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Sample records for abi1 protein phosphatase

  1. Molecular cloning in Arabidopsis thaliana of a new protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) with homology to ABI1 and ABI2.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, P L; Leube, M P; Grill, E

    1998-11-01

    We report the cloning of both the cDNA and the corresponding genomic sequence of a new PP2C from Arabidopsis thaliana, named AtP2C-HA (for homology to ABI1/ABI2). The AtP2C-HA cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1536 bp and encodes a putative protein of 511 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 55.7 kDa. The AtP2C-HA protein is composed of two domains, a C-terminal PP2C catalytic domain and a N-terminal extension of ca. 180 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence is 55% and 54% identical to ABI1 and ABI2, respectively. Comparison of the genomic structure of the ABI1, ABI2 and AtP2C-HA genes suggests that they belong to a multigene family. The expression of the AtP2C-HA gene is up-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) treatment.

  2. ABI1 and PP2CA Phosphatases Are Negative Regulators of Snf1-Related Protein Kinase1 Signaling in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Américo; Adamo, Mattia; Crozet, Pierre; Margalha, Leonor; Confraria, Ana; Martinho, Cláudia; Elias, Alexandre; Rabissi, Agnese; Lumbreras, Victoria; González-Guzmán, Miguel; Antoni, Regina; Rodriguez, Pedro L.; Baena-González, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Plant survival under environmental stress requires the integration of multiple signaling pathways into a coordinated response, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this integration are poorly understood. Stress-derived energy deprivation activates the Snf1-related protein kinases1 (SnRK1s), triggering a vast transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming that restores homeostasis and promotes tolerance to adverse conditions. Here, we show that two clade A type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs), established repressors of the abscisic acid (ABA) hormonal pathway, interact with the SnRK1 catalytic subunit causing its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Accordingly, SnRK1 repression is abrogated in double and quadruple pp2c knockout mutants, provoking, similarly to SnRK1 overexpression, sugar hypersensitivity during early seedling development. Reporter gene assays and SnRK1 target gene expression analyses further demonstrate that PP2C inhibition by ABA results in SnRK1 activation, promoting SnRK1 signaling during stress and once the energy deficit subsides. Consistent with this, SnRK1 and ABA induce largely overlapping transcriptional responses. Hence, the PP2C hub allows the coordinated activation of ABA and energy signaling, strengthening the stress response through the cooperation of two key and complementary pathways. PMID:24179127

  3. Role of the adapter protein Abi1 in actin-associated signaling and smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Cleary, Rachel A; Wang, Ruping; Tang, Dale D

    2013-07-12

    Actin filament polymerization plays a critical role in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction. However, our knowledge regarding modulation of the actin cytoskeleton in smooth muscle just begins to accumulate. In this study, stimulation with acetylcholine (ACh) induced an increase in the association of the adapter protein c-Abl interactor 1 (Abi1) with neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) (an actin-regulatory protein) in smooth muscle cells/tissues. Furthermore, contractile stimulation activated N-WASP in live smooth muscle cells as evidenced by changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of an N-WASP sensor. Abi1 knockdown by lentivirus-mediated RNAi inhibited N-WASP activation, actin polymerization, and contraction in smooth muscle. However, Abi1 silencing did not affect myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation at Ser-19 in smooth muscle. In addition, c-Abl tyrosine kinase and Crk-associated substrate (CAS) have been shown to regulate smooth muscle contraction. The interaction of Abi1 with c-Abl and CAS has not been investigated. Here, contractile activation induced formation of a multiprotein complex including c-Abl, CAS, and Abi1. Knockdown of c-Abl and CAS attenuated the activation of Abi1 during contractile activation. More importantly, Abi1 knockdown inhibited c-Abl phosphorylation at Tyr-412 and the interaction of c-Abl with CAS. These results suggest that Abi1 is an important component of the cellular process that regulates N-WASP activation, actin dynamics, and contraction in smooth muscle. Abi1 is activated by the c-Abl-CAS pathway, and Abi1 reciprocally controls the activation of its upstream regulator c-Abl.

  4. Role of the Adapter Protein Abi1 in Actin-associated Signaling and Smooth Muscle Contraction*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Cleary, Rachel A.; Wang, Ruping; Tang, Dale D.

    2013-01-01

    Actin filament polymerization plays a critical role in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction. However, our knowledge regarding modulation of the actin cytoskeleton in smooth muscle just begins to accumulate. In this study, stimulation with acetylcholine (ACh) induced an increase in the association of the adapter protein c-Abl interactor 1 (Abi1) with neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) (an actin-regulatory protein) in smooth muscle cells/tissues. Furthermore, contractile stimulation activated N-WASP in live smooth muscle cells as evidenced by changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of an N-WASP sensor. Abi1 knockdown by lentivirus-mediated RNAi inhibited N-WASP activation, actin polymerization, and contraction in smooth muscle. However, Abi1 silencing did not affect myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation at Ser-19 in smooth muscle. In addition, c-Abl tyrosine kinase and Crk-associated substrate (CAS) have been shown to regulate smooth muscle contraction. The interaction of Abi1 with c-Abl and CAS has not been investigated. Here, contractile activation induced formation of a multiprotein complex including c-Abl, CAS, and Abi1. Knockdown of c-Abl and CAS attenuated the activation of Abi1 during contractile activation. More importantly, Abi1 knockdown inhibited c-Abl phosphorylation at Tyr-412 and the interaction of c-Abl with CAS. These results suggest that Abi1 is an important component of the cellular process that regulates N-WASP activation, actin dynamics, and contraction in smooth muscle. Abi1 is activated by the c-Abl-CAS pathway, and Abi1 reciprocally controls the activation of its upstream regulator c-Abl. PMID:23740246

  5. Teaching resources. Protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Salton, Stephen R

    2005-03-01

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering the structure and function of protein phosphatases and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: A Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of the importance of phosphatases in physiology, recognized by the award of a Nobel Prize in 1992, and then proceeds to describe the two types of protein phosphatases: serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphatases. The information covered includes the structure, regulation, and substrate specificity of protein phosphatases, with an emphasis on their importance in disease and clinical settings.

  6. Abelson Interactor 1 (Abi1) and Its Interaction with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (Wasp) Are Critical for Proper Eye Formation in Xenopus Embryos*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvinder; Winterbottom, Emily F.; Ji, Yon Ju; Hwang, Yoo-Seok; Daar, Ira O.

    2013-01-01

    Abl interactor 1 (Abi1) is a scaffold protein that plays a central role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics as a constituent of several key protein complexes, and homozygous loss of this protein leads to embryonic lethality in mice. Because this scaffold protein has been shown in cultured cells to be a critical component of pathways controlling cell migration and actin regulation at cell-cell contacts, we were interested to investigate the in vivo role of Abi1 in morphogenesis during the development of Xenopus embryos. Using morpholino-mediated translation inhibition, we demonstrate that knockdown of Abi1 in the whole embryo, or specifically in eye field progenitor cells, leads to disruption of eye morphogenesis. Moreover, signaling through the Src homology 3 domain of Abi1 is critical for proper movement of retinal progenitor cells into the eye field and their appropriate differentiation, and this process is dependent upon an interaction with the nucleation-promoting factor Wasp (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein). Collectively, our data demonstrate that the Abi1 scaffold protein is an essential regulator of cell movement processes required for normal eye development in Xenopus embryos and specifically requires an Src homology 3 domain-dependent interaction with Wasp to regulate this complex morphogenetic process. PMID:23558677

  7. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptionalmore » regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.« less

  8. Evolutionarily conserved regulatory mechanisms of abscisic acid signaling in land plants: characterization of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE1-like type 2C protein phosphatase in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Tougane, Ken; Komatsu, Kenji; Bhyan, Salma Begum; Sakata, Yoichi; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Kohchi, Takayuki; Takezawa, Daisuke

    2010-03-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is postulated to be a ubiquitous hormone that plays a central role in seed development and responses to environmental stresses of vascular plants. However, in liverworts (Marchantiophyta), which represent the oldest extant lineage of land plants, the role of ABA has been least emphasized; thus, very little information is available on the molecular mechanisms underlying ABA responses. In this study, we isolated and characterized MpABI1, an ortholog of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE1 (ABI1), from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. The MpABI1 cDNA encoded a 568-amino acid protein consisting of the carboxy-terminal protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) domain and a novel amino-terminal regulatory domain. The MpABI1 transcript was detected in the gametophyte, and its expression level was increased by exogenous ABA treatment in the gemma, whose growth was strongly inhibited by ABA. Experiments using green fluorescent protein fusion constructs indicated that MpABI1 was mainly localized in the nucleus and that its nuclear localization was directed by the amino-terminal domain. Transient overexpression of MpABI1 in M. polymorpha and Physcomitrella patens cells resulted in suppression of ABA-induced expression of the wheat Em promoter fused to the beta -glucuronidase gene. Transgenic P. patens expressing MpABI1 and its mutant construct, MpABI1-d2, lacking the amino-terminal domain, had reduced freezing and osmotic stress tolerance, and associated with reduced accumulation of ABA-induced late embryogenesis abundant-like boiling-soluble proteins. Furthermore, ABA-induced morphological changes leading to brood cells were not prominent in these transgenic plants. These results suggest that MpABI1 is a negative regulator of ABA signaling, providing unequivocal molecular evidence of PP2C-mediated ABA response mechanisms functioning in liverworts.

  9. Evolutionarily Conserved Regulatory Mechanisms of Abscisic Acid Signaling in Land Plants: Characterization of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE1-Like Type 2C Protein Phosphatase in the Liverwort Marchantia polymorpha1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tougane, Ken; Komatsu, Kenji; Bhyan, Salma Begum; Sakata, Yoichi; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Yamato, Katsuyuki T.; Kohchi, Takayuki; Takezawa, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is postulated to be a ubiquitous hormone that plays a central role in seed development and responses to environmental stresses of vascular plants. However, in liverworts (Marchantiophyta), which represent the oldest extant lineage of land plants, the role of ABA has been least emphasized; thus, very little information is available on the molecular mechanisms underlying ABA responses. In this study, we isolated and characterized MpABI1, an ortholog of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE1 (ABI1), from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. The MpABI1 cDNA encoded a 568-amino acid protein consisting of the carboxy-terminal protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) domain and a novel amino-terminal regulatory domain. The MpABI1 transcript was detected in the gametophyte, and its expression level was increased by exogenous ABA treatment in the gemma, whose growth was strongly inhibited by ABA. Experiments using green fluorescent protein fusion constructs indicated that MpABI1 was mainly localized in the nucleus and that its nuclear localization was directed by the amino-terminal domain. Transient overexpression of MpABI1 in M. polymorpha and Physcomitrella patens cells resulted in suppression of ABA-induced expression of the wheat Em promoter fused to the β -glucuronidase gene. Transgenic P. patens expressing MpABI1 and its mutant construct, MpABI1-d2, lacking the amino-terminal domain, had reduced freezing and osmotic stress tolerance, and associated with reduced accumulation of ABA-induced late embryogenesis abundant-like boiling-soluble proteins. Furthermore, ABA-induced morphological changes leading to brood cells were not prominent in these transgenic plants. These results suggest that MpABI1 is a negative regulator of ABA signaling, providing unequivocal molecular evidence of PP2C-mediated ABA response mechanisms functioning in liverworts. PMID:20097789

  10. Protein tyrosine phosphatases as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    He, Rong-jun; Yu, Zhi-hong; Zhang, Ruo-yu; Zhang, Zhong-yin

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a key regulatory process in virtually all aspects of cellular functions. Dysregulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a major cause of human diseases, such as cancers, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, and neurological diseases. Indeed, protein tyrosine phosphorylation-mediated signaling events offer ample therapeutic targets, and drug discovery efforts to date have brought over two dozen kinase inhibitors to the clinic. Accordingly, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are considered next-generation drug targets. For instance, PTP1B is a well-known targets of type 2 diabetes and obesity, and recent studies indicate that it is also a promising target for breast cancer. SHP2 is a bona-fide oncoprotein, mutations of which cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and solid tumors. In addition, LYP is strongly associated with type 1 diabetes and many other autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes recent findings on several highly recognized PTP family drug targets, including PTP1B, Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2(SHP2), lymphoid-specific tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), CD45, Fas associated phosphatase-1 (FAP-1), striatal enriched tyrosine phosphatases (STEP), mitogen-activated protein kinase/dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (MKP-1), phosphatases of regenerating liver-1 (PRL), low molecular weight PTPs (LMWPTP), and CDC25. Given that there are over 100 family members, we hope this review will serve as a road map for innovative drug discovery targeting PTPs. PMID:25220640

  11. Interrogating Protein Phosphatases with Chemical Activity Probes.

    PubMed

    Casey, Garrett R; Stains, Cliff I

    2018-06-04

    Protein phosphatases, while long overlooked, have recently become appreciated as drivers of both normal- and disease-associated signaling events. As a result, the spotlight is now turning torwards this enzyme family and efforts geared towards the development of modern chemical tools for studying these enzymes are well underway. This Minireview focuses on the evolution of chemical activity probes, both optical and covalent, for the study of protein phosphatases. Small-molecule probes, global monitoring of phosphatase activity through the use of covalent modifiers, and targeted fluorescence-based activity probes are discussed. We conclude with an overview of open questions in the field and highlight the potential impact of chemical tools for studying protein phosphatases. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Expression of Abelson Interactor 1 (Abi1) Correlates with Inflammation, KRAS Mutation and Adenomatous Change during Colonic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Steinestel, Konrad; Brüderlein, Silke; Steinestel, Julie; Märkl, Bruno; Schwerer, Michael J.; Arndt, Annette; Kraft, Klaus; Pröpper, Christian; Möller, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Abelson interactor 1 (Abi1) is an important regulator of actin dynamics during cytoskeletal reorganization. In this study, our aim was to investigate the expression of Abi1 in colonic mucosa with and without inflammation, colonic polyps, colorectal carcinomas (CRC) and metastases as well as in CRC cell lines with respect to BRAF/KRAS mutation status and to find out whether introduction of KRAS mutation or stimulation with TNFalpha enhances Abi1 protein expression in CRC cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We immunohistochemically analyzed Abi1 protein expression in 126 tissue specimens from 95 patients and in 5 colorectal carcinoma cell lines with different mutation status by western immunoblotting. We found that Abi1 expression correlated positively with KRAS, but not BRAF mutation status in the examined tissue samples. Furthermore, Abi1 is overexpressed in inflammatory mucosa, sessile serrated polyps and adenomas, tubular adenomas, invasive CRC and CRC metastasis when compared to healthy mucosa and BRAF-mutated as well as KRAS wild-type hyperplastic polyps. Abi1 expression in carcinoma was independent of microsatellite stability of the tumor. Abi1 protein expression correlated with KRAS mutation in the analyzed CRC cell lines, and upregulation of Abi1 could be induced by TNFalpha treatment as well as transfection of wild-type CRC cells with mutant KRAS. The overexpression of Abi1 could be abolished by treatment with the PI3K-inhibitor Wortmannin after KRAS transfection. Conclusions/Significance Our results support a role for Abi1 as a downstream target of inflammatory response and adenomatous change as well as oncogenic KRAS mutation via PI3K, but not BRAF activation. Furthermore, they highlight a possible role for Abi1 as a marker for early KRAS mutation in hyperplastic polyps. Since the protein is a key player in actin dynamics, our data encourages further studies concerning the exact role of Abi1 in actin reorganization upon enhanced KRAS/PI3K

  13. Abi1 is essential for the formation and activation of a WAVE2 signalling complex.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Metello; Zucconi, Adriana; Disanza, Andrea; Frittoli, Emanuela; Areces, Liliana B; Steffen, Anika; Stradal, Theresia E B; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Carlier, Marie-France; Scita, Giorgio

    2004-04-01

    WAVE2 belongs to a family of proteins that mediates actin reorganization by relaying signals from Rac to the Arp2/3 complex, resulting in lamellipodia protrusion. WAVE2 displays Arp2/3-dependent actin nucleation activity in vitro, and does not bind directly to Rac. Instead, it forms macromolecular complexes that have been reported to exert both positive and negative modes of regulation. How these complexes are assembled, localized and activated in vivo remains to be established. Here we use tandem mass spectrometry to identify an Abi1-based complex containing WAVE2, Nap1 (Nck-associated protein) and PIR121. Abi1 interacts directly with the WHD domain of WAVE2, increases WAVE2 actin polymerization activity and mediates the assembly of a WAVE2-Abi1-Nap1-PIR121 complex. The WAVE2-Abi1-Nap1-PIR121 complex is as active as the WAVE2-Abi1 sub-complex in stimulating Arp2/3, and after Rac activation it is re-localized to the leading edge of ruffles in vivo. Consistently, inhibition of Abi1 by RNA interference (RNAi) abrogates Rac-dependent lamellipodia protrusion. Thus, Abi1 orchestrates the proper assembly of the WAVE2 complex and mediates its activation at the leading edge in vivo.

  14. Alkaline Phosphatase, an Unconventional Immune Protein.

    PubMed

    Rader, Bethany A

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the number of studies focusing on alkaline phosphatases (APs), revealing an expanding complexity of function of these enzymes. Of the four human AP (hAP) proteins, most is known about tissue non-specific AP (TNAP) and intestinal AP (IAP). This review highlights current understanding of TNAP and IAP in relation to human health and disease. TNAP plays a role in multiple processes, including bone mineralization, vitamin B6 metabolism, and neurogenesis, is the genetic cause of hypophosphatasia, influences inflammation through regulation of purinergic signaling, and has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease. IAP regulates fatty acid absorption and has been implicated in the regulation of diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome. IAP and TNAP can dephosphorylate bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharide, and IAP has been identified as a potential regulator of the composition of the intestinal microbiome, an evolutionarily conserved function. Endogenous and recombinant bovine APs and recombinant hAPs are currently being explored for their potential as pharmacological agents to treat AP-associated diseases and mitigate multiple sources of inflammation. Continued research on these versatile proteins will undoubtedly provide insight into human pathophysiology, biochemistry, and the human holobiont.

  15. Rhizobiales-like Phosphatase 2 from Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Novel Phospho-tyrosine-specific Phospho-protein Phosphatase (PPP) Family Protein Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; Labandera, Anne-Marie; Muhammad, Jamshed; Samuel, Marcus; Moorhead, Greg B

    2016-03-11

    Cellular signaling through protein tyrosine phosphorylation is well established in mammalian cells. Although lacking the classic tyrosine kinases present in humans, plants have a tyrosine phospho-proteome that rivals human cells. Here we report a novel plant tyrosine phosphatase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtRLPH2) that, surprisingly, has the sequence hallmarks of a phospho-serine/threonine phosphatase belonging to the PPP family. Rhizobiales/Rhodobacterales/Rhodospirillaceae-like phosphatases (RLPHs) are conserved in plants and several other eukaryotes, but not in animals. We demonstrate that AtRLPH2 is localized to the plant cell cytosol, is resistant to the classic serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin, but is inhibited by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor orthovanadate and is particularly sensitive to inhibition by the adenylates, ATP and ADP. AtRLPH2 displays remarkable selectivity toward tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides versus serine/threonine phospho-peptides and readily dephosphorylates a classic tyrosine phosphatase protein substrate, suggesting that in vivo it is a tyrosine phosphatase. To date, only one other tyrosine phosphatase is known in plants; thus AtRLPH2 represents one of the missing pieces in the plant tyrosine phosphatase repertoire and supports the concept of protein tyrosine phosphorylation as a key regulatory event in plants. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Reduced expression of CD45 Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase Pr

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-08

    H S /D T R A on A ugust 19, 2009 w w w .jbc.org D ow nloaded from PTP1B , CD45, TCPTP, LMPTP-A, LMPTP-B, MEG1, MEG2, HePTP, PTP), three belong to...the dual specificity phosphatase VHR or the protein-tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B . Given these FIGURE 5. Mice expressing intermediate CD45 levels survive

  17. A Global Protein Kinase and Phosphatase Interaction Network in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Breitkreutz, Ashton; Choi, Hyungwon; Sharom, Jeffrey R.; Boucher, Lorrie; Neduva, Victor; Larsen, Brett; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Stark, Chris; Liu, Guomin; Ahn, Jessica; Dewar-Darch, Danielle; Reguly, Teresa; Tang, Xiaojing; Almeida, Ricardo; Qin, Zhaohui Steve; Pawson, Tony; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Tyers, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The interactions of protein kinases and phosphatases with their regulatory subunits and substrates underpin cellular regulation. We identified a kinase and phosphatase interaction (KPI) network of 1844 interactions in budding yeast by mass spectrometric analysis of protein complexes. The KPI network contained many dense local regions of interactions that suggested new functions. Notably, the cell cycle phosphatase Cdc14 associated with multiple kinases that revealed roles for Cdc14 in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, the DNA damage response, and metabolism, whereas interactions of the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) uncovered new effector kinases in nitrogen and carbon metabolism. An extensive backbone of kinase-kinase interactions cross-connects the proteome and may serve to coordinate diverse cellular responses. PMID:20489023

  18. The protein histidine phosphatase LHPP is a tumour suppressor.

    PubMed

    Hindupur, Sravanth K; Colombi, Marco; Fuhs, Stephen R; Matter, Matthias S; Guri, Yakir; Adam, Kevin; Cornu, Marion; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Betz, Charles; Liko, Dritan; Quagliata, Luca; Moes, Suzette; Jenoe, Paul; Terracciano, Luigi M; Heim, Markus H; Hunter, Tony; Hall, Michael N

    2018-03-29

    Histidine phosphorylation, the so-called hidden phosphoproteome, is a poorly characterized post-translational modification of proteins. Here we describe a role of histidine phosphorylation in tumorigenesis. Proteomic analysis of 12 tumours from an mTOR-driven hepatocellular carcinoma mouse model revealed that NME1 and NME2, the only known mammalian histidine kinases, were upregulated. Conversely, expression of the putative histidine phosphatase LHPP was downregulated specifically in the tumours. We demonstrate that LHPP is indeed a protein histidine phosphatase. Consistent with these observations, global histidine phosphorylation was significantly upregulated in the liver tumours. Sustained, hepatic expression of LHPP in the hepatocellular carcinoma mouse model reduced tumour burden and prevented the loss of liver function. Finally, in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, low expression of LHPP correlated with increased tumour severity and reduced overall survival. Thus, LHPP is a protein histidine phosphatase and tumour suppressor, suggesting that deregulated histidine phosphorylation is oncogenic.

  19. Identification and bioinformatics comparison of two novel phosphatases in monoecious and gynoecious cucumber lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawełkowicz, Magdalena E.; Wojcieszek, Michał; Osipowski, Paweł; Krzywkowski, Tomasz; PlÄ der, Wojciech; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Two Arabidopsis thaliana genes from the PP2C family of protein phosphatases (AtABI1 and AtABI2) were used to find orthologous genes in the Cucumis sativus L. cv. Borszczagowski (cucumber) genome. Cucumber has been used as a model plant for sex expression studies because although it has been defined as a monoecious species, numerous genotypes are known to produce only female, only male, or hermaphroditic flowers. We identified two new orthologous genes of AtABI1 and AtABI2 in the cucumber genome and named them CsABI1 and CsABI2. To determine the relationships between the regulation of CsABI1 and CsABI2 and flower morphogenesis in cucumber, we performed various computational analyses to define the structure of the genes, and to predict regulatory elements and protein motifs in their sequences. We also performed an expression analysis to identify differences in the expression levels of CsABI1 and CsABI2 in vegetative and generative tissues (leaf, shoot apex, and flower buds) of monoecious (B10) and gynoecious (2gg) cucumber lines. We found that the expressions of CsABI1 and CsABI2 differed in male and female floral buds, and correlated these findings with the abscisic acid signaling pathways in male and female flowers.

  20. Purification and characterization of two wheat-embryo protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Polya, G M; Haritou, M

    1988-04-15

    Two protein phosphatases (enzymes I and II) were extensively purified from wheat embryo by a procedure involving chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, DEAE-Sephacel and Ultrogel AcA 44. Preparations of enzyme I (Mr 197,000) are heterogeneous. Preparations of enzyme II (Mr 35,000) contain only one major polypeptide (Mr 17,500), which exactly co-purifies with protein phosphatase II on gel filtration and is not present in preparations of enzyme I. However, this major polypeptide has been identified as calmodulin. Calmodulin and protein phosphatase II can be separated by further chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B. Protein phosphatases I and II do not require Mg2+ or Ca2+ for activity. Both enzymes catalyse the dephosphorylation of phosphohistone H1 (phosphorylated by wheat-germ Ca2+-dependent protein kinase) and of phosphocasein (phosphorylated by wheat-germ Ca2+-independent casein kinase), but neither enzyme dephosphorylates a range of non-protein phosphomonoesters tested. Both enzymes are inhibited by Zn2+, Hg2+, vanadate, molybdate, F-, pyrophosphate and ATP.

  1. Protein Kinases and Phosphatases in the Control of Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Bononi, Angela; Agnoletto, Chiara; De Marchi, Elena; Marchi, Saverio; Patergnani, Simone; Bonora, Massimo; Giorgi, Carlotta; Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Rimessi, Alessandro; Pinton, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation controls many aspects of cell fate and is often deregulated in pathological conditions. Several recent findings have provided an intriguing insight into the spatial regulation of protein phosphorylation across different subcellular compartments and how this can be finely orchestrated by specific kinases and phosphatases. In this review, the focus will be placed on (i) the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, specifically on the kinases Akt and mTOR and on the phosphatases PP2a and PTEN, and on (ii) the PKC family of serine/threonine kinases. We will look at general aspects of cell physiology controlled by these kinases and phosphatases, highlighting the signalling pathways that drive cell division, proliferation, and apoptosis. PMID:21904669

  2. Protein Phosphatase 2A Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    family of serine/threonine phosphatases implicated in cell growth and signalling. Biochem J 2001;353:417-39. (6) Eto M, Bennouna J, Hunter OC...phosphatidylinositol 3’-kinase and Akt/protein kinase B. Cancer Res 1999;59:1449-53. (14) Grethe S, Porn -Ares MI. p38 MAPK regulates phosphorylation of Bad

  3. Dysbindin-1, WAVE2 and Abi-1 form a complex that regulates dendritic spine formation.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Morishita, R; Shinoda, T; Iwamoto, I; Sudo, K; Okamoto, K; Nagata, K

    2010-10-01

    Genetic variations in dysbindin-1 (dystrobrevin-binding protein-1) are one of the most commonly reported variations associated with schizophrenia. As schizophrenia could be regarded as a neurodevelopmental disorder resulting from abnormalities of synaptic connectivity, we attempted to clarify the function of dysbindin-1 in neuronal development. We examined the developmental change of dysbindin-1 in rat brain by western blotting and found that a 50 kDa isoform is highly expressed during the embryonic stage, whereas a 40 kDa one is detected at postnatal day 11 and increased thereafter. Immunofluorescent analyses revealed that dysbindin-1 is enriched at the spine-like structure of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We identified WAVE2, but not N-WASP, as a binding partner for dysbindin-1. We also found that Abi-1, a binding molecule for WAVE2 involved in spine morphogenesis, interacts with dysbindin-1. Although dysbindin-1, WAVE2 and Abi-1 form a ternary complex, dysbindin-1 promoted the binding of WAVE2 to Abi-1. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of dysbindin-1 led to the generation of abnormally elongated immature dendritic protrusions. The present results indicate possible functions of dysbindin-1 at the postsynapse in the regulation of dendritic spine morphogenesis through the interaction with WAVE2 and Abi-1.

  4. Proteomic analysis of protein phosphatase Z1 from Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Pfliegler, Walter P.; Petrényi, Katalin; Boros, Enikő; Pócsi, István; Tőzsér, József; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z is a “novel type” fungus specific serine/threonine protein phosphatase. Previously our research group identified the CaPPZ1 gene in the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans and reported that the gene deletion had several important physiological consequences. In order to reveal the protein targets and the associated mechanisms behind the functions of the phosphatase a proteomic method was adopted for the comparison of the cappz1 deletion mutant and the genetically matching QMY23 control strain. Proteins extracted from the control and deletion mutant strains were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the protein spots were stained with RuBPS and Pro-Q Diamond in order to visualize the total proteome and the phosphoproteome, respectively. The alterations in spot intensities were determined by densitometry and were analysed with the Delta2D (Decodon) software. Spots showing significantly different intensities between the mutant and control strains were excised from the gels and were digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were identified by LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry. As many as 15 protein spots were found that exhibited significant changes in their intensity upon the deletion of the phosphatase and 20 phosphoproteins were identified in which the level of phosphorylation was modified significantly in the mutant. In agreement with previous findings we found that the affected proteins function in protein synthesis, oxidative stress response, regulation of morphology and metabolism. Among these proteins we identified two potential CaPpz1 substrates (Eft2 and Rpp0) that may regulate the elongation step of translation. RT-qPCR experiments revealed that the expression of the genes coding for the affected proteins was not altered significantly. Thus, the absence of CaPpz1 exerted its effects via protein synthesis/degradation and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. In addition, our proteomics data strongly suggested a role for

  5. Centromeric binding and activity of Protein Phosphatase 4

    PubMed Central

    Lipinszki, Zoltan; Lefevre, Stephane; Savoian, Matthew S.; Singleton, Martin R.; Glover, David M.; Przewloka, Marcin R.

    2015-01-01

    The cell division cycle requires tight coupling between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. However, understanding the cell cycle roles of multimeric protein phosphatases has been limited by the lack of knowledge of how their diverse regulatory subunits target highly conserved catalytic subunits to their sites of action. Phosphoprotein phosphatase 4 (PP4) has been recently shown to participate in the regulation of cell cycle progression. We now find that the EVH1 domain of the regulatory subunit 3 of Drosophila PP4, Falafel (Flfl), directly interacts with the centromeric protein C (CENP-C). Unlike other EVH1 domains that interact with proline-rich ligands, the crystal structure of the Flfl amino-terminal EVH1 domain bound to a CENP-C peptide reveals a new target-recognition mode for the phosphatase subunit. We also show that binding of Flfl to CENP-C is required to bring PP4 activity to centromeres to maintain CENP-C and attached core kinetochore proteins at chromosomes during mitosis. PMID:25562660

  6. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  7. A New Protein Phosphatase 2C (FsPP2C1) Induced by Abscisic Acid Is Specifically Expressed in Dormant Beechnut Seeds1

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Oscar; Rodríguez, Dolores; Nicolás, Gregorio; Rodríguez, Pedro L.; Nicolás, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    An abscisic acid (ABA)-induced cDNA fragment encoding a putative protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) was obtained by means of differential reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction approach. The full-length clone was isolated from a cDNA library constructed using mRNA from ABA-treated beechnut (Fagus sylvatica) seeds. This clone presents all the features of plant type PP2C and exhibits homology to members of this family such as AthPP2CA (61%), ABI1 (48%), or ABI2 (47%), therefore it was named FsPP2C1. The expression of FsPP2C1 is detected in dormant seeds and increases after ABA treatment, when seeds are maintained dormant, but it decreases and tends to disappear when dormancy is being released by stratification or under gibberellic acid treatment. Moreover, drought stress seems to have no effect on FsPP2C1 transcript accumulation. The FsPP2C1 transcript expression is tissue specific and was found to accumulate in ABA-treated seeds rather than in other ABA-treated vegetative tissues examined. These results suggest that the corresponding protein could be related to ABA-induced seed dormancy. By expressing FsPP2C1 in Escherichia coli as a histidine tag fusion protein, we have obtained direct biochemical evidence supporting Mg2+-dependent phosphatase activity of this protein. PMID:11299374

  8. The NESH/Abi-3-based WAVE2 complex is functionally distinct from the Abi-1-based WAVE2 complex.

    PubMed

    Sekino, Saki; Kashiwagi, Yuriko; Kanazawa, Hitoshi; Takada, Kazuki; Baba, Takashi; Sato, Seiichi; Inoue, Hiroki; Kojima, Masaki; Tani, Katsuko

    2015-10-01

    Abl interactor (Abi) family proteins play significant roles in actin cytoskeleton organization through participation in the WAVE complex. Mammals possess three Abi proteins: Abi-1, Abi-2, and NESH/Abi-3. Abi-1 and Abi-2 were originally identified as Abl tyrosine kinase-binding proteins. It has been disclosed that Abi-1 acts as a bridge between c-Abl and WAVE2, and c-Abl-mediated WAVE2 phosphorylation promotes actin remodeling. We showed previously that NESH/Abi-3 is present in the WAVE2 complex, but neither binds to c-Abl nor promotes c-Abl-mediated phosphorylation of WAVE2. In this study, we characterized NESH/Abi-3 in more detail, and compared its properties with those of Abi-1 and Abi-2. NESH/Abi-3 was ectopically expressed in NIH3T3 cells, in which Abi-1, but not NESH/Abi-3, is expressed. The expression of NESH/Abi-3 caused degradation of endogenous Abi-1, which led to the formation of a NESH/Abi-3-based WAVE2 complex. When these cells were plated on fibronectin-coated dishes, the translocation of WAVE2 to the plasma membrane was significantly reduced and the formation of peripheral lamellipodial structures was disturbed, suggesting that the NESH/Abi-3-based WAVE2 complex was unable to help produce lamellipodial protrusions. Next, Abi-1, Abi-2, or NESH/Abi-3 was expressed in v-src-transformed NIH3T3 cells. Only in NESH/Abi-3-expressed cells did treatment with an Abl kinase inhibitor, imatinib mesylate, or siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Abl promote the formation of invadopodia, which are ventral membrane protrusions with extracellular matrix degradation activity. Structural studies showed that a linker region between the proline-rich regions and the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of Abi-1 is crucial for its interaction with c-Abl and c-Abl-mediated phosphorylation of WAVE2. The NESH/Abi-3-based WAVE2 complex is functionally distinct from the Abi-1-based one, and NESH/Abi-3 may be involved in the formation of ventral protrusions under certain conditions.

  9. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Regulates Tight Junction Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Hu, Dong; Huo, Haizhong; Zhang, Weifeng; Adiliaghdam, Fatemeh; Morrison, Sarah; Ramirez, Juan M; Gul, Sarah S; Hamarneh, Sulaiman R; Hodin, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) plays a pivotal role in maintaining gut health and well-being. Oral supplementation with IAP in mice improves gut barrier function and prevents luminal proinflammatory factors from gaining access to the circulation. In this study, we sought to explore the relationship between IAP and tight junction protein (TJP) expression and function. STUDY DESIGN The effect of IAP deletion on TJP levels was studied in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) generated from IAP-knockout and wild type mice. Regulation of TJPs by IAP was assayed in the human colon cancer Caco-2 and T84 cells by overexpressing the human IAP gene. Tight junction protein levels and localization were measured by using RT q-PCR and antibodies targeting the specific TJPs. Finally, the effect of IAP on inflammation-induced intestinal permeability was measured by in vitro trans-well epithelial electrical resistance (TEER). RESULTS Intestinal alkaline phosphatase gene deletion in MEFs resulted in significantly lower levels of ZO-1, ZO-2, and Occludin compared with levels in wild-type control cells; IAP over-expression in Caco-2 and T84 cells resulted in approximate 2-fold increases in the mRNA levels of ZO-1 and ZO-2. The IAP treatment ameliorated lipopolysaccharide-induced increased permeability in the Caco-2 trans-well system. Furthermore, IAP treatment preserved the localization of the ZO-1 and Occludin proteins during inflammation and was also associated with improved epithelial barrier function. CONCLUSIONS Intestinal alkaline phosphatase is a major regulator of gut mucosal permeability and appears to work at least partly through improving TJP levels and localization. These data provide a strong foundation to develop IAP as a novel therapy to maintain gut barrier function. PMID:27106638

  10. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Regulates Tight Junction Protein Levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Hu, Dong; Huo, Haizhong; Zhang, Weifeng; Adiliaghdam, Fatemeh; Morrison, Sarah; Ramirez, Juan M; Gul, Sarah S; Hamarneh, Sulaiman R; Hodin, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) plays a pivotal role in maintaining gut health and well-being. Oral supplementation with IAP in mice improves gut barrier function and prevents luminal proinflammatory factors from gaining access to the circulation. In this study, we sought to explore the relationship between IAP and tight junction protein (TJP) expression and function. The effect of IAP deletion on TJP levels was studied in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) generated from IAP-knockout and wild type mice. Regulation of TJPs by IAP was assayed in the human colon cancer Caco-2 and T84 cells by overexpressing the human IAP gene. Tight junction protein levels and localization were measured by using RT q-PCR and antibodies targeting the specific TJPs. Finally, the effect of IAP on inflammation-induced intestinal permeability was measured by in vitro trans-well epithelial electrical resistance (TEER). Intestinal alkaline phosphatase gene deletion in MEFs resulted in significantly lower levels of ZO-1, ZO-2, and Occludin compared with levels in wild-type control cells; IAP overexpression in Caco-2 and T84 cells resulted in approximate 2-fold increases in the mRNA levels of ZO-1 and ZO-2. The IAP treatment ameliorated lipopolysaccharide-induced increased permeability in the Caco-2 trans-well system. Furthermore, IAP treatment preserved the localization of the ZO-1 and Occludin proteins during inflammation and was also associated with improved epithelial barrier function. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase is a major regulator of gut mucosal permeability and appears to work at least partly through improving TJP levels and localization. These data provide a strong foundation to develop IAP as a novel therapy to maintain gut barrier function. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. The Zds proteins control entry into mitosis and target protein phosphatase 2A to the Cdc25 phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Wicky, Sidonie; Tjandra, Hendri; Schieltz, David; Yates, John; Kellogg, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    The Wee1 kinase restrains entry into mitosis by phosphorylating and inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1). The Cdc25 phosphatase promotes entry into mitosis by removing Cdk1 inhibitory phosphorylation. Experiments in diverse systems have established that Wee1 and Cdc25 are regulated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), but a full understanding of the function and regulation of PP2A in entry into mitosis has remained elusive. In budding yeast, entry into mitosis is controlled by a specific form of PP2A that is associated with the Cdc55 regulatory subunit (PP2ACdc55). We show here that related proteins called Zds1 and Zds2 form a tight stoichiometric complex with PP2ACdc55 and target its activity to Cdc25 but not to Wee1. Conditional inactivation of the Zds proteins revealed that their function is required primarily at entry into mitosis. In addition, Zds1 undergoes cell cycle–dependent changes in phosphorylation. Together, these observations define a role for the Zds proteins in controlling specific functions of PP2ACdc55 and suggest that upstream signals that regulate PP2ACdc55 may play an important role in controlling entry into mitosis. PMID:21119008

  12. The Zds proteins control entry into mitosis and target protein phosphatase 2A to the Cdc25 phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Wicky, Sidonie; Tjandra, Hendri; Schieltz, David; Yates, John; Kellogg, Douglas R

    2011-01-01

    The Wee1 kinase restrains entry into mitosis by phosphorylating and inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1). The Cdc25 phosphatase promotes entry into mitosis by removing Cdk1 inhibitory phosphorylation. Experiments in diverse systems have established that Wee1 and Cdc25 are regulated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), but a full understanding of the function and regulation of PP2A in entry into mitosis has remained elusive. In budding yeast, entry into mitosis is controlled by a specific form of PP2A that is associated with the Cdc55 regulatory subunit (PP2A(Cdc55)). We show here that related proteins called Zds1 and Zds2 form a tight stoichiometric complex with PP2A(Cdc55) and target its activity to Cdc25 but not to Wee1. Conditional inactivation of the Zds proteins revealed that their function is required primarily at entry into mitosis. In addition, Zds1 undergoes cell cycle-dependent changes in phosphorylation. Together, these observations define a role for the Zds proteins in controlling specific functions of PP2A(Cdc55) and suggest that upstream signals that regulate PP2A(Cdc55) may play an important role in controlling entry into mitosis.

  13. Evidence for a latent form of protein phosphatase 1 associated with cardiac myofibrils.

    PubMed

    Schlender, K K; Wang, W; Wilson, S E

    1989-02-28

    Detergent-purified myofibrils from bovine heart contained very little spontaneously active protein phosphatase 1 activity. Phosphatase 1, extracted from the myofibrils by freeze-thawing in the presence of 500 mM KCl, was markedly activated by cobalt/trypsin treatment. Myofibril phosphatase 1 was separated from phosphatase 2A by chromatography on heparin-Sepharose. The phosphatase 1 was isolated in a latent form. Pretreatment with trypsin released free catalytic subunit and increased activity about 25-fold. Addition of cobalt with the trypsin increased activity another 2-fold. The latent myofibril phosphatase 1 did not appear to be the same as previously characterized forms of protein phosphatase 1. We suggest that cardiac myofibril phosphatase 1 contains a unique inhibitory subunit which directs the enzyme to the myofibril and regulates the dephosphorylation of myofibril phosphoproteins.

  14. Protein Phosphatase-1 Inhibitor-2 Is a Novel Memory Suppressor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongtian; Hou, Hailong; Pahng, Amanda; Gu, Hua; Nairn, Angus C; Tang, Ya-Ping; Colombo, Paul J; Xia, Houhui

    2015-11-11

    Reversible phosphorylation, a fundamental regulatory mechanism required for many biological processes including memory formation, is coordinated by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases. Type I protein phosphatase (PP1), in particular, has been shown to constrain learning and memory formation. However, how PP1 might be regulated in memory is still not clear. Our previous work has elucidated that PP1 inhibitor-2 (I-2) is an endogenous regulator of PP1 in hippocampal and cortical neurons (Hou et al., 2013). Contrary to expectation, our studies of contextual fear conditioning and novel object recognition in I-2 heterozygous mice suggest that I-2 is a memory suppressor. In addition, lentiviral knock-down of I-2 in the rat dorsal hippocampus facilitated memory for tasks dependent on the hippocampus. Our data indicate that I-2 suppresses memory formation, probably via negatively regulating the phosphorylation of cAMP/calcium response element-binding protein (CREB) at serine 133 and CREB-mediated gene expression in dorsal hippocampus. Surprisingly, the data from both biochemical and behavioral studies suggest that I-2, despite its assumed action as a PP1 inhibitor, is a positive regulator of PP1 function in memory formation. We found that inhibitor-2 acts as a memory suppressor through its positive functional influence on type I protein phosphatase (PP1), likely resulting in negative regulation of cAMP/calcium response element-binding protein (CREB) and CREB-activated gene expression. Our studies thus provide an interesting example of a molecule with an in vivo function that is opposite to its in vitro function. PP1 plays critical roles in many essential physiological functions such as cell mitosis and glucose metabolism in addition to its known role in memory formation. PP1 pharmacological inhibitors would thus not be able to serve as good therapeutic reagents because of its many targets. However, identification of PP1 inhibitor-2 as a critical

  15. Essential role for Abi1 in embryonic survival and WAVE2 complex integrity.

    PubMed

    Dubielecka, Patrycja M; Ladwein, Kathrin I; Xiong, Xiaoling; Migeotte, Isabelle; Chorzalska, Anna; Anderson, Kathryn V; Sawicki, Janet A; Rottner, Klemens; Stradal, Theresia E; Kotula, Leszek

    2011-04-26

    Abl interactor 1 (Abi1) plays a critical function in actin cytoskeleton dynamics through participation in the WAVE2 complex. To gain a better understanding of the specific role of Abi1, we generated a conditional Abi1-KO mouse model and MEFs lacking Abi1 expression. Abi1-KO cells displayed defective regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and this dysregulation was ascribed to altered activity of the WAVE2 complex. Changes in motility of Abi1-KO cells were manifested by a decreased migration rate and distance but increased directional persistence. Although these phenotypes did not correlate with peripheral ruffling, which was unaffected, Abi1-KO cells exhibited decreased dorsal ruffling. Western blotting analysis of Abi1-KO cell lysates indicated reduced levels of the WAVE complex components WAVE1 and WAVE2, Nap1, and Sra-1/PIR121. Although relative Abi2 levels were more than doubled in Abi1-KO cells, the absolute Abi2 expression in these cells amounted only to a fifth of Abi1 levels in the control cell line. This finding suggests that the presence of Abi1 is critical for the integrity and stability of WAVE complex and that Abi2 levels are not sufficiently increased to compensate fully for the loss of Abi1 in KO cells and to restore the integrity and function of the WAVE complex. The essential function of Abi1 in WAVE complexes and their regulation might explain the observed embryonic lethality of Abi1-deficient embryos, which survived until approximately embryonic day 11.5 and displayed malformations in the developing heart and brain. Cells lacking Abi1 and the conditional Abi1-KO mouse will serve as critical models for defining Abi1 function.

  16. Essential role for Abi1 in embryonic survival and WAVE2 complex integrity

    PubMed Central

    Dubielecka, Patrycja M.; Ladwein, Kathrin I.; Xiong, Xiaoling; Migeotte, Isabelle; Chorzalska, Anna; Anderson, Kathryn V.; Sawicki, Janet A.; Rottner, Klemens; Stradal, Theresia E.; Kotula, Leszek

    2011-01-01

    Abl interactor 1 (Abi1) plays a critical function in actin cytoskeleton dynamics through participation in the WAVE2 complex. To gain a better understanding of the specific role of Abi1, we generated a conditional Abi1-KO mouse model and MEFs lacking Abi1 expression. Abi1-KO cells displayed defective regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and this dysregulation was ascribed to altered activity of the WAVE2 complex. Changes in motility of Abi1-KO cells were manifested by a decreased migration rate and distance but increased directional persistence. Although these phenotypes did not correlate with peripheral ruffling, which was unaffected, Abi1-KO cells exhibited decreased dorsal ruffling. Western blotting analysis of Abi1-KO cell lysates indicated reduced levels of the WAVE complex components WAVE1 and WAVE2, Nap1, and Sra-1/PIR121. Although relative Abi2 levels were more than doubled in Abi1-KO cells, the absolute Abi2 expression in these cells amounted only to a fifth of Abi1 levels in the control cell line. This finding suggests that the presence of Abi1 is critical for the integrity and stability of WAVE complex and that Abi2 levels are not sufficiently increased to compensate fully for the loss of Abi1 in KO cells and to restore the integrity and function of the WAVE complex. The essential function of Abi1 in WAVE complexes and their regulation might explain the observed embryonic lethality of Abi1-deficient embryos, which survived until approximately embryonic day 11.5 and displayed malformations in the developing heart and brain. Cells lacking Abi1 and the conditional Abi1-KO mouse will serve as critical models for defining Abi1 function. PMID:21482783

  17. Crystal structure of a protein phosphatase 2A heterotrimeric holoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Cho, Uhn Soo; Xu, Wenqing

    2007-01-04

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a principal Ser/Thr phosphatase, the deregulation of which is associated with multiple human cancers, Alzheimer's disease and increased susceptibility to pathogen infections. How PP2A is structurally organized and functionally regulated remains unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of an AB'C heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme. The structure reveals that the HEAT repeats of the scaffold A subunit form a horseshoe-shaped fold, holding the catalytic C and regulatory B' subunits together on the same side. The regulatory B' subunit forms pseudo-HEAT repeats and interacts with the C subunit near the active site, thereby defining substrate specificity. The methylated carboxy-terminal tail of the C subunit interacts with a highly negatively charged region at the interface between A and B' subunits, suggesting that the C-terminal carboxyl methylation of the C subunit promotes B' subunit recruitment by neutralizing charge repulsion. Together, our structural results establish a crucial foundation for understanding PP2A assembly, substrate recruitment and regulation.

  18. Molecular basis for TPR domain-mediated regulation of protein phosphatase 5.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Roe, S Mark; Cliff, Matthew J; Williams, Mark A; Ladbury, John E; Cohen, Patricia T W; Barford, David

    2005-01-12

    Protein phosphatase 5 (Ppp5) is a serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprising a regulatory tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain N-terminal to its phosphatase domain. Ppp5 functions in signalling pathways that control cellular responses to stress, glucocorticoids and DNA damage. Its phosphatase activity is suppressed by an autoinhibited conformation maintained by the TPR domain and a C-terminal subdomain. By interacting with the TPR domain, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and fatty acids including arachidonic acid stimulate phosphatase activity. Here, we describe the structure of the autoinhibited state of Ppp5, revealing mechanisms of TPR-mediated phosphatase inhibition and Hsp90- and arachidonic acid-induced stimulation of phosphatase activity. The TPR domain engages with the catalytic channel of the phosphatase domain, restricting access to the catalytic site. This autoinhibited conformation of Ppp5 is stabilised by the C-terminal alphaJ helix that contacts a region of the Hsp90-binding groove on the TPR domain. Hsp90 activates Ppp5 by disrupting TPR-phosphatase domain interactions, permitting substrate access to the constitutively active phosphatase domain, whereas arachidonic acid prompts an alternate conformation of the TPR domain, destabilising the TPR-phosphatase domain interface.

  19. Leukocyte common antigen-related phosphatase (LRP) gene structure: Conservation of the genomic organization of transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, E.C.C.; Mullersman, J.E.; Thomas, M.L.

    1993-07-01

    The leukocyte common antigen-related protein tyrosine phosphatase (LRP) is a widely expressed transmembrane glycoprotein thought to be involved in cell growth and differentiation. Similar to most other transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatases, LRP contains two tandem cytoplasmic phosphatase domains. To understand further the regulation and evolution of LRP, the authors have isolated and characterized mouse [lambda] genomic clones. Thirteen genomic clones could be divided into two non-overlapping clusters. The first cluster contained the transcription initiation site and the exon encoding most of the 5[prime] untranslated region. The second cluster contained the remaining exons encoding the protein and the 3[prime] untranslated region.more » The gene consists of 22 exons spanning over 75 kb. The distance between exon 1 and exon 2 is at least 25 kb. Characterization of the 5[prime] ends of LRP mRNA by S1 nuclease protection identifies putative initiation start sites within a G/C-rich region. The upstream region does not contain a TATA box. Comparison of the LRP gene structure to the mammalian protein tyrosine phosphatase gene, CD45, shows striking similarities in size and genomic organization. 29 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.« less

  20. Protein tyrosine phosphatases as wardens of STAT signaling

    PubMed Central

    Böhmer, Frank-D; Friedrich, Karlheinz

    2014-01-01

    Signaling by signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) is controlled at many levels of the signaling cascade. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) regulate STAT activation at several layers, including direct pSTAT dephosphorylation in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Despite the importance of this regulation mode, many aspects are still incompletely understood, e.g., the identity of PTPs acting on certain members of the STAT family. After a brief introduction into the STAT and PTP families, we discuss here the current knowledge on PTP mediated regulation of STAT activity, focusing on the interaction of individual STATs with specific PTPs. Finally, we highlight open questions and propose important tasks of future research. PMID:24778927

  1. Conformational motions regulate phosphoryl transfer in related protein tyrosine phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Whittier, Sean K.; Hengge, Alvan C.; Loria, J. Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have implicated a role for conformational motions during the catalytic cycle, acting to optimize the binding pocket or facilitate product release, but a more intimate role in the chemical reaction has not been described. We address this by monitoring active-site loop motion in two protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) using NMR spectroscopy. The PTPs, YopH and PTP1B, have very different catalytic rates, however we find in both that the active-site loop closes to its catalytically competent position at rates that mirror the phosphotyrosine cleavage kinetics. This loop contains the catalytic acid, suggesting that loop closure occurs concomitantly with the protonation of the leaving group tyrosine and explains the different kinetics of two otherwise chemically and mechanistically indistinguishable enzymes. PMID:23970698

  2. The Roles of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yide; Zhang, Yafei; Ge, Lilin

    2018-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family is involved in multiple cellular functions and plays an important role in various pathological and physiological processes. In many chronic diseases, for example cancer, PTP is a potential therapeutic target for cancer treatment. In the last two decades, dozens of PTP inhibitors which specifically target individual PTP molecules were developed as therapeutic agents. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors and is the second most lethal cancer worldwide due to a lack of effective therapies. Recent studies have unveiled both oncogenic and tumor suppressive functions of PTP in HCC. Here, we review the current knowledge on the involvement of PTP in HCC and further discuss the possibility of targeting PTP in HCC. PMID:29558404

  3. Protein phosphatase 2A: a highly regulated family of serine/threonine phosphatases implicated in cell growth and signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, V; Goris, J

    2001-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) comprises a family of serine/threonine phosphatases, minimally containing a well conserved catalytic subunit, the activity of which is highly regulated. Regulation is accomplished mainly by members of a family of regulatory subunits, which determine the substrate specificity, (sub)cellular localization and catalytic activity of the PP2A holoenzymes. Moreover, the catalytic subunit is subject to two types of post-translational modification, phosphorylation and methylation, which are also thought to be important regulatory devices. The regulatory ability of PTPA (PTPase activator), originally identified as a protein stimulating the phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity of PP2A, will also be discussed, alongside the other regulatory inputs. The use of specific PP2A inhibitors and molecular genetics in yeast, Drosophila and mice has revealed roles for PP2A in cell cycle regulation, cell morphology and development. PP2A also plays a prominent role in the regulation of specific signal transduction cascades, as witnessed by its presence in a number of macromolecular signalling modules, where it is often found in association with other phosphatases and kinases. Additionally, PP2A interacts with a substantial number of other cellular and viral proteins, which are PP2A substrates, target PP2A to different subcellular compartments or affect enzyme activity. Finally, the de-regulation of PP2A in some specific pathologies will be touched upon. PMID:11171037

  4. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity of lavandulyl flavonoids from roots of Sophora flavescens.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tatsunori; Li, Wei; Higai, Koji; Quang, Tran Hong; Kim, Young Ho; Koike, Kazuo

    2014-05-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a non-transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase and major negative regulator in insulin signaling cascades, and much attention has been paid to protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors as potential therapies for diabetes. The screening of a natural compound library led to the discovery of five lavandulyl flavonoids, which were isolated from the roots of Sophora flavescens, as novel PTP1B inhibitors: kuraridin (1), norkurarinone (2), kurarinone (3), 2'-methoxykurarinone (4), and kushenol T (5). The three most potent compounds, 1, 2, and 4 (IC50 < 30 µM), were demonstrated to be noncompetitive inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B based on a kinetic analysis, and they exhibited different inhibitory selectivities against four homologous protein tyrosine phosphatases (T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase, vaccinia H1-related phosphatase, and Src homology domain 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatases 1 and 2). Compounds 1, 2, and 4 also exhibited cellular activity in the insulin signaling pathway by increasing the insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation level in human hepatocellular liver carcinoma HepG2 cells, suggesting their potential for new anti-insulin-resistant drug developments. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Protein Phosphatase-1 regulates Rift Valley fever virus replication.

    PubMed

    Baer, Alan; Shafagati, Nazly; Benedict, Ashwini; Ammosova, Tatiana; Ivanov, Andrey; Hakami, Ramin M; Terasaki, Kaori; Makino, Shinji; Nekhai, Sergei; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-03-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), genus Phlebovirus family Bunyaviridae, is an arthropod-borne virus endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Recent outbreaks have resulted in cyclic epidemics with an increasing geographic footprint, devastating both livestock and human populations. Despite being recognized as an emerging threat, relatively little is known about the virulence mechanisms and host interactions of RVFV. To date there are no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines for RVF and there is an urgent need for their development. The Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) has previously been shown to play a significant role in the replication of several viruses. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PP1 plays a prominent role in RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle. Both siRNA knockdown of PP1α and a novel PP1-targeting small molecule compound 1E7-03, resulted in decreased viral titers across several cell lines. Deregulation of PP1 was found to inhibit viral RNA production, potentially through the disruption of viral RNA transcript/protein interactions, and indicates a potential link between PP1α and the viral L polymerase and nucleoprotein. These results indicate that PP1 activity is important for RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle and may prove an attractive therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Protein phosphatase 5 promotes hepatocarcinogenesis through interaction with AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Li; Hung, Man-Hsin; Chu, Pei-Yi; Chao, Tzu-I; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Chen, Li-Ju; Hsiao, Yung-Jen; Shih, Chih-Ting; Hsieh, Feng-Shu; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2017-08-15

    The serine-threonine protein phosphatase family members are known as critical regulators of various cellular functions, such as survival and transformation. Growing evidence suggests that pharmacological manipulation of phosphatase activity exhibits therapeutic benefits. Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is known to participate in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and stress-induced signaling cascades that regulate cell growth and apoptosis, and has been shown to be overexpressed in various human malignant diseases. However, the role of PP5 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and whether PP5 may be a viable therapeutic target for HCC treatment are unknown. Here, by analyzing HCC clinical samples obtained from 215 patients, we found that overexpression of PP5 is tumor specific and associated with worse clinical outcomes. We further characterized the oncogenic properties of PP5 in HCC cells. Importantly, both silencing of PP5 with lentiviral-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and chemical inhibition of PP5 phosphatase activity using the natural compound cantharidin/norcantharidin markedly suppressed the growth of HCC cells and tumors in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we identified AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as a novel downstream target of oncogenic PP5 and demonstrated that the antitumor mechanisms underlying PP5 inhibition involve activation of AMPK signaling. Overall, our results establish a pathological function of PP5 in hepatocarcinogenesis via affecting AMPK signaling and suggest that PP5 inhibition is an attractive therapeutic approach for HCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure of the protein phosphatase 2A holoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanhui; Xing, Yongna; Chen, Yu; Chao, Yang; Lin, Zheng; Fan, Eugene; Yu, Jong W; Strack, Stefan; Jeffrey, Philip D; Shi, Yigong

    2006-12-15

    Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular physiology. The PP2A holoenzyme consists of a heterodimeric core enzyme, which comprises a scaffolding subunit and a catalytic subunit, and a variable regulatory subunit. Here we report the crystal structure of the heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme involving the regulatory subunit B'/B56/PR61. Surprisingly, the B'/PR61 subunit has a HEAT-like (huntingtin-elongation-A subunit-TOR-like) repeat structure, similar to that of the scaffolding subunit. The regulatory B'/B56/PR61 subunit simultaneously interacts with the catalytic subunit as well as the conserved ridge of the scaffolding subunit. The carboxyterminus of the catalytic subunit recognizes a surface groove at the interface between the B'/B56/PR61 subunit and the scaffolding subunit. Compared to the scaffolding subunit in the PP2A core enzyme, formation of the holoenzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced conformational rearrangements. This structure reveals significant ramifications for understanding the function and regulation of PP2A.

  8. Protein phosphatase 2A in stretch-induced endothelial cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murata, K.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    We previously proposed that activation of protein kinase C is a key mechanism for control of cell growth enhanced by cyclic strain [Rosales and Sumpio (1992): Surgery 112:459-466]. Here we examined protein phosphatase 1 and 2A activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to cyclic stain. Protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cytosol was decreased by 36.1% in response to cyclic strain for 60 min, whereas the activity in the membrane did not change. Treatment with low concentration (0.1 nM) of okadaic acid enhanced proliferation of both static and stretched endothelial cells in 10% fetal bovine serum. These data suggest that protein phosphatase 2A acts as a growth suppressor and cyclic strain may enhance cellular proliferation by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A as well as stimulating protein kinase C.

  9. Identification of a dual-specificity protein phosphatase that inactivates a MAP kinase from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Huang, Y.; Kieber, J.; Luan, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play a key role in plant responses to stress and pathogens. Activation and inactivation of MAPKs involve phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on both threonine and tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. Here we report the identification of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a dual-specificity protein phosphatase capable of hydrolysing both phosphoserine/threonine and phosphotyrosine in protein substrates. This enzyme, designated AtDsPTP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase), dephosphorylated and inactivated AtMPK4, a MAPK member from the same plant. Replacement of a highly conserved cysteine by serine abolished phosphatase activity of AtDsPTP1, indicating a conserved catalytic mechanism of dual-specificity protein phosphatases from all eukaryotes.

  10. Legionella pneumophila effector WipA, a bacterial PPP protein phosphatase with PTP activity.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qian; Lin, Yun; Gou, Xuejing; He, Lei; Shen, Dong; Chen, Dongni; Xie, Wei; Lu, Yongjun

    2018-04-26

    The gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila invades human's lung and causes Legionnaires' disease. To benefit its survival and replication in cellular milieu, L. pneumophila secrets at least 330 effector proteins into host cells. We found that the effector WipA has the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity but does not depend on the classical CX5R motif for activity, suggesting that WipA is an unconventional PTP. Meanwhile, the presence of three other highly conserved motifs typically seen in protein serine/threonine phosphatases and the poor inhibition of WipA activity by okadaic acid led us to propose that WipA is a bacterial protein phosphatase. In addition, the determination of the 2.55-Å crystal structure of WipA revealed that WipA resembles cold-active protein tyrosine phosphatase (CAPTPase), and therefore very likely shares the same catalytic mechanism.

  11. Tripeptide inhibitors of Yersinia protein-tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong; Gao, Yang; Yao, Zhu-Jun; Phan, Jason; Wu, Li; Liang, Jiao; Waugh, David S; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Burke, Terrence R

    2003-08-04

    The protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 'YopH' is a virulence factor of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. Potential use of Yersinia as a bioterrorism agent renders YopH inhibitors of therapeutic importance. Previously, we had examined the inhibitory potencies of a variety of phosphotyrosyl (pTyr) mimetics against the human PTP1B enzyme by displaying them in the EGFR-derived hexapeptide sequence, 'Ac-Asp-Ala-Asp-Glu-Xxx-Leu-amide', where Xxx=pTyr mimetic. The poor inhibitory potencies of certain of these pTyr mimetics were attributed to restricted orientation within the PTP1B catalytic pocket incurred by extensive peripheral interaction of the hexapeptide platform. Utilizing the smaller tripeptide platform, 'Fmoc-Glu-Xxx-Leu-amide' we demonstrate herein that several of the low affinity hexapeptide-expressed pTyr mimetics exhibit high PTP1B affinity within the context of the tripeptide platform. Of particular note, the mono-anionic 4-(carboxydifluoromethyl)Phe residue exhibits affinity equivalent to the di-anionic F(2)Pmp residue, which had previously been among the most potent PTP-binding motifs. Against YopH, it was found that all tripeptides having Glu residues with an unprotected side chain carboxyl were inactive. Alternatively, in their Glu-OBn ester forms, several of the tripeptides exhibited good YopH affinity with the mono-anionic peptide, Fmoc-Glu(OBn)-Xxx-Leu-amide, where Xxx=4-(carboxymethyloxy)Phe providing an IC(50) value of 2.8 microM. One concern with such inhibitors is that they may potentially function by non-specific mechanisms. Studies with representative inhibitors, while failing to provide evidence of a non-specific promiscuous mode of inhibition, did indicate that non-classical inhibition may be involved.

  12. Arabidopsis PPP family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases: many targets but few engines.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; Labandera, Anne-Marie; Moorhead, Greg B

    2013-09-01

    The major plant serine/threonine protein phosphatases belong to the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family. Over the past few years the complement of Arabidopsis thaliana PPP family of catalytic subunits has been cataloged and many regulatory subunits identified. Specific roles for PPPs have been characterized, including roles in auxin and brassinosteroid signaling, in phototropism, in regulating the target of rapamycin pathway, and in cell stress responses. In this review, we provide a framework for understanding the PPP family by exploring the fundamental role of the phosphatase regulatory subunits that drive catalytic engine specificity. Although there are fewer plant protein phosphatases compared with their protein kinase partners, their function is now recognized to be as dynamic and as regulated as that of protein kinases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of Bacterial Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Regulation of the Biosynthesis of Secreted Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Morona, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Tyrosine phosphorylation and associated protein tyrosine phosphatases are gaining prominence as critical mechanisms in the regulation of fundamental processes in a wide variety of bacteria. In particular, these phosphatases have been associated with the control of the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides, critically important virulence factors for bacteria. Recent Advances: Deletion and overexpression of the phosphatases result in altered polysaccharide biosynthesis in a range of bacteria. The recent structures of associated auto-phosphorylating tyrosine kinases have suggested that the phosphatases may be critical for the cycling of the kinases between monomers and higher order oligomers. Critical Issues: Additional substrates of the phosphatases apart from cognate kinases are currently being identified. These are likely to be critical to our understanding of the mechanism by which polysaccharide biosynthesis is regulated. Future Directions: Ultimately, these protein tyrosine phosphatases are an attractive target for the development of novel antimicrobials. This is particularly the case for the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase family, which is predominantly found in bacteria. Furthermore, the determination of bacterial tyrosine phosphoproteomes will likely help to uncover the fundamental roles, mechanism, and critical importance of these phosphatases in a wide range of bacteria. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2274–2289. PMID:24295407

  14. Cloning and characterization of rat density-enhanced phosphatase-1, a protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed by vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Borges, L G; Seifert, R A; Grant, F J; Hart, C E; Disteche, C M; Edelhoff, S; Solca, F F; Lieberman, M A; Lindner, V; Fischer, E H; Lok, S; Bowen-Pope, D F

    1996-09-01

    We have cloned from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells a protein tyrosine phosphatase, rat density-enhanced phosphatase-1 (rDEP-1), which is a probable rat homologue of DEP-1/HPTP eta. rDEP-1 is encoded by an 8.7-kb transcript and is expressed as a 180- to 220-kD protein. The rDEP-1 gene is located on human chromosome 11 (region p11.2) and on mouse chromosome 2 (region 2E). The cDNA sequence predicts a transmembrane protein consisting of a single phosphatase catalytic domain in the intracellular region, a single transmembrane domain, and eight fibronectin type III repeats in the extracellular region (GenBank accession number U40790). In situ hybridization analysis demonstrates that rDEP-1 is widely expressed in vivo but that expression is highest in cells that form epithelioid monolayers. In cultured cells with epitheliod morphology, including endothelial cells and newborn smooth muscle cells, but not in fibroblast-like cells, rDEP-1 transcript levels are dramatically upregulated as population density increases. In vivo, quiescent endothelial cells in normal arteries express relatively high levels of rDEP-1. During repair of vascular injury, expression of rDEP-1 is downregulated in migrating and proliferating endothelial cells. In vivo, rDEP-1 transcript levels are present in very high levels in megakaryocytes, and circulating plates have high levels of the rDEP-1 protein. In vitro, initiation of differentiation of the human megakaryoblastic cell line CHRF-288-11 with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate leads to a very strong upregulation of rDEP-1 transcripts. The deduced structure and the regulation of expression of rDEP-1 suggest that it may play a role in adhesion and/or signaling events involving cell-cell and cell-matrix contact.

  15. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A determines bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Yu; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Huang, Hsiang-Po; Chen, Ming-Huang; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The multiple cellular targets affected by proteasome inhibition implicate a potential role for bortezomib, a first-in-class proteasome inhibitor, in enhancing antitumor activities in hematologic malignancies. Here, we examined the antitumor activity and drug targets of bortezomib in leukemia cells. Human leukemia cell lines were used for in vitro studies. Drug efficacy was evaluated by apoptosis assays and associated molecular events assessed by Western Blot. Gene silencing was performed by small interference RNA. Drug was tested in vivo in xenograft models of human leukemia cell lines and in primary leukemia cells. Clinical samples were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Bortezomib differentially induced apoptosis in leukemia cells that was independent of its proteasome inhibition. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, a cellular inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, mediated the apoptotic effect of bortezomib. Bortezomib increased protein phosphatase 2A activity in sensitive leukemia cells (HL-60 and KG-1), but not in resistant cells (MOLT-3 and K562). Bortezomib’s downregulation of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A and phospho-Akt correlated with its drug sensitivity. Furthermore, cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A negatively regulated protein phosphatase 2A activity. Ectopic expression of CIP2A up-regulated phospho-Akt and protected HL-60 cells from bortezomib-induced apoptosis, whereas silencing CIP2A overcame the resistance to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in MOLT3 and K562 cells. Importantly, bortezomib exerted in vivo antitumor activity in HL-60 xenografted tumors and induced cell death in some primary leukemic cells. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A was expressed in leukemic blasts from bone marrow samples. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A plays a major role in mediating bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. PMID:22983581

  16. Ppm1E is an in cellulo AMP-activated protein kinase phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Voss, Martin; Paterson, James; Kelsall, Ian R; Martín-Granados, Cristina; Hastie, C James; Peggie, Mark W; Cohen, Patricia T W

    2011-01-01

    Activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is believed to be the mechanism by which the pharmaceuticals, metformin and phenformin, exert their beneficial effects for treatment of type 2 diabetes. These biguanide drugs elevate 5'-AMP, which allosterically activates AMPK and promotes phosphorylation on Thr172 of AMPK catalytic α subunits. Although kinases phosphorylating this site have been identified, phosphatases that dephosphorylate it are unknown. The aim of this study is to identify protein phosphatase(s) that dephosphorylate AMPKα-Thr172 within cells. Our initial data indicated that members of the protein phosphatase Mg/Mn(2+)-dependent [corrected] (PPM) family and not those of the PPP family of protein serine/threonine phosphatases may be directly or indirectly inhibited by phenformin. Using antibodies raised to individual Ppm phosphatases that facilitated the assessment of their activities, phenformin stimulation of cells was found to decrease the Mg(2+)/Mn(2+)-dependent [corrected] protein serine/threonine phosphatase activity of Ppm1E and Ppm1F, but not that attributable to other PPM family members, including Ppm1A/PP2Cα. Depletion of Ppm1E, but not Ppm1A, using lentiviral-mediated stable gene silencing, increased AMPKα-Thr172 phosphorylation approximately three fold in HEK293 cells. In addition, incubation of cells with low concentrations of phenformin and depletion of Ppm1E increased AMPK phosphorylation synergistically. Ppm1E and the closely related Ppm1F interact weakly with AMPK and assays with lysates of cells stably depleted of Ppm1F suggest [corrected] that this phosphatase contributes to dephosphorylation of AMPK. The data indicate that Ppm1E and probably PpM1F are in cellulo AMPK phosphatases and that Ppm1E is a potential anti-diabetic drug target. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Purification and characterization of a phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase from wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H F; Tao, M

    1989-10-19

    A neutral phosphatase which catalyzes the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphate has been purified to homogeneity from wheat seedlings. The enzyme is a monomeric glycoprotein exhibiting a molecular weight of 35,000, frictional ratio of 1.22, Stokes' radius of 260 nm, and sedimentation coefficient of 3.2 S. That the enzyme is a glycoprotein is surmised from its chromatographic property on Concanavalin A-Sepharose column. An examination of the substrate specificity indicates that the enzyme exhibits a preference for phosphotyrosine over a number of phosphocompounds, including p-nitrophenylphosphate and several glycolytic intermediates. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine are not hydrolyzed by the enzyme. The phosphatase activity is not affected by high concentrations of chelating agents and does not require metal ions. Molybdate, orthovanadate, Zn2+, and Hg2+ are all potent inhibitors of the phosphatase activity. The ability of the phosphatase to dephosphorylate protein phosphotyrosine has been investigated. [32P-Tyr]poly(Glu,Tyr)n, [32P-Tyr]alkylated bovine serum albumin, [32P-Tyr]angiotensin-I, and [32P-Tyr]band 3 (from human erythrocyte) are all substrates of the phosphatase. On the other hand, the enzyme has no activity toward protein phosphoserine and phosphothreonine. Our result further indicates that the neutral phosphatase is distinct from the wheat germ acid phosphatase. The latter enzyme is found to dephosphorylate phosphotyrosyl as well as phosphoseryl and phosphothreonyl groups in proteins. In light of the many similarities in properties to phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases isolated from several sources, it is suggested that the wheat seedling phosphatase may participate in cellular regulation involving protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  18. Purification and characterization of the glycogen-bound protein phosphatase from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Wera, S; Bollen, M; Stalmans, W

    1991-01-05

    Glycogen-bound protein phosphatase G from rat liver was transferred from glycogen to beta-cyclodextrin (cycloheptaamylose) linked to Sepharose 6B. After removal of the catalytic subunit and of contaminating proteins with 2 M NaCl, elution with beta-cyclodextrin yielded a single protein on native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and two polypeptides (161 and 54 kDa) on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the latter polypeptides are subunits of the protein phosphatase G holoenzyme. First, these polypeptides were also present, together with the catalytic subunit, in the extensively purified holoenzyme. Also, polyclonal antibodies against these polypeptides were able to bind the holoenzyme. Further, while bound to cyclodextrin-Sepharose, the polypeptides were able to recombine with separately purified type-1 (AMD) catalytic subunit, but not with type-2A (PCS) catalytic subunit. The characteristics of the reconstituted enzyme resembled those of the nonpurified protein phosphatase G. At low dilutions, the spontaneous phosphorylase phosphatase activity of the reconstituted enzyme was about 10 times lower than that of the catalytic subunit, but it was about 1000-fold more resistant to inhibition by the modulator protein (inhibitor-2). In contrast with the free catalytic subunit, the reconstituted enzyme co-sedimented with glycogen, and it was able to activate purified liver glycogen synthase b. Also, the synthase phosphatase activity was synergistically increased by a cytosolic phosphatase and inhibited by physiological concentrations of phosphorylase alpha and of Ca2+.

  19. A WAVE2-Abi1 complex mediates CSF-1-induced F-actin-rich membrane protrusions and migration in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kheir, Wassim Abou; Gevrey, Jean-Claude; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Isaac, Beth; Cox, Dianne

    2005-11-15

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) is an important physiological chemoattractant for macrophages. The mechanisms by which CSF-1 elicits the formation of filamentous actin (F-actin)-rich membrane protrusions and induces macrophage migration are not fully understood. In particular, very little is known regarding the contribution of the different members of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP) family of actin regulators in response to CSF-1. Although a role for WASP itself in macrophage chemotaxis has been previously identified, no data was available regarding the function of WASP family verprolin-homologous (WAVE) proteins in this cell type. We found that WAVE2 was the predominant isoform to be expressed in primary macrophages and in cells derived from the murine monocyte/macrophage RAW264.7 cell line (RAW/LR5). CSF-1 treatment of macrophages resulted in WAVE2 accumulation in F-actin-rich protrusions induced by CSF-1. Inhibition of WAVE2 function by expressing a dominant-negative mutant or introducing anti-WAVE2 antibodies in RAW/LR5 cells, as well as reduction of endogenous WAVE2 expression by RNA-mediated interference (RNAi), resulted in a significant reduction of CSF-1-elicited F-actin protrusions. WAVE2 was found in a protein complex together with Abelson kinase interactor 1 (Abi1) in resting or stimulated cells. Both WAVE2 and Abi1 were recruited to and necessary for the formation of F-actin protrusions in response to CSF-1. Reducing the levels of WAVE2, directly or by targeting Abi1, resulted in an impaired cell migration to CSF-1. Altogether these data identify a WAVE2-Abi1 complex crucial for the normal actin cytoskeleton reorganization and migration of macrophages in response to CSF-1.

  20. Two ancient bacterial-like PPP family phosphatases from Arabidopsis are highly conserved plant proteins that possess unique properties.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2011-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases, is a cornerstone of cellular signaling and regulation. Since their discovery, protein phosphatases have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with specificity that rivals their counteracting kinase partners. However, despite years of focused characterization in mammalian and yeast systems, many protein phosphatases in plants remain poorly or incompletely characterized. Here, we describe a bioinformatic, biochemical, and cellular examination of an ancient, Bacterial-like subclass of the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family designated the Shewanella-like protein phosphatases (SLP phosphatases). The SLP phosphatase subcluster is highly conserved in all plants, mosses, and green algae, with members also found in select fungi, protists, and bacteria. As in other plant species, the nucleus-encoded Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SLP phosphatases (AtSLP1 and AtSLP2) lack genetic redundancy and phylogenetically cluster into two distinct groups that maintain different subcellular localizations, with SLP1 being chloroplastic and SLP2 being cytosolic. Using heterologously expressed and purified protein, the enzymatic properties of both AtSLP1 and AtSLP2 were examined, revealing unique metal cation preferences in addition to a complete insensitivity to the classic serine/threonine PPP protein phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin. The unique properties and high conservation of the plant SLP phosphatases, coupled to their exclusion from animals, red algae, cyanobacteria, archaea, and most bacteria, render understanding the function(s) of this new subclass of PPP family protein phosphatases of particular interest.

  1. [Effect of inhibitors serine/threonine protein kinases and protein phosphatases on mitosis progression of synchronized tobacco by-2 cells].

    PubMed

    Sheremet, Ia A; Emets, A I; Azmi, A; Vissenberg, K; Verbelen, J-P; Blium, Ia B

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of various serine/ threonine protein kinases and protein phosphatases in the regulation of mitosis progression in plant cells the influence of cyclin-dependent (olomoucine) and Ca2+ -calmodulin-dependent (W7) protein kinases inhibitors, as well as protein kinase C inhibitors (H7 and staurosporine) and protein phosphatases inhibitor (okadaic acid) on mitosis progression in synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells has been studied. It was found that BY-2 culture treatment with inhibitors of cyclin dependent protein kinases and protein kinase C causes prophase delay, reduces the mitotic index and displaces of mitotic peak as compare with control cells. Inhibition of Ca2+ -calmodulin dependent protein kinases enhances the cell entry into prophase and delays their exit from mitosis. Meanwhile inhibition of serine/threonine protein phosphatases insignificantly enhances of synchronized BY-2 cells entering into all phases of mitosis.

  2. Outer membrane protein e of Escherichia coli K-12 is co-regulated with alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Tommassen, J; Lugtenberg, B

    1980-07-01

    Outer membrane protein e is induced in wild-type cells, just like alkaline phosphatase and some other periplasmic proteins, by growth under phosphatase limitation. nmpA and nmpB mutants, which synthesize protein e constitutively, are shown also to produce the periplasmic enzyme alkaline phosphatase constitutively. Alternatively, individual phoS, phoT, and phoR mutants as well as pit pst double mutants, all of which are known to produce alkaline phosphatase constitutively, were found to be constitutive for protein e. Also, the periplasmic space of most nmpA mutants and of all nmpB mutants grown in excess phosphate was found to contain, in addition to alkaline phosphatase, at least two new proteins, a phenomenon known for individual phoT and phoR mutants as well as for pit pst double mutants. The other nmpA mutants as well as phoS mutants lacked one of these extra periplasmic proteins, namely the phosphate-binding protein. From these data and from the known positions of the mentioned genes on the chromosomal map, it is concluded that nmpB mutants are identical to phoR mutants. Moreover, some nmpA mutants were shown to be identical to phoS mutants, whereas other nmpA mutants are likely to contain mutations in one of the genes phoS, phoT, or pst.

  3. Alkaline phosphatase protein increases in response to prednisolone in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hanford, W C; Kottel, R H; Fishman, W H

    1981-01-01

    Quantification of term-placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme protein in HeLa TCRC-1 cells grown in the presence and absence of prednisolone indicates that there is a net increase in amount of enzyme-specific protein in prednisolone-stimulated cells. In a similar analysis of HeLa D98AH2 cells, prednisolone treatment causes the appearance of term-placental alkaline phosphatase protein and the loss of the intestinal isoenzyme protein. These results support the interpretation that the response of these cells to corticosteroids is the net accumulation of alkaline phosphatase protein rather than the modification of pre-existing enzyme to a more active state. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:7340849

  4. Arabidopsis Protein Phosphatase DBP1 Nucleates a Protein Network with a Role in Regulating Plant Defense

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Kai; Lassowskat, Ines; Navarrete-Gómez, Marisa; Scheel, Dierk; Vera, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana DBP1 belongs to the plant-specific family of DNA-binding protein phosphatases. Although recently identified as a novel host factor mediating susceptibility to potyvirus, little is known about DBP1 targets and partners and the molecular mechanisms underlying its function. Analyzing changes in the phosphoproteome of a loss-of-function dbp1 mutant enabled the identification of 14-3-3λ isoform (GRF6), a previously reported DBP1 interactor, and MAP kinase (MAPK) MPK11 as components of a small protein network nucleated by DBP1, in which GRF6 stability is modulated by MPK11 through phosphorylation, while DBP1 in turn negatively regulates MPK11 activity. Interestingly, grf6 and mpk11 loss-of-function mutants showed altered response to infection by the potyvirus Plum pox virus (PPV), and the described molecular mechanism controlling GRF6 stability was recapitulated upon PPV infection. These results not only contribute to a better knowledge of the biology of DBP factors, but also of MAPK signalling in plants, with the identification of GRF6 as a likely MPK11 substrate and of DBP1 as a protein phosphatase regulating MPK11 activity, and unveils the implication of this protein module in the response to PPV infection in Arabidopsis. PMID:24595057

  5. Protein phosphatase and kinase activities possibly involved in exocytosis regulation in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed Central

    Kissmehl, R; Treptau, T; Hofer, H W; Plattner, H

    1996-01-01

    In Paramecium tetraurelia cells synchronous exocytosis induced by aminoethyldextran (AED) is accompanied by an equally rapid dephosphorylation of a 63 kDa phosphoprotein (PP63) within 80 ms. In vivo, rephosphorylation occurs within a few seconds after AED triggering. In homogenates (P)P63 can be solubilized in all three phosphorylation states (phosphorylated, dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated) and thus tested in vitro. By using chelators of different divalent cations, de- and rephosphorylation of PP63 and P63 respectively can be achieved by an endogenous protein phosphatase/kinase system. Dephosphorylation occurs in the presence of EDTA, whereas in the presence of EGTA this was concealed by phosphorylation by endogenous kinase(s), thus indicating that phosphorylation of P63 is calcium-independent. Results obtained with protein phosphatase inhibitors (okadaic acid, calyculin A) allowed us to exclude a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type I (with selective sensitivity in Paramecium). Protein phosphatase 2C is also less likely to be a candidate because of its requirement for high Mg2+ concentrations. According to previous evidence a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type 2B (calcineurin; CaN) is possibly involved. We have now found that bovine brain CaN dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro. Taking into account the specific requirements of this phosphatase in vitro, with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate, we have isolated a cytosolic phosphatase of similar characteristics by combined preparative gel electrophoresis and affinity-column chromatography. In Paramecium this phosphatase also dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro (after 32P labelling in vivo). Using various combinations of ion exchange, affinity and hydrophobic interaction chromatography we have also isolated three different protein kinases from the soluble fraction, i.e. a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and a casein kinase. Among the kinases tested, PKA

  6. An acid phosphatase in the plasma membranes of human astrocytoma showing marked specificity toward phosphotyrosine protein.

    PubMed

    Leis, J F; Kaplan, N O

    1982-11-01

    The plasma membrane from the human tumor astrocytoma contains an active acid phosphatase activity based on hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate. Other acid phosphatase substrates--beta-glycerophosphate, O-phosphorylcholine, and 5'-AMP--are not hydrolyzed significantly. The phosphatase activity is tartrate insensitive and is stimulated by Triton X-100 and EDTA. Of the three known phosphoamino acids, only free O-phosphotyrosine is hydrolyzed by the membrane phosphatase activity. Other acid phosphatases tested from potato, wheat germ, milk, and bovine prostate did not show this degree of specificity. The plasma membrane activity also dephosphorylated phosphotyrosine histone at a much greater rate than did the other acid phosphatases. pH profiles for free O-phosphotyrosine and phosphotyrosine histone showed a shift toward physiological pH, indicating possible physiological significance. Phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation activity was nearly 10 times greater than that seen for phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation, and Km values were much lower for phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (0.5 microM vs. 10 microM). Fluoride and zinc significantly inhibited phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation. Vanadate, on the other hand, was a potent inhibitor of phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (50% inhibition at 0.5 microM) but not of phosphoserine histone. ATP stimulated phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (160-250%) but inhibited phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation (95%). These results suggest the existence of a highly specific phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase activity associated with the plasma membrane of human astrocytoma.

  7. Shigeru Tsuiki: a pioneer in the research fields of complex carbohydrates and protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Taeko; Kikuchi, Kunimi; Tamura, Shinri

    2011-11-01

    Dr Tsuiki made three major contributions during his illustrious career as a biochemist. First, he developed the procedure for mucin isolation from bovine submaxillary glands. His work became the basis for mucin biochemistry. Second, he identified four distinct molecular species of mammalian sialidase. Subsequent studies based on his work led to the discovery that sialidase plays a unique role as an intracellular signalling factor involved in the regulation of a variety of cellular functions. Finally, he established the molecular basis for the diversity of mammalian protein phosphatases through protein purification and molecular cloning. His work prompted the functional studies of protein phosphatases.

  8. Effects of SOV-induced phosphatase inhibition and expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases in rat corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Li; Harris, Deshea L; Joyce, Nancy C

    2005-11-01

    Contact inhibition is an important mechanism for maintaining corneal endothelium in a non-replicative state. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play a role in regulating the integrity of cell-cell contacts, differentiation, and growth. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether phosphatases are involved in the maintenance of contact-dependent inhibition of proliferation in corneal endothelial cells and to identify candidate PTPs that are expressed in these cells and might be involved in regulation of contact inhibition. Confluent cultures of rat corneal endothelial cells or endothelium in ex vivo corneas were treated with the general phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate (SOV). Immunocytochemistry (ICC) evaluated the effect of SOV on cell-cell contacts by staining for ZO-1, and on cell cycle progression by staining for Ki67. Transverse sections of rat cornea and cultured rat corneal endothelial cells were used to test for expression of the candidate PTPs: PTP-mu, PTP-LAR, PTP1B, SHP-1, SHP-2, and PTEN using ICC and either Western blots or RT-PCR. ZO-1 staining demonstrated that SOV induced a time-dependent release of cell-cell contacts in confluent cultures of corneal endothelial cells and in the endothelium of ex vivo corneas. Staining for Ki67 indicated that SOV promoted limited cell cycle progression in the absence of serum. PTP-mu, PTP1B, SHP-1, SHP-2, and PTEN, but not PTP-LAR, were expressed in rat corneal endothelial cells in situ and in culture. The subcellular location of PTP-mu and PTP1B differed in subconfluent and confluent cells, while that of SHP-1, SHP-2, and PTEN was similar, regardless of confluent status. Western blots confirmed the expression of PTP1B, SHP-1, SHP-2, and PTEN. RT-PCR confirmed expression of PTP-mu mRNA. Phosphatases are involved in regulation of junctional integrity and of cell proliferation in corneal endothelial cells. PTP-mu, PTP1B, SHP-1, SHP-2, and PTEN are expressed in rat corneal endothelium and may be involved in

  9. Negative regulation of multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases: physiological and pharmacological significance of protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, A; Sueyoshi, N; Shigeri, Y; Kameshita, I

    2008-01-01

    Multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) play pivotal roles in intracellular Ca2+ signaling pathways. There is growing evidence that CaMKs are involved in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various human diseases. In this review, we begin by briefly summarizing our knowledge of the involvement of CaMKs in the pathogenesis of various diseases suggested to be caused by the dysfunction/dysregulation or aberrant expression of CaMKs. It is widely known that the activities of CaMKs are strictly regulated by protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of specific phosphorylation sites. Since phosphorylation status is balanced by protein kinases and protein phosphatases, the mechanism of dephosphorylation/deactivation of CaMKs, corresponding to their ‘switching off', is extremely important, as is the mechanism of phosphorylation/activation corresponding to their ‘switching on'. Therefore, we focus on the regulation of multifunctional CaMKs by protein phosphatases. We summarize the current understanding of negative regulation of CaMKs by protein phosphatases. We also discuss the biochemical properties and physiological significance of a protein phosphatase that we designated as Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP), and those of its homologue CaMKP-N. Pharmacological applications of CaMKP inhibitors are also discussed. These compounds may be useful not only for exploring the physiological functions of CaMKP/CaMKP-N, but also as novel chemotherapies for various diseases. PMID:18454172

  10. A protein phosphatase network controls the temporal and spatial dynamics of differentiation commitment in human epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Walko, Gernot; Viswanathan, Priyalakshmi; Tihy, Matthieu; Nijjher, Jagdeesh; Dunn, Sara-Jane; Lamond, Angus I

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal homeostasis depends on a balance between stem cell renewal and terminal differentiation. The transition between the two cell states, termed commitment, is poorly understood. Here, we characterise commitment by integrating transcriptomic and proteomic data from disaggregated primary human keratinocytes held in suspension to induce differentiation. Cell detachment induces several protein phosphatases, five of which - DUSP6, PPTC7, PTPN1, PTPN13 and PPP3CA – promote differentiation by negatively regulating ERK MAPK and positively regulating AP1 transcription factors. Conversely, DUSP10 expression antagonises commitment. The phosphatases form a dynamic network of transient positive and negative interactions that change over time, with DUSP6 predominating at commitment. Boolean network modelling identifies a mandatory switch between two stable states (stem and differentiated) via an unstable (committed) state. Phosphatase expression is also spatially regulated in vivo and in vitro. We conclude that an auto-regulatory phosphatase network maintains epidermal homeostasis by controlling the onset and duration of commitment. PMID:29043977

  11. Selective activators of protein phosphatase 5 target the auto-inhibitory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Haslbeck, Veronika; Drazic, Adrian; Eckl, Julia M; Alte, Ferdinand; Helmuth, Martin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Schmidt, Werner; Braun, Frank; Weiwad, Matthias; Fischer, Gunter; Gemmecker, Gerd; Sattler, Michael; Striggow, Frank; Groll, Michael; Richter, Klaus

    2015-04-20

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is an evolutionary conserved serine/threonine phosphatase. Its dephosphorylation activity modulates a diverse set of cellular factors including protein kinases and the microtubule-associated tau protein involved in neurodegenerative disorders. It is auto-regulated by its heat-shock protein (Hsp90)-interacting tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain and its C-terminal α-helix. In the present study, we report the identification of five specific PP5 activators [PP5 small-molecule activators (P5SAs)] that enhance the phosphatase activity up to 8-fold. The compounds are allosteric modulators accelerating efficiently the turnover rate of PP5, but do barely affect substrate binding or the interaction between PP5 and the chaperone Hsp90. Enzymatic studies imply that the compounds bind to the phosphatase domain of PP5. For the most promising compound crystallographic comparisons of the apo PP5 and the PP5-P5SA-2 complex indicate a relaxation of the auto-inhibited state of PP5. Residual electron density and mutation analyses in PP5 suggest activator binding to a pocket in the phosphatase/TPR domain interface, which may exert regulatory functions. These compounds thus may expose regulatory mechanisms in the PP5 enzyme and serve to develop optimized activators based on these scaffolds. © 2015 Authors.

  12. A novel transmembrane Ser/Thr kinase complexes with protein phosphatase-1 and inhibitor-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Brautigan, David L

    2002-12-20

    Protein kinases and protein phosphatases exert coordinated control over many essential cellular processes. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of a novel human transmembrane protein KPI-2 (Kinase/Phosphatase/Inhibitor-2) that was identified by yeast two-hybrid using protein phosphatase inhibitor-2 (Inh2) as bait. KPI-2 mRNA was predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle. KPI-2 is a 1503-residue protein with two predicted transmembrane helices at the N terminus, a kinase domain, followed by a C-terminal domain. The transmembrane helices were sufficient for targeting proteins to the membrane. KPI-2 kinase domain has about 60% identity with its closest relative, a tyrosine kinase. However, it only exhibited serine/threonine kinase activity in autophosphorylation reactions or with added substrates. KPI-2 kinase domain phosphorylated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1C) at Thr(320), which attenuated PP1C activity. KPI-2 C-terminal domain directly associated with PP1C, and this required a VTF motif. Inh2 associated with KPI-2 C-terminal domain with and without PP1C. Thus, KPI-2 is a kinase with sites to associate with PP1C and Inh2 to form a regulatory complex that is localized to membranes.

  13. The leukocyte common antigen (CD45): a putative receptor-linked protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, H; Tonks, N K; Walsh, K A; Fischer, E H

    1988-01-01

    A major protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase 1B) has been isolated in essentially homogeneous form from the soluble and particulate fractions of human placenta. Unexpectedly, partial amino acid sequences displayed no homology with the primary structures of the protein Ser/Thr phosphatases deduced from cDNA clones. However, the sequence is strikingly similar to the tandem C-terminal homologous domains of the leukocyte common antigen (CD45). A 157-residue segment of PTPase 1B displayed 40% and 33% sequence identity with corresponding regions from cytoplasmic domains I and II of human CD45. Similar degrees of identity have been observed among the catalytic domains of families of regulatory proteins such as protein kinases and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases. On this basis, it is proposed that the CD45 family has protein tyrosine phosphatase activity and may represent a set of cell-surface receptors involved in signal transduction. This suggests that the repertoire of signal transduction mechanisms may include the direct control of an intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatase, offering the possibility of a regulatory balance with those protein tyrosine kinases that act at the internal surface of the membrane. Images PMID:2845400

  14. Protein tyrosine phosphatases: Ligand interaction analysis and optimisation of virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, Mohammad A; Atatreh, Noor; Bichenkova, Elena V; Bryce, Richard A

    2014-07-01

    Docking-based virtual screening is an established component of structure-based drug discovery. Nevertheless, scoring and ranking of computationally docked ligand libraries still suffer from many false positives. Identifying optimal docking parameters for a target protein prior to virtual screening can improve experimental hit rates. Here, we examine protocols for virtual screening against the important but challenging class of drug target, protein tyrosine phosphatases. In this study, common interaction features were identified from analysis of protein-ligand binding geometries of more than 50 complexed phosphatase crystal structures. It was found that two interactions were consistently formed across all phosphatase inhibitors: (1) a polar contact with the conserved arginine residue, and (2) at least one interaction with the P-loop backbone amide. In order to investigate the significance of these features on phosphatase-ligand binding, a series of seeded virtual screening experiments were conducted on three phosphatase enzymes, PTP1B, Cdc25b and IF2. It was observed that when the conserved arginine and P-loop amide interactions were used as pharmacophoric constraints during docking, enrichment of the virtual screen significantly increased in the three studied phosphatases, by up to a factor of two in some cases. Additionally, the use of such pharmacophoric constraints considerably improved the ability of docking to predict the inhibitor's bound pose, decreasing RMSD to the crystallographic geometry by 43% on average. Constrained docking improved enrichment of screens against both open and closed conformations of PTP1B. Incorporation of an ordered water molecule in PTP1B screening was also found to generally improve enrichment. The knowledge-based computational strategies explored here can potentially inform structure-based design of new phosphatase inhibitors using docking-based virtual screening. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Discovery of a protein phosphatase activity encoded in the genome of bacteriophage lambda. Probable identity with open reading frame 221.

    PubMed

    Cohen, P T; Cohen, P

    1989-06-15

    Infection of Escherichia coli with phage lambda gt10 resulted in the appearance of a protein phosphatase with activity towards 32P-labelled casein. Activity reached a maximum near the point of cell lysis and declined thereafter. The phosphatase was stimulated 30-fold by Mn2+, while Mg2+ and Ca2+ were much less effective. Activity was unaffected by inhibitors 1 and 2, okadaic acid, calmodulin and trifluoperazine, distinguishing it from the major serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatases of eukaryotic cells. The lambda phosphatase was also capable of dephosphorylating other substrates in the presence of Mn2+, although activity towards 32P-labelled phosphorylase was 10-fold lower, and activity towards phosphorylase kinase and glycogen synthase 25 50-fold lower than with casein. No casein phosphatase activity was present in either uninfected cells, or in E. coli infected with phage lambda gt11. Since lambda gt11 lacks part of the open reading frame (orf) 221, previously shown to encode a protein with sequence similarity to protein phosphatase-1 and protein phosphatase-2A of mammalian cells [Cohen, Collins, Coulson, Berndt & da Cruz e Silva (1988) Gene 69, 131-134], the results indicate that ORF221 is the protein phosphatase detected in cells infected with lambda gt10. Comparison of the sequence of ORF221 with other mammalian protein phosphatases defines three highly conserved regions which are likely to be essential for function. The first of these is deleted in lambda gt11.

  16. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724-837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991-1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998-1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction.

  17. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: From Housekeeping Enzymes to Master-Regulators of Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2013-01-01

    There are many misconceptions surrounding the roles of protein phosphatases in the regulation of signal transduction, perhaps the most damaging of which is the erroneous view that these enzymes exert their effects merely as constitutively active housekeeping enzymes. On the contrary, the phosphatases are critical, specific regulators of signaling in their own right and serve an essential function, in a coordinated manner with the kinases, to determine the response to a physiological stimulus. This review is a personal perspective on the development of our understanding of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family of enzymes. I have discussed various aspects of the structure, regulation and function of the PTP family, which I hope will illustrate the fundamental importance of these enzymes to the control of signal transduction. PMID:23176256

  18. A peptide export-import control circuit modulating bacterial development regulates protein phosphatases of the phosphorelay.

    PubMed

    Perego, M

    1997-08-05

    The phosphorelay signal transduction system activates developmental transcription in sporulation of Bacillus subtilis by phosphorylation of aspartyl residues of the Spo0F and Spo0A response regulators. The phosphorylation level of these response regulators is determined by the opposing activities of protein kinases and protein aspartate phosphatases that interpret positive and negative signals for development in a signal integration circuit. The RapA protein aspartate phosphatase of the phosphorelay is regulated by a peptide that directly inhibits its activity. This peptide is proteolytically processed from an inactive pre-inhibitor protein encoded in the phrA gene. The pre-inhibitor is cleaved by the protein export apparatus to a putative pro-inhibitor that is further processed to the active inhibitor peptide and internalized by the oligopeptide permease. This export-import circuit is postulated to be a mechanism for timing phosphatase activity where the processing enzymes regulate the rate of formation of the active inhibitor. The processing events may, in turn, be controlled by a regulatory hierarchy. Chromosome sequencing has revealed several other phosphatase-prepeptide gene pairs in B. subtilis, suggesting that the use of this mechanism may be widespread in signal transduction.

  19. An RNAi Screen To Identify Protein Phosphatases That Function Within the Drosophila Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Parul; Hardin, Paul E

    2016-12-07

    Circadian clocks in eukaryotes keep time via cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops. A well-characterized example of such a transcriptional feedback loop is in Drosophila, where CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) complexes activate transcription of period (per) and timeless (tim) genes, rising levels of PER-TIM complexes feed-back to repress CLK-CYC activity, and degradation of PER and TIM permits the next cycle of CLK-CYC transcription. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated posttranslationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Previous behavioral screens identified several kinases that control CLK, PER, and TIM levels, subcellular localization, and/or activity, but two phosphatases that function within the clock were identified through the analysis of candidate genes from other pathways or model systems. To identify phosphatases that play a role in the clock, we screened clock cell-specific RNA interference (RNAi) knockdowns of all annotated protein phosphatases and protein phosphatase regulators in Drosophila for altered activity rhythms. This screen identified 19 protein phosphatases that lengthened or shortened the circadian period by ≥1 hr (p ≤ 0.05 compared to controls) or were arrhythmic. Additional RNAi lines, transposon inserts, overexpression, and loss-of-function mutants were tested to independently confirm these RNAi phenotypes. Based on genetic validation and molecular analysis, 15 viable protein phosphatases remain for future studies. These candidates are expected to reveal novel features of the circadian timekeeping mechanism in Drosophila that are likely to be conserved in all animals including humans. Copyright © 2016 Agrawal and Hardin.

  20. A Drosophila protein-tyrosine phosphatase associates with an adapter protein required for axonal guidance.

    PubMed

    Clemens, J C; Ursuliak, Z; Clemens, K K; Price, J V; Dixon, J E

    1996-07-19

    We have used the yeast two-hybrid system to isolate a novel Drosophila adapter protein, which interacts with the Drosophila protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) dPTP61F. Absence of this protein in Drosophila causes the mutant photoreceptor axon phenotype dreadlocks (dock) (Garrity, P. A., Rao, Y., Salecker, I., and Zipursky, S. L.(1996) Cell 85, 639-650). Dock is similar to the mammalian oncoprotein Nck and contains three Src homology 3 (SH3) domains and one Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. The interaction of dPTP61F with Dock was confirmed in vivo by immune precipitation experiments. A sequence containing five PXXP motifs from the non-catalytic domain of the PTP is sufficient for interaction with Dock. This suggests that binding to the PTP is mediated by one or more of the SH3 domains of Dock. Immune precipitations of Dock also co-precipitate two tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins having molecular masses of 190 and 145 kDa. Interactions between Dock and these tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins are likely mediated by the Dock SH2 domain. These findings identify potential signal-transducing partners of Dock and propose a role for dPTP61F and the unidentified phosphoproteins in axonal guidance.

  1. Transcriptional responses to cantharidin a protein phosphatase inhibitor in Arabidopsis thaliana reveal the involvement of multiple signal transduction pathways

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cantharidin is a natural compound isolated from the blister beetle (Epicauta spp.). It is a very potent inhibitor of serine/threonine protein phosphatases PPP, especially PP2A and PP4. Protein phosphatases and kinases maintain a sensitive balance between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated forms of ...

  2. Dragmacidins: new protein phosphatase inhibitors from a southern australian deep-water marine sponge, spongosorites sp

    PubMed

    Capon; Rooney; Murray; Collins; Sim; Rostas; Butler; Carroll

    1998-05-01

    A Spongosorites sp. collected during trawling operations off the southern coast of Australia returned the new alkaloid dragmacidin E (3), the structure of which was secured by detailed spectroscopic analysis. Dragmacidin E (3), and its co-metabolite dragmacidin D (1) have been identified as potent inhibitors of serine-threonine protein phosphatases.

  3. Serine/threonine protein phosphatases: multi-purpose enzymes in control of defense mechanisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatases are a group of enzymes involved in the regulation of defense mechanisms in plants. This paper describes the effects of an inhibitor of these enzymes on the expression of all of the genes associated with these defense mechanisms. The results suggest that inhibi...

  4. MECHANISM OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE INHIBITION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS (HAEC) EXPOSED TO ZN2+

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to Zn2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity and leads to activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in ...

  5. TCTEX1D4, a novel protein phosphatase 1 interactor: connecting the phosphatase to the microtubule network

    PubMed Central

    Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Vieira, Sandra I.; Esteves, Sara L. C.; Silva, Joana V.; Freitas, Maria João; Brauns, Ann-Kristin; Luers, Georg; Abrantes, Joana; Esteves, Pedro J.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.; Fardilha, Margarida; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Reversible phosphorylation plays an important role as a mechanism of intracellular control in eukaryotes. PPP1, a major eukaryotic Ser/Thr-protein phosphatase, acquires its specificity by interacting with different protein regulators, also known as PPP1 interacting proteins (PIPs). In the present work we characterized a physiologically relevant PIP in testis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen with a human testis cDNA library, we identified a novel PIP of PPP1CC2 isoform, the T-complex testis expressed protein 1 domain containing 4 (TCTEX1D4) that has recently been described as a Tctex1 dynein light chain family member. The overlay assays confirm that TCTEX1D4 interacts with the different spliced isoforms of PPP1CC. Also, the binding domain occurs in the N-terminus, where a consensus PPP1 binding motif (PPP1BM) RVSF is present. The distribution of TCTEX1D4 in testis suggests its involvement in distinct functions, such as TGFβ signaling at the blood–testis barrier and acrosome cap formation. Immunofluorescence in human ejaculated sperm shows that TCTEX1D4 is present in the flagellum and in the acrosome region of the head. Moreover, TCTEX1D4 and PPP1 co-localize in the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) and microtubules in cell cultures. Importantly, the TCTEX1D4 PPP1BM seems to be relevant for complex formation, for PPP1 retention in the MTOC and movement along microtubules. These novel results open new avenues to possible roles of this dynein, together with PPP1. In essence TCTEX1D4/PPP1C complex appears to be involved in microtubule dynamics, sperm motility, acrosome reaction and in the regulation of the blood–testis barrier. PMID:23789093

  6. AR-v7 protein expression is regulated by protein kinase and phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinan; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E.; Rennie, Paul S.; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    Failure of androgen-targeted therapy and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are often attributed to sustained expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its major splice variant, AR-v7. Although the new generation of anti-androgens such as enzalutamide effectively inhibits AR activity, accumulating pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that AR-v7 remains constitutively active in driving CRPC progression. However, molecular mechanisms which control AR-v7 protein expression remain unclear. We apply multiple prostate cancer cell models to demonstrate that enzalutamide induces differential activation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and Akt kinase depending on the gene context of cancer cells. The balance between PP-1 and Akt activation governs AR phosphorylation status and activation of the Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase. Mdm2 recognizes phosphorylated serine 213 of AR-v7, and induces AR-v7 ubiquitination and protein degradation. These findings highlight the decisive roles of PP-1 and Akt for AR-v7 protein expression and activities when AR is functionally blocked. PMID:26378044

  7. Requirement for tyrosine phosphatase during serotonergic neuromodulation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Catarsi, S; Drapeau, P

    1997-08-01

    Tyrosine kinases and phosphatases are abundant in the nervous system, where they signal cellular differentiation, mediate the responses to growth factors, and direct neurite outgrowth during development. Tyrosine phosphorylation can also alter ion channel activity, but its physiological significance remains unclear. In an identified leech mechanosensory neuron, the ubiquitous neuromodulator serotonin increases the activity of a cation channel by activating protein kinase C (PKC), resulting in membrane depolarization and modulation of the receptive field properties. We observed that the effects on isolated neurons and channels were blocked by inhibiting tyrosine phosphatases. Serotonergic stimulation of PKC thus activates a tyrosine phosphatase activity associated with the channels, which reverses their constitutive inhibition by tyrosine phosphorylation, representing a novel form of neuromodulation.

  8. Miklós Bodanszky Award Lecture: Advances in the selective targeting of protein phosphatase-1 and phosphatase-2A with peptides.

    PubMed

    Köhn, Maja

    2017-10-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 and phosphatase-2A are two ubiquitously expressed enzymes known to catalyze the majority of dephosphorylation reactions on serine and threonine inside cells. They play roles in most cellular processes and are tightly regulated by regulatory subunits in holoenzymes. Their misregulation and malfunction contribute to disease development and progression, such as in cancer, diabetes, viral infections, and neurological as well as heart diseases. Therefore, targeting these phosphatases for therapeutic use would be highly desirable; however, their complex regulation and high conservation of the active site have been major hurdles for selectively targeting them in the past. In the last decade, new approaches have been developed to overcome these hurdles and have strongly revived the field. I will focus here on peptide-based approaches, which contributed to showing that these phosphatases can be targeted selectively and aided in rethinking the design of selective phosphatase modulators. Finally, I will give a perspective on www.depod.org, the human dephosphorylation database, and how it can aid phosphatase modulator design. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Peptide Science published by European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Peptide Science published by European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Identification of an additional member of the protein-tyrosine-phosphatase family: evidence for alternative splicing in the tyrosine phosphatase domain.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, R J; Cahir, E D; Thomas, M L

    1990-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine-phosphatases (protein-tyrosine-phosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.13.48) have been implicated in the regulation of cell growth; however, to date few tyrosine phosphatases have been characterized. To identify additional family members, the cDNA for the human tyrosine phosphatase leukocyte common antigen (LCA; CD45) was used to screen, under low stringency, a mouse pre-B-cell cDNA library. Two cDNA clones were isolated and sequence analysis predicts a protein sequence of 793 amino acids. We have named the molecule LRP (LCA-related phosphatase). RNA transfer analysis indicates that the cDNAs were derived from a 3.2-kilobase mRNA. The LRP mRNA is transcribed in a wide variety of tissues. The predicted protein structure can be divided into the following structural features: a short 19-amino acid leader sequence, an exterior domain of 123 amino acids that is predicted to be highly glycosylated, a 24-amino acid membrane-spanning region, and a 627-amino acid cytoplasmic region. The cytoplasmic region contains two approximately 260-amino acid domains, each with homology to the tyrosine phosphatase family. One of the cDNA clones differed in that it had a 108-base-pair insertion that, while preserving the reading frame, would disrupt the first protein-tyrosine-phosphatase domain. Analysis of genomic DNA indicates that the insertion is due to an alternatively spliced exon. LRP appears to be evolutionarily conserved as a putative homologue has been identified in the invertebrate Styela plicata. Images PMID:2162042

  10. Protein Phosphatase 1-α Regulates AS160 Ser588 and Thr642 Dephosphorylation in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pragya; Arias, Edward B; Cartee, Gregory D

    2016-09-01

    Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) phosphorylation on Thr(642) and Ser(588) by Akt is essential for insulin's full effect on glucose transport. However, protein phosphorylation is determined by the balance of actions by kinases and phosphatases, and the specific phosphatase(s) controlling AS160 dephosphorylation is (are) unknown. Accordingly, we assessed roles of highly expressed skeletal muscle serine/threonine phosphatases (PP1, PP2A, PP2B, and PP2C) on AS160 dephosphorylation. Preliminary screening of candidate phosphatases used an AS160 dephosphorylation assay. Lysates from insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle were treated with pharmacological phosphatase inhibitors and assessed for AS160 Ser(588) and Thr(642) dephosphorylation. AS160 dephosphorylation on both phosphorylation sites was unaltered by PP2B or PP2C inhibitors. Okadaic acid (low dose inhibits PP2A; high dose inhibits PP1) delayed AS160 Ser(588) (both doses) and Thr(642) (high dose only) dephosphorylation concomitant with greater Akt phosphorylation (both doses). AS160 was coimmunoprecipitated with PP1-α but not with PP1-β, PP1-γ1, or PP2A. Recombinant inhibitor-2 protein (a selective PP1 inhibitor) delayed AS160 dephosphorylation on both phosphorylation sites without altering Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, knockdown of PP1-α but not PP1-β or PP1-γ1 by small interfering RNA caused greater AS160 Ser(588) and Thr(642) phosphorylation concomitant with unaltered Akt phosphorylation. Together, these results identified PP1-α as a regulator of AS160 Thr(642) and Ser(588) dephosphorylation in skeletal muscle. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. EKPD: a hierarchical database of eukaryotic protein kinases and protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongbo; Liu, Zexian; Cheng, Han; Gao, Tianshun; Pan, Zhicheng; Yang, Qing; Guo, Anyuan; Xue, Yu

    2014-01-01

    We present here EKPD (http://ekpd.biocuckoo.org), a hierarchical database of eukaryotic protein kinases (PKs) and protein phosphatases (PPs), the key molecules responsible for the reversible phosphorylation of proteins that are involved in almost all aspects of biological processes. As extensive experimental and computational efforts have been carried out to identify PKs and PPs, an integrative resource with detailed classification and annotation information would be of great value for both experimentalists and computational biologists. In this work, we first collected 1855 PKs and 347 PPs from the scientific literature and various public databases. Based on previously established rationales, we classified all of the known PKs and PPs into a hierarchical structure with three levels, i.e. group, family and individual PK/PP. There are 10 groups with 149 families for the PKs and 10 groups with 33 families for the PPs. We constructed 139 and 27 Hidden Markov Model profiles for PK and PP families, respectively. Then we systematically characterized ∼50,000 PKs and >10,000 PPs in eukaryotes. In addition, >500 PKs and >400 PPs were computationally identified by ortholog search. Finally, the online service of the EKPD database was implemented in PHP + MySQL + JavaScript.

  12. The WAVE2/Abi1 complex differentially regulates megakaryocyte development and spreading: implications for platelet biogenesis and spreading machinery.

    PubMed

    Eto, Koji; Nishikii, Hidekazu; Ogaeri, Takunori; Suetsugu, Shiro; Kamiya, Akihide; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Oda, Atsushi; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2007-11-15

    Actin polymerization is crucial in throm-bopoiesis, platelet adhesion, and mega-karyocyte (MK) and platelet spreading. The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) homolog WAVE functions downstream of Rac and plays a pivotal role in lamellipodia formation. While MKs and platelets principally express WAVE1 and WAVE2, which are associated with Abi1, the physiologic significance of WAVE isoforms remains undefined. We generated WAVE2(-/-) embryonic stem (ES) cells because WAVE2-null mice die by embryonic day (E) 12.5. We found that while WAVE2(-/-) ES cells differentiated into immature MKs on OP9 stroma, they were severely impaired in terminal differentiation and in platelet production. WAVE2(-/-) MKs exhibited a defect in peripheral lamellipodia on fibrinogen even with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) costimulation, indicating a requirement of WAVE2 for integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3)-mediated full spreading. MKs in which expression of Abi1 was reduced by small interfering RNA (siRNA) exhibited striking similarity to WAVE2(-/-) MKs in maturation and spreading. Interestingly, the knockdown of IRSp53, a Rac effector that preferentially binds to WAVE2, impaired the development of lamellipodia without affecting proplatelet production. In contrast, thrombopoiesis in vivo and platelet spreading on fibrinogen in vitro were intact in WAVE1-null mice. These observations clarify indispensable roles for the WAVE2/Abi1 complex in alpha(IIb)beta(3)-mediated lamellipodia by MKs and platelets through Rac and IRSp53, and additionally in thrombopoiesis independent of Rac and IRSp53.

  13. Crystal structure of SP-PTP, a low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Ku, Bonsu; Keum, Chae Won; Lee, Hye Seon; Yun, Hye-Yeoung; Shin, Ho-Chul; Kim, Bo Yeon; Kim, Seung Jun

    2016-09-23

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or Group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a pathogenic bacterium that causes a variety of infectious diseases. The GAS genome encodes one protein tyrosine phosphatase, SP-PTP, which plays an essential role in the replication and virulence maintenance of GAS. Herein, we present the crystal structure of SP-PTP at 1.9 Å resolution. Although SP-PTP has been reported to have dual phosphatase specificity for both phosphorylated tyrosine and serine/threonine, three-dimensional structural analysis showed that SP-PTP shares high similarity with typical low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (LMWPTPs), which are specific for phosphotyrosine, but not with dual-specificity phosphatases, in overall folding and active site composition. In the dephosphorylation activity test, SP-PTP consistently acted on phosphotyrosine substrates, but not or only minimally on phosphoserine/phosphothreonine substrates. Collectively, our structural and biochemical analyses verified SP-PTP as a canonical tyrosine-specific LMWPTP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Integrative Transcriptome Profiling of Cognitive Aging and Its Preservation through Ser/Thr Protein Phosphatase Regulation.

    PubMed

    Park, C Sehwan; Valomon, Amandine; Welzl, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Environmental enrichment has been reported to delay or restore age-related cognitive deficits, however, a mechanism to account for the cause and progression of normal cognitive decline and its preservation by environmental enrichment is lacking. Using genome-wide SAGE-Seq, we provide a global assessment of differentially expressed genes altered with age and environmental enrichment in the hippocampus. Qualitative and quantitative proteomics in naïve young and aged mice was used to further identify phosphorylated proteins differentially expressed with age. We found that increased expression of endogenous protein phosphatase-1 inhibitors in aged mice may be characteristic of long-term environmental enrichment and improved cognitive status. As such, hippocampus-dependent performances in spatial, recognition, and associative memories, which are sensitive to aging, were preserved by environmental enrichment and accompanied by decreased protein phosphatase activity. Age-associated phosphorylated proteins were also found to correspond to the functional categories of age-associated genes identified through transcriptome analysis. Together, this study provides a comprehensive map of the transcriptome and proteome in the aging brain, and elucidates endogenous protein phosphatase-1 inhibition as a potential means through which environmental enrichment may ameliorate age-related cognitive deficits.

  15. Protein Phosphatase 2A Isoforms Utilizing Aβ Scaffolds Regulate Differentiation through Control of Akt Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Justin H.; Jiang, Tao; Kulkarni, Shreya; Faure, Nathalie; Schaffhausen, Brian S.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulates almost all cell signaling pathways. It consists of a scaffolding A subunit to which a catalytic C subunit and one of many regulatory B subunits bind. Of the more than 80 PP2A isoforms, 10% use Aβ as a scaffold. This study demonstrates the isoform-specific function of the A scaffold subunits. Polyomaviruses have shown the importance of phosphotyrosine, PI3K, and p53 in transformation. Comparisons of polyoma and SV40 small T antigens implicate Aβ in the control of differentiation. Knockdown of Aβ enhanced differentiation. Akt signaling regulated differentiation; its activation or inhibition promoted or blocked it, respectively. Aβ bound Akt. Enhancement of PP2A Aβ/Akt interaction by polyoma small T antigen increased turnover of Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation. Conversely, knockdown of Aβ promoted Akt activity and reduced turnover of phosphate at Ser-473 of Akt. These data provide new insight into the regulation of Akt, a protein of extreme importance in cancer. Furthermore, our results suggest that the role for Aβ in differentiation and perhaps tumor suppression may lie partly in its ability to negatively regulate Akt. PMID:24052256

  16. Gardenia jasminoides Encodes an Inhibitor-2 Protein for Protein Phosphatase Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lan; Li, Hao-Ming

    2017-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) regulates diverse, essential cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, protein synthesis, muscle contraction, carbohydrate metabolism, transcription and neuronal signaling. Inhibitor-2 (I-2) can inhibit the activity of PP1 and has been found in diverse organisms. In this work, a Gardenia jasminoides fruit cDNA library was constructed, and the GjI-2 cDNA was isolated from the cDNA library by sequencing method. The GjI-2 cDNA contains a predicted 543 bp open reading frame that encodes 180 amino acids. The bioinformatics analysis suggested that the GjI-2 has conserved PP1c binding motif, and contains a conserved phosphorylation site, which is important in regulation of its activity. The three-dimensional model structure of GjI-2 was buite, its similar with the structure of I-2 from mouse. The results suggest that GjI-2 has relatively conserved RVxF, FxxR/KxR/K and HYNE motif, and these motifs are involved in interaction with PP1.

  17. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1: a critical phosphatase manipulating mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in cardiovascular disease (review).

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Yi; Yang, Ling-Chao; Guo, Kai; Wang, Yue-Peng; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are important players in the overall representation of cellular signal transduction pathways, and the deregulation of MAPKs is involved in a variety of diseases. The activation of MAPK signals occurs through phosphorylation by MAPK kinases at conserved threonine and tyrosine (Thr-Xaa-Tyr) residues. The mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs) are a major part of the dual-specificity family of phosphatases and specifically inactivate MAPKs by dephosphorylating both phosphotyrosine and phosphoserine/phosphothreonine residues within the one substrate. MAPKs binding to MKPs can enhance MKP stability and activity, providing an important negative-feedback control mechanism that limits the MAPK cascades. In recent years, accumulating and compelling evidence from studies mainly employing cultured cells and mouse models has suggested that the archetypal MKP family member, MKP-1, plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular disease as a major negative modulator of MAPK signaling pathways. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge on the pathological properties and the regulation of MKP-1 in cardiovascular disease, which may provide valuable therapeutic options.

  18. Role of Plastid Protein Phosphatase TAP38 in LHCII Dephosphorylation and Thylakoid Electron Flow

    PubMed Central

    Pribil, Mathias; Pesaresi, Paolo; Hertle, Alexander; Barbato, Roberto; Leister, Dario

    2010-01-01

    Short-term changes in illumination elicit alterations in thylakoid protein phosphorylation and reorganization of the photosynthetic machinery. Phosphorylation of LHCII, the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II, facilitates its relocation to photosystem I and permits excitation energy redistribution between the photosystems (state transitions). The protein kinase STN7 is required for LHCII phosphorylation and state transitions in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. LHCII phosphorylation is reversible, but extensive efforts to identify the protein phosphatase(s) that dephosphorylate LHCII have been unsuccessful. Here, we show that the thylakoid-associated phosphatase TAP38 is required for LHCII dephosphorylation and for the transition from state 2 to state 1 in A. thaliana. In tap38 mutants, thylakoid electron flow is enhanced, resulting in more rapid growth under constant low-light regimes. TAP38 gene overexpression markedly decreases LHCII phosphorylation and inhibits state 1→2 transition, thus mimicking the stn7 phenotype. Furthermore, the recombinant TAP38 protein is able, in an in vitro assay, to directly dephosphorylate LHCII. The dependence of LHCII dephosphorylation upon TAP38 dosage, together with the in vitro TAP38-mediated dephosphorylation of LHCII, suggests that TAP38 directly acts on LHCII. Although reversible phosphorylation of LHCII and state transitions are crucial for plant fitness under natural light conditions, LHCII hyperphosphorylation associated with an arrest of photosynthesis in state 2 due to inactivation of TAP38 improves photosynthetic performance and plant growth under state 2-favoring light conditions. PMID:20126264

  19. Evaluating transition state structures of vanadium-phosphatase protein complexes using shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Lombardo, Irma; Alvarez, Santiago; McLauchlan, Craig C; Crans, Debbie C

    2015-06-01

    Shape analysis of coordination complexes is well-suited to evaluate the subtle distortions in the trigonal bipyramidal (TBPY-5) geometry of vanadium coordinated in the active site of phosphatases and characterized by X-ray crystallography. Recent studies using the tau (τ) analysis support the assertion that vanadium is best described as a trigonal bipyramid, because this geometry is the ideal transition state geometry of the phosphate ester substrate hydrolysis (C.C. McLauchlan, B.J. Peters, G.R. Willsky, D.C. Crans, Coord. Chem. Rev. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccr.2014.12.012 ; D.C. Crans, M.L. Tarlton, C.C. McLauchlan, Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. 2014, 4450-4468). Here we use continuous shape measures (CShM) analysis to investigate the structural space of the five-coordinate vanadium-phosphatase complexes associated with mechanistic transformations between the tetrahedral geometry and the five-coordinate high energy TBPY-5 geometry was discussed focusing on the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) enzyme. No evidence for square pyramidal geometries was observed in any vanadium-protein complexes. The shape analysis positioned the metal ion and the ligands in the active site reflecting the mechanism of the cleavage of the organic phosphate in a phosphatase. We identified the umbrella distortions to be directly on the reaction path between tetrahedral phosphate and the TBPY-5-types of high-energy species. The umbrella distortions of the trigonal bipyramid are therefore identified as being the most relevant types of transition state structures for the phosphoryl group transfer reactions for phosphatases and this may be related to the possibility that vanadium is an inhibitor for enzymes that support both exploded and five-coordinate transition states. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase 1 Disrupts Proinflammatory Protein Synthesis in Endotoxin-Adapted Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Brudecki, Laura; Ferguson, Donald A.; McCall, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Autotoxic production of proinflammatory mediators during early sepsis induces excessive inflammation, and their later suppression may limit the immune response. We previously reported that sepsis differentially represses transcription and translation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) to reprogram sepsis inflammation. This switch is gene specific and plays a crucial role in the clinically relevant syndrome of endotoxin adaptation/tolerance, multiorgan failure, and poor sepsis outcome. To further define the mechanisms responsible for translation disruption that follows inflammation induction, we used THP-1 human promonocytes as a model of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) responses found in sepsis. We showed that phosphorylation-dependent activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and translation disruption of TNF-α and IL-6 follow increased MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) expression and that MKP-1 knockdown rephosphorylates p38 and restores the capacity to translate TNF-α and IL-6 mRNAs. We also observed that the RNA-binding protein motif 4 (RBM4), a p38 MAPK target, accumulates in an unphosphorylated form in the cytosol in endotoxin-adapted cells, suggesting that dephosphorylated RBM4 may function as a translational repressor. Moreover, MKP-1 knockdown promotes RBM4 phosphorylation, blocks its transfer from the nucleus to the cytosol, and reverses translation repression. We also found that microRNA 146a (miR-146a) knockdown prevents and miR-146a transfection induces MKP-1 expression, which lead to increases or decreases in TNF-α and IL-6 translation, respectively. We conclude that a TLR4-, miR-146a-, p38 MAPK-, and MKP-1-dependent autoregulatory pathway regulates the translation of proinflammatory genes during the acute inflammatory response by spatially and temporally modifying the phosphorylation state of RBM4 translational repressor protein. PMID:23825193

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphatase σ targets apical junction complex proteins in the intestine and regulates epithelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    Murchie, Ryan; Guo, Cong-Hui; Persaud, Avinash; Muise, Aleixo; Rotin, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)σ (PTPRS) was shown previously to be associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PTPσ−/− mice exhibit an IBD-like phenotype in the intestine and show increased susceptibility to acute models of murine colitis. However, the function of PTPσ in the intestine is uncharacterized. Here, we show an intestinal epithelial barrier defect in the PTPσ−/− mouse, demonstrated by a decrease in transepithelial resistance and a leaky intestinal epithelium that was determined by in vivo tracer analysis. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation was observed at the plasma membrane of epithelial cells lining the crypts of the small bowel and colon of the PTPσ−/− mouse, suggesting the presence of PTPσ substrates in these regions. Using mass spectrometry, we identified several putative PTPσ intestinal substrates that were hyper–tyrosine-phosphorylated in the PTPσ−/− mice relative to wild type. Among these were proteins that form or regulate the apical junction complex, including ezrin. We show that ezrin binds to and is dephosphorylated by PTPσ in vitro, suggesting it is a direct PTPσ substrate, and identified ezrin-Y353/Y145 as important sites targeted by PTPσ. Moreover, subcellular localization of the ezrin phosphomimetic Y353E or Y145 mutants were disrupted in colonic Caco-2 cells, similar to ezrin mislocalization in the colon of PTPσ−/− mice following induction of colitis. Our results suggest that PTPσ is a positive regulator of intestinal epithelial barrier, which mediates its effects by modulating epithelial cell adhesion through targeting of apical junction complex-associated proteins (including ezrin), a process impaired in IBD. PMID:24385580

  2. Developmental expression and function analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D in oligodendrocyte myelination

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qiang; Tan, Zhou; Zhao, Shufang; Huang, Hao; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Hu, Xuemei; Zhang, Yiping; Shields, Christopher B; Uetani, Noriko; Qiu, Mengsheng

    2015-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are extensively expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), and have distinct spatial and temporal patterns in different cell types during development. Previous studies have demonstrated possible roles for RPTPs in axon outgrowth, guidance, and synaptogenesis. In the present study, our results revealed that protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type D (PTPRD) was initially expressed in mature neurons in embryonic CNS, and later in oligodendroglial cells at postnatal stages when oligodendrocyte undergo active axonal myelination process. In PTPRD mutants, oligodendrocyte differentiation was normal and a transient myelination delay occurred at early postnatal stages, indicating the contribution of PTPRD to the initiation of axonal myelination. Our results also showed that the remyelination process was not affected in the absence of PTPRD function after a cuprizone-induced demyelination in adult animals. PMID:26341907

  3. Characterization of protein phosphatase 2A acting on phosphorylated plasma membrane aquaporin of tulip petals.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2004-05-01

    A protein phosphatase holo-type enzyme (38, 65, and 75 kDa) preparation and a free catalytic subunit (38 kDa) purified from tulip petals were characterized as protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) by immunological and biochemical approaches. The plasma membrane containing the putative plasma membrane aquaporin (PM-AQP) was prepared from tulip petals, phosphorylated in vitro, and used as the substrate for both of the purified PP2A preparations. Although both preparations dephosphorylated the phosphorylated PM-AQP at 20 degrees C, only the holo-type enzyme preparation acted at 5 degrees C on the phosphorylated PM-AQP with higher substrate specificity, suggesting that regulatory subunits are required for low temperature-dependent dephosphorylation of PM-AQP in tulip petals.

  4. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human SER/THR Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E.

    2004-01-01

    Serinekhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth. Here we report the 1.6 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of PP5 catalytic domain with metal and phosphate ions in the active site. The structure reveals a mechanism for PPS-mediated catalysis that requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1),-M(sub 2)-His(sup 427)-W(sup 2)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif, and provides a structural basis for the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases placing them among the most powerful catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of PP5 should aid development of specific inhibitors.

  5. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    Serinehhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth and cellular responses to stress. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 A. From this structure we resolved the mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a con served Aspn-271-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His-427-His-304-Asp-274 catalytic motif. The structure of PPSc provides a structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  6. Disruption of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) function in neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific tyrosine phosphatase that plays a major role in the development of synaptic plasticity. Recent findings have implicated STEP in several psychiatric and neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome, Huntington’s disease, stroke/ischemia, and stress-related psychiatric disorders. In these disorders, STEP protein expression levels and activity are dysregulated, contributing to the cognitive deficits that are present. In this review, we focus on the most recent findings on STEP, discuss how STEP expression and activity are maintained during normal cognitive function, and how disruptions in STEP activity contribute to a number of illnesses. PMID:25218562

  7. Protein phosphatase AP2C1 negatively regulates basal resistance and defense responses to Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Shubchynskyy, Volodymyr; Boniecka, Justyna; Schweighofer, Alois; Simulis, Justinas; Kvederaviciute, Kotryna; Stumpe, Michael; Mauch, Felix; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Boutrot, Freddy; Zipfel, Cyril; Meskiene, Irute

    2017-02-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) mediate plant immune responses to pathogenic bacteria. However, less is known about the cell autonomous negative regulatory mechanism controlling basal plant immunity. We report the biological role of Arabidopsis thaliana MAPK phosphatase AP2C1 as a negative regulator of plant basal resistance and defense responses to Pseudomonas syringae. AP2C2, a closely related MAPK phosphatase, also negatively controls plant resistance. Loss of AP2C1 leads to enhanced pathogen-induced MAPK activities, increased callose deposition in response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns or to P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000, and enhanced resistance to bacterial infection with Pto. We also reveal the impact of AP2C1 on the global transcriptional reprogramming of transcription factors during Pto infection. Importantly, ap2c1 plants show salicylic acid-independent transcriptional reprogramming of several defense genes and enhanced ethylene production in response to Pto. This study pinpoints the specificity of MAPK regulation by the different MAPK phosphatases AP2C1 and MKP1, which control the same MAPK substrates, nevertheless leading to different downstream events. We suggest that precise and specific control of defined MAPKs by MAPK phosphatases during plant challenge with pathogenic bacteria can strongly influence plant resistance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Inhibitors of Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatases: Biochemical and Structural Studies Provide Insight for Further Development.

    PubMed

    Swingle, Mark R; Honkanen, Richard Eric

    2018-05-07

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins regulates many key functions in eukaryotic cells. Phosphorylation is catalyzed by protein kinases, with the majority of phosphorylation occurring on side chains of serine and threonine residues. The phosphomonoesters generated by protein kinases are hydrolyzed by protein phosphatases. In the absence of a phosphatase the half-time for the hydrolysis of alkyl phosphate dianions at 25º C is over 1 trillion years; knon ~2 x 10-20 sec-1. Therefore, ser/thr phosphatases are critical for processes controlled by reversible phosphorylation. This review is based on a search of the literature in available databases. We compare the catalytic mechanism of PPP-family phosphatases (PPPases) and the interactions of inhibitors that target these enzymes. PPPases are metal-dependent hydrolases that enhance the rate of hydrolysis ([kcat/kM]/knon ) by a factor of ~1021, placing them among the most powerful known catalysts on earth. Biochemical and structural studies indicate the remarkable catalytic proficiencies of PPPases are achieved by 10 conserved amino acids, DXH(X)~26DXXDR(X)~20-26NH(X)~50H(X)~25-45R(X)~30-40H. Six act as metal-coordinating residues. Four position and orient the substrate phosphate. Together, two metal ions and the 10 catalytic residues position the phosphoryl group and an activated bridging water/hydroxide nucleophile for inline attack upon the substrate phosphorous atom. The PPPases are conserved among species, and many structurally diverse natural toxins co-evolved to target these enzymes. Although the catalytic site is conserved, opportunities for the development of selective inhibitors of this important group of metalloenzymes exist. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Dephosphorylation of microtubule-binding sites at the neurofilament-H tail domain by alkaline, acid, and protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Hisanaga, S; Yasugawa, S; Yamakawa, T; Miyamoto, E; Ikebe, M; Uchiyama, M; Kishimoto, T

    1993-06-01

    The dephosphorylation-induced interaction of neurofilaments (NFs) with microtubules (MTs) was investigated by using several phosphatases. Escherichia coli alkaline and wheat germ acid phosphatases increased the electrophoretic mobility of NF-H and NF-M by dephosphorylation, and induced the binding of NF-H to MTs. The binding of NFs to MTs was observed only after the electrophoretic mobility of NF-H approached the exhaustively dephosphorylated level when alkaline phosphatase was used. The number of phosphate remaining when NF-H began to bind to MTs was estimated by measuring phosphate bound to NF-H. NF-H did not bind to MTs even when about 40 phosphates from the total of 51 had been removed by alkaline phosphatase. The removal of 6 further phosphates finally resulted in the association of NF-H with MTs. A similar finding, that the restricted phosphorylation sites in the NF-H tail domain, but not the total amount of phosphates, were important for binding to MTs, was also obtained with acid phosphatases. In contrast to alkaline and acid phosphatases, four classes of protein phosphatases (protein phosphatases 1, 2A, 2B, and 2C) were ineffective for shifting the electrophoretic mobility of NF proteins and for inducing the association of NFs to MTs.

  10. Differential regulation of the androgen receptor by protein phosphatase regulatory subunits

    PubMed Central

    Grey, James; Jones, Dominic; Wilson, Laura; Nakjang, Sirintra; Clayton, Jake; Temperley, Richard; Clark, Emma; Gaughan, Luke; Robson, Craig

    2018-01-01

    The Androgen Receptor (AR) is a key molecule in the development, maintenance and progression of prostate cancer (PC). However, the relationship between the AR and co-regulatory proteins that facilitate AR activity in castrate resistant settings remain understudied. Here we show that protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunits, identified from a phosphatase RNAi screen, direct PP1 catalytic subunits to a varied yet significant response in AR function. As such, we have characterised the PP1β holoenzyme, myosin phosphatase (MLCP), as a novel ligand independent regulator of the AR. Sustained MLCP activity through down-regulation of the MLCP inhibitory subunit, PPP1R14C, results in impaired AR nuclear translocation, protein stability and transcriptional activity in distinct models of PC progression, culminating in restoration of a non-malignant prostate genotype. Phenotypically, a marked reduction in cell proliferation and migration, characterised by G1 cell cycle arrest is observed, confirming PP1 holoenzyme disruption as a novel treatment approach in PC. PMID:29423094

  11. Mutational analysis of the SRC homology 2 domain protein-tyrosine phosphatase Corkscrew.

    PubMed

    Allard, J D; Herbst, R; Carroll, P M; Simon, M A

    1998-05-22

    The SRC homology 2 (SH2) domain protein-tyrosine phosphatase, Corkscrew (CSW) is required for signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases, including the Sevenless receptor tyrosine kinase (SEV), which directs Drosophila R7 photoreceptor cell development. To investigate the role of the different domains of CSW, we constructed domain-specific csw mutations and assayed their effects on CSW function. Our results indicate that CSW SH2 domain function is essential, but either CSW SH2 domain can fulfill this requirement. We also found that CSW and activated SEV are associated in vivo in a manner that does not require either CSW SH2 domain function or tyrosine phosphorylation of SEV. In contrast, the interaction between CSW and Daughter of Sevenless, a CSW substrate, is dependent on SH2 domain function. These results suggest that the role of the CSW SH2 domains during SEV signaling is to bind Daughter of Sevenless rather than activated SEV. We also found that although CSW protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity is required for full CSW function, a catalytically inactive CSW is capable of providing partial function. In addition, we found that deletion of either the CSW protein- tyrosine phosphatase insert or the entire CSW carboxyl terminus, which includes a conserved DRK/GRB2 SH2 domain binding sequence, does not abolish CSW function.

  12. Dimerization and phosphatase activity of calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1 interacting protein: the influence of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Topolska-Woś, Agnieszka M.; Shell, Steven M.; Kilańczyk, Ewa; Szczepanowski, Roman H.; Chazin, Walter J.; Filipek, Anna

    2015-01-01

    CacyBP/SIP [calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1 [seven in absentia homolog 1 (Siah E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1)] interacting protein] is a multifunctional protein whose activity includes acting as an ERK1/2 phosphatase. We analyzed dimerization of mouse CacyBP/SIP in vitro and in mouse neuroblastoma cell line (NB2a) cells, as well as the structure of a full-length protein. Moreover, we searched for the CacyBP/SIP domain important for dimerization and dephosphorylation of ERK2, and we analyzed the role of dimerization in ERK1/2 signaling in NB2a cells. Cell-based assays showed that CacyBP/SIP forms a homodimer in NB2a cell lysate, and biophysical methods demonstrated that CacyBP/SIP forms a stable dimer in vitro. Data obtained using small-angle X-ray scattering supported a model in which CacyBP/SIP occupies an anti-parallel orientation mediated by the N-terminal dimerization domain. Site-directed mutagenesis established that the N-terminal domain is indispensable for full phosphatase activity of CacyBP/SIP. We also demonstrated that the oligomerization state of CacyBP/SIP as well as the level of post-translational modifications and subcellular distribution of CacyBP/SIP change after activation of the ERK1/2 pathway in NB2a cells due to oxidative stress. Together, our results suggest that dimerization is important for controlling phosphatase activity of CacyBP/SIP and for regulating the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.—Topolska-Woś, A. M., Shell, S. M., Kilańczyk, E., Szczepanowski, R. H., Chazin, W. J., Filipek, A. Dimerization and phosphatase activity of calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1 interacting protein: the influence of oxidative stress. PMID:25609429

  13. Sprouty proteins are in vivo targets of Corkscrew/SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Lesley A; Toering, Stephanie J; Simon, Michael A; Krasnow, Mark A; Smith-Bolton, Rachel K

    2006-03-01

    Drosophila Corkscrew protein and its vertebrate ortholog SHP-2 (now known as Ptpn11) positively modulate receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling during development, but how these tyrosine phosphatases promote tyrosine kinase signaling is not well understood. Sprouty proteins are tyrosine-phosphorylated RTK feedback inhibitors, but their regulation and mechanism of action are also poorly understood. Here, we show that Corkscrew/SHP-2 proteins control Sprouty phosphorylation and function. Genetic experiments demonstrate that Corkscrew/SHP-2 and Sprouty proteins have opposite effects on RTK-mediated developmental events in Drosophila and an RTK signaling process in cultured mammalian cells, and the genes display dose-sensitive genetic interactions. In cultured cells, inactivation of SHP-2 increases phosphorylation on the critical tyrosine of Sprouty 1. SHP-2 associates in a complex with Sprouty 1 in cultured cells and in vitro, and a purified SHP-2 protein dephosphorylates the critical tyrosine of Sprouty 1. Substrate-trapping forms of Corkscrew bind Sprouty in cultured Drosophila cells and the developing eye. These results identify Sprouty proteins as in vivo targets of Corkscrew/SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatases and show how Corkscrew/SHP-2 proteins can promote RTK signaling by inactivating a feedback inhibitor. We propose that this double-negative feedback circuit shapes the output profile of RTK signaling events.

  14. A protein tyrosine phosphatase-like protein from baculovirus has RNA 5′-triphosphatase and diphosphatase activities

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Toshimitsu; Taylor, Gregory S.; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Charbonneau, Harry; Buratowski, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The superfamily of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) includes at least one enzyme with an RNA substrate. We recently showed that the RNA triphosphatase domain of the Caenorhabditis elegans mRNA capping enzyme is related to the PTP enzyme family by sequence similarity and mechanism. The PTP most similar in sequence to the capping enzyme triphosphatase is BVP, a dual-specificity PTP encoded by the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus. Although BVP previously has been shown to have modest tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphatase activity, we find that it is much more potent as an RNA 5′-phosphatase. BVP sequentially removes γ and β phosphates from the 5′ end of triphosphate-terminated RNA, leaving a 5′-monophosphate end. The activity was specific for polynucleotides; nucleotide triphosphates were not hydrolyzed. A mutant protein in which the active site cysteine was replaced with serine was inactive. Three other dual-specificity PTPs (VH1, VHR, and Cdc14) did not exhibit detectable RNA phosphatase activity. Therefore, capping enzyme and BVP are members of a distinct PTP-like subfamily that can remove phosphates from RNA. PMID:9707557

  15. INHIBITION OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY MEDIATES EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads t...

  16. Leishmania mexicana: promastigotes and amastigotes secrete protein phosphatases and this correlates with the production of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Escalona-Montaño, A R; Ortiz-Lozano, D M; Rojas-Bernabé, A; Wilkins-Rodriguez, A A; Torres-Guerrero, H; Mondragón-Flores, R; Mondragón-Gonzalez, R; Becker, I; Gutiérrez-Kobeh, L; Aguirre-Garcia, M M

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatase activity of Leishmania spp. has been shown to deregulate the signalling pathways of the host cell. We here show that Leishmania mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes secrete proteins with phosphatase activity to the culture medium, which was higher in the Promastigote Secretion Medium (PSM) as compared with the Amastigote Secretion Medium (ASM) and was not due to cell lysis, since parasite viability was not affected by the secretion process. The biochemical characterization showed that the phosphatase activity present in PSM was higher in dephosphorylating the peptide END (pY) INASL as compared with the peptide RRA (pT)VA. In contrast, the phosphatase activity in ASM showed little dephosphorylating capacity for both peptides. Inhibition assays demonstrated that the phosphatase activity of both PSM and ASM was sensible only to protein tyrosine phosphatases inhibitors. An antibody against a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) of Leishmania major cross-reacted with a 44·9 kDa molecule in different cellular fractions of L. mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes, however, in PSM and ASM, the antibody recognized a protein about 70 kDa. By electron microscopy, the PP2C was localized in the flagellar pocket of amastigotes. PSM and ASM induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1β, IL-12p70 and IL-10 in human macrophages.

  17. PhosphoregDB: The tissue and sub-cellular distribution of mammalian protein kinases and phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Alistair RR; Taylor, Darrin F; Fink, J Lynn; Gongora, M Milena; Flegg, Cameron; Teasdale, Rohan D; Suzuki, Harukazu; Kanamori, Mutsumi; Kai, Chikatoshi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Grimmond, Sean M

    2006-01-01

    Background Protein kinases and protein phosphatases are the fundamental components of phosphorylation dependent protein regulatory systems. We have created a database for the protein kinase-like and phosphatase-like loci of mouse that integrates protein sequence, interaction, classification and pathway information with the results of a systematic screen of their sub-cellular localization and tissue specific expression data mined from the GNF tissue atlas of mouse. Results The database lets users query where a specific kinase or phosphatase is expressed at both the tissue and sub-cellular levels. Similarly the interface allows the user to query by tissue, pathway or sub-cellular localization, to reveal which components are co-expressed or co-localized. A review of their expression reveals 30% of these components are detected in all tissues tested while 70% show some level of tissue restriction. Hierarchical clustering of the expression data reveals that expression of these genes can be used to separate the samples into tissues of related lineage, including 3 larger clusters of nervous tissue, developing embryo and cells of the immune system. By overlaying the expression, sub-cellular localization and classification data we examine correlations between class, specificity and tissue restriction and show that tyrosine kinases are more generally expressed in fewer tissues than serine/threonine kinases. Conclusion Together these data demonstrate that cell type specific systems exist to regulate protein phosphorylation and that for accurate modelling and for determination of enzyme substrate relationships the co-location of components needs to be considered. PMID:16504016

  18. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PRL2 Mediates Notch and Kit Signals in Early T Cell Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michihiro; Nabinger, Sarah C; Bai, Yunpeng; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Gao, Rui; Chen, Sisi; Yao, Chonghua; Dong, Yuanshu; Zhang, Lujuan; Rodriguez, Sonia; Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; Pear, Warren S; Carlesso, Nadia; Yoder, Mervin C; Kapur, Reuben; Kaplan, Mark H; Daniel Lacorazza, Hugo; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Liu, Yan

    2017-04-01

    The molecular pathways regulating lymphoid priming, fate, and development of multipotent bone marrow hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) that continuously feed thymic progenitors remain largely unknown. While Notch signal is indispensable for T cell specification and differentiation, the downstream effectors are not well understood. PRL2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase that regulates hematopoietic stem cell proliferation and self-renewal, is highly expressed in murine thymocyte progenitors. Here we demonstrate that protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL2 and receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit are critical downstream targets and effectors of the canonical Notch/RBPJ pathway in early T cell progenitors. While PRL2 deficiency resulted in moderate defects of thymopoiesis in the steady state, de novo generation of T cells from Prl2 null hematopoietic stem cells was significantly reduced following transplantation. Prl2 null HSPCs also showed impaired T cell differentiation in vitro. We found that Notch/RBPJ signaling upregulated PRL2 as well as c-Kit expression in T cell progenitors. Further, PRL2 sustains Notch-mediated c-Kit expression and enhances stem cell factor/c-Kit signaling in T cell progenitors, promoting effective DN1-DN2 transition. Thus, we have identified a critical role for PRL2 phosphatase in mediating Notch and c-Kit signals in early T cell progenitors. Stem Cells 2017;35:1053-1064. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  19. A novel function of twins, B subunit of protein phosphatase 2A, in regulating actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Po-An; Chang, Ching-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Actin is an important component of the cytoskeleton and its polymerization is delicately regulated by several kinases and phosphatases. Heterotrimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a potent phosphatase that is crucial for cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, signal transduction, cytoskeleton arrangement, and neurodegeneration. To facilitate these varied functions, different regulators determine the different targets of PP2A. Among these regulators of PP2A, the B subunits in particular may be involved in cytoskeleton arrangement. However, little is known about the role of PP2A in actin polymerization in vivo. Using sophisticated fly genetics, we demonstrated a novel function for the fly B subunit, twins, to promote actin polymerization in varied tissue types, suggesting a broad and conserved effect. Furthermore, our genetic data suggest that twins may act upstream of the actin-polymerized-proteins, Moesin and Myosin-light-chain, and downstream of Rho to promote actin polymerization. This work opens a new avenue for exploring the biological functions of a PP2A regulator, twins, in cytoskeleton regulation.

  20. A novel function of twins, B subunit of protein phosphatase 2A, in regulating actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Actin is an important component of the cytoskeleton and its polymerization is delicately regulated by several kinases and phosphatases. Heterotrimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a potent phosphatase that is crucial for cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, signal transduction, cytoskeleton arrangement, and neurodegeneration. To facilitate these varied functions, different regulators determine the different targets of PP2A. Among these regulators of PP2A, the B subunits in particular may be involved in cytoskeleton arrangement. However, little is known about the role of PP2A in actin polymerization in vivo. Using sophisticated fly genetics, we demonstrated a novel function for the fly B subunit, twins, to promote actin polymerization in varied tissue types, suggesting a broad and conserved effect. Furthermore, our genetic data suggest that twins may act upstream of the actin-polymerized-proteins, Moesin and Myosin-light-chain, and downstream of Rho to promote actin polymerization. This work opens a new avenue for exploring the biological functions of a PP2A regulator, twins, in cytoskeleton regulation. PMID:28977036

  1. Natural products possessing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activity found in the last decades

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Cheng-shi; Liang, Lin-fu; Guo, Yue-wei

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of approximately 300 secondary metabolites with inhibitory activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which were isolated from various natural sources or derived from synthetic process in the last decades. The structure-activity relationship and the selectivity of some compounds against other protein phosphatases were also discussed. Potential pharmaceutical applications of several PTP1B inhibitors were presented. PMID:22941286

  2. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate and penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose inhibit protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Andrea; Bécsi, Bálint; Kolozsvári, Bernadett; Komáromi, István; Kövér, Katalin E; Erdődi, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) and protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) are responsible for the dephosphorylation of the majority of phosphoserine/threonine residues in cells. In this study, we show that (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (PGG), polyphenolic constituents of green tea and tannins, inhibit the activity of the PP1 recombinant δ-isoform of the PP1 catalytic subunit and the native PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) with IC(50) values of 0.47-1.35 μm and 0.26-0.4 μm, respectively. EGCG and PGG inhibit PP2Ac less potently, with IC(50) values of 15 and 6.6 μm, respectively. The structure-inhibitory potency relationships of catechin derivatives suggests that the galloyl group may play a major role in phosphatase inhibition. The interaction of EGCG and PGG with PP1c was characterized by NMR and surface plasmon resonance-based binding techniques. Competitive binding assays and molecular modeling suggest that EGCG docks at the hydrophobic groove close to the catalytic center of PP1c, partially overlapping with the binding surface of microcystin-LR or okadaic acid. This hydrophobic interaction is further stabilized by hydrogen bonding via hydroxyl/oxo groups of EGCG to PP1c residues. Comparative docking shows that EGCG binds to PP2Ac in a similar manner, but in a distinct pose. Long-term treatment (24 h) with these compounds and other catechins suppresses the viability of HeLa cells with a relative effectiveness reminiscent of their in vitro PP1c-inhibitory potencies. The above data imply that the phosphatase-inhibitory features of these polyphenols may be implicated in the wide spectrum of their physiological influence. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  3. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 positively regulates macrophage oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing Jun; Goodwin, Charles B; Nabinger, Sarah C; Richine, Briana M; Yang, Zhenyun; Hanenberg, Helmut; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Matozaki, Takashi; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Chan, Rebecca J

    2015-02-13

    Macrophages are vital to innate immunity and express pattern recognition receptors and integrins for the rapid detection of invading pathogens. Stimulation of Dectin-1 and complement receptor 3 (CR3) activates Erk- and Akt-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Shp2, a protein-tyrosine phosphatase encoded by Ptpn11, promotes activation of Ras-Erk and PI3K-Akt and is crucial for hematopoietic cell function; however, no studies have examined Shp2 function in particulate-stimulated ROS production. Maximal Dectin-1-stimulated ROS production corresponded kinetically to maximal Shp2 and Erk phosphorylation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) from mice with a conditionally deleted allele of Ptpn11 (Shp2(flox/flox);Mx1Cre+) produced significantly lower ROS levels compared with control BMMs. Although YFP-tagged phosphatase dead Shp2-C463A was strongly recruited to the early phagosome, its expression inhibited Dectin-1- and CR3-stimulated phospho-Erk and ROS levels, placing Shp2 phosphatase function and Erk activation upstream of ROS production. Further, BMMs expressing gain of function Shp2-D61Y or Shp2-E76K and peritoneal exudate macrophages from Shp2D61Y/+;Mx1Cre+ mice produced significantly elevated levels of Dectin-1- and CR3-stimulated ROS, which was reduced by pharmacologic inhibition of Erk. SIRPα (signal regulatory protein α) is a myeloid inhibitory immunoreceptor that requires tyrosine phosphorylation to exert its inhibitory effect. YFP-Shp2C463A-expressing cells have elevated phospho-SIRPα levels and an increased Shp2-SIRPα interaction compared with YFP-WT Shp2-expressing cells. Collectively, these findings indicate that Shp2 phosphatase function positively regulates Dectin-1- and CR3-stimulated ROS production in macrophages by dephosphorylating and thus mitigating the inhibitory function of SIRPα and by promoting Erk activation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. A protein-tyrosine phosphatase with sequence similarity to the SH2 domain of the protein-tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Shen, S H; Bastien, L; Posner, B I; Chrétien, P

    1991-08-22

    The phosphorylation of proteins at tyrosine residues is critical in cellular signal transduction, neoplastic transformation and control of the mitotic cycle. These mechanisms are regulated by the activities of both protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases). As in the PTKs, there are two classes of PTPases: membrane associated, receptor-like enzymes and soluble proteins. Here we report the isolation of a complementary DNA clone encoding a new form of soluble PTPase, PTP1C. The enzyme possesses a large noncatalytic region at the N terminus which unexpectedly contains two adjacent copies of the Src homology region 2 (the SH2 domain) found in various nonreceptor PTKs and other cytoplasmic signalling proteins. As with other SH2 sequences, the SH2 domains of PTP1C formed high-affinity complexes with the activated epidermal growth factor receptor and other phosphotyrosine-containing proteins. These results suggest that the SH2 regions in PTP1C may interact with other cellular components to modulate its own phosphatase activity against interacting substrates. PTPase activity may thus directly link growth factor receptors and other signalling proteins through protein-tyrosine phosphorylation.

  5. Finding the smoking gun: protein tyrosine phosphatases as tools and targets of unicellular microorganisms and viruses.

    PubMed

    Heneberg, P

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are increasingly recognized as important effectors of host-pathogen interactions. Since Guan and Dixon reported in 1990 that phosphatase YopH serves as an essential virulence determinant of Yersinia, the field shifted significantly forward, and dozens of PTPs were identified in various microorganisms and even in viruses. The discovery of extensive tyrosine signaling networks in non-metazoan organisms refuted the moth-eaten paradigm claiming that these organisms rely exclusively on phosphoserine/phosphothreonine signaling. Similarly to humans, phosphotyrosine signaling is thought to comprise a small fraction of total protein phosphorylation, but plays a disproportionately important role in cell-cycle control, differentiation, and invasiveness. Here we summarize the state-of-art knowledge on PTPs of important non-metazoan pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Caulobacter crescentus, Yersinia, Synechocystis, Leishmania, Plasmodium falciparum, Entamoeba histolytica, etc.), and focus also at the microbial proteins affecting directly or indirectly the PTPs of the host (Mycobacterium tuberculosis MTSA-10, Bacillus anthracis anthrax toxin, streptococcal β protein, Helicobacter pylori CagA and VacA, Leishmania GP63 and EF-1α, Plasmodium hemozoin, etc.). This is the first review summarizing the knowledge on biological activity and pharmacological inhibition of non-metazoan PTPs, with the emphasis of those important in host-pathogen interactions. Targeting of numerous non-metazoan PTPs is simplified by the fact that they act either as ectophosphatases or are secreted outside of the pathogen. Interfering with tyrosine phosphorylation represents a powerful pharmacologic approach, and even though the PTP inhibitors are difficult to develop, lifting the fog of phosphatase inhibition is of the great market potential and further clinical impact.

  6. Structure-Based Virtual Screening of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Inhibitors: Significance, Challenges, and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Rallabandi Harikrishna; Kim, Hackyoung; Cha, Seungbin; Lee, Bongsoo; Kim, Young Jun

    2017-05-28

    Phosphorylation, a critical mechanism in biological systems, is estimated to be indispensable for about 30% of key biological activities, such as cell cycle progression, migration, and division. It is synergistically balanced by kinases and phosphatases, and any deviation from this balance leads to disease conditions. Pathway or biological activity-based abnormalities in phosphorylation and the type of involved phosphatase influence the outcome, and cause diverse diseases ranging from diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and numerous cancers. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are of prime importance in the process of dephosphorylation and catalyze several biological functions. Abnormal PTP activities are reported to result in several human diseases. Consequently, there is an increased demand for potential PTP inhibitory small molecules. Several strategies in structure-based drug designing techniques for potential inhibitory small molecules of PTPs have been explored along with traditional drug designing methods in order to overcome the hurdles in PTP inhibitor discovery. In this review, we discuss druggable PTPs and structure-based virtual screening efforts for successful PTP inhibitor design.

  7. Regulation of Mih1/Cdc25 by protein phosphatase 2A and casein kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Gayatri; Paraz, Maria T.Z.; Kellogg, Douglas R.

    2008-01-01

    The Cdc25 phosphatase promotes entry into mitosis by removing cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) inhibitory phosphorylation. Previous work suggested that Cdc25 is activated by Cdk1 in a positive feedback loop promoting entry into mitosis; however, it has remained unclear how the feedback loop is initiated. To learn more about the mechanisms that regulate entry into mitosis, we have characterized the function and regulation of Mih1, the budding yeast homologue of Cdc25. We found that Mih1 is hyperphosphorylated early in the cell cycle and is dephosphorylated as cells enter mitosis. Casein kinase 1 is responsible for most of the hyperphosphorylation of Mih1, whereas protein phosphatase 2A associated with Cdc55 dephosphorylates Mih1. Cdk1 appears to directly phosphorylate Mih1 and is required for initiation of Mih1 dephosphorylation as cells enter mitosis. Collectively, these observations suggest that Mih1 regulation is achieved by a balance of opposing kinase and phosphatase activities. Because casein kinase 1 is associated with sites of polar growth, it may regulate Mih1 as part of a signaling mechanism that links successful completion of growth-related events to cell cycle progression. PMID:18316413

  8. Protein Phosphatase 1ß Limits Ring Canal Constriction during Drosophila Germline Cyst Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Bayat, Vafa; Bellen, Hugo J.; Tan, Change

    2013-01-01

    Germline cyst formation is essential for the propagation of many organisms including humans and flies. The cytoplasm of germline cyst cells communicate with each other directly via large intercellular bridges called ring canals. Ring canals are often derived from arrested contractile rings during incomplete cytokinesis. However how ring canal formation, maintenance and growth are regulated remains unclear. To better understand this process, we carried out an unbiased genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster germ cells and identified multiple alleles of flapwing (flw), a conserved serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase. Flw had previously been reported to be unnecessary for early D. melanogaster oogenesis using a hypomorphic allele. We found that loss of Flw leads to over-constricted nascent ring canals and subsequently tiny mature ring canals, through which cytoplasmic transfer from nurse cells to the oocyte is impaired, resulting in small, non-functional eggs. Flw is expressed in germ cells undergoing incomplete cytokinesis, completely colocalized with the Drosophila myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase (DMYPT). This colocalization, together with genetic interaction studies, suggests that Flw functions together with DMYPT to negatively regulate myosin activity during ring canal formation. The identification of two subunits of the tripartite myosin phosphatase as the first two main players required for ring canal constriction indicates that tight regulation of myosin activity is essential for germline cyst formation and reproduction in D. melanogaster and probably other species as well. PMID:23936219

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis provides insight into the biological role of protein phosphatase inhibitor-2 from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Nagib; Chen, Mingjie; Salvato, Fernanda; Wilson, Rashaun S; Shyama Prasad Rao, R; Thelen, Jay J

    2017-08-08

    Protein phosphatase inhibitor-2 (PPI-2) is a conserved eukaryotic effector protein that inhibits type one protein phosphatases (TOPP). A transfer-DNA knockdown of AtPPI-2 resulted in stunted growth in both vegetative and reproductive phases of Arabidopsis development. At the cellular level, AtPPI-2 knockdown had 35 to 40% smaller cells in developing roots and leaves. This developmental phenotype was rescued by transgenic expression of the AtPPI-2 cDNA behind a constitutive promoter. Comparative proteomics of developing leaves of wild type (WT) and AtPPI-2 mutant revealed reduced levels of proteins associated with chloroplast development, ribosome biogenesis, transport, and cell cycle regulation processes. Decreased abundance of several ribosomal proteins, a DEAD box RNA helicase family protein (AtRH3), Clp protease (ClpP3) and proteins associated with cell division suggests a bottleneck in chloroplast ribosomal biogenesis and cell cycle regulation in AtPPI-2 mutant plants. In contrast, eight out of nine Arabidopsis TOPP isoforms were increased at the transcript level in AtPPI-2 leaves compared to WT. A protein-protein interaction network revealed that >75% of the differentially accumulated proteins have at least secondary and/or tertiary connections with AtPPI-2. Collectively, these data reveal a potential basis for the growth defects of AtPPI-2 and support the presumed role of AtPPI-2 as a master regulator for TOPPs, which regulate diverse growth and developmental processes. Comparative label-free proteomics was used to characterize an AtPPI-2T-DNA knockdown mutant. The complex, reduced growth phenotype supports the notion that AtPPI-2 is a global regulator of TOPPs, and possibly other proteins. Comparative proteomics revealed a range of differences in protein abundance from various cellular processes such as chloroplast development, ribosome biogenesis, and transporter activity in the AtPPI-2 mutant relative to WT Arabidopsis. Collectively the results of

  10. A screen for over-secretion of proteins by yeast based on a dual component cellular phosphatase and immuno-chromogenic stain for exported bacterial alkaline phosphatase reporter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To isolate over-secretors, we subjected to saturation mutagenesis, a strain of P.pastoris exporting E. coli alkaline phosphatase (EAP) fused to the secretory domain of the yeast α factor pheromone through cellular PHO1/KEX2 secretory processing signals as the α-sec-EAP reporter protein. Direct chromogenic staining for α-sec-EAP activity is non-specific as its NBT/BCIP substrate cross-reacts with cellular phosphatases which can be inhibited with Levulinic acid. However, the parental E(P) strain only exports detectable levels of α-sec-EAP at 69 hours and not within the 36 hour period post-seeding required for effective screening with the consequent absence of a reference for secretion. We substituted the endogenous cellular phosphatase activity as a comparative reference for secretion rate and levels as well as for colony alignment while elevating specificity and sensitivity of detection of the exported protein with other innovative modifications of the immuno-chromogenic staining application for screening protein export mutants. Results Raising the specificity and utility of staining for α-sec-EAP activity required 5 modifications including some to published methods. These included, exploitation of endogenous phosphatase activity, reduction of the cell/protein burden, establishment of the direct relation between concentrations of transcriptional inducer and exported membrane immobilized protein and concentrations of protein exported into growth media, amplification of immuno-specificity and sensitivity of detection of α-sec-EAP reporter enzyme signal and restriction of staining to optimal concentrations of antisera and time periods. The resultant immuno-chromogenic screen allows for the detection of early secretion and as little as 1.3 fold over-secretion of α-sec-EAP reporter protein by E(M) mutants in the presence of 10 fold -216 fold higher concentrations of HSA. Conclusions The modified immuno-chromogenic screen is sensitive, specific and has

  11. Protein Kinase A (PKA) Phosphorylation of Shp2 Protein Inhibits Its Phosphatase Activity and Modulates Ligand Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Burmeister, Brian T.; Wang, Li; Gold, Matthew G.; Skidgel, Randal A.; O'Bryan, John P.; Carnegie, Graeme K.

    2015-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy (an increase in cardiac mass resulting from stress-induced cardiac myocyte growth) is a major factor underlying heart failure. Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase (Shp2) is critical for cardiac function because mutations resulting in loss of Shp2 catalytic activity are associated with congenital cardiac defects and hypertrophy. We identified a novel mechanism of Shp2 inhibition that may promote cardiac hypertrophy. We demonstrate that Shp2 is a component of the protein kinase A anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc complex. AKAP-Lbc facilitates PKA phosphorylation of Shp2, which inhibits Shp2 phosphatase activity. We identified two key amino acids in Shp2 that are phosphorylated by PKA. Thr-73 contributes a helix cap to helix αB within the N-terminal SH2 domain of Shp2, whereas Ser-189 occupies an equivalent position within the C-terminal SH2 domain. Utilizing double mutant PKA phosphodeficient (T73A/S189A) and phosphomimetic (T73D/S189D) constructs, in vitro binding assays, and phosphatase activity assays, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of these residues disrupts Shp2 interaction with tyrosine-phosphorylated ligands and inhibits its protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity. Overall, our data indicate that AKAP-Lbc integrates PKA and Shp2 signaling in the heart and that AKAP-Lbc-associated Shp2 activity is reduced in hypertrophic hearts in response to chronic β-adrenergic stimulation and PKA activation. Therefore, although induction of cardiac hypertrophy is a multifaceted process, inhibition of Shp2 activity through AKAP-Lbc-anchored PKA is a previously unrecognized mechanism that may promote this compensatory response. PMID:25802336

  12. Protein Kinase A (PKA) Phosphorylation of Shp2 Protein Inhibits Its Phosphatase Activity and Modulates Ligand Specificity.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, Brian T; Wang, Li; Gold, Matthew G; Skidgel, Randal A; O'Bryan, John P; Carnegie, Graeme K

    2015-05-08

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy (an increase in cardiac mass resulting from stress-induced cardiac myocyte growth) is a major factor underlying heart failure. Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase (Shp2) is critical for cardiac function because mutations resulting in loss of Shp2 catalytic activity are associated with congenital cardiac defects and hypertrophy. We identified a novel mechanism of Shp2 inhibition that may promote cardiac hypertrophy. We demonstrate that Shp2 is a component of the protein kinase A anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc complex. AKAP-Lbc facilitates PKA phosphorylation of Shp2, which inhibits Shp2 phosphatase activity. We identified two key amino acids in Shp2 that are phosphorylated by PKA. Thr-73 contributes a helix cap to helix αB within the N-terminal SH2 domain of Shp2, whereas Ser-189 occupies an equivalent position within the C-terminal SH2 domain. Utilizing double mutant PKA phosphodeficient (T73A/S189A) and phosphomimetic (T73D/S189D) constructs, in vitro binding assays, and phosphatase activity assays, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of these residues disrupts Shp2 interaction with tyrosine-phosphorylated ligands and inhibits its protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity. Overall, our data indicate that AKAP-Lbc integrates PKA and Shp2 signaling in the heart and that AKAP-Lbc-associated Shp2 activity is reduced in hypertrophic hearts in response to chronic β-adrenergic stimulation and PKA activation. Therefore, although induction of cardiac hypertrophy is a multifaceted process, inhibition of Shp2 activity through AKAP-Lbc-anchored PKA is a previously unrecognized mechanism that may promote this compensatory response. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. The Protein Phosphatases of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Open Reading Frames sll1033 and sll1387 Encode Enzymes That Exhibit both Protein-Serine and Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity In Vitro.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruiliang; Potters, M B.; Shi, Liang

    2005-09-01

    The open reading frames (ORFs) encoding two potential protein-serine/threonine phosphatases from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 were cloned and their protein products expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The product of ORF sll1033, SynPPM3, is a homologue of the PPM family of protein-serine/threonine phosphatases found in all eukaryotes as well as many members of the Bacteria. Surprisingly, the recombinant protein phosphatase dephosphorylated phosphotyrosine- as well as phosphoserine-containing proteins in vitro. While kinetic analyses indicate that the enzyme was more efficient at dephosphorylating the latter, replacement of Asp(608) by asparagine enhanced activity toward a phosphotyrosine-containing protein fourfold. The product ofmore » ORF sll1387, SynPPP1, is the sole homolog of the PPP family of protein phosphatases encoded by the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Like many other bacterial PPPs, the enzyme dephosphorylated phosphoserine- and phosphotyrosine-containing proteins with comparable efficiencies. However, while previously described PPPs from prokaryotic organisms required the addition of exogenous metal ion cofactors, such as Mg(2+) or Mn(2+), for activity, recombinantly produced SynPPP1 displayed near-maximal activity in the absence of added metals. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry indicated that recombinant SynPPP1 contained significant quantities, 0.32 to 0.44 mol/mole total, of Mg and Mn. In this respect, the cyanobacterial enzyme resembled eukaryotic members of the PPP family, which are metalloproteins. mRNA encoding SynPPP1 or SynPPM3 could be detected in cells grown under many, but not all, environmental conditions.« less

  14. Low-Molecular-Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Predicts Prostate Cancer Outcome by Increasing the Metastatic Potential.

    PubMed

    Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta R; Hoekstra, Elmer; Hoogland, A Marije; Queiroz, Karla C Souza; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Stubbs, Andrew P; Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin; van Leenders, Geert J L H; Jenster, Guido; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Ferreira, Carmen V; Fuhler, Gwenny M

    2016-04-01

    Low-risk patients suffering from prostate cancer (PCa) are currently placed under active surveillance rather than undergoing radical prostatectomy. However, clear parameters for selecting the right patient for each strategy are not available, and new biomarkers and treatment modalities are needed. Low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMWPTP) could present such a target. To correlate expression levels of LMWPTP in primary PCa to clinical outcome, and determine the role of LMWPTP in prostate tumor cell biology. Acid phosphatase 1, soluble (ACP1) expression was analyzed on microarray data sets, which were subsequently used in Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Immunohistochemistry was performed on a tissue microarray containing material of 481 PCa patients whose clinicopathologic data were recorded. PCa cell line models were used to investigate the role of LMWPTP in cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, and anoikis resistance. The association between LMWPTP expression and clinical and pathologic outcomes was calculated using chi-square correlations and multivariable Cox regression analysis. Functional consequences of LMWPTP overexpression or downregulation were determined using migration and adhesion assays, confocal microscopy, Western blotting, and proliferation assays. LMWPTP expression was significantly increased in human PCa and correlated with earlier recurrence of disease (hazard ratio [HR]:1.99; p<0.001) and reduced patient survival (HR: 1.53; p=0.04). Unbiased Ingenuity analysis comparing cancer and normal prostate suggests migratory propensities in PCa. Indeed, overexpression of LMWPTP increases PCa cell migration, anoikis resistance, and reduces activation of focal adhesion kinase/paxillin, corresponding to decreased adherence. Overexpression of LMWPTP in PCa confers a malignant phenotype with worse clinical outcome. Prospective follow-up should determine the clinical potential of LMWPTP overexpression. These findings implicate low

  15. The Role of Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) in Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Christopher James; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) has recently been implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders with significant cognitive impairments, including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, and fragile X syndrome. A model has emerged by which STEP normally opposes the development of synaptic strengthening and that disruption in STEP activity leads to aberrant synaptic function. We review the mechanisms by which STEP contributes to the etiology of these and other neuropsychiatric disorders. These findings suggest that disruptions in STEP activity may be a common mechanism for cognitive impairments in diverse illnesses. PMID:21863137

  16. Fundamental role of the fostriecin unsaturated lactone and implications for selective protein phosphatase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Buck, Suzanne B; Hardouin, Christophe; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Soenen, Danielle R; Gauss, C-M; Hwang, Inkyu; Swingle, Mark R; Bonness, Kathy M; Honkanen, Richard E; Boger, Dale L

    2003-12-24

    Key derivatives and analogues of fostriecin were prepared and examined that revealed a fundamental role for the unsaturated lactone and confirmed the essential nature of the phosphate monoester. Thus, an identical 200-fold reduction in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibition is observed with either the saturated lactone (7) or with an analogue that lacks the entire lactone (15). This 200-fold increase in PP2A inhibition attributable to the unsaturated lactone potentially may be due to reversible C269 alkylation within the PP beta12-beta13 active site loop accounting for PP2A/4 potency and selectivity.

  17. Regulation of protein phosphatase 2A during embryonic diapause process in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shi-Hong; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Lin, Pei-Ling

    2017-11-01

    Regulation of protein phosphorylation requires coordinated interactions between protein kinases and protein phosphatases. In the present study, we investigated regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) during the embryonic diapause process of B. mori. An immunoblotting analysis showed that Bombyx eggs contained a catalytic C subunit, a major regulatory B subunit (B55/PR55 subunit), and a structural A subunit, with the A and B subunits undergoing differential changes between diapause and non-diapause eggs during embryonic process. In non-diapause eggs, eggs whose diapause initiation was prevented by HCl, and eggs in which diapause had been terminated by chilling of diapausing eggs at 5°C for 70days and then were transferred to 25°C, protein levels of the A and B subunits of PP2A gradually increased toward embryonic development. However, protein levels of the A and B subunits in diapause eggs remained at low levels during the first 8days after oviposition. The direct determination of PP2A enzymatic activity showed that the activity remained at low levels in diapause eggs during the first 8days after oviposition. However, in non-diapause eggs, eggs whose diapause initiation was prevented by HCl, and eggs in which diapause had been terminated by chilling, PP2A enzymatic activity sharply increased during the first several days, reached a peak during the middle embryonic development, and then greatly decreased 3 or 4days before hatching. Examination of temporal changes in mRNA expression levels of the catalytic β subunit and regulatory subunit of PP2A showed high levels in eggs whose diapause initiation was prevented by HCl compared to those in diapause eggs. These results demonstrate that the higher PP2A gene expression and PP2A A and B subunit protein levels and increased enzymatic activity are related to embryonic development of B. mori. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 6 modulates the radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Y; Wang, Y; Sheng, K; Fei, X; Guo, Q; Larner, J; Kong, X; Qiu, Y; Mi, J

    2011-01-01

    Increasing the sensitivity of glioblastoma cells to radiation is a promising approach to improve survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This study aims to determine if serine/threonine phosphatase (protein phosphatase 6 (PP6)) is a molecular target for GBM radiosensitization treatment. The GBM orthotopic xenograft mice model was used in this study. Our data demonstrated that the protein level of PP6 catalytic subunit (PP6c) was upregulated in the GBM tissue from about 50% patients compared with the surrounding tissue or control tissue. Both the in vitro survival fraction of GBM cells and the patient survival time were highly correlated or inversely correlated with PP6c expression (R2=0.755 and −0.707, respectively). We also found that siRNA knockdown of PP6c reduced DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity in three different GBM cell lines, increasing their sensitivity to radiation. In the orthotopic mice model, the overexpression of PP6c in GBM U87 cells attenuated the effect of radiation treatment, and reduced the survival time of mice compared with the control mice, while the PP6c knocking-down improved the effect of radiation treatment, and increased the survival time of mice. These findings demonstrate that PP6 regulates the sensitivity of GBM cells to radiation, and suggest small molecules disrupting or inhibiting PP6 association with DNA-PK is a potential radiosensitizer for GBM. PMID:22158480

  19. Mutations in a new Arabidopsis cyclophilin disrupt its interaction with protein phosphatase 2A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The heterotrimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a component of multiple signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Disruption of PP2A activity in Arabidopsis is known to alter auxin transport and growth response pathways. We demonstrated that the regulatory subunit A of an Arabidopsis PP2A interacts with a novel cyclophilin, ROC7. The gene for this cyclophilin encodes a protein that contains a unique 30-amino acid extension at the N-terminus, which distinguishes the gene product from all previously identified Arabidopsis cyclophilins. Altered forms of ROC7 cyclophilin with mutations in the conserved DENFKL domain did not bind to PP2A. Unlike protein phosphatase 2B, PP2A activity in Arabidopsis extracts was not affected by the presence of the cyclophilin-binding molecule cyclosporin. The ROC7 transcript was expressed to high levels in all tissues tested. Expression of an ROC7 antisense transcript gave rise to increased root growth. These results indicate that cyclophilin may have a role in regulating PP2A activity, by a mechanism that differs from that employed for cyclophilin regulation of PP2B.

  20. Protein phosphatase 2A associates with and regulates atypical PKC and the epithelial tight junction complex

    PubMed Central

    Nunbhakdi-Craig, Viyada; Machleidt, Thomas; Ogris, Egon; Bellotto, Dennis; White, Charles L.; Sontag, Estelle

    2002-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) play a crucial role in the establishment of cell polarity and regulation of paracellular permeability in epithelia. Here, we show that upon calcium-induced junction biogenesis in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, ABαC, a major protein phosphatase (PP)2A holoenzyme, is recruited to the apical membrane where it interacts with the TJ complex. Enhanced PP2A activity induces dephosphorylation of the TJ proteins, ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1, and is associated with increased paracellular permeability. Expression of PP2A catalytic subunit severely prevents TJ assembly. Conversely, inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid promotes the phosphorylation and recruitment of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 to the TJ during junctional biogenesis. PP2A negatively regulates TJ assembly without appreciably affecting the organization of F-actin and E-cadherin. Significantly, inhibition of atypical PKC (aPKC) blocks the calcium- and serum-independent membrane redistribution of TJ proteins induced by okadaic acid. Indeed, PP2A associates with and critically regulates the activity and distribution of aPKC during TJ formation. Thus, we provide the first evidence for calcium-dependent targeting of PP2A in epithelial cells, we identify PP2A as the first serine/threonine phosphatase associated with the multiprotein TJ complex, and we unveil a novel role for PP2A in the regulation of epithelial aPKC and TJ assembly and function. PMID:12196510

  1. Sodium arsenite induces chromosome endoreduplication and inhibits protein phosphatase activity in human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Rong-Nan Huang; I-Ching Ho; Ling-Hui Yih

    Arsenic, strongly associated with increased risks of human cancers, is a potent clastogen in a variety of mammalian cell systems. The effect of sodium arsenite (a trivalent arsenic compound) on chromatid separation was studied in human skin fibroblasts (HFW). Human fibroblasts were arrested in S phase by the aid of serum starvation and aphidicolin blocking and then these cells were allowed to synchronously progress into G2 phase. Treatment of the G2-enriched HFW cells with sodium arsenite (0-200 {mu}M) resulted in arrest of cells in the G2 phase, interference with mitotic division, inhibition of spindle assembly, and induction of chromosome endoreduplicationmore » in their second mitosis. Sodium arsenite treatment also inhibited the activities of serine/threonine protein phosphatases and enhanced phosphorylation levels of a small heat shock protein (HSP27). These results suggest that sodium arsenite may mimic okadaic acid to induce chromosome endoreduplication through its inhibitory effect on protein phosphatase activity. 61 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  2. 2,4-Dihydroxychalcone derivatives as novel potent cell division cycle 25B phosphatase inhibitors and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao; Sun, Yuan; Pan, Cheng-Yan; Tang, Li-Ming; Guan, Li-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Eleven 2,4-dihydroxychalcone compounds were synthesized and identified as reversible and competitive cell division cycle 25 (CDC25) B and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1B inhibitors with inhibition values in the micromolar range. The results showed that nine compounds significantly inhibited CDC25B phosphatase, whereas seven compounds inhibited the activity against PTP1B in vitro. Compound 8 had the greatest inhibition activity against CDC25B and PTP1B in vitro, with percentage inhibition values of 97.5% and 96.3% at a dose of 20 microg/mL, respectively. Cytotoxic activity assays revealed that compound 8 was the most potent against HCT116, HeLa, and A549 cells. Furthermore, compound 8 exhibited potent antitumor activity in a colo205 xenograft model.

  3. Rac interacts with Abi-1 and WAVE2 to promote an Arp2/3-dependent actin recruitment during chlamydial invasion.

    PubMed

    Carabeo, Rey A; Dooley, Cheryl A; Grieshaber, Scott S; Hackstadt, Ted

    2007-09-01

    Chlamydiae are Gram-negative obligate intracellular pathogens to which access to an intracellular environment is fundamental to their development. Chlamydial attachment to host cells induces the activation of the Rac GTPase, which is required for the localization of WAVE2 at the sites of chlamydial entry. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that Chlamydia trachomatis infection promoted the interaction of Rac with WAVE2 and Abi-1, but not with IRSp53. siRNA depletion of WAVE2 and Abi-1 abrogated chlamydia-induced actin recruitment and significantly reduced the uptake of the pathogen by the depleted cells. Chlamydia invasion also requires the Arp2/3 complex as demonstrated by its localization to the sites of chlamydial attachment and the reduced efficiency of chlamydial invasion in cells overexpressing the VCA domain of the neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Thus, C. trachomatis activates Rac and promotes its interaction with WAVE2 and Abi-1 to activate the Arp2/3 complex resulting in the induction of actin cytoskeletal rearrangements that are required for invasion.

  4. Negative regulation of protein phosphatase 2Cbeta by ISG15 conjugation.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Tomoharu; Kobayashi, Takayasu; Tamura, Shinri; Yokosawa, Hideyoshi

    2006-08-07

    ISG15, an interferon-upregulated ubiquitin-like protein, is covalently conjugated to various cellular proteins (ISGylation). In this study, we found that protein phosphatase 2Cbeta (PP2Cbeta), which functions in the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway via dephosphorylation of TGF-beta-activated kinase, was ISGylated, and analysis by NF-kappaB luciferase reporter assay revealed that PP2Cbeta activity was suppressed by co-expression of ISG15, UBE1L, and UbcH8. We determined the ISGylation sites of PP2Cbeta and constructed its ISGylation-resistant mutant. In contrast to the wild type, this mutant suppressed the NF-kappaB pathway even in the presence of ISG15, UBE1L, and UbcH8. Thus, we propose that ISGylation negatively regulates PP2Cbeta activity.

  5. Bacterial-like PPP protein phosphatases: novel sequence alterations in pathogenic eukaryotes and peculiar features of bacterial sequence similarity.

    PubMed

    Kerk, David; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2013-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is a widespread modification affecting the great majority of eukaryotic cellular proteins, and whose effects influence nearly every cellular function. Protein phosphatases are increasingly recognized as exquisitely regulated contributors to these changes. The PPP (phosphoprotein phosphatase) family comprises enzymes, which catalyze dephosphorylation at serine and threonine residues. Nearly a decade ago, "bacterial-like" enzymes were recognized with similarity to proteins from various bacterial sources: SLPs (Shewanella-like phosphatases), RLPHs (Rhizobiales-like phosphatases), and ALPHs (ApaH-like phosphatases). A recent article from our laboratory appearing in Plant Physiology characterizes their extensive organismal distribution, abundance in plant species, predicted subcellular localization, motif organization, and sequence evolution. One salient observation is the distinct evolutionary trajectory followed by SLP genes and proteins in photosynthetic eukaryotes vs. animal and plant pathogens derived from photosynthetic ancestors. We present here a closer look at sequence data that emphasizes the distinctiveness of pathogen SLP proteins and that suggests that they might represent novel drug targets. A second observation in our original report was the high degree of similarity between the bacterial-like PPPs of eukaryotes and closely related proteins of the "eukaryotic-like" phyla Myxococcales and Planctomycetes. We here reflect on the possible implications of these observations and their importance for future research.

  6. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  7. Aralkyl selenoglycosides and related selenosugars in acetylated form activate protein phosphatase-1 and -2A.

    PubMed

    Kónya, Zoltán; Bécsi, Bálint; Kiss, Andrea; Tamás, István; Lontay, Beáta; Szilágyi, László; Kövér, Katalin E; Erdődi, Ferenc

    2018-05-01

    Aralkyl and aryl selenoglycosides as well as glycosyl selenocarboxylate derivatives were assayed on the activity of protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) and -2A (PP2A) catalytic subunits (PP1c and PP2Ac) in search of compounds for PP1c and PP2Ac effectors. The majority of tested selenoglycosides activated both PP1c and PP2Ac by ∼2-4-fold in a phosphatase assay with phosphorylated myosin light chain substrate when the hydroxyl groups of the glycosyl moiety were acetylated, but they were without any effects in the non-acetylated forms. A peptide from the myosin phosphatase target subunit-1 (MYPT1 23-38 ) that included an RVxF PP1c-binding motif attenuated activation of PP1c by 2-Trifluoromethylbenzyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-1-seleno-β-d-glucopyranoside (TFM-BASG) and 4-Bromobenzyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-1-seleno-β-d-glucopyranoside (Br-BASG). MYPT1 23-38 stimulated PP2Ac and contributed to PP2Ac activation exerted by either Br-BASG or TFM-BASG. Br-BASG and TFM-BASG suppressed partially binding of PP1c to MYPT1 in surface plasmon resonance based binding experiments. Molecular docking predicted that the hydrophobic binding surfaces in PP1c for interaction with either the RVxF residues of PP1c-interactors or selenoglycosides are partially overlapped. Br-BASG and TFM-BASG caused a moderate increase in the phosphatase activity of HeLa cells in 1 h, and suppressed cell viability in 24 h incubations. In conclusion, our present study identified selenoglycosides as novel activators of PP1 and PP2A as well as provided insights into the structural background of their interactions establishing a molecular model for future design of more efficient phosphatase activator molecules. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. B56δ-related protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction identified in patients with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Houge, Gunnar; Haesen, Dorien; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Mehta, Sarju; Parker, Michael J.; Wright, Michael; Vogt, Julie; McKee, Shane; Tolmie, John L.; Cordeiro, Nuno; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Reijnders, Margot R.F.; Berland, Siren; Hayman, Eli; Lahat, Eli; Brilstra, Eva H.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; de Bie, Charlotte I.; Hoischen, Alexander; Eichler, Evan E.; Holdhus, Rita; Steen, Vidar M.; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Hurles, Matthew E.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Janssens, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Here we report inherited dysregulation of protein phosphatase activity as a cause of intellectual disability (ID). De novo missense mutations in 2 subunits of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were identified in 16 individuals with mild to severe ID, long-lasting hypotonia, epileptic susceptibility, frontal bossing, mild hypertelorism, and downslanting palpebral fissures. PP2A comprises catalytic (C), scaffolding (A), and regulatory (B) subunits that determine subcellular anchoring, substrate specificity, and physiological function. Ten patients had mutations within a highly conserved acidic loop of the PPP2R5D-encoded B56δ regulatory subunit, with the same E198K mutation present in 6 individuals. Five patients had mutations in the PPP2R1A-encoded scaffolding Aα subunit, with the same R182W mutation in 3 individuals. Some Aα cases presented with large ventricles, causing macrocephaly and hydrocephalus suspicion, and all cases exhibited partial or complete corpus callosum agenesis. Functional evaluation revealed that mutant A and B subunits were stable and uncoupled from phosphatase activity. Mutant B56δ was A and C binding–deficient, while mutant Aα subunits bound B56δ well but were unable to bind C or bound a catalytically impaired C, suggesting a dominant-negative effect where mutant subunits hinder dephosphorylation of B56δ-anchored substrates. Moreover, mutant subunit overexpression resulted in hyperphosphorylation of GSK3β, a B56δ-regulated substrate. This effect was in line with clinical observations, supporting a correlation between the ID degree and biochemical disturbance. PMID:26168268

  9. Structure of Thermotoga maritima Stationary Phase Survival Protein SurE: A Novel Acid Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, R.-G.; Skarina, T.; Katz, J.E.; Beasley, S.; Khachatryan, A.; Vyas, S.; Arrowsmith, C.H.; Clarke, S.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background The rpoS, nlpD, pcm, and surE genes are among many whose expression is induced during the stationary phase of bacterial growth. rpoS codes for the stationary-phase RNA polymerase σ subunit, and nlpD codes for a lipoprotein. The pcm gene product repairs damaged proteins by converting the atypical isoaspartyl residues back to L-aspartyls. The physiological and biochemical functions of surE are unknown, but its importance in stress is supported by the duplication of the surE gene in E. coli subjected to high-temperature growth. The pcm and surE genes are highly conserved in bacteria, archaea, and plants. Results The structure of SurE from Thermotoga maritima was determined at 2.0 Å. The SurE monomer is composed of two domains; a conserved N-terminal domain, a Rossman fold, and a C-terminal oligomerization domain, a new fold. Monomers form a dimer that assembles into a tetramer. Biochemical analysis suggests that SurE is an acid phosphatase, with an optimum pH of 5.5–6.2. The active site was identified in the N-terminal domain through analysis of conserved residues. Structure-based site-directed point mutations abolished phosphatase activity. T. maritima SurE intra- and inter-subunit salt bridges were identified that may explain the SurE thermostability. Conclusions The structure of SurE provided information about the protein’s fold, oligomeric state, and active site. The protein possessed magnesium-dependent acid phosphatase activity, but the physiologically relevant substrate(s) remains to be identified. The importance of three of the assigned active site residues in catalysis was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:11709173

  10. Abscisic acid affects transcription of chloroplast genes via protein phosphatase 2C-dependent activation of nuclear genes: repression by guanosine-3'-5'-bisdiphosphate and activation by sigma factor 5.

    PubMed

    Yamburenko, Maria V; Zubo, Yan O; Börner, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) represses the transcriptional activity of chloroplast genes (determined by run-on assays), with the exception of psbD and a few other genes in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings and mature rosette leaves. Abscisic acid does not influence chloroplast transcription in the mutant lines abi1-1 and abi2-1 with constitutive protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) activity, suggesting that ABA affects chloroplast gene activity by binding to the pyrabactin resistance (PYR)/PYR1-like or regulatory component of ABA receptor protein family (PYR/PYL/RCAR) and signaling via PP2Cs and sucrose non-fermenting protein-related kinases 2 (SnRK2s). Further we show by quantitative PCR that ABA enhances the transcript levels of RSH2, RSH3, PTF1 and SIG5. RelA/SpoT homolog 2 (RSH2) and RSH3 are known to synthesize guanosine-3'-5'-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp), an inhibitor of the plastid-gene-encoded chloroplast RNA polymerase. We propose, therefore, that ABA leads to an inhibition of chloroplast gene expression via stimulation of ppGpp synthesis. On the other hand, sigma factor 5 (SIG5) and plastid transcription factor 1 (PTF1) are known to be necessary for the transcription of psbD from a specific light- and stress-induced promoter (the blue light responsive promoter, BLRP). We demonstrate that ABA activates the psbD gene by stimulation of transcription initiation at BLRP. Taken together, our data suggest that ABA affects the transcription of chloroplast genes by a PP2C-dependent activation of nuclear genes encoding proteins involved in chloroplast transcription. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Human cytomegalovirus carries serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1 and a host-cell derived PP2A.

    PubMed Central

    Michelson, S; Turowski, P; Picard, L; Goris, J; Landini, M P; Topilko, A; Hemmings, B; Bessia, C; Garcia, A; Virelizier, J L

    1996-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV), a herpesvirus, is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. When studying hyper-immediate-early events after contact between CMV virions and the cell membrane, we observed a hypophosphorylation of cellular proteins within 10 min. This can be explained in part by our finding that purified CMV contains serine/threonine protein phosphatase activities. Biochemical analyses indicate that this protein phosphatase activity has all characteristics of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A). Specifically, PP1 accounts for approximately 30% and PP2A accounts for the remaining 70% of the phosphorylase phosphatase activity found. CMV produced in astrocytoma cells stably expressing an amino-terminally tagged PP2A catalytic subunit contained tagged enzyme, thus demonstrating the cellular origin of CMV-associated PP2A. PP2A is specifically found inside the virus, associated with the nucleocapsid fraction. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of purified virus revealed the presence of the catalytic subunits of PP2A and PP1. Furthermore, the catalytic subunit of PP2A appears to be complexed to the regulatory subunits PR65 and PR55, which is also the most abundant configuration of this enzyme found in the host cells. Incubation of virus with okadaic acid before contact of CMV with cells prevented hypophosphorylation of cellular proteins, thus demonstrating the role of CMV-associated phosphatases in this phenomenon. CMV can thus transport an active enzyme from one cell to another. PMID:8627658

  12. Transcriptome analyses of chronic traumatic encephalopathy show alterations in protein phosphatase expression associated with tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jeong-Sun; Lee, Seungbok; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Hwang, Yu Jin; Cho, Hyesun; Yoo, Seong-Keun; Kim, Yunha; Lim, Sungsu; Kim, Yun Kyung; Hwang, Eun Mi; Kim, Su Hyun; Kim, Chong-Hyun; Hyeon, Seung Jae; Yun, Ji-Young; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Yona; Alvarez, Victor E; Stein, Thor D; Lee, Junghee; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Jong-Il; Kowall, Neil W; Ryu, Hoon; McKee, Ann C

    2017-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is associated with repetitive head injury and has distinctive neuropathological features that differentiate this disease from other neurodegenerative diseases. Intraneuronal tau aggregates, although they occur in different patterns, are diagnostic neuropathological features of CTE, but the precise mechanism of tauopathy is not known in CTE. We performed whole RNA sequencing analysis of post-mortem brain tissue from patients with CTE and compared the results to normal controls to determine the transcriptome signature changes associated with CTE. The results showed that the genes related to the MAP kinase and calcium-signaling pathways were significantly downregulated in CTE. The altered expression of protein phosphatases (PPs) in these networks further suggested that the tauopathy observed in CTE involves common pathological mechanisms similar to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using cell lines and animal models, we also showed that reduced PPP3CA/PP2B phosphatase activity is directly associated with increases in phosphorylated (p)-tau proteins. These findings provide important insights into PP-dependent neurodegeneration and may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to reduce the tauopathy associated with CTE. PMID:28524178

  13. STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) Regulates the PTPα/Fyn Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Foscue, Ethan; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase Fyn has two regulatory tyrosine residues that when phosphorylated either activate (Tyr420) or inhibit (Tyr531) Fyn activity. Within the central nervous system, two protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) target these regulatory tyrosines in Fyn. PTPα dephosphorylates Tyr531 and activates Fyn, while STEP (STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase) dephosphorylates Tyr420 and inactivates Fyn. Thus, PTPα and STEP have opposing functions in the regulation of Fyn; however, whether there is cross talk between these two PTPs remains unclear. Here, we used molecular techniques in primary neuronal cultures and in vivo to demonstrate that STEP negatively regulates PTPα by directly dephosphorylating PTPα at its regulatory Tyr789. Dephosphorylation of Tyr789 prevents the translocation of PTPα to synaptic membranes, blocking its ability to interact with and activate Fyn. Genetic or pharmacologic reduction of STEP61 activity increased the phosphorylation of PTPα at Tyr789, as well as increased translocation of PTPα to synaptic membranes. Activation of PTPα and Fyn and trafficking of GluN2B to synaptic membranes are necessary for ethanol intake behaviors in rodents. We tested the functional significance of STEP61 in this signaling pathway by ethanol administration to primary cultures as well as in vivo, and demonstrated that the inactivation of STEP61 by ethanol leads to the activation of PTPα, its translocation to synaptic membranes, and the activation of Fyn. These findings indicate a novel mechanism by which STEP61 regulates PTPα and suggest that STEP and PTPα coordinate the regulation of Fyn. PMID:25951993

  14. Therapeutic Implications for Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Goebel-Goody, Susan M.; Baum, Matthew; Paspalas, Constantinos D.; Fernandez, Stephanie M.; Carty, Niki C.; Kurup, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase that modulates key signaling molecules involved in synaptic plasticity and neuronal function. Targets include extracellular-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), stress-activated protein kinase p38 (p38), the Src family tyrosine kinase Fyn, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs). STEP-mediated dephosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and Fyn leads to inactivation of these enzymes, whereas STEP-mediated dephosphorylation of surface NMDARs and AMPARs promotes their endocytosis. Accordingly, the current model of STEP function posits that it opposes long-term potentiation and promotes long-term depression. Phosphorylation, cleavage, dimerization, ubiquitination, and local translation all converge to maintain an appropriate balance of STEP in the central nervous system. Accumulating evidence over the past decade indicates that STEP dysregulation contributes to the pathophysiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome, epileptogenesis, alcohol-induced memory loss, Huntington's disease, drug abuse, stroke/ischemia, and inflammatory pain. This comprehensive review discusses STEP expression and regulation and highlights how disrupted STEP function contributes to the pathophysiology of diverse neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:22090472

  15. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  16. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein–Protein Interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Lund, George; Dudkin, Sergii; Borkin, Dmitry; ...

    2014-11-25

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here in this paper, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation ofmore » CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes.« less

  17. Differential effects of protein phosphatases in the recycling of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5.

    PubMed

    Mahato, P K; Pandey, S; Bhattacharyya, S

    2015-10-15

    The major excitatory neurotransmitter Glutamate acts on both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in the central nervous system. mGluR5, a member of the group I mGluR family is widely expressed throughout the brain and plays important roles in a variety of neuronal processes including various forms of synaptic plasticity. This receptor is also involved in various neuropsychiatric disorders, viz., Fragile X syndrome, autism etc. It has been reported that mGluR5 undergoes desensitization and subsequently internalization on ligand exposure in various cell types. However, the downstream events after the internalization and the molecular players involved in the post-endocytic events of this receptor have not been studied. In the present study, we find that subsequent to internalization mGluR5 enters the recycling compartment. After that the receptor recycles back to the cell surface. We also show here that the recycling of mGluR5 is dependent on protein phosphatases. Our data suggest that mGluR5 recycling is completely dependent on the activity of PP2A whereas, PP2B has partial effect on this process. Thus our study suggests that mGluR5 recycles back to the cell surface after ligand-dependent internalization and protein phosphatases that have been implicated in various forms of synaptic plasticity have differential effects on the recycling of mGluR5. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulation of Src homology 2-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 during activation of human neutrophils. Role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Brumell, J H; Chan, C K; Butler, J; Borregaard, N; Siminovitch, K A; Grinstein, S; Downey, G P

    1997-01-10

    The tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins induced in neutrophils by soluble and particulate stimuli is thought to be crucial for initiating antimicrobial responses. Although activation of tyrosine kinases is thought to mediate this event, the role of tyrosine phosphatases in the initiation and modulation of neutrophil responses remains largely undefined. We investigated the role of Src homology 2-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1; also known as protein tyrosine phosphatase 1C (PTP1C), hematopoetic cell phosphatase, PTP-N6, and SHPTP-1), a phosphatase expressed primarily in hemopoietic cells, in the activation of human neutrophils. SHP-1 mRNA and protein were detected in these cells, and the enzyme was found to be predominantly localized to the cytosol in unstimulated cells. Following stimulation with neutrophil agonists such as phorbol ester, chemotactic peptide, or opsonized zymosan, a fraction of the phosphatase redistributed to the cytoskeleton. Agonist treatment also induced significant decreases (30-60%) in SHP-1 activity, which correlated temporally with increases in the cellular phosphotyrosine content. Phosphorylation of SHP-1 on serine residues was associated with the inhibition of its enzymatic activity, suggesting a causal relationship. Accordingly, both the agonist-evoked phosphorylation of SHP-1 and the inhibition of its catalytic activity were blocked by treatment with bisindolylmaleimide I, a potent and specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC) activity. Immunoprecipitated SHP-1 was found to be phosphorylated efficiently by purified PKC in vitro. Such phosphorylation also caused a decrease in the phosphatase activity of SHP-1. Together, these data suggest that inhibition of SHP-1 by PKC-mediated serine phosphorylation plays a role in facilitating the accumulation of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins following neutrophil stimulation. These findings provide a new link between the PKC and tyrosine phosphorylation branches of the

  19. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase modulates nociception: evidence from genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Saavedra, Ana; Aira, Zigor; Aluja, David; Xifró, Xavier; Baguley, Tyler; Alberch, Jordi; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Azkue, Jon J.; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The information from nociceptors is processed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by complex circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. It is well documented that GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation contributes to central sensitization. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) dephosphorylates GluN2B and ERK1/2, promoting internalization of GluN2B and inactivation of ERK1/2. The activity of STEP was modulated by genetic (STEP knockout mice) and pharmacological (recently synthesized STEP inhibitor, TC-2153) approaches. STEP61 protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord were determined in male and female mice of different ages. Inflammatory pain was induced by complete Freund’s adjuvant injection. Behavioral tests, immunoblotting, and electrophysiology were used to analyze the effect of STEP on nociception. Our results show that both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of STEP induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which were accompanied by increased pGluN2BTyr1472 and pERK1/2Thr202/Tyr204 levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase heterozygous and knockout mice presented a similar phenotype. Furthermore, electrophysiological experiments showed that TC-2153 increased C fiber-evoked spinal field potentials. Interestingly, we found that STEP61 protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord inversely correlated with thermal hyperalgesia associated with age and female gender in mice. Consistently, STEP knockout mice failed to show age-related thermal hyperalgesia, although gender-related differences were preserved. Moreover, in a model of inflammatory pain, hyperalgesia was associated with increased phosphorylation-mediated STEP61 inactivation and increased pGluN2BTyr1472 and pERK1/2Thr202/Tyr204 levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Collectively, the present results underscore an important role of spinal STEP activity in the modulation of nociception. PMID:26270590

  20. Differential Effects of Tautomycetin and Its Derivatives on Protein Phosphatase Inhibition, Immunosuppressive Function and Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Mingshan; Sun, Yan; Liu, Bo

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we studied the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of tautomycetin (TMC) and its derivatives. Further, we demonstrated the correlation between the immunosuppressive fuction, anticancer activity and protein phosphatase type 1 (PP1) inhibition of TMC and its derivatives. We have prepared some TMC derivatives via combinatorial biosynthesis, isolation from fermentation broth or chemical degradation of TMC. We found that the immunosuppressive activity was correlated with anticancer activity for TMC and its analog compounds, indicating that TMC may home at the same targets for its immunosuppressive and anticancer activities. Interestingly, TMC-F1, TMC-D1 and TMC-D2 all retained significant, albeit reduced PP1 inhibitory activity compared to TMC. However, only TMC-D2 showed immunosuppressive and anticancer activities in studies carried out in cell lines. Moreover, TMC-Chain did not show any significant inhibitory activity towards PP1 but showed strong growth inhibitory effect. This observation implicates that the maleic anhydride moiety of TMC is critical for its phosphatase inhibitory activity whereas the C1-C18 moiety of TMC is essential for the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. Furthermore, we measured in vivo phosphatase activities of PP1 in MCF-7 cell extracts treated with TMC and its related compounds, and the results indicate that the cytotoxicity of TMC doesn't correlate with its in vivo PP1 inhibition activity. Taken together, our study suggests that the immunosuppressive and anticancer activities of TMC are not due to the inhibition of PP1. Our results provide a novel insight for the elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanisms of TMC's important biological functions. PMID:22563261

  1. The possible involvement of protein phosphatase 1 in thrombin-induced Ca2+ influx of human platelets.

    PubMed

    Murata, K; Sakon, M; Kambayashi, J; Yukawa, M; Yano, Y; Fujitani, K; Kawasaki, T; Shiba, E; Mori, T

    1993-04-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 is considered to be involved in thrombin-induced platelet activation (Murata et al., Biochem Int 26:327-334, 1992). To clarify the mechanism, we examined the effects of protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitors (calyculin A, tautomycin, okadaic acid) on Ca2+ influx. In the presence of 1 mM Ca2+, thrombin- (0.1 U/ml) induced platelet aggregation and ATP release were inhibited by calyculin A, while this inhibitory effect was abolished in the absence of Ca2+ (EGTA 1 mM). Furthermore, thrombin-induced Mn2+ influx but not intracellular Ca2+ mobilization was inhibited by calyculin A in a dose-related manner. Calyculin A also blocked the ongoing Ca2+ influx when added 3 min after thrombin stimulation. Similar inhibitory effects were observed with okadaic acid and tautomycin in the same potency sequence as the reported one for protein phosphatase 1 (calyculin A > tautomycin > okadaic acid). These results suggest that the anti-platelet effects of phosphatase inhibitors are due to the inhibition of Ca2+ influx and that protein phosphatase 1 plays a key role in the regulation of receptor operated Ca2+ channel of human platelets.

  2. Protein Kinase C Controls Binding of Igo/ENSA Proteins to Protein Phosphatase 2A in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Thai, Vu; Dephoure, Noah; Weiss, Amit; Ferguson, Jacqueline; Leitao, Ricardo; Gygi, Steven P; Kellogg, Douglas R

    2017-03-24

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays important roles in controlling mitosis in all eukaryotic cells. The form of PP2A that controls mitosis is associated with a conserved regulatory subunit that is called B55 in vertebrates and Cdc55 in budding yeast. The activity of this form of PP2A can be inhibited by binding of conserved Igo/ENSA proteins. Although the mechanisms that activate Igo/ENSA to bind and inhibit PP2A are well understood, little is known about how Igo/Ensa are inactivated. Here, we have analyzed regulation of Igo/ENSA in the context of a checkpoint pathway that links mitotic entry to membrane growth in budding yeast. Protein kinase C (Pkc1) relays signals in the pathway by activating PP2A Cdc55 We discovered that constitutively active Pkc1 can drive cells through a mitotic checkpoint arrest, which suggests that Pkc1-dependent activation of PP2A Cdc55 plays a critical role in checkpoint signaling. We therefore used mass spectrometry to determine how Pkc1 modifies the PP2A Cdc55 complex. This revealed that Pkc1 induces changes in the phosphorylation of multiple subunits of the complex, as well as dissociation of Igo/ENSA. Pkc1 directly phosphorylates Cdc55 and Igo/ENSA, and phosphorylation site mapping and mutagenesis indicate that phosphorylation of Cdc55 contributes to Igo/ENSA dissociation. Association of Igo2 with PP2A Cdc55 is regulated during the cell cycle, yet mutation of Pkc1-dependent phosphorylation sites on Cdc55 and Igo2 did not cause defects in mitotic progression. Together, the data suggest that Pkc1 controls PP2A Cdc55 by multiple overlapping mechanisms. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor R and Z1 expression as independent prognostic indicators in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Duś-Szachniewicz, Kamila; Woźniak, Marta; Nelke, Kamil; Gamian, Elżbieta; Gerber, Hanna; Ziółkowski, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    The actions of tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are controlled by tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. Although substantial previous data have revealed the role of several protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in various cancers, the function of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor R (PTPRR) and protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor-type, Z polypeptide 1 (PTPRZ1) proteins in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has not been studied to date. The PTPRR and PTPRZ1 immunoreactivity in 67 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded oral cancer tissues at different stages were analyzed with the technique of immunohistochemistry (IHC). The presence of PTPRR in cancerous tissue was confirmed by Western blotting. The occurrence of PTPRR and PTPRZ1 proteins in the cancer specimens was more frequent in lower grade tumors. In addition, the association between the immunoreactivity of both examined proteins and improved patients survival was detected. Moreover, the PTPRR expression was found to be related to the absence of synchronous lymph node involvement. The above results indicate that the PTPRR and PTPRZ1 protein expression should be monitored in oral cancer for patients' prognostic stratification. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Expression, prognostic significance and mutational analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Vasiliki; Kontandreopoulou, Elina; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Roumelioti, Maria; Angelopoulou, Maria; Kyriazopoulou, Lydia; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis T; Vaiopoulos, George; Variami, Eleni; Kotsianidis, Ioannis; Athina Viniou, Nora

    2016-05-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 dephosphorylates BCR-ABL1, thereby serving as a potential control mechanism of BCR-ABL1 kinase activity. Pathways regulating SHP-1 expression, which could be exploited in the therapeutics of TKI-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), remain unknown. Moreover, the questions of whether there is any kind of SHP-1 deregulation in CML, contributing to disease initiation or evolution, as well as the question of prognostic significance of SHP-1, have not been definitively answered. This study shows moderately lower SHP-1 mRNA expression in chronic phase CML patients in comparison to healthy individuals and no change in SHP-1 mRNA levels after successful TKI treatment. Mutational analysis of the aminoterminal and phosphatase domains of SHP-1 in patients did not reveal genetic lesions. This study also found no correlation of SHP-1 expression at diagnosis with response to treatment, although a trend for lower SHP-1 expression was noted in the very small non-responders' group of the 3-month therapeutic milestone.

  5. Structural Basis for Selective Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PtpB

    PubMed Central

    Grundner, Christoph; Perrin, Dominique; van Huijsduijnen, Rob Hooft; Swinnen, Dominique; Gonzalez, Jérome; Gee, Christine L.; Wells, Timothy N.; Alber, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases and phosphatases establish the crucial balance of tyrosine phosphorylation in cellular signaling, but creating specific inhibitors of protein Tyr phosphatases (PTPs) remains a challenge. Here we report the development of a potent, selective inhibitor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PtpB, a bacterial PTP that is secreted into host cells where it disrupts unidentified signaling pathways. The inhibitor, (oxalylamino-methylene)-thiophene sulfonamide (OMTS), showed an IC50 of 440 +/− 50 nM and >60-fold specificity for PtpB over six human PTPs. The 2-Å resolution crystal structure of PtpB in complex with OMTS revealed a large rearrangement of the enzyme, with some residues shifting >27 Å relative to the PtpB:PO4 complex. Extensive contacts with the catalytic loop provide a potential basis for inhibitor selectivity. Two OMTS molecules bound adjacent to each other, raising the possibility of a second substrate phosphotyrosine binding site in PtpB. The PtpB:OMTS structure provides an unanticipated framework to guide inhibitor improvement. PMID:17437721

  6. Effects of protein tyrosine phosphatase-PEST are reversed by Akt in T cells.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Yutaka; Shimizu, Kazuhiko; Koyanagi, Madoka; Yagi, Junji

    2014-12-01

    T cell activation is regulated by a balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation that is under the control of kinases and phosphatases. Here, we examined the role of a non-receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP-PEST, using retrovirus-mediated gene transduction into murine T cells. Based on observations of vector markers (GFP or Thy1.1), exogenous PTP-PEST-positive CD4(+) T cells appeared within 2 days after gene transduction; the percentage of PTP-PEST-positive cells tended to decrease during a resting period in the presence of IL-2 over the next 2 days. These vector markers also showed much lower expression intensities, compared with control cells, suggesting a correlation between the percent reduction and the low marker expression intensity. A catalytically inactive PTP-PEST mutant also showed the same tendency, and stepwise deletion mutants gradually lost their ability to induce the above phenomenon. On the other hand, these PTP-PEST-transduced cells did not have an apoptotic phenotype. No difference in the total cell numbers was found in the wells of a culture plate containing VEC- and PTP-PEST-transduced T cells. Moreover, serine/threonine kinase Akt, but not the anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, reversed the phenotype induced by PTP-PEST. We discuss the novel mechanism by which Akt interferes with PTP-PEST. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Coordinated Regulation of Insulin Signaling by the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases PTP1B and TCPTP

    PubMed Central

    Galic, Sandra; Hauser, Christine; Kahn, Barbara B.; Haj, Fawaz G.; Neel, Benjamin G.; Tonks, Nicholas K.; Tiganis, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is a negative regulator of insulin signaling and a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes. Our previous studies have shown that the closely related tyrosine phosphatase TCPTP might also contribute to the regulation of insulin receptor (IR) signaling in vivo (S. Galic, M. Klingler-Hoffmann, M. T. Fodero-Tavoletti, M. A. Puryer, T. C. Meng, N. K. Tonks, and T. Tiganis, Mol. Cell. Biol. 23:2096-2108, 2003). Here we show that PTP1B and TCPTP function in a coordinated and temporally distinct manner to achieve an overall regulation of IR phosphorylation and signaling. Whereas insulin-induced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling was prolonged in both TCPTP−/− and PTP1B−/− immortalized mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/2 signaling was elevated only in PTP1B-null MEFs. By using phosphorylation-specific antibodies, we demonstrate that both IR β-subunit Y1162/Y1163 and Y972 phosphorylation are elevated in PTP1B−/− MEFs, whereas Y972 phosphorylation was elevated and Y1162/Y1163 phosphorylation was sustained in TCPTP−/− MEFs, indicating that PTP1B and TCPTP differentially contribute to the regulation of IR phosphorylation and signaling. Consistent with this, suppression of TCPTP protein levels by RNA interference in PTP1B−/− MEFs resulted in no change in ERK1/2 signaling but caused prolonged Akt activation and Y1162/Y1163 phosphorylation. These results demonstrate that PTP1B and TCPTP are not redundant in insulin signaling and that they act to control both common as well as distinct insulin signaling pathways in the same cell. PMID:15632081

  8. Timely Degradation of Wip1 Phosphatase by APC/C Activator Protein Cdh1 is Necessary for Normal Mitotic Progression.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ho-Chang; Gil, Na-Yeon; Lee, Ho-Soo; Cho, Seung-Ju; Kim, Kyungtae; Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Cho, Hyeseong; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2015-08-01

    Wip1 belongs to the protein phosphatase C (PP2C) family, of which expression is up-regulated by a number of external stresses, and serves as a stress modulator in normal physiological conditions. When overexpressed, premature dephosphorylation of stress-mediators by Wip1 results in abrogation of tumor surveillance, thus Wip1 acts as an oncogene. Previously, the functional regulation of Wip1 in cell-cycle progression by counteracting cellular G1 and G2/M checkpoint activity in response to DNA damage was reported. However, other than in stress conditions, the function and regulatory mechanism of Wip1 has not been fully determined. Herein, we demonstrated that protein regulation of Wip1 occurs in a cell cycle-dependent manner, which is directly governed by APC/C(Cdh1) at the end of mitosis. In particular, we also showed evidence that Wip1 phosphatase activity is closely associated with its own protein stability, suggesting that reduced phosphatase activity of Wip1 during mitosis could trigger its degradation. Furthermore, to verify the physiological role of its phosphatase activity during mitosis, we established doxycycline-inducible cell models, including a Wip1 wild type (WT) and phosphatase dead mutant (Wip1 DA). When ectopically expressing Wip1 WT, we observed a delay in the transition from metaphase to anaphase. In conclusion, these studies show that mitotic degradation of Wip1 by APC/C(Cdh1) is important for normal mitotic progression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Molecular characterization of a tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase encoded by a stress-responsive gene in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Q; Fu, H H; Gupta, R; Luan, S

    1998-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases play a vital role in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation in animal systems. However, none of these enzymes has been characterized from higher plants. In this study, we isolated a cDNA encoding a putative protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) from Arabidopsis (referred to as AtPTP1). The expression level of AtPTP1 is highly sensitive to environmental stresses. High-salt conditions increased AtPTP1 mRNA levels, whereas cold treatment rapidly eliminated the AtPTP1 transcript. The recombinant AtPTP1 protein specifically hydrolyzed phosphotyrosine, but not phosphoserine/threonine, in protein substrates. Site-directed mutagenesis defined two highly conserved amino acids, cysteine-265 and aspartate-234, as being essential for the phosphatase activity of the AtPTP1 protein, suggesting a common catalytic mechanism for PTPases from all eukaryotic systems. In summary, we have identified AtPTP1 as a tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase that may function in stress responses of higher plants. PMID:9596642

  10. Structure of the WipA protein reveals a novel tyrosine protein phosphatase effector from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Pinotsis, Nikos; Waksman, Gabriel

    2017-06-02

    Legionnaires' disease is a severe form of pneumonia caused by the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. L. pneumophila pathogenicity relies on secretion of more than 300 effector proteins by a type IVb secretion system. Among these Legionella effectors, WipA has been primarily studied because of its dependence on a chaperone complex, IcmSW, for translocation through the secretion system, but its role in pathogenicity has remained unknown. In this study, we present the crystal structure of a large fragment of WipA, WipA435. Surprisingly, this structure revealed a serine/threonine phosphatase fold that unexpectedly targets tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides. The structure also revealed a sequence insertion that folds into an α-helical hairpin, the tip of which adopts a canonical coiled-coil structure. The purified protein was a dimer whose dimer interface involves interactions between the coiled coil of one WipA molecule and the phosphatase domain of another. Given the ubiquity of protein-protein interaction mediated by interactions between coiled-coils, we hypothesize that WipA can thereby transition from a homodimeric state to a heterodimeric state in which the coiled-coil region of WipA is engaged in a protein-protein interaction with a tyrosine-phosphorylated host target. In conclusion, these findings help advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of an effector involved in Legionella virulence and may inform approaches to elucidate the function of other effectors. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Regulation of receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatases by their C-terminal tail domains.

    PubMed

    Barnea, Maayan; Olender, Tsviya; Bedford, Mark T; Elson, Ari

    2016-10-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) perform specific functions in vivo, despite being vastly outnumbered by their substrates. Because of this and due to the central roles PTPs play in regulating cellular function, PTP activity is regulated by a large variety of molecular mechanisms. We review evidence that indicates that the divergent C-terminal tail sequences (C-terminal domains, CTDs) of receptor-type PTPs (RPTPs) help regulate RPTP function by controlling intermolecular associations in a way that is itself subject to physiological regulation. We propose that the CTD of each RPTP defines an 'interaction code' that helps determine molecules it will interact with under various physiological conditions, thus helping to regulate and diversify PTP function. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  12. Asperentin B, a New Inhibitor of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Jutta; Aldemir, Hülya; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Gulder, Tobias A M; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2017-06-21

    In the frame of studies on secondary metabolites produced by fungi from deep-sea environments we have investigated inhibitors of enzymes playing key roles in signaling cascades of biochemical pathways relevant for the treatment of diseases. Here we report on a new inhibitor of the human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a target in the signaling pathway of insulin. A new asperentin analog is produced by an Aspergillus sydowii strain isolated from the sediment of the deep Mediterranean Sea. Asperentin B ( 1 ) contains an additional phenolic hydroxy function at C-6 and exhibits an IC 50 value against PTP1B of 2 μM in vitro, which is six times stronger than the positive control, suramin. Interestingly, asperentin ( 2 ) did not show any inhibition of this enzymatic activity. Asperentin B ( 1 ) is discussed as possible therapeutic agents for type 2 diabetes and sleeping sickness.

  13. Asperentin B, a New Inhibitor of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Jutta; Aldemir, Hülya; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Gulder, Tobias A. M.; Imhoff, Johannes F.

    2017-01-01

    In the frame of studies on secondary metabolites produced by fungi from deep-sea environments we have investigated inhibitors of enzymes playing key roles in signaling cascades of biochemical pathways relevant for the treatment of diseases. Here we report on a new inhibitor of the human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a target in the signaling pathway of insulin. A new asperentin analog is produced by an Aspergillus sydowii strain isolated from the sediment of the deep Mediterranean Sea. Asperentin B (1) contains an additional phenolic hydroxy function at C-6 and exhibits an IC50 value against PTP1B of 2 μM in vitro, which is six times stronger than the positive control, suramin. Interestingly, asperentin (2) did not show any inhibition of this enzymatic activity. Asperentin B (1) is discussed as possible therapeutic agents for type 2 diabetes and sleeping sickness. PMID:28635658

  14. Protein phosphatase PHLPP1 controls the light-induced resetting of the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Masubuchi, Satoru; Gao, Tianyan; O'Neill, Audrey; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Newton, Alexandra C.; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) differentially attenuates Akt, PKC, and ERK1/2 signaling, thereby controlling the duration and amplitude of responses evoked by these kinases. PHLPP1 is expressed in the mammalian central clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, where it oscillates in a circadian fashion. To explore the role of PHLPP1 in vivo, we have generated mice with a targeted deletion of the PHLPP1 gene. Here we show that PHLPP1-null mice, although displaying normal circadian rhythmicity, have a drastically impaired capacity to stabilize the circadian period after light-induced resetting, producing a large phase shift after light resetting. Our findings reveal that PHLPP1 exerts a previously unappreciated role in circadian control, governing the consolidation of circadian periodicity after resetting. PMID:20080691

  15. Identification of caffeoylquinic acid derivatives as natural protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from Artemisia princeps.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Sasaki, Tatsunori; Li, Wei; Nagata, Kazuya; Higai, Koji; Feng, Feng; Wang, Jian; Cheng, Maosheng; Koike, Kazuo

    2018-04-15

    Considerable attention has been paid to protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitors as a potential therapy for diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Ten caffeoylquinic acid derivatives (1-10) from leaves of Artemisia princeps Pamp. (Asteraceae) were identified as natural PTP1B inhibitors. Among them, chlorogenic acid (3) showed the most potent inhibitory activity (IC 50 11.1 μM). Compound 3 was demonstrated to be a noncompetitive inhibitor by a kinetic analysis. Molecular docking simulation suggested that compound 3 bound to the allosteric site of PTP1B. Furthermore, compound 3 showed remarkable selectivity against four homologous PTPs. According to these findings, compound 3 might be potentially valuable for further drug development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Caged xanthones displaying protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibition from Cratoxylum cochinchinense.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuo Peng; Lee, Hyeong-Hwan; Uddin, Zia; Song, Yeong Hun; Park, Ki Hun

    2018-08-01

    Four new caged xanthones (1-4) and two known compounds (5, 6) were isolated from the roots of Cratoxylum cochinchinense, a polyphenol rich plant, collected in China. The structures of the isolated compounds (1-6) were characterized by obtaining their detailed spectroscopic data. In particular, compounds 1 and 6 were fully identified by X-ray crystallographic data. The isolated compounds (1-6) were evaluated against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which plays an important role in diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Among these compounds, 3, 4, and 6 displayed significant inhibition with IC 50 values of 76.3, 43.2, and 6.6 µM, respectively. A detailed kinetic study was conducted by determining K m , V max , and the ratio of K ik and K iv , which revealed that all the compounds behaved as competitive inhibitors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Restricted Protein Phosphatase 2A Targeting by Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kwun, Hyun Jin; Shuda, Masahiro; Camacho, Carlos J.; Gamper, Armin M.; Thant, Mamie; Chang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) is a newly discovered human cancer virus encoding a small T (sT) oncoprotein. We performed MCV sT FLAG-affinity purification followed by mass spectroscopy (MS) analysis, which identified several protein phosphatases (PP), including PP2A A and C subunits and PP4C, as potential cellular interacting proteins. PP2A targeting is critical for the transforming properties of nonhuman polyomaviruses, such as simian virus 40 (SV40), but is not required for MCV sT-induced rodent cell transformation. We compared similarities and differences in PP2A binding between MCV and SV40 sT. While SV40 sT coimmunopurified with subunits PP2A Aα and PP2A C, MCV sT coimmunopurified with PP2A Aα, PP2A Aβ, and PP2A C. Scanning alanine mutagenesis at 29 sites across the MCV sT protein revealed that PP2A-binding domains lie on the opposite molecular surface from a previously described large T stabilization domain (LSD) loop that binds E3 ligases, such as Fbw7. MCV sT-PP2A interactions can be functionally distinguished by mutagenesis from MCV sT LSD-dependent 4E-BP1 hyperphosphorylation and viral DNA replication enhancement. MCV sT has a restricted range for PP2A B subunit substitution, inhibiting only the assembly of B56α into the phosphatase holoenzyme. In contrast, SV40 sT inhibits the assembly of B55α, B56α and B56ε into PP2A. We conclude that MCV sT is required for Merkel cell carcinoma growth, but its in vitro transforming activity depends on LSD interactions rather than PP2A targeting. IMPORTANCE Merkel cell polyomavirus is a newly discovered human cancer virus that promotes cancer, in part, through expression of its small T (sT) oncoprotein. Animal polyomavirus sT oncoproteins have been found to cause experimental tumors by blocking the activities of a group of phosphatases called protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Our structural analysis reveals that MCV sT also displaces the B subunit of PP2A to inhibit PP2A activity. MCV sT, however, only

  18. The nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase corkscrew functions in multiple receptor tyrosine kinase pathways in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Perkins, L A; Johnson, M R; Melnick, M B; Perrimon, N

    1996-11-25

    Corkscrew (csw) encodes a nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) that has been implicated in signaling from the Torso receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). csw mutations, unlike tor mutations, are associated with zygotic lethality, indicating that Csw plays additional roles during development. We have conducted a detailed phenotypic analysis of csw mutations to identify these additional functions of Csw. Our results indicate that Csw operates positively downstream of other Drosophila RTKs such as the Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor (DER), the fibroblast growth factor receptor (Breathless), and likely other RTKs. This model is substantiated by specific dosage interactions between csw and DER. It is proposed that Csw is part of the evolutionarily conserved "signaling cassette" that operates downstream of all RTKs. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that SHP-2, a vertebrate PTPase similar to Csw and previously implicated in RTK signaling, encodes the functional vertebrate homologue of Csw.

  19. Purification and characterization of protein phosphatase 2A from petals of the tulip Tulipa gesnerina.

    PubMed

    Azad, Md Abul Kalam; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2006-11-30

    The holoenzyme of protein phosphatase (PP) from tulip petals was purified by using hydrophobic interaction, anion exchange and microcystin affinity chromatography to analyze activity towards p-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP). The catalytic subunit of PP was released from its endogenous regulatory subunits by ethanol precipitation and further purified. Both preparations were characterized by immunological and biochemical approaches to be PP2A. On SDS-PAGE, the final purified holoenzyme preparation showed three protein bands estimated at 38, 65, and 75 kDa while the free catalytic subunit preparation showed only the 38 kDa protein. In both preparations, the 38 kDa protein was identified immunologically as the catalytic subunit of PP2A by using a monoclonal antibody against the PP2A catalytic subunit. The final 623- and 748- fold purified holoenzyme and the free catalytic preparations, respectively, exhibited high sensitivity to inhibition by 1 nM okadaic acid when activity was measured with p-NPP. The holoenzyme displayed higher stimulation in the presence of ammonium sulfate than the free catalytic subunit did by protamine, thereby suggesting different enzymatic behaviors.

  20. Gingival crevicular fluid protein content and alkaline phosphatase activity in relation to pubertal growth phase.

    PubMed

    Perinetti, Giuseppe; Franchi, Lorenzo; Castaldo, Attilio; Contardo, Luca

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) protein content and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in growing subjects in relation to stages of skeletal maturation, ie, the growth phase, as prepubertal, pubertal, and postpubertal. Fifty healthy growing subjects (31 girls and 19 boys; age range, 7.8-17.7 years) were enrolled in this study that followed a double-blind, prospective, cross-sectional design. Collection of GCF was performed at the mesial and distal sites of both central incisors, for the maxilla and mandible. Growth phase was assessed through the cervical vertebral maturation method. GCF parameters were expressed as total protein content, total ALP activity, and normalized ALP activity. The total GCF protein content was similar between the different growth phases. On the contrary, the total ALP activity showed a peak for the pubertal growth phase. The normalized GCF ALP activity was only poorly associated with growth phase. No differences were seen between the maxillary and mandibular sites, or between the sexes, for any GCF parameter. The total GCF protein content is not sensitive to the growth phase. However, GCF ALP activity has potential as a diagnostic aid for identification of the pubertal growth phase in individual subjects when expressed as total, but not normalized, values.

  1. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals new roles for the protein phosphatase PP6 in mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Rusin, Scott F; Schlosser, Kate A; Adamo, Mark E; Kettenbach, Arminja N

    2015-10-13

    Protein phosphorylation is an important regulatory mechanism controlling mitotic progression. Protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) is an essential enzyme with conserved roles in chromosome segregation and spindle assembly from yeast to humans. We applied a baculovirus-mediated gene silencing approach to deplete HeLa cells of the catalytic subunit of PP6 (PP6c) and analyzed changes in the phosphoproteome and proteome in mitotic cells by quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. We identified 408 phosphopeptides on 272 proteins that increased and 298 phosphopeptides on 220 proteins that decreased in phosphorylation upon PP6c depletion in mitotic cells. Motif analysis of the phosphorylated sites combined with bioinformatics pathway analysis revealed previously unknown PP6c-dependent regulatory pathways. Biochemical assays demonstrated that PP6c opposed casein kinase 2-dependent phosphorylation of the condensin I subunit NCAP-G, and cellular analysis showed that depletion of PP6c resulted in defects in chromosome condensation and segregation in anaphase, consistent with dysregulation of condensin I function in the absence of PP6 activity. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals new roles for the protein phosphatase PP6 in mitotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Rusin, Scott F.; Schlosser, Kate A.; Adamo, Mark E.; Kettenbach, Arminja N.

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important regulatory mechanism controlling mitotic progression. Protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) is an essential enzyme with conserved roles in chromosome segregation and spindle assembly from yeast to humans. We applied a baculovirus-mediated gene silencing approach to deplete HeLa cells of the catalytic subunit of PP6 (PP6c) and analyzed changes in the phosphoproteome and proteome in mitotic cells by quantitative mass spectrometry–based proteomics. We identified 408 phosphopeptides on 272 proteins that increased and 298 phosphopeptides on 220 proteins that decreased in phosphorylation upon PP6c depletion in mitotic cells. Motif analysis of the phosphorylated sites combined with bioinformatics pathway analysis revealed previously unknown PP6c–dependent regulatory pathways. Biochemical assays demonstrated that PP6c opposed casein kinase 2–dependent phosphorylation of the condensin I subunit NCAP-G, and cellular analysis showed that depletion of PP6c resulted in defects in chromosome condensation and segregation in anaphase, consistent with dysregulation of condensin I function in the absence of PP6 activity. PMID:26462736

  3. Striatal-enriched Tyrosine Protein Phosphatase (STEP) in the Mechanisms of Depressive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Elizabeth; Kulikov, Alexander

    2017-08-30

    Striatal-enriched tyrosine protein phosphatase (STEP) is expressed mainly in the brain. Its dysregulation is associated with Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome, drug abuse and stroke/ischemia. However, an association between STEP and depressive disorders is still obscure. The review discusses the theoretical foundations and experimental facts concerning possible relationship between STEP dysregulation and depression risk. STEP dephosphorylates and inactivates several key neuronal signaling proteins such as extracellular signal-regulating kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), stress activated protein kinases p38, the Src family tyrosine kinases Fyn, Pyk2, NMDA and AMPA glutamate receptors. The inactivation of these proteins decreases the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) necessary for neurogenesis and neuronal survival. The deficit of BDNF results in progressive degeneration of neurons in the hippocampus and cortex and increases depression risk. At the same time, a STEP inhibitor, 8-(trifluoromethyl)-1,2,3,4,5-benzopentathiepin-6-amine hydrochloride (TC-2153), increases BDNF expression in the hippocampus and attenuated the depressivelike behavior in mice. Thus, STEP is involved in the mechanism of depressive disorders and it is a promising molecular target for atypical antidepressant drugs of new generation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Basal protein phosphatase 2A activity restrains cytokine expression: role for MAPKs and tristetraprolin.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Morris, Jonathan C; Clark, Andrew R; Verrills, Nicole M; Ammit, Alaina J

    2015-05-18

    PP2A is a master controller of multiple inflammatory signaling pathways. It is a target in asthma; however the molecular mechanisms by which PP2A controls inflammation warrant further investigation. In A549 lung epithelial cells in vitro we show that inhibition of basal PP2A activity by okadaic acid (OA) releases restraint on MAPKs and thereby increases MAPK-mediated pro-asthmatic cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-8. Notably, PP2A inhibition also impacts on the anti-inflammatory protein - tristetraprolin (TTP), a destabilizing RNA binding protein regulated at multiple levels by p38 MAPK. Although PP2A inhibition increases TTP mRNA expression, resultant TTP protein builds up in the hyperphosphorylated inactive form. Thus, when PP2A activity is repressed, pro-inflammatory cytokines increase and anti-inflammatory proteins are rendered inactive. Importantly, these effects can be reversed by the PP2A activators FTY720 and AAL(s), or more specifically by overexpression of the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2A-C). Moreover, PP2A plays an important role in cytokine expression in cells stimulated with TNFα; as inhibition of PP2A with OA or PP2A-C siRNA results in significant increases in cytokine production. Collectively, these data reveal the molecular mechanisms of PP2A regulation and highlight the potential of boosting the power of endogenous phosphatases as novel anti-inflammatory strategies to combat asthmatic inflammation.

  5. Overexpression, purification, and characterization of SHPTP1, a Src homology 2-containing protein-tyrosine-phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Pei, D; Neel, B G; Walsh, C T

    1993-01-01

    A protein-tyrosine-phosphatase (PTPase; EC 3.1.3.48) containing two Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, SHPTP1, was previously identified in hematopoietic and epithelial cells. By placing the coding sequence of the PTPase behind a bacteriophage T7 promoter, we have overexpressed both the full-length enzyme and a truncated PTPase domain in Escherichia coli. In each case, the soluble enzyme was expressed at levels of 3-4% of total soluble E. coli protein. The recombinant proteins had molecular weights of 63,000 and 45,000 for the full-length protein and the truncated PTPase domain, respectively, as determined by SDS/PAGE. The recombinant enzymes dephosphorylated p-nitrophenyl phosphate, phosphotyrosine, and phosphotyrosyl peptides but not phosphoserine, phosphothreonine, or phosphoseryl peptides. The enzymes showed a strong dependence on pH and ionic strength for their activity, with pH optima of 5.5 and 6.3 for the full-length enzyme and the catalytic domain, respectively, and an optimal NaCl concentration of 250-300 mM. The recombinant PTPases had high Km values for p-nitrophenyl phosphate and exhibited non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics for phosphotyrosyl peptides. Images PMID:8430079

  6. Molecular mechanism of ERK dephosphorylation by striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Li, Kang-shuai; Su, Jing; Chen, Lai-Zhong; Xu, Yun-Fei; Wang, Hong-Mei; Gong, Zheng; Cui, Guo-Ying; Yu, Xiao; Wang, Kai; Yao, Wei; Xin, Tao; Li, Min-Yong; Xiao, Kun-Hong; An, Xiao-fei; Huo, Yuqing; Xu, Zhi-gang; Sun, Jin-Peng; Pang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Striatal-enriched tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is an important regulator of neuronal synaptic plasticity, and its abnormal level or activity contributes to cognitive disorders. One crucial downstream effector and direct substrate of STEP is extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), which has important functions in spine stabilisation and action potential transmission. The inhibition of STEP activity toward phospho-ERK has the potential to treat neuronal diseases, but the detailed mechanism underlying the dephosphorylation of phospho-ERK by STEP is not known. Therefore, we examined STEP activity toward pNPP, phospho-tyrosine-containing peptides, and the full-length phospho-ERK protein using STEP mutants with different structural features. STEP was found to be a highly efficient ERK tyrosine phosphatase that required both its N-terminal regulatory region and key residues in its active site. Specifically, both KIM and KIS of STEP were required for ERK interaction. In addition to the N-terminal KIS region, S245, hydrophobic residues L249/L251, and basic residues R242/R243 located in the KIM region were important in controlling STEP activity toward phospho-ERK. Further kinetic experiments revealed subtle structural differences between STEP and HePTP that affected the interactions of their KIMs with ERK. Moreover, STEP recognised specific positions of a phospho-ERK peptide sequence through its active site, and the contact of STEP F311 with phospho-ERK V205 and T207 were crucial interactions. Taken together, our results not only provide the information for interactions between ERK and STEP, but will also help in the development of specific strategies to target STEP-ERK recognition, which could serve as a potential therapy for neurological disorders. PMID:24117863

  7. STRIATAL-ENRICHED PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE (STEP) KNOCKOUT MICE HAVE ENHANCED HIPPOCAMPAL MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Venkitaramani, Deepa V.; Moura, Paula J.; Picciotto, Marina R.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    STEP is a brain-specific phosphatase that opposes synaptic strengthening by the regulation of key synaptic signaling proteins. Previous studies suggest a possible role for STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) in learning and memory. To demonstrate the functional importance of STEP in learning and memory, we generated STEP knockout (KO) mice and examined the effect of deletion of STEP on behavioral performance, as well as the phosphorylation and expression of its substrates. Here we report that loss of STEP leads to significantly enhanced performance in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory tasks. In addition, STEP KO mice displayed greater dominance behavior, although they were normal in their motivation, motor coordination, visual acuity and social interactions. STEP KO mice displayed enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), the NR2B subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), Proline-rich tyrosine kinase (Pyk2), as well as an increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 substrates. Concomitant to the increased phosphorylation of NR2B, synaptosomal expression of NR1/NR2B NMDARs was increased in STEP KO mice, as was the GluR1/GluR2 containing α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptors (AMPAR), providing a potential molecular mechanism for the improved cognitive performance. The data support a role for STEP in the regulation of synaptic strengthening. The absence of STEP improves cognitive performance, and may do so by the regulation of downstream effectors necessary for synaptic transmission. PMID:21501258

  8. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase type 5 (PP5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, Mark R.; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Honkanen, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) is a member of the PPP-gene family of protein phosphatases that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues and is highly conserved among eukaryotes. PP5 associates with several proteins that affect signal transduction networks, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90)-heterocomplex, the CDC16 and CDC27 subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex, elF2alpha kinase, the A subunit of PP2A, the G12-alpha / G13-alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and DNA-PK. The catalytic domain of PP5 (PP5c) shares 35-45% sequence identity with the catalytic domains of other PPP-phosphatases, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), -2B / calcineurin (PP2B), -4 (PP4), -6 (PP6), and -7 (PP7). Like PP1, PP2A and PP4, PP5 is also sensitive to inhibition by okadaic acid, microcystin, cantharidin, tautomycin, and calyculin A. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 angstroms. From this structure we propose a mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif. The structure of PP5c provides a possible structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  9. Use of double-stranded RNA-mediated interference to determine the substrates of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Muda, Marco; Worby, Carolyn A; Simonson-Leff, Nancy; Clemens, James C; Dixon, Jack E

    2002-08-15

    Despite the wealth of information generated by genome-sequencing projects, the identification of in vivo substrates of specific protein kinases and phosphatases is hampered by the large number of candidate enzymes, overlapping enzyme specificity and sequence similarity. In the present study, we demonstrate the power of RNA interference (RNAi) to dissect signal transduction cascades involving specific kinases and phosphatases. RNAi is used to identify the cellular tyrosine kinases upstream of the phosphorylation of Down-Syndrome cell-adhesion molecule (Dscam), a novel cell-surface molecule of the immunoglobulin-fibronectin super family, which has been shown to be important for axonal path-finding in Drosophila. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Dscam recruits the Src homology 2 domain of the adaptor protein Dock to the receptor. Dock, the ortho- logue of mammalian Nck, is also essential for correct axonal path-finding in Drosophila. We further determined that Dock is tyrosine-phosphorylated in vivo and identified DPTP61F as the protein tyrosine phosphatase responsible for maintaining Dock in its non-phosphorylated state. The present study illustrates the versatility of RNAi in the identification of the physiological substrates for protein kinases and phosphatases.

  10. Downregulation of protein phosphatase 2A carboxyl methylation and methyltransferase may contribute to Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sontag, Estelle; Hladik, Christa; Montgomery, Lisa; Luangpirom, Ampa; Mudrak, Ingrid; Ogris, Egon; White, Charles L

    2004-10-01

    ABalphaC, a major protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) heterotrimeric enzyme, binds to and regulates the microtubule cytoskeleton and tau. We have shown that ABalphaC protein expression levels are selectively reduced in Alzheimer disease (AD). Notably, the carboxyl methylation of PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2A(C)) is critically required for ABalphaC holoenzyme assembly, and catalyzed by a specific methyltransferase (PPMT). Here, we provide the first analysis of human PPMT and methylated PP2A(C) in brain regions from AD, non-AD demented, and aged control autopsy cases. Immunoblotting analyses revealed that PPMT protein expression and PP2A(C) methylation levels were quantitatively decreased in AD-affected brain regions. Immunohistochemical studies showed that PPMT was abundant in neurons throughout the cortex in normal control and non-AD demented cases. However, in AD, there was a regional loss of PPMT immunoreactivity that closely paralleled the severity of tau pathology, but not amyloid plaque burden. We propose that the deregulation of PPMT and PP2A methylation/demethylation cycles contributes to AD pathogenesis, by inducing changes in PP2A heteromultimeric composition and substrate specificity. In turn, PP2A dysfunction compromises the mechanisms that control tau, neuronal plasticity, and survival.

  11. Novel Mixed-Type Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B. Kinetic and Computational Studies.

    PubMed

    Sarabia-Sánchez, Marie Jazmín; Trejo-Soto, Pedro Josué; Velázquez-López, José Miguel; Carvente-García, Carlos; Castillo, Rafael; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Avitia-Domínguez, Claudia; Enríquez-Mendiola, Daniel; Sierra-Campos, Erick; Valdez-Solana, Mónica; Salas-Pacheco, José Manuel; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo

    2017-12-20

    The Atlas of Diabetes reports 415 million diabetics in the world, a number that has surpassed in half the expected time the twenty year projection. Type 2 diabetes is the most frequent form of the disease; it is characterized by a defect in the secretion of insulin and a resistance in its target organs. In the search for new antidiabetic drugs, one of the principal strategies consists in promoting the action of insulin. In this sense, attention has been centered in the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a protein whose overexpression or increase of its activity has been related in many studies with insulin resistance. In the present work, a chemical library of 250 compounds was evaluated to determine their inhibition capability on the protein PTP1B. Ten molecules inhibited over the 50% of the activity of the PTP1B, the three most potent molecules were selected for its characterization, reporting Ki values of 5.2, 4.2 and 41.3 µM, for compounds 1 , 2 , and 3 , respectively. Docking and molecular dynamics studies revealed that the three inhibitors made interactions with residues at the secondary binding site to phosphate, exclusive for PTP1B. The data reported here support these compounds as hits for the design more potent and selective inhibitors against PTP1B in the search of new antidiabetic treatment.

  12. Using mass spectrometry to study the photo-affinity labeling of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leriche, Tammy; Skorey, Kathryn; Roy, Patrick; McKay, Dan; Bateman, Kevin P.

    2004-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a potential target for the treatment of Type II diabetes and several companies are developing small molecule inhibitors of this enzyme. Part of the characterization of these compounds as PTP1B inhibitors is the understanding of how they bind in the enzyme active site. The use of photo-activated inhibitors that target the active site can provide such insight. This paper describes the characterization of a photoprobe directed at the active site of PTP1B. Mass spectrometry revealed the specific binding of the probe to the intact protein. Digestion of the labeled protein followed by LC-MS and LC-MS/MS was used to show that the photoprobe binds to a specific active site amino acid. This was confirmed by comparison with the X-ray structure of PTP1B with a PTP1B inhibitor. The probe labels a conserved acidic residue (Asp) that is required for catalytic activity. This photoprobe may prove to be a useful tool for the development of a PTP1B inhibitor or for the study of PTPs in general.

  13. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in Retinal Ischemic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Dreixler, John C.; Bratton, Anthony; Du, Eugenie; Shaikh, Afzhal R.; Savoie, Brian; Michael, Alexander; Marcet, Marcus; Roth, Steven

    2011-01-01

    We previously described the phenomenon of retinal ischemic preconditioning (IPC) and we have shown the role of various signaling proteins in the protective pathways, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38. In this study we examined the role in IPC of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), which inactivates p38. Ischemia was produced by elevation of intraocular pressure above systolic arterial blood pressure in adult Wistar rats. Preconditioning was produced by transient retinal ischemia for 5 min, 24 h prior to ischemia. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) to MKP-1 or a control non-silencing siRNA, was injected into the vitreous 6 h prior to IPC. Recovery was assessed by electroretinography (ERG) and histology. The a- and b-waves, and oscillatory potentials (OPs), measured before and 1 week after ischemia, were then normalized relative to pre-ischemic baseline, and corrected for diurnal variation in the normal non-ischemic eye. The P2, or post-photoreceptor component of the ERG (which reflects function of the rod bipolar cells in the inner retina), was derived using the Hood-Birch model. MKP-1 was localized in specific retinal cells using immunohistochemistry; levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases were measured using Western blotting. Injection of siRNA to MKP-1 significantly attenuated the protective effect of IPC as reflected by decreased recovery of the electroretinogram a- and b-waves and the P2 after ischemia. The injection of siRNA to MKP-1 reduced the number of cells in the retinal ganglion cell and outer nuclear layers after IPC and ischemia. Blockade of MKP-1 by siRNA also increased the activation of p38 at 24 h following IPC. MKP-1 siRNA did not alter the levels of phosphorylated jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) after IPC. The results suggest the involvement of dual-specificity phosphatase MKP-1 in IPC and that MKP-1 is involved in IPC by regulating levels of activated MAPK p38. PMID

  14. Unbiased identification of substrates of protein tyrosine phosphatase ptp-3 in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Christopher J; Kim, Min-Sik; Zhong, Jun; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Bose, Anjun K; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-06-01

    The leukocyte antigen related (LAR) family of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases has three members in humans - PTPRF, PTPRD and PTPRS - that have been implicated in diverse processes including embryonic development, inhibition of cell growth and axonal guidance. Mutations in the LAR family are associated with developmental defects such as cleft palate as well as various cancers including breast, neck, lung, colon and brain. Although this family of tyrosine phosphatases is important for many developmental processes, little is known of their substrates. This is partially due to functional redundancy within the LAR family, as deletion of a single gene in the LAR family does not have an appreciable phenotype, but a dual knockout is embryonically lethal in mouse models. To circumvent the inability to knockout multiple members of the LAR family in mouse models, we used a knockout of ptp-3, which is the only known ortholog of the LAR family in Caenorhabditis elegans and allows for the study of the LAR family at the organismal level. Using SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, we identified 255 putative substrates of ptp-3, which included four of the nine known annotated substrates of the LAR family. A motif analysis of the identified phosphopeptides allowed for the determination of sequences that appear to be preferentially dephosphorylated. Finally, we discovered that kinases were overrepresented in the list of identified putative substrates and tyrosine residues whose phosphorylation is known to increase kinase activity were dephosphorylated by ptp-3. These data are suggestive of ptp-3 as a potential negative regulator of several kinase families, such as the mitogen activated kinases (MAPKs), and multiple tyrosine kinases including FER, MET, and NTRK2. Copyright © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein phosphatase 2A inhibition enhances radiation sensitivity and reduces tumor growth in chordoma.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuyu; Song, Hua; Zhang, Wei; Seldomridge, Ashlee; Jung, Jinkyu; Giles, Amber J; Hutchinson, Marsha-Kay; Cao, Xiaoyu; Colwell, Nicole; Lita, Adrian; Larion, Mioara; Maric, Dragan; Abu-Asab, Mones; Quezado, Martha; Kramp, Tamalee; Camphausen, Kevin; Zhuang, Zhengping; Gilbert, Mark R; Park, Deric M

    2018-05-18

    Standard therapy for chordoma consists of surgical resection followed by high-dose irradiation. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine phosphatase involved in signal transduction, cell cycle progression, cell differentiation, and DNA repair. LB100 is a small-molecule inhibitor of PP2A designed to sensitize cancer cells to DNA damage from irradiation and chemotherapy. A recently completed phase I trial of LB100 in solid tumors demonstrated its safety. Here, we show the therapeutic potential of LB100 in chordoma. Three patient-derived chordoma cell lines were used: U-CH1, JHC7, and UM-Chor1. Cell proliferation was determined with LB100 alone and in combination with irradiation. Cell cycle progression was assessed by flow cytometry. Quantitative γ-H2AX immunofluorescence and immunoblot evaluated the effect of LB100 on radiation-induced DNA damage. Ultrastructural evidence for nuclear damage was investigated using Raman imaging and transmission electron microscopy. A xenograft model was established to determine potential clinical utility of adding LB100 to irradiation. PP2A inhibition in concert with irradiation demonstrated in vitro growth inhibition. The combination of LB100 and radiation also induced accumulation at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, the stage most sensitive to radiation-induced damage. LB100 enhanced radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Animals implanted with chordoma cells and treated with the combination of LB100 and radiation demonstrated tumor growth delay. Combining LB100 and radiation enhanced DNA damage-induced cell death and delayed tumor growth in an animal model of chordoma. PP2A inhibition by LB100 treatment may improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy for chordoma.

  16. Overproduction, purification, and biochemical characterization of the dual specificity H1 protein phosphatase encoded by variola major virus.

    PubMed

    Tropea, Joseph E; Phan, Jason; Waugh, David S

    2006-11-01

    Smallpox, a highly contagious infectious disease caused by the variola major virus, has an overall mortality rate of about 30%. Because there currently is no specific treatment for smallpox, and the only prevention is vaccination, there is an urgent need for the development of effective antiviral drugs. The dual specificity protein phosphatase encoded by the smallpox virus (H1) is essential for the production of infectious viral particles, making it a promising molecular target for antiviral therapeutics. Here, we report the molecular cloning, overproduction, purification, and initial biochemical characterization of H1 phosphatase, thereby paving the way for the discovery of small molecule inhibitors.

  17. Chimeric proteins combining phosphatase and cellulose-binding activities: proof-of-concept and application in the hydrolysis of paraoxon.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Larissa M; Chaimovich, Hernan; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Marana, Sandro R

    2014-05-01

    Phosphatases for organophosphate degradation and carbohydrate-binding domains (CBMs) have potential biotechnological applications. As a proof-of-concept, a soluble chimeric protein that combines acid phosphatase (AppA) from Escherichia coli and a CBM from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (AppA-CBM) was produced in E.coli. AppACBM adsorbed in microcrystalline cellulose Avicel PH101 catalyzed the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (PNPP). The binding to microcrystalline cellulose displayed saturation behavior with an apparent binding constant (Kb) of 22 ± 5 mg and a maximum binding (Bmax) of 1.500 ± 0.001 enzyme units. Binding was highest at pH 2.5 and decreased above pH 6.5, as previously observed for family 2 CBMs. The Km values for PNPP of AppA-CBM and native AppA were identical (2.7 mM). To demonstrate that this strategy for protein engineering has practical applications and is largely functional, even for phosphatases exhibiting diverse folds, a chimeric protein combining human paraoxonase 1 (hPON1) and the CBM was produced. Both PON1-CBM and hPON1 had identical Km values for paraoxon (1.3 mM). Additionally, hPON1 bound to microcrystalline cellulose with a Kb of 27 ± 3 mg, the same as that observed for AppA-CBM. These data show that the phosphatase domains are as functional in both of the chimeric proteins as they are in the native enzymes and that the CBM domain maintains the same cellulose affinity. Therefore, the engineering of chimeric proteins combining domains of phosphatases and CBMs is fully feasible, resulting in chimeric enzymes that exhibit potential for OP detoxification.

  18. Identification and partial characterization of a latent ATP, Mg-dependent protein phosphatase in rabbit skeletal muscle cytosol.

    PubMed

    Vandenheede, J R; Staquet, S; Merlevede, W

    1989-05-04

    Fractionation of rabbit skeletal muscle cytosol on Aminohexyl-Sepharose has resulted in the identification of a latent ATP, Mg-dependent protein phosphatase whose catalytic subunit is in the active conformation, but is inhibited by the presence of more than one modulator unit. The partially purified enzyme is converted to an inactive, kinase FA-dependent form upon incubation at 30 degrees C unless modulator-specific polyclonal antibodies are added to the preparation. The immunoglobulins also relieve the inhibition which is responsible for the low basal phosphatase activity of the enzyme, and they counteract all of the heat-stable inhibitor activity present in the preparation. Addition of free catalytic subunit abolishes the inhibition of the latent enzyme in a dose-dependent way, but cannot prevent the inactivation process. The inactivated phosphatase and the original latent enzyme exhibit the same apparent Mr in sucrose density-gradient centrifugation (70,000) and in gel filtration (110,000).

  19. Mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of arsenic compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Kanwal; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Wen Wen

    2012-09-15

    Arsenic binding to biomolecules is considered one of the major toxic mechanisms, which may also be related to the carcinogenic risks of arsenic in humans. At the same time, arsenic is also known to activate the phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor, the mitogen-activated protein kinase and insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 pathways. These signaling pathways originate at the level of receptor tyrosine kinases whose phosphorylation status is regulated by opposing protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation, which is governed by the balanced action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, regulates important signaling pathways that are involvedmore » in the control of cell proliferation, adhesion and migration. In the present study, we have focused on the interaction of cellular PTPs with toxic trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and its intermediate metabolites such as monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) in vitro, and then determined the arsenic binding site in PTP by the use of recombinant PTPs (e.g., PTP1B and CD45). Interestingly, the activities of PTP1B (cytoplasm-form) or CD45 (receptor-linked form) were observed to be strongly inhibited by both methylated metabolites (i.e., MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III}) but not by iAs{sup III}. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has clearly confirmed that the organic intermediate, DMA{sup III} directly bound to the active site cysteine residue of PTP1B (e.g., Cys215), resulting in inhibition of enzyme activity. These results suggest that arsenic exposure may disturb the cellular signaling pathways through PTP inactivation. Highlights: ► This study focused on the interaction of PTPs with trivalent arsenicals in vitro. ► We for the first time confirmed that DMA{sup III} strongly inhibited activity of PTP1B. ► DMA{sup III

  20. Ascorbate protects endothelial barrier function during septic insult: Role of protein phosphatase type 2A.

    PubMed

    Han, Min; Pendem, Suresh; Teh, Suet Ling; Sukumaran, Dinesh K; Wu, Feng; Wilson, John X

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial barrier dysfunction contributes to morbidity in sepsis. We tested the hypothesis that raising the intracellular ascorbate concentration protects the endothelial barrier from septic insult by inhibiting protein phosphatase type 2A. Monolayer cultures of microvascular endothelial cells were incubated with ascorbate, dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA), the NADPH oxidase inhibitors apocynin and diphenyliodonium, or the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid and then were exposed to septic insult (lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma). Under standard culture conditions that depleted intracellular ascorbate, septic insult stimulated oxidant production and PP2A activity, dephosphorylated phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues in the tight junction-associated protein occludin, decreased the abundance of occludin at cell borders, and increased monolayer permeability to albumin. NADPH oxidase inhibitors prevented PP2A activation and monolayer leak, showing that these changes required reactive oxygen species. Okadaic acid, at a concentration that inhibited PP2A activity and monolayer leak, prevented occludin dephosphorylation and redistribution, implicating PP2A in the response of occludin to septic insult. Incubation with ascorbate or DHAA raised intracellular ascorbate concentrations and mitigated the effects of septic insult. In conclusion, ascorbate acts within microvascular endothelial cells to inhibit septic stimulation of oxidant production by NADPH oxidase and thereby prevents PP2A activation, PP2A-dependent dephosphorylation and redistribution of occludin, and disruption of the endothelial barrier. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Elevated levels of Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Teresa; Aragon, Ileana V.; Rutland, Beth; Tucker, J. Allan; Shevde, Lalita A.; Samant, Rajeev S.; Zhou, Guofei; Amable, Lauren; Skarra, Danalea; Honkanen, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) regulates several signaling-cascades that suppress growth and/or facilitate apoptosis in response to genomic stress. The expression of PP5 is responsive to hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and estrogen, which have both been linked to the progression of human breast cancer. Still, it is not clear if PP5 plays a role in the development of human cancer. Here, immunostaining of breast cancer tissue-microarrays (TMAs) revealed a positive correlation between PP5 overexpression and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS; P value 0.0028), invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC; P value 0.012) and IDC with metastases at the time of diagnosis (P value 0.0001). In a mouse xenograft model, the constitutive overexpression of PP5 was associated with an increase in the rate of tumor growth. In a MCF-7 cell culture model overexpression correlated with both an increase in the rate of proliferation and protection from cell death induced by oxidative stress, UVC-irradiation, adriamycin, and vinblastine. PP5 overexpression had no apparent effect on the sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to taxol or rapamycin. Western analysis of extracts from cells over-expressing PP5 revealed a decrease in the phosphorylation of known substrates for PP5. Together, these studies indicate that elevated levels of PP5 protein occur in human breast cancer and suggest that PP5 overexpression may aid tumor progression. PMID:18280813

  2. Immunohistochemical analysis of IA-2 family of protein tyrosine phosphatases in rat gastrointestinal endocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Hiroshi; Kubota-Murata, Chisato; Yasui, Tadashi; Tsukise, Azuma; Torii, Seiji

    2013-02-01

    Islet-associated protein-2 (IA-2) and IA-2β (also known as phogrin) are unique neuroendocrine-specific protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). The IA-2 family of PTPs was originally identified from insulinoma cells and discovered to be major autoantigens in type 1 diabetes. Despite its expression in the neural and canonical endocrine tissues, data on expression of the IA-2 family of PTPs in gastrointestinal endocrine cells (GECs) are limited. Therefore, we immunohistochemically investigated the expression of the IA-2 family of PTPs in the rat gastrointestinal tract. In the stomach, IA-2 and IA-2β were expressed in GECs that secrete serotonin, somatostatin, and cholecystokinin/gastrin-1. In addition to these hormones, secretin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (also known as the glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide), glucagon-like peptide-1, and glucagon, but not ghrelin were coexpressed with IA-2 or IA-2β in duodenal GECs. Pancreatic islet cells that secrete gut hormones expressed the IA-2 family of PTPs. The expression patterns of IA-2 and IA-2β were comparable. These results reveal that the IA-2 family of PTPs is expressed in a cell type-specific manner in rat GECs. The extensive expression of the IA-2 family of PTPs in pancreo-gastrointestinal endocrine cells and in the enteric plexus suggests their systemic contribution to nutritional control through a neuroendocrine signaling network.

  3. Repression of class I transcription by cadmium is mediated by the protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Le Roux, Gwenaëlle; Ducrot, Cécile; Chédin, Stéphane; Labarre, Jean; Riva, Michel; Carles, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Toxic metals are part of our environment, and undue exposure to them leads to a variety of pathologies. In response, most organisms adapt their metabolism and have evolved systems to limit this toxicity and to acquire tolerance. Ribosome biosynthesis being central for protein synthesis, we analyzed in yeast the effects of a moderate concentration of cadmium (Cd2+) on Pol I transcription that represents >60% of the transcriptional activity of the cells. We show that Cd2+ rapidly and drastically shuts down the expression of the 35S rRNA. Repression does not result from a poisoning of any of the components of the class I transcriptional machinery by Cd2+, but rather involves a protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-dependent cellular signaling pathway that targets the formation/dissociation of the Pol I–Rrn3 complex. We also show that Pol I transcription is repressed by other toxic metals, such as Ag+ and Hg2+, which likewise perturb the Pol I–Rrn3 complex, but through PP2A-independent mechanisms. Taken together, our results point to a central role for the Pol I–Rrn3 complex as molecular switch for regulating Pol I transcription in response to toxic metals. PMID:23640330

  4. Activation of the Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase in Keratinocytes Exposed to Hyperosmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cavalheiro, Renan P.; Machado, Daisy; Cruz, Bread L. G.; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J.; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria C. C.; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Vasques, Luciana; Nader, Helena B.; Souza, Ana Carolina S.; Justo, Giselle Z.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we provide new contribution to the mechanisms involved in keratinocytes response to hyperosmotic shock showing, for the first time, the participation of Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP) activity in this event. We reported that sorbitol-induced osmotic stress mediates alterations in the phosphorylation of pivotal cytoskeletal proteins, particularly Src and cofilin. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of the phosphorylated form of LMWPTP, which was followed by an augment in its catalytic activity, was observed. Of particular importance, these responses occurred in an intracellular milieu characterized by elevated levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Altogether, our results suggest that hyperosmostic stress provides a favorable cellular environment to the activation of LMWPTP, which is associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes, high levels of GSH and inhibition of Src kinase. Finally, the real contribution of LMWPTP in the hyperosmotic stress response of keratinocytes was demonstrated through analysis of the effects of ACP1 gene knockdown in stressed and non-stressed cells. LMWPTP knockdown attenuates the effects of sorbitol induced-stress in HaCaT cells, mainly in the status of Src kinase, Rac and STAT5 phosphorylation and activity. These results describe for the first time the participation of LMWPTP in the dynamics of cytoskeleton rearrangement during exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic shock, which may contribute to cell death. PMID:25781955

  5. B′-protein phosphatase 2A is a functional binding partner of delta-retroviral integrase

    PubMed Central

    Maertens, Goedele N.

    2016-01-01

    To establish infection, a retrovirus must insert a DNA copy of its RNA genome into host chromatin. This reaction is catalysed by the virally encoded enzyme integrase (IN) and is facilitated by viral genus-specific host factors. Herein, cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is identified as a functional IN binding partner exclusive to δ-retroviruses, including human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV). PP2A is a heterotrimer composed of a scaffold, catalytic and one of any of four families of regulatory subunits, and the interaction is specific to the B′ family of the regulatory subunits. B′-PP2A and HTLV-1 IN display nuclear co-localization, and the B′ subunit stimulates concerted strand transfer activity of δ-retroviral INs in vitro. The protein–protein interaction interface maps to a patch of highly conserved residues on B′, which when mutated render B′ incapable of binding to and stimulating HTLV-1 and -2 IN strand transfer activity. PMID:26657642

  6. SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 and focal adhesion kinase protein interactions regulate pulmonary endothelium barrier function.

    PubMed

    Chichger, Havovi; Braza, Julie; Duong, Huetran; Harrington, Elizabeth O

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced protein tyrosine phosphorylation is associated with changes in vascular permeability through formation and dissolution of adherens junctions and regulation of stress fiber formation. Inhibition of the protein tyrosine phosphorylase SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP2) increases tyrosine phosphorylation of vascular endothelial cadherin and β-catenin, resulting in disruption of the endothelial monolayer and edema formation in the pulmonary endothelium. Vascular permeability is a hallmark of acute lung injury (ALI); thus, enhanced SHP2 activity offers potential therapeutic value for the pulmonary vasculature in diseases such as ALI, but this has not been characterized. To assess whether SHP2 activity mediates protection against edema in the endothelium, we assessed the effect of molecular activation of SHP2 on lung endothelial barrier function in response to the edemagenic agents LPS and thrombin. Both LPS and thrombin reduced SHP2 activity, correlated with decreased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation (Y(397) and Y(925)) and diminished SHP2 protein-protein associations with FAK. Overexpression of constitutively active SHP2 (SHP2(D61A)) enhanced baseline endothelial monolayer resistance and completely blocked LPS- and thrombin-induced permeability in vitro and significantly blunted pulmonary edema formation induced by either endotoxin (LPS) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa exposure in vivo. Chemical inhibition of FAK decreased SHP2 protein-protein interactions with FAK concomitant with increased permeability; however, overexpression of SHP2(D61A) rescued the endothelium and maintained FAK activity and FAK-SHP2 protein interactions. Our data suggest that SHP2 activation offers the pulmonary endothelium protection against barrier permeability mediators downstream of the FAK signaling pathway. We postulate that further studies into the promotion of SHP2 activation in the pulmonary endothelium may offer a therapeutic approach for patients

  7. Not so pseudo: the evolutionary history of protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 2 and related pseudogenes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudogenes are traditionally considered “dead” genes, therefore lacking biological functions. This view has however been challenged during the last decade. This is the case of the Protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 2 (PPP1R2) or inhibitor-2 gene family, for which several incomplete copies exist scattered throughout the genome. Results In this study, the pseudogenization process of PPP1R2 was analyzed. Ten PPP1R2-related pseudogenes (PPP1R2P1-P10), highly similar to PPP1R2, were retrieved from the human genome assembly present in the databases. The phylogenetic analysis of mammalian PPP1R2 and related pseudogenes suggested that PPP1R2P7 and PPP1R2P9 retroposons appeared before the great mammalian radiation, while the remaining pseudogenes are primate-specific and retroposed at different times during Primate evolution. Although considered inactive, four of these pseudogenes seem to be transcribed and possibly possess biological functions. Given the role of PPP1R2 in sperm motility, the presence of these proteins was assessed in human sperm, and two PPP1R2-related proteins were detected, PPP1R2P3 and PPP1R2P9. Signatures of negative and positive selection were also detected in PPP1R2P9, further suggesting a role as a functional protein. Conclusions The results show that contrary to initial observations PPP1R2-related pseudogenes are not simple bystanders of the evolutionary process but may rather be at the origin of genes with novel functions. PMID:24195737

  8. Analysis of the interactome of the Ser/Thr Protein Phosphatase type 1 in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Hollin, Thomas; De Witte, Caroline; Lenne, Astrid; Pierrot, Christine; Khalife, Jamal

    2016-03-17

    Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is an enzyme essential to cell viability in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (Pf). The activity of PP1 is regulated by the binding of regulatory subunits, of which there are up to 200 in humans, but only 3 have been so far reported for the parasite. To better understand the P. falciparum PP1 (PfPP1) regulatory network, we here report the use of three strategies to characterize the PfPP1 interactome: co-affinity purified proteins identified by mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening and in silico analysis of the P. falciparum predicted proteome. Co-affinity purification followed by MS analysis identified 6 PfPP1 interacting proteins (Pips) of which 3 contained the RVxF consensus binding, 2 with a Fxx[RK]x[RK] motif, also shown to be a PP1 binding motif and one with both binding motifs. The Y2H screens identified 134 proteins of which 30 present the RVxF binding motif and 20 have the Fxx[RK]x[RK] binding motif. The in silico screen of the Pf predicted proteome using a consensus RVxF motif as template revealed the presence of 55 potential Pips. As further demonstration, 35 candidate proteins were validated as PfPP1 interacting proteins in an ELISA-based assay. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on PfPP1 interactome. The data reports several conserved PP1 interacting proteins as well as a high number of specific interactors to PfPP1. Their analysis indicates a high diversity of biological functions for PP1 in Plasmodium. Based on the present data and on an earlier study of the Pf interactome, a potential implication of Pips in protein folding/proteolysis, transcription and pathogenicity networks is proposed. The present work provides a starting point for further studies on the structural basis of these interactions and their functions in P. falciparum.

  9. A peptide export–import control circuit modulating bacterial development regulates protein phosphatases of the phosphorelay

    PubMed Central

    Perego, Marta

    1997-01-01

    The phosphorelay signal transduction system activates developmental transcription in sporulation of Bacillus subtilis by phosphorylation of aspartyl residues of the Spo0F and Spo0A response regulators. The phosphorylation level of these response regulators is determined by the opposing activities of protein kinases and protein aspartate phosphatases that interpret positive and negative signals for development in a signal integration circuit. The RapA protein aspartate phosphatase of the phosphorelay is regulated by a peptide that directly inhibits its activity. This peptide is proteolytically processed from an inactive pre-inhibitor protein encoded in the phrA gene. The pre-inhibitor is cleaved by the protein export apparatus to a putative pro-inhibitor that is further processed to the active inhibitor peptide and internalized by the oligopeptide permease. This export–import circuit is postulated to be a mechanism for timing phosphatase activity where the processing enzymes regulate the rate of formation of the active inhibitor. The processing events may, in turn, be controlled by a regulatory hierarchy. Chromosome sequencing has revealed several other phosphatase–prepeptide gene pairs in B. subtilis, suggesting that the use of this mechanism may be widespread in signal transduction. PMID:9238025

  10. Receptor Type Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase ζ-Pleiotrophin Signaling Controls Endocytic Trafficking of DNER That Regulates Neuritogenesis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fukazawa, Nobuna; Yokoyama, Seisuke; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Kengaku, Mineko; Maeda, Nobuaki

    2008-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase ζ (PTPζ) is a receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase that uses pleiotrophin as a ligand. Pleiotrophin inactivates the phosphatase activity of PTPζ, resulting in the increase of tyrosine phosphorylation levels of its substrates. We studied the functional interaction between PTPζ and DNER, a Notch-related transmembrane protein highly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. PTPζ and DNER displayed patchy colocalization in the dendrites of Purkinje cells, and immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that these proteins formed complexes. Several tyrosine residues in and adjacent to the tyrosine-based and the second C-terminal sorting motifs of DNER were phosphorylated and were dephosphorylated by PTPζ, and phosphorylation of these tyrosine residues resulted in the accumulation of DNER on the plasma membrane. DNER mutants lacking sorting motifs accumulated on the plasma membrane of Purkinje cells and Neuro-2A cells and induced their process extension. While normal DNER was actively endocytosed and inhibited the retinoic-acid-induced neurite outgrowth of Neuro-2A cells, pleiotrophin stimulation increased the tyrosine phosphorylation level of DNER and suppressed the endocytosis of this protein, which led to the reversal of this inhibition, thus allowing neurite extension. These observations suggest that pleiotrophin-PTPζ signaling controls subcellular localization of DNER and thereby regulates neuritogenesis. PMID:18474614

  11. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-2 Deletion Impairs Synaptic Plasticity and Hippocampal-Dependent Memory.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahman, Nor Zaihana; Greenwood, Sam M; Brett, Ros R; Tossell, Kyoko; Ungless, Mark A; Plevin, Robin; Bushell, Trevor J

    2016-02-24

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) regulate brain function and their dysfunction is implicated in a number of brain disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the signaling systems that control MAPK function. One family of proteins that contribute to this process, the mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs), directly inactivate MAPKs through dephosphorylation. Recent studies have identified novel functions of MKPs in development, the immune system, and cancer. However, a significant gap in our knowledge remains in relation to their role in brain functioning. Here, using transgenic mice where the Dusp4 gene encoding MKP-2 has been knocked out (MKP-2(-/-) mice), we show that long-term potentiation is impaired in MKP-2(-/-) mice compared with MKP-2(+/+) controls whereas neuronal excitability, evoked synaptic transmission, and paired-pulse facilitation remain unaltered. Furthermore, spontaneous EPSC (sEPSC) frequency was increased in acute slices and primary hippocampal cultures prepared from MKP-2(-/-) mice with no effect on EPSC amplitude observed. An increase in synapse number was evident in primary hippocampal cultures, which may account for the increase in sEPSC frequency. In addition, no change in ERK activity was detected in both brain tissue and primary hippocampal cultures, suggesting that the effects of MKP-2 deletion were MAPK independent. Consistent with these alterations in hippocampal function, MKP-2(-/-) mice show deficits in spatial reference and working memory when investigated using the Morris water maze. These data show that MKP-2 plays a role in regulating hippocampal function and that this effect may be independent of MAPK signaling. Copyright © 2016 Abdul Rahman et al.

  12. Control of cytoplasmic and nuclear protein kinase A by phosphodiesterases and phosphatases in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haj Slimane, Zeineb; Bedioune, Ibrahim; Lechêne, Patrick; Varin, Audrey; Lefebvre, Florence; Mateo, Philippe; Domergue-Dupont, Valérie; Dewenter, Matthias; Richter, Wito; Conti, Marco; El-Armouche, Ali; Zhang, Jin; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    Aims The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) mediates β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) regulation of cardiac contraction and gene expression. Whereas PKA activity is well characterized in various subcellular compartments of adult cardiomyocytes, its regulation in the nucleus remains largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to compare the modalities of PKA regulation in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cardiomyocytes. Methods and results Cytoplasmic and nuclear cAMP and PKA activity were measured with targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes in adult rat ventricular myocytes. β-AR stimulation with isoprenaline (Iso) led to fast cAMP elevation in both compartments, whereas PKA activity was fast in the cytoplasm but markedly slower in the nucleus. Iso was also more potent and efficient in activating cytoplasmic than nuclear PKA. Similar slow kinetics of nuclear PKA activation was observed upon adenylyl cyclase activation with L-858051 or phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxantine. Consistently, pulse stimulation with Iso (15 s) maximally induced PKA and myosin-binding protein C phosphorylation in the cytoplasm, but marginally activated PKA and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation in the nucleus. Inhibition of PDE4 or ablation of the Pde4d gene in mice prolonged cytoplasmic PKA activation and enhanced nuclear PKA responses. In the cytoplasm, phosphatase 1 (PP1) and 2A (PP2A) contributed to the termination of PKA responses, whereas only PP1 played a role in the nucleus. Conclusion Our study reveals a differential integration of cytoplasmic and nuclear PKA responses to β-AR stimulation in cardiac myocytes. This may have important implications in the physiological and pathological hypertrophic response to β-AR stimulation. PMID:24550350

  13. A novel splice variant of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRJ that encodes for a soluble protein involved in angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bilotta, Anna; Dattilo, Vincenzo; D'Agostino, Sabrina; Belviso, Stefania; Scalise, Stefania; Bilotta, Mariaconcetta; Gaudio, Eugenio; Paduano, Francesco; Perrotti, Nicola; Florio, Tullio; Fusco, Alfredo; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Trapasso, Francesco

    2017-02-07

    PTPRJ is a receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase with tumor suppressor activity. Very little is known about the role of PTPRJ ectodomain, although recently both physiological and synthetic PTPRJ ligands have been identified. A putative shorter spliced variant, coding for a 539 aa protein corresponding to the extracellular N-terminus of PTPRJ, is reported in several databases but, currently, no further information is available.Here, we confirmed that the PTPRJ short isoform (named sPTPRJ) is a soluble protein secreted into the supernatant of both endothelial and tumor cells. Like PTPRJ, also sPTPRJ undergoes post-translational modifications such as glycosylation, as assessed by sPTPRJ immunoprecipitation. To characterize its functional activity, we performed an endothelial cell tube formation assay and a wound healing assay on HUVEC cells overexpressing sPTPRJ and we found that sPTPRJ has a proangiogenic activity. We also showed that sPTPRJ expression down-regulates endothelial adhesion molecules, that is a hallmark of proangiogenic activity. Moreover, sPTPRJ mRNA levels in human high-grade glioma, one of the most angiogenic tumors, are higher in tumor samples compared to controls. Further studies will be helpful not only to clarify the way sPTPRJ works but also to supply clues to circumvent its activity in cancer therapy.

  14. A novel splice variant of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRJ that encodes for a soluble protein involved in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bilotta, Anna; Dattilo, Vincenzo; D'Agostino, Sabrina; Belviso, Stefania; Scalise, Stefania; Bilotta, Mariaconcetta; Gaudio, Eugenio; Paduano, Francesco; Perrotti, Nicola; Florio, Tullio; Fusco, Alfredo; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Trapasso, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    PTPRJ is a receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase with tumor suppressor activity. Very little is known about the role of PTPRJ ectodomain, although recently both physiological and synthetic PTPRJ ligands have been identified. A putative shorter spliced variant, coding for a 539 aa protein corresponding to the extracellular N-terminus of PTPRJ, is reported in several databases but, currently, no further information is available. Here, we confirmed that the PTPRJ short isoform (named sPTPRJ) is a soluble protein secreted into the supernatant of both endothelial and tumor cells. Like PTPRJ, also sPTPRJ undergoes post-translational modifications such as glycosylation, as assessed by sPTPRJ immunoprecipitation. To characterize its functional activity, we performed an endothelial cell tube formation assay and a wound healing assay on HUVEC cells overexpressing sPTPRJ and we found that sPTPRJ has a proangiogenic activity. We also showed that sPTPRJ expression down-regulates endothelial adhesion molecules, that is a hallmark of proangiogenic activity. Moreover, sPTPRJ mRNA levels in human high-grade glioma, one of the most angiogenic tumors, are higher in tumor samples compared to controls. Further studies will be helpful not only to clarify the way sPTPRJ works but also to supply clues to circumvent its activity in cancer therapy. PMID:28052032

  15. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase (Mkp)-1 Protects Mice against Acetaminophen-induced Hepatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wancket, Lyn M.; Meng, Xiaomei; Rogers, Lynette K.; Liu, Yusen

    2012-01-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation promotes hepatocyte death during acetaminophen overdose, a common cause of drug-induced liver failure. While mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase (Mkp)-1 is a critical negative regulator of JNK MAPK, little is known about the role of Mkp-1 during hepatotoxicity. In this study, we evaluated the role of Mkp-1 during acute acetaminophen toxicity. Mkp-1+/+ and Mkp-1−/− mice were dosed ip with vehicle or acetaminophen at 300 mg/kg (for mechanistic studies) or 400 mg/kg (for survival studies). Tissues were collected 1–6 hr post 300 mg/kg dosing to assess glutathione levels, organ damage, and MAPK activation. Mkp-1−/− mice exhibited more rapid plasma clearance of acetaminophen than did Mkp-1+/+ mice, indicated by a quicker decline of plasma acetaminophen level. Moreover, Mkp-1−/− mice suffered more severe liver injury, indicated by higher plasma alanine transaminase activity and more extensive centrilobular apoptosis and necrosis. Hepatic JNK activity in Mkp-1−/− mice was higher than in Mkp-1+/+ mice. Finally, Mkp-1−/− mice displayed a lower overall survival rate and shorter median survival time after dosing with 400 mg/kg acetaminophen. The more severe phenotype exhibited by Mkp-1−/− mice indicates that Mkp-1 plays a protective role during acute acetaminophen overdose, potentially through regulation of JNK. PMID:22623522

  16. Characterization of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibition by Chlorogenic Acid and Cichoric Acid.

    PubMed

    Lipchock, James M; Hendrickson, Heidi P; Douglas, Bonnie B; Bird, Kelly E; Ginther, Patrick S; Rivalta, Ivan; Ten, Nicholas S; Batista, Victor S; Loria, J Patrick

    2017-01-10

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a known regulator of the insulin and leptin signaling pathways and is an active target for the design of inhibitors for the treatment of type II diabetes and obesity. Recently, cichoric acid (CHA) and chlorogenic acid (CGA) were predicted by docking methods to be allosteric inhibitors that bind distal to the active site. However, using a combination of steady-state inhibition kinetics, solution nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that CHA is a competitive inhibitor that binds in the active site of PTP1B. CGA, while a noncompetitive inhibitor, binds in the second aryl phosphate binding site, rather than the predicted benzfuran binding pocket. The molecular dynamics simulations of the apo enzyme and cysteine-phosphoryl intermediate states with and without bound CGA suggest CGA binding inhibits PTP1B by altering hydrogen bonding patterns at the active site. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the allosteric inhibition of PTP1B.

  17. Acetylcholine content and viability of cholinergic neurons are influenced by the activity of protein histidine phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The first mammalian protein histidine phosphatase (PHP) was discovered in the late 90s of the last century. One of the known substrates of PHP is ATP-citrate lyase (ACL), which is responsible - amongst other functions - for providing acetyl-CoA for acetylcholine synthesis in neuronal tissues. It has been shown in previous studies that PHP downregulates the activity of ACL by dephosphorylation. According to this our present work focused on the influence of PHP activity on the acetylcholine level in cholinergic neurons. Results The amount of PHP in SN56 cholinergic neuroblastoma cells was increased after overexpression of PHP by using pIRES2-AcGFP1-PHP as a vector. We demonstrated that PHP overexpression reduced the acetylcholine level and induced cell death. The acetylcholine content of SN56 cells was measured by fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Overexpression of the inactive H53A-PHP mutant also induced cell damage, but in a significantly reduced manner. However, this overexpression of the inactive PHP mutant did not change the acetylcholine content of SN56 cells significantly. In contrast, PHP downregulation, performed by RNAi-technique, did not induce cell death, but significantly increased the acetylcholine content in SN56 cells. Conclusions We could show for the first time that PHP downregulation increased the acetylcholine level in SN56 cells. This might be a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases involving cholinergic deficits like Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22436051

  18. Transient expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases encoded in Cotesia plutellae bracovirus inhibits insect cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. A.; Kim, Yonggyun

    2008-01-01

    Several immunosuppressive factors are associated with parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, on the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) encodes a large number of putative protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which may play a role in inhibiting host cellular immunity. To address this inhibitory hypothesis of CpBV-PTPs, we performed transient expression of individual CpBV-PTPs in hemocytes of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and analyzed their cellular immune responses. Two different forms of CpBV-PTPs were chosen and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the p10 promoter of baculovirus: one with the normal cysteine active site (CpBV-PTP1) and the other with a mutated active site (CpBV-PTP5). The hemocytes transfected with CpBV-PTP1 significantly increased in PTP activity compared to control hemocytes, but those with CpBV-PTP5 exhibited a significant decrease in the PTP activity. All transfected hemocytes exhibited a significant reduction in both cell spreading and encapsulation activities compared to control hemocytes. Co-transfection of CpBV-PTP1 together with its double-stranded RNA reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of CpBV-PTP1 and resulted in recovery of both hemocyte behaviors. This is the first report demonstrating that the polydnaviral PTPs can manipulate PTP activity of the hemocytes to interrupt cellular immune responses.

  19. Inhibition of T Cell Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Enhances Interleukin-18-Dependent Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Bourdeau, Annie; Trop, Sébastien; Doody, Karen M; Dumont, Daniel J; Tremblayef, Michel L

    2013-01-01

    The clinical application of hematopoietic progenitor cell-based therapies for the treatment of hematological diseases is hindered by current protocols, which are cumbersome and have limited efficacy to augment the progenitor cell pool. We report that inhibition of T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP), an enzyme involved in the regulation of cytokine signaling, through gene knockout results in a ninefold increase in the number of hematopoietic progenitors in murine bone marrow (BM). This effect could be reproduced using a short (48 hours) treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of TC-PTP in murine BM, as well as in human BM, peripheral blood, and cord blood. We also demonstrate that the ex vivo use of TC-PTP inhibitor only provides a temporary effect on stem cells and did not alter their capacity to reconstitute all hematopoietic components in vivo. We establish that one of the mechanisms whereby inhibition of TC-PTP mediates its effects involves the interleukin-18 (IL-18) signaling pathway, leading to increased production of IL-12 and interferon-gamma by progenitor cells. Together, our results reveal a previously unrecognized role for IL-18 in contributing to the augmentation of the stem cell pool and provide a novel and simple method to rapidly expand progenitor cells from a variety of sources using a pharmacological compound. Stem Cells 2013;31:293–304 PMID:23135963

  20. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 2 and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Spalinger, Marianne R; McCole, Declan F; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2016-01-21

    Genome wide association studies have associated single nucleotide polymorphisms within the gene locus encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 2 (PTPN2) with the onset of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other inflammatory disorders. Expression of PTPN2 is enhanced in actively inflamed intestinal tissue featuring a marked up-regulation in intestinal epithelial cells. PTPN2 deficient mice suffer from severe intestinal and systemic inflammation and display aberrant innate and adaptive immune responses. In particular, PTPN2 is involved in the regulation of inflammatory signalling cascades, and critical for protecting intestinal epithelial barrier function, regulating innate and adaptive immune responses, and finally for maintaining intestinal homeostasis. On one hand, dysfunction of PTPN2 has drastic effects on innate host defence mechanisms, including increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, limited autophagosome formation in response to invading pathogens, and disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier. On the other hand, PTPN2 function is crucial for controlling adaptive immune functions, by regulating T cell proliferation and differentiation as well as maintaining T cell tolerance. In this way, dysfunction of PTPN2 contributes to the manifestation of IBD. The aim of this review is to present an overview of recent findings on the role of PTPN2 in intestinal homeostasis and the impact of dysfunctional PTPN2 on intestinal inflammation.

  1. Discovery and study of novel protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Chen, Xi; Feng, Changgen

    2017-10-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is considered to be a target for therapy of type II diabetes and obesity. So it is of great significance to take advantage of a computer aided drug design protocol involving the structured-based virtual screening with docking simulations for fast searching small molecule PTP1B inhibitors. Based on optimized complex structure of PTP1B bound with specific inhibitor of IX1, structured-based virtual screening against a library of natural products containing 35308 molecules, which was constructed based on Traditional Chinese Medicine database@ Taiwan (TCM database@ Taiwan), was conducted to determine the occurrence of PTP1B inhibitors using the Lubbock module and CDOCKER module from Discovery Studio 3.1 software package. The results were further filtered by predictive ADME simulation and predictive toxic simulation. As a result, 2 good drug-like molecules, namely para-benzoquinone compound 1 and Clavepictine analogue 2 were identified ultimately with the dock score of original inhibitor (IX1) and the receptor as a threshold. Binding model analyses revealed that these two candidate compounds have good interactions with PTP1B. The PTP1B inhibitory activity of compound 2 hasn't been reported before. The optimized compound 2 has higher scores and deserves further study.

  2. Neuroprotective Effects of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibition against ER Stress-Induced Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yu-Mi; Lee, Shinrye; Kim, Seyeon; Kwon, Younghwi; Kim, Kiyoung; Chung, Chang Geon; Lee, Seongsoo; Lee, Sung Bae; Kim, Hyung-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is known to regulate the ER stress signaling pathway, but its role in neuronal systems in terms of ER stress remains largely unknown. Here, we showed that rotenone-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma cell lines and mouse primary cortical neurons was ameliorated by PTP1B inhibition. Moreover, the increase in the level of ER stress markers (eIF2α phosphorylation and PERK phosphorylation) induced by rotenone treatment was obviously suppressed by concomitant PTP1B inhibition. However, the rotenone-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was not affected by PTP1B inhibition, suggesting that the neuroprotective effect of the PTP1B inhibitor is not associated with ROS production. Moreover, we found that MG132-induced toxicity involving proteasome inhibition was also ameliorated by PTP1B inhibition in a human neuroblastoma cell line and mouse primary cortical neurons. Consistently, downregulation of the PTP1B homologue gene in Drosophila mitigated rotenone- and MG132-induced toxicity. Taken together, these findings indicate that PTP1B inhibition may represent a novel therapeutic approach for ER stress-mediated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28359145

  3. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B as a potential treatment of diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhonghua; Liu, Gang; Lubben, Thomas H; Szczepankiewicz, Bruce G

    2004-01-01

    Diabetes is a prevalent disease which effects over 150 million people worldwide and there is a great medical need for new therapeutic agents to treat it. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has emerged as a highly validated, attractive target for treatment of not only diabetes but also obesity. Discovery of small-molecule inhibitors has been pursued extensively in both academia and industry and a number of very potent and selective inhibitors have been identified. With X-ray crystallography, the binding interactions of several classes of inhibitors have been elucidated. This has resulted in significant progress in understanding important interactions between inhibitors and specific residues of PTP1B, which could help the design of future inhibitors. However, since the active site of PTP1B that most of these inhibitors bind to is highly hydrophilic, it remains a challenge to identify inhibitors with both excellent in vitro potency and drug-like physiochemical properties which would lead to good in vivo activities.

  4. The Ablation of Mitochondrial Protein Phosphatase Pgam5 Confers Resistance Against Metabolic Stress.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shiori; Yao, Akari; Hattori, Kazuki; Sugawara, Sho; Naguro, Isao; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Takeda, Kohsuke; Ichijo, Hidenori

    2016-03-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5) is a mitochondrial protein phosphatase that has been reported to be involved in various stress responses from mitochondrial quality control to cell death. However, its roles in vivo are largely unknown. Here, we show that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to several metabolic insults. Under cold stress combined with fasting, Pgam5-deficient mice better maintained body temperature than wild-type mice and showed an extended survival rate. Serum triglycerides and lipid content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), a center of adaptive thermogenesis, were severely reduced in Pgam5-deficient mice. Moreover, although Pgam5 deficiency failed to maintain proper mitochondrial integrity in BAT, it reciprocally resulted in the dramatic induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) that activates various functions of BAT including thermogenesis. Thus, the enhancement of lipid metabolism and FGF21 may contribute to the cold resistance of Pgam5-deficient mice under fasting condition. Finally, we also found that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Our study uncovered that PGAM5 is involved in the whole-body metabolism in response to stresses that impose metabolic challenges on mitochondria.

  5. Molecular underpinnings of neurodegenerative disorders: striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase signaling and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lombroso, Paul J.; Ogren, Marilee; Kurup, Pradeep; Nairn, Angus C.

    2016-01-01

    This commentary focuses on potential molecular mechanisms related to the dysfunctional synaptic plasticity that is associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Specifically, we focus on the role of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in modulating synaptic function in these illnesses. STEP affects neuronal communication by opposing synaptic strengthening and does so by dephosphorylating several key substrates known to control synaptic signaling and plasticity. STEP levels are elevated in brains from patients with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Studies in model systems have found that high levels of STEP result in internalization of glutamate receptors as well as inactivation of ERK1/2, Fyn, Pyk2, and other STEP substrates necessary for the development of synaptic strengthening. We discuss the search for inhibitors of STEP activity that may offer potential treatments for neurocognitive disorders that are characterized by increased STEP activity. Future studies are needed to examine the mechanisms of differential and region-specific changes in STEP expression pattern, as such knowledge could lead to targeted therapies for disorders involving disrupted STEP activity. PMID:29098072

  6. Striatal-enriched Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) Regulates Pyk2 Kinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Bartos, Jason A.; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Hell, Johannes W.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) is a member of the focal adhesion kinase family and is highly expressed in brain and hematopoietic cells. Pyk2 plays diverse functions in cells, including the regulation of cell adhesion, migration, and cytoskeletal reorganization. In the brain, it is involved in the induction of long term potentiation through regulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor trafficking. This occurs through the phosphorylation and activation of Src family tyrosine kinase members, such as Fyn, that phosphorylate GluN2B at Tyr1472. Phosphorylation at this site leads to exocytosis of GluN1-GluN2B receptors to synaptic membranes. Pyk2 activity is modulated by phosphorylation at several critical tyrosine sites, including Tyr402. In this study, we report that Pyk2 is a substrate of striatal-enriched protein-tyrosine phosphatase (STEP). STEP binds to and dephosphorylates Pyk2 at Tyr402. STEP KO mice showed enhanced phosphorylation of Pyk2 at Tyr402 and of the Pyk2 substrates paxillin and ASAP1. Functional studies indicated that STEP opposes Pyk2 activation after KCl depolarization of cortical slices and blocks Pyk2 translocation to postsynaptic densities, a key step required for Pyk2 activation and function. This is the first study to identify Pyk2 as a substrate for STEP. PMID:22544749

  7. Protein Phosphatase 1 inactivates Mps1 to ensure efficient Spindle Assembly Checkpoint silencing

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Margarida; Osswald, Mariana; Leça, Nelson; Barbosa, João; Pereira, António J; Maiato, Helder; Sunkel, Claudio E; Conde, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Faithfull genome partitioning during cell division relies on the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC), a conserved signaling pathway that delays anaphase onset until all chromosomes are attached to spindle microtubules. Mps1 kinase is an upstream SAC regulator that promotes the assembly of an anaphase inhibitor through a sequential multi-target phosphorylation cascade. Thus, the SAC is highly responsive to Mps1, whose activity peaks in early mitosis as a result of its T-loop autophosphorylation. However, the mechanism controlling Mps1 inactivation once kinetochores attach to microtubules and the SAC is satisfied remains unknown. Here we show in vitro and in Drosophila that Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) inactivates Mps1 by dephosphorylating its T-loop. PP1-mediated dephosphorylation of Mps1 occurs at kinetochores and in the cytosol, and inactivation of both pools of Mps1 during metaphase is essential to ensure prompt and efficient SAC silencing. Overall, our findings uncover a mechanism of SAC inactivation required for timely mitotic exit. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25366.001 PMID:28463114

  8. Protein Phosphatase 1 inactivates Mps1 to ensure efficient Spindle Assembly Checkpoint silencing.

    PubMed

    Moura, Margarida; Osswald, Mariana; Leça, Nelson; Barbosa, João; Pereira, António J; Maiato, Helder; Sunkel, Claudio E; Conde, Carlos

    2017-05-02

    Faithfull genome partitioning during cell division relies on the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC), a conserved signaling pathway that delays anaphase onset until all chromosomes are attached to spindle microtubules. Mps1 kinase is an upstream SAC regulator that promotes the assembly of an anaphase inhibitor through a sequential multi-target phosphorylation cascade. Thus, the SAC is highly responsive to Mps1, whose activity peaks in early mitosis as a result of its T-loop autophosphorylation. However, the mechanism controlling Mps1 inactivation once kinetochores attach to microtubules and the SAC is satisfied remains unknown. Here we show in vitro and in Drosophila that Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) inactivates Mps1 by dephosphorylating its T-loop. PP1-mediated dephosphorylation of Mps1 occurs at kinetochores and in the cytosol, and inactivation of both pools of Mps1 during metaphase is essential to ensure prompt and efficient SAC silencing. Overall, our findings uncover a mechanism of SAC inactivation required for timely mitotic exit.

  9. Aurora kinases and protein phosphatase 1 mediate chromosome congression through regulation of CENP-E

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yumi; Holland, Andrew J.; Lan, Weijie; Cleveland, Don W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Opposing roles of Aurora kinases and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) during mitosis have long been suggested. Here we demonstrate that Aurora kinases A and B phosphorylate a single residue on the kinetochore motor CENP-E. PP1 binds CENP-E via a motif overlapping this phosphorylation site and binding is disrupted by Aurora phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of CENP-E by the Auroras is enriched at spindle poles, disrupting binding of PP1 and reducing CENP-E’s affinity for individual microtubules. This phosphorylation is required for CENP-E-mediated towing of initially polar chromosomes toward the cell center. Kinetochores on such chromosomes cannot make subsequent stable attachment to spindle microtubules when dephosphorylation of CENP-E or rebinding of PP1 to CENP-E is blocked. Thus, an Aurora/PP1 phosphorylation switch modulates CENP-E motor activity as an essential feature of chromosome congression from poles and localized PP1 delivery by CENP-E to the outer kinetochore is necessary for stable microtubule capture by those chromosomes. PMID:20691903

  10. Structure of a Protein Phosphatase 2A Holoenzyme: Insights into B55-Mediated Tau Dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanhui; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Ping; Jeffrey, Philip D.; Shi, Yigong

    2009-01-01

    Summary Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulates many essential aspects of cellular physiology. Members of the regulatory B/B55/PR55 family are thought to play a key role in the dephosphorylation of Tau, whose hyperphosphorylation contributes to Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms of the PP2A-Tau connection remain largely enigmatic. Here, we report the complete reconstitution of a Tau dephosphorylation assay and the crystal structure of a heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme involving the regulatory subunit Bα. We show that Bα specifically and markedly facilitates dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated Tau in our reconstituted assay. The Bα subunit comprises a seven-bladed β propeller, with an acidic, substrate-binding groove located in the center of the propeller. The β propeller latches onto the ridge of the PP2A scaffold subunit with the help of a protruding β hairpin arm. Structure-guided mutagenesis studies revealed the underpinnings of PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of Tau. PMID:18922469

  11. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B by flavonoids: A structure - activity relationship study.

    PubMed

    Proença, Carina; Freitas, Marisa; Ribeiro, Daniela; Sousa, Joana L C; Carvalho, Félix; Silva, Artur M S; Fernandes, Pedro A; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2018-01-01

    The classical non-transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has emerged as a key negative regulator of insulin signaling pathways that leads to insulin resistance, turning this enzyme a promising therapeutic target in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In the present work, the in vitro inhibitory activity of a panel of structurally related flavonoids, for recombinant human PTP1B was studied and the type of inhibition of the most active compounds further evaluated. The majority of the studied flavonoids was tested in this work for the first time, including flavonoid C13, which was the most potent inhibitor. It was observed that the ability to inhibit PTP1B depends on the nature, position and number of substituents in the flavonoid structure, as the presence of both 7- and 8-OBn groups in the A ring, together with the presence of both 3' and 4'-OMe groups in the B ring and the 3-OH group in the C ring; these substituents increase the flavonoids' ability to inhibit PTP1B. In conclusion, some of the tested flavonoids seem to be promising PTP1B inhibitors and potential effective agents in the management of T2DM, by increasing insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B): A Potential Target for Alzheimer's Therapy?

    PubMed

    Vieira, Marcelo N N; Lyra E Silva, Natalia M; Ferreira, Sergio T; De Felice, Fernanda G

    2017-01-01

    Despite significant advances in current understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease (AD), attempts at drug development based on those discoveries have failed to translate into effective, disease-modifying therapies. AD is a complex and multifactorial disease comprising a range of aberrant cellular/molecular processes taking part in different cell types and brain regions. As a consequence, therapeutics for AD should be able to block or compensate multiple abnormal pathological events. Here, we examine recent evidence that inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) may represent a promising strategy to combat a variety of AD-related detrimental processes. Besides its well described role as a negative regulator of insulin and leptin signaling, PTB1B recently emerged as a modulator of various other processes in the central nervous system (CNS) that are also implicated in AD. These include signaling pathways germane to learning and memory, regulation of synapse dynamics, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and microglia-mediated neuroinflammation. We propose that PTP1B inhibition may represent an attractive and yet unexplored therapeutic approach to correct aberrant signaling pathways linked to AD.

  13. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Regulates Pyruvate Kinase M2 Tyrosine Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Bettaieb, Ahmed; Bakke, Jesse; Nagata, Naoto; Matsuo, Kosuke; Xi, Yannan; Liu, Siming; AbouBechara, Daniel; Melhem, Ramzi; Stanhope, Kimber; Cummings, Bethany; Graham, James; Bremer, Andrew; Zhang, Sheng; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Cantley, Lewis C.; Havel, Peter J.; Haj, Fawaz G.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a physiological regulator of glucose homeostasis and adiposity and is a drug target for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. Here we identify pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) as a novel PTP1B substrate in adipocytes. PTP1B deficiency leads to increased PKM2 total tyrosine and Tyr105 phosphorylation in cultured adipocytes and in vivo. Substrate trapping and mutagenesis studies identify PKM2 Tyr-105 and Tyr-148 as key sites that mediate PTP1B-PKM2 interaction. In addition, in vitro analyses illustrate a direct effect of Tyr-105 phosphorylation on PKM2 activity in adipocytes. Importantly, PTP1B pharmacological inhibition increased PKM2 Tyr-105 phosphorylation and decreased PKM2 activity. Moreover, PKM2 Tyr-105 phosphorylation is regulated nutritionally, decreasing in adipose tissue depots after high-fat feeding. Further, decreased PKM2 Tyr-105 phosphorylation correlates with the development of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in rodents, non-human primates, and humans. Together, these findings identify PKM2 as a novel substrate of PTP1B and provide new insights into the regulation of adipose PKM2 activity. PMID:23640882

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1 in immunology, physiology, and disease.

    PubMed

    Wancket, Lyn M; Frazier, W Joshua; Liu, Yusen

    2012-02-13

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key regulators of cellular physiology and immune responses, and abnormalities in MAPKs are implicated in many diseases. MAPKs are activated by MAPK kinases through phosphorylation of the threonine and tyrosine residues in the conserved Thr-Xaa-Tyr domain, where Xaa represents amino acid residues characteristic of distinct MAPK subfamilies. Since MAPKs play a crucial role in a variety of cellular processes, a delicate regulatory network has evolved to control their activities. Over the past two decades, a group of dual specificity MAPK phosphatases (MKPs) has been identified that deactivates MAPKs. Since MAPKs can enhance MKP activities, MKPs are considered as an important feedback control mechanism that limits the MAPK cascades. This review outlines the role of MKP-1, a prototypical MKP family member, in physiology and disease. We will first discuss the basic biochemistry and regulation of MKP-1. Next, we will present the current consensus on the immunological and physiological functions of MKP-1 in infectious, inflammatory, metabolic, and nervous system diseases as revealed by studies using animal models. We will also discuss the emerging evidence implicating MKP-1 in human disorders. Finally, we will conclude with a discussion of the potential for pharmacomodulation of MKP-1 expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pleiotrophin and its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta as regulators of angiogenesis and cancer.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Evangelia; Pantazaka, Evangelia; Castana, Penelope; Tsalios, Thomas; Polyzos, Alexandros; Beis, Dimitris

    2016-12-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a secreted heparin-binding growth factor that through its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta (RPTPβ/ζ) has a significant regulatory effect on angiogenesis and cancer. PTN and RPTPβ/ζ are over-expressed in several types of human cancers and regulate important cancer cell functions in vitro and cancer growth in vivo. This review begins with a brief introduction of PTN and the regulation of its expression. PTN receptors are described with special emphasis on RPTPβ/ζ, which also interacts with and/or affects the function of other important targets for cancer therapy, such as vascular endothelial growth factor A, α ν β 3 and cell surface nucleolin. PTN biological activities related to angiogenesis and cancer are extensively discussed. Finally, up to date approaches of targeting PTN or RPTPβ/ζ for cancer treatment are presented. Insights into the regulatory role of PTN/RPTPβ/ζ on angiogenesis will be extremely beneficial for future development of alternative anti-angiogenic approaches in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Curcumin and derivatives function through protein phosphatase 2A and presenilin orthologues in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Cocorocchio, Marco; Baldwin, Amy J.; Stewart, Balint; Kim, Lou; Harwood, Adrian J.; Thompson, Christopher R. L.; Andrews, Paul L. R.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural compounds often have complex molecular structures and unknown molecular targets. These characteristics make them difficult to analyse using a classical pharmacological approach. Curcumin, the main curcuminoid of turmeric, is a complex molecule possessing wide-ranging biological activities, cellular mechanisms and roles in potential therapeutic treatment, including Alzheimer's disease and cancer. Here, we investigate the physiological effects and molecular targets of curcumin in Dictyostelium discoideum. We show that curcumin exerts acute effects on cell behaviour, reduces cell growth and slows multicellular development. We employed a range of structurally related compounds to show the distinct role of different structural groups in curcumin's effects on cell behaviour, growth and development, highlighting active moieties in cell function, and showing that these cellular effects are unrelated to the well-known antioxidant activity of curcumin. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of curcumin and one synthetic analogue (EF24) were then investigated to identify a curcumin-resistant mutant lacking the protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit (PsrA) and an EF24-resistant mutant lacking the presenilin 1 orthologue (PsenB). Using in silico docking analysis, we then showed that curcumin might function through direct binding to a key regulatory region of PsrA. These findings reveal novel cellular and molecular mechanisms for the function of curcumin and related compounds. PMID:29361519

  17. Curcumin and derivatives function through protein phosphatase 2A and presenilin orthologues in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Cocorocchio, Marco; Baldwin, Amy J; Stewart, Balint; Kim, Lou; Harwood, Adrian J; Thompson, Christopher R L; Andrews, Paul L R; Williams, Robin S B

    2018-01-29

    Natural compounds often have complex molecular structures and unknown molecular targets. These characteristics make them difficult to analyse using a classical pharmacological approach. Curcumin, the main curcuminoid of turmeric, is a complex molecule possessing wide-ranging biological activities, cellular mechanisms and roles in potential therapeutic treatment, including Alzheimer's disease and cancer. Here, we investigate the physiological effects and molecular targets of curcumin in Dictyostelium discoideum We show that curcumin exerts acute effects on cell behaviour, reduces cell growth and slows multicellular development. We employed a range of structurally related compounds to show the distinct role of different structural groups in curcumin's effects on cell behaviour, growth and development, highlighting active moieties in cell function, and showing that these cellular effects are unrelated to the well-known antioxidant activity of curcumin. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of curcumin and one synthetic analogue (EF24) were then investigated to identify a curcumin-resistant mutant lacking the protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit (PsrA) and an EF24-resistant mutant lacking the presenilin 1 orthologue (PsenB). Using in silico docking analysis, we then showed that curcumin might function through direct binding to a key regulatory region of PsrA. These findings reveal novel cellular and molecular mechanisms for the function of curcumin and related compounds. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Probing the origins of catalytic discrimination between phosphate and sulfate monoester hydrolysis: comparative analysis of alkaline phosphatase and protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Logan D; Zalatan, Jesse G; Herschlag, Daniel

    2014-11-04

    Catalytic promiscuity, the ability of enzymes to catalyze multiple reactions, provides an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the origins of catalysis and substrate specificity. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) catalyzes both phosphate and sulfate monoester hydrolysis reactions with a ∼10(10)-fold preference for phosphate monoester hydrolysis, despite the similarity between these reactions. The preponderance of formal positive charge in the AP active site, particularly from three divalent metal ions, was proposed to be responsible for this preference by providing stronger electrostatic interactions with the more negatively charged phosphoryl group versus the sulfuryl group. To test whether positively charged metal ions are required to achieve a high preference for the phosphate monoester hydrolysis reaction, the catalytic preference of three protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which do not contain metal ions, were measured. Their preferences ranged from 5 × 10(6) to 7 × 10(7), lower than that for AP but still substantial, indicating that metal ions and a high preponderance of formal positive charge within the active site are not required to achieve a strong catalytic preference for phosphate monoester over sulfate monoester hydrolysis. The observed ionic strength dependences of kcat/KM values for phosphate and sulfate monoester hydrolysis are steeper for the more highly charged phosphate ester with both AP and the PTP Stp1, following the dependence expected based on the charge difference of these two substrates. However, the dependences for AP were not greater than those of Stp1 and were rather shallow for both enzymes. These results suggest that overall electrostatics from formal positive charge within the active site is not the major driving force in distinguishing between these reactions and that substantial discrimination can be attained without metal ions. Thus, local properties of the active site, presumably including multiple positioned dipolar

  19. Analysis of in vitro interactions of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B with insulin receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Bergdahl, K; Heijbel, A; Liljebris, C; Bleasdale, J E

    2001-02-28

    One strategy to treat the insulin resistance that is central to type II diabetes mellitus may be to maintain insulin receptors (IR) in the active (tyrosine phosphorylated) form. Because protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) binds and subsequently dephosphorylates IR, inhibitors of PTP1B-IR binding are potential insulin 'sensitizers.' A Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) was developed to characterize and quantitate PTP1B-IR binding. Human IR were solubilized and captured on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-coated SPA beads. Subsequent binding of human, catalytically inactive [35S] PTP1B Cys(215)/Ser (PTP1B(C215S)) to the lectin-anchored IR results in scintillation from the SPA beads that can be quantitated. Binding of PTP1B to IR was pH- and divalent cation-sensitive. Ca(2+) and Mn(2+), but not Mg(2+), dramatically attenuated the loss of PTP1B-IR binding observed when pH was raised from 6.2 to 7.8. PTP1B binding to IR from insulin-stimulated cells was much greater than to IR from unstimulated cells and was inhibited by either an antiphosphotyrosine antibody or treatment of IR with alkaline phosphatase, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation of IR is required for PTP1B binding. Phosphopeptides modeled after various IR phosphotyrosine domains each only partially inhibited PTP1B-IR binding, indicating that multiple domains of IR are likely involved in binding PTP1B. However, competitive displacement of [35S]PTP1B(C215S) by PTP1B(C215S) fitted best to a single binding site with a K(d) in the range 100-1000 nM, depending upon pH and divalent cations. PNU-200898, a potent and selective inhibitor of PTP1B whose orientation in the active site of PTP1B has been solved, competitively inhibited catalysis and PTP1B-IR binding with equal potency. The results of this novel assay for PTP1B-IR binding suggest that PTP1B binds preferentially to tyrosine phosphorylated IR through its active site and that binding may be susceptible to therapeutic disruption by small molecules.

  20. The KIM-family protein-tyrosine phosphatases use distinct reversible oxidation intermediates: Intramolecular or intermolecular disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Machado, Luciana E S F; Shen, Tun-Li; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang

    2017-05-26

    The kinase interaction motif (KIM) family of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) includes hematopoietic protein-tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP), striatal-enriched protein-tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), and protein-tyrosine phosphatase receptor type R (PTPRR). KIM-PTPs bind and dephosphorylate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and thereby critically modulate cell proliferation and differentiation. PTP activity can readily be diminished by reactive oxygen species (ROS), e.g. H 2 O 2 , which oxidize the catalytically indispensable active-site cysteine. This initial oxidation generates an unstable sulfenic acid intermediate that is quickly converted into either a sulfinic/sulfonic acid (catalytically dead and irreversible inactivation) or a stable sulfenamide or disulfide bond intermediate (reversible inactivation). Critically, our understanding of ROS-mediated PTP oxidation is not yet sufficient to predict the molecular responses of PTPs to oxidative stress. However, identifying distinct responses will enable novel routes for PTP-selective drug design, important for managing diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we performed a detailed biochemical and molecular study of all KIM-PTP family members to determine their H 2 O 2 oxidation profiles and identify their reversible inactivation mechanism(s). We show that despite having nearly identical 3D structures and sequences, each KIM-PTP family member has a unique oxidation profile. Furthermore, we also show that whereas STEP and PTPRR stabilize their reversibly oxidized state by forming an intramolecular disulfide bond, HePTP uses an unexpected mechanism, namely, formation of a reversible intermolecular disulfide bond. In summary, despite being closely related, KIM-PTPs significantly differ in oxidation profiles. These findings highlight that oxidation protection is critical when analyzing PTPs, for example, in drug screening. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  1. Adaptor protein GRB2 promotes Src tyrosine kinase activation and podosomal organization by protein-tyrosine phosphatase ϵ in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Levy-Apter, Einat; Finkelshtein, Eynat; Vemulapalli, Vidyasiri; Li, Shawn S-C; Bedford, Mark T; Elson, Ari

    2014-12-26

    The non-receptor isoform of protein-tyrosine phosphatase ϵ (cyt-PTPe) supports adhesion of bone-resorbing osteoclasts by activating Src downstream of integrins. Loss of cyt-PTPe reduces Src activity in osteoclasts, reduces resorption of mineralized matrix both in vivo and in cell culture, and induces mild osteopetrosis in young female PTPe KO mice. Activation of Src by cyt-PTPe is dependent upon this phosphatase undergoing phosphorylation at its C-terminal Tyr-638 by partially active Src. To understand how cyt-PTPe activates Src, we screened 73 Src homology 2 (SH2) domains for binding to Tyr(P)-638 of cyt-PTPe. The SH2 domain of GRB2 bound Tyr(P)-638 of cyt-PTPe most prominently, whereas the Src SH2 domain did not bind at all, suggesting that GRB2 may link PTPe with downstream molecules. Further studies indicated that GRB2 is required for activation of Src by cyt-PTPe in osteoclast-like cells (OCLs) in culture. Overexpression of GRB2 in OCLs increased activating phosphorylation of Src at Tyr-416 and of cyt-PTPe at Tyr-638; opposite results were obtained when GRB2 expression was reduced by shRNA or by gene inactivation. Phosphorylation of cyt-PTPe at Tyr-683 and its association with GRB2 are integrin-driven processes in OCLs, and cyt-PTPe undergoes autodephosphorylation at Tyr-683, thus limiting Src activation by integrins. Reduced GRB2 expression also reduced the ability of bone marrow precursors to differentiate into OCLs and reduced the fraction of OCLs in which podosomal adhesion structures assume organization typical of active, resorbing cells. We conclude that GRB2 physically links cyt-PTPe with Src and enables cyt-PTPe to activate Src downstream of activated integrins in OCLs. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Rapid detection of protein phosphatase activity using Zn(II)-coordinated gold nanosensors based on His-tagged phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Oh; Kim, Eun-Ji; Lim, Butaek; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-01-20

    We report a rapid colorimetric assay to detect protein phosphatase (PP) activity based on the controlled assembly and disassembly of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) via Zn(II)-specific coordination in the presence of His6-tagged phosphopeptides. Among divalent metal ions including Ni(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Mg(II), Mn(II), and Zn(II), only Zn(II) triggered a strong association between phosphopeptides with hexahistidine at a single end and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-modified AuNPs (21.3 nm in core diameter), leading to the self-assembly of AuNPs and consequently changes in color of the AuNP solution. In contrast, unphosphorylated peptides and His6-deficient phosphopeptides did not change the color of the AuNP solution. As a result, protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) activity and its inhibition were easily quantified with high sensitivity by determining the extinction ratio (E520/E700) of colloidal AuNPs. Most importantly, this method was capable of detecting protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity in immunoprecipitated plant extracts. Because PPs play pivotal roles in mediating diverse signal transduction pathways as primary effectors of protein dephosphorylation, we anticipate that our method will be applied as a rapid format method to analyze the activities of various PPs and their inhibition.

  3. Cross-talk between oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines in acute pancreatitis: a key role for protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Javier; Pereda, Javier; Arduini, Alessandro; Sandoval, Juan; Sabater, Luis; Aparisi, Luis; López-Rodas, Gerardo; Sastre, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process localized in the pancreatic gland that frequently involves peripancreatic tissues. It is still under investigation why an episode of acute pancreatitis remains mild affecting only the pancreas or progresses to a severe form leading to multiple organ failure and death. Proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress play a pivotal role in the early pathophysiological events of the disease. Cytokines such as interleukin 1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha initiate and propagate almost all consequences of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. On the other hand, depletion of pancreatic glutathione is an early hallmark of acute pancreatitis and reactive oxygen species are also associated with the inflammatory process. Changes in thiol homestasis and redox signaling decisively contribute to amplification of the inflammatory cascade through mitogen activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) pathways. This review focuses on the relationship between oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokines and MAP kinase/protein phosphatase pathways as major modulators of the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis. Redox sensitive signal transduction mediated by inactivation of protein phosphatases, particularly protein tyrosin phosphatases, is highlighted.

  4. Protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP1B, expression and activity in rat corneal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Deshea L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The current studies were conducted to determine whether the protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP1B, plays a role in regulating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Tyr992 phosphorylation and cell cycle entry in rat corneal endothelial cells. Methods Corneas were obtained from male Sprague-Dawley rats. PTP1B mRNA and protein expression were compared in confluent and subconfluent cells by RT-PCR and western blots. Immunocytochemistry was used to determine the subcellular localization of both PTP1B and EGFR following epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. Western blots were used to analyze the time-dependent effect of EGF on phosphorylation of EGFR Tyr992 plus or minus CinnGEL 2Me, an inhibitor of PTP1B activity. The effect of PTP1B inhibition on cell cycle entry was determined by calculating the percent of Ki67-positive cells following EGF treatment. Results PTP1B mRNA expression was similar in confluent and subconfluent cells, but PTP1B protein was expressed at 3 fold higher levels in subconfluent cells. Positive staining for PTP1B was localized in vesicular structures below the plasma membrane. EGFR staining was located at cell-cell borders in untreated endothelium, but was mainly cytoplasmic by 15 min after EGF treatment. In control cultures, phosphorylation of EGFR Tyr992 peaked by 5 min following EGF stimulation and rapidly decreased to basal levels by 30 min. In cultures pretreated with CinnGEL 2Me, Tyr992 phosphorylation peaked 2 min following EGF addition and was consistently sustained at a higher level than controls until 60 min after treatment. By 18 h following EGF treatment, cultures pretreated with CinnGEL 2Me exhibited a 1.7 fold increase in the number of Ki67-positive cells compared with control cultures. Conclusions Comparison of PTP1B mRNA and protein levels indicates that PTP1B expression is regulated mainly at the protein level and is higher in subconfluent cells. PTP1B was located in vesicles below the plasma membrane. The fact that

  5. Macrophage Fusion Is Controlled by the Cytoplasmic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP-PEST/PTPN12

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Inmoo; Davidson, Dominique; Souza, Cleiton Martins; Vacher, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages can undergo cell-cell fusion, leading to the formation of multinucleated giant cells and osteoclasts. This process is believed to promote the proteolytic activity of macrophages toward pathogens, foreign bodies, and extracellular matrices. Here, we examined the role of PTP-PEST (PTPN12), a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase, in macrophage fusion. Using a macrophage-targeted PTP-PEST-deficient mouse, we determined that PTP-PEST was not needed for macrophage differentiation or cytokine production. However, it was necessary for interleukin-4-induced macrophage fusion into multinucleated giant cells in vitro. It was also needed for macrophage fusion following implantation of a foreign body in vivo. Moreover, in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line, PTP-PEST was required for receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-triggered macrophage fusion into osteoclasts. PTP-PEST had no impact on expression of fusion mediators such as β-integrins, E-cadherin, and CD47, which enable macrophages to become fusion competent. However, it was needed for polarization of macrophages, migration induced by the chemokine CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), and integrin-induced spreading, three key events in the fusion process. PTP-PEST deficiency resulted in specific hyperphosphorylation of the protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2 and the adaptor paxillin. Moreover, a fusion defect was induced upon treatment of normal macrophages with a Pyk2 inhibitor. Together, these data argue that macrophage fusion is critically dependent on PTP-PEST. This function is seemingly due to the ability of PTP-PEST to control phosphorylation of Pyk2 and paxillin, thereby regulating cell polarization, migration, and spreading. PMID:23589331

  6. Protection against gamma-radiation injury by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Mojena, Marina; Pimentel-Santillana, María; Povo-Retana, Adrián; Fernández-García, Victoria; González-Ramos, Silvia; Rada, Patricia; Tejedor, Alberto; Rico, Daniel; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Valverde, Angela M; Boscá, Lisardo

    2018-07-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is widely expressed in mammalian tissues, in particular in immune cells, and plays a pleiotropic role in dephosphorylating many substrates. Moreover, PTP1B expression is enhanced in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli and to different cell stressors. Taking advantage of the use of mice deficient in PTP1B we have investigated the effect of γ-radiation in these animals and found enhanced lethality and decreased respiratory exchange ratio vs. the corresponding wild type animals. Using bone-marrow derived macrophages and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from wild-type and PTP1B-deficient mice, we observed a differential response to various cell stressors. PTP1B-deficient macrophages exhibited an enhanced response to γ-radiation, UV-light, LPS and S-nitroso-glutathione. Macrophages exposed to γ-radiation show DNA damage and fragmentation, increased ROS production, a lack in GSH elevation and enhanced acidic β-galactosidase activity. Interestingly, these differences were not observed in MEFs. Differential gene expression analysis of WT and KO macrophages revealed that the main pathways affected after irradiation were an up-regulation of protein secretion, TGF-β signaling and angiogenesis among other, and downregulation of Myc targets and Hedgehog signaling. These results demonstrate a key role for PTP1B in the protection against the cytotoxicity of irradiation in intact animal and in macrophages, which might be therapeutically relevant. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Role for DUSP1 (dual-specificity protein phosphatase 1) in the regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Zhou, Jun-Ying; Kho, Dhonghyo; Reiners, John J; Wu, Gen Sheng

    2016-10-02

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) regulate macroautophagy/autophagy. However, the involvement of dual-specificity protein phosphatases (DUSPs), endogenous inhibitors for MAPKs, in autophagy remains to be determined. Here we report that DUSP1/MKP-1, the founding member of the DUSP family, plays a critical role in regulating autophagy. Specifically, we demonstrate that DUSP1 knockdown by shRNA in human ovarian cancer CAOV3 cells and knockout in murine embryonic fibroblasts, increases both basal and rapamycin-increased autophagic flux. Overexpression of DUSP1 had the opposite effect. Importantly, knockout of Dusp1 promoted phosphorylation of ULK1 at Ser555, and BECN1/Beclin 1 at Ser15, and the association of PIK3C3/VPS34, ATG14, BECN1 and MAPK, leading to the activation of the autophagosome-initiating class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) complex. Furthermore, knockdown and pharmacological inhibitor studies indicated that DUSP1-mediated suppression of autophagy reflected inactivation of the MAPK1-MAPK3 members of the MAPK family. Knockdown of DUSP1 sensitized CAOV3 cells to rapamycin-induced antigrowth activity. Moreover, CAOV3-CR cells, a line that had acquired cisplatin resistance, exhibited an elevated DUSP1 level and were refractory to rapamycin-induced autophagy and cytostatic effects. Knockdown of DUSP1 in CAOV3-CR cells restored sensitivity to rapamycin. Collectively, this work identifies a previously unrecognized role for DUSP1 in regulating autophagy and suggests that suppression of DUSP1 may enhance the therapeutic activity of rapamycin.

  8. Increased hypothalamic protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B contributes to leptin resistance with age.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Christopher D; White, Christy L; Wang, Zhong; Lee, Seung-Yub; Lawrence, David S; Cefalu, William T; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Gettys, Thomas W

    2007-01-01

    Animals at advanced ages exhibit a reduction in central leptin sensitivity. However, changes in growth, metabolism, and obesity risk occur much earlier in life, particularly during the transition from youth to middle age. To determine when initial decreases in central leptin sensitivity occur, leptin-dependent suppression of food intake was tested in 8-, 12-, and 20-wk-old male, chow-fed Sprague Dawley rats. Intracerebroventricular leptin injection (3 microg) suppressed 24-h food intake in 8- and 12-wk-old rats (P < 0.05) but not 20-wk-old rats. To identify potential cellular mediators of this resistance, we focused on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a recently described inhibitor of leptin signaling. PTP1B protein levels, as determined by Western blot, were significantly higher in mediobasal hypothalamic punches collected from 20-wk-old rats, compared with 8-wk-old rats (P < 0.05). When 20-wk-old rats were fasted for 24 h, levels of hypothalamic PTP1B decreased (P < 0.05), coincident with a restoration of leptin sensitivity. To directly test whether inhibition of PTP1B restores leptin sensitivity, 20-wk-old chow-fed rats were pretreated with a pharmacological PTP1B inhibitor 1 h before leptin, and 24-h food intake was recorded. As expected, leptin alone produced a small but nonsignificant reduction in food intake. However, pretreatment with the PTP1B inhibitor resulted in a marked improvement in leptin-dependent suppression of food intake (P < 0.05). These data are consistent with the hypothesis that increases in PTP1B contribute to hypothalamic leptin resistance as rats transition into middle age.

  9. Differential regulation of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) isoforms in human heart failure and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Roxlau, Stefanie; Lämmle, Simon; Opitz, Annett; Künzel, Stephan; Joos, Julius P; Neef, Stefan; Sekeres, Karolina; Sossalla, Samuel; Schöndube, Friedrich; Alexiou, Konstantin; Maier, Lars S; Dobrev, Dobromir; Guan, Kaomei; Weber, Silvio; El-Armouche, Ali

    2017-07-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a key regulator of important cardiac signaling pathways. Dysregulation of PP1 has been heavily implicated in cardiac dysfunctions. Accordingly, pharmacological targeting of PP1 activity is considered for therapeutic intervention in human cardiomyopathies. Recent evidence from animal models implicated previously unrecognized, isoform-specific activities of PP1 in the healthy and diseased heart. Therefore, this study examined the expression of the distinct PP1 isoforms PP1α, β, and γ in human heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF) and addressed the consequences of β-adrenoceptor blocker (beta-blocker) therapy for HF patients with reduced ejection fraction on PP1 isoform expression. Using western blot analysis, we found greater abundance of PP1 isoforms α and γ but unaltered PP1β levels in left ventricular myocardial tissues from HF patients as compared to non-failing controls. However, expression of all three PP1 isoforms was higher in atrial appendages from patients with AF compared to patients with sinus rhythm. Moreover, we found that in human failing ventricles, beta-blocker therapy was associated with lower PP1α abundance and activity, as indicated by higher phosphorylation of the PP1α-specific substrate eIF2α. Greater eIF2α phosphorylation is a known repressor of protein translation, and accordingly, we found lower levels of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker Grp78 in the very same samples. We propose that isoform-specific targeting of PP1α activity may be a novel and innovative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of human cardiac diseases by reducing ER stress conditions.

  10. Suppressing Type 2C Protein Phosphatases Alters Fruit Ripening and the Stress Response in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yushu; Li, Qian; Jiang, Li; Kai, Wenbin; Liang, Bin; Wang, Juan; Du, Yangwei; Zhai, Xiawan; Wang, Jieling; Zhang, Yingqi; Sun, Yufei; Zhang, Lusheng; Leng, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Although ABA signaling has been widely studied in Arabidopsis, the roles of core ABA signaling components in fruit remain poorly understood. Herein, we characterize SlPP2C1, a group A type 2C protein phosphatase that negatively regulates ABA signaling and fruit ripening in tomato. The SlPP2C1 protein was localized in the cytoplasm close to AtAHG3/AtPP2CA. The SlPP2C1 gene was expressed in all tomato tissues throughout development, particularly in flowers and fruits, and it was up-regulated by dehydration and ABA treatment. SlPP2C1 expression in fruits was increased at 30 d after full bloom and peaked at the B + 1 stage. Suppression of SlPP2C1 expression significantly accelerated fruit ripening which was associated with higher levels of ABA signaling genes that are reported to alter the expression of fruit ripening genes involved in ethylene release and cell wall catabolism. SlPP2C1-RNAi (RNA interference) led to increased endogenous ABA accumulation and advanced release of ethylene in transgenic fruits compared with wild-type (WT) fruits. SlPP2C1-RNAi also resulted in abnormal flowers and obstructed the normal abscission of pedicels. SlPP2C1-RNAi plants were hypersensitized to ABA, and displayed delayed seed germination and primary root growth, and increased resistance to drought stress compared with WT plants. These results demonstrated that SlPP2C1 is a functional component in the ABA signaling pathway which participates in fruit ripening, ABA responses and drought tolerance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Protein phosphatase 2A mediates resensitization of the neurokinin 1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jane E.; Roosterman, Dirk; Cottrell, Graeme S.; Padilla, Benjamin E.; Feld, Micha; Brand, Eva; Cedron, Wendy J.; Steinhoff, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are phosphorylated and interact with β-arrestins, which mediate desensitization and endocytosis. Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) degrades neuropeptides in endosomes and can promote recycling. Although endocytosis, dephosphorylation, and recycling are accepted mechanisms of receptor resensitization, a large proportion of desensitized receptors can remain at the cell surface. We investigated whether reactivation of noninternalized, desensitized (phosphorylated) receptors mediates resensitization of the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R). Herein, we report a novel mechanism of resensitization by which protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is recruited to dephosphorylate noninternalized NK1R. A desensitizing concentration of SP reduced cell-surface SP binding sites by only 25%, and SP-induced Ca2+ signals were fully resensitized before cell-surface binding sites started to recover, suggesting resensitization of cell-surface-retained NK1R. SP induced association of β-arrestin1 and PP2A with noninternalized NK1R. β-Arrestin1 small interfering RNA knockdown prevented SP-induced association of cell-surface NK1R with PP2A, indicating that β-arrestin1 mediates this interaction. ECE-1 inhibition, by trapping β-arrestin1 in endosomes, also impeded SP-induced association of cell-surface NK1R with PP2A. Resensitization of NK1R signaling required both PP2A and ECE-1 activity. Thus, after stimulation with SP, PP2A interacts with noninternalized NK1R and mediates resensitization. PP2A interaction with NK1R requires β-arrestin1. ECE-1 promotes this process by releasing β-arrestin1 from NK1R in endosomes. These findings represent a novel mechanism of PP2A- and ECE-1-dependent resensitization of GPCRs. PMID:21795521

  12. Macrophage fusion is controlled by the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST/PTPN12.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Inmoo; Davidson, Dominique; Souza, Cleiton Martins; Vacher, Jean; Veillette, André

    2013-06-01

    Macrophages can undergo cell-cell fusion, leading to the formation of multinucleated giant cells and osteoclasts. This process is believed to promote the proteolytic activity of macrophages toward pathogens, foreign bodies, and extracellular matrices. Here, we examined the role of PTP-PEST (PTPN12), a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase, in macrophage fusion. Using a macrophage-targeted PTP-PEST-deficient mouse, we determined that PTP-PEST was not needed for macrophage differentiation or cytokine production. However, it was necessary for interleukin-4-induced macrophage fusion into multinucleated giant cells in vitro. It was also needed for macrophage fusion following implantation of a foreign body in vivo. Moreover, in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line, PTP-PEST was required for receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-triggered macrophage fusion into osteoclasts. PTP-PEST had no impact on expression of fusion mediators such as β-integrins, E-cadherin, and CD47, which enable macrophages to become fusion competent. However, it was needed for polarization of macrophages, migration induced by the chemokine CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), and integrin-induced spreading, three key events in the fusion process. PTP-PEST deficiency resulted in specific hyperphosphorylation of the protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2 and the adaptor paxillin. Moreover, a fusion defect was induced upon treatment of normal macrophages with a Pyk2 inhibitor. Together, these data argue that macrophage fusion is critically dependent on PTP-PEST. This function is seemingly due to the ability of PTP-PEST to control phosphorylation of Pyk2 and paxillin, thereby regulating cell polarization, migration, and spreading.

  13. Phosphatase control of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation state is central for glycolytic regulation of retinal protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Thomas W; Abcouwer, Steven F; Losiewicz, Mandy K; Fort, Patrice E

    2015-09-15

    Control of protein synthesis in insulin-responsive tissues has been well characterized, but relatively little is known about how this process is regulated in nervous tissues. The retina exhibits a relatively high protein synthesis rate, coinciding with high basal Akt and metabolic activities, with the majority of retinal ATP being derived from aerobic glycolysis. We examined the dependency of retinal protein synthesis on the Akt-mTOR signaling and glycolysis using ex vivo rat retinas. Akt inhibitors significantly reduced retinal protein synthesis but did not affect glycolytic lactate production. Surprisingly, the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) markedly inhibited Akt1 and Akt3 activities, as well as protein synthesis. The effects of 2-DG, and 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (2-FDG) on retinal protein synthesis correlated with inhibition of lactate production and diminished ATP content, with all these effects reversed by provision of d-mannose. 2-DG treatment was not associated with increased AMPK, eEF2, or eIF2α phosphorylation; instead, it caused rapid dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1. 2-DG reduced total mTOR activity by 25%, but surprisingly, it did not reduce mTORC1 activity, as indicated by unaltered raptor-associated mTOR autophosphorylation and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation. Dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 was largely prevented by inhibition of PP1/PP2A phosphatases with okadaic acid and calyculin A, and inhibition of PPM1 phosphatases with cadmium. Thus, inhibition of retinal glycolysis diminished Akt and protein synthesis coinciding with accelerated dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 independently of mTORC1. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism regulating protein synthesis in the retina involving an mTORC1-independent and phosphatase-dependent regulation of 4E-BP1. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Role of serine threonine protein phosphatase type 5 (PP5) in the regulation of stress induced signaling networks and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Teresa; Swingle, Mark; Honkanen, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Although the aberrant actions of protein kinases have long been known to contribute to tumor promotion and carcinogenesis, roles for proteins phosphatases in the development of human cancer have only emerged in the last decade. In this review, we discuss the data obtained from studies examining the biological and pathological roles of a serine/threonine protein phosphate, PP5, which suggest that PP5 is a potentially important regulator of both hormone- and stress-induced networks that enable a cell to respond appropriately to genomic stress. PMID:18253812

  15. Regulation of tumor cell migration by protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-proline-, glutamate-, serine-, and threonine-rich sequence (PEST)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanhua; Lu, Zhimin

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)–proline-, glutamate-, serine-, and threonine-rich sequence (PEST) is ubiquitously expressed and is a critical regulator of cell adhesion and migration. PTP-PEST activity can be regulated transcriptionally via gene deletion or mutation in several types of human cancers or via post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, oxidation, and caspase-dependent cleavage. PTP-PEST interacts with and dephosphorylates cytoskeletal and focal adhesion-associated proteins. Dephosphorylation of PTP-PEST substrates regulates their enzymatic activities and/or their interaction with other proteins and plays an essential role in the tumor cell migration process. PMID:23237212

  16. Vanillic acid derivatives from the green algae Cladophora socialis as potent protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yunjiang; Carroll, Anthony R; Addepalli, Rama; Fechner, Gregory A; Avery, Vicky M; Quinn, Ronald J

    2007-11-01

    A novel vanillic acid derivative (1) and its sulfate adduct (2) were isolated from a green algae, Cladophora socialis. The structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated from NMR and HRESIMS experiments. Both compounds showed potent inhibitory activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), an enzyme involved in the regulation of insulin cell signaling. Compounds 1 and 2 had IC50 values of 3.7 and 1.7 microM, respectively.

  17. Regulation of ciliary motility: conserved protein kinases and phosphatases are targeted and anchored in the ciliary axoneme

    PubMed Central

    Wirschell, Maureen; Yamamoto, Ryosuke; Alford, Lea; Gokhale, Avanti; Gaillard, Anne; Sale, Winfield S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence has revealed that the dynein motors and highly conserved signaling proteins are localized within the ciliary 9 + 2 axoneme. One key mechanism for regulation of motility is phosphorylation. Here, we review diverse evidence, from multiple experimental organisms, that ciliary motility is regulated by phosphorylation / dephosphorylation of the dynein arms through kinases and phosphatases that are anchored immediately adjacent to their axonemal substrates. PMID:21513695

  18. Antisense protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B reverses activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in liver of ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Gum, Rebecca J; Gaede, Lori L; Heindel, Matthew A; Waring, Jeffrey F; Trevillyan, James M; Zinker, Bradley A; Stark, Margery E; Wilcox, Denise; Jirousek, Michael R; Rondinone, Cristina M; Ulrich, Roger G

    2003-06-01

    Phosphorylation of stress-activated kinase p38, a MAPK family member, was increased in liver of ob/ob diabetic mice relative to lean littermates. Treatment of ob/ob mice with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) reduced phosphorylation of p38 in liver-to below lean littermate levels-and normalized plasma glucose while reducing plasma insulin. Phosphorylation of ERK, but not JNK, was also decreased in ASO-treated mice. PTP1B ASO decreased TNFalpha protein levels and phosphorylation of the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in liver, both of which can occur through decreased phosphorylation of p38 and both of which have been implicated in insulin resistance or hyperglycemia. Decreased p38 phosphorylation was not directly due to decreased phosphorylation of the kinases that normally phosphorylate p38-MKK3 and MKK6. Additionally, p38 phosphorylation was not enhanced in liver upon insulin stimulation of ASO-treated ob/ob mice (despite increased activation of other signaling molecules) corroborating that p38 is not directly affected via the insulin receptor. Instead, decreased phosphorylation of p38 may be due to increased expression of MAPK phosphatases, particularly the p38/ERK phosphatase PAC1 (phosphatase of activated cells). This study demonstrates that reduction of PTP1B protein using ASO reduces activation of p38 and its substrates TNFalpha and CREB in liver of diabetic mice, which correlates with decreased hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia.

  19. 3D model for Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A armadillo domain unveils highly conserved protein-protein interaction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dahlström, Käthe M; Salminen, Tiina A

    2015-12-07

    Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a human oncoprotein, which exerts its cancer-promoting function through interaction with other proteins, for example Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and MYC. The lack of structural information for CIP2A significantly prevents the design of anti-cancer therapeutics targeting this protein. In an attempt to counteract this fact, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain (CIP2A-ArmRP), analyzed key areas and amino acids, and coupled the results to the existing literature. The model reliably shows a stable armadillo repeat fold with a positively charged groove. The fact that this conserved groove highly likely binds peptides is corroborated by the presence of a conserved polar ladder, which is essential for the proper peptide-binding mode of armadillo repeat proteins and, according to our results, several known CIP2A interaction partners appropriately possess an ArmRP-binding consensus motif. Moreover, we show that Arg229Gln, which has been linked to the development of cancer, causes a significant change in charge and surface properties of CIP2A-ArmRP. In conclusion, our results reveal that CIP2A-ArmRP shares the typical fold, protein-protein interaction site and interaction patterns with other natural armadillo proteins and that, presumably, several interaction partners bind into the central groove of the modeled CIP2A-ArmRP. By providing essential structural characteristics of CIP2A, the present study significantly increases our knowledge on how CIP2A interacts with other proteins in cancer progression and how to develop new therapeutics targeting CIP2A. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of a human src homology 2-containing protein-tyrosine-phosphatase: a putative homolog of Drosophila corkscrew.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, R M; Plutzky, J; Neel, B G

    1992-01-01

    src homology 2 (SH2) domains direct binding to specific phosphotyrosyl proteins. Recently, SH2-containing protein-tyrosine-phosphatases (PTPs) were identified. Using degenerate oligonucleotides and the PCR, we have cloned a cDNA for an additional PTP, SH-PTP2, which contains two SH2 domains and is expressed ubiquitously. When expressed in Escherichia coli, SH-PTP2 displays tyrosine-specific phosphatase activity. Strong sequence similarity between SH-PTP2 and the Drosophila gene corkscrew (csw) and their similar patterns of expression suggest that SH-PTP2 is the human corkscrew homolog. Sequence comparisons between SH-PTP2, SH-PTP1, corkscrew, and other SH2-containing proteins suggest the existence of a subfamily of SH2 domains found specifically in PTPs, whereas comparison of the PTP domains of the SH2-containing PTPs with other tyrosine phosphatases suggests the existence of a subfamily of PTPs containing SH2 domains. Since corkscrew, a member of the terminal class signal transduction pathway, acts in concert with D-raf to positively transduce the signal generated by the receptor tyrosine kinase torso, these findings suggest several mechanisms by which SH-PTP2 may participate in mammalian signal transduction. Images PMID:1280823

  1. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphism in protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 11 gene in Murrah bulls

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Varsha; Patel, Brijesh; Umar, Farhat Paul; Ajithakumar, H. M.; Gurjar, Suraj K.; Gupta, I. D.; Verma, Archana

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted with the objective to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 11 (PPP1R11) gene in Murrah bulls. Materials and Methods: Genomic DNA was isolated by phenol–chloroform extraction method from the frozen semen samples of 65 Murrah bulls maintained at Artificial Breeding Research Centre, ICAR-National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal. The quality and concentration of DNA was checked by spectrophotometer reading and agarose gel electrophoresis. The target region of PPP1R11 gene was amplified using four sets of primer designed based on Bos taurus reference sequence. The amplified products were sequenced and aligned using Clustal Omega for identification of SNPs. Animals were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using EcoNI restriction enzyme. Results: The sequences in the NCBI accession number NW_005785016.1 for Bubalus bubalis were compared and aligned with the edited sequences of Murrah bulls with Clustal Omega software. A total of 10 SNPs were found, out of which 1 at 5’UTR, 3 at intron 1, and 6 at intron 2 region. PCR-RFLP using restriction enzyme EcoNI revealed only AA genotype indicating monomorphism in PPP1R11 gene of all Murrah animals included in the study. Conclusion: A total of 10 SNPs were found. PCR-RFLP revealed only AA genotype indicating monomorphism in PPP1R11 gene of all Murrah animals included in the study, due to which association analysis with conception rate was not feasible. PMID:28344410

  2. Cardiac-specific deletion of protein phosphatase 1β promotes increased myofilament protein phosphorylation and contractile alterations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijie; Correll, Robert N.; Davis, Jennifer; Vagnozzi, Ronald J.; York, Allen J.; Sargent, Michelle A.; Nairn, Angus C.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2015-01-01

    There are 3 protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) catalytic isoforms (α, β and γ) encoded within the mammalian genome. These 3 gene products share ~90% amino acid homology within their catalytic domains but each has unique N- and C-termini that likely underlie distinctive subcellular localization or functionality. In this study, we assessed the effect associated with loss of each PP1 isoform in the heart using a conditional Cre-loxP targeting approach in mice. Ppp1ca-loxP, Ppp1cb-loxP and Ppp1cc-oxP alleles were crossed with either an Nkx2.5-Cre knock-in containing allele for early embryonic deletion or a tamoxifen inducible α-myosin heavy chain (αMHC)-MerCreMer transgene for adult and cardiac-specific deletion. We determined that while deletion of Ppp1ca (PP1α) or Ppp1cc (PP1γ) had little effect on the whole heart, deletion of Ppp1cb (PP1β) resulted in concentric remodeling of the heart, interstitial fibrosis and contractile dysregulation, using either the embryonic or adult-specific Cre-expressing alleles. However, myocytes isolated from Ppp1cb deleted hearts surprisingly showed enhanced contractility. Mechanistically we found that deletion of any of the 3 PP1 gene-encoding isoforms had no effect on phosphorylation of phospholamban, nor were Ca2+ handling dynamics altered in adult myocytes from Ppp1cb deleted hearts. However, loss of Ppp1cb from the heart, but not Ppp1ca or Ppp1cc, resulted in elevated phosphorylation of myofilament proteins such as myosin light chain 2 and cardiac myosin binding protein C, consistent with an enriched localization profile of this isoform to the sarcomeres. These results suggest a unique functional role for the PP1β isoform in affecting cardiac contractile function. PMID:26334248

  3. The heterotrimeric G protein Gβ1 interacts with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 and modulates G protein-coupled receptor signaling in platelets.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Subhashree; Khatlani, Tanvir; Nairn, Angus C; Vijayan, K Vinod

    2017-08-11

    Thrombosis is caused by the activation of platelets at the site of ruptured atherosclerotic plaques. This activation involves engagement of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) on platelets that promote their aggregation. Although it is known that protein kinases and phosphatases modulate GPCR signaling, how serine/threonine phosphatases integrate with G protein signaling pathways is less understood. Because the subcellular localization and substrate specificity of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c) is dictated by PP1c-interacting proteins, here we sought to identify new PP1c interactors. GPCRs signal via the canonical heterotrimeric Gα and Gβγ subunits. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we discovered an interaction between PP1cα and the heterotrimeric G protein Gβ 1 subunit. Co-immunoprecipitation studies with epitope-tagged PP1c and Gβ 1 revealed that Gβ 1 interacts with the PP1c α, β, and γ1 isoforms. Purified PP1c bound to recombinant Gβ 1 -GST protein, and PP1c co-immunoprecipitated with Gβ 1 in unstimulated platelets. Thrombin stimulation of platelets induced the dissociation of the PP1c-Gβ 1 complex, which correlated with an association of PP1c with phospholipase C β3 (PLCβ3), along with a concomitant dephosphorylation of the inhibitory Ser 1105 residue in PLCβ3. siRNA-mediated depletion of GNB1 (encoding Gβ 1 ) in murine megakaryocytes reduced protease-activated receptor 4, activating peptide-induced soluble fibrinogen binding. Thrombin-induced aggregation was decreased in PP1cα -/- murine platelets and in human platelets treated with a small-molecule inhibitor of Gβγ. Finally, disruption of PP1c-Gβ 1 complexes with myristoylated Gβ 1 peptides containing the PP1c binding site moderately decreased thrombin-induced human platelet aggregation. These findings suggest that Gβ 1 protein enlists PP1c to modulate GPCR signaling in platelets.

  4. Role of Zinc and Magnesium Ions in the Modulation of Phosphoryl Transfer in Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Elisa; Abro, Asma; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang; Domene, Carmen

    2018-03-28

    While the majority of phosphatases are metalloenzymes, the prevailing model for the reactions catalyzed by protein tyrosine phosphatases does not involve any metal ion, yet both metal cations and oxoanions affect their enzymatic activity. Mg 2+ and Zn 2+ activate and inhibit, respectively, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Molecular dynamics simulations, metadynamics, and quantum chemical calculations in combination with experimental investigations demonstrate that Mg 2+ and Zn 2+ compete for the same binding site in the active site only in the closed conformation of the enzyme in its phosphorylated state. The two cations have different effects on the arrangements and activities of water molecules that are necessary for the hydrolysis of the phosphocysteine intermediate in the second catalytic step of the reaction. Remarkable differences between the established structural enzymology of PTP1B investigated ex vivo and the function of PTP1B in vivo become evident. Different reaction pathways are viable when the presence of metal ions and their cellular concentrations are considered. The findings suggest that the substrate delivers the inhibitory Zn 2+ ion to the active site. The inhibition and activation can be ascribed to the different coordination chemistries of Zn 2+ and Mg 2+ ions and the orientation of the metal-coordinated water molecules. Metallochemistry adds an additional dimension to the regulation of PTP1B and presumably other members of this enzyme family.

  5. Crystal structure of low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis at 1.9-A resolution.

    PubMed

    Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Rajakumara, Eerappa; Mazumdar, Pooja Anjali; Saha, Baisakhee; Mitra, Devrani; Wiker, Harald G; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan; Das, Amit Kumar

    2005-03-01

    The low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMWPTPase) belongs to a distinctive class of phosphotyrosine phosphatases widely distributed among prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We report here the crystal structure of LMWPTPase of microbial origin, the first of its kind from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure was determined to be two crystal forms at 1.9- and 2.5-A resolutions. These structural forms are compared with those of the LMWPTPases of eukaryotes. Though the overall structure resembles that of the eukaryotic LMWPTPases, there are significant changes around the active site and the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) loop. The variable loop forming the wall of the crevice leading to the active site is conformationally unchanged from that of mammalian LMWPTPase; however, differences are observed in the residues involved, suggesting that they have a role in influencing different substrate specificities. The single amino acid substitution (Leu12Thr [underlined below]) in the consensus sequence of the PTP loop, CTGNICRS, has a major role in the stabilization of the PTP loop, unlike what occurs in mammalian LMWPTPases. A chloride ion and a glycerol molecule were modeled in the active site where the chloride ion interacts in a manner similar to that of phosphate with the main chain nitrogens of the PTP loop. This structural study, in addition to identifying specific mycobacterial features, may also form the basis for exploring the mechanism of the substrate specificities of bacterial LMWPTPases.

  6. Rearrangement of the Protein Phosphatase 1 Interactome During Heart Failure Progression.

    PubMed

    Chiang, David Y; Alsina, Katherina M; Corradini, Eleonora; Fitzpatrick, Martin; Ni, Li; Lahiri, Satadru K; Reynolds, Julia; Pan, Xiaolu; Scott, Larry; Heck, Albert J R; Wehrens, Xander H

    2018-04-18

    Background -Heart failure (HF) is a complex disease with a rising prevalence despite advances in treatment. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) has long been implicated in HF pathogenesis but its exact role is both unclear and controversial. Most previous studies measured only the PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) without investigating its diverse set of interactors, which confer localization and substrate specificity to the holoenzyme. In this study we define the PP1 interactome in cardiac tissue and test the hypothesis that this interactome becomes rearranged during HF progression at the level of specific PP1c interactors. Methods -Mice were subjected to transverse aortic constriction and grouped based on ejection fraction (EF) into sham, hypertrophy, moderate HF (EF 30-40%), and severe HF (EF<30%). Cardiac lysates were subjected to affinity-purification using anti-PP1c antibodies followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Ppp1r7 was knocked down in mouse cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells using adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) and siRNA, respectively. Calcium imaging was performed on isolated ventricular myocytes. Results -Seventy-one and 98 PP1c interactors were quantified from mouse cardiac and HeLa lysates, respectively, including many novel interactors and protein complexes. This represents the largest reproducible PP1 interactome dataset ever captured from any tissue, including both primary and secondary/tertiary interactors. Nine PP1c interactors with changes in their binding to PP1c were strongly associated with HF progression including two known (Ppp1r7, Ppp1r18) and 7 novel interactors. Within the entire cardiac PP1 interactome, Ppp1r7 had the highest binding to PP1c. Cardiac-specific knockdown in mice led to cardiac dysfunction and disruption of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Conclusions -PP1 is best studied at the level of its interactome, which undergoes significant rearrangement during HF progression. The nine key interactors that are

  7. A new monoclonal antibody detects downregulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type γ in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Vezzalini, Marzia; Mafficini, Andrea; Tomasello, Luisa; Lorenzetto, Erika; Moratti, Elisabetta; Fiorini, Zeno; Holyoake, Tessa L; Pellicano, Francesca; Krampera, Mauro; Tecchio, Cristina; Yassin, Mohamed; Al-Dewik, Nader; Ismail, Mohamed A; Al Sayab, Ali; Monne, Maria; Sorio, Claudio

    2017-06-21

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor gamma (PTPRG) is a ubiquitously expressed member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase family known to act as a tumor suppressor gene in many different neoplasms with mechanisms of inactivation including mutations and methylation of CpG islands in the promoter region. Although a critical role in human hematopoiesis and an oncosuppressor role in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have been reported, only one polyclonal antibody (named chPTPRG) has been described as capable of recognizing the native antigen of this phosphatase by flow cytometry. Protein biomarkers of CML have not yet found applications in the clinic, and in this study, we have analyzed a group of newly diagnosed CML patients before and after treatment. The aim of this work was to characterize and exploit a newly developed murine monoclonal antibody specific for the PTPRG extracellular domain (named TPγ B9-2) to better define PTPRG protein downregulation in CML patients. TPγ B9-2 specifically recognizes PTPRG (both human and murine) by flow cytometry, western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunohistochemistry. Co-localization experiments performed with both anti-PTPRG antibodies identified the presence of isoforms and confirmed protein downregulation at diagnosis in the Philadelphia-positive myeloid lineage (including CD34 + /CD38 bright/dim cells). After effective tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment, its expression recovered in tandem with the return of Philadelphia-negative hematopoiesis. Of note, PTPRG mRNA levels remain unchanged in tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) non-responder patients, confirming that downregulation selectively occurs in primary CML cells. The availability of this unique antibody permits its evaluation for clinical application including the support for diagnosis and follow-up of these disorders. Evaluation of PTPRG as a potential therapeutic target is also facilitated by the availability of a specific reagent capable to specifically

  8. Protein phosphatase PPM1G regulates protein translation and cell growth by dephosphorylating 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1).

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianyu; Stevens, Payton D; Eshleman, Nichole E; Gao, Tianyan

    2013-08-09

    Protein translation initiation is a tightly controlled process responding to nutrient availability and mitogen stimulation. Serving as one of the most important negative regulators of protein translation, 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) binds to translation initiation factor 4E and inhibits cap-dependent translation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Although it has been demonstrated previously that the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 is controlled by mammalian target of rapamycin in the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, the mechanism underlying the dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 remains elusive. Here, we report the identification of PPM1G as the phosphatase of 4E-BP1. A coimmunoprecipitation experiment reveals that PPM1G binds to 4E-BP1 in cells and that purified PPM1G dephosphorylates 4E-BP1 in vitro. Knockdown of PPM1G in 293E and colon cancer HCT116 cells results in an increase in the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at both the Thr-37/46 and Ser-65 sites. Furthermore, the time course of 4E-BP1 dephosphorylation induced by amino acid starvation or mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition is slowed down significantly in PPM1G knockdown cells. Functionally, the amount of 4E-BP1 bound to the cap-dependent translation initiation complex is decreased when the expression of PPM1G is depleted. As a result, the rate of cap-dependent translation, cell size, and protein content are increased in PPM1G knockdown cells. Taken together, our study has identified protein phosphatase PPM1G as a novel regulator of cap-dependent protein translation by negatively controlling the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1.

  9. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SAP-1 protects against colitis through regulation of CEACAM20 in the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoji; Kotani, Takenori; Supriatna, Yana; Kitamura, Yasuaki; Imada, Shinya; Kawahara, Kohichi; Nishio, Miki; Daniwijaya, Edwin Widyanto; Sadakata, Hisanobu; Kusakari, Shinya; Mori, Munemasa; Kanazawa, Yoshitake; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okawa, Katsuya; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Azuma, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akira; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-08-04

    Intestinal epithelial cells contribute to regulation of intestinal immunity in mammals, but the detailed molecular mechanisms of such regulation have remained largely unknown. Stomach-cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1, also known as PTPRH) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is localized specifically at microvilli of the brush border in gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that SAP-1 ablation in interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice, a model of inflammatory bowel disease, resulted in a marked increase in the severity of colitis in association with up-regulation of mRNAs for various cytokines and chemokines in the colon. Tyrosine phosphorylation of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 20, an intestinal microvillus-specific transmembrane protein of the Ig superfamily, was greatly increased in the intestinal epithelium of the SAP-1-deficient animals, suggesting that this protein is a substrate for SAP-1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM20 by the protein tyrosine kinase c-Src and the consequent association of CEACAM20 with spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) promoted the production of IL-8 in cultured cells through the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, SAP-1 and CEACAM20 were found to form a complex through interaction of their ectodomains. SAP-1 and CEACAM20 thus constitute a regulatory system through which the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal immunity.

  10. Microvillus-Specific Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SAP-1 Plays a Role in Regulating the Intestinal Paracellular Transport of Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shingo; Kamei, Noriyasu; Murata, Yoji; Takayama, Kozo; Matozaki, Takashi; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2017-09-01

    The stomach cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is specifically expressed on the apical membrane of the intestinal epithelium. SAP-1 is known to maintain the balance of phosphorylation of proteins together with protein kinases; however, its biological function and impact on pharmacokinetics in the intestine remain unclear. The present study, therefore, aimed at clarifying the relationship between SAP-1 and the intestinal absorption behaviors of typical transporter substrates and macromolecules. The endogenous levels of glucose and total cholesterol in the blood were similar between wild-type and SAP-1-deficient mice (Sap1 -/- ), suggesting no contribution of SAP-1 to biogenic influx. Moreover, in vitro transport study with everted ileal sacs demonstrated that there was no difference in the absorption of breast cancer resistance protein, P-glycoprotein, and peptide transporter substrates between both mice. However, absorptive clearance of macromolecular model dextrans (FD-4 and FD-10) in Sap1 -/- mice was significantly higher than that in wild-type mice, and this was confirmed by the trend of increased FD-4 absorption from colonic loops of Sap1 -/- mice. Therefore, the results of this study suggest the partial contribution of SAP-1 to the regulated transport of hydrophilic macromolecules through paracellular tight junctions. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of Scd5, a protein phosphatase-1 targeting protein, in phosphoregulation of Sla1 during endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Richard J.; Torres, Onaidy T.; Segarra, Verónica A.; Lansley, Tanya; Chang, Ji Suk; Newpher, Thomas M.; Lemmon, Sandra K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Phosphorylation regulates assembly and disassembly of proteins during endocytosis. In yeast, Prk1 and Ark1 phosphorylate factors after vesicle internalization leading to coat disassembly. Scd5, a protein phosphatase-1 (PP1)-targeting subunit, is proposed to regulate dephosphorylation of Prk1/Ark1 substrates to promote new rounds of endocytosis. In this study we analyzed scd5-PP1Δ2, a mutation causing impaired PP1 binding. scd5-PP1Δ2 caused hyperphosphorylation of several Prk1 endocytic targets. Live-cell imaging of 15 endocytic components in scd5-PP1Δ2 revealed that most factors arriving before the invagination/actin phase of endocytosis had delayed lifetimes. Severely affected were early factors and Sla2 (Hip1R homolog), whose lifetime was extended nearly fourfold. In contrast, the lifetime of Sla1, a Prk1 target, was extended less than twofold, but its cortical recruitment was significantly reduced. Delayed Sla2 dynamics caused by scd5-PP1Δ2 were suppressed by SLA1 overexpression. This was dependent on the LxxQxTG repeats (SR) of Sla1, which are phosphorylated by Prk1 and bind Pan1, another Prk1 target, in the dephosphorylated state. Without the SR, Sla1ΔSR was still recruited to the cell surface, but was less concentrated in cortical patches than Pan1. sla1ΔSR severely impaired endocytic progression, but this was partially suppressed by overexpression of LAS17, suggesting that without the SR region the SH3 region of Sla1 causes constitutive negative regulation of Las17 (WASp). These results demonstrate that Scd5/PP1 is important for recycling Prk1 targets to initiate new rounds of endocytosis and provide new mechanistic information on the role of the Sla1 SR domain in regulating progression to the invagination/actin phase of endocytosis. PMID:22825870

  12. Sperm motility development in the epididymis is associated with decreased glycogen synthase kinase-3 and protein phosphatase 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, S; Stephens, D T; Trautman, K; Smith, G D; Khatra, B; da Cruz e Silva, E F; Greengard, P

    1996-03-01

    Immotile bovine caput epididymal sperm contain levels of protein phosphatase activity twofold higher than do mature motile caudal sperm. Comparison of the inhibition profiles of endogenous phosphatase activities detected by okadaic acid (OA) and calyculin A (CA) revealed a pattern consistent with the predominance of a type 1 protein phosphatase (PP1). Immunoblot analysis identified PP1 gamma 2 (the testis-specific isoform of PP1) as the only PP1 isoform in sperm and showed little protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). In addition, of the known PP1 inhibitors, i.e., DARPP-32, inhibitor 1 (I1), and inhibitor 2 (I2), only I2-like activity was detected in sperm. Inhibition of PP1 by the heat-stable I2-like activity purified from sperm could be reversed with purified glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). Furthermore, sperm extracts contain an inactive complex of PP1 and I2 (termed PP1I) that could also be activated by purified GSK-3. The presence of GSK-3 in sperm was demonstrated by activation of purified PP1I, and quantitation revealed that immotile caput sperm contained sixfold higher GSK-3 activity than motile caudal sperm. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the expression of GSK-3 in sperm and revealed the occurrence of both the alpha and beta isoforms. Our findings suggest that the higher PP1 activity measured in immotile sperm, presumably due to higher GSK-3 activity, is responsible for holding motility in check. This conclusion was supported by the observation that the phosphatase inhibitors OA and CA, at micromolar and nanomolar levels, respectively, were able to induce motility in completely immotile bovine caput epididymal sperm and to stimulate the kinetic activity of mature caudal sperm. The intrasperm levels of cAMP, pH, and calcium were unaltered by treatment with these inhibitors. The results suggest a biochemical basis for the development and regulation of sperm motility and a possible physiological role for the PP1/I2/GSK-3 system.

  13. Protein phosphatase 2Cm is a critical regulator of branched-chain amino acid catabolism in mice and cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Sun, Haipeng; She, Pengxiang; Youn, Ji-Youn; Warburton, Sarah; Ping, Peipei; Vondriska, Thomas M; Cai, Hua; Lynch, Christopher J; Wang, Yibin

    2009-06-01

    The branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are essential amino acids required for protein homeostasis, energy balance, and nutrient signaling. In individuals with deficiencies in BCAA, these amino acids can be preserved through inhibition of the branched-chain-alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, the rate-limiting step in their metabolism. BCKD is inhibited by phosphorylation of its E1alpha subunit at Ser293, which is catalyzed by BCKD kinase. During BCAA excess, phosphorylated Ser293 (pSer293) becomes dephosphorylated through the concerted inhibition of BCKD kinase and the activity of an unknown intramitochondrial phosphatase. Using unbiased, proteomic approaches, we have found that a mitochondrial-targeted phosphatase, PP2Cm, specifically binds the BCKD complex and induces dephosphorylation of Ser293 in the presence of BCKD substrates. Loss of PP2Cm completely abolished substrate-induced E1alpha dephosphorylation both in vitro and in vivo. PP2Cm-deficient mice exhibited BCAA catabolic defects and a metabolic phenotype similar to the intermittent or intermediate types of human maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), a hereditary disorder caused by defects in BCKD activity. These results indicate that PP2Cm is the endogenous BCKD phosphatase required for nutrient-mediated regulation of BCKD activity and suggest that defects in PP2Cm may be responsible for a subset of human MSUD.

  14. Three-dimensional structure and ligand interactions of the low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase from Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Tolkatchev, Dmitri; Shaykhutdinov, Rustem; Xu, Ping; Plamondon, Josée; Watson, David C; Young, N Martin; Ni, Feng

    2006-10-01

    A putative low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMW-PTP) was identified in the genome sequence of the bacterial pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni. This novel gene, cj1258, has sequence homology with a distinctive class of phosphatases widely distributed among prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We report here the solution structure of Cj1258 established by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy using NOE-derived distance restraints, hydrogen bond data, and torsion angle restraints. The three-dimensional structure consists of a central four-stranded parallel beta-sheet flanked by five alpha-helices, revealing an overall structural topology similar to those of the eukaryotic LMW-PTPs, such as human HCPTP-A, bovine BPTP, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae LTP1, and to those of the bacterial LMW-PTPs MPtpA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and YwlE from Bacillus subtilis. The active site of the enzyme is flexible in solution and readily adapts to the binding of ligands, such as the phosphate ion. An NMR-based screen was carried out against a number of potential inhibitors and activators, including phosphonomethylphenylalanine, derivatives of the cinnamic acid, 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, adenine, and hypoxanthine. Despite its bacterial origin, both the three-dimensional structure and ligand-binding properties of Cj1258 suggest that this novel phosphatase may have functional roles close to those of eukaryotic and mammalian tyrosine phosphatases. The three-dimensional structure along with mapping of small-molecule binding will be discussed in the context of developing high-affinity inhibitors of this novel LMW-PTP.

  15. Inhibitors of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase family (CaMKP and CaMKP-N)

    SciTech Connect

    Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Takao, Toshihiko; Nimura, Takaki

    2007-11-23

    Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP) and its nuclear isoform CaMKP-N are unique Ser/Thr protein phosphatases that negatively regulate the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) cascade by dephosphorylating multifunctional CaMKI, II, and IV. However, the lack of specific inhibitors of these phosphatases has hampered studies on these enzymes in vivo. In an attempt to obtain specific inhibitors, we searched inhibitory compounds and found that Evans Blue and Chicago Sky Blue 6B served as effective inhibitors for CaMKP. These compounds also inhibited CaMKP-N, but inhibited neither protein phosphatase 2C, another member of PPM family phosphatase, nor calcineurin, a typical PPP familymore » phosphatase. The minimum structure required for the inhibition was 1-amino-8-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid. When Neuro2a cells cotransfected with CaMKIV and CaMKP-N were treated with these compounds, the dephosphorylation of CaMKIV was strongly suppressed, suggesting that these compounds could be used as potent inhibitors of CaMKP and CaMKP-N in vivo as well as in vitro.« less

  16. A low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803: enzymatic characterization and identification of its potential substrates

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Archana; Kennelly, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    The predicted protein product of open reading frame slr0328 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, SynPTP, possesses significant amino acid sequence similarity with known low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). To determine the functional properties of this hypothetical protein, open reading frame slr0328 was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant protein, SynPTP, displayed its catalytic phosphatase activity towards several tyrosine, but not serine, phosphorylated exogenous protein substrates. The protein phosphatase activity of SynPTP was inhibited by sodium orthovanadate, a known inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, but not by okadaic acid, an inhibitor for many serine/threonine phosphatases. Kinetic analysis indicated that the Km and Vmax values for SynPTP towards p-nitrophenyl phosphate are similar to those of other known bacterial low molecular weight PTPs. Mutagenic alteration of the predicted catalytic cysteine of PTP, Cys7, to serine abolished enzyme activity. Using a combination of immunodetection, mass spectrometric analysis and mutagenically altered Cys7SerAsp125Ala-SynPTP, we identified PsaD (photosystem I subunit II), CpcD (phycocyanin rod linker protein) and phycocyanin-α and -β subunits as possible endogenous substrates of SynPTP in this cyanobacterium. These results indicate that SynPTP might be involved in the regulation of photosynthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. PMID:21288886

  17. Inactivation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Receptor Type Z by Pleiotrophin Promotes Remyelination through Activation of Differentiation of Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuboyama, Kazuya; Fujikawa, Akihiro; Suzuki, Ryoko; Noda, Masaharu

    2015-09-02

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive neurological disorder associated with myelin destruction and neurodegeneration. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) present in demyelinated lesions gradually fail to differentiate properly, so remyelination becomes incomplete. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type Z (PTPRZ), one of the most abundant protein tyrosine phosphatases expressed in OPCs, is known to suppress oligodendrocyte differentiation and maintain their precursor cell stage. In the present study, we examined the in vivo mechanisms for remyelination using a cuprizone-induced demyelination model. Ptprz-deficient and wild-type mice both exhibited severe demyelination and axonal damage in the corpus callosum after cuprizone feeding. The similar accumulation of OPCs was observed in the lesioned area in both mice; however, remyelination was significantly accelerated in Ptprz-deficient mice after the removal of cuprizone. After demyelination, the expression of pleiotrophin (PTN), an inhibitory ligand for PTPRZ, was transiently increased in mouse brains, particularly in the neurons involved, suggesting its role in promoting remyelination by inactivating PTPRZ activity. In support of this view, oligodendrocyte differentiation was augmented in a primary culture of oligodendrocyte-lineage cells from wild-type mice in response to PTN. In contrast, these cells from Ptprz-deficient mice showed higher oligodendrocyte differentiation without PTN and differentiation was not enhanced by its addition. We further demonstrated that PTN treatment increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of p190 RhoGAP, a PTPRZ substrate, using an established line of OPCs. Therefore, PTPRZ inactivation in OPCs by PTN, which is secreted from demyelinated axons, may be the mechanism responsible for oligodendrocyte differentiation during reparative remyelination in the CNS. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the CNS that destroys myelin, the insulation that surrounds axons

  18. Protein phosphatase 2A regulates deoxycytidine kinase activity via Ser-74 dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Amsailale, Rachid; Beyaert, Maxime; Smal, Caroline; Janssens, Veerle; Van Den Neste, Eric; Bontemps, Françoise

    2014-03-03

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) is a critical enzyme for activation of anticancer nucleoside analogs. Its activity is controlled via Ser-74 phosphorylation. Here, we investigated which Ser/Thr phosphatase dephosphorylates Ser-74. In cells, the PP1/PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid increased both dCK activity and Ser-74 phosphorylation at concentrations reported to specifically target PP2A. In line with this, purified PP2A, but not PP1, dephosphorylated recombinant pSer-74-dCK. In cell lysates, the Ser-74-dCK phosphatase activity was found to be latent, Mn(2+)-activated, responsive to PP2A inhibitors, and diminished after PP2A-immunodepletion. Use of siRNAs allowed concluding definitively that PP2A constitutively dephosphorylates dCK in cells and negatively regulates its activity. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduced Expression of CD45 Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase Provides Protection against Anthrax Pathogenesis*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Panchal, Rekha G.; Ulrich, Ricky L.; Bradfute, Steven B.; Lane, Douglas; Ruthel, Gordon; Kenny, Tara A.; Iversen, Patrick L.; Anderson, Arthur O.; Gussio, Rick; Raschke, William C.; Bavari, Sina

    2009-01-01

    The modulation of cellular processes by small molecule inhibitors, gene inactivation, or targeted knockdown strategies combined with phenotypic screens are powerful approaches to delineate complex cellular pathways and to identify key players involved in disease pathogenesis. Using chemical genetic screening, we tested a library of known phosphatase inhibitors and identified several compounds that protected Bacillus anthracis infected macrophages from cell death. The most potent compound was assayed against a panel of sixteen different phosphatases of which CD45 was found to be most sensitive to inhibition. Testing of a known CD45 inhibitor and antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers targeting CD45 also protected B. anthracis-infected macrophages from cell death. However, reduced CD45 expression did not protect anthrax lethal toxin (LT) treated macrophages, suggesting that the pathogen and independently added LT may signal through distinct pathways. Subsequent, in vivo studies with both gene-targeted knockdown of CD45 and genetically engineered mice expressing reduced levels of CD45 resulted in protection of mice after infection with the virulent Ames B. anthracis. Intermediate levels of CD45 expression were critical for the protection, as mice expressing normal levels of CD45 or disrupted CD45 phosphatase activity or no CD45 all succumbed to this pathogen. Mechanism-based studies suggest that the protection provided by reduced CD45 levels results from regulated immune cell homeostasis that may diminish the impact of apoptosis during the infection. To date, this is the first report demonstrating that reduced levels of host phosphatase CD45 modulate anthrax pathogenesis. PMID:19269962

  20. Immunoreactivity of protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) in sera from sheep infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ratna B; Begg, Douglas J; Purdie, Auriol C; Bach, Horacio; Whittington, Richard J

    2014-07-15

    Evasion of host defense mechanisms and survival inside infected host macrophages are features of pathogenic mycobacteria including Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) has been identified as a secreted protein critical for survival of mycobacteria within infected macrophages. The host may mount an immune response to such secreted proteins. In this study, the humoral immune response to purified recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis PtpA was investigated using sera from a cohort of sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and compared with uninfected healthy controls. A significantly higher level of reactivity to PtpA was observed in sera collected from M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis infected sheep when compared to those from uninfected healthy controls. PtpA could be a potential candidate antigen for detection of humoral immune responses in sheep infected with M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development.

    PubMed

    Beier, Anna; Teichert, Ines; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A; Kück, Ulrich

    2016-06-21

    The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general. The striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex is highly conserved from yeasts to humans and is an important regulator of numerous eukaryotic developmental processes, such as cellular signaling and cell development. Although functional insights into the STRIPAK complex are accumulating, the detailed molecular mechanisms of single subunits are only partially understood

  2. PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 2 (PHLPP2) regulates G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5)-induced cardiac hypertrophy in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Szu-Tsen; Zambrano, Cristina M; Koch, Walter J; Purcell, Nicole H

    2018-05-25

    PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP) is a serine/threonine phosphatase that has been shown to regulate cell growth and survival through dephosphorylation of several members of the AGC family of kinases. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) is an AGC kinase that regulates phenylephrine (PE)-induced cardiac hypertrophy through its noncanonical function of directly targeting proteins to the nucleus to regulate transcription. Here we investigated the possibility that the PHLPP2 isoform can regulate GRK5-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). We show that removal of PHLPP2 by siRNA induces hypertrophic growth of NRVMs as measured by cell size changes at baseline, potentiated PE-induced cell size changes, and re-expression of fetal genes atrial natriuretic factor and brain natriuretic peptide. Endogenous GRK5 and PHLPP2 were found to interact in NRVMs, and PE-induced nuclear accumulation of GRK5 was enhanced upon down-regulation of PHLPP2. Conversely, overexpression of PHLPP2 blocked PE-induced hypertrophic growth, re-expression of fetal genes, and nuclear accumulation of GRK5, which depended on its phosphatase activity. Finally, using siRNA against GRK5, we found that GRK5 was necessary for the hypertrophic response induced by PHLPP2 knockdown. Our findings demonstrate for the first time a novel regulation of GRK5 by the phosphatase PHLPP2, which modulates hypertrophic growth. Understanding the signaling pathways affected by PHLPP2 has potential for new therapeutic targets in the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Identification of Open Stomata1-Interacting Proteins Reveals Interactions with Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 and with Type 2A Protein Phosphatases That Function in Abscisic Acid Responses

    DOE PAGES

    Waadt, Rainer; Manalansan, Bianca; Rauniyar, Navin; ...

    2015-09-04

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls growth and development and regulates plant water status through an established signaling pathway. In the presence of ABA, pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor proteins inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). This, in turn, enables the activation of Sucrose Nonfermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 (SnRK2). Open Stomata1 (OST1)/SnRK2.6/SRK2E is a major SnRK2-type protein kinase responsible for mediating ABA responses. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing an epitope-tagged OST1 in the recessive ost1-3 mutant background was used for the copurification and identification of OST1-interacting proteins after osmotic stress and ABA treatments. Furthemore, these analyses, which were confirmed usingmore » bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation, unexpectedly revealed homo- and heteromerization of OST1 with SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, OST1, and SnRK2.8. Furthermore, several OST1-complexed proteins were identified as type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) subunits and as proteins involved in lipid and galactolipid metabolism. More detailed analyses suggested an interaction network between ABA-activated SnRK2-type protein kinases and several PP2A-type protein phosphatase regulatory subunits. pp2a double mutants exhibited a reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and stomatal closure and an enhanced ABA sensitivity in root growth regulation. Our analyses add PP2A-type protein phosphatases as another class of protein phosphatases to the interaction network of SnRK2-type protein kinases.« less

  4. Identification of Open Stomata1-Interacting Proteins Reveals Interactions with Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 and with Type 2A Protein Phosphatases That Function in Abscisic Acid Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Waadt, Rainer; Manalansan, Bianca; Rauniyar, Navin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Booker, Matthew A.; Brandt, Benjamin; Waadt, Christian; Nusinow, Dmitri A.; Kay, Steve A.; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schumacher, Karin; DeLong, Alison; Yates, John R.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls growth and development and regulates plant water status through an established signaling pathway. In the presence of ABA, pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor proteins inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). This, in turn, enables the activation of Sucrose Nonfermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 (SnRK2). Open Stomata1 (OST1)/SnRK2.6/SRK2E is a major SnRK2-type protein kinase responsible for mediating ABA responses. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing an epitope-tagged OST1 in the recessive ost1-3 mutant background was used for the copurification and identification of OST1-interacting proteins after osmotic stress and ABA treatments. These analyses, which were confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation, unexpectedly revealed homo- and heteromerization of OST1 with SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, OST1, and SnRK2.8. Furthermore, several OST1-complexed proteins were identified as type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) subunits and as proteins involved in lipid and galactolipid metabolism. More detailed analyses suggested an interaction network between ABA-activated SnRK2-type protein kinases and several PP2A-type protein phosphatase regulatory subunits. pp2a double mutants exhibited a reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and stomatal closure and an enhanced ABA sensitivity in root growth regulation. These analyses add PP2A-type protein phosphatases as another class of protein phosphatases to the interaction network of SnRK2-type protein kinases. PMID:26175513

  5. Domains involved in calcineurin phosphatase inhibition and nuclear localisation in the African swine fever virus A238L protein

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, Charles C.; Chapman, Dave A.G.; Silk, Rhiannon

    2008-05-10

    The African swine fever virus A238L protein inhibits calcineurin phosphatase activity and activation of NF-{kappa}B and p300 co-activator. An 82 amino acid domain containing residues 157 to 238 at the C-terminus of A238L was expressed in E. coli and purified. This purified A238L fragment acted as a potent inhibitor of calcineurin phosphatase in vitro with an IC{sub 50} of approximately 70 nM. Two putative nuclear localisation signals were identified between residues 80 to 86 (NLS-1) and between residues 203 to 207 overlapping with the N-terminus of the calcineurin docking motif (NLS-2). Mutation of these motifs independently did not reduce nuclearmore » localisation compared to the wild type A238L protein, whereas mutation of both motifs significantly reduced nuclear localisation of A238L. Mutation of the calcineurin docking motif resulted in a dramatic increase in the nuclear localisation of A238L provided an intact NLS was present. We propose that binding of calcineurin to A238L masks NLS-2 contributing to the cytoplasmic retention of A238L.« less

  6. Deficiency of the protein-tyrosine phosphatase DEP-1/PTPRJ promotes matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in meningioma cells.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Astrid; Stampnik, Yvonn; Cui, Yan; Morrison, Helen; Pachow, Doreen; Kliese, Nadine; Mawrin, Christian; Böhmer, Frank-D

    2015-05-01

    Brain-invasive growth of a subset of meningiomas is associated with less favorable prognosis. The molecular mechanisms causing invasiveness are only partially understood, however, the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) has been identified as a contributing factor. We have previously found that loss of density enhanced phosphatase-1 (DEP-1, also designated PTPRJ), a transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase, promotes meningioma cell motility and invasive growth in an orthotopic xenotransplantation model. We have now analyzed potential alterations of the expression of genes involved in motility control, caused by DEP-1 loss in meningioma cell lines. DEP-1 depleted cells exhibited increased expression of mRNA encoding MMP-9, and the growth factors EGF and FGF-2. The increase of MMP-9 expression in DEP-1 depleted cells was also readily detectable at the protein level by zymography. MMP-9 upregulation was sensitive to chemical inhibitors of growth factor signal transduction. Conversely, MMP-9 mRNA levels could be stimulated with growth factors (e.g. EGF) and inflammatory cytokines (e.g. TNFα). Increase of MMP-9 expression by DEP-1 depletion, or growth factor/cytokine stimulation qualitatively correlated with increased invasiveness in vitro scored as transmigration through matrigel-coated membranes. The studies suggest induction of MMP-9 expression promoted by DEP-1 deficiency, or potentially by growth factors and inflammatory cytokines, as a mechanism contributing to meningioma brain invasiveness.

  7. Isothiazolidinone (IZD) as a phosphoryl mimetic in inhibitors of the Yersinia pestis protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Bahta, Medhanit; Lountos, George T.

    2011-07-01

    The first X-ray crystal structure of the Y. pestis protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH in complex with an isothiazolidinone-based lead-fragment compound is reported. Isothiazolidinone (IZD) heterocycles can act as effective components of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitors by simultaneously replicating the binding interactions of both a phosphoryl group and a highly conserved water molecule, as exemplified by the structures of several PTP1B–inhibitor complexes. In the first unambiguous demonstration of IZD interactions with a PTP other than PTP1B, it is shown by X-ray crystallography that the IZD motif binds within the catalytic site of the Yersinia pestis PTP YopH by similarly displacingmore » a highly conserved water molecule. It is also shown that IZD-based bidentate ligands can inhibit YopH in a nonpromiscuous fashion at low micromolar concentrations. Hence, the IZD moiety may represent a useful starting point for the development of YopH inhibitors.« less

  8. Arctigenin inhibits triple-negative breast cancers by targeting CIP2A to reactivate protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiuyue; Qin, Shanshan; Yuan, Xiaoning; Zhang, Liang; Ji, Juanli; Liu, Xuewen; Ma, Wenjing; Zhang, Yunfei; Liu, Pengfei; Sun, Zhiting; Zhang, Jingxuan; Liu, Ying

    2017-07-01

    We have shown that a novel STAT3 inhibitor arctigenin (Atn) induces significant cytotoxicity in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. This study further delineated molecular mechanisms where by Atn triggered cytotoxicity in TNBC cells. We found Atn can also inhibit metastasis in TNBC cells through cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) pathway. CIP2A is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), which can increase the migration and invasion of various cancer cells. PP2A is a tumor suppressor, which is functionally defective in various cancers. Atn-induced metastasis inhibition was associated with reactivation of PP2A, downregulation of CIP2A and Akt phosphorylation. Silencing CIP2A enhanced Atn-induced metastasis inhibition and apoptosis in TNBCs. Furthermore, ectopic expression of CIP2A or inhibition of PP2A in TNBC cells abolished the effects of Atn. In conclusion, we found that enhancement of PP2A activity by inhibition of CIP2A, at least in part, promotes the anti-metastasis effect induced by Atn. Our findings disclose the novel therapeutic mechanism of this targeted agent, and suggest the therapeutic potential and feasibility of developing PP2A enhancers as a novel anticancer strategy.

  9. Molecular Investigations of the Structure and Function of the Protein Phosphatase 1:Spinophilin:Inhibitor-2 Heterotrimeric Complex

    PubMed Central

    Dancheck, Barbara; Ragusa, Michael J.; Allaire, Marc; Nairn, Angus C.; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of the major ser/thr phosphatase Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is controlled by a diverse array of targeting and inhibitor proteins. Though many PP1 regulatory proteins share at least one PP1 binding motif, usually the RVxF motif, it was recently discovered that certain pairs of targeting and inhibitor proteins bind PP1 simultaneously to form PP1 heterotrimeric complexes. To date, structural information for these heterotrimeric complexes, and, in turn, how they direct PP1 activity is entirely lacking. Using a combination of NMR spectroscopy, biochemistry and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we show that major structural rearrangements in both spinophilin (targeting) and Inhibitor-2 (I-2, inhibitor) are essential for the formation of the heterotrimeric PP1:spinophilin:I-2 (PSI) complex. The RVxF motif of I-2 is released from PP1 during the formation of PSI, making the less prevalent SILK motif of I-2 essential for complex stability. The release of the I-2 RVxF motif allows for enhanced flexibility of both I-2 and spinophilin in the heterotrimeric complex. In addition, we used inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy to show that PP1 contains two metals in both heterodimeric complexes (PP1:spinophilin and PP1:I2) and PSI, demonstrating that PSI retains the biochemical characteristics of the PP1:I2 holoenzyme. Finally, we combined the NMR and biochemical data with SAXS and molecular dynamics simulations to generate a structural model of the full heterotrimeric PSI complex. Collectively, these data reveal the molecular events that enable PP1 heterotrimeric complexes to exploit both the targeting and inhibitory features of the PP1-regulatory proteins to form multi-functional PP1 holoenzymes. PMID:21218781

  10. MiR-181a/b induce the growth, invasion, and metastasis of neuroblastoma cells through targeting ABI1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodan; Peng, Hongxia; Liao, Wang; Luo, Ailing; Cai, Mansi; He, Jing; Zhang, Xiaohong; Luo, Ziyan; Jiang, Hua; Xu, Ling

    2018-05-26

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric malignancy, and the clinical phenotypes range from localized tumors with excellent outcomes to widely metastatic disease in which long-term survival is approximately 40%, despite intensive therapy. Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant miRNA regulation plays a role in neuroblastoma, but the miRNA functions and mechanisms remain unknown. miR-181 family members were detected in 32 neuroblastoma patients, and the effects of miR-181a/b on cell viability, invasion, and migration were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. A parallel global mRNA expression profile was obtained for neuroblastoma cells overexpressing miR-181a. The potential targets of miR-181a/b were validated. miR-181a/b expression levels were positively associated with MYCN amplification and neuroblastoma aggressiveness. Moreover, ectopic miR-181a/b expression significantly induced the growth and invasion of neuroblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Microarray analysis revealed that mRNAs were consistently downregulated after miR-181a overexpression, leading to cell migration. In addition, the expression of ABI1 was suppressed by miR-181a/b, and ABI1 was validated as a direct target of miR-181a/b. We concluded that miR-181a/b were significantly upregulated in aggressive neuroblastoma, which enhanced its tumorigenesis and progression by suppressing the expression of ABI1. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B as a target for the treatment of impaired glucose tolerance and type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Trevillyan, James M

    2002-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a negative regulator of the insulin signal transduction cascade, initiated when insulin binds to the insulin receptor. PTP1B-deficient mice are more sensitive to insulin, and have improved glycemic control and resistance to diet-induced obesity than wild-type control mice. Diabetic mice treated with PTP1B antisense oligonucleotides intraperitoneally have lower PTP1B protein levels in liver and fat, reduced plasma insulin, blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. These studies validate PTP1B as a promising drug discovery target for the treatment of insulin resistance, diabetes and obesity. Herein we review the recent advances in the structure-based design of potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of PTP1B, and discuss th e challenge of developing compounds with improved cell permeability and bioavailability.

  12. Protein Phosphatase 2A Regulates Innate Immune and Proteolytic Responses to Cigarette Smoke Exposure in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Alison M.; Hardigan, Andrew; Geraghty, Patrick; Salim, Shaneeza; Gaffney, Adam; Thankachen, Jincy; Arellanos, Leo; D'Armiento, Jeanine M.; Foronjy, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the primary serine-threonine phosphatase of eukaryotic cells, and changes in its activity have been linked to neoplastic and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of PP2A in noncancerous lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has not been previously examined. This study determined that PP2A activity was significantly increased in the lungs of advanced emphysema subjects compared with age-matched controls. Furthermore, we found that cigarette smoke exposure increases PP2A activity in mouse lung in vivo and in primary human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells in vitro. In mice, intratracheal transfection of PP2A protein prior to cigarette smoke exposure prevented acute smoke–induced lung inflammation. Conversely, inhibiting PP2A activity during smoke exposure exacerbated inflammatory responses in the lung. To further determine how PP2A modulates the responses to cigarette smoke in the lung, enzyme levels were manipulated in SAE cells using protein transfection and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) techniques. Increasing PP2A activity in SAE cells via PP2A protein transfection downregulated cytokine expression and prevented the induction of proteases following cigarette smoke extract (CSE) treatment. Conversely, decreasing enzymatic activity by stably transfecting SAE cells with shRNA for the A subunit of PP2A exacerbated these smoke-mediated responses. This study establishes that PP2A induction by cigarette smoke modulates immune and proteolytic responses to cigarette smoke exposure. Together, these findings suggest that manipulation of PP2A activity may be a plausible means to treat COPD and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:22223484

  13. Inhibition of AMP Kinase by the Protein Phosphatase 2A Heterotrimer, PP2APpp2r2d*

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Biny K.; Liu, Hsing-Yin; Francisco, Jamie; Pandya, Devanshi; Donigan, Melissa; Gallo-Ebert, Christina; Giordano, Caroline; Bata, Adam; Nickels, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    AMP kinase is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein kinase that regulates a number of metabolic processes, including lipid biosynthesis and metabolism. AMP kinase activity is regulated by phosphorylation, and the kinases involved have been uncovered. The particular phosphatases counteracting these kinases remain elusive. Here we discovered that the protein phosphatase 2A heterotrimer, PP2APpp2r2d, regulates the phosphorylation state of AMP kinase by dephosphorylating Thr-172, a residue that activates kinase activity when phosphorylated. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies indicated that PP2APpp2r2d directly interacted with AMP kinase. PP2APpp2r2d dephosphorylated Thr-172 in rat aortic and human vascular smooth muscle cells. A positive correlation existed between decreased phosphorylation, decreased acetyl-CoA carboxylase Acc1 phosphorylation, and sterol response element-binding protein 1c-dependent gene expression. PP2APpp2r2d protein expression was up-regulated in the aortas of mice fed a high fat diet, and the increased expression correlated with increased blood lipid levels. Finally, we found that the aortas of mice fed a high fat diet had decreased AMP kinase Thr-172 phosphorylation, and contained an Ampk-PP2APpp2r2d complex. Thus, PP2APpp2r2d may antagonize the aortic AMP kinase activity necessary for maintaining normal aortic lipid metabolism. Inhibiting PP2APpp2r2d or activating AMP kinase represents a potential pharmacological treatment for many lipid-related diseases. PMID:25694423

  14. Protein phosphatase 2ACα gene knock-out results in cortical atrophy through activating hippo cascade in neuronal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Sun, Li-Hua; Huang, Yan-Fei; Guo, Li-Jun; Luo, Li-Shu

    2018-02-01

    Protein phosphatase 2ACα (PP2ACα), a vital member of the protein phosphatase family, has been studied primarily as a regulator for the development, growth and protein synthesis of a lot of cell types. Dysfunction of PP2ACα protein results in neurodegenerative disease; however, this finding has not been directly confirmed in the mouse model with PP2ACα gene knock-out. Therefore, in this study presented here, we generated the PP2ACα gene knock-out mouse model by the Cre-loxP targeting gene system, with the purpose to directly observe the regulatory role of PP2ACα gene in the development of mouse's cerebral cortex. We observe that knocking-out PP2ACα gene in the central nervous system (CNS) results in cortical neuronal shrinkage, synaptic plasticity impairments, and learning/memory deficits. Further study reveals that PP2ACα gene knock-out initiates Hippo cascade in cortical neuroprogenitor cells (NPCs), which blocks YAP translocation into the nuclei of NPCs. Notably, p73, directly targeted by Hippo cascade, can bind to the promoter of glutaminase2 (GLS2) that plays a dominant role in the enzymatic regulation of glutamate/glutamine cycle. Finally, we find that PP2ACα gene knock-out inhibits the glutamine synthesis through up-regulating the activity of phosphorylated-p73 in cortical NPCs. Taken together, it concludes that PP2ACα critically supports cortical neuronal growth and cognitive function via regulating the signaling transduction of Hippo-p73 cascade. And PP2ACα indirectly modulates the glutamine synthesis of cortical NPCs through targeting p73 that plays a direct transcriptional regulatory role in the gene expression of GLS2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Serine Threonine Protein Phosphatase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinglel, Mark; Honkanel, Richard; Ciszak, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues is a well-recognized mechanism in eukaryotic cells for the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cell growth and metabolism. Human serine/threonine phosphatases can be placed into two major families, PPP and PPM. To date the structure on one PPP family member (PPl) has been determined. Here we present the structure of a 323-residue catalytic domain of a second phosphatase belonging to the PPP family of enzyme. catalytic domain of the enzyme has been determined to 1.60Angstrom resolution and refined to R=17.5 and Rfree = 20.8%. The catalytic domain possesses a unique fold consisting of a largely monolithic structure, divisible into closely-associated helical and sheet regions. The catalytic site contains two manganese ions that are involved in substrate binding and catalysis. The enzyme crystallizes as a dimer that completely buries catalytic surfaces of both monomers, Also, the structure shows evidence of some flexibility around the active site cleft that may be related to substrate specificity of this enzyme.

  16. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of serine/threonine protein phosphatase of Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guang Xu; Zhou, Rong Qiong; Hu, Shi Jun; Huang, Han Cheng; Zhu, Tao; Xia, Qing You

    2014-06-01

    Toxocara canis (T. canis) is a widely prevalent zoonotic parasite that infects a wide range of mammalian hosts, including humans. We generated the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) of the serine/threonine phosphatase gene of T. canis (Tc stp) using 5' rapid amplification of the cDNA ends. The 1192-bp sequence contained a continuous 942-nucleotide open reading frame, encoding a 313-amino-acid polypeptide. The Tc STP polypeptide shares a high level of amino-acid sequence identity with the predicted STPs of Loa loa (89%), Brugia malayi (86%), Oesophagostomum columbianum (76%), and Oesophagostomumdentatum (76%). The Tc STP contains GDXHG, GDXVDRG, GNHE motifs, which are characteristic of members of the phosphoprotein phosphatase family. Our quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the Tc STP was expressed in six different tissues in the adult male, with high-level expression in the spermary, vas deferens, and musculature, but was not expressed in the adult female, suggesting that Tc STP might be involved in spermatogenesis and mating behavior. Thus, STP might represent a potential molecular target for controlling T. canis reproduction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a high-affinity phosphate-binding protein endowed with phosphatase activity from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Djeghader, Ahmed; Gotthard, Guillaume; Suh, Andrew; Gonzalez, Daniel; Scott, Ken; Chabriere, Eric; Elias, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    In prokaryotes, phosphate starvation induces the expression of numerous phosphate-responsive genes, such as the pst operon including the high-affinity phosphate-binding protein (PBP or pstS) and alkaline phosphatases such as PhoA. This response increases the cellular inorganic phosphate import efficiency. Notably, some Pseudomonas species secrete, via a type-2 secretion system, a phosphate-binding protein dubbed LapA endowed with phosphatase activity. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray data collection at 0.87 Å resolution of LapA are described. Combined with biochemical and enzymatic characterization, the structure of this intriguing phosphate-binding protein will help to elucidate the molecular origin of its phosphatase activity and to decipher its putative role in phosphate uptake. PMID:24100568

  18. PTEN is a protein phosphatase that targets active PTK6 and inhibits PTK6 oncogenic signaling in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Darren J; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Macias, Virgilia; Ball-Kell, Susan; Zenner, Morgan L; Bie, Wenjun; Tyner, Angela L

    2017-11-15

    PTEN activity is often lost in prostate cancer. We show that the tyrosine kinase PTK6 (BRK) is a PTEN substrate. Phosphorylation of PTK6 tyrosine 342 (PY342) promotes activation, while phosphorylation of tyrosine 447 (PY447) regulates auto-inhibition. Introduction of PTEN into a PTEN null prostate cancer cell line leads to dephosphorylation of PY342 but not PY447 and PTK6 inhibition. Conversely, PTEN knockdown promotes PTK6 activation in PTEN positive cells. Using a variety of PTEN mutant constructs, we show that protein phosphatase activity of PTEN targets PTK6, with efficiency similar to PTP1B, a phosphatase that directly dephosphorylates PTK6 Y342. Conditional disruption of Pten in the mouse prostate leads to tumorigenesis and increased phosphorylation of PTK6 Y342, and disruption of Ptk6 impairs tumorigenesis. In human prostate tumor tissue microarrays, loss of PTEN correlates with increased PTK6 PY342 and poor outcome. These data suggest PTK6 activation promotes invasive prostate cancer induced by PTEN loss.

  19. Toward the identification of a reliable 3D-QSAR model for the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zhou, Bo

    2018-04-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is an intracellular non-receptor phosphatase that is implicated in signal transduction of insulin and leptin pathways, thus PTP1B is considered as potential target for treating type II diabetes and obesity. The present article is an attempt to formulate the three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) modeling of a series of compounds possessing PTP1B inhibitory activities using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) techniques. The optimum template ligand-based models are statistically significant with great CoMFA (R2cv = 0.600, R2pred = 0.6760) and CoMSIA (R2cv = 0.624, R2pred = 0.8068) values. Molecular docking was employed to elucidate the inhibitory mechanisms of this series of compounds against PTP1B. In addition, the CoMFA and CoMSIA field contour maps agree well with the structural characteristics of the binding pocket of PTP1B active site. The knowledge of structure-activity relationship and ligand-receptor interactions from 3D-QSAR model and molecular docking will be useful for better understanding the mechanism of ligand-receptor interaction and facilitating development of novel compounds as potent PTP1B inhibitors.

  20. Functional analysis of the glycogen binding subunit CG9238/Gbs-70E of protein phosphatase 1 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kerekes, Éva; Kókai, Endre; Páldy, Ferenc Sándor; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2014-06-01

    The product of the CG9238 gene that we termed glycogen binding subunit 70E (Gbs-70E) was characterized by biochemical and molecular genetics methods. The interaction between Gbs-70E and all catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (Pp1-87B, Pp1-9C, Pp1-96A and Pp1-13C) of Drosophila melanogaster was confirmed by pairwise yeast two-hybrid tests, co-immunoprecipitation and pull down experiments. The binding of Gbs-70E to glycogen was demonstrated by sedimentation analysis. With RT-PCR we found that the mRNAs coding for the longer Gbs-70E PB/PC protein were expressed in all developmental stages of the fruit flies while the mRNA for the shorter Gbs-70E PA was restricted to the eggs and the ovaries of the adult females. The development specific expression of the shorter splice variant was not conserved in different Drosophila species. The expression level of the gene was manipulated by P-element insertions and gene deletion to analyze the functions of the gene product. A small or moderate reduction in the gene expression resulted in no significant changes, however, a deletion mutant expressing very low level of the transcript lived shorter and exhibited reduced glycogen content in the imagos. In addition, the gene deletion decreased the fertility of the fruit flies. Our results prove that Gbs-70E functions as the glycogen binding subunit of protein phosphatase 1 that regulates glycogen content and plays a role in the development of eggs in D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP) deficiency in muscle does not alter insulin signalling and glucose homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Loh, K; Merry, T L; Galic, S; Wu, B J; Watt, M J; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z-Y; Neel, B G; Tiganis, T

    2012-02-01

    Insulin activates insulin receptor protein tyrosine kinase and downstream phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signalling in muscle to promote glucose uptake. The insulin receptor can serve as a substrate for the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1B and T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), which share a striking 74% sequence identity in their catalytic domains. PTP1B is a validated therapeutic target for the alleviation of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. PTP1B dephosphorylates the insulin receptor in liver and muscle to regulate glucose homeostasis, whereas TCPTP regulates insulin receptor signalling and gluconeogenesis in the liver. In this study we assessed for the first time the role of TCPTP in the regulation of insulin receptor signalling in muscle. We generated muscle-specific TCPTP-deficient (Mck-Cre;Ptpn2(lox/lox)) mice (Mck, also known as Ckm) and assessed the impact on glucose homeostasis and muscle insulin receptor signalling in chow-fed versus high-fat-fed mice. Blood glucose and insulin levels, insulin and glucose tolerance, and insulin-induced muscle insulin receptor activation and downstream PI3K/Akt signalling remained unaltered in chow-fed Mck-Cre;Ptpn2(lox/lox) versus Ptpn2(lox/lox) mice. In addition, body weight, adiposity, energy expenditure, insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis were not altered in high-fat-fed Mck-Cre;Ptpn2(lox/lox) versus Ptpn2(lox/lox) mice. These results indicate that TCPTP deficiency in muscle has no effect on insulin signalling and glucose homeostasis, and does not prevent high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance. Thus, despite their high degree of sequence identity, PTP1B and TCPTP contribute differentially to insulin receptor regulation in muscle. Our results are consistent with the notion that these two highly related PTPs make distinct contributions to insulin receptor regulation in different tissues.

  2. Deficiency in Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B Shortens Lifespan and Leads to Development of Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Le Sommer, Samantha; Morrice, Nicola; Pesaresi, Martina; Thompson, Dawn; Vickers, Mark A; Murray, Graeme I; Mody, Nimesh; Neel, Benjamin G; Bence, Kendra K; Wilson, Heather M; Delibegović, Mirela

    2018-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is a critical regulator of signaling pathways controlling metabolic homeostasis, cell proliferation, and immunity. In this study, we report that global or myeloid-specific deficiency of PTP1B in mice decreases lifespan. We demonstrate that myeloid-specific deficiency of PTP1B is sufficient to promote the development of acute myeloid leukemia. LysM-PTP1B -/- mice lacking PTP1B in the innate myeloid cell lineage displayed a dysregulation of bone marrow cells with a rapid decline in population at midlife and a concomitant increase in peripheral blood blast cells. This phenotype manifested further with extramedullary tumors, hepatic macrophage infiltration, and metabolic reprogramming, suggesting increased hepatic lipid metabolism prior to overt tumor development. Mechanistic investigations revealed an increase in anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage responses in liver and spleen, as associated with increased expression of arginase I and the cytokines IL10 and IL4. We also documented STAT3 hypersphosphorylation and signaling along with JAK-dependent upregulation of antiapoptotic proteins Bcl2 and BclXL. Our results establish a tumor suppressor role for PTP1B in the myeloid lineage cells, with evidence that its genetic inactivation in mice is sufficient to drive acute myeloid leukemia. Significance: This study defines a tumor suppressor function for the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B in myeloid lineage cells, with evidence that its genetic inactivation in mice is sufficient to drive acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer Res; 78(1); 75-87. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Prostate Secretory Protein of 94 Amino Acids (PSP94) Binds to Prostatic Acid Phosphatase (PAP) in Human Seminal Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Anklesaria, Jenifer H.; Jagtap, Dhanashree D.; Pathak, Bhakti R.; Kadam, Kaushiki M.; Joseph, Shaini; Mahale, Smita D.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate Secretory Protein of 94 amino acids (PSP94) is one of the major proteins present in the human seminal plasma. Though several functions have been predicted for this protein, its exact role either in sperm function or in prostate pathophysiology has not been clearly defined. Attempts to understand the mechanism of action of PSP94 has led to the search for its probable binding partners. This has resulted in the identification of PSP94 binding proteins in plasma and seminal plasma from human. During the chromatographic separation step of proteins from human seminal plasma by reversed phase HPLC, we had observed that in addition to the main fraction of PSP94, other fractions containing higher molecular weight proteins also showed the presence of detectable amounts of PSP94. This prompted us to hypothesize that PSP94 could be present in the seminal plasma complexed with other protein/s of higher molecular weight. One such fraction containing a major protein of ∼47 kDa, on characterization by mass spectrometric analysis, was identified to be Prostatic Acid Phosphatase (PAP). The ability of PAP present in this fraction to bind to PSP94 was demonstrated by affinity chromatography. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the presence of PSP94-PAP complex both in the fraction studied and in the fresh seminal plasma. In silico molecular modeling of the PSP94-PAP complex suggests that β-strands 1 and 6 of PSP94 appear to interact with domain 2 of PAP, while β-strands 7 and 10 with domain 1 of PAP. This is the first report which suggests that PSP94 can bind to PAP and the PAP-bound PSP94 is present in human seminal plasma. PMID:23469287

  4. Taperin (c9orf75), a mutated gene in nonsyndromic deafness, encodes a vertebrate specific, nuclear localized protein phosphatase one alpha (PP1α) docking protein

    PubMed Central

    Ferrar, Tony; Chamousset, Delphine; De Wever, Veerle; Nimick, Mhairi; Andersen, Jens; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Moorhead, Greg B. G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The promiscuous activity of protein phosphatase one (PP1) is controlled in the cell by associated proteins termed regulatory or targeting subunits. Using biochemical and proteomic approaches we demonstrate that the autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss gene, taperin (C9orf75), encodes a protein that preferentially docks the alpha isoform of PP1. Taperin associates with PP1 through a classic ‘RVxF’ motif and suppresses the general phosphatase activity of the enzyme. The steady-state localization of taperin is predominantly nuclear, however we demonstrate here that the protein can shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and that it is found complexed to PP1 in both of these cellular compartments. Although originally identified as a hearing loss gene, Western blot analyses with taperin-specific antibodies revealed that the protein is widely expressed across mammalian tissues as multiple splice variants. Taperin is a recent proteome addition appearing during the vertebrate lineage with the PP1 binding site embedded within the most conserved region of the protein. Taperin also shares an ancestral relationship with the cytosolic actin binding protein phostensin, another PP1 interacting partner. Quantitative Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Culture (SILAC)-based mass spectrometry was employed to uncover additional taperin binding partners, and revealed an interaction with the DNA damage response proteins Ku70, Ku80, PARP and topoisomerases I and IIα. Consistent with this, we demonstrate the active recruitment of taperin to sites of DNA damage. This makes taperin a new addition to the family of PP1 targeting subunits involved in the DNA damage repair pathway. PMID:23213405

  5. Association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C→T polymorphism and susceptibility to vitiligo: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Silky; Changotra, Harish

    2017-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 gene, which translates to lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase, is considered to be a susceptibility gene marker associated with several autoimmune diseases. Several studies have demonstrated the association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C→T polymorphism with vitiligo. However, these studies showed conflicting results. Meta-analysis of the same was conducted earlier that included fewer number of publications in their study. We performed a meta-analysis of a total of seven studies consisting of 2094 cases and 3613 controls to evaluate the possible association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C>T polymorphism with vitiligo susceptibility. We conducted a literature search in PubMed, Google Scholar and Dogpile for all published paper on protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C→T polymorphism and vitiligo risk till June 2016. Data analysis was performed by RevMan 5.3 and comprehensive meta-analysis v3.0 software. Meta-analysis showed an overall significant association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non- receptor type 22 +1858C→T polymorphism with vitiligo in all models (allelic model [T vs. C]: odds ratio = 1.50, 95% confidence interval [1.32-1.71], P< 0.001; dominant model [TT + CT vs. CC]: odds ratio = 1.61, 95% confidence interval [1.16-2.24], P = 0.004; recessive model [TT vs. CT + CC]: odds ratio = 4.82, 95% confidence interval [1.11-20.92], P = 0.04; homozygous model [TT vs. CC]: odds ratio = 5.34, 95% confidence interval [1.23-23.24], P = 0.03; co-dominant model [CT vs. CC]: odds ratio = 1.52, 95% confidence interval [1.09-2.13], P = 0.01). No publication bias was detected in the funnel plot study. Limited ethnic-based studies, unable to satisfy data by gender or vitiligo-type are some limitations of the present meta-analysis. Stratifying data by ethnicity showed an association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C

  6. Cloning and sequence analysis of a full-length cDNA of SmPP1cb encoding turbot protein phosphatase 1 beta catalytic subunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Fei; Guo, Huarong; Wang, Jian

    2008-02-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by protein kinases and phosphatases, is an important and versatile mechanism by which eukaryotic cells regulate almost all the signaling processes. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is the first and well-characterized member of the protein serine/threonine phosphatase family. In the present study, a full-length cDNA encoding the beta isoform of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1(PP1cb), was for the first time isolated and sequenced from the skin tissue of flatfish turbot Scophthalmus maximus, designated SmPP1cb, by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. The cDNA sequence of SmPP1cb we obtained contains a 984 bp open reading frame (ORF), flanked by a complete 39 bp 5' untranslated region and 462 bp 3' untranslated region. The ORF encodes a putative 327 amino acid protein, and the N-terminal section of this protein is highly acidic, Met-Ala-Glu-Gly-Glu-Leu-Asp-Val-Asp, a common feature for PP1 catalytic subunit but absent in protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B). And its calculated molecular mass is 37 193 Da and pI 5.8. Sequence analysis indicated that, SmPP1cb is extremely conserved in both amino acid and nucleotide acid levels compared with the PP1cb of other vertebrates and invertebrates, and its Kozak motif contained in the 5'UTR around ATG start codon is GXXAXXGXX ATGG, which is different from mammalian in two positions A-6 and G-3, indicating the possibility of different initiation of translation in turbot, and also the 3'UTR of SmPP1cb is highly diverse in the sequence similarity and length compared with other animals, especially zebrafish. The cloning and sequencing of SmPP1cb gene lays a good foundation for the future work on the biological functions of PP1 in the flatfish turbot.

  7. Arabidopsis PHOSPHOTYROSYL PHOSPHATASE ACTIVATOR Is Essential for PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A Holoenzyme Assembly and Plays Important Roles in Hormone Signaling, Salt Stress Response, and Plant Development1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Hu, Rongbin; Zhu, Yinfeng; Shen, Guoxin; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A (PP2A) is a major group of serine/threonine protein phosphatases in eukaryotes. It is composed of three subunits: scaffolding subunit A, regulatory subunit B, and catalytic subunit C. Assembly of the PP2A holoenzyme in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) depends on Arabidopsis PHOSPHOTYROSYL PHOSPHATASE ACTIVATOR (AtPTPA). Reduced expression of AtPTPA leads to severe defects in plant development, altered responses to abscisic acid, ethylene, and sodium chloride, and decreased PP2A activity. In particular, AtPTPA deficiency leads to decreased methylation in PP2A-C subunits (PP2Ac). Complete loss of PP2Ac methylation in the suppressor of brassinosteroid insensitive1 mutant leads to 30% reduction of PP2A activity, suggesting that PP2A with a methylated C subunit is more active than PP2A with an unmethylated C subunit. Like AtPTPA, PP2A-A subunits are also required for PP2Ac methylation. The interaction between AtPTPA and PP2Ac is A subunit dependent. In addition, AtPTPA deficiency leads to reduced interactions of B subunits with C subunits, resulting in reduced functional PP2A holoenzyme formation. Thus, AtPTPA is a critical factor for committing the subunit A/subunit C dimer toward PP2A heterotrimer formation. PMID:25281708

  8. Docking simulations and in vitro assay unveil potent inhibitory action of papaverine against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Bustanji, Yasser; Taha, Mutasem Omar; Al-Masri, Ihab Mustafa; Mohammad, Mohammad Khalil

    2009-04-01

    The structural similarity between papaverine and berberine, a known inhibitor of human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (h-PTP 1B), prompted us to investigate the potential of papaverine as h-PTP 1B inhibitor. The investigation included simulated docking experiments to fit papaverine into the binding pocket of h-PTP 1B. Papaverine was found to readily dock within the binding pocket of h-PTP 1B in a low energy orientation via an optimal set of attractive interactions. Experimentally, papaverine illustrated potent in vitro inhibitory effect against recombinant h-PTP 1B (IC(50)=1.20 microM). In vivo, papaverine significantly decreased fasting blood glucose level of Balb/c mice. Our findings should encourage screening of other natural alkaloids for possible anti-h-PTP 1B activities.

  9. Use of an Anaerobic Chamber Environment for the Assay of Endogenous Cellular Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li

    2002-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) have a catalytic cysteine residue whose reduced state is integral to the reaction mechanism. Since exposure to air can artifactually oxidize this highly reactive thiol, PTPase assays have typically used potent reducing agents to reactivate the enzymes present; however, this approach does not allow for the measurement of the endogenous PTPase activity directly isolated from the in vivo cellular environment. Here we provide a method for using an anaerobic chamber to preserve the activity of the total PTPase complement in a tissue lysate or of an immunoprecipitated PTPase homolog to characterize their endogenous activation state. Comparison with a sample treated with biochemical reducing agents allows the determination of the activatable (reducible) fraction of the endogenous PTPase pool. PMID:12734574

  10. Isothiazolidinone (IZD) as a phosphoryl mimetic in inhibitors of the Yersinia pestis protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Bahta, Medhanit; Lountos, George T.; Ulrich, Robert G.; Burke, Terrence R.; Waugh, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Isothiazolidinone (IZD) heterocycles can act as effective components of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitors by simultaneously replicating the binding interactions of both a phosphoryl group and a highly conserved water molecule, as exemplified by the structures of several PTP1B–inhibitor complexes. In the first unambiguous demonstration of IZD interactions with a PTP other than PTP1B, it is shown by X-ray crystallography that the IZD motif binds within the catalytic site of the Yersinia pestis PTP YopH by similarly displacing a highly conserved water molecule. It is also shown that IZD-based bidentate ligands can inhibit YopH in a nonpromiscuous fashion at low micromolar concentrations. Hence, the IZD moiety may represent a useful starting point for the development of YopH inhibitors. PMID:21697602

  11. Discovery and structure-activity relationship of oxalylarylaminobenzoic acids as inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Szczepankiewicz, Bruce G; Pei, Zhonghua; Janowick, David A; Xin, Zhili; Hajduk, Philip J; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Liang, Heng; Hutchins, Charles W; Fesik, Stephen W; Ballaron, Steve J; Stashko, Mike A; Lubben, Tom; Mika, Amanda K; Zinker, Bradley A; Trevillyan, James M; Jirousek, Michael R

    2003-05-22

    Protein Tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been implicated as a key negative regulator of both insulin and leptin signaling pathways. Using an NMR-based screening approach with 15N- and 13C-labeled PTP1B, we have identified 2,3-dimethylphenyloxalylaminobenzoic acid (1) as a general, reversible, and competitive PTPase inhibitor. Structure-based approach guided by X-ray crystallography facilitated the development of 1 into a novel series of potent and selective PTP1B inhibitors occupying both the catalytic site and a portion of the noncatalytic, second phosphotyrosine binding site. Interestingly, oral biovailability has been observed in rats for some compounds. Furthermore, we demonstrated in vivo plasma glucose lowering effects with compound 12d in ob/ob mice.

  12. Presence of ecto-protein tyrosine phosphatase activity is vital for survival of Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Heneberg, Petr; Rathaur, Sushma

    2014-10-01

    The ecto protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) are known to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the intracellular parasites. However, their presence and role in filarial parasites is still unknown. We found a significant amount of tyrosine phosphatase activity in the surface antigen fraction extracted from Setaria cervi (S. cervi), a bovine filarial parasite. An antibody designed against the conserved catalytic core of human protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B cross reacted with a 63 kDa band in the surface antigen. We detected a significant amount of PTP activity in the intact S. cervi adult parasites as well as microfilariae in this study for the first time. This PTP may be localized on the surface of the parasite with an exposed active site available for the external substrates. The PTP activity was also inhibited by sodium orthovanadate and phenyl arsine oxide, specific inhibitors of PTP in both the life stages. The Km and Vmax for PTP in the adult parasites and microfilariae were determined to be 2.574 ± 0.14 mM; 206.3 ± 2.75 μM Pi/h/two parasites and 5.510 ± 0.59 mM; 62.27 ± 2.27 μM Pi/h/10(6) parasites respectively using O-P-L-Tyrosine as substrate. Interestingly, a positive correlation was observed between the inhibition in PTP activity and reduction in the motility/ viability of the parasites when they were subjected to the specific PTP inhibitors (Orthovanadate and Phenyl arsine oxide) for 4 h in the KRB maintenance medium. The activity was also significantly inhibited in the parasites exposed to antifilarial drug/compounds for e.g. Diethylcarbamazine, Acetylsalicylic Acid and SK7, a methyl chalcone. Therefore suggesting a possible role played by PTP in the survival of the parasite, its interaction with the host as well as in the screening of newly synthesized antifilarials/drugs.

  13. Avirulence gene mapping in the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) reveals a protein phosphatase 2C effector gene family.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chaoyang; Shukle, Richard; Navarro-Escalante, Lucio; Chen, Mingshun; Richards, Stephen; Stuart, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    The genetic tractability of the Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor) provides an opportunity to investigate the mechanisms insects use to induce plant gall formation. Here we demonstrate that capacity using the newly sequenced HF genome by identifying the gene (vH24) that elicits effector-triggered immunity in wheat (Triticum spp.) seedlings carrying HF resistance gene H24. vH24 was mapped within a 230-kb genomic fragment near the telomere of HF chromosome X1. That fragment contains only 21 putative genes. The best candidate vH24 gene in this region encodes a protein containing a secretion signal and a type-2 serine/threonine protein phosphatase (PP2C) domain. This gene has an H24-virulence associated insertion in its promoter that appears to silence transcription of the gene in H24-virulent larvae. Candidate vH24 is a member of a small family of genes that encode secretion signals and PP2C domains. It belongs to the fraction of genes in the HF genome previously predicted to encode effector proteins. Because PP2C proteins are not normally secreted, our results suggest that these are PP2C effectors that HF larvae inject into wheat cells to redirect, or interfere, with wheat signal transduction pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reduction of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B increases insulin-dependent signaling in ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Gum, Rebecca J; Gaede, Lori L; Koterski, Sandra L; Heindel, Matthew; Clampit, Jill E; Zinker, Bradley A; Trevillyan, James M; Ulrich, Roger G; Jirousek, Michael R; Rondinone, Cristina M

    2003-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a negative regulator of insulin receptor (IR) signal transduction and a drug target for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Using PTP1B antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs), effects of decreased PTP1B levels on insulin signaling in diabetic ob/ob mice were examined. Insulin stimulation, prior to sacrifice, resulted in no significant activation of insulin signaling pathways in livers from ob/ob mice. However, in PTP1B ASO-treated mice, in which PTP1B protein was decreased by 60% in liver, similar stimulation with insulin resulted in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the IR and IR substrate (IRS)-1 and -2 by threefold, fourfold, and threefold, respectively. IRS-2-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity was also increased threefold. Protein kinase B (PKB) serine phosphorylation was increased sevenfold in liver of PTP1B ASO-treated mice upon insulin stimulation, while phosphorylation of PKB substrates, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3alpha and -3beta, was increased more than twofold. Peripheral insulin signaling was increased by PTP1B ASO, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of PKB in muscle of insulin-stimulated PTP1B ASO-treated animals despite the lack of measurable effects on muscle PTP1B protein. These results indicate that reduction of PTP1B is sufficient to increase insulin-dependent metabolic signaling and improve insulin sensitivity in a diabetic animal model.

  15. Involvement of PTPN5, the gene encoding the STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP), in schizophrenia and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Pelov, Ilana; Teltsh, Omri; Greenbaum, Lior; Rigbi, Amihai; Kanyas-Sarner, Kyra; Lerer, Bernard; Lombroso, Paul; Kohn, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    Objective STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific member of the PTP family that has been implicated in learning and memory. In this study, we examined the association of the PTPN5 (protein-tyrosine-phosphatase non-receptor 5) gene, which encodes for STEP, with both schizophrenia and cognitive functioning in the Israeli Jewish population. Methods A 868 subjects schizophrenia (SZ) case-control study was performed (286 cases and 582 controls). Eleven STEP tagging SNPs were selected, and single markers and haplotypes association analyses were performed. A cognitive variability study included 437 healthy females who completed a computerized cognitive battery. We performed univariate associations between the SNPs and cognitive performance. The possible functional role of these variants was examined by studying their association with gene expression levels in the brain. Results In the SZ study, we found nominal association in the whole sample between rs4075664 and SZ. SZ males showed a more significant association for 3 SNPs (rs4075664, rs2278732, rs4757710). Haplotypes of the studied SNPs were associated with SZ both in the overall sample and within the male sub-sample. Expression analysis provided some support for the effects of the associated SNPs on PTPN5 expression level. The cognitive variability study showed positive associations between PTPN5 SNPs and different cognitive subtests. Principal component analysis demonstrated an “Attention Index” neurocognitive component that was associated with two SNP pairs (rs10832983*rs10766504 and rs7932938*rs4757718). Conclusion The results imply a model in which PTPN5 may play a role in normal cognitive functioning and contributes to aspects of the neuropathology of schizophrenia. PMID:22555153

  16. Ethanol and Other Short-Chain Alcohols Inhibit NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation through Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Laura R; Ather, Jennifer L; Randall, Matthew J; DePuccio, Daniel P; Landry, Christopher C; Wewers, Mark D; Gavrilin, Mikhail A; Poynter, Matthew E

    2016-08-15

    Immunosuppression is a major complication of alcoholism that contributes to increased rates of opportunistic infections and sepsis in alcoholics. The NLRP3 inflammasome, a multiprotein intracellular pattern recognition receptor complex that facilitates the cleavage and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, can be inhibited by ethanol, and we sought to better understand the mechanism through which this occurs and whether chemically similar molecules exert comparable effects. We show that ethanol can specifically inhibit activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, resulting in attenuated IL-1β and caspase-1 cleavage and secretion, as well as diminished apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) speck formation, without affecting potassium efflux, in a mouse macrophage cell line (J774), mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, mouse neutrophils, and human PBMCs. The inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome were independent of γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor activation or N-methyl-d-asparate receptor inhibition but were associated with decreased oxidant production. Ethanol treatment markedly decreased cellular tyrosine phosphorylation, whereas administration of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate prior to ethanol restored tyrosine phosphorylation and IL-1β secretion subsequent to ATP stimulation. Furthermore, sodium orthovanadate-induced phosphorylation of ASC Y144, necessary and sufficient for Nlrp3 inflammasome activation, and secretion of phosphorylated ASC were inhibited by ethanol. Finally, multiple alcohol-containing organic compounds exerted inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome, whereas 2-methylbutane (isopentane), the analogous alkane of the potent inhibitor isoamyl alcohol (isopentanol), did not. Our results demonstrate that ethanol antagonizes the NLRP3 inflammasome at an apical event in its activation through the stimulation of protein tyrosine phosphatases, an effect shared by other

  17. Diversity in genomic organisation, developmental regulation and distribution of the murine PR72/B" subunits of protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Louis, Justin V; Goris, Jozef; Janssens, Veerle

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-specific phosphatase displaying vital functions in growth and development through its role in various signalling pathways. PP2A holoenzymes comprise a core dimer composed of a catalytic C and a structural A subunit, which can associate with a variable B-type subunit. The importance of the B-type subunits for PP2A regulation cannot be overestimated as they determine holoenzyme localisation, activity and substrate specificity. Three B-type subunit families have been identified: PR55/B, PR61/B' and PR72/B", of which the latter is currently the least characterised. Results We deduced the sequences and genomic organisation of the different murine PR72/B" isoforms: three genes encode nine isoforms, five of which are abundantly expressed and give rise to genuine PP2A subunits. Thereby, one novel subunit was identified. Using Northern blotting, we examined the tissue-specific and developmental expression of these subunits. All subunits are highly expressed in heart, suggesting an important cardiac function. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a striated expression pattern of PR72 and PR130 in heart and skeletal muscle, but not in bladder smooth muscle. The subcellular localisation and cell cycle regulatory ability of several PR72/B" isoforms were determined, demonstrating differences as well as similarities. Conclusion In contrast to PR55/B and PR61/B', the PR72/B" family seems evolutionary more divergent, as only two of the murine genes have a human orthologue. We have integrated these results in a more consistent nomenclature of both human and murine PR72/B" genes and their transcripts/proteins. Our results provide a platform for the future generation of PR72/B" knockout mice. PMID:18715506

  18. Ethanol and Other Short-Chain Alcohols Inhibit NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation through Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, Laura R.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Randall, Matthew J.; DePuccio, Daniel P.; Landry, Christopher C.; Wewers, Mark D.; Gavrilin, Mikhail A.; Poynter, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression is a major complication of alcoholism that contributes to increased rates of opportunistic infections and sepsis in alcoholics. The NLRP3 inflammasome, a multi-protein intracellular pattern recognition receptor complex that facilitates the cleavage and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, can be inhibited by ethanol and we sought to better understand the mechanism through which this occurs and whether chemically similar molecules exert comparable effects. We show that ethanol can specifically inhibit activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, resulting in attenuated IL-1β and caspase-1 cleavage and secretion, as well as diminished ASC speck formation, without affecting potassium efflux, in a mouse macrophage cell line (J774), mouse bone marrow derived dendritic cells, mouse neutrophils, and human PBMCs. The inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome were independent of GABAA receptor activation or NMDA receptor inhibition, but was associated with decreased oxidant production. Ethanol treatment markedly decreased cellular tyrosine phosphorylation, while administration of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate prior to ethanol restored tyrosine phosphorylation and IL-1β secretion subsequent to ATP stimulation. Furthermore, sodium orthovanadate-induced phosphorylation of ASC Y144, necessary and sufficient for Nlrp3 inflammasome activation, and secretion of phosphorylated ASC, were inhibited by ethanol. Finally, multiple alcohol-containing organic compounds exerted inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome, whereas 2-methylbutane (isopentane), the analogous alkane of the potent inhibitor isoamyl alcohol (isopentanol), did not. Our results demonstrate that ethanol antagonizes the NLRP3 inflammasome at an apical event in its activation through the stimulation of protein tyrosine phosphatases, an effect shared by other short-chain alcohols. PMID:27421477

  19. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum Translation Initiation eIF2β Subunit: Direct Interaction with Protein Phosphatase Type 1.

    PubMed

    Tellier, Géraldine; Lenne, Astrid; Cailliau-Maggio, Katia; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Valdés, James J; Martoriati, Alain; Aliouat, El M; Gosset, Pierre; Delaire, Baptiste; Fréville, Aline; Pierrot, Christine; Khalife, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c) is one of the main phosphatases whose function is shaped by many regulators to confer a specific location and a selective function for this enzyme. Here, we report that eukaryotic initiation factor 2β of Plasmodium falciparum (PfeIF2β) is an interactor of PfPP1c. Sequence analysis of PfeIF2β revealed a deletion of 111 amino acids when compared to its human counterpart and the presence of two potential binding motifs to PfPP1 ((29)FGEKKK(34), (103)KVAW(106)). As expected, we showed that PfeIF2β binds PfeIF2γ and PfeIF5, confirming its canonical interaction with partners of the translation complex. Studies of the PfeIF2β-PfPP1 interaction using wild-type, single and double mutated versions of PfeIF2β revealed that both binding motifs are critical. We next showed that PfeIF2β is able to induce Germinal Vesicle Break Down (GVBD) when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, an indicator of its capacity to regulate PP1. Only combined mutations of both binding motifs abolished the interaction with PP1 and the induction of GVBD. In P. falciparum, although the locus is accessible for genetic manipulation, PfeIF2β seems to play an essential role in intraerythrocytic cycle as no viable knockout parasites were detectable. Interestingly, as for PfPP1, the subcellular fractionation of P. falciparum localized PfeIF2β in cytoplasm and nuclear extracts, suggesting a potential effect on PfPP1 in both compartments and raising the question of a non-canonical function of PfeIf2β in the nucleus. Hence, the role played by PfeIF2β in blood stage parasites could occur at multiple levels involving the binding to proteins of the translational complex and to PfPP1.

  20. Neurotrophin-3 Enhances the Synaptic Organizing Function of TrkC-Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase σ in Rat Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Naito, Yusuke; Craig, Ann Marie; Takahashi, Hideto

    2015-09-09

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and its high-affinity receptor TrkC play crucial trophic roles in neuronal differentiation, axon outgrowth, and synapse development and plasticity in the nervous system. We demonstrated previously that postsynaptic TrkC functions as a glutamatergic synapse-inducing (synaptogenic) cell adhesion molecule trans-interacting with presynaptic protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (PTPσ). Given that NT-3 and PTPσ bind distinct domains of the TrkC extracellular region, here we tested the hypothesis that NT-3 modulates TrkC/PTPσ binding and synaptogenic activity. NT-3 enhanced PTPσ binding to cell surface-expressed TrkC and facilitated the presynapse-inducing activity of TrkC in rat hippocampal neurons. Imaging of recycling presynaptic vesicles combined with TrkC knockdown and rescue approaches demonstrated that NT-3 rapidly potentiates presynaptic function via binding endogenous postsynaptic TrkC in a tyrosine kinase-independent manner. Thus, NT-3 positively modulates the TrkC-PTPσ complex for glutamatergic presynaptic assembly and function independently from TrkC kinase activation. Our findings provide new insight into synaptic roles of neurotrophin signaling and mechanisms controlling synaptic organizing complexes. Significance statement: Although many synaptogenic adhesion complexes have been identified in recent years, little is known about modulatory mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate a novel role of neurotrophin-3 in synaptic assembly and function as a positive modulator of the TrkC-protein tyrosine phosphatase σ complex. This study provides new insight into the involvement of neurotrophin signaling in synapse development and plasticity, presenting a molecular mechanism that may underlie previous observations of short- and long-term enhancement of presynaptic function by neurotrophin. Given the links of synaptogenic adhesion molecules to autism and schizophrenia, this study might also contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of

  1. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of two Streptococcus agalactiae proteins: the family II inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Rantanen, Mika K.; Lehtiö, Lari; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    Two S. agalactiae proteins, the inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase, were crystallized and diffraction data were collected and processed from these crystals. The data from the two protein crystals extended to 2.80 and 2.65 Å, respectively. Streptococcus agalactiae, which infects human neonates and causes sepsis and meningitis, has recently been shown to possess a eukaryotic-like serine/threonine protein phosphorylation signalling cascade. Through their target proteins, the S. agalactiae Ser/Thr kinase and Ser/Thr phosphatase together control the growth as well as the morphology and virulence of this organism. One of the targets is the S. agalactiae family II inorganic pyrophosphatase. Themore » inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase have therefore been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected from their crystals. The data were processed using XDS. The inorganic pyrosphosphatase crystals diffracted to 2.80 Å and the Ser/Thr phosphatase crystals to 2.65 Å. Initial structure-solution experiments indicate that structure solution will be successful in both cases. Solving the structure of the proteins involved in this cascade is the first step towards understanding this phenomenon in atomic detail.« less

  2. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta downregulates total tau proteins in cultured neurons and its reversal by the blockade of protein phosphatase-2A.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ludovic; Magnaudeix, Amandine; Esclaire, Françoise; Yardin, Catherine; Terro, Faraj

    2009-02-03

    In tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), the molecular mechanisms of tau protein aggregation into neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and their contribution to neurodegeneration remain not understood. It was recently demonstrated that tau, regardless of its aggregation, might represent a key mediator of neurodegeneration. Therefore, reduction of tau levels might represent a mechanism of neuroprotection. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta) and protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) are key enzymes involved in the regulation of tau phosphorylation, and have been suggested to be involved in the abnormal tau phosphorylation and aggregation in AD. Connections between PP2A and GSK3beta signaling have been reported. We have previously demonstrated that exposure of cultured cortical neurons to lithium decreased tau protein expression and provided neuroprotection against Abeta. Since lithium is not a specific inhibitor of GSK3beta (ID50=2.0 mM), whether or not the lithium-induced tau decrease involves GSK3beta remained to be determined. For that purpose, cultured cortical neurons were exposed to 6-bromo-indirubin-3'-oxime (6-BIO), a more selective and potent GSK3beta inhibitor (ID50=1.5 microM) or to lithium. Analysis of tau levels and phosphorylation by western-blot assays showed that lithium and 6-BIO dose-dependently decreased both tau protein levels and tau phosphorylation. Conversely, inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (CDK5) by roscovitine decreased phosphorylated tau but failed to alter tau protein levels. These data indicate that GSK3beta might be selectively involved in the regulation of tau protein levels. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid, but not that of PP2B (protein phosphatase-2B)/calcineurin by FK506, dose-dependently reversed lithium-induced tau decrease. These data indicate that GSK3beta regulates both tau phosphorylation and total tau levels through PP2A.

  3. A Novel Inositol Pyrophosphate Phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Siw14 PROTEIN SELECTIVELY CLEAVES THE β-PHOSPHATE FROM 5-DIPHOSPHOINOSITOL PENTAKISPHOSPHATE (5PP-IP5).

    PubMed

    Steidle, Elizabeth A; Chong, Lucy S; Wu, Mingxuan; Crooke, Elliott; Fiedler, Dorothea; Resnick, Adam C; Rolfes, Ronda J

    2016-03-25

    Inositol pyrophosphates are high energy signaling molecules involved in cellular processes, such as energetic metabolism, telomere maintenance, stress responses, and vesicle trafficking, and can mediate protein phosphorylation. Although the inositol kinases underlying inositol pyrophosphate biosynthesis are well characterized, the phosphatases that selectively regulate their cellular pools are not fully described. The diphosphoinositol phosphate phosphohydrolase enzymes of the Nudix protein family have been demonstrated to dephosphorylate inositol pyrophosphates; however, theSaccharomyces cerevisiaehomolog Ddp1 prefers inorganic polyphosphate over inositol pyrophosphates. We identified a novel phosphatase of the recently discovered atypical dual specificity phosphatase family as a physiological inositol pyrophosphate phosphatase. Purified recombinant Siw14 hydrolyzes the β-phosphate from 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (5PP-IP5or IP7)in vitro. In vivo,siw14Δ yeast mutants possess increased IP7levels, whereas heterologousSIW14overexpression eliminates IP7from cells. IP7levels increased proportionately whensiw14Δ was combined withddp1Δ orvip1Δ, indicating independent activity by the enzymes encoded by these genes. We conclude that Siw14 is a physiological phosphatase that modulates inositol pyrophosphate metabolism by dephosphorylating the IP7isoform 5PP-IP5to IP6. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf4 Protein Targets Two Phosphatase Regulators of the Hippo Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mui, Melissa Z.; Zhou, Yiwang; Blanchette, Paola; Chughtai, Naila; Knight, Jennifer F.; Gruosso, Tina; Papadakis, Andreas I.; Huang, Sidong; Park, Morag; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT When expressed alone at high levels, the human adenovirus E4orf4 protein exhibits tumor cell-specific p53-independent toxicity. A major E4orf4 target is the B55 class of PP2A regulatory subunits, and we have shown recently that binding of E4orf4 inhibits PP2AB55 phosphatase activity in a dose-dependent fashion by preventing access of substrates (M. Z. Mui et al., PLoS Pathog 9:e1003742, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1003742). While interaction with B55 subunits is essential for toxicity, E4orf4 mutants exist that, despite binding B55 at high levels, are defective in cell killing, suggesting that other essential targets exist. In an attempt to identify additional targets, we undertook a proteomics approach to characterize E4orf4-interacting proteins. Our findings indicated that, in addition to PP2AB55 subunits, ASPP-PP1 complex subunits were found among the major E4orf4-binding species. Both the PP2A and ASPP-PP1 phosphatases are known to positively regulate effectors of the Hippo signaling pathway, which controls the expression of cell growth/survival genes by dephosphorylating the YAP transcriptional coactivator. We find here that expression of E4orf4 results in hyperphosphorylation of YAP, suggesting that Hippo signaling is affected by E4orf4 interactions with PP2AB55 and/or ASPP-PP1 phosphatases. Furthermore, knockdown of YAP1 expression was seen to enhance E4orf4 killing, again consistent with a link between E4orf4 toxicity and inhibition of the Hippo pathway. This effect may in fact contribute to the cancer cell specificity of E4orf4 toxicity, as many human cancer cells rely heavily on the Hippo pathway for their enhanced proliferation. IMPORTANCE The human adenovirus E4orf4 protein has been known for some time to induce tumor cell-specific death when expressed at high levels; thus, knowledge of its mode of action could be of importance for development of new cancer therapies. Although the B55 form of the phosphatase PP2A has long been

  5. HONSU, a protein phosphatase 2C, regulates seed dormancy by inhibiting ABA signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woohyun; Lee, Yeon; Park, Jeongmoo; Lee, Nayoung; Choi, Giltsu

    2013-04-01

    Seed dormancy, a seed status that prohibits germination even in the presence of inductive germination signals, is a poorly understood process. To identify molecular components that regulate seed dormancy, we screened T-DNA insertion lines and identified a mutant designated honsu (hon). HON loss-of-function mutants display deep seed dormancy, whereas HON-overexpressing lines display shallow seed dormancy. HON encodes a seed-specific group A phosphatase 2C (PP2C) and is one of the major negative regulators of seed dormancy among group A PP2Cs. Like other PP2C family members, HON interacts with PYR1/RCAR11 in the presence of ABA. Our analysis indicates that HON inhibits ABA signaling and activates gibberellic acid signaling, and both of these conditions must be satisfied to promote the release of seed dormancy. However, HON mRNA levels are increased in mutants displaying deep seed dormancy or under conditions that deepen seed dormancy, and decreased in mutants displaying shallow seed dormancy or under conditions that promote the release of seed dormancy. Taken together, our results indicate that the expression of HON mRNA is homeostatically regulated by seed dormancy.

  6. Multilevel Control of Arabidopsis 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase by Protein Phosphatase 2A[W

    PubMed Central

    Leivar, Pablo; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; Ferrero, Sergi; Closa, Marta; Arró, Montserrat; Ferrer, Albert; Boronat, Albert; Campos, Narciso

    2011-01-01

    Plants synthesize a myriad of isoprenoid products that are required both for essential constitutive processes and for adaptive responses to the environment. The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) catalyzes a key regulatory step of the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is modulated by many endogenous and external stimuli. In spite of that, no protein factor interacting with and regulating plant HMGR in vivo has been described so far. Here, we report the identification of two B′′ regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), designated B′′α and B′′β, that interact with HMGR1S and HMGR1L, the major isoforms of Arabidopsis thaliana HMGR. B′′α and B′′β are Ca2+ binding proteins of the EF-hand type. We show that HMGR transcript, protein, and activity levels are modulated by PP2A in Arabidopsis. When seedlings are transferred to salt-containing medium, B′′α and PP2A mediate the decrease and subsequent increase of HMGR activity, which results from a steady rise of HMGR1-encoding transcript levels and an initial sharper reduction of HMGR protein level. In unchallenged plants, PP2A is a posttranslational negative regulator of HMGR activity with the participation of B′′β. Our data indicate that PP2A exerts multilevel control on HMGR through the five-member B′′ protein family during normal development and in response to a variety of stress conditions. PMID:21478440

  7. Expression of the growth factor pleiotrophin and its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta in the serum, cartilage and subchondral bone of patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kaspiris, Angelos; Mikelis, Constantinos; Heroult, Melanie; Khaldi, Lubna; Grivas, Theodoros B; Kouvaras, Ioannis; Dangas, Spyridon; Vasiliadis, Elias; Lioté, Frédéric; Courty, José; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2013-07-01

    Pleiotrophin is a heparin-binding growth factor expressed in embryonic but not mature cartilage, suggesting a role in cartilage development. Elucidation of the molecular changes observed during the remodelling process in osteoarthritis is of paramount importance. This study aimed to investigate serum pleiotrophin levels and expression of pleiotrophin and its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta in the cartilage and subchondral bone of osteoarthritis patients. Serum samples derived from 16 osteoarthritis patients and 18 healthy donors. Pleiotrophin and receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta in the cartilage and subchondral bone were studied in 29 patients who had undergone total knee or hip replacement for primary osteoarthritis and in 10 control patients without macroscopic osteoarthritis changes. Serum pleiotrophin levels and expression of pleiotrophin in chondrocytes and subchondral bone osteocytes significantly increased in osteoarthritis patients graded Ahlback II to III. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta was mainly detected in the subchondral bone osteocytes of patients with moderate osteoarthritis and as disease severity increased, in the osteocytes and bone lining cells of the distant trabeculae. These data render pleiotrophin and receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta promising candidates for further studies towards developing targeted therapeutic schemes for osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2012 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatase of liver regeneration-1 is required for normal timing of cell cycle progression during liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Ye, Diana Z.; Li, Zhaoyu; Teta-Bissett, Monica; Peng, Yong; Taub, Rebecca; Greenbaum, Linda E.

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase of liver regeneration-1 (Prl-1) is an immediate-early gene that is significantly induced during liver regeneration. Several in vitro studies have suggested that Prl-1 is important for the regulation of cell cycle progression. To evaluate its function in liver regeneration, we ablated the Prl-1 gene specifically in mouse hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system. Prl-1 mutant mice (Prl-1loxP/loxP;AlfpCre) appeared normal and fertile. Liver size and metabolic function in Prl-1 mutants were comparable to controls, indicating that Prl-1 is dispensable for liver development, postnatal growth, and hepatocyte differentiation. Mutant mice demonstrated a delay in DNA synthesis after 70% partial hepatectomy, although ultimate liver mass restoration was not affected. At 40 h posthepatectomy, reduced protein levels of the cell cycle regulators cyclin E, cyclin A2, cyclin B1, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 were observed in Prl-1 mutant liver. Investigation of the major signaling pathways involved in liver regeneration demonstrated that phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 were significantly reduced at 40 h posthepatectomy in Prl-1 mutants. Taken together, this study provides evidence that Prl-1 is required for proper timing of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. Prl-1 promotes G1/S progression via modulating expression of several cell cycle regulators through activation of the AKT and STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:25377314

  9. Flavonoids as potent allosteric inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B: molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculation.

    PubMed

    Zargari, Farshid; Lotfi, Maryam; Shahraki, Omolbanin; Nikfarjam, Zahra; Shahraki, Jafar

    2017-12-11

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a member of the PTP superfamily which is considered to be a negative regulator of insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway. PTP1B is a promising drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cancer. The existence of allosteric site in PTP1B has turned the researcher's attention to an alternate strategy for inhibition of this enzyme. Herein, the molecular interactions between the allosteric site of PTP1B with three non-competitive flavonoids, (MOR), (MOK), and (DPO) have been investigated. Three ligands were docked into allosteric site of the enzyme. The resulting protein-ligand complexes were used for molecular dynamics studies. Principal component and free-energy landscape (FEL) as well as cluster analyses were used to investigate the conformational and dynamical properties of the protein and identify representative enzyme substrates bounded to the inhibitors. Per residue energy decomposition analysis attributed dissimilar affinities of three inhibitors to the several hydrogen bonds and non-bonded interactions. In conclusion, our results exhibited an inhibitory pattern of the ligands against PTP1B.

  10. A protein phosphatase feedback mechanism regulates the basal phosphorylation of Chk2 kinase in the absence of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Carlessi, Luigi; Buscemi, Giacomo; Fontanella, Enrico; Delia, Domenico

    2010-10-01

    The checkpoint kinase Chk2 is an effector component of the ATM-dependent DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. The activation of Chk2 by genotoxic stress involves its phosphorylation on T68 by ATM and additional auto/transphosphorylations. Here we demonstrate that in unperturbed cells, chemical inhibition of Chk2 by VRX0466617 (VRX) enhances the phosphorylation of Chk2-T68 throughout the cell cycle phases. This event, dependent on the presence of ATM and catalytically functional Chk2, is not consequential to DNA damage, as neither gamma-H2AX nuclear foci nor increased ATM activation is detected in VRX-treated cells, suggesting the involvement of other regulatory proteins. As serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PPs) regulate the phosphorylation and deactivation of proteins of the DDR pathway, we analyzed their role in phospho-T68-Chk2 regulation. We found that intracellular inhibition of PP1 and PP2A-like activities by okadaic acid markedly raised the accumulation of Chk2-pT68 without DNA damage induction, and this phenomenon was also seen when PP1-C, PP2A-C, and Wip1/PPM1D were simultaneously knockdown by siRNA. Altogether, these data indicate a novel mechanism in undamaged cells where PPs function to maintain the balance between ATM and its direct substrate Chk2 through a regulatory circuit. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. hSSB1 phosphorylation is dynamically regulated by DNA-PK and PPP-family protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Nicholas W; Paquet, Nicolas; Shirran, Sally L; Bolderson, Emma; Kariawasam, Ruvini; Touma, Christine; Fallahbaghery, Azadeh; Gamsjaeger, Roland; Cubeddu, Liza; Botting, Catherine; Pollock, Pamela M; O'Byrne, Kenneth J; Richard, Derek J

    2017-06-01

    The maintenance of genomic stability is essential for cellular viability and the prevention of diseases such as cancer. Human single-stranded DNA-binding protein 1 (hSSB1) is a protein with roles in the stabilisation and restart of stalled DNA replication forks, as well as in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions and double-strand DNA breaks. In the latter process, phosphorylation of threonine 117 by the ATM kinase is required for hSSB1 stability and efficient DNA repair. The regulation of hSSB1 in other DNA repair pathways has however remained unclear. Here we report that hSSB1 is also directly phosphorylated by DNA-PK at serine residue 134. While this modification is largely suppressed in undamaged cells by PPP-family protein phosphatases, S134 phosphorylation is enhanced following the disruption of replication forks and promotes cellular survival. Together, these data thereby represent a novel mechanism for hSSB1 regulation following the inhibition of replication. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Inactivation and unfolding of protein tyrosine phosphatase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 during urea and guanidine hydrochloride denaturation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yejing; He, Huawei; Liu, Lina; Gao, Chunyan; Xu, Shui; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-01-01

    The effects of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) on the activity, conformation and unfolding process of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), a thermostable low molecular weight protein from Thermus thermophilus HB27, have been studied. Enzymatic activity assays showed both urea and GdnHCl resulted in the inactivation of PTPase in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Inactivation kinetics analysis suggested that the inactivation of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl were both monophasic and reversible processes, and the effects of urea and GdnHCl on PTPase were similar to that of mixed-type reversible inhibitors. Far-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD), Tryptophan and 1-anilinonaphthalene -8-sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence spectral analyses indicated the existence of a partially active and an inactive molten globule-like intermediate during the unfolding processes induced by urea and GdnHCl, respectively. Based on the sequence alignment and the homolog Tt1001 protein structure, we discussed the possible conformational transitions of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl and compared the conformations of these unfolding intermediates with the transient states in bovine PTPase and its complex structures in detail. Our results may be able to provide some valuable clues to reveal the relationship between the structure and enzymatic activity, and the unfolding pathway and mechanism of PTPase.

  13. Inactivation and Unfolding of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 during Urea and Guanidine Hydrochloride Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lina; Gao, Chunyan; Xu, Shui; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-01-01

    The effects of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) on the activity, conformation and unfolding process of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), a thermostable low molecular weight protein from Thermus thermophilus HB27, have been studied. Enzymatic activity assays showed both urea and GdnHCl resulted in the inactivation of PTPase in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Inactivation kinetics analysis suggested that the inactivation of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl were both monophasic and reversible processes, and the effects of urea and GdnHCl on PTPase were similar to that of mixed-type reversible inhibitors. Far-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD), Tryptophan and 1-anilinonaphthalene -8-sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence spectral analyses indicated the existence of a partially active and an inactive molten globule-like intermediate during the unfolding processes induced by urea and GdnHCl, respectively. Based on the sequence alignment and the homolog Tt1001 protein structure, we discussed the possible conformational transitions of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl and compared the conformations of these unfolding intermediates with the transient states in bovine PTPase and its complex structures in detail. Our results may be able to provide some valuable clues to reveal the relationship between the structure and enzymatic activity, and the unfolding pathway and mechanism of PTPase. PMID:25255086

  14. Expression of receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase in developing and adult renal vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Keiko; Kim, Rachel; Lauhan, Colette; Park, Yuna; Nguyen, Nghiep G.; Vestweber, Dietmar; Dominguez, Melissa G.; Valenzuela, David M.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Gale, Nicholas W.; Takahashi, Takamune

    2017-01-01

    Renal vascular development is a coordinated process that requires ordered endothelial cell proliferation, migration, intercellular adhesion, and morphogenesis. In recent decades, studies have defined the pivotal role of endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases (RPTKs) in the development and maintenance of renal vasculature. However, the expression and the role of receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) in renal endothelium are poorly understood, though coupled and counterbalancing roles of RPTKs and RPTPs are well defined in other systems. In this study, we evaluated the promoter activity and immunolocalization of two endothelial RPTPs, VE-PTP and PTPμ, in developing and adult renal vasculature using the heterozygous LacZ knock-in mice and specific antibodies. In adult kidneys, both VE-PTP and PTPμ were expressed in the endothelium of arterial, glomerular, and medullary vessels, while their expression was highly limited in peritubular capillaries and venous endothelium. VE-PTP and PTPμ promoter activity was also observed in medullary tubular segments in adult kidneys. In embryonic (E12.5, E13.5, E15.5, E17.5) and postnatal (P0, P3, P7) kidneys, these RPTPs were expressed in ingrowing renal arteries, developing glomerular microvasculature (as early as the S-shaped stage), and medullary vessels. Their expression became more evident as the vasculatures matured. Peritubular capillary expression of VE-PTP was also noted in embryonic and postnatal kidneys. Compared to VE-PTP, PTPμ immunoreactivity was relatively limited in embryonic and neonatal renal vasculature and evident immunoreactivity was observed from the P3 stage. These findings indicate 1) VE-PTP and PTPμ are expressed in endothelium of arterial, glomerular, and medullary renal vasculature, 2) their expression increases as renal vascular development proceeds, suggesting that these RPTPs play a role in maturation and maintenance of these vasculatures, and 3) peritubular capillary VE-PTP expression is down

  15. Ferulic Acid Attenuates the Injury-Induced Decrease of Protein Phosphatase 2A Subunit B in Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Phil-Ok

    2013-01-01

    Background Ferulic acid provides a neuroprotective effect during cerebral ischemia through its anti-oxidant function. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine and threonine phosphatase that contributes broadly to normal brain function. This study investigated whether ferulic acid regulates PP2A subunit B in a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) animal model and glutamate toxicity-induced neuronal cell death. Methodology/Principal Findings MCAO was surgically induced to yield permanent cerebral ischemic injury in rats. The rats were treated with either vehicle or ferulic acid (100 mg/kg, i.v.) immediately after MCAO, and cerebral cortex tissues were collected 24 h after MCAO. A proteomics approach, RT-PCR, and Western blot analyses performed to identification of PP2A subunit B expression levels. Ferulic acid significantly reduced the MCAO-induced infarct volume of the cerebral cortex. A proteomics approach elucidated the reduction of PP2A subunit B in MCAO-induced animals, and ferulic acid treatment prevented the injury-induced reduction in PP2A subunit B levels. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses also showed that ferulic acid treatment attenuates the injury-induced decrease in PP2A subunit B levels. Moreover, the number of PP2A subunit B-positive cells was reduced in MCAO-induced animals, and ferulic acid prevented these decreases. In cultured neuronal cells, ferulic acid treatment protected cells against glutamate toxicity and prevented the glutamate-induced decrease in PP2A subunit B. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that the maintenance of PP2A subunit B by ferulic acid in ischemic brain injury plays an important role for the neuroprotective function of ferulic acid. PMID:23349830

  16. Expression and localization of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β and its ligand pleiotrophin in the submandibular gland of mice.

    PubMed

    Adthapanyawanich, Kannika; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Nakata, Hiroki; Keattikunpairoj, Sunisa; Iseki, Shoichi

    2013-02-01

    The family of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTPβ) is composed of 4 splice variants and thought to play roles in the neural migration and outgrowth. Several ligands including the growth factor pleiotrophin (PTN) bind to RPTPβ and inhibit its phosphatase activity, thereby activating cellular signalling pathways. We examined the expression and localization of RPTPβ and its ligands in the submandibular gland (SMG) of mice, which is known for a prominent sexual dimorphism in the duct system. The homogenates and tissue sections of male and female mouse SMG were analysed with RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. The short receptor type of RPTPβ (RPTPβ-S) was dominantly expressed in the SMG, and the male gland had significantly higher levels of RPTPβ-S expression than the female gland. In the male, RPTPβ-S was localized predominantly in intercalated duct (ID) cells, but was not found in granular convoluted tubule (GCT) cells or acinar cells. In the female, weaker reactivity was demonstrated in both ID and striated duct (SD) cells. Of the known ligands for RPTPβ, PTN was expressed in the SMG, without sexual difference in levels. In the male, PTN was localized in ID cells as well as in cells located in the distal ends of GCT that are in close vicinity to the ID, whereas in the female PTN was colocalized with RPTPβ-S throughout ID and SD cells. These results indicated that the distribution of RPTPβ-S and its ligand PTN has a close relation to the sexual dimorphism in the duct system of mouse SMG. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRJ negatively modulates the CD98hc oncoprotein in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    D’Agostino, Sabrina; Lanzillotta, Delia; Varano, Mariaconcetta; Botta, Cirino; Baldrini, Antonio; Bilotta, Anna; Scalise, Stefania; Dattilo, Vincenzo; Amato, Rosario; Gaudio, Eugenio; Paduano, Francesco; Palmieri, Camillo; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Perrotti, Nicola; Indiveri, Cesare; Fusco, Alfredo; Gaspari, Marco; Trapasso, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    PTPRJ, a receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase strongly downregulated in human cancer, displays tumor suppressor activity by negatively modulating several proteins involved in proliferating signals. Here, through a proteomic-based approach, we identified a list of potential PTPRJ-interacting proteins and among them we focused on CD98hc, a type II glycosylated integral membrane protein encoded by SLC3A2, corresponding to the heavy chain of a heterodimeric transmembrane amino-acid transporter, including LAT1. CD98hc is widely overexpressed in several types of cancers and contributes to the process of tumorigenesis by interfering with cell proliferation, adhesion, and migration. We first validated PTPRJ-CD98hc interaction, then demonstrated that PTPRJ overexpression dramatically reduces CD98hc protein levels in A549 lung cancer cells. In addition, following to the treatment of PTPRJ-transduced cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, CD98hc levels did not decrease compared to controls, indicating that PTPRJ is involved in the regulation of CD98hc proteasomal degradation. Moreover, PTPRJ overexpression combined with CD98hc silencing consistently reduced cell proliferation and triggered apoptosis of lung cancer cells. Interestingly, by interrogating the can Evolve database, we observed an inverse correlation between PTPRJ and SLC3A2 gene expression. Indeed, the non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) of patients showing a short survival rate express the lowest and the highest levels of PTPRJ and SLC3A2, respectively. Therefore, the results reported here contribute to shed lights on PTPRJ signaling in cancer cells: moreover, our findings also support the development of a novel anticancer therapeutic approach by targeting the pathway of PTPRJ that is usually downregulated in highly malignant human neoplasias.

  18. Complex regulation of Arabidopsis AGR1/PIN2-mediated root gravitropic response and basipetal auxin transport by cantharidin-sensitive protein phosphatases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Heungsop; Shin, Hwa-Soo; Guo, Zibiao; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Masson, Patrick H.; Chen, Rujin

    2005-01-01

    Polar auxin transport, mediated by two distinct plasma membrane-localized auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins/complexes, plays an important role in many plant growth and developmental processes including tropic responses to gravity and light, development of lateral roots and patterning in embryogenesis. We have previously shown that the Arabidopsis AGRAVITROPIC 1/PIN2 gene encodes an auxin efflux component regulating root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport. However, the regulatory mechanism underlying the function of AGR1/PIN2 is largely unknown. Recently, protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases, respectively, have been implicated in regulating polar auxin transport and root gravitropism. Here, we examined the effects of chemical inhibitors of protein phosphatases on root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport, as well as the expression pattern of AGR1/PIN2 gene and the localization of AGR1/PIN2 protein. We also examined the effects of inhibitors of vesicle trafficking and protein kinases. Our data suggest that protein phosphatases, sensitive to cantharidin and okadaic acid, are likely involved in regulating AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and gravitropism, as well as auxin response in the root central elongation zone (CEZ). BFA-sensitive vesicle trafficking may be required for the cycling of AGR1/PIN2 between plasma membrane and the BFA compartment, but not for the AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and auxin response in CEZ cells.

  19. Structural Basis for Interactions Between Contactin Family Members and Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase Receptor Type G in Neural Tissues

    DOE PAGES

    Nikolaienko, Roman M.; Hammel, Michal; Dubreuil, Véronique; ...

    2016-08-18

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase receptor type G (RPTPγ/PTPRG) interacts in vitro with contactin-3-6 (CNTN3-6), a group of glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored cell adhesion molecules involved in the wiring of the nervous system. In addition to PTPRG, CNTNs associate with multiple transmembrane proteins and signal inside the cell via cis-binding partners to alleviate the absence of an intracellular region. Here, we use comprehensive biochemical and structural analyses to demonstrate that PTPRG·CNTN3-6 complexes share similar binding affinities and a conserved arrangement. Furthermore, as a first step to identifying PTPRG·CNTN complexes in vivo, we found that PTPRG and CNTN3 associate in the outer segments of mouse rod photoreceptormore » cells. In particular, PTPRG and CNTN3 form cis-complexes at the surface of photoreceptors yet interact in trans when expressed on the surfaces of apposing cells. Further structural analyses suggest that all CNTN ectodomains adopt a bent conformation and might lie parallel to the cell surface to accommodate these cis and trans binding modes. Taken together, these studies identify a PTPRG·CNTN complex in vivo and provide novel insights into PTPRG- and CNTN-mediated signaling.« less

  20. Long-term beta-adrenergic stimulation leads to downregulation of protein phosphatase inhibitor-1 in the heart.

    PubMed

    El-Armouche, Ali; Gocht, Fabian; Jaeckel, Elmar; Wittköpper, Katrin; Peeck, Micha; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2007-11-01

    Desensitization of the beta-adrenoceptor/cAMP/PKA pathway is a hallmark of heart failure. Inhibitor-1 (I-1) acts as a conditional amplifier of beta-adrenergic signalling downstream of PKA by inhibiting type-1 phosphatases in the PKA-phosphorylated form. I-1 is downregulated in failing hearts and thus presumably contributes to beta-adrenergic desensitization. To test whether I-1 downregulation is a consequence of excessive adrenergic drive in heart failure, rats were treated via minipumps with isoprenaline 2.4 mg/kg/day (ISO) or 0.9% NaCl for 4 days. As expected, chronic ISO increased heart-to-body weight ratio by approximately 40% and abolished the inotropic response to acute ISO in papillary muscles by approximately 50%. In the ISO-treated hearts I-1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased by 30% and 54%, respectively. This was accompanied by decreased phospholamban phosphorylation (-40%), a downstream target of I-1, and a reduction in 45Ca2+ uptake (-54%) in membrane vesicles. Notably, phospholamban phosphorylation correlated significantly with I-1 protein levels indicating a causal relationship. We conclude that I-1 downregulation in heart failure is likely a consequence of the increased sympathetic adrenergic drive and participates in desensitization of the beta-adrenergic signalling cascade.

  1. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Shin-Ichiro; Alvino, Gina M; Chang, Fujung; Lian, Hui-Yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M K; Donaldson, Anne D

    2014-02-15

    Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires phosphorylation of the MCM complex by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), composed of Cdc7 kinase and its activator, Dbf4. We report here that budding yeast Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor 1) controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes DDK function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. Deleting RIF1 partially compensates for the limited DDK activity in a cdc7-1 mutant strain by allowing increased, premature phosphorylation of Mcm4. PP1 interaction motifs within the Rif1 N-terminal domain are critical for its repressive effect on replication. We confirm that Rif1 interacts with PP1 and that PP1 prevents premature Mcm4 phosphorylation. Remarkably, our results suggest that replication repression by Rif1 is itself also DDK-regulated through phosphorylation near the PP1-interacting motifs. Based on our findings, we propose that Rif1 is a novel PP1 substrate targeting subunit that counteracts DDK-mediated phosphorylation during replication. Fission yeast and mammalian Rif1 proteins have also been implicated in regulating DNA replication. Since PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence, it is likely that replication control by Rif1 through PP1 is a conserved mechanism.

  2. Structural Basis for Interactions Between Contactin Family Members and Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase Receptor Type G in Neural Tissues.

    PubMed

    Nikolaienko, Roman M; Hammel, Michal; Dubreuil, Véronique; Zalmai, Rana; Hall, David R; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Karuppan, Sebastian J; Harroch, Sheila; Stella, Salvatore L; Bouyain, Samuel

    2016-10-07

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase receptor type G (RPTPγ/PTPRG) interacts in vitro with contactin-3-6 (CNTN3-6), a group of glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored cell adhesion molecules involved in the wiring of the nervous system. In addition to PTPRG, CNTNs associate with multiple transmembrane proteins and signal inside the cell via cis-binding partners to alleviate the absence of an intracellular region. Here, we use comprehensive biochemical and structural analyses to demonstrate that PTPRG·CNTN3-6 complexes share similar binding affinities and a conserved arrangement. Furthermore, as a first step to identifying PTPRG·CNTN complexes in vivo, we found that PTPRG and CNTN3 associate in the outer segments of mouse rod photoreceptor cells. In particular, PTPRG and CNTN3 form cis-complexes at the surface of photoreceptors yet interact in trans when expressed on the surfaces of apposing cells. Further structural analyses suggest that all CNTN ectodomains adopt a bent conformation and might lie parallel to the cell surface to accommodate these cis and trans binding modes. Taken together, these studies identify a PTPRG·CNTN complex in vivo and provide novel insights into PTPRG- and CNTN-mediated signaling. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Rif1 acts through Protein Phosphatase 1 but independent of replication timing to suppress telomere extension in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Kedziora, Sylwia; Gali, Vamsi K; Wilson, Rosemary H C; Clark, Kate R M; Nieduszynski, Conrad A; Hiraga, Shin-Ichiro; Donaldson, Anne D

    2018-05-04

    The Rif1 protein negatively regulates telomeric TG repeat length in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but how it prevents telomere over-extension is unknown. Rif1 was recently shown to control DNA replication by acting as a Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-targeting subunit. Therefore, we investigated whether Rif1 controls telomere length by targeting PP1 activity. We find that a Rif1 mutant defective for PP1 interaction causes a long-telomere phenotype, similar to that of rif1Δ cells. Tethering PP1 at a specific telomere partially substitutes for Rif1 in limiting TG repeat length, confirming the importance of PP1 in telomere length control. Ablating Rif1-PP1 interaction is known to cause precocious activation of telomere-proximal replication origins and aberrantly early telomere replication. However, we find that Rif1 still limits telomere length even if late replication is forced through deletion of nearby replication origins, indicating that Rif1 can control telomere length independent of replication timing. Moreover we find that, even at a de novo telomere created after DNA synthesis during a mitotic block, Rif1-PP1 interaction is required to suppress telomere lengthening and prevent inappropriate recruitment of Tel1 kinase. Overall, our results show that Rif1 controls telomere length by recruiting PP1 to directly suppress telomerase-mediated TG repeat lengthening.

  4. Loss of function studies in mice and genetic association link receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α to schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nagahide; Nielsen, Karin Sandager; Aleksic, Branko; Petersen, Steffen; Ikeda, Masashi; Kushima, Itaru; Vacaresse, Nathalie; Ujike, Hiroshi; Iwata, Nakao; Dubreuil, Véronique; Mirza, Naheed; Sakurai, Takeshi; Ozaki, Norio; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Sap, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Background Solid evidence links schizophrenia (SZ) susceptibility to neurodevelopmental processes involving tyrosine phosphorylation-mediated signaling. Mouse studies implicate the Ptpra gene, encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase RPTPα, in the control of radial neuronal migration, cortical cytoarchitecture, and oligodendrocyte differentiation. The human gene encoding RPTPα, PTPRA, maps to a chromosomal region (20p13) associated with susceptibility to psychotic illness. Methods We characterized neurobehavioral parameters, as well as gene expression in the central nervous system, of mice with a null mutation in the Ptpra gene. We searched for genetic association between polymorphisms in PTPRA and schizophrenia risk (2 independent cohorts; total of 1420 cases and 1377 controls), and we monitored PTPRA expression in prefrontal dorsolateral cortex of SZ patients (35 cases, 2 control groups of 35 cases) Results We find that Ptpra−/− mice reproduce neurobehavioral endophenotypes of human SZ: sensitization to metamphetamine-induced hyperactivity, defective sensorimotor gating, and defective habituation to a startle response. Ptpra loss of function also leads to reduced expression of multiple myelination genes, mimicking the hypomyelination-associated changes in gene expression observed in post mortem patient brains. We further report that a polymorphism at the PTPRA locus is genetically associated with SZ, and that PTPRA mRNA levels are reduced in post mortem dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of subjects with SZ. Conclusion The implication of this well-studied signaling protein in SZ risk and endophenotype manifestation provides novel entry points into the etiopathology of this disease. PMID:21831360

  5. Downregulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPL1 alters cell cycle and upregulates invasion-related genes in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Carolina; Flores, M Luz; Conde, José M; Medina, Rafael; Torrubia, Francisco J; Japón, Miguel A; Sáez, Carmen

    2012-04-01

    PTPL1, a non-receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase, has been involved in the regulation of apoptosis and invasiveness of various tumour cell types, but its role in prostate cancer remained to be investigated. We report here that downregulation of PTPL1 by small interfering RNA in PC3 cells decreases cell proliferation and concomitantly reduces the expression of cell cycle-related proteins such as cyclins E and B1, PCNA, PTTG1 and phospho-histone H3. PTPL1 downregulation also increases the invasion ability of PC3 cells through Matrigel coated membranes. cDNA array of PTPL1-silenced PC3 cells versus control cells showed an upregulation of invasion-related genes such as uPA, uPAR, tPA, PAI-1, integrin α6 and osteopontin. This increased expression was also confirmed in PTPL1-silenced DU145 prostate cancer cells by quantitative real time PCR and western blot. These findings suggest that PTPL1 is an important mediator of central cellular processes such as proliferation and invasion.

  6. The C. elegans RSA complex localizes protein phosphatase 2A to centrosomes and regulates mitotic spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Schlaitz, Anne-Lore; Srayko, Martin; Dammermann, Alexander; Quintin, Sophie; Wielsch, Natalie; MacLeod, Ian; de Robillard, Quentin; Zinke, Andrea; Yates, John R; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Shevchenko, Andrei; Oegema, Karen; Hyman, Anthony A

    2007-01-12

    Microtubule behavior changes during the cell cycle and during spindle assembly. However, it remains unclear how these changes are regulated and coordinated. We describe a complex that targets the Protein Phosphatase 2A holoenzyme (PP2A) to centrosomes in C. elegans embryos. This complex includes Regulator of Spindle Assembly 1 (RSA-1), a targeting subunit for PP2A, and RSA-2, a protein that binds and recruits RSA-1 to centrosomes. In contrast to the multiple functions of the PP2A catalytic subunit, RSA-1 and RSA-2 are specifically required for microtubule outgrowth from centrosomes and for spindle assembly. The centrosomally localized RSA-PP2A complex mediates these functions in part by regulating two critical mitotic effectors: the microtubule destabilizer KLP-7 and the C. elegans regulator of spindle assembly TPXL-1. By regulating a subset of PP2A functions at the centrosome, the RSA complex could therefore provide a means of coordinating microtubule outgrowth from centrosomes and kinetochore microtubule stability during mitotic spindle assembly.

  7. Protein phosphatases 2A as well as reactive oxygen species involved in tributyltin-induced apoptosis in mouse livers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yali; Chen, Yonggang; Sun, Lijun; Liang, Jing; Guo, Zonglou; Xu, Lihong

    2014-02-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), a highly toxic environmental contaminant, has been shown to induce caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in human amniotic cells through protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibition and consequent JNK activation. This in vivo study was undertaken to further verify the results derived from our previous in vitro study. Mice were orally dosed with 0, 10, 20, and 60 mg/kg of body weight TBT, and levels of PP2A, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Bax/Bcl-2, and caspase-3 were detected in the mouse livers. Apoptosis was also evaluated using the TUNEL assay. The results showed that PP2A activity was inhibited, ROS levels were elevated, and MAPKs including ERK, JNK, and p38 were activated in mouse livers treated with the highest dose of TBT. Additionally, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 was increased, caspase-3 was activated, and apoptosis in mouse livers could be detected in the highest dose group. Therefore, a possible signaling pathway in TBT-induced apoptosis in mouse livers involves PP2A inhibition and ROS elevation serving a pivotal function as upstream activators of MAPKs; activation of MAPKs in turn leads to an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, ultimately leading to the activation of caspase-3. The results give a comprehensive and novel description of the mechanism of TBT-induced toxicity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is required for cardiac lineage differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eshkiki, Zahra Shokati; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Shabani, Parisa; Firuzjaee, Sattar Gorgani; Sadeghi, Asie; Ghanbarian, Hossein; Meshkani, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been shown to regulate multiple cellular events such as differentiation, cell growth, and proliferation; however, the role of PTP1B in differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells into cardiomyocytes remains unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the effects of PTP1B inhibition on differentiation of ES cells into cardiomyocytes. PTP1B mRNA and protein levels were increased during the differentiation of ES cells into cardiomyocytes. Accordingly, a stable ES cell line expressing PTP1B shRNA was established. In vitro, the number and size of spontaneously beating embryoid bodies were significantly decreased in PTP1B-knockdown cells, compared with the control cells. Decreased expression of cardiac-specific markers Nkx2-5, MHC-α, cTnT, and CX43, as assessed by real-time PCR analysis, was further confirmed by immunocytochemistry of the markers. The results also showed that PTP1B inhibition induced apoptosis in both differentiated and undifferentiated ES cells, as presented by increasing the level of cleaved caspase-3, cytochrome C, and cleaved PARP. Further analyses revealed that PTP1B inhibition did not change proliferation and pluripotency of undifferentiated ES cells. Taken together, the data presented here suggest that PTP1B is essential for proper differentiation of ES cells into cardiomyocytes.

  9. Protein Phosphatase 2A Antagonizes ATM and ATR in a Cdk2- and Cdc7-Independent DNA Damage Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Paris; Chou, Danny M.; You, Zhongsheng; Hunter, Tony; Walter, Johannes C.; Walter, Gernot

    2006-01-01

    We previously used a soluble cell-free system derived from Xenopus eggs to investigate the role of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in chromosomal DNA replication. We found that immunodepletion of PP2A or inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid (OA) inhibits initiation of DNA replication by preventing loading of the initiation factor Cdc45 onto prereplication complexes. Evidence was provided that PP2A counteracts an inhibitory protein kinase that phosphorylates and inactivates a crucial Cdc45 loading factor. Here, we report that the inhibitory effect of OA is abolished by caffeine, an inhibitor of the checkpoint kinases ataxia-telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM) and ataxia-telangiectasia related protein (ATR) but not by depletion of ATM or ATR from the extract. Furthermore, we demonstrate that double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) cause inhibition of Cdc45 loading and initiation of DNA replication and that caffeine, as well as immunodepletion of either ATM or ATR, abolishes this inhibition. Importantly, the DSB-induced inhibition of Cdc45 loading is prevented by addition of the catalytic subunit of PP2A to the extract. These data suggest that DSBs and OA prevent Cdc45 loading through different pathways, both of which involve PP2A, but only the DSB-induced checkpoint implicates ATM and ATR. The inhibitory effect of DSBs on Cdc45 loading does not result from downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) or Cdc7 activity and is independent of Chk2. However, it is partially dependent on Chk1, which becomes phosphorylated in response to DSBs. These data suggest that PP2A counteracts ATM and ATR in a DNA damage checkpoint in Xenopus egg extracts. PMID:16479016

  10. Protein phosphatase 2A mediates JS-K-induced apoptosis by affecting Bcl-2 family proteins in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Huang, Zile; Chen, Jingjing; Wang, Jiangang; Wang, Shuying

    2018-04-25

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is an important enzyme within various signal transduction pathways. The present study was investigated PP2A mediates JS-K-induced apoptosis by affecting Bcl-2 family protein. JS-K showed diverse inhibitory effects in five HCC cell lines, especially HepG2 cells. JS-K caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in cell viability and increased in levels of LDH release. Meanwhile, JS-K- induced apoptosis was characterized by mitochondrial membrane potential reduction, Hoechst 33342 + /PI + dual staining, release of cytochrome c (Cyt c), and activation of cleaved caspase-9/3. Moreover, JS-K-treatment could lead to the activation of protein phosphatase 2A-C (PP2A-C), decrease of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family-protein expression including p-Bcl-2 (Ser70), Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1 as well as the increase of pro-apoptosis Bcl-2 family-protein including Bim, Bad, Bax, and Bak. Furthermore, JS-K caused a marked increase of intracellular NO levels while pre-treatment with Carboxy-PTIO (a NO scavenger) reduced the cytotoxicity effects and the apoptosis rate. Meanwhile, pre-treatment with Carboxy-PTIO attenuated the JS-K-induced up-regulation of PP2A, Cyt c, and cleaved-caspase-9/3 activation. The silencing PP2A-C by siRNA could abolish the activation of PP2A-C, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family-protein (p-Bcl-2, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1), increase of pro-apoptosis Bcl-2 family-protein (Bim, Bad, Bax, and Bak) and apoptotic-related protein (Cyt c, cleaved caspase-9/3) that were caused by JS-K in HepG2 cells. In addition, pre-treatment with OA (a PP2A inhibitor) also attenuated the above effects induced by JS-K. In summary, NO release from JS-K induces apoptosis through PP2A activation, which contributed to the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Protein Phosphatase 1-Dependent Transcriptional Programs for Long-Term Memory and Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff, Johannes; Koshibu, Kyoko; Jouvenceau, Anne; Dutar, Patrick; Mansuy, Isabelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Gene transcription is essential for the establishment and the maintenance of long-term memory (LTM) and for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity. The molecular mechanisms that control gene transcription in neuronal cells are complex and recruit multiple signaling pathways in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Protein kinases (PKs) and…

  12. A wheat (Triticum aestivum) protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit gene provides enhanced drought tolerance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chongyi; Jing, Ruilian; Mao, Xinguo; Jia, Xiaoyun; Chang, Xiaoping

    2007-03-01

    Multiple copies of genes encoding the catalytic subunit (c) of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) are commonly found in plants. For some of these genes, expression is up-regulated under water stress. The aim of this study was to investigate expression and characterization of TaPP2Ac-1 from Triticum aestivum, and to evaluate the effects of TaPP2Ac-1 on Nicotiana benthamiana in response to water stress. TaPP2Ac-1 cDNA was isolated from wheat by in silico identification and RT-PCR amplification. Transcript levels of TaPP2Ac-1 were examined in wheat responding to water deficit. Copy numbers of TaPP2Ac-1 in wheat genomes and subcellular localization in onion epidermal cells were studied. Enzyme properties of the recombinant TaPP2Ac-1 protein were determined. In addition, studies were carried out in tobacco plants with pCAPE2-TaPP2Ac-1 under water-deficit conditions. TaPP2Ac-1 cDNA was cloned from wheat. Transcript levels of TaPP2Ac-1 in wheat seedlings were up-regulated under drought condition. One copy for this TaPP2Ac-1 was present in each of the three wheat genomes. TaPP2Ac-1 fused with GFP was located in the nucleus and cytoplasm of onion epidermis cells. The recombinant TaPP2Ac-1 gene was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and encoded a functional serine/threonine phosphatase. Transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing TaPP2Ac-1 exhibited stronger drought tolerance than non-transgenic tobacco plants. Tobacco plants with pCAPE2-TaPP2Ac-1 appeared to be resistant to water deficit, as shown by their higher capacity to maintain leaf relative water content, leaf cell-membrane stability index, water-retention ability and water use efficiency under water stress. The results suggest that the physiological role of TaPP2Ac-1 is related to drought stress response, possibly through its involvement in drought-responding signal transduction pathways.

  13. The eighth fibronectin type III domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J influences the formation of protein complexes and cell localization.

    PubMed

    Iuliano, Rodolfo; Raso, Cinzia; Quintiero, Alfina; Pera, Ilaria Le; Pichiorri, Flavia; Palumbo, Tiziana; Palmieri, Dario; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Florio, Tullio; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Trapasso, Francesco; Croce, Carlo Maria; Fusco, Alfredo

    2009-03-01

    Regulation of receptor-type phosphatases can involve the formation of higher-order structures, but the exact role played in this process by protein domains is not well understood. In this study we show the formation of different higher-order structures of the receptor-type phosphatase PTPRJ, detected in HEK293A cells transfected with different PTPRJ expression constructs. In the plasma membrane PTPRJ forms dimers detectable by treatment with the cross-linking reagent BS(3) (bis[sulfosuccinimidyl]suberate). However, other PTPRJ complexes, dependent on the formation of disulfide bonds, are detected by treatment with the oxidant agent H(2)O(2) or by a mutation Asp872Cys, located in the eighth fibronectin type III domain of PTPRJ. A deletion in the eighth fibronectin domain of PTPRJ impairs its dimerization in the plasma membrane and increases the formation of PTPRJ complexes dependent on disulfide bonds that remain trapped in the cytoplasm. The deletion mutant maintains the catalytic activity but is unable to carry out inhibition of proliferation on HeLa cells, achieved by the wild type form, since it does not reach the plasma membrane. Therefore, the intact structure of the eighth fibronectin domain of PTPRJ is critical for its localization in plasma membrane and biological function.

  14. Applying a Targeted Label-free Approach using LC-MS AMT Tags to Evaluate Changes in Protein Phosphorylation Following Phosphatase Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Jaitly, Navdeep; Jayachandran, Hemalatha

    2007-10-12

    To identify phosphoproteins regulated by the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family of S/T phosphatases, we performed a large-scale characterization of changes in protein phosphorylation on extracts from HeLa cells treated with or without calyculin A, a potent PPP enzyme inhibitor. A label-free comparative Phosphoproteomics approach using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography and targeted tandem mass spectrometry was employed to discover and identify signatures based upon distinctive changes in abundance. Overall, 232 proteins were identified as either direct or indirect targets for PPP enzyme regulation. Most of the present identifications represent novel PPP enzyme targets at the level of both phosphorylation sitemore » and protein. These include phosphorylation sites within signaling proteins such as p120 Catenin, A Kinase Anchoring Protein 8, JunB, and Type II Phosphatidyl Inositol 4 Kinase. These data can be used to define underlying signaling pathways and events regulated by the PPP family of S/T phosphatases.« less

  15. NMDA-induced potentiation of mGluR5 is mediated by activation of protein phosphatase 2B/calcineurin

    PubMed Central

    Alagarsamy, Sudar; Saugstad, Julie; Warren, Lee; Mansuy, Isabelle M.; Gereau, Robert W.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors potentiates responses to activation of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR5 by reversing PKC-mediated desensitization of this receptor. NMDA-induced reversal of mGluR5 desensitization is dependent on activation of protein phosphatases. However, the specific protein phosphatase involved and the precise mechanism by which NMDA receptor activation reduces mGluR desensitization are not known. We have performed a series of molecular, biochemical, and genetic studies to show that NMDA-induced regulation of mGluR5 is dependent on activation of calcium-dependent protein phosphatase 2B/calcineurin (PP2B/CaN). Furthermore, we report that purified calcineurin directly dephosphorylates the C-terminal tail of mGluR5 at sites that are phosphorylated by PKC. Finally, immunoprecipitation and GST fusion protein pull-down experiments reveal that calcineurin interacts with mGluR5, suggesting that these proteins could be colocalized in a signaling complex. Taken together with previous studies, these data suggest that activation of NMDA receptors leads to activation of calcineurin and that calcineurin modulates mGluR5 function by directly dephosphorylating mGluR5 at PKC sites that are involved in desensitization of this receptor. 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. PMID:16005030

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 expression in macrophages is controlled by lymphocytes during macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chong; Yang, Xiqiang; Yao, Lan; Jiang, Liping; Liu, Wei; Li, Xin; Wang, Lijia

    2012-01-01

    The viewpoints on the control of innate immune cells by the adaptive immune system during sepsis remain controversial. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) is essential to the negative control of innate immunity and suppresses the activation of macrophages by inhibiting activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The purpose of the current study was to observe inflammatory response and macrophage activation in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with endotoxemia and to determine the role of MKP-1 in the control of macrophage activation by the adaptive immune system. Endotoxemia was induced in wild-type and SCID mice by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and all of the SCID mice died. SCID mice produced more inflammatory cytokines than BALB/c mice systemically and locally. TNF-α mRNA expression was higher and MKP-1 mRNA expression was lower in peritoneal macrophages (PMa) from SCID mice compared to PMa from wild-type mice after and even before LPS injection. Thioglycollate-stimulated PMa from wild-type mice were stimulated with LPS in vitro in the presence or absence of pan-T cells. The levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were higher in the supernatants from PMa cultured alone compared to PMa co-cultured with pan-T cells, and PMa MKP-1 mRNA and protein expression were higher when PMa were co-cultured with pan-T cells. Therefore, pan-T cells can up-regulate MKP-1 expression in macrophages and inhibit the secretion of inflammatory cytokines secretion by macrophages. In SCID mice, lymphocyte deficiency, especially T cell deficiency, causes insufficient MKP-1 expression in macrophages, which can be responsible for the severe inflammation and bad prognosis of septic SCID mice. MKP-1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage activation by the adaptive immune system.

  17. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP){beta}/{zeta} is expressed in different subtypes of human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Garcia-Suarez, Olivia; Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo

    2007-10-12

    Increasing evidence suggests mutations in human breast cancer cells that induce inappropriate expression of the 18-kDa cytokine pleiotrophin (PTN, Ptn) initiate progression of breast cancers to a more malignant phenotype. Pleiotrophin signals through inactivating its receptor, the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP){beta}/{zeta}, leading to increased tyrosine phosphorylation of different substrate proteins of RPTP{beta}/{zeta}, including {beta}-catenin, {beta}-adducin, Fyn, GIT1/Cat-1, and P190RhoGAP. PTN signaling thus has wide impact on different important cellular systems. Recently, PTN was found to activate anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway; this discovery potentially is very important, since constitutive ALK activity of nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK fusionmore » protein is causative of anaplastic large cell lymphomas, and, activated ALK is found in other malignant cancers. Recently ALK was identified in each of 63 human breast cancers from 22 subjects. We now demonstrate that RPTP{beta}/{zeta} is expressed in each of these same 63 human breast cancers that previously were found to express ALK and in 10 additional samples of human breast cancer. RPTP{beta}/{zeta} furthermore was localized not only in its normal association with the cell membrane but also scattered in cytoplasm and in nuclei in different breast cancer cells and, in the case of infiltrating ductal carcinomas, the distribution of RPTP{beta}/{zeta} changes as the breast cancer become more malignant. The data suggest that the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway may be constitutively activated and potentially function to constitutively activate ALK in human breast cancer.« less

  18. Protein Phosphatase 1 Inhibitor-1 Deficiency Reduces Phosphorylation of Renal NaCl Cotransporter and Causes Arterial Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Nicolas; Trompf, Katja; Yang, Chao-Ling; Miller, R. Lance; Carrel, Monique; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Fenton, Robert A.; Ellison, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) of the renal distal convoluted tubule (DCT) controls ion homeostasis and arterial BP. Loss-of-function mutations of NCC cause renal salt wasting with arterial hypotension (Gitelman syndrome). Conversely, mutations in the NCC-regulating WNK kinases or kelch-like 3 protein cause familial hyperkalemic hypertension. Here, we performed automated sorting of mouse DCTs and microarray analysis for comprehensive identification of novel DCT-enriched gene products, which may potentially regulate DCT and NCC function. This approach identified protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor-1 (I-1) as a DCT-enriched transcript, and immunohistochemistry revealed I-1 expression in mouse and human DCTs and thick ascending limbs. In heterologous expression systems, coexpression of NCC with I-1 increased thiazide-dependent Na+ uptake, whereas RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous I-1 reduced NCC phosphorylation. Likewise, levels of phosphorylated NCC decreased by approximately 50% in I-1 (I-1−/−) knockout mice without changes in total NCC expression. The abundance and phosphorylation of other renal sodium-transporting proteins, including NaPi-IIa, NKCC2, and ENaC, did not change, although the abundance of pendrin increased in these mice. The abundance, phosphorylation, and subcellular localization of SPAK were similar in wild-type (WT) and I-1−/− mice. Compared with WT mice, I-1−/− mice exhibited significantly lower arterial BP but did not display other metabolic features of NCC dysregulation. Thus, I-1 is a DCT-enriched gene product that controls arterial BP, possibly through regulation of NCC activity. PMID:24231659

  19. An ABA-regulated and Golgi-localized protein phosphatase controls water loss during leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kewei; Xia, Xiuying; Zhang, Yanyan; Gan, Su-Sheng

    2012-02-01

    It is known that a senescing leaf loses water faster than a non-senescing leaf and that ABA has an important role in promoting leaf senescence. However, questions such as why water loss is faster, how water loss is regulated, and how ABA functions in leaf senescence are not well understood. Here we report on the identification and functional analysis of a leaf senescence associated gene called SAG113. The RNA blot and GUS reporter analyses all show that SAG113 is expressed in senescing leaves and is induced by ABA in Arabidopsis. The SAG113 expression levels are significantly reduced in aba2 and abi4 mutants. A GFP fusion protein analysis revealed that SAG113 protein is localized in the Golgi apparatus. SAG113 encodes a protein phosphatase that belongs to the PP2C family and is able to functionally complement a yeast PP2C-deficient mutant TM126 (ptc1Δ). Leaf senescence is delayed in the SAG113 knockout mutant compared with that in the wild type, stomatal movement in the senescing leaves of SAG113 knockouts is more sensitive to ABA than that of the wild type, and the rate of water loss in senescing leaves of SAG113 knockouts is significantly reduced. In contrast, inducible over-expression of SAG113 results in a lower sensitivity of stomatal movement to ABA treatment, more rapid water loss, and precocious leaf senescence. No other aspects of growth and development, including seed germination, were observed. These findings suggest that SAG113, a negative regulator of ABA signal transduction, is specifically involved in the control of water loss during leaf senescence. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. A novel protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is involved in the transformation of human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    González, Jorge; Cornejo, Alberto; Santos, Marcia R M; Cordero, Esteban M; Gutiérrez, Bessy; Porcile, Patricio; Mortara, Renato A; Sagua, Hernán; Da Silveira, José Franco; Araya, Jorge E

    2003-01-01

    Here we provide evidence for a critical role of PP2As (protein phosphatase 2As) in the transformation of Trypanosoma cruzi. In axenic medium at pH 5.0, trypomastigotes rapidly transform into amastigotes, a process blocked by okadaic acid, a potent PP2A inhibitor, at concentrations as low as 0.1 microM. 1-Norokadaone, an inactive okadaic acid analogue, did not affect the transformation. Electron microscopy studies indicated that okadaic acid-treated trypomastigotes had not undergone ultrastructural modifications, reinforcing the idea that PP2A inhibits transformation. Using a microcystin-Sepharose affinity column we purified the native T. cruzi PP2A. The enzyme displayed activity against 32P-labelled phosphorylase a that was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by okadaic acid. The protein was also submitted to MS and, from the peptides obtained, degenerate primers were used to clone a novel T. cruzi PP2A enzyme by PCR. The isolated gene encodes a protein of 303 amino acids, termed TcPP2A, which displayed a high degree of homology (86%) with the catalytic subunit of Trypanosoma brucei PP2A. Northern-blot analysis revealed the presence of a major 2.1-kb mRNA hybridizing in all T. cruzi developmental stages. Southern-blot analysis suggested that the TcPP2A gene is present in low copy number in the T. cruzi genome. These results are consistent with the mapping of PP2A genes in two chromosomal bands by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and chromoblot hybridization. Our studies suggest that in T. cruzi PP2A is important for the complete transformation of trypomastigotes into amastigotes during the life cycle of this protozoan parasite. PMID:12737627

  1. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibitor CIP2A indicates resistance to radiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Birkman, Eva-Maria; Elzagheid, Adam; Jokilehto, Terhi; Avoranta, Tuulia; Korkeila, Eija; Kulmala, Jarmo; Syrjänen, Kari; Westermarck, Jukka; Sundström, Jari

    2018-03-01

    Preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy, (C)RT, is an essential part of the treatment of rectal cancer patients, but tumor response to this therapy among patients is variable. Thus far, there are no clinical biomarkers that could be used to predict response to (C)RT or to stratify patients into different preoperative treatment groups according to their prognosis. Overexpression of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) has been demonstrated in several cancers and is frequently associated with reduced survival. Recently, high CIP2A expression has also been indicated to contribute to radioresistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, but few studies have examined the connection between CIP2A and radiation response regarding other malignancies. We have evaluated CIP2A protein expression levels in relation to tumor regression after preoperative (C)RT and survival of rectal adenocarcinoma patients. The effects of CIP2A knockdown by siRNA on cell survival were further investigated in colorectal cancer cells exposed to radiation. Patients with low-CIP2A-expressing tumors had more frequently moderate or excellent response to long-course (C)RT than patients with high-CIP2A-expressing tumors. They also had higher 36-month disease-specific survival (DSS) rate in categorical analysis. In the multivariate analysis, low CIP2A expression level remained as an independent predictive factor for increased DSS. Suppression of CIP2A transcription by siRNA was found to sensitize colorectal cancer cells to irradiation and decrease their survival in vitro. In conclusion, these results suggest that by contributing to radiosensitivity of cancer cells, low CIP2A protein expression level associates with a favorable response to long-course (C)RT in rectal cancer patients. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Benzene Polyphosphates as Tools for Cell Signalling: Inhibition of Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate 5-Phosphatase and Interaction with the PH Domain of Protein Kinase Bα

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Stephen J; Vandeput, Fabrice; Trusselle, Melanie N.; Safrany, Stephen T.; Erneux, Christophe; Potter, Barry V. L.

    2009-01-01

    Novel benzene polyphosphates were synthesised as inositol polyphosphate mimics and evaluated against both type-I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 5-phosphatase, which only binds soluble inositol polyphosphates, and the PH domain of protein kinase Bα (PKBα), which can bind both soluble inositol polyphosphates and inositol phospholipids. The most potent trisphosphate 5-phosphatase inhibitor is benzene 1,2,4-trisphosphate 2, (IC50 of 14 μm) a potential mimic of d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and the most potent tetrakisphosphate Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase inhibitor is benzene 1,2,4,5-tetrakisphosphate, with an IC50 of 4 μm. Biphenyl 2,3′,4,5′,6-pentakisphosphate 4 was the most potent inhibitor evaluated against type I Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase (IC50 of 1 μm). All new benzene polyphosphates are resistant to dephosphorylation by type I Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase. Unexpectedly, all benzene polyphosphates studied bind to the PH domain of PKBα with apparent higher affinity than type 1 Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase. The most potent ligand for PKBα PH domain is biphenyl 2,3′,4,5′,6-pentakisphosphate 4 (Ki = 27 nm), measured by inhibition of biotinylated diC8-PtdIns(3,4)P2 binding. The ca 80-fold enhancement of binding relative to parent benzene trisphosphate is rationalised by the involvement of a cation–π interaction. These new molecular tools will be of potential use in structural and cell signalling studies. PMID:18574825

  3. Allosteric Inhibition of the nonMyristoylated c-Abl Tyrosine Kinase by Phosphopeptides Derived from Abi1/Hssh3bp1

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaoling; Cui, Ping; Hossain, Sajjad; Xu, Rong; Warner, Brian; Guo, Xinhua; An, Xiuli; Debnath, Asim K.; Cowburn, David; Kotula, Leszek

    2008-01-01

    Here we report c-Abl kinase inhibition mediated by a phosphotyrosine located in trans in the c-Abl substrate, Abi1. The mechanism, which is pertinent to the nonmyristoylated c-Abl kinase, involves high affinity concurrent binding of the phosphotyrosine pY213 to the Abl SH2 domain and binding of a proximal PXXP motif to the Abl SH3 domain. Abi1 regulation of c-Abl in vivo appears to play a critical role, as demonstrated by inhibition of pY412 phosphorylation of the nonmyristoylated Abl by coexpression of Abi1. Pervanadate-induced c-Abl kinase activity was also reduced upon expression of the wild type Abi1 but not by expression of the Y213 to F213 mutant Abi1 in LNCaP cells, which are naturally deficient in the regulatory pY213. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism by which Abl kinase is regulated in cells. PMID:18328268

  4. CuAAC click chemistry accelerates the discovery of novel chemical scaffolds as promising protein tyrosine phosphatases inhibitors.

    PubMed

    He, X-P; Xie, J; Tang, Y; Li, J; Chen, G-R

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are crucial regulators for numerous biological processes in nature. The dysfunction and overexpression of many PTP members have been demonstrated to cause fatal human diseases such as cancers, diabetes, obesity, neurodegenerative diseases and autoimmune disorders. In the past decade, considerable efforts have been devoted to the production of PTPs inhibitors by both academia and the pharmaceutical industry. However, there are only limited drug candidates in clinical trials and no commercial drugs have been approved, implying that further efficient discovery of novel chemical entities competent for inhibition of the specific PTP target in vivo remains yet a challenge. In light of the click-chemistry paradigm which advocates the utilization of concise and selective carbon-heteroatom ligation reactions for the modular construction of useful compound libraries, the Cu(I)-catalyzed azidealkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC) has fueled enormous energy into the modern drug discovery. Recently, this ingenious chemical ligation tool has also revealed efficacious and expeditious in establishing large combinatorial libraries for the acquisition of novel PTPs inhibitors with promising pharmacological profiles. We thus offer here a comprehensive review highlighting the development of PTPs inhibitors accelerated by the CuAAC click chemistry.

  5. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a mediator of cyclic ADP ribose-induced Ca2+ signaling in ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Seon-Ah; Hong, Bing-Zhe; Ha, Ki-Chan; Kim, Uh-Hyun; Han, Myung-Kwan; Kwak, Yong-Geun

    2017-06-02

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) releases Ca 2+ from ryanodine receptor (RyR)-sensitive calcium pools in various cell types. In cardiac myocytes, the physiological levels of cADPR transiently increase the amplitude and frequency of Ca 2+ (that is, a rapid increase and decrease of calcium within one second) during the cardiac action potential. In this study, we demonstrated that cADPR levels higher than physiological levels induce a slow and gradual increase in the resting intracellular Ca 2+ ([Ca 2+ ] i ) level over 10 min by inhibiting the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ ATPase (SERCA). Higher cADPR levels mediate the tyrosine-dephosphorylation of α-actin by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) present in the endoplasmic reticulum. The tyrosine dephosphorylation of α-actin dissociates phospholamban, the key regulator of SERCA, from α-actin and results in SERCA inhibition. The disruption of the integrity of α-actin by cytochalasin B and the inhibition of α-actin tyrosine dephosphorylation by a PTP1B inhibitor block cADPR-mediated Ca 2+ increase. Our results suggest that levels of cADPR that are relatively higher than normal physiological levels modify calcium homeostasis through the dephosphorylation of α-actin by PTB1B and the subsequent inhibition of SERCA in cardiac myocytes.

  6. Computational revelation of binding mechanisms of inhibitors to endocellular protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fangfang; Liu, Xinguo; Zhang, Shaolong; Su, Jing; Zhang, Qinggang; Chen, Jianzhong

    2017-11-06

    Endocellular protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is one of the most promising target for designing and developing drugs to cure type-II diabetes and obesity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) and solvated interaction energy methods were applied to study binding differences of three inhibitors (ID: 901, 941, and 968) to PTP1B, the calculated results show that the inhibitor 901 has the strongest binding ability to PTP1B among the current inhibitors. Principal component (PC) analysis was also carried out to investigate the conformational change of PTP1B, and the results indicate that the associations of inhibitors with PTP1B generate a significant effect on the motion of the WPD-loop. Free energy decomposition method was applied to study the contributions of individual residues to inhibitor bindings, it is found that three inhibitors can generate hydrogen bonding interactions and hydrophobic interactions with different residues of PTP1B, which provide important forces for associations of inhibitors with PTP1B. This research is expected to give a meaningfully theoretical guidance to design and develop of effective drugs curing type-II diabetes and obesity.

  7. A complex between contactin-1 and the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRZ controls the development of oligodendrocyte precursor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lamprianou, Smaragda; Chatzopoulou, Elli; Thomas, Jean-Léon

    The six members of the contactin (CNTN) family of neural cell adhesion molecules are involved in the formation and maintenance of the central nervous system (CNS) and have been linked to mental retardation and neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism. Five of the six CNTNs bind to the homologous receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases gamma (PTPRG) and zeta (PTPRZ), but the biological roles of these interactions remain unclear. We report here the cocrystal structure of the carbonic anhydrase-like domain of PTPRZ bound to tandem Ig repeats of CNTN1 and combine these structural data with binding assays to show that PTPRZ binds specificallymore » to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Furthermore, analyses of glial cell populations in wild-type and PTPRZ-deficient mice show that the binding of PTPRZ to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells inhibits their proliferation and promotes their development into mature oligodendrocytes. Overall, these results implicate the PTPRZ/CNTN1 complex as a previously unknown modulator of oligodendrogenesis.« less

  8. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade controls phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ciuffreda, Ludovica; Di Sanza, Cristina; Cesta Incani, Ursula; Eramo, Adriana; Desideri, Marianna; Biagioni, Francesca; Passeri, Daniela; Falcone, Italia; Sette, Giovanni; Bergamo, Paola; Anichini, Andrea; Sabapathy, Kanaga; McCubrey, James A; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Tafuri, Agostino; Blandino, Giovanni; Orlandi, Augusto; De Maria, Ruggero; Cognetti, Francesco; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Milella, Michele

    2012-06-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K pathways are regulated by extensive crosstalk, occurring at different levels. In tumors, transactivation of the alternate pathway is a frequent "escape" mechanism, suggesting that combined inhibition of both pathways may achieve synergistic antitumor activity. Here we show that, in the M14 melanoma model, simultaneous inhibition of both MEK and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) achieves synergistic effects at suboptimal concentrations, but becomes frankly antagonistic in the presence of relatively high concentrations of MEK inhibitors. This observation led to the identification of a novel crosstalk mechanism, by which either pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of constitutive MEK signaling restores phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression, both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibits downstream signaling through AKT and mTOR, thus bypassing the need for double pathway blockade. This appears to be a general regulatory mechanism and is mediated by multiple mechanisms, such as MAPK-dependent c-Jun and miR-25 regulation. Finally, PTEN upregulation appears to be a major effector of MEK inhibitors' antitumor activity, as cancer cells in which PTEN is inactivated are consistently more resistant to the growth inhibitory and anti-angiogenic effects of MEK blockade.

  9. Aspergillus fumigatus protein phosphatase PpzA is involved in iron assimilation, secondary metabolite production, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Manfiolli, Adriana Oliveira; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Dolan, Stephen; Doyle, Sean; Jones, Gary; Riaño Pachón, Diego M; Ulaş, Mevlüt; Noble, Luke M; Mattern, Derek J; Brakhage, Axel A; Valiante, Vito; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Bayram, Ozgur; Goldman, Gustavo H

    2017-12-01

    Metal restriction imposed by mammalian hosts during an infection is a common mechanism of defence to reduce or avoid the pathogen infection. Metals are essential for organism survival due to its involvement in several biological processes. Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive aspergillosis, a disease that typically manifests in immunocompromised patients. A. fumigatus PpzA, the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase Z (PPZ), has been recently identified as associated with iron assimilation. A. fumigatus has 2 high-affinity mechanisms of iron acquisition during infection: reductive iron assimilation and siderophore-mediated iron uptake. It has been shown that siderophore production is important for A. fumigatus virulence, differently to the reductive iron uptake system. Transcriptomic and proteomic comparisons between ∆ppzA and wild-type strains under iron starvation showed that PpzA has a broad influence on genes involved in secondary metabolism. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry under standard and iron starvation conditions confirmed that the ΔppzA mutant had reduced production of pyripyropene A, fumagillin, fumiquinazoline A, triacetyl-fusarinine C, and helvolic acid. The ΔppzA was shown to be avirulent in a neutropenic murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. PpzA plays an important role at the interface between iron starvation, regulation of SM production, and pathogenicity in A. fumigatus. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Ligand-Dependent Interaction of PPARδ With T-Cell Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 45 Enhances Insulin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Taesik; Ham, Sun Ah; Lee, Won Jin; Hwang, Seon In; Park, Jin-A; Hwang, Jung Seok; Hur, Jinwoo; Shin, Ho-Chul; Han, Sung Gu; Lee, Chi-Ho; Han, Dong Wook; Paek, Kyung Shin; Seo, Han Geuk

    2018-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ plays a pivotal role in metabolic homeostasis through its effect on insulin signaling. Although diverse genomic actions of PPARδ are postulated, the specific molecular mechanisms whereby PPARδ controls insulin signaling have not been fully elucidated. We demonstrate here that short-term activation of PPARδ results in the formation of a stable complex with nuclear T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase 45 (TCPTP45) isoform. This interaction of PPARδ with TCPTP45 blocked translocation of TCPTP45 into the cytoplasm, thereby preventing its interaction with the insulin receptor, which inhibits insulin signaling. Interaction of PPARδ with TCPTP45 blunted interleukin 6-induced insulin resistance, leading to retention of TCPTP45 in the nucleus, thereby facilitating deactivation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)-suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) signal. Finally, GW501516-activated PPARδ improved insulin signaling and glucose intolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet through its interaction with TCPTP45. This novel interaction of PPARδ constitutes the most upstream component identified of the mechanism downregulating insulin signaling. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. A rapid lateral flow immunoassay for the detection of tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 autoantibodies in human serum.

    PubMed

    Kikkas, Ingrid; Mallone, Roberto; Larger, Etienne; Volland, Hervé; Morel, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from the destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells and is strongly associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies. Autoantibodies to tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 (IA-2As) are considered to be highly predictive markers of T1D. We developed a novel lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) based on a bridging format for the rapid detection of IA-2As in human serum samples. In this assay, one site of the IA-2As is bound to HA-tagged-IA-2, which is subsequently captured on the anti-HA-Tag antibody-coated test line on the strip. The other site of the IA-2As is bound to biotinylated IA-2, allowing the complex to be visualized using colloidal gold nanoparticle-conjugated streptavidin. For this study, 35 serum samples from T1D patients and 44 control sera from non-diabetic individuals were analyzed with our novel assay and the results were correlated with two IA-2A ELISAs. Among the 35 serum samples from T1D patients, the IA-2A LFIA, the in-house IA-2A ELISA and the commercial IA-2A ELISA identified as positive 21, 29 and 30 IA-2A-positive sera, respectively. The major advantages of the IA-2A LFIA are its rapidity and simplicity.

  12. Highly sensitive detection and discrimination of LR and YR microcystins based on protein phosphatases and an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Covaci, O I; Sassolas, A; Alonso, G A; Muñoz, R; Radu, G L; Bucur, B; Marty, J-L

    2012-08-01

    The inhibition characteristics of three different protein phosphatases by three microcystin (MC) variants--LR, YR, and RR--were studied. The corresponding K (I) for each enzyme-MC couple was calculated. The toxicity of MC varies in the following order: MC-LR > MC-YR > MC-RR. The sensitivity of the enzymes increased in the following order: mutant PP2A < mutant PP1 < natural PP2A. The best limit of detection obtained was 21.2 pM MC-LR using the most sensible enzyme. Methanol, ethanol, and acetonitrile up to 2 % (v/v) may be used in inhibition measurements. An artificial neural network (ANN) was used to discriminate two MC variants--LR and YR--using the differences in inhibition percentages measured with mutant PP1 and natural PP2A. The ANN is able to analyze mixtures with concentrations ranging from 8 to 98 pM MC-LR and 31 to 373 pM MC-YR.

  13. Structure of the Trypanosoma cruzi protein tyrosine phosphatase TcPTP1, a potential therapeutic target for Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2013-06-05

    Chagas’ disease, a neglected tropical affliction transmitted by the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is prevalent in Latin America and affects nearly 18 million people worldwide, yet few approved drugs are available to treat the disease. Moreover, the currently available drugs exhibit severe toxicity or are poorly effective in the chronic phase of the disease. This limitation, along with the large population at risk, underscores the urgent need to discover new molecular targets and novel therapeutic agents. Recently, the T. cruzi protein tyrosine phosphatase TcPTP1 has been implicated in the cellular differentiation and infectivity of the parasite and is therefore amore » promising target for the design of novel anti-parasitic drugs. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of TcPTP1 refined to a resolution of 2.18 Å, which provides structural insights into the active site environment that can be used to initiate structure-based drug design efforts to develop specific TcPTP1 inhibitors. Potential strategies to develop such inhibitors are also discussed.« less

  14. Altered expression levels of the protein phosphatase 2A ABalphaC enzyme are associated with Alzheimer disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Sontag, Estelle; Luangpirom, Ampa; Hladik, Christa; Mudrak, Ingrid; Ogris, Egon; Speciale, Samuel; White, Charles L

    2004-04-01

    The formation of amyloid-containing senile plaques and tau-rich neurofibrillary tangles are central events in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis. Significantly, ABalphaC, a major protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) holoenzyme, specifically binds to and dephosphorylates tau. Deregulation of PP2A results in tau hyperphosphorylation in vivo. Here, we compared the expression levels and distribution of PP2A subunits in various brain regions from autopsy cases of AD and aged controls with or without histological evidence of age-related neurofibrillary degeneration. Immunoblotting analyses revealed that there was a significant reduction in the total amounts of ABalphaC in AD frontal and temporal cortices that matched the decrease in PP2A activity measured in the same brain homogenates. Immunohistochemical studies showed that neuronal ABalphaC expression levels were significantly and selectively decreased in AD-affected regions and in tangle-bearing neurons, but not in AD cerebellum and in non-AD dementias. Reduced neuronal ABalphaC immunoreactivity closely correlated with tangle load, but not plaque burden, suggesting that ABalphaC dysfunction contributes to AD tau pathology. Glial cells within senile plaques were also positive for ABalphaC. Increased glial PP2A immunoreactivity was observed in both AD and non-AD cases and may play a role in the brain's response to general inflammatory processes and amyloidogenesis.

  15. Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1 negatively regulates Dictyostelium STATa and is required for proper cell-type proportioning.

    PubMed

    Early, A; Gamper, M; Moniakis, J; Kim, E; Hunter, T; Williams, J G; Firtel, R A

    2001-04-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1, which mediates reversible phosphorylation on tyrosine, has been shown to play an important regulatory role during Dictyostelium development. Mutants lacking PTP1 develop more rapidly than normal, while strains that overexpress PTP1 display aberrant morphology. However, the signalling pathways involved have not been characterised. In reexamining these strains, we have found that there is an inverse correlation between levels of PTP1 activity, the extent of tyrosine phosphorylation on Dictyostelium STATa after treatment with cAMP, and the proportion of the slug population exhibiting STATa nuclear enrichment in vivo. This suggests that PTP1 acts to attenuate the tyrosine phosphorylation of STATa and downstream STATa-mediated pathways. Consistent with this, we show that when PTP1 is overexpressed, there is increased expression of a prestalk cell marker at the slug posterior, a phenocopy of STATa null slugs. In ptp1 null strains, STATa tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear enrichment in the slug anterior is increased. There is also a change in the prestalk to prespore cell ratio. Synergy experiments suggest that this is due to a cell-autonomous defect in forming the subset of prespore cells that are located in the anterior prespore region. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  16. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B negatively regulates S100A9-mediated lung damage during respiratory syncytial virus exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Foronjy, R F; Ochieng, P O; Salathe, M A; Dabo, A J; Eden, E; Baumlin, N; Cummins, N; Barik, S; Campos, M; Thorp, E B; Geraghty, P

    2016-09-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has anti-inflammatory potential but PTP1B responses are desensitized in the lung by prolonged cigarette smoke exposure. Here we investigate whether PTP1B expression affects lung disease severity during respiratory syncytial viral (RSV) exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Ptp1b(-/-) mice infected with RSV exhibit exaggerated immune cell infiltration, damaged epithelial cell barriers, cytokine production, and increased apoptosis. Elevated expression of S100A9, a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, was observed in the lungs of Ptp1b(-/-) mice during RSV infection. Utilizing a neutralizing anti-S100A9 IgG antibody, it was determined that extracellular S100A9 signaling significantly affects lung damage during RSV infection. Preexposure to cigarette smoke desensitized PTP1B activity that coincided with enhanced S100A9 secretion and inflammation in wild-type animals during RSV infection. S100A9 levels in human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid had an inverse relationship with lung function in healthy subjects, smokers, and COPD subjects. Fully differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells isolated from COPD donors cultured at the air liquid interface secreted more S100A9 than cells from healthy donors or smokers following RSV infection. Together, these findings show that reduced PTP1B responses contribute to disease symptoms in part by enhancing S100A9 expression during viral-associated COPD exacerbations.

  17. Disruption of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B expression in the pancreas affects β-cell function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siming; Xi, Yannan; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Matsuo, Kosuke; Matsuo, Izumi; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Haj, Fawaz G

    2014-09-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a physiological regulator of glucose homeostasis and energy balance. However, the role of PTP1B in pancreatic endocrine function remains largely unknown. To investigate the metabolic role of pancreatic PTP1B, we generated mice with pancreas PTP1B deletion (panc-PTP1B KO). Mice were fed regular chow or a high-fat diet, and metabolic parameters, insulin secretion and glucose tolerance were determined. On regular chow, panc-PTP1B KO and control mice exhibited comparable glucose tolerance whereas aged panc-PTP1B KO exhibited mild glucose intolerance. Furthermore, high-fat feeding promoted earlier impairment of glucose tolerance and attenuated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in panc-PTP1B KO mice. The secretory defect in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was recapitulated in primary islets ex vivo, suggesting that the effects were likely cell-autonomous. At the molecular level, PTP1B deficiency in vivo enhanced basal and glucose-stimulated tyrosyl phosphorylation of EphA5 in islets. Consistently, PTP1B overexpression in the glucose-responsive MIN6 β-cell line attenuated EphA5 tyrosyl phosphorylation, and substrate trapping identified EphA5 as a PTP1B substrate. In summary, these studies identify a novel role for PTP1B in pancreatic endocrine function.

  18. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of Greatwall kinase by protein phosphatase 1 and regulatory subunit 3B.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dapeng; Fisher, Laura A; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Ling; Williams, Byron C; Goldberg, Michael L; Peng, Aimin

    2017-06-16

    Greatwall (Gwl) kinase plays an essential role in the regulation of mitotic entry and progression. Mitotic activation of Gwl requires both cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)-dependent phosphorylation and its autophosphorylation at an evolutionarily conserved serine residue near the carboxyl terminus (Ser-883 in Xenopus ). In this study we show that Gwl associates with protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), particularly PP1γ, which mediates the dephosphorylation of Gwl Ser-883. Consistent with the mitotic activation of Gwl, its association with PP1 is disrupted in mitotic cells and egg extracts. During mitotic exit, PP1-dependent dephosphorylation of Gwl Ser-883 occurs prior to dephosphorylation of other mitotic substrates; replacing endogenous Gwl with a phosphomimetic S883E mutant blocks mitotic exit. Moreover, we identified PP1 regulatory subunit 3B (PPP1R3B) as a targeting subunit that can direct PP1 activity toward Gwl. PPP1R3B bridges PP1 and Gwl association and promotes Gwl Ser-883 dephosphorylation. Consistent with the cell cycle-dependent association of Gwl and PP1, Gwl and PPP1R3B dissociate in M phase. Interestingly, up-regulation of PPP1R3B facilitates mitotic exit and blocks mitotic entry. Thus, our study suggests PPP1R3B as a new cell cycle regulator that functions by governing Gwl dephosphorylation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is dispensable for IgE-mediated cutaneous reaction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Xie, Zhongping; Li, Hua; Yue, Lei; Pang, Zheng; MacNeil, Adam J; Tremblay, Michel L; Tang, Jin-Tian; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells play a critical role in allergic reactions. The cross-linking of FcεRI-bound IgE with multivalent antigen initiates a cascade of signaling events leading to mast cell activation. It has been well-recognized that cross linking of FcεRI mediates tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the mechanism involved in tyrosine dephosphorylation in mast cells is less clear. Here we demonstrated that protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B)-deficient mast cells showed increased IgE-mediated phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and enhanced production of CCL9 (MIP-1γ) and IL-6 in IgE-mediated mast cells activation in vitro. However, IgE-mediated calcium mobilization, β-hexaosaminidase release (degranulation), and phosphorylation of IκB and MAP kinases were not affected by PTP1B deficiency. Furthermore, PTP1B deficient mice showed normal IgE-dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and late phase cutaneous reactions in vivo. Thus, PTP1B specifically regulates IgE-mediated STAT5 pathway, but is redundant in influencing mast cell function in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP1B) and α-glucosidase by geranylated flavonoids from Paulownia tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Song, Yeong Hun; Uddin, Zia; Jin, Young Min; Li, Zuopeng; Curtis-Long, Marcus John; Kim, Kwang Dong; Cho, Jung Keun; Park, Ki Hun

    2017-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and α-glucosidase are important targets to treat obesity and diabetes, due to their deep correlation with insulin and leptin signalling, and glucose regulation. The methanol extract of Paulownia tomentosa fruits showed potent inhibition against both enzymes. Purification of this extract led to eight geranylated flavonoids (1-8) displaying dual inhibition of PTP1B and α-glucosidase. The isolated compounds were identified as flavanones (1-5) and dihydroflavonols (6-8). Inhibitory potencies of these compounds varied accordingly, but most of the compounds were highly effective against PTP1B (IC 50  = 1.9-8.2 μM) than α-glucosidase (IC 50  = 2.2-78.9 μM). Mimulone (1) was the most effective against PTP1B with IC 50  = 1.9 μM, whereas 6-geranyl-3,3',5,5',7-pentahydroxy-4'-methoxyflavane (8) displayed potent inhibition against α-glucosidase (IC 50  = 2.2 μM). All inhibitors showed mixed type Ι inhibition toward PTP1B, and were noncompetitive inhibitors of α-glucosidase. This mixed type behavior against PTP1B was fully demonstrated by showing a decrease in V max , an increase of K m , and K ik /K iv ratio ranging between 2.66 and 3.69.

  1. Covalent Allosteric Inactivation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) by an Inhibitor-Electrophile Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Punthasee, Puminan; Laciak, Adrian R; Cummings, Andrea H; Ruddraraju, Kasi Viswanatharaju; Lewis, Sarah M; Hillebrand, Roman; Singh, Harkewal; Tanner, John J; Gates, Kent S

    2017-04-11

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a validated drug target, but it has proven difficult to develop medicinally useful, reversible inhibitors of this enzyme. Here we explored covalent strategies for the inactivation of PTP1B using a conjugate composed of an active site-directed 5-aryl-1,2,5-thiadiazolidin-3-one 1,1-dioxide inhibitor connected via a short linker to an electrophilic α-bromoacetamide moiety. Inhibitor-electrophile conjugate 5a caused time-dependent loss of PTP1B activity consistent with a covalent inactivation mechanism. The inactivation occurred with a second-order rate constant of (1.7 ± 0.3) × 10 2 M -1 min -1 . Mass spectrometric analysis of the inactivated enzyme indicated that the primary site of modification was C121, a residue distant from the active site. Previous work provided evidence that covalent modification of the allosteric residue C121 can cause inactivation of PTP1B [Hansen, S. K., Cancilla, M. T., Shiau, T. P., Kung, J., Chen, T., and Erlanson, D. A. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 7704-7712]. Overall, our results are consistent with an unusual enzyme inactivation process in which noncovalent binding of the inhibitor-electrophile conjugate to the active site of PTP1B protects the nucleophilic catalytic C215 residue from covalent modification, thus allowing inactivation of the enzyme via selective modification of allosteric residue C121.

  2. Identification of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 as a new target of perfluoroalkyl acids in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Lv, Qi-Yan; Guo, Liang-Hong; Wan, Bin; Ren, Xiao-Min; Shi, Ya-Li; Cai, Ya-Qi

    2017-04-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widespread environmental contaminants which have been detected in humans and linked to adverse health effects. Previous toxicological studies mostly focused on nuclear receptor-mediated pathways and did not support the observed toxic effects. In this study, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of PFAA toxicities by identifying their biological targets in cells. Using a novel electrochemical biosensor, 16 PFAAs were evaluated for inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 activity. Their potency increased with PFAA chain length, with perfluorooctadecanoic acid (PFODA) showing the strongest inhibition. Three selected PFAAs, 25 μM perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, and PFODA, also inhibited SHP-2 activity in HepG2 cells and increased paxillin phosphorylation level. PFOA was detected in the immunoprecipitated SHP-2 from the cells exposed to 250 μM PFOA, providing unequivocal evidence for the direct binding of PFOA with SHP-2 in the cell. Molecular docking rationalized the formation of PFAA/SHP-2 complex and chain length-dependent inhibition potency. Our results have established SHP-2 as a new cellular target of PFAAs.

  3. The protein phosphatase inhibitor cantharidin induces head and foot formation in buds of Cassiopea andromeda (Rhizostomae, Scyphozoa).

    PubMed

    Kehls, N E; Herrmann, K; Berking, S

    1999-01-01

    The polyps of Cassiopea andromeda produce spindle shaped, freely swimming buds which do not develop a head (a mouth opening surrounded by tentacles) and a foot (a sticky plate at the opposite end) until settlement to a suited substrate. The buds, therewith, look very similar to the planula larvae produced in sexual reproduction. With respect to both, buds and planulae, several peptides and the phorbolester TPA have been found to induce the transformation into a polyp. Here it is shown that cantharidin, a serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitor, induces head and foot formation in buds very efficiently in a 30 min treatment, the shortest yet known efficient treatment. Some resultant polyps show malformations which indicate that a bud is ordinary polyp tissue in which preparatory steps of head and foot formation mutually block each other from proceeding. Various compounds related to the transfer of methyl groups have been shown to affect head and foot formation in larvae of the hydrozoon Hydractinia echinata. These compounds including methionine, homocysteine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid and cycloleucine are shown to also interfere with the initiation of the processes which finally lead to head and foot formation in buds of Cassiopea andromeda.

  4. 17β-Estradiol and/or estrogen receptor alpha signaling blocks protein phosphatase 1 mediated ISO induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Hung, Meng-Yu; Lin, Yueh-Min; Pandey, Sudhir; Chang, Chia-Chien; Lin, Kuan-Ho; Shen, Chia-Yao; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2018-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that estrogen possess protective function against the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. However, the molecular mechanisms of estrogens (E2) protective effect are poorly understood. Additionally, abnormal activation of β-adrenergic signaling have been implicated in the development of pathological cardiac remodeling. However, the role of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) in pathological cardiac remodeling under the influence of β-adrenergic signaling have been sparsely investigated. In this study, we assessed the downstream effects of abnormal activation of PP1 upon isoproterenol (ISO) induced pathological cardiac changes. We found that pre-treatment of 17β-estradiol (E2), tet-on estrogen receptor-α, or both significantly inhibited ISO-induced increase in cell size, hypertrophy marker gene expression and cytosolic calcium accumulation in H9c2 cells. Additionally, treatment with estrogen receptor inhibitor (ICI) reversed those effects, implicating role of E2 in inhibiting pathological cardiac remodeling. However, specific inhibition of ERα using melatonin, reduced ISO-induced PP1c expression and enhanced the level of ser-16 phosphorylated phospholamban (PLB), responsible for regulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) activity. Furthermore, hypertrophic effect caused by overexpression of PP1cα was reduced by treatment with specific inhibitor of ERα. Collectively, we found that estrogen and estrogen receptor-α have protective effect against pathological cardiac changes by suppressing PP1 expression and its downstream signaling pathway, which further needs to be elucidated.

  5. Nuclear localization of CPI-17, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, affects histone H3 phosphorylation and corresponds to proliferation of cancer and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Masumi, E-mail: masumi.eto@jefferson.edu; Kirkbride, Jason A.; Chugh, Rishika

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Non-canonical roles of the myosin phosphatase inhibitor (CPI-17) were studied. •CPI-17 is localized in the nucleus of hyperplastic cancer and smooth muscle cells. •CPI-17 Ser12 phosphorylation may regulate the nuclear import. •CPI-17 regulates histone H3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation. •The nuclear CPI-17-PP1 axis plays a proliferative role in cells. -- Abstract: CPI-17 (C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor, 17 kDa) is a cytoplasmic protein predominantly expressed in mature smooth muscle (SM) that regulates the myosin-associated PP1 holoenzyme (MLCP). Here, we show CPI-17 expression in proliferating cells, such as pancreatic cancer and hyperplastic SM cells. Immunofluorescence showed that CPI-17 was concentratedmore » in nuclei of human pancreatic cancer (Panc1) cells. Nuclear accumulation of CPI-17 was also detected in the proliferating vascular SM cell culture and cells at neointima of rat vascular injury model. The N-terminal 21-residue tail domain of CPI-17 was necessary for the nuclear localization. Phospho-mimetic Asp-substitution of CPI-17 at Ser12 attenuated the nuclear import. CPI-17 phosphorylated at Ser12 was not localized at nuclei, suggesting a suppressive role of Ser12 phosphorylation in the nuclear import. Activated CPI-17 bound to all three isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in Panc1 nuclear extracts. CPI-17 knockdown in Panc1 resulted in dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3, Ser10 and Thr11, whereas it had no effects on the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and merlin, the known targets of MLCP. In parallel, CPI-17 knockdown suppressed Panc1 proliferation. We propose that CPI-17 accumulated in the nucleus through the N-terminal tail targets multiple PP1 signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation.« less

  6. Activation of T-cell Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase Suppresses Keratinocyte Survival and Proliferation following UVB Irradiation*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunseung; Morales, Liza D.; Slaga, Thomas J.; Kim, Dae Joon

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to UV radiation can contribute to the development of skin cancer by promoting protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) signaling. Studies show that exposure to UV radiation increases the ligand-independent activation of PTKs and induces protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inactivation. In the present work, we report that T-cell PTP (TC-PTP) activity is stimulated during the initial response to UVB irradiation, which leads to suppression of keratinocyte cell survival and proliferation via the down-regulation of STAT3 signaling. Our results show that TC-PTP-deficient keratinocyte cell lines expressed a significantly increased level of phosphorylated STAT3 after exposure to low dose UVB. This increase corresponded with increased cell proliferation in TC-PTP-deficient keratinocytes following UVB irradiation. Loss of TC-PTP also reduced UVB-induced apoptosis. Corroborating with these results, overexpression of TC-PTP in keratinocyte cell lines yielded a decrease in phosphorylated STAT3 levels, which corresponded with a significant decrease in cell proliferation in response to low dose UVB. We demonstrate that TC-PTP activity was increased upon UVB exposure, and overexpression of TC-PTP in keratinocyte cell lines further increased its activity in the presence of UVB. Treatment of TC-PTP-deficient keratinocytes with the STAT3 inhibitor STA21 significantly reduced cell viability following UVB exposure in comparison with untreated TC-PTP-deficient keratinocytes, confirming that the effect of TC-PTP on cell viability is mediated by STAT3 dephosphorylation. Combined, our results indicate that UVB-mediated activation of TC-PTP plays an important role in the STAT3-dependent regulation of keratinocyte cell proliferation and survival. Furthermore, these results suggest that TC-PTP may be a novel potential target for the prevention of UVB-induced skin cancer. PMID:25406309

  7. Novel prokaryotic expression of thioredoxin-fused insulinoma associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (IA-2), its characterization and immunodiagnostic application.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Luciano Lucas; Faccinetti, Natalia Inés; Trabucchi, Aldana; Rovitto, Bruno David; Sabljic, Adriana Victoria; Poskus, Edgardo; Iacono, Ruben Francisco; Valdez, Silvina Noemí

    2016-11-24

    The insulinoma associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (IA-2) is one of the immunodominant autoantigens involved in the autoimmune attack to the beta-cell in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. In this work we have developed a complete and original process for the production and recovery of the properly folded intracellular domain of IA-2 fused to thioredoxin (TrxIA-2 ic ) in Escherichia coli GI698 and GI724 strains. We have also carried out the biochemical and immunochemical characterization of TrxIA-2 ic and design variants of non-radiometric immunoassays for the efficient detection of IA-2 autoantibodies (IA-2A). The main findings can be summarized in the following statements: i) TrxIA-2 ic expression after 3 h of induction on GI724 strain yielded ≈ 10 mg of highly pure TrxIA-2 ic /L of culture medium by a single step purification by affinity chromatography, ii) the molecular weight of TrxIA-2 ic (55,358 Da) could be estimated by SDS-PAGE, size exclusion chromatography and mass spectrometry, iii) TrxIA-2 ic was properly identified by western blot and mass spectrometric analysis of proteolytic digestions (63.25 % total coverage), iv) excellent immunochemical behavior of properly folded full TrxIA-2 ic was legitimized by inhibition or displacement of [ 35 S]IA-2 binding from IA-2A present in Argentinian Type 1 Diabetic patients, v) great stability over time was found under proper storage conditions and vi) low cost and environmentally harmless ELISA methods for IA-2A assessment were developed, with colorimetric or chemiluminescent detection. E. coli GI724 strain emerged as a handy source of recombinant IA-2 ic , achieving high levels of expression as a thioredoxin fusion protein, adequately validated and applicable to the development of innovative and cost-effective immunoassays for IA-2A detection in most laboratories.

  8. 1E7-03, a low MW compound targeting host protein phosphatase-1, inhibits HIV-1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ammosova, Tatyana; Platonov, Maxim; Ivanov, Andrei; Kont, Yasemin Saygideğer; Kumari, Namita; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Jerebtsova, Marina; Kulkarni, Amol A; Üren, Aykut; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Nekhai, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose HIV-1 transcription is activated by the Tat protein which recruits the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK9/cyclin T1 to TAR RNA. Tat binds to protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) through the Q35VCF38 sequence and translocates PP1 to the nucleus. PP1 dephosphorylates CDK9 and activates HIV-1 transcription. We have synthesized a low MW compound 1H4, that targets PP1 and prevents HIV-1 Tat interaction with PP1 and inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription. Here, we report our further work with the 1H4-derived compounds and analysis of their mechanism of action. Experimental Approach Using the 1H4-PP1 complex as a model, we iteratively designed and synthesized follow-up libraries that were analysed for the inhibition of HIV-1 transcription and toxicity. We also confirmed the mechanism of action of the PP1-targeting molecules by determining the affinity of binding of these molecules to PP1, by analysing their effects on PP1 activity, disruption of PP1 binding to Tat and shuttling of PP1 to the nucleus. Key Results We identified a tetrahydroquinoline derivative, compound 7, which disrupted the interaction of Tat with PP1. We further optimized compound 7 and obtained compound 7c, renamed 1E7-03, which inhibited HIV-1 with low IC50 (fivefold lower than the previously reported compound, 1H4), showed no cytotoxicity and displayed a plasma half-life greater than 8 h in mice. 1E7-03 bound to PP1 in vitro and prevented shuttling of PP1 into the nucleus. Conclusions and Implications Our study shows that low MW compounds that functionally mimic the PP1-binding RVxF peptide can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating PP1. PMID:25073485

  9. Loss of protein phosphatase 6 in mouse keratinocytes enhances K-rasG12D -driven tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Koreyuki; Inoue, Yui; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Yamashita, Yoji; Kanazawa, Kosuke; Kishimoto, Kazuhiro; Nomura, Miyuki; Momoi, Yuki; Sato, Ikuro; Chiba, Natsuko; Suzuki, Mai; Ogoh, Honami; Yamada, Hidekazu; Miura, Koh; Watanabe, Toshio; Tanuma, Nobuhiro; Tachi, Masahiro; Shima, Hiroshi

    2018-05-14

    Here, we address the function of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) loss on K-ras-initiated tumorigenesis in keratinocytes. To do so, we developed tamoxifen-inducible double mutant (K-ras G12D -expressing and Ppp6c-deficient) mice in which K-ras G12D expression is driven by the cytokeratin 14 (K14) promoter. Doubly-mutant mice showed early onset tumor formation in lip, nipples, external genitalia, anus and palms, and had to be sacrificed by three weeks after induction by tamoxifen, while comparably-treated K-ras G12D -expressing mice did not. HE-staining of lip tumors before euthanasia revealed that all were papillomas, some containing focal squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of lip of doubly-mutant versus K-ras G12D mice revealed that cell proliferation and cell size increased approximately two-fold relative to K-ras G12D -expressing mutants, and epidermal thickness of lip tissue greatly increased relative to that seen in K-ras G12D only mice. Moreover, AKT phosphorylation increased in K-ras G12D -expressing/Ppp6c-deficient cells, as did phosphorylation of the downstream effectors 4EBP1, S6, and GSK3, suggesting that protein synthesis and survival signals are enhanced in lip tissues of doubly-mutant mice. Finally, increased numbers of K14-positive cells were present in the suprabasal layer of doubly-mutant mice, indicating abnormal keratinocyte differentiation, and γH2AX-positive cells accumulated, indicating perturbed DNA repair. Taken together, Ppp6c deficiency enhances K-ras G12D -dependent tumor promotion. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 modulates regional effects of injurious mechanical ventilation in rodent lungs.

    PubMed

    Park, Moo Suk; He, Qianbin; Edwards, Michael G; Sergew, Amen; Riches, David W H; Albert, Richard K; Douglas, Ivor S

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation induces heterogeneous lung injury by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB. Mechanisms regulating regional injury and protective effects of prone positioning are unclear. To determine the key regulators of the lung regional protective effects of prone positioning in rodent lungs exposed to injurious ventilation. Adult rats were ventilated with high (18 ml/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP] 0) or low Vt (6 ml/kg; PEEP 3 cm H(2)O; 3 h) in supine or prone position. Dorsal-caudal lung mRNA was analyzed by microarray and MAPK phosphatases (MKP)-1 quantitative polymerase chain reaction. MKP-1(-/-) or wild-type mice were ventilated with very high (24 ml/kg; PEEP 0) or low Vt (6-7 ml/kg; PEEP 3 cm H(2)O). The MKP-1 regulator PG490-88 (MRx-108; 0.75 mg/kg) or phosphate-buffered saline was administered preventilation. Injury was assessed by lung mechanics, bronchioalveolar lavage cell counts, protein content, and lung injury scoring. Immunoblotting for MKP-1, and IκBα and cytokine ELISAs were performed on lung lysates. Prone positioning was protective against injurious ventilation in rats. Expression profiling demonstrated MKP-1 20-fold higher in rats ventilated prone rather than supine and regional reduction in p38 and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation. MKP-1(-/-) mice experienced amplified injury. PG490-88 improved static lung compliance and injury scores, reduced bronchioalveolar lavage cell counts and cytokine levels, and induced MKP-1 and IκBα. Injurious ventilation induces MAPK in an MKP-1-dependent fashion. Prone positioning is protective and induces MKP-1. PG490-88 induced MKP-1 and was protective against high Vt in a nuclear factor-κB-dependent manner. MKP-1 is a potential target for modulating regional effects of injurious ventilation.

  11. Study of Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) Activity in LPS-Induced Tolerance Using Fluorescence-Based and Immunoprecipitation-Aided Methodology.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Ii, Adlai L Pappy; Pham, Tiffany T; Shanley, Thomas P

    2015-06-29

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant intracellular serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) phosphatases accounting for 1% of the total cellular protein content. PP2A is comprised of a heterodimeric core enzyme and a substrate-specific regulatory subunit. Potentially, at least seventy different compositions of PP2A exist because of variable regulatory subunit binding that accounts for various activity modulating numerous cell functions. Due to the constitutive phosphatase activity present inside cells, a sensitive assay is required to detect the changes of PP2A activity under various experimental conditions. We optimized a fluorescence assay (DIFMU assay) by combining it with prior anti-PP2A immunoprecipitation to quantify PP2A-specific phosphatase activity. It is also known that prior exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induces "immune tolerance" of the cells to subsequent stimulation. Herein we report that PP2A activity is upregulated in tolerized peritoneal macrophages, corresponding to decreased TNF-α secretion upon second LPS stimulation. We further examined the role of PP2A in the tolerance effect by using PP2ACαl°xl°x;lyM-Cre conditional knockout macrophages. We found that PP2A phosphatase activity cannot be further increased by tolerance. TNF-α secretion from tolerized PP2ACαl°xl°x;lyM-Cre macrophages is higher than tolerized control macrophages. Furthermore, we showed that the increased TNF-α secretion may be due to an epigenetic transcriptionally active signature on the promoter of TNF-α gene rather than regulation of the NFκB/IκB signaling pathway. These results suggest a role for increased PP2A activity in the regulation of immune tolerance.

  12. The immunoglobulin-like domains 1 and 2 of the protein tyrosine phosphatase LAR adopt an unusual horseshoe-like conformation

    PubMed Central

    Biersmith, Bridget H.; Hammel, Michal; Geisbrecht, Erika R.; Bouyain, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Neurogenesis depends on exquisitely regulated interactions between macromolecules on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix. In particular, interactions between proteoglycans and members of the type IIa subgroup of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases underlie critical developmental processes such as the formation of synapses at the neuromuscular junction and the migration of axons to their appropriate targets. We report here the crystal structures of the first and second immunoglobulin-like domains of the Drosophila type IIa receptor Dlar and its mouse homologue LAR. These two domains adopt an unusual antiparallel arrangement that has not been previously observed in tandem repeats of immunoglobulin-like domains and that is presumably conserved in all type IIa receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:21402080

  13. Penostatin derivatives, a novel kind of protein phosphatase 1b inhibitors isolated from solid cultures of the entomogenous fungus Isaria tenuipes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Peng; Yang, Chun-Gui; Wei, Pei-Yao; Li, Lin; Luo, Du-Qiang; Zheng, Zhi-Hui; Lu, Xin-Hua

    2014-01-29

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated as a negative regulator of insulin receptor (IR) signaling and a potential drug target for the treatment of type II diabetes and other associated metabolic syndromes. Therefore, small molecular inhibitors of PTP1B can be considered as an attractive approach for the design of new therapeutic agents of type II diabetes diseases. In a continuing search for new protein phosphatase inhibitors from fungi, we have isolated a new compound, named penostatin J (1), together with three known ones, penostatin C (2), penostatin A (3), and penostatin B (4), from cultures of the entomogenous fungus Isaria tenuipes. The structure of penostatin J (1) was elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis. We also demonstrate for the first time that penostatin derivatives exhibit the best PTP1B inhibitory action. These findings suggest that penostatin derivatives are a potential novel kind of PTP1B inhibitors.

  14. Molecular characterization of the Salmonella typhi StpA protein that is related to both Yersinia YopE cytotoxin and YopH tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Arricau, N; Hermant, D; Waxin, H; Popoff, M Y

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of a 4-kb DNA fragment located between the sip and iag loci on Salmonella typhi chromosome revealed three open reading frames, termed sipF, ctpA and stpA. The 82-amino-acid (aa) sipF product showed extensive similarity to the lacP protein from S. typhimurium. The StpA protein (535 aa) exhibited significant similarity to both Yersinia enterocolitica YopE cytotoxin and YopH tyrosine phosphatase. The CtpA polypeptide (130 aa) might be the molecular chaperone of the StpA protein.

  15. A widespread family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases shares a common regulatory switch with proteasomal proteases

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Niels; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Zimanyi, Christina M.

    PP2C phosphatases control biological processes including stress responses, development, and cell division in all kingdoms of life. Diverse regulatory domains adapt PP2C phosphatases to specific functions, but how these domains control phosphatase activity was unknown. We present structures representing active and inactive states of the PP2C phosphatase SpoIIE from Bacillus subtilis. Based on structural analyses and genetic and biochemical experiments, we identify an α-helical switch that shifts a carbonyl oxygen into the active site to coordinate a metal cofactor. Our analysis indicates that this switch is widely conserved among PP2C family members, serving as a platform to control phosphatase activitymore » in response to diverse inputs. Remarkably, the switch is shared with proteasomal proteases, which we identify as evolutionary and structural relatives of PP2C phosphatases. Although these proteases use an unrelated catalytic mechanism, rotation of equivalent helices controls protease activity by movement of the equivalent carbonyl oxygen into the active site.« less

  16. A widespread family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases shares a common regulatory switch with proteasomal proteases

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Niels; Levdikov, Vladimir M; Zimanyi, Christina M; Gaudet, Rachelle; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Losick, Richard

    2017-01-01

    PP2C phosphatases control biological processes including stress responses, development, and cell division in all kingdoms of life. Diverse regulatory domains adapt PP2C phosphatases to specific functions, but how these domains control phosphatase activity was unknown. We present structures representing active and inactive states of the PP2C phosphatase SpoIIE from Bacillus subtilis. Based on structural analyses and genetic and biochemical experiments, we identify an α-helical switch that shifts a carbonyl oxygen into the active site to coordinate a metal cofactor. Our analysis indicates that this switch is widely conserved among PP2C family members, serving as a platform to control phosphatase activity in response to diverse inputs. Remarkably, the switch is shared with proteasomal proteases, which we identify as evolutionary and structural relatives of PP2C phosphatases. Although these proteases use an unrelated catalytic mechanism, rotation of equivalent helices controls protease activity by movement of the equivalent carbonyl oxygen into the active site. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26111.001 PMID:28527238

  17. Using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a protein phosphatase inhibition assay (PPIA) for the detection of microcystins and nodularins.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, W W; An, J

    1999-01-01

    Cyanotoxins produced by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) include potent neurotoxins and hepatotoxins. The hepatotoxins include cyclic peptide microcystins and nodularins plus the alkaloid cylindrospermopsins. Among the cyanotoxins the microcystins have proven to be the most widespread, and are most often implicated in animal and human poisonings. This paper presents a practical guide to two widely used methods for detecting and quantifying microcystins and nodularins in environmental samples-the enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and the protein phosphatase inhibition assay (PPIA).

  18. Identification, characterization and purification to near-homogeneity of a novel 67 kDa phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatase associated with pig lung annexin extract.

    PubMed Central

    Vicendo, P; Fauvel, J; Ragab-Thomas, J M; Chap, H

    1991-01-01

    During the purification of annexin VI from pig lung, we previously reported the isolation of another 67 kDa protein (protein 67E) differing from the former by immunological reactivity, amino acid composition, inability to interact with anionic phospholipids in the presence of Ca2+ and inability to inhibit phospholipase A2 [Fauvel, Vicendo, Roques, Ragab-Thomas, Granier, Vilgrain, Chambaz, Rochat, Chap & Douste-Blazy (1987) FEBS Lett. 221, 397-402]. Attempts to phosphorylate protein 67E by the protein tyrosine kinase of epidermal-growth-factor receptor revealed a dramatic inhibition of receptor autophosphorylation, which was also observed with insulin receptor. This inhibitory effect was found to be supported by a phosphatase active towards p-nitrophenyl phosphate, phosphotyrosine, [32P]phosphotyrosyl histones and [32P]phosphotyrosyl poly(Glu,Tyr), but inactive towards phosphoserine, phosphothreonine and [32P]phosphoseryl histones. Although not purified to complete homogeneity, the enzyme was purified 273-fold over EGTA extracts from pig lung and corresponded to a monomeric protein displaying an apparent molecular mass of 67 kDa. With [32P]phosphotyrosyl poly(Glu,Tyr) as substrate, the purified enzyme displayed Km and Vmax. values of 10 microM and 1.93 mumol/min per mg respectively, which compare reasonably well with other recently described phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases. From these data and from its sensitivity to various inhibitors, it is concluded that protein fraction 67E contains a novel phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatase, the association of which with annexin extract might offer a clue to the understanding of its possible targeting to membrane substrates. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:1654882

  19. Midgut GPI-anchored proteins with alkaline phosphatase activity from the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) are putative receptors for the Cry1B protein of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Martins, Erica Soares; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Queiroz, Paulo Roberto; Dumas, Vinicius Fiuza; Braz, Shélida Vasconcelos; de Souza Aguiar, Raimundo Wagner; Gomes, Ana Cristina Menezes Mendes; Sánchez, Jorge; Bravo, Alejandra; Ribeiro, Bergmann Morais

    2010-02-01

    Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are used for insect control. They interact with specific receptors located on the host cell surface and are activated by host proteases following receptor binding resulting in midgut epithelial cells lysis. In this work we had cloned, sequenced and expressed a cry1Ba toxin gene from the B thuringiensis S601 strain which was previously shown to be toxic to Anthonomus grandis, a cotton pest. The Cry1Ba6 protein expressed in an acrystaliferous B. thuringiensis strain was toxic to A. grandis in bioassays. The binding of Cry1Ba6 toxin to proteins located in the midgut brush border membrane of A. grandis was analyzed and we found that Cry1Ba6 binds to two proteins (62 and 65kDa) that showed alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. This work is the first report that shows the localization of Cry toxin receptors in the midgut cells of A. grandis. 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Functional analysis of the pepper protein phosphatase, CaAIPP1, and its interacting partner CaAIRF1: Modulation of ABA signalling and the drought stress response.

    PubMed

    Baek, Woonhee; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2017-10-01

    Plant adaptive responses to abiotic stress are coordinated by restriction of plant growth and development. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is the key regulator of the response to abiotic stress, and its sensitivity determines abiotic stress tolerance levels. We previously showed that the E3 ubiquitin ligase CaAIRF1 functions as a positive regulator of ABA and drought stress via modulation of transcription and stability of the type 2C protein phosphatase CaADIP1. Here, we report the identification and functional analysis of a novel-type 2C phosphatase, CaAIPP1 (Capsicum annuum CaAIRF1 Interacting Protein Phosphatase 1). CaAIPP1 interacted with and was ubiquitinated by CaAIRF1. CaAIPP1 gene expression in pepper leaves was induced by ABA and drought. CaAIPP1 degradation was faster in crude protein extracts from ABA-treated pepper plants than in those from control plants. CaAIPP1-overexpressing plants displayed an ABA-hyposensitive phenotype during seed germination and seedling growth. Moreover, these plants exhibited a drought-sensitive phenotype characterized by high levels of transpirational water loss via decreased stomatal closure and reduced leaf temperatures. Our data indicate that CaAIPP1 is a negative regulator of the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. Our findings provide a valuable insight into the plant defence mechanism that operates during drought stress. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Regulation of cortical contractility and spindle positioning by the protein phosphatase 6 PPH-6 in one-cell stage C. elegans embryos

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Katayoun; Werner, Michael E.; Tse, Yu Chung; Glotzer, Michael; Gönczy, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of the microtubule and the actin cytoskeleton is crucial for proper cell division. Protein phosphorylation is known to be an important regulatory mechanism modulating these cytoskeletal networks. By contrast, there is a relative paucity of information regarding how protein phosphatases contribute to such modulation. Here, we characterize the requirements for protein phosphatase PPH-6 and its associated subunit SAPS-1 in one-cell stage C. elegans embryos. We establish that the complex of PPH-6 and SAPS-1 (PPH-6/SAPS-1) is required for contractility of the actomyosin network and proper spindle positioning. Our analysis demonstrates that PPH-6/SAPS-1 regulates the organization of cortical non-muscle myosin II (NMY-2). Accordingly, we uncover that PPH-6/SAPS-1 contributes to cytokinesis by stimulating actomyosin contractility. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PPH-6/SAPS-1 is required for the proper generation of pulling forces on spindle poles during anaphase. Our results indicate that this requirement is distinct from the role in organizing the cortical actomyosin network. Instead, we uncover that PPH-6/SAPS-1 contributes to the cortical localization of two positive regulators of pulling forces, GPR-1/2 and LIN-5. Our findings provide the first insights into the role of a member of the PP6 family of phosphatases in metazoan development. PMID:20040490

  2. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity of alkaloids from Rhizoma Coptidis and their molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Sue; Ali, Md Yousof; Jung, Hyun Ah; Oh, Sang Ho; Choi, Ran Joo; Kim, Eon Ji

    2015-08-02

    Rhizoma Coptidis (the rhizome of Coptis chinensis Franch) has commonly been used for treatment of diabetes mellitus in traditional Chinese medicine due to its blood sugar-lowering properties and therapeutic benefits which highly related to the alkaloids therein. However, a limited number of studies focused on the Coptis alkaloids other than berberine. In the present study, we investigated the anti-diabetic potential of Coptis alkaloids, including berberine (1), epiberberine (2), magnoflorine (3), and coptisine (4), by evaluating the ability of these compounds to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), and ONOO(-)-mediated protein tyrosine nitration. We scrutinized the potentials of Coptis alkaloids as PTP1B inhibitors via enzyme kinetics and molecular docking simulation. The Coptis alkaloids 1-4 exhibited remarkable inhibitory activities against PTP1B with the IC50 values of 16.43, 24.19, 28.14, and 51.04 μM, respectively, when compared to the positive control ursolic acid. These alkaloids also suppressed ONOO(-)-mediated tyrosine nitration effectively in a dose dependent manner. In addition, our kinetic study using the Lineweaver-Burk and Dixon plots revealed that 1 and 2 showed a mixed-type inhibition against PTP1B, while 3 and 4 noncompetitively inhibited PTP1B. Moreover, molecular docking simulation of these compounds demonstrated negative binding energies (Autodock 4.0=-6.7 to -7.8 kcal/mol; Fred 2.0=-59.4 to -68.2 kcal/mol) and a high proximity to PTP1B residues, including Phe182 and Asp181 in the WPD loop, Cys215 in the active sites and Tyr46, Arg47, Asp48, Val49, Ser216, Ala217, Gly218, Ile219, Gly220, Arg221 and Gln262 in the pocket site, indicating a higher affinity and tighter binding capacity of these alkaloids for the active site of the enzyme. Our results clearly indicate the promising anti-diabetic potential of Coptis alkaloids as inhibitors on PTP1B as well as suppressors of ONOO(-)-mediated protein tyrosine nitration, and thus hold

  3. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase-1B Mediates Sleep Fragmentation-Induced Insulin Resistance and Visceral Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Gozal, David; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Qiao, Zhuanghong; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Maccari, Rosanna; Ottanà, Rosaria

    2017-09-01

    Sleep fragmentation (SF) is highly prevalent and has emerged as an important contributing factor to obesity and metabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that SF-induced increases in protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B) expression and activity underlie increased food intake, inflammation, and leptin and insulin resistance. Wild-type (WT) and ObR-PTP-1b-/- mice (Tg) were exposed to SF and control sleep (SC), and food intake was monitored. WT mice received a PTP-1B inhibitor (RO-7d; Tx) or vehicle (Veh). Upon completion of exposures, systemic insulin and leptin sensitivity tests were performed as well as assessment of visceral white adipose tissue (vWAT) insulin receptor sensitivity and macrophages (ATM) polarity. SF increased food intake in either untreated or Veh-treated WT mice. Leptin-induced hypothalamic STAT3 phosphorylation was decreased, PTP-1B activity was increased, and reduced insulin sensitivity emerged both systemic and in vWAT, with the latter displaying proinflammatory ATM polarity changes. All of the SF-induced effects were abrogated following PTP-1B inhibitor treatment and in Tg mice. SF induces increased food intake, reduced leptin signaling in hypothalamus, systemic insulin resistance, and reduced vWAT insulin sensitivity and inflammation that are mediated by increased PTP-1B activity. Thus, PTP-1B may represent a viable therapeutic target in the context of SF-induced weight gain and metabolic dysfunction. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Protein Phosphatase 4 Promotes Chromosome Pairing and Synapsis, and Contributes to Maintaining Crossover Competence with Increasing Age

    PubMed Central

    Sato-Carlton, Aya; Li, Xuan; Crawley, Oliver; Testori, Sarah; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Sugimoto, Asako; Carlton, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the meiotic divisions, dynamic chromosome reorganizations including pairing, synapsis, and recombination of maternal and paternal chromosome pairs must occur in a highly regulated fashion during meiotic prophase. How chromosomes identify each other's homology and exclusively pair and synapse with their homologous partners, while rejecting illegitimate synapsis with non-homologous chromosomes, remains obscure. In addition, how the levels of recombination initiation and crossover formation are regulated so that sufficient, but not deleterious, levels of DNA breaks are made and processed into crossovers is not understood well. We show that in Caenorhabditis elegans, the highly conserved Serine/Threonine protein phosphatase PP4 homolog, PPH-4.1, is required independently to carry out four separate functions involving meiotic chromosome dynamics: (1) synapsis-independent chromosome pairing, (2) restriction of synapsis to homologous chromosomes, (3) programmed DNA double-strand break initiation, and (4) crossover formation. Using quantitative imaging of mutant strains, including super-resolution (3D-SIM) microscopy of chromosomes and the synaptonemal complex, we show that independently-arising defects in each of these processes in the absence of PPH-4.1 activity ultimately lead to meiotic nondisjunction and embryonic lethality. Interestingly, we find that defects in double-strand break initiation and crossover formation, but not pairing or synapsis, become even more severe in the germlines of older mutant animals, indicating an increased dependence on PPH-4.1 with increasing maternal age. Our results demonstrate that PPH-4.1 plays multiple, independent roles in meiotic prophase chromosome dynamics and maintaining meiotic competence in aging germlines. PP4's high degree of conservation suggests it may be a universal regulator of meiotic prophase chromosome dynamics. PMID:25340746

  5. Prostate anatomy in motheaten viable (me(v)) mice with mutations in the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1.

    PubMed

    García-Tello, A; Angulo, J C; Rodriguez-Ubreva, J; Andrés, G; López, J I; Sánchez-Chapado, M; López-Ruiz, P; Colás, B

    2014-09-01

    To study prostate and seminal vesicle anatomy in viable motheaten (mev) with mutations in PTPN6 gene leading to a severe reduction in the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. Homozygous mev mice exhibit multiple anomalies that include immunodeficiencies, increased proliferation of macrophage, neutrophil, and erythrocyte progenitors, decreased bone density and sterility. We analyzed macro- and microscopic anatomy of the seminal vesicle and prostate macro- and microscopic anatomy of 5 mev/mev and 8 wt/wt adult 7 week old mice. Computerized morphometric analysis was performed to measure the relative changes appearing in the epithelial volume of the different prostatic lobes. All mice studied revealed normal genital organs (penis, testis, epididymis, vas deferens) and bladder. The seminal vesicle was absent in all mev/mev individuals analyzed, being normal and very noticeable in wt/wt mice. The different glands that compose the prostatic complex (anterior, ventral and dorso-lateral prostate) were atrophied in mev/mev mice: anterior prostate 0.4 times, ventral 0.19 times, dorsal 0.35 times and lateral 0.28 times those of the respective regions in wt/wt mice. Microscopically, mev/mev mice revealed scarce and large prostatic ducts, acini severely atrophic with empty lumen and scarce loose epithelial component forming tufts and infoldings, and hyperplastic changes in fibromuscular stroma. The prostate of mev/mev mice exhibits signs of aberrant differentiation and the resulting phenotype may be related to the loss of function of SHP-1. Prostatic anomalies in these mice affect, together with defects in sperm maduration, for their sterility. These data suggest SHP-1 plays an important role in prostate epithelial morphogenesis. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Extracellular HCO3- is sensed by mouse cerebral arteries: Regulation of tone by receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase γ

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kristoffer B; Boedtkjer, Donna MB; Aalkjaer, Christian; Boron, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    We investigate sensing and signaling mechanisms for H+, HCO3- and CO2 in basilar arteries using out-of-equilibrium solutions. Selectively varying pHo, [HCO3-]o, or pCO2, we find: (a) lowering pHo attenuates vasoconstriction and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) Ca2+-responses whereas raising pHo augments vasoconstriction independently of VSMC [Ca2+]i, (b) lowering [HCO3-]o increases arterial agonist-sensitivity of tone development without affecting VSMC [Ca2+]i but c) no evidence that CO2 has direct net vasomotor effects. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP)γ is transcribed in endothelial cells, and direct vasomotor effects of HCO3o- are absent in arteries from RPTPγ-knockout mice. At pHo 7.4, selective changes in [HCO3-]o or pCO2 have little effect on pHi. At pHo 7.1, decreased [HCO3-]o or increased pCO2 causes intracellular acidification, which attenuates vasoconstriction. Under equilibrated conditions, anti-contractile effects of CO2/HCO3- are endothelium-dependent and absent in arteries from RPTPγ-knockout mice. With CO2/HCO3- present, contractile responses to agonist-stimulation are potentiated in arteries from RPTPγ-knockout compared to wild-type mice, and this difference is larger for respiratory than metabolic acidosis. In conclusion, decreased pHo and pHi inhibit vasoconstriction, whereas decreased [HCO3-]o promotes vasoconstriction through RPTPγ-dependent changes in VSMC Ca2+-sensitivity. HCO3o- serves dual roles, providing substrate for pHi-regulating membrane transporters and modulating arterial responses to acid–base disturbances. PMID:26661205

  7. Pharmacological Activation of Protein Phosphatase 2 A (PP2A): A Novel Strategy to Fight Against Human Malignancies?

    PubMed

    Carratù, Maria Rosaria; Signorile, Anna; De Rasmo, Domenico; Reale, Antonia; Vacca, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    The serine-threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulates multiple cell signaling cascades and its inactivation by viral oncoproteins, mutation of specific structural subunits or upregulation of the cellular endogenous inhibitors may contribute to malignant transformation by regulating specific phosphorylation events. Pharmacological modulation of PP2A activity is becoming an attractive strategy for cancer treatment. Some compounds targeting PP2A are able to induce PP2A reactivation and subsequent cell death in several types of cancer. We undertook a search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed articles focusing on the main item of the review. We selected articles published in indexed journals. The quality of retrieved papers was appraised using the standard bibliometric indicators. One hundred and fourteen papers were included in the review. Twenty-seven papers gave an overview of structure and physiological role of PP2A. Twenty-five papers outlined the role of PP2A in tumor suppression. Forty papers analyzed the mechanism involved in PP2A reactivation by synthetic compounds, and twenty-two papers outlined the capability of natural compounds of restoring PP2A activity and how this could be beneficial. Findings analyzed in this review underline the central role of PP2A as a regulator of cell growth and survival, hence its function as tumor suppressor. The discovery that some compounds, either synthetic or natural, are capable of reactivating PP2A opens up new perspectives for future strategies to fully exploit therapeutic potential in human cancer. Thus, this review could also be of particular interest to pharmaceutical or biotechnology companies for drug design and targeted delivery.

  8. Essential Role of Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase 1B in the Modulation of Insulin Signaling by Acetaminophen in Hepatocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Mobasher, Maysa Ahmed; de Toro-Martín, Juan; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Ramos, Sonia; Letzig, Lynda G.; James, Laura P.; Muntané, Jordi; Álvarez, Carmen; Valverde, Ángela M.

    2014-01-01

    Many drugs are associated with the development of glucose intolerance or deterioration in glycemic control in patients with pre-existing diabetes. We have evaluated the cross-talk between signaling pathways activated by acetaminophen (APAP) and insulin signaling in hepatocytes with or without expression of the protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and in wild-type and PTP1B-deficient mice chronically treated with APAP. Human primary hepatocytes, Huh7 hepatoma cells with silenced PTP1B, mouse hepatocytes from wild-type and PTP1B-deficient mice, and a mouse model of chronic APAP treatment were used to examine the mechanisms involving PTP1B in the effects of APAP on glucose homeostasis and hepatic insulin signaling. In APAP-treated human hepatocytes at concentrations that did not induce death, phosphorylation of JNK and PTP1B expression and enzymatic activity were increased. APAP pretreatment inhibited activation of the early steps of insulin signaling and decreased Akt phosphorylation. The effects of APAP in insulin signaling were prevented by suramin, a PTP1B inhibitor, or rosiglitazone that decreased PTP1B levels. Likewise, PTP1B deficiency in human or mouse hepatocytes protected against APAP-mediated impairment in insulin signaling. These signaling pathways were modulated in mice with chronic APAP treatment, resulting in protection against APAP-mediated hepatic insulin resistance and alterations in islet alpha/beta cell ratio in PTP1B−/− mice. Our results demonstrate negative cross-talk between signaling pathways triggered by APAP and insulin signaling in hepatocytes, which is in part mediated by PTP1B. Moreover, our in vivo data suggest that chronic use of APAP may be associated with insulin resistance in the liver. PMID:25204659

  9. T-Cell Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Attenuates STAT3 and Insulin Signaling in the Liver to Regulate Gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Loh, Kim; Galic, Sandra; Fam, Barbara; Shields, Ben; Wiede, Florian; Tremblay, Michel L.; Watt, Matthew J.; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Tiganis, Tony

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin-induced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and interleukin-6 (IL-6)-instigated JAK/STAT3-signaling pathways in the liver inhibit the expression of gluconeogenic genes to decrease hepatic glucose output. The insulin receptor (IR) and JAK1 tyrosine kinases and STAT3 can serve as direct substrates for the T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP). Homozygous TCPTP-deficiency results in perinatal lethality prohibiting any informative assessment of TCPTP's role in glucose homeostasis. Here we have used Ptpn2+/− mice to investigate TCPTP's function in glucose homeostasis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed insulin sensitivity and gluconeogenesis in chow versus high-fat–fed (HFF) Ptpn2+/− and Ptpn2+/+ mice and insulin and IL-6 signaling and gluconeogenic gene expression in Ptpn2+/− and Ptpn2+/+ hepatocytes. RESULTS HFF Ptpn2+/− mice exhibited lower fasted blood glucose and decreased hepatic glucose output as determined in hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps and by the decreased blood glucose levels in pyruvate tolerance tests. The reduced hepatic glucose output coincided with decreased expression of the gluconeogenic genes G6pc and Pck1 and enhanced hepatic STAT3 phosphorylation and PI3K/Akt signaling in the fasted state. Insulin-induced IR-β–subunit Y1162/Y1163 phosphorylation and PI3K/Akt signaling and IL-6–induced STAT3 phosphorylation were also enhanced in isolated Ptpn2+/− hepatocytes. The increased insulin and IL-6 signaling resulted in enhanced suppression of G6pc and Pck1 mRNA. CONCLUSIONS Liver TCPTP antagonises both insulin and STAT3 signaling pathways to regulate gluconeogenic gene expression and hepatic glucose output. PMID:20484139

  10. Molecular cloning, expression and single nucleotide polymorphisms of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) in mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao-Yan; He, Shan; Liang, Xu-Fang; Song, Yi; Yuan, Xiao-Chen; Li, Ling; Wen, Zheng-Yong; Cai, Wen-Jing; Tao, Ya-Xiong

    2015-11-01

    In the wild, mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi) only feed on live prey fish, refusing dead prey. When reared in ponds, training will result in some mandarin fish accepting artificial diets. However, little is currently known about the molecular mechanism of the individual difference. Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a suppressor of learning and long-term memory (LTM) in mammals. In the present study, the relationship between PP1 and the individual difference in acceptance of artificial diets in mandarin fish was investigated. The complete CDS (coding sequence) of four PP1 isoforms (PP1caa, PP1cab, PP1cb and PP1cc) were cloned in mandarin fish. The amino acid sequences of these PP1 isoforms are highly conserved in different species. The mRNA expressions of PP1caa and PP1cb in brain of artificial diet feeders were significantly higher than those in nonfeeders, suggesting the deficiency in the maintenance of long-term memory of its natural food habit (live prey fish). The SNP loci in PP1caa and PP1cb were also found to be associated with the individual difference in acceptance of artificial diets in mandarin fish. These SNPs of PP1caa and PP1cb genes could be useful markers for gene-associated breeding of mandarin fish, which could accept artificial diets. In conclusion, different mRNA expression and SNPs of PP1caa and PP1cb genes in feeders and nonfeeders of artificial diets might contribute to understanding the molecular mechanism of individual difference in acceptance of artificial diets in mandarin fish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B obliterates endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced myocardial dysfunction through regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyi; Chen, Xiyao; Nair, Sreejayan; Sun, Dongdong; Wang, Xiaoming; Ren, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been demonstrated to prompt various cardiovascular risks although the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) serves as an essential negative regulator for insulin signaling. This study examined the role of PTP1B in ER stress-induced myocardial anomalies and underlying mechanism involved with a focus on autophagy. WT and PTP1B knockout mice were subjected to the ER stress inducer tunicamycin (1mg/kg). Cardiac function was evaluated with echocardiography and an Ion-Optix MyoCam system. Western blot analysis was used to monitor the levels of ER stress, autophagy and insulin signaling including insulin receptor substrate (IRS), tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3), Atg5/7, p62 and LC3-II. Our results showed that ER stress resulted in compromised echocardiographic and cardiomyocyte contractile function, intracellular Ca 2+ mishandling, ER stress, O 2 - production, apoptosis, the effects of which (with the exception of ER stress) were significantly attenuated or negated by PTP1B ablation. Levels of serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, TRIB3, Atg5/7, LC3B and the autophagy adaptor p62 were significantly upregulated while IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation was reduced by tunicamycin, the effect of which were obliterated by PTP1B ablation. In vitro study revealed that the autophagy inducer rapamycin and TRIB3 overexpression cancelled PTP1B ablation-offered beneficial effects on cardiomyocyte function or O 2 - production in murine cardiomyocytes or H9C2 myoblasts. Antioxidant or gene silencing of TRIB3 mimicked PTP1B ablation-induced protective effects. These findings collectively suggested that PTP1B ablation protects against ER stress-induced cardiac anomalies through regulation of autophagy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Competitive protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitors, prenylated caged xanthones from Garcinia hanburyi and their inhibitory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xue Fei; Uddin, Zia; Park, Chanin; Song, Yeong Hun; Son, Minky; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Ki Hun

    2017-04-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) plays important role in diabetes, obesity and cancer. The methanol extract of the gum resin of Garcinia hanburyi (G. hanburyi) showed potent PTP1B inhibition at 10µg/ml. The active compounds were identified as prenylated caged xanthones (1-9) which inhibited PTP1B in dose-dependent manner. Carboxybutenyl group within caged motif (A ring) was found to play a critical role in enzyme inhibition such as 1-6 (IC 50 s=0.47-4.69µM), whereas compounds having hydroxymethylbutenyl 7 (IC 50 =70.25µM) and methylbutenyl 8 (IC 50 >200µM) showed less activity. The most potent inhibitor, gambogic acid 1 (IC 50 =0.47µM) showed 30-fold more potency than ursolic acid (IC 50 =15.5µM), a positive control. In kinetic study, all isolated xanthones behaved as competitive inhibitors which were fully demonstrated with K m , V max and K ik /K iv ratio. It was also proved that inhibitor 1 operated under the enzyme isomerization model having k 5 =0.0751µM - 1 S - 1 , k 6 =0.0249µM - 1 S - 1 and K i app =0.499µM. To develop a pharmacophore model, we explored the binding sites of compound 1 and 7 in PTP1B. These modeling results were in agreement with our findings, which revealed that the inhibitory activities are tightly related to caged motif and prenyl group in A ring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Midgut-enriched receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP52F is required for Drosophila development during larva-pupa transition.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Abirami; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Chen, Dong-Yuan; Chen, Guang-Chao; Meng, Tzu-Ching

    2013-01-01

    To date our understanding of Drosophila receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPs) in the regulation of signal transduction is limited. Of the seven R-PTPs identified in flies, six are involved in the axon guidance that occurs during embryogenesis. However, whether and how R-PTPs may control key steps of Drosophila development is not clear. In this study we investigated the potential role of Drosophila R-PTPs in developmental processes outside the neuronal system and beyond the embryogenesis stage. Through systematic data mining of available microarray databases, we found the mRNA level of PTP52F to be highly enriched in the midgut of flies at the larva-pupa transition. This finding was confirmed by gut tissue staining with a specific antibody. The unique spatiotemporal expression of PTP52F suggests that it is possibly involved in regulating metamorphosis during the transformation from larva to pupa. To test this hypothesis, we employed RNA interference to examine the defects of transgenic flies. We found that ablation of endogenous PTP52F led to high lethality characterized by the pharate adult phenotype, occurring due to post pupal eclosion failure. These results show that PTP52F plays an indispensable role during the larva-pupa transition. We also found that PTP52F could be reclassified as a member of the subtype R3 PTPs instead of as an unclassified R-PTP without a human ortholog, as suggested previously. Together, these findings suggest that Drosophila R-PTPs may control metamorphosis and other biological processes beyond our current knowledge. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  14. Identification of genomic regions that interact with a viable allele of the Drosophila protein tyrosine phosphatase corkscrew.

    PubMed Central

    Firth, L; Manchester, J; Lorenzen, J A; Baron, M; Perkins, L A

    2000-01-01

    Signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is critical for a multitude of developmental decisions and processes. Among the molecules known to transduce the RTK-generated signal is the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Corkscrew (Csw). Previously, Csw has been demonstrated to function throughout the Drosophila life cycle and, among the RTKs tested, Csw is essential in the Torso, Sevenless, EGF, and Breathless/FGF RTK pathways. While the biochemical function of Csw remains to be unambiguously elucidated, current evidence suggests that Csw plays more than one role during transduction of the RTK signal and, further, the molecular mechanism of Csw function differs depending upon the RTK in question. The isolation and characterization of a new, spontaneously arising, viable allele of csw, csw(lf), has allowed us to undertake a genetic approach to identify loci required for Csw function. The rough eye and wing vein gap phenotypes exhibited by adult flies homo- or hemizygous for csw(lf) has provided a sensitized background from which we have screened a collection of second and third chromosome deficiencies to identify 33 intervals that enhance and 21 intervals that suppress these phenotypes. We have identified intervals encoding known positive mediators of RTK signaling, e.g., drk, dos, Egfr, E(Egfr)B56, pnt, Ras1, rolled/MAPK, sina, spen, Src64B, Star, Su(Raf)3C, and vein, as well as known negative mediators of RTK signaling, e.g., aos, ed, net, Src42A, sty, and su(ve). Of particular interest are the 5 lethal enhancing intervals and 14 suppressing intervals for which no candidate genes have been identified. PMID:11014820

  15. Identification of genomic regions that interact with a viable allele of the Drosophila protein tyrosine phosphatase corkscrew.

    PubMed

    Firth, L; Manchester, J; Lorenzen, J A; Baron, M; Perkins, L A

    2000-10-01

    Signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is critical for a multitude of developmental decisions and processes. Among the molecules known to transduce the RTK-generated signal is the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Corkscrew (Csw). Previously, Csw has been demonstrated to function throughout the Drosophila life cycle and, among the RTKs tested, Csw is essential in the Torso, Sevenless, EGF, and Breathless/FGF RTK pathways. While the biochemical function of Csw remains to be unambiguously elucidated, current evidence suggests that Csw plays more than one role during transduction of the RTK signal and, further, the molecular mechanism of Csw function differs depending upon the RTK in question. The isolation and characterization of a new, spontaneously arising, viable allele of csw, csw(lf), has allowed us to undertake a genetic approach to identify loci required for Csw function. The rough eye and wing vein gap phenotypes exhibited by adult flies homo- or hemizygous for csw(lf) has provided a sensitized background from which we have screened a collection of second and third chromosome deficiencies to identify 33 intervals that enhance and 21 intervals that suppress these phenotypes. We have identified intervals encoding known positive mediators of RTK signaling, e.g., drk, dos, Egfr, E(Egfr)B56, pnt, Ras1, rolled/MAPK, sina, spen, Src64B, Star, Su(Raf)3C, and vein, as well as known negative mediators of RTK signaling, e.g., aos, ed, net, Src42A, sty, and su(ve). Of particular interest are the 5 lethal enhancing intervals and 14 suppressing intervals for which no candidate genes have been identified.

  16. Conservative Tryptophan Mutants of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase YopH Exhibit Impaired WPD-Loop Function and Crystallize with Divanadate Esters in Their Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Gwendolyn; Gallup, Nathan M.; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.; Hengge, Alvan C.; Johnson, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) involves movement of a protein loop called the WPD loop that brings a conserved aspartic acid into the active site to function as a general acid. Mutation of the tryptophan in the WPD loop of the PTP YopH to any other residue with a planar, aromatic side chain (phenylalanine, tyrosine, or histidine) disables general acid catalysis. Crystal structures reveal these conservative mutations leave this critical loop in a catalytically unproductive, quasi-open position. Although the loop positions in crystal structures are similar for all three conservative mutants, the reasons inhibiting normal loop closure differ for each mutant. In the W354F and W354Y mutants, steric clashes result from six-membered rings occupying the position of the five-membered ring of the native indole side chain. The histidine mutant dysfunction results from new hydrogen bonds stabilizing the unproductive position. The results demonstrate how even modest modifications can disrupt catalytically important protein dynamics. Crystallization of all the catalytically compromised mutants in the presence of vanadate gave rise to vanadate dimers at the active site. In W354Y and W354H, a divanadate ester with glycerol is observed. Such species have precedence in solution and are known from the small molecule crystal database. Such species have not been observed in the active site of a phosphatase, as a functional phosphatase would rapidly catalyze their decomposition. The compromised functionality of the mutants allows the trapping of species that undoubtedly form in solution and are capable of binding at the active sites of PTPs, and, presumably, other phosphatases. In addition to monomeric vanadate, such higher-order vanadium-based molecules are likely involved in the interaction of vanadate with PTPs in solution. PMID:26445170

  17. Protein Phosphatase 2A Interacts with the Na+,K+-ATPase and Modulates Its Trafficking by Inhibition of Its Association with Arrestin

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Toru; Han, WonSun; Pagel, Philipp; Nairn, Angus C.; Caplan, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The P-type ATPase family constitutes a collection of ion pumps that form phosphorylated intermediates during ion transport. One of the best known members of this family is the Na+,K+-ATPase. The catalytic subunit of the Na+,K+-ATPase includes several functional domains that determine its enzymatic and trafficking properties. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the yeast two-hybrid system we found that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic C-subunit is a specific Na+,K+-ATPase interacting protein. PP-2A C-subunit interacted with the Na+,K+-ATPase, but not with the homologous sequences of the H+,K+-ATPase. We confirmed that the Na+,K+-ATPase interacts with a complex of A- and C-subunits in native rat kidney. Arrestins and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are important regulators of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, and they also regulate Na+,K+-ATPase trafficking through direct association. PP2A inhibits association between the Na+,K+-ATPase and arrestin, and diminishes the effect of arrestin on Na+,K+-ATPase trafficking. GRK phosphorylates the Na+,K+-ATPase and PP2A can at least partially reverse this phosphorylation. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these data demonstrate that the sodium pump belongs to a growing list of ion transport proteins that are regulated through direct interactions with the catalytic subunit of a protein phosphatase. PMID:22242112

  18. A novel mechanism for the Ca(2+)-sensitizing effect of protein kinase C on vascular smooth muscle: inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Mechanisms of Ca2+ sensitization of both myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and force development by protein kinase C (PKC) were studied in permeabilized tonic smooth muscle obtained from the rabbit femoral artery. For comparison, the Ca2+ sensitizing effect of guanosine 5'-O-(gamma-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S) was examined, which had been previously shown to inhibit MLC phosphatase in phasic vascular smooth muscle. We now report that PKC activators (phorbol esters, short chain synthetic diacylglycerols and a diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor) and GTP gamma S significantly increase both MLC phosphorylation and force development at constant [Ca2+]. Major phosphorylation site occurring in the presence of phorbol-12,13- dibutyrate (PDBu) or GTP gamma S at constant [Ca2+] is the same serine residue (Ser-19) as that phosphorylated by MLC kinase in response to increased Ca2+ concentrations. In an ATP- and Ca(2+)-free solution containing 1-(5-chloronaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4- diazepine (ML-9), to avoid the kinase activity, both PDBu and GTP gamma S significantly decreased the rate of MLC dephosphorylation to half its control value. However, PDBu inhibited the relaxation rate more than did GTP gamma S. In the presence of microcystin-LR to inhibit the phosphatase activity, neither PDBu nor GTP gamma S affected MLC phosphorylation and force development. These results indicate that PKC, like activation of GTP binding protein, increases Ca2+ sensitivity of both MLC phosphorylation and force production through inhibition of MLC phosphatase. PMID:7807049

  19. Inducible Knockdown of Endothelial Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-1B Promotes Neointima Formation in Obese Mice by Enhancing Endothelial Senescence.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Marianne; Hubert, Astrid; Gogiraju, Rajinikanth; Bochenek, Magdalena L; Münzel, Thomas; Schäfer, Katrin

    2018-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) is a negative regulator of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. In this study, we determined the importance of PTP1B expressed in endothelial cells for the vascular response to arterial injury in obesity. Morphometric analysis of vascular lesions generated by 10% ferric chloride (FeCl 3 ) revealed that tamoxifen-inducible endothelial PTP1B deletion (Tie2.ER T2 -Cre × PTP1B fl/fl ; End.PTP1B knockout, KO) significantly increased neointima formation, and reduced numbers of (endothelial lectin-positive) luminal cells in End.PTP1B-KO mice suggested impaired lesion re-endothelialization. Significantly higher numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive proliferating cells as well as smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive or vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM1)-positive activated smooth muscle cells or vimentin-positive myofibroblasts were detected in neointimal lesions of End.PTP1B-KO mice, whereas F4/80-positive macrophage numbers did not differ. Activated receptor tyrosine kinase and transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) signaling and oxidative stress markers were also significantly more abundant in End.PTP1B-KO mouse lesions. Genetic knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of PTP1B in endothelial cells resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1 and oxidative stress, and distinct morphological changes, elevated numbers of senescence-associated β-galactosidase-positive cells, and increased expression of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) or the cell cycle inhibitor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor-2A (p16INK4A) suggested senescence, all of which could be attenuated by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated downregulation of caveolin-1. In vitro, senescence could be prevented and impaired re-endothelialization restored by preincubation with the antioxidant Trolox. Our results reveal a previously unknown role of PTP1B in endothelial cells and provide mechanistic insights how PTP1B deletion or inhibition

  20. Requirement of SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 for paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PIR-B)-mediated inhibitory signal.

    PubMed

    Maeda, A; Kurosaki, M; Ono, M; Takai, T; Kurosaki, T

    1998-04-20

    Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PIR-B) (p91) molecule has been proposed to function as an inhibitory receptor in B cells and myeloid lineage cells. We demonstrate here that the cytoplasmic region of PIR-B is capable of inhibiting B cell activation. Mutational analysis of five cytoplasmic tyrosines indicate that tyrosine 771 in the motif VxYxxL plays the most crucial role in mediating the inhibitory signal. PIR-B-mediated inhibition was markedly reduced in the SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 double-deficient DT40 B cells, whereas this inhibition was unaffected in the inositol polyphosphate 5'-phosphatase SHIP-deficient cells. These data demonstrate that PIR-B can negatively regulate B cell receptor activation and that this PIR-B-mediated inhibition requires redundant functions of SHP-1 and SHP-2.

  1. miR-135a-5p-mediated downregulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta is a candidate driver of HCV-associated hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Van Renne, Nicolaas; Roca Suarez, Armando Andres; Duong, Francois H T; Gondeau, Claire; Calabrese, Diego; Fontaine, Nelly; Ababsa, Amina; Bandiera, Simonetta; Croonenborghs, Tom; Pochet, Nathalie; De Blasi, Vito; Pessaux, Patrick; Piardi, Tullio; Sommacale, Daniele; Ono, Atsushi; Chayama, Kazuaki; Fujita, Masashi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Hoshida, Yujin; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Heim, Markus H; Baumert, Thomas F; Lupberger, Joachim

    2018-05-01

    HCV infection is a leading risk factor of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, even after viral clearance, HCC risk remains elevated. HCV perturbs host cell signalling to maintain infection, and derailed signalling circuitry is a key driver of carcinogenesis. Since protein phosphatases are regulators of signalling events, we aimed to identify phosphatases that respond to HCV infection with relevance for hepatocarcinogenesis. We assessed mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles in primary human hepatocytes, liver biopsies and resections of patients with HCC, and analysed microarray and RNA-seq data from paired liver biopsies of patients with HCC. We revealed changes in transcriptional networks through gene set enrichment analysis and correlated phosphatase expression levels to patient survival and tumour recurrence. We demonstrate that tumour suppressor protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta (PTPRD) is impaired by HCV infection in vivo and in HCC lesions of paired liver biopsies independent from tissue inflammation or fibrosis. In liver tissue adjacent to tumour, high PTPRD levels are associated with a dampened transcriptional activity of STAT3, an increase of patient survival from HCC and reduced tumour recurrence after surgical resection. We identified miR-135a-5p as a mechanistic regulator of hepatic PTPRD expression in patients with HCV. We previously demonstrated that STAT3 is required for HCV infection. We conclude that HCV promotes a STAT3 transcriptional programme in the liver of patients by suppressing its regulator PTPRD via upregulation of miR-135a-5p. Our results show the existence of a perturbed PTPRD-STAT3 axis potentially driving malignant progression of HCV-associated liver disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. cDNA isolated from a human T-cell library encodes a member of the protein-tyrosine-phosphatase family

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, D.E.; Tonks, N.K.; Charbonneau, H.

    1989-07-01

    A human peripheral T-cell cDNA library was screened with two labeled synthetic oligonucleotides encoding regions of a human placenta protein-tyrosine-phosphatase. One positive clone was isolated and the nucleotide sequence was determined. It contained 1,305 base pairs of open reading frame followed by a TAA stop codon and 978 base pairs of 3{prime} untranslated end, although a poly(A){sup +} tail was not found. An initiator methionine residue was predicted at position 61, which would result in a protein of 415 amino acid residues. This was supported by the synthesis of a M{sub r} 48,000 protein in an in vitro reticulocyte lysatemore » translation system using RNA transcribed from the cloned cDNA and T7 RNA polymerase. The deduced amino acid sequence was compared to other known proteins revealing 65% identity to the low M{sub r} PTPase 1B isolated from placenta. In view of the high degree of similarity, the T-cell cDNA likely encodes a newly discovered protein-tyrosine-phosphatase, thus expanding this family of genes.« less

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Movement of the Wpd Flexible Loop of Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B in Complex with Halide Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Aline; Saenz-Méndez, Patricia; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Podjarny, Alberto D.; Ventura, Oscar N.

    2012-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a post-translational modification mechanism, crucial for the regulation of nearly all aspects of cell life. This dynamic, reversible process is regulated by the balanced opposing activity of protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases. In particular, the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated in the regulation of the insulin-receptor activity, leptin-stimulated signal transduction pathways and other clinically relevant metabolic routes, and it has been found overexpressed or overregulated in human breasts, colon and ovary cancers. The WPD loop of the enzyme presents an inherent flexibility, and it plays a fundamental role in the enzymatic catalysis, turning it into a potential target in the design of new efficient PTP1B inhibitors. In order to determine the interactions that control the spatial conformation adopted by the WPD loop, complexes between the enzyme and halide ions (Br- and I- in particular) were crystallized and their crystallographic structure determined, and the collective movements of the aforementioned complexes were studied through Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Both studies yielded concordant results, indicating the existence of a relationship between the identity of the ion present in the complex and the strength of the interactions it establishes with the surrounding protein residues.

  4. The myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant HOSCN inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases and modulates cell signalling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Amanda E.; Tan, Joanne T. M.; Hawkins, Clare L.; Heather, Alison K.; Davies, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    MPO (myeloperoxidase) catalyses the oxidation of chloride, bromide and thiocyanate by hydrogen peroxide to HOCl (hypochlorous acid), HOBr (hypobromous acid) and HOSCN (hypothiocyanous acid) respectively. Specificity constants indicate that SCN− is a major substrate for MPO. HOSCN is also a major oxidant generated by other peroxidases including salivary, gastric and eosinophil peroxidases. While HOCl and HOBr are powerful oxidizing agents, HOSCN is a less reactive, but more specific, oxidant which targets thiols and especially low pKa species. In the present study we show that HOSCN targets cysteine residues present in PTPs (protein tyrosine phosphatases) with this resulting in a loss of PTP activity for the isolated enzyme, in cell lysates and intact J774A.1 macrophage-like cells. Inhibition also occurs with MPO-generated HOCl and HOBr, but is more marked with MPO-generated HOSCN, particularly at longer incubation times. This inhibition is reversed by dithiothreitol, particularly at early time points, consistent with the reversible oxidation of the active site cysteine residue to give either a cysteine–SCN adduct or a sulfenic acid. Inhibition of PTP activity is associated with increased phosphorylation of p38a and ERK2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 2) as detected by Western blot analysis and phosphoprotein arrays, and results in altered MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signalling. These data indicate that the highly selective targeting of some protein thiols by HOSCN can result in perturbation of cellular phosphorylation and altered cell signalling. These changes occur with (patho)physiological concentrations of SCN− ions, and implicate HOSCN as an important mediator of inflammation-induced oxidative damage, particularly in smokers who have elevated plasma levels of SCN−. PMID:20528774

  5. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) regulate DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Neal, Jessica A; De Wever, Veerle; Morrice, Nick A; Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2014-06-25

    The protein kinase activity of the DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) and its autophosphorylation are critical for DBS (DNA double-strand break) repair via NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining). Recent studies have shown that depletion or inactivation of DNA-PKcs kinase activity also results in mitotic defects. DNA-PKcs is autophosphorylated on Ser2056, Thr2647 and Thr2609 in mitosis and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and the midbody. DNA-PKcs also interacts with PP6 (protein phosphatase 6), and PP6 has been shown to dephosphorylate Aurora A kinase in mitosis. Here we report that DNA-PKcs is phosphorylated on Ser3205 and Thr3950 in mitosis. Phosphorylation of Thr3950 is DNA-PK-dependent, whereas phosphorylation of Ser3205 requires PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1). Moreover, PLK1 phosphorylates DNA-PKcs on Ser3205 in vitro and interacts with DNA-PKcs in mitosis. In addition, PP6 dephosphorylates DNA-PKcs at Ser3205 in mitosis and after IR (ionizing radiation). DNA-PKcs also phosphorylates Chk2 on Thr68 in mitosis and both phosphorylation of Chk2 and autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs in mitosis occur in the apparent absence of Ku and DNA damage. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the roles of DNA-PKcs and PP6 in mitosis and suggest that DNA-PKcs' role in mitosis may be mechanistically distinct from its well-established role in NHEJ.

  6. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) regulate DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Neal, Jessica A.; De Wever, Veerle; Morrice, Nick A.; Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    The protein kinase activity of the DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) and its autophosphorylation are critical for DBS (DNA double-strand break) repair via NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining). Recent studies have shown that depletion or inactivation of DNA-PKcs kinase activity also results in mitotic defects. DNA-PKcs is autophosphorylated on Ser2056, Thr2647 and Thr2609 in mitosis and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and the midbody. DNA-PKcs also interacts with PP6 (protein phosphatase 6), and PP6 has been shown to dephosphorylate Aurora A kinase in mitosis. Here we report that DNA-PKcs is phosphorylated on Ser3205 and Thr3950 in mitosis. Phosphorylation of Thr3950 is DNA-PK-dependent, whereas phosphorylation of Ser3205 requires PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1). Moreover, PLK1 phosphorylates DNA-PKcs on Ser3205 in vitro and interacts with DNA-PKcs in mitosis. In addition, PP6 dephosphorylates DNA-PKcs at Ser3205 in mitosis and after IR (ionizing radiation). DNA-PKcs also phosphorylates Chk2 on Thr68 in mitosis and both phosphorylation of Chk2 and autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs in mitosis occur in the apparent absence of Ku and DNA damage. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the roles of DNA-PKcs and PP6 in mitosis and suggest that DNA-PKcs’ role in mitosis may be mechanistically distinct from its well-established role in NHEJ. PMID:24844881

  7. Evaluation of microcystin contamination in blue-green algal dietary supplements using a protein phosphatase inhibition-based test kit.

    PubMed

    Marsan, David W; Conrad, Stephen M; Stutts, Whitney L; Parker, Christine H; Deeds, Jonathan R

    2018-03-01

    The cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA), from Upper-Klamath Lake, Oregon, are used to produce blue-green algal (BGA) dietary supplements. The periodic co-occurrence of hepatotoxin-producing contaminant species prompted the Oregon Health Division to establish a limit of 1 μg/g microcystin (MC) for products sold in Oregon in 1997. At the federal level, the current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) regulations for dietary supplements require manufacturers establish a specification, and test, for limits on contaminants that may adulterate finished products. Despite this, several previous international surveys reported MC in BGA supplements in excess of 1 μg/g. The objectives of this study were (1) identify a reliable, easy to use test kit for the detection of MC in dried BGA materials and (2) use this kit to assess the occurrence of MC contamination in AFA-BGA dietary supplements in the U.S. A commercial protein phosphatase inhibition assay (PPIA), based on the enzyme PP2A, was found to have acceptable relative enzyme inhibition and accuracy for the majority of MC variants tested, including those most commonly identified in commercial samples, making the kit fit for purpose. Using the PPIA kit, 51% (26 of 51) distinct AFA-BGA products had MC ≥0.25 μg/g (the detection limit of the kit), 10 products had MC concentrations between 0.5 and 1.0 μg/g, and 4 products exceeded the limit (1.1-2.8 μg/g). LC-MS/MS confirmed PPIA results ≥0.5 μg/g and determined that MC-LA and MC-LR were the main congeners present. PPIA is a reliable method for the detection of MC contamination in dried BGA dietary supplements produced in the U.S. While the majority of AFA-BGA products contained ≥0.25 μg/g MC, most were at or below 1.0 μg/g, suggesting that manufacturers have adopted this level as a specification in these products; however, variability in recommended serving sizes prevented further analysis of consumer exposure based on the concentrations of MC

  8. [Alkaline phosphatase in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2005-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), 3 phosphatase were found after disc-electrophoresis of 10 microg of protein in PAGE and using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate a pH 9.0. These phosphatases differed in their electrophoretic mobilities - "slow" (1-3 bands), "middle" (one band) and "fast" (one band). In addition to 1-naphthyl phosphate, "slow" phosphatases were able to hydrolyse 2-naphthyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl phosphate. They were slightly activated by Mg2+, completely inhibited by 3 chelators (EDTA, EGTA and 1,10-phenanthroline), L-cysteine, sodium dodecyl sulfate and Fe2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+ (50 mM), considerably inactivated by orthovanadate, molybdate, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 1, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, Na2HPO4, DL-dithiothreitol and urea and partly inhibited by H2O2, DL-phenylalanine, 2-mercaptoethanol, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 2 and Ca2+. Imidazole, L-(+)-tartrate, okadaic acid, NaF and sulfhydryl reagents -p-(hydroxy-mercuri)benzoate and N-ethylmaleimide - had no influence on the activity of "slow" phosphatases. "Middle" and "fast" phosphatases, in contrast to "slow" ones, were not inactivated by 3 chelators. The "middle" phosphatase differed from the "fast" one by smaller resistance to urea, Ca2+, Mn2+, phosphates and H2O2 and greater resistance to dithiothreitol and L-(+)-tartrate. In addition, the "fast" phosphatase was inhibited by L-cysteine but the "middle" one was activated by it. Of 5 tested ions (Mg2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+), only Zn2+ reactivated "slow" phosphatases after their inactivation by EDTA treatment. The reactivation of apoenzyme was only partial (about 35 %). Thus, among phosphatases found in amoebae at pH 9.0, only "slow" ones are Zn-metalloenzymes and may be considered as alkaline phosphatases (EC 3.1.3.1). It still remains uncertain, to which particular phosphatase class "middle" and "fast" phosphatases (pH 9.0) may belong.

  9. Cortical Recruitment and Nuclear–Cytoplasmic Shuttling of Scd5p, a Protein Phosphatase-1-targeting Protein Involved in Actin Organization and EndocytosisD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ji Suk; Henry, Kenneth; Geli, María Isabel; Lemmon, Sandra K.

    2006-01-01

    Scd5p regulates endocytosis and cortical actin organization as a targeting subunit for the Ser/Thr protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) in yeast. To identify localization signals in Scd5p required for cell surface recruitment, visualization of GFP-tagged Scd5 truncations and deletions was performed. Scd5p contains a PP1 binding site, a 3-repeat region of 20 amino acids (3R), and a 9-repeat region of 12 amino acids (9R). We found that the 9R is critical for cortical localization of Scd5p, but cortical recruitment is not essential for Scd5p's function in actin organization and endocytosis. We propose that Scd5p can target PP1 to endocytic factors in the cytoplasm that have been disassembled and/or inactivated by phosphorylation. We also found that Scd5p undergoes nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling in a Crm1p-dependent manner. Scd5p-ΔCT lacking the 9R region and its nuclear export signal (NES) accumulates in the nucleus, causing cortical actin and endocytic defects. Cytoplasmic localization and function of Scd5p-ΔCT is restored by NES addition. However, removal of Scd5p's nuclear localization signal prevents nuclear entry, but endocyt