally. These advances allow us to reach limits of time resolution down to regimes of a few femtoseconds and, possibly, attoseconds. With tilted pulses, every part of the sample is excited at precisely the same time as when the electrons arrive at the specimen. Here, this approach is demonstrated for the most unfavorable case of ultrafast crystallography. We also present a method for measuring the duration of electron packets by autocorrelating electron pulses in free space and without streaking, and we discuss the potential of tilting the electron pulses themselves for applications in domains involving nuclear and electron motions. PMID:17056711

  7. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  8. The Electron Microscopy eXchange (EMX) initiative.

    PubMed

    Marabini, Roberto; Ludtke, Steven J; Murray, Stephen C; Chiu, Wah; de la Rosa-Trevín, Jose M; Patwardhan, Ardan; Heymann, J Bernard; Carazo, Jose M

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy (3DEM) of ice-embedded samples allows the structural analysis of large biological macromolecules close to their native state. Different techniques have been developed during the last forty years to process cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data. Not surprisingly, success in analysis and interpretation is highly correlated with the continuous development of image processing packages. The field has matured to the point where further progress in data and methods sharing depends on an agreement between the packages on how to describe common image processing tasks. Such standardization will facilitate the use of software as well as seamless collaboration, allowing the sharing of rich information between different platforms. Our aim here is to describe the Electron Microscopy eXchange (EMX) initiative, launched at the 2012 Instruct Image Processing Center Developer Workshop, with the intention of developing a first set of standard conventions for the interchange of information for single-particle analysis (EMX version 1.0). These conventions cover the specification of the metadata for micrograph and particle images, including contrast transfer function (CTF) parameters and particle orientations. EMX v1.0 has already been implemented in the Bsoft, EMAN, Xmipp and Scipion image processing packages. It has been and will be used in the CTF and EMDataBank Validation Challenges respectively. It is also being used in EMPIAR, the Electron Microscopy Pilot Image Archive, which stores raw image data related to the 3DEM reconstructions in EMDB. PMID:26873784

  9. 'GIARDIA MURIS': SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF IN VITRO EXCYSTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recently developed in vitro excystation procedure results in almost total excystation of Giardia muris, an intestinal parasite of mice. The present experiment examines the G. muris cyst morphology by scanning electron microscopy and evaluates the efficacy of the excystation pro...

  10. Collaboration at the Nanoscale: Exploring Viral Genetics with Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duboise, S. Monroe; Moulton, Karen D.; Jamison, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    The Maine Science Corps is a project sponsored by the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12 ) program. Through this program, the University of Southern Maine's (USM) virology and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) research group provides high school teachers and students in rural areas with…

  11. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of corrosion degradation on tinplate substrates.

    PubMed

    Zumelzu, E; Cabezas, C; Vera, A

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of electrolytic tinplate used in food containers was analysed and evaluated, using scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements of microcorrosion and ion dissolution by atomic absorption to prevent food contamination caused by metal traces and to increase the durability of such tinplates. PMID:12627896

  12. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  13. Electron microscopy of Mycoplasma pneumoniae microcolonies grown on solid surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C K; Pfister, R M; Somerson, N L

    1977-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae sprain CL-8 was studied by using various surfaces for adherence and growth. Cells grown on Epon 812, Formvar, carbon, and glass were of similar morphology. Thin Epon pieces were good material for culturing the organisms and examining thin-sectioned microcolonies by transmission electron microscopy. Images PMID:931378

  14. Improved handling of embedding plastics for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shannon, W A

    1982-08-01

    An improved, safer, rapid method for preparing embedding plastics for electron microscopy is described. The method consists of contained storage and dispensing of individual plastic components on an automatic tare balance. The proportions are based on weight measurements and may be calculated from volume or proportion recipes. The usual problems in and resulting from embedding plastic handling have been eliminated. PMID:6750130

  15. Detection of parvoviruses in wolf feces by electron microscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muneer, M.A.; Farah, I.O.; Pomeroy, K.A.; Goyal, S.M.; Mech, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    One hundred fifteen wolf (Canis lupus) feces were collected between 1980 and 1984 from northeastern Minnesota and were examined for canine parvovirus by negative contrast electron microscopy. Of these, seven (6%) samples revealed the presence of parvovirus. Some of these viruses were able to grow in cell cultures forming intranuclear inclusion bodies and giant cells.

  16. DICHOTOMOUS SAMPLERS MODIFIED FOR USE WITH ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large sulfate artifacts up to 2 um in diameter were observed by scanning electron microscopy for the fine particle fraction collected in dichotomous samplers. he artifacts were attributed to small liquid particles that piled up on the filter, coalesced, and later dried as larger ...

  17. Detective quantum efficiency of electron area detectors in electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, G.; Chen, S.; Henderson, R.; Faruqi, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in detector design has created the need for a careful side-by-side comparison of the modulation transfer function (MTF) and resolution-dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of existing electron detectors with those of detectors based on new technology. We present MTF and DQE measurements for four types of detector: Kodak SO-163 film, TVIPS 224 charge coupled device (CCD) detector, the Medipix2 hybrid pixel detector, and an experimental direct electron monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) detector. Film and CCD performance was measured at 120 and 300 keV, while results are presented for the Medipix2 at 120 keV and for the MAPS detector at 300 keV. In the case of film, the effects of electron backscattering from both the holder and the plastic support have been investigated. We also show that part of the response of the emulsion in film comes from light generated in the plastic support. Computer simulations of film and the MAPS detector have been carried out and show good agreement with experiment. The agreement enables us to conclude that the DQE of a backthinned direct electron MAPS detector is likely to be equal to, or better than, that of film at 300 keV. PMID:19497671

  18. Generation and application of bessel beams in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Harris, Jérémie; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Balboni, Roberto; Mafakheri, Erfan; Dennis, Mark R; Frabboni, Stefano; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2016-07-01

    We report a systematic treatment of the holographic generation of electron Bessel beams, with a view to applications in electron microscopy. We describe in detail the theory underlying hologram patterning, as well as the actual electron-optical configuration used experimentally. We show that by optimizing our nanofabrication recipe, electron Bessel beams can be generated with relative efficiencies reaching 37±3%. We also demonstrate by tuning various hologram parameters that electron Bessel beams can be produced with many visible rings, making them ideal for interferometric applications, or in more highly localized forms with fewer rings, more suitable for imaging. We describe the settings required to tune beam localization in this way, and explore beam and hologram configurations that allow the convergences and topological charges of electron Bessel beams to be controlled. We also characterize the phase structure of the Bessel beams generated with our technique, using a simulation procedure that accounts for imperfections in the hologram manufacturing process. PMID:27203186

  19. Environmental scanning electron microscopy gold immunolabeling in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Francesco; Papale, Ferdinando; Barbarisi, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Immunogold labeling (IGL) technique has been utilized by many authors in combination with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to obtain the identification/localization of receptors and antigens, both in cells and tissues. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) represents an important tool in biomedical research, since it does not require any severe processing of the sample, lowering the risk of generating artifacts and interfere with the IGL procedure. The absence of metal coating could yield further advantages for our purpose as the labeling detection is based on the atomic number difference between nanogold spheres and the biological material. Using the gaseous secondary electron detector, compositional contrast is easily revealed by the backscattered electron component of the signal. In spite of this fact, only few published papers present a combination of ESEM and IGL. Hereby we present our method, optimized to improve the intensity and the specificity of the labeling signal, in order to obtain a semiquantitative evaluation of the labeling signal.In particular, we used a combination of IGL and ESEM to detect the presence of a protein on the cell surface. To achieve this purpose, we chose as an experimental system 3T3 Swiss albino mouse fibroblasts and galectin-3. PMID:23027021

  20. Correlative Light- and Electron Microscopy Using Quantum Dot Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Killingsworth, Murray C; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-01-01

    A method is described whereby quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles can be used for correlative immunocytochemical studies of human pathology tissue using widefield fluorescence light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To demonstrate the protocol we have immunolabeled ultrathin epoxy sections of human somatostatinoma tumor using a primary antibody to somatostatin, followed by a biotinylated secondary antibody and visualization with streptavidin conjugated 585 nm cadmium-selenium (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs). The sections are mounted on a TEM specimen grid then placed on a glass slide for observation by widefield fluorescence light microscopy. Light microscopy reveals 585 nm QD labeling as bright orange fluorescence forming a granular pattern within the tumor cell cytoplasm. At low to mid-range magnification by light microscopy the labeling pattern can be easily recognized and the level of non-specific or background labeling assessed. This is a critical step for subsequent interpretation of the immunolabeling pattern by TEM and evaluation of the morphological context. The same section is then blotted dry and viewed by TEM. QD probes are seen to be attached to amorphous material contained in individual secretory granules. Images are acquired from the same region of interest (ROI) seen by light microscopy for correlative analysis. Corresponding images from each modality may then be blended to overlay fluorescence data on TEM ultrastructure of the corresponding region. PMID:27584907

  1. Increase of penetration depth in real-time clinical epi-optoacoustic imaging: clutter reduction and aberration correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Michael; Gashi, Kujtim; Peeters, Sara; Held, Gerrit; Preisser, Stefan; Gruenig, Michael; Frenz, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) imaging will experience broadest clinical application if implemented in epi-style with the irradiation optics and the acoustic probe integrated in a single probe. This will allow most flexible imaging of the human body in a combined system together with echo ultrasound (US). In such a multimodal combination, the OA signal could provide functional information within the anatomical context shown in the US image, similar to what is already done with colour flow imaging. Up to date, successful deep epi-OA imaging was difficult to achieve, owing to clutter and acoustic aberrations. Clutter signals arise from strong optical absorption in the region of tissue irradiation and strongly reduce contrast and imaging depth. Acoustic aberrations are caused by the inhomogeneous speed of sound and degrade the spatial resolution of deep tissue structures, further reducing contrast and thus imaging depth. In past years we have developed displacement-compensated averaging (DCA) for clutter reduction based on the clutter decorrelation that occurs when palpating the tissue using the ultrasound probe. We have now implemented real-time DCA on a research ultrasound system to evaluate its clutter reduction performance in freehand scanning of human volunteers. Our results confirm that DCA significantly improves image contrast and imaging depth, making clutter reduction a basic requirement for a clinically successful combination of epi-OA and US imaging. In addition we propose a novel technique which allows automatic full aberration correction of OA images, based on measuring the effect of aberration spatially resolved using echo US. Phantom results demonstrate that this technique allows spatially invariant diffraction-limited resolution in presence of a strong aberrator.

  2. Carbon-metal interfaces analyzed by aberration-corrected TEM: how copper and nickel nanoparticles interact with MWCNTs.

    PubMed

    Ilari, Gabriele M; Hage, Fredrik S; Zhang, Yucheng; Rossell, Marta D; Ramasse, Quentin M; Niederberger, Markus; Erni, Rolf

    2015-05-01

    Experimental confirmation for the stronger interaction of Ni with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) compared to Cu with MWCNTs is presented. The interfaces between Cu (Ni) nanoparticles side-on oriented onto MWCNTs are analyzed with high spatial resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) of the carbon K-edge. The EEL spectra reveal a rehybridization from sp(2) to sp(3) hybridized carbon of the outermost MWCNT layer at the Ni interface, but no such rehybridization can be observed at the Cu interface. The EELS results are supported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, which show a better wetting behavior of Ni and a smaller gap at the Ni-MWCNT interface, as compared to the corresponding Cu interfaces. The different behavior of Cu and Ni can be explained in terms of differing valence d-orbital occupancy. For the successful experimental demonstration of this effect the use of a soft chemical metal deposition technique is crucial. PMID:25836722

  3. Ballistic electron magnetic microscopy on epitaxial spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindl, E.; Vancea, J.; Back, C. H.

    2007-02-01

    The tip of a scanning tunneling microscope has been used as an injector of hot electrons or hot holes into a spin valve epitaxially grown on n-GaAs67P33 . Spin-dependent transport of injected and hole excited electrons has been studied in an external magnetic field at room temperature. Significant variations in the collector current due to the spin-dependent inelastic decay of the hot charge carriers have been measured for parallel and antiparallel configurations of the magnetization of the individual layers. We found magnetocurrent effects on the order of 600% and relative large transmission values compared to other ballistic electron magnetic microscopy studies. In addition, we investigated the excitation of electron-hole pairs with its subsequent electron transport in the spin valve and found a magnetocurrent effect with positive sign.

  4. 3D strain measurement in electronic devices using through-focal annular dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suhyun; Jung, Younheum; Lee, Sungho; Jung Kim, Joong; Byun, Gwangseon; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Haebum

    2014-11-01

    Spherical aberration correction in high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) allows us to form an electron probe with reduced depth of field. Using through-focal HAADF imaging, we experimentally demonstrated 3D strain measurement in a strained-channel transistor. The strain field distribution in the channel region was obtained by scanning an electron beam over a plan-view specimen. Furthermore, the decrease in the strain fields toward the silicon substrate was revealed at different focal planes with a 5-nm focal step. These results demonstrate that it is possible to reconstruct the 3D strain field in electronic devices. PMID:24859824

  5. Immuno-electron microscopy of primary cell cultures from genetically modified animals in liquid by atmospheric scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Takaaki; Mori, Yosio; Hirano, Kazumi; Sugimoto, Shinya; Okuda, Ken-ichi; Matsumoto, Shunsuke; Namiki, Takeshi; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Kawata, Masaaki; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Sato, Mari; Suga, Mitsuo; Higashiyama, Kenichi; Sonomoto, Kenji; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Nishihara, Shoko; Sato, Chikara

    2014-04-01

    High-throughput immuno-electron microscopy is required to capture the protein-protein interactions realizing physiological functions. Atmospheric scanning electron microscopy (ASEM) allows in situ correlative light and electron microscopy of samples in liquid in an open atmospheric environment. Cells are cultured in a few milliliters of medium directly in the ASEM dish, which can be coated and transferred to an incubator as required. Here, cells were imaged by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM, sometimes with additional metal staining. Axonal partitioning of neurons was correlated with specific cytoskeletal structures, including microtubules, using primary-culture neurons from wild type Drosophila, and the involvement of ankyrin in the formation of the intra-axonal segmentation boundary was studied using neurons from an ankyrin-deficient mutant. Rubella virus replication producing anti-double-stranded RNA was captured at the host cell's plasma membrane. Fas receptosome formation was associated with clathrin internalization near the surface of primitive endoderm cells. Positively charged Nanogold clearly revealed the cell outlines of primitive endoderm cells, and the cell division of lactic acid bacteria. Based on these experiments, ASEM promises to allow the study of protein interactions in various complexes in a natural environment of aqueous liquid in the near future. PMID:24564988

  6. Electron microscopy of legionella and legionella-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Gary; Garduño, Rafael A

    2013-01-01

    Those investigators who study the morphology of Legionella and Legionella-infected cells have greatly benefited from the superior resolution afforded by electron microscopy (EM). It can also be said with confidence that EM will continue to reveal as yet to be discovered features of this fascinating intracellular pathogen. In this chapter we detail our practical experience in the application of three transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques to the study of Legionella: conventional ultrastructural analysis, immuno-gold labeling, and negative staining. Each of these techniques has particular, well-defined applications, which are discussed in the context of our in-house developed methods. We invite researchers to try the methods given here in the study of Legionella, and adopt TEM as part of their research tools arsenal. PMID:23150403

  7. Microfabricated high-bandpass foucault aperture for electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, Robert; Cambie, Rossana; Jin, Jian

    2014-08-26

    A variant of the Foucault (knife-edge) aperture is disclosed that is designed to provide single-sideband (SSB) contrast at low spatial frequencies but retain conventional double-sideband (DSB) contrast at high spatial frequencies in transmission electron microscopy. The aperture includes a plate with an inner open area, a support extending from the plate at an edge of the open area, a half-circle feature mounted on the support and located at the center of the aperture open area. The radius of the half-circle portion of reciprocal space that is blocked by the aperture can be varied to suit the needs of electron microscopy investigation. The aperture is fabricated from conductive material which is preferably non-oxidizing, such as gold, for example.

  8. Scanning electron microscopy: preparation and imaging for SEM.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris G

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been almost universally applied for the surface examination and characterization of both natural and man-made objects. Although an invasive technique, developments in electron microscopy over the years has given the microscopist a much clearer choice in how invasive the technique will be. With the advent of low vacuum SEM in the 1970s (The environmental cold stage, 1970) and environmental SEM in the late 1980s (J Microsc 160(pt. 1):9-19, 1989), it is now possible in some circumstances to examine samples without preparation. However, for the examination of biological tissue and cells it is still advisable to chemically fix, dehydrate, and coat samples for SEM imaging and analysis. This chapter aims to provide an overview of SEM as an imaging tool, and a general introduction to some of the methods applied for the preparation of samples. PMID:22907399

  9. In Situ Electron Microscopy of Lactomicroselenium Particles in Probiotic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gabor; Pinczes, Gyula; Pinter, Gabor; Pocsi, Istvan; Prokisch, Jozsef; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy was used to test whether or not (a) in statu nascendi synthesized, and in situ measured, nanoparticle size does not differ significantly from the size of nanoparticles after their purification; and (b) the generation of selenium is detrimental to the bacterial strains that produce them. Elemental nano-sized selenium produced by probiotic latic acid bacteria was used as a lactomicroselenium (lactomicroSel) inhibitor of cell growth in the presence of lactomicroSel, and was followed by time-lapse microscopy. The size of lactomicroSel produced by probiotic bacteria was measured in situ and after isolation and purification. For these measurements the TESLA BS 540 transmission electron microscope was converted from analog (aTEM) to digital processing (dTEM), and further to remote-access internet electron microscopy (iTEM). Lactobacillus acidophilus produced fewer, but larger, lactomicroSel nanoparticles (200–350 nm) than Lactobacillus casei (L. casei), which generated many, smaller lactomicroSel particles (85–200 nm) and grains as a cloudy, less electrodense material. Streptococcus thermophilus cells generated selenoparticles (60–280 nm) in a suicidic manner. The size determined in situ in lactic acid bacteria was significantly lower than those measured by scanning electron microscopy after the isolation of lactomicroSel particles obtained from lactobacilli (100–500 nm), but higher relative to those isolated from Streptococcus thermopilus (50–100 nm). These differences indicate that smaller lactomicroSel particles could be more toxic to the producing bacteria themselves and discrepancies in size could have implications with respect to the applications of selenium nanoparticles as prebiotics. PMID:27376279

  10. In Situ Electron Microscopy of Lactomicroselenium Particles in Probiotic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gabor; Pinczes, Gyula; Pinter, Gabor; Pocsi, Istvan; Prokisch, Jozsef; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy was used to test whether or not (a) in statu nascendi synthesized, and in situ measured, nanoparticle size does not differ significantly from the size of nanoparticles after their purification; and (b) the generation of selenium is detrimental to the bacterial strains that produce them. Elemental nano-sized selenium produced by probiotic latic acid bacteria was used as a lactomicroselenium (lactomicroSel) inhibitor of cell growth in the presence of lactomicroSel, and was followed by time-lapse microscopy. The size of lactomicroSel produced by probiotic bacteria was measured in situ and after isolation and purification. For these measurements the TESLA BS 540 transmission electron microscope was converted from analog (aTEM) to digital processing (dTEM), and further to remote-access internet electron microscopy (iTEM). Lactobacillus acidophilus produced fewer, but larger, lactomicroSel nanoparticles (200-350 nm) than Lactobacillus casei (L. casei), which generated many, smaller lactomicroSel particles (85-200 nm) and grains as a cloudy, less electrodense material. Streptococcus thermophilus cells generated selenoparticles (60-280 nm) in a suicidic manner. The size determined in situ in lactic acid bacteria was significantly lower than those measured by scanning electron microscopy after the isolation of lactomicroSel particles obtained from lactobacilli (100-500 nm), but higher relative to those isolated from Streptococcus thermopilus (50-100 nm). These differences indicate that smaller lactomicroSel particles could be more toxic to the producing bacteria themselves and discrepancies in size could have implications with respect to the applications of selenium nanoparticles as prebiotics. PMID:27376279

  11. Practical aspects of monochromators developed for transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Koji

    2014-01-01

    A few practical aspects of monochromators recently developed for transmission electron microscopy are briefly reviewed. The basic structures and properties of four monochromators, a single Wien filter monochromator, a double Wien filter monochromator, an omega-shaped electrostatic monochromator and an alpha-shaped magnetic monochromator, are outlined. The advantages and side effects of these monochromators in spectroscopy and imaging are pointed out. A few properties of the monochromators in imaging, such as spatial or angular chromaticity, are also discussed. PMID:25125333

  12. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  13. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  14. Preparation of gold nanocluster bioconjugates for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Heinecke, Christine L; Ackerson, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe types of gold nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates and their use in electron microscopy. Included are two detailed protocols for labeling an IgG antibody with gold monolayer protected clusters. The first approach is a direct bonding approach that utilizes the ligand place exchange reaction. The second approach describes NHS-EDC coupling of Au(144)(pMBA)(60) with IgG. Also included are various characterization techniques for determining labeling efficiency. PMID:23086882

  15. Three-dimensional transcranial ultrasound imaging with bilateral phase aberration correction of multiple isoplanatic patches: A pilot human study with microbubble contrast enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Bennett, Ellen R.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    With stroke currently the second-leading cause of death globally, and 87% of all strokes classified as ischemic, the development of a fast, accessible, cost-effective approach for imaging occlusive stroke could have a significant impact on healthcare outcomes and costs. While clinical examination and standard CT alone do not provide adequate information for understanding the complex temporal events that occur during an ischemic stroke, ultrasound imaging is well-suited to the task of examining blood flow dynamics in real-time and may allow for localization of a clot. A prototype bilateral 3D ultrasound imaging system utilizing two matrix array probes on either side of the head allows for correction of skull-induced aberration throughout two entire phased array imaging volumes. We investigated the feasibility of applying this custom correction technique in 5 healthy volunteers with Definity® microbubble contrast enhancement. Subjects were scanned simultaneously via both temporal acoustic windows in 3D color flow mode. The number of color flow voxels above a common threshold increased due to aberration correction in 5/5 subjects, with a mean increase of 33.9%. The percentage of large arteries visualized in 3D color Doppler imaging increased from 46% without aberration correction to 60% with aberration correction. PMID:24239360

  16. Transmission electron microscopy of a model crystalline organic, theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattle, J.; S'ari, M.; Hondow, N.; Abellán, P.; Brown, A. P.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyse the diffraction patterns of the model crystalline organic theophylline to investigate beam damage in relation to changing accelerating voltage, sample temperature and TEM grid support films. We find that samples deposited on graphene film grids have the longest lifetimes when also held at -190 °C and imaged at 200 kV accelerating voltage. Finally, atomic lattice images are obtained in bright field STEM by working close to the estimated critical electron dose for theophylline.

  17. Vertically integrated optics for ballistic electron emission luminescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Yi, Wei; Russell, K. J.; Narayanamurti, V.; Hanson, M. P.; Gossard, A. C.

    2005-02-01

    We have integrated a photon detector directly into a ballistic electron emission luminescence (BEEL) heterostructure, just below a luminescent quantum well. Results from solid-state metal-base hot-electron transistors fabricated with this collector design indicate that more than 10% of the photons emitted by the quantum well excite photoelectrons in the detector region. The improved photonic coupling and effective collection angle in this scheme improves the BEEL signal by many orders of magnitude as compared to far-field detection with the most sensitive single-photon counters, enabling BEEL microscopy in systems with no optical components.

  18. Imaging Nanobubbles in Water with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Edward R.; Mecklenburg, Matthew; Singer, Scott B.; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, Brian Christopher

    2011-05-01

    We present a technique based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) that is capable of probing nanobubble dynamics with nanometer spatial resolution. A vacuum-tight vessel holds a sub-micrometer layer of water between two electron-transparent dielectric membranes. Electrical current pulses passing through a platinum wire on one of the membranes inject sufficient heat locally to initiate single bubble formation. In the absence of power input, all bubbles are observed to be unstable against collapse, but the STEM beam alone can cause a shrinking bubble to grow.

  19. Fixation methods for electron microscopy of human and other liver

    PubMed Central

    Wisse, Eddie; Braet, Filip; Duimel, Hans; Vreuls, Celien; Koek, Ger; Olde Damink, Steven WM; van den Broek, Maartje AJ; De Geest, Bart; Dejong, Cees HC; Tateno, Chise; Frederik, Peter

    2010-01-01

    For an electron microscopic study of the liver, expertise and complicated, time-consuming processing of hepatic tissues and cells is needed. The interpretation of electron microscopy (EM) images requires knowledge of the liver fine structure and experience with the numerous artifacts in fixation, embedding, sectioning, contrast staining and microscopic imaging. Hence, the aim of this paper is to present a detailed summary of different methods for the preparation of hepatic cells and tissue, for the purpose of preserving long-standing expertise and to encourage new investigators and clinicians to include EM studies of liver cells and tissue in their projects. PMID:20556830

  20. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of InN Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Li, X.; Kryliouk, Olga; Park, H.J.; Mangum,J.; Anderson, T.

    2006-07-13

    InN nanorods were grown on a, c-, and r-plane of sapphire and also on Si (111) and GaN (0001) by non-catalytic, template-free hydride metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and studied by transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss (EELS) and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. These nanocrystals have different shapes and different faceting depending on the substrate used and their crystallographic orientation. EELS measurements have confirmed the high purity of these crystals. The observed PL peak was in the range of 0.9-0.95 eV. The strongest PL intensity was observed for the nanocrystals with the larger diameters.

  1. Fine precipitation scenarios of AlZnMg(Cu) alloys revealed by advanced atomic-resolution electron microscopy study Part II: Fine precipitation scenarios in AlZnMg(Cu) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.Z.; Chen, J.H.; Liu, Z.R.; Wu, C.L.

    2015-01-15

    Although they are among the most important precipitation-hardened materials for industry applications, the high-strength AlZnMg(Cu) alloys have thus far not yet been understood adequately about their underlying precipitation scenarios in relation with the properties. This is partly due to the fact that the structures of a number of different precipitates involved in the alloys are unknown, and partly due to the complexity that the precipitation behaviors of the alloys may be closely related to the alloy's composition. In Part I of the present study, we have determined all the unknown precipitate structures in the alloys. Here in Part II, using atomic-resolution electron microscopy in association with the first principles energy calculations, we further studied and correlated the phase/structure transformation/evolution among these hardening precipitates in relation with the alloy's composition. It is shown that there are actually two coexisting classes of hardening precipitates in these alloys: the first class includes the η′-precipitates and their early-stage Guinier–Preston (GP-η′) zones; the second class includes the precursors of the equilibrium η-phase (referred to η{sub p}, or η-precursor) and their early-stage Guinier–Preston (GP-η{sub p}) zones. The two coexisting classes of precipitates correspond to two precipitation scenarios. - Highlights: • We determine and verify all the key precipitate structures in AlMgZn(Cu) alloys. • We employ aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). • We use aberration-corrected high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) for the investigations. • We obtain atomic-resolution images of the precipitates and model their structures. • We refine all precipitate structures with quantitative image simulation analysis. • The hardening precipitates in AlZnMg alloys shall be classified into two groups. • Two precipitation scenarios coexist in the alloys. • The precipitation behavior of such an

  2. Experiments in electron microscopy: from metals to nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Nigel

    2015-04-01

    Electron microscopy has advanced remarkably as a tool for biological structure research since the development of methods to examine radiation-sensitive unstained specimens and the introduction of cryo-techniques. Structures of biological molecules at near-atomic resolution can now be obtained from images of single particles as well as crystalline arrays. It has also become possible to analyze structures of molecules in their functional context, i.e. in their natural membrane or cellular setting, and in an ionic environment like that in living tissue. Electron microscopy is thus opening ways to answer definitively questions about physiological mechanisms. Here I recall a number of experiments contributing to, and benefiting from the technical advances that have taken place. I begin—in the spirit of this crystallography series—with some biographical background, and then sketch the path to an analysis by time-resolved microscopy of the opening mechanism of an ion channel (nicotinic acetylcholine receptor). This analysis illustrates how electron imaging can be combined with freeze-trapping to illuminate a transient biological event: in our case, chemical-to-electrical transduction at the nerve-muscle synapse.

  3. Electron Microscopy: an Analytical Tool for Solid State Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2013-03-01

    For too long the electron microscope has been considered as ``a big magnifying glass.'' Modern electron microscopy however has evolved into an analytical technique, able to provide quantitative data on structure, composition, chemical bonding and magnetic properties. Using lens corrected instruments it is now possible to determine atom shifts at interfaces with a precision of a few picometer; chemical diffusion at these interfaces can be imaged down to atomic scale. The chemical nature of the surface atoms can be visualized and even the bonding state of the elements (e.g. Mn2+ versus Mn3+) can be detected on an atomic scale. Electron microscopy is by principle a projection technique, but the final dream is to obtain atomic info of materials in three dimensions. We will show that this is no longer a dream, but that it is possible using advanced microscopy. We will show evidence of determining the valence change Ce4+ versus Ce3+ at the surface of a CeO2 nanocrystal; the atomic shifts at the interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 and the 3D relaxation of a Au nanocrystal.

  4. Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2005-08-01

    This book is a comprehensive review of the theories, techniques and applications of reflection electron microscopy (REM), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). The book is divided into three parts: diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy. The text is written to combine basic techniques with special applications, theories with experiments, and the basic physics with materials science, so that a full picture of RHEED and REM emerges. An entirely self-contained study, the book contains much invaluable reference material, including FORTRAN source codes for calculating crystal structures data and electron energy-loss spectra in different scattering geometries. This and many other features makes the book an important and timely addition to the materials science literature for researchers and graduate students in physics and materials science.

  5. Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    1996-05-01

    This book is a comprehensive review of the theories, techniques and applications of reflection electron microscopy (REM), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). The book is divided into three parts: diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy. The text is written to combine basic techniques with special applications, theories with experiments, and the basic physics with materials science, so that a full picture of RHEED and REM emerges. An entirely self-contained study, the book contains much invaluable reference material, including FORTRAN source codes for calculating crystal structures data and electron energy-loss spectra in different scattering geometries. This and many other features makes the book an important and timely addition to the materials science literature for researchers and graduate students in physics and materials science.

  6. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  7. Electron microscopy study of antioxidant interaction with bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, Oleg P.; Novikova, Olga V.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Korsukov, Vladimir N.; Gunkin, Ivan F.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    2000-10-01

    To maintain native microorganisms genotype and phenotype features a lyophylization technique is widely used. However in this case cells are affected by influences of vacuum and low temperature that cause a part of the cells population to be destruction. Another factor reduced microorganisms vitality is formation of reactive oxygen forms that damage certain biological targets (such as DNA, membranes etc.) Recently to raise microorganism's resistance against adverse condition natural and synthetic antioxidants are used. Antioxidant- are antagonists of free radicals. Introduction of antioxidants in protective medium for lyophylization increase bacteria storage life about 2,0-4,8 fold in comparison with reference samples. In the article the main results of our investigation of antioxidants interaction with microorganism cells is described. As bacteria cells we use vaccine strain yersinia pestis EV, that were grown for 48 h at 28 degree(s)C on the Hottinger agar (pH 7,2). Antioxidants are inserted on the agar surface in specimen under test. To investigate a localization of antioxidants for electron microscopy investigation, thallium organic antioxidants were used. The thallium organic compounds have an antioxidant features if thallium is in low concentration (about 1(mu) g/ml). The localization of the thallium organic antioxidants on bacteria Y. pestis EV is visible in electron microscopy images, thallium being heavy metal with high electron density. The negatively stained bacteria and bacteria thin sections with thallium organic compounds were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. The localization of the thallium organic compounds is clearly visible in electron micrographs as small dark spots with size about 10-80nm. Probably mechanisms of interaction of antioxidants with bacteria cells are discussed.

  8. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  9. Low-pass secondary electron detector for outlens scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Takashi; Iwai, Hideo

    2015-08-01

    A low-pass secondary electron detector has been invented for outlens scanning electron microscopy. This detector is composed of a bias grid above and an electron detector below the specimen. The upward low-energy electrons emitted from the specimen are reflected downward by the bias grid and reach the secondary electron detector. The high-energy electrons penetrate the grid and are not detected. This detector has an advantage of quantitative analysis because the secondary electron trajectories are easily traced with simple parabolic motion. The energy-filtered images of the GaN/Si sample are obtained using this detector.

  10. 4D multiple-cathode ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, John Spencer; Liu, Haihua; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2014-01-01

    Four-dimensional multiple-cathode ultrafast electron microscopy is developed to enable the capture of multiple images at ultrashort time intervals for a single microscopic dynamic process. The dynamic process is initiated in the specimen by one femtosecond light pulse and probed by multiple packets of electrons generated by one UV laser pulse impinging on multiple, spatially distinct, cathode surfaces. Each packet is distinctly recorded, with timing and detector location controlled by the cathode configuration. In the first demonstration, two packets of electrons on each image frame (of the CCD) probe different times, separated by 19 picoseconds, in the evolution of the diffraction of a gold film following femtosecond heating. Future elaborations of this concept to extend its capabilities and expand the range of applications of 4D ultrafast electron microscopy are discussed. The proof-of-principle demonstration reported here provides a path toward the imaging of irreversible ultrafast phenomena of materials, and opens the door to studies involving the single-frame capture of ultrafast dynamics using single-pump/multiple-probe, embedded stroboscopic imaging. PMID:25006261

  11. Experimental demonstration of passive acoustic imaging in the human skull cavity using CT-based aberration corrections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan M.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Experimentally verify a previously described technique for performing passive acoustic imaging through an intact human skull using noninvasive, computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections Jones et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 4981–5005 (2013)]. Methods: A sparse hemispherical receiver array (30 cm diameter) consisting of 128 piezoceramic discs (2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) was used to passively listen through ex vivo human skullcaps (n = 4) to acoustic emissions from a narrow-band fixed source (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency) and from ultrasound-stimulated (5 cycle bursts, 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency, estimated in situ peak negative pressure 0.11–0.33 MPa, 306 kHz driving frequency) Definity™ microbubbles flowing through a thin-walled tube phantom. Initial in vivo feasibility testing of the method was performed. The performance of the method was assessed through comparisons to images generated without skull corrections, with invasive source-based corrections, and with water-path control images. Results: For source locations at least 25 mm from the inner skull surface, the modified reconstruction algorithm successfully restored a single focus within the skull cavity at a location within 1.25 mm from the true position of the narrow-band source. The results obtained from imaging single bubbles are in good agreement with numerical simulations of point source emitters and the authors’ previous experimental measurements using source-based skull corrections O’Reilly et al. [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 61, 1285–1294 (2014)]. In a rat model, microbubble activity was mapped through an intact human skull at pressure levels below and above the threshold for focused ultrasound-induced blood–brain barrier opening. During bursts that led to coherent bubble activity, the location of maximum intensity in images generated with CT-based skull corrections was found to deviate by less than 1 mm, on average, from the position

  12. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography.

    PubMed

    Jesse, S; Chi, M; Belianinov, A; Beekman, C; Kalinin, S V; Borisevich, A Y; Lupini, A R

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called "big-data" methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy. PMID:27211523

  13. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    PubMed Central

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy. PMID:27211523

  14. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  15. High-Pressure Freezing Electron Microscopy of Zebrafish Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kanagaraj, Palsamy; Riedel, Dietmar; Dosch, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Oogenesis is an essential cellular and developmental process to prepare the oocyte for propagation of a species after fertilization. Oocytes of oviparous animals are enormous cells endowed with many, big cellular compartments, which are interconnected through active intracellular transport. The dynamic transport pathways and the big organelles of the oocyte provide the opportunity to study cellular trafficking with outstanding resolution. Hence, oocytes were classically used to investigate cellular compartments. Though many novel regulators of vesicle trafficking have been discovered in yeast, tissue culture cells and invertebrates, recent forward genetic screens in invertebrate and vertebrate oocytes isolated novel control proteins specific to multicellular organisms. Zebrafish is a widely used vertebrate model to study cellular and developmental processes in an entire animal. The transparency of zebrafish embryos allows following cellular events during early development with in vivo imaging. Unfortunately, the active endocytosis of the oocyte also represents a drawback for imaging. The massive amounts of yolk globules prevent the penetration of light-beams and currently make in vivo microscopy a challenge. As a consequence, electron microscopy (EM) still provides the highest resolution to analyze the ultra-structural details of compartments and organelles and the mechanisms controlling many cellular pathways of the oocyte. Among different fixation approaches for EM, High Pressure Freezing (HPF) in combination with freeze substitution significantly improves the samples preservation closest to their natural status. Here, we describe the HPF with freeze substitution embedding method for analyzing cellular processes in zebrafish oocytes using electron microscopy. PMID:27557580

  16. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-23

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. In this paper, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature andmore » does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. Finally, however, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.« less

  17. Electron Microscopy Study of Exotic Nanostructures of Cadmium Sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lifeng; Jiao, Jun

    2005-04-01

    In this article, two simple methods, evaporation-condensation and catalytic thermal evaporation, were used to investigate the synthesis of CdS nanostructures for nanoscale optoelectronic applications. To understand their growth mechanisms, various electron microscopy and microanalysis techniques were utilized in characterizing their morphologies, internal structures, growth directions and elemental compositions. The electron microscopy study reveals that when using the evaporation-condensation method, branched CdS nanorods and self-assembled arrays of CdS nanorods were synthesized at 800°C and 1000°C, respectively. Instead of morphological differences, both types of CdS nanorods grew along the [0001] direction. However, when using the catalytic thermal evaporation method (Au as the catalyst), patterned CdS nanowires and nanobelts were formed at the temperature region of 500 600°C and 600 750°C, respectively. Their growth direction was along the direction [1010] instead of [0001]. Based on the microscopy and microanalysis results, we propose some growth mechanisms in relation to the growth processes of those exotic CdS nanostructures.

  18. Analysis of environmental particles by atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mavrocordatos, D; Pronk, W; Boiler, M

    2004-01-01

    Due to their large specific surface and their abundance, micro and nano particles play an important role in the transport of micropollutants in the environment. Natural particles are usually composed of a mixture of inorganic amorphous or crystalline material (mainly FeOOH, Fe(x)Oy, Mn(x)Oy and clays) and organic material (humics and polysaccharides). They all tend to occur as very small particles (1-1,000 nm in diameter). Most natural amorphous particles are unstable and tend to transform with time towards more crystalline forms, either by aging or possibly, by dissolution and re-crystallization. Such transformations affect the fate of sorbed micropollutants and the scavenging properties are therefore changed. As these entities are sensitive to dehydration (aggregation, changes in the morphology), it is highly important to observe their morphology in their natural environment and understand their composition at the scale of the individual particles. Also for the understanding and optimization of water treatment technologies, the knowledge of the occurrence and behavior of nano-particles is of high importance. Some of the possible particle analysis methods are presented: aggregation processes, biomineralization, bacterial adhesion, biofilms in freshwaters, ferrihydrite as heavy metals remover from storm water. These examples demonstrate the capabilities and focus of the microscopes. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows to analyze the particles in their own environment, meaning in air or in the water. Thus, native aspects of particles can be observed. As well, forces of interactions between particles or between particles and other surfaces such as membranes will be highly valuable data. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and for higher lateral resolution, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allow measurement of the morphology and composition. Especially, TEM coupled with Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (TEM-EELS) is a powerful technique for elemental analysis

  19. Minerals in coal: a transmission electron microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, C.A.; Hsieh, K.C.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques of electron microscopy have been applied to identification of minerals in coal and coal conversion products. The principal problem is making satisfactory thin-samples. Ion-milling has been used, but grinding and microtoming also show promise. Principal attention has been given to characterization of sulfides and clays, but many other minerals have been identified. Application of the technique to identification of the minerals in oil shale has been demonstrated. The great value of this method is the extraordinary detail with which mineral inclusions can be characterized. General topography, crystal type (including space group of complex crystalline forms), planar spacing and chemical composition can be determined using the large array of techniques available - bright and dark field imaging, electron diffraction, including convergent beam electron diffraction, x-ray emission spectroscopy and energy loss spectroscopy. 63 refences, 10 figures.

  20. Time resolved electron microscopy for in situ experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey H. McKeown, Joseph T.; Santala, Melissa K.

    2014-12-15

    Transmission electron microscopy has functioned for decades as a platform for in situ observation of materials and processes with high spatial resolution. Yet, the dynamics often remain elusive, as they unfold too fast to discern at these small spatial scales under traditional imaging conditions. Simply shortening the exposure time in hopes of capturing the action has limitations, as the number of electrons will eventually be reduced to the point where noise overtakes the signal in the image. Pulsed electron sources with high instantaneous current have successfully shortened exposure times (thus increasing the temporal resolution) by about six orders of magnitude over conventional sources while providing the necessary signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic imaging. We describe here the development of this new class of microscope and the principles of its operation, with examples of its application to problems in materials science.

  1. Effects of instrument imperfections on quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Florian F; Schowalter, Marco; Grieb, Tim; Müller-Caspary, Knut; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Several instrumental imperfections of transmission electron microscopes are characterized and their effects on the results of quantitative scanning electron microscopy (STEM) are investigated and quantified using simulations. Methods to either avoid influences of these imperfections during acquisition or to include them in reference calculations are proposed. Particularly, distortions inflicted on the diffraction pattern by an image-aberration corrector can cause severe errors of more than 20% if not accounted for. A procedure for their measurement is proposed here. Furthermore, afterglow phenomena and nonlinear behavior of the detector itself can lead to incorrect normalization of measured intensities. Single electrons accidentally impinging on the detector are another source of error but can also be exploited for threshold-less calibration of STEM images to absolute dose, incident beam current determination and measurement of the detector sensitivity. PMID:26686661

  2. Opportunities for electron microscopy in space radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lett, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    Densely ionizing, particulate radiations in outer space are likely to cause to mammalian tissues biological damage that is particularly amenable to examination by the techniques of electron microscopy. This situation arises primarily from the fact that once the density of ionization along the particle track exceeds a certain value, small discrete lesions involving many adjacent cells may be caused in organized tissues. Tissue damage produced by ionization densities below the critical value also afford opportunities for electron microscopic evaluation, as is shown by the damage produced in optic and proximate tissues of the New Zealand white rabbit in terrestrial experiments. Late radiation sequelae in nondividing, or terminally differentiating, tissues, and in stem cell populations, are of special importance in these regards. It is probable that evaluations of the hazards posed to astronauts by galactic particulate radiations during prolonged missions in outer space will not be complete without adequate electron microscopic evaluation of the damage those radiations cause to organized tissues.

  3. Scanning electron microscopy of Purkinje fibres of the pig heart.

    PubMed

    Bytzer, P

    1979-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of Purkinje fibres (P-fibres) from the septal walls and the septomarginal trabecula was performed on deparaffinized sections, the identification in SEM made possible by comparative light microscopy. The myofibrils in P-fibres from the septal walls were arranged in a cart-wheel fashion, whereas P-fibres from the septomarginal trabecula showed a nearly parallel alignment of the contractile material. Z-line ridges resembling the T-tubules of the myocardial fibres were observed in both kinds of P-fibres. The myofibrillar arrangements are discussed in relation to the expected mechanical stress put upon P-fibres in the 2 locations during systolic-diastolic activity. An adaptive function of the contractile material to the mechanical stress is suggested and the possible need of a T-tubular system is discussed. PMID:507370

  4. Ultrahigh Voltage Electron Microscopy Links Neuroanatomy and Neuroscience/Neuroendocrinology

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) analysis of anatomical ultrastructures is extremely important in most fields of biological research. Although it is very difficult to perform 3D image analysis on exact serial sets of ultrathin sections, 3D reconstruction from serial ultrathin sections can generally be used to obtain 3D information. However, this technique can only be applied to small areas of a specimen because of technical and physical difficulties. We used ultrahigh voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM) to overcome these difficulties and to study the chemical neuroanatomy of 3D ultrastructures. This methodology, which links UHVEM and light microscopy, is a useful and powerful tool for studying molecular and/or chemical neuroanatomy at the ultrastructural level. PMID:22567316

  5. Electron microscopy imaging of proteins on gallium phosphide semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, Martin; Bauer, Mikael; Gunnarsson, Stefan; Mårsell, Erik; Zakharov, Alexei A.; Karlsson, Gunnel; Sanfins, Elodie; Prinz, Christelle N.; Wallenberg, Reine; Cedervall, Tommy; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2016-02-01

    We have imaged GaP nanowires (NWs) incubated with human laminin, serum albumin (HSA), and blood plasma using both cryo-transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy. This extensive imaging methodology simultaneously reveals structural, chemical and morphological details of individual nanowires and the adsorbed proteins. We found that the proteins bind to NWs, forming coronas with thicknesses close to the proteins' hydrodynamic diameters. We could directly image how laminin is extending from the NWs, maximizing the number of proteins bound to the NWs. NWs incubated with both laminin and HSA show protein coronas with a similar appearance to NWs incubated with laminin alone, indicating that the presence of HSA does not affect the laminin conformation on the NWs. In blood plasma, an intermediate sized corona around the NWs indicates a corona with a mixture of plasma proteins. The ability to directly visualize proteins on nanostructures in situ holds great promise for assessing the conformation and thickness of the protein corona, which is key to understanding and predicting the properties of engineered nanomaterials in a biological environment.We have imaged GaP nanowires (NWs) incubated with human laminin, serum albumin (HSA), and blood plasma using both cryo-transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy. This extensive imaging methodology simultaneously reveals structural, chemical and morphological details of individual nanowires and the adsorbed proteins. We found that the proteins bind to NWs, forming coronas with thicknesses close to the proteins' hydrodynamic diameters. We could directly image how laminin is extending from the NWs, maximizing the number of proteins bound to the NWs. NWs incubated with both laminin and HSA show protein coronas with a similar appearance to NWs incubated with laminin alone, indicating that the presence of HSA does not affect the

  6. Direct imaging of local atomic ordering in a Pd-Ni-P bulk metallic glass using Cs-corrected transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akihiko; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Nieh, T G; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2007-01-01

    In amorphous alloys, crystalline atomic clusters as small as 1-2 nm are frequently observed as local lattice fringe images by high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM). These clusters can be understood as local structures of amorphous alloys corresponding to "medium-range-order (MRO)". The MRO structure can be observed only under suitable defocusing conditions of the objective lens in HREM. A clear imaging of the MRO structure is difficult in conventional TEMs, mainly due to the delocalization of the image, caused mainly by the spherical aberration of the objective lens and eventually by the chosen defocus. In the present study, we have examined MRO in a Pd-based bulk metallic glass (Pd(40)Ni(40)P(20)) using a high-resolution TEM (acceleration voltage 200 kV) fitted with a spherical aberration constant corrector (Cs corrector) for aberration correction. We found that when Cs was close to zero and defocus values were near the Gaussian focus, MRO regions with an FCC-Pd structure could be clearly observed with a low image disturbance. Under these conditions, the phase-contrast transfer function was understood to act as an ideal filter function, which distinctly selects specific lattice periods of the FCC-Pd clusters. The obtained atomic images of the glass structure including the FCC-Pd clusters are in good agreement with those expected from image simulation according to our amorphous structure model. In this study, we have demonstrated that the Cs-corrected HREM is a powerful tool to directly image locally ordered structures in metallic glasses. PMID:16872747

  7. Installation of electric field electron beam blanker in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Misa; Kimura, Yoshihide; Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Otsuka, Masayuki; Takai, Yoshizo

    2006-11-15

    We have newly installed an electric field electron beam blanker in a transmission electron microscopy, which chops an electron beam very quickly without the effect of hysteresis. The electric field, which is generated by the electron beam blanker, deflects the electron beam, and the electron beam is intercepted by an aperture. The response time of the beam blanker is 50 {mu}s. Therefore, a very short pulsed electron beam enables a charge-coupled device camera to directly expose an electron beam spot or diffraction pattern. Moreover, we measured the response of a deflector coil, which is usually used as an electron beam blanker, using our electron beam blanker. Our beam blanker will become a key component in a computer-assisted minimal dose system, which enables us to reduce the electron dose of the sample.

  8. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  9. Measuring electron-phonon coupling with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Vidya

    Electron-boson interactions are ubiquitous in systems ranging from simple metals to novel materials such as graphene, high-temperature superconductors and topological insulators. Of particular interest is the coupling between electrons and phonons. In general, electron-phonon coupling gives rise to quasiparticles of decreased mobility and increased effective mass. Nearly all information about electron-phonon coupling is contained in the Eliashberg function (α2 F (ω k , E)) of the material. In this talk I discuss the various methods by which the effects of electron-phonon coupling can be measured by scanning tunneling microscopy. I will present STM data on a variety of systems ranging from metals to topological insulators and discuss the signatures of electron-phonon interactions in different types of STM data. In particular I discuss how high resolution measurements allow us to measure the dispersion and obtain the real part of the self-energy, which can in principle be inverted to obtain the Eliashberg function.

  10. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki; Uemura, Takeshi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Sato, Mari; Suga, Mitsuo; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Nishihara, Shoko; Sato, Chikara

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. PMID:24216127

  11. New developments in electron microscopy for serial image acquisition of neuronal profiles.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    Recent developments in electron microscopy largely automate the continuous acquisition of serial electron micrographs (EMGs), previously achieved by laborious manual serial ultrathin sectioning using an ultramicrotome and ultrastructural image capture process with transmission electron microscopy. The new systems cut thin sections and capture serial EMGs automatically, allowing for acquisition of large data sets in a reasonably short time. The new methods are focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, ultramicrotome/serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, automated tape-collection ultramicrotome/scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope camera array. In this review, their positive and negative aspects are discussed. PMID:25564566

  12. Nanocrystal size distribution analysis from transmission electron microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sebille, Martijn; van der Maaten, Laurens J. P.; Xie, Ling; Jarolimek, Karol; Santbergen, Rudi; van Swaaij, René A. C. M. M.; Leifer, Klaus; Zeman, Miro

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method, with minimal bias caused by user input, to quickly detect and measure the nanocrystal size distribution from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images using a combination of Laplacian of Gaussian filters and non-maximum suppression. We demonstrate the proposed method on bright-field TEM images of an a-SiC:H sample containing embedded silicon nanocrystals with varying magnifications and we compare the accuracy and speed with size distributions obtained by manual measurements, a thresholding method and PEBBLES. Finally, we analytically consider the error induced by slicing nanocrystals during TEM sample preparation on the measured nanocrystal size distribution and formulate an equation to correct this effect.We propose a method, with minimal bias caused by user input, to quickly detect and measure the nanocrystal size distribution from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images using a combination of Laplacian of Gaussian filters and non-maximum suppression. We demonstrate the proposed method on bright-field TEM images of an a-SiC:H sample containing embedded silicon nanocrystals with varying magnifications and we compare the accuracy and speed with size distributions obtained by manual measurements, a thresholding method and PEBBLES. Finally, we analytically consider the error induced by slicing nanocrystals during TEM sample preparation on the measured nanocrystal size distribution and formulate an equation to correct this effect. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06292f

  13. Electron microscopy study of direct laser deposited IN718

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, R.G.; Huang, Z.W.; Li, H.Y.; Mitchell, I.; Baxter, G.; Bowen, P.

    2015-08-15

    The microstructure of direct laser deposited (DLD) IN718 has been investigated in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results confirm that the dendrite core microstructure can be linked to the cooling rate experienced during the deposition. A ~ 100 μm wide δ partially dissolved region in the IN718 substrate was observed close to the substrate/deposit boundary. In the deposited IN718, γ/Laves eutectic constituent is the predominant minor microconstituent. Irregular and regular (small) (Nb,Ti)C carbides and a mixture of the carbides and Laves were observed. Most M{sub 3}B{sub 2} borides were nucleated around a (Nb,Ti)C carbide. Needles of δ phase precipitated from the Laves phase were also observed. A complex constituent (of Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″, and γ matrix) is reported in IN718 for the first time. The formation of α-Cr particles could be related to Cr rejection during the formation and growth of Cr-depleted δ phase. - Highlights: • Secondary phases in IN718 deposits were identified using electron diffraction and EDS. • MC, M{sub 3}B{sub 2}, γ/Laves eutectic and γ/NbC/Laves eutectic were observed. • Needle-like δ phases were precipitated from the Laves phase. • A complex constituent (Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″ and γ) was reported for the first time.

  14. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy And Spectroscopy Studies Of Rechargeable Batteries Under Dynamic Operating Conditions: A Retrospective And Perspective View

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chong M.

    2015-02-14

    Since the advent of the transmission electron microscope (TEM), continuing efforts have been made to image material under native and reaction environments that typically involve liquids, gases, and external stimuli. With the advances of aberration-corrected TEM for improving the imaging resolution, steady progress has been made on developing methodologies that allow imaging under dynamic operating conditions, or in situ TEM imaging. The success of in situ TEM imaging is closely associated with advances in microfabrication techniques that enable manipulation of nanoscale objects around the objective lens of the TEM. This paper summarizes and highlights recent progress involving in situ TEM studies of energy storage materials, especially rechargeable batteries. The paper is organized to cover both the in situ TEM techniques and the scientific discoveries made possible by in situ TEM imaging.

  15. Analysis of electron emission from GaAs(Cs,O) by low energy electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiuguang

    2015-10-01

    Low-energy electron microscopy was carried out to study the electron emission process from a GaAs photocathode with a negative electron affinity (NEA) surface. The relationship between emission current and electron affinity was investigated in detail to obtain information regarding the electron tunneling in the vacuum barrier and the electron distribution in the interior of GaAs, especially with respect to photoelectron capture in the band bending region. A comparison of the calculated quantized sub-band energies in the band bending region confirmed that the majority of photoelectrons fell within sub-bands, from where a large portion of the photoelectrons escape into the vacuum.

  16. Analysis of Electron Beam Damage of Crystalline Pharmaceutical Materials by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S'ari, M.; Cattle, J.; Hondow, N.; Blade, H.; Cosgrove, S.; Brydson, R. M.; Brown, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the impact of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and low dose electron diffraction on ten different crystalline pharmaceutical compounds, covering a diverse chemical space and with differing physical properties. The aim was to establish if particular chemical moieties were more susceptible to damage within the electron beam. We have measured crystalline diffraction patterns for each and indexed nine out of ten of them. Characteristic electron dosages are reported for each material, with no apparent correlation between chemical structure and stability within the electron beam. Such low dose electron diffraction protocols are suitable for the study of pharmaceutical compounds.

  17. The origins and evolution of freeze-etch electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Heuser, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the Balzers freeze-fracture machine by Moor in 1961 had a much greater impact on the advancement of electron microscopy than he could have imagined. Devised originally to circumvent the dangers of classical thin-section techniques, as well as to provide unique en face views of cell membranes, freeze-fracturing proved to be crucial for developing modern concepts of how biological membranes are organized and proved that membranes are bilayers of lipids within which proteins float and self-assemble. Later, when freeze-fracturing was combined with methods for freezing cells that avoided the fixation and cryoprotection steps that Moor still had to use to prepare the samples for his original invention, it became a means for capturing membrane dynamics on the millisecond time-scale, thus allowing a deeper understanding of the functions of biological membranes in living cells as well as their static ultrastructure. Finally, the realization that unfixed, non-cryoprotected samples could be deeply vacuum-etched or even freeze-dried after freeze-fracturing opened up a whole new way to image all the other molecular components of cells besides their membranes and also provided a powerful means to image the interactions of all the cytoplasmic components with the various membranes of the cell. The purpose of this review is to outline the history of these technical developments, to describe how they are being used in electron microscopy today and to suggest how they can be improved in order to further their utility for biological electron microscopy in the future. PMID:21844598

  18. Copper Decoration of Carbon Nanotubes and High Resolution Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, Camille

    A new process of decorating carbon nanotubes with copper was developed for the fabrication of nanocomposite aluminum-nanotubes. The process consists of three stages: oxidation, activation and electroless copper plating on the nanotubes. The oxidation step was required to create chemical function on the nanotubes, essential for the activation step. Then, catalytic nanoparticles of tin-palladium were deposited on the tubes. Finally, during the electroless copper plating, copper particles with a size between 20 and 60 nm were uniformly deposited on the nanotubes surface. The reproducibility of the process was shown by using another type of carbon nanotube. The fabrication of nanocomposites aluminum-nanotubes was tested by aluminum vacuum infiltration. Although the infiltration of carbon nanotubes did not produce the expected results, an interesting electron microscopy sample was discovered during the process development: the activated carbon nanotubes. Secondly, scanning transmitted electron microscopy (STEM) imaging in SEM was analysed. The images were obtained with a new detector on the field emission scanning electron microscope (Hitachi S-4700). Various parameters were analysed with the use of two different samples: the activated carbon nanotubes (previously obtained) and gold-palladium nanodeposits. Influences of working distance, accelerating voltage or sample used on the spatial resolution of images obtained with SMART (Scanning Microscope Assessment and Resolution Testing) were analysed. An optimum working distance for the best spatial resolution related to the sample analysed was found for the imaging in STEM mode. Finally, relation between probe size and spatial resolution of backscattered electrons (BSE) images was studied. An image synthesis method was developed to generate the BSE images from backscattered electrons coefficients obtained with CASINO software. Spatial resolution of images was determined using SMART. The analysis shown that using a probe

  19. Frontiers in Electron Microscopy: Probing the Nanoscale in Nanoseconds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Nigel

    2005-03-01

    Electron microscopy has traditionally been driven by the desire to investigate the result of a given materials process (e.g. nucleation and growth, fatigue etc) at the highest spatial resolution. However, this type of observation typically gives no indication as to how the material achieved its final state. With the nanotechnology revolution highlighting the novel properties that can be achieved by modifying the processing and ambient conditions a material is subjected to, the need to characterize the fundamentals behind the materials process itself has assumed critical importance. One of the developing methods to achieve this level of characterization is dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM). Using a laser pulse to stimulate the electron emission, pulse durations of nanoseconds and shorter can be achieved with sufficient signal to obtain images and diffraction patterns from materials excited by a laser in a pump-probe configuration (with the probe being the electron beam). A novel nanosecond electron microscope incorporating this principle has been used initially to observe the hexagonal close packed (HCP) to body centered cubic (BCC) martensitic phase transformation in titanium. The general class of martensitic phase transformations occur by a rapid shear of the crystal lattice. No long range diffusion is required during these transformations, thus they propagate through a crystal with a speed that can approach the speed of sound. The images and diffraction patterns obtained can be interpreted in terms of the unusual vibrational stabilization of the high temperature BCC phase of Ti. An interesting observation is that the speed of the transition seems to be dependent on the history of the sample and appears to be linked to the presence of oxygen impurities. This work was performed in collaboration with A. Ziegler, G. H. Campbell, H. Kleinschmidt, and O. Bostonjoglo and supported by LLNL LDRD project 04-ERD-071. This work performed under the auspices of

  20. Electron Microscopy Studies of Solid Surfaces and Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija

    1991-02-01

    Electron microscopy techniques for study of surfaces and interfaces have been investigated and applied to (100) and (111) surfaces of MgO and to interfaces of Mo/Si multilayers and CoSi_2/Si epitaxial films. MgO surfaces subjected to different annealing and chemical treatments have been characterized by reflection electron microscopy imaging, reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). An oxygen rich (sqrt {3} times sqrt{3})R 30^circ reconstruction was found on the polar (111) surface upon annealing in oxygen at temperatures higher than 1500 ^circC. Transformation of the surface topography and segregation of calcium were observed on the cleaved (100) surface due to annealing. RHEED resonance conditions have been employed and studied with geometrical constructions, rocking curves and REELS. These conditions are associated with parabolas in the Kikuchi (K) patterns whose nature had been subject of much controversy. The parabolas have been explained as K lines of two-dimensional (2D) lattices in a general scheme which describes the K pattern geometry in terms of intersections of Brillouin zone boundaries with a sphere of reflections. Full treatment of the cases of 2D and 1D real lattices has revealed previously unknown boundaries in the form of parabolic surfaces (2D) and paraboloids of revolution (1D). These boundaries have been applied to lines which arise from electron channeling in 3D crystals and to RHEED parabolas from 2D surface reconstructions. Nanodiffraction, low angle dark-field imaging, electron holography, high spatial resolution EELS, and shadow imaging have been evaluated as means for measuring interface abruptness and change in mean-inner potential and compared to other microscopy techniques. Refraction effects at interfaces were observed as streaking of the nanodiffraction disks which was found to depend on the crystalline nature of the interface. For polycrystalline

  1. Cryogenic electron microscopy study of nanoemulsion formation from microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Seung; Morrison, Eric D; Frethem, Chris D; Zasadzinski, Joseph A; McCormick, Alon V

    2014-09-16

    We examine a process of preparing oil-in-water nanoemulsions by quenching (diluting and cooling) precursor microemulsions made with nonionic surfactants and a cosurfactant. The precursor microemulsion structure is varied by changing the concentration of the cosurfactant. Water-continuous microemulsions produce initial nanoemulsion structures that are small and simple, mostly unilamellar vesicles, but microemulsions that are not water-continuous produce initial nanoemulsion structures that are larger and multilamellar. Examination of these structures by cryo-electron microscopy supports the hypothesis that they are initially vesicular structures formed via lamellar intermediate structures, and that if the lamellar structures are too well ordered they fail to produce small simple structures. PMID:25141294

  2. Photoemission Electron Microscopy of a Plasmonic Silver Nanoparticle Trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Peppernick, Samuel J.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.; Wang, Jinyong; Wang, Yi-Chung; Wei, Wei

    2013-07-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to investigate the spatial distribution of photoelectrons emitted from core-shell silver (Ag) nanoparticles. We use two-photon photoemission microscopy (2P-PEEM) to spatially resolve electron emission from a trimeric core-shell aggregate of triangular symmetry. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations are performed to model the intensity distributions of the electromagnetic near-fields resulting from femtosecond (fs) laser excitation of localized surface plasmon oscillations in the triangular core-shell structure. We demonstrate that the predicted FDTD near-field intensity distribution reproduces the 2P-PEEM photoemission pattern.

  3. Photonic near-field imaging in multiphoton photoemission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Word, R. C.; Saliba, S. D.; Könenkamp, R.

    2013-05-01

    We report the observation of optical near fields in a photonic waveguide of conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) using multiphoton photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). Nonlinear two-photon photoelectron emission is enhanced at field maxima created by interference between incident 410-nm and coherently excited guided photonic waves, providing strong phase contrast. Guided modes are observed under both transverse magnetic field (TM) and transverse electric field (TE) polarized illuminations and are consistent with classical electromagnetic theory. Implications on the role of multiphoton PEEM in optical near-field imaging are discussed.

  4. Analytical electron microscopy study of radioactive ceramic waste form

    SciTech Connect

    O'Holleran, T. P.; Sinkler, W.; Moschetti, T. L.; Johnson, S. G.; Goff, K. M.

    1999-11-11

    A ceramic waste form has been developed to immobilize the halide high-level waste stream from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. Analytical electron microscopy studies, using both scanning and transmission instruments, have been performed to characterize the microstructure of this material. The microstructure consists primarily of sodalite granules (containing the bulk of the halides) bonded together with glass. The results of these studies are discussed in detail. Insight into the waste form fabrication process developed as a result of these studies is also discussed.

  5. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  6. Electron microscopy of a Gd-Ba-Cu-O superconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesh, R.; Thomas, G.; Meng, R. L.; Hor, P. H.; Chu, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    An electron microscopy study has been carried out to characterize the microstructure of a sintered Gd-Ba-Cu-O superconductor alloy. The GdBa2Cu3O(7-x) phase in the oxygen annealed sample is orthorhombic, while in the vacuum annealed sample it is tetragonal. It is shown that the details of the fine structure in the 001-line zone axis convergent beam patterns can be used to distinguish between the orthorhombic form and the tetragonal form. In addition to this matrix phase, an amorphous phase is frequently observed at the triple grain junctions. Gd-rich inclusions have been observed inside the matrix phase.

  7. Fiber analysis vignettes: Electron microscopy to the rescue!

    PubMed

    Roggli, Victor L

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in the exposure doses that contribute to the various asbestos-associated diseases. Epidemiological studies have shown important differences in the contributions of the various fiber types to asbestos-related diseases, with the amphiboles showing a greater degree of potency as compared to chrysotile. However, epidemiological studies have occasionally provided misleading results. Over the past several decades, there have been several examples where fiber analysis using electron microscopy produced unexpected results which were important to our understanding of disease-exposure relationships. It is the purpose of this article to summarize these fiber analysis vignettes. PMID:26934117

  8. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and compared to those of other techniques available.

  9. Direct single electron detection with a CMOS detector for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruqi, A. R.; Henderson, R.; Pryddetch, M.; Allport, P.; Evans, A.

    2005-07-01

    We report the results of an investigation into the use of a monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) for electron microscopy. MAPS, designed originally for astronomers at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratories, was installed in a 120 kV electron microscope (Philips CM12) at the MRC Laboratory in Cambridge for tests which included recording single electrons at 40 and 120 keV, and measuring signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), spatial resolution and radiation sensitivity. Our results show that, due to the excellent SNR and resolution, it is possible to register single electrons. The radiation damage to the detector is apparent with low doses and gets progressively greater so that its lifetime is limited to 600,000-900,000 electrons/pixel (very approximately 10-15 krad). Provided this detector can be radiation hardened to reduce its radiation sensitivity several hundred fold and increased in size, it will provide excellent performance for all types of electron microscopy.

  10. Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy Studies of Ferromagnet - Semiconductor Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, P. G.; Perrella, A. C.; Yurtsever, A.; Buhrman, R. A.

    2004-03-01

    Devices that employ spin as well as charge effects have been the subjects of extensive study recently. The magnetic tunneling transistor (1) is one important device that demonstrates an electrical means of injecting spin-polarized electrons into a semiconductor. A Schottky barrier lies at the heart of the device, and a high quality spatially homogenous and uniform barrier formed on GaAs is highly desirable. We have used ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) to study CoFe, Fe and permalloy deposited on a GaAs substrate to give nanometer resolved evaluation of hot electron transport through the films and across the Schottky barrier. All films give a homogenous, uniform barrier as compared with evaporated Au/GaAs and Ag/GaAs interfaces. We will report on BEEM measurements of the hot electron transfer ratio across the Schottky barrier for the different ferromagnetic materials, and on the energy and spin-dependent hot electron attenuation lengths of the CoFe, Fe, and permalloy films. (1) Sebastiaan van Dijken, Xin Jiang, Stuart S. P. Parkin, APL, 80, 3364.

  11. Observations of Nanobubble Dynamics with Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Meera Kanakamma; Arora, Manish; Mirsaidov, Utkur; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2013-11-01

    Recent developments in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) allow the imaging of liquids with high spatial resolution. Here we report on novel studies of water trapped between two monolayers of graphene sheets. The geometry prevents evaporation of the liquid into the low pressure environment of the TEM while providing excellent electron-optical properties for investigations. The graphene sheets are supported by a conventional TEM grid. We report on the nucleation of bubbles, the coalescence between neighbouring bubbles, rupture of thin liquid filaments, and their slow shrinkage. At a dose rate of 100-155 e-Å-2s-1 these events are observed conveniently at video frame rate. The correlation with the local electron beam dose rate suggests that the radiolysis induced by the electron beam is the main driving force for most events. In general, we observed bubbles with lateral sizes between 20 nm and 100 nm and estimated heights between 6 nm and 30 nm. Likely, the bubbles connect both graphene sheets. In the absence of the electron beam the nanobubbles do not dissolve completely but surprisingly remain stable for even up to one hour. This resembles the stability of surface attached nanobubbles.

  12. Correlative video-light-electron microscopy of mobile organelles.

    PubMed

    Beznoussenko, Galina V; Mironov, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    Correlative microscopy is a method when for the analysis of the very same cell or tissue area, several different methods of light microscopy (LM) and then electron microscopy (EM) are used consecutively. The combination of LM and EM allows researchers to study phenomena at a global scale and then to look for unique or rare events for their subsequent EM examination. Unfortunately, the observation of living cells under EM is still impossible. LM provides the possibility to examine quickly many live cells, whereas EM provides the high level of resolution. On the other side, the final goal of any morphological analysis of a biological sample, whether it is an organism, organ, tissue, cell, organelle, or molecule, is to get an averaged three-dimensional model of the structure examined and to determine the chemical composition of it. This chapter describes the methodology of imaging with the help of CVLEM. The guidelines presented herein enable researchers to analyze structure of organelles and to obtain the three-dimensional model of the structure examined, and in particular rare events captured by low-resolution imaging of a population or transient events captured by live imaging can now also be studied at high resolution by EM. PMID:25702127

  13. Sample heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kohashi, Teruo; Motai, Kumi

    2013-08-01

    A sample-heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM) has been developed and used for microscopic magnetization analysis at temperatures up to 500°C. In this system, a compact ceramic heater and a preheating operation keep the ultra-high vacuum conditions while the sample is heated during spin SEM measurement. Moreover, the secondary-electron collector, which is arranged close to the sample, was modified so that it is not damaged at high temperatures. The system was used to heat a Co(1000) single-crystal sample from room temperature up to 500°C, and the magnetic-domain structures were observed. Changes of the domain structures were observed around 220 and 400°C, and these changes are considered to be due to phase transitions of this sample. PMID:23349241

  14. Cryo electron microscopy to determine the structure of macromolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Carroni, Marta; Saibil, Helen R

    2016-02-15

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a structural molecular and cellular biology technique that has experienced major advances in recent years. Technological developments in image recording as well as in processing software make it possible to obtain three-dimensional reconstructions of macromolecular assemblies at near-atomic resolution that were formerly obtained only by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy. In parallel, cryo-electron tomography has also benefitted from these technological advances, so that visualization of irregular complexes, organelles or whole cells with their molecular machines in situ has reached subnanometre resolution. Cryo-EM can therefore address a broad range of biological questions. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of the principles and current state of the cryo-EM field. PMID:26638773

  15. Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmen, Tim; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre G; Lupini, Andrew R; Kubel, Christian; Slusallek, Phillip; De Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller missing wedge artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  16. Electron Microscopy and Luminescence Study of Defects in Semiconductor Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Fiona Jane

    1990-03-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Dislocations and defects in semiconductor silicon have been the subject of much research in the last thirty years. However, to date some of the mechanisms involved in the nucleation and growth of oxidation induced defects remain uncertain, as does the origin of luminescence lines in heat treated and dislocated material. Defects introduced into silicon single crystals by three different mechanisms have been examined using Cathodoluminescence (CL), Photoluminescence (PL) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The mechanisms employed were heat treatments, electron irradiation and plastic deformation. The CL system at Bristol had previously been developed for the study of II-VI and III-V semiconductors, the subsequent addition of the near infra-red detector enabled the luminescence from silicon to be studied. The first phase of this thesis explores the capability of the CL system in detecting and spatially resolving luminescence from silicon using the Germanium detector. The second phase involved the study of different defect systems with the aim of studying luminescence emitted from TEM thin samples. Transmission Electron Microscopy was used to examine large scale defects nucleated after single and multiple medium and high temperature anneals. Electron irradiation damage introduced in the 300kV TEM was studied in the CL system. The threshold energy for silicon displacement via 'knock-on' interactions was found to be 155keV. Dislocation related D line luminescence in plastically deformed silicon was examined using both PL and CL spectroscopy. D line emission from thermally annealed silicon, previously thought to be associated with energy states at the Si-SiO _{rm x} interface, was spatially resolved in the CL system. D line emission was detected close to the cleaved edges of samples studied.

  17. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback. PMID:25615867

  18. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  19. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom; Patwardhan, Ardan; Scheres, Sjors; Topf, Maya; Roseman, Alan; Winn, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed.

  20. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy study on microstructure of gallbladder mucosa in pig.

    PubMed

    Prozorowska, Ewelina; Jackowiak, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    The present light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies on porcine gallbladder mucosa provide a description of the microstructures of great functional importance such as mucosal folds, the epithelium, glands, and lymphatic nodules. The results showed the regional structural differences of the porcine gallbladder wall. Depending on the part of the gallbladder, three types of mucosal structures were described: simple and branched folds and mucosal crypts. An important structural feature found in the mucosa is connected with the structural variety of type of mucosal folds, which change from simple located in the neck, to most composed, i.e., branched or joined, in the polygonal crypts toward the fundus of the gallbladder. The morphometric analysis showed statistically significantly differences in the form and size of the folds and between the fundus, body, and neck of the gallbladder. Differences in the size of mucosal epithelium are discussed in terms of processes of synthesis and secretion of glycoproteins. Regional, species-specific differences in morphology of mucosal subepithelial glands, i.e., their secretory units and openings, and intensity of mucus secretion were described. Our results on the pig gallbladder show adaptation and/or specialization in particular areas of the mucosa for (1) secretion of mucus in the neck or body of gallbladder and (2) for cyclic volume changes, especially in the fundus of gallbladder. The description of the microstructures of mucosa in the porcine gallbladder could be useful as reference data for numerous experiments on the bile tract in the pig. PMID:25604381

  1. Engineering and Characterization of Collagen Networks Using Wet Atomic Force Microscopy and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Jenna; Coffey, Tonya; Conrad, Brad; Burris, Jennifer; Hester, Brooke

    2014-03-01

    Collagen is an abundant protein and its monomers covalently crosslink to form fibrils which form fibers which contribute to forming macrostructures like tendon or bone. While the contribution is well understood at the macroscopic level, it is not well known at the fibril level. We wish to study the mechanical properties of collagen for networks of collagen fibers that vary in size and density. We present here a method to synthesize collagen networks from monomers and that allows us to vary the density of the networks. By using biotynilated collagen and a surface that is functionalized with avidin, we generate two-dimensional collagen networks across the surface of a silicon wafer. During network synthesis, the incubation time is varied from 30 minutes to 3 hours or temperature is varied from 25°C to 45°C. The two-dimensional collagen network created in the process is characterized using environmental atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The network density is measured by the number of strands in one frame using SPIP software. We expect that at body temperature (37°C) and with longer incubation times, the network density should increase.

  2. Transmission electron microscopy characterisation of 0-D nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Stuart Matthew

    When materials are scaled down to the nanometre level, a change in physical behaviour is frequently observed. In so-called 0-D nanomaterials (nanoparticles), these unique nanoscale properties are most abundant and are usually linked to either a change in (electronic) structure of the material or to the dominating influence of the particle surface at the nanometre scale. In this doctoral work the nanoscale properties of several nanoparticle systems have been studied using advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Every material that was studied required for its solution a unique approach and a host of transmission electron microscopy techniques. The title of this doctoral work can be freely translated as "retrieving quantitatively the maximal and most accurate chemical, structural and morphological information from nanoparticles by advanced transmission electron microscopy, to uncover and explain their unique properties". Chapter 1 gives a brief general introduction to the world of nanomaterials and nanotechnology in general and more specifically to 0-D nanomaterials (nanoparticles). The unique properties and potential applications of these materials are described. The production of 0-D nanomaterials is not covered in this chapter, as this is an extremely broad field to cover in only a few pages. Instead, the production method for each of the materials is left to the detailed chapters that follow. In Chapter 2 the main transmission electron microscopy techniques used to characterise the materials in the further chapters are described together with the microscopes used to perform these techniques and their parameters of operation. Again, the sample-specific setups are listed in the detailed chapters that follow. Chapter 3 covers all work carried out on luminescent detonation nanodiamond powder for drug delivery and bio-medical imaging applications. Specific attention is paid to the morphology, surface chemistry and nitrogen incorporation of detonation

  3. Cryo-electron microscopy of extracellular vesicles in fresh plasma

    PubMed Central

    Yuana, Yuana; Koning, Roman I.; Kuil, Maxim E.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Koster, Abraham J.; Bertina, Rogier M; Osanto, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Extracellular vesicles (EV) are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles recognized as new mediators in intercellular communication and potential biomarkers of disease. They are found in many body fluids and mainly studied in fractions isolated from blood plasma in view of their potential in medicine. Due to the limitations of available analytical methods, morphological information on EV in fresh plasma is still rather limited. Objectives To image EV and determine the morphology, structure and size distribution in fresh plasma by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Methods Fresh citrate- and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-anticoagulated plasma or EV isolated from these plasmas were rapidly cryo-immobilized by vitrification and visualized by cryo-EM. Results EV isolated from fresh plasma were highly heterogeneous in morphology and size and mostly contain a discernible lipid bilayer (lipid vesicles). In fresh plasma there were 2 types of particles with a median diameter of 30 nm (25–260 nm). The majority of these particles are electron dense particles which most likely represent lipoproteins. The minority are lipid vesicles, either electron dense or electron lucent, which most likely represent EV. Lipid vesicles were occasionally observed in close proximity of platelets in citrate and EDTA-anticoagulated platelet-rich plasma. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) was employed to determine the 3D structure of platelet secretory granules. Conclusions Cryo-EM is a powerful technique that enables the characterization of EV in fresh plasma revealing structural details and considerable morphological heterogeneity. Only a small proportion of the submicron structures in fresh plasma are lipid vesicles representing EV. PMID:24455109

  4. Fluctuation Electron Microscopy of Amorphous and Polycrystalline Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezikyan, Aram

    Fluctuation Electron Microscopy (FEM) has become an effective materials' structure characterization technique, capable of probing medium-range order (MRO) that may be present in amorphous materials. Although its sensitivity to MRO has been exercised in numerous studies, FEM is not yet a quantitative technique. The holdup has been the discrepancy between the computed kinematical variance and the experimental variance, which previously was attributed to source incoherence. Although high-brightness, high coherence, electron guns are now routinely available in modern electron microscopes, they have not eliminated this discrepancy between theory and experiment. The main objective of this thesis was to explore, and to reveal, the reasons behind this conundrum. The study was started with an analysis of the speckle statistics of tilted dark-field TEM images obtained from an amorphous carbon sample, which confirmed that the structural ordering is sensitively detected by FEM. This analysis also revealed the inconsistency between predictions of the source incoherence model and the experimentally observed variance. FEM of amorphous carbon, amorphous silicon and ultra nanocrystalline diamond samples was carried out in an attempt to explore the conundrum. Electron probe and sample parameters were varied to observe the scattering intensity variance behavior. Results were compared to models of probe incoherence, diffuse scattering, atom displacement damage, energy loss events and multiple scattering. Models of displacement decoherence matched the experimental results best. Decoherence was also explored by an interferometric diffraction method using bilayer amorphous samples, and results are consistent with strong displacement decoherence in addition to temporal decoherence arising from the electron source energy spread and energy loss events in thick samples. It is clear that decoherence plays an important role in the long-standing discrepancy between experimental FEM and its

  5. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. PMID:25475529

  6. Electron microscopy investigations of nanoparticles for cancer diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Ai Leen

    This dissertation concerns electron microscopy characterization of magnetic (MNP) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles for in-vitro cancer diagnostic applications. Electron microscopy is an essential characterization tool owing to its (sub) nanometer spatial resolution. Structural information about the nanoparticles can be obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which can in turn be correlated to their physical characteristics. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) has excellent depth of field and can be effectively utilized to obtain high resolution information about nanoparticles binding onto cell surfaces. Part One of this thesis focuses on MNPs for bio-sensing and detection applications. As a preliminary study, chemically-synthesized, commercially-available iron oxide nanoparticles were compared against their laboratory-synthesized counterparts to assess their suitability for this application. The motivation for this initial study came about due to the lack of published data on commercially available iron oxide nanoparticles. TEM studies show that the latter are "beads" composed of multiple iron oxide cores encapsulated by a polymer shell, with large standard deviations in core diameter. Laboratory-synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles, on the other hand, are single core particles with small variations in diameter and therefore are expected to be better candidates for the required application. A key limitation in iron oxide nanoparticles is their relatively weak magnetic signals. The development of high moment Synthetic Anti-Ferromagnetic (SAF) nanoparticles aims to overcome this issue. SAFs are a novel class of MNPs fabricated using nanoimprint lithography, direct deposition of multilayer structure and final suspension into liquid medium (water). TEM analyses of cross-section specimens reveal that the SAFs possess characteristics similar to those of sputtered magnetic multilayer thin films. Their layered structure is

  7. Utility of transmission electron microscopy in small round cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Rae; Ha, Seung Yeon; Cho, Hyun Yee

    2015-03-01

    Small round cell tumors (SRCTs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms composed of small, primitive, and undifferentiated cells sharing similar histology under light microscopy. SRCTs include Ewing sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor family tumors, neuroblastoma, desmoplastic SRCT, rhabdomyosarcoma, poorly differentiated round cell synovial sarcoma, mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, small cell osteosarcoma, small cell malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and small cell schwannoma. Non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma, myeloid sarcoma, malignant melanoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumor may also present as SRCT. The current shift towards immunohistochemistry and cytogenetic molecular techniques for SRCT may be inappropriate because of antigenic overlapping or inconclusive molecular results due to the lack of differentiation of primitive cells and unavailable genetic service or limited moleculocytogenetic experience. Although usage has declined, electron microscopy (EM) remains very useful and shows salient features for the diagnosis of SRCTs. Although EM is not always required, it provides reliability and validity in the diagnosis of SRCT. Here, the ultrastructural characteristics of SRCTs are reviewed and we suggest that EM would be utilized as one of the reliable modalities for the diagnosis of undifferentiated and poorly differentiated SRCTs. PMID:25812730

  8. Utility of Transmission Electron Microscopy in Small Round Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Rae; Ha, Seung Yeon; Cho, Hyun Yee

    2015-01-01

    Small round cell tumors (SRCTs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms composed of small, primitive, and undifferentiated cells sharing similar histology under light microscopy. SRCTs include Ewing sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor family tumors, neuroblastoma, desmoplastic SRCT, rhabdomyosarcoma, poorly differentiated round cell synovial sarcoma, mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, small cell osteosarcoma, small cell malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and small cell schwannoma. Non-Hodgkin’s malignant lymphoma, myeloid sarcoma, malignant melanoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumor may also present as SRCT. The current shift towards immunohistochemistry and cytogenetic molecular techniques for SRCT may be inappropriate because of antigenic overlapping or inconclusive molecular results due to the lack of differentiation of primitive cells and unavailable genetic service or limited moleculocytogenetic experience. Although usage has declined, electron microscopy (EM) remains very useful and shows salient features for the diagnosis of SRCTs. Although EM is not always required, it provides reliability and validity in the diagnosis of SRCT. Here, the ultrastructural characteristics of SRCTs are reviewed and we suggest that EM would be utilized as one of the reliable modalities for the diagnosis of undifferentiated and poorly differentiated SRCTs. PMID:25812730

  9. Procoagulant platelet balloons: evidence from cryopreparation and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hess, M W; Siljander, P

    2001-05-01

    Visualisation of the procoagulant transformation of human platelets has recently become possible through use of an in vitro approach combined with fluorescence and phase contrast microscopy. Here, we extended these studies to the ultrastructural level by employing both rapid freezing/freeze-substitution and conventional ambient-temperature chemical fixation for transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Procoagulant transformation was only inducible by adhering platelets to collagen fibrils or to the collagen-related peptide and exposing them to physiological extracellular Ca2+ levels. Under these conditions prominent, 2- to 4-micron-wide balloon-like structures were regularly observed, regardless of the specimen fixation protocol. In strong contrast to normal platelets in their vicinity, the balloons' subcellular architecture proved remarkably poor: dilute cytoplasm, no cytoskeleton, only a few, randomly distributed organelles and/or their remnants. Cryofixed balloons displayed intact and smooth surfaces whereas conventional specimen processing caused plasma membrane perforations and shrinkage of the balloons. Our results clearly show that neither the balloons themselves, nor their simple ultrastructure reflect fixation artefacts caused by inadequate membrane stabilisation. The balloons are interpreted as to be transformed and/or fragmented procoagulant platelets. Thus, the generation of balloons represents a genuine, final stage of platelet ontogenesis, presumably occurring alternatively to aggregate formation. PMID:11449892

  10. An electron microscopy study of wear in polysilicon microelectromechanical systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Enachescu, M.; Stach, Eric A.; Alsem, Daan Hein; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2005-02-01

    Wear is a critical factor in determining the durability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). While the reliability of polysilicon MEMS has received extensive attention, the mechanisms responsible for this failure mode at the microscale have yet to be conclusively determined. We have used on-chip polycrystalline silicon side-wall friction MEMS specimens to study active mechanisms during sliding wear in ambient air. Worn parts were examined by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy, while local temperature changes were monitored using advanced infrared microscopy. Observations show that small amorphous debris particles ({approx}50-100 nm) are removed by fracture through the silicon grains ({approx}500 nm) and are oxidized during this process. Agglomeration of such debris particles into larger clusters also occurs. Some of these debris particles/clusters create plowing tracks on the beam surface. A nano-crystalline surface layer ({approx}20-200 nm), with higher oxygen content, forms during wear at and below regions of the worn surface; its formation is likely aided by high local stresses. No evidence of dislocation plasticity or of extreme local temperature increases was found, ruling out the possibility of high temperature-assisted wear mechanisms.

  11. Advanced analytical electron microscopy for alkali-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Danna; Ma, Cheng; Meng, Ying Shirley; More, Karren; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a leading candidate for electric vehicle and smart grid applications. However, further optimizations of the energy/power density, coulombic efficiency and cycle life are still needed, and this requires a thorough understanding of the dynamic evolution of each component and their synergistic behaviors during battery operation. With the capability of resolving the structure and chemistry at an atomic resolution, advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) is an ideal technique for this task. The present review paper focuses on recent contributions of this important technique to the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical processes of battery materials. A detailed review of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ) studies will be given, and issues that still need to be addressed will be discussed.

  12. Temperature Calibration for In Situ Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Winterstein, JP; Lin, PA; Sharma, R

    2016-01-01

    In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) experiments require specimen heating holders to study material behavior in gaseous environments at elevated temperatures. In order to extract meaningful kinetic parameters, such as activation energies, it is essential to have a direct and accurate measurement of local sample temperature. This is particularly important if the sample temperature might fluctuate, for example when room temperature gases are introduced to the sample area. Using selected-area diffraction (SAD) in an ETEM, the lattice parameter of Ag nanoparticles was measured as a function of the temperature and pressure of hydrogen gas to provide a calibration of the local sample temperature. SAD permits measurement of temperature to an accuracy of ± 30 °C using Ag lattice expansion. Gas introduction can cause sample cooling of several hundred degrees celsius for gas pressures achievable in the ETEM. PMID:26441334

  13. Electron microscopy of gallium nitride growth on polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, R. F.; Cherns, D.; Kuball, M.; Jiang, Q.; Allsopp, D.

    2015-11-01

    Transmission and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) on polycrystalline diamond substrates grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy with a low-temperature aluminium nitride (AlN) nucleation layer. Growth on unmasked substrates was in the (0001) orientation with threading dislocation densities ≈7 × 109 cm-2. An epitaxial layer overgrowth technique was used to reduce the dislocation densities further, by depositing silicon nitride stripes on the surface and etching the unmasked regions down to the diamond substrate. A re-growth was then performed on the exposed side walls of the original GaN growth, reducing the threading dislocation density in the overgrown regions by two orders of magnitude. The resulting microstructures and the mechanisms of dislocation reduction are discussed.

  14. Annular dark field transmission electron microscopy for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-02-01

    Recently annular dark field (ADF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been advocated as a means of recording images of biological specimens with better signal to noise ratio (SNR) than regular bright field images. I investigate whether and how such images could be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins given that an ADF aperture with a suitable pass-band can be manufactured and used in practice. I develop an approximate theory of ADF-TEM image formation for weak amplitude and phase objects and test this theory using computer simulations. I also test whether these simulated images can be used to calculate a three-dimensional model of the protein using standard software and discuss problems and possible ways to overcome these. PMID:26656466

  15. Near field and exit wave computations for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Howie, A

    2013-11-01

    The partial wave phase shift formalism of atomic scattering is applied to compute exit wave functions for isolated Au and Si atoms under both plane wave and focused probe illumination. Connections between the far field and near field (exit) waves are clarified. This approach treats the Coulomb singularity properly though at 100 keV large numbers of phase shifts are required. In principle any form of incident wave can be handled so it may provide a means for testing traditional scattering theories used in electron microscopy. By applying the analysis to an atom embedded in a constant potential rather than free space, exit spheres of radius half the interatomic spacing can be used. PMID:23726769

  16. Scanning electron microscopy of a liver cavernous hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Itoshima, T; Ito, T; Ukida, M; Ogawa, H; Kitadai, M; Hattori, S; Mizutani, S; Nagashima, H

    1983-02-01

    A 39-year-old female with a large cavernous hemangioma of the liver was successfully treated by ligation of the left hepatic artery. A wedge biopsy specimen of the hemangioma was obtained after the ligation and was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The hemangioma was demarcated from the surrounding normal liver parenchyma and had a labyrinth of caves 50-150 microns in diameter. The caves were separated by fibrous septa 20-40 microns in width. Endothelial cells of the caves were spindle-shaped and arranged in parallel. The surface property of the caves resembled that of the hepatic artery and differed from that of the portal vein or hepatic vein. These findings support that the cavernous hemangioma of the liver was supplied by the hepatic artery. The labyrinthine structure of the cavernous hemangioma may explain the long standing contrast enhancement of the hemangioma after hepatic arteriography. PMID:6832546

  17. A Primer to Single-Particle Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yifan; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Penczek, Pawel A.; Walz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of single-particle specimens is used to determine the structure of proteins and macromolecular complexes without the need for crystals. Recent advances in detector technology and software algorithms now allow images of unprecedented quality to be recorded and structures to be determined at near-atomic resolution. However, compared with X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM is a young technique with distinct challenges. This primer explains the different steps and considerations involved in structure determination by single-particle cryo-EM to provide an overview for scientists wishing to understand more about this technique and the interpretation of data obtained with it, as well as a starting guide for new practitioners. PMID:25910204

  18. High-resolution electron microscopy and its applications.

    PubMed

    Li, F H

    1987-12-01

    A review of research on high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) carried out at the Institute of Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is presented. Apart from the direct observation of crystal and quasicrystal defects for some alloys, oxides, minerals, etc., and the structure determination for some minute crystals, an approximate image-contrast theory named pseudo-weak-phase object approximation (PWPOA), which shows the image contrast change with crystal thickness, is described. Within the framework of PWPOA, the image contrast of lithium ions in the crystal of R-Li2Ti3O7 has been observed. The usefulness of diffraction analysis techniques such as the direct method and Patterson method in HREM is discussed. Image deconvolution and resolution enhancement for weak-phase objects by use of the direct method are illustrated. In addition, preliminary results of image restoration for thick crystals are given. PMID:3505590

  19. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigations of ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, C.; Walter, P.; Castaing, J.; Penhoud, P.; Veyssière, P.

    The processing technologies available during the time of ancient Egypt are of present concern to the field of Archaeology and Egyptology. Materials characterization is the best tool for establishing the processing history of archaeological objects. In this study, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used, in addition to other techniques, for phase identification and study of the microstructure and characteristic defect structures in ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders. These powders generally consist of a mix of Pb-containing mineral phases: galena (PbS), cerussite (PbCO3), and phosgenite (Pb2Cl2CO3), among others. Modern materials are fabricated according to recipes found in ancient texts to mimic the processing of ancient times and to compare with the archaeological specimens. In particular, a comparison between the dislocation structures of PbS crystals deformed in the laboratory and PbS from archaeological specimens from the collections of the Louvre Museum is presented .

  20. Electron microscopy analysis of microstructure of postannealed aluminum nitride template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jesbains; Kuwano, Noriyuki; Rijal Jamaludin, Khairur; Mitsuhara, Masatoshi; Saito, Hikaru; Hata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shuhei; Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The microstructure of an AlN template after high-temperature annealing was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The AlN template was prepared by depositing an AlN layer of about 200 nm thickness on a sapphire (0001) substrate by metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy. The AlN template was annealed under (N2 + CO) atmosphere at 1500–1650 °C. TEM characterization was conducted to investigate the microstructural evolution, revealing that the postannealed AlN has a two-layer structure, the upper and lower layers of which exhibit Al and N polarities, respectively. It has been confirmed that postannealing is an effective treatment for controlling the microstructure.

  1. Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Segura-Valdez, María De L.; Jiménez-García, Luis F.

    2005-08-01

    The nucleolus is the main site for synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA in eukaryotes. In mammals, plants, and yeast the nucleolus has been extensively characterized by electron microscopy, but in the majority of the unicellular eukaryotes no such studies have been performed. Here we used ultrastructural cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques as well as three-dimensional reconstruction to analyze the nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is an early divergent eukaryote of medical importance. In T. cruzi epimastigotes the nucleolus is a spherical intranuclear ribonucleoprotein organelle localized in a relatively central position within the nucleus. Dense fibrillar and granular components but not fibrillar centers were observed. In addition, nuclear bodies resembling Cajal bodies were observed associated to the nucleolus in the surrounding nucleoplasm. Our results provide additional morphological data to better understand the synthesis and processing of the ribosomal RNA in kinetoplastids.

  2. Waveguide characterization with multi-photon photoemission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Word, Robert C.; Saliba, Sebastian; Koenenkamp, Rolf

    2012-10-01

    Multi-photon photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) images surface interactions of visible light with matter, showing electromagnetic (EM) waves that propagate at or near the surface. Images are interferometric, showing where incident and surface waves are in-phase (bright) and out-of-phase (dark), with strong contrast between regions of high and low rates of photoelectron emission. Interferogram analysis can determine the amplitude, wavelength, phase evolution, and propagation decay length of the surface waves. Most multi-photon PEEM studies focus on surface plasmon polaritons. We show that this technique can also be applied to conducting thin-film waveguides, measuring the properties of confined EM waves in a two-mode slab waveguide made of indium tin oxide on glass, which are consistent with waveguide theory. This research was funded by the US Department of Energy Basic Science Office under contract DE-FG02-10ER46406.

  3. Watershed Merge Tree Classification for Electron Microscopy Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, TIng; Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Ellisman, Mark; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2012-11-11

    Automated segmentation of electron microscopy (EM) images is a challenging problem. In this paper, we present a novel method that utilizes a hierarchical structure and boundary classification for 2D neuron segmentation. With a membrane detection probability map, a watershed merge tree is built for the representation of hierarchical region merging from the watershed algorithm. A boundary classifier is learned with non-local image features to predict each potential merge in the tree, upon which merge decisions are made with consistency constraints in the sense of optimization to acquire the final segmentation. Independent of classifiers and decision strategies, our approach proposes a general framework for efficient hierarchical segmentation with statistical learning. We demonstrate that our method leads to a substantial improvement in segmentation accuracy.

  4. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cells Using Dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhang, Wei; Soffe, Rebecca; Nahavandi, Sofia; Shukla, Ravi; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2014-01-01

    Ultrastructural analysis of cells can reveal valuable information about their morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been widely used to provide high-resolution images from the surface of biological samples. However, samples need to be dehydrated and coated with conductive materials for SEM imaging. Besides, immobilizing non-adherent cells during processing and analysis is challenging and requires complex fixation protocols. In this work, we developed a novel dielectrophoresis based microfluidic platform for interfacing non-adherent cells with high-resolution SEM at low vacuum mode. The system enables rapid immobilization and dehydration of samples without deposition of chemical residues over the cell surface. Moreover, it enables the on-chip chemical stimulation and fixation of immobilized cells with minimum dislodgement. These advantages were demonstrated for comparing the morphological changes of non-budding and budding yeast cells following Lyticase treatment. PMID:25089528

  5. Advanced analytical electron microscopy for alkali-ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qian, Danna; Ma, Cheng; Meng, Ying Shirley; More, Karren; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a leading candidate for electric vehicle and smart grid applications. However, further optimizations of the energy/power density, coulombic efficiency and cycle life are still needed, and this requires a thorough understanding of the dynamic evolution of each component and their synergistic behaviors during battery operation. With the capability of resolving the structure and chemistry at an atomic resolution, advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) is an ideal technique for this task. The present review paper focuses on recent contributions of this important technique to the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical processes of battery materials. A detailed reviewmore » of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ) studies will be given, and issues that still need to be addressed will be discussed.« less

  6. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and comparedmore » to those of other techniques available.« less

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of Strongylus spp. in zebra.

    PubMed

    Els, H J; Malan, F S; Scialdo-Krecek, R C

    1983-12-01

    The external ultrastructure of the anterior and posterior extremities of the nematodes, Strongylus asini , Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus equinus and Strongylus edentatus, was studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fresh specimens of S. asini were collected from the caecum, ventral colon and vena portae of Equus burchelli and Equus zebra hartmannae ; S. vulgaris from the caecum, colon and arteria ileocolica of E. burchelli ; S. equinus from the ventral colon of E. z. hartmannae and S. edentatus from the caecum and ventral colon of both zebras , during surveys of parasites in zebras in the Etosha Game Reserve, South West Africa/Namibia, and the Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa. The worms were cleaned, fixed and mounted by standard methods and photographed in a JEOL JSM - 35C scanning electron microscope (SEM) operating at 12kV . The SEM showed the following differences: the tips of the external leaf-crowns varied and were fine and delicate in S. asini , coarse and broad in S. vulgaris and, in S. equinus and S. edentatus, closely adherent, separating into single elements for half their length. The excretory pores showed only slight variation, and the morphology of the copulatory bursae did not differ from those seen with light microscopy. The genital cones differed markedly: S. asini had a ventral triangular projection and laterally 2 finger-like projections: in S. vulgaris there were numerous bosses on the lateral and ventral aspects of the cone; in S. equinus 2 finger-like processes projected laterocaudally ; and in S. edentatus 2 pairs of papilla-like processes projected laterally on the ventral aspects, and a pair of rounded projections and a pair of hair-like structures adorned the dorsal aspects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6676687

  8. Immuno EM-OM correlative microscopy in solution by atmospheric scanning electron microscopy (ASEM).

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yuusuke; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara

    2012-11-01

    In the atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM), an inverted SEM observes the wet sample from beneath an open dish while an optical microscope (OM) observes it from above. The disposable dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can hold a few milliliters of culture medium, and allows various types of cells to be cultured in a stable environment. The use of this system for in situ correlative OM/SEM immuno-microscopy is explored, the efficiency of the required dual-tagged labeling assessed and the imaging capabilities of the ASEM documented. We have visualized the cytoskeletons formed by actin and tubulin, the chaperone PDI that catalyses native disulfide bond formation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the calcium sensor STIM1 that is integrated in ER membranes, using established cell lines. In particular, a dynamic string-like gathering of STIM1 was observed on the ER in Jurkat T cells in response to Ca(2+) store depletion. We have also visualized filamentous actin (F-actin) and tubulin in the growth cones of primary-culture neurons as well as in synapses. Further, radially running actin fibers were shown to partly colocalize with concentric bands of the Ca(2+) signaling component Homer1c in the lamellipodia of neuron primary culture growth cones. After synapse formation, neurite configurations were drastically rearranged; a button structure with a fine F-actin frame faces a spine with a different F-actin framework. Based on this work, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the dynamics of various protein complexes to be investigated in the near future. PMID:22959994

  9. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  10. The characterization of nanoparticles using analytical electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Whitney B.

    2011-06-01

    Nanoparticles are often overlooked during routine trace evidence analyses because of their small size and the degree of difficulty needed to efficiently characterize them. However, analytical electron microscopy (AEM) enables the characterization and/or identification of nanoparticles because of its high magnification capability, the ability to gather elemental data and also the ability to determine the internal structure of a single nanoparticles(1). There is a wide variety of natural and manufactured nanoparticles that are prominent within the environment and their presence becomes very valuable in the absence of larger particles. The combustion of materials produces by-products such as nano-sized carbon soot, fumes, fly ash and gun-shot residue (GSR). Using AEM, nano-sized carbon soot, fumes, fly ash and GSR can not only be distinguished from other nanoparticles within the environment but can also be distinguished from each other because of differences in morphology, elemental composition, and internal structure. The elemental information gathered from combustion by-products during AEM analysis can also give an indication of the original source material. Other nanoparticles such as paint pigments and fillers can also be characterized by AEM using morphology, electron diffraction and elemental composition.

  11. Analytical electron microscopy in mineralogy; exsolved phases in pyroxenes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nord, G.L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy has been successfully used to characterize the structure and composition of lamellar exsolution products in pyroxenes. At operating voltages of 100 and 200 keV, microanalytical techniques of x-ray energy analysis, convergent-beam electron diffraction, and lattice imaging have been used to chemically and structurally characterize exsolution lamellae only a few unit cells wide. Quantitative X-ray energy analysis using ratios of peak intensities has been adopted for the U.S. Geological Survey AEM in order to study the compositions of exsolved phases and changes in compositional profiles as a function of time and temperature. The quantitative analysis procedure involves 1) removal of instrument-induced background, 2) reduction of contamination, and 3) measurement of correction factors obtained from a wide range of standard compositions. The peak-ratio technique requires that the specimen thickness at the point of analysis be thin enough to make absorption corrections unnecessary (i.e., to satisfy the "thin-foil criteria"). In pyroxenes, the calculated "maximum thicknesses" range from 130 to 1400 nm for the ratios Mg/Si, Fe/Si, and Ca/Si; these "maximum thicknesses" have been contoured in pyroxene composition space as a guide during analysis. Analytical spatial resolutions of 50-100 nm have been achieved in AEM at 200 keV from the composition-profile studies, and analytical reproducibility in AEM from homogeneous pyroxene standards is ?? 1.5 mol% endmember. ?? 1982.

  12. Morphological classification of bioaerosols from composting using scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tamer Vestlund, A.; Al-Ashaab, R.; Tyrrel, S.F.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T.; Drew, G.H.

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Bioaerosols were captured using the filter method. • Bioaerosols were analysed using scanning electron microscope. • Bioaerosols were classified on the basis of morphology. • Single small cells were found more frequently than aggregates and larger cells. • Smaller cells may disperse further than heavier aggregate structures. - Abstract: This research classifies the physical morphology (form and structure) of bioaerosols emitted from open windrow composting. Aggregation state, shape and size of the particles captured are reported alongside the implications for bioaerosol dispersal after release. Bioaerosol sampling took place at a composting facility using personal air filter samplers. Samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Particles were released mainly as small (<1 μm) single, spherical cells, followed by larger (>1 μm) single cells, with aggregates occurring in smaller proportions. Most aggregates consisted of clusters of 2–3 particles as opposed to chains, and were <10 μm in size. No cells were attached to soil debris or wood particles. These small single cells or small aggregates are more likely to disperse further downwind from source, and cell viability may be reduced due to increased exposure to environmental factors.

  13. Thin dielectric film thickness determination by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, A.C.; Foran, B.; Kisielowski, C.; Muller, D.; Pennycook, S.; Principe, E.; Stemmer, S.

    2003-09-01

    High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) has been used as the ultimate method of thickness measurement for thin films. The appearance of phase contrast interference patterns in HR-TEM images has long been confused as the appearance of a crystal lattice by non-specialists. Relatively easy to interpret crystal lattice images are now directly observed with the introduction of annular dark field detectors for scanning TEM (STEM). With the recent development of reliable lattice image processing software that creates crystal structure images from phase contrast data, HR-TEM can also provide crystal lattice images. The resolution of both methods was steadily improved reaching now into the sub Angstrom region. Improvements in electron lens and image analysis software are increasing the spatial resolution of both methods. Optimum resolution for STEM requires that the probe beam be highly localized. In STEM, beam localization is enhanced by selection of the correct aperture. When STEM measurement is done using a highly localized probe beam, HR-TEM and STEM measurement of the thickness of silicon oxynitride films agree within experimental error. In this paper, the optimum conditions for HR-TEM and STEM measurement are discussed along with a method for repeatable film thickness determination. The impact of sample thickness is also discussed. The key result in this paper is the proposal of a reproducible method for film thickness determination.

  14. Quantitative Energy-filtering Transmission Electron Microscopy in Materials Science.

    PubMed

    Grogger; Hofer; Warbichler; Kothleitner

    2000-03-01

    Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) can be used to acquire elemental distribution images at high lateral resolution within short acquisition times. In this article, we present an overview of typical problems from materials science which can be preferentially solved by means of EFTEM. In the first example, we show how secondary phases in a steel specimen can be easily detected by recording jump ratio images of the matrix element under rocking beam illumination. Secondly, we describe how elemental maps can be converted into concentration maps. A Ba-Nd-titanate ceramics serves as a typical materials science example exhibiting three different compounds with varying composition. In order to reduce diffraction and/or thickness variation effects which may be a problem for quantification of crystalline specimens, we calculated atomic ratio maps by dividing two elemental maps and subsequent normalizing by the partial ionization cross-sections (or k-factors). Additionally, the atomic ratio maps are correlated using the scatter diagram technique thus leading to quantitative chemical phase maps. Finally, we show how the near-edge structures (electron energy-loss near edge fine structures, or ELNES) can be used for mapping chemical bonding states thus differentiating between various modifications of an element. In order to distinguish between diamond and non-diamond carbon in diamond coated materials, we have investigated a diamond layer on a substrate with the help of ELNES mapping utilizing the pi*-peak of the C-K ionization edge. PMID:10742404

  15. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics. PMID:24420248

  16. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, N.; Watanabe, G.; Harada, A.; Suzuki, T.

    1988-11-01

    Samples of postmortem pink teeth were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Fracture surfaces of the dentin in pink teeth were noticeably rough and revealed many more smaller dentinal tubules than those of the control white teeth. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed that the pink teeth contained iron which seemed to be derived from blood hemoglobin. The present study confirms that under the same circumstance red coloration of teeth may occur more easily in the teeth in which the dentin is less compact and contains more dentinal tubules.

  17. Isolated dystrophin molecules as seen by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pons, F; Augier, N; Heilig, R; Léger, J; Mornet, D; Léger, J J

    1990-10-01

    Dystrophin, the protein product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus [Hoffman, E. P., Brown, R. H., Jr., & Kunkel, L. M. (1987) Cell 51, 919-928], is expressed in striated and smooth muscles as well as in non-muscle tissues. Examination of its primary structure has revealed that the molecule is composed of four domains, three of which share many features with the membrane cytoskeletal proteins spectrin and actinin. Dystrophin has thus been predicted to adopt a rod shape [Koenig, M., Monaco, A. P. & Kunkel, L. M. (1988) Cell 53, 219-228]. In the present study, we describe its isolation from the chicken gizzard smooth muscle and present electron microscopic images of the molecule. Polyclonal antibodies were first prepared from a dystrophin fragment derived from the chicken skeletal muscle gene (residues 1173-1728). A dystrophin-enriched membrane preparation from chicken gizzard muscle was then purified by passing it through an affinity chromatography column made with the anti-dystrophin antibodies. Electron microscopy of isolated and rotatory-shadowed dystrophin molecules revealed that the lengths measured for the dystrophin monomers (175 +/- 15 nm) are compatible with a structural arrangement of the repeat sequence segments in triple-barrel alpha-helices connected by short-turn regions, as was earlier postulated for the repeat domains of spectrin and actinin. Electron microscopic images indicate that in addition the dystrophin molecules could present the same capacity of self-association in oligomeric structures as these cytoskeletal proteins and may thus be a part of a complex molecular meshwork essential to muscle cell function. PMID:2236001

  18. Probing Individual Ice Nucleation Events with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup; Knopf, Daniel; Gilles, Mary; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is one of the processes of critical relevance to a range of topics in the fundamental and the applied science and technologies. Heterogeneous ice nucleation initiated by particles proceeds where microscopic properties of particle surfaces essentially control nucleation mechanisms. Ice nucleation in the atmosphere on particles governs the formation of ice and mixed phase clouds, which in turn influence the Earth's radiative budget and climate. Heterogeneous ice nucleation is still insufficiently understood and poses significant challenges in predictive understanding of climate change. We present a novel microscopy platform allowing observation of individual ice nucleation events at temperature range of 193-273 K and relative humidity relevant for ice formation in the atmospheric clouds. The approach utilizes a home built novel ice nucleation cell interfaced with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (IN-ESEM system). The IN-ESEM system is applied for direct observation of individual ice formation events, determining ice nucleation mechanisms, freezing temperatures, and relative humidity onsets. Reported microanalysis of the ice nucleating particles (INP) include elemental composition detected by the energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (EDX), and advanced speciation of the organic content in particles using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The performance of the IN-ESEM system is validated through a set of experiments with kaolinite particles with known ice nucleation propensity. We demonstrate an application of the IN-ESEM system to identify and characterize individual INP within a complex mixture of ambient particles.

  19. Transmission electron microscopy of polymer blends and block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of soft matter is a field that warrants further investigation. Developments in sample preparation, imaging and spectroscopic techniques could lead to novel experiments that may further our understanding of the structure and the role structure plays in the functionality of various organic materials. Unlike most hard materials, TEM of organic molecules is limited by the amount of radiation damage the material can withstand without changing its structure. Despite this limitation, TEM has been and will be a powerful tool to study polymeric materials and other soft matter. In this dissertation, an introduction of TEM for polymer scientists is presented. The fundamentals of interactions of electrons with matter are described using the Schrodinger wave equation and scattering cross-sections to fully encompass coherent and incoherent scattering. The intensity, which is the product of the wave function and its complex conjugate, shows no perceptible change due to the sample. Instead, contrast is generated through the optical system of the microscope by removing scattered electrons or by generating interference due to material-induced phase changes. Perhaps the most challenging aspect of taking TEM images, however, is sample preparation, because TEM experiments require materials with approximately 50 nm thickness. Although ultramicrotomy is a well-established powerful tool for preparing biological and polymeric sections for TEM, the development of cryogenic Focused Ion Beam may enable unprecedented cross-sectional TEM studies of polymer thin films on arbitrary substrates with nanometer precision. Two examples of TEM experiments of polymeric materials are presented. The first involves quantifying the composition profile across a lamellar phase obtained in a multicomponent blend of saturated poly(butadiene) and poly(isobutylene), stabilized by a saturated poly(butadiene) copolymer serving as a surfactant, using TEM and self

  20. Faradaurate-940: synthesis, mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, high-energy X-ray diffraction, and X-ray scattering study of Au∼940±20(SR)∼160±4 nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Kumara, Chanaka; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cullen, David A; Dass, Amala

    2014-06-24

    Obtaining monodisperse nanocrystals and determining their composition to the atomic level and their atomic structure is highly desirable but is generally lacking. Here, we report the discovery and comprehensive characterization of a 2.9 nm plasmonic nanocrystal with a composition of Au940±20(SCH2CH2Ph)160±4, which is the largest mass spectrometrically characterized gold thiolate nanoparticle produced to date. The compositional assignment has been made using electrospray ionization and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MS). The MS results show an unprecedented size monodispersity, where the number of Au atoms varies by only 40 atoms (940 ± 20). The mass spectrometrically determined composition and size are supported by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and synchrotron-based methods such as atomic pair distribution function (PDF) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Lower-resolution STEM images show an ensemble of particles-1000s per frame-visually demonstrating monodispersity. Modeling of SAXS data on statistically significant nanoparticle population-approximately 10(12) individual nanoparticles-shows that the diameter is 3.0 ± 0.2 nm, supporting mass spectrometry and electron microscopy results on monodispersity. Atomic PDF based on high-energy X-ray diffraction experiments shows decent match with either a Marks decahedral or truncated octahedral structure. Atomic resolution STEM images of single particles and their fast Fourier transform suggest face-centered cubic arrangement. UV-visible spectroscopy data show that Faradaurate-940 supports a surface plasmon resonance peak at ̃505 nm. These monodisperse plasmonic nanoparticles minimize averaging effects and have potential application in solar cells, nano-optical devices, catalysis, and drug delivery. PMID:24813022

  1. Hot Electron Transport Properties of Thin Copper Films Using Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garramone, J. J.; Abel, J. R.; Sitnitsky, I. L.; Zhao, L.; Appelbaum, I.; Labella, V. P.

    2009-03-01

    Copper is widely used material for electrical interconnects within integrated circuits and recently as a base layer for hot electron spin injection and readout into silicon. Integral to both their applications is the knowledge of the electron scattering length. To the best of our knowledge, little work exists that directly measures the scattering length of electrons in copper. In this study we used ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) to measure the hot electron attenuation length of copper thin films deposited on Si(001). BEEM is a three terminal scanning tunneling microcopy (STM) based technique that can measure transport and Schottky heights of metal/semiconductor systems. We find a Schottky height of 0.67 eV and an attenuation length approaching 40 nm just above the Schottky height at 77 K. We also measure a decrease in the attenuation length with increasing tip bias to determine the relative roles of inelastic and elastic scattering.

  2. Scanning transmission electron microscopy strain measurement from millisecond frames of a direct electron charge coupled device

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Knut; Rosenauer, Andreas; Ryll, Henning; Ordavo, Ivan; Ihle, Sebastian; Soltau, Heike; Strueder, Lothar; Volz, Kerstin; Zweck, Josef

    2012-11-19

    A high-speed direct electron detection system is introduced to the field of transmission electron microscopy and applied to strain measurements in semiconductor nanostructures. In particular, a focused electron probe with a diameter of 0.5 nm was scanned over a fourfold quantum layer stack with alternating compressive and tensile strain and diffracted discs have been recorded on a scintillator-free direct electron detector with a frame time of 1 ms. We show that the applied algorithms can accurately detect Bragg beam positions despite a significant point spread each 300 kV electron causes during detection on the scintillator-free camera. For millisecond exposures, we find that strain can be measured with a precision of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, enabling, e.g., strain mapping in a 100 Multiplication-Sign 100 nm{sup 2} region with 0.5 nm resolution in 40 s.

  3. New innovations for contrast enhancement in electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, A.

    In this study two techniques for producing and improving contrast in Electron Microscopy are discussed. The first technique deals with the production of secondary contrast in a Variable Pressure SEM under poor vacuum conditions using the specimen current signal. A review of the prior work in this field shows that the presence of the gas ions in the microscope column results in the amplification of the specimen current signal which is enriched in secondary content. The focus of this study is to establish practical conditions for imaging samples in the microscope using specimen current with gas amplification. This is done by understanding the different variables in the microscope which affect the image formation process and then finding out optimum conditions for obtaining the best possible image, i.e., the image most enhanced in secondary contrast. A few 'real life' samples analyzed using this technique show that the gas amplified specimen current images contain secondary information and, in some cases, provide clear advantages to imaging with conventional secondary and backscattered detectors. The second technique dealing with the production of phase contrast in the TEM for extremely thin, electron transparent samples, is analyzed. A review of the literature regarding prior work in the field shows that, while the theoretical aspects of production of phase contrast in the TEM using a phase plate are well understood, there have been problems in practically implementing this in the microscope. One major assumption with most of the studies is that a fiber, partially coated with gold, results in the formation of point charges which is an essential requirement for symmetrically shifting the phase of the electron beam. The focus of this portion of the dissertation is to image the type of fields associated with such a phase plate using the technique of electron holography. It is found that there are two types of fields associated with a phase plate of this sort. One is a

  4. Imaging doped silicon test structures using low energy electron microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakakura, Craig Yoshimi; Anderson, Meredith Lynn; Kellogg, Gary Lee

    2010-01-01

    This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 105877 - 'Novel Diagnostic for Advanced Measurements of Semiconductor Devices Exposed to Adverse Environments' - funded through the Nanoscience to Microsystems investment area. Along with the continuous decrease in the feature size of semiconductor device structures comes a growing need for inspection tools with high spatial resolution and high sample throughput. Ideally, such tools should be able to characterize both the surface morphology and local conductivity associated with the structures. The imaging capabilities and wide availability of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) make them an obvious choice for imaging device structures. Dopant contrast from pn junctions using secondary electrons in the SEM was first reported in 1967 and more recently starting in the mid-1990s. However, the serial acquisition process associated with scanning techniques places limits on the sample throughput. Significantly improved throughput is possible with the use of a parallel imaging scheme such as that found in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The application of PEEM and LEEM to device structures relies on contrast mechanisms that distinguish differences in dopant type and concentration. Interestingly, one of the first applications of PEEM was a study of the doping of semiconductors, which showed that the PEEM contrast was very sensitive to the doping level and that dopant concentrations as low as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} could be detected. More recent PEEM investigations of Schottky contacts were reported in the late 1990s by Giesen et al., followed by a series of papers in the early 2000s addressing doping contrast in PEEM by Ballarotto and co-workers and Frank and co-workers. In contrast to PEEM, comparatively little has been done to identify contrast mechanisms and assess the capabilities of LEEM for imaging semiconductor device strictures. The one exception is the

  5. Capturing enveloped viruses on affinity grids for downstream cryo-electron microscopy applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electron microscopy cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography are essential techniques used for characterizing basic virus morphology and determining the three-dimensional structure of viruses. Enveloped viruses, which contain an outer lipoprotein coat, constitute the largest group of pa...

  6. Study of titanate nanotubes by X-ray and electron diffraction and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brunatova, Tereza; Popelkova, Daniela; Wan, Wei; Oleynikov, Peter; Danis, Stanislav; Zou, Xiaodong; Kuzel, Radomir

    2014-01-15

    The structure of titanate nanotubes (Ti-NTs) was studied by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Ti-NTs are prepared by hydrothermal treatment of TiO{sub 2} powder. The structure is identified by powder X-ray diffraction as the one based on the structure of H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O phase. The same structure is obtained by projected potential from HRTEM through-focus image series. The structure is verified by simulated PXRD pattern with the aid of the Debye formula. The validity of the model is tested by computing Fourier transformation of a single nanotube which is proportional to measured electron diffraction intensities. A good agreement of this calculation with measured precession electron diffraction data is achieved. - Highlights: • Titanate nanotubes were prepared by hydrothermal method. • X-ray powder diffraction indicated their structure based on that of H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O. • Structural model was created with the aid of high-resolution electron microscopy. • The model was verified with electron diffraction data. • X-ray powder diffraction pattern was calculated with the aid of the Debye formula.

  7. Atomic-Resolution 3D Electron Microscopy with Dynamic Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Meisheng, Hu

    2005-02-15

    Achievement of atomic-resolution electron-beam tomography will allow determination of the three-dimensional structure of nanoparticles (and other suitable specimens) at atomic resolution. Three-dimensional reconstructions will yield ''section'' images that resolve atoms overlapped in normal electron microscope images (projections), resolving lighter atoms such as oxygen in the presence of heavier atoms, and atoms that lie on non-lattice sites such as those in non-periodic defect structures. Lower-resolution electron microscope tomography has been used to produce reconstructed 3D images of nanoparticles [1] but extension to atomic resolution is considered not to be straightforward. Accurate three-dimensional reconstruction from two-dimensional projections generally requires that intensity in the series of 2-D images be a monotonic function of the specimen structure (often specimen density, but in our case atomic potential). This condition is not satisfied in electron microscopy when specimens with strong periodicity are tilted close to zone-axis orientation and produce ''anomalous'' image contrast because of strong dynamic diffraction components. Atomic-resolution reconstructions from tilt series containing zone-axis images (with their contrast enhanced by strong dynamical scattering) can be distorted when the stronger zone-axis images overwhelm images obtained in other ''random'' orientations in which atoms do not line up in neat columns. The first demonstrations of 3-D reconstruction to atomic resolution used five zone-axis images from test specimens of staurolite consisting of a mix of light and heavy atoms [2,3]. Initial resolution was to the 1.6{angstrom} Scherzer limit of a JEOL-ARM1000. Later experiments used focal-series reconstruction from 5 to 10 images to produce staurolite images from the ARM1000 with resolution extended beyond the Scherzer limit to 1.38{angstrom} [4,5]. To obtain a representation of the three-dimensional structure, images were obtained

  8. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of corroded metal waste forms.

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, N. L.

    2005-04-15

    This report documents the results of analyses with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and selected area electron diffraction (ED) of samples of metallic waste form (MWF) materials that had been subjected to various corrosion tests. The objective of the TEM analyses was to characterize the composition and microstructure of surface alteration products which, when combined with other test results, can be used to determine the matrix corrosion mechanism. The examination of test samples generated over several years has resulted in refinements to the TEM sample preparation methods developed to preserve the orientation of surface alteration layers and the underlying base metal. The preservation of microstructural spatial relationships provides valuable insight for determining the matrix corrosion mechanism and for developing models to calculate radionuclide release in repository performance models. The TEM results presented in this report show that oxide layers are formed over the exposed steel and intermetallic phases of the MWF during corrosion in aqueous solutions and humid air at elevated temperatures. An amorphous non-stoichiometric ZrO{sub 2} layer forms at the exposed surfaces of the intermetallic phases, and several nonstoichiometric Fe-O layers form over the steel phases in the MWF. These oxide layers adhere strongly to the underlying metal, and may be overlain by one or more crystalline Fe-O phases that probably precipitated from solution. The layer compositions are consistent with a corrosion mechanism of oxidative dissolution of the steel and intermetallic phases. The layers formed on the steel and intermetallic phases form a continuous layer over the exposed waste form, although vertical splits in the layer and corrosion in pits and crevices were seen in some samples. Additional tests and analyses are needed to verify that these layers passivate the underlying metals and if passivation can break

  9. In-vivo Candida biofilms in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Paulitsch, Astrid Helga; Willinger, Birgit; Zsalatz, Benedikt; Stabentheiner, Edith; Marth, Egon; Buzina, Walter

    2009-11-01

    Candida biofilms on indwelling devices are an increasing problem in patients treated at intensive care units. The goal of this study was to examine the occurrence and frequency of these biofilms. A total of 172 catheters were collected from 105 male and 67 female patients (the age range of both patient groups was from 3 weeks to 98 years old). The catheters were incubated on blood agar plates and the resulting yeast colonies were subsequently identified. Furthermore, pieces of catheters were fixed, dried and sputter coated with gold for investigation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Yeasts were recovered from significantly more catheters obtained from men than from women (chi(2): n = 67; P < 0.01). In SEM, 56.4% catheters turned out to be positive for biofilm formation. Again catheters from male patients were statistically significant (chi(2): n = 40; P < 0.01) more often positive than those from women. Candida albicans (71.1%) was the most common species isolated from the catheters, followed by C. glabrata (10.3%), C. parapsilosis (8.2%) and C. tropicalis (5.2%). Based on the results of this investigation, the epidemiology of Candida biofilms on indwelling devices seems to be a promising target for future investigations. PMID:19888801

  10. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Jäger, A.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.; Dejneka, A.

    2015-02-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin-stained rat skin sections from plasma-treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  11. Microstructural evaluation of ? bilayer film by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuan; Liu, Wei; Wang, Ruilan; Xuan, Yi; Li, Lin; Li, Hongchen; Xi, Xiao Xing

    1998-07-01

    The microstructure of 0022-3727/31/14/005/img11Cu0022-3727/31/14/005/img12 bilayer film grown on 0022-3727/31/14/005/img13 substrate was studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM). The results showed that the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img14 film is epitaxially grown on the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img13 substrate with c axis orientation. Planar defects, grain boundaries, moiré patterns, a axis oriented 0022-3727/31/14/005/img14 and impurity particulates are found in the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img14 film. The 0022-3727/31/14/005/img18 film was grown on the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img14 film with a columnar structure. However, some region of the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img18 film is single crystalline, but with strain bands. The development of strain bands in the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img18 film could be a result of lattice mismatch between 0022-3727/31/14/005/img14 and 0022-3727/31/14/005/img18 films and the surface roughness of the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img14 film. In consequence, the dielectric properties of the strained STO film are greatly decreased compared to the bulk single crystalline STO.

  12. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lunov, O. Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  13. Analytical electron microscopy of biogenic and inorganic carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.

    1989-01-01

    In the terrestrial sedimentary environment, the mineralogically predominant carbonates are calcite-type minerals (rhombohedral carbonates) and aragonite-type minerals (orthorhombic carbonates). Most common minerals precipitating either inorganically or biogenically are high magnesium calcite and aragonite. High magnesium calcite (with magnesium carbonate substituting for more than 7 mole percent of the calcium carbonate) is stable only at temperatures greater than 700 C or thereabouts, and aragonite is stable only at pressures exceeding several kilobars of confining pressure. Therefore, these carbonates are expected to undergo chemical stabilization in the diagenetic environment to ultimately form stable calcite and dolomite. Because of the strong organic control of carbonate deposition in organisms during biomineralization, the microchemistry and microstructure of invertebrate skeletal material is much different than that present in inorganic carbonate cements. The style of preservation of microstructural features in skeletal material is therefore often quite distinctive when compared to that of inorganic carbonate even though wholesale recrystallization of the sediment has taken place. Microstructural and microchemical comparisons are made between high magnesium calcite echinoderm skeletal material and modern inorganic high magnesium calcite inorganic cements, using analytical electron microscopy and related techniques. Similar comparisons are made between analogous materials which have undergone stabilization in the diagenetic environment. Similar analysis schemes may prove useful in distinguishing between biogenic and inorganic carbonates in returned Martian carbonate samples.

  14. High-performance probes for light and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Sarada; Williams, Megan E.; Bloss, Erik B.; Stasevich, Timothy J.; Speer, Colenso M.; Nern, Aljoscha; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Hooks, Bryan M.; Li, Wei-Ping; English, Brian P.; Tian, Teresa; Henry, Gilbert L.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Gerfen, Charles R.; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Wang, Yalin; Rubin, Gerald M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe an engineered family of highly antigenic molecules based on GFP-like fluorescent proteins. These molecules contain numerous copies of peptide epitopes and simultaneously bind IgG antibodies at each location. These “spaghetti monster” fluorescent proteins (smFPs) distribute well in neurons, notably into small dendrites, spines and axons. smFP immunolabeling localizes weakly expressed proteins not well resolved with traditional epitope tags. By varying epitope and scaffold, we generated a diverse family of mutually orthogonal antigens. In cultured neurons and mouse and fly brains, smFP probes allow robust, orthogonal multi-color visualization of proteins, cell populations and neuropil. smFP variants complement existing tracers, greatly increase the number of simultaneous imaging channels, and perform well in advanced preparations such as array tomography, super-resolution fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy. In living cells, the probes improve single-molecule image tracking and increase yield for RNA-Seq. These probes facilitate new experiments in connectomics, transcriptomics and protein localization. PMID:25915120

  15. Glycine receptor mechanism elucidated by electron cryo-microscopy.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Lü, Wei; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Gouaux, Eric

    2015-10-01

    The strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR) mediates inhibitory synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and brainstem and is linked to neurological disorders, including autism and hyperekplexia. Understanding of molecular mechanisms and pharmacology of glycine receptors has been hindered by a lack of high-resolution structures. Here we report electron cryo-microscopy structures of the zebrafish α1 GlyR with strychnine, glycine, or glycine and ivermectin (glycine/ivermectin). Strychnine arrests the receptor in an antagonist-bound closed ion channel state, glycine stabilizes the receptor in an agonist-bound open channel state, and the glycine/ivermectin complex adopts a potentially desensitized or partially open state. Relative to the glycine-bound state, strychnine expands the agonist-binding pocket via outward movement of the C loop, promotes rearrangement of the extracellular and transmembrane domain 'wrist' interface, and leads to rotation of the transmembrane domain towards the pore axis, occluding the ion conduction pathway. These structures illuminate the GlyR mechanism and define a rubric to interpret structures of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:26344198

  16. Application of particle analysis to transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DaPonte, J.; Sadowski, T.; Broadbridge, C. C.; Day, D.; Lehman, A. H.; Krishna, D.; Marinella, L.; Munhutu, P.; Sawicki, M.

    2007-04-01

    Nanoparticles, particles with a diameter of 1-100 nanometers (nm), are of interest in many applications including device fabrication, quantum computing, and sensing because their size may give them properties that are very different from bulk materials. Further advancement of nanotechnology cannot be obtained without an increased understanding of nanoparticle properties such as size (diameter) and size distribution frequently evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the past, these parameters have been obtained from digitized TEM images by manually measuring and counting many of these nanoparticles, a task that is highly subjective and labor intensive. More recently, computer imaging particle analysis has emerged as an objective alternative by counting and measuring objects in a binary image. This paper will describe the procedures used to preprocess a set of gray scale TEM images so that they could be correctly thresholded into binary images. This allows for a more accurate assessment of the size and frequency (size distribution) of nanoparticles. Several preprocessing methods including pseudo flat field correction and rolling ball background correction were investigated with the rolling ball algorithm yielding the best results. Examples of particle analysis will be presented for different types of materials and different magnifications. In addition, a method based on the results of particle analysis for identifying and removing small noise particles will be discussed. This filtering technique is based on identifying the location of small particles in the binary image and removing them without affecting the size of other larger particles.

  17. Analysis of virus textures in transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Loris; Paci, Michelangelo; Caetano Dos Santos, Florentino Luciano; Brahnam, Sheryl; Hyttinen, Jari

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose an ensemble of texture descriptors for analyzing virus textures in transmission electron microscopy images. Specifically, we present several novel multi-quinary (MQ) codings of local binary pattern (LBP) variants: the MQ version of the dense LBP, the MQ version of the rotation invariant co-occurrence among adjacent LBPs, and the MQ version of the LBP histogram Fourier. To reduce computation time as well as to improve performance, a feature selection approach is utilized to select the thresholds used in the MQ approaches. In addition, we propose new variants of descriptors where two histograms, instead of the standard one histogram, are produced for each descriptor. The two histograms (one for edge pixels and the other for non-edge pixels) are calculated for training two different SVMs, whose results are then combined by sum rule. We show that a bag of features approach works well with this problem. Our experiments, using a publicly available dataset of 1500 images with 15 classes and same protocol as in previous works, demonstrate the superiority of our new proposed ensemble of texture descriptors. The MATLAB code of our approach is available at https://www.dei.unipd.it/node/2357. PMID:25488214

  18. Life Cycle of Neurospora crassa Viewed by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Seale, Thomas

    1973-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the major stages of the life cycle of two wild-type strains of Neurospora crassa Shear and Dodge (St. Lawrence 3.1a and 74A): mycelia, protoperithecium formation, perithecia, ascospores, ascospore germination and outgrowth, macro and microconidia, and germination and outgrowth of macroconidia. Structures seen at the limit of resolution of bright-field and phase-contrast microscopes, e.g., the ribbed surface of ascospores, are well resolved. New details of conidial development and surface structure are revealed. There appears to be only one distinguishable morphological difference between the two strains. The pattern of germination and outgrowth which seems relatively constant for strain 74A or strain 3.1a, appears to be different for each. Conidia from strain 3.1a almost always germinate from a site between interconidial attachment points; whereas the germ tubes of strain 74A usually emerge from or very near the interconidial attachment site. These germination patterns usually do not segregate 2:2 in asci dissected in order. This observation suggests that conidial germination pattern is not under the control of a single gene. Images PMID:4266170

  19. Glycine receptor mechanism illuminated by electron cryo-microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Lü, Wei; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Gouaux, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary The strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR) mediates inhibitory synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and brainstem and is linked to neurological disorders including autism and hyperekplexia. Understanding of molecular mechanisms and pharmacology of GlyRs has been hindered by a dearth of high-resolution structures. Here we report electron cryo-microscopy structures of the α1 GlyR with strychnine, glycine, or glycine/ivermectin. Strychnine arrests the receptor in an antagonist-bound, closed ion channel state, glycine stabilizes the receptor in an agonist-bound open channel state, and the glycine/ivermectin complex adopts a potentially desensitized or partially open state. Relative to the glycine-bound state, strychnine expands the agonist-binding pocket via outward movement of the C loop, promotes rearrangement of the extracellular and transmembrane domain ‘wrist’ interface, and leads to rotation of the transmembrane domain toward the pore axis, occluding the ion conduction pathway. These structures illuminate GlyR mechanism and define a rubric to interpret structures of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:26344198

  20. Electron microscopy of iron chalcogenide FeTe(Se) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchichko, I. O.; Presnyakov, M. Yu.; Stepantsov, E. A.; Kazakov, S. M.; Antipov, E. V.; Makarova, I. P.; Vasil'ev, A. L.

    2015-05-01

    The structure of Fe1 + δTe1 - x Se x films ( x = 0; 0.05) grown on single-crystal MgO and LaAlO3 substrates has been investigated by transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The study of Fe1.11Te/MgO structures has revealed two crystallographic orientation relationships between the film and substrate. It is shown that the lattice mismatch between the film and substrate is compensated for by the formation of misfit dislocations. The Burgers vector projection is determined. The stresses in the film can partially be compensated for due to the formation of an intermediate disordered layer. It is shown that a FeTe0.5Se0.5 film grown on a LaAlO3 substrate is single-crystal and that the FeTe0.5Se0.5/LaAlO3 interface in a selected region is coherent. The orientation relationships between the film and substrate are also determined for this case.

  1. Electron microscopy of iron chalcogenide FeTe(Se) films

    SciTech Connect

    Shchichko, I. O.; Presnyakov, M. Yu.; Stepantsov, E. A.; Kazakov, S. M.; Antipov, E. V.; Makarova, I. P.; Vasil’ev, A. L.

    2015-05-15

    The structure of Fe{sub 1+δ}Te{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} films (x = 0; 0.05) grown on single-crystal MgO and LaAlO{sub 3} substrates has been investigated by transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The study of Fe{sub 1.11}Te/MgO structures has revealed two crystallographic orientation relationships between the film and substrate. It is shown that the lattice mismatch between the film and substrate is compensated for by the formation of misfit dislocations. The Burgers vector projection is determined. The stresses in the film can partially be compensated for due to the formation of an intermediate disordered layer. It is shown that a FeTe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 0.5} film grown on a LaAlO{sub 3} substrate is single-crystal and that the FeTe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 0.5}/LaAlO{sub 3} interface in a selected region is coherent. The orientation relationships between the film and substrate are also determined for this case.

  2. Surface treatment of feldspathic porcelain: scanning electron microscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Valian, Azam

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Topographic analysis of treated ceramics provides qualitative information regarding the surface texture affecting the micromechanical retention and locking of resin-ceramics. This study aims to compare the surface microstructure following different surface treatments of feldspathic porcelain. MATERIALS AND METHODS This in-vitro study was conducted on 72 porcelain discs randomly divided into 12 groups (n=6). In 9 groups, feldspathic surfaces were subjected to sandblasting at 2, 3 or 4 bar pressure for 5, 10 or 15 seconds with 50 µm alumina particles at a 5 mm distance. In group 10, 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HF) gel was applied for 120 seconds. In group 11, specimens were sandblasted at 3 bar pressure for 10 seconds and then conditioned with HF. In group 12, specimens were first treated with HF and then sandblasted at 3 bar pressure for 10 seconds. All specimens were then evaluated under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at different magnifications. RESULTS SEM images of HF treated specimens revealed deep porosities of variable sizes; whereas, the sandblasted surfaces were more homogenous and had sharper peaks. Increasing the pressure and duration of sandblasting increased the surface roughness. SEM images of the two combined techniques showed that in group 11 (sandblasted first), HF caused deeper porosities; whereas in group 12 (treated with HF first) sandblasting caused irregularities with less homogeneity. CONCLUSION All surface treatments increased the surface area and caused porous surfaces. In groups subjected to HF, the porosities were deeper than those in sandblasted only groups. PMID:25352961

  3. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF HELIUM BEARING FUSION WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tosten, M; Michael Morgan, M

    2008-12-12

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was conducted to characterize the helium bubble distributions in tritium-charged-and-aged 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel fusion welds containing approximately 150 appm helium-3. TEM foils were prepared from C-shaped fracture toughness test specimens containing {delta} ferrite levels ranging from 4 to 33 volume percent. The weld microstructures in the low ferrite welds consisted mostly of austenite and discontinuous, skeletal {delta} ferrite. In welds with higher levels of {delta} ferrite, the ferrite was more continuous and, in some areas of the 33 volume percent sample, was the matrix/majority phase. The helium bubble microstructures observed were similar in all samples. Bubbles were found in the austenite but not in the {delta} ferrite. In the austenite, bubbles had nucleated homogeneously in the grain interiors and heterogeneously on dislocations. Bubbles were not found on any austenite/austenite grain boundaries or at the austenite/{delta} ferrite interphase interfaces. Bubbles were not observed in the {delta} ferrite because of the combined effects of the low solubility and rapid diffusion of tritium through the {delta} ferrite which limited the amount of helium present to form visible bubbles.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of lung following alpha irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Lauhala, K.E.; McDonald, K.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Pulmonary aggregation of inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} particles leads to a cellular evolution of focal inflammation, fibrosis, epithelial dysplasia and lung tumor formation. Female Wistar rats were exposed to an aerosol of high-fired {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} (initial lung burden, 3.9 kBq) and the lungs examined at intervals from 1 day to 700 days after exposure by light and scanning electron microscopy and autoradiography. Peribronchiolar Pu particle aggregation increased with time, resulting in well-defined focal inflammatory lesions after 120 days and fibrotic lesions after 180 days. A generalized hypertrophy and hyperplasia of nonciliated bronchiolar cells was seen at 15 days and type II cell hyperplasia by 30 days after exposure. Focal dysplastic changes in type II alveolar epithelium and terminal nonciliated bronchiolar epithelium preceded carcinoma formation. Alveolar bronchiolarization was first noted at 120 days, squamous metaplasia at 210 days, squamous carcinoma at 270 days and adenocarcinoma at 600 days after exposure.

  5. Histological preparation of developing vestibular otoconia for scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The unique nature of vestibular otoconia as calcium carbonate biominerals makes them particularly susceptible to chemical deformation during histological processing. We fixed and stored otoconia from all three otolith endorgans of embryonic, hatchling and adult Japanese quail in glutaraldehyde containing either phosphate or non-phosphate buffers for varying lengths of time and processed them for scanning electron microscopy. Otoconia from all age groups and otolith endorgans processed in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) showed abnormal surface morphology when compared to acetone fixed controls. Otoconia processed in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate or HEPES buffered artificial endolymph (pH 7.4) showed normal morphology that was similar to controls. The degree of otoconial deformation was directly related to the time exposed to phosphate buffer. Short duration exposure produced particulate deformations while longer exposures resulted in fused otoconia that formed solid sheets. Otoconial surface deformation and fusing was independent of the glutaraldehyde component of the histological processing. These findings should help vestibular researchers to develop appropriate histological processing protocols in future studies of otoconia.

  6. Applications of Direct Detection Device in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Li, Shengdong; Leblanc, Philippe; Duttweiler, Fred; Bouwer, James C.; Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu

    2008-01-01

    A prototype Direct Detection Device (DDD) camera system has shown great promise in improving both the spatial resolution and the signal to noise ratio for electron microscopy at 120–400 keV beam energies (Xuong, et al., 2007. Methods in Cell Biology, 79, 721–739). Without the need for a resolution-limiting scintillation screen as in the charge coupled device (CCD), the DDD camera can outperform CCD based systems in terms of spatial resolution, due to its small pixel size (5 μm). In this paper, the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the DDD prototype is measured and compared with the specifications of commercial scientific CCD camera systems. Combining the fast speed of the DDD with image mosaic techniques, fast wide-area imaging is now possible. In this paper, the first large area mosaic image and the first tomography dataset from the DDD camera are presented, along with an image processing algorithm to correct the specimen drift utilizing the fast readout of the DDD system. PMID:18054249

  7. High-performance probes for light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Sarada; Williams, Megan E; Bloss, Erik B; Stasevich, Timothy J; Speer, Colenso M; Nern, Aljoscha; Pfeiffer, Barret D; Hooks, Bryan M; Li, Wei-Ping; English, Brian P; Tian, Teresa; Henry, Gilbert L; Macklin, John J; Patel, Ronak; Gerfen, Charles R; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Wang, Yalin; Rubin, Gerald M; Looger, Loren L

    2015-06-01

    We describe an engineered family of highly antigenic molecules based on GFP-like fluorescent proteins. These molecules contain numerous copies of peptide epitopes and simultaneously bind IgG antibodies at each location. These 'spaghetti monster' fluorescent proteins (smFPs) distributed well in neurons, notably into small dendrites, spines and axons. smFP immunolabeling localized weakly expressed proteins not well resolved with traditional epitope tags. By varying epitope and scaffold, we generated a diverse family of mutually orthogonal antigens. In cultured neurons and mouse and fly brains, smFP probes allowed robust, orthogonal multicolor visualization of proteins, cell populations and neuropil. smFP variants complement existing tracers and greatly increase the number of simultaneous imaging channels, and they performed well in advanced preparations such as array tomography, super-resolution fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy. In living cells, the probes improved single-molecule image tracking and increased yield for RNA-seq. These probes facilitate new experiments in connectomics, transcriptomics and protein localization. PMID:25915120

  8. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of minerals in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Kuang-Chien

    1982-01-01

    Minerals in eight coals from different mines were characterized in the micron-size range by using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were thinned by ion-milling wafers cut from these coals; a cold stage cooled by liquid nitrogen was used to reduce thermal degradation of the minerals by the ion-beam. Different mineral compounds were observed in different coals. The major minerals are clays, sulfides, oxides, carbonates and some minor-element-bearing phosphates. Clays (kaolinite, illite and others) have been most commonly found as either flat sheets or round globules. Iron sulfide was mostly found in the No. 5 and No. 6 coals from Illinois, distributed as massive polycrystals, as clusters of single crystals (framboids) or as isolated single crystals with size range down to some 0.25 microns. Other sulfides and some oxides were found in other coals with particle size as small as some 200 angstroms. Quartz, titanium oxides and many other carbonates and phosphate compounds were also characterized. Brief TEM work in the organic mass of coal was also introduced to study the nature of the coal macerals.

  9. Customized patterned substrates for highly versatile correlative light-scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Lorena; Sogne, Elisa; Rodighiero, Simona; Marchesi, Davide; Milani, Paolo; Francolini, Maura

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) combines the advantages of light and electron microscopy, thus making it possible to follow dynamic events in living cells at nanometre resolution. Various CLEM approaches and devices have been developed, each of which has its own advantages and technical challenges. We here describe our customized patterned glass substrates, which improve the feasibility of correlative fluorescence/confocal and scanning electron microscopy. PMID:25391455

  10. Customized patterned substrates for highly versatile correlative light-scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Lorena; Sogne, Elisa; Rodighiero, Simona; Marchesi, Davide; Milani, Paolo; Francolini, Maura

    2014-11-01

    Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) combines the advantages of light and electron microscopy, thus making it possible to follow dynamic events in living cells at nanometre resolution. Various CLEM approaches and devices have been developed, each of which has its own advantages and technical challenges. We here describe our customized patterned glass substrates, which improve the feasibility of correlative fluorescence/confocal and scanning electron microscopy.

  11. EDITORIAL: Electron Microscopy and Analysis Group Conference 2011 (EMAG 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebus, Guenter; Walther, Thomas; Brydson, Rik; Ozkaya, Dogan; MacLaren, Ian; Donnelly, Steve; Nellist, Pete; Li, Ziyou; Baker, Richard; Chiu, YuLung

    2012-07-01

    The biennial EMAG conference has established a strong reputation as a key event for the national and international electron microscopy community. In 2011 the meeting was held at The University of Birmingham, and I must first take this opportunity of thanking Birmingham for hosting the conference and for the excellent support we received from the local organisers. As a committee, we are delighted to see that enthusiasm for the EMAG conference series continues to be strong. We received more than 160 submitted abstracts, and 157 delegates attended the meeting. The scientific programme organiser, Ian MacLaren, put together an exciting programme. Plenary lectures were presented by Professor Knut Urban, Dr Frances Ross and Dr Richard Henderson. There were a further 10 invited speakers, from the UK, Continental Europe, Australia, the USA and Japan. The quality of the contributed oral and poster presentations was also very high. EMAG is keen to encourage student participation, and a winner and two runners-up were presented with prizes for the best oral and poster presentations from a student. I am always struck by the scientific quality of the oral and poster contributions and the vibrant discussions that occur both in the formal sessions and in the exhibition space at EMAG. I am convinced that a crucial part of maintaining that scientific quality is the opportunity that is offered of having a paper fully reviewed by two internationally selected referees and published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. For many students, this is the first fully reviewed paper they publish. I hope that you, like me, will be struck by the scientific quality of the 87 papers that follow, and that you will find them interesting and informative. Finally I must thank the platinum sponsors for their support of the meeting. These were Gatan, Zeiss, FEI, JEOL and Hitachi. I must also thank the European Microscopy Society for their generous sponsorship and support for the travel costs of

  12. Optimization-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Jacopo; van Werkhoven, Tim; Verhaegen, Michel; Truong, Hoa H; Keller, Christoph U; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2014-06-01

    Optical aberrations have detrimental effects in multiphoton microscopy. These effects can be curtailed by implementing model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics, which only requires the addition of a wavefront shaping device, such as a deformable mirror (DM) to an existing microscope. The aberration correction is achieved by maximizing a suitable image quality metric. We implement a model-based aberration correction algorithm in a second-harmonic microscope. The tip, tilt, and defocus aberrations are removed from the basis functions used for the control of the DM, as these aberrations induce distortions in the acquired images. We compute the parameters of a quadratic polynomial that is used to model the image quality metric directly from experimental input-output measurements. Finally, we apply the aberration correction by maximizing the image quality metric using the least-squares estimate of the unknown aberration. PMID:24977374

  13. EDITORIAL: Electron Microscopy and Analysis Group Conference 2013 (EMAG2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellist, Pete

    2014-06-01

    It has once again been my pleasure to act as editor for these proceedings, and I must thank all those who have acted as reviewers. I am always struck by the scientific quality of the oral and poster contributions and the vibrant discussions that occur both in the formal sessions and in the exhibition space at EMAG. I am convinced that a crucial part of maintaining that scientific quality is the opportunity that is offered of having a paper fully reviewed by two internationally selected referees and published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. For many students, this is the first fully reviewed paper they publish. I hope that, like me, you will be struck by the scientific quality of the 80 papers that follow, and that you will find them interesting and informative. I must also personally thank all the organisers of EMAG2013 for arranging such an excellent meeting. Ian MacLaren, as Chair of the EMAG Group and of the meeting itself, has contributed a foreword to these proceedings describing the meeting in more detail. A particular highlight of the conference was the special symposium in honour of Professor Archie Howie. We all enjoyed a wonderful speech from Archie at the conference dinner, along with some of his electron microscopy-related poetry. I have great pleasure in publishing the conference dinner poems in this proceedings. I hope you will find these proceedings to be an interesting read and an invaluable resource. Pete Nellist Conference committee Conference chair: Dr I MacLaren Programme organiser: Dr C Ducati Proceedings editor: Prof P D Nellist Trade exhibition organiser: C Hockey (CEM Group) Local organisers: Professor E Boyes, Professor P Gai, Dr R Kröger, Dr V Lazarov, Dr P O'Toole, Dr S Tear and Professor J Yuan Advanced school organisers: Dr S Haigh, Dr A Brown Other committee members: Mr K Meade, Mr O Heyning, Dr M Crawford, Mr M Dixon and Dr Z Li

  14. [High resolution scanning electron microscopy of isolated outer hair cells].

    PubMed

    Koitschev, A; Müller, H

    1996-11-01

    Isolated hair cell preparations have gained wide acceptance as a model for studying physiological and molecular properties of the sensory cells involved in the hearing process. Ultrastructural details, such as stereocilia links, lateral membrane substructure or synaptic links are of crucial importance for normal sensory transduction. For this reason, we developed a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) procedure to study the surface of isolated hair cells. Cells were mechanically and/or enzymatically separated, isolated and immobilized on cover slips by alcian blue and fixed by 2% glutardialdehyde or 1% OsO4. After dehydration, preparations were critical point-dried and sputter-coated with gold-palladium (2-4 nm). Up to 5 nm resolution was achieved. Optimal fixation kept the cells in their typical cylindrical forms. Preservation of the stereocilia and the apical plates of the outer hair cells depended strongly on the fixation process. Tip- and side-links were observed only sporadically because of the aggressive preparation procedure. The lateral plasma membranes of the cell bodies showed regular granular structures of 5-7 nm diameter at maximal magnification. The granular structure of the cell membrane seemed to correspond to putative transmembrane proteins believed to generate membrane-based motility. The remnants of the nerve endings and/or supporting cells usually covered the cell base. The preservation of the cells was better when enzymatic isolation was omitted. The technique used allowed for high resolution ultrastructural examination of isolated hair cells and, when combined with immunological labeling, may permit the identification of proteins at a molecular level. PMID:9064297

  15. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Iron Metal in Almahata Sitta Ureilite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Yubuta, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yasuhara, A.; Mihira, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Goodrich, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Almahata Sitta (AS) is a polymict breccia mainly composed of variable ureilite lithologies with small amounts of chondritic lithologies [1]. Fe metal is a common accessory phase in ureilites, but our earlier study on Fe metals in one of AS fragments (#44) revealed a unique mineralogy never seen in other ureilites [2,3]. In this abstract we report detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on these metal grains to better understand the thermal history of ureilites. We prepared FIB sections of AS#44 by JEOL JIB-4000 from the PTS that was well characterized by SEM-EBSD in our earlier study [2]. The sections were then observed by STEM (JEOL JEM- 2100F). One of the FIB sections shows a submicron-sized symplectic intergrown texture composed of Fe metal (kamacite), Fe carbide (cohenite), Fe phosphide (schreibersite), and Fe sulfide (troilite). Each phase has an identical SAED pattern in spite of its complex texture, suggesting co-crystallization of all phases. This is probably caused by shock re-melting of pre-existing metal + graphite to form a eutectic-looking texture. The other FIB section is mostly composed of homogeneous Fe metal (93 wt% Fe, 5 wt% Ni, and 2 wt% Si), but BF-STEM images exhibited the presence of elongated lathy grains (approx. 2 microns long) embedded in the interstitial matrix. The SAED patterns from these lath grains could be indexed by alpha-Fe (bcc) while interstitial areas are gamma-Fe (fcc). The elongated alpha-Fe grains show tweed-like structures suggesting martensite transformation. Such a texture can be formed by rapid cooling from high temperature where gamma-Fe was stable. Subsequently alpha-Fe crystallized, but gamma-Fe remained in the interstitial matrix due to quenching from high temperature. This scenario is consistent with very rapid cooling history of ureilites suggested by silicate mineralogy.

  16. Structure and assembly of haptoglobin polymers by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wejman, J C; Hovsepian, D; Wall, J S; Hainfeld, J F; Greer, J

    1984-04-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp) consists of light (L) and heavy (H) chains, the latter of which combine with hemoglobin alpha beta dimers to form a highly stable complex. Human haptoglobin assembles as HL units that occur in two allelic forms; HL1 , which is monovalent, and HL2 , which is divalent. As a result, three phenotypic forms exist in the human population: Hp1-1, the homozygous form in which the monovalent HL1 unit occurs as a dimer; Hp2-2, the homozygous form of the divalent HL2 unit, which gives a series of polymers; and the heterozygous Hp2-1 form, which gives a different series of polymers. We have investigated the structures and assembly properties of these two haptoglobin polymeric series in their complexes with hemoglobin using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Polymers of complex are composed of ellipsoidal or bilobal head groups, which are the H alpha beta subunits connected by thin filament-like structures, which are the L chains. Polymers of size up to pentamers can be identified easily by counting the number of head groups in the molecule. Complex 2-1 and complex 2-2 trimers were studied extensively. The differences in detailed morphology show that while the 2-1 trimer is a linear polymer, the 2-2 trimer is a closed circular molecule. The micrograph images suggest that complex 2-2 tetramers and pentamers, and perhaps higher forms may also be cyclic. The structure of the L2 subunit of haptoglobin is shown to be composed of two domains, which may be similar in structure to the single domain of the monovalent L1 chain. The two L2 domains are connected by a hinge that has quite limited flexibility. Using these structural models, assembly characteristics and structural properties of the trimers and tetramers of complex 2-1 and complex 2-2 are described. PMID:6716482

  17. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of auto catalyst and cobalt germanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiping

    The modern ceria-zirconia based catalysts are used in automobiles to reduce exhaust pollutants. Cobalt germanides have potential applications as electrical contacts in the future Ge-based semiconductor devices. In this thesis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to study the atomic scale interactions between metallic nanostructures and crystalline substrates in the two material systems mentioned above. The model catalyst samples consisted of precious metal nano-particles (Pd, Rh) supported on the surface of (Ce,Zr)O2 thin films. The response of the microstructure of the metal-oxide interface to the reduction and oxidation treatments was investigated by cross-sectional high resolution TEM. Atomic detail of the metal-oxide interface was obtained. It was found that Pd and Rh showed different sintering and interaction behaviors on the oxide surface. The preferred orientation of Pd particles in this study was Pd(111)//CZO(111). Partial encapsulation of Pd particles by reduced (Ce,Zr)O 2 surface was observed and possible mechanisms of the encapsulation were discussed. The characteristics of the metal-oxide interaction depend on the properties of the oxide, as well as their relative orientation. The results provide experimental evidence for understanding the thermodynamics of the equilibrium morphology of a solid particle supported on a solid surface that is not considered as inert. The reaction of Co with Ge to form epitaxial Co5Ge7 was studied by in situ ultra-high vacuum (UHV) TEM using two methods. One was reactive deposition of Co on Ge, in which the Ge substrate was maintained at 350°C during deposition. The other method was solid state reaction, in which the deposition of Co on Ge was carried out at room temperature followed by annealing to higher temperatures. During reactive deposition, the deposited Co reacted with Ge to form nanosized 3D Co 5Ge7 islands. During solid state reaction, a continuous epitaxial Co5Ge7 film on the (001) Ge

  18. Visualization of Microbial Biomarkers by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wainwright, Norman R.; Allen, Carlton C.; Child, Alice

    2001-01-01

    . Fortunately, many antimicrobial defense systems of higher organisms require sensitive detection to combat microbial pathogens. We employ here the primitive immune system of the evolutionarily ancient horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. This species relies on multi-enzyme signal amplification detection of cell wall molecules and they can be applied to the development of useful detectors of life. An extension of this work includes the visualization of microbial signatures by labeling LAL components with chromogenic or electron dense markers. The protein Limulus Anti-LPS Factor (LALF) has an extremely high affinity for LPS. By coupling LALF binding with colloidal gold labels we demonstrate a correlation of the structures visible by electron microscopy with biochemical evidence of microbial cell wall materials. Pure silica particles were mixed with cultures of E. coli (10(exp 6) cfu/mL). Samples were washed sequentially with buffered saline, LALF, antibody to LALF and finally colloidal gold-labeled Protein A. Negative controls were not exposed to E. coli but received identical treatment otherwise. Samples were coated with carbon and imaged on a JEOL JSM-840 scanning electron microscope with LaB6 source in the back scatter mode with the JEOL annular back scatter detector. 20 nm-scale black spots in this contrast-reversed image originate from electrons back-scattered by gold atoms. Negative controls did not give any signal. Future work will expand application of this technique to soil simulants and mineralized rock samples.

  19. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis of daily disposable limbal ring contact lenses

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kathrine Osborn; Kakkassery, Joseph; Boree, Danielle; Pinto, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Limbal ring (also known as ‘circle’) contact lenses are becoming increasingly popular, especially in Asian markets because of their eye-enhancing effects. The pigment particles that give the eye-enhancing effects of these lenses can be found on the front or back surface of the contact lens or ‘enclosed’ within the lens matrix. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pigment location and surface roughness of seven types of ‘circle’ contact lenses. Methods Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis was performed using a variable pressure Hitachi S3400N instrument to discern the placement of lens pigments. Atomic force microscopy (Dimension Icon AFM from Bruker Nano) was used to determine the surface roughness of the pigmented regions of the contact lenses. Atomic force microscopic analysis was performed in fluid phase under contact mode using a Sharp Nitride Lever probe (SNL-10) with a spring constant of 0.06 N/m. Root mean square (RMS) roughness values were analysed using a generalised linear mixed model with a log-normal distribution. Least square means and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals were estimated for each brand, location and pigment combination. Results SEM cross-sectional images at 500× and 2,000× magnification showed pigment on the surface of six of the seven lens types tested. The mean depth of pigment for 1-DAY ACUVUE DEFINE (1DAD) lenses was 8.1 μm below the surface of the lens, while the remaining lens types tested had pigment particles on the front or back surface. Results of the atomic force microscopic analysis indicated that 1DAD lenses had significantly lower root mean square roughness values in the pigmented area of the lens than the other lens types tested. Conclusions SEM and AFM analysis revealed pigment on the surface of the lens for all types tested with the exception of 1DAD. Further research is required to determine if the difference in pigment location influences on-eye performance. PMID

  20. Comparison of Scheimpflug-photography, specular microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to detect corneal changes in toxicity studies in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Boeker, T.W.; Wegener, A.; Koch, F.; Hockwin, O. )

    1990-01-01

    With an increasing number of in-vivo methods to examine the eyes of laboratory animals, the rat has become an important animal model in experimental eye research. Specular microscopy is a clinical tool to examine the corneal endothelium in-vivo. To evaluate the versatility of this method for small animal eyes, we studied both corneal endothelial cell-count and corneal thickness in normal rats as well as those with diabetic, naphthalene and UV-B cataract. As a reference scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the corneal endothelium was performed. For cell-counts the correlation coefficient between both methods was found to be sufficient. The comparison of corneal thickness measurement (SEM-values) with specular microscopy and with Scheimpflugbiometry failed to show a satisfactory correlation. The study proves that specular microscopy is a useful tool to document changes also in the endothelium of the rat-cornea.

  1. Backscattered Electron Microscopy as an Advanced Technique in Petrography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krinsley, David Henry; Manley, Curtis Robert

    1989-01-01

    Three uses of this method with sandstone, desert varnish, and granite weathering are described. Background information on this technique is provided. Advantages of this type of microscopy are stressed. (CW)

  2. The New Electron Microscopy: Cells and Molecules in Three Dimensions | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI recently announced the launch of the new National Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility (NCEF) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). The launch comes while cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is enjoying the spotlight as a newly emerging, rapidly evolving technology with the potential to revolutionize the field of structural biology. Read more...

  3. A CCD Camera with Electron Decelerator for Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, Kenneth H; Downing, Kenneth H.; Mooney, Paul E.

    2008-03-17

    Electron microscopists are increasingly turning to Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscopes (IVEMs) operating at 300 - 400 kV for a wide range of studies. They are also increasingly taking advantage of slow-scan charge coupled device (CCD) cameras, which have become widely used on electron microscopes. Under some conditions CCDs provide an improvement in data quality over photographic film, as well as the many advantages of direct digital readout. However, CCD performance is seriously degraded on IVEMs compared to the more conventional 100 kV microscopes. In order to increase the efficiency and quality of data recording on IVEMs, we have developed a CCD camera system in which the electrons are decelerated to below 100 kV before impacting the camera, resulting in greatly improved performance in both signal quality and resolution compared to other CCDs used in electron microscopy. These improvements will allow high-quality image and diffraction data to be collected directly with the CCD, enabling improvements in data collection for applications including high-resolution electron crystallography, single-particle reconstruction of protein structures, tomographic studies of cell ultrastructure and remote microscope operation. This approach will enable us to use even larger format CCD chips that are being developed with smaller pixels.

  4. Mapping magnetism with atomic resolution using aberrated electron probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrobo, Juan; Rusz, Ján; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2015-03-01

    In this talk, we report a direct experimental real-space mapping of magnetic circular dichroism with atomic resolution in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an aberrated electron probe with customized phase distribution, we reveal with electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The aberrated probes allow the collection of EEL spectra using the transmitted beam, which results in a magnetic circular dichroic signal with intrinsically larger signal-to-noise ratios than those obtained via nanodiffraction techniques (where most of the transmitted electrons are discarded). The novel experimental setup presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution. This research was supported by DOE SUFD MSED, by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the US DOE, and by the Swedish Research Council and Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (NSC center)

  5. Observation of Materials Processes in Liquids in the Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chong M.; Liao, Honggang; Ross, Frances M.

    2015-01-01

    Materials synthesis and the functioning of devices often indispensably involve liquid media. But direct visualization of dynamic process in liquids, especially with high spatial and temporal resolution, has been challenging. For solid materials, advances in aberration corrected electron microscopy have made observation of atomic level features a routine practice. Here we discuss the extent to which one can take advantage of the resolution of modern electron microscopes to image phenomenon occuring in liquids. We will describe the fundamentals of two different experimental approaches, closed and open liquid cells. We will illustrate the capabilities of each approach by considering processes in batteries and nucleation and growth of nanoparticles from solution. We conclude that liquid cell electron microscopy appears to be duly fulfilling its role for in situ studies of nanoscale processes in liquids, revealing physical and chemical processes otherwise difficult to observe.

  6. A Fresh Twist on The Electron Microscope: Probing Broken Symmetries at a New Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos

    The introduction of aberration-correction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has allowed the realization of Richard Feynman's long sought dream, atom-by-atom structural and elemental identification of materials by simply looking ``at the thing.'' Until now, the goal of aberration-correction in STEM has been to produce the smallest possible electron probes, which essentially corresponds to a near constant phase across the probe. Phases increase the size of electron probes and result in images and spectra with a lower spatial resolution. In this talk, calculations will be presented showing that aberrations in lenses are intrinsic generators of angular momentum, and that phases introduced in atomic-size electron probes can actually be beneficial when studying the symmetry of materials. In particular, examples of mapping magnetic ordering of materials with atomic size electron probes will be shown. Magnetic dichroism is one of the new frontiers where aberration-correction STEM can have a significant impact, and reveal information that is physically out of reach in X-ray and neutron synchrotrons. Current and future limitations in the experiments and requirements to reveal the magnetic moment (orbital and spin), charge ordering, crystal field splitting, spin-orbit-coupling, optical dichroism, and other physical phenomena associated with broken symmetries will be discussed. This research was supported by the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS), which is sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy. Collaborators: J. Rusz, J. Spiegelberg, M.A. McGuire, C.T. Symons, R.R. Vatsavai, C. Cantoni and A.R. Lupini.

  7. Identifying different stacking sequences in few-layer CVD-grown Mo S2 by low-energy atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Aiming; Chen, Wei; Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Lin, Yuyuan; Persson, Kristin; Zettl, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Atomically thin Mo S2 grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising candidate for next-generation electronics due to inherent CVD scalability and controllability. However, it is well known that the stacking sequence in few-layer Mo S2 can significantly impact electrical and optical properties. Herein we report different intrinsic stacking sequences in CVD-grown few-layer Mo S2 obtained by atomic-resolution annular-dark-field imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope operated at 50 keV. Trilayer Mo S2 displays a new stacking sequence distinct from the commonly observed 2 H and 3 R phases of Mo S2 . Density functional theory is used to examine the stability of different stacking sequences, and the findings are consistent with our experimental observations.

  8. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lansåker, Pia C. Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G.; Hallén, Anders

    2014-10-15

    Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness d{sub g}—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for d{sub g} were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  9. Fast Imaging with Inelastically Scattered Electrons by Off-Axis Chromatic Confocal Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Changlin; Zhu, Ye; Lazar, Sorin; Etheridge, Joanne

    2014-04-01

    We introduce off-axis chromatic scanning confocal electron microscopy, a technique for fast mapping of inelastically scattered electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope without a spectrometer. The off-axis confocal mode enables the inelastically scattered electrons to be chromatically dispersed both parallel and perpendicular to the optic axis. This enables electrons with different energy losses to be separated and detected in the image plane, enabling efficient energy filtering in a confocal mode with an integrating detector. We describe the experimental configuration and demonstrate the method with nanoscale core-loss chemical mapping of silver (M4,5) in an aluminium-silver alloy and atomic scale imaging of the low intensity core-loss La (M4,5@840 eV) signal in LaB6. Scan rates up to 2 orders of magnitude faster than conventional methods were used, enabling a corresponding reduction in radiation dose and increase in the field of view. If coupled with the enhanced depth and lateral resolution of the incoherent confocal configuration, this offers an approach for nanoscale three-dimensional chemical mapping.

  10. Visualization of macromolecular complexes using cryo-electron microscopy with FEI Tecnai transmission electron microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Grassucci, Robert A; Taylor, Derek; Frank, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    This protocol details the steps used for visualizing the frozen-hydrated grids as prepared following the accompanying protocol entitled ‘Preparation of macromolecular complexes for visualization using cryo-electron microscopy.’ This protocol describes how to transfer the grid to the microscope using a standard cryo-transfer holder or, alternatively, using a cryo-cartridge loading system, and how to collect low-dose data using an FEI Tecnai transmission electron microscope. This protocol also summarizes and compares the various options that are available in data collection for three-dimensional (3D) single-particle reconstruction. These options include microscope settings, choice of detectors and data collection strategies both in situations where a 3D reference is available and in the absence of such a reference (random-conical and common lines). PMID:18274535

  11. High bandwidth secondary electron detection in variable pressure scanning electron microscopy using a Frisch grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, S. W.; Phillips, M. R.

    2008-03-01

    The bandwidth and contrast of secondary electron (SE) images obtained using variable pressure scanning electron microscopy are enhanced when a grounded Frisch grid is placed between the SE detecting anode and the negatively biased stage. The improvement in SE image quality occurs as a consequence of the grounded Frisch grid electrostatically screening the 'slow' induced ion current signal, generated below the grid, from the induced current detected above the grid by the anode. Ion induced artefacts, such as image smearing at fast scan rates, are virtually eliminated using a Frisch grid. Gas amplification data are presented to illustrate that gas gain can be optimized by varying the Frisch grid-stage (amplification region) separation Frisch grid-anode (drift region) separation and stage bias.

  12. Atomically resolved structure of ligand-protected Au9 clusters on TiO2 nanosheets using aberration-corrected STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Qahtani, Hassan S.; Kimoto, Koji; Bennett, Trystan; Alvino, Jason F.; Andersson, Gunther G.; Metha, Gregory F.; Golovko, Vladimir B.; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2016-03-01

    Triphenylphosphine ligand-protected Au9 clusters deposited onto titania nanosheets show three different atomic configurations as observed by scanning transmission electron microscopy. The configurations observed are a 3-dimensional structure, corresponding to the previously proposed Au9 core of the clusters, and two pseudo-2-dimensional (pseudo-2D) structures, newly found by this work. With the help of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the observed pseudo-2D structures are attributed to the low energy, de-ligated structures formed through interaction with the substrate. The combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy with DFT calculations thus allows identifying whether or not the deposited Au9 clusters have been de-ligated in the deposition process.

  13. Hot Electron Scattering in Thin Metal Films Utilizing Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durcan, Christopher; Nolting, Westly; Balsano, Robert; Labella, Vincent

    Electron scattering in nm-thick metal films has fundamental and technological importance. Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM) an STM based technique can be utilized to measure the scattering rate and understand the scattering mechanisms. By injecting electrons from the STM tip in the energy range of 0.2 eV- 1.5 eV into the metal base of a metal semiconductor diode and measuring the amount of current collected in the semiconductor a Schottky barrier height can be measured. In addition, by measuring the decay in the collector or BEEM current vs. metal film thickness, an electron attenuation length can be measured. One question has always been; what are these BEEM attenuation lengths sensitive to? Intrinsic properties of the metal, or extrinsic effects such as the structure of the film? By measuring the attenuation length of W and Cr and comparing to prior measurements of Cu, Ag, Au a comparison between the BEEM attenuation length and resistivity can be achieved over an order of magnitude in resistivity. The results show an inverse relationship that one expects for mean free path and resistivity, indicating that BEEM measurements are sensitive to the intrinsic properties of the metal and not solely the structure of the films.

  14. Diffusive and inelastic scattering in ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy and ballistic-electron-emission microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.; Turner, B.R.; Schowalter, L.J.

    1993-07-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscopy (BEEM) of Au/Si(001) n type was done to study whether elastic scattering in the Au overlayer is dominant. It was found that there is no dependence of the BEEM current on the relative gradient of the Au surface with respect to the Si interface, and this demonstrates that significant elastic scattering must occur in the Au overlayer. Ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy (BEES) was also done, and, rather than using the conventional direct-current BEES, alternating-current (ac) BEES was done on Au/Si and also on Au/PtSi/Si(001) n type. The technique of ac BEES was found to give linear threshold for the Schottky barrier, and it also clearly showed the onset of electron-hole pair creation and other inelastic scattering events. The study of device quality PtSi in Au/PtSi/Si(001) yielded an attenuation length of 4 nm for electrons of energy 1 eV above the PtSi Fermi energy. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Discrete Chromatic Aberrations Arising from Photoinduced Electron-Photon Interactions in Ultrafast Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Plemmons, Dayne A; Flannigan, David J

    2016-05-26

    In femtosecond ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) experiments, the initial excitation period is composed of spatiotemporal overlap of the temporally commensurate pump photon pulse and probe photoelectron packet. Generation of evanescent near-fields at the nanostructure specimens produces a dispersion relation that enables coupling of the photons (ℏω = 2.4 eV, for example) and freely propagating electrons (200 keV, for example) in the near-field. Typically, this manifests as discrete peaks occurring at integer multiples (n) of the photon energy in the low-loss/gain region of electron-energy spectra (i.e., at 200 keV ± nℏω eV). Here, we examine the UEM imaging resolution implications of the strong inelastic near-field interactions between the photons employed in optical excitation and the probe photoelectrons. We find that the additional photoinduced energy dispersion occurring when swift electrons pass through intense evanescent near-fields results in a discrete chromatic aberration that limits the spatial resolving power to several angstroms during the excitation period. PMID:27111530

  16. Correlative light and electron microscopy analysis of the centrosome: A step-by-step protocol.

    PubMed

    Kong, Dong; Loncarek, Jadranka

    2015-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy harnesses the best from each of the two modalities of microscopy it utilizes; while light microscopy provides information about the dynamic properties of the cellular structure or fluorescently labeled protein, electron microscopy provides ultrastructural information in an unsurpassed resolution. However, tracing a particular cell and its rare and small structures such as centrosomes throughout numerous steps of the experiment is not a trivial task. In this chapter, we present the experimental workflow for combining live-cell fluorescence microscopy analysis with classical transmission electron microscopy, adapted for the studies of the centrosomes and basal bodies. We describe, in a step-by-step manner, an approach that can be affordably and successfully employed in any typical cell biology laboratory. The article details all key phases of the analysis starting from cell culture, live-cell microscopy, and sample fixation, through the steps of sample preparation for electron microscopy, to the identification of the target cell on the electron microscope. PMID:26175430

  17. Atomic force microscopy, lateral force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy investigations and adhesion force measurements for elucidation of tungsten removal mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, D.J.; Cecchi, J.L.; Hetherington, D.L.

    1999-09-01

    We investigated various interactions between alumina and tungsten films that occur during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Atomic force microscopy surface topography measurements of post-CMP tungsten indicate that the roughness of the tungsten is independent of polish pressure and rotation rate. Pure mechanical abrasion is therefore an unlikely mechanism of material removal during CMP. Transmission electron microscopy images corroborate these results. The adhesion force between alumina and tungsten was measured in solution. The adhesive force increased with KIO{sub 3} concentration. Friction forces were measured in solution using lateral force microscopy. The friction force in buffered solutions was independent of KIO{sub 3} concentration. These results indicate that interactions other than purely mechanical interactions exist during CMP. {copyright} {ital 1999 Materials Research Society.}

  18. Analytical electron microscopy characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site, FY1993 report

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.C.; Cunnane, J.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.

    1994-10-01

    A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) is being used to determine the nature of uranium in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The information gained from these studies is being used to develop and test remediation technologies. Investigations using SEM have shown that uranium is contained within particles that are typically 1 to 100 {mu}m in diameter. Further analysis with AEM has shown that these uranium-rich regions are made up of discrete uranium-bearing phases. The distribution of these uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level.

  19. Compact, low power radio frequency cavity for femtosecond electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lassise, A.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; Luiten, O. J.

    2012-04-15

    Reported here is the design, construction, and characterization of a small, power efficient, tunable dielectric filled cavity for the creation of femtosecond electron bunches in an existing electron microscope without the mandatory use of femtosecond lasers. A 3 GHz pillbox cavity operating in the TM{sub 110} mode was specially designed for chopping the beam of a 30 keV scanning electron microscope. The dielectric material used is ZrTiO{sub 4}, chosen for the high relative permittivity ({epsilon}{sub r}= 37 at 10 GHz) and low loss tangent (tan {delta}= 2 x 10{sup -4}). This allows the cavity radius to be reduced by a factor of six, while the power consumption is reduced by an order of magnitude compared to a vacuum pillbox cavity. These features make this cavity ideal as a module for existing electron microscopes, and an alternative to femtosecond laser systems integrated with electron microscopes.

  20. Computed Ultrasound Tomography in Echo mode (CUTE) of speed of sound for diagnosis and for aberration correction in pulse-echo sonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Michael; Held, Gerrit; Preisser, Stefan; Peeters, Sara; Grünig, Michael; Frenz, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Sound speed as a diagnostic marker for various diseases of human tissue has been of interest for a while. Up to now, mostly transmission ultrasound computed tomography (UCT) was able to detect spatially resolved sound speed, and its promise as a diagnostic tool has been demonstrated. However, UCT is limited to acoustically transparent samples such as the breast. We present a novel technique where spatially resolved detection of sound speed can be achieved using conventional pulse-echo equipment in reflection mode. For this purpose, pulse-echo images are acquired under various transmit beam directions and a two-dimensional map of the sound speed is reconstructed from the changing phase of local echoes using a direct reconstruction method. Phantom results demonstrate that a high spatial resolution (1 mm) and contrast (0.5 % of average sound speed) can be achieved suitable for diagnostic purposes. In comparison to previous reflection-mode based methods, CUTE works also in a situation with only diffuse echoes, and its direct reconstruction algorithm enables real-time application. This makes it suitable as an addition to conventional clinical ultrasound where it has the potential to benefit diagnosis in a multimodal approach. In addition, knowledge of the spatial distribution of sound speed allows full aberration correction and thus improved spatial resolution and contrast of conventional B-mode ultrasound.

  1. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles.

  2. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles. PMID:27121137

  3. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles. PMID:27121137

  4. Pulmonary mineral dust. A study of ninety patients by electron microscopy, electron microanalysis, and electron microdiffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J. P.; Henoc, P.; Galle, P.; Pariente, R.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study of 90 patients are presented. Intrapulmonary mineral deposits were characterized by electron diffraction and electron probe microanalysis. Using this method, pneumoconioses may be distinguidhed from other pneumopathies. In cases of pneumoconiosis, there exists a specific relationship between the etiology of the dust exposure and the crystallographic characteristics of the intrapulmonary deposits. The nature of the deposits may be indicative of a specific type of pneumoconiosis. This method is particularly useful in differentiating between asbestos bodies and ferruginous bodies. The value of the method in general and its importance in the study of pneumoconiosis are discussed. Images Figure 4 Figure 13 Figure 5 Figure 14 Figure 6 Figure 15 Figure 7 Figure 16 Figure 8 Figure 17 Figure 1 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 2 Figure 11 Figure 3 Figure 12 PMID:937507

  5. High resolution structural and compositional mapping of the SrTiO3/LaFeO3 interface using chromatic aberration corrected energy filtered imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabius, Bernd; Houben, Lothar; Dwyer, Christian; Colby, Robert; Chambers, Scott A.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal

    2014-03-01

    Interfaces between insulating polar perovskites have demonstrated a wealth of electronic and magnetic properties. Understanding and predicting the properties of a specific interface requires atomic level knowledge of interface structure and chemistry. Electron microscopy is capable of this task, and has been frequently applied to oxide interfaces using a combination of high-angle angular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) captures a full image for a given energy losses, allowing a larger field of view than typical for STEM-EELS in far less time. However, EFTEM has not, to date, demonstrated the spatial resolution of STEM-EELS due to the limits set by chromatic aberration Cc. This study of LaFeO3/SrTiO3 demonstrates that Cc correction enhances the resolution of EFTEM for elemental mapping, allowing a unit cell-by-unit cell analysis of the concentration gradients across the SrTiO3/LaFeO3 interface. The charge distribution at the interface will be discussed. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  6. Investigation of proximity effects in electron microscopy and lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, M.-M.; Vollnhals, F.; Rietzler, F.; Schirmer, M.; Steinrueck, H.-P.; Marbach, H.

    2012-01-30

    A fundamental challenge in lithographic and microscopic techniques employing focused electron beams are so-called proximity effects due to unintended electron emission and scattering in the sample. Herein, we apply a method that allows for visualizing electron induced surface modifications on a SiN substrate covered with a thin native oxide layer by means of iron deposits. Conventional wisdom holds that by using thin membranes proximity effects can be effectively reduced. We demonstrate that, contrary to the expectation, these can be indeed larger on a 200 nm SiN-membrane than on the respective bulk substrate due to charging effects.

  7. Microscopic techniques bridging between nanoscale and microscale with an atomically sharpened tip - field ion microscopy/scanning probe microscopy/ scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Sasahara, Akira

    2014-11-01

    Over a hundred years an atomistic point of view has been indispensable to explore fascinating properties of various materials and to develop novel functional materials. High-resolution microscopies, rapidly developed during the period, have taken central roles in promoting materials science and related techniques to observe and analyze the materials. As microscopies with the capability of atom-imaging, field ion microscopy (FIM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be cited, which have been highly evaluated as methods to ultimately bring forward the viewpoint of reductionism in materials science. On one hand, there have been difficulties to derive useful and practical information on large (micro) scale unique properties of materials using these excellent microscopies and to directly advance the engineering for practical materials. To make bridges over the gap between an atomic scale and an industrial engineering scale, we have to develop emergence science step-by-step as a discipline having hierarchical structures for future prospects by combining nanoscale and microscale techniques; as promising ways, the combined microscopic instruments covering the scale gap and the extremely sophisticated methods for sample preparation seem to be required. In addition, it is noted that spectroscopic and theoretical methods should implement the emergence science.Fundamentally, the function of microscope is to determine the spatial positions of a finite piece of material, that is, ultimately individual atoms, at an extremely high resolution with a high stability. To define and control the atomic positions, the STM and AFM as scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have successfully demonstrated their power; the technological heart of SPM lies in an atomically sharpened tip, which can be observed by FIM and TEM. For emergence science we would like to set sail using the tip as a base. Meanwhile, it is significant

  8. Extracellular vesicles release by cardiac telocytes: electron microscopy and electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Fertig, Emanuel T; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Popescu, Laurentiu M

    2014-10-01

    Telocytes have been reported to play an important role in long-distance heterocellular communication in normal and diseased heart, both through direct contact (atypical junctions), as well as by releasing extracellular vesicles (EVs) which may act as paracrine mediators. Exosomes and ectosomes are the two main types of EVs, as classified by size and the mechanism of biogenesis. Using electron microscopy (EM) and electron tomography (ET) we have found that telocytes in culture release at least three types of EVs: exosomes (released from endosomes; 45 ± 8 nm), ectosomes (which bud directly from the plasma membrane; 128 ± 28 nm) and multivesicular cargos (MVC; 1 ± 0.4 μm), the latter containing tightly packaged endomembrane-bound vesicles (145 ± 35 nm). Electron tomography revealed that endomembrane vesicles are released into the extracellular space as a cargo enclosed by plasma membranes (estimated area of up to 3 μm(2)). This new type of EV, also released by telocytes in tissue, likely represents an essential component in the paracrine secretion of telocytes and may consequently be directly involved in heart physiology and regeneration. PMID:25257228

  9. Imaging of magnetic and electric fields by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zweck, Josef

    2016-10-12

    Nanostructured materials become more and more a part of our daily life, partly as self-assembled particles or artificially patterned. These nanostructures often possess intrinsic magnetic and/or electric fields which determine (at least partially) their physical properties. Therefore it is important to be able to measure these fields reliably on a nanometre scale. A rather common instrument for the investigation of these fields is the transmission electron microscope as it offers high spatial resolution. The use of an electron microscope to image electric and magnetic fields on a micron down to sub-nanometre scale is treated in detail for transmission electron microscopes (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM). The formation of contrast is described for the most common imaging modes, the specific advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed and examples are given. In addition, the experimental requirements for the use of the techniques described are listed and explained. PMID:27536873

  10. A large area cooled-CCD detector for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruqi, A. R.; Andrews, H. N.; Raeburn, C.

    1994-09-01

    Large area cooled-CCDs are an excellent medium for (indirectly) recording electron images and electron diffraction patterns in real time and for use in electron tomography; real-time imaging is extremely useful in making rapid adjustments in the electron microscope. CCDs provide high sensitivity (useful for minimising dosage to radiation-sensitive biological specimen), good resolution, stable performance, excellent dynamic range and linearity and a reasonably fast readout. We have built an electron imaging device based on the EEV 1152 by 814 pixel CCD which is controlled from a unix based SUN Sparestation operating under X-Windows. The incident 100 kV electrons are converted to visible light in a 0.5 mm thick YAG single crystal which is imaged through a lens on to the CCD. The CCD electronics is designed to be as flexible as possible and allows a wide variation in the readout speed to cater for the relatively fast application where readout noise is less critical and low readout noise applications where the extra few seconds of readout time are not significant. The CCD electronics is built in VME format which is controlled through a S-bus to VME driver. With two parallel channels of readout the whole image can be read out in ˜ 1 s (using the faster readout speed) with 16 bit precision and the image is displayed under X-Windows in a few seconds. The present readout works at 500 kHz and has a noise of ˜ 30 e rms per pixel. With a Peltier cooling device we can operate the CCD at ˜ -40°C which reduces the dark current adequately to allow exposures of up to several minutes. Several examples of patterns collected with the system on a Philips CM12 microscope will be presented.

  11. Measuring Lattice Strain in Three Dimensions through Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) atomic structure of nanomaterials, including strain, is crucial to understand their properties. Here, we investigate lattice strain in Au nanodecahedra using electron tomography. Although different electron tomography techniques enabled 3D characterizations of nanostructures at the atomic level, a reliable determination of lattice strain is not straightforward. We therefore propose a novel model-based approach from which atomic coordinates are measured. Our findings demonstrate the importance of investigating lattice strain in 3D. PMID:26340328

  12. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns about the environmental and public health effects of particulate matter (PM) have stimulated interest in analytical techniques capable of measuring the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSE...

  13. SEM (SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY) EVIDENCE FOR A NEW SPECIES, 'GIARDIA PSITTACI' (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Giardia trophozoites were isolated from the small intestine of budgerigars (parakeets) and examined morphologically with light and scanning electron microscopy. The presence of a claw-hammer shape median body suggested classification of these trophozoites as G. duodenalis. Howeve...

  14. Fundamental Technical Elements of Freeze-fracture/Freeze-etch in Biological Electron Microscopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freeze-fracture/freeze-etch describes a process whereby specimens, typically biological or nanomaterial in nature, are frozen, fractured, and replicated to generate a carbon/platinum "cast" intended for examination by transmission electron microscopy. Specimens are subjected to u...

  15. Fixation-resistant photoactivatable fluorescent proteins for correlative light and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Paez Segala, Maria G.; Sun, Mei G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Viswanathan, Sarada; Baird, Michelle A.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Allen, John R.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Yalin; Looger, Loren L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins facilitate a variety of imaging paradigms in live and fixed samples. However, they cease to function following heavy fixation, hindering advanced applications such as correlative light and electron microscopy. Here we report engineered variants of the photoconvertible Eos fluorescent protein that function normally in heavily fixed (0.5–1% OsO4), plastic resin-embedded samples, enabling correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and high-quality electron microscopy. PMID:25581799

  16. Modern electron microscopy resolved in space, energy and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, F.

    2011-06-01

    Recent pioneering experiments combining ultrafast lasers with electron-based technology demonstrated the possibility to obtain real-time information about chemical bonds and their dynamics during reactions and phase transformation. These techniques have been successfully applied to several states of matter including gases, liquids, solids and biological samples showing a unique versatility thanks to the high sensitivity of electrons to tiny amounts of material and their low radiation damage. A very powerful tool, the time-resolved Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), is capable of delivering information on the structure of ordered and disordered matter through diffraction and imaging, with a spatial resolution down to the atomic limit (10-10 m); the same apparatus can distinguish dynamical phenomena happening on the time-scales between fs and ms, with a dynamic range of 12 orders of magnitude. At the same time, spectroscopic information can be obtained from the loss of kinetic energy of electrons interacting with specimens in the range of interband transitions and plasmons in solids, or charge transfers in molecules, all the way up to the atomic core levels with the same time-resolution. In this contribution, we focus on the recent advances in fs Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (FEELS), discussing the main results and their implications for future studies.

  17. Atomic scale characterization of materials using scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Jeffery Andrew

    Coupling the development of emerging experimental techniques in STEM and EELS with a fundamental understanding of atomic electronic structure afforded by DFT represents the unique approach and intention of this thesis. Scanning transmission electron microscopes equipped with high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) detectors and Gatan image filters (GIF) provide images and spectra, where the image brightness is interpreted as a function of atomic mass and thickness, and elemental specific spectra provide a means for the exploration of electronic and chemical structure of materials at the angstrom size scale. Over the past 20 years, the application of EELS in STEM has enabled more accurate elemental identification and exploration of electronic and chemical structure on angstrom-length scales, and arguably has provided an unprecedented wealth of materials characterization compared to other available techniques. Many materials issues related to specific novel properties that cannot be analyzed using the traditional techniques of the past, however, still remain unanswered. These concepts require a married approach of experiment and theory to fully explain. The intent of this dissertation is the development of improved analysis techniques that derive quantitative atomic scale information in connection with unraveling the origins of materials properties linked to the electronic structure and chemistry of materials.

  18. In-Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdi, Beata L; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas; Xu, WU; Nasybulin, Eduard; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chongmin; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James E; Browning, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  19. In Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdi, Beata L.; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R.; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R.; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David A.; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of in situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  20. Time Resolved Phase Transitions via Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; Armstrong, M R; Blobaum, K J; Browning, N D; Burnham, A K; Campbell, G H; Gee, R; Kim, J S; King, W E; Maiti, A; Piggott, W T; Torralva, B R

    2007-02-22

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) project is developing an in situ electron microscope with nanometer- and nanosecond-scale resolution for the study of rapid laser-driven processes in materials. We report on the results obtained in a year-long LDRD-supported effort to develop DTEM techniques and results for phase transitions in molecular crystals, reactive multilayer foils, and melting and resolidification of bismuth. We report the first in situ TEM observation of the HMX {beta}-{delta} phase transformation in sub-{micro}m crystals, computational results suggesting the importance of voids and free surfaces in the HMX transformation kinetics, and the first electron diffraction patterns of intermediate states in fast multilayer foil reactions. This project developed techniques which are applicable to many materials systems and will continue to be employed within the larger DTEM effort.

  1. In-situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy for battery research.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, B Layla; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David A; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong-Min; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires. PMID:24755142

  2. The theory and practice of high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.C. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in instrumentation have produced the first commercial examples of what can justifiably be called High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopes. The key components of such instruments are a cold field emission gun, a small-gap immersion probe-forming lens, and a clean dry-pumped vacuum. The performance of these microscopes is characterized by several major features including a spatial resolution, in secondary electron mode on solid specimens, which can exceed 1nm on a routine basis; an incident probe current density of the order of 10{sup 6} amps/cm{sup 2}; and the ability to maintain these levels of performance over an accelerating voltage range of from 1 to 30keV. This combination of high resolution, high probe current, low contamination and flexible electron-optical conditions provides many new opportunitites for the application of the SEM to materials science, physics, and the life sciences. 27 refs., 14 figs.

  3. Electronic and magnetic reconstructions in La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures: A case of enhanced interlayer coupling controlled by the interface

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Flavio Y.; Garcia-Barriocanal, Javier; Varela del Arco, Maria; Nemes, Norbert; Thakur, P.; Cezar, J. C.; Rivera-Calzada, Alberto; Garcia-Hernandez, M; Leon, C.; Okamoto, Satoshi; Pennycook, Stephen J; Santamaria, J.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the electronic reconstruction that occurs at the LSMO/STO interface on epitaxial superlattices by combined magnetotransport measurements, aberration corrected microscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. We have found a reduced Ti oxidation state resulting from charge transfer at the interface. XMCD evidences magnetic moment at the Ti originated at the superexchange interaction with Mn. This induced magnetic moment at STO controls the bulk magnetic and transport properties of the superlattices when the titanate layer thickness is below 1 nm.

  4. Studying intracellular transport using high-pressure freezing and Correlative Light Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Edward; Mantell, Judith; Carter, Debbie; Tilly, Gini; Verkade, Paul

    2009-10-01

    Correlative Light Electron Microscopy (CLEM) aims at combining the best of light and electron microscopy in one experiment. Light microscopy (LM) is especially suited for providing a general overview with data from lots of different cells and by using live cell imaging it can show the history or sequence of events between or inside cells. Electron microscopy (EM) on the other hand can provide a much higher resolution image of a particular event and provide additional spatial information, the so-called reference space. CLEM thus has certain strengths over the application of both LM and EM techniques separately. But combining both modalities however generally also means making compromises in one or both of the techniques. Most often the preservation of ultrastructure for the electron microscopy part is sacrificed. Ideally samples should be visualized in its most native state both in the light microscope as well as the electron microscope. For electron microscopy this currently means that the sample will have to be cryo-fixed instead of the standard chemical fixation. In this paper we will discuss the rationale for using cryofixation for CLEM experiments. In particular we will highlight a CLEM technique using high-pressure freezing in combination with live cell imaging. In addition we examine some of the EM analysis tools that may be useful in combination with CLEM techniques. PMID:19660566

  5. Time-resolved scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frömter, Robert; Kloodt, Fabian; Rößler, Stefan; Frauen, Axel; Staeck, Philipp; Cavicchia, Demetrio R.; Bocklage, Lars; Röbisch, Volker; Quandt, Eckhard; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of investigating periodically driven magnetization dynamics in a scanning electron microscope with polarization analysis based on spin-polarized low-energy electron diffraction. With the present setup, analyzing the time structure of the scattering events, we obtain a temporal resolution of 700 ps, which is demonstrated by means of imaging the field-driven 100 MHz gyration of the vortex in a soft-magnetic FeCoSiB square. Owing to the efficient intrinsic timing scheme, high-quality movies, giving two components of the magnetization simultaneously, can be recorded on the time scale of hours.

  6. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, M.; Hankla, A.

    1996-07-09

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90{degree} such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system. 5 figs.

  7. Aberration correction of unstable resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Construction of aspheric reflectors for unstable resonator lasers to provide an arbitrary laser mode inside the resonator to correct aberrations of an output beam by the construction of the shape of an end reflector opposite the output reflector of the resonator cavity, such as aberrations resulting from refraction of a beam exiting the solid of the resonator having an index of refraction greater than 1 or to produce an aberration in the output beam that will precisely compensate for the aberration of an optical train into which the resonator beam is coupled.

  8. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, Mark; Hankla, Allen

    1996-01-01

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90.degree. such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system.

  9. Integrating electron microscopy into nanoscience and materials engineering programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormia, Robert D.; Oye, Michael M.; Nguyen, Anh; Skiver, David; Shi, Meng; Torres, Yessica

    2014-10-01

    Preparing an effective workforce in high technology is the goal of both academic and industry training, and has been the engine that drives innovation and product development in the United States for over a century. During the last 50 years, technician training has comprised a combination of two-year academic programs, internships and apprentice training, and extensive On-the-Job Training (OJT). Recently, and especially in Silicon Valley, technicians have four-year college degrees, as well as relevant hands-on training. Characterization in general, and microscopy in particular, is an essential tool in process development, manufacturing and QA/QC, and failure analysis. Training for a broad range of skills and practice is challenging, especially for community colleges. Workforce studies (SRI/Boeing) suggest that even four year colleges often do not provide the relevant training and experience in laboratory skills, especially design of experiments and analysis of data. Companies in high-tech further report difficulty in finding skilled labor, especially with industry specific experience. Foothill College, in partnership with UCSC, SJSU, and NASA-Ames, has developed a microscopy training program embedded in a research laboratory, itself a partnership between university and government, providing hands-on experience in advanced instrumentation, experimental design and problem solving, with real-world context from small business innovators, in an environment called `the collaboratory'. The program builds on AFM-SEM training at Foothill, and provides affordable training in FE-SEM and TEM through a cost recovery model. In addition to instrument and engineering training, the collaboratory also supports academic and personal growth through a multiplayer social network of students, faculty, researchers, and innovators.

  10. Low impact to fixed cell processing aiming transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barth, Ortrud Monika; Silva, Marcos Alexandre Nunes da; Barreto-Vieira, Debora Ferreira

    2016-06-01

    In cell culture, cell structures suffer strong impact due to centrifugation during processing for electron microscope observation. In order to minimise this effect, a new protocol was successfully developed. Using conventional reagents and equipments, it took over one week, but cell compression was reduced to none or the lowest deformation possible. PMID:27276186

  11. Photoemission electron microscopy using extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulse trains

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, A.; Schwenke, J.; Fordell, T.; Luo, G.; Kluender, K.; Hilner, E.; Anttu, N.; Lundgren, E.; Mauritsson, J.; Andersen, J. N.; Xu, H. Q.; L'Huillier, A.; Zakharov, A. A.

    2009-12-15

    We report the first experiments carried out on a new imaging setup, which combines the high spatial resolution of a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) with the temporal resolution of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse trains. The very short pulses were provided by high-harmonic generation and used to illuminate lithographic structures and Au nanoparticles, which, in turn, were imaged with a PEEM resolving features below 300 nm. We argue that the spatial resolution is limited by the lack of electron energy filtering in this particular demonstration experiment. Problems with extensive space charge effects, which can occur due to the low probe pulse repetition rate and extremely short duration, are solved by reducing peak intensity while maintaining a sufficient average intensity to allow imaging. Finally, a powerful femtosecond infrared (IR) beam was combined with the XUV beam in a pump-probe setup where delays could be varied from subfemtoseconds to picoseconds. The IR pump beam could induce multiphoton electron emission in resonant features on the surface. The interaction between the electrons emitted by the pump and probe pulses could be observed.

  12. Stratification of centrifuged amoeba nuclei investigated by electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breyer, E. P.; Daniels, E. W.

    1968-01-01

    Study establishes a relationship between radioresistance and the nucleolar stratification characteristics of various amoeba species. Two species of fresh water amoeba are studied with the electron microscope. The report discusses the nature of nucleolar layers and their possible relationship to the differences in radiosensitivity of the two amoeba species.

  13. Bulk sensitive hard x-ray photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, M. Wiemann, C.; Weber, N.; Escher, M.; Merkel, M.; Gloskovskii, A.; Drube, W.; Schneider, C. M.

    2014-11-15

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) has now matured into a well-established technique as a bulk sensitive probe of the electronic structure due to the larger escape depth of the highly energetic electrons. In order to enable HAXPES studies with high lateral resolution, we have set up a dedicated energy-filtered hard x-ray photoemission electron microscope (HAXPEEM) working with electron kinetic energies up to 10 keV. It is based on the NanoESCA design and also preserves the performance of the instrument in the low and medium energy range. In this way, spectromicroscopy can be performed from threshold to hard x-ray photoemission. The high potential of the HAXPEEM approach for the investigation of buried layers and structures has been shown already on a layered and structured SrTiO{sub 3} sample. Here, we present results of experiments with test structures to elaborate the imaging and spectroscopic performance of the instrument and show the capabilities of the method to image bulk properties. Additionally, we introduce a method to determine the effective attenuation length of photoelectrons in a direct photoemission experiment.

  14. Low impact to fixed cell processing aiming transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Ortrud Monika; da Silva, Marcos Alexandre Nunes; Barreto-Vieira, Debora Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    In cell culture, cell structures suffer strong impact due to centrifugation during processing for electron microscope observation. In order to minimise this effect, a new protocol was successfully developed. Using conventional reagents and equipments, it took over one week, but cell compression was reduced to none or the lowest deformation possible. PMID:27276186

  15. Advantages of environmental scanning electron microscopy in studies of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Collins, S P; Pope, R K; Scheetz, R W; Ray, R I; Wagner, P A; Little, B J

    1993-08-01

    Microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and microalgae, are composed predominantly of water which prohibits direct observation in a traditional scanning electron microscope (SEM). Preparation for SEM requires that microorganisms be fixed, frozen or dehydrated, and coated with a conductive film before observation in a high vacuum environment. Sample preparation may mechanically disturb delicate samples, compromise morphological information, and introduce other artifacts. The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) provides a technology for imaging hydrated or dehydrated biological samples with minimal manipulation and without the need for conductive coatings. Sporulating cultures of three fungi, Aspergillus sp., Cunninghamella sp., and Mucor sp., were imaged in the ESEM to assess usefulness of the instrument in the direct observation of delicate, uncoated, biological specimens. Asexual sporophores showed no evidence of conidial displacement or disruption of sporangia. Uncoated algal cells of Euglena gracilis and Spirogyra sp. were examined using the backscatter electron detector (BSE) and the environmental secondary electron detector (ESD) of the ESEM. BSE images had more clearly defined intracellular structures, whereas ESD gave a clearer view of the surface E. gracilis cells fixed with potassium permanganate, Spirogyra sp. stained with Lugol's solution, and Saprolegnia sp. fixed with osmium tetroxide were compared using BSE and ESD to demonstrate that cellular details could be enhanced by the introduction of heavy metals. The effect of cellular water on signal quality was evaluated by comparing hydrated to critical point dried specimens. PMID:8400431

  16. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis studies of human pineal concretions.

    PubMed

    Kodaka, T; Mori, R; Debari, K; Yamada, M

    1994-10-01

    The calcareous concretions of human pineal bodies were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The initial concretions measuring 5-7 microns in diameter may have started at the calcified pinealocytes. They grew appositionally forming concentric laminations, and then the simple calcospherulites over 20 microns occasionally aggregated with each other. Some of them became numerous spherulite-aggregated concretions. Others individually grew with scallop-shaped concentric laminations at intervals of 0.05-1 microns and became lobated calcospherulites up to 0.5 mm. The concretions over 0.5 mm were formed by their attachments. The major elements were Ca and P, while traces of S, Mg, and Na were detected. In the calcification and crystallization values, the center of the concretions over 50 microns was significantly higher than the periphery, while there were no differences among the centers and also among the peripheries. The Ca and P amounts in the center were 30.8% and 14.2% by weight and the Ca/P molar ratio was 1.68; thereby the sand-grain-shaped crystals may be nearly hydroxyapatite, as reported previously. PMID:7699308

  17. Ultrasoft magnetic films investigated with Lorentz tranmission electron microscopy and electron holography.

    PubMed

    De Hosson, Jeff Th M; Chechenin, Nicolai G; Alsem, Daan-Hein; Vystavel, Tomas; Kooi, Bart J; Chezan, Antoni R; Boerma, Dik O

    2002-08-01

    As a tribute to the scientific work of Professor Gareth Thomas in the field of structure-property relationships this paper delineates a new possibility of Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (LTEM) to study the magnetic properties of soft magnetic films. We show that in contrast to the traditional point of view, not only does the direction of the magnetization vector in nano-crystalline films make a correlated small-angle wiggling, but also the magnitude of the magnetization modulus fluctuates. This fluctuation produces a rapid modulation in the LTEM image. A novel analysis of the ripple structure in nano-crystalline Fe-Zr-N film corresponds to an amplitude of the transversal component of the magnetization deltaMy of 23 mT and a longitudinal fluctuation of the magnetization of the order of deltaMx = 30 mT. The nano-crystalline (Fe99Zr1)1-xNx films have been prepared by DC magnetron reactive sputtering with a thickness between 50 and 1000 nm. The grain size decreased monotonically with N content from typically 100 nm in the case of N-free films to less than 10 nm for films containing 8 at%. The specimens were examined with a JEOL 2010F 200 kV transmission electron microscope equipped with a post column energy filter (GIF 2000 Gatan Imaging Filter). For holography, the microscope is mounted with a biprism (JEOL biprism with a 0.6 microm diameter platinum wire). PMID:12533225

  18. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Faas, F G A; Bárcena, M; Agronskaia, A V; Gerritsen, H C; Moscicka, K B; Diebolder, C A; van Driel, L F; Limpens, R W A L; Bos, E; Ravelli, R B G; Koning, R I; Koster, A J

    2013-03-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain morphological and structural information from a selected field of view at nm-scale resolution. Previously, an integrated approach to room temperature correlative microscopy was described. Combined use of light and electron microscopy within one instrument greatly simplifies sample handling, avoids cumbersome experimental overheads, simplifies navigation between the two modalities, and improves the success rate of image correlation. Here, an integrated approach for correlative microscopy under cryogenic conditions is presented. Its advantages over the room temperature approach include safeguarding the native hydrated state of the biological specimen, preservation of the fluorescence signal without risk of quenching due to heavy atom stains, and reduced photo bleaching. The potential of cryo integrated light and electron microscopy is demonstrated for the detection of viable bacteria, the study of in vitro polymerized microtubules, the localization of mitochondria in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and for a search into virus-induced intracellular membrane modifications within mammalian cells. PMID:23261400

  19. Three-Dimensional Electron Microscopy Simulation with the CASINO Monte Carlo Software

    PubMed Central

    Demers, Hendrix; Poirier-Demers, Nicolas; Couture, Alexandre Réal; Joly, Dany; Guilmain, Marc; de Jonge, Niels; Drouin, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo softwares are widely used to understand the capabilities of electron microscopes. To study more realistic applications with complex samples, 3D Monte Carlo softwares are needed. In this paper, the development of the 3D version of CASINO is presented. The software feature a graphical user interface, an efficient (in relation to simulation time and memory use) 3D simulation model, accurate physic models for electron microscopy applications, and it is available freely to the scientific community at this website: www.gel.usherbrooke.ca/casino/index.html. It can be used to model backscattered, secondary, and transmitted electron signals as well as absorbed energy. The software features like scan points and shot noise allow the simulation and study of realistic experimental conditions. This software has an improved energy range for scanning electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy applications. PMID:21769885

  20. [Electron microscopy as a tool for the diagnosis of neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Richard, Laurence; Sindou, Philippe; Magy, Laurent

    2008-12-01

    Ultrastructural examination of a peripheral nerve biopsy may be particularly useful and sometimes indispensable for identification of the type of nerve lesion and of the aetiologies of peripheral neuropathies. The ultrastructural findings have, anyway, to be correlated with the clinical findings, the electrophysiological examination and the laboratory investigations. In this presentation, the various causes of peripheral neuropathies for which nerve biopsy study by electron microscope can provide diagnostic information are discussed. The principal aetiologies that will benefit from such an ultrastructural study are toxic, infectious, haemopathic and storage disorders. Chiefly for Charcot-Marie-Tooth sporadic cases, there are still indications for nerve biopsy to orientate diagnostic research in molecular biology. Sometimes, the electron microscopic examination will help to determine not only the cause of the peripheral neuropathy, but also the mechanism of nerve lesions which may induce specific and efficient treatments. PMID:19084717