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Sample records for abies scots pine

  1. Ozone fumigation under dark/light conditions of Norway Spruce (Picea Abies) and Scots Pine (Pinus Sylvestris)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canaval, Eva; Jud, Werner; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Norway Spruce (Picea abies) and Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris) represent dominating tree species in the northern hemisphere. Thus, the understanding of their ozone sensitivity in the light of the expected increasing ozone levels in the future is of great importance. In our experiments we investigated the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of 3-4 year old Norway Spruce and Scots Pine seedlings under ozone fumigation (50-150 ppbv) and dark/light conditions. For the experiments the plants were placed in a setup with inert materials including a glass cuvette equipped with a turbulent air inlet and sensors for monitoring a large range of meteorological parameters. Typical conditions were 20-25°C and a relative humidity of 70-90 % for both plant species. A fast gas exchange rate was used to minimize reactions of ozone in the gas phase. A Switchable-Reagent-Ion-Time-of-Flight-MS (SRI-ToF-MS) was used to analyze the VOCs at the cuvette outlet in real-time during changing ozone and light levels. The use of H3O+ and NO+ as reagent ions allows the separation of certain isomers (e.g. aldehydes and ketones) due to different reaction pathways depending on the functional groups of the molecules. Within the Picea abies experiments the ozone loss, defined as the difference of the ozone concentration between cuvette inlet and outlet, remained nearly constant at the transition from dark to light. This indicates that a major part of the supplied ozone is depleted non-stomatally. In contrast the ozone loss increased by 50 % at the transition from dark to light conditions within Pinus sylvestris experiments. In this case the stomata represent the dominant loss channel. Since maximally 0.1% of the ozone loss could be explained by gas phase reactions with monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, we suggest that ozone reactions on the surface of Picea abies represent the major sink in this case and lead to an light-independent ozone loss. This is supported by the fact that we detected

  2. Contamination of environment in the road surroudings - impact of road salting on Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegrová, Jitka; Steiner, Oliver; Goessler, Walter; Tanda, Stefan; Anděl, Petr

    2017-09-01

    A comprehensive overview of the influence of transport on the environment is presented in this study. The complex analysis of soil and needle samples provides an extensive set of data, which presents elemental contamination of the environment near roads. Traffic pollution (including winter road treatment) has a significant negative influence on our environment. Besides sodium and chlorine from winter maintenance many other elements are emitted into the environment. Three possible sources of contamination are assumed for environmental contamination evaluation: car emission, winter maintenance and abrasion from breaks and clutches. The chemical analysis focused on the description of samples from inorganic point of view. The influence of the contamination potential on the sodium and chlorine content in the samples of 1st year-old and 2nd year-old needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is discussed. Additional soil samples were taken from each sampling site and analyzed to get insight in the sodium and chlorine distribution. Statistical evaluation was used for interpretation of complex interaction patterns between element concentrations in different aged needles based on localities character including distance from the road and element concentration in soils. This species of needles were chosen because of its heightened sensitivity towards salinization. The study was conducted in different parts of the Czech Republic. The resulting database is a source of valuable information about the influence of transport on the environment.

  3. Caledonian scots pine: origins and genetic structure

    Treesearch

    Bohun B Kinloch; R. D. Westfall; G. I. Forrest

    1986-01-01

    Monoterpene and isozyme loci, used as markers to study the genetic structure of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) native to Scotland, showed that the endemic populations are not genetically impoverished, in spite of severe contraction in range and numbers as a result of both natural and anthropogenic causes. On the contrary, variability in the relict...

  4. Hydraulic adjustment of Scots pine across Europe.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Vilalta, J; Cochard, H; Mencuccini, M; Sterck, F; Herrero, A; Korhonen, J F J; Llorens, P; Nikinmaa, E; Nolè, A; Poyatos, R; Ripullone, F; Sass-Klaassen, U; Zweifel, R

    2009-10-01

    * The variability of branch-level hydraulic properties was assessed across 12 Scots pine populations covering a wide range of environmental conditions, including some of the southernmost populations of the species. The aims were to relate this variability to differences in climate, and to study the potential tradeoffs between traits. * Traits measured included wood density, radial growth, xylem anatomy, sapwood- and leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity (K(S) and K(L)), vulnerability to embolism, leaf-to-sapwood area ratio (A(L) : A(S)), needle carbon isotope discrimination (Delta13C) and nitrogen content, and specific leaf area. * Between-population variability was high for most of the hydraulic traits studied, but it was directly associated with climate dryness (defined as a combination of atmospheric moisture demand and availability) only for A(L) : A(S), K(L) and Delta13C. Shoot radial growth and A(L) : A(S) declined with stand development, which is consistent with a strategy to avoid exceedingly low water potentials as tree size increases. In addition, we did not find evidence at the intraspecific level of some associations between hydraulic traits that have been commonly reported across species. * The adjustment of Scots pine's hydraulic system to local climatic conditions occurred primarily through modifications of A(L) : A(S) and direct stomatal control, whereas intraspecific variation in vulnerability to embolism and leaf physiology appears to be limited.

  5. Drought stress alters the concentration of wood terpenoids in Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Turtola, Satu; Manninen, Anne-Marja; Rikala, Risto; Kainulainen, Pirjo

    2003-09-01

    Drought is known to have an impact on the resistance of conifers to various pests, for example, by affecting resin flow in trees. Little is known, however, about the quantitative and qualitative changes in resin when trees are growing in low moisture conditions. We exposed Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) seedlings to medium and severe drought stress for two growing seasons and analyzed the monoterpenes and resin acids in the main stem wood after two years of treatment. In addition to secondary chemistry, we measured the level of nutrients in the needles and the growth response of seedlings. After the first year of treatment, drought stress did not affect the growth of seedlings, but in the second year, shoot growth was retarded, especially in Scots pine. In both conifer species, severe drought increased the concentrations of several individual monoterpenes and resin acids. Total monoterpenes and resin acids were 39 and 32% higher in severe drought-treated Scots pine seedlings than in the controls, and 35 and 45% higher in Norway spruce seedlings. In Scots pine needles, the concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus increased, while magnesium and calcium decreased compared to controls. In Norway spruce needles, nutrient concentrations were not affected. The results suggest that drought stress substantially affects both the growth of conifers and the chemical quality of the wood. We discuss the potential trade-off in growth and defense of small conifer seedlings.

  6. Methyl Jasmonate-Induced Monoterpenes in Scots Pine and Norway Spruce Tissues Affect Pine Weevil Orientation.

    PubMed

    Lundborg, Lina; Nordlander, Göran; Björklund, Niklas; Nordenhem, Henrik; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin

    2016-12-01

    In large parts of Europe, insecticide-free measures for protecting conifer plants are desired to suppress damage by the pine weevil Hylobius abietis (L.). Treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a chemical elicitor already used in crop production, may enhance expression of chemical defenses in seedlings in conifer regenerations. However, in a previous experiment, MeJA treatment resulted in substantially better field protection for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) than for Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). Hypothesizing that the variations may be at least due partly to volatiles released by MeJA-treated seedlings and their effects on pine weevil orientation, we examined tissue extracts of seedlings (from the same batches as previously used) by two-dimensional GC-MS. We found that the MeJA treatment increased contents of the monoterpene (-)-β-pinene in phloem (the weevil's main target tissue) of both tree species, however, the (-)-β-pinene/(-)-α-pinene ratio increased more in the phloem of P. sylvestris. We also tested the attractiveness of individual monoterpenes found in conifer tissues (needles and phloem) for pine weevils using an arena with traps baited with single-substance dispensers and pine twigs. Trap catches were reduced when the pine material was combined with a dispenser releasing (-)-β-pinene, (+)-3-carene, (-)-bornyl acetate or 1,8-cineole. However, (-)-α-pinene did not have this effect. Thus, the greater field protection of MeJA-treated P. sylvestris seedlings may be due to the selective induction of increases in contents of the deterrent (-)-β-pinene, in contrast to strong increases in both non-deterrent (-)-α-pinene and the deterrent (-)-β-pinene in P. abies seedlings.

  7. Imaging spectroscopy in soil-water based site suitability assessment for artificial regeneration to Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Maarit; Närhi, Paavo; Sutinen, Raimo

    In a humid northern boreal climate, the success rate of artificial regeneration to Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.) can be improved by including a soil water content (SWC) based assessment of site suitability in the reforestation planning process. This paper introduces an application of airborne visible-near-infrared imaging spectroscopic data to identify suitable subregions of forest compartments for the low SWC-tolerant Scots pine. The spatial patterns of understorey plant species communities, recorded by the AISA (Airborne Imaging Spectrometer for Applications) sensor, were demonstrated to be dependant on the underlying SWC. According to the nonmetric multidimensional scaling and correlation results twelve understorey species were found to be most abundant on sites with high soil SWCs. The abundance of bare soil, rocks and abundance of more than ten species indicated low soil SWCs. The spatial patterns of understorey are attributed to time-stability of the underlying SWC patterns. A supervised artificial neural network (radial basis functional link network, probabilistic neural network) approach was taken to classify AISA imaging spectrometer data with dielectric (as a measure volumetric SWC) ground referencing into regimes suitable and unsuitable for Scots pine. The accuracy assessment with receiver operating characteristics curves demonstrated a maximum of 74.1% area under the curve values which indicated moderate success of the NN modelling. The results signified the importance of the training set's quality, adequate quantity (>2.43 points/ha) and NN algorithm selection over the NN algorithm training parameter optimization to perfection. This methodology for the analysis of site suitability of Scots pine can be recommended, especially when artificial regeneration of former mixed wood Norway spruce ( Picea abies L. Karst) - downy birch ( Betula pubenscens Ehrh.) stands is being considered, so that artificially regenerated areas to Scots pine can be optimized

  8. Annual cycle of Scots pine photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari, Pertti; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Liisa; Kulmala, Markku; Noe, Steffen; Petäjä, Tuukka; Vanhatalo, Anni; Bäck, Jaana

    2017-12-01

    Photosynthesis, i.e. the assimilation of atmospheric carbon to organic molecules with the help of solar energy, is a fundamental and well-understood process. Here, we connect theoretically the fundamental concepts affecting C3 photosynthesis with the main environmental drivers (ambient temperature and solar light intensity), using six axioms based on physiological and physical knowledge, and yield straightforward and simple mathematical equations. The light and carbon reactions in photosynthesis are based on the coherent operation of the photosynthetic machinery, which is formed of a complicated chain of enzymes, membrane pumps and pigments. A powerful biochemical regulation system has emerged through evolution to match photosynthesis with the annual cycle of solar light and temperature. The action of the biochemical regulation system generates the annual cycle of photosynthesis and emergent properties, the state of the photosynthetic machinery and the efficiency of photosynthesis. The state and the efficiency of the photosynthetic machinery is dynamically changing due to biosynthesis and decomposition of the molecules. The mathematical analysis of the system, defined by the very fundamental concepts and axioms, resulted in exact predictions of the behaviour of daily and annual patterns in photosynthesis. We tested the predictions with extensive field measurements of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) photosynthesis on a branch scale in northern Finland. Our theory gained strong support through rigorous testing.

  9. Scots pine in eastern Nebraska: A provenance study

    Treesearch

    Ralph A. Read

    1971-01-01

    Seedling progenies of 36 rangewide provenances of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) were established in a field test in eastern Nebraska. Results in growth and other characteristics after 8 years reveal that (1) southern origins bordering the Mediterranean grow slowly to moderately fast and remain dark green in winter, (2) central European origins grow very fast and turn...

  10. Developmental Changes in Scots Pine Transcriptome during Heartwood Formation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kean-Jin; Paasela, Tanja; Harju, Anni; Venäläinen, Martti; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Kärkkäinen, Katri; Teeri, Teemu H

    2016-11-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) wood is desired in woodworking industries due to its favorable timber characteristics and natural durability that is contributed by heartwood extractives. It has been discussed whether the Scots pine heartwood extractives (mainly stilbenes and resin acids) are synthesized in the cells of the transition zone between sapwood and heartwood, or if they are transported from the sapwood. Timing of heartwood formation during the yearly cycle has also not been unambiguously defined. We measured steady-state mRNA levels in Scots pine transition zone and sapwood using RNA sequencing. Year-round expression profiles of selected transcripts were further investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. Differentially accumulating transcripts suggest that, of the Scots pine heartwood extractives, stilbenes are synthesized in situ in the transition zone and gain their carbon-skeletons from Suc and triglycerides. Resin acids, on the other hand, are synthesized early in the spring mainly in the sapwood, meaning that they must be transported to the heartwood transition zone. Heartwood formation is marked by programmed cell death that occurs during the summer months in the transition zone. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Flux agreement above a Scots pine plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, L. W.; Vogt, R.; Bernhofer, Ch.; Blanford, J. H.

    1996-03-01

    The surface energy exchange of 12m high Scots pine plantation at Hartheim, Germany, was measured with a variety of methods during a 11-day period of fine weather in mid-May 1992. Net radiation and rate of thermal storage were measured with conventional net radiometers, soil heat flux discs and temperature-based storage models. The turbulent fluxes discussed in this report were obtained with an interchanging Bowen ratio energy budget system (BREB, at 14 m), two one-propeller eddy correlation systems (OPEC systems 1 and 2 at 17m), a 1-dimensional sonic eddy correlation system (SEC system 3) at 15 m, all on one “low” tower, and a 3-dimensional sonic eddy correlation system (SEC system 22) at 22 m on the “high” tower that was about 46 m distant. All systems measured sensible and latent heat (H and LE) directly, except for OPEC systems 1 and 2 which estimated LE as a residual term in the surface energy balance. Closure of turbulent fluxes from the two SEC systems was around 80% for daytime and 30% for night, with closure of 1-dimensional SEC system 3 exceeding that of 3-dimensional SEC system 22. The night measurements of turbulent fluxes contained considerable uncertainty, especially with the BREB system where measured gradients often yielded erroneous fluxes due to problems inherent in the method (i.e., computational instability as Bowen's ratio approaches -1). Also, both eddy correlation system designs (OPEC and SEC) appeared to underestimate |H| during stable conditions at night. In addition, both sonic systems (1- and 3-dimensional) underestimated |LE| during stable conditions. The underestimate of |H| at night generated residual estimates of OPEC LE containing a “phantom dew” error that erroneously decreased daily LE totals by about 10 percent. These special night problems are circumvented here by comparing results for daytime periods only, rather than for full days. To summarize, turbulent fluxes on the low tower from OPEC system 2 and the adjacent

  12. Fine root morphological adaptations in Scots pine, Norway spruce and silver birch along a latitudinal gradient in boreal forests.

    PubMed

    Ostonen, Ivika; Lõhmus, Krista; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko; Truu, Jaak; Meel, Signe

    2007-11-01

    Variability in short root morphology of the three main tree species of Europe's boreal forest (Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and silver birch (Betula pendula Roth)) was investigated in four stands along a latitudinal gradient from northern Finland to southern Estonia. Silver birch and Scots pine were present in three stands and Norway spruce was present in all stands. For three fertile Norway spruce stands, fine root biomass and number of root tips per stand area or unit basal area were assessed from north to south. Principal component analysis indicated that short root morphology was significantly affected by tree species and site, which together explained 34.7% of the total variability. The range of variation in mean specific root area (SRA) was 51-74, 60-70 and 84-124 m(2) kg(-1) for Norway spruce, Scots pine and silver birch, respectively, and the corresponding ranges for specific root length were 37-47, 40-48 and 87-97 m g(-1). The range of variation in root tissue density of Norway spruce, Scots pine and silver birch was 113-182, 127-158 and 81-156 kg m(-3), respectively. Sensitivity of short root morphology to site conditions decreased in the order: Norway spruce > silver birch > Scots pine. Short root SRA increased with site fertility in all species. In Norway spruce, fine root biomass and number of root tips per m(2) decreased from north to south. The differences in morphological parameters among sites were significant but smaller than the site differences in fine root biomass and number of root tips.

  13. Response of Scots pine stand vitality to changes in environmental factors in Poland, 1991-1995

    Treesearch

    Jerzy Wawrzoniak

    1998-01-01

    Vitality inventories of Scots pine stands, the most common species in Poland, have been done since 1991 by using the ICP-Forest methodology. In Scots pine stands older than 40 years, 1,040 observation plots were established. Defoliation was used as the primary indicator of stand vitality. During 1991 to 1995, SO2 and NOx...

  14. Do multiple herbivores maintain chemical diversity of Scots pine monoterpenes?

    PubMed Central

    Iason, Glenn R.; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M.; Brewer, Mark J.; Summers, Ron W.; Moore, Ben D.

    2011-01-01

    A central issue in our understanding of the evolution of the diversity of plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) is whether or not compounds are functional, conferring an advantage to the plant, or non-functional. We examine the hypothesis that the diversity of monoterpene PSMs within a plant species (Scots pine Pinus sylvestris) may be explained by different compounds acting as defences against high-impact herbivores operating at different life stages. We also hypothesize that pairwise coevolution, with uncorrelated interactions, is more likely to result in greater PSM diversity, than diffuse coevolution. We tested whether up to 13 different monoterpenes in Scots pine were inhibitory to herbivory by slugs (Arion ater), bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), each of which attack trees at a different life stage. Plants containing more α-pinene were avoided by both slugs and capercaillie, which may act as reinforcing selective agents for this dominant defensive compound. Herbivory by red deer and capercaillie were, respectively, weakly negatively associated with δ3-carene, and strongly negatively correlated with the minor compound β-ocimene. Three of the four herbivores are probably contributory selective agents on some of the terpenes, and thus maintain some, but by no means all, of the phytochemical diversity in the species. The correlated defensive function of α-pinene against slugs and capercaillie is consistent with diffuse coevolutionary processes. PMID:21444308

  15. Fluid self-diffusion in Scots pine sapwood tracheid cells.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Espen H; Hansen, Eddy W; Rosenholm, Jarl B

    2006-02-09

    The self-diffusion coefficients of water and toluene in Scots pine sapwood was measured using low field pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR). Wood chips of 8 mm diameter were saturated with the respective liquids, and liquid self-diffusion was then traced in one dimension orthogonal to the tracheid cell walls in the wood's radial direction. The experimental echo attenuation curves were exponential, and characteristic self-diffusion coefficients were produced for diffusion times spanning from very short times to times on the order of magnitude of seconds. Observed self-diffusion coefficients were decaying asymptotically as a function of diffusion time, an effect which was ascribed to the cell walls' restriction on confined liquid diffusion. The observed self-diffusion behavior in Scots pine sapwood was compared to self-diffusion coefficients obtained from simulations of diffusion in a square. Principles of molecular displacements in confined geometries were used for elucidating the wood's cellular structure from the observed diffusion coefficients. The results were compared with a mathematical model for diffusion between parallel planes.

  16. Plasticity in hydraulic architecture of Scots pine across Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Poyatos, R; Martínez-Vilalta, J; Cermák, J; Ceulemans, R; Granier, A; Irvine, J; Köstner, B; Lagergren, F; Meiresonne, L; Nadezhdina, N; Zimmermann, R; Llorens, P; Mencuccini, M

    2007-08-01

    Widespread tree species must show physiological and structural plasticity to deal with contrasting water balance conditions. To investigate these plasticity mechanisms, a meta-analysis of Pinus sylvestris L. sap flow and its response to environmental variables was conducted using datasets from across its whole geographical range. For each site, a Jarvis-type, multiplicative model was used to fit the relationship between sap flow and photosynthetically active radiation, vapour pressure deficit (D) and soil moisture deficit (SMD); and a logarithmic function was used to characterize the response of stomatal conductance (G(s)) to D. The fitted parameters of those models were regressed against climatic variables to study the acclimation of Scots pine to dry/warm conditions. The absolute value of sap flow and its sensitivity to D and SMD increased with the average summer evaporative demand. However, relative sensitivity of G(s) to D (m/G (s,ref), where m is the slope and G(s,ref) is reference G(s) at D = 1 kPa) did not increase with evaporative demand across populations, and transpiration per unit leaf area at a given D increased accordingly in drier/warmer climates. This physiological plasticity was linked to the previously reported climate- and size-related structural acclimation of leaf to sapwood area ratios. G (s,ref), and its absolute sensitivity to D(m), tended to decrease with age/height of the trees as previously reported for other pine species. It is unclear why Scots pines have higher transpiration rates at drier/warmer sites, at the expense of lower water-use efficiency. In any case, our results suggest that these structural adjustments may not be enough to prevent lower xylem tensions at the driest sites.

  17. Induction of discolored wood in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris).

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Mikael; Wikman, Susanne; Eklund, Leif

    2002-04-01

    Induction of discolored wood in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees by treatment with ethylene, carbon dioxide, nitrogen (hypoxia) or wounding from early April to late September was investigated. All treatments induced formation of discolored wood upward and downward from the drill hole. The amount of discolored wood formed above the drill hole depended on the treatment in the following order: ethylene > carbon dioxide = nitrogen > wounding; and below the drill hole in the order: ethylene > carbon dioxide = nitrogen = wounding. Based on chemical analyses (HPLC/UV, GS/MS, LC/MS and 1H-NMR), discolored wood induced by wounding or treatment with ethylene or carbon dioxide showed compositional similarities to natural heartwood, whereas discolored wood induced by nitrogen treatment showed fewer similarities to natural heartwood. The results suggest that ethylene is an important factor controlling heartwood formation, although wounding and internal concentrations of carbon dioxide may also play a role.

  18. Are Scots pine forest edges particularly prone to drought-stress?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Allan; Schunk, Christian; Taeger, Steffen; Lemme, Hannes; Gößwein, Sebastian; Menzel, Annette

    2017-04-01

    In 2016, Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests experienced a pronounced dieback in several regions across Germany. Being an economically important tree species, a thorough identification of the reasons for this dieback is of high interest. The dieback is likely to be associated with a record drought event which occurred in summer 2015. However, visual observations indicate that forest edges were particularly affected. This observation is supported by a study from Sweden which showed that Scots pine trees growing at a north-facing forest edge expressed a higher water use if compared to trees from the interior (Cienciala et al., 2002). We therefore hypothesize that Scots pine trees are more prone to drought-stress induced dieback when growing at the forest edge. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the growth performance of Scots pine across three affected stands in Franconia, southern Germany. The stands were selected to represent differing conditions along a gradient of forest fragmentation, ranging from the forest interior, over a forest edge situation, to a small forest island. By means of dendroclimatology and UAV-borne remote sensing, Scots pine growth performance and vitality was compared among the three stands. Our results revealed differing Scots pine growth reactions between the forest interior and forest edge as indicated by the identification of different responder groups (Buras et al., 2016). The forest edge and the forest island expressed significantly higher correlations with the drought-index SPEI (Vicente-Serrano et al., 2009) if compared to the forest interior. Moreover, NDVI of Scots Pine canopies significantly decreased towards the forest edge, this indicating lower vitality of corresponding trees. In conclusion, our results highlight Scots pine to be more prone to drought-stress when growing at the forest edge. This finding has important implications for forest management activities in the context of climate change adaptation, since

  19. Drought-induced adaptation of the xylem in Scots pine and pubescent oak.

    PubMed

    Eilmann, Britta; Zweifel, Roman; Buchmann, Nina; Fonti, Patrick; Rigling, Andreas

    2009-08-01

    Drought impairs tree growth in the inner-Alpine valleys of Central Europe. We investigated species-specific responses to contrasting water supply, with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), threatened by drought-induced mortality, and pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.), showing no connection between drought events and mortality. The two co-occurring tree species were compared, growing either along an open water channel or at a site with naturally dry conditions. In addition, the growth response of Scots pine to a draining of a water channel was studied. We analysed the radial increment for the last 100 years and wood anatomical parameters for the last 45 years. Drought reduced the conduit area of pubescent oak, but increased the radial lumen diameter of the conduits in Scots pine. Both species decreased their radial increment under drought. In Scots pine, radial increment was generally more dependent on water availability than that in pubescent oak. Irrigated trees responded less negatively to high temperature as seen in the increase in the conduit area in pubescent oak and the removal of the limitation of cell division by high temperatures. After irrigation stopped, tree-ring width for Scots pine decreased within 1-year delay, whereas lumen diameter and cell-wall thickness responded with a 4-year delay. Scots pine seemed to optimize the carbon-per-conduit-costs under drought by increasing conduits diameter while decreasing cell numbers. This strategy might lead to a complete loss of tree rings under severe drought and thus to an impairment of water transport. In contrast, in pubescent oak tree-ring width is less affected by summer drought because parts of the earlywood are built in early spring. Thus, pubescent oak might have gradual advantages over pine in today's climate of the inner-Alpine valley.

  20. [Seasonal development of phloem in Scots pine stems].

    PubMed

    Antonova, G F; Stasova, V V

    2006-01-01

    The formation of phloem was studied for two years in stems of 50 to 60 year old trees of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in nature. The development of phloem of the current year begins 10 to 20 days before the xylem formation and is completed with the termination of shoot growth in the end of June. Observations over the seasonal activity of cambium producing sieve-like cells of phloem and duration of their differentiation as compared to the xylem derivatives of cambium have shown that the maxima of formation of phloem and xylem cells could coincide or not coincide by season, while the activities of their differentiation were always at antiphase. The sieve-like cells of early phloem were separated from those of late phloem by a layer of tannin-containing cells, which are formed simultaneously with the formation of late xylem cells by the cambium. Seasonal dynamics of accumulation of starch grain in structural elements of the phloem is related to the xylem development. The content of metabolites in differentiating and mature phloem elements, in the cambium zone, and in the xylem cells growing in the radial direction depended on cell specificity, stage of their development, and type of forming wood, early or late, which differ in the cell wall parameters and, hence, requirement of assimilates. Significant differences were described between the content of low molecular weigh carbohydrates, amino acids, organic acids, and phenol compounds using two methods of calculation: per dry weight and per cell.

  1. NIR spectroscopic measurement of moisture content in Scots pine seeds.

    PubMed

    Lestander, Torbjörn A; Geladi, Paul

    2003-04-01

    When tree seeds are used for seedling production it is important that they are of high quality in order to be viable. One of the factors influencing viability is moisture content and an ideal quality control system should be able to measure this factor quickly for each seed. Seed moisture content within the range 3-34% was determined by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) single seeds and on bulk seed samples consisting of 40-50 seeds. The models for predicting water content from the spectra were made by partial least squares (PLS) and ordinary least squares (OLS) regression. Different conditions were simulated involving both using less wavelengths and going from samples to single seeds. Reflectance and transmission measurements were used. Different spectral pretreatment methods were tested on the spectra. Including bias, the lowest prediction errors for PLS models based on reflectance within 780-2280 nm from bulk samples and single seeds were 0.8% and 1.9%, respectively. Reduction of the single seed reflectance spectrum to 850-1048 nm gave higher biases and prediction errors in the test set. In transmission (850-1048 nm) the prediction error was 2.7% for single seeds. OLS models based on simulated 4-sensor single seed system consisting of optical filters with Gaussian transmission indicated more than 3.4% error in prediction. A practical F-test based on test sets to differentiate models is introduced.

  2. Nitrogen balance of a boreal Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, J. F. J.; Pihlatie, M.; Pumpanen, J.; Aaltonen, H.; Hari, P.; Levula, J.; Kieloaho, A.-J.; Nikinmaa, E.; Vesala, T.; Ilvesniemi, H.

    2013-02-01

    The productivity of boreal forests is considered to be limited by low nitrogen (N) availability. Increased atmospheric N deposition has altered the functioning and N cycling of these N-sensitive ecosystems by increasing the availability of reactive nitrogen. The most important components of N pools and fluxes were measured in a boreal Scots pine stand in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. The measurements at the site allowed direct estimations of nutrient pools in the soil and biomass, inputs from the atmosphere and outputs as drainage flow and gaseous losses from two micro-catchments. N was accumulating in the system, mainly in woody biomass, at a rate of 7 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Nitrogen input as atmospheric deposition was 7.4 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Dry deposition and organic N in wet deposition contributed over half of the inputs in deposition. Total outputs were 0.4 kg N ha-1 yr-1, the most important outputs being N2O emission to the atmosphere and organic N flux in drainage flow. Nitrogen uptake and retranslocation were equally important sources of N for plant growth. Most of the assimilated N originated from decomposition of organic matter, and the fraction of N that could originate directly from deposition was about 30%. In conclusion, atmospheric N deposition fertilizes the site considerably, but there are no signs of N saturation. Further research is needed to estimate soil N2 fluxes (emission and fixation), which may amount up to several kg N ha-1 yr-1.

  3. Chronic radiation exposure as an ecological factor: Hypermethylation and genetic differentiation in irradiated Scots pine populations.

    PubMed

    Volkova, P Yu; Geras'kin, S A; Horemans, N; Makarenko, E S; Saenen, E; Duarte, G T; Nauts, R; Bondarenko, V S; Jacobs, G; Voorspoels, S; Kudin, M

    2018-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic changes were investigated in chronically irradiated Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) populations from territories that were heavily contaminated by radionuclides as result of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. In comparison to the reference site, the genetic diversity revealed by electrophoretic mobility of AFLPs was found to be significantly higher at the radioactively contaminated areas. In addition, the genome of pine trees was significantly hypermethylated at 4 of the 7 affected sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Developmental Changes in Scots Pine Transcriptome during Heartwood Formation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Paasela, Tanja; Harju, Anni; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Kärkkäinen, Katri

    2016-01-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) wood is desired in woodworking industries due to its favorable timber characteristics and natural durability that is contributed by heartwood extractives. It has been discussed whether the Scots pine heartwood extractives (mainly stilbenes and resin acids) are synthesized in the cells of the transition zone between sapwood and heartwood, or if they are transported from the sapwood. Timing of heartwood formation during the yearly cycle has also not been unambiguously defined. We measured steady-state mRNA levels in Scots pine transition zone and sapwood using RNA sequencing. Year-round expression profiles of selected transcripts were further investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. Differentially accumulating transcripts suggest that, of the Scots pine heartwood extractives, stilbenes are synthesized in situ in the transition zone and gain their carbon-skeletons from Suc and triglycerides. Resin acids, on the other hand, are synthesized early in the spring mainly in the sapwood, meaning that they must be transported to the heartwood transition zone. Heartwood formation is marked by programmed cell death that occurs during the summer months in the transition zone. PMID:27600814

  5. The effects of multiple metal contamination on ectomycorrhizal Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hartley, J; Cairney, J W; Freestone, P; Woods, C; Meharg, A A

    1999-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of single and multiple metal contamination (Cd, Pb, Zn, Sb, Cu) on Scots pine seedlings colonised by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi from natural soil inoculum. Seedlings were grown in either contaminated field soil from the site of a chemical accident, soils amended with five metals contaminating the site, or in soil from an uncontaminated control site. Although contaminated and metal-amended soil significantly inhibited root and shoot growth of the Scots pine seedlings, total root tip density was not affected. Of the five metals tested in amended soils, Cd was the most toxic to ECM Scots pine. Field-contaminated soil had a toxic effect on ECM fungi associated with Scots pine seedlings and caused shifts in ECM species composition on ECM seedlings. When compared to soils amended with only one metal, soils amended with a combination of all five metals tested had lower relative toxicity and less accumulation of Pb, Zn and Sb into seedlings. This would indicate that the toxicity of multiple metal contamination cannot be predicted from the individual toxicity of the metals investigated.

  6. Ectomycorrhizae of young and mature Scots pine trees in industrial regions in Poland

    Treesearch

    Barbara Kieliszewska-Rokicka; Maria Rudawska; Tomasz Leski

    1998-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizae of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees grown in forests influenced by different levels of air pollutants were investigated. Total numbers of mycorrhizal root tips in the soil horizons and the frequency of mycorrhizal morphotypes were compared as indicators of ectomycorrhizal status. The studies were conducted in two comparable...

  7. Know your limits? Climate extremes impact the range of Scots pine in unexpected places

    PubMed Central

    Julio Camarero, J.; Gazol, Antonio; Sancho-Benages, Santiago; Sangüesa-Barreda, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Although extreme climatic events such as drought are known to modify forest dynamics by triggering tree dieback, the impact of extreme cold events, especially at the low-latitude margin (‘rear edge’) of species distributional ranges, has received little attention. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of one such extreme cold event on a population of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) along the species’ European southern rear-edge range limit and to determine how such events can be incorporated into species distribution models (SDMs). Methods A combination of dendrochronology and field observation was used to quantify how an extreme cold event in 2001 in eastern Spain affected growth, needle loss and mortality of Scots pine. Long-term European climatic data sets were used to contextualize the severity of the 2001 event, and an SDM for Scots pine in Europe was used to predict climatic range limits. Key Results The 2001 winter reached record minimum temperatures (equivalent to the maximum European-wide diurnal ranges) and, for trees already stressed by a preceding dry summer and autumn, this caused dieback and large-scale mortality. Needle loss and mortality were particularly evident in south-facing sites, where post-event recovery was greatly reduced. The SDM predicted European Scots pine distribution mainly on the basis of responses to maximum and minimum monthly temperatures, but in comparison with this the observed effects of the 2001 cold event at the southerly edge of the range limit were unforeseen. Conclusions The results suggest that in order to better forecast how anthropogenic climate change might affect future forest distributions, distribution modelling techniques such as SDMs must incorporate climatic extremes. For Scots pine, this study shows that the effects of cold extremes should be included across the entire distribution margin, including the southern ‘rear edge’, in order to avoid biased predictions based solely

  8. Contrasting Hydraulic Architectures of Scots Pine and Sessile Oak at Their Southernmost Distribution Limits

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sancho, Elisabet; Dorado-Liñán, Isabel; Hacke, Uwe G.; Seidel, Hannes; Menzel, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Many temperate European tree species have their southernmost distribution limits in the Mediterranean Basin. The projected climatic conditions, particularly an increase in dryness, might induce an altitudinal and latitudinal retreat at their southernmost distribution limit. Therefore, characterizing the morphological and physiological variability of temperate tree species under dry conditions is essential to understand species’ responses to expected climate change. In this study, we compared branch-level hydraulic traits of four Scots pine and four sessile oak natural stands located at the western and central Mediterranean Basin to assess their adjustment to water limiting conditions. Hydraulic traits such as xylem- and leaf-specific maximum hydraulic conductivity (KS-MAX and KL-MAX), leaf-to-xylem area ratio (AL:AX) and functional xylem fraction (FX) were measured in July 2015 during a long and exceptionally dry summer. Additionally, xylem-specific native hydraulic conductivity (KS-N) and native percentage of loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC) were measured for Scots pine. Interspecific differences in these hydraulic traits as well as intraspecific variability between sites were assessed. The influence of annual, summer and growing season site climatic aridity (P/PET) on intraspecific variability was investigated. Sessile oak displayed higher values of KS-MAX, KL-MAX, AL:AX but a smaller percentage of FX than Scots pines. Scots pine did not vary in any of the measured hydraulic traits across the sites, and PLC values were low for all sites, even during one of the warmest summers in the region. In contrast, sessile oak showed significant differences in KS-MAX, KL-MAX, and FX across sites, which were significantly related to site aridity. The striking similarity in the hydraulic traits across Scots pine sites suggests that no adjustment in hydraulic architecture was needed, likely as a consequence of a drought-avoidance strategy. In contrast, sessile oak

  9. Chemodiversity in terpene emissions at a boreal Scots pine stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäck, J.; Aalto, J.; Henriksson, M.; Hakola, H.; He, Q.; Boy, M.

    2011-10-01

    Atmospheric chemistry in background areas is strongly influenced by natural vegetation. Coniferous forests are known to produce large quantities of volatile vapors, especially terpenes to the surrounding air. These compounds are reactive in the atmosphere, and contribute to the formation and growth of atmospheric new particles. Our aim was to analyze the variability of mono- and sesquiterpene emissions between Scots pine trees, in order to clarify the potential errors caused by using emission data obtained from only a few trees in atmospheric chemistry models. We also aimed at testing if stand history and seed origin has an influence on the chemotypic diversity. The inherited, chemotypic variability in mono- and sesquiterpene emission was studied in a seemingly homogeneous 47-yr-old stand in Southern Finland, where two areas differing in their stand regeneration history could be distinguished. Sampling was conducted in August 2009. Terpene concentrations in the air had been measured at the same site for seven years prior to branch sampling for chemotypes. Two main compounds, α-pinene and Δ3-carene formed together 40-97% of the monoterpene proportions in both the branch emissions and in the air concentrations. The data showed a bimodal distribution in emission composition, in particular in Δ3-carene emission within the studied population. 10% of the trees emitted mainly α-pinene and no Δ3-carene at all, whereas 20% of the trees where characterized as high Δ3-carene emitters (Δ3-carene forming >80% of total emitted monoterpene spectrum). An intermediate group of trees emitted equal amounts of both α-pinene and Δ3-carene. The emission pattern of trees at the area established using seeding as the artificial regeneration method differed from the naturally regenerated or planted trees, being mainly high Δ3-carene emitters. Some differences were also seen in e.g. camphene and limonene emissions between chemotypes, but sesquiterpene emissions did not differ

  10. Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) reproduction and development in Scots, jack, red and eastern white pine under laboratory conditions

    Treesearch

    Hui Ye; Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice

    2005-01-01

    The pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (L.) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), is an exotic bark beetle in North America that was first found in the Great Lakes region in 1992. We evaluated T. piniperda reproduction and development in one Eurasian pine (Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris L.) and three North American...

  11. Effects of radioactive contamination on Scots pines in the remote period after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Geras'kin, Stanislav; Oudalova, Alla; Dikareva, Nina; Spiridonov, Sergey; Hinton, Thomas; Chernonog, Elena; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2011-08-01

    A 6 year study of Scots pine populations inhabiting sites in the Bryansk region of Russia radioactively contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident is presented. In six study sites, (137)Cs activity concentrations and heavy metal content in soils, as well as (137)Cs, (90)Sr and heavy metal concentrations in cones were measured. Doses absorbed in reproduction organs of pine trees were calculated using a dosimetric model. The maximum annual dose absorbed at the most contaminated site was about 130 mGy. Occurrence of aberrant cells scored in the root meristem of germinated seeds collected from pine trees growing on radioactively contaminated territories for over 20 years significantly exceeded the reference levels during all 6 years of the study. The data suggest that cytogenetic effects occur in Scots pine populations due to the radioactive contamination. However, no consistent differences in reproductive ability were detected between the impacted and reference populations as measured by the frequency of abortive seeds. Even though the Scots pine populations have occupied radioactively contaminated territories for two decades, there were no clear indications of adaptation to the radiation, when measured by the number of aberrant cells in root meristems of seeds exposed to an additional acute dose of radiation.

  12. Influence of long-term chronic exposure and weather conditions on Scots pine populations.

    PubMed

    Geras'kin, Stanislav; Vasiliyev, Denis; Makarenko, Ekaterina; Volkova, Polina; Kuzmenkov, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    Over a period of 8 years (2007-2014), we were evaluating seed quality and morphological abnormalities in Scots pine trees affected as a result of the Chernobyl accident. The calculated dose rates for the trees at the study sites varied from background values at the reference sites to 40 mGy/year at the most contaminated site. We investigated whether radioactive contamination and/or weather factors could decrease the reproductive capacity or increase the frequency of morphological abnormalities of needles in pine trees. Scots pine seeds are characterized by high interannual variability of viability, which is largely determined by weather conditions. No consistent differences in reproductive capacity were detected between the impacted and reference populations. Brachyblasts with three needles were found only in the affected populations; however, their frequency was very low and only at the very border of significance at the p < 0.10 level.

  13. A stochastic model of tree architecture and biomass partitioning: application to Mongolian Scots pines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Kang, Mengzhen; Lu, Qi; Letort, Véronique; Han, Hui; Guo, Yan; de Reffye, Philippe; Li, Baoguo

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Mongolian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) is one of the principal species used for windbreak and sand stabilization in arid and semi-arid areas in northern China. A model-assisted analysis of its canopy architectural development and functions is valuable for better understanding its behaviour and roles in fragile ecosystems. However, due to the intrinsic complexity and variability of trees, the parametric identification of such models is currently a major obstacle to their evaluation and their validation with respect to real data. The aim of this paper was to present the mathematical framework of a stochastic functional–structural model (GL2) and its parameterization for Mongolian Scots pines, taking into account inter-plant variability in terms of topological development and biomass partitioning. Methods In GL2, plant organogenesis is determined by the realization of random variables representing the behaviour of axillary or apical buds. The associated probabilities are calibrated for Mongolian Scots pines using experimental data including means and variances of the numbers of organs per plant in each order-based class. The functional part of the model relies on the principles of source–sink regulation and is parameterized by direct observations of living trees and the inversion method using measured data for organ mass and dimensions. Key Results The final calibration accuracy satisfies both organogenetic and morphogenetic processes. Our hypothesis for the number of organs following a binomial distribution is found to be consistent with the real data. Based on the calibrated parameters, stochastic simulations of the growth of Mongolian Scots pines in plantations are generated by the Monte Carlo method, allowing analysis of the inter-individual variability of the number of organs and biomass partitioning. Three-dimensional (3D) architectures of young Mongolian Scots pines were simulated for 4-, 6- and 8-year-old trees

  14. A stochastic model of tree architecture and biomass partitioning: application to Mongolian Scots pines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Kang, Mengzhen; Lu, Qi; Letort, Véronique; Han, Hui; Guo, Yan; de Reffye, Philippe; Li, Baoguo

    2011-04-01

    Mongolian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) is one of the principal species used for windbreak and sand stabilization in arid and semi-arid areas in northern China. A model-assisted analysis of its canopy architectural development and functions is valuable for better understanding its behaviour and roles in fragile ecosystems. However, due to the intrinsic complexity and variability of trees, the parametric identification of such models is currently a major obstacle to their evaluation and their validation with respect to real data. The aim of this paper was to present the mathematical framework of a stochastic functional-structural model (GL2) and its parameterization for Mongolian Scots pines, taking into account inter-plant variability in terms of topological development and biomass partitioning. In GL2, plant organogenesis is determined by the realization of random variables representing the behaviour of axillary or apical buds. The associated probabilities are calibrated for Mongolian Scots pines using experimental data including means and variances of the numbers of organs per plant in each order-based class. The functional part of the model relies on the principles of source-sink regulation and is parameterized by direct observations of living trees and the inversion method using measured data for organ mass and dimensions. The final calibration accuracy satisfies both organogenetic and morphogenetic processes. Our hypothesis for the number of organs following a binomial distribution is found to be consistent with the real data. Based on the calibrated parameters, stochastic simulations of the growth of Mongolian Scots pines in plantations are generated by the Monte Carlo method, allowing analysis of the inter-individual variability of the number of organs and biomass partitioning. Three-dimensional (3D) architectures of young Mongolian Scots pines were simulated for 4-, 6- and 8-year-old trees. This work provides a new method for characterizing

  15. Features of Scots pine radial growth in conditions of provenance trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, S.

    2012-12-01

    Provenance trial of Scots pine in Boguchany forestry of Krasnoyarsk krai is conducted on two different soils - dark-grey loam forest soil and sod-podzol sandy soil. Complex of negative factors for plant growth and development appears in dry conditions of sandy soil. It could results in decrease of resistance to diseases. Sandy soils in different climatic zones have such common traits as low absorbing capacity, poorness of elemental nutrition, low microbiological activity and moisture capacity, very high water permeability. But Scots pine trees growing in such conditions could have certain advantages and perspectives of use. In the scope of climate change (global warming) the study of Scots pine growth on sandy soil become urgent because of more frequent appearance of dry seasons. Purpose of the work is revelation of radial growth features of Scots pine with different origin in dry conditions of sandy soil and assessment of external factors influence. The main feature of radial growth of majority of studied pine provenances in conditions of sandy soil is presence of significant variation of increment with distinct decline in 25-years old with loss of tree rings in a number of cases. The reason of it is complex of factors: deficit of June precipitation and next following outbreak of fungal disease. Found «frost rings» for all trees of studied clymatypes in 1992 are the consequence of temperature decline from May 21 to June 2 - from 23 C degrees up to 2 C. Perspective climatypes with biggest radial increments and least sensitivity to fungal disease were revealed.

  16. Chronic radiation exposure modifies temporal dynamics of cytogenetic but not reproductive indicators in Scots pine populations.

    PubMed

    Geras'kin, Stanislav; Oudalova, Alla; Kuzmenkov, Alexey; Vasiliyev, Denis

    2018-04-18

    Over a period of 13 years (2003-2015), reproductive and cytogenetic effects are investigated in Scots pine populations growing in the Bryansk region of Russia radioactively contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident. In reference populations, the frequencies of cytogenetic abnormalities are shown to change with time in a cyclic manner. In chronically exposed populations, the cyclic patterns in temporal dynamics of cytogenetic abnormalities appear to be disturbed. In addition, a tendency to decrease in the frequencies of cytogenetic abnormalities with time as well as an increase in their variability with dose rate is revealed. In contrast, no significant impact of chronic radiation exposure on the time dynamics of reproductive indexes is detected. Finally, long-term observations on chronically exposed Scots pine populations revealed qualitative differences in the temporal dynamics of reproductive and cytogenetic indicators. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effects of heat treatment on some technological properties of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) wood.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Süleyman; Akgül, Mehmet; Dündar, Turker

    2008-04-01

    Heat treatment is often applied to wood species to improve their dimensional stability. This study examined the effect of heat treatment on certain mechanical properties of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), which has industrially high usage potential and large plantations in Turkey. Wood specimens obtained from Bolu, Turkey, were subjected to heat treatment under atmospheric pressure at varying temperatures (120, 150 and 180 degrees C) for varying durations (2, 6 and 10h). The test results of heat-treated Scots pine and control samples showed that technological properties including compression strength, bending strength, modulus of elasticity in bending, janka-hardness, impact bending strength and tension strength perpendicular to grain suffered with heat treatment, and increase in temperature and duration further diminished technological strength values of the wood specimens.

  18. Predicting the decomposition of Scots pine, Norway spruce, and birch stems in Finland.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Harri; Hynynen, Jari; Siitonen, Juha; Sievänen, Risto

    2006-10-01

    Models were developed for predicting the decomposition of dead wood for the main tree species in Finland, based on data collected from long-term thinning experiments in southern and central Finland. The decomposition rates were strongly related to the number of years after tree death. In contrast to previous studies, which have used the first-order exponential model, we found that the decomposition rate was not constant. Therefore, the Gompertz and Chapman-Richard's functions were fitted to the data. The slow initial decomposition period was mainly due to the fact that most dead trees remained standing as snags after their death. The initial period was followed by a period of rapid decomposition and, finally, by a period of moderately slow decomposition. Birch stems decomposed more rapidly than Scots pine and Norway spruce stems. Decomposition rates of Norway spruce stems were somewhat lower than those of Scots pine. Because the carbon concentration of decaying boles was relatively stable (about 50%) the rate of carbon loss follows that of mass loss. Models were also developed for the probability that a dead tree remains standing as a snag. During the first years after death, the probability was high. Thereafter, it decreased rapidly, the decrease being faster for birch stems than for Scots pine and Norway spruce stems. Almost all stems had fallen down within 40 years after their death. In Scots pine and Norway spruce, most snags remained hard and belonged to decay class 1. In birch, a higher proportion of snags belonged to the more advanced decay classes. The models provide a framework for predicting dead wood dynamics in managed as well as dense unthinned stands. The models can be incorporated into forest management planning systems, thereby facilitating estimates of carbon dynamics.

  19. Analysis, pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification of different fractions of Scots pine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Forestry residues consisting of softwood are a major lignocellulosic resource for production of liquid biofuels. Scots pine, a commercially important forest tree, was fractionated into seven fractions of chips: juvenile heartwood, mature heartwood, juvenile sapwood, mature sapwood, bark, top parts, and knotwood. The different fractions were characterized analytically with regard to chemical composition and susceptibility to dilute-acid pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. Results All fractions were characterized by a high glucan content (38-43%) and a high content of other carbohydrates (11-14% mannan, 2-4% galactan) that generate easily convertible hexose sugars, and by a low content of inorganic material (0.2-0.9% ash). The lignin content was relatively uniform (27-32%) and the syringyl-guaiacyl ratio of the different fractions were within the range 0.021-0.025. The knotwood had a high content of extractives (9%) compared to the other fractions. The effects of pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification were relatively similar, but without pretreatment the bark fraction was considerably more susceptible to enzymatic saccharification. Conclusions Since sawn timber is a main product from softwood species such as Scots pine, it is an important issue whether different parts of the tree are equally suitable for bioconversion processes. The investigation shows that bioconversion of Scots pine is facilitated by that most of the different fractions exhibit relatively similar properties with regard to chemical composition and susceptibility to techniques used for bioconversion of woody biomass. PMID:24641769

  20. Analysis, pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification of different fractions of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Normark, Monica; Winestrand, Sandra; Lestander, Torbjörn A; Jönsson, Leif J

    2014-03-19

    Forestry residues consisting of softwood are a major lignocellulosic resource for production of liquid biofuels. Scots pine, a commercially important forest tree, was fractionated into seven fractions of chips: juvenile heartwood, mature heartwood, juvenile sapwood, mature sapwood, bark, top parts, and knotwood. The different fractions were characterized analytically with regard to chemical composition and susceptibility to dilute-acid pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. All fractions were characterized by a high glucan content (38-43%) and a high content of other carbohydrates (11-14% mannan, 2-4% galactan) that generate easily convertible hexose sugars, and by a low content of inorganic material (0.2-0.9% ash). The lignin content was relatively uniform (27-32%) and the syringyl-guaiacyl ratio of the different fractions were within the range 0.021-0.025. The knotwood had a high content of extractives (9%) compared to the other fractions. The effects of pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification were relatively similar, but without pretreatment the bark fraction was considerably more susceptible to enzymatic saccharification. Since sawn timber is a main product from softwood species such as Scots pine, it is an important issue whether different parts of the tree are equally suitable for bioconversion processes. The investigation shows that bioconversion of Scots pine is facilitated by that most of the different fractions exhibit relatively similar properties with regard to chemical composition and susceptibility to techniques used for bioconversion of woody biomass.

  1. Growth, aboveground biomass, and nutrient concentration of young Scots pine and lodgepole pine in oil shale post-mining landscapes in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatjana; Tilk, Mari; Pärn, Henn; Lukjanova, Aljona; Mandre, Malle

    2011-12-01

    The investigation was carried out in 8-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm.) plantations on post-mining area, Northeast Estonia. The aim of the study was to assess the suitability of lodgepole pine for restoration of degraded lands by comparing the growth, biomass, and nutrient concentration of studied species. The height growth of trees was greater in the Scots pine stand, but the tree aboveground biomass was slightly larger in the lodgepole pine stand. The aboveground biomass allocation to the compartments did not differ significantly between species. The vertical distribution of compartments showed that 43.2% of the Scots pine needles were located in the middle layer of the crown, while 58.5% of the lodgepole pine needles were in the lowest layer of the crown. The largest share of the shoots and stem of both species was allocated to the lowest layer of the crown. For both species, the highest NPK concentrations were found in the needles and the lowest in the stems. On the basis of the present study results, it can be concluded that the early growth of Scots pine and lodgepole pine on oil shale post-mining landscapes is similar.

  2. Know your limits? Climate extremes impact the range of Scots pine in unexpected places.

    PubMed

    Julio Camarero, J; Gazol, Antonio; Sancho-Benages, Santiago; Sangüesa-Barreda, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Although extreme climatic events such as drought are known to modify forest dynamics by triggering tree dieback, the impact of extreme cold events, especially at the low-latitude margin ('rear edge') of species distributional ranges, has received little attention. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of one such extreme cold event on a population of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) along the species' European southern rear-edge range limit and to determine how such events can be incorporated into species distribution models (SDMs). A combination of dendrochronology and field observation was used to quantify how an extreme cold event in 2001 in eastern Spain affected growth, needle loss and mortality of Scots pine. Long-term European climatic data sets were used to contextualize the severity of the 2001 event, and an SDM for Scots pine in Europe was used to predict climatic range limits. The 2001 winter reached record minimum temperatures (equivalent to the maximum European-wide diurnal ranges) and, for trees already stressed by a preceding dry summer and autumn, this caused dieback and large-scale mortality. Needle loss and mortality were particularly evident in south-facing sites, where post-event recovery was greatly reduced. The SDM predicted European Scots pine distribution mainly on the basis of responses to maximum and minimum monthly temperatures, but in comparison with this the observed effects of the 2001 cold event at the southerly edge of the range limit were unforeseen. The results suggest that in order to better forecast how anthropogenic climate change might affect future forest distributions, distribution modelling techniques such as SDMs must incorporate climatic extremes. For Scots pine, this study shows that the effects of cold extremes should be included across the entire distribution margin, including the southern 'rear edge', in order to avoid biased predictions based solely on warmer climatic scenarios. © The Author 2015. Published by

  3. Association of FLOWERING LOCUS T/TERMINAL FLOWER 1-like gene FTL2 expression with growth rhythm in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris).

    PubMed

    Avia, Komlan; Kärkkäinen, Katri; Lagercrantz, Ulf; Savolainen, Outi

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of the timing of bud set, an important trait in conifers, is relevant for adaptation and forestry practice. In common garden experiments, both Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) show a latitudinal cline in the trait. We compared the regulation of their bud set biology by examining the expression of PsFTL2, a Pinus sylvestris homolog to PaFTL2, a FLOWERING LOCUS T/TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (FT/TFL1)-like gene, the expression levels of which have been found previously to be associated with the timing of bud set in Norway spruce. In a common garden study, we analyzed the relationship of bud phenology under natural and artificial photoperiods and the expression of PsFTL2 in a set of Scots pine populations from different latitudes. The expression of PsFTL2 increased in the needles preceding bud set and decreased during bud burst. In the northernmost population, even short night periods were efficient to trigger this expression, which also increased earlier under all photoperiodic regimes compared with the southern populations. Despite the different biology, with few limitations, the two conifers that diverged 140 million yr ago probably share an association of FTL2 with bud set, pointing to a common mechanism for the timing of growth cessation in conifers. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Fungal succession in relation to volatile organic compounds emissions from Scots pine and Norway spruce leaf litter-decomposing fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidorov, Valery; Tyszkiewicz, Zofia; Pirożnikow, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Leaf litter fungi are partly responsible for decomposition of dead material, nutrient mobilization and gas fluxes in forest ecosystems. It can be assumed that microbial destruction of dead plant materials is an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted into the atmosphere from terrestrial ecosystems. However, little information is available on both the composition of fungal VOCs and their producers whose community can be changed at different stages of litter decomposition. The fungal community succession was investigated in a litter bag experiment with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) needle litter. The succession process can be divided into a several stages controlled mostly by changes in litter quality. At the very first stages of decomposition the needle litter was colonized by ascomycetes which can use readily available carbohydrates. At the later stages, the predominance of Trichoderma sp., the known producers of cellulolytic enzymes, was documented. To investigate the fungi-derived VOCs, eight fungi species were isolated. As a result of gas chromatographic analyses, as many as 75C2sbnd C15 fungal volatile compounds were identified. Most components detected in emissions were very reactive substances: the principal groups of VOCs were formed by monoterpenes, carbonyl compounds and aliphatic alcohols. It was found that production of VOCs by fungi is species specific: only 10 metabolites were emitted into the gas phase by all eight species. The reported data confirm that the leave litter decomposition is important source of reactive organic compounds under the forest canopy.

  5. Differential response of Scots pine seedlings to variable intensity and ratio of red and far-red light.

    PubMed

    Razzak, Abdur; Ranade, Sonali Sachin; Strand, Åsa; García-Gil, M R

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the response to increasing intensity of red (R) and far-R (FR) light and to a decrease in R:FR ratio in Pinus sylvestris L. (Scots pine) seedling. The results showed that FR high-irradiance response for hypocotyl elongation may be present in Scots pine and that this response is enhanced by increasing light intensity. However, both hypocotyl inhibition and pigment accumulation were more strongly affected by the R light compared with FR light. This is in contrast to previous reports in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. In the angiosperm, A. thaliana R light shows an overall milder effect on inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and on pigment biosynthesis compared with FR suggesting conifers and angiosperms respond very differently to the different light regimes. Scots pine shade avoidance syndrome with longer hypocotyls, shorter cotyledons and lower chlorophyll content in response to shade conditions resembles the response observed in A. thaliana. However, anthocyanin accumulation increased with shade in Scots pine, which again differs from what is known in angiosperms. Overall, the response of seedling development and physiology to R and FR light in Scots pine indicates that the regulatory mechanism for light response may differ between gymnosperms and angiosperms. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Recovery plan for Scots pine blister rust caused by Cronartium flaccidum (Alb. & Schwein.) G. Winter and Peridermium pini (Pers.) Lév. [syn. C. asclepiadeum (Willd.) Fr., Endocronartium pini (Pers.) Y. Hiratsuka

    Treesearch

    Brian W. Geils; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook Kim; Pauline Spaine; Bryce A. Richardson; Paul J. Zambino; Charles G. Shaw; James Walla; Russ Bulluck; Laura Redmond; Kent Smith

    2009-01-01

    The sexually reproducing form of Scots pine blister rust, C. flaccidum, completes its life cycle alternating between pines of the subgenus Pinus and seed-plants of various families. Scots pine blister rust is also caused by a form of the rust that spreads directly from pine to pine and is named, Peridermium pini...

  7. Drought alters timing, quantity, and quality of wood formation in Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Eilmann, Britta; Zweifel, Roman; Buchmann, Nina; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; Rigling, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Drought has been frequently discussed as a trigger for forest decline. Today, large-scale Scots pine decline is observed in many dry inner-Alpine valleys, with drought discussed as the main causative factor. This study aimed to analyse the impact of drought on wood formation and wood structure. To study tree growth under contrasting water supply, an irrigation experiment was installed in a mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forest at a xeric site in a dry inner-Alpine valley. Inter- and intra-annual radial increments as well as intra-annual variations in wood structure of pine trees were studied. It was found that non-irrigated trees had a noticeably shorter period of wood formation and showed a significantly lower increment. The water conduction cells were significantly enlarged and had significantly thinner cell walls compared with irrigated trees. It is concluded that pine trees under drought stress build a more effective water-conducting system (larger tracheids) at the cost of a probably higher vulnerability to cavitation (larger tracheids with thinner cell walls) but without losing their capability to recover. The significant shortening of the growth period in control trees indicated that the period where wood formation actually takes place can be much shorter under drought than the 'potential' period, meaning the phenological growth period.

  8. Features of Scots pine radial growth in conditions of provenance trial.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Sergey; Kuzmina, Nina

    2013-04-01

    Provenance trial of Scots pine in Boguchany forestry of Krasnoyarsk krai is conducted on two different soils - dark-grey loam forest soil and sod-podzol sandy soil. Complex of negative factors for plant growth and development appears in dry conditions of sandy soil. It could results in decrease of resistance to diseases. Sandy soils in different climatic zones have such common traits as low absorbing capacity, poorness of elemental nutrition, low microbiological activity and moisture capacity, very high water permeability. But Scots pine trees growing in such conditions could have certain advantages and perspectives of use. In the scope of climate change (global warming) the study of Scots pine growth on sandy soil become urgent because of more frequent appearance of dry seasons. Purpose of the work is revelation of radial growth features of Scots pine with different origin in dry conditions of sandy soil and assessment of external factors influence. The main feature of radial growth of majority of studied pine provenances in conditions of sandy soil is presence of significant variation of increment with distinct decline in 25-years old with loss of tree rings in a number of cases. The reason of it is complex of factors: deficit of June precipitation and next following outbreak of fungal disease. Found «frost rings» for all trees of studied clymatypes in 1992 are the consequence of temperature decline from May 21 to June 2 - from 23 down to 2 degree Celsius. Perspective climatypes with biggest radial increments and least sensitivity to fungal disease were revealed. Eniseysk and Vikhorevka (from Krasnoyarsk krai and Irkutsk oblast)provenances of pine have the biggest radial increments, the least sensitivity to Cenangium dieback and smallest increments decline. These climatypes are in the group of perspective provenances and in present time they are recommended for wide trial in the region for future use in plantation forest growing. Kandalaksha (Murmansk oblast

  9. Logging residue removal after thinning in boreal forests: long-term impact on the nutrient status of Norway spruce and Scots pine needles.

    PubMed

    Luiro, Jukka; Kukkola, Mikko; Saarsalmi, Anna; Tamminen, Pekka; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare how conventional stem harvesting (CH) and whole-tree harvesting (WTH) in the first, and in some cases also in the second, thinning affect the needle nutrient status of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stands in Finland. A series of 12 long-term field experiments was studied. The experiments were established during 1978-86. The effects of logging residue removal after thinnings on the needle nutrient concentrations were generally minor and without any overall trends, but there were differences between experiments. Trees tend to maintain their current needle nutrient concentrations at the same level by re-utilizing the nutrients stored in the older tissues and by changing C allocation in the whole tree. Thus, needle analysis should be combined with stem growth data in order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of WTH on the nutrient status of trees.

  10. Wood anatomical parameters of lowland European oak and Scots pine as proxies for climate reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanzategui, Daniel; Heußner, Karl-Uwe; Wazny, Tomasz; Helle, Gerd; Heinrich, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Tree-ring based temperature reconstructions from the temperate lowlands worldwide are largely missing due to diffuse climate signals so far found in tree-ring widths. This motivated us to concentrate our efforts on the wood anatomies of two common European tree species, the European oak (Quercus robur) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). We combined core samples of living trees with archaeological wood from northern Germany and Poland. We measured approx. 46,000 earlywood oak vessels of 34 trees covering the period AD 1500 to 2016 and approx. 7.5 million pine tracheid cells of 41 trees covering the period AD 1300 to 2010. First climate growth analyses indicate that both oak earlywood vessel and pine tracheid parameters contain climate signals which are different and more significant than those found in tree-ring widths. Preliminary results will be presented and discussed at EGU for the first time.

  11. Radiation exposure in the remote period after the Chernobyl accident caused oxidative stress and genetic effects in Scots pine populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, Polina Yu.; Geras'Kin, Stanislav A.; Kazakova, Elizaveta A.

    2017-02-01

    Even 30 years after the Chernobyl accident, biological effects of irradiation are observed in the chronically exposed Scots pine populations. Chronic radiation exposure at dose rates above 50 mGy•yr-1 caused oxidative stress and led to the increase of antioxidants concentrations in these populations. Genetic variability was examined for 6 enzymes and 14 enzymatic loci of 6 Scots pine populations. Dose rates over 10 mGy•yr-1 caused the increased frequency of mutations and changes in genetic structure of Scots pine populations. However, the same dose rates had no effect on enzymatic activities. The results indicate that even relatively low dose rates of radiation can be considered as an ecological factor which should be taken into account for ecological management and radiation protection of biota species.

  12. Mistletoe (Viscum album) infestation in the Scots pine stimulates drought-dependent oxidative damage in summer.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Salih; Ilhan, Veli; Turkoglu, Halil Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    This study sought to contribute to the understanding of the detrimental effect of the mistletoe (Viscum albumL.), a hemiparasitic plant, on the mortality of the Scots pine (Pinus sylvestrisL.). Fieldwork was conducted in the town of Kelkit (Gumushane province, Turkey) from April to October in 2013. Pine needles of similar ages were removed from the branches of mistletoe-infested and noninfested Scots pine plants, then transported to the laboratory and used as research materials. The effects of the mistletoe on the Scots pine during infestation were evaluated by determining the levels of water, electrolyte leakage (EL), malondialdehyde (MDA, being a product of lipid peroxidation) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion (O2 (-•)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical ((•)OH). In addition, the activities of antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POX) were measured in the same samples. The highest level of drought stress was found in summer (especially in August) as a result of the lowest water content in the soil and the highest average temperature occurring in these months. The drought stress induced by mistletoe infestation caused a regular decrease in water content, while it increased the levels of EL, MDA and ROS (H2O2, O2 (-•)and(•)OH). The infestation also stimulated the activities of CAT and POX, with the exception of SOD. On the other hand, in August, when the drought conditions were the harshest, the levels of EL and MDA, which are two of the most important indicator parameters for oxidative stress, as well as the levels of H2O2and(•)OH, which are two of the ROS leading to oxidative stress, reached the highest values in both infested and noninfested needles, whereas the O2 (-•)level decreased. For the same period and needles, CAT activity increased, while SOD activity decreased. Peroxidase activity, however, did not exhibit a significant change. Our findings indicate

  13. Long-term exposure to enhanced UV-B radiation has no significant effects on growth or secondary compounds of outdoor-grown Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Turtola, Satu; Sallas, Leena; Holopainen, Jarmo K; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Kainulainen, Pirjo

    2006-11-01

    The effects of long-term enhanced UV-B radiation on growth and secondary compounds of two conifer species were studied in an outdoor experiment. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) seedlings were exposed for two growing seasons and Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings for three growing seasons to supplemental UV-B radiation, corresponding to a 30% increase in ambient UV-B radiation. The experiment also included appropriate controls for ambient and increased UV-A radiation. Enhanced UV-B did not affect the growth of the conifer seedlings. In addition, neither the concentrations of terpenes and phenolics in the needles nor the concentrations of terpenes in the wood were affected. However, in the UV-A control treatment the concentrations of diterpenes in the wood of Scots pine decreased significantly compared to the ambient control. Apparently, a small increase in UV-B radiation has no significant effects on the secondary compounds and growth of Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings.

  14. Above-Ground Dimensions and Acclimation Explain Variation in Drought Mortality of Scots Pine Seedlings from Various Provenances

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Hannes; Menzel, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Seedling establishment is a critical part of the life cycle, thus seedling survival might be even more important for forest persistence under recent and future climate change. Scots pine forests have been disproportionally more affected by climate change triggered forest-dieback. Nevertheless, some Scots pine provenances might prove resilient to future drought events because of the species’ large distributional range, genetic diversity, and adaptation potential. However, there is a lack of knowledge on provenance-specific survival under severe drought events and on how acclimation alters survival rates in Scots pine seedlings. We therefore conducted two drought-induced mortality experiments with potted Scots pine seedlings in a greenhouse. In the first experiment, 760 three-year-old seedlings from 12 different provenances of the south-western distribution range were subjected to the same treatment followed by the mortality experiment in 2014. In the second experiment, we addressed the question of whether acclimation to re-occurring drought stress events and to elevated temperature might decrease mortality rates. Thus, 139 four-year-old seedlings from France, Germany, and Poland were subjected to different temperature regimes (2012–2014) and drought treatments (2013–2014) before the mortality experiment in 2015. Provenances clearly differed in their hazard of drought-induced mortality, which was only partly related to the climate of their origin. Drought acclimation decreased the hazard of drought-induced mortality. Above-ground dry weight and height were the main determinants for the hazard of mortality, i.e., heavier and taller seedlings were more prone to mortality. Consequently, Scots pine seedlings exhibit a considerable provenance-specific acclimation potential against drought mortality and the selection of suitable provenances might thus facilitate seedling establishment and the persistence of Scots pine forest. PMID:27458477

  15. Above- and belowground fluxes of CH4 from boreal shrubs and Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Santalahti, Minna; Putkinen, Anuliina; Fritze, Hannu; Pihlatie, Mari

    2016-04-01

    Boreal upland forests are considered as an important sink for the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) due to CH4 oxidizing microbes in the soil. However, recent evidence suggests that vegetation can act as a significant source of CH4. Also, preliminary measurements indicate occasional emissions of CH4 above the tree canopies of a boreal forest. Nevertheless, the sources and the mechanisms of the observed CH4 emissions are still mostly unknown. Furthermore, the majority of CH4 flux studies have been conducted with the soil chamber method, thus not considering the role of the vegetation itself. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study separately the above- and belowground CH4 fluxes of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), heather (Calluna vulgaris), and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), which were grown in microcosms. The above- and belowground fluxes of the plants were measured separately, and these fluxes were compared to fluxes of microcosms containing only humus soil. In addition to the flux measurements, we analysed the CH4 producing archaea (methanogens) and the CH4 consuming bacteria (methanotrophs) with the qPCR method to discover whether these microbes contribute to the CH4 exchange from the plant material and the soil. The results of the flux measurements indicate that the humus soil with roots of lingonberry, heather, and Scots pine consume CH4 compared to bare humus soil. Simultaneously, the shoots of heather and Scots pine emit small amounts of CH4. We did not find detectable amounts of methanogens from any of the samples, suggesting the produced CH4 could be of non-microbial origin, or produced by very small population of methanogens. Based on the first preliminary results, methanotrophs were present in all the studied plant species, and especially in high amounts in the rooted soils, thus implying that the methanotrophs could be responsible of the CH4 uptake in the root-soil systems.

  16. Impact of summer drought on isoprenoid emissions and carbon sink of three Scots pine provenances

    PubMed Central

    Lüpke, M.; Leuchner, M.; Steinbrecher, R.; Menzel, A.

    2016-01-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) provenances cover broad ecological amplitudes. In a greenhouse study, we investigated the impact of drought stress and rewetting on gas exchange for three provenances (Italy: Emilia Romagna; Spain: Alto Ebro; Germany: East-German lowlands) of 2-year old Scots pine seedlings. CO2, water vapour and isoprenoid exchange of stressed and control trees were quantified with a four-chamber dynamic-enclosure system in the controlled environment of a climate chamber. The three provenances showed distinct isoprenoid emission patterns and were classified into a non-Δ3-carene, with either high α-/β-pinene or β-myrcene fraction, and a Δ3-carene dominated type. Isoprenoid emission rates, net-photosynthesis and transpiration were reduced during summer drought stress and significantly recovered after rewetting. A seasonal increase of isoprenoid emission rates towards autumn was observed for all control groups. Compared with the German provenance, the Spanish and Italian provenances revealed higher isoprenoid emission rates and more plastic responses to drought stress and seasonal development, which points to a local adaptation to climate. As a result of drought, net carbon uptake and transpiration of trees was reduced, but recovered after rewetting. We conclude from our study that Scots pine isoprenoid emission is more variable than expected and sensitive to drought periods, likely impacting regional air chemistry. Thus, a provenance-specific emission assessment accounting for reduced emission during prolonged (summer) drought is recommend for setting up biogenic volatile organic compound emission inventories used in air quality models. PMID:27591438

  17. Intraspecific variability in functional traits matters: case study of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Laforest-Lapointe, Isabelle; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Retana, Javier

    2014-08-01

    Although intraspecific trait variability is an important component of species ecological plasticity and niche breadth, its implications for community and functional ecology have not been thoroughly explored. We characterized the intraspecific functional trait variability of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) in Catalonia (NE Spain) in order to (1) compare it to the interspecific trait variability of trees in the same region, (2) explore the relationships among functional traits and the relationships between them and stand and climatic variables, and (3) study the role of functional trait variability as a determinant of radial growth. We considered five traits: wood density (WD), maximum tree height (H max), leaf nitrogen content (Nmass), specific leaf area (SLA), and leaf biomass-to-sapwood area ratio (B L:A S). A unique dataset was obtained from the Ecological and Forest Inventory of Catalonia (IEFC), including data from 406 plots. Intraspecific trait variation was substantial for all traits, with coefficients of variation ranging between 8% for WD and 24% for B L:A S. In some cases, correlations among functional traits differed from those reported across species (e.g., H max and WD were positively related, whereas SLA and Nmass were uncorrelated). Overall, our model accounted for 47% of the spatial variability in Scots pine radial growth. Our study emphasizes the hierarchy of factors that determine intraspecific variations in functional traits in Scots pine and their strong association with spatial variability in radial growth. We claim that intraspecific trait variation is an important determinant of responses of plants to changes in climate and other environmental factors, and should be included in predictive models of vegetation dynamics.

  18. Modeling of bud break of Scots pine in northern Finland in 1908–2014

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Hannu; Jalkanen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Bud break and height-growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in the northern boreal zone in Lapland, Finland, was followed through the entire growing seasons in the periods 2001–2003 and 2008–2010 in sapling stands in two different locations in northern Finland set some 250 km apart along a latitudinal transect. Field measurements continued at the southern site also in 2011–2013. Air temperature was recorded hourly at the sites. A simple optimization algorithm (GA) was used to adjust parameters of the models predicting the timing of bud break of Scots pine in order to minimize the difference between observed and predicted dates. The models giving the best performance and century-long daily temperatures were used to reconstruct bud-break time series. The temperature observations were recorded for the period 1908–2014 in Sodankylä, which is located in-between the sapling stands in the north–south direction and for the period 1877–2014 in Karasjok, which is in Norway about 145 km north–west from the northernmost stand of this study. On average buds began to extend in the beginning of May in the southernmost stand and in mid-May in the northernmost stands, and the variation between years was in the range of 3 weeks. A simple day-length-triggered (fixed date) model predicted most accurately the date of bud break; root mean square error (RMSE) was 2 and 4 days in the northern and southern site, respectively. The reconstructed bud-break series indicated that based on temperature observations from Sodankylä, growth onset of Scots pine has clearly advanced since the 1960s, though it currently matches that of the early 1920s and early 1950s. The temperature record from Karasjok indicated a similar variation, though there was a weak linear trend advancing bud break by about 3–4 days over a 100-year period. PMID:25798141

  19. Impact of summer drought on isoprenoid emissions and carbon sink of three Scots pine provenances.

    PubMed

    Lüpke, M; Leuchner, M; Steinbrecher, R; Menzel, A

    2016-11-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) provenances cover broad ecological amplitudes. In a greenhouse study, we investigated the impact of drought stress and rewetting on gas exchange for three provenances (Italy: Emilia Romagna; Spain: Alto Ebro; Germany: East-German lowlands) of 2-year old Scots pine seedlings. CO 2 , water vapour and isoprenoid exchange of stressed and control trees were quantified with a four-chamber dynamic-enclosure system in the controlled environment of a climate chamber. The three provenances showed distinct isoprenoid emission patterns and were classified into a non-Δ 3 -carene, with either high α-/β-pinene or β-myrcene fraction, and a Δ 3 -carene dominated type. Isoprenoid emission rates, net-photosynthesis and transpiration were reduced during summer drought stress and significantly recovered after rewetting. A seasonal increase of isoprenoid emission rates towards autumn was observed for all control groups. Compared with the German provenance, the Spanish and Italian provenances revealed higher isoprenoid emission rates and more plastic responses to drought stress and seasonal development, which points to a local adaptation to climate. As a result of drought, net carbon uptake and transpiration of trees was reduced, but recovered after rewetting. We conclude from our study that Scots pine isoprenoid emission is more variable than expected and sensitive to drought periods, likely impacting regional air chemistry. Thus, a provenance-specific emission assessment accounting for reduced emission during prolonged (summer) drought is recommend for setting up biogenic volatile organic compound emission inventories used in air quality models. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Structural and climatic determinants of demographic rates of Scots pine forests across the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Vilà-Cabrera, Albert; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Vayreda, Jordi; Retana, Javier

    2011-06-01

    The demographic rates of tree species typically show large spatial variation across their range. Understanding the environmental factors underlying this variation is a key topic in forest ecology, with far-reaching management implications. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) covers large areas of the Northern Hemisphere, the Iberian Peninsula being its southwestern distribution limit. In recent decades, an increase in severe droughts and a densification of forests as a result of changes in forest uses have occurred in this region. Our aim was to use climate and stand structure data to explain mortality and growth patterns of Scots pine forests across the Iberian Peninsula. We used data from 2392 plots dominated by Scots pine, sampled for the National Forest Inventory of Spain. Plots were sampled from 1986 to 1996 (IFN2) and were resampled from 1997 to 2007 (IFN3), allowing for the calculation of growth and mortality rates. We fitted linear models to assess the response of growth and mortality rates to the spatial variability of climate, climatic anomalies, and forest structure. Over the period of approximately 10 years between the IFN2 and IFN3, the amount of standing dead trees increased 11-fold. Higher mortality rates were related to dryness, and growth was reduced with increasing dryness and temperature, but results also suggested that effects of climatic stressors were not restricted to dry sites only. Forest structure was strongly related to demographic rates, suggesting that stand development and competition are the main factors associated with demography. In the case of mortality, forest structure interacted with climate, suggesting that competition for water resources induces tree mortality in dry sites. A slight negative relationship was found between mortality and growth, indicating that both rates are likely to be affected by the same stress factors. Additionally, regeneration tended to be lower in plots with higher mortality. Taken together, our results

  1. Driving factors of a vegetation shift from Scots pine to pubescent oak in dry Alpine forests.

    PubMed

    Rigling, Andreas; Bigler, Christof; Eilmann, Britta; Feldmeyer-Christe, Elisabeth; Gimmi, Urs; Ginzler, Christian; Graf, Ulrich; Mayer, Philipp; Vacchiano, Giorgio; Weber, Pascale; Wohlgemuth, Thomas; Zweifel, Roman; Dobbertin, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have reported on forest declines and vegetation shifts triggered by drought. In the Swiss Rhone valley (Valais), one of the driest inner-Alpine regions, the species composition in low elevation forests is changing: The sub-boreal Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) dominating the dry forests is showing high mortality rates. Concurrently the sub-Mediterranean pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) has locally increased in abundance. However, it remains unclear whether this local change in species composition is part of a larger-scale vegetation shift. To study variability in mortality and regeneration in these dry forests we analysed data from the Swiss national forest inventory (NFI) on a regular grid between 1983 and 2003, and combined it with annual mortality data from a monitoring site. Pine mortality was found to be highest at low elevation (below 1000 m a.s.l.). Annual variation in pine mortality was correlated with a drought index computed for the summer months prior to observed tree death. A generalized linear mixed-effects model indicated for the NFI data increased pine mortality on dryer sites with high stand competition, particularly for small-diameter trees. Pine regeneration was low in comparison to its occurrence in the overstorey, whereas oak regeneration was comparably abundant. Although both species regenerated well at dry sites, pine regeneration was favoured at cooler sites at higher altitude and oak regeneration was more frequent at warmer sites, indicating a higher adaptation potential of oaks under future warming. Our results thus suggest that an extended shift in species composition is actually occurring in the pine forests in the Valais. The main driving factors are found to be climatic variability, particularly drought, and variability in stand structure and topography. Thus, pine forests at low elevations are developing into oak forests with unknown consequences for these ecosystems and their goods and

  2. Frost hardiness of mycorrhizal (Hebeloma sp.) and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine roots.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Anna; Lehto, Tarja; Repo, Tapani

    2013-10-01

    The frost hardiness (FH) of mycorrhizal [ectomycorrhizal (ECM)] and non-mycorrhizal (NM) Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) seedlings was studied to assess whether mycorrhizal symbiosis affected the roots' tolerance of below-zero temperatures. ECM (Hebeloma sp.) and NM seedlings were cultivated in a growth chamber for 18 weeks. After 13 weeks' growth in long-day and high-temperature (LDHT) conditions, a half of the ECM and NM seedlings were moved into a chamber with short-day and low-temperature (SDLT) conditions to cold acclimate. After exposures to a range of below-zero temperatures, the FH of the roots was assessed by means of the relative electrolyte leakage test. The FH was determined as the inflection point of the temperature-response curve. No significant difference was found between the FH of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal roots in LDHT (-8.9 and -9.8 °C) or SDLT (-7.5 and -6.8 °C). The mycorrhizal treatment had no significant effect on the total dry mass, the allocation of dry mass among the roots and needles or nutrient accumulation. The mycorrhizal treatment with Hebeloma sp. did not affect the FH of Scots pine in this experimental setup. More information is needed on the extent to which mycorrhizas tolerate low temperatures, especially with different nutrient contents and different mycorrhiza fungi.

  3. Radial diffusion, vertical transport, and refixation of labeled bicarbonate in scots pine stems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. D.; Tarvainen, L.; Wallin, G.

    2016-12-01

    The CO2 produced by a respiring stem provides an index of metabolic activity in the stem and a quantitative estimate of an important component of the forest carbon budget. Production of CO2 by a given stem volume is lost by three competing processes. First, some diffuses radially outward through the bark. Second, some is dissolved and vertically transported upward out of the control volume by the xylem stream. Third, some is refixed by photosynthesis under the bark. The relative balance among these pathways was quantified in 17-m Scots pine trees by 13C-bicarbonate labeling of the xylem stream and monitoring of the 13CO2 in the xylem water, along with continuous monitoring of the radial diffusive flux at four canopy heights and in transpiration from leaves. Most of the label diffused out radially, as 13CO2, immediately above the labeling site, over about a week. The pulse was weakly and briefly detected 4 m above that height. Further up the stem it was not detected at all. We detected significant refixation of CO2 in the stems at all heights above 4 m, where the bark becomes papery and thin, but the label was so weak at this height that refixation had little influence on the pulse chase. We conclude that the vertical flux is negligible in Scots pine, but that the refixation flux must be accounted for in estimates of whole-stem CO2 efflux.

  4. Are Scots pine forest edges particularly prone to drought-induced mortality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Allan; Schunk, Christian; Zeiträg, Claudia; Herrmann, Corinna; Kaiser, Laura; Lemme, Hannes; Straub, Christoph; Taeger, Steffen; Gößwein, Sebastian; Klemmt, Hans-Joachim; Menzel, Annette

    2018-02-01

    Climate change is expected to exacerbate the frequency of drought-induced tree mortality world-wide. To better predict the associated change of species composition and forest dynamics on various scales and develop adequate adaptation strategies, more information on the mechanisms driving the often observed patchiness of tree die-back is needed. Although forest-edge effects may play an important role within the given context, only few corresponding studies exist. Here, we investigate the regional die-back of Scots pine in Franconia, Germany, after a hot and dry summer in 2015, thereby emphasizing possible differences in mortality between forest edge and interior. By means of dendroecological investigations and close-range remote sensing, we assess long-term growth performance and current tree vitality along five different forest-edge distance gradients. Our results clearly indicate a differing growth performance between edge and interior trees, associated with a higher vulnerability to drought, increased mortality rates, and lower tree vitality at the forest edge. Prior long-lasting growth decline of dead trees compared to live trees suggests depletion of carbon reserves in course of a long-term drought persisting since the 1990s to be the cause of regional Scots pine die-back. These findings highlight the forest edge as a potential focal point of forest management adaptation strategies in the context of drought-induced mortality.

  5. No evidence for depletion of carbohydrate pools in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) under drought stress

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, A.; Pirkebner, D.; Florian, C.; Oberhuber, W.

    2012-01-01

    The physiological mechanisms leading to Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) decline in the dry inner Alpine valleys are still unknown. Testing the carbon starvation hypothesis, we analysed the seasonal course of mobile carbohydrate pools (NSC) of Scots pine growing at a xeric and a dry-mesic site within an inner Alpine dry valley (750 m a.s.l., Tyrol, Austria) during the year 2009, which was characterized by exceptional soil dryness. Although, soil moisture content dropped to c. 10% at both sites during the growing season, NSC concentrations were rising in all tissues (branch, stem, root) till end of July, except in needles where maxima were reached around bud break. NSC concentrations were not significantly different in the analysed tissues at the xeric and the dry-mesic site. At the dry-mesic site NSC concentrations in the above ground tree biomass were significantly higher during the period of radial growth. An accumulation of NSC in roots at the end of July indicates a change in carbon allocation after an early cessation in above ground growth, possibly due to elevated below ground carbon demand. In conclusion our results revealed that extensive soil dryness during the growing season did not lead to carbon depletion. However, even though C-reserves were not exhausted, a sequestration of carbohydrate pools during drought periods might lead to deficits in carbon supply that weaken tree vigour and drive tree mortality. PMID:21974742

  6. Comparing the VOC emissions between air-dried and heat-treated Scots pine wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, Anne-Marja; Pasanen, Pertti; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    The emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from air-dried Scots pine wood and from heat-treated Scots pine wood were compared with GC-MS analysis. Air-dried wood blocks released about 8 times more total VOCs than heat-treated (24 h at 230°C) ones. Terpenes were clearly the main compound group in the air-dried wood samples, whereas aldehydes and carboxylic acids and their esters dominated in the heat-treated wood samples. Only 14 compounds out of 41 identified individual compounds were found in both wood samples indicating considerable changes in VOC emission profile during heat-treatment process. Of individual compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and hexanal were the most abundant ones in the air-dried wood. By contrast, in the heat-treated wood 2-furancarboxaldehyde, acetic acid and 2-propanone were the major compounds of VOC emission. Current emission results reveal that significant chemical changes have occurred, and volatile monoterpenes and other low-molecular-weight compounds have evaporated from the wood during the heat-treatment process when compared to air-dried wood. Major chemical changes detected in VOC emissions are explained by the thermal degradation and oxidation of main constituents in wood. The results suggest that if heat-treated wood is used in interior carpentry, emissions of monoterpenes are reduced compared to air-dried wood, but some irritating compounds might be released into indoor air.

  7. Assessment of growth and stemwood quality of Scots pine on territory influenced by alkaline industrial dust.

    PubMed

    Mandre, Malle; Kask, Regino; Pikk, Jaak; Ots, Katri

    2008-03-01

    Long-term influence of alkaline dust (pH 12.3-12.7) pollution emitted over 40 years from a cement plant in Estonia was the reason of alkalisation (pH 6.7-7.9) and high concentrations of K, Ca and Mg in the soil of affected territories. Although dust emission has diminished during the last 10 years, the imbalances in nutrition substrate and their influence on the growth of trees are notable up to now. The study of morphological and physical properties of 70-80-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) crown, stems and stemwood from three different air pollution zones showed serious deviations in comparison with a relatively healthy forest in an unpolluted area. The specimens from polluted trees, if compared to reference site, showed significantly smaller height growth, radial increment and width of annual rings of sapwood. In heartwood wider annual rings were found in polluted areas. In the period of heartwood formation the dust pollution level emitted from the plant was relatively modest and cement dust, which contains elements necessary for mineral nutrition of trees, may have acted as fertiliser. The moisture content in sapwood and heartwood, especially in the upper layers of stems, was lower in the polluted area than in reference site trees. Regression analysis revealed a strong dependence between latewood percentage and sapwood or heartwood in stems of Scots pine in all sample plots.

  8. Differences in delta13C and diameter growth among remnant Scots pine populations in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Oliver; Handley, Linda; Griffiths, Howard

    2002-10-01

    Published data suggest that differences in wood cellulose carbon isotope composition (delta13C) and xylem ring width among natural populations of Scots pine in Scotland (Pinus sylvestris L.) are attributable to the persistence of palaeotypes of various post-glacial migratory origins. We assessed differences in wood cellulose delta13C and ring width among Scottish Scots pine populations grown in a clone bank and in natural stands at various locations in northern and central Scotland. Ring width and wood cellulose delta13C varied significantly among natural stands. Potential water deficit was positively correlated with wood cellulose delta13C and xylem ring width in the natural stands. Neither wood cellulose delta13C nor xylem ring width of clone bank trees correlated with any climate variables at the sites from which the trees originated, indicating little adaptation to climate for these traits. Xylem ring width showed a site x population interaction for the growth sites (i.e., natural stands versus clone bank), but wood cellulose delta13C did not. These results suggest that climate variation in Scotland has not resulted in significant genetic variation in wood cellulose delta13C or xylem ring width in post-glacial populations.

  9. No evidence for depletion of carbohydrate pools in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Gruber, A; Pirkebner, D; Florian, C; Oberhuber, W

    2012-01-01

    The physiological mechanisms leading to Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) decline in the dry inner alpine valleys are still unknown. Testing the carbon starvation hypothesis, we analysed the seasonal course of mobile carbohydrate pools (NSC) of Scots pine growing at a xeric and a dry-mesic site within an inner alpine dry valley (750 m a.s.l., Tyrol, Austria) during 2009, which was characterised by exceptional soil dryness. Although, soil moisture content dropped to ca. 10% at both sites during the growing season, NSC concentrations rose in all tissues (branch, stem, root) until the end of July, except in needles, where maxima were reached around bud break. NSC concentrations were not significantly different in the analysed tissues at the xeric and the dry-mesic site. At the dry-mesic site, NSC concentrations in the aboveground tree biomass were significantly higher during the period of radial growth. An accumulation of NSC in roots at the end of July indicates a change in carbon allocation after an early cessation in aboveground growth, possibly due to elevated belowground carbon demand. In conclusion, our results revealed that extensive soil dryness during the growing season did not lead to carbon depletion. However, even though carbon reserves were not exhausted, sequestration of carbohydrate pools during drought periods might lead to deficits in carbon supply that weaken tree vigour and drive tree mortality. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  10. Climate influences the leaf area/sapwood area ratio in Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Mencuccini, M; Grace, J

    1995-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the leaf area/sapwood area ratio in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is influenced by site differences in water vapor pressure deficit of the air (D). Two stands of the same provenance were selected, one in western Scotland and one in eastern England, so that effects resulting from age, genetic variability, density and fertility were minimized. Compared with the Scots pine trees at the cooler and wetter site in Scotland, the trees at the warmer and drier site in England produced less leaf area per unit of conducting sapwood area both at a stem height of 1.3 m and at the base of the live crown, whereas stem permeability was similar at both sites. Also, trees at the drier site had less leaf area per unit branch cross-sectional area at the branch base than trees at the wetter site. For each site, the average values for leaf area, sapwood area and permeability were used, together with values of transpiration rates at different D, to calculate average stem water potential gradients. Changes in the leaf area/sapwood area ratio acted to maintain a similar water potential gradient in the stems of trees at both sites despite climatic differences between the sites.

  11. Impregnation of Scots pine and beech with tannin solutions: effect of viscosity and wood anatomy in wood infiltration.

    PubMed

    Tondi, G; Thevenon, M F; Mies, B; Standfest, G; Petutschnigg, A; Wieland, S

    The impregnation process of Scots pine and beech samples with tannin solutions was investigated. The two materials involved in the process (impregnation solution and wood samples) are studied in depth. Viscosity of mimosa tannin solutions and the anatomical aspect of beech and Scots pine were analysed and correlated. The viscosity of tannin solutions presents a non-newtonian behaviour when its pH level increases, and in the case of addition of hexamine as a hardener, the crosslinking of the flavonoids turns out to be of great importance. During the impregnation of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.) and beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.), the liquid and solid uptakes were monitored while taking into consideration the different conditions of the impregnation process. This method allowed to identify the best conditions needed in order to get a successful preservative uptake for each wooden substrate. The penetration mechanism within the wood of both species was revealed with the aid of a microscopic analysis. Scots pine is impregnated through the tracheids in the longitudinal direction and through parenchyma rays in the radial direction, whereas in beech, the penetration occurs almost completely through longitudinal vessels.

  12. Chemical composition of needles and cambial activity of stems of Scots pine trees affected by air pollutants in Polish forests

    Treesearch

    Wojciech Dmuchowski; Ewa U. Kurczynska; Wieslaw Wloch

    1998-01-01

    The impact of environmental pollution is defined for the chemical composition of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles and cambial activity in the tree stems in Polish forests. The research investigated 20-year-old trees growing in two areas in significantly different levels of pollution. The highly polluted area was located near the Warsaw...

  13. A Functional and Structural Mongolian Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) Model Integrating Architecture, Biomass and Effects of Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Letort, Véronique; Lu, Qi; Bai, Xuefeng; Guo, Yan; de Reffye, Philippe; Li, Baoguo

    2012-01-01

    Mongolian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) is one of the principal tree species in the network of Three-North Shelterbelt for windbreak and sand stabilisation in China. The functions of shelterbelts are highly correlated with the architecture and eco-physiological processes of individual tree. Thus, model-assisted analysis of canopy architecture and function dynamic in Mongolian Scots pine is of value for better understanding its role and behaviour within shelterbelt ecosystems in these arid and semiarid regions. We present here a single-tree functional and structural model, derived from the GreenLab model, which is adapted for young Mongolian Scots pines by incorporation of plant biomass production, allocation, allometric rules and soil water dynamics. The model is calibrated and validated based on experimental measurements taken on Mongolian Scots pines in 2007 and 2006 under local meteorological conditions. Measurements include plant biomass, topology and geometry, as well as soil attributes and standard meteorological data. After calibration, the model allows reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) canopy architecture and biomass dynamics for trees from one- to six-year-old at the same site using meteorological data for the six years from 2001 to 2006. Sensitivity analysis indicates that rainfall variation has more influence on biomass increment than on architecture, and the internode and needle compartments and the aboveground biomass respond linearly to increases in precipitation. Sensitivity analysis also shows that the balance between internode and needle growth varies only slightly within the range of precipitations considered here. The model is expected to be used to investigate the growth of Mongolian Scots pines in other regions with different soils and climates. PMID:22927982

  14. Effects of soil copper and nickel on survival and growth of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Tiina Maileena

    2004-11-01

    The contribution of soil Cu and Ni pollution to the poor vitality and growth rate of Scots pine growing in the vicinity of a Cu-Ni smelter was investigated in two manipulation experiments. In the first manipulation, Cu-Ni smelter-polluted soil cores were transported from a smelter-pollution gradient to unpolluted greenhouse conditions. A 4-year-old pine seedling was planted in each core and cultivated for a 17-month period. In the second manipulation, pine seedlings from the same lot were cultivated for the same 17-month period in a quartz sand medium containing increasing doses of copper sulfate, nickel sulfate, and a combination of both. The variation in the biomass growth of the seedlings grown in the smelter-polluted soil cores was very similar to that of mature pine stands growing along the same smelter-pollution gradient in the field. In addition, the rate of Cu and Ni exposure explained a high proportion of the biomass growth variation, and had an effect on the Ca, K, and Mg status of the seedlings. According to the lethal threshold values determined on the basis of the metal sulfate exposure experiments, both the Cu and Ni content of the 0.5 km smelter-polluted soil cores were high enough to cause the death of most of the seedlings. The presence of Cu seemed to increase Ni toxicity.

  15. Greenhouse gas balance of a Scots pine forest using biometric, eddy covariance and chamber measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, Bert; De Vos, Bruno; Papale, Dario; Janssens, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, the status of forests as sources or sinks of carbon has received much attention. Nonetheless, evidence-based long-term estimates of the magnitude of the carbon sequestration in forests are still scarce. In this study we present two independent estimates of net carbon sequestration in a temperate Scots pine dominated forest ecosystem over a 9 year period (2002-2010) and in addition, to determine the full greenhouse gas balance, the first results of automated chamber measurements of N2O and CH4. First, the net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) was estimated from net ecosystem CO2 exchange as measured by the eddy covariance technique (NECBEC). To this end, the eddy covariance estimates were combined with non-CO2 carbon fluxes such as DOC leaching and VOC emissions. The second approach to determine the carbon sequestration was based on the changes in the ecosystem carbon stocks over time (NECBSC). For this NECBSC estimate, two assessments of the ecosystem carbon stocks (2002 and 2010) were compared. Results showed that the eddy covariance approach estimated a net uptake of 2.4 ± 1.25 tC ha-1 yr-1, while the stock based approach suggested a carbon sink of 1.8 ± 1.20 tC ha-1 yr-1. No significant change was observed in the mineral soil carbon, while the carbon stock of the litter layer slightly decreased. Phytomass was thus the main carbon sink (2.1 tC ha-1 yr-1) in the pine forest, predominantly in the stems (1.3 tC ha-1 yr-1). The fact that stem wood is the main carbon sink within the ecosystem implies that the future harvesting has the potential to fully offset the CO2 uptake by this Scots pine forest. Estimates of the impact of N2O and CH4 emissions from the soil on the total greenhouse gas budget will be presented.

  16. Influence of tree provenance on biogenic VOC emissions of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivimäenpää, Minna; Magsarjav, Narantsetseg; Ghimire, Rajendra; Markkanen, Juha-Matti; Heijari, Juha; Vuorinen, Martti; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    2012-12-01

    Resin-storing plant species such as conifer trees can release substantial amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere under stress circumstances that cause resin flow. Wounding can be induced by animals, pathogens, wind or direct mechanical damage e.g. during harvesting. In atmospheric modelling of biogenic VOCs, actively growing vegetation has been mostly considered as the source of emissions. Root systems and stumps of resin-storing conifer trees could constitute a significant store of resin after tree cutting. Therefore, we assessed the VOC emission rates from the cut surface of Scots pine stumps and estimated the average emission rates for an area with a density of 2000 stumps per ha. The experiment was conducted with trees of one Estonian and three Finnish Scots pine provenances covering a 1200 km gradient at a common garden established in central Finland in 1991. VOC emissions were dominated by monoterpenes and less than 0.1% of the total emission was sesquiterpenes. α-Pinene (7-92% of the total emissions) and 3-carene (0-76% of the total emissions) were the dominant monoterpenes. Proportions of α-pinene and camphene were significantly lower and proportions of 3-carene, sabinene, γ-terpinene and terpinolene higher in the southernmost Saaremaa provenance compared to the other provenances. Total terpene emission rates (standardised to +20 °C) from stumps varied from 27 to 1582 mg h-1 m-2 when measured within 2-3 h after tree cutting. Emission rates decreased rapidly to between 2 and 79 mg h-1 m-2 at 50 days after cutting. The estimated daily terpene emission rates on a hectare basis from freshly cut stumps at a cut tree density of 2000 per ha varied depending on provenance. Estimated emission ranges were 100-710 g ha-1 d-1 and 137-970 g ha-1 d-1 in 40 and in 60 year-old forest stands, respectively. Our result suggests that emission directly from stump surfaces could be a significant source of monoterpene emissions for a few weeks after

  17. Surface Fire Influence on Carbon Balance Components in Scots Pine Forest of Siberia, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukavskaya, E.; Ivanova, G. A.; Conard, S. G.; Soja, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    Wildfire is one of the most important disturbances in boreal forests, and it can have a profound effect on forest-atmosphere carbon exchange. Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) stands of Siberia are strongly impacted by fires of low to high severity. Biomass distribution in mature lichen/feathermoss Scots pine stands indicates that they are carbon sinks before fire. Fires contribute significantly to the carbon budget resulting in a considerable carbon efflux, initially through direct consumption of forest fuels and later as a result of tree mortality and decomposition of dead material accumulated on the forest floor. In initial postfire years these processes dominate over photosynthetic carbon assimilation, and the ecosystems become a carbon source. Over several postfire years, above-ground carbon in dead biomass tends to increase, with the increase depending significantly on fire severity. High-severity fire enhances dead biomass carbon, while moderate- and low-severity fires have minimal effect on above-ground carbon distribution in Scots pine ecosystems. Dead stand biomass carbon increases, primarily during the first two years following fires, due to tree mortality. This increase can account for up to 12.4% of the total stand biomass after low- and moderate- intensity fires. We found tree dieback following a high-intensity fire is an order of magnitude higher, and thus the dead biomass increases up to 88.1% of total above-ground biomass. Photosynthetic CO2 uptake decreases with increasing tree mortality, and needle foliage and bark are incorporated into the upper layer of the forest floor in the course of years. Ground vegetation and duff carbon were >90, 71-83, and 82% of prefire levels after fires of low, moderate, and high severity, respectively for the first 4 to 5 years after fire. Fires of low and moderate severity caused down woody fuel carbon to increase by 2.1 and 3.6 t ha-1 respectively by four years after burning as compared to the pre-fire values. Climate

  18. Response of water use efficiency to summer drought in a boreal Scots pine forest in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yao; Markkanen, Tiina; Aurela, Mika; Mammarella, Ivan; Thum, Tea; Tsuruta, Aki; Yang, Huiyi; Aalto, Tuula

    2017-09-01

    The influence of drought on plant functioning has received considerable attention in recent years, however our understanding of the response of carbon and water coupling to drought in terrestrial ecosystems still needs to be improved. A severe soil moisture drought occurred in southern Finland in the late summer of 2006. In this study, we investigated the response of water use efficiency to summer drought in a boreal Scots pine forest (Pinus sylvestris) on the daily time scale mainly using eddy covariance flux data from the Hyytiälä (southern Finland) flux site. In addition, simulation results from the JSBACH land surface model were evaluated against the observed results. Based on observed data, the ecosystem level water use efficiency (EWUE; the ratio of gross primary production, GPP, to evapotranspiration, ET) showed a decrease during the severe soil moisture drought, while the inherent water use efficiency (IWUE; a quantity defined as EWUE multiplied with mean daytime vapour pressure deficit, VPD) increased and the underlying water use efficiency (uWUE, a metric based on IWUE and a simple stomatal model, is the ratio of GPP multiplied with a square root of VPD to ET) was unchanged during the drought. The decrease in EWUE was due to the stronger decline in GPP than in ET. The increase in IWUE was because of the decreased stomatal conductance under increased VPD. The unchanged uWUE indicates that the trade-off between carbon assimilation and transpiration of the boreal Scots pine forest was not disturbed by this drought event at the site. The JSBACH simulation showed declines of both GPP and ET under the severe soil moisture drought, but to a smaller extent compared to the observed GPP and ET. Simulated GPP and ET led to a smaller decrease in EWUE but a larger increase in IWUE because of the severe soil moisture drought in comparison to observations. As in the observations, the simulated uWUE showed no changes in the drought event. The model deficiencies exist

  19. Canopy Defoliation has More Impact on Carbohydrate Availability than on Hydraulic Function in Declining Scots Pine Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyatos, R.; Aguadé, D.; Gómez, M.; Mencuccini, M.; Martínez-Vilalta, J.

    2013-12-01

    Drought-induced defoliation has recently been associated with depletion of carbohydrate reserves and increased mortality risk in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) at its dry limit. Are defoliated pines hydraulically impaired compared to non-defoliated pines? Moreover, how do defoliated pines cope with potentially lethal droughts, as compared to non-defoliated pines in the same population? In order to address these questions, we measured the seasonal dynamics of sap flow and needle water potentials (2010-2012), hydraulic function and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) (2012) in healthy and defoliated pines in the Prades mountains (NE Spain). The summer drought was mild in 2010, intense in 2012 and extremely long in 2011. Defoliated Scots pines showed higher sap flow per unit leaf area during spring, but they were more sensitive to summer drought (Figure 1). This pattern was associated with a steeper decline in soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance, which could not be explained by differences in branch vulnerability to embolism across defoliation classes. Accordingly, the native loss of xylem conductivity in branches, measured in 2012, remained similar across defoliation classes and reached >65% at the peak of the drought. However, a steeper vulnerability curve was observed for root xylem of defoliated pines. Xylem diameter variations (2011-2012) will be used to further investigate possible differences in the aboveground/belowground partitioning of hydraulic resistance across defoliation classes. NSC levels varied across tree organs (leaves>branches>roots>trunk) and strongly declined with drought. Defoliated pines displayed reduced NSC levels throughout the study period, despite enhanced water transport capacity and increased gas exchange rates during spring. Overall, the defoliated vs. healthy status seems to be more associated to differences in carbohydrate storage and dynamics than to hydraulic differences per se. However, starch conversion to soluble sugars during

  20. Characterization of Scots pine stump-root biomass as feed-stock for gasification.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Daniel; Weiland, Fredrik; Hedman, Henry; Stenberg, Martin; Öhrman, Olov; Lestander, Torbjörn A; Bergsten, Urban; Öhman, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    The main objective was to explore the potential for gasifying Scots pine stump-root biomass (SRB). Washed thin roots, coarse roots, stump heartwood and stump sapwood were characterized (solid wood, milling and powder characteristics) before and during industrial processing. Non-slagging gasification of the SRB fuels and a reference stem wood was successful, and the gasification parameters (synthesis gas and bottom ash characteristics) were similar. However, the heartwood fuel had high levels of extractives (≈19%) compared to the other fuels (2-8%) and thereby ≈16% higher energy contents but caused disturbances during milling, storage, feeding and gasification. SRB fuels could be sorted automatically according to their extractives and moisture contents using near-infrared spectroscopy, and their amounts and quality in forests can be predicted using routinely collected stand data, biomass functions and drill core analyses. Thus, SRB gasification has great potential and the proposed characterizations exploit it. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of long-term forest fertilization on Scots pine xylem quality and wood borer performance.

    PubMed

    Heijari, Juha; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Kainulainen, Pirjo; Noldt, Uwe; Levula, Teuvo; Raitio, Hannu; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2008-01-01

    We tested whether changes in long-term nutrient availability would affect the xylem quality and characteristics of Scots pine trees as a food source for the larvae of the xylophagous wood borer Hylotrupes bajulus L. (Cerambycidae). We looked for an effect of host plant growth and xylem structural traits on H. bajulus larval performance, and looked for delayed effects of long-term forest fertilization on xylem chemical quality. In general, larval performance was dependent on larval developmental stage. However, the growth of larvae also varied with host plant quality (increases in the concentration of nitrogen and carbon-based secondary compounds of xylem were correlated with a decrease in the larval growth rate). The greater annual growth of trees reduced tracheid length and correlated positively with second-instar H. bajulus growth rate. This is consistent with the hypothesis that intrinsic growth patterns of host plants influence the development of the xylophagous wood borer H. bajulus.

  2. Defoliating Insect Mass Outbreak Affects Soil N Fluxes and Tree N Nutrition in Scots Pine Forests.

    PubMed

    Grüning, Maren M; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz; L-M-Arnold, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Biotic stress by mass outbreaks of defoliating pest insects does not only affect tree performance by reducing its photosynthetic capacity, but also changes N cycling in the soil of forest ecosystems. However, how insect induced defoliation affects soil N fluxes and, in turn, tree N nutrition is not well-studied. In the present study, we quantified N input and output fluxes via dry matter input, throughfall, and soil leachates. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of mass insect herbivory on tree N acquisition (i.e., organic and inorganic 15 N net uptake capacity of fine roots) as well as N pools in fine roots and needles in a Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.) forest over an entire vegetation period. Plots were either infested by the nun moth ( Lymantria monacha L.) or served as controls. Our results show an increased N input by insect feces, litter, and throughfall at the infested plots compared to controls, as well as increased leaching of nitrate. However, the additional N input into the soil did not increase, but reduce inorganic and organic net N uptake capacity of Scots pine roots. N pools in the fine roots and needles of infested trees showed an accumulation of total N, amino acid-N, protein-N, and structural N in the roots and the remaining needles as a compensatory response triggered by defoliation. Thus, although soil N availability was increased via surplus N input, trees did not respond with an increased N acquisition, but rather invested resources into defense by accumulation of amino acid-N and protein-N as a survival strategy.

  3. Fungal Infection Increases the Rate of Somatic Mutation in Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sonali Sachin; Ganea, Laura-Stefana; Razzak, Abdur M; García Gil, M R

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations are transmitted during mitosis in developing somatic tissue. Somatic cells bearing the mutations can develop into reproductive (germ) cells and the somatic mutations are then passed on to the next generation of plants. Somatic mutations are a source of variation essential to evolve new defense strategies and adapt to the environment. Stem rust disease in Scots pine has a negative effect on wood quality, and thus adversely affects the economy. It is caused by the 2 most destructive fungal species in Scandinavia: Peridermium pini and Cronartium flaccidum. We studied nuclear genome stability in Scots pine under biotic stress (fungus-infected, 22 trees) compared to a control population (plantation, 20 trees). Stability was assessed as accumulation of new somatic mutations in 10 microsatellite loci selected for genotyping. Microsatellites are widely used as molecular markers in population genetics studies of plants, and are particularly used for detection of somatic mutations as their rate of mutation is of a much higher magnitude when compared with other DNA markers. We report double the rate of somatic mutation per locus in the fungus-infected trees (4.8×10(-3) mutations per locus), as compared to the controls (2.0×10(-3) mutations per locus) when individual samples were analyzed at 10 different microsatellite markers. Pearson's chi-squared test indicated a significant effect of the fungal infection which increased the number of mutations in the fungus-infected trees (χ(2) = 12.9883, df = 1, P = 0.0003134). © The American Genetic Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Defoliating Insect Mass Outbreak Affects Soil N Fluxes and Tree N Nutrition in Scots Pine Forests

    PubMed Central

    Grüning, Maren M.; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz; l-M-Arnold, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Biotic stress by mass outbreaks of defoliating pest insects does not only affect tree performance by reducing its photosynthetic capacity, but also changes N cycling in the soil of forest ecosystems. However, how insect induced defoliation affects soil N fluxes and, in turn, tree N nutrition is not well-studied. In the present study, we quantified N input and output fluxes via dry matter input, throughfall, and soil leachates. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of mass insect herbivory on tree N acquisition (i.e., organic and inorganic 15N net uptake capacity of fine roots) as well as N pools in fine roots and needles in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forest over an entire vegetation period. Plots were either infested by the nun moth (Lymantria monacha L.) or served as controls. Our results show an increased N input by insect feces, litter, and throughfall at the infested plots compared to controls, as well as increased leaching of nitrate. However, the additional N input into the soil did not increase, but reduce inorganic and organic net N uptake capacity of Scots pine roots. N pools in the fine roots and needles of infested trees showed an accumulation of total N, amino acid-N, protein-N, and structural N in the roots and the remaining needles as a compensatory response triggered by defoliation. Thus, although soil N availability was increased via surplus N input, trees did not respond with an increased N acquisition, but rather invested resources into defense by accumulation of amino acid-N and protein-N as a survival strategy. PMID:28638396

  5. Secondary metabolite concentrations and terpene emissions of Scots pine xylem after long-term forest fertilization.

    PubMed

    Turtola, S; Manninen, A M; Holopainen, J K; Levula, T; Raitio, H; Kainulainen, P

    2002-01-01

    Secondary compounds are known to be associated with the resistance of conifer xylem against insects and fungi. The effects of long-term forest fertilization with nitrogen (N) or with N, calcium (Ca), and phosphorus (P) on secondary compounds in the xylem of 50-yr-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees were examined. Xylem samples were collected from trees growing in three locations in southern Finland: Vilppula, Padasjoki, and Punkaharju. Forests were fertilized every fifth (Vilppula and Padasjoki) or tenth (Punkaharju) year since the 1950s. We compared concentrations of individual and total monoterpenes and resin acids in the heartwood and sapwood of Scots pine. Terpene emissions were analyzed from the sapwood and total phenolics from the heartwood. Fertilization did not have any significant effect on the concentrations and emissions of xylem monoterpenes. Concentrations of several individual terpenes in sapwood were positively correlated with the corresponding terpene emission. The concentrations of individual resin acids (i.e., abietic and dehydroabietic) decreased significantly in Punkaharju, but increased in the sapwood of N-fertilized trees compared with control ones at Padasjoki and Vilppula. The concentrations of resin acids in the heartwood were not significantly affected by fertilization. Both fertilization treatments decreased the total phenolic concentrations in the heartwood of trees growing in Padasjoki. There was a significant positive correlation between the total phenolics and total resin acid concentration. Overall, resin acids and phenolics seemed be more responsive than monoterpenes to N treatment. These results suggest that forest fertilization might cause slight changes in secondary compound concentrations of xylem, and thus might have significance in the decay resistance of wood.

  6. Effects of prolonged drought stress on Scots pine seedling carbon allocation.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, Heidi; Lindén, Aki; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Biasi, Christina; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2017-04-01

    As the number of drought occurrences has been predicted to increase with increasing temperatures, it is believed that boreal forests will become particularly vulnerable to decreased growth and increased tree mortality caused by the hydraulic failure, carbon starvation and vulnerability to pests following these. Although drought-affected trees are known to have stunted growth, as well as increased allocation of carbon to roots, still not enough is known about the ways in which trees can acclimate to drought. We studied how drought stress affects belowground and aboveground carbon dynamics, as well as nitrogen uptake, in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings exposed to prolonged drought. Overall 40 Scots pine seedlings were divided into control and drought treatments over two growing seasons. Seedlings were pulse-labelled with 13CO2 and litter bags containing 15N-labelled root biomass, and these were used to follow nutrient uptake of trees. We determined photosynthesis, biomass distribution, root and rhizosphere respiration, water potential, leaf osmolalities and carbon and nitrogen assimilation patterns in both treatments. The photosynthetic rate of the drought-induced seedlings did not decrease compared to the control group, the maximum leaf specific photosynthetic rate being 0.058 and 0.045 µmol g-1 s-1 for the drought and control treatments, respectively. The effects of drought were, however, observed as lower water potentials, increased osmolalities as well as decreased growth and greater fine root-to-shoot ratio in the drought-treated seedlings. We also observed improved uptake of labelled nitrogen from soil to needles in the drought-treated seedlings. The results indicate acclimation of seedlings to long-term drought by aiming to retain sufficient water uptake with adequate allocation to roots and root-associated mycorrhizal fungi. The plants seem to control water potential with osmolysis, for which sufficient photosynthetic capability is needed. © The

  7. Duration of shoot elongation in Scots pine varies within the crown and between years.

    PubMed

    Schiestl-Aalto, Pauliina; Nikinmaa, Eero; Mäkelä, Annikki

    2013-10-01

    Shoot elongation in boreal and temperate trees typically follows a sigmoid pattern where the onset and cessation of growth are related to accumulated effective temperature (thermal time). Previous studies on leader shoots suggest that while the maximum daily growth rate depends on the availability of resources to the shoot, the duration of the growth period may be an adaptation to long-term temperature conditions. However, other results indicate that the growth period may be longer in faster growing lateral shoots with higher availability of resources. This study investigates the interactions between the rate of elongation and the duration of the growth period in units of thermal time in lateral shoots of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). Length development of 202 lateral shoots were measured approximately three times per week during seven growing seasons in 2-5 trees per year in a mature stand and in three trees during one growing season in a sapling stand. A dynamic shoot growth model was adapted for the analysis to determine (1) the maximum growth rate and (2) the thermal time reached at growth completion. The relationship between those two parameters and its variation between trees and years was analysed using linear mixed models. The shoots with higher maximum growth rate within a crown continued to grow for a longer period in any one year. Higher July-August temperature of the previous summer implied a higher requirement of thermal time for growth completion. The results provide evidence that the requirement of thermal time for completion of lateral shoot extension in Scots pine may interact with resource availability to the shoot both from year to year and among shoots in a crown each year. If growing season temperatures rise in the future, this will affect not only the rate of shoot growth but its duration also.

  8. Twenty-two year results of a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) provenance test in North Dakota

    Treesearch

    Richard A. Cunningham; David F. Van Haverbeke

    1991-01-01

    A provenance test of 49 seed sources of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) from eastern Europe, Russia, and Siberia was established in two plantations in north-central North Dakota. After 22 years, trees from seed sources within the region bounded by 20° to 57° east longitude and 50° to 58° north latitude were taller, and larger in diameter, and had denser crown and...

  9. Fine root biomass in relation to site and stand characteristics in Norway spruce and Scots pine stands.

    PubMed

    Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko; Derome, John; Nöjd, Pekka; Kukkola, Mikko

    2007-10-01

    Variations in fine root biomass of trees and understory in 16 stands throughout Finland were examined and relationships to site and stand characteristics determined. Norway spruce fine root biomass varied between 184 and 370 g m(-2), and that of Scots pine ranged between 149 and 386 g m(-2). In northern Finland, understory roots and rhizomes (< 2 mm diameter) accounted for up to 50% of the stand total fine root biomass. Therefore, the fine root biomass of trees plus understory was larger in northern Finland in stands of both tree species, resulting in a negative relationship between fine root biomass and the temperature sum and a positive relationship between fine root biomass and the carbon:nitrogen ratio of the soil organic layer. The foliage:fine root ratio varied between 2.1 and 6.4 for Norway spruce and between 0.8 and 2.2 for Scots pine. The ratio decreased for both Norway spruce and Scots pine from south to north, as well as from fertile to more infertile site types. The foliage:fine root ratio of Norway spruce was related to basal area and stem surface area. The strong positive correlations of these three parameters with fine root nitrogen concentration implies that more fine roots are needed to maintain a certain amount of foliage when nutrient availability is low. No significant relationships were found between stand parameters and fine root biomass at the stand level, but the relationships considerably improved when both fine root biomass and stand parameters were calculated for the mean tree in the stand. When the northern and southern sites were analyzed separately, fine root biomass per tree of both species was significantly correlated with basal area and stem surface area per tree. Basal area, stem surface area and stand density can be estimated accurately and easily. Thus, our results may have value in predicting fine root biomass at the tree and stand level in boreal Norway spruce and Scots pine forests.

  10. Diurnal patterns in Scots pine stem oleoresin pressure in a boreal forest.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, K; Hölttä, T; Vanhatalo, A; Aalto, J; Nikinmaa, E; Rita, H; Bäck, J

    2016-03-01

    Coniferous tree stems contain large amounts of oleoresin under positive pressure in the resin ducts. Studies in North-American pines indicated that the stem oleoresin exudation pressure (OEP) correlates negatively with transpiration rate and soil water content. However, it is not known how the OEP changes affect the emissions of volatile vapours from the trees. We measured the OEP, xylem diameter changes indicating changes in xylem water potential and monoterpene emissions under field conditions in mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees in southern Finland. Contrary to earlier reports, the diurnal OEP changes were positively correlated with temperature and transpiration rate. OEP was lowest at the top part of the stem, where water potentials were also more negative, and often closely linked to ambient temperature and stem monoterpene emissions. However, occasionally OEP was affected by sudden changes in vapour pressure deficit (VPD), indicating the importance of xylem water potential on OEP as well. We conclude that the oleoresin storage pools in tree stems are in a dynamic relationship with ambient temperature and xylem water potential, and that the canopy monoterpene emission rates may therefore be also regulated by whole tree processes and not only by the conditions prevailing in the upper canopy. © 2015 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Growth responses of Scots pine to climatic factors on reclaimed oil shale mined land.

    PubMed

    Metslaid, Sandra; Stanturf, John A; Hordo, Maris; Korjus, Henn; Laarmann, Diana; Kiviste, Andres

    2016-07-01

    Afforestation on reclaimed mining areas has high ecological and economic importance. However, ecosystems established on post-mining substrate can become vulnerable due to climate variability. We used tree-ring data and dendrochronological techniques to study the relationship between climate variables and annual growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing on reclaimed open cast oil shale mining areas in Northeast Estonia. Chronologies for trees of different age classes (50, 40, 30) were developed. Pearson's correlation analysis between radial growth indices and monthly climate variables revealed that precipitation in June-July and higher mean temperatures in spring season enhanced radial growth of pine plantations, while higher than average temperatures in summer months inhibited wood production. Sensitivity of radial increment to climatic factors on post-mining soils was not homogenous among the studied populations. Older trees growing on more developed soils were more sensitive to precipitation deficit in summer, while growth indices of two other stand groups (young and middle-aged) were highly correlated to temperature. High mean temperatures in August were negatively related to annual wood production in all trees, while trees in the youngest stands benefited from warmer temperatures in January. As a response to thinning, mean annual basal area increment increased up to 50 %. By managing tree competition in the closed-canopy stands, through the thinning activities, tree sensitivity and response to climate could be manipulated.

  12. The inflow of Cs-137 in soil with root litter and root exudates of Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, Alexey; Tsvetnova, Olga; Popova, Evgenia

    2017-04-01

    In the model experiment on evaluation of Cs-137 inflow in the soil with litter of roots and woody plants root exudates on the example of soil and water cultures of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was shown, that through 45 days after the deposit Cs-137 solution on pine needles (specific activity of solution was 3.718*106 Bk) of the radionuclide in all components of model systems has increased significantly: needles, small branches and trunk by Cs-137 surface contamination during the experiment; roots as a result of the internal distribution of the radionuclide in the plant; soil and soil solution due to the of receipt Cs-137 in the composition of root exudates and root litter. Over 99% of the total reserve of Cs-137 accumulated in the components of the soil and water systems, accounted for bodies subjected to external pollution (needles and small branches) and <0.5% - on the soil / soil solution, haven't been subjected to surface contamination. At the same contamination of soil and soil solution by Cs-137 in the model experiment more than a> 99.9% was due to root exudates

  13. The O-methyltransferase PMT2 mediates methylation of pinosylvin in Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Paasela, Tanja; Lim, Kean-Jin; Pietiäinen, Milla; Teeri, Teemu H

    2017-06-01

    Heartwood extractives are important determinants of the natural durability of pine heartwood. The most important phenolic compounds affecting durability are the stilbenes pinosylvin and its monomethylether, which in addition have important functions as phytoalexins in active defense. A substantial portion of the synthesized pinosylvin is 3-methoxylated but the O-methyltransferase responsible for this modification has not been correctly identified. We studied the expression of the stilbene pathway during heartwood development as well as in response to wounding of xylem and UV-C treatment of needles. We isolated and enzymatically characterized a novel O-methyltransferase, PMT2. The methylated product was verified as pinosylvin monomethylether using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography analyses. The PMT2 enzyme was highly specific for stilbenes as substrate, in contrast to caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT) and PMT1 that were multifunctional. Expression profile and multifunctional activity of CCoAOMT suggest that it might have additional roles outside lignin biosynthesis. PMT1 is not involved in the stilbene pathway and its biological function remains an open question. We isolated a new specific O-methyltransferase responsible for 3-methoxylation of pinosylvin. Expression of PMT2 closely follows stilbene biosynthesis during developmental and stress induction. We propose that PMT2 is responsible for pinosylvin methylation in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), instead of the previously characterized methyltransferase, PMT1. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Effects of drought and irrigation on ecosystem functioning in a mature Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbertin, Matthias; Brunner, Ivano; Egli, Simon; Eilmann, Britta; Graf Pannatier, Eisabeth; Schleppi, Patrick; Zingg, Andreas; Rigling, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Climate change is expected to increase temperature and reduce summer precipitation in Switzerland. To study the expected effects of increased drought in mature forests two different approaches are in general possible: water can be partially or completely removed from the ecosystems via above- or below-canopy roofs or water can be added to already drought-prone ecosystems. Both methods have advantages and disadvantages. In our study water was added to a mature 90-year old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forest with a few singe pubescent oaks (Quercus pubescens Willd.), located in the valley bottom of the driest region of Switzerland (Valais). In Valais, Scots pines are declining, usually with increased mortality rates following drought years. It was therefore of special interest to study here how water addition is changing forest ecosystem functioning. The irrigation experiment started in the summer of 2003. Out of eight 0.1 ha experimental plots, four were randomly selected for irrigation, the other four left as a control. Irrigation occurred during rainless nights between April and October, doubling the annual rainfall amount from 650 to 1300 mm. Irrigation water, taken from a near-by irrigation channel, added some nutrients to the plots, but nutrients which were deficient on the site, e.g. nitrogen and phosphorus, were not altered. Tree diameter, tree height and crown width were assessed before the start of the irrigation in winter 2002/2003 and after 7 years of the experiment in 2009/2010. Tree crown transparency (lack of foliage) and leaf area index (LAI) were annually assessed. Additionally, tree mortality was annually evaluated. Mycorrhizal fruit bodies were identified and counted at weekly intervals from 2003 until 2007. Root samples were taken in 2004 and 2005. In 2004 and 2005 wood formation of thirteen trees was analysed in weekly or biweekly intervals using the pinning method. These trees were felled in 2006 for stem, shoot and needle growth analysis

  15. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a stress-induced multifunctional O-methyltransferase with pinosylvin methyltransferase activity from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Chiron, H; Drouet, A; Claudot, A C; Eckerskorn, C; Trost, M; Heller, W; Ernst, D; Sandermann, H

    2000-12-01

    Formation of pinosylvin (PS) and pinosylvin 3-O-monomethyl ether (PSM), as well as the activities of stilbene synthase (STS) and S-adenosyl-1-methionine (SAM):pinosylvin O-methyltransferase (PMT), were induced strongly in needles of Scots pine seedlings upon ozone treatment, as well as in cell suspension cultures of Scots pine upon fungal elicitation. A SAM-dependent PMT protein was purified and partially characterised. A cDNA encoding PMT was isolated from an ozone-induced Scots pine cDNA library. Southern blot analysis of the genomic DNA suggested the presence of a gene family. The deduced protein sequence showed the typical highly conserved regions of O-methyltransferases (OMTs), and average identities of 20-56% to known OMTs. PMT expressed in Escherichia coli corresponded to that of purified PMT (40 kDa) from pine cell cultures. The recombinant enzyme catalysed the methylation of PS, caffeic acid, caffeoyl-CoA and quercetin. Several other substances, such as astringenin, resveratrol, 5-OH-ferulic acid, catechol and luteolin, were also methylated. Recombinant PMT thus had a relatively broad substrate specificity. Treatment of 7-year old Scots pine trees with ozone markedly increased the PMT mRNA level. Our results show that PMT represents a new SAM-dependent OMT for the methylation of stress-induced pinosylvin in Scots pine needles.

  16. Fluorescence measurements show stronger cold inhibition of photosynthetic light reactions in Scots pine compared to Norway spruce as well as during spring compared to autumn.

    PubMed

    Linkosalo, Tapio; Heikkinen, Juha; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    We studied the photosynthetic activity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) in relation to air temperature changes from March 2013 to February 2014. We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence of approximately 50 trees of each species growing in southern Finland. Fluorescence was measured 1-3 times per week. We began by measuring shoots present in late winter (i.e., March 2013) before including new shoots once they started to elongate in spring. By July, when the spring shoots had achieved similar fluorescence levels to the older ones, we proceeded to measure the new shoots only. We analyzed the data by fitting a sigmoidal model containing four parameters to link sliding averages of temperature and fluorescence. A parameter defining the temperature range over which predicted fluorescence increased most rapidly was the most informative with in describing temperature dependence of fluorescence. The model generated similar fluorescence patterns for both species, but differences were observed for critical temperature and needle age. Down regulation of the light reaction was stronger in spring than in autumn. Pine showed more conservative control of the photosynthetic light reactions, which were activated later in spring and more readily attenuated in autumn. Under the assumption of a close correlation of fluorescence and photosynthesis, spruce should therefore benefit more than pine from the increased photosynthetic potential during warmer springs, but be more likely to suffer frost damage with a sudden cooling following a warm period. The winter of 2013-2014 was unusually mild and similar to future conditions predicted by global climate models. During the mild winter, the activity of photosynthetic light reactions of both conifers, especially spruce, remained high. Because light levels during winter are too low for photosynthesis, this activity may translate to a net carbon loss due to respiration.

  17. Contribution of ambient ozone to Scots pine defoliation and reduced growth in the Central European forests: a Lithuanian case study.

    PubMed

    Augustaitis, Algirdas; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej

    2008-10-01

    The study aimed to explore if changes in crown defoliation and stem growth of Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) could be related to changes in ambient ozone (O(3)) concentration in central Europe. To meet this objective the study was performed in 3 Lithuanian national parks, close to the ICP integrated monitoring stations from which data on meteorology and pollution were provided. Contribution of peak O(3) concentrations to the integrated impact of acidifying compounds and meteorological parameters on pine stem growth was found to be more significant than its contribution to the integrated impact of acidifying compounds and meteorological parameters on pine defoliation. Findings of the study provide statistical evidence that peak concentrations of ambient O(3) can have a negative impact on pine tree crown defoliation and stem growth reduction under field conditions in central and northeastern Europe where the AOT40 values for forests are commonly below their phytotoxic levels.

  18. Diverging drought resistance of Scots pine provenances revealed by infrared thermography and mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Hannes; Schunk, Christian; Matiu, Michael; Menzel, Annette

    2016-04-01

    Climate warming and more frequent and severe drought events will alter the adaptedness and fitness of tree species. Especially, Scots pine forests have been affected above average by die-off events during the last decades. Assisted migration of adapted provenances might help alleviating impacts by recent climate change and successfully regenerating forests. However, the identification of suitable provenances based on established ecophysiological methods is time consuming, sometimes invasive, and data on provenance-specific mortality are lacking. We studied the performance, stress and survival of potted Scots pine seedlings from 12 European provenances grown in a greenhouse experiment with multiple drought and warming treatments. In this paper, we will present results of drought stress impacts monitored with four different thermal indices derived from infrared thermography imaging as well as an ample mortality study. Percent soil water deficit (PSWD) was shown to be the main driver of drought stress response in all thermal indices. In spite of wet and dry reference surfaces, however, fluctuating environmental conditions, mainly in terms of air temperature and humidity, altered the measured stress response. In linear mixed-effects models, besides PSWD and meteorological covariates, the factors provenance and provenance - PSWD interactions were included. The explanatory power of the models (R2) ranged between 0.51 to 0.83 and thus, provenance-specific responses to strong and moderate drought and subsequent recovery were revealed. However, obvious differences in the response magnitude of provenances to drought were difficult to explicitly link to general features such Mediterranean - continental type or climate at the provenances' origin. We conclude that seedlings' drought resistance may be linked to summer precipitation and their experienced stress levels are a.o. dependent on their above ground dimensions under given water supply. In respect to mortality, previous

  19. Winter drought impairs xylem phenology, anatomy and growth in Mediterranean Scots pine forests.

    PubMed

    Camarero, J J; Guada, G; Sánchez-Salguero, R; Cervantes, E

    2016-12-01

    Continental Mediterranean forests face drought but also cold spells and both climate extremes can impair the resilience capacity of these forests. Climate warming could amplify the negative effects of cold spells by inducing premature dehardening. Here we capitalize on a winter drought-induced dieback triggered by a cold spell which occurred in December 2001 affecting Scots pine forests in eastern Spain. We assessed post-dieback recovery by quantifying and comparing radial growth and xylem anatomy of non-declining (ND, crown cover >50%) and declining (D, crown cover ≤50%) trees in two sites (VP, Villarroya de los Pinares; TO, Torrijas). We also characterized xylogenesis in both sites and aboveground productivity in site VP. Dieback caused legacy effects since needle loss, a 60% reduction in litter fall and radial-growth decline characterized D-trees 3 years after dieback symptoms started appearing in spring 2002. D-trees formed collapsed tracheids in the 2002-ring, particularly in the most affected VP site where xylogenesis differences between ND and D trees were most noticeable. The lower growth rates of D-trees were caused by a shorter duration of their major xylogenesis phases. In site VP the radial-enlargement and wall-thickening of tracheids were significantly reduced in D-trees as compared to ND-trees because these xylogenesis phases tended to start earlier and end later in ND-trees. Gompertz models fitted to tracheid production predicted that maximum growth rates occurred 11-12 days earlier in ND than in D-trees. The formation of radially-enlarging tracheids was enhanced by longer days in both study sites and also by wetter conditions in the driest TO site, but xylogenesis sensitivity to climate was reduced in D-trees. Winter-drought dieback impairs xylem anatomy and phenology, aboveground productivity, xylogenesis and growth in Mediterranean Scots pine populations. Affected stands show a costly post-dieback recovery challenging their resilience ability

  20. Frost hardiness of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine under two fertilization treatments.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Anna; Lehto, Tarja; Repo, Tapani

    2015-07-01

    Survival and functioning of mycorrhizal associations at low temperatures are not known well. In an earlier study, ectomycorrhizas did not affect the frost hardiness of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) roots, but here we studied whether differential nutrient availability would change the result and additionally, alter frost hardiness aboveground. The aim in this experiment was to compare the frost hardiness of roots and needles of mycorrhizal (Hebeloma sp.) and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine seedlings raised using two fertilization treatments and two cold-hardening regimes. The fertilization treatments were low (LF) and high (HF) application of a complete nutrient solution. Three hundred mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal seedlings were cultivated in growth chambers in four blocks for 16 weeks. For the first 9 weeks, the seedlings grew in long-day and high-temperature (LDHT) with low fertilization and then they were raised for 3 weeks in LDHT with either low or high fertilization. After this, half of the plants in each treatment combination remained in LDHT, and half were transferred to short-day and low-temperature (SDLT) conditions to cold acclimatize. The frost hardiness of the roots and needles was assessed using controlled freezing tests followed by electrolyte leakage tests (REL). Mycorrhizal roots were slightly more frost hardy than non-mycorrhizal roots, but only in the growing-season conditions (LDHT) in low-nutrient treatment. In LDHT and LF, the frost hardiness of the non-mycorrhizal roots was about -9 °C, and that of the non-mycorrhizal HF roots and the mycorrhizal roots in both fertilization levels was about -11 °C. However, no difference was found in the roots within the SDLT regime, and in needles, there was no difference between mycorrhizal and fertilization treatments. The frost hardiness of needles increased by SDLT treatment, being -8.5 and -14.1 °C in LDHT and SDLT, respectively. The dry mass of roots, stems, and needles was lower in LF than in

  1. Impacts of changing climate on the productivity of Norway spruce dominant stands with a mixture of Scots pine and birch in relation to water availability in southern and northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhen-Ming; Kellomäki, Seppo; Peltola, Heli; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, Kai-Yun; Väisänen, Hannu

    2011-03-01

    A process-based ecosystem model was used to assess the impacts of changing climate on net photosynthesis and total stem wood growth in relation to water availability in two unmanaged Norway spruce (Picea abies) dominant stands with a mixture of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and birch (Betula sp.). The mixed stands were grown over a 100-year rotation (2000-99) in southern and northern Finland with initial species shares of 50, 25 and 25% for Norway spruce, Scots pine and birch, respectively. In addition, pure Norway spruce, Scots pine and birch stands were used as a comparison to identify whether species' response is different in mixed and pure stands. Soil type and moisture conditions (moderate drought) were expected to be the same at the beginning of the simulations irrespective of site location. Regardless of tree species, both annual net canopy photosynthesis (P(nc)) and total stem wood growth (V(s)) were, on average, lower on the southern site under the changing climate compared with the current climate (difference increasing toward the end of the rotation); the opposite was the case for the northern site. Regarding the stand water budget, evapotranspiration (E(T)) was higher under the changing climate regardless of site location. Transpiration and evaporation from the canopy affected water depletion the most. Norway spruce and birch accounted for most of the water depletion in mixed stands on both sites regardless of climatic condition. The annual soil water deficit (W(d)) was higher on the southern site under the changing climate. On the northern site, the situation was the opposite. According to our results, the growth of pure Norway spruce stands in southern Finland could be even lower than the growth of Norway spruce in mixed stands under the changing climate. The opposite was found for pure Scots pine and birch stands due to lower water depletion. This indicates that in the future the management should be properly adapted to climate change in order to

  2. [The changes in contents and composition of phenolic acids during cell xylem growth in scots pine].

    PubMed

    Antonova, G F; Zheliznichenko, T V; Stasova, V V

    2011-01-01

    The contents and composition of alcohol soluble phenolic acids were studied during cell xylem growth in the course of wood annual increment formation in the stems of Scots pine. The cells of cambium zone, of two stages of expansion growth and the outset of secondary thickening zone (before lignification) were successively gathered from the stem segments of 25-old pine trees in the period of earlywood xylem formation with constant anatomical and histochemical control. The contents of free and bound forms of phenolic acids, isolated by 80% ethanol from tissues, as well as of their ethers and esters were calculated both per dry weight and per cell. The content and relation of the fractions and the composition of phenolic acid have been found to change significantly from cambium zone to the outset of tracheid secondary thickening. The character of the variations depends on a calculation method. According to the calculation per cell the amount of free and bound phenolic acids and in their composition of esters and especially ethers increased at the first step of expansion growth zone, decreased at the second one and rose again in the outset of secondary wall deposition. In dependence on the stage of cell development the pool of bound phenolic acids exceeded of free acid pool in 2-5 times. Sinapic and ferulic acids dominated in the composition of free hydroxycinnamic acids. The content and composition of hydroxycinnamic acids in ethers and esters depended on cell development phase. In cambium p-coumaric and sinapic acids were principal aglycons in ethers, at other stages these were sinapic and caffeic acids. The esters in cambium zone included essentially p-coumaric acid and at the other stages - sinapic and ferulic acids. At the first phase of growth benzoic acid was connected principally by ester bonds. The pool of these esters decreased from the first phase of growth to the outset of cell wall thickening and in proportion to this the level of free benzoic acid rose.

  3. Vertical and seasonal dynamics of fungal communities in boreal Scots pine forest soil.

    PubMed

    Santalahti, Minna; Sun, Hui; Jumpponen, Ari; Pennanen, Taina; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2016-11-01

    Fungal communities are important for carbon (C) transformations in boreal forests that are one of the largest C pools in terrestrial ecosystems, warranting thus further investigation of fungal community dynamics in time and space. We investigated fungal diversity and community composition seasonally and across defined soil horizons in boreal Scots pine forest in Finland using 454 pyrosequencing. We collected a total of 120 samples from five vertical soil horizons monthly from March to October; in March, under snow. Boreal forest soil generally harbored diverse fungal communities across soil horizons. The communities shifted drastically and rapidly over time. In late winter, saprotrophs dominated the community and were replaced by ectomycorrhizal fungi during the growing season. Our studies are among the first to dissect the spatial and temporal dynamics in boreal forest ecosystems and highlights the ecological importance of vertically distinct communities and their rapid seasonal dynamics. As climate change is predicted to result in warmer and longer snow-free winter seasons, as well as increase the rooting depth of trees in boreal forest, the seasonal and vertical distribution of fungal communities may change. These changes are likely to affect the organic matter decomposition by the soil-inhabiting fungi and thus alter organic C pools. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Genetic basis of climatic adaptation in scots pine by bayesian quantitative trait locus analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Hurme, P; Sillanpää, M J; Arjas, E; Repo, T; Savolainen, O

    2000-01-01

    We examined the genetic basis of large adaptive differences in timing of bud set and frost hardiness between natural populations of Scots pine. As a mapping population, we considered an "open-pollinated backcross" progeny by collecting seeds of a single F(1) tree (cross between trees from southern and northern Finland) growing in southern Finland. Due to the special features of the design (no marker information available on grandparents or the father), we applied a Bayesian quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping method developed previously for outcrossed offspring. We found four potential QTL for timing of bud set and seven for frost hardiness. Bayesian analyses detected more QTL than ANOVA for frost hardiness, but the opposite was true for bud set. These QTL included alleles with rather large effects, and additionally smaller QTL were supported. The largest QTL for bud set date accounted for about a fourth of the mean difference between populations. Thus, natural selection during adaptation has resulted in selection of at least some alleles of rather large effect. PMID:11063704

  5. Modelling the effect of low soil temperatures on transpiration by Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellander, Per-Erik; Stähli, Manfred; Gustafsson, David; Bishop, Kevin

    2006-06-01

    For ecosystem modelling of the Boreal forest it is important to include processes associated with low soil temperature during spring-early summer, as these affect the tree water uptake. The COUP model, a physically based SVAT model, was tested with 2 years of soil and snow physical measurements and sap flow measurements in a 70-year-old Scots pine stand in the boreal zone of northern Sweden. During the first year the extent and duration of soil frost was manipulated in the field. The model was successful in reproducing the timing of the soil warming after the snowmelt and frost thaw. A delayed soil warming, into the growing season, severely reduced the transpiration. We demonstrated the potential for considerable overestimation of transpiration by the model if the reduction of the trees' capacity to transpire due to low soil temperatures is not taken into account. We also demonstrated that the accumulated effect of aboveground conditions could be included when simulating the relationship between soil temperature and tree water uptake. This improved the estimated transpiration for the control plot and when soil warming was delayed into the growing season. The study illustrates the need of including antecedent conditions on root growth in the model in order to catch these effects on transpiration. The COUP model is a promising tool for predicting transpiration in high-latitude stands.

  6. Monitoring environmental pollution in Poland by chemical analysis of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles.

    PubMed

    Dmuchowski, W; Bytnerowicz, A

    1995-01-01

    Maps of the distribution of environmental pollution by sulfur (S), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), and arsenic (As) for the territory of Poland and the Warsaw (Warszawa) district were developed on the basis of chemical analysis of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles collected from randomly selected sampling points during 1983-1985. The maps show deposition zones for the studied elements and can help in identification of sources and directions of air pollution dispersion. This study indicated that vegetation in Poland is greatly endangered by sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) and other sulfurous air pollutants, whereas Zn, Cd, Pb, and As do not pose an immediate threat to vegetation in most of the country's territory. However, in the urban-industrial agglomeration of Katowice-Cracow, very high pollution with Z, Cd, Pb and As could limit growth and development of some sensitive plant species. Higher than normal levels of As in some areas of Poland (Upper Silesia, Glogow-Lubin Copper Region, and areas close to the Russian border near Braniewo) might affect the health of humans and animals. Results of this study indicated that Poland's environment was not contaminated with Cu.

  7. Retention of seed trees fails to lifeboat ectomycorrhizal fungal diversity in harvested Scots pine forests.

    PubMed

    Varenius, Kerstin; Lindahl, Björn D; Dahlberg, Anders

    2017-09-01

    Fennoscandian forestry has in the past decades changed from natural regeneration of forests towards replantation of clear-cuts, which negatively impacts ectomycorrhizal fungal (EMF) diversity. Retention of trees during harvesting enables EMF survival, and we therefore expected EMF communities to be more similar to those in old natural stands after forest regeneration using seed trees compared to full clear-cutting and replanting. We sequenced fungal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) amplicons to assess EMF communities in 10- to 60-year-old Scots pine stands regenerated either using seed trees or through replanting of clear-cuts with old natural stands as reference. We also investigated local EMF communities around retained old trees. We found that retention of seed trees failed to mitigate the impact of harvesting on EMF community composition and diversity. With increasing stand age, EMF communities became increasingly similar to those in old natural stands and permanently retained trees maintained EMF locally. From our observations, we conclude that EMF communities, at least common species, post-harvest are more influenced by environmental filtering, resulting from environmental changes induced by harvest, than by the continuity of trees. These results suggest that retention of intact forest patches is a more efficient way to conserve EMF diversity than retaining dispersed single trees. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Wood properties of Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) grown at elevated temperature and carbon dioxide concentration.

    PubMed

    Kilpeläinen, Antti; Peltola, Heli; Ryyppö, Aija; Sauvala, Kari; Laitinen, Kaisa; Kellomäki, Seppo

    2003-09-01

    Impacts of elevated temperature and carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) on wood properties of 15-year-old Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) grown under conditions of low nitrogen supply were investigated in open-top chambers. The treatments consisted of (i) ambient temperature and ambient [CO2] (AT+AC), (ii) ambient temperature and elevated [CO2] (AT+EC), (iii) elevated temperature and ambient [CO2] (ET+AC) and (iv) elevated temperature and elevated [CO2] (ET+EC). Wood properties analyzed for the years 1992-1994 included ring width, early- and latewood width and their proportions, intra-ring wood density (minimum, maximum and mean, as well as early- and latewood densities), mean fiber length and chemical composition of the wood (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and acetone extractive concentration). Absolute radial growth over the 3-year period was 54% greater in AT+EC trees and 30 and 25% greater in ET+AC and ET+EC trees, respectively, than in AT+AC trees. Neither elevated temperature nor elevated [CO2] had a statistically significant effect on ring width, early- and latewood widths or their proportions. Both latewood density and maximum intra-ring density were increased by elevated [CO2], whereas fiber length was increased by elevated temperature. Hemicellulose concentration decreased and lignin concentration increased significantly in response to elevated temperature. There were no statistically significant interaction effects of elevated temperature and elevated [CO2] on the wood properties, except on earlywood density.

  9. Tree water relations can trigger monoterpene emissions from Scots pine stems during spring recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhatalo, A.; Chan, T.; Aalto, J.; Korhonen, J. F.; Kolari, P.; Hölttä, T.; Nikinmaa, E.; Bäck, J.

    2015-09-01

    Tree canopies are known to emit large amounts of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) such as monoterpenes into the surrounding air. High VOC emission rates from boreal forests have been observed during the transition from winter to summer activity. The most important sources of these are considered to be the green foliage, understory vegetation and soil organisms, but emissions from the living stand woody compartments have so far not been quantified. We analyzed whether the non-foliar components could partially explain the springtime high emission rates. We measured the monoterpene emissions from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stem and shoots during the dehardening phase of trees in field conditions in two consecutive springs. We observed a large, transient monoterpene burst from the stem, while the shoot monoterpene emissions remained low. The burst lasted about 12 h. Simultaneously, an unusual nighttime sap flow and a non-systematic diurnal pattern of tree diameter were detected. Hence, we suggest that the monoterpene burst was a consequence of the recovery of the stem from wintertime, and likely related to the refilling of embolized tracheids and/or phenological changes in the living cells of the stem. This indicates that the dominant processes and environmental drivers triggering the monoterpene emissions are different between the stem and the foliage.

  10. Delayed soil thawing affects root and shoot functioning and growth in Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Repo, Tapani; Lehto, Tarja; Finér, Leena

    2008-10-01

    In boreal regions, soil can remain frozen after the start of the growing season. We compared relationships between root characteristics and water relations in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) saplings subjected to soil frost treatments before and during the first week of the growing period in a controlled environment experiment. Delayed soil thawing delayed the onset of sap flow or totally blocked it if soil thawing lagged the start of the growing period by 7 days. This effect was reflected in the electrical impedance of needles and trunks and in the relative electrolyte leakage of needles. Prolonged soil frost reduced or completely inhibited root growth. In unfrozen soil, limited trunk sap flow was observed despite unfavorable aboveground growing conditions (low temperature, low irradiance, short photoperiod). Following the earliest soil thaw, sap flow varied during the growing season, depending on light and temperature conditions, phenological stage of the plant and the amount of live needles in the canopy. The results suggest that delayed soil thawing can reduce tree growth, and if prolonged, it can be lethal.

  11. Estimating the onset of cambial activity in Scots pine in northern Finland by means of the heat-sum approach.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Wook; Eckstein, Dieter; Jalkanen, Risto; Rickebusch, Sophie; Schmitt, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    We estimated the date of onset (Date(est)) of cambial activity by the pinning method in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees at Vanttauskoski (Site 1) and Laanila (Site 2) near the latitudinal limit of Scots pine in northern Finland. In each year and at each site, observations were made on a different set of five trees. The estimated dates of onset of cambial activity were compared with the corresponding heat sums, calculated in degree-days according to two models. Within years, Date(est) varied among trees by up to 15 days at Site 1 and up to 13 days at Site 2. Among years, mean Date(est) varied by 15.3 days at Site 1 and 12.0 days at Site 2. The overall mean Date(est) differed between sites by 6 days (June 5 at Site 1 and June 11 at Site 2). Among all trees in all years, the mean number of degree days (d.d.) calculated from mean daily temperature above a threshold of 5 degrees C before Date(est) ranged from 68.7 to 135 d.d. at Site 1 and from 37.4 to 154.7 d.d. at Site 2. Among years, the mean heat sum before Date(est )ranged from 94 to 112.5 d.d. at Site 1 and from 61.4 to 136 d.d. at Site 2. Variation among years in heat sum before Date(est) at Site 2 was highly significant, indicating that one or more factors other than, or in addition to, heat sum determines the onset of cambial activity in Scots pine. Similar results were obtained when heat sum was computed from the area between the sine wave generated by daily maximum and minimum temperature and the threshold temperature.

  12. Response of central Siberian Scots pine to soil water deficit and long-term trends in atmospheric CO2 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneth, A.; Lloyd, J.; Šantrůčková, H.; Bird, M.; Grigoryev, S.; Kalaschnikov, Y. N.; Gleixner, G.; Schulze, E.-D.

    2002-01-01

    Twenty tree ring 13C / 12C ratio chronologies from Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) trees were determined from five locations sampled along the Yenisei River, spaced over a total distance of ~1000 km between the cities of Turuhansk (66°N) and Krasnoyarsk (56°N). The transect covered the major part of the natural distribution of Scots pine in the region with median growing season temperatures and precipitation varying from 12.2°C and 218 mm to 14.0°C and 278 mm for Turuhansk and Krasnoyarsk, respectively. A key focus of the study was to investigate the effects of variations in temperature, precipitation, and atmospheric CO2 concentration on long- and short-term variation in photosynthetic 13C discrimination during photosynthesis and the marginal cost of tree water use, as reflected in the differences in the historical records of the 13C / 12C ratio in wood cellulose compared to that of the atmosphere (Δ13Cc). In 17 of the 20 samples, trees Δ13Cc has declined during the last 150 years, particularly so during the second half of the twentieth century. Using a model of stomatal behaviour combined with a process-based photosynthesis model, we deduce that this trend indicates a long-term decrease in canopy stomatal conductance, probably in response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This response being observed for most trees along the transect is suggestive of widespread decreases in Δ13Cc and increased water use efficiency for Scots pine in central Siberia over the last century. Overlying short-term variations in Δ13Cc were also accounted for by the model and were related to variations in growing season soil water deficit and atmospheric humidity.

  13. Controls of Evapotranspiration and CO2 Fluxes from Scots Pine by Surface Conductance and Abiotic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Tianshan; Li, Chunyi; Kellomäki, Seppo; Peltola, Heli; Wang, Kai-Yun; Zhang, Yuqing

    2013-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (E) and CO2 flux (Fc) in the growing season of an unusual dry year were measured continuously over a Scots pine forest in eastern Finland, by eddy covariance techniques. The aims were to gain an understanding of their biological and environmental control processes. As a result, there were obvious diurnal and seasonal changes in E, Fc, surface conductance (gc), and decoupling coefficient (Ω), showing similar trends to those in radiation (PAR) and vapour pressure deficit (δ). The maximum mean daily values (24-h average) for E, Fc, gc, and Ω were 1.78 mmol m−2 s−1, −11.18 µmol m−2 s−1, 6.27 mm s−1, and 0.31, respectively, with seasonal averages of 0.71 mmol m−2 s−1, −4.61 µmol m−2 s−1, 3.3 mm s−1, and 0.16. E and Fc were controlled by combined biological and environmental variables. There was curvilinear dependence of E on gc and Fc on gc. Among the environmental variables, PAR was the most important factor having a positive linear relationship to E and curvilinear relationship to Fc, while vapour pressure deficit was the most important environmental factor affecting gc. Water use efficiency was slightly higher in the dry season, with mean monthly values ranging from 6.67 to 7.48 μmol CO2 (mmol H2O)−1 and a seasonal average of 7.06 μmol CO2 (μmol H2O)−1. Low Ω and its close positive relationship with gc indicate that evapotranspiration was sensitive to surface conductance. Mid summer drought reduced surface conductance and decoupling coefficient, suggesting a more biotic control of evapotranspiration and a physiological acclimation to dry air. Surface conductance remained low and constant under dry condition, supporting that a constant value of surface constant can be used for modelling transpiration under drought condition. PMID:23894401

  14. Controls of evapotranspiration and CO2 fluxes from scots pine by surface conductance and abiotic factors.

    PubMed

    Zha, Tianshan; Li, Chunyi; Kellomäki, Seppo; Peltola, Heli; Wang, Kai-Yun; Zhang, Yuqing

    2013-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (E) and CO2 flux (Fc ) in the growing season of an unusual dry year were measured continuously over a Scots pine forest in eastern Finland, by eddy covariance techniques. The aims were to gain an understanding of their biological and environmental control processes. As a result, there were obvious diurnal and seasonal changes in E, Fc , surface conductance (gc ), and decoupling coefficient (Ω), showing similar trends to those in radiation (PAR) and vapour pressure deficit (δ). The maximum mean daily values (24-h average) for E, Fc , gc , and Ω were 1.78 mmol m(-2) s(-1), -11.18 µmol m(-2) s(-1), 6.27 mm s(-1), and 0.31, respectively, with seasonal averages of 0.71 mmol m(-2) s(-1), -4.61 µmol m(-2) s(-1), 3.3 mm s(-1), and 0.16. E and Fc were controlled by combined biological and environmental variables. There was curvilinear dependence of E on gc and Fc on gc . Among the environmental variables, PAR was the most important factor having a positive linear relationship to E and curvilinear relationship to Fc , while vapour pressure deficit was the most important environmental factor affecting gc . Water use efficiency was slightly higher in the dry season, with mean monthly values ranging from 6.67 to 7.48 μmol CO2 (mmol H2O)(-1) and a seasonal average of 7.06 μmol CO2 (μmol H2O)(-1). Low Ω and its close positive relationship with gc indicate that evapotranspiration was sensitive to surface conductance. Mid summer drought reduced surface conductance and decoupling coefficient, suggesting a more biotic control of evapotranspiration and a physiological acclimation to dry air. Surface conductance remained low and constant under dry condition, supporting that a constant value of surface constant can be used for modelling transpiration under drought condition.

  15. Impacts of seasonal air and soil temperatures on photosynthesis in Scots pine trees.

    PubMed

    Strand, Martin; Lundmark, Tomas; Söderbergh, Ingrid; Mellander, Per-Erik

    2002-08-01

    Seasonal courses of light-saturated rate of net photosynthesis (A360) and stomatal conductance (gs) were examined in detached 1-year-old needles of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) from early April to mid-November. To evaluate the effects of soil frost and low soil temperatures on gas exchange, the extent and duration of soil frost, as well as the onset of soil warming, were manipulated in the field. During spring, early summer and autumn, the patterns of A360 and gs in needles from the control and warm-soil plots were generally strongly related to daily mean air temperatures and the frequency of severe frost. The warm-soil treatment had little effect on gas exchange, although mean soil temperature in the warm-soil plot was 3.8 degrees C higher than in the control plot during spring and summer, indicating that A360 and gs in needles from control trees were not limited by low soil temperature alone. In contrast, prolonged exposure to soil temperatures slightly above 0 degrees C severely restricted recovery of A360 and especially gs in needles from the cold-soil treatment during spring and early summer; however, full recovery of both A360 and gs occurred in late summer. We conclude that inhibition of A360 by low soil temperatures is related to both stomatal closure and effects on the biochemistry of photosynthesis, the relative importance of which appeared to vary during spring and early summer. During the autumn, soil temperatures as low as 8 degrees C did not affect either A360 or gs.

  16. Maternal heterozygosity and progeny fitness association in an inbred Scots pine population.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, S; Ahlinder, J; Waldmann, P; García-Gil, M R

    2013-03-01

    Associations between heterozygosity and fitness traits have typically been investigated in populations characterized by low levels of inbreeding. We investigated the associations between standardized multilocus heterozygosity (stMLH) in mother trees (obtained from12 nuclear microsatellite markers) and five fitness traits measured in progenies from an inbred Scots pine population. The traits studied were proportion of sound seed, mean seed weight, germination rate, mean family height of one-year old seedlings under greenhouse conditions (GH) and mean family height of three-year old seedlings under field conditions (FH). The relatively high average inbreeding coefficient (F) in the population under study corresponds to a mixture of trees with different levels of co-ancestry, potentially resulting from a recent bottleneck. We used both frequentist and Bayesian methods of polynomial regression to investigate the presence of linear and non-linear relations between stMLH and each of the fitness traits. No significant associations were found for any of the traits except for GH, which displayed negative linear effect with stMLH. Negative HFC for GH could potentially be explained by the effect of heterosis caused by mating of two inbred mother trees (Lippman and Zamir 2006), or outbreeding depression at the most heterozygote trees and its negative impact on the fitness of the progeny, while their simultaneous action is also possible (Lynch. 1991). However,since this effect wasn't detected for FH, we cannot either rule out that the greenhouse conditions introduce artificial effects that disappear under more realistic field conditions.

  17. Seasonal changes in amino acids, protein and total nitrogen in needles of fertilized Scots pine trees.

    PubMed

    Näsholm, T; Ericsson, A

    1990-09-01

    Seasonal changes in amino acids, protein and total nitrogen in needles of 30-year-old, fertilized Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees growing in Northern Sweden were investigated over two years in field experiments. The studied plots had been fertilized annually for 17 years with (i) a high level of N, (ii) a medium level of N, or (iii) a medium level of N, P and K. Trees growing on unfertilized plots served as controls. In control trees, glutamine, glutamic acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid, aspartic acid and proline represented 50-70% of the total free amino acids determined. Arginine was present only in low concentrations in control trees throughout the year, but it was usually the most abundant amino acid in fertilized trees. Glutamine concentrations were high during the spring and summer in both years of study, whereas proline concentrations were high in the spring but otherwise low throughout the year. In the first year of study, glutamic acid concentrations were high during the spring and summer, whereas gamma-aminobutyric acid was present in high concentrations during the winter months. This pattern was less pronounced in the second year of investigation. The concentrations of most amino acids, except glutamic acid, increased in response to fertilization. Nitrogen fertilization increased the foliar concentration of arginine from < 1 micromol g(dw) (-1) in control trees to a maximum of 110 micromol g(dw) (-1). Trees fertilized with nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium had significantly lower arginine concentrations than trees fertilized with the same amount of nitrogen only. Protein concentrations were similar in all fertilized trees but higher than those in control trees. For all treatments, protein concentrations were high in winter and at a minimum in early spring. In summer, the protein concentration remained almost constant except for a temporary decrease which coincided with the expansion of new shoots. Apart from arginine, the amino acid composition of

  18. Functional Multi-Locus QTL Mapping of Temporal Trends in Scots Pine Wood Traits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zitong; Hallingbäck, Henrik R.; Abrahamsson, Sara; Fries, Anders; Gull, Bengt Andersson; Sillanpää, Mikko J.; García-Gil, M. Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of wood properties in conifer species has focused on single time point measurements or on trait means based on heterogeneous wood samples (e.g., increment cores), thus ignoring systematic within-tree trends. In this study, functional QTL mapping was performed for a set of important wood properties in increment cores from a 17-yr-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) full-sib family with the aim of detecting wood trait QTL for general intercepts (means) and for linear slopes by increasing cambial age. Two multi-locus functional QTL analysis approaches were proposed and their performances were compared on trait datasets comprising 2 to 9 time points, 91 to 455 individual tree measurements and genotype datasets of amplified length polymorphisms (AFLP), and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. The first method was a multilevel LASSO analysis whereby trend parameter estimation and QTL mapping were conducted consecutively; the second method was our Bayesian linear mixed model whereby trends and underlying genetic effects were estimated simultaneously. We also compared several different hypothesis testing methods under either the LASSO or the Bayesian framework to perform QTL inference. In total, five and four significant QTL were observed for the intercepts and slopes, respectively, across wood traits such as earlywood percentage, wood density, radial fiberwidth, and spiral grain angle. Four of these QTL were represented by candidate gene SNPs, thus providing promising targets for future research in QTL mapping and molecular function. Bayesian and LASSO methods both detected similar sets of QTL given datasets that comprised large numbers of individuals. PMID:25305041

  19. Long-term nitrogen additions and the intrinsic water-use efficiency of boreal Scots pine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, John; Wallin, Göran; Linder, Sune; Lundmark, Tomas; Näsholm, Torgny

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen fertilization nearly always increases productivity in boreal forests, at least in terms of wood production, but it is unclear how. In a mature (80 yrs. old) Scots pine forest in northern Sweden, we tested the extent to which nitrogen fertilization increased intrinsic photosynthetic water-use efficiency. We measured δ13C both discretely, in biweekly phloem sampling, and continuously, by monitoring of bole respiration. The original experiment was designed as a test of eddy covariance methods and is not therefore strictly replicated. Nonetheless, we compared phloem contents among fifteen trees from each plot and stem respiration from four per plot. The treatments included addition of 100 kg N/ha for eight years and a control. Phloem contents have the advantage of integrating over the whole canopy and undergoing complete and rapid turnover. Their disadvantage is that some have observed isotopic drift with transport down the length of the stem, presumably as a result of preferential export and/or reloading. We also measured the isotopic composition of stem respiration from four trees on each plot using a Picarro G1101-I CRDS attached to the vent flow from a continuous gas-exchange system. We detected consistent differences in δ13C between the treatments in phloem contents. Within each treatment, the phloem δ13C was negatively correlated with antecedent temperature (R2= 0.65) and no other measured climate variable. The isotopic composition of stem CO2 efflux will be compared to that of phloem contents. However, when converted to intrinsic water-use efficiency, the increase amounted to only about 4%. This is a small relative to the near doubling in wood production. Although we were able to detect a clear and consistent increase in water-use efficiency with N-fertilization, it constitutes but a minor cause of the observed increase in wood production.

  20. The true distribution and accumulation of radiocaesium in stem of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Thiry, Yves; Goor, Francois; Riesen, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The radial and vertical distributions of radiocaesium, potassium and calcium were determined in two Scots pine stands (17 and 58 yr old) similarly affected by the Chernobyl fallout. For both age classes, concentrations are always the lowest in the stemwood, highest in the inner bark and intermediary levels were observed for the outer bark. Due to the cumulative character of its biomass. however. stemwood is a long-term major reservoir of 137Cs. With tree development, changes in the 137Cs radial distribution are well described by variations in the sap ascent pattern and reveal an important transfer between tree rings. It is shown that. both the biomass evolution and knowledge of the evolution of the 137Cs radial gradient are important to predicting 137Cs accumulation in wood with time. According to the common transfer factor (TF) approach, one would expect a decrease in radiocaesium accumulation with time (from 0.0047 +/- 0.0013 to 0.0035 +/- 0.0008 m2kg(-1) for the 17 and 58 yr old trees, respectively). With the wood immobilisation potential (WIP) approach, it was, however, clearly shown that additional annual uptake was highest for the older stand (3.12 +/- 0.23 Bq cm(-3) yr(-1) for the 58-year-old stand compared to 1.99 +/- 0.30 Bq cm(-3) yr(-1) for the younger stand). Following the WIP approach, it was moreover possible to distinguish between the 137Cs incorporated via the root uptake process and a possible lasting effect of interception. It is shown that, whereas for the younger stand (5 yr old at the time of the accident) root uptake contributed exclusively to the wood contamination, the former process explained only 48% of the measured total 137Cs content in the wood of the older tree.

  1. Functional multi-locus QTL mapping of temporal trends in Scots pine wood traits.

    PubMed

    Li, Zitong; Hallingbäck, Henrik R; Abrahamsson, Sara; Fries, Anders; Gull, Bengt Andersson; Sillanpää, Mikko J; García-Gil, M Rosario

    2014-10-09

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of wood properties in conifer species has focused on single time point measurements or on trait means based on heterogeneous wood samples (e.g., increment cores), thus ignoring systematic within-tree trends. In this study, functional QTL mapping was performed for a set of important wood properties in increment cores from a 17-yr-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) full-sib family with the aim of detecting wood trait QTL for general intercepts (means) and for linear slopes by increasing cambial age. Two multi-locus functional QTL analysis approaches were proposed and their performances were compared on trait datasets comprising 2 to 9 time points, 91 to 455 individual tree measurements and genotype datasets of amplified length polymorphisms (AFLP), and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. The first method was a multilevel LASSO analysis whereby trend parameter estimation and QTL mapping were conducted consecutively; the second method was our Bayesian linear mixed model whereby trends and underlying genetic effects were estimated simultaneously. We also compared several different hypothesis testing methods under either the LASSO or the Bayesian framework to perform QTL inference. In total, five and four significant QTL were observed for the intercepts and slopes, respectively, across wood traits such as earlywood percentage, wood density, radial fiberwidth, and spiral grain angle. Four of these QTL were represented by candidate gene SNPs, thus providing promising targets for future research in QTL mapping and molecular function. Bayesian and LASSO methods both detected similar sets of QTL given datasets that comprised large numbers of individuals. Copyright © 2014 Li et al.

  2. Comparing the variation of needle and wood terpenoids in Scots pine provenances.

    PubMed

    Manninen, A M; Tarhanen, S; Vuorinen, M; Kainulaine, P

    2002-01-01

    We determined variation in both the concentration and composition of terpenoids in needles and wood within nine Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) provenances. Seedlings of different provenances representing a 1200-km N-S transect from Estonia to northern Finland were cultivated in Suonenjoki nursery field, central Finland, for seven years. Growth of seedlings and the number of vertical resin ducts in wood were also determined. alpha-Pinene and 3-carene were the major monoterpenes both in the needles and wood. The total monoterpene concentration was about five times higher in the needles than in the wood. A strong positive correlation was found between proportional quantities of several terpenes of the needles and wood, particularly for 3-carene, sabinene, and terpinolene. The needles contained both labdane-type and tricyclic resin acids, whereas the wood contained only tricyclic ones. The wood had a four times higher tricyclic resin acid concentration than the needles. The highest total monoterpene concentration in the needles and in the wood occurred in the most northern Muonio provenance and in the most southern Saaremaa provenance plants, respectively. The amount of high 3-carene genotype trees decreased among the northern provenances. The wood of the most northern Muonio provenance showed the lowest total resin acid concentration, but provenance did not affect total tricyclic resin acids in the needles. Korpilahti provenance trees from central Finland had the best growth in height. In addition, Korpilahti and Ruokolahti provenance trees showed largest radial growth of stem and smallest number of vertical resin ducts. The results suggest that especially the proportional quantity of 3-carene in the needles could be used in estimating the amount of this compound in the wood and vice versa.

  3. Scots pine responses to elevated temperature and carbon dioxide concentration: growth and wood properties.

    PubMed

    Kilpeläinen, Antti; Peltola, Heli; Ryyppö, Aija; Kellomäki, Seppo

    2005-01-01

    Growth and wood properties of 20-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees were studied for 6 years in 16 closed chambers providing a factorial combination of two temperature regimes (ambient and elevated) and two carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO2]) (ambient and twice ambient). The elevation of temperature corresponded to the predicted effect at the site of a doubling in atmospheric [CO2]. Annual height and radial growth and wood properties were analyzed during 1997-2002. Physical wood properties analyzed included early- and latewood widths and their proportions, intra-ring wood densities, early- and latewood density and mean fiber length. Chemical wood properties analyzed included concentrations of acetone-soluble extractives, lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose. There were no significant treatment effects on height growth during the 6-year study. Elevated [CO2] increased ring width by 66 and 47% at ambient and elevated temperatures, respectively. At ambient [CO2], elevated temperature increased ring width by 19%. Increased ring width in response to elevated [CO2] resulted from increases in both early- and latewood width; however, there was no effect of the treatments on early- and latewood proportions. Mean wood density, earlywood density and fiber length increased in response to elevated temperature. The chemical composition of wood was affected by elevated [CO2], which reduced the cellulose concentration, and by elevated temperature, which reduced the concentration of acetone-soluble extractives. Thus, over the 6-year period, radial growth was significantly increased by elevated [CO2], and some wood properties were significantly affected by elevated temperature or elevated [CO2], or both, indicating that climate change may affect the material properties of wood.

  4. Function and Dynamics of Auxin and Carbohydrates during Earlywood/Latewood Transition in Scots Pine1

    PubMed Central

    Uggla, Claes; Magel, Elisabeth; Moritz, Thomas; Sundberg, Björn

    2001-01-01

    In temperate regions the annual pattern of wood development is characterized by the formation of radially narrow and thick walled latewood cells. This takes place at the later part of the growing season when cambial cell division declines. To gain new insight into the regulation of this process, micro-analytical techniques were used to visualize the distribution of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), soluble carbohydrates, and activities of sucrose (Suc)-metabolizing enzymes across the cambial region tissues in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). The total amount of IAA in the cambial region did not change with latewood initiation. But its radial distribution pattern was altered, resulting in an increased concentration in the cambial meristem and its recent derivatives. Thus, initiation of latewood formation and cessation of cambial cell division is not a consequence of decreased IAA concentrations in dividing and expanding cells. Rather, IAA most likely has a role in defining the altered developmental pattern associated with latewood formation. Carbohydrates and enzyme activities showed distinctive radial distribution patterns. Suc peaked in the phloem and decreased sharply to low levels across the cambial zone, whereas fructose and glucose reached their highest levels in the maturing tracheids. Suc synthase was the dominating Suc cleaving enzyme with a peak in the secondary wall-forming tracheids and in the phloem. Soluble acid invertase peaked in dividing and expanding cells. Suc-phosphate synthase had its highest activities in the phloem. Activities of cell wall bound invertase were low. The absence of major seasonal variations indicates that carbohydrate availability is not a trigger for latewood initiation. However, steep concentration gradients of the sugars suggest a role for sugar signaling in vascular development. PMID:11299382

  5. Function and dynamics of auxin and carbohydrates during earlywood/latewood transition in scots pine.

    PubMed

    Uggla, C; Magel, E; Moritz, T; Sundberg, B

    2001-04-01

    In temperate regions the annual pattern of wood development is characterized by the formation of radially narrow and thick walled latewood cells. This takes place at the later part of the growing season when cambial cell division declines. To gain new insight into the regulation of this process, micro-analytical techniques were used to visualize the distribution of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), soluble carbohydrates, and activities of sucrose (Suc)-metabolizing enzymes across the cambial region tissues in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). The total amount of IAA in the cambial region did not change with latewood initiation. But its radial distribution pattern was altered, resulting in an increased concentration in the cambial meristem and its recent derivatives. Thus, initiation of latewood formation and cessation of cambial cell division is not a consequence of decreased IAA concentrations in dividing and expanding cells. Rather, IAA most likely has a role in defining the altered developmental pattern associated with latewood formation. Carbohydrates and enzyme activities showed distinctive radial distribution patterns. Suc peaked in the phloem and decreased sharply to low levels across the cambial zone, whereas fructose and glucose reached their highest levels in the maturing tracheids. Suc synthase was the dominating Suc cleaving enzyme with a peak in the secondary wall-forming tracheids and in the phloem. Soluble acid invertase peaked in dividing and expanding cells. Suc-phosphate synthase had its highest activities in the phloem. Activities of cell wall bound invertase were low. The absence of major seasonal variations indicates that carbohydrate availability is not a trigger for latewood initiation. However, steep concentration gradients of the sugars suggest a role for sugar signaling in vascular development.

  6. Neutral lipids and phospholipids in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) sapwood and heartwood.

    PubMed

    Piispanen, R; Saranpää, P

    2002-06-01

    Variations in the concentration and composition of triacylglycerols, free fatty acids and phospholipids were analyzed in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees at five sites. Disks were taken at breast height or at a height of 4 m from the stems of 81 trees differing in diameter and growth rate. The mean concentration of triacylglycerols in sapwood was 26 mg g(-1) dry mass; however, variation among trees was large (16-51 mg g(dm)(-1)). The concentration of triacylglycerols was slightly larger at 4 m height in the stem than at breast height. Concentrations of triacylglycerols did not differ between the sapwood of young and small-diameter stems (DBH < 12 cm) and the sapwood of old stems (DBH > 36 cm). Concentrations of free fatty acids were negligible in the outer sapwood, but ranged between 5 and 18 mg g(dm)(-1) in the heartwood. The most abundant fatty acids of triacylglycerols were oleic (18:1), linoleic (18:2omega6, 18:2Delta5,9), linolenic (pinolenic, 18:3Delta5,9,12 and 18:3omega3) and eicosatrienoic acid (20:3Delta5,11,14 and 20:3omega6). The concentration of linoleic acid comprised 39-46% of the triacylglycerol fatty acids and the concentration was higher in the slow-growing stem from northern Finland than in the stems from southern Finland. Major phospholipids were detected only in sapwood, and only traces of lipid phosphorus were detected in heartwood.

  7. Temperature dependence of needle and shoot elongation before bud break in Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Schiestl-Aalto, Pauliina; Mäkelä, Annikki

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge about the early part of needle growth is deficient compared with what is known about shoot growth. It is however important to understand growth of different organs to be able to estimate the changes in whole tree growth in a changing environment. The onset of growth in spring has been observed to occur over some certain threshold value of momentary temperature or temperature accumulation. We measured the length growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles and shoots from March until bud break over 3 years. We first compared needle growth with concurrent shoot growth. Then, we quantified threshold temperature of growth (i) with a logistic regression based on momentary temperatures and (ii) with the temperature sum accumulation method. Temperature sum was calculated with combinations of various time steps, starting dates and threshold temperature values. Needle elongation began almost concurrently with shoot elongation and proceeded linearly in relation to shoot growth until bud break. When studying the threshold temperature for growth, the method with momentary temperature effect on growth onset yielded ambiguous results in our conditions. The best fit of an exponential regression between needle growth or length and temperature sum was obtained with threshold temperatures -1 to +2 °C, with several combinations of starting date and time step. We conclude that although growth onset is a momentary event the process leading to it is a long-term continuum where past time temperatures have to be accounted for, rather than a sudden switch from quiescence to active growth. Further, our results indicate that lower temperatures than the commonly used +5 °C are sufficient for actuating the growth process. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Autumn temperature and carbon balance of a boreal Scots pine forest in Southern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesala, T.; Launiainen, S.; Kolari, P.; Pumpanen, J.; Sevanto, S.; Hari, P.; Nikinmaa, E.; Kaski, P.; Mannila, H.; Ukkonen, E.; Piao, S. L.; Ciais, P.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the dynamics of carbon balance components: gross primary production (GPP) and total ecosystem respiration (TER), of a boreal Scots pine forest in Southern Finland. The main focus is on investigations of environmental drivers of GPP and TER and how they affect the inter-annual variation in the carbon balance in autumn (September-December). We used standard climate data and CO2 exchange measurements collected by the eddy covariance (EC) technique over 11 years. EC data revealed that increasing autumn temperature significantly enhances TER: the temperature sensitivity was 9.5 gC m-2 °C-1 for the period September-October (early autumn when high radiation levels still occur) and 3.8 gC m-2 °C-1 for November-December (late autumn with suppressed radiation level). The cumulative GPP was practically independent of the temperature in early autumn. In late autumn, air temperature could explain part of the variation in GPP but the temperature sensitivity was very weak, less than 1 gC m-2 °C-1. Two models, a stand photosynthesis model (COCA) and a global vegetation model (ORCHIDEE), were used for estimating stand GPP and its sensitivity to the temperature. The ORCHIDEE model was tested against the observations of GPP derived from EC data. The stand photosynthesis model COCA predicted that under a predescribed 3-6 °C temperature increase, the temperature sensitivity of 4-5 gC m-2 °C-1 in GPP may appear in early autumn. The analysis by the ORCHIDEE model revealed the model sensitivity to the temporal treatment of meteorological forcing. The model predictions were similar to observed ones when the site level 1/2-hourly time step was applied, but the results calculated by using daily meteorological forcing, interpolated to 1/2-hourly time step, were biased. This is due to the nonlinear relationship between the processes and the environmental factors.

  9. Modelling short-term variability in carbon and water exchange in a temperate Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, M. H.; Kruijt, B. J.; Hickler, T.; Kabat, P.

    2015-07-01

    The vegetation-atmosphere carbon and water exchange at one particular site can strongly vary from year to year, and understanding this interannual variability in carbon and water exchange (IAVcw) is a critical factor in projecting future ecosystem changes. However, the mechanisms driving this IAVcw are not well understood. We used data on carbon and water fluxes from a multi-year eddy covariance study (1997-2009) in a Dutch Scots pine forest and forced a process-based ecosystem model (Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator; LPJ-GUESS) with local data to, firstly, test whether the model can explain IAVcw and seasonal carbon and water exchange from direct environmental factors only. Initial model runs showed low correlations with estimated annual gross primary productivity (GPP) and annual actual evapotranspiration (AET), while monthly and daily fluxes showed high correlations. The model underestimated GPP and AET during winter and drought events. Secondly, we adapted the temperature inhibition function of photosynthesis to account for the observation that at this particular site, trees continue to assimilate at very low atmospheric temperatures (up to daily averages of -10 °C), resulting in a net carbon sink in winter. While we were able to improve daily and monthly simulations during winter by lowering the modelled minimum temperature threshold for photosynthesis, this did not increase explained IAVcw at the site. Thirdly, we implemented three alternative hypotheses concerning water uptake by plants in order to test which one best corresponds with the data. In particular, we analyse the effects during the 2003 heatwave. These simulations revealed a strong sensitivity of the modelled fluxes during dry and warm conditions, but no single formulation was consistently superior in reproducing the data for all timescales and the overall model-data match for IAVcw could not be improved. Most probably access to deep soil water leads to higher AET and GPP simulated

  10. Modelling short-term variability in carbon and water exchange in a temperate Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, M. H.; Kruijt, B. J.; Hickler, T.; Kabat, P.

    2015-02-01

    Vegetation - atmosphere carbon and water exchange at one particular site can strongly vary from year to year, and understanding this interannual variability in carbon and water exchange (IAVcw) is a critical factor in projecting future ecosystem changes. However, the mechanisms driving this IAVcw are not well understood. We used data on carbon and water fluxes from a multi-year Eddy Covariance study (1997-2009) in a Dutch Scots pine forest and forced a process-based ecosystem model (LPJ-GUESS) with local data to, firstly, test whether the model can explain IAVcw and seasonal carbon and water exchange from direct environmental factors only. Initial model runs showed low correlations with estimated annual gross primary productivity (GPP) and annual actual evapotranspiration (AET), while monthly and daily fluxes showed high correlations. The model underestimated GPP and AET during winter and drought events. Secondly, we adapted the temperature inhibition function of photosynthesis to account for the observation that at this particular site, trees continue to assimilate at very low atmospheric temperatures (up to daily averages of -10 °C), resulting in a net carbon sink in winter. While we were able to improve daily and monthly simulations during winter by lowering the modelled minimum temperature threshold for photosynthesis, this did not increase explained IAVcw at the site. Thirdly, we implemented three alternative hypotheses concerning water uptake by plants in order to test which one best corresponds with the data. In particular, we analyse the effects during the 2003 heatwave. These simulations revealed a strong sensitivity of the modelled fluxes during dry and warm conditions, but no single formulation was consistently superior in reproducing the data for all time scales and the overall model-data match for IAVcw could not be improved. Most probably access to deep soil water leads to higher AET and GPP simulated during the heat wave of 2003. We conclude that

  11. Genetic variability and heritability of chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Čepl, Jaroslav; Holá, Dana; Stejskal, Jan; Korecký, Jiří; Kočová, Marie; Lhotáková, Zuzana; Tomášková, Ivana; Palovská, Markéta; Rothová, Olga; Whetten, Ross W; Kaňák, Jan; Albrechtová, Jana; Lstibůrek, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Current knowledge of the genetic mechanisms underlying the inheritance of photosynthetic activity in forest trees is generally limited, yet it is essential both for various practical forestry purposes and for better understanding of broader evolutionary mechanisms. In this study, we investigated genetic variation underlying selected chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF) parameters in structured populations of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) grown on two sites under non-stress conditions. These parameters were derived from the OJIP part of the ChlF kinetics curve and characterize individual parts of primary photosynthetic processes associated, for example, with the exciton trapping by light-harvesting antennae, energy utilization in photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers (RCs) and its transfer further down the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. An additive relationship matrix was estimated based on pedigree reconstruction, utilizing a set of highly polymorphic single sequence repeat markers. Variance decomposition was conducted using the animal genetic evaluation mixed-linear model. The majority of ChlF parameters in the analyzed pine populations showed significant additive genetic variation. Statistically significant heritability estimates were obtained for most ChlF indices, with the exception of DI0/RC, φD0 and φP0 (Fv/Fm) parameters. Estimated heritabilities varied around the value of 0.15 with the maximal value of 0.23 in the ET0/RC parameter, which indicates electron-transport flux from QA to QB per PSII RC. No significant correlation was found between these indices and selected growth traits. Moreover, no genotype × environment interaction (G × E) was detected, i.e., no differences in genotypes' performance between sites. The absence of significant G × E in our study is interesting, given the relatively low heritability found for the majority of parameters analyzed. Therefore, we infer that polygenic variability of these indices is

  12. Fast response of Scots pine to improved water availability reflected in tree-ring width and delta 13C.

    PubMed

    Eilmann, Britta; Buchmann, Nina; Siegwolf, Rolf; Saurer, Matthias; Cherubini, Paolo; Rigling, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    Drought-induced forest decline, like the Scots pine mortality in inner-Alpine valleys, will gain in importance as the frequency and severity of drought events are expected to increase. To understand how chronic drought affects tree growth and tree-ring delta(13)C values, we studied mature Scots pine in an irrigation experiment in an inner-Alpine valley. Tree growth and isotope analyses were carried out at the annual and seasonal scale. At the seasonal scale, maximum delta(13)C values were measured after the hottest and driest period of the year, and were associated with decreasing growth rates. Inter-annual delta(13)C values in early- and latewood showed a strong correlation with annual climatic conditions and an immediate decrease as a response to irrigation. This indicates a tight coupling between wood formation and the freshly produced assimilates for trees exposed to chronic drought. This rapid appearance of the isotopic signal is a strong indication for an immediate and direct transfer of newly synthesized assimilates for biomass production. The fast appearance and the distinct isotopic signal suggest a low availability of old stored carbohydrates. If this was a sign for C-storage depletion, an increasing mortality could be expected when stressors increase the need for carbohydrate for defence, repair or regeneration.

  13. Variation and inheritance pattern in cone and seed characteristics of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) for evaluation of genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sevik, Hakan; Topaçoğlu, Osman

    2015-09-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is one of the most common and important forest tree species in Turkey due to usefulness of its wood to many commercial uses. This species is classified as one of the economically important tree species for Turkish Forestry in the "National Tree Breeding and Seed Production Program". The objective of the present study was to investigate variation and inheritance pattern in cone and seed characteristics of Scots pine and to evaluate variation in cone and seed characters within and among clones and grafts. The results showed that maximum CV among the clones was found for SWe (21.95), FS (16.99) and CWe (16.88). According to the results of SAS, variation between the clones is averaged at 19.2% and variation within the clones is averaged at 24.4 %. Variation between the clones ranged from 3.6% (SW) to 34.5% (TC) and variation within the clones ranged from 12.3% (SW) to 38.1% (WL). For CW, AL, AW, WW and TC, genetic variation among clones was higher than within clones. When the results of study like compared with results obtained from natural populations, it was seen that genetic variability in seed orchard which was subjected to study was quite low. This case may have dangerous results for the future of forests.

  14. Seasonal and spatial variability of rainfall redistribution under Scots pine and Downy oak forests in Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Estringana, Pablo; Latron, Jérôme; Molina, Antonio J.; Llorens, Pilar

    2013-04-01

    The large degree of temporal and spatial variability of throughfall input patterns may lead to significant changes in the volume of water that reach the soil in each location, and beyond in the hydrological response of forested hillslopes. To explore the role of vegetation in the temporal and spatial redistribution of rainfall in Mediterranean climatic conditions two contrasted stands were monitored. One is a Downy oak forest (Quercus pubescens) and the other is a Scots pine forest (Pinus sylvestris), both are located in the Vallcebre research catchments (NE Spain, 42° 12'N, 1° 49'E). These plots are representative of Mediterranean mountain areas with spontaneous afforestation by Scots pine as a consequence of the abandonment of agricultural terraces, formerly covered by Downy oaks. The monitoring design of each plot consists of a set of 20 automatic rain recorders and 40 automatic soil moisture probes located below the canopy. 100 hemispheric photographs of the canopy were used to place the instruments at representative locations (in terms of canopy cover) within the plot. Bulk rainfall, stemflow and meteorological conditions above the forest cover are also automatically recorded. Canopy cover as well as biometric characteristics of the plots are also regularly measured. This work presents the first results describing the variability of throughfall beneath each forest stand and compares the persistence of temporal patterns among stands, and for the oaks stand among the leafed and the leafless period. Furthermore, canopy structure, rainfall characteristics and meteorological conditions of rainfall events are evaluated as main drivers of throughfall redistribution.

  15. Dynamic relationship between the VOC emissions from a Scots pine stem and the tree water relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhatalo, Anni; Chan, Tommy; Aalto, Juho; Kolari, Pasi; Rissanen, Kaisa; Hakola, Hannele; Hölttä, Teemu; Bäck, Jaana

    2013-04-01

    The stems of coniferous trees contain huge storages of oleoresin. The composition of oleoresin depends on e.g. tree species, age, provenance, health status, and environmental conditions. Oleoresin is under pressure in the extensive network of resin ducts in wood and needles. It flows out from a mechanically damaged site to protect the tree by sealing the wounded site. Once in contact with air, volatile parts of oleoresin evaporate, and the residual compounds harden to make a solid protective seal over damaged tissues. The hardening time of the resin depends on evaporation rate of the volatiles which in turn depends on temperature. The storage is also toxic to herbivores and attracts predators that restrict the herbivore damage. Despite abundant knowledge on emissions of volatile isoprenoids from foliage, very little is known about their emissions from woody plant parts. We set up an experiment to measure emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes as well as two oxygenated VOCs, methanol and acetone, from a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stem and branches. The measurements were started in early April and continued until mid-June, 2012. Simultaneously, we measured the dynamics of whole stem and xylem diameter changes, stem sap flow rate and foliage transpiration rate. These measurements were used to estimate A) pressure changes inside the living stem tissue and the water conducting xylem, B) the refilling of stem water stores after winter dehydration (the ratio of sap flow at the stem base to water loss by foliage), and C) the increase in tree water transport capacity (the ratio of maximum daily sap flow rate to the diurnal variation in xylem pressure) during spring due to winter embolism refilling and/or the temperature dependent root water uptake capacity. The results show that already very early in spring, significant VOC emissions from pine stem can be detected, and that they exhibit a diurnal cycle similar to that of ambient temperature. During the highest emission

  16. Chemodiversity of a Scots pine stand and implications for terpene air concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäck, J.; Aalto, J.; Henriksson, M.; Hakola, H.; He, Q.; Boy, M.

    2012-02-01

    Atmospheric chemistry in background areas is strongly influenced by natural vegetation. Coniferous forests are known to produce large quantities of volatile vapors, especially terpenes. These compounds are reactive in the atmosphere, and contribute to the formation and growth of atmospheric new particles. Our aim was to analyze the variability of mono- and sesquiterpene emissions between Scots pine trees, in order to clarify the potential errors caused by using emission data obtained from only a few trees in atmospheric chemistry models. We also aimed at testing if stand history and seed origin has an influence on the chemotypic diversity. The inherited, chemotypic variability in mono- and sesquiterpene emission was studied in a seemingly homogeneous 48 yr-old stand in Southern Finland, where two areas differing in their stand regeneration history could be distinguished. Sampling was conducted in August 2009. Terpene concentrations in the air had been measured at the same site for seven years prior to branch sampling for chemotypes. Two main compounds, α-pinene and Δ3-carene formed together 40-97% of the monoterpene proportions in both the branch emissions and in the air concentrations. The data showed a bimodal distribution in emission composition, in particular in Δ3-carene emission within the studied population. 10% of the trees emitted mainly α-pinene and no Δ3-carene at all, whereas 20% of the trees where characterized as high Δ3-carene emitters (Δ3-carene forming >80% of total emitted monoterpene spectrum). An intermediate group of trees emitted equal amounts of both α-pinene and Δ3-carene. The emission pattern of trees at the area established using seeding as the artificial regeneration method differed from the naturally regenerated or planted trees, being mainly high Δ3-carene emitters. Some differences were also seen in e.g. camphene and limonene emissions between chemotypes, but sesquiterpene emissions did not differ significantly between trees

  17. Trait-specific responses of Scots pine to irrigation on a short vs long time scale.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, Linda M; Eilmann, Britta; Buchmann, Nina; Rigling, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    In xeric environments, an increase in drought is related to reduced forest productivity and to enhanced mortality. However, predictions of future forest development remain difficult as the mechanisms underlying the responses of mature trees to long-term variations in water availability are not well understood. Here, we aimed to compare the adjustments in radial growth and morphological needle and shoot traits of mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing along open water channels with those of control trees growing under naturally dry conditions at three sites in Valais, an inner-Alpine dry valley of Switzerland. The trees growing along two channels had been irrigated since germination (>70 years), whereas those along another previously drained channel had been irrigated only from 2010 to 2012, when the channel was re-established, and could thus be used to quantify the short-term effects of re-irrigation. Linear mixed models revealed that needle and shoot lengths as well as early- and late-wood basal area increments (BAIs) were most responsive to short-term and long-term irrigation. However, the magnitude of the response to the short-term irrigation exceeded that of the long-term irrigation. An extreme drought during the first half of 2011 led to an immediate decrease in the needle length, needle width, and early- and late-wood BAIs of the control trees, whereas the shoot length and needle numbers of control trees reacted with a 1-year delay to the extreme drought, as the shoots were responding to water availability of previous year's summer. Such negative responses to dry climatic conditions were even found in irrigated trees at one of our sites, which might be linked to tree growth becoming more sensitive to drought with increasing tree height and leaf area. In order to improve predictions of future forest development, long-term studies are necessary that consider lagged responses and adjustment processes of trees to changes in water availability. © The

  18. Elevated temperature and CO(2) concentration effects on xylem anatomy of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Kilpeläinen, Antti; Gerendiain, Ane Zubizarreta; Luostarinen, Katri; Peltola, Heli; Kellomäki, Seppo

    2007-09-01

    We studied the effects of elevated temperature and carbon dioxide concentration ([CO(2)]) alone and together on wood anatomy of 20-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees. The study was conducted in 16 closed chambers, providing a factorial combination of two temperature regimes and two CO(2) concentrations (ambient and elevated), with four trees in each treatment. The climate scenario included a doubling of [CO(2)] and a corresponding increase of 2-6 degrees C in temperature at the site depending on the season. Anatomical characteristics analyzed were annual earlywood, latewood and ring widths, intra-ring wood densities (earlywood, latewood and mean wood density), tracheid width, length, wall thickness, lumen diameter, wall thickness:lumen diameter ratio and mass per unit length (coarseness), and numbers of rays, resin canals and tracheids per xylem cross-sectional area. Elevated [CO(2)] increased ring width in four of six treatment years; earlywood width increased in the first two years and latewood width in the third year. Tracheid walls in both the earlywood and latewood tended to become thicker over the 6-year treatment period when temperature or [CO(2)] was elevated alone, whereas in the combined treatment they tended to become thinner relative to the tracheids of trees grown under ambient conditions. Latewood tracheid lumen diameters were larger in all the treatments relative to ambient conditions over the 6-year period, whereas lumen diameters in earlywood increased only in response to elevated [CO(2)] and were 3-6% smaller in the treatments with elevated temperature than in ambient conditions. Tracheid width, length and coarseness were greater in trees grown in elevated than in ambient temperature. The number of resin canals per mm(2) decreased in the elevated [CO(2)] treatment and increased in the elevated temperature treatments relative to ambient conditions. The treatments decreased the number of rays and tracheids per mm(2) of cross

  19. Historical changes in lead concentrations in tree-rings of sycamore, oak and Scots pine in north-west England.

    PubMed

    Watmough, Shaun A; Hutchinson, Thomas C

    2002-07-03

    Lead concentrations in tree rings of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.), oak (Quercus robur L.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sampled at a parkland in north-west England were measured in wood formed since the mid-1800s. Concentrations of Pb in Scots pine and oak peaked in wood formed between 1900 and 1940, most likely because of Pb accumulation in heartwood, indicating that oak and Scots pine are unsuitable for monitoring temporal changes in Pb deposition at the study site. In contrast, Pb concentrations in sycamore, a species that has similar heartwood and sapwood chemistry, were relatively constant in wood formed between the mid-1800s and 1950. Lead concentrations decreased steadily in sycamore tree rings formed after the 1950s, and decreased more abruptly in wood formed after 1985. This sharp decrease in wood Pb cannot be due to decreases in soil Pb concentration. Stable Pb isotope analysis was used to further investigate Pb patterns in sycamore wood. Excess 206Pb/207Pb ratios in tree-rings of sycamore were relatively constant, approximately 1.17, in wood formed prior to the 1930s, but decreased steadily thereafter reaching a minimum value of approximately 1.16 in wood formed between 1975 and 1985 after which time 206Pb/207Pb ratios increased. This pattern is consistent with changes in Pb isotope ratios measured in peat, sediment and aerosol samples in the UK. However, the magnitude of the decrease in 206Pb/207Pb (largely due to gasoline Pb) is considerably lower than in other studies and our estimates indicate that less than 20% of the total Pb in sycamore wood measured since the mid-1800s is derived from gasoline emissions. A more likely explanation for the pattern of Pb observed in sycamore tree rings is that soil Pb accumulates within rings of the diffuse porous wood over a number of years. Such uptake patterns would result in lower Pb concentrations in the outer (more recently formed) tree rings, which coincide with recent reductions in Pb deposition

  20. Tree rings of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.) as a source of information about past climate in northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Marcin; Przybylak, Rajmund; Zielski, Andrzej; Pospieszyńska, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) is a very common tree in Polish forests, and therefore was widely used as timber. A relatively large amount of available wood allowed a long-term chronology to be built up and used as a source of information about past climate. The analysis of reconstructed indexed values of mean temperature in 51-year moving intervals allowed the recognition of the coldest periods in the years 1207-1346, 1383-1425, 1455-1482, 1533-1574, 1627-1646, and 1694-1785. The analysis of extreme wide and narrow rings forms a complementary method of examining climatic data within tree rings. The tree ring widths, early wood and late wood widths of 16 samples were assessed during the period 1581-1676. The most apparent effect is noted in the dry summer of 1616. According to previous research and our findings, temperature from February to March seems to be one of the most stable climatic factors which influenced pine growth in Poland. Correlation coefficients in the calibration and validation procedure gave promising results for temperature reconstruction from the pine chronology.

  1. Tree rings of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) as a source of information about past climate in northern Poland.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, Marcin; Przybylak, Rajmund; Zielski, Andrzej; Pospieszyńska, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a very common tree in Polish forests, and therefore was widely used as timber. A relatively large amount of available wood allowed a long-term chronology to be built up and used as a source of information about past climate. The analysis of reconstructed indexed values of mean temperature in 51-year moving intervals allowed the recognition of the coldest periods in the years 1207-1346, 1383-1425, 1455-1482, 1533-1574, 1627-1646, and 1694-1785. The analysis of extreme wide and narrow rings forms a complementary method of examining climatic data within tree rings. The tree ring widths, early wood and late wood widths of 16 samples were assessed during the period 1581-1676. The most apparent effect is noted in the dry summer of 1616. According to previous research and our findings, temperature from February to March seems to be one of the most stable climatic factors which influenced pine growth in Poland. Correlation coefficients in the calibration and validation procedure gave promising results for temperature reconstruction from the pine chronology.

  2. A hydrological tracer study of water uptake depth in a Scots pine forest under two different water regimes.

    PubMed

    Plamboeck, A H; Grip, H; Nygren, U

    1999-05-01

    Little is known about the vertical distribution of water uptake by trees under different water supply regimes, the subject of this study, conducted in a Scots pine stand on sandy loam in northern Sweden. The objective was to determine the water uptake distribution in pines under two different water regimes, desiccation (no precipitation) and irrigation (2 mm day -1 in July and 1 mm day -1 in August), and to relate the uptake to water content, root and soil texture distributions. The natural 18 O gradient in soil water was exploited, in combination with two added tracers, 2 H at 10 cm and 3 H at 20 cm depth. Extraction of xylem sap and water from the soil profile then enabled evaluation of relative water uptake from four different soil depths (humus layer, 0-10, 10-25 and 25-55 cm) in each of two 50-m 2 plots per treatment. In addition, water content, root biomass and soil texture were determined. There were differences in vertical water uptake distribution between treatments. In July, the pines at the irrigated and desiccated plots took up 50% and 30%, respectively, of their water from the upper layers, down to 25 cm depth. In August, the pines on the irrigated plots took up a greater proportion of their water from layers below 25 cm deep than they did in July. In a linear regression, the mean hydraulic conductivity for each mineral soil horizon explained a large part of the variation in relative water uptake. No systematic variation in the residual water uptake correlated to the root distribution. It was therefore concluded that the distribution of water uptake by the pines at Åheden was not a function of root density in the mineral soil, but was largely determined by the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity.

  3. Cambial history of Scots pine trees (Pinus Sylvestris) prior and after the Chernobyl accident as encoded in the xylem.

    PubMed

    Tulik, M

    2001-08-01

    Studies were carried out on wood samples collected in October 1997 from breast height of Scots pine trees (Pinus sylvestris) from site located 5 km south from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. The radioactive contamination at the site was 3.7x10(5) kBq m(-2). These samples of secondary wood were used as an archive of information about the dynamics of a meristematic tissue cambium affected by ionising radiation from the Chernobyl reactor accident. The results show that frequency of the cambial cells events like anticlinal divisions, intrusive growth and cells elimination, was after the Chernobyl accident, about three times higher in comparison to preceding years. The most interesting finding was that after irradiation the length of tracheids increased. This increase is interpreted as an effect of intracambial competition among cells in the initial layer.

  4. Qualitative and quantitative determination of extractives in heartwood of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ekeberg, Dag; Flaete, Per-Otto; Eikenes, Morten; Fongen, Monica; Naess-Andresen, Carl Fredrik

    2006-03-24

    A method for quantitative determination of extractives from heartwood of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) using gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection (FID) was developed. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.03 mg/g wood and the linear range (r = 0.9994) was up to 10 mg/g with accuracy within +/- 10% and precision of 18% relative standard deviation. The identification of the extractives was performed using gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The yields of extraction by Soxhlet were tested for solid wood, small particles and fine powder. Small particles were chosen for further analysis. This treatment gave good yields of the most important extractives: pinosylvin, pinosylvin monomethyl ether, resin acids and free fatty acids. The method is used to demonstrate the variation of these extractives across stems and differences in north-south direction.

  5. Wounding response in xylem of Scots pine seedlings shows wide genetic variation and connection with the constitutive defence of heartwood.

    PubMed

    Harju, Anni M; Venäläinen, Martti; Laakso, Tapio; Saranpää, Pekka

    2009-01-01

    In this greenhouse experiment, 3-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings were wounded by drilling holes through the stem. In the xylem next to the wound, the concentration of resin acids (RAC) increased, and the production of extractives typical for heartwood (stilbenes) and knotwood (stilbenes and lignans) of mature trees was induced. The induced stilbenes were pinosylvin (PS) and pinosylvin monomethyl ether (PSM), and the lignans nortrachelogenin (NTG) and matairesinol (MR). There was positive phenotypic correlation between concentrations of the different extractives. Except for the RAC, the extractive concentrations showed no correlation with the size of the seedlings. The treated seedlings belonged to half-sib families, which enabled the estimation of the genetic parameters for the response variables. The proportion of heritable variation (heritability, h(2)) in the concentration of PS, NTG and MR varied between 0.71 and 1.03, whereas for PSM and RAC the heritability was lower (0.35 and 0.31). Genetic correlation was significant between PS and PSM (r = 0.55, P = 0.018), and between NTG and MR (r = 0.50, P = 0.033). Heritabilities were also estimated on the basis of the regression of the offspring on their mothers h(2)(0P). These estimates were assessed for the concentration of PS, PSM and RAC in the wound response area of the seedlings and correspondingly in the heartwood of their mothers. The heritability was highest for the concentration of PS h(2)(0P). The findings of this study support the suggestion that the wounding of Scots pine seedlings may facilitate the development of an early testing method for breeding heartwood durability.

  6. Influence of canopy traits on spatio-temporal variability of throughfall in Mediterranean Downy oak and Scots pine stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Pilar; Garcia-Estringana, Pablo; Latron, Jérôme; Molina, Antonio J.; Gallart, Francesc

    2014-05-01

    The spatio-temporal variability of throughfall is the result of the interaction of biotic factors, related to the canopy traits, and abiotic factors, linked to the meteorological conditions. This variability may lead to significant differences in the volume of water and solutes that reach the ground in each location, and beyond in the hydrological and biogeochemical dynamics of forest soils. Two forest stands in Mediterranean climatic conditions were studied to analyse the role of biotic and abiotic factors in the temporal and spatial redistribution of throughfall. The monitored stands are a Downy oak forest (Quercus pubescens) and a Scots pine forest (Pinus sylvestris), both located in the Vallcebre research catchments (NE Spain, 42º 12'N, 1º 49'E). The study plots are representative of Mediterranean mountain areas with spontaneous afforestation by Scots pine as a consequence of the abandonment of agricultural terraces, formerly covered by Downy oaks. The monitoring design of each plot consisted of a set of 20 automatic rain recorders and 40 automatic soil moisture probes located below the canopy. 100 hemispheric photographs of the canopy were used to place the instruments at representative locations (in terms of canopy cover) within the plot. Bulk rainfall, stemflow and meteorological conditions above the forest cover were also automatically recorded. Canopy cover as well as biometric characteristics of the plots were also regularly measured. The results indicate a temporal persistence of throughfall in both stands, as observed elsewhere. However, for the oak plot the seasonal evolution of canopy traits added additional variability, with higher variability in summer and different locations of wet and dry spots depending on the season. Furthermore, this work investigates the influence of canopy structure on the spatial variability of throughfall by analysing a large set of forest parameters, from main canopy traits to detailed leaves and wood characteristics

  7. Tree stem diameter variations and transpiration in Scots pine: an analysis using a dynamic sap flow model.

    PubMed

    Perämäki, M; Nikinmaa, E; Sevanto, S; Ilvesniemi, H; Siivola, E; Hari, P; Vesala, T

    2001-08-01

    A dynamic model for simulating water flow in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) tree was developed. The model is based on the cohesion theory and the assumption that fluctuating water tension driven by transpiration, together with the elasticity of wood tissue, causes variations in the diameter of a tree stem and branches. The change in xylem diameter can be linked to water tension in accordance with Hookeâ s law. The model was tested against field measurements of the diurnal xylem diameter change at different heights in a 37-year-old Scots pine at Hyytiälä, southern Finland (61 degrees 51' N, 24 degrees 17' E, 181 m a.s.l.). Shoot transpiration and soil water potential were input data for the model. The biomechanical and hydraulic properties of wood and fine root hydraulic conductance were estimated from simulated and measured stem diameter changes during the course of 1 day. The estimated parameters attained values similar to literature values. The ratios of estimated parameters to literature values ranged from 0.5 to 0.9. The model predictions (stem diameters at several heights) were in close agreement with the measurements for a period of 6 days. The time lag between changes in transpiration rate and in sap flow rate at the base of the tree was about half an hour. The analysis showed that 40% of the resistance between the soil and the top of the tree was located in the rhizosphere. Modeling the water tension gradient and consequent woody diameter changes offer a convenient means of studying the link between wood hydraulic conductivity and control of transpiration.

  8. Contrasting growth forecasts across the geographical range of Scots pine due to altitudinal and latitudinal differences in climatic sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Matías, Luis; Linares, Juan C; Sánchez-Miranda, Ángela; Jump, Alistair S

    2017-10-01

    Ongoing changes in global climate are altering ecological conditions for many species. The consequences of such changes are typically most evident at the edge of a species' geographical distribution, where differences in growth or population dynamics may result in range expansions or contractions. Understanding population responses to different climatic drivers along wide latitudinal and altitudinal gradients is necessary in order to gain a better understanding of plant responses to ongoing increases in global temperature and drought severity. We selected Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) as a model species to explore growth responses to climatic variability (seasonal temperature and precipitation) over the last century through dendrochronological methods. We developed linear models based on age, climate and previous growth to forecast growth trends up to year 2100 using climatic predictions. Populations were located at the treeline across a latitudinal gradient covering the northern, central and southernmost populations and across an altitudinal gradient at the southern edge of the distribution (treeline, medium and lower elevations). Radial growth was maximal at medium altitude and treeline of the southernmost populations. Temperature was the main factor controlling growth variability along the gradients, although the timing and strength of climatic variables affecting growth shifted with latitude and altitude. Predictive models forecast a general increase in Scots pine growth at treeline across the latitudinal distribution, with southern populations increasing growth up to year 2050, when it stabilizes. The highest responsiveness appeared at central latitude, and moderate growth increase is projected at the northern limit. Contrastingly, the model forecasted growth declines at lowland-southern populations, suggesting an upslope range displacement over the coming decades. Our results give insight into the geographical responses of tree species to climate change

  9. Testing phenotypic trade-offs in the chemical defence strategy of Scots pine under growth-limiting field conditions.

    PubMed

    Villari, Caterina; Faccoli, Massimo; Battisti, Andrea; Bonello, Pierluigi; Marini, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    Plants protect themselves from pathogens and herbivores through fine-tuned resource allocation, including trade-offs among resource investments to support constitutive and inducible defences. However, empirical research, especially concerning conifers growing under natural conditions, is still scarce. We investigated the complexity of constitutive and induced defences in a natural Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand under growth-limiting conditions typical of alpine environments. Phenotypic trade-offs at three hierarchical levels were tested by investigating the behaviour of phenolic compounds and terpenoids of outer bark and phloem. We tested resource-derived phenotypic correlations between (i) constitutive and inducible defences vs tree ring growth, (ii) different constitutive defence metabolites and (iii) constitutive concentration and inducible variation of individual metabolites. Tree ring growth was positively correlated only with constitutive concentration of total terpenoids, and no overall phenotypic trade-offs between different constitutive defensive metabolites were found. At the lowest hierarchical level tested, i.e., at the level of relationship between constitutive and inducible variation of individual metabolites, we found that different compounds displayed different behaviours; we identified five different defensive metabolite response types, based on direction and strength of the response, regardless of tree age and growth rate. Therefore, under growth-limiting field conditions, Scots pine appears to utilize varied and complex outer bark and phloem defence chemistry, in which only part of the constitutive specialized metabolism is influenced by tree growth, and individual components do not appear to be expressed in a mutually exclusive manner in either constitutive or inducible metabolism. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Drought-induced defoliation and long periods of near-zero gas exchange play a key role in accentuating metabolic decline of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Poyatos, Rafael; Aguadé, David; Galiano, Lucía; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi

    2013-10-01

    Drought-induced defoliation has recently been associated with the depletion of carbon reserves and increased mortality risk in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). We hypothesize that defoliated individuals are more sensitive to drought, implying that potentially higher gas exchange (per unit of leaf area) during wet periods may not compensate for their reduced photosynthetic area. We measured sap flow, needle water potentials and whole-tree hydraulic conductance to analyse the drought responses of co-occurring defoliated and nondefoliated Scots pines in northeast Spain during typical (2010) and extreme (2011) drought conditions. Defoliated Scots pines showed higher sap flow per unit leaf area during spring, but were more sensitive to summer drought, relative to nondefoliated pines. This pattern was associated with a steeper decline in soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance with drought and an enhanced sensitivity of canopy conductance to soil water availability. Near-homeostasis in midday water potentials was observed across years and defoliation classes, with minimum values of -2.5 MPa. Enhanced sensitivity to drought and prolonged periods of near-zero gas exchange were consistent with low levels of carbohydrate reserves in defoliated trees. Our results support the critical links between defoliation, water and carbon availability, and their key roles in determining tree survival and recovery under drought. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Tree-ring growth of Scots pine, Common beech and Pedunculate oak under future climate in northeastern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurasinski, Gerald; Scharnweber, Tobias; Schröder, Christian; Lennartz, Bernd; Bauwe, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Tree growth depends, among other factors, largely on the prevailing climatic conditions. Therefore, tree growth patterns are to be expected under climate change. Here, we analyze the tree-ring growth response of three major European tree species to projected future climate across a climatic (mostly precipitation) gradient in northeastern Germany. We used monthly data for temperature, precipitation, and the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI) over multiple time scales (1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months) to construct models of tree-ring growth for Scots pine (Pinus syl- vestris L.) at three pure stands, and for Common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) at three mature mixed stands. The regression models were derived using a two-step approach based on partial least squares regression (PLSR) to extract potentially well explaining variables followed by ordinary least squares regression (OLSR) to consolidate the models to the least number of variables while retaining high explanatory power. The stability of the models was tested with a comprehensive calibration-verification scheme. All models were successfully verified with R2s ranging from 0.21 for the western pine stand to 0.62 for the beech stand in the east. For growth prediction, climate data forecasted until 2100 by the regional climate model WETTREG2010 based on the A1B Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) emission scenario was used. For beech and oak, growth rates will likely decrease until the end of the 21st century. For pine, modeled growth trends vary and range from a slight growth increase to a weak decrease in growth rates depending on the position along the climatic gradient. The climatic gradient across the study area will possibly affect the future growth of oak with larger growth reductions towards the drier east. For beech, site-specific adaptations seem to override the influence of the climatic gradient. We conclude that in Northeastern

  12. Diel cycles of isoprenoids in the emissions of Norway spruce, different Scots pine chemotypes, and in Boreal forest ambient air during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, N.; Williams, J.; Song, W.; Vanhatalo, A.; Bäck, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2012-04-01

    Cuvette based emission rates of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes from four chemotypes of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and one chemotype of Norway spruce (Picea abies) as well as the ambient mixing ratios of monoterpenes were determined during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 summer campaign. Differences in chemical composition as well as in emission strength were observed between the different chemotypes. The chemotypes of Scots pine can be classified according to species with high, no and intermediate content of Δ3-carene. The "no- Δ3-carene" chemotype was found to be the strongest emitter of monoterpenes. From this chemotype, β-myrcene, a very reactive organic gas, was the dominant species accounting for more than 35 % of the total emission rates of isoprenoids followed by ß-phellandrene (~34%). Myrcene emission rates ranged from 0.8 up to 24 µg/g (dw)/h. α-farnesene was the dominant sesquiterpene species, with measured average emission rates of 318 ng/g (dw)/h. In the high Δ3-carene chemotype, which is the most studied in Hyytiälä, Δ3-carene was more than 48 % of the total monoterpene emission. The mean Δ3-carene emission rate, circa 609 ng/g (dw)/h reported here is consistent with the previously reported value during the same season. The terpene emission from spruce was dominated by limonene (35%), ß-phellandrene (15%), α-pinene (14 %) and eucalyptol (9%). Total spruce monoterpene emissions ranged from 0.549 up to 12.2 µg/g (dw)/h. Overall the total terpene flux (monoterpenes + sesquiterpenes) from all studied plant species varied from 230 ng/g (dw)/h up to 66 µg/g (dw)/h. The total ambient monoterpenes (including α-pinene, Δ3-carene, ß-pinene and ß-myrcene) measured during the campaign varied in mixing ratio from a few ppt to over one ppb. The most abundant biogenic VOCs measured above the canopy were α-pinene and Δ3-carene and these two compounds together contributed more than 50% of the total monoterpenes. The diel cycles of isoprenoid mixing ratios

  13. CHRONIC IRRADIATION OF SCOTS PINE TREES (PINUS SYLVESTRIS) IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE: DOSIMETRY AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    To identify effects of chronic internal and external radiation exposure for components of terrestrial ecosystems, a comprehensive study of Scots pine trees in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone was performed. The experimental plan included over 1,100 young trees (up to 20 years old) selected from areas with varying levels of radioactive contamination. These pine trees were planted after the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mainly to prevent radionuclide resuspension and soil erosion. For each tree, the major morphological parameters and radioactive contamination values were identified. Cytological analyses were performed for selected trees representing all dose rate ranges. A specially developedmore » dosimetric model capable of taking into account radiation from the incorporated radionuclides in the trees was developed for the apical meristem. The calculated dose rates for the trees in the study varied within three orders of magnitude, from close to background values in the control area (about 5 mGy y{sup -1}) to approximately 7 Gy y{sup -1} in the Red Forest area located in the immediate vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site. Dose rate/effect relationships for morphological changes and cytogenetic defects were identified and correlations for radiation effects occurring on the morphological and cellular level were established.« less

  14. Microfibril angle in wood of Scots pine trees (Pinus sylvestris) after irradiation from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Tulik, Mirela; Rusin, Aleksandra

    2005-03-01

    The secondary cell wall structure of tracheids of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), especially the angle of microfibrils in the S(2) layer, was examined in wood deposited prior to and after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Microscopic analysis was carried out on wood samples collected in October 1997 from breast height of three pine trees 16, 30 and 42 years old. The polluted site was located in a distance of 5 km south from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant where radioactive contamination in 1997 was 3.7 x 10(5) kBq m(-2). Anatomical analysis showed that the structure of the secondary cell wall in tracheids formed after the Chernobyl accident was changed. Changes occurred both in S(2) and S(3) layers. The angle of microfibrils in S(2) layer in wood deposited after the Chernobyl accident was different in comparison to this measured in wood formed prior to the disaster. The intensity of the changes, i.e. alteration of the microfibrils angle in S(2) layer and unusual pattern of the S(3) layer, depended on the age of the tree and was most intensive in a young tree.

  15. Distinct effects of water use efficiency increase on growth in Scots pine and sessile oak in the Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Sancho, Elisabet; Dorado-Liñán, Isabel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Emilia; Matiu, Michael; Heinrich, Ingo; Helle, Gerhard; Menzel, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Drought is one of the main drivers of species distribution in the Mediterranean Basin, which will be exacerbated by climate change. The increase of atmospheric CO2 concentrations (Ca) has been related to enhanced tree growth and intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE). However, in the Mediterranean Basin this 'fertilizing' effect should compensate the potential drought-induced growth reduction to maintain forest productivity at a comparable level. This is particularly relevant for temperate species reaching their southern distribution limits and/or the limits of their climatic niche in this region. We investigated tree growth and physiological responses of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) stands located at their southern distribution limits using annually resolved tree-ring width and δ13C chronologies for the period 1960-2012. The selected stands were sampled in Spain, France, Italy, Slovenia, Bulgaria, and Romania. Wood cores were extracted at each site and tree-ring width and δ13C were measured. Basal area increment (BAI) was calculated as a surrogate of secondary growth and 13C discrimination (Δ), leaf intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) and iWUE were estimated from δ13C values. The temporal trends of BAI, Δ, Ci and iWUE, as well as in climatic variables (i.e. temperature, precipitation and potential evapotranspiration derived from CRU TS3.23 dataset) were calculated per site for the study period. Our specific objectives were (i) to test if rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations and changes in climate may have induced shifts in tree growth and ecophysiological proxies; (ii) to determine whether and how changes in iWUE are related to radial growth rates; and (iii) to assess site-specific physiological adjustments to increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the studied period. Preliminary results showed a generalized increase in Ci, and consequently in iWUE, at all study sites. Scots pine stands displayed a

  16. Impacts of regional climatic fluctuations on radial growth of Siberian and Scots pine at Mukhrino mire (central-western Siberia).

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Guillaume; Guillet, Sébastien; Calliari, Baptiste; Corona, Christophe; Edvardsson, Johannes; Stoffel, Markus; Bragazza, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Ring width (TRW) chronologies from Siberian (Pinus sibirica) and Scots (Pinus sylvestris) pine trees were sampled at Mukhrino - a large mire complex in central-western Siberia - to evaluate the impacts of hydroclimatic variability on tree growth over the last three centuries. For this purpose, we compared climate-growth correlation profiles from trees growing on peat soils with those growing on adjacent mineral soils. Tree growth at both peat and mineral soils was positively correlated to air temperature during the vegetation period. This finding can be explained by (i) the positive influence of temperature on plant physiological processes (i.e. growth control) during the growing season and (ii) the indirect impact of air temperatures on water table fluctuations. We observe also a strong link between TRW and the winter Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), especially in Siberian pine, reflecting the isolating effect of snow and limited freezing damage in roots. Significant negative relations were, by contrast, observed between bog TRW chronologies and hydroclimatic indices during spring and summer; they are considered an expression of the negative impacts of high water levels and moist peat soils on root development. Some unusually old bog pines - exhibiting >500 growth rings - apparently colonized the site at the beginning of the Little Ice Age, and therefore seem to confirm that (i) peat conditions may have been drier in Siberia than in most other regions of western Europe during this period. At the same time, the bog trees also point to (ii) their strong dependence on surface conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Artificial recharge of groundwater through sprinkling infiltration: impacts on forest soil and the nutrient status and growth of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Nöjd, Pekka; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Smolander, Aino; Derome, John; Lumme, Ilari; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko

    2009-05-01

    We studied the chemical changes in forest soil and the effects on Scots pine trees caused by continuous sprinkling infiltration over a period of two years, followed by a recovery period of two years. Infiltration increased the water input onto the forest soil by a factor of approximately 1000. After one year of infiltration, the pH of the organic layer had risen from about 4.0 to 6.7. The NH(4)-N concentration in the organic layer increased, most probably due to the NH(4) ions in the infiltration water, as the net N mineralization rate did not increase. Sprinkling infiltration initiated nitrification in the mineral soil. Macronutrient concentrations generally increased in the organic layer and mineral soil. An exception, however, was the concentration of extractable phosphorus, which decreased strongly during the infiltration period and did not show a recovery within two years. The NO(3)-N and K concentrations had reverted back to their initial level during the two-year recovery period, while the concentrations of Ca, Mg and NH(4)-N were still elevated. Nutrient concentrations in the pine needles increased on the infiltrated plots. However, the needle P concentration increased, despite the decrease in plant-available P in the soil. Despite the increase in the nutrient status, there were some visible signs of chlorosis in the current-year needles after two years of infiltration. The radial growth of the pines more than doubled on the infiltrated plots, which suggests that the very large increase in the water input onto the forest floor had no adverse effect on the functioning of the trees. However, a monitoring period of four years is not sufficient for detecting potential long term detrimental effects on forest trees.

  18. Soil respiration shifts as drought-induced tree substitution advances from Scots pine to Holm oak forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, Josep; Curiel Yuste, Jorge; Poyatos, Rafael; Janssens, Ivan A.; Lloret, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    There is more and more evidences that the current global warming trend and the increase of frequency and intensity of drought events during the last decades in the Northern hemisphere are currently producing an increment of drought-induced forest die-off events, being the Mediterranean region one of the most affected areas. This drought-induced mortality could lead in a vegetation shift with unpredicted consequences in carbon pools, where soils are the most determinant factor in this carbon balance as they contain over two-thirds of carbon on forest ecosystems. There are several uncertainties related on the interaction between soil, environmental conditions and vegetation shifts that could modify their capability to be net carbon sinks or sources in a warming context. We studied soil respiration and its heterotrophic (RH) and autotrophic (Ra) (split in fine roots [Rr] and mycorrhizal respiration [Rs]) components in a mixed Mediterranean forest where Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) are suffering from drought-induced die-off and replaced by Holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) as the dominant tree species. Soil respiration fluxes and its fractions were measured every two weeks during one year at four stages of the substitution process (non defoliated pines [NDP], defoliated pines [DFP], dead pines [DP] and Holm oak [HO]), using the mesh exclusion method. The aims were (i) to describe soil respiration fluxes in a drought-induced secondary successional process, (ii) to test whether the changes in vegetation affected soil respiration fluxes and (iii) to determine the influence of environmental and abiotic variables on the different soil respiration fractions. Total soil respiration was 10.10±6.17 TC ha-1 y-1, RH represented the 67% of the total, Ra represented the 34% of the total, and Rr and Rs were the 22 and 12%, respectively. Significant differences were found in total soil respiration and RH between NDP and HO, being lower in HO than in NDP (34% in total and 48% in RH). No

  19. Above-ground biomass and structure of pristine Siberian Scots pine forests as controlled by competition and fire.

    PubMed

    Wirth, C; Schulze, E-D; Schulze, W; von Stünzner-Karbe, D; Ziegler, W; Miljukova, I M; Sogatchev, A; Varlagin, A B; Panvyorov, M; Grigoriev, S; Kusnetzova, W; Siry, M; Hardes, G; Zimmermann, R; Vygodskaya, N N

    1999-10-01

    The study presents a data set of above-ground biomass (AGB), structure, spacing and fire regime, for 24 stands of pristine Siberian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forests with lichens (n = 20) or Vaccinium/mosses (n = 4) as ground cover, along four chronosequences. The stands of the "lichen" site type (LT) were stratified into three chronosequences according to stand density and fire history. Allometric equations were established from 90 sample trees for stem, coarse branch, fine branch, twig and needle biomass. The LT stands exhibited a low but sustained biomass accumulation until a stand age of 383 years. AGB reached only 6-10 kg dw  m -2 after 200 years depending on stand density and fire history compared to 20 kg dw  m -2 in the "Vaccinium" type (VT) stands. Leaf area index (LAI) in the LT stands remained at 0.5-1.5 and crown cover was 30-60%, whereas LAI reached 2.5 and crown cover was >100% in the VT stands. Although nearest-neighbour analyses suggested the existence of density-dependent mortality, fire impact turned out to have a much stronger effect on density dynamics. Fire scar dating and calculation of mean and initial fire return intervals revealed that within the LT stands differences in structure and biomass were related to the severity of fire regimes, which in turn was related to the degree of landscape fragmentation by wetlands. Self-thinning analysis was used to define the local carrying capacity for biomass. A series of undisturbed LT stands was used to characterise the upper self-thinning boundary. Stands that had experienced a moderate fire regime were positioned well below the self-thinning boundary in a distinct fire-thinning band of reduced major axis regression slope -0.26. We discuss how this downward shift resulted from alternating phases of density reduction by fire and subsequent regrowth. We conclude that biomass in Siberian Scots pine forests is strongly influenced by fire and that climate change will affect ecosystem

  20. Nitrogen fertilizer factory effects on the amino acid and nitrogen content in the needles of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Kupsinskiene, E

    2001-12-04

    The aim of the research was to evaluate the content of amino acids in the needles of Pinus sylvestris growing in the area affected by a nitrogen fertilizer factory and to compare them with other parameters of needles, trees, and sites. Three young-age stands of Scots pine were selected at a distance of 0.5 km, 5 km, and 17 km from the factory. Examination of the current-year needles in winter of the year 2000 revealed significant (p < 0.05) differences between the site at a 0.5-km distance from the factory and the site at a 17-km distance from the factory--with the site closest to the factory showing the highest concentrations of protein (119%), total arginine (166%), total other amino acids (depending on amino acid, the effect ranged between 119 and 149%), free arginine (771%), other free amino acids (glutamic acid, threonine, serine, lysine--depending on amino acid, the effect ranged between 162 and 234%), also the longest needles, widest diameter, largest surface area, and heaviest dry weight (respectively, 133, 110, 136, and 169%). The gradient of nitrogen concentration in the needles was assessed on the selected plots over the period of 1995-2000, with the highest concentration (depending on year, 119 to 153%) documented in the site located 0.5 km from the factory. Significant correlations were determined between the total amino acid contents (r = 0.448 -0.939, p < 0.05), some free amino acid (arginine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, lysine, threonine, and serine) contents (r = 0.418 - 0.975, p < 0.05), and air pollutant concentration at the sites, the distance between the sites and the factory, and characteristics of the needles. No correlation was found between free or total arginine content and defoliation or retention of the needles. In conclusion, it was revealed that elevated mean monthly concentration of ammonia (26 microg m(-3)) near the nitrogen fertilizer factory caused changes in nitrogen metabolism, especially increasing (nearly eight times

  1. Rapid changes in the range limits of Scots pine 4000 years ago

    SciTech Connect

    Gear, A.J.; Huntley, B.

    Paleoecological data provide estimates of response rates to past climate changes. Fossil Pinus sylvestris stumps in far northern Scotland demonstrate former presence of pine trees where conventional pollen evidence of pine forests is lacking. Radiocarbon, dendrochronological, and fine temporal-resolution palynological data show that pine forest were present for about four centuries some 4,000 years ago; the forests expanded and then retreated rapidly some 70 to 80 kilometers. Despite the rapidity of this response to climate change, it occurred at rates slower by an order of magnitude than those necessary to maintain equilibrium with forecast climate changes attributed to the greenhousemore » effect.« less

  2. The history of mercury pollution near the Spolana chlor-alkali plant (Neratovice, Czech Republic) as recorded by Scots pine tree rings and other bioindicators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Navrátil, Tomáš; Šimeček, Martin; Shanley, James B.; Rohovec, Jan; Hojdová, Maria; Houška, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    We assessed > 100 years of mercury (Hg) pollution recorded in the tree rings of Scots Pine near a Czech chlor-alkali plant operating since 1941. Hg concentrations in tree rings increased with the launching of plant operations and decreased when Hg emissions decreased in 1975 due to an upgrade in production technology. Similar to traditional bioindicators of pollution such as pine needles, bark and forest floor humus, Hg concentrations in Scots Pine boles decreased with distance from the plant. Mean Hg in pine bole in the 1940s ranged from 32.5 μg/kg Hg at a distance of 0.5 km from the plant to 5.4 μg/kg at a distance of > 4.7 km, where tree ring Hg was the same as at a reference site, and other bioindicators also suggest that the effect of the plant was no longer discernible. Tree ring Hg concentrations decreased by 8–29 μg/kg since the 1940s at all study sites including the reference site. The lack of exact correspondence between changes at the plant and tree ring Hg indicated some smearing of the signal due to lateral translocation of Hg from sapwood to heartwood. Bole Hg concentrations reflected local and regional atmospheric Hg concentrations, and not Hg wet deposition.

  3. Balancing the risks of hydraulic failure and carbon starvation: a twig scale analysis in declining Scots pine

    PubMed Central

    Torres‐Ruiz, José M.; Poyatos, Rafael; Martinez‐Vilalta, Jordi; Meir, Patrick; Cochard, Hervé; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Understanding physiological processes involved in drought‐induced mortality is important for predicting the future of forests and for modelling the carbon and water cycles. Recent research has highlighted the variable risks of carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in drought‐exposed trees. However, little is known about the specific responses of leaves and supporting twigs, despite their critical role in balancing carbon acquisition and water loss. Comparing healthy (non‐defoliated) and unhealthy (defoliated) Scots pine at the same site, we measured the physiological variables involved in regulating carbon and water resources. Defoliated trees showed different responses to summer drought compared with non‐defoliated trees. Defoliated trees maintained gas exchange while non‐defoliated trees reduced photosynthesis and transpiration during the drought period. At the branch scale, very few differences were observed in non‐structural carbohydrate concentrations between health classes. However, defoliated trees tended to have lower water potentials and smaller hydraulic safety margins. While non‐defoliated trees showed a typical response to drought for an isohydric species, the physiology appears to be driven in defoliated trees by the need to maintain carbon resources in twigs. These responses put defoliated trees at higher risk of branch hydraulic failure and help explain the interaction between carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in dying trees. PMID:25997464

  4. Resolving the smell of wood - identification of odour-active compounds in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Linda; Bauer, Patrick; Buettner, Andrea

    2018-05-29

    Being one of the most common trees in forests, Pinus sylvestris L. is a frequently used raw material for wood products. Its specific odour is, however, mostly unresolved to date. Accordingly, we investigated Scots pine wood samples grown in Germany for their main odorant composition. We employed dedicated odorant analysis techniques such as gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) and successfully detected 44 odour-active compounds; of these, 39 substances were successfully identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O) and two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry (2D-GC-MS/O). Among the main odorants found were (E,E)-nona-2,4-dienal, vanillin, phenylacetic acid, 3-phenylpropanoic acid, δ-octalactone and α-pinene, all of them having been detected with high flavour dilution factors during GC-O analyses. The majority of the identified odorants were fatty acid degradation products, plus some terpenoic substances and odorous substances resulting from the degradation of lignin. Although some of the detected substances have previously been reported as constituents of wood, 11 substances are reported here for the first time as odour-active compounds in wood, amongst them heptanoic acid, γ-octalactone, δ-nonalactone and (E,Z,Z)-trideca-2,4,7-trienal.

  5. Needle and stem wood production in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) trees of different age, size and competitive status.

    PubMed

    Vanninen, Petteri; Mäkelä, Annikki

    2000-04-01

    We studied effects of tree age, size and competitive status on foliage and stem production of 43 Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees in southern Finland. The tree attributes related to competition included foliage density, crown ratio and height/diameter ratio. Needle mass was considered to be the primary cause of growth through photosynthesis. Both stem growth and foliage growth were strongly correlated with foliage mass. Consequently, differences in growth allocation between needles and stem wood in trees of different age, size, or position were small. However, increasing relative height increased the sum of stem growth and foliage growth per unit foliage mass, indicating an effect of available light. Suppressed trees seemed to allocate more growth to stem wood than dominant trees, and their stem growth per unit foliage mass was larger. Similarly, trees in dense stands allocated more growth to stem wood than trees in sparse stands. The results conformed to the pipe model theory but seemed to contradict the priority principle of allocation.

  6. Adaptive potential of northernmost tree populations to climate change, with emphasis on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Savolainen, Outi; Kujala, Sonja T; Sokol, Catherina; Pyhäjärvi, Tanja; Avia, Komlan; Knürr, Timo; Kärkkäinen, Katri; Hicks, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    The adaptive potential of the northernmost Pinus sylvestris L. (and other northern tree) populations is considered by examining first the current patterns of quantitative genetic adaptive traits, which show high population differentiation and clines. We then consider the postglacial history of the populations using both paleobiological and genetic data. The current patterns of diversity at nuclear genes suggest that the traces of admixture are mostly visible in mitochondrial DNA variation patterns. There is little evidence of increased diversity due to admixture between an eastern and western colonization lineage, but no signal of reduced diversity (due to sequential bottlenecks) either. Quantitative trait variation in the north is not associated with the colonizing lineages. The current clines arose rapidly and may be based on standing genetic variation. The initial phenotypic response of Scots pine in the north is predicted to be increased survival and growth. The genetic responses are examined based on quantitative genetic predictions of sustained selection response and compared with earlier simulation results that have aimed at more ecological realism. The phenotypic responses of increased growth and survival reduce the opportunity for selection and delay the evolutionary responses. The lengthening of the thermal growing period also causes selection on the critical photoperiod in the different populations. Future studies should aim at including multiple ecological and genetic factors in evaluating potential responses.

  7. Actinobacteria possessing antimicrobial and antioxidant activities isolated from the pollen of scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) grown on the Baikal shore.

    PubMed

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V; Voytsekhovskaya, Irina V; Rebets, Yuriy V; Tokovenko, Bogdan T; Penzina, Tatyana A; Gornostay, Tatyana G; Adelshin, Renat V; Protasov, Eugenii S; Luzhetskyy, Andriy N; Timofeyev, Maxim A

    2016-10-01

    Isolated ecosystems existing under specific environmental conditions have been shown to be promising sources of new strains of actinobacteria. The taiga forest of Baikal Siberia has not been well studied, and its actinobacterial population remains uncharacterized. The proximity between the huge water mass of Lake Baikal and high mountain ranges influences the structure and diversity of the plant world in Siberia. Here, we report the isolation of eighteen actinobacterial strains from male cones of Scots pine trees (Pinus sylvestris) growing on the shore of the ancient Lake Baikal in Siberia. In addition to more common representative strains of Streptomyces, several species belonging to the genera Rhodococcus, Amycolatopsis, and Micromonospora were isolated. All isolated strains exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities. We identified several strains that inhibited the growth of the pathogen Candida albicans but did not hinder the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several isolates were active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The high proportion of biologically active strains producing antibacterial and specific antifungal compounds may reflect their role in protecting pollen against phytopathogens.

  8. Increase of apatite dissolution rate by Scots pine roots associated or not with Burkholderia glathei PML1(12)Rp in open-system flow microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvaruso, Christophe; Turpault, Marie-Pierre; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Uroz, Stéphane; Pierret, Marie-Claire; Tosheva, Zornitza; Kies, Antoine

    2013-04-01

    The release of nutritive elements through apatite dissolution represents the main source of phosphorus, calcium, and several micronutrients (e.g., Zn, Cu) for organisms in non-fertilized forest ecosystems. The aim of this study was to quantify, for the first time, the dissolution rate of apatite grains by tree roots that were or were not associated with a mineral weathering bacterial strain, and by various acids known to be produced by tree roots and soil bacterial strains in open-system flow microcosms. In addition, we explored whether the mobilization of trace elements (including rare earth elements) upon apatite dissolution was affected by the presence of trees and associated microorganisms. The dissolution rate of apatite by Scots pine plants that were or were not inoculated with the strain Burkholderia glathei PML1(12)Rp, and by inorganic (nitric) and organic (citric, oxalic and gluconic) acids at pH 5.5, 4.8, 3.8, 3.5, 3.0, and 2.0 was monitored in two controlled experiments: "plant-bacteria interaction" and "inorganic and organic acids". Analyses of the outlet solutions in the "plant-bacteria interaction" experiment showed that Scots pine roots and B. glathei PML1(12)Rp produced protons and organic acids such as gluconate, oxalate, acetate, and lactate. The weathering budget calculation revealed that Scots pines (with or without PML1(12)Rp) significantly increased (factor > 10) the release of Ca, P, As, Sr, Zn, U, Y, and rare earth elements such as Ce, La, Nd from apatite, compared to control abiotic treatment. Scanning electron microscopy observation confirmed traces of apatite dissolution in contact of roots. Most dissolved elements were taken up by Scots pine roots, i.e., approximately 50% of Ca, 70% of P, 30% of As, 70% of Sr, 90% of Zn, and 100% of U, Y, and rare earth elements. Interestingly, no significant additional effect due to the bacterial strain PML1(12)Rp on apatite dissolution and Scots pine nutrition and growth was observed. The "inorganic

  9. Levels of selected trace elements in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), silver birch (Betula pendula L.), and Norway maple (Acer platanoides L.) in an urbanized environment.

    PubMed

    Kosiorek, Milena; Modrzewska, Beata; Wyszkowski, Mirosław

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the concentrations of selected trace elements in needles and bark of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), leaves and bark of silver birch (Betula pendula L.), and Norway maple (Acer platanoides L.), as well as in the soil in which the trees grew, depending on their localization and hence the distribution of local pollution sources. The content of trace elements in needles of Scots pine, leaves of silver birch, and Norway maple and in bark of these trees depended on the location, tree species, and analyzed organ. The content of Fe, Mn, and Zn in needles, leaves, and bark of the examined tree species was significantly higher than that of the other elements. The highest average content of Fe and Mn was detected in leaves of Norway maple whereas the highest average content of Zn was found in silver birch leaves. The impact of such locations as the center of Olsztyn or roadside along Road 51 on the content of individual elements tended to be more pronounced than the influence of the other locations. The influence of the sampling sites on the content of trace elements in tree bark was less regular than the analogous effect in needles and leaves. Moreover, the relevant dependences were slightly different for Scots pine than for the other two tree species. The concentrations of heavy metals determined in the soil samples did not exceed the threshold values set in the Regulation of the Minister for the Environment, although the soil along Road 51 and in the center of Olsztyn typically had the highest content of these elements. There were also significant correlations between the content of some trace elements in soil and their accumulation in needles, leaves, and bark of trees.

  10. Glacial vicariance in Eurasia: mitochondrial DNA evidence from Scots pine for a complex heritage involving genetically distinct refugia at mid-northern latitudes and in Asia Minor

    PubMed Central

    Naydenov, Krassimir; Senneville, Sauphie; Beaulieu, Jean; Tremblay, Francine; Bousquet, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Background At the last glacial maximum, Fennoscandia was covered by an ice sheet while the tundra occupied most of the rest of northern Eurasia. More or less disjunct refugial populations of plants were dispersed in southern Europe, often trapped between mountain ranges and seas. Genetic and paleobotanical evidences indicate that these populations have contributed much to Holocene recolonization of more northern latitudes. Less supportive evidence has been found for the existence of glacial populations located closer to the ice margin. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is a nordic conifer with a wide natural range covering much of Eurasia. Fractures in its extant genetic structure might be indicative of glacial vicariance and how different refugia contributed to the current distribution at the continental level. The population structure of Scots pine was investigated on much of its Eurasian natural range using maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms. Results A novel polymorphic region of the Scots pine mitochondrial genome has been identified, the intron 1 of nad7, with three variants caused by insertions-deletions. From 986 trees distributed among 54 populations, four distinct multi-locus mitochondrial haplotypes (mitotypes) were detected based on the three nad7 intron 1 haplotypes and two previously reported size variants for nad1 intron B/C. Population differentiation was high (GST = 0.657) and the distribution of the mitotypes was geographically highly structured, suggesting at least four genetically distinct ancestral lineages. A cosmopolitan lineage was widely distributed in much of Europe throughout eastern Asia. A previously reported lineage limited to the Iberian Peninsula was confirmed. A new geographically restricted lineage was found confined to Asia Minor. A new lineage was restricted to more northern latitudes in northeastern Europe and the Baltic region. Conclusion The contribution of the various ancestral lineages to the current

  11. Cadmium-Induced Changes in Antioxidative Systems, Hydrogen Peroxide Content, and Differentiation in Scots Pine Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Schützendübel, Andres; Schwanz, Peter; Teichmann, Thomas; Gross, Kristina; Langenfeld-Heyser, Rosemarie; Godbold, Douglas L.; Polle, Andrea

    2001-01-01

    To investigate whether Cd induces common plant defense pathways or unspecific necrosis, the temporal sequence of physiological reactions, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, changes in ascorbate-glutathione-related antioxidant systems, secondary metabolism (peroxidases, phenolics, and lignification), and developmental changes, was characterized in roots of hydroponically grown Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) seedlings. Cd (50 μm, 6 h) initially increased superoxide dismutase, inhibited the systems involved in H2O2 removal (glutathione/glutathione reductase, catalase [CAT], and ascorbate peroxidase [APX]), and caused H2O2 accumulation. Elongation of the roots was completely inhibited within 12 h. After 24 h, glutathione reductase activities recovered to control levels; APX and CAT were stimulated by factors of 5.5 and 1.5. Cell death was increased. After 48 h, nonspecific peroxidases and lignification were increased, and APX and CAT activities were decreased. Histochemical analysis showed that soluble phenolics accumulated in the cytosol of Cd-treated roots but lignification was confined to newly formed protoxylem elements, which were found in the region of the root tip that normally constitutes the elongation zone. Roots exposed to 5 μm Cd showed less pronounced responses and only a small decrease in the elongation rate. These results suggest that in cells challenged by Cd at concentrations exceeding the detoxification capacity, H2O2 accumulated because of an imbalance of redox systems. This, in turn, may have triggered the developmental program leading to xylogenesis. In conclusion, Cd did not cause necrotic injury in root tips but appeared to expedite differentiation, thus leading to accelerated aging. PMID:11706171

  12. Persisting soil drought reduces leaf specific conductivity in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens).

    PubMed

    Sterck, Frank J; Zweifel, Roman; Sass-Klaassen, Ute; Chowdhury, Qumruzzaman

    2008-04-01

    Leaf specific conductivity (LSC; the ratio of stem conductivity (K(P)) to leaf area (A(L))), a measure of the hydraulic capacity of the stem to supply leaves with water, varies with soil water content. Empirical evidence for LSC responses to drought is ambiguous, because previously published results were subject to many confounding factors. We tested how LSC of similar-sized trees of the same population, under similar climatic conditions, responds to persistently wet or dry soil. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) trees were compared between a dry site and a wet site in the Valais, an inner alpine valley in Switzerland. Soil water strongly influenced A(L) and K(P) and the plant components affecting K(P), such as conduit radius, conduit density and functional sapwood area. Trees at the dry site had lower LSC than trees with the same stem diameter at the wet site. Low LSC in trees at the dry site was associated with a smaller functional sapwood area and narrower conduits, resulting in a stronger reduction in K(P) than in A(L). These observations support the hypothesis that trees maintain a homeostatic water pressure gradient. An alternative hypothesis is that relatively high investments in leaves compared with sapwood contribute to carbon gain over an entire season by enabling rapid whole-plant photosynthesis during periods of high water availability (e.g., in spring, after rain events and during morning hours when leaf-to-air vapor pressure deficit is small). Dynamic data and a hydraulic plant growth model are needed to test how investments in leaves versus sapwood and roots contribute to transpiration and to maximizing carbon gain throughout entire growth seasons.

  13. Branch age and light conditions determine leaf-area-specific conductivity in current shoots of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Grönlund, Leila; Hölttä, Teemu; Mäkelä, Annikki

    2016-08-01

    Shoot size and other shoot properties more or less follow the availability of light, but there is also evidence that the topological position in a tree crown has an influence on shoot development. Whether the hydraulic properties of new shoots are more regulated by the light or the position affects the shoot acclimation to changing light conditions and thereby to changing evaporative demand. We investigated the leaf-area-specific conductivity (and its components sapwood-specific conductivity and Huber value) of the current-year shoots of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in relation to light environment and topological position in three different tree classes. The light environment was quantified in terms of simulated transpiration and the topological position was quantified by parent branch age. Sample shoot measurements included length, basal and tip diameter, hydraulic conductivity of the shoot, tracheid area and density, and specific leaf area. In our results, the leaf-area-specific conductivity of new shoots declined with parent branch age and increased with simulated transpiration rate of the shoot. The relation to transpiration demand seemed more decisive, since it gave higher R(2) values than branch age and explained the differences between the tree classes. The trend of leaf-area-specific conductivity with simulated transpiration was closely related to Huber value, whereas the trend of leaf-area-specific conductivity with parent branch age was related to a similar trend in sapwood-specific conductivity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Biotic and abiotic factors affecting stemflow variability in downy oak and Scots pine stands in Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayuela, Carles; Garcia-Estringana, Pablo; Latron, Jérôme; Llorens, Pilar

    2015-04-01

    Although stemflow is only a small portion of rainfall, it may represent an important local input of water and nutrients at the plant stem. Previous studies have shown that stemflow has a significant influence on hydrological and biogeochemical processes. Stemflow volume is affected by many biotic factors as species, age, branch or bark characteristics. Moreover, the seasonality of the rainfall regime in Mediterranean areas, which includes both frontal rainfall events and short convective storms, can add complexity to the rainfall-stemflow relationship. This work investigates stemflow dynamics and the influence of biotic and abiotic factors on stemflow rates in two Mediterranean stands during the leafed period - from May to October. The monitored stands are a Downy oak forest (Quercus pubescens) and a Scots pine forest (Pinus sylvestris), both located in the Vallcebre research catchments (NE Spain, 42° 12'N, 1° 49'E). The monitoring design of each plot consists of 7 stemflow rings connected to tipping-buckets, bulk rainfall measured in a nearby clearing and meteorological conditions above the canopies. All data were recorded at 5 min interval. Biometric characteristics of the measured trees were also measured. The analysis of 39 rainfall events (65% smaller than 10 mm) shows that stemflow accounted for less than 1% of the bulk rainfall in both stands. Results also show that, on average, the rainfall amount required for the start of the stemflow and the time delay between the beginning of the precipitation and the start of stemflow are higher in the Downy oak forest. As suggested by stemflow funneling ratios, these differences might be linked to the canopy structure and bark water storage capacity of the trees, indicating that during low magnitude events, oaks have more difficulty to reach storage capacity. The role of other biotic and abiotic parameters on stemflow variability in both stands is still under investigation.

  15. Processes, dynamics and modelling of radiocaesium cycling in a chronosequence of Chernobyl-contaminated Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) plantations.

    PubMed

    Goor, François; Thiry, Yves

    2004-06-05

    In a large forested area affected by the Chernobyl radioactive fallout, especially in CIS, the lasting recycling of radiocaesium (137Cs) by the trees is a source of long-term contamination of woody products. The quantitative description of the 137Cs dynamics in contaminated forest is a prerequisite to predictive modelling and further management of such territories. Three even-aged mono-specific Scots pine stands (17, 37 and 57 years old) were selected in a contaminated woodland in southeastern Belarus to constitute an adequate chronosequence. We determined the potassium and radiocaesium annual fluxes involved in the biological cycling in each stand using a well-documented calculation methodology. Qualitatively, 137Cs was shown to be rapidly recycled in trees through the same pathways as K and to redistribute similarly between the tree components. Compared to K, a higher fraction of 137Cs, corresponding to about the half of the annual uptake, is immobilised in perennial organs. With tree development, trunk wood and bark become prevailing sinks for 137Cs since they represent an increasing pool of biomass. In the pine chronosequence, the current root absorption, respectively, mobilizes 0.53, 0.32 and 0.31% year(-1) of the total 137Cs pool in soil. Variations in the 137Cs uptake do not reflect differences in the 137Cs balance between stands. In the two older stands, 51 and 71% of the current tree contamination are related to earlier accumulation subsequent to the initial fallout interception and recycling. The soil is the dominant source of long-term tree contamination. A simple modelling based on the measured 137Cs fluxes indicates that, for young stands, radioactive decay-corrected contamination would stabilize after reaching a maximum of 25 years after the 137Cs deposition. Stemwood presents a maximum of 15 years after the deposition and decrease afterwards mainly through radioactive decay. In the older stands, the decontamination is constant without local maximum

  16. Changes in the essential oil composition in the needles of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) under anthropogenic stress.

    PubMed

    Judzentiene, Asta; Stikliene, Aida; Kupcinskiene, Eugenija

    2007-03-21

    Unfavorable anthropogenic factors, such as air pollution, lead to biochemical responses in trees. Changes in the amounts of secondary metabolites may be early indicators of invisible injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate composition of the essential oils in the needles of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in the areas affected by pollutant emissions of main factories in Lithuania: a nitrogen fertilizer factory (NFF), a cement factory (CF), and an oil refinery (OR). Totally, 14 pine stands were examined along transects from the factories (July 2005). Volatile components of the needles were extracted and analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Over 70 components of the essential oils were identified in current-year and 1-year-old needles. Along the CF transect for current-year needles, the percentage of diterpenes was decreasing with the increasing pH of the pine bark (r = -0.582; p < 0.05) or with the increasing concentration of SO2 (r = -0.573; p < 0.05); for 1-year-old needles, the percentage of diterpenes was decreasing with the increasing pH of the bark (r = -0.534; p < 0.05). Along the OR transect, in both the current-year and 1-year-old needles, the percentage of diterpenes was decreasing with the increasing SO2 (respectively, r = -0.773; p < 0.01; r = -0.486; p < 0.05); an opposite relation was true for sesquiterpenes (respectively, r = -0.751; p < 0.01; r = 0.785; p < 0.01). The view was different along the NFF transect. For current-year needles, the percentage of monoterpenes was decreasing with the increasing NH3 (r = -0.669; p < 0.01); while the percentage of sesquiterpenes or oxysesquiterpenes was increasing with the increasing NH3 (respectively, r = 0.540; p < 0.05 and r = 0.688; p < 0.01). For each transect, cluster analysis of the percentages of components of essential oils in the needles allowed us to distinguish the most contrasting stands according to the concentration of air pollutants. Current-year needles were more effective as indicators of

  17. Plasticity in gas-exchange physiology of mature Scots pine and European larch drive short- and long-term adjustments to changes in water availability.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, Linda M; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Gessler, Arthur; Buchmann, Nina; Lévesque, Mathieu; Rigling, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Adjustment mechanisms of trees to changes in soil-water availability over long periods are poorly understood, but crucial to improve estimates of forest development in a changing climate. We compared mature trees of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and European larch (Larix decidua) growing along water-permeable channels (irrigated) and under natural conditions (control) at three sites in inner-Alpine dry valleys. At two sites, the irrigation had been stopped in the 1980s. We combined measurements of basal area increment (BAI), tree height and gas-exchange physiology (Δ 13 C) for the period 1970-2009. At one site, the Δ 13 C of irrigated pine trees was higher than that of the control in all years, while at the other sites, it differed in pine and larch only in years with dry climatic conditions. During the first decade after the sudden change in water availability, the BAI and Δ 13 C of originally irrigated pine and larch trees decreased instantly, but subsequently reached higher levels than those of the control by 2009 (15 years afterwards). We found a high plasticity in the gas-exchange physiology of pine and larch and site-specific responses to changes in water availability. Our study highlights the ability of trees to adjust to new conditions, thus showing high resilience. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effects of male fecundity, interindividual distance and anisotropic pollen dispersal on mating success in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) seed orchard

    PubMed Central

    Torimaru, T; Wennström, U; Lindgren, D; Wang, X-R

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying the effect of pollen dispersal and flowering traits on mating success is essential for understanding evolutionary responses to changing environments and establishing strategies for forest tree breeding. This study examined, quantitatively, the effects of male fecundity, interindividual distance and anisotropic pollen dispersal on the mating success of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), utilizing a well-mapped Scots pine seed orchard. Paternity analysis of 1021 seeds sampled from 87 trees representing 28 clones showed that 53% of the seeds had at least one potential pollen parent within the orchard. Pronounced variation in paternal contribution was observed among clones. Variations in pollen production explained up to 78% of the variation in mating success, which was 11.2 times greater for clones producing the largest amount of pollen than for clones producing the least pollen. Mating success also varied with intertree distance and direction, which explained up to 28% of the variance. Fertilization between neighboring trees 2.3 m apart was 2.4 times more frequent than between trees 4.6 m apart, and up to 12.4 times higher for trees downwind of the presumed prevailing wind direction than for upwind trees. The effective number of pollen donors recorded in the seed orchard (12.2) was smaller than the theoretical expectation (19.7). Based on the empirical observations, a mating model that best describes the gene dispersal pattern in clonal seed orchards was constructed. PMID:21897440

  19. A UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopic study on the extractable compounds in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) wood. Part II. Hydrophilic compounds.

    PubMed

    Nuopponen, M; Willför, S; Jääskeläinen, A-S; Vuorinen, T

    2004-11-01

    Hydrophilic extracts of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) heartwood and sapwood and a solid Scots pine knotwood sample were studied by UV resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS). In addition, UVRR spectra of two hydrophilic model compounds (pinosylvin and chrysin) were analysed. UV Raman spectra were collected using 244 and 257 nm excitation wavelengths. The chemical composition of the acetone:water (95:5 v/v) extracts were also determined by gas chromatography. The aromatic and oleophilic structures of pinosylvin and chrysin showed three intense resonance enhanced bands in the spectral region of 1649-1548 cm(-1). Pinosylvin showed also a relatively intense band in the aromatic substitution region at 996 cm(-1). The spectra of the heartwood acetone:water extract showed many bands typical of pinosylvin. In addition, the extract included bands distinctive for resin and fatty acids. The sapwood acetone:water extract showed bands due to oleophilic structures at 1655-1650 cm(-1). The extract probably also contained oligomeric lignans because the UVRR spectra were in parts similar to that of guaiacyl lignin. The characteristic band of pinosylvin (996 cm(-1)) was detected in the UVRR spectrum of the resin rich knotwood. In addition, several other bands typical for wood resin were observed, which indicated that the wood resin in the knotwood was resonance enhanced even more than lignin.

  20. A UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopic study on the extractable compounds in Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) wood . Part II. Hydrophilic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuopponen, M.; Willför, S.; Jääskeläinen, A.-S.; Vuorinen, T.

    2004-11-01

    Hydrophilic extracts of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) heartwood and sapwood and a solid Scots pine knotwood sample were studied by UV resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS). In addition, UVRR spectra of two hydrophilic model compounds (pinosylvin and chrysin) were analysed. UV Raman spectra were collected using 244 and 257 nm excitation wavelengths. The chemical composition of the acetone:water (95:5 v/v) extracts were also determined by gas chromatography. The aromatic and oleophilic structures of pinosylvin and chrysin showed three intense resonance enhanced bands in the spectral region of 1649-1548 cm -1. Pinosylvin showed also a relatively intense band in the aromatic substitution region at 996 cm -1. The spectra of the heartwood acetone:water extract showed many bands typical of pinosylvin. In addition, the extract included bands distinctive for resin and fatty acids. The sapwood acetone:water extract showed bands due to oleophilic structures at 1655-1650 cm -1. The extract probably also contained oligomeric lignans because the UVRR spectra were in parts similar to that of guaiacyl lignin. The characteristic band of pinosylvin (996 cm -1) was detected in the UVRR spectrum of the resin rich knotwood. In addition, several other bands typical for wood resin were observed, which indicated that the wood resin in the knotwood was resonance enhanced even more than lignin.

  1. The HartX-synthesis: An experimental approach to water and carbon exchange of a Scots pine plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhofer, Ch.; Gay, L. W.; Granier, A.; Joss, U.; Kessler, A.; Köstner, B.; Siegwolf, R.; Tenhunen, J. D.; Vogt, R.

    1996-03-01

    In May 1992 during the interdisciplinary measurement campaign HartX (Hartheim eXperiment), several independent estimates of stand water vapor flux were compared at a 12-m high Scots pine ( Pinus silvestris) plantation on a flat fluvial terrace of the Rhine close to Freiburg, Germany. Weather during the HartX period was characterized by ten consecutive clear days with exceptionally high input of available energy for this time of year and with a slowly shifting diurnal pattern in atmospheric variables like vapor pressure deficit. Methods utilized to quantify components of stand water flux included porometry measurements on understory graminoid leaves and on pine needles and three different techniques for determining individual tree xylem sap flow. Micrometeorological methods included eddy covariance and eddy covariance energy balance techniques with six independent systems on two towers separated by 40 m. Additionally, Bowen ratio energy balance estimates of water flux were conducted and measurements of the gradients in water vapor, CO2, and trace gases within and above the stand were carried out with an additional, portable 30 m high telescoping mast. Biologically-based estimates of overstory transpiration were obtained by up-scaling tree sap flow rates to stand level via cumulative sapwood area. Tree transpiration contributed between 2.2 and 2.6 mm/day to ET for a tree leaf area index (LAI) of 2.8. The pine stand had an understory dominated by sedge and grass species with overall average LAI of 1.5. Mechanistic canopy gas exchange models that quantify both water vapor and CO2 exchange were applied to both understory and tree needle ecosystem compartments. Thus, the transpiration by graminoid species was estimated at approximately 20% of total stand ET. The modelled estimates for understory contribution to stand water flux compared well with micrometeorologically-based determinations. Maximum carbon gain was estimated from the canopy models at approximately 425 mmol

  2. Influence of wind-induced air pressure fluctuations on topsoil gas concentrations within a Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Manuel; Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Schindler, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    Commonly it is assumed that soil gas transport is dominated by molecular diffusion. Few recent studies indicate that the atmosphere above the soil triggers non-diffusive gas transport processes in the soil, which can enhance soil gas transport and therefore soil gas efflux significantly. During high wind speed conditions, the so called pressure pumping effect has been observed: the enhancement of soil gas transport through dynamic changes in the air pressure field above the soil. However, the amplitudes and frequencies of the air pressure fluctuations responsible for pressure pumping are still uncertain. Moreover, an in situ observation of the pressure pumping effect is still missing. To investigate the pressure pumping effect, airflow measurements above and below the canopy of a Scots pine forest and high-precision relative air pressure measurements were conducted in the below-canopy space and in the soil over a measurement period of 16 weeks. To monitor the soil gas transport, a newly developed gas measurement system was used. The gas measurement system continuously injects helium as a tracer gas into the soil until a diffusive steady state is reached. With the steady state concentration profile of the tracer gas, it is possible to inversely model the gas diffusion coefficient profile of the soil. If the gas diffusion coefficient profile differed from steady state, we deduced that the soil gas transport is not only diffusive, but also influenced by non-diffusive processes. Results show that the occurrence of small air pressure fluctuations is strongly dependent on the mean above-canopy wind speed. The wind-induced air pressure fluctuations have mean amplitudes up to 10 Pa and lie in the frequency range 0.01-0.1 Hz. To describe the pumping motion of the air pressure field, the pressure pumping coefficient (PPC) was defined as the mean change in pressure per second. The PPC shows a clear quadratic dependence on mean above-canopy wind speed. Empirical modelling of

  3. Effect of raw humus under two adult Scots pine stands on ectomycorrhization, nutritional status, nitrogen uptake, phosphorus uptake and growth of Pinus sylvestris seedlings.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Horst; Schäfer, Tina; Storbeck, Veronika; Härtling, Sigrid; Rudloff, Renate; Köck, Margret; Buscot, François

    2012-01-01

    Ectomycorrhiza (EM) formation improves tree growth and nutrient acquisition, particularly that of nitrogen (N). Few studies have coupled the effects of naturally occurring EM morphotypes to the nutrition of host trees. To investigate this, pine seedlings were grown on raw humus substrates collected at two forest sites, R2 and R3. Ectomycorrhiza morphotypes were identified, and their respective N uptake rates from organic (2-(13)C, (15)N-glycine) and inorganic ((15)NH(4)Cl, Na(15)NO(3), (15)NH(4)NO(3), NH(4)(15)NO(3)) sources as well as their phosphate uptake rates were determined. Subsequently, the growth and nutritional status of the seedlings were analyzed. Two dominant EM morphotypes displayed significantly different mycorrhization rates in the two substrates. Rhizopogon luteolus Fr. (RL) was dominant in R2 and Suillus bovinus (Pers.) Kuntze (SB) was dominant in R3. (15)N uptake of RL EM was at all times higher than that of SB EM. Phosphate uptake rates by the EM morphotypes did not differ significantly. The number of RL EM correlated negatively and the number of SB EM correlated positively with pine growth rate. Increased arginine concentrations and critical P/N ratios in needles indicated nutrient imbalances of pine seedlings from humus R2, predominantly mycorrhizal with RL. We conclude that different N supply in raw humus under Scots pine stands can induce shifts in the EM frequency of pine seedlings, and this may lead to EM formation by fungal strains with different ability to support tree growth.

  4. The role of defoliation and root rot pathogen infection in driving the mode of drought-related physiological decline in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Aguadé, D; Poyatos, R; Gómez, M; Oliva, J; Martínez-Vilalta, J

    2015-03-01

    Drought-related tree die-off episodes have been observed in all vegetated continents. Despite much research effort, however, the multiple interactions between carbon starvation, hydraulic failure and biotic agents in driving tree mortality under field conditions are still not well understood. We analysed the seasonal variability of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in four organs (leaves, branches, trunk and roots), the vulnerability to embolism in roots and branches, native embolism (percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC)) in branches and the presence of root rot pathogens in defoliated and non-defoliated individuals in a declining Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) population in the NE Iberian Peninsula in 2012, which included a particularly dry and warm summer. No differences were observed between defoliated and non-defoliated pines in hydraulic parameters, except for a higher vulnerability to embolism at pressures below -2 MPa in roots of defoliated pines. No differences were found between defoliation classes in branch PLC. Total NSC (TNSC, soluble sugars plus starch) values decreased during drought, particularly in leaves. Defoliation reduced TNSC levels across tree organs, especially just before (June) and during (August) drought. Root rot infection by the fungal pathogen Onnia P. Karst spp. was detected but it did not appear to be associated to tree defoliation. However, Onnia infection was associated with reduced leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity and sapwood depth, and thus contributed to hydraulic impairment, especially in defoliated pines. Infection was also associated with virtually depleted root starch reserves during and after drought in defoliated pines. Moreover, defoliated and infected trees tended to show lower basal area increment. Overall, our results show the intertwined nature of physiological mechanisms leading to drought-induced mortality and the inherent difficulty of isolating their contribution under field conditions. © The

  5. Long term changes in atmospheric N and S throughfall deposition and effects on soil solution chemistry in a Scots pine forest in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Boxman, Andries W; Peters, Roy C J H; Roelofs, Jan G M

    2008-12-01

    In a Scots pine forest the throughfall deposition and the chemical composition of the soil solution was monitored since 1984. (Inter)national legislation measures led to a reduction of the deposition of nitrogen and sulphur. The deposition of sulphur has decreased by approximately 65%. The total mineral-nitrogen deposition has decreased by ca. 25%, which is mainly due to a reduction in ammonium-N deposition (-40%), since nitrate-N deposition has increased (+50%). The nitrogen concentration in the upper mineral soil solution at 10 cm depth has decreased, leading to an improved nutritional balance, which may result in improved tree vitality. In the drainage water at 90 cm depth the fluxes of NO3(-) and SO4(2-) have decreased, resulting in a reduced leeching of accompanying base cations, thus preserving nutrients in the ecosystem. It may take still several years, however, before this will meet the prerequisite of a sustainable ecosystem.

  6. Influence of throughfall spatial and temporal patterns on soil moisture variability under Downy oak and Scots pine stands in Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Pilar; Garcia-Estringana, Pablo; Cayuela, Carles; Latron, Jérôme; Molina, Antonio; Gallart, Francesc

    2015-04-01

    Temporal and spatial variability of throughfall and stemflow patterns, due to differences in forest structure and seasonality of Mediterranean climate, may lead to significant changes in the volume of water that locally reaches the soil, with a potential effect on groundwater recharge and on hydrological response of forested hillslopes. Two forest stands in Mediterranean climatic conditions were studied to explore the role of vegetation on the temporal and spatial redistribution of rainfall. One is a Downy oak forest (Quercus pubescens) and the other is a Scots pine forest (Pinus sylvestris), both located in the Vallcebre research catchments (NE Spain, 42° 12'N, 1° 49'E). These plots are representative of Mediterranean mountain areas with spontaneous afforestation by Scots pine as a consequence of the abandonment of agricultural terraces, formerly covered by Downy oaks. The monitoring design of each plot consists of 20 automatic rain recorders to measuring throughfall, 7 stemflow rings connected to tipping-buckets and 40 automatic soil moisture probes. All data were recorded each 5 min. Bulk rainfall and meteorological conditions above both forest covers were also recorded, and canopy cover and biometric characteristics of the plots were measured. Results indicate a marked temporal stability of throughfall in both stands, and a lower persistence of spatial patterns in the leafless period than in the leafed one in the oaks stand. Moreover, in the oaks plot the ranks of gauges in the leafed and leafless periods were not significantly correlated, indicating different wet and dry hotspots in each season. The spatial distribution of throughfall varied significantly depending on rainfall volume, with small events having larger variability, whereas large events tended to homogenize the relative differences in point throughfall. Soil water content spatial variability increased with increasing soil water content, but direct dependence of soil water content variability on

  7. The role of below-ground competition during early stages of secondary succession: the case of 3-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings in an abandoned grassland.

    PubMed

    Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Coll, Lluis; Balandier, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    In abandoned or extensively managed grasslands, the mechanisms involved in pioneer tree species success are not fully explained. Resource competition among plants and microclimate modifications have been emphasised as possible mechanisms to explain variation of survivorship and growth. In this study, we evaluated a number of mechanisms that may lead to successful survival and growth of seedlings of a pioneer tree species (Pinus sylvestris) in a grass-dominated grassland. Three-year-old Scots pines were planted in an extensively managed grassland of the French Massif Central and for 2 years were either maintained in bare soil or subjected to aerial and below-ground interactions induced by grass vegetation. Soil temperatures were slightly higher in bare soil than under the grass vegetation, but not to an extent explaining pine growth differences. The tall grass canopy reduced light transmission by 77% at ground level and by 20% in the upper part of Scots pine seedlings. Grass vegetation presence also significantly decreased soil volumetric water content (Hv) and soil nitrate in spring and in summer. In these conditions, the average tree height was reduced by 5% compared to trees grown in bare soil, and plant biomass was reduced by 85%. Scots pine intrinsic water-use efficiency (A/g), measured by leaf gas-exchange, increased when Hv decreased owing to a rapid decline of stomatal conductance (g). This result was also confirmed by delta 13C analyses of needles. A summer 15N labelling of seedlings and grass vegetation confirmed the higher NO3 capture capacity of grass vegetation in comparison with Scots pine seedlings. Our results provide evidence that the seedlings' success was linked to tolerance of below-ground resource depletion (particularly water) induced by grass vegetation based on morphological and physiological plasticity as well as to resource conservation.

  8. The intracellular Scots pine shoot symbiont Methylobacterium extorquens DSM13060 aggregates around the host nucleus and encodes eukaryote-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Koskimäki, Janne J; Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Ihantola, Emmi-Leena; Halonen, Outi; Frank, A Carolin

    2015-03-24

    Endophytes are microbes that inhabit plant tissues without any apparent signs of infection, often fundamentally altering plant phenotypes. While endophytes are typically studied in plant roots, where they colonize the apoplast or dead cells, Methylobacterium extorquens strain DSM13060 is a facultatively intracellular symbiont of the meristematic cells of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) shoot tips. The bacterium promotes host growth and development without the production of known plant growth-stimulating factors. Our objective was to examine intracellular colonization by M. extorquens DSM13060 of Scots pine and sequence its genome to identify novel molecular mechanisms potentially involved in intracellular colonization and plant growth promotion. Reporter construct analysis of known growth promotion genes demonstrated that these were only weakly active inside the plant or not expressed at all. We found that bacterial cells accumulate near the nucleus in intact, living pine cells, pointing to host nuclear processes as the target of the symbiont's activity. Genome analysis identified a set of eukaryote-like functions that are common as effectors in intracellular bacterial pathogens, supporting the notion of intracellular bacterial activity. These include ankyrin repeats, transcription factors, and host-defense silencing functions and may be secreted by a recently imported type IV secretion system. Potential factors involved in host growth include three copies of phospholipase A2, an enzyme that is rare in bacteria but implicated in a range of plant cellular processes, and proteins putatively involved in gibberellin biosynthesis. Our results describe a novel endophytic niche and create a foundation for postgenomic studies of a symbiosis with potential applications in forestry and agriculture. All multicellular eukaryotes host communities of essential microbes, but most of these interactions are still poorly understood. In plants, bacterial endophytes are found inside

  9. Sulphur isotopes as tracers of the influence of a coal-fired power plant on a Scots pine forest in Catalonia (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, R.; Àvila, A.; Soler, A.

    Stable sulphur isotopes and major ionic composition were analysed in precipitation and throughfall samples from a Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris, L.) forest near the Cercs coal-fired power plant (Catalonia, NE Spain). The purpose of the study was to determine the main sources of sulphur deposition on this pine forest. Sulphur isotope measurements from the SO 2 power plant stack emissions were used to identify the isotopic signature of this source. Net throughfall fluxes of sulphur (26.1 kg S ha 1 yr -1) and nitrogen (16.3 kg N ha -1 yr -1) were higher—5-25 times higher for S and 5-15 times for N—at this site than in other forests in Catalonia. Sulphur isotope analysis confirmed that the net throughfall fluxes of sulphur were mostly due to the dry deposition of the SO 2 power plant emissions onto the pine canopies. Two potential atmospheric end-members were distinguished: regional background rainwater (δ 34S=+7.2‰) and power plant emissions (δ 34S=-2.8‰). By applying a two-component sulphur isotope mixing model, we found that during periods of low power plant activity (⩽10 emission h day -1), 62% of the throughfall sulphate could be attributed to the power plant emissions. At higher activity periods (⩾14 emission h day -1), this contribution rose to 73%. Although power plant contribution to bulk deposition was lower in both cases (34% and 45%), the possible influence of sulphate coming with long-range transport events from the polluted areas in the Mediterranean basin (δ 34S≈0‰) was not discarded.

  10. Impact of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) plantings on long term (137)Cs and (90)Sr recycling from a waste burial site in the Chernobyl Red Forest.

    PubMed

    Thiry, Yves; Colle, Claude; Yoschenko, Vasyl; Levchuk, Svjatoslav; Van Hees, May; Hurtevent, Pierre; Kashparov, Valery

    2009-12-01

    Plantings of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) on a waste burial site in the Chernobyl Red Forest was shown to greatly influence the long term redistribution of radioactivity contained in sub-surfaces trenches. After 15 years of growth, aboveground biomass of the average tree growing on waste trench no.22 had accumulated 1.7 times more (137)Cs than that of trees growing off the trench, and 5.4 times more (90)Sr. At the scale of the trench and according to an average tree density of 3300 trees/ha for the study zone, tree contamination would correspond to 0.024% of the (137)Cs and 2.52% of the (90)Sr contained in the buried waste material. A quantitative description of the radionuclide cycling showed a potential for trees to annually extract up to 0.82% of the (90)Sr pool in the trench and 0.0038% of the (137)Cs. A preferential (90)Sr uptake from the deep soil is envisioned while pine roots would take up (137)Cs mostly from less contaminated shallow soil layers. The current upward flux of (90)Sr through vegetation appeared at least equal to downward loss in waste material leaching as reported by Dewiere et al. (2004, Journal of Environmental Radioactivity 74, 139-150). Using a prospective calculation model, we estimated that maximum (90)Sr cycling can be expected to occur at 40 years post-planting, resulting in 12% of the current (90)Sr content in the trench transferred to surface soils through biomass turnover and 7% stored in tree biomass. These results are preliminary, although based on accurate methodology. A more integrated ecosystem study leading to the coupling between biological and geochemical models of radionuclide cycling within the Red Forest seems opportune. Such a study would help in the adequate management of that new forest and the waste trenches upon which they reside.

  11. Seasonal variation in respiration of 1-year-old shoots of scots pine exposed to elevated carbon dioxide and temperature for 4 years.

    PubMed

    Zha, T S; Kellomaki, S; Wang, K Y

    2003-07-01

    Sixteen 20-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees growing in the field were enclosed for 4 years in environment-controlled chambers that maintained: (1) ambient conditions (CON); (2) elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (ambient + 350 micro mol mol-1; EC); (3) elevated temperature (ambient +2-6 degrees C; ET); or (4) elevated CO2 and elevated temperature (ECT). The dark respiration rates of 1-year-old shoots, from which needles had been partly removed, were measured over the growing season in the fourth year. In all treatments, the temperature coefficient of respiration, Q10, changed with season, being smaller during the growing season than at other times. Respiration rate varied diurnally and seasonally with temperature, being highest around mid-summer and declining gradually thereafter. When measurements were made at the temperature of the chamber, respiration rates were reduced by the EC treatment relative to CON, but were increased by ET and ECT treatments. However, respiration rates at a reference temperature of 15 degrees C were reduced by ET and ECT treatments, reflecting a decreased capacity for respiration at warmer temperatures (negative acclimation). The interaction between season and treatment was not significant. Growth respiration did not differ between treatments, but maintenance respiration did, and the differences in mean daily respiration rate between the treatments were attributable to the maintenance component. We conclude that maintenance respiration should be considered when modelling respiratory responses to elevated CO2 and elevated temperature, and that increased atmospheric temperature is more important than increasing CO2 when assessing the carbon budget of pine forests under conditions of climate change.

  12. Comparisons of xylem sap flow and water vapour flux at the stand level and derivation of canopy conductance for Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granier, A.; Biron, P.; Köstner, B.; Gay, L. W.; Najjar, G.

    1996-03-01

    Simultaneous measurements of xylem sap flow and water vapour flux over a Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) forest (Hartheim, Germany), were carried out during the Hartheim Experiment (HartX), an intensive observation campaign of the international programme REKLIP. Sap flow was measured every 30 min using both radial constant heating (Granier, 1985) and two types of Cermak sap flowmeters installed on 24 trees selected to cover a wide range of the diameter classes of the stand (min 8 cm; max 17.5 cm). Available energy was high during the observation period (5.5 to 6.9 mm.day-1), and daily cumulated sap flow on a ground area basis varied between 2.0 and 2.7 mm day-1 depending on climate conditions. Maximum hourly values of sap flow reached 0.33 mm h-1, i.e., 230 W m-2. Comparisons of sap flow with water vapour flux as measured with two OPEC (One Propeller Eddy Correlation, University of Arizona) systems showed a time lag between the two methods, sap flow lagging about 90 min behind vapour flux. After taking into account this time lag in the sap flow data set, a good agreement was found between both methods: sap flow = 0.745* vapour flux, r 2 = 0.86. The difference between the two estimates was due to understory transpiration. Canopy conductance ( g c ) was calculated from sap flow measurements using the reverse form of Penman-Monteith equation and climatic data measured 4 m above the canopy. Variations of g c were well correlated ( r 2 = 0.85) with global radiation ( R) and vapour pressure deficit ( vpd). The quantitative expression for g c = f ( R, vpd) was very similar to that previously found with maritime pine ( Pinus pinaster) in the forest of Les Landes, South Western France.

  13. A UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopic study on the extractable compounds of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) wood . Part I: Lipophilic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuopponen, M.; Willför, S.; Jääskeläinen, A.-S.; Sundberg, A.; Vuorinen, T.

    2004-11-01

    The wood resin in Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) stemwood and branch wood were studied using UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy. UVRR spectra of the sapwood and heartwood hexane extracts, solid wood samples and model compounds (six resin acids, three fatty acids, a fatty acid ester, sitosterol and sitosterol acetate) were collected using excitation wavelengths of 229, 244 and 257 nm. In addition, visible Raman spectra of the fatty and resin acids were recorded. Resin compositions of heartwood and sapwood hexane extracts were determined using gas chromatography. Raman signals of both conjugated and isolated double bonds of all the model compounds were resonance enhanced by UV excitation. The oleophilic structures showed strong bands in the region of 1660-1630 cm -1. Distinct structures were enhanced depending on the excitation wavelength. The UVRR spectra of the hexane extracts showed characteristic bands for resin and fatty acids. It was possible to identify certain resin acids from the spectra. UV Raman spectra collected from the solid wood samples containing wood resin showed a band at ˜1650 cm -1 due to unsaturated resin components. The Raman signals from extractives in the resin rich branch wood sample gave even more strongly enhanced signals than the aromatic lignin.

  14. A UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopic study on the extractable compounds of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) wood. Part I: lipophilic compounds.

    PubMed

    Nuopponen, M; Willför, S; Jääskeläinen, A-S; Sundberg, A; Vuorinen, T

    2004-11-01

    The wood resin in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stemwood and branch wood were studied using UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy. UVRR spectra of the sapwood and heartwood hexane extracts, solid wood samples and model compounds (six resin acids, three fatty acids, a fatty acid ester, sitosterol and sitosterol acetate) were collected using excitation wavelengths of 229, 244 and 257 nm. In addition, visible Raman spectra of the fatty and resin acids were recorded. Resin compositions of heartwood and sapwood hexane extracts were determined using gas chromatography. Raman signals of both conjugated and isolated double bonds of all the model compounds were resonance enhanced by UV excitation. The oleophilic structures showed strong bands in the region of 1660-1630 cm(-1). Distinct structures were enhanced depending on the excitation wavelength. The UVRR spectra of the hexane extracts showed characteristic bands for resin and fatty acids. It was possible to identify certain resin acids from the spectra. UV Raman spectra collected from the solid wood samples containing wood resin showed a band at approximately 1650 cm(-1) due to unsaturated resin components. The Raman signals from extractives in the resin rich branch wood sample gave even more strongly enhanced signals than the aromatic lignin.

  15. A retrospective, dual-isotope approach reveals individual predispositions to winter-drought induced tree dieback in the southernmost distribution limit of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Voltas, Jordi; Camarero, Jesús Julio; Carulla, David; Aguilera, Mònica; Ortiz, Araceli; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2013-08-01

    Winter-drought induced forest diebacks in the low-latitude margins of species' distribution ranges can provide new insights into the mechanisms (carbon starvation, hydraulic failure) underlying contrasting tree reactions. We analysed a winter-drought induced dieback at the Scots pine's southern edge through a dual-isotope approach (Δ(13) C and δ(18) O in tree-ring cellulose). We hypothesized that a differential long-term performance, mediated by the interaction between CO(2) and climate, determined the fates of individuals during dieback. Declining trees showed a stronger coupling between climate, growth and intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) than non-declining individuals that was noticeable for 25 years prior to dieback. The rising stomatal control of water losses with time in declining trees, indicated by negative Δ(13) C-δ(18) O relationships, was likely associated with their native aptitude to grow more and take up more water (suggested by larger tracheid lumen widths) than non-declining trees and, therefore, to exhibit a greater cavitation risk. Freeze-thaw episodes occurring in winter 2001 unveiled such physiological differences by triggering dieback in those trees more vulnerable to hydraulic failure. Thus, WUEi tightly modulated growth responses to long-term warming in declining trees, indicating that co-occurring individuals were differentially predisposed to winter-drought mortality. These different performances were unconnected to the depletion of stored carbohydrates. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Uptake of ¹³⁷Cs by berries, mushrooms and needles of Scots pine in peatland forests after wood ash application.

    PubMed

    Vetikko, Virve; Rantavaara, Aino; Moilanen, Mikko

    2010-12-01

    Increasing use of wood fuels for energy production in Finland since the 1990s implies that large quantities of the generated ashes will be available for forest fertilization. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of wood ash application on ¹³⁷Cs activity concentrations in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles and certain berries and mushrooms on drained peatlands. The study was based on field experiments carried out on two mires in Finland in 1997-1998. Two different types of wood ash were applied at dosages of 3500, 3700, 10 500 and 11 100 kg ha⁻¹. Wood ash did not increase ¹³⁷Cs activity concentration in plants in the second growing season following application. On the contrary, a decrease in ¹³⁷Cs activity concentration was seen in the plants of the ecosystem on drained peatlands. This result is of importance, for instance, when recycling of ash is being planned. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The impact of wood ants (Formica rufa) on the distribution and abundance of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in a Scots pine plantation.

    PubMed

    Hawes, C; Stewart, A; Evans, H

    2002-05-01

    The importance of wood ants (Formica rufa) in determining the community structure (defined as the relative abundance of component species) and small-scale distribution of carabids was examined in a mature Scots pine stand in the New Forest, southern England. Carabids and wood ants were sampled by pitfall trapping throughout the forest stand from March to September 1998. The abundance of individual carabid species were modelled using vegetation type (grass or bracken), litter depth and wood ant density as independent explanatory variables. Models were fitted using a maximum-likelihood method (GLIM v.3.77; Baker 1985) with the assumption of a Poisson distribution, using a log-link function. Areas of high wood ant density were characterised by low abundance and species richness of carabids and high percentage dominance by the most commonly sampled species, Abax parallelepipedus. The extent and type of vegetation cover was found to influence the distribution and abundance of certain carabid species but only in areas where the density of wood ants was low. Large-bodied species occurred more frequently in bracken-dominated patches where the litter layer was deeper and the density of potential prey items was higher. Wood ant density was found to be the most important determinant of carabid species abundance in the study site.

  18. A comparison of postburn woodpecker foraging use of white fir (Abies concolor) and Jeffrey Pine (Pinus jeffreyi)

    Treesearch

    Kerry L. Farris; Steve Zack

    2008-01-01

    We examined the temporal patterns of the structural decay, insect infestation and woodpecker foraging patterns on white-fir and yellow pine following a prescribed burn in Lassen National Park, CA. Our objectives were to: 1) describe how pine and fir differ in their decay patterns and insect activity, and 2) determine how these differences reflect woodpecker foraging...

  19. Particulate pollutants are capable to 'degrade' epicuticular waxes and to decrease the drought tolerance of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Juergen; Pariyar, Shyam

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution causes the amorphous appearance of epicuticular waxes in conifers, usually called wax 'degradation' or 'erosion', which is often correlated with tree damage symptoms, e.g., winter desiccation. Previous investigations concentrated on wax chemistry, with little success. Here, we address the hypothesis that both 'wax degradation' and decreasing drought tolerance of trees may result from physical factors following the deposition of salt particles onto the needles. Pine seedlings were sprayed with dry aerosols or 50 mM solutions of different salts. The needles underwent humidity changes within an environmental scanning electron microscope, causing salt expansion on the surface and into the epistomatal chambers. The development of amorphous wax appearance by deliquescent salts covering tubular wax fibrils was demonstrated. The minimum epidermal conductance of the sprayed pine seedlings increased. Aerosol deposition potentially 'degrades' waxes and decreases tree drought tolerance. These effects have not been adequately considered thus far in air pollution research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Explaining the inter-annual variability in the ecosystem fluxes of the Brasschaat Scots pine forest: 20 years of eddy flux and pollution monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horemans, Joanna; Roland, Marilyn; Janssens, Ivan; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2017-04-01

    Because of their ecological and recreational value, the health of forest ecosystems and their response to global change and pollution are of high importance. At a number of EuroFlux and ICOS ecosystem sites in Europe - as the Brasschaat forest site - the measurements of ecosystem fluxes of carbon and other gases are combined with vertical profiles of air pollution within the framework of the ICP-Forest monitoring program. The Brasschaat forest is dominated by 80-year old Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.), and has a total area of about 150 ha. It is situated near an urban area in the Campine region of Flanders, Belgium and is characterized by a mean annual temperature of 9.8 °C and an annual rainfall of 830 mm. In this contribution we report on a long-term analysis (1996-2016) of the ecosystem carbon and water fluxes, the energy exchanges and the pollutant concentrations (ozone, NOx, NH3, SO2). Particular interest goes to the inter-annual variation of the carbon fluxes and the carbon allocation patterns. The impact of the long-term (aggregated) and the short-term variability in both the meteorological drivers and in the main tropospheric pollutants on the carbon fluxes is examined, as well as their mutual interactive effects and their potential memory effect. The effect of variability in the drivers during the phenological phases (seasonality) on the inter-annual variability of the fluxes is also examined. Basic statistical techniques as well as spectral analyses and data mining techniques are being used.

  1. Significance of wood terpenoids in the resistance of Scots pine provenances against the old house borer, Hylotrupes bajulus, and brown-rot fungus, Coniophora puteana.

    PubMed

    Nerg, A M; Heijari, J; Noldt, U; Viitanen, H; Vuorinen, M; Kainulainen, P; Holopainen, J K

    2004-01-01

    We tested how terpenoid (i.e., monoterpenes and resin acids) composition and concentration in wood affects resistance against wood-borers and decaying fungi. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) wood from nine provenances having variable terpenoid profiles was studied against the old house borer, Hylotrupes bajulus, and the decay fungus, Coniophora puteana. Provenances represented a 1200-km N-S transect from Estonia to northern Finland, but they were all cultivated for 7 years in the same nursery field, in central Finland. Mean relative growth rate (MRGR) of small H. hajulus larvae positively correlated with the total monoterpene concentration of wood, and feeding was associated with high proportion of levopimaric+palustric acid in wood. Provenance did not affect the MRGR of small or big larvae, but big larvae consumed more wood and produced more frass on the northern Ylitornio trees than on the southern Rakvere and Ruokolahti trees. Low beta-pinene and total monoterpene concentration and low beta: alpha-pinene ratio in wood were all associated with a high number of eggs. The most northern Muonio provenance was the most favored as an oviposition site, differing significantly from Saaremaa, Tenhola, and Suomussalmi. Wood from Saaremaa, Tenhola, Ruokolahti, and Suomussalmi provenance was most resistant against decay fungus, differing significantly from that of Kinnula provenance. However, decay resistance was not clearly associated with the concentrations of wood terpenoids. These results suggest that monoterpene composition of wood affects resistance against wood-boring Cerambycid beetles, but resistance against wood-decaying fungi is not as clearly associated with wood terpenoids.

  2. Characterisation of the initial degradation stage of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood after attack by brown-rot fungus Coniophora puteana.

    PubMed

    Irbe, Ilze; Andersone, Ingeborga; Andersons, Bruno; Noldt, Guna; Dizhbite, Tatiana; Kurnosova, Nina; Nuopponen, Mari; Stewart, Derek

    2011-07-01

    In our study, early period degradation (10 days) of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood by the brown-rot fungus Coniophora puteana (Schum.: Fr.) Karst. (BAM Ebw.15) was followed at the wood chemical composition and ultrastructure-level, and highlighted the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An advanced decay period of 50 days was chosen for comparison of the degradation dynamics. Scanning UV microspectrophotometry (UMSP) analyses of lignin distribution in wood cells revealed that the linkages of lignin and polysaccharides were already disrupted in the early period of fungal attack. An increase in the lignin absorption A(280) value from 0.24 (control) to 0.44 in decayed wood was attributed to its oxidative modification which has been proposed to be generated by Fenton reaction derived ROS. The wood weight loss in the initial degradation period was 2%, whilst cellulose and lignin content decreased by 6.7% and 1%, respectively. Lignin methoxyl (-OCH3) content decreased from 15.1% (control) to 14.2% in decayed wood. Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (DRIFT) spectroscopy corroborated the moderate loss in the hemicellulose and lignin degradation accompanying degradation. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra and spin trapping confirmed the generation of ROS, such as hydroxyl radicals (HO∙), in the early wood degradation period. Our results showed that irreversible changes in wood structure started immediately after wood colonisation by fungal hyphae and the results generated here will assist in the understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of wood biodegradation by brown-rot fungi with the ultimate aim of developing novel wood protection methods.

  3. Impact of Canopy Decoupling and Subcanopy Advection on the Annual Carbon Balance of a Boreal Scots Pine Forest as Derived From Eddy Covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jocher, Georg; Marshall, John; Nilsson, Mats B.; Linder, Sune; De Simon, Giuseppe; Hörnlund, Thomas; Lundmark, Tomas; Näsholm, Torgny; Ottosson Löfvenius, Mikaell; Tarvainen, Lasse; Wallin, Göran; Peichl, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    Apparent net uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) during wintertime by an ˜ 90 year old Scots pine stand in northern Sweden led us to conduct canopy decoupling and subcanopy advection investigations over an entire year. Eddy covariance (EC) measurements ran simultaneously above and within the forest canopy for that purpose. We used the correlation of above- and below-canopy standard deviation of vertical wind speed (σw) as decoupling indicator. We identified 0.33 m s-1 and 0.06 m s-1 as site-specific σw thresholds for above- and below-canopy coupling during nighttime (global radiation <20 W m-2) and 0.23 m s-1 and 0.06 m s-1 as daytime (global radiation >20 W m-2) σw thresholds. Decoupling occurred in 53% of the annual nighttime and 14% of the annual daytime. The annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE), gross ecosystem exchange (GEE), and ecosystem respiration (Reco) derived via two-level filtered EC data were -357 g C m-2, -1,138 g C m-2, and 781 g C m-2, respectively. In comparison, both single-level friction velocity (u*) and quality filtering resulted in 22% higher NEE, mainly caused by 16% lower Reco. GEE remained similar among filtering regimes. Accounting for changes of CO2 storage across the canopy in the single-level filtered data could only marginally decrease these discrepancies. Consequently, advection appears to be responsible for the major part of this divergence. We conclude that the two-level filter is necessary to adequately address decoupling and subcanopy advection at our site, and we recommend this filter for all forested EC sites.

  4. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) based reconstruction of 130 years of water table fluctuations in a peatland and its relevance for moisture variability assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamkevičiūtė, Marija; Edvardsson, Johannes; Pukienė, Rūtilė; Taminskas, Julius; Stoffel, Markus; Corona, Christophe; Kibirkštis, Gintautas

    2018-03-01

    Continuous water-table (WT) measurements from peatlands are scarce and - if existing at all -very short. Consequently, proxy indicators are critically needed to simulate hydrological changes in peatlands over longer time periods. In this study, we demonstrate that tree-ring width (TRW) records of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in the Čepkeliai peatland (southern Lithuania) can be used as a proxy to reconstruct hydrological variability in a raised bog environment. A two-step modelling procedure was applied to extend existing measurements and to develop a new and longer peatland WT time series. To this end, we used instrumental WT measurements extending back to 2002, meteorological records, a P-PET (difference between precipitation and potential evapotranspiration) series covering the period 1935-2014, so as to construct a tree-ring based time series of WT fluctuations at the site for the period 1870-2014. Strongest correlations were obtained between average annual WT measured at the bog margin and total P-PET over 7 years (r = 0.923, p < 0.00001), as well as between modelled WT and standardized TRW data with a two years lag (r = -0.602, p < 0.001) for those periods where WT fluctuated at the level of pine roots which is typically at <50 cm depth below the peat surface. Our results suggest that moisture is a limiting factor for tree growth at peatlands, but below a certain WT level (<50 cm under the soil surface), drought becomes a limiting factor instead. To validate the WT reconstruction from the Čepkeliai bog, results were compared to Nemunas river runoff since CE 1812 (r = 0.39, p < 0.00001, 1870-2014). We conclude that peatlands can act both as sinks and sources of greenhouse gases in case that hydrological conditions change, but that hydrological lags and complex feedbacks still hamper our understanding of several processes affecting the hydrology and carbon budget in peatlands. We therefore call for the development of further proxy records of water

  5. Mistletoe effects on Scots pine decline following drought events: insights from within-tree spatial patterns, growth and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sangüesa-Barreda, Gabriel; Linares, Juan Carlos; Camarero, J Julio

    2012-05-01

    Forest decline has been attributed to the interaction of several stressors including biotic factors such as mistletoes and climate-induced drought stress. However, few data exist on how mistletoes are spatially arranged within trees and how this spatial pattern is related to changes in radial growth, responses to drought stress and carbon use. We used dendrochronology to quantify how mistletoe (Viscum album L.) infestation and drought stress affected long-term growth patterns in Pinus sylvestris L. at different heights. Basal area increment (BAI) trends and comparisons between trees of three different infestation degrees (without mistletoe, ID1; moderately infested trees, ID2; and severely infested trees, ID3) were performed using linear mixed-effects models. To identify the main climatic drivers of tree growth tree-ring widths were converted into indexed chronologies and related to climate data using correlation functions. We performed spatial analyses of the 3D distribution of mistletoe individuals and their ages within the crowns of three severely infested pines to describe their patterns. Lastly, we quantified carbohydrate and nitrogen concentrations in needles and sapwood of branches from severely infested trees and from trees without mistletoe. Mistletoe individuals formed strongly clustered groups of similar age within tree crowns and their age increased towards the crown apex. Mistletoe infestation negatively impacted growth but this effect was stronger near the tree apex than in the rest of sampled heights, causing an average loss of 64% in BAI (loss of BAI was ∼51% at 1.3 m or near the tree base). We found that BAI of severely infested trees and moderately or non-infested trees diverged since 2001 and such divergence was magnified by drought. Infested trees had lower concentrations of soluble sugars in their needles than non-infested ones. We conclude that mistletoe infestation causes growth decline and increases the sensitivity of trees to drought

  6. Environmental impact assessment and monetary ecosystem service valuation of an ecosystem under different future environmental change and management scenarios; a case study of a Scots pine forest.

    PubMed

    Schaubroeck, Thomas; Deckmyn, Gaby; Giot, Olivier; Campioli, Matteo; Vanpoucke, Charlotte; Verheyen, Kris; Rugani, Benedetto; Achten, Wouter; Verbeeck, Hans; Dewulf, Jo; Muys, Bart

    2016-05-15

    For a sustainable future, we must sustainably manage not only the human/industrial system but also ecosystems. To achieve the latter goal, we need to predict the responses of ecosystems and their provided services to management practices under changing environmental conditions via ecosystem models and use tools to compare the estimated provided services between the different scenarios. However, scientific articles have covered a limited amount of estimated ecosystem services and have used tools to aggregate services that contain a significant amount of subjective aspects and that represent the final result in a non-tangible unit such as 'points'. To resolve these matters, this study quantifies the environmental impact (on human health, natural systems and natural resources) in physical units and uses an ecosystem service valuation based on monetary values (including ecosystem disservices with associated negative monetary values). More specifically, the paper also focuses on the assessment of ecosystem services related to pollutant removal/generation flows, accounting for the inflow of eutrophying nitrogen (N) when assessing the effect of N leached to groundwater. Regarding water use/provisioning, evapotranspiration is alternatively considered a disservice because it implies a loss of (potential) groundwater. These approaches and improvements, relevant to all ecosystems, are demonstrated using a Scots pine stand from 2010 to 2089 for a combination of three environmental change and three management scenarios. The environmental change scenarios considered interannual climate variability trends and included alterations in temperature, precipitation, nitrogen deposition, wind speed, Particulate matter (PM) concentration and CO2 concentration. The addressed flows/ecosystem services, including disservices, are as follows: particulate matter removal, freshwater loss, CO2 sequestration, wood production, NOx emissions, NH3 uptake and nitrogen pollution/removal. The monetary

  7. Long-term effects of drought on tree-ring growth and carbon isotope variability in Scots pine in a dry environment.

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, Galina; Treydte, Kerstin; Bugmann, Harald; Rigling, Andreas; Schaub, Marcus; Siegwolf, Rolf; Saurer, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Drought frequency is increasing in many parts of the world and may enhance tree decline and mortality. The underlying physiological mechanisms are poorly understood, however, particularly regarding chronic effects of long-term drought and the response to increasing temperature and vapor pressure deficit (VPD). We combined analyses of radial growth and stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in tree rings in a mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forest over the 20th century to elucidate causes of tree mortality in one of the driest parts of the European Alps (Pfynwald, Switzerland). We further compared trees that have recently died with living trees in a 10-year irrigation experiment, where annual precipitation was doubled. We found a sustained growth increase and immediate depletion of δ13C values for irrigated trees, indicating higher stomatal conductance and thus indeed demonstrating that water is a key limiting factor for growth. Growth of the now-dead trees started declining in the mid-1980s, when both mean temperature and VPD increased strongly. But growth of these trees was reduced to some extent already several decades earlier, while intrinsic water-use efficiency derived from δ13C values was higher. This indicates a more conservative water-use strategy compared with surviving trees, possibly at the cost of low carbon uptake and long-term reduction of the needle mass. We observed reduced climatic sensitivity of raw tree-ring δ13C for the now-dead in contrast to surviving trees, indicating impaired stomatal regulation, although this difference between the tree groups was smaller after detrending the data. Higher autocorrelation and a lower inter-annual δ13C variability of the now-dead trees further indicates a strong dependence on (low) carbon reserves. We conclude that the recent increase in atmospheric moisture demand in combination with insufficient soil water supply was the main trigger for mortality of those trees that were weakened by long

  8. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emission of Scots pine under drought stress - a 13CO2 labeling study to determine de novo and pool emissions under different treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüpke, M.

    2015-12-01

    Plants emit biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) to e.g. communicate and to defend herbivores. Yet BVOCs also impact atmospheric chemistry processes, and lead to e.g. the built up of secondary organic aerosols. Abiotic stresses, such as drought, however highly influence plant physiology and subsequently BVOCs emission rates. In this study, we investigated the effect of drought stress on BVOCs emission rates of Scots pine trees, a de novo and pool emitter, under controlled climate chamber conditions within a dynamic enclosure system consisting of four plant chambers. Isotopic labeling with 13CO2 was used to detect which ratio of emissions of BVOCs derives from actual synthesis and from storage organs under different treatments. Additionally, the synthesis rate of the BVOCs synthesis can be determined. The experiment consisted of two campaigns (July 2015 and August 2015) of two control and two treated trees respectively in four controlled dynamic chambers simultaneously. Each campaign lasted for around 21 days and can be split into five phases: adaptation, control, dry-out, drought- and re-watering phase. The actual drought phase lasted around five days. During the campaigns two samples of BVOCs emissions were sampled per day and night on thermal desorption tubes and analyzed by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer and a flame ionization detector. Additionally, gas exchange of water and CO2, soil moisture, as well as leaf and chamber temperature was monitored continuously. 13CO2 labeling was performed simultaneously in all chambers during the phases control, drought and re-watering for five hours respectively. During the 13CO2 labeling four BVOCs emission samples per chamber were taken to identify the labeling rate on emitted BVOCs. First results show a decrease of BVOCs emissions during the drought phase and a recovery of emission after re-watering, as well as different strength of reduction of single compounds. The degree of labeling with 13

  9. Comparison of VOC emissions between air-dried and heat-treated Norway spruce ( Picea abies), Scots pine ( Pinus sylvesteris) and European aspen ( Populus tremula) wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyttinen, Marko; Masalin-Weijo, Marika; Kalliokoski, Pentti; Pasanen, Pertti

    2010-12-01

    Heat-treated wood is an increasingly popular decoration material. Heat-treatment improves dimensional stability of the wood and also prevents rot fungus growth. Although production of heat-treated wood has been rapidly increasing, there is only little information about the VOC emissions of heat-treated wood and its possible influences on indoor air quality. In the present study, VOC emissions from three untreated (air-dried) and heat-treated wood species were compared during a four weeks test period. It appeared that different wood species had clearly different VOC emission profiles. Heat-treatment was found to decrease VOC emissions significantly and change their composition. Especially, emissions of terpenes decreased from softwood samples and aldehydes from European aspen samples. Emissions of total aldehydes and organic acids were at the same level or slightly higher from heat treated than air-dried softwood samples. In agreement with another recent study, the emissions of furfural were found to increase and those of hexanal to decrease from all the wood species investigated. In contrast to air-dried wood samples, emissions of VOCs were almost in steady state from heat treated wood samples even in the beginning of the test.

  10. Increased Needle Nitrogen Contents Did Not Improve Shoot Photosynthetic Performance of Mature Nitrogen-Poor Scots Pine Trees.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, Lasse; Lutz, Martina; Räntfors, Mats; Näsholm, Torgny; Wallin, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that temperate and boreal forests are limited by nitrogen (N) availability. However, few studies have provided a detailed account of how carbon (C) acquisition of such forests reacts to increasing N supply. We combined measurements of needle-scale biochemical photosynthetic capacities and continuous observations of shoot-scale photosynthetic performance from several canopy positions with simple mechanistic modeling to evaluate the photosynthetic responses of mature N-poor boreal Pinus sylvestris to N fertilization. The measurements were carried out in August 2013 on 90-year-old pine trees growing at Rosinedalsheden research site in northern Sweden. In spite of a nearly doubling of needle N content in response to the fertilization, no effect on the long-term shoot-scale C uptake was recorded. This lack of N-effect was due to strong light limitation of photosynthesis in all investigated canopy positions. The effect of greater N availability on needle photosynthetic capacities was also constrained by development of foliar phosphorus (P) deficiency following N addition. Thus, P deficiency and accumulation of N in arginine appeared to contribute toward lower shoot-scale nitrogen-use efficiency in the fertilized trees, thereby additionally constraining tree-scale responses to increasing N availability. On the whole our study suggests that the C uptake response of the studied N-poor boreal P. sylvestris stand to enhanced N availability is constrained by the efficiency with which the additional N is utilized. This efficiency, in turn, depends on the ability of the trees to use the greater N availability for additional light capture. For stands that have not reached canopy closure, increase in leaf area following N fertilization would be the most effective way for improving light capture and C uptake while for mature stands an increased leaf area may have a rather limited effect on light capture owing to increased self-shading. This raises the

  11. Increased Needle Nitrogen Contents Did Not Improve Shoot Photosynthetic Performance of Mature Nitrogen-Poor Scots Pine Trees

    PubMed Central

    Tarvainen, Lasse; Lutz, Martina; Räntfors, Mats; Näsholm, Torgny; Wallin, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that temperate and boreal forests are limited by nitrogen (N) availability. However, few studies have provided a detailed account of how carbon (C) acquisition of such forests reacts to increasing N supply. We combined measurements of needle-scale biochemical photosynthetic capacities and continuous observations of shoot-scale photosynthetic performance from several canopy positions with simple mechanistic modeling to evaluate the photosynthetic responses of mature N-poor boreal Pinus sylvestris to N fertilization. The measurements were carried out in August 2013 on 90-year-old pine trees growing at Rosinedalsheden research site in northern Sweden. In spite of a nearly doubling of needle N content in response to the fertilization, no effect on the long-term shoot-scale C uptake was recorded. This lack of N-effect was due to strong light limitation of photosynthesis in all investigated canopy positions. The effect of greater N availability on needle photosynthetic capacities was also constrained by development of foliar phosphorus (P) deficiency following N addition. Thus, P deficiency and accumulation of N in arginine appeared to contribute toward lower shoot-scale nitrogen-use efficiency in the fertilized trees, thereby additionally constraining tree-scale responses to increasing N availability. On the whole our study suggests that the C uptake response of the studied N-poor boreal P. sylvestris stand to enhanced N availability is constrained by the efficiency with which the additional N is utilized. This efficiency, in turn, depends on the ability of the trees to use the greater N availability for additional light capture. For stands that have not reached canopy closure, increase in leaf area following N fertilization would be the most effective way for improving light capture and C uptake while for mature stands an increased leaf area may have a rather limited effect on light capture owing to increased self-shading. This raises the

  12. A dose rate causes no fluctuating asymmetry indexes changes in silver birch (Betula pendula (L.) Roth.) leaves and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

    PubMed

    Kashparova, Elena; Levchuk, Sviatoslav; Morozova, Valeriia; Kashparov, Valery

    2018-06-04

    The assessment of the fluctuating asymmetry based on measurement of the parameters of left and right parts of silver birch (Betula pendula (L.) Roth.) leaves and relative sizes of pairs of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles from the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ) was carried out. Twelve samples of both birch leaves and pairs of needles were collected from 10 trees at 5 sites in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and also at one control site located outside the ChEZ. Values of gamma dose rate in the air varied between the sites from 0.1 to 40 μGy h -1 . Activity concentrations of 90 Sr and 137 Cs in the birch leaves varied over the range of 0.9÷2460 kBq kg -1 and 0.1÷339 kBq·kg -1 (DW), respectively. In addition to the above, in the Scots pine needles, these ranges were 0.7 ÷1970 kBq kg -1 f for 90 Sr and 0.1÷78 kBq kg -1 (DW) for 137 Cs. From the values of the radionuclides activity concentrations in the plants, the internal dose rate is estimated to be in the range of 0.1 ÷ 274 μGy h -1 . The main sources of the internal dose rate were radiation of 90 Sr and 90 Y. Indices of fluctuating asymmetry of silver birch leaves and Scots pine needles varied over the range of 0.048 ± 0.007 ÷ 0.060 ± 0.009 and 0.014 ± 0.002 ÷ 0.018 ± 0.002, respectively, and did not statistically differ for all experimental sites. The indices also did not depend on the external or internal dose rate of ionizing radiation for plants. The above findings seem to be consistent with other research effort in terms of understanding the response of organisms to chronic pollutant exposure and the long-term effects of large scale nuclear accidents. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. High-efficiency Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenck, A. R.; Quinn, M.; Whetten, R. W.; Pullman, G.; Sederoff, R.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer is the method of choice for many plant biotechnology laboratories; however, large-scale use of this organism in conifer transformation has been limited by difficult propagation of explant material, selection efficiencies and low transformation frequency. We have analyzed co-cultivation conditions and different disarmed strains of Agrobacterium to improve transformation. Additional copies of virulence genes were added to three common disarmed strains. These extra virulence genes included either a constitutively active virG or extra copies of virG and virB, both from pTiBo542. In experiments with Norway spruce, we increased transformation efficiencies 1000-fold from initial experiments where little or no transient expression was detected. Over 100 transformed lines expressing the marker gene beta-glucuronidase (GUS) were generated from rapidly dividing embryogenic suspension-cultured cells co-cultivated with Agrobacterium. GUS activity was used to monitor transient expression and to further test lines selected on kanamycin-containing medium. In loblolly pine, transient expression increased 10-fold utilizing modified Agrobacterium strains. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer is a useful technique for large-scale generation of transgenic Norway spruce and may prove useful for other conifer species.

  14. Spatial variability of throughfall in a stand of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) with deciduous admixture as influenced by canopy cover and stem distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, Anna; Boczoń, Andrzej; Hildebrand, Robert; Polkowska, Żaneta

    2016-07-01

    Vegetation cover affects the amount of precipitation, its chemical composition and its spatial distribution, and this may have implications for the distribution of water, nutrients and contaminants in the subsurface soil layer. The aim of this study was a detailed diagnosis of the spatio-temporal variability in the amount of throughfall (TF) and its chemical components in a 72-year-old pine stand with an admixture of oak and birch. The spatio-temporal variability in the amount of TF water and the concentrations and deposition of the TF components were studied. The components that are exchanged in canopy (H+, K, Mg, Mn, DOC, NH4+) were more variable than the components whose TF deposition is the sum of wet and dry (including gas) deposition and which undergo little exchange in the canopy (Na, Cl, NO3-, SO42-). The spatial distribution was temporally stable, especially during the leafed period. This study also investigated the effect of the selected pine stand characteristics on the spatial distribution of throughfall and its chemical components; the characteristics included leaf area index (LAI), the proportion of the canopy covered by deciduous species and pine crowns, and the distance from the nearest tree trunk. The LAI measured during the leafed and leafless periods had the greatest effect on the spatial distribution of TF deposition. No relationship was found between the spatial distribution of the amount of TF water and (i) the LAI; (ii) the canopy cover of broadleaf species or pines; or (iii) the distance from the trunks.

  15. Pines

    Treesearch

    C. Dana Nelson; Gary F. Peter; Steven E. McKeand; Eric J. Jokela; Robert B. Rummer; Les Groom; Kurt H. Johnsen

    2013-01-01

    The southern pines (yellow or hard pines, Genus Pinus Sub-genus Pinus Section Pinus Subsection Australes) occupy an immense land-base in the southeastern region of the United States (Little and Critchfield, 1969). In addition, they are planted and managed for wood production on millions of hectares worldwide including China, Brazil, Argentina, and Australia. The...

  16. Ground-fire effects on the composition of dissolved and total organic matter in forest floor and soil solutions from Scots pine forests in Germany: new insights from solid state 13C NMR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näthe, Kerstin; Michalzik, Beate; Levia, Delphis; Steffens, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Fires represent an ecosystem disturbance and are recognized to seriously pertubate the nutrient budgets of forested ecosystems. While the effects of fires on chemical, biological, and physical soil properties have been intensively studied, especially in Mediterranean areas and North America, few investigations examined the effects of fire-induced alterations in the water-bound fluxes and the chemical composition of dissolved and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC, POC, DN, PN). The exclusion of the particulate organic matter fraction (0.45 μm < POM < 500 μm) potentially results in misleading inferences and budgeting gaps when studying the effects of fires on nutrient and energy fluxes. To our best knowledge, this is the first known study to present fire-induced changes on the composition of dissolved and total organic matter (DOM, TOM) in forest floor (FF) and soil solutions (A, B horizon) from Scots pine forests in Germany. In relation to control sites, we test the effects of low-severity fires on: (1) the composition of DOM and TOM in forest floor and soil solutions; and (2) the translocated amount of particulate in relation to DOC and DN into the subsoil. The project aims to uncover the mechanisms of water-bound organic matter transport along an ecosystem profile and its compositional changes following a fire disturbance. Forest floor and soil solutions were fortnightly sampled from March to December 2014 on fire-manipulated and control plots in a Scots pine forest in Central Germany. Shortly after the experimental duff fire in April 2014 pooled solutions samples were taken for solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy to characterize DOM (filtered solution < 0.8μm pore size) and TOM in unfiltered solutions. Independent from fire manipulation, the composition of TOM was generally less aromatic (aromaticity index [%] according to Hatcher et al., 1981) with values between 18 (FF) - 25% (B horizon) than the DOM fraction with 23 (FF) - 27% (B horizon). For DOM

  17. A forest health inventory assessment of red fir (Abies magnifica) in upper montane California

    Treesearch

    Leif Mortenson; Andrew N. Gray; David C. Shaw

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the forest health of red fir (Abies magnifica) and how it compared with commonly-associated species Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and white fir (Abies concolor) in the upper montane forests of California. We evaluated tree mortality rates...

  18. Better Incident Response with SCOT

    SciTech Connect

    Bruner, Todd

    2015-04-01

    SCOT is an incident response management system and knowledge base designed for incident responders by incident responders. SCOT increases the effectiveness of the team without adding undue burdens. Focused on reducing the friction between analysts and their tools, SCOT enables analysts to document and share their research and response efforts in near real time. Automatically identifying indicators and correlating those indicators, SCOT helps analysts discover and respond to advanced threats.

  19. Pines

    Treesearch

    C. Plomion; D. Chagne; D. Pot; S. Kumar; P.L. Wilcox; R.D. Burdon; D. Prat; D.G. Peterson; J. Paiva; P. Chaumeil; G.G. Vendramin; F. Sebastiani; C.D. Nelson; C.S. Echt; O. Savolainen; T.L. Kubisiak; M.T. Cervera; N. de Maria; M.N. Islam-Faridi

    2007-01-01

    Pinus is the most important genus within the Family Pinaceae and also within the gymnosperms by the number of species (109 species recognized by Farjon 2001) and by its contribution to forest ecosystems. All pine species are evergreen trees or shrubs. They are widely distributed in the northern hemisphere, from tropical areas to northern areas in America and Eurasia....

  20. Close and distant: Contrasting the metabolism of two closely related subspecies of Scots pine under the effects of folivory and summer drought

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas-Ubach, Albert; Sardans, Jordi; Hódar, José Antonio

    The metabolome, the chemical phenotype of an organism, should be shaped by evolution. Metabolomes depend on genetic composition and expression, which can be sources of evolutionary inertia, so most aspects of metabolomes should be similar in closely related sympatric species. We examined the metabolomes of two sympatric subspecies of Pinus sylvestris in Sierra Nevada (southern Iberian Peninsula), one introduced (ssp. iberica) and one autochthonous (ssp. nevadensis), in summer and winter and exposed to folivory by the pine processionary moth. The overall metabolomes differed between the subspecies but both tended to respond more similarly to folivory. The metabolomes of the subspeciesmore » were more dissimilar in summer than in winter, and iberica trees had higher concentrations of metabolites directly related to drought stress. Our results suggest that certain plant metabolic responses associated with folivory have been conserved throughout evolutionary history. The larger divergence between subspecies metabolomes in summer is likely due to the warmer and drier conditions that the northern iberica subspecies experience in Sierra Nevada. Our results provide crucial insights into how iberica populations would respond to the predicted conditions of climate change under an increased defoliation, two recent severe issues in the Mediterranean Basin.« less

  1. Intra-seasonal dynamics in metabolic processes of 13C/12C and 18O/16O in components of Scots pine twigs from southern Siberia interpreted with a conceptual framework based on the Carbon Metabolism Oscillatory Model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbon isotope data from conifer trees play an important role in research on the boreal forest carbon reservoir in the global carbon cycle. Carbon isotopes are routinely used to study interactions between the environment and tree growth. Moreover, carbon isotopes became an essential tool for the evaluation of carbon assimilation and transport from needles into reserve pools, as well as the allocation of stored assimilates within a tree. The successful application and interpretation of carbon isotopes rely on the coherence of isotopic fractionation modeling. This study employs a new Carbon Metabolism Oscillatory Model (CMOM) to interpret the experimental data sets on metabolic seasonal dynamics of 13C/12 C and 18O/16O ratios measured in twig components of Scots pine growing in southern Siberia (Russia). Results The dynamics of carbon isotopic variables were studied in components of Pinus sylvestris L. in light and in dark chambers during the vegetation period from 14 June to 28 July 2006. At the beginning of this period water-soluble organic matter, mostly labile sugars (including sucrose as the main component) and newly formed bulk needle material, displayed relatively “light” δ13C values (depletion in 13 C). Then, 13 C content increased again with noticeable “depletion” events in the middle of the growth period. A gradual 13 C accumulation took place in the second half of the vegetation period. Similar effects were observed both in the light and in the dark with some temporal shifts. Environmental factors did not influence the δ13C values. A gradual 12C-depletion effect was noticed in needles of the previous year. The δ13C values of sucrose and proteins from needle biomass altered independently from each other in the light chamber. A distinct negative correlation between δ13C and δ18O values was revealed for all studied variables. Conclusions The abrupt 13C depletion recorded by all tested trees for the period from June to July

  2. Intra-seasonal dynamics in metabolic processes of 13C/12C and 18O/16O in components of Scots pine twigs from southern Siberia interpreted with a conceptual framework based on the Carbon Metabolism Oscillatory Model.

    PubMed

    Voronin, Victor; Ivlev, Alexander A; Oskolkov, Vladimir; Boettger, Tatjana

    2012-05-30

    Carbon isotope data from conifer trees play an important role in research on the boreal forest carbon reservoir in the global carbon cycle. Carbon isotopes are routinely used to study interactions between the environment and tree growth. Moreover, carbon isotopes became an essential tool for the evaluation of carbon assimilation and transport from needles into reserve pools, as well as the allocation of stored assimilates within a tree. The successful application and interpretation of carbon isotopes rely on the coherence of isotopic fractionation modeling. This study employs a new Carbon Metabolism Oscillatory Model (CMOM) to interpret the experimental data sets on metabolic seasonal dynamics of 13C/12 C and 18O/16O ratios measured in twig components of Scots pine growing in southern Siberia (Russia). The dynamics of carbon isotopic variables were studied in components of Pinus sylvestris L. in light and in dark chambers during the vegetation period from 14 June to 28 July 2006. At the beginning of this period water-soluble organic matter, mostly labile sugars (including sucrose as the main component) and newly formed bulk needle material, displayed relatively "light" δ13C values (depletion in 13 C). Then, 13 C content increased again with noticeable "depletion" events in the middle of the growth period. A gradual 13 C accumulation took place in the second half of the vegetation period. Similar effects were observed both in the light and in the dark with some temporal shifts. Environmental factors did not influence the δ13C values. A gradual 12C-depletion effect was noticed in needles of the previous year. The δ13C values of sucrose and proteins from needle biomass altered independently from each other in the light chamber. A distinct negative correlation between δ13C and δ18O values was revealed for all studied variables. The abrupt 13C depletion recorded by all tested trees for the period from June to July provides clear evidence of the transition

  3. Does carbon availability control temporal dynamics of radial growth in Norway spruce (Picea abies)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas; Swidrak, Irene

    2015-04-01

    Intra-annual dynamics of cambial activity and wood formation of coniferous species exposed to soil dryness revealed early culmination of maximum growth in late spring prior to occurrence of more favourable environmental conditions, i.e., repeated high rainfall events during summer (Oberhuber et al. 2014). Because it is well known that plants can adjust carbon allocation patterns to optimize resource uptake under prevailing environmental constraints, we hypothesize that early decrease in radial stem growth is an adaptation to cope with drought stress, which might require an early switch of carbon allocation to belowground organs. Physical blockage of carbon transport in the phloem through girdling causes accumulation and depletion of carbohydrates above and below the girdle, respectively, making this method quite appropriate to investigate carbon relationships in trees. Hence, in a common garden experiment we will manipulate the carbon status of Norway spruce (Picea abies) saplings by phloem blockage at different phenological stages during the growing season. We will present the methodological approach and first results of the study aiming to test the hypothesis that carbon status of the tree affects temporal dynamics of cambial activity and wood formation in conifers under drought. Acknowledgment The research is funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF): P25643-B16 "Carbon allocation and growth of Scots pine". Reference Oberhuber W, A Gruber, W Kofler, I Swidrak (2014) Radial stem growth in response to microclimate and soil moisture in a drought-prone mixed coniferous forest at an inner Alpine site. Eur J For Res 133:467-479.

  4. Effectiveness of the lactococcal abortive infection systems AbiA, AbiE, AbiF and AbiG against P335 type phages.

    PubMed

    Tangney, Mark; Fitzgerald, Gerald F

    2002-04-23

    Four lactococcal abortive infection mechanisms were introduced into strains which were sensitive hosts for P335 type phages and plaque assay experiments performed to assess their effect on five lactococcal bacteriophages from this family. Results indicate that AbiA inhibits all five P335 phages tested, while AbiG affects phiP335 itself and phiQ30 but not the other P335 species phages. AbiA was shown to retard phage Q30 DNA replication as previously reported for other phages. It was also demonstrated that AbiG, previously shown to act at a point after DNA replication in the cases of c2 type and 936 type phages, acts at the level of, or prior to phage Q30 DNA replication. AbiE and AbiF had no effect on the P335 type phages examined.

  5. Semiochemical disruption of the pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Peter De Groot; Stephen Burke; David Wakarchuk; Robert A. Haack; Reginald Nott

    2004-01-01

    The pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), is an exotic pest of pine in North America. We evaluated blends of semiochemical disruptants, which included nonhost volatiles and verbenone, for their ability to disrupt attraction of T. piniperda to traps baited with the attractant α-pinene and to Scots...

  6. Hybridization of a Rocky Mountain fir (Abies concolor) and a Mexican fir (Abies religiosa).

    Treesearch

    J.B. St. Clair; W.B. Critchfield

    1988-01-01

    Interspecific crosses of Abies religiosa (HBK.) Schlecht. & Cham. (oyamel) with Abies concolor (Gord. & Glend.) Lindle. ex Hildebr. var. concolor (white fir) and Abies magnifica A. Murr. (California red fir) were undertaken to explore the relationships between these species. The...

  7. Hybridization of a Rocky Mountain fir (Abies concolor) and a Mexican fir (Abies religiosa)

    Treesearch

    J. B. St. Clair; W. B. Critchfield

    1988-01-01

    Interspecific crosses of Abies religiosa (HBK.) Schlecht. & Cham, (oyamel) with Abies concolor (Gord. & Glend.) Lindl. ex Hildebr. var. concolor (white fir) and Abies magnifica A. Murr. (California red fir) were undertaken to explore the relationships between these species. The cross...

  8. Multiresource effects of a stand-replacement prescribed fire in the Pinus contorta-Abies lasiocarpa vegetation zone of central Washington.

    Treesearch

    Arthur R. Tiedemann; Paul M. Woodard

    2002-01-01

    A stand-replacement prescribed fire in an over-mature lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.)-subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) stand (snag area) and in a mature lodgepole pine thicket (thicket area) resulted in lower plant diversity within the first year after burning, and as fire energy outputs increased...

  9. Diplodia Tip Blight and Canker of Pines (Pest Alert)

    Treesearch

    USDA Forest Service

    The fungus Diplodia pinea can cause serious damage to Austrian, ponderosa, red, Scots, mugo, jack, and white pine. Although it is considered a weak pathogen, it may successfully attack and kill trees. It may be more serious on trees growing out of their natural range or stressed by adverse climatic conditions or air pollution. Infection can occur as a result of hail...

  10. Host-tree preferences of the pine moth (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae) and pine beauty moth (Lepidopera: Noctuidae) larvae in relation to needle quality

    Treesearch

    Lidia Sukovata; Andrzej Kolk; Jadwiga Jaroszynska; Urszula Krajewska; Agnieszka Purzynska; Valerii Isidorov

    2003-01-01

    The larvae of Dendrolimus pini L. and Panolis flammea (Den. et Schiff.) usually occur in high numbers on different trees within a stand. Studies that focused on the host tree-preference of these two species were conducted in the Wymiarki Forest District (Poland) in 2001. Sixteen Scots pine trees were selected to estimate the...

  11. Microbial activities related to C and N cycling and microbial community structure in the rhizospheres of Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies and Betula pendula seedlings in an organic and mineral soil.

    PubMed

    Priha; Grayston; Pennanen; Smolander

    1999-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) seedlings have a selective influence on the soil microbial community structure and activity and whether this varies in different soils. Seedlings of pine, spruce and birch were planted into pots of two soil types: an organic soil and a mineral soil. Pots without seedlings were also included. After one growing season, microbial biomass C (C(mic)) and N (N(mic)), C mineralization, net ammonification, net nitrification, denitrification potential, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) patterns and community level physiological profiles (CLPPs) were measured in the rhizosphere soil of the seedlings. In the organic soil, C(mic) and N(mic) were higher in the birch rhizosphere than in pine and spruce rhizosphere. The C mineralization rate was not affected by tree species. Unplanted soil contained the highest amount of mineral N and birch rhizosphere the lowest, but rates of net N mineralization and net nitrification did not differ between treatments. The microbial community structure, measured by PLFAs, had changed in the rhizospheres of all tree species compared to the unplanted soil. Birch rhizosphere was most clearly separated from the others. There was more of the fungal specific fatty acid 18:2omega6,9 and more branched fatty acids, common in Gram-positive bacteria, in this soil. CLPPs, done with Biolog GN plates and 30 additional substrates, separated only birch rhizosphere from the others. In the mineral soil, roots of all tree species stimulated C mineralization in soil and prevented nitrification, but did not affect C(mic) and N(mic), PLFA patterns or CLPPs. The effects of different tree species did not vary in the mineral soil. Thus, in the mineral soil, the strongest effect on soil microbes was the presence of a plant, regardless of the tree species, but in the organic soil, different tree species varied in

  12. Does tree diversity increase wood production in pine forests?

    PubMed

    Vilà, Montserrat; Vayreda, Jordi; Gracia, Carles; Ibáñez, Joan Josep

    2003-04-01

    Recent experimental advances on the positive effect of species richness on ecosystem productivity highlight the need to explore this relationship in communities other than grasslands and using non-synthetic experiments. We investigated whether wood production in forests dominated by Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis) and Pyrenean Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) differed between monospecific and mixed forests (2-5 species) using the Ecological and Forest Inventory of Catalonia (IEFC) database which contains biotic and environmental characteristics for 10,644 field plots distributed within a 31,944 km(2) area in Catalonia (NE Spain). We found that in Pyrenean Scots pine forests wood production was not significantly different between monospecific and mixed plots. In contrast, in Aleppo pine forests wood production was greater in mixed plots than in monospecific plots. However, when climate, bedrock types, radiation and successional stage per plot were included in the analysis, species richness was no longer a significant factor. Aleppo pine forests had the highest productivity in plots located in humid climates and on marls and sandstone bedrocks. Climate did not influence wood production in Pyrenean Scots pine forests, but it was highest on sandstone and consolidated alluvial materials. For both pine forests wood production was negatively correlated with successional stage. Radiation did not influence wood production. Our analysis emphasizes the influence of macroenvironmental factors and temporal variation on tree productivity at the regional scale. Well-conducted forest surveys are an excellent source of data to test for the association between diversity and productivity driven by large-scale environmental factors.

  13. A ponderosa pine-grand fir spacing study in central Oregon: results after 10 years.

    Treesearch

    K.W. Seidel

    1985-01-01

    The 10-year growth response from an initial spacing study established in a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl, ex Laws.) and grand fir (Abies grandis (Dougl. ex D. Don) Lindl.) plantation was measured in central Oregon. The study was designed to compare the growth rates of pure pine, pure fir, and a 50-percent mixture of...

  14. The NESH/Abi-3-based WAVE2 complex is functionally distinct from the Abi-1-based WAVE2 complex.

    PubMed

    Sekino, Saki; Kashiwagi, Yuriko; Kanazawa, Hitoshi; Takada, Kazuki; Baba, Takashi; Sato, Seiichi; Inoue, Hiroki; Kojima, Masaki; Tani, Katsuko

    2015-10-01

    Abl interactor (Abi) family proteins play significant roles in actin cytoskeleton organization through participation in the WAVE complex. Mammals possess three Abi proteins: Abi-1, Abi-2, and NESH/Abi-3. Abi-1 and Abi-2 were originally identified as Abl tyrosine kinase-binding proteins. It has been disclosed that Abi-1 acts as a bridge between c-Abl and WAVE2, and c-Abl-mediated WAVE2 phosphorylation promotes actin remodeling. We showed previously that NESH/Abi-3 is present in the WAVE2 complex, but neither binds to c-Abl nor promotes c-Abl-mediated phosphorylation of WAVE2. In this study, we characterized NESH/Abi-3 in more detail, and compared its properties with those of Abi-1 and Abi-2. NESH/Abi-3 was ectopically expressed in NIH3T3 cells, in which Abi-1, but not NESH/Abi-3, is expressed. The expression of NESH/Abi-3 caused degradation of endogenous Abi-1, which led to the formation of a NESH/Abi-3-based WAVE2 complex. When these cells were plated on fibronectin-coated dishes, the translocation of WAVE2 to the plasma membrane was significantly reduced and the formation of peripheral lamellipodial structures was disturbed, suggesting that the NESH/Abi-3-based WAVE2 complex was unable to help produce lamellipodial protrusions. Next, Abi-1, Abi-2, or NESH/Abi-3 was expressed in v-src-transformed NIH3T3 cells. Only in NESH/Abi-3-expressed cells did treatment with an Abl kinase inhibitor, imatinib mesylate, or siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Abl promote the formation of invadopodia, which are ventral membrane protrusions with extracellular matrix degradation activity. Structural studies showed that a linker region between the proline-rich regions and the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of Abi-1 is crucial for its interaction with c-Abl and c-Abl-mediated phosphorylation of WAVE2. The NESH/Abi-3-based WAVE2 complex is functionally distinct from the Abi-1-based one, and NESH/Abi-3 may be involved in the formation of ventral protrusions under certain conditions.

  15. Treatment of understory hemlock in the western white pine type

    Treesearch

    I. T. Haig

    1933-01-01

    Silvicultural practice for the national forests in the mixed western white pine stands of northern Idaho has long been complicated by the economic problems arising from the presence of aggressive, tolerant, low-value species, such as western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) and lowland white fir (Abies grandis), in association with the less tolerant, faster-growing, high-...

  16. Interviewing Children with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Anne-Marie; Linden, Mark; Alderdice, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    Research into the lives of children with acquired brain injury (ABI) often neglects to incorporate children as participants, preferring to obtain the opinions of the adult carer (e.g. McKinlay et al., 2002). There has been a concerted attempt to move away from this position by those working in children's research with current etiquette…

  17. Sargent's fir hybrid: Abies amabilis x lasicarpa

    Treesearch

    William B. Critchfield

    1977-01-01

    On a short trip into the northern Olympic Mountains of Washington in the summer of 1896, Professor Charles Sprague Sargent found a fir tree that he thought might be a natural hybrid between Abies amabilis (Dougl.) Forbes and A. lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt. The founder and Director of the Arnold Arboretum, Sargent was generally...

  18. Suitability of pines and other conifers as hosts for the invasive Mediterranean pine engraver (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in North America.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jana C; Flint, Mary Louise; Seybold, Steven J

    2008-06-01

    The invasive Mediterranean pine engraver, Orthotomicus erosus (Wollaston) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), was detected in North America in 2004, and it is currently distributed in the southern Central Valley of California. It originates from the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and Asia, and it reproduces on pines (Pinus spp.). To identify potentially vulnerable native and adventive hosts in North America, no-choice host range tests were conducted in the laboratory on 22 conifer species. The beetle reproduced on four pines from its native Eurasian range--Aleppo, Canary Island, Italian stone, and Scots pines; 11 native North American pines--eastern white, grey, jack, Jeffrey, loblolly, Monterey, ponderosa, red, Sierra lodgepole, singleleaf pinyon, and sugar pines; and four native nonpines--Douglas-fir, black and white spruce, and tamarack. Among nonpines, fewer progeny developed and they were of smaller size on Douglas-fir and tamarack, but sex ratios of progeny were nearly 1:1 on all hosts. Last, beetles did not develop on white fir, incense cedar, and coast redwood. With loblolly pine, the first new adults emerged 42 d after parental females were introduced into host logs at temperatures of 20-33 degrees C and 523.5 or 334.7 accumulated degree-days based on lower development thresholds of 13.6 or 18 degrees C, respectively.

  19. SCoT: a Python toolbox for EEG source connectivity.

    PubMed

    Billinger, Martin; Brunner, Clemens; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of brain connectivity has become an important research tool in neuroscience. Connectivity can be estimated between cortical sources reconstructed from the electroencephalogram (EEG). Such analysis often relies on trial averaging to obtain reliable results. However, some applications such as brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) require single-trial estimation methods. In this paper, we present SCoT-a source connectivity toolbox for Python. This toolbox implements routines for blind source decomposition and connectivity estimation with the MVARICA approach. Additionally, a novel extension called CSPVARICA is available for labeled data. SCoT estimates connectivity from various spectral measures relying on vector autoregressive (VAR) models. Optionally, these VAR models can be regularized to facilitate ill posed applications such as single-trial fitting. We demonstrate basic usage of SCoT on motor imagery (MI) data. Furthermore, we show simulation results of utilizing SCoT for feature extraction in a BCI application. These results indicate that CSPVARICA and correct regularization can significantly improve MI classification. While SCoT was mainly designed for application in BCIs, it contains useful tools for other areas of neuroscience. SCoT is a software package that (1) brings combined source decomposition and connectivtiy estimation to the open Python platform, and (2) offers tools for single-trial connectivity estimation. The source code is released under the MIT license and is available online at github.com/SCoT-dev/SCoT.

  20. SCoT: a Python toolbox for EEG source connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Billinger, Martin; Brunner, Clemens; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of brain connectivity has become an important research tool in neuroscience. Connectivity can be estimated between cortical sources reconstructed from the electroencephalogram (EEG). Such analysis often relies on trial averaging to obtain reliable results. However, some applications such as brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) require single-trial estimation methods. In this paper, we present SCoT—a source connectivity toolbox for Python. This toolbox implements routines for blind source decomposition and connectivity estimation with the MVARICA approach. Additionally, a novel extension called CSPVARICA is available for labeled data. SCoT estimates connectivity from various spectral measures relying on vector autoregressive (VAR) models. Optionally, these VAR models can be regularized to facilitate ill posed applications such as single-trial fitting. We demonstrate basic usage of SCoT on motor imagery (MI) data. Furthermore, we show simulation results of utilizing SCoT for feature extraction in a BCI application. These results indicate that CSPVARICA and correct regularization can significantly improve MI classification. While SCoT was mainly designed for application in BCIs, it contains useful tools for other areas of neuroscience. SCoT is a software package that (1) brings combined source decomposition and connectivtiy estimation to the open Python platform, and (2) offers tools for single-trial connectivity estimation. The source code is released under the MIT license and is available online at github.com/SCoT-dev/SCoT. PMID:24653694

  1. Elemental analyses of pine bark and wood in an environmental study.

    PubMed

    Saarela, K-E; Harju, L; Rajander, J; Lill, J-O; Heselius, S-J; Lindroos, A; Mattsson, K

    2005-05-01

    Bark and wood samples were taken from the same individuals of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) from a polluted area close to a Cu-Ni smelter in Harjavalta and from some relatively unpolluted areas in western Finland. The samples were analysed by thick-target particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) after preconcentration by dry ashing at 550 degrees C. The elemental contents of pine bark and wood were compared to study the impact of heavy metal pollution on pine trees. By comparison of the elemental contents in ashes of bark and wood, a normalisation was obtained. For the relatively clean areas, the ratios of the concentration in bark ash to the concentration in wood ash for different elements were close to 1. This means that the ashes of Scots Pine wood and bark have quite similar elemental composition. For the samples from the polluted area the mean concentration ratios for some heavy metals were elevated (13-28), reflecting the effect of direct atmospheric contamination. The metal contents in the ashes of pine bark and wood were also compared to recommendations for ashes to be recycled back to the forest environment. Bark from areas close to emission sources of heavy metal pollution should be considered with caution if aiming at recycling the ash. Burning of bark fuel of pine grown within 6 km of the Cu-Ni smelter is shown to generate ashes with high levels of Cu, Ni as well as Cd, As and Pb.

  2. Jack Pine

    Treesearch

    William Dent Sterrett

    1920-01-01

    Jack pine is a very frugal tree in its climatic and soil requirements. The northern limit of its natural range is within 14 degrees of the Arctic Circle and the southern is marked by the southern shores of Lake Michigan. No other North American pine grows naturally so far north and all the others grow farther south. It develops commercial stands and reproduces itself...

  3. Longleaf pine

    Treesearch

    William D. Boyer; Donald W. Patterson

    1983-01-01

    Abstract:This report describes the longleaf pine forest type and the characteristics of both tree and forest that can affect management decisions.Longleaf pine is highly adaptable to a range of management goals and silvicultural systems.Management options and appropriate silvicultural methods for the regeneration and management of this species are...

  4. Automatic determination of trunk diameter, crown base and height of scots pine (Pinus Sylvestris L.) Based on analysis of 3D point clouds gathered from multi-station terrestrial laser scanning. (Polish Title: Automatyczne okreslanie srednicy pnia, podstawy korony oraz wysokosci sosny zwyczajnej (Pinus Silvestris L.) Na podstawie analiz chmur punktow 3D pochodzacych z wielostanowiskowego naziemnego skanowania laserowego)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, M.; Wężyk, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in recent years resulted in its recognition and implementation in many industries, including forestry and nature conservation. The use of the 3D TLS point clouds in the process of inventory of trees and stands, as well as in the determination of their biometric features (trunk diameter, tree height, crown base, number of trunk shapes), trees and lumber size (volume of trees) is slowly becoming a practice. In addition to the measurement precision, the primary added value of TLS is the ability to automate the processing of the clouds of points 3D in the direction of the extraction of selected features of trees and stands. The paper presents the original software (GNOM) for the automatic measurement of selected features of trees, based on the cloud of points obtained by the ground laser scanner FARO. With the developed algorithms (GNOM), the location of tree trunks on the circular research surface was specified and the measurement was performed; the measurement covered the DBH (l: 1.3m), further diameters of tree trunks at different heights of the tree trunk, base of the tree crown and volume of the tree trunk (the selection measurement method), as well as the tree crown. Research works were performed in the territory of the Niepolomice Forest in an unmixed pine stand (Pinussylvestris L.) on the circular surface with a radius of 18 m, within which there were 16 pine trees (14 of them were cut down). It was characterized by a two-storey and even-aged construction (147 years old) and was devoid of undergrowth. Ground scanning was performed just before harvesting. The DBH of 16 pine trees was specified in a fully automatic way, using the algorithm GNOM with an accuracy of +2.1%, as compared to the reference measurement by the DBH measurement device. The medium, absolute measurement error in the cloud of points - using semi-automatic methods "PIXEL" (between points) and PIPE (fitting the cylinder) in the FARO Scene 5.x

  5. Girdling as a means of removing undesirable tree species from the western white pine type

    Treesearch

    Donald R. Brewster; Julius A. Larsen

    1925-01-01

    Western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) and white or grand fir (Abies grandis), two shade-tolerating species which are found in more or less abundance in the western white pine type in northern Idaho and northwestern Montana, must usually be classified as undesirable species silviculturally, and for several reasons. In both species the liability to infection by heart-rot...

  6. Limited Growth Recovery after Drought-Induced Forest Dieback in Very Defoliated Trees of Two Pine Species

    PubMed Central

    Guada, Guillermo; Camarero, J. Julio; Sánchez-Salguero, Raúl; Cerrillo, Rafael M. Navarro

    2016-01-01

    Mediterranean pine forests display high resilience after extreme climatic events such as severe droughts. However, recent dry spells causing growth decline and triggering forest dieback challenge the capacity of some forests to recover following major disturbances. To describe how resilient the responses of forests to drought can be, we quantified growth dynamics in plantations of two pine species (Scots pine, black pine) located in south-eastern Spain and showing drought-triggered dieback. Radial growth was characterized at inter- (tree-ring width) and intra-annual (xylogenesis) scales in three defoliation levels. It was assumed that the higher defoliation the more negative the impact of drought on tree growth. Tree-ring width chronologies were built and xylogenesis was characterized 3 years after the last severe drought occurred. Annual growth data and the number of tracheids produced in different stages of xylem formation were related to climate data at several time scales. Drought negatively impacted growth of the most defoliated trees in both pine species. In Scots pine, xylem formation started earlier in the non-defoliated than in the most defoliated trees. Defoliated trees presented the shortest duration of the radial-enlargement phase in both species. On average the most defoliated trees formed 60% of the number of mature tracheids formed by the non-defoliated trees in both species. Since radial enlargement is the xylogenesis phase most tightly related to final growth, this explains why the most defoliated trees grew the least due to their altered xylogenesis phases. Our findings indicate a very limited resilience capacity of drought-defoliated Scots and black pines. Moreover, droughts produce legacy effects on xylogenesis of highly defoliated trees which could not recover previous growth rates and are thus more prone to die. PMID:27066053

  7. 19 CFR 143.7 - Revocation of ABI participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Revocation of ABI participation. 143.7 Section 143.7 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Automated Broker Interface § 143.7 Revocation of ABI...

  8. From America to Eurasia: a multigenomes history of the genus Abies.

    PubMed

    Semerikova, Svetlana A; Khrunyk, Yuliya Y; Lascoux, Martin; Semerikov, Vladimir L

    2018-03-15

    The origin of conifer genera, the main components of mountain temperate and boreal forests, was deemed to arise in the Mesozoic, although paleontological records and molecular data point to a recent diversification, presumably related to Neogene cooling. The geographical area(s) where the modern lines of conifers emerged remains uncertain, as is the sequence of events leading to their present distribution. To gain further insights into the biogeography of firs (Abies), we conducted phylogenetic analyses of chloroplast, mitochondrial and nuclear markers. The species tree, generated from ten single-copy nuclear genes, yielded probably the best phylogenetic hypothesis available for Abies. The tree obtained from five regions of chloroplast DNA largely corresponded to the nuclear species tree. Ancestral area reconstructions based on fossil calibrated chloroplast DNA and nuclear DNA trees pointed to repeated intercontinental migrations. The mitochondrial DNA haplotype tree, however, disagreed with nuclear and chloroplast DNA trees. It consisted of two clusters: one included mainly American haplotypes, while the other was composed of only Eurasian haplotypes. Presumably, this conflict is due to inter-continental migrations and introgressive hybridization, accompanied by the capture of the mitotypes from aboriginal species by the invading firs. Given that several species inhabiting Northeastern Asia carry American mitotypes and mutations typical for the American cluster, whereas no Asian mitotypes were detected within the American species, we hypothesize that Abies migrated from America to Eurasia, but not in the opposite direction. The direction and age of intercontinental migrations in firs are congruent with other conifers, such as spruces and pines of subsection Strobus, suggesting that these events had the same cause. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Prelude to Revolution: Scots-Irish Vigilantes in the Colonial Backcountry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    A PRELUDE TO REVOLUTION: SCOTS -IRISH VIGILANTES IN THE COLONIAL BACKCOUNTRY A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S...2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Prelude to Revolution: Scots -Irish Vigilantes in the Colonial Backcountry 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...arrived Scots -Irish. These clannish warrior farmers from the north of Ireland ultimately broke out in open rebellion in several locations in the

  10. European Pine Shoot Moth

    Treesearch

    William E. Miller; Arthur R. Hastings; John F. Wootten

    1961-01-01

    In the United States, the European pine shoot moth has caused much damage in young, plantations of red pine. It has been responsible for reduced planting of red pine in many areas. Although attacked trees rarely if ever die, their growth is inhibited and many are, deformed. Scotch pine and Austrian pine (Pinus nigra Arnold) are usually not so badly damaged. Swiss...

  11. General Toxicity and Antifungal Activity of a New Dental Gel with Essential Oil from Abies Sibirica L

    PubMed Central

    Noreikaitė, Aurelija; Ayupova, Rizvangul; Satbayeva, Elmira; Seitaliyeva, Aida; Amirkulova, Marzhan; Pichkhadze, Guram; Datkhayev, Ubaidilla; Stankeviandccaron;ius, Edgaras

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the antifungal activity and the general toxicity of a new dental gel containing essential oil from the tree Abies sibirica L., which grows in the Republic of Kazakhstan. Material/Methods The essential oil from Abies sibirica L. was obtained by microwave heating method using the STARTE Microwave Extraction System. Adjutants used to prepare the oil were carbomer 974P, glycerin, polysorbate 80, xylitol, triethanolamine, and purified water, all allowed for medical usage. The antifungal activity of the essential oil was assessed by monitoring the optical density of Candida albicans in a microplate reader. The safety was determined by analyzing the acute and subacute toxicity. Results The essential oil obtained by the microwave heating method revealed a higher antifungal activity in comparison with the essential oil obtained by the steam distillation method. No obvious changes were detected in guinea pigs following cutaneous application of the gel. Enteral administration of the essential oil caused minimal functional and histological changes in mice after 4 weeks. The new harmless dental gel containing pine oil from Abies sibirica L. was provided for the purposes of this particular clinical research. Conclusions The high antifungal activity of the gel is the basis for more in-depth studies on its safety and pharmacological activity. PMID:28132065

  12. General Toxicity and Antifungal Activity of a New Dental Gel with Essential Oil from Abies Sibirica L.

    PubMed

    Noreikaitė, Aurelija; Ayupova, Rizvangul; Satbayeva, Elmira; Seitaliyeva, Aida; Amirkulova, Marzhan; Pichkhadze, Guram; Datkhayev, Ubaidilla; Stankevičius, Edgaras

    2017-01-29

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to analyze the antifungal activity and the general toxicity of a new dental gel containing essential oil from the tree Abies sibirica L., which grows in the Republic of Kazakhstan. MATERIAL AND METHODS The essential oil from Abies sibirica L. was obtained by microwave heating method using the STARTE Microwave Extraction System. Adjutants used to prepare the oil were carbomer 974P, glycerin, polysorbate 80, xylitol, triethanolamine, and purified water, all allowed for medical usage. The antifungal activity of the essential oil was assessed by monitoring the optical density of Candida albicans in a microplate reader. The safety was determined by analyzing the acute and subacute toxicity. RESULTS The essential oil obtained by the microwave heating method revealed a higher antifungal activity in comparison with the essential oil obtained by the steam distillation method. No obvious changes were detected in guinea pigs following cutaneous application of the gel. Enteral administration of the essential oil caused minimal functional and histological changes in mice after 4 weeks. The new harmless dental gel containing pine oil from Abies sibirica L. was provided for the purposes of this particular clinical research. CONCLUSIONS The high antifungal activity of the gel is the basis for more in-depth studies on its safety and pharmacological activity.

  13. Experiences from Auditory Brainstem Implantation (ABIs) in four paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Karin; Stillesjö, Fredrik; Nyberg, Gunnar; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2016-01-01

    Indications for auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) have been widened from patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) to paediatric patients with congenital cochlear malformations, cochlear nerve hypoplasia/aplasia, or cochlear ossification after meningitis. We present four ABI surgeries performed in children at Uppsala University Hospital in Sweden since 2009. Three children were implanted with implants from Cochlear Ltd. (Lane Cove, Australia) and one child with an implant from MedEl GMBH (Innsbruck, Austria). A boy with Goldenhar syndrome was implanted with a Cochlear Nucleus ABI24M at age 2 years (patient 1). Another boy with CHARGE syndrome was implanted with a Cochlear Nucleus ABI541 at age 2.5 years (patient 2). Another boy with post-ossification meningitis was implanted with a Cochlear Nucleus ABI24M at age 4 years (patient 3). A girl with cochlear aplasia was implanted with a MedEl Synchrony ABI at age 3 years (patient 4). In patients 1, 2, and 3, the trans-labyrinthine approach was used, and in patient 4 the retro-sigmoid approach was used. Three of the four children benefited from their ABIs and use it full time. Two of the full time users had categories of auditory performance (CAP) score of 4 at their last follow up visit (6 and 2.5 years postoperative) which means they can discriminate consistently any combination of two of Ling's sounds. One child has not been fully evaluated yet, but is a full time user and had CAP 2 (responds to speech sounds) after 3 months of ABI use. No severe side or unpleasant stimulation effects have been observed so far. There was one case of immediate electrode migration and one case of implant device failure after 6.5 years. ABI should be considered as an option in the rehabilitation of children with similar diagnoses.

  14. Essential role for Abi1 in embryonic survival and WAVE2 complex integrity.

    PubMed

    Dubielecka, Patrycja M; Ladwein, Kathrin I; Xiong, Xiaoling; Migeotte, Isabelle; Chorzalska, Anna; Anderson, Kathryn V; Sawicki, Janet A; Rottner, Klemens; Stradal, Theresia E; Kotula, Leszek

    2011-04-26

    Abl interactor 1 (Abi1) plays a critical function in actin cytoskeleton dynamics through participation in the WAVE2 complex. To gain a better understanding of the specific role of Abi1, we generated a conditional Abi1-KO mouse model and MEFs lacking Abi1 expression. Abi1-KO cells displayed defective regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and this dysregulation was ascribed to altered activity of the WAVE2 complex. Changes in motility of Abi1-KO cells were manifested by a decreased migration rate and distance but increased directional persistence. Although these phenotypes did not correlate with peripheral ruffling, which was unaffected, Abi1-KO cells exhibited decreased dorsal ruffling. Western blotting analysis of Abi1-KO cell lysates indicated reduced levels of the WAVE complex components WAVE1 and WAVE2, Nap1, and Sra-1/PIR121. Although relative Abi2 levels were more than doubled in Abi1-KO cells, the absolute Abi2 expression in these cells amounted only to a fifth of Abi1 levels in the control cell line. This finding suggests that the presence of Abi1 is critical for the integrity and stability of WAVE complex and that Abi2 levels are not sufficiently increased to compensate fully for the loss of Abi1 in KO cells and to restore the integrity and function of the WAVE complex. The essential function of Abi1 in WAVE complexes and their regulation might explain the observed embryonic lethality of Abi1-deficient embryos, which survived until approximately embryonic day 11.5 and displayed malformations in the developing heart and brain. Cells lacking Abi1 and the conditional Abi1-KO mouse will serve as critical models for defining Abi1 function.

  15. Essential role for Abi1 in embryonic survival and WAVE2 complex integrity

    PubMed Central

    Dubielecka, Patrycja M.; Ladwein, Kathrin I.; Xiong, Xiaoling; Migeotte, Isabelle; Chorzalska, Anna; Anderson, Kathryn V.; Sawicki, Janet A.; Rottner, Klemens; Stradal, Theresia E.; Kotula, Leszek

    2011-01-01

    Abl interactor 1 (Abi1) plays a critical function in actin cytoskeleton dynamics through participation in the WAVE2 complex. To gain a better understanding of the specific role of Abi1, we generated a conditional Abi1-KO mouse model and MEFs lacking Abi1 expression. Abi1-KO cells displayed defective regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and this dysregulation was ascribed to altered activity of the WAVE2 complex. Changes in motility of Abi1-KO cells were manifested by a decreased migration rate and distance but increased directional persistence. Although these phenotypes did not correlate with peripheral ruffling, which was unaffected, Abi1-KO cells exhibited decreased dorsal ruffling. Western blotting analysis of Abi1-KO cell lysates indicated reduced levels of the WAVE complex components WAVE1 and WAVE2, Nap1, and Sra-1/PIR121. Although relative Abi2 levels were more than doubled in Abi1-KO cells, the absolute Abi2 expression in these cells amounted only to a fifth of Abi1 levels in the control cell line. This finding suggests that the presence of Abi1 is critical for the integrity and stability of WAVE complex and that Abi2 levels are not sufficiently increased to compensate fully for the loss of Abi1 in KO cells and to restore the integrity and function of the WAVE complex. The essential function of Abi1 in WAVE complexes and their regulation might explain the observed embryonic lethality of Abi1-deficient embryos, which survived until approximately embryonic day 11.5 and displayed malformations in the developing heart and brain. Cells lacking Abi1 and the conditional Abi1-KO mouse will serve as critical models for defining Abi1 function. PMID:21482783

  16. Nine Years of Irrigation Cause Vegetation and Fine Root Shifts in a Water-Limited Pine Forest

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Claude; Steffen, Jan; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; Hajdas, Irka; Brunner, Ivano

    2014-01-01

    Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) in the inner-Alpine dry valleys of Switzerland have suffered from increased mortality during the past decades, which has been caused by longer and more frequent dry periods. In addition, a proceeding replacement of Scots pines by pubescent oaks (Quercus pubescens Willd.) has been observed. In 2003, an irrigation experiment was performed to track changes by reducing drought pressure on the natural pine forest. After nine years of irrigation, we observed major adaptations in the vegetation and shifts in Scots pine fine root abundance and structure. Irrigation permitted new plant species to assemble and promote canopy closure with a subsequent loss of herb and moss coverage. Fine root dry weight increased under irrigation and fine roots had a tendency to elongate. Structural composition of fine roots remained unaffected by irrigation, expressing preserved proportions of cellulose, lignin and phenolic substances. A shift to a more negative δ13C signal in the fine root C indicates an increased photosynthetic activity in irrigated pine trees. Using radiocarbon (14C) measurement, a reduced mean age of the fine roots in irrigated plots was revealed. The reason for this is either an increase in newly produced fine roots, supported by the increase in fine root biomass, or a reduced lifespan of fine roots which corresponds to an enhanced turnover rate. Overall, the responses belowground to irrigation are less conspicuous than the more rapid adaptations aboveground. Lagged and conservative adaptations of tree roots with decadal lifespans are challenging to detect, hence demanding for long-term surveys. Investigations concerning fine root turnover rate and degradation processes under a changing climate are crucial for a complete understanding of C cycling. PMID:24802642

  17. Seeding and planting pines

    Treesearch

    Ralph E. Willard; L. Max Schmollinger

    1989-01-01

    Pines that occur naturally in parts of the region, as well as those that do not, have been introduced throughout. Pines usually produce greater volumes of wood faster than hardwoods, but in many parts of the region there is no market for pine stumpage or logs. Aside from wood production, pines are established for Christmas trees, windbreaks, landscaping, erosion...

  18. Mountain Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    Gene D. Amman; Mark D. McGregor; Robert E. Jr. Dolph

    1989-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a member of a group of beetles known as bark beetles: Except when adults emerge and attack new trees, the mountain pine beetle completes its life cycle under the bark. The beetle attacks and kills lodgepole, ponderosa, sugar, and western white pines. Outbreaks frequently develop in lodgepole pine stands that...

  19. Southern Pine Beetle Competitors

    Treesearch

    Fred M. Stephen

    2011-01-01

    When southern pine beetles mass attack a living pine tree, if colonization is successful the tree dies and its phloem becomes immediately available to a complex of other bark beetles and long-horned beetles, all of which, in order to reproduce, compete for the new resource. In southern pines the phloem-inhabiting guild is composed of the southern pine beetle...

  20. Soil concentrations and soil-atmosphere exchange of alkylamines in a boreal Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieloaho, Antti-Jussi; Pihlatie, Mari; Launiainen, Samuli; Kulmala, Markku; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Mammarella, Ivan; Vesala, Timo; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2017-03-01

    Alkylamines are important precursors in secondary aerosol formation in the boreal forest atmosphere. To better understand the behavior and sources of two alkylamines, dimethylamine (DMA) and diethylamine (DEA), we estimated the magnitudes of soil-atmosphere fluxes of DMA and DEA using a gradient-diffusion approximation based on measured concentrations in soil solution and in the canopy air space. The ambient air concentration of DMA used in this study was a sum of DMA and ethylamine. To compute the amine fluxes, we first estimated the soil air space concentration from the measured soil solution amine concentration using soil physical (temperature, soil water content) and chemical (pH) state variables. Then, we used the resistance analogy to account for gas transport mechanisms in the soil, soil boundary layer, and canopy air space. The resulting flux estimates revealed that the boreal forest soil with a typical long-term mean pH 5.3 is a possible source of DMA (170 ± 51 nmol m-2 day-1) and a sink of DEA (-1.2 ± 1.2 nmol m-2 day-1). We also investigated the potential role of fungi as a reservoir for alkylamines in boreal forest soil. We found high DMA and DEA concentrations both in fungal hyphae collected from field humus samples and in fungal pure cultures. The highest DMA and DEA concentrations were found in fungal strains belonging to decay and ectomycorrhizal fungal groups, indicating that boreal forest soil and, in particular, fungal biomass may be important reservoirs for these alkylamines.

  1. Isotope studies to the sorption behavior of atmospheric sulfate in humus layers of scots pine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Schulz, H; Neue, H-U

    2005-03-01

    The sorption potential for SO4(2-) in humus layer samples from field sites along a deposition gradient was determined experimentally in batch experiments. The Freundlich equation was used to quantify the sorption of added SO4(2-) in humus layer samples and to determine site-dependent sorption parameters. SO4(2-) sorption in humus layers is a concentration-dependent process. The linearity of isotherms reveals that SO4(2-) is reversibly bound in the organic surface layer, as long as soil solution concentrations remain above 26 to 44 mg SO4(2-) L(-1). Natural isotope variations of sulfur in SO4(2-) were analysed to investigate the degree of sorption of dissolved atmospheric and added SO4(2-). Both sulfate species differed significantly in their isotope composition. The pattern of delta34S values for SO4(2-) in all equilibrium solutions confirm the findings from sorption isotherms, showing a close relationship between the sulfur isotope ratios of SO4(2-) in soil solutions and the amount of SO4(2-) sorbed at the humus layer matrix. Stored atmospheric SO4(2-) in humus layers is released at sites where sulfate concentration in throughfall drops below 26 mg SO4(2-) L(-1). Concentration of soluble Fe decreased with increasing sulfate sorption, thus supporting the assumption that active Fe for example is important. Iron probably stabilizes the reactive surface of humus complexes and therefore has a positive influence on the SO4(2-) sorption in humus layers.

  2. The May October energy budget of a Scots pine plantation at Hartheim, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, L. W.; Vogt, R.; Kessler, A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes measurements of the Hartheim forest energy budget for the 157-day period of May 11 Oct. 14, 1992. Data were collected as 30-min means. Energy available to the forest was measured with net radiometers and soil heat flux discs; sensible heat exchange between the canopy and atmosphere was measured with two “One-Propeller Eddy Correlation” (OPEC) systems, and latent energy (evapotranspiration or ET) was determined as a residual in the surface energy balance equation. Net rediation, change in thermal storage, and sensible heat flux were verified by independent measurements during the Hartheim Experiment (HartX, May 11 12), and again during the “HartX2” experiment over 20 days late in the summer (Sep. 10 29). Specifically, sensible heat estimates from the two adjacent OPEC sensor sets were in close agreement throughout the summer, and in excellent agreement with measurements of sonic eddy correlation systems in May and September. The eddy correlation/energy balance technique was observed to overestimate occurrence of dew, leading to an underestimate of daily ET of about 5%. After taking dew into account, estimates of OPEC ET totaled 358 mm over the 5.1-month period, which is in quite good agreement with an ET estimate of 328 mm from a hydrologic water balance. An observed decrease in forest ET in July and August was clearly associated with low rainfall and increased soil water deficit. The OPEC system required only modest technical supervision, and generated a data yield of 99.5% over the period DOY 144 288. The documented verification and precision of this energy budget appears to be unmatched by any other long-term forest study reported to date.

  3. Climatic Changes in the East-European Forest-Steppe and Effects on Scots Pine Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, S. M.; Chendev, Yu. G.; Lupo, A. R.; Hubbart, J. A.; Timashchuk, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change during the 20th and early 21st centuries in the transitional zone between forests and grasslands at the center of the East-European Plain (Voronezh oblast) was determined by examining climate trends and variability using tree ring radial increment data as representative of productivity. An increase in atmospheric moisture for the warm period of the year (May-September) since 1890s, and mean annual temperatures since the 1950s was identified. During the same time period, there was a marked increase in amplitude of the annual variations for temperature and precipitation. Study results revealed trends, variability in the climatic indices, and corresponding radial wood increment for the regional stands of Pinus sylvestris L. These fluctuations are consistent with 10-12-years Schwabe-Wolf, 22-years Hale, and the 32-36-years Bruckner Solar Cycles. There was an additional relationship found between high-frequency (short-period) climate fluctuations, lasting for about three years, and 70-90-years fluctuations of the moisture regime in the study region corresponding to longer cycles. The results of this study can help guide management decisions in the study region and elsewhere, especially where climate change induced alterations to the state and productivity of forest ecosystems and associated natural resource commodities are of growing concern.

  4. High-alkali low-temperature polysulfide pulping (HALT) of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Paananen, Markus; Sixta, Herbert

    2015-10-01

    High-alkali low-temperature polysulfide pulping (HALT) was effectively utilised to prevent major polysaccharide losses while maintaining the delignification rate. A yield increase of 6.7 wt% on wood was observed for a HALT pulp compared to a conventionally produced kappa number 60 pulp with comparable viscosity. Approximately 70% of the yield increase was attributed to improved galactoglucomannan preservation and 30% to cellulose. A two-stage oxygen delignification sequence with inter-stage peroxymonosulphuric acid treatment was used to ensure delignification to a bleachable grade. In a comparison to conventional pulp, HALT pulp effectively maintained its yield advantage. Diafiltration trials indicate that purified black liquor can be directly recycled, as large lignin fractions and basically all dissolved polysaccharides were separated from the alkali-rich BL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Climate signals derived from cell anatomy of Scots pine in NE Germany.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei; Heinrich, Ingo; Simard, Sonia; Helle, Gerhard; Liñán, Isabel Dorado; Heinken, Thilo

    2013-08-01

    Tree-ring chronologies of Pinus sylvestris L. from latitudinal and altitudinal limits of the species distribution have been widely used for climate reconstructions, but there are many sites within the temperate climate zone, as is the case in northeastern Germany, at which there is little evidence of a clear climate signal in the chronologies. In this study, we developed long chronologies of several cell structure variables (e.g., average lumen area and cell wall thickness) from P. sylvestris growing in northeastern Germany and investigated the influence of climate on ring widths and cell structure variables. We found significant correlations between cell structure variables and temperature, and between tree-ring width and relative humidity and vapor pressure, respectively, enabling the development of robust reconstructions from temperate sites that have not yet been realized. Moreover, it has been shown that it may not be necessary to detrend chronologies of cell structure variables and thus low-frequency climate signals may be retrieved from longer cell structure chronologies. The relatively extensive resource of archaeological material of P. sylvestris covering approximately the last millennium may now be useful for climate reconstructions in northeastern Germany and other sites in the temperate climate zone.

  6. Uptake of cations under two different water regimes in a boreal scots pine forest.

    PubMed

    Plamboeck, A H; Nylén, T; Grip, H

    2000-07-10

    There is still much to find out about how trees react to changing nutrient conditions. In this cation uptake study, 134Cs and 22Na were injected between the humus and the mineral soil, and into a 20-cm depth in the mineral soil, respectively. Half of the experimental site was subjected to desiccation in 1995 and 1996, while the other half was subjected to irrigation in 1995, and desiccation in 1996. One month after the injections, the concentration of 134Cs in the xylem sap was higher in the irrigated plots (ID) than in the desiccated plots (DD). In August 1995, the difference in the 134Cs concentration in the xylem sap was even higher between the treatments. In 1995, 22Na was also higher in the xylem sap on the ID plots than on the DD plots, but not significantly. Exponential relationships were found between the amount of 134Cs and 22Na in the xylem sap; the relative water uptake from humus and 0-10-cm mineral soil (134Cs); and 10-25-cm mineral soil (22Na) in July 1995, when the tracers had not yet reached the top of the boles. The relative uptake of injected 22Na was larger than that of injected 134Cs, probably due to low exchangeability of Cs in the soil. One year after the injection (1996), more 134Cs was found in the wood, bark, needles and cones on the plots irrigated in 1995 than on the desiccated plots. The content of 134Cs in the stem wood and stump amounted to nearly 80% of the total uptake in the trees. The Cs distribution 1 year after the Chernobyl accident was dominated by Cs on/in needles and bark. After 10 years of redistribution, the Chernobyl Cs content of the different parts of the trees approached that of K.

  7. Fire Impact on Surface Fuels and Carbon Emissions in Scots pine Logged Sites of Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, G. A.; Kukavskaya, E. A.; Bogorodskaya, A. V.; Ivanov, V. A.; Zhila, S. V.; Conard, S. G.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fire and large-scale forest harvesting are the two major disturbances in the Russian boreal forests. Non-recovered logged sites total about a million hectares. Logged sites are characterized by higher fire hazard than forest sites due great amounts of logging slash, which dries out much more rapidly compared to understory fuels. Moreover, most logging sites can be easily accessed by local population. Both legal and illegal logging are also increasing rapidly in many forest areas of Siberia. Fire effects on forest overstory, subcanopy woody layer, and ground vegetation biomass were estimated on logged vs. unlogged sites in the Central Siberia region in 2009-2012 as a part of the project "The Influence of Changing Forestry Practices on the Effects of Wildfire and on Interactions Between Fire and Changing Climate in Central Siberia" supported by NASA (NEESPI). Dead down woody fuels are significantly less at unburned/logged area of dry southern regions compared to more humid northern regions. Fuel consumption was typically less in spring fires than during summer fires. Fire-caused carbon emissions on logged sites appeared to be twice that on unlogged sites. Soil respiration is less at logged areas compared to undisturbed forest. After fire soil respiration decreases both at logged and unlogged areas. arbon emissions from fire and post-fire ecosystem damage on logged sites are expected to increase under changing climate conditions and as a result of anticipated increases in future forest harvesting in Siberia.

  8. Stilbenes as constitutive and induced protection compounds in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.)

    Treesearch

    Anni Harju; Martti Venalainen

    2012-01-01

    The goals of our studies are to describe the natural variation in the concentration of constitutive heartwood extractives; estimate the genetic parameters related to heartwood characteristics; determine whether there is a genetic connection between constitutive and inducible production of stilbenes; and, together with technical experts, to develop fast and...

  9. Formosan subterranean termite resistance to heat treatment of Scots pine and Norway spruce

    Treesearch

    W. Ramsay Smith; Andreas O. Rapp; Christian Welzbacher; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2003-01-01

    New challenges to the durability of wood building materials have arisen in the U.S. The Formosan subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki) now infests sizable portions of the U.S. south (Figure 1) and their range is extending. Heat treatments offer a unique opportunity for wood-based composites because many of the process techniques already employ various...

  10. Journeying into the Anthropocene - Scots pine and eastern hemlock over the next 400 years

    Treesearch

    Duncan Stone

    2014-01-01

    Our native trees are much loved and valued components of our forests and fields, towns and cities. For a host of reasons - conservation, landscape, shade, and their sheer visual glory, we want our trees to grow big and old. But it takes time - often several centuries - from planting a tree to the desired outcome. This means that we need to choose trees today, which can...

  11. Which climate change path are we following? Bad news from Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Bombi, Pierluigi; D'Andrea, Ettore; Rezaie, Negar; Cammarano, Mario; Matteucci, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Current expectations on future climate derive from coordinated experiments, which compile many climate models for sampling the entire uncertainty related to emission scenarios, initial conditions, and modelling process. Quantifying this uncertainty is important for taking decisions that are robust under a wide range of possible future conditions. Nevertheless, if uncertainty is too large, it can prevent from planning specific and effective measures. For this reason, reducing the spectrum of the possible scenarios to a small number of one or a few models that actually represent the climate pathway influencing natural ecosystems would substantially increase our planning capacity. Here we adopt a multidisciplinary approach based on the comparison of observed and expected spatial patterns of response to climate change in order to identify which specific models, among those included in the CMIP5, catch the real climate variation driving the response of natural ecosystems. We used dendrochronological analyses for determining the geographic pattern of recent growth trends for three European species of trees. At the same time, we modelled the climatic niche for the same species and forecasted the suitability variation expected across Europe under each different GCM. Finally, we estimated how well each GCM explains the real response of ecosystems, by comparing the expected variation with the observed growth trends. Doing this, we identified four climatic models that are coherent with the observed trends. These models are close to the highest range limit of the climatic variations expected by the ensemble of the CMIP5 models, suggesting that current predictions of climate change impacts on ecosystems could be underestimated.

  12. Which climate change path are we following? Bad news from Scots pine

    PubMed Central

    D’Andrea, Ettore; Rezaie, Negar; Cammarano, Mario; Matteucci, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Current expectations on future climate derive from coordinated experiments, which compile many climate models for sampling the entire uncertainty related to emission scenarios, initial conditions, and modelling process. Quantifying this uncertainty is important for taking decisions that are robust under a wide range of possible future conditions. Nevertheless, if uncertainty is too large, it can prevent from planning specific and effective measures. For this reason, reducing the spectrum of the possible scenarios to a small number of one or a few models that actually represent the climate pathway influencing natural ecosystems would substantially increase our planning capacity. Here we adopt a multidisciplinary approach based on the comparison of observed and expected spatial patterns of response to climate change in order to identify which specific models, among those included in the CMIP5, catch the real climate variation driving the response of natural ecosystems. We used dendrochronological analyses for determining the geographic pattern of recent growth trends for three European species of trees. At the same time, we modelled the climatic niche for the same species and forecasted the suitability variation expected across Europe under each different GCM. Finally, we estimated how well each GCM explains the real response of ecosystems, by comparing the expected variation with the observed growth trends. Doing this, we identified four climatic models that are coherent with the observed trends. These models are close to the highest range limit of the climatic variations expected by the ensemble of the CMIP5 models, suggesting that current predictions of climate change impacts on ecosystems could be underestimated. PMID:29252985

  13. Effects of temperature and drought manipulations on seedlings of Scots pine provenances.

    PubMed

    Taeger, S; Sparks, T H; Menzel, A

    2015-03-01

    Rising temperatures and more frequent and severe climatic extremes as a consequence of climate change are expected to affect growth and distribution of tree species that are adapted to current local conditions. Species distribution models predict a considerable loss of habitats for Pinus sylvestris. These models do not consider possible intraspecific differences in response to drought and warming that could buffer those impacts. We tested 10 European provenances of P. sylvestris, from the southwestern to the central European part of the species distribution, for their response to warming and to drought using a factorial design. In this common-garden experiment the air surrounding plants was heated directly to prevent excessive soil heating, and drought manipulation, using a rain-out shelter, permitted almost natural radiation, including high light stress. Plant responses were assessed as changes in phenology, growth increment and biomass allocation. Seedlings of P. sylvestris revealed a plastic response to drought by increased taproot length and root-shoot ratios. Strongest phenotypic plasticity of root growth was found for southwestern provenances, indicating a specific drought adaptation at the cost of overall low growth of aboveground structures even under non-drought conditions. Warming had a minor effect on growth but advanced phenological development and had a contrasting effect on bud biomass and diameter increment, depending on water availability. The intraspecific variation of P. sylvestris provenances could buffer climate change impacts, although additional factors such as the adaptation to other climatic extremes have to be considered before assisted migration could become a management option. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  14. Limber Pine Dwarf Mistletoe (FIDL)

    Treesearch

    Jane E. Taylor; Robert L. Mathiason

    1999-01-01

    Limber pine dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium cyanocarpum (A. Nelson ex Rydberg) Coulter & Nelson) is a damaging parasite of limber pine (Pinus flexilis James), whitebark pine (P. albicaulis Engelm.), Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine (P. aristata Engelm.) and Great Basin bristlecone pine (P. longaeva D.K. Bailey). Limber pine dwarf mistletoe occurs in the Rocky...

  15. Species Distribution Modeling between Abies koreana and Abies nephrolepis According to the RCP Scenarios in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. G.; Kim, I. S.; Lee, W. K.; Kwon, H. J.; Byeon, J. G.; Yun, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Vulnerable plant that includes species in crisis of extinction is shown by environment, competition between various species. The climate is one of the main factor that affect to the plant distribution. The most essential particular to make species distribution model is distribution data, and secondly environmental factors. 179 taxon plant classified according to the distribution, it consist of characteristic and regional distribution criteria. In case of climate data, 1960-1990 period made by World Clim Data is applied which has 0.86㎢ spatial resolution. It separates temperature and precipitation factor. To predict potential distribution, Maxent(Maximum Entropy Model) is applied that is widely known as suitable model in case of presence distributional data only. Among the target species, Abies koreana and Abies nephrolepis have no clearly key to identify, so their differences of distribution and environmental fator information could act useful. In order to know the distinction according to the classifying species, Abies koreana and Abies nephrolepis are typically selected. Abies koreana distributes at high mountain in Southern part of Korean Peninsula, otherwise Abies nephrolepis is at high mountain in from Middle latitude(over the 37°) in South Korea. These species has been the center of controversy recently, because the classification key of these species is not scientifically clear yet. In this perspective these species predicted potential distribution depend on whether these are same species or not. In the result of considering these species are same, entire predicted distribution area is wider, especially Jiri-san mountain(latitude : 35°) which is the highest latitude of the Abies koreana distributed point. On the other side, result of considering different species is shown that Abies koreana could climatically survive near by Soerak-san mountain(latitude : 37°), but Abies nephrolepis could not live in Halla-san mountan(33°) in Jeju-island which is the

  16. Colonization behaviors of mountain pine beetle on novel hosts: Implications for range expansion into northeastern North America

    PubMed Central

    Venette, Robert C.; Maddox, Mitchell P.; Aukema, Brian H.

    2017-01-01

    As climates change, thermal limits may no longer constrain some native herbivores within their historical ranges. The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a tree-killing bark beetle native to western North America that is currently expanding its range. Continued eastward expansion through the newly invaded and novel jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) trees of the Canadian boreal forest could result in exposure of several species of novel potential host pines common in northeastern North America to this oligophagous herbivore. Due to the tightly co-evolved relationship between mountain pine beetle and western pine hosts, in which the insect utilizes the defensive chemistry of the host to stimulate mass attacks, we hypothesized that lack of co-evolutionary association would affect the host attraction and acceptance behaviors of this insect among novel hosts, particularly those with little known historical association with an aggressive stem-infesting insect. We studied how beetle behavior differed among the various stages of colonization on newly cut logs of four novel potential pine host species; jack, red (P. resinosa Ait.), eastern white (P. strobus L.) and Scots (P. sylvestris L.) pines, as well as two historical hosts, ponderosa (P. ponderosa Dougl. ex. Laws. var. scopulorum Engelm.) and lodgepole (P. contorta Dougl. var. latifolia Engelm.) pines. Overall, we found that beetle colonization behaviors at each stage in the colonization process differ between pine hosts, likely due to differing chemical and physical bark traits. Pines without co-evolved constitutive defenses against mountain pine beetle exhibited reduced amounts of defensive monoterpenoid chemicals; however, such patterns also reduced beetle attraction and colonization. Neither chemical nor physical defenses fully defended trees against the various stages of host procurement that can result in tree colonization and death. PMID:28472047

  17. Colonization behaviors of mountain pine beetle on novel hosts: Implications for range expansion into northeastern North America.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Derek W; Venette, Robert C; Maddox, Mitchell P; Aukema, Brian H

    2017-01-01

    As climates change, thermal limits may no longer constrain some native herbivores within their historical ranges. The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a tree-killing bark beetle native to western North America that is currently expanding its range. Continued eastward expansion through the newly invaded and novel jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) trees of the Canadian boreal forest could result in exposure of several species of novel potential host pines common in northeastern North America to this oligophagous herbivore. Due to the tightly co-evolved relationship between mountain pine beetle and western pine hosts, in which the insect utilizes the defensive chemistry of the host to stimulate mass attacks, we hypothesized that lack of co-evolutionary association would affect the host attraction and acceptance behaviors of this insect among novel hosts, particularly those with little known historical association with an aggressive stem-infesting insect. We studied how beetle behavior differed among the various stages of colonization on newly cut logs of four novel potential pine host species; jack, red (P. resinosa Ait.), eastern white (P. strobus L.) and Scots (P. sylvestris L.) pines, as well as two historical hosts, ponderosa (P. ponderosa Dougl. ex. Laws. var. scopulorum Engelm.) and lodgepole (P. contorta Dougl. var. latifolia Engelm.) pines. Overall, we found that beetle colonization behaviors at each stage in the colonization process differ between pine hosts, likely due to differing chemical and physical bark traits. Pines without co-evolved constitutive defenses against mountain pine beetle exhibited reduced amounts of defensive monoterpenoid chemicals; however, such patterns also reduced beetle attraction and colonization. Neither chemical nor physical defenses fully defended trees against the various stages of host procurement that can result in tree colonization and death.

  18. Early survival and height growth of Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine seedlings and variations in site factors following treatment of logging residues.

    Treesearch

    W. Lopushlnsky; D. Zabowskl; T.D. Anderson

    1992-01-01

    Logging residues were broadcast burned, piled and burned, removed, or left in place after clearcutting in a high-elevation subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) forest in north-central Washington. Survival, height growth and foliar nutrient content of planted Douglas-fir...

  19. Biophysical characteristics influencing growth and abundance of western white pine (Pinus monticola) across spatial scales in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin, Idaho

    Treesearch

    Theresa Jain

    2001-01-01

    During the past 50 years the moist forests of northern Idaho changed from being dominated by western white pine (Pinus monticola), an early sera! species, to ones dominated by late serial species, grand fir (Abies grandis) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla). Variable fire regimes, successional processes and endemic insects and pathogens worked in concert to...

  20. Jeffrey Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    Richard H. Smith

    1971-01-01

    The Jeffrey pine beetle (Dendroctonus jeffreyi Hopk.), one of the bark beetles that kill trees by mining between the bark and the wood, is the principal insect enemy of Jeffrey pine. The beetle is of economic importance chiefly in California, where most of the Jeffrey pine grows, and is most destructive in old-growth stands in the timber-producing areas of northeastern...

  1. Southwestern Pine Tip Moth

    Treesearch

    Daniel T. Jennings; Robert E. Stevens

    1982-01-01

    The southwestern pine tip moth, Rhyacionia neomexicana (Dyar), injures young ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws) in the Southwest, central Rockies, and midwestern plains. Larvae feed on and destroy new, expanding shoots, often seriously reducing terminal growth of both naturally regenerated and planted pines. The tip moth is especially damaging to trees on...

  2. Pine Tortoise Scale

    Treesearch

    Harvey J. MacAloney

    1961-01-01

    The pine tortoise scale (Toumeyella numismaticum (P. & M.)) is a soft scale that periodically causes a noticeable amount of mortality of hard pines. Although it was not described until 1920, when it was found on Scotch pine, in northern Wisconsin, there is evidence that it had caused injury much earlier in a number of localities in this and other States. Scale...

  3. Southern Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    Robert C. Thatcher; Patrick J. Barry

    1982-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann) is one of pine's most destructive insect enemies in the Southern United States, Mexico, and Central America. Because populations build rapidly to outbreak proportions and large numbers of trees are killed, this insect generates considerable concern among managers of southern pine forests. The beetle...

  4. White Pine Weevil

    Treesearch

    Abdul Hamid; Thomas M. O' Dell; Steven Katovich

    1995-01-01

    The white pine weevil - Pissodes strobi (Peck) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) - is a native insect attacking eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.). The latest cytogenetic and breeding studies indicate that two other North American pine weevil species - the Sitka spruce weevil and the Engelmann spruce weevil-also should be classified as Pissodes strobi. The present...

  5. Lodgepole Pine Dwarf Mistletoe

    Treesearch

    Frank G. Hawksworth; Oscar J. Dooling

    1984-01-01

    Lodgepole pine dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum Nutt. ex Engelm.) is a native, parasitic, seed plant that occurs essentially throughout the range of lodgepole pine in North America. It is the most damaging disease agent in lodgepole pine, causing severe growth loss and increased tree mortality. Surveys in the Rocky Mountains show that the parasite is found in...

  6. Ecology of shortleaf pine

    Treesearch

    James M. Guldin

    1986-01-01

    Shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) occupies the broadest natural range of all the southern pines, and is found across a diverse range of geography, soils, topography, and habitats. Individual shortleaf trees achieve their best developmnet on deep, well-drained soils of the Upper Coastal Plain, but shortleaf pine communities are most prominent in the Ouachita...

  7. Ponderosa pine ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Russell T. Graham; Theresa B. Jain

    2005-01-01

    Ponderosa pine is a wide-ranging conifer occurring throughout the United States, southern Canada, and northern Mexico. Since the 1800s, ponderosa pine forests have fueled the economies of the West. In western North America, ponderosa pine grows predominantly in the moist and dry forests. In the Black Hills of South Dakota and the southern portion of its range, the...

  8. Eastern Pine Shoot Borer

    Treesearch

    Louis F. Wilson

    1978-01-01

    The eastern pineshoot borer Eucosma gloriola Heinrich 2, also known as the white pine tip moth, American pine shoot moth, white pine shoot borer, and Tordeuse americaine, du pin, injures young conifers in Northeastern North America. Because it infests the new shoots of sapling conifers, this insect is particularly destructive on planted trees destined for the Christmas...

  9. An ABI3-interactor of conifers responds to multiple hormones.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ying; Zhao, Tiehan; Kermode, Allison

    2013-11-01

    CnAIP2 (Callitropsis nootkatensis ABI3-Interacting Protein 2) was previously identified as a protein that interacts with the yellow-cedar ABI3 protein. CnAIP2 plays important roles during several key transitions of the plant lifecycle and acts as a global regulator with functions opposite to those of ABI3 proteins. Here we report that the CnAIP2 gene promoter is strongly upregulated by all of the major plant hormones. Young Arabidopsis seedlings expressing a chimeric CnAIP2pro-GUS construct were subjected to exogenously applied hormones; the maximum fold-enhancement of GUS activity was as high as 47-fold, and each hormone showed a distinctive cell/tissue-specific pattern of GUS induction. By far the greatest response was elicited by the synthetic auxin 2,4-D (47-fold induction); the other hormones tested stimulated GUS activities by 8- to 21-fold. The CnAIP2 promoter also responded to glucose and salt (NaCl), albeit to a lesser extent (2- to 3-fold induction). As well as acting in an antagonistic way to the global regulator ABI3, CnAIP2 appears to participate in multiple hormonal crosstalk pathways to carry out its functions.

  10. 19 CFR 143.7 - Revocation of ABI participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Risk of significant harm to system. If the participant's continued use of ABI would pose a potential risk of significant harm to the integrity and functioning of the system, the Director, User Support... appeal the revocation to the Assistant Commissioner, Information and Technology, within 10 days following...

  11. Triterpene derivatives from Abies spectabilis leaves of Nepalese origin.

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Minesso, Paola; Comai, Stefano; Shrestha, Bharat Babu; Gewali, Mohan Bikram; Jha, Pramod Kumar; Innocenti, Gabbriella

    2011-06-01

    Our ongoing studies of Nepalese medicinal plants has led to the isolation and characterization of five new triterpenes, two known triterpenes and two phenolic derivatives from Abies spectabilis (D.Don) Mirb leaves grown in the high mountain. The structures of the isolated compounds were characterized by means of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic and MS techniques.

  12. Resistance to Phytophthora cinnamomi in the Genus Abies

    Treesearch

    John Frampton; Fikret Isik; Mike Benson; Jaroslav Kobliha; Jan Stjskal

    2012-01-01

    A major limiting factor for the culture of true firs as Christmas trees is their susceptibility to Oomycete species belonging to the genus Phytophthora. In North Carolina alone, the Fraser fir (Abies fraseri [Pursh] Poir.) Christmas tree industry loses 6 to 7 million dollars annually to root rot primarily caused by ...

  13. ABI5 Is a Regulator of Seed Maturation and Longevity in Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Zinsmeister, Julia; Lalanne, David; Terrasson, Emmanuel; Chatelain, Emilie; Vandecasteele, Céline; Vu, Benoit Ly; Gutbrod, Katharina; Dörmann, Peter; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid

    2016-01-01

    The preservation of our genetic resources and production of high-quality seeds depends on their ability to remain viable and vigorous during storage. In a quantitative trait locus analysis on seed longevity in Medicago truncatula, we identified the bZIP transcription factor ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5). Characterization of Mt-abi5 insertion mutant seeds revealed that both the acquisition of longevity and dormancy were severely impaired. Using transcriptomes of developing Mt-abi5 seeds, we created a gene coexpression network and revealed ABI5 as a regulator of gene modules with functions related to raffinose family oligosaccharide (RFO) metabolism, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, and photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs). Lower RFO contents in Mt-abi5 seeds were linked to the regulation of SEED IMBIBITION PROTEIN1. Proteomic analysis confirmed that a set of LEA polypeptides was reduced in mature Mt-abi5 seeds, whereas the absence of repression of PhANG in mature Mt-abi5 seeds was accompanied by chlorophyll and carotenoid retention. This resulted in a stress response in Mt-abi5 seeds, evident from an increase in α-tocopherol and upregulation of genes related to programmed cell death and protein folding. Characterization of abi5 mutants in a second legume species, pea (Pisum sativum), confirmed a role for ABI5 in the regulation of longevity, seed degreening, and RFO accumulation, identifying ABI5 as a prominent regulator of late seed maturation in legumes. PMID:27956585

  14. Preliminary GOES-R ABI navigation and registration assessment results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, B.; Dellomo, J.; Wolfe, R. E.; Reth, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    The US Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R Series (GOES-R) was launched on November 19, 2016, and was designated GOESR-16 upon reaching geostationary orbit ten days later. The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) is the primary instrument on the GOES-R series for imaging Earth's surface and atmosphere to aid in weather prediction and climate monitoring. We developed algorithms and software for independent verification of the ABI Image Navigation and Registration (INR). Since late January 2017, four INR metrics have been continuously generated to monitor the ABI INR performance: navigation (NAV) error, channel-to-channel registration (CCR) error, frame-to-frame registration (FFR) error, and within-frame registration (WIFR) error. In this paper, we will describe the fundamental algorithm used for the image registration and briefly discuss the processing flow of INR Performance Assessment Tool Set (IPATS) developed for ABI INR. The assessment of the accuracy shows that IPATS measurements error is about 1/20 of the size of a pixel. Then the GOES-16 NAV assessments results, the primary metric, from January to August 2017, will be presented. The INR has improved over time as post-launch tests were performed and corrections were applied. The mean NAV error of the visible and near infrared (VNIR) channels dropped from 20 μrad in January to around 5 μrad (+/-4 μrad, 1 σ) in June, while the mean NAV error of long wave infrared (LWIR) channels dropped from around 70 μrad in January to around 5 μrad (+/-15 μrad, 1 σ) in June. A full global ABI image is composed with 22 east-west direction swaths. The swath-wise NAV error analysis shows that there was some variation in the mean swath-wise NAV errors. The variations are about as much as 20% of the scene NAV mean errors. As expected, the swaths over the tropical area have far fewer valid assessments (matchups) than those in mid-latitude region due to cloud coverage. It was also found that there was a rotation

  15. Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency: two pathogenic mutations, V133E and C456F, in Japanese siblings.

    PubMed

    Song, X Q; Fukao, T; Watanabe, H; Shintaku, H; Hirayama, K; Kassovska-Bratinova, S; Kondo, N; Mitchell, G A

    1998-01-01

    Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT; EC 2.8.3.5; locus symbol OXCT) is the key enzyme of ketone body utilization. Hereditary SCOT deficiency (MIM 245050) causes episodes of severe ketoacidosis. We developed a transient expression system for mutant SCOT cDNAs, using immortalized SCOT-deficient fibroblasts. This paper describes and characterizes three missense mutations in two SCOT-deficient siblings from Japan. They are genetic compounds who inherited the mutation C456F (c1367 G-->T) from their mother. Their paternal allele contains two mutations in cis, T58M (c173 C-->T) and V133E (c398T-->A). Expression of SCOT cDNAs containing either V133E or C456F produces no detectable SCOT activity, whereas T58M is functionally neutral. T58M is a rare sequence variant not detected in 100 control Japanese alleles. In fibroblasts from the proband (GS02), in whom immunoblot demonstrated no detectable SCOT peptide, we measured an apparent residual SCOT activity of 20-35%. We hypothesize that the high residual SCOT activity in homogenates may be an artifact caused by use of the substrate, acetoacetyl-CoA by other enzymes. Expression of mutant SCOT cDNAs more accurately reflects the residual activity of SCOT than do currently available assays in cell or tissue homogenates.

  16. Geoecology of a forest watershed underlain by serpentine in Central Europe

    Treesearch

    Pavel Krám; Filip Oulehle; Veronika Štedrá; Jakub Hruška; James B. Shanley; Rakesh Minocha; Elena Traister

    2009-01-01

    The geoecology of a serpentinite-dominated site in the Czech Republic was investigated by rock, soil, water, and plant analyses. The 22-ha Pluhuv Bor watershed is almost entirely forested by a nearly 110-year old plantation of Picea abies (Norway Spruce) mixed with native Pinus sylvestris (Scots Pine) in the highest elevations...

  17. Validation of early GOES-16 ABI on-orbit geometrical calibration accuracy using SNO method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fangfang; Shao, Xi; Wu, Xiangqian; Kondratovich, Vladimir; Li, Zhengping

    2017-09-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) onboard the GOES-16 satellite, which was launched on 19 November 2016, is the first next-generation geostationary weather instrument in the west hemisphere. It has 16 spectral solar reflective and emissive bands located in three focal plane modules (FPM): one visible and near infrared (VNIR) FPM, one midwave infrared (MWIR), and one longwave infrared (LWIR) FPM. All the ABI bands are geometeorically calibrated with new techniques of Kalman filtering and Global Positioning System (GPS) to determine the accurate spacecraft attitude and orbit configuration to meet the challenging image navigation and registration (INR) requirements of ABI data. This study is to validate the ABI navigation and band-to-band registration (BBR) accuracies using the spectrally matched pixels of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) M-band data and the ABI images from the Simultaneous Nadir Observation (SNO) images. The preliminary results showed that during the ABI post-launch product test (PLPT) period, the ABI BBR errors at the y-direction (along the VIIRS track direction) is smaller than at the x-direction (along the VIIRS scan direction). Variations in the ABI BBR calibration residuals and navigation difference to VIIRS can be observed. Note that ABI is not operational yet and the data is experimental and still under testing. Effort is still ongoing to improve the ABI data quality.

  18. Development concepts of a Smart Cyber Operating Theater (SCOT) using ORiN technology.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Jun; Masamune, Ken; Iseki, Hiroshi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2018-02-23

    Currently, networking has not progressed in the treatment room. Almost every medical device in the treatment room operates as a stand-alone device. In this project, we aim to develop a networked operating room called "Smart Cyber Operating Theater (SCOT)". Medical devices are connected using Open Resource interface for the Network (ORiN) technology. In this paper, we describe the concept of the SCOT project. SCOT is integrated using the communication interface ORiN, which was originally developed for industry. One feature of ORiN is that the system can be constructed flexibly. ORiN creates abstracts of the same type of devices and increases the robustness of the system for device exchange. By using ORiN technology, we are developing new applications, such as decision-making navigation or a precision guided treatment system.

  19. Hurricane Katrina winds damaged longleaf pine less than loblolly pine

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Johnsen; John R. Butnor; John S. Kush; Ronald C. Schmidtling; C. Dana Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Some evidence suggests that longleaf pine might be more tolerant of high winds than either slash pine (Pinus elliotii Englem.) or loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). We studied wind damage to these three pine species in a common garden experiment in southeast Mississippi following Hurricane Katrina,...

  20. Individual variation of sap-flow rate in large pine and spruce trees and stand transpiration: a pilot study at the central NOPEX site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čermák, J.; Cienciala, E.; Kučera, J.; Lindroth, A.; Bednářová, E.

    1995-06-01

    Transpiration in a mixed old stand of sub-boreal forest in the Norunda region (central Sweden) was estimated on the basis of direct measurement of sap flow rate in 24 large Scots pine and Norway spruce trees in July and August 1993. Sap flow rate was measured using the trunk tissue heat balance method based on internal (electric) heating and sensing of temperature. Transpiration was only 0.7 mm day -1 in a relatively dry period in July (i.e. about 20% of potential evaporation) and substantially higher after a rainy period in August. The error of the estimates of transpiration was higher during a dry period (about 13% and 22% in pine and spruce, respectively) and significantly lower (about 9% in both species) during a period of sufficient water supply. Shallow-rooted spruce trees responded much faster to precipitation than deeply rooted pines.

  1. Red Pine Shoot Moth

    Treesearch

    John Hainze; David Hall

    The red pine shoot moth recently caused significant damage to red pine plantations in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. Trees of all ages have been attacked, but the most severe damage has occurred in 20-40 year old plantations growing on sandy soils.

  2. Squirrel Damage to Pines

    Treesearch

    USDA Forest Service

    1981-01-01

    Flagging (dead branch tips) on jack pine and red pine may be caused by insects, diseases, or mechanical damage. In the Lake States, flagging is often the result of mechanical damage, sometimes girdling, caused when the cones are torn off by red squirrels.

  3. Western Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    Clarence J. Jr. DeMars; Bruce H. Roettgering

    1982-01-01

    The western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte, can aggressively attack and kill ponderosa and Coulter pine trees of all ages and vigor classes that are 6 inches (15 cm) or larger in diameter, including apparently healthy trees. Group killing of trees is common in dense, overstocked stands of pure, even-aged, young sawtimber (fig. 1), but also occurs among...

  4. Whitebark pine planting guidelines

    Treesearch

    Ward McCaughey; Glenda L. Scott; Kay L. Izlar

    2009-01-01

    This article incorporates new information into previous whitebark pine guidelines for planting prescriptions. Earlier 2006 guidelines were developed based on review of general literature, research studies, field observations, and standard US Forest Service survival surveys of high-elevation whitebark pine plantations. A recent study of biotic and abiotic factors...

  5. Nantucket Pine Tip Moth

    Treesearch

    Harry O. III Yates; Nell A. Overgaard; Thomas W. Koerber

    1981-01-01

    The Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock),4 is a major forest insect pest in the United States. Its range extends from Massachusetts to Florida and west to Texas. It was found in San Diego County, California, in 1971 and traced to infested pine seedlings shipped from Georgia in 1967. The moth has since spread north and east in California and is now...

  6. Longleaf pine seedling production

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett

    2000-01-01

    Longleaf pine is a highly desirable species, resisting fire, insects and pathogens, and produces quality solid-wood products, but regeneration of the species has been difficult. Natural regeneration is feasible only on a small portion of the area considered to be longleaf pine type. Therefore, artificial regeneration must become a reliable means of regenerating the...

  7. Common Pine Shoot Beetle

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack; Daniel Kucera; Steven Passoa

    1993-01-01

    The common (or larger) pine shoot beetle, Tomicus (=Blastophagus) piniperda (L.), was discovered near Cleveland, Ohio in July 1992. As of this writing, it is now in six states: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Adults of the common pine shoot beetle are cylindrical and range from 3 to 5 mm in length (about the size of a match head). Their...

  8. Diplodia Blight of Pines

    Treesearch

    Glenn W. Peterson

    1981-01-01

    The fungus Diplodia pinea (Desm.) Kickx is most damaging to plantings of both exotic and native pine species in the United States. The fungus is seldom found in natural pine stands. Diplodia pinea kills current-year shoots, major branches, and ultimately entire trees. The effects of this disease are most severe in landscape, windbreak, and park plantings in the Central...

  9. Silvical characteristics of Jeffrey pine

    Treesearch

    William E. Hallin

    1957-01-01

    The most noteworthy feature of Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi Grev. & Balf. ) is its similarity in appearance and behavior to ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.), a much more widespread and better known species. At one time Jeffrey pine was considered to be a variety of ponderosa pine, and lumber markets make no...

  10. Pinus glabra Walt. Spruce Pine

    Treesearch

    Susan V. Kossuth; J.L. Michael

    1991-01-01

    Spruce pine (Pinus glabra), also called cedar pine, Walter pine, or bottom white pine, is a medium-sized tree that grows in limited numbers in swamps, river valleys, on hummocks, and along river banks of the southern Coastal Plain. Its wood is brittle, close-grained, nondurable, and is of limited commercial importance.

  11. Sugar pine and its hybrids

    Treesearch

    W. B. Critchfield; B. B. Kinloch

    1986-01-01

    Unlike most white pines, sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana) is severely restricted in its ability to hybridize with other species. It has not been successfully crossed with any other North American white pine, nor with those Eurasian white pines it most closely resembles. Crosses with the dissimilar P. koraiensis and P....

  12. AbiA, a lactococcal abortive infection mechanism functioning in Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Tangney, Mark; Fitzgerald, Gerald F

    2002-12-01

    The lactococcal abortive infection mechanisms AbiA and AbiG were introduced into Streptococcus thermophilus 4035, and a range of phages capable of infecting this host were examined for sensitivity to these mechanisms. AbiA proved effective against six phages when examined at a growth temperature of 30 degrees C but had no effect on any of the phages when tested at 37 or 42 degrees C. AbiG failed to affect any of the S. thermophilus phages at 30, 37, or 42 degrees C.

  13. Pyrene degradation in forest humus microcosms with or without pine and its mycorrhizal fungus.

    PubMed

    Koivula, Teija T; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja; Peltola, Rainer; Romantschuk, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The mineralization potential of forest humus and the self-cleaning potential of a boreal coniferous forest environment for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds was studied using a model ecosystem of acid forest humus (pH = 3.6) and pyrene as the model compound. The matrix was natural humus or humus mixed with oil-polluted soil in the presence and absence of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and its mycorrhizal fungus (Paxillus involutus). The rates of pyrene mineralization in the microcosms with humus implants (without pine) were initially insignificant but increased from Day 64 onward to 47 microg kg(-1) d(-1) and further to 144 microg kg(-1) d(-1) after Day 105. In the pine-planted humus microcosms the rate of mineralization also increased, reaching 28 microg kg(-1) d(-1) after Day 105. The 14CO2 emission was already considerable in nonplanted microcosms containing oily soil at Day 21 and the pyrene mineralization continued throughout the study. The pyrene was converted to CO2 at rates of 0.07 and 0.6 microg kg(-1) d(-1) in the oily-soil implanted microcosms with and without pine, respectively. When the probable assimilation of 14CO2 by the pine and ground vegetation was taken into account the most efficient microcosm mineralized 20% of the 91.2 mg kg(-1) pyrene in 180 d. The presence of pine and its mycorrhizal fungus had no statistically significant effect on mineralization yields. The rates of pyrene mineralization observed in this study for forest humus exceeded the total annual deposition rate of PAHs in southern Finland. This indicates that accumulation in forest soil is not to be expected.

  14. Scottish Classroom Voices: A Case Study of Teaching and Learning Scots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoba, Jo Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Research in multilingual classrooms demonstrates education as a key site within which social and linguistic values are shaped. This study extends such research by investigating language use in a Scottish primary classroom. Scots is widely spoken throughout Scotland, figuring in a 2003 Scottish Parliament report as one of two indigenous heritage…

  15. Strange, incredible and impossible things: the early anthropology of Reginald Scot.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Roland

    2009-06-01

    Reginald Scot has been acclaimed as an early rationalist for his critical consideration of witchcraft in 1584. At the same time, the Discoverie of Witchcraft appears organized much as later classic anthropological monographs. This article considers whether his methods and writing might indeed correspond to what we recognise as the procedures of medical or psychiatric anthropology.

  16. Phenological notes on Latin American Pinus and Abies

    Treesearch

    William B. Critchfield

    1966-01-01

    Very little information has been reported on the time of pollen shedding of the many pines and firs native to Mexico and northern Central America. This kind of information is necessary for any breeding operation, and is often of considerable taxonomic and evolutionary interest as well. An example is the difference in pollination time of a month to six weeks between...

  17. Genetic relationship and diversity among coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) accessions revealed through SCoT analysis.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, M K; Sabana, A A; Rachana, K E; Rahman, Shafeeq; Jerard, B A; Karun, Anitha

    2015-12-01

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is one of the important palms grown both as a homestead and plantation crop in countries and most island territories of tropical regions. Different DNA-based marker systems have been utilized to assess the extent of genetic diversity in coconut. Advances in genomics research have resulted in the development of novel gene-targeted markers. In the present study, we have used a simple and novel marker system, start codon targeted polymorphism (SCoT), for its evaluation as a potential marker system in coconut. SCoT markers were utilized for assessment of genetic diversity in 23 coconut accessions (10 talls and 13 dwarfs), representing different geographical regions. Out of 25 SCoT primers screened, 15 primers were selected for this study based on their consistent amplification patterns. A total of 102 scorable bands were produced by the 15 primers, 88 % of which were polymorphic. The scored data were used to construct a similarity matrix. The similarity coefficient values ranged between 0.37 and 0.91. These coefficients were utilized to construct a dendrogram using the unweighted pair group of arithmetic means (UPGMA). The extent of genetic diversity observed based on SCoT analysis of coconut accessions was comparable to earlier findings using other marker systems. Tall and dwarf coconut accessions were clearly demarcated, and in general, coconut accessions from the same geographical region clustered together. The results indicate the potential of SCoT markers to be utilized as molecular markers to detect DNA polymorphism in coconut accessions.

  18. Thinking Allowed: Use of Egocentric Speech after Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Sian A.; Skidmore, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the use of thinking aloud made by young people who have sustained a severe acquired brain injury (ABI). The phenomenon is compared with the concepts of egocentric speech and inner speech before the form of thinking aloud by pupils with ABI is examined. It is suggested that by using thinking aloud, this group of pupils is able…

  19. Students' Attitudes toward ABI/INFORM on CD-ROM: A Factor Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Vicky; Lau, Shuk-fong

    Two years after the introduction of CD-ROM bibliographic database searching in the Memphis State University libraries (Tennessee), a survey was conducted to examine students' attitudes toward the business database, ABI/INFORM. ABI/INFORM contains indexes and abstracts of articles from over 800 journals on management, accounting, banking, human…

  20. Molecular cloning in Arabidopsis thaliana of a new protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) with homology to ABI1 and ABI2.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, P L; Leube, M P; Grill, E

    1998-11-01

    We report the cloning of both the cDNA and the corresponding genomic sequence of a new PP2C from Arabidopsis thaliana, named AtP2C-HA (for homology to ABI1/ABI2). The AtP2C-HA cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1536 bp and encodes a putative protein of 511 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 55.7 kDa. The AtP2C-HA protein is composed of two domains, a C-terminal PP2C catalytic domain and a N-terminal extension of ca. 180 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence is 55% and 54% identical to ABI1 and ABI2, respectively. Comparison of the genomic structure of the ABI1, ABI2 and AtP2C-HA genes suggests that they belong to a multigene family. The expression of the AtP2C-HA gene is up-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) treatment.

  1. Pine Island Bay

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... Birth of a Large Iceberg in Pine Island Bay, Antarctica     View Larger Image ... revealed the crack to be propagating through the shelf ice at a rate averaging 15 meters per day, accompanied by a slight rotation of ...

  2. The longleaf pine resource

    Treesearch

    John F. Kelly; William A. Bechtold

    1989-01-01

    Area of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) in the Southern United States has declined from 12.2 to 3.8 million acres over the past 30 years. Longleaf pine, which once dominated vast portions of the region, now accounts for only 3 percent of the total timberland acreage in the 8 States where the species is found.Longleaf growing-stock volume has decreased by 12...

  3. Development of Species-Specific SCAR Markers, Based on a SCoT Analysis, to Authenticate Physalis (Solanaceae) Species

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shangguo; Zhu, Yujia; Yu, Chenliang; Jiao, Kaili; Jiang, Mengying; Lu, Jiangjie; Shen, Chenjia; Ying, Qicai; Wang, Huizhong

    2018-01-01

    Physalis is an important genus in the Solanaceae family. It includes many species of significant medicinal value, edible value, and ornamental value. However, many Physalis species are easily confused because of their similar morphological traits, which hinder the utilization and protection of Physalis resources. Therefore, it is necessary to create fast, sensitive, and reliable methods for the Physalis species authentication. Intended for that, in this study, species-specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers were developed for accurate identification of the closely related Physalis species P. angulata, P. minima, P. pubescens, and P. alkekengi var. franchetii, based on a simple and novel marker system, start codon targeted (SCoT) marker. A total of 34 selected SCoT primers yielded 289 reliable SCoT loci, of which 265 were polymorphic. Four species-specific SCoT fragments (SCoT3-1404, SCoT3-1589, SCoT5-550, and SCoT36-520) from Physalis species were successfully identified, cloned, and sequenced. Based on these selected specific DNA fragments, four SCAR primers pairs were developed and named ST3KZ, ST3MSJ, ST5SJ, and ST36XSJ. PCR analysis of each of these primer pairs clearly demonstrated a specific amplified band in all samples of the target Physalis species, but no amplification was observed in other Physalis species. Therefore, the species-specific SCAR primer pairs developed in this study could be used as powerful tools that can rapidly, effectively, and reliably identify and differentiate Physalis species.

  4. Role of the adapter protein Abi1 in actin-associated signaling and smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Cleary, Rachel A; Wang, Ruping; Tang, Dale D

    2013-07-12

    Actin filament polymerization plays a critical role in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction. However, our knowledge regarding modulation of the actin cytoskeleton in smooth muscle just begins to accumulate. In this study, stimulation with acetylcholine (ACh) induced an increase in the association of the adapter protein c-Abl interactor 1 (Abi1) with neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) (an actin-regulatory protein) in smooth muscle cells/tissues. Furthermore, contractile stimulation activated N-WASP in live smooth muscle cells as evidenced by changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of an N-WASP sensor. Abi1 knockdown by lentivirus-mediated RNAi inhibited N-WASP activation, actin polymerization, and contraction in smooth muscle. However, Abi1 silencing did not affect myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation at Ser-19 in smooth muscle. In addition, c-Abl tyrosine kinase and Crk-associated substrate (CAS) have been shown to regulate smooth muscle contraction. The interaction of Abi1 with c-Abl and CAS has not been investigated. Here, contractile activation induced formation of a multiprotein complex including c-Abl, CAS, and Abi1. Knockdown of c-Abl and CAS attenuated the activation of Abi1 during contractile activation. More importantly, Abi1 knockdown inhibited c-Abl phosphorylation at Tyr-412 and the interaction of c-Abl with CAS. These results suggest that Abi1 is an important component of the cellular process that regulates N-WASP activation, actin dynamics, and contraction in smooth muscle. Abi1 is activated by the c-Abl-CAS pathway, and Abi1 reciprocally controls the activation of its upstream regulator c-Abl.

  5. Role of the Adapter Protein Abi1 in Actin-associated Signaling and Smooth Muscle Contraction*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Cleary, Rachel A.; Wang, Ruping; Tang, Dale D.

    2013-01-01

    Actin filament polymerization plays a critical role in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction. However, our knowledge regarding modulation of the actin cytoskeleton in smooth muscle just begins to accumulate. In this study, stimulation with acetylcholine (ACh) induced an increase in the association of the adapter protein c-Abl interactor 1 (Abi1) with neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) (an actin-regulatory protein) in smooth muscle cells/tissues. Furthermore, contractile stimulation activated N-WASP in live smooth muscle cells as evidenced by changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of an N-WASP sensor. Abi1 knockdown by lentivirus-mediated RNAi inhibited N-WASP activation, actin polymerization, and contraction in smooth muscle. However, Abi1 silencing did not affect myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation at Ser-19 in smooth muscle. In addition, c-Abl tyrosine kinase and Crk-associated substrate (CAS) have been shown to regulate smooth muscle contraction. The interaction of Abi1 with c-Abl and CAS has not been investigated. Here, contractile activation induced formation of a multiprotein complex including c-Abl, CAS, and Abi1. Knockdown of c-Abl and CAS attenuated the activation of Abi1 during contractile activation. More importantly, Abi1 knockdown inhibited c-Abl phosphorylation at Tyr-412 and the interaction of c-Abl with CAS. These results suggest that Abi1 is an important component of the cellular process that regulates N-WASP activation, actin dynamics, and contraction in smooth muscle. Abi1 is activated by the c-Abl-CAS pathway, and Abi1 reciprocally controls the activation of its upstream regulator c-Abl. PMID:23740246

  6. Potential of Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers for DNA fingerprinting of newly synthesized tritordeums and their respective parents.

    PubMed

    Cabo, Sandra; Ferreira, Luciana; Carvalho, Ana; Martins-Lopes, Paula; Martín, António; Lima-Brito, José Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    Hexaploid tritordeum (H(ch)H(ch)AABB; 2n = 42) results from the cross between Hordeum chilense (H(ch)H(ch); 2n = 14) and cultivated durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (AABB; 2n = 28). Morphologically, tritordeum resembles the wheat parent, showing promise for agriculture and wheat breeding. Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) polymorphism is a recently developed technique that generates gene-targeted markers. Thus, we considered it interesting to evaluate its potential for the DNA fingerprinting of newly synthesized hexaploid tritordeums and their respective parents. In this study, 60 SCoT primers were tested, and 18 and 19 of them revealed SCoT polymorphisms in the newly synthesized tritordeum lines HT27 and HT22, respectively, and their parents. An analysis of the presence/absence of bands among tritordeums and their parents revealed three types of polymorphic markers: (i) shared by tritordeums and one of their parents, (ii) exclusively amplified in tritordeums, and (iii) exclusively amplified in the parents. No polymorphism was detected among individuals of each parental species. Three SCoT markers were exclusively amplified in tritordeums of lines HT22 and HT27, being considered as polyploidization-induced rearrangements. About 70% of the SCoT markers of H. chilense origin were not transmitted to the allopolyploids of both lines, and most of the SCoTs scored in the newly synthesized allopolyploids originated from wheat, reinforcing the potential use of tritordeum as an alternative crop.

  7. Abscisic Acid Antagonizes Ethylene Production through the ABI4-Mediated Transcriptional Repression of ACS4 and ACS8 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhijun; Yu, Yanwen; Li, Shenghui; Wang, Juan; Tang, Saijun; Huang, Rongfeng

    2016-01-04

    Increasing evidence has revealed that abscisic acid (ABA) negatively modulates ethylene biosynthesis, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To identify the factors involved, we conducted a screen for ABA-insensitive mutants with altered ethylene production in Arabidopsis. A dominant allele of ABI4, abi4-152, which produces a putative protein with a 16-amino-acid truncation at the C-terminus of ABI4, reduces ethylene production. By contrast, two recessive knockout alleles of ABI4, abi4-102 and abi4-103, result in increased ethylene evolution, indicating that ABI4 negatively regulates ethylene production. Further analyses showed that expression of the ethylene biosynthesis genes ACS4, ACS8, and ACO2 was significantly decreased in abi4-152 but increased in the knockout mutants, with partial dependence on ABA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR assays showed that ABI4 directly binds the promoters of these ethylene biosynthesis genes and that ABA enhances this interaction. A fusion protein containing the truncated ABI4-152 peptide accumulated to higher levels than its full-length counterpart in transgenic plants, suggesting that ABI4 is destabilized by its C terminus. Therefore, our results demonstrate that ABA negatively regulates ethylene production through ABI4-mediated transcriptional repression of the ethylene biosynthesis genes ACS4 and ACS8 in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ABI3, a component of the WAVE2 complex, is potentially regulated by PI3K/AKT pathway

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Lais; Zanchin, Nilson I.T.; Cerutti, Janete M.

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that ABI3 expression is lost in follicular thyroid carcinomas and its restoration significantly inhibited cell growth, invasiveness, migration, and reduced tumor growth in vivo. The mechanistic basis by which ABI3 exerts its tumor suppressive effects is not fully understood. In this study, we show that ABI3 is a phosphoprotein. Using proteomic array analysis, we showed that ABI3 modulated distinct cancer-related pathways in thyroid cancer cells. The KEA analysis found that PI3K substrates were enriched and forced expression of ABI3 markedly decreased the phosphorylation of AKT and the downstream-targeted protein pGSK3β. We next used immunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry to identify ABI3-interacting proteins that may be involved in modulating/integrating signaling pathways. We identified 37 ABI3 partners, including several components of the canonical WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) such as WAVE2/CYF1P1/NAP1, suggesting that ABI3 function might be regulated through WRC. Both, pharmacological inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway and mutation at residue S342 of ABI3, which is predicted to be phosphorylated by AKT, provided evidences that the non-phosphorylated form of ABI3 is preferentially present in the WRC protein complex. Collectively, our findings suggest that ABI3 might be a downstream mediator of the PI3K/AKT pathway that might disrupt WRC via ABI3 phosphorylation. PMID:28978070

  9. ABI3, a component of the WAVE2 complex, is potentially regulated by PI3K/AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Lais; Zanchin, Nilson I T; Cerutti, Janete M

    2017-09-15

    We previously reported that ABI3 expression is lost in follicular thyroid carcinomas and its restoration significantly inhibited cell growth, invasiveness, migration, and reduced tumor growth in vivo . The mechanistic basis by which ABI3 exerts its tumor suppressive effects is not fully understood. In this study, we show that ABI3 is a phosphoprotein. Using proteomic array analysis, we showed that ABI3 modulated distinct cancer-related pathways in thyroid cancer cells. The KEA analysis found that PI3K substrates were enriched and forced expression of ABI3 markedly decreased the phosphorylation of AKT and the downstream-targeted protein pGSK3β. We next used immunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry to identify ABI3-interacting proteins that may be involved in modulating/integrating signaling pathways. We identified 37 ABI3 partners, including several components of the canonical WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) such as WAVE2/CYF1P1/NAP1, suggesting that ABI3 function might be regulated through WRC. Both, pharmacological inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway and mutation at residue S342 of ABI3, which is predicted to be phosphorylated by AKT, provided evidences that the non-phosphorylated form of ABI3 is preferentially present in the WRC protein complex. Collectively, our findings suggest that ABI3 might be a downstream mediator of the PI3K/AKT pathway that might disrupt WRC via ABI3 phosphorylation.

  10. Health of whitebark pine forests after mountain pine beetle outbreaks

    Treesearch

    Sandra Kegley; John Schwandt; Ken Gibson; Dana Perkins

    2011-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), a keystone high-elevation species, is currently at risk due to a combination of white pine blister rust (WPBR) (Cronartium ribicola), forest succession, and outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae). While recent mortality is often quantified by aerial detection surveys (ADS) or ground surveys, little...

  11. Should ponderosa pine be planted on lodgepole pine sites?

    Treesearch

    P.H. Cochran

    1984-01-01

    Repeated radiation frosts caused no apparent harm to the majority of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.) seedlings planted on a pumice flat in south-central Oregon. For most but not all of the ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl.) seedlings planted with the lodgepole pine, however, damage from radiation frost resulted in...

  12. Abi1 is essential for the formation and activation of a WAVE2 signalling complex.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Metello; Zucconi, Adriana; Disanza, Andrea; Frittoli, Emanuela; Areces, Liliana B; Steffen, Anika; Stradal, Theresia E B; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Carlier, Marie-France; Scita, Giorgio

    2004-04-01

    WAVE2 belongs to a family of proteins that mediates actin reorganization by relaying signals from Rac to the Arp2/3 complex, resulting in lamellipodia protrusion. WAVE2 displays Arp2/3-dependent actin nucleation activity in vitro, and does not bind directly to Rac. Instead, it forms macromolecular complexes that have been reported to exert both positive and negative modes of regulation. How these complexes are assembled, localized and activated in vivo remains to be established. Here we use tandem mass spectrometry to identify an Abi1-based complex containing WAVE2, Nap1 (Nck-associated protein) and PIR121. Abi1 interacts directly with the WHD domain of WAVE2, increases WAVE2 actin polymerization activity and mediates the assembly of a WAVE2-Abi1-Nap1-PIR121 complex. The WAVE2-Abi1-Nap1-PIR121 complex is as active as the WAVE2-Abi1 sub-complex in stimulating Arp2/3, and after Rac activation it is re-localized to the leading edge of ruffles in vivo. Consistently, inhibition of Abi1 by RNA interference (RNAi) abrogates Rac-dependent lamellipodia protrusion. Thus, Abi1 orchestrates the proper assembly of the WAVE2 complex and mediates its activation at the leading edge in vivo.

  13. Landsat-ABI (L-ABI) Enables 8-day Revisits and Increased Science Content with a Single Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woody, L. M.; Griffith, P. C.; Wirth, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    In addition to the on-going uses of Landsat data for land use and land cover change assessment, crop monitoring, ecosystem evaluation, and water use mapping, the increasing number of severe environmental events (storms, droughts, floods, and fires) has intensified the demand for land imaging data. Users desire more data and, more importantly, more frequent data to better understand the trends and impacts of these extreme events. Additionally, the Sustainable Land Imaging (SLI) thrust faces the difficult task of providing continuity of measurements in a strict budget-constrained environment. To that end, the desire is to reduce the size, mass, and - most importantly - cost of future US land imaging capability, without impacting the continuity of the SLI data with past Landsat archives. During our exploration of possible alternatives for future Landsat missions, we re-opened the trade space to include scanned options. The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) has been delivered to NASA/NOAA for flight on GOES-R, and additional models are in fabrication for various customers. Adapting this in-production instrument to flight at low-Earth orbit is relatively straightforward, and leads to a simple, high-heritage (low-risk) concept for a full-spectrum Landsat instrument that would meet virtually all of the Landsat 8 Reference Performance Parameters at significantly lower cost than the Landsat-8 (LDCM) payload. It would also be smaller than the L-8 payload, about half the mass, and require lower power. In addition, it could offer the option for spectral enhancement of Landsat through additional LWIR and/or MWIR bands. Finally, the L-ABI can offer larger swath coverage, driving the SLI system towards the desired 8-day repeat coverage.

  14. Longleaf pine can catch up

    Treesearch

    William D. Boyer

    1997-01-01

    One of the principal southern pines, longleaf (Pinus palustris Mill.) is the key tree species in a fire-dependent ecosystem. In pm-settlement times, longleaf pine forests covered much of the southeastern United States.Once the most extensive forest ecosystem in North America dominated by a single species longleaf pine now occupies only about 3...

  15. Direct seeding of shortleaf pine

    Treesearch

    Corinne S. Mann; David Gwaze

    2007-01-01

    Direct seeding is a potentially viable method for regenerating shortleaf pine, but it has not been used extensively. In Missouri, an estimated 10,000 acres have been direct-seeded with shortleaf pine; half of which are at Mark Twain National Forest. Direct seeding offers a flexible and efficient alternative to planting as a way to restore shortleaf pine in the Ozarks....

  16. Southern Pine Bark Beetle Guild

    Treesearch

    T. Evan Nebeker

    2011-01-01

    Dendroctonus frontalis (southern pine beetle), D. terebrans (black turpentine beetle), Ips avulsus (small southern pine engraver or four-spined engraver), I. grandicollis (five-spined engraver), and I. calligraphus (six-spined engraver) comprise the southern pine bark beetle guild. Often they are found sharing the same hosts in the Southeastern United States. They...

  17. Whitebark pine mortality related to white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle outbreak, and water availability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanahan, Erin; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Thoma, David P.; Wilmoth, Siri K.; Ray, Andrew; Legg, Kristin; Shovic, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests in the western United States have been adversely affected by an exotic pathogen (Cronartium ribicola, causal agent of white pine blister rust), insect outbreaks (Dendroctonus ponderosae, mountain pine beetle), and drought. We monitored individual trees from 2004 to 2013 and characterized stand-level biophysical conditions through a mountain pine beetle epidemic in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Specifically, we investigated associations between tree-level variables (duration and location of white pine blister rust infection, presence of mountain pine beetle, tree size, and potential interactions) with observations of individual whitebark pine tree mortality. Climate summaries indicated that cumulative growing degree days in years 2006–2008 likely contributed to a regionwide outbreak of mountain pine beetle prior to the observed peak in whitebark mortality in 2009. We show that larger whitebark pine trees were preferentially attacked and killed by mountain pine beetle and resulted in a regionwide shift to smaller size class trees. In addition, we found evidence that smaller size class trees with white pine blister rust infection experienced higher mortality than larger trees. This latter finding suggests that in the coming decades white pine blister rust may become the most probable cause of whitebark pine mortality. Our findings offered no evidence of an interactive effect of mountain pine beetle and white pine blister rust infection on whitebark pine mortality in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Interestingly, the probability of mortality was lower for larger trees attacked by mountain pine beetle in stands with higher evapotranspiration. Because evapotranspiration varies with climate and topoedaphic conditions across the region, we discuss the potential to use this improved understanding of biophysical influences on mortality to identify microrefugia that might contribute to successful whitebark pine conservation

  18. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emissions from Abies alba in a French forest.

    PubMed

    Moukhtar, S; Couret, C; Rouil, L; Simon, V

    2006-02-01

    Air quality studies need to be based on accurate and reliable data, particularly in the field of the emissions. Biogenic emissions from forests, crops, and grasslands are now considered as major compounds in photochemical processes. Unfortunately, depending on the type of vegetation, these emissions are not so often reliably defined. As an example, although the silver fir (Abies alba) is a very widespread conifer tree in the French and European areas, its standard emission rate is not available in the literature. This study investigates the isoprene and monoterpenes emission from A. alba in France measured during the fieldwork organised in the Fossé Rhénan, from May to June 2003. A dynamic cuvette method was used. Limonene was the predominant monoterpene emitted, followed by camphene, alpha-pinene and eucalyptol. No isoprene emission was detected. The four monoterpenes measured showed different behaviours according to micrometeorological conditions. In fact, emissions of limonene, alpha-pinene and camphene were temperature-dependant while eucalyptol emissions were temperature and light dependant. Biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions were modeled using information gathered during the field study. Emissions of the three monoterpenes previously quoted were achieved using the monoterpenes algorithm developed by Tingey et al. (1980) [Tingey D, Manning M, Grothaus L, Burns W. Influence of light and temperature on monoterpene emission rates from slash pine. Plant Physiol 1980;65: 797-801.] and the isoprene algorithm [Guenther, A., Monson, R., Fall, R., 1991. Isoprene and monoterpene emission rate variability: observations with eucalyptus and emission rate algorithm development. J Geophys Res 26A: 10799-10808.]; [Guenther, A., Zimmerman, P., Harley, P., Monson, R., Fall, R., 1993. Isoprene and monoterpene emission rate variability: model evaluation and sensitivity analysis. J Geophys Res 98D: 12609-12617.]) was used for the eucalyptol emission. With these

  19. Influence of drought on radial stem growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) in an inner Alpine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Radial stem growth indices of trees are known to be valuable long-term measures of overall tree vigor and are frequently applied to identify the climatic factors limiting tree growth. Based on several tree-ring studies conducted within inner-Alpine dry valleys, it is well established that growth of Pinus sylvestris is primarily limited by spring precipitation (April through June) and severe drought results in abrupt growth reductions and increased tree mortality. However, the record breaking heat-wave in summer 2003 had only minor impact on growth of drought exposed coniferous trees within the dry inner-Alpine valley of the Inn river (750 m a.s.l., Tyrol, Austria), where mean annual precipitation and temperature amount to 716 mm and 7.3 °C, respectively. To examine short-term influences of drought stress on growth processes more closely, we determined the influence of meteorological factors (air temperature, precipitation) and soil moisture on intra-annual dynamics of tree ring development and stem radial growth in Pinus sylvestris at two sites differing in soil moisture characteristics (xeric and dry-mesic). Radial stem development was continuously followed during 2007 and 2008 by band dendrometers and repeated micro-sampling of the developing tree ring of mature trees. In 2007, when air temperature at the beginning of the growing season in April exceeded long-term mean by 6.4 °C, cambial cell division started in early April at both study plots. A delayed onset of cambial activity of c. 2 wk was found in 2008, when average climate conditions prevailed in spring, suggesting that resumption of cambial cell division after winter dormancy is temperature-controlled. Wood formation stopped c. 4 wk earlier at the xeric compared to dry-mesic site in both study years, which indicates a strong influence of drought stress on cell differentiation processes. This is supported by radial widths of earlywood cells, which were found to be significantly narrower at the xeric compared to the dry-mesic site (P < 0.05). Furthermore, early culmination of radial growth was found at both study plots around mid-May, prior to occurrence of more favourable climatic conditions, i.e. an increase in precipitation during summer. We suggest that early achievement of maximum growth rate in spring can be regarded as an adaptation to cope with extreme environmental conditions prevailing within the study area, which require an early switch of carbon allocation to belowground organs to ensure adequate resource acquisition on the drought prone substrate. Sustainably reduced tree vigor, higher tree mortality and strikingly reduced stem growth of shallowly rooted trees support our reasoning. In conclusion, our results suggest that in Pinus sylvestris exposed to dry inner-Alpine climate (i) a temperature threshold rather than water availability triggers onset of aboveground stem growth in spring, and (ii) recurring drought periods combined with nutrient deficiency of shallow, stony soils cause elevated carbohydrate requirements of the root system and associated symbiotic mycorrhizal hyphae to maintain the capability of absorbing scarce water und nutrient resources at the expense of aboveground stem growth.

  20. Drought stress release increased growth rate but did not affect levels of storage carbohydrates in Scots pine trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönbeck, Leonie; Gessler, Arthur; Rigling, Andreas; Schaub, Marcus; Li, Mai-He

    2017-04-01

    For trees, energy storage in the form of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) plays an important role for survival and growth, especially during stress events such as drought. It is hypothesized, that tree individuals that experience long-term drought stress use up larger amounts of NSCs than trees that do not experience drought. Consequently, such drought-induced depletion might lead to a decrease in tree vigor and carbon starvation, a mechanism that is subject of intensive debates in recent literature. Hence, if carbon starvation is occurring during drought, drought stress release should again increase NSC concentrations. A long-term (13 years) irrigation experiment is being conducted in the Pfyn forest, the largest Pinus sylvestris dominated forest in Switzerland, located in the dry inner-Alpine Swiss Rhone valley (average precipitation 600 mm/year, with frequent dry spells). Water addition ( 600 mm/year) is executed every year during the growing season between April and October. Tree height, stem diameter and crown transparency are being measured since 2003. In February, July and October 2015, roots, stem sapwood and needles were harvested from 30 irrigated and 30 control trees and 5 different crown transparency classes. Shoot length, needle morphology, soluble sugars, starch concentrations, needle δ13C and δ15N were measured. Shoot and stem growth were higher in irrigated trees than in control trees. Growth decreased with increasing crown transparency in both treatments. Only in July, needle starch levels were higher in irrigated trees than in control trees but there was no treatment effect for wood and root starch concentrations. Tissue starch and sugar levels were negatively correlated with crown transparency, particularly in the roots (p<0.001), independent of the treatment. Needle δ13C values were higher in the control trees than in the irrigated trees, where needle δ13C values were positively correlated with increasing transparency (p<0.01). Annual shoot growth was positively correlated with starch levels in the roots. The results show that 13 years of irrigation did lead to increased growth but not to increased NSC levels hence not confirming our initial hypothesis. δ13C levels indicate that control trees experienced more drought stress than irrigated trees. However, we found irrigated trees from high crown transparency classes with similar δ13C levels as for non-irrigated control trees. The release of drought stress has benefited the initially vital trees, whereas the initially inferior trees still show signs of drought stress. The results point to a 'winner takes it all principle', where differences between individuals increase when environment conditions improve. This caused the irrigation treatment not being effective in generally releasing drought stress and NSC depletion in all trees. As increasing crown transparency over both treatments is correlated with decreasing growth and decreasing NSC levels, there are still indications that reduced NSC is related to reduced tree vigor under drought.

  1. Radiocaesium accumulation in stemwood: integrated approach at the scale of forest stands for contaminated Scots pine in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Goor, François; Thiry, Yves; Delvaux, Bruno

    2007-10-01

    Twenty years after the Chernobyl accident, root uptake from the surface layers of contaminated forest soils plays a major role in radiocaesium ((137)Cs) transfer to the trees and accumulation in perennial compartments, including stemwood. Trustworthy long-term predictions (modelling) of stemwood contamination with (137)Cs should accordingly be based on a reliable picture of this source-sink relationship. Considering the complexity of the processes involved in (137)Cs cycling in forest stands, elementary ratios like transfer factors (TF) were shown to be not very relevant for that purpose. At the tree level, alternatives like the wood immobilisation potential (WIP) have therefore been proposed in order to quantify the current net (137)Cs accumulation in stemwood. Our objective was here to compare WIP values determined for a series of contaminated forest stands in Belarus with the corresponding pools of (137)Cs available in the soil for root uptake. The comparison reveals that both indices are quite proportional, whatever the forest ecosystem features. This corroborates the relevancy of WIP as an indicator of the current (137)Cs root uptake by the trees, which could accordingly help to improve the existing models of (137)Cs cycling and the long-term management of contaminated forest ecosystems.

  2. Carbon Emission from Forest Fires on Scots Pine Logging Sites in the Angara Region of Central Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, G. A.; Conard, S. G.; McRae, D. J.; Kukavskaya, E. A.; Bogorodskaya, A. V.; Kovaleva, N. M.

    2010-12-01

    Wildfire and large-scale forest harvesting are the two major disturbances in the Russian boreal forests. Non-recovered logged sites total about a million hectares in Siberia. Logged sites are characterized by higher fire hazard than forest sites due to the presence of generally untreated logging slash (i.e., available fuel) which dries out much more rapidly compared to understory fuels. Moreover, most logging sites can be easily accessed by local population; this increases the risk for fire ignition. Fire impacts on the overstory trees, subcanopy woody layer, and ground vegetation biomass were estimated on 14 logged and unlogged comparison sites in the Lower Angara Region in 2009-2010 as part of the NASA-funded NEESPI project, The Influence of Changing Forestry Practices on the Effects of Wildfire and on Interactions Between Fire and Changing Climate in Central Siberia. Based on calculated fuel consumption, we estimated carbon emission from fires on both logged and unlogged burned sites. Carbon emission from fires on logged sites appeared to be twice that on unlogged sites. Soil respiration decreased on both site types after fires. This reduction may partially offset fire-produced carbon emissions. Carbon emissions from fire and post-fire ecosystem damage on logged sites are expected to increase under changing climate conditions and as a result of anticipated increases in future forest harvesting in Siberia.

  3. CASSIA--a dynamic model for predicting intra-annual sink demand and interannual growth variation in Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Schiestl-Aalto, Pauliina; Kulmala, Liisa; Mäkinen, Harri; Nikinmaa, Eero; Mäkelä, Annikki

    2015-04-01

    The control of tree growth vs environment by carbon sources or sinks remains unresolved although it is widely studied. This study investigates growth of tree components and carbon sink-source dynamics at different temporal scales. We constructed a dynamic growth model 'carbon allocation sink source interaction' (CASSIA) that calculates tree-level carbon balance from photosynthesis, respiration, phenology and temperature-driven potential structural growth of tree organs and dynamics of stored nonstructural carbon (NSC) and their modifying influence on growth. With the model, we tested hypotheses that sink demand explains the intra-annual growth dynamics of the meristems, and that the source supply is further needed to explain year-to-year growth variation. The predicted intra-annual dimensional growth of shoots and needles and the number of cells in xylogenesis phases corresponded with measurements, whereas NSC hardly limited the growth, supporting the first hypothesis. Delayed GPP influence on potential growth was necessary for simulating the yearly growth variation, indicating also at least an indirect source limitation. CASSIA combines seasonal growth and carbon balance dynamics with long-term source dynamics affecting growth and thus provides a first step to understanding the complex processes regulating intra- and interannual growth and sink-source dynamics. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. A density management diagram for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.): A tool for assessing the forest's protective effect

    Treesearch

    Giorgio Vacchiano; Renzo Motta; James N. Long; John D. Shaw

    2008-01-01

    Density management diagrams (DMD) are graphical tools used in the design of silvicultural regimes in even-aged forests. They depict the relationship between stand density, average tree size, stand yield and dominant height, based upon relevant ecological and allometric relationships such as the self-thinning rule, the yield-density effect, and site index curves. DMD...

  5. Quantification of extraradical soil mycelium and ectomycorrhizas of Boletus edulis in a Scots pine forest with variable sporocarp productivity.

    PubMed

    De la Varga, Herminia; Agueda, Beatriz; Martínez-Peña, Fernando; Parladé, Javier; Pera, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The availability of most edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms depends on their natural fructification. Sporocarp formation of these fungi is linked to habitat characteristics and climate conditions, but these data alone do not explain all the trends of fungal fruiting and dynamics. It could be hypothesized that the amount of soil mycelia could also be related to the production of carpophores. Soil samples (five cylinders of 250 cm(3) per plot) were taken monthly, from September to November, in five fenced permanent plots (5 × 5 m) in Pinar Grande (Soria, Spain), a Pinus sylvestris stand situated in the north of the Sistema Ibérico mountain range. Plots were chosen to establish a gradient of Boletus edulis productivity from 0 to 38.5 kg/ha year, according to the mean fresh weight of sporocarps collected during the last 10 years. B. edulis ectomycorrhizal root tips were identified in each soil sample according to its morphology and counted. DNA extractions were performed with the PowerSoil(TM) DNA Isolation Kit and quantification of extraradical soil mycelium by real-time polymerase chain reaction using specific primers and a TaqMan® probe. The concentration of soil mycelium of B. edulis (mg mycelium/g soil) did not differ significantly between plots (p = 0.1397), and sampling time (p = 0.7643) within the fructification period. The number of mycorrhizal short roots per soil volume showed significant differences between the plots (p = 0.0050) and the three sampling times (p < 0.0001). No significant correlation between the number of mycorrhizas and the productivity of the plot (kg of B. edulis/ha year) was detected (p = 0.615). A statistically significant positive correlation (p = 0.0481) was detected between the concentration of mycelia of B. edulis in the soil samples and the presence of short roots mycorrhizal with B. edulis in these samples. The productivity of the plots, in terms of sporocarps produced during the last 10 years, was not correlated either with the concentration of soil mycelium or with the presence or abundance of ectomycorrhizas.

  6. Effects of mistletoe removal on growth, N and C reserves, and carbon and oxygen isotope composition in Scots pine hosts

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Cai-Feng; Gessler, Arthur; Rigling, Andreas; Dobbertin, Matthias; Han, Xing-Guo; Li, Mai-He

    2016-01-01

    Most mistletoes are xylem-tapping hemiparasites, which derive their resources from the host’s xylem solution. Thus, they affect the host’s water relations and resource balance. To understand the physiological mechanisms underlying the mistletoe–host relationship, we experimentally removed Viscum album ssp. austriacum (Wiesb.) Vollmann from adult Pinus sylvestris L. host trees growing in a Swiss dry valley. We analyzed the effects of mistletoe removal over time on host tree growth and on concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC) and nitrogen (N) in needles, fine roots and sapwood. In addition, we assessed the δ13C and δ18O in host tree rings. After mistletoe removal, δ13C did not change in newly produced tree rings compared with tree rings in control trees (still infected with mistletoe), but δ18O values increased. This pattern might be interpreted as a decrease in assimilation (A) and stomatal conductance (gs), but in our study, it most likely points to an inadequacy of the dual isotope approach. Instead, we interpret the unchanged δ13C in tree rings upon mistletoe removal as a balanced increase in A and gs that resulted in a constant intrinsic water use efficiency (defined as A/gs). Needle area-based concentrations of N, soluble sugars and NSC, as well as needle length, single needle area, tree ring width and shoot growth, were significantly higher in trees from which mistletoe was removed than in control trees. This finding suggests that mistletoe removal results in increased N availability and carbon gain, which in turn leads to increased growth rates of the hosts. Hence, in areas where mistletoe is common and the population is large, mistletoe management (e.g., removal) may be needed to improve the host vigor, growth rate and productivity, especially for relatively small trees and crop trees in xeric growth conditions. PMID:27083524

  7. Effects of mistletoe removal on growth, N and C reserves, and carbon and oxygen isotope composition in Scots pine hosts.

    PubMed

    Yan, Cai-Feng; Gessler, Arthur; Rigling, Andreas; Dobbertin, Matthias; Han, Xing-Guo; Li, Mai-He

    2016-05-01

    Most mistletoes are xylem-tapping hemiparasites, which derive their resources from the host's xylem solution. Thus, they affect the host's water relations and resource balance. To understand the physiological mechanisms underlying the mistletoe-host relationship, we experimentally removed Viscum album ssp. austriacum (Wiesb.) Vollmann from adult Pinus sylvestris L. host trees growing in a Swiss dry valley. We analyzed the effects of mistletoe removal over time on host tree growth and on concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC) and nitrogen (N) in needles, fine roots and sapwood. In addition, we assessed the δ(13)C and δ(18)O in host tree rings. After mistletoe removal, δ(13)C did not change in newly produced tree rings compared with tree rings in control trees (still infected with mistletoe), but δ(18)O values increased. This pattern might be interpreted as a decrease in assimilation (A) and stomatal conductance (gs), but in our study, it most likely points to an inadequacy of the dual isotope approach. Instead, we interpret the unchanged δ(13)C in tree rings upon mistletoe removal as a balanced increase in A and gs that resulted in a constant intrinsic water use efficiency (defined as A/gs). Needle area-based concentrations of N, soluble sugars and NSC, as well as needle length, single needle area, tree ring width and shoot growth, were significantly higher in trees from which mistletoe was removed than in control trees. This finding suggests that mistletoe removal results in increased N availability and carbon gain, which in turn leads to increased growth rates of the hosts. Hence, in areas where mistletoe is common and the population is large, mistletoe management (e.g., removal) may be needed to improve the host vigor, growth rate and productivity, especially for relatively small trees and crop trees in xeric growth conditions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Evidences on the Ability of Mycorrhizal Genus Piloderma to Use Organic Nitrogen and Deliver It to Scots Pine

    PubMed Central

    Heinonsalo, Jussi; Sun, Hui; Santalahti, Minna; Bäcklund, Kirsi; Hari, Pertti; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbiosis has been proposed to link plant photosynthesis and soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition through the production of fungal enzymes which promote SOM degradation and nitrogen (N) uptake. However, laboratory and field evidence for the existence of these processes are rare. Piloderma sp., a common ECM genus in boreal forest soil, was chosen as model mycorrhiza for this study. The abundance of Piloderma sp. was studied in root tips and soil over one growing season and in winter. Protease production was measured from ectomycorrhiza and soil solution in the field and pure fungal cultures. We also tested the effect of Piloderma olivaceum on host plant organic N nutrition in the laboratory. The results showed that Piloderma sp. was highly abundant in the field and produced extracellular proteases, which correlated positively with the gross primary production, temperature and soil respiration. In the laboratory, Piloderma olivaceum could improve the ability of Pinus sylvestris L. to utilize N from extragenous proteins. We suggest that ECM fungi, although potentially retaining N in their hyphae, are important in forest C and N cycling due to their ability to access proteinaeous N. As Piloderma sp. abundance appeared to be seasonally highly variable, recycling of fungal-bound N after hyphal death may therefore be of primary importance for the N cycling in boreal ecosystems. PMID:26132469

  9. Arabidopsis ABI5 plays a role in regulating ROS homeostasis by activating CATALASE 1 transcription in seed germination.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chao; Ma, Yu; Wu, Zhen; Yu, Yong-Tao; Liang, Shan; Lu, Kai; Wang, Xiao-Fang

    2017-05-01

    It has been known that ABA INSENSITIVE 5 (ABI5) plays a vital role in regulating seed germination. In the present study, we showed that inhibition of the catalase activity with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT) inhibits seed germination of Col-0, abi5 mutants and ABI5-overexpression transgenic lines. Compared with Col-0, the seeds of abi5 mutants showed more sensitive to 3-AT during seed germination, while the seeds of ABI5-overexpression transgenic lines showed more insensitive. H 2 O 2 showed the same effect on seed germination of Col-0, abi5 mutants and ABI5-overexpression transgenic lines as 3-AT. These results suggest that ROS is involved in the seed germination mediated by ABI5. Further, we observed that T-DNA insertion mutants of the three catalase members in Arabidopsis displayed 3-AT-insensitive or -hypersensitive phenotypes during seed germination, suggesting that these catalase members regulate ROS homeostasis in a highly complex way. ABI5 affects reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis by affecting CATALASE expression and catalase activity. Furthermore, we showed that ABI5 directly binds to the CAT1 promoter and activates CAT1 expression. Genetic evidence supports the idea that CAT1 functions downstream of ABI5 in ROS signaling during seed germination. RNA-sequencing analysis indicates that the transcription of the genes involved in ROS metabolic process or genes responsive to ROS stress is impaired in abi5-1 seeds. Additionally, expression changes in some genes correlative to seed germination were showed due to the change in ABI5 expression under 3-AT treatment. Together, all the findings suggest that ABI5 regulates seed germination at least partly by affecting ROS homeostasis.

  10. The Arabidopsis DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 gene affects ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 5 (ABI5) expression and genetically interacts with ABI3 during Arabidopsis seed development.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Bas J W; He, Hanzi; Hanson, Johannes; Willems, Leo A J; Jamar, Diaan C L; Cueff, Gwendal; Rajjou, Loïc; Hilhorst, Henk W M; Bentsink, Leónie

    2016-02-01

    The seed expressed gene DELAY OF GERMINATION (DOG) 1 is absolutely required for the induction of dormancy. Next to a non-dormant phenotype, the dog1-1 mutant is also characterized by a reduced seed longevity suggesting that DOG1 may affect additional seed processes as well. This aspect however, has been hardly studied and is poorly understood. To uncover additional roles of DOG1 in seeds we performed a detailed analysis of the dog1 mutant using both transcriptomics and metabolomics to investigate the molecular consequences of a dysfunctional DOG1 gene. Further, we used a genetic approach taking advantage of the weak aba insensitive (abi) 3-1 allele as a sensitized genetic background in a cross with dog1-1. DOG1 affects the expression of hundreds of genes including LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT and HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN genes which are affected by DOG1 partly via control of ABI5 expression. Furthermore, the content of a subset of primary metabolites, which normally accumulate during seed maturation, was found to be affected in the dog1-1 mutant. Surprisingly, the abi3-1 dog1-1 double mutant produced green seeds which are highly ABA insensitive, phenocopying severe abi3 mutants, indicating that dog1-1 acts as an enhancer of the weak abi3-1 allele and thus revealing a genetic interaction between both genes. Analysis of the dog1 and dog1 abi3 mutants revealed additional seed phenotypes and therefore we hypothesize that DOG1 function is not limited to dormancy but that it is required for multiple aspects of seed maturation, in part by interfering with ABA signalling components. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. L Band Service Compatibility : Part II: Optimum GPS Receiver ABI Compatibility

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-03-12

    Workshop Objectives. This is the Second of Two Parts on Compatibility. Last time, OOBE. Today examine mitigation of Adjacent Band Interference, ABI. Apply Relevant TWG and NPEF (2011) data to engage compatibility analysis. Assert Principle: Dr. Brad ...

  12. Start codon targeted (SCoT) and target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP) for evaluating the genetic relationship of Dendrobium species.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangguo; He, Refeng; Yang, Sai; Chen, Zhe; Jiang, Mengying; Lu, Jiangjie; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-08-10

    Two molecular marker systems, start codon targeted (SCoT) and target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP), were used for genetic relationship analysis of 36 Dendrobium species collected from China. Twenty-two selected SCoT primers produced 337 loci, of which 324 (96%) were polymorphic, whereas 13 TRAP primer combinations produced a total of 510 loci, with 500 (97.8%) of them being polymorphic. An average polymorphism information content of 0.953 and 0.983 was detected using the SCoT and TRAP primers, respectively, showing that a high degree of genetic diversity exists among Chinese Dendrobium species. The partition of clusters in the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram and principal coordinate analysis plot based on the SCoT and TRAP markers was similar and clustered the 36 Dendrobium species into four main groups. Our results will provide useful information for resource protection and will also be useful to improve the current Dendrobium breeding programs. Our results also demonstrate that SCoT and TRAP markers are informative and can be used to evaluate genetic relationships between Dendrobium species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Online investigation of respiratory quotients in Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies during drought and shading by means of cavity-enhanced Raman multi-gas spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hanf, Stefan; Fischer, Sarah; Hartmann, Henrik; Keiner, Robert; Trumbore, Susan; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-07-07

    Photosynthesis and respiration are major components of the plant carbon balance. During stress, like drought, carbohydrate supply from photosynthesis is reduced and the Krebs cycle respiration must be fueled with other stored carbon compounds. However, the dynamics of storage use are still unknown. The respiratory quotient (RQ, CO2 released per O2 consumed during respiration) is an excellent indicator of the nature of the respiration substrate. In plant science, however, online RQ measurements have been challenging or even impossible so far due to very small gas exchange fluxes during respiration. Here we apply cavity-enhanced multi-gas Raman spectrometry (CERS) for online in situ RQ measurements in drought-tolerant pine (Pinus sylvestris [L.]) and drought-intolerant spruce (Picea abies [L. H. Karst]). Two different treatments, drought and shading, were applied to reduce photosynthesis and force dependency on stored substrates. Changes in respiration rates and RQ values were continuously monitored over periods of several days with low levels of variance. The results show that both species switched from COH-dominated respiration (RQ = 1.0) to a mixture of substrates during shading (RQ = 0.77-0.81), while during drought only pine did so (RQ = 0.75). The gas phase measurements were complemented by concentration measurements of non-structural carbohydrates and lipids. These first results suggest a physiological explanation for greater drought tolerance in pine. CERS was proven as powerful technique for non-consumptive and precise real-time monitoring of respiration rates and respirational quotients for the investigation of plant metabolism under drought stress conditions that are predicted to increase with future climate change.

  14. S-nitrosylation triggers ABI5 degradation to promote seed germination and seedling growth

    PubMed Central

    Albertos, Pablo; Romero-Puertas, María C.; Tatematsu, Kiyoshi; Mateos, Isabel; Sánchez-Vicente, Inmaculada; Nambara, Eiji; Lorenzo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Plant survival depends on seed germination and progression through post-germinative developmental checkpoints. These processes are controlled by the stress phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA regulates the basic leucine zipper transcriptional factor ABI5, a central hub of growth repression, while the reactive nitrogen molecule nitric oxide (NO) counteracts ABA during seed germination. However, the molecular mechanisms by which seeds sense more favourable conditions and start germinating have remained elusive. Here we show that ABI5 promotes growth via NO, and that ABI5 accumulation is altered in genetic backgrounds with impaired NO homeostasis. S-nitrosylation of ABI5 at cysteine-153 facilitates its degradation through CULLIN4-based and KEEP ON GOING E3 ligases, and promotes seed germination. Conversely, mutation of ABI5 at cysteine-153 deregulates protein stability and inhibition of seed germination by NO depletion. These findings suggest an inverse molecular link between NO and ABA hormone signalling through distinct posttranslational modifications of ABI5 during early seedling development. PMID:26493030

  15. Longleaf Pine Genetics

    Treesearch

    Ronald C. Schmidtling

    1999-01-01

    There has been a movement of late toward the use of natural regeneration for iongieaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) as well as for other forest tree species. If you have a good natural stand, and have plenty of time, natural regeneration will result in a suitable stand, and genetics is not relevant.

  16. Sand Pine Symposium Proceedings

    Treesearch

    USDA Forest Service Southern Forest Experiment Station

    1973-01-01

    Sand pine, a species well suited to the excessively drained soils common to several million acres in the Southeast, was the subject of this well-attended 3-day meeting. Papers presented included a review of the literature plus results of current research related to this species. Subjects covered ranged from seeds and seedlings to final harvest and conversion...

  17. Diseases of lodgepole pine

    Treesearch

    Frank G. Hawksworth

    1964-01-01

    Diseases are a major concern to forest managers throughout the lodgepole pine type. In many areas, diseases constitute the primary management problem. As might be expected for a tree that has a distribution from Baja California, Mexico to the Yukon and from the Pacific to the Dakotas, the diseases of chief concern vary in different parts of the tree's range. For...

  18. Lifting Pine Seedlings

    Treesearch

    C. B. Briscoe

    1960-01-01

    One of the factors preventing more widespread planting of the true pines (Pinus spp.) in the tropics is the present necessity of using potted stock instead of barerooted seedlings, such as are used throughout the temperate regions. Potted seedlings require more space, more equipment, more labor, and more money, both to produce in the nursery and to plant in the field...

  19. Pinus L. Pine

    Treesearch

    Stanley L. Krugman; James L. Jenkinson

    1974-01-01

    Growth habit, occurrence, and use. The genus Pinus, one of the largest and most important of the coniferous genera, comprises about 95 species and numerous varieties and hybrids. Pines are widely distributed, mostly in the Northern Hemisphere from sea level (Pinus contorta var. contorta) to timberline (P...

  20. Regenerating Longleaf Pine Naturally

    Treesearch

    Thomas C. Croker; William D. Boyer

    1975-01-01

    Research has developed guides for consistent natural regeneration of longleaf pine by a shelterwood system. Key measures include hardwood control by fire and other means, timely preparatory and seed cuts, seed crop monitoring, seedbed preparation, protection of established seedlings, prompt removal of parent trees when reproduction is adequate, and control of...

  1. Does bristlecone pine senesce?

    Treesearch

    R.M Lanner; Kristina F. Connor

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated hypotheses of senscence in old trees by comparing putative biomarkers of aging in great basin bristlecone pine ( Pinus longaeva) ranging in age from 23 to 4713 years. To teast a hypothesis that water and nutrient conduction is impaired in old trees we examined cambial products in the xylem and phloem. We found no statiscally significant...

  2. The Mediterranean pine engraver

    Treesearch

    Jana C. Lee; Sheri L. Smith; Steven J. Seybold

    2005-01-01

    In May 2004, a new exotic bark beetle for North America was discovered in baited flight traps in Fresno, California during an annual bark beetle and woodborer survey by the California Department of Food and Agriculture. This bark beetle was identified as Orthotomicus erosus (Wollaston), the Mediterranean pine engraver, a well-documented pest of...

  3. Introduced Pine Sawfly

    Treesearch

    Louis F. Wilson

    1966-01-01

    The introduced pine, sawfly (Diprion similis (Hartig)) in North America was first discovered in 1914 in a nursery in New Haven, Conn. This insect might have been introduced in the cocoon stage on nursery stock or packing material from Holland. Since its arrival, it has advanced steadily westward, reaching Pennsylvania before 1920 and Ontario by 1931. The present range...

  4. Mountain pine beetle

    Treesearch

    Ken Gibson; Sandy Kegley; Barbara Bentz

    2009-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) is a member of a group of insects known as bark beetles. Its entire life cycle is spent beneath the bark of host trees, except when adults emerge from brood trees and fly in search of new host trees.

  5. Southern Pine Seed Sources

    Treesearch

    Ronald C. Schmidtling

    2001-01-01

    The selection of an appropriate seed source is critical for successful southern pine plantations. Guidelines for selection of seed sources are presented for loblolly (Pinus taeda L.), slash (P. elliottii Engelm.), longleaf (P. palustris Mill.), Virginia (P. virginiana Mill.), shortleaf (P. echinata...

  6. Pine Beetle Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Earth Systems Science Office scientists worked with officials in St. Tammany Parish, La., to detect and battle pine beetle infestation in Fontainebleu State Park. The scientists used a new method of detecting plant stress by using special lenses and modified sensors to detect a change in light levels given off by the plant before the stress is visible to the naked eye.

  7. Longleaf Pine Seed Dispersal

    Treesearch

    William D. Boyer

    1963-01-01

    Production and dispersal of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seeds were sampled in 1955, 1957, and 1958 on the Escambia Experimental Forest in southwest Alabama.Two transects of seed traps were established at right angles to each of four forest walls enclosing a rectangular 80-acre clearing. Walls were oriented in the cardinal...

  8. Longleaf pine site zones

    Treesearch

    Phillip J. Craul; John S. Kush; William D. Boyer

    2005-01-01

    The authors delineate six major climatic areas of the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) region. They subdivide these areas into 21 site zones, each of which is deemed homogenous with respect to climate, physiography, and soils. The site zones are mapped and their climate, physiography, and soils described. The authors recommend that plantings of...

  9. Southern Pine Beetle II

    Treesearch

    R. N. Coulson; Kier Klepzig

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge base for the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) has increased dramatically since the last comprehensive and interpretative summary (Thatcher and others 1980). This insect continues to be a significant pest affecting the forest environment of the Southern US and adjoining states and it is also the subject of...

  10. Longleaf pine agroforestry

    Treesearch

    Kristina Connor; Rebecca Barlow; Luben Dimov; Mark Smith

    2012-01-01

    While ecosystem restoration of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests represents a worthy ideal, it is not always a practical alternative for landowners. Agroforestry systems, which can be developed in existing agricultural land, natural forest stands, plantations, or pasturelands, offer the opportunity to provide multiple benefits: high value...

  11. Functional analysis of the isoforms of an ABI3-like factor of Pisum sativum generated by alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Gagete, Andrés P; Riera, Marta; Franco, Luis; Rodrigo, M Isabel

    2009-01-01

    At least seven isoforms (PsABI3-1 to PsABI3-7) of a putative, pea ABI3-like factor, originated by alternative splicing, have been identified after cDNA cloning. A similar variability had previously only been described for monocot genes. The full-length isoform, PsABI3-1, contains the typical N-terminal acidic domains and C-terminal basic subdomains, B1 to B3. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that the gene is expressed just in seeds, starting at middle embryogenesis; no gene products are observed in embryo axes after 18 h post-imbibition although they are more persistent in cotyledons. The activity of the isoforms was studied by yeast one-hybrid assays. When yeast was transformed with the isoforms fused to the DNA binding domain of Gal4p, only the polypeptides PsABI3-2 and PsABI3-7 failed to complement the activity of Gal4p. Acidic domains A1 and A2 exhibit transactivating activity, but the former requires a small C-terminal extension to be active. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that PsABI3 is able to heterodimerize with Arabidopsis thaliana ABI5, thus proving that PsABI3 is functionally active. The minimum requirement for the interaction PsABI3-AtABI5 is the presence of the subdomain B1 with an extension, 81 amino acids long, at their C-terminal side. Finally, a transient onion transformation assay showed that both the active PsABI3-1 and the inactive PsABI3-2 isoforms are localized to nuclei. Considering that the major isoforms remain approximately constant in developing seeds although their relative proportion varied, the possible role of splicing in the regulatory network of ABA signalling is discussed.

  12. The Role and Regulation of ABI5 (ABA-Insensitive 5) in Plant Development, Abiotic Stress Responses and Phytohormone Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Skubacz, Anna; Daszkowska-Golec, Agata; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    ABA Insensitive 5 (ABI5) is a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that plays a key role in the regulation of seed germination and early seedling growth in the presence of ABA and abiotic stresses. ABI5 functions in the core ABA signaling, which is composed of PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors, PP2C phosphatases and SnRK2 kinases, through the regulation of the expression of genes that contain the ABSCISIC ACID RESPONSE ELEMENT (ABRE) motif within their promoter region. The regulated targets include stress adaptation genes, e.g., LEA proteins. However, the expression and activation of ABI5 is not only dependent on the core ABA signaling. Many transcription factors such as ABI3, ABI4, MYB7 and WRKYs play either a positive or a negative role in the regulation of ABI5 expression. Additionally, the stability and activity of ABI5 are also regulated by other proteins through post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation and S-nitrosylation. Moreover, ABI5 also acts as an ABA and other phytohormone signaling integrator. Components of auxin, cytokinin, gibberellic acid, jasmonate and brassinosteroid signaling and metabolism pathways were shown to take part in ABI5 regulation and/or to be regulated by ABI5. Monocot orthologs of AtABI5 have been identified. Although their roles in the molecular and physiological adaptations during abiotic stress have been elucidated, knowledge about their detailed action still remains elusive. Here, we describe the recent advances in understanding the action of ABI5 in early developmental processes and the adaptation of plants to unfavorable environmental conditions. We also focus on ABI5 relation to other phytohormones in the abiotic stress response of plants. PMID:28018412

  13. Expression of Abelson Interactor 1 (Abi1) Correlates with Inflammation, KRAS Mutation and Adenomatous Change during Colonic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Steinestel, Konrad; Brüderlein, Silke; Steinestel, Julie; Märkl, Bruno; Schwerer, Michael J.; Arndt, Annette; Kraft, Klaus; Pröpper, Christian; Möller, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Abelson interactor 1 (Abi1) is an important regulator of actin dynamics during cytoskeletal reorganization. In this study, our aim was to investigate the expression of Abi1 in colonic mucosa with and without inflammation, colonic polyps, colorectal carcinomas (CRC) and metastases as well as in CRC cell lines with respect to BRAF/KRAS mutation status and to find out whether introduction of KRAS mutation or stimulation with TNFalpha enhances Abi1 protein expression in CRC cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We immunohistochemically analyzed Abi1 protein expression in 126 tissue specimens from 95 patients and in 5 colorectal carcinoma cell lines with different mutation status by western immunoblotting. We found that Abi1 expression correlated positively with KRAS, but not BRAF mutation status in the examined tissue samples. Furthermore, Abi1 is overexpressed in inflammatory mucosa, sessile serrated polyps and adenomas, tubular adenomas, invasive CRC and CRC metastasis when compared to healthy mucosa and BRAF-mutated as well as KRAS wild-type hyperplastic polyps. Abi1 expression in carcinoma was independent of microsatellite stability of the tumor. Abi1 protein expression correlated with KRAS mutation in the analyzed CRC cell lines, and upregulation of Abi1 could be induced by TNFalpha treatment as well as transfection of wild-type CRC cells with mutant KRAS. The overexpression of Abi1 could be abolished by treatment with the PI3K-inhibitor Wortmannin after KRAS transfection. Conclusions/Significance Our results support a role for Abi1 as a downstream target of inflammatory response and adenomatous change as well as oncogenic KRAS mutation via PI3K, but not BRAF activation. Furthermore, they highlight a possible role for Abi1 as a marker for early KRAS mutation in hyperplastic polyps. Since the protein is a key player in actin dynamics, our data encourages further studies concerning the exact role of Abi1 in actin reorganization upon enhanced KRAS/PI3K

  14. Freeze injury to southern pine seedlings

    Treesearch

    David B. South

    2006-01-01

    Freeze injury to roots and shoots of pines is affected by genotype and nursery practices. Local sources of shortleaf pine and Virginia pine that are grown in nurseries in USDA hardiness Zones 6 and 7a are relatively freeze tolerant. However, loblolly pine, slash pine, and longleaf pine seedlings have been injured by a number of freeze events (0 to 24 °F) in hardiness...

  15. Factors related to fatigue after paediatric acquired brain injury (ABI).

    PubMed

    van Markus-Doornbosch, F; de Kloet, A J; Berger, M A M; Lambregts, S A M; Wolterbeek, R; Vliet Vlieland, T P M

    2016-01-01

    To assess the degree of fatigue in children and youth after traumatic and non-traumatic brain injury (TBI and NTBI) and related factors. Follow-up study including patients with a hospital-based diagnosis of acquired brain injury (ABI), aged 4-20 years at onset and their parents. Parents and children (dependent on age) completed the Paediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ Multidimensional Fatigue Scale (PedsQL™ MFS), which measures general fatigue (GF), sleep/rest fatigue (SRF) and cognitive fatigue (CF). Additional assessments included the Child & Family Follow-up Survey (CFFS) and PedsQL™ 4.0 General Core Scales and sociodemographic and disease characteristics. Eighty-eight parents completed the PedsQL™ MFS 24-30 months after diagnosis, with 49/88 patients (56%) completing the child version. The median age of the patients was 11 years (interquartile range [IQR] = 7). There were 69 patients with TBI (16% moderate/severe TBI) and 19 patients with NTBI (16% moderate/severe NTBI). The median parent-reported and child-reported PedsQL™ MFS Total Scale Scores were 76.5 (SD = 16.4) and 78.5 (12.9), respectively (Spearman r = 0.450, p = 0.001). Apart from NTBI, increasing age and a single-parent household were significantly associated with more fatigue according to the parent-reported PedsQL™ MFS Total Score (and/or one or more sub-scale scores). Two years after onset, in particular, the parent-reported fatigue after NTBI was considerable. Moreover, older children and children from a single-parent household were found to have higher fatigue levels.

  16. Raman Spectroscopic Online Investigation of Respiratory Quotients in Pinus Sylvestris and Picea Abies during Drought and Shading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanf, S.; Fischer, S.; Hartmann, H.; Trumbore, S.; Popp, J.; Frosch, T.

    2014-12-01

    Drought and heat waves have been linked to forest mortality event across the globe. The underlying physiological processes are still not elucidated but both tree carbon and water relations have been identified as the driving forces. While studies on tree hydraulics are straightforward, studies on the tree carbon balance are not. For example, the use of different carbon compounds for maintenance respiration during drought cannot be assessed with measurements of carbon pools but requires real-time analyses of respiration stoichiometry. However, so far there were no technical solutions for such applications. Here we introduce cavity-enhanced Raman spectrometry (CERS) for simultaneous real-time monitoring of O2 and CO2 and rapid and continuous quantification of dark respiration rates and the respiratory quotient (RQ), i.e. the ratio of CO2 produced over O2 consumed during respiration. This ratio indicates the proportions of different substrates (carbohydrates [COH], lipids, proteins) used during respiration and allows fundamental insights into tree physiology. CERS combines high temporal resolution with a high dynamic concentration range for all important gases, ranging from few ppm to 100 vol. % with a single measurement every few seconds. The respiration analysis of tree branches was performed in a closed chamber for two species of different drought tolerance, Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies. We applied not only drought but also a shading treatment because both cause reductions in carbon assimilation rates but have different effects on tree hydraulics. Declines in RQ during shading in both species indicate a switch from pure COH metabolism to a mixture of COH, lipids and proteins. During drought such declines occurred only in the drought-tolerant pine but not in spruce and the underlying more dynamic carbon use strategy in pine may provide a physiological basis for its drought tolerance, more detailed investigation still pending. Our study highlights the suitability

  17. Non-null full field X-ray mirror metrology using SCOTS: a reflection deflectometry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Su P.; Kaznatcheev K.; Wang, Y.

    In a previous paper, the University of Arizona (UA) has developed a measurement technique called: Software Configurable Optical Test System (SCOTS) based on the principle of reflection deflectometry. In this paper, we present results of this very efficient optical metrology method applied to the metrology of X-ray mirrors. We used this technique to measure surface slope errors with precision and accuracy better than 100 nrad (rms) and {approx}200 nrad (rms), respectively, with a lateral resolution of few mm or less. We present results of the calibration of the metrology systems, discuss their accuracy and address the precision in measuring amore » spherical mirror.« less

  18. Black Pine Circle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mytko, Christine

    2014-03-31

    A group of seventh graders from Black Pine Circle school in Berkeley had the opportunity to experience the Advanced Light Source (ALS) as "users" via a collaborative field trip and proposal project. The project culminated with a field trip to the ALS for all seventh graders, which included a visit to the ALS data visualization room, a diffraction demonstration, a beamline tour, and informative sessions about x-rays and tomography presented by ALS scientists.

  19. Black Pine Circle Project

    ScienceCinema

    Mytko, Christine

    2018-05-18

    A group of seventh graders from Black Pine Circle school in Berkeley had the opportunity to experience the Advanced Light Source (ALS) as "users" via a collaborative field trip and proposal project. The project culminated with a field trip to the ALS for all seventh graders, which included a visit to the ALS data visualization room, a diffraction demonstration, a beamline tour, and informative sessions about x-rays and tomography presented by ALS scientists.

  20. Overruns - Southern Pine Logs

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Campbell

    1962-01-01

    Overrun and underrun data were collected for the four major southern pine species during a series of grade yield studies in the late 1950's in Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina. Each of the 1,491 logs was carefully scaled by the Doyle, Scribner Decimal C, and International ¼-inch log rule. All logs were sawed on. circle mills and the...

  1. Ecophysiological comparison of 50-year-old longleaf pine, slash pine and loblolly pine.

    Treesearch

    Lisa Samuelson; Tom Stokes; Kurt Johnsen

    2012-01-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.), a species that once dominated the southeastern USA, is considered to be more drought tolerant than the principle plantation species in the South, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.), and so is predicted to better cope with increases in drought frequency associated with climate change. To...

  2. Impact of pine tip moth attack on loblolly pine

    Treesearch

    Roy Hedden

    1999-01-01

    Data on the impact of Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana, attack on the height of loblolly pine, Pinus taeda, in the first three growing seasons after planting from three locations in eastern North Carolina (U.S.A.) was used to develop multiple linear regression models relating tree height to tip moth infestation level in each growing season. These models...

  3. Insects of whitebark pine with emphasis on mountain pine beetle

    Treesearch

    Dale L. Bartos; Kenneth E. Gibson

    1990-01-01

    Few insects that live on whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) are considered pests or potential pests. Those that inhabit cones can cause reductions in reproduction of the tree by destroying seed crops. Decreases in food for animals ranging from squirrels to grizzly bears may also result. A single insect species, mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus...

  4. Loblolly pine SSR markers for shortleaf pine genetics

    Treesearch

    C. Dana Nelson; Sedley Josserand; Craig S. Echt; Jeff Koppelman

    2007-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSR) are highly informative DNA-based markers widely used in population genetic and linkage mapping studies. We have been developing PCR primer pairs for amplifying SSR markers for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) using loblolly pine DNA and EST sequence data as starting materials. Fifty primer pairs known to reliably amplify...

  5. Mountain pine beetle infestations in relation to lodgepole pine diameters

    Treesearch

    Walter E. Cole; Gene D. Amman

    1969-01-01

    Tree losses resulting from infestation by the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) were measured in two stands of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.) where the beetle population had previously been epidemic. Measurement data showed that larger diameter trees were infested and killed first. Tree losses...

  6. Impact of weak water deficit on growth, photosynthetic primary processes and storage processes in pine and spruce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zlobin, Ilya E; Ivanov, Yury V; Kartashov, Alexander V; Sarvin, Boris A; Stavrianidi, Andrey N; Kreslavski, Vladimir D; Kuznetsov, Vladimir V

    2018-05-19

    We investigated the influence of 40 days of drought on growth, storage processes and primary photosynthetic processes in 3-month-old Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings growing in perlite culture. Water stress significantly affected seedling water status, whereas absolute dry biomass growth was not substantially influenced. Water stress induced an increase in non-structural carbohydrate content (sugars, sugar alcohols, starch) in the aboveground part of pine seedlings in contrast to spruce seedlings. Due to the relatively low content of sugars and sugar alcohols in seedling organs, their expected contribution to osmotic potential changes was quite low. In contrast to biomass accumulation and storage, photosynthetic primary processes were substantially influenced by water shortage. In spruce seedlings, PSII was more sensitive to water stress than PSI. In particular, electron transport in PSI was stable under water stress despite the substantial decrease of electron transport in PSII. The increase in thermal energy dissipation due to enhancement of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was evident in both species under water stress. Simultaneously, the yields of non-regulated energy dissipation in PSII were decreased in pine seedlings under drought. A relationship between growth, photosynthetic activities and storage processes is analysed under weak water deficit.

  7. Mapping quantitative trait loci controlling early growth in a (longleaf pine × slash pine) × slash pine BC1 family

    Treesearch

    C. Weng; Thomas L. Kubisiak; C. Dana Nelson; M. Stine

    2002-01-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were employed to map the genome and quantitative trait loci controlling the early growth of a pine hybrid F1 tree (Pinus palustris Mill. × P. elliottii Engl.) and a recurrent slash pine tree (P. ellottii Engl.) in a (longleaf pine × slash pine...

  8. Mountain pine beetles use volatile cues to locate host limber pine and avoid non-host Great Basin bristlecone pine

    Treesearch

    Curtis A. Gray; Justin B. Runyon; Michael J. Jenkins; Andrew D. Giunta

    2015-01-01

    The tree-killing mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) is an important disturbance agent of western North American forests and recent outbreaks have affected tens of millions of hectares of trees. Most western North American pines (Pinus spp.) are hosts and are successfully attacked by mountain pine beetles whereas a handful of pine species are not...

  9. Slash Pine (Pinus Elliottii), Including South Florida Slash Pine: Nomenclature and Description

    Treesearch

    Elbert L. Little; Keith W. Dorman

    1954-01-01

    Slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.), including its variation South Florida slash pine recently distinguished as a new botanical variety, has been known by several different scientific names. As a result, the common name slash pine is more precise and clearer than scientific names. The slash pine of southern Florida differs from typical slash pine in a few characters...

  10. Climate influences on whitebark pine mortality from mountain pine beetle in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    Treesearch

    Polly C. Buotte; Jeffrey A. Hicke; Haiganoush K. Preisler; John T. Abatzoglou; Kenneth F. Raffa; Jesse A. Logan

    2016-01-01

    Extensive mortality of whitebark pine, beginning in the early to mid-2000s, occurred in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) of the western USA, primarily from mountain pine beetle but also from other threats such as white pine blister rust. The climatic drivers of this recent mortality and the potential for future whitebark pine mortality from mountain pine beetle...

  11. Age-related effects on leaf area/sapwood area relationships, canopy transpiration and carbon gain of Norway spruce stands (Picea abies) in the Fichtelgebirge, Germany.

    PubMed

    Köstner, B; Falge, E; Tenhunen, J D

    2002-06-01

    Stand age is an important structural determinant of canopy transpiration (E(c)) and carbon gain. Another more functional parameter of forest structure is the leaf area/sapwood area relationship, A(L)/A(S), which changes with site conditions and has been used to estimate leaf area index of forest canopies. The interpretation of age-related changes in A(L)/A(S) and the question of how A(L)/A(S) is related to forest functions are of current interest because they may help to explain forest canopy fluxes and growth. We conducted studies in mature stands of Picea abies (L.) Karst. varying in age from 40 to 140 years, in tree density from 1680 to 320 trees ha(-1), and in tree height from 15 to 30 m. Structural parameters were measured by biomass harvests of individual trees and stand biometry. We estimated E(c) from scaled-up xylem sap flux of trees, and canopy-level fluxes were predicted by a three-dimensional microclimate and gas exchange model (STANDFLUX). In contrast to pine species, A(L)/A(S) of P. abies increased with stand age from 0.26 to 0.48 m(2) cm(-2). Agreement between E(c) derived from scaled-up sap flux and modeled canopy transpiration was obtained with the same parameterization of needle physiology independent of stand age. Reduced light interception per leaf area and, as a consequence, reductions in net canopy photosynthesis (A(c)), canopy conductance (g(c)) and E(c) were predicted by the model in the older stands. Seasonal water-use efficiency (WUE = A(c)/E(c)), derived from scaled-up sap flux and stem growth as well as from model simulation, declined with increasing A(L)/A(S) and stand age. Based on the different behavior of age-related A(L)/A(S) in Norway spruce stands compared with other tree species, we conclude that WUE rather than A(L)/A(S) could represent a common age-related property of all species. We also conclude that, in addition to hydraulic limitations reducing carbon gain in old stands, a functional change in A(L)/A(S) that is related to

  12. Dimensional stabilization of southern pines

    Treesearch

    E.T. Choong; H.M. Barnes

    1969-01-01

    The effectiveness of five dimensional stabilizing agents and three impregnation methods on southern pine was determined. Four southern pine species were studies in order to determine the effect of wood factors. The best dimensional stability was obtained when the wood was preswollen and the chemical was impregnated by a diffusion process. In general, polyethylene...

  13. Restoration of Longleaf Pine Ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Dale G. Brockway; Kenneth W. Outcalt; Donald J. Tomczak; Everett E. Johnson

    2005-01-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ecosystems once occupied 38 million ha in the Southeastern United States, occurring as forests, woodlands, and savannas on a variety of sites ranging from wet flatwoods to xeric sandhills and rocky mountainous ridges. Characterized by an open parklike structure, longleaf pine ecosystems are a product of frequent fires...

  14. Natural Regeneration of Longleaf Pine

    Treesearch

    William D. Boyer

    1979-01-01

    Natural regeneration is now a reliable alternative for existing longleaf pine forests. The shelterwood system, or modifications of it, has been used experimentally to regenerate longleaf pine for over 20 years, and regional tests have confirmed its value for a wide range of site conditions. Natural regeneration, because of its low cost when compared to other...

  15. Perry Pinyon Pines Protection Project

    Treesearch

    Daniel McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Fuel reduction treatments around pinyon pine trees began as a simple project but ended in something more complex, enjoyable, and rewarding. The project eventually led to pinyon species (Pinus monophylla and P. quadrifolia) reforestation efforts, something that has been tried in the past with disappointing results. The Perry Pinyon Pines Protection Project and current...

  16. Dothistroma Needle Blight of Pines

    Treesearch

    Glenn W. Peterson

    1982-01-01

    Dothistroma blight is a devastating foliar disease of a wide range of pine species. The causal fungus, Dothistroma pini Hulbary, infects and kills needles. Premature defoliation caused by this fungus has resulted in complete failure of most ponderosa pine plantings in States east of the Great Plains. In the central and southern Great Plains, D. pini damages Austrian...

  17. Exploiting Measurement Uncertainty Estimation in Evaluation of GOES-R ABI Image Navigation Accuracy Using Image Registration Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Evan; DeLuccia, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In evaluating GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) image navigation quality, upsampled sub-images of ABI images are translated against downsampled Landsat 8 images of localized, high contrast earth scenes to determine the translations in the East-West and North-South directions that provide maximum correlation. The native Landsat resolution is much finer than that of ABI, and Landsat navigation accuracy is much better than ABI required navigation accuracy and expected performance. Therefore, Landsat images are considered to provide ground truth for comparison with ABI images, and the translations of ABI sub-images that produce maximum correlation with Landsat localized images are interpreted as ABI navigation errors. The measured local navigation errors from registration of numerous sub-images with the Landsat images are averaged to provide a statistically reliable measurement of the overall navigation error of the ABI image. The dispersion of the local navigation errors is also of great interest, since ABI navigation requirements are specified as bounds on the 99.73rd percentile of the magnitudes of per pixel navigation errors. However, the measurement uncertainty inherent in the use of image registration techniques tends to broaden the dispersion in measured local navigation errors, masking the true navigation performance of the ABI system. We have devised a novel and simple method for estimating the magnitude of the measurement uncertainty in registration error for any pair of images of the same earth scene. We use these measurement uncertainty estimates to filter out the higher quality measurements of local navigation error for inclusion in statistics. In so doing, we substantially reduce the dispersion in measured local navigation errors, thereby better approximating the true navigation performance of the ABI system.

  18. Guidelines for regenerating southern pine beetle spots

    Treesearch

    J.C.G. Goelz; B.L. Strom; J.P. Barnett; M.A. Sword Sayer

    2012-01-01

    Southern pine forests are of exceptional commercial and ecological importance to the United States, and the southern pine beetle is their most serious insect pest. The southern pine beetle generally kills overstory pines, causing spots of tree mortality that are unpredictable in time and space and frequently disruptive to management activities and goals. The canopy...

  19. Southern Pine Beetle Behavior and Semiochemistry

    Treesearch

    Brian T. Sullivan

    2011-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (SPB) feeds both as adults and larvae within the inner bark of pine trees, which invariably die as a result of colonization. Populations of the SPB erupt periodically and produce catastrophic losses of pines, while at other times the beetles persist almost undetectably in the environment. The southern pine beetle has evolved behaviors that...

  20. Carbon sequestration and natural longleaf pine ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Ralph S. Meldahl; John S. Kush

    2006-01-01

    A fire-maintained longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystem may offer the best option for carbon (C) sequestration among the southern pines. Longleaf is the longest living of the southern pines, and products from longleaf pine will sequester C longer than most since they are likely to be solid wood products such as structural lumber and poles....

  1. Cronartium ribicola resistance in whitebark pine, southwestern white pine, limber pine and Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine - preliminary screening results from first tests at Dorena GRC

    Treesearch

    Richard A. Sniezko; Angelia Kegley; Robert Danchok; Anna W. Schoettle; Kelly S. Burns; Dave Conklin

    2008-01-01

    All nine species of white pines (five-needle pines) native to the United States are highly susceptible to Cronartium ribicola, the fungus causing white pine blister rust. The presence of genetic resistance will be the key to maintaining or restoring white pines in many ecosystems and planning gene conservation activities. Operational genetic...

  2. Growth and Yield of Slash Pine Plantations

    Treesearch

    Frank A. Bennett

    1963-01-01

    Although slash pine has the most limited range of the major southern pines, more has been planted than any other southern pine, or for that matter, than any timber species in North America. More acres of planted slash pine are also approaching a merchantable condition than any other species, even though the bulk of the plantings has been in the last 20 years....

  3. Southern Pine Beetle Information System (SPBIS)

    Treesearch

    Valli Peacher

    2011-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (SPB) is the most destructive forest insect in the South. The SPB attacks all species of southern pine, but loblolly and shortleaf are most susceptible. The Southern Pine Beetle Information System (SPBIS) is the computerized database used by the national forests in the Southern Region for tracking individual southern pine beetle infestations....

  4. Pleistocene Refugia for Longleaf and Loblolly Pines

    Treesearch

    Ronald C. Schmidtling; V. Hipkins; E. Carroll

    2000-01-01

    Longleaf pine (P. palustris Mill.) and loblolly pine (P. taeda L.) are two species that are common to the coastal plain of the southeastern United States. The current natural range of the two species is largely overlapping. Loblolly pine occurs in 13 southeastern states. Longleaf pine is the more austral of the two species,...

  5. The Austrian x red pine hybrid

    Treesearch

    W. B. Critchfield

    1963-01-01

    The genetic improvement of red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) presents tree breeders with one of their most difficult problems. Not only is this valuable species remarkably uniform, but until 1955 it resisted all attempts to cross it with other pines. In that year red pine and Austrian pine (P. nigra var. austriaca [...

  6. Scots and Scotch Irish in Connecticut: A History. The Peoples of Connecticut Multicultural Ethnic Heritage Project, Number Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Frank Andrews

    This monograph reviews the history of Scots and Scotch Irish settlements in Connecticut from the 17th century to the present. Intended primarily for adult readers, the pamphlet is part of a series of curriculum guides about ethnic groups in America. Historical information was obtained from oral histories, church and military records, and…

  7. In vitro antioxidant activity of extracts from the leaves of Abies pindrow Royle.

    PubMed

    Gupta, D; Bhardwaj, R; Gupta, R K

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, the leaves of Abies pindrow Royle are employed as an ayurvedic remedy for fever, hypoglycaemic, respiratory and inflammatory conditions. In this study, dichloromethane, methanol and acetone extracts of A. pindrow leaves were analysed for their phytochemical content and in vitro antioxidant activities. The methanol extract exhibited highest antioxidant activity while acetone extract showed presence of relatively high total phenol and flavonoids contents. The present study provides evidence that extracts of Abies pindrow leaves are a potential source of natural antioxidants and could serve as a base for future drugs.

  8. Southern Pine Beetle Handbook: Southern Pine Beetles Can Kill Your Ornamental Pine

    Treesearch

    Robert C. Thatcher; Jack E. Coster; Thomas L. Payne

    1974-01-01

    Southern pine beetles are compulsive eaters. Each year in the South from Texas to Virginia the voracious insects conduct a movable feast across thousands of acres of pine forests. Most trees die soon after the beetles sink their teeth into them.

  9. Silvicultural treatments for converting loblolly pine to longleaf pine dominance: Effects on planted longleaf pine seedlings

    Treesearch

    Huifeng Hu; G.Geoff Wang; Joan L. Walker; Benjamin O. Knapp

    2012-01-01

    A field study was installed to test silvicultural treatments for establishing longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill) in loblolly pine (P. taeda L.) stands. Harvesting was used to create seven canopy treatments, four with uniformly distributed canopies at different residual basal areas [Control (16.2 m2/ha),...

  10. Red Pine in the Northern Lake States

    Treesearch

    Thomas L. Schmidt

    2003-01-01

    Red pine is an important tree species for the Northern Lake States. About 4 percent of the total area of timberland is dominated by red pine but most other forest types also have red pine as a component. The red pine forest type in the region has dramatically increased in area since the 1930s. Stand-size class distribution of the red pine forest type has changed over...

  11. Investigation and Analysis of Genetic Diversity of Diospyros Germplasms Using SCoT Molecular Markers in Guangxi.

    PubMed

    Deng, Libao; Liang, Qingzhi; He, Xinhua; Luo, Cong; Chen, Hu; Qin, Zhenshi

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about genetic diversity and relationships among germplasms could be an invaluable aid in diospyros improvement strategies. This study was designed to analyze the genetic diversity and relationship of local and natural varieties in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China using start codon targeted polymorphism (SCoT) markers. The accessions of 95 diospyros germplasms belonging to four species Diospyros kaki Thunb, D. oleifera Cheng, D. kaki var. silverstris Mak, and D. lotus Linn were collected from different eco-climatic zones in Guangxi and were analyzed using SCoT markers. Results indicated that the accessions of 95 diospyros germplasms could be distinguished using SCoT markers, and were divided into three groups at similarity coefficient of 0.608; these germplasms that belong to the same species were clustered together; of these, the degree of genetic diversity of the natural D. kaki var. silverstris Mak population was richest among the four species; the geographical distance showed that the 12 natural populations of D. kaki var. silverstris Mak were divided into two groups at similarity coefficient of 0.19. Meanwhile, in order to further verify the stable and useful of SCoT markers in diospyros germplasms, SSR markers were also used in current research to analyze the genetic diversity and relationship in the same diospyros germplasms. Once again, majority of germplasms that belong to the same species were clustered together. Thus SCoT markers were stable and especially useful for analysis of the genetic diversity and relationship in diospyros germplasms. The molecular characterization and diversity assessment of diospyros were very important for conservation of diospyros germplasm resources, meanwhile for diospyros improvement.

  12. Investigation and Analysis of Genetic Diversity of Diospyros Germplasms Using SCoT Molecular Markers in Guangxi

    PubMed Central

    He, Xinhua; Luo, Cong; Chen, Hu; Qin, Zhenshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Knowledge about genetic diversity and relationships among germplasms could be an invaluable aid in diospyros improvement strategies. Methods This study was designed to analyze the genetic diversity and relationship of local and natural varieties in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China using start codon targeted polymorphism (SCoT) markers. The accessions of 95 diospyros germplasms belonging to four species Diospyros kaki Thunb, D. oleifera Cheng, D. kaki var. silverstris Mak, and D. lotus Linn were collected from different eco-climatic zones in Guangxi and were analyzed using SCoT markers. Results Results indicated that the accessions of 95 diospyros germplasms could be distinguished using SCoT markers, and were divided into three groups at similarity coefficient of 0.608; these germplasms that belong to the same species were clustered together; of these, the degree of genetic diversity of the natural D. kaki var. silverstris Mak population was richest among the four species; the geographical distance showed that the 12 natural populations of D. kaki var. silverstris Mak were divided into two groups at similarity coefficient of 0.19. Meanwhile, in order to further verify the stable and useful of SCoT markers in diospyros germplasms, SSR markers were also used in current research to analyze the genetic diversity and relationship in the same diospyros germplasms. Once again, majority of germplasms that belong to the same species were clustered together. Thus SCoT markers were stable and especially useful for analysis of the genetic diversity and relationship in diospyros germplasms. Discussion The molecular characterization and diversity assessment of diospyros were very important for conservation of diospyros germplasm resources, meanwhile for diospyros improvement. PMID:26317414

  13. Nutrients in foliage and wet deposition of nitrate, ammonium and sulfate in washing tree top in Abies religiosa forests

    Treesearch

    E.R Peña-Mendoza; A. Gómez-Guerrero; Mark Fenn; P. Hernández de la Rosa; D. Alvarado Rosales

    2016-01-01

    The nutritional content and tree top in the forests are evaluated of Abies religiosa, San Miguel Tlaixpan (SMT) and Rio Frio (RF), State of Mexico. The work had two parts. In the first, the nutritional content was evaluated in new foliage (N, P, K, Ca and Mg) in Abies religiosa trees, in periods of spring, summer and winter, in...

  14. Department of Defense (DOD) Automated Biometric Identification System (ABIS) Version 1.2: Initial Operational Test and Evaluation Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Director, Operational Test and Evaluation Department of Defense (DOD) Automated Biometric Identification System (ABIS) Version 1.2 Initial...Operational Test and Evaluation Report May 2015 This report on the Department of Defense (DOD) Automated Biometric Identification System...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Department of Defense (DOD) Automated Biometric Identification System (ABIS) Version 1.2 Initial Operational Test

  15. Seed Source Significantly Influences Growth Rates and Disease Resistance of Abies Lasiocarpa Grown for Ornamental Nursery Stock and Christmas Trees

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Trees from six corkbark fir (Abies lasiocarpa var. arizonica) and 10 subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa var. lasiocarpa) seed sources were grown at the University of Idaho (SREC) and three commercial nurseries in northern Idaho and northeastern Oregon. Post transplant mortality was highest during the f...

  16. Identifying ponderosa pines infested with mountain pine beetles

    Treesearch

    William F. McCambridge

    1974-01-01

    Trees successfully and unsuccessfully attacked by mountain pine beetles have several symptoms in common, so that proper diagnosis is not always easy. Guidelines presented here enable the observer to correctly distinguish nearly all attacked trees.

  17. Pine Sawfly Larvae Destroy Shortleaf Pine Strobili in Virginia

    Treesearch

    David L. Bramlett; Jay G. Hutchinson

    1965-01-01

    Current studies of shortleaf pine seed production at the Lee Experimental Forest in the Virginia Piedmont have shown that insects can seriously reduce the number of female strobili during the a-year development period.

  18. Breeding for resistance to adelgids in Abies fraseri, Tsuga canadensis, and T. caroliniana

    Treesearch

    Ben Smith; Fred Hain; John Frampton

    2012-01-01

    The balsam woolly adelgid (BWA; Adelges piceae) and hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA; Adelges tsugae) have had a tremendous impact on native ecosystems with Fraser fir (Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière), and Carolina hemlock (T....

  19. Photosynthetic characteristics of fagus sylvatica and quercus robur established for stand conversion from picea abies

    Treesearch

    Emile S. Gardiner; Magnus Lof; Joseph J. O' brien; John A. Stanturf; Palle Madsen

    2009-01-01

    Efforts inEurope to convertNorway spruce (Picea abies) plantations to broadleaf ormixed broadleaf-conifer forests could be bolstered by an increased understanding of how artificial regeneration acclimates and functions under a range of Norway spruce stand conditions. We studied foliage characteristics and leaflevel photosynthesis on 7-year-old European beech (Fagus...

  20. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in Fraser fir (Abies fraseri)

    Treesearch

    S.A. Josserand; K.M. Potter; G. Johnson; J.A. Bowen; J. Frampton; C.D. Nelson

    2006-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of 14 microsatellite loci from Fraser fir (Abies fraseri). These markers originated from cloned inserts enriched for DNA sequences containing tandem di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. In total, 36 clones were selected, sequenced and evaluated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for 14 of these...

  1. Tree mortality patterns following prescribed fire for Pinus and Abies across the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Mantgem, Philip J.; Nesmith, Jonathan C. B.; Keifer, MaryBeth; Brooks, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The reintroduction of fire to historically fire-prone forests has been repeatedly shown to reduce understory fuels and promote resistance to high severity fire. However, there is concern that prescribed fire may also have unintended consequences, such as high rates of mortality for large trees and fire-tolerant Pinus species. To test this possibility we evaluated mortality patterns for two common genera in the western US, Pinus and Abies, using observations from a national-scale prescribed fire effects monitoring program. Our results show that mortality rates of trees >50 DBH were similar for Pinus (4.6% yr-1) and Abies (4.0% yr-1) 5 years following prescribed fires across seven sites in the southwestern US. In contrast, mortality rates of trees >50 cm DBH differed between Pinus (5.7% yr-1) and Abies (9.0% yr-1). Models of post-fire mortality probabilities suggested statistically significant differences between the genera (after including differences in bark thickness), but accounting for these differences resulted in only small improvements in model classification. Our results do not suggest unusually high post-fire mortality for large trees or for Pinus relative to the other common co-occurring genus, Abies, following prescribed fire in the southwestern US.

  2. Polyamines in embryogenic cultures of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and red spruce (Picea rubens)

    Treesearch

    Rakesh Minocha; Haarald Kvaalen; Subhash C. Minocha; Stephanie Long

    1993-01-01

    Embryogenic cultures of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) were initiated from dissected mature zygotic embryos. The tissues were grown on either proliferation medium or maturation medium. On proliferation medium, the embryogenic tissue continued to produce early stage somatic embryos (...

  3. Heart-rot hazard is low in Abies amabilis reproduction injured by logging.

    Treesearch

    Paul E. Aho

    1960-01-01

    Clear-cut units in upper-slope forest types in western Washington and Oregon often have an understory of Pacific silver fir (Abies amabilis) at time of logging. Foresters sometimes hesitate to preserve this advance regeneration, partly because of the possibility that heart rots infecting through logging wounds might considerably reduce the...

  4. Abies concolor growth responses to vegetation changes following shrub removal, northern Sierra Nevada, California

    Treesearch

    Steven R. Sparks

    1993-01-01

    Conifer productivity in western North America is often severely inhibited by competing vegetation. Abies concolor [Gord. and Glendl.] Lindl. (white fir) is an important species over much of this area, yet little information is available on response of A. concolor to vegetation management treatments. We revisited two sites in the...

  5. Photosynthetic characteristics of Fagus sylvatica and Quercus robur established for stand conversion from Picea abies

    Treesearch

    E.S. Gardiner; J.J. O’Brien; M. Löf; J.A. Stanturf; P. Madsen

    2009-01-01

    Efforts in Europe to convertNorway spruce (Picea abies) plantations to broadleaf ormixed broadleaf-conifer forests could be bolstered by an increased understanding of how artificial regeneration acclimates and functions under a range of Norway spruce stand conditions. We studied foliage characteristics and leaflevel photosynthesis on 7-year-old European beech (Fagus...

  6. Abies religiosa habitat prediction in climatic change scenarios and implications for monarch butterfly conservation in Mexico

    Treesearch

    Cuauhtemoc Saenz-Romero; Gerald E. Rehfeldt; Pierre Duval; Roberto A. Lindig-Cisneros

    2012-01-01

    Abies religiosa (HBK) Schl. & Cham. (oyamel fir) is distributed in conifer-dominated mountain forests at high altitudes along the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This fir is the preferred host for overwintering monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) migratory populations which habitually congregate within a few stands now located inside a Monarch Butterfly Biosphere...

  7. Preliminary results on the genetic structure of Heterobasidion annosum white fir (Abies concolor) root decay centers

    Treesearch

    M. Garbelotto; F. Cobb; T. Bruns; W. Otrosina; Garey Slaughter; T. Popenuck

    1994-01-01

    It is known that Heterobasidion annosum is a complex species comprised of at least three biological species, more precisely defined as intersterility groups (ISGs). The S ISG is widely diffused in North America, Europe, and probably Asia. Although with regional variations, S ISG isolates are commonly found associated with Picea spp., Abies spp., Tsuga spp.,...

  8. Complex bud architecture and cell-specific chemical patterns enable supercooling of Picea abies bud primordial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bud primordia of Picea abies, despite a frozen shoot, stay ice free down to -50 °C by a mechanism termed supercooling whose biophysical and biochemical requirements are poorly understood. Bud architecture was assessed by 3D-reconstruction, supercooling and freezing patterns by infrared video thermog...

  9. Post-fire epicormic branching in Sierra Nevada Abies concolor (white fir)

    Treesearch

    Chad T. Hanson; Malcolm P. North

    2006-01-01

    In California's mixed-conifer forest, which historically had a regime of frequent fires, two conifers, Sequoiadendron giganteum and Pseudotsuga menziesii, were previously known to produce epicormic sprouts from branches. We found epicormic branching in a third mixed-conifer species, Abies concolor, 3 and 4...

  10. Dysbindin-1, WAVE2 and Abi-1 form a complex that regulates dendritic spine formation.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Morishita, R; Shinoda, T; Iwamoto, I; Sudo, K; Okamoto, K; Nagata, K

    2010-10-01

    Genetic variations in dysbindin-1 (dystrobrevin-binding protein-1) are one of the most commonly reported variations associated with schizophrenia. As schizophrenia could be regarded as a neurodevelopmental disorder resulting from abnormalities of synaptic connectivity, we attempted to clarify the function of dysbindin-1 in neuronal development. We examined the developmental change of dysbindin-1 in rat brain by western blotting and found that a 50 kDa isoform is highly expressed during the embryonic stage, whereas a 40 kDa one is detected at postnatal day 11 and increased thereafter. Immunofluorescent analyses revealed that dysbindin-1 is enriched at the spine-like structure of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We identified WAVE2, but not N-WASP, as a binding partner for dysbindin-1. We also found that Abi-1, a binding molecule for WAVE2 involved in spine morphogenesis, interacts with dysbindin-1. Although dysbindin-1, WAVE2 and Abi-1 form a ternary complex, dysbindin-1 promoted the binding of WAVE2 to Abi-1. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of dysbindin-1 led to the generation of abnormally elongated immature dendritic protrusions. The present results indicate possible functions of dysbindin-1 at the postsynapse in the regulation of dendritic spine morphogenesis through the interaction with WAVE2 and Abi-1.

  11. Allozyme variation and possible phylogenetic implications in Abies cephalonica Loudon and some related eastern Mediterranean firs

    Treesearch

    B. Fady; M. T. Conkle

    1993-01-01

    A total of 22 loci were assayed in several populations of Abies cephalonica, A. borisii regis, A. bornmuelleriana and A. alba using horizontal starch gel electrophoresis. Within and between-population diversity were analyzed as well as between-species diversity. Mean expected heterozygosity was...

  12. Genetic variation and population structure in Fraser fir (Abies fraseri): a microsatellite assessment of young trees

    Treesearch

    Kevin M. Potter; John Frampton; Sedley A. Josserand; Dana C. Nelson

    2008-01-01

    The island-like populations of Fraser fir (Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.) have been isolated since the end of the late-Wisconsinian glaciation on the highest peaks of the Southern Appalachian Mountains and therefore offer an opportunity to investigate the genetic dynamics of a long-fragmented forest tree species. An analysis of eight microsatellite...

  13. Genetic variation and population structure in fraser fir (Abies fraseri): a microsatellite assessment of young trees

    Treesearch

    Kevin M. Potter; John Framton; Sedley A. Josserand; C. Dana Nelson

    2008-01-01

    The island-like populations of Fraser fir (Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.) have been isolated since the end of the late-Wisconsinian glaciation on the highest peaks of the Southern Appalachian Mountains and therefore offer an opportunity to investigate the genetic dynamics of a long-fragmented forest tree species. An analysis of eight microsatellite...

  14. Ponderosa pine mortality resulting from a mountain pine beetle outbreak

    Treesearch

    William F. McCambridge; Frank G. Hawksworth; Carleton B. Edminster; John G. Laut

    1982-01-01

    From 1965 to 1978, mountain pine beetles killed 25% of the pines taller than 4.5 feet in a study area in north-central Colorado. Average basal area was reduced from 92 to 58 square feet per acre. Mortality increased with tree diameter up to about 9 inches d.b.h. Larger trees appeared to be killed at random. Mortality was directly related to number of trees per acre and...

  15. Pinus lambertiana Dougl. Sugar Pine; Pinaceae Pine family

    Treesearch

    Bohun B. Kinloch Jr.; William H. Scheuner

    1990-01-01

    Called "the most princely of the genus" by its discoverer, David Douglas, sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana) is the tallest and largest of all pines, commonly reaching heights of 53 to 61 m (175 to 200 ft) and d.b.h. of 91 to 152 cm (36 to 60 in). Old trees occasionally exceed 500 years and, among associated species, are second only to giant...

  16. Artificial regeneration of shortleaf pine

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett; John C. Brissette; William C. Carlson

    1986-01-01

    The artificial means for establishing stands of shortleaf pine seedlings are reviewed. In addition to the relative merits of direct seeding and planting of bare-root and container seedlings, techniques that should help ensure successful stand establishment are discussed.

  17. Wildlife and shortleaf pine management

    Treesearch

    T. Bently Wigley

    1986-01-01

    Shortleaf pine forests (Pinus echinata) are used for multiple purposes. This paper discusses the effects that timber management, livestock grazing, and recreational uses of the shortleaf forest may have on its wildlife resources.

  18. A conifer ABI3-interacting protein plays important roles during key transitions of the plant life cycle.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ying; Zhao, Tiehan; Kermode, Allison R

    2013-01-01

    ABI3 (for ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3), a transcription factor of the abscisic acid signal transduction pathway, plays a major role during seed development, dormancy inception, and dormancy maintenance. This protein appears to also function in meristematic and vegetative plant tissues and under certain stress conditions. We have isolated the ABI3 gene ortholog (CnABI3) from yellow cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis) and found that it was functionally similar to other ABI3 genes of angiosperms. Here, we report that using a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid approach, we have identified another protein of yellow cedar (CnAIP2; for CnABI3 INTERACTING PROTEIN2) that physically interacts with CnABI3. Functional analyses revealed that CnAIP2 plays important roles during key transitions in the plant life cycle: (1) CnAIP2 impaired seed development and reduced seed dormancy; (2) CnAIP2 promoted root development, particularly the initiation of lateral roots, and the CnAIP2 gene promoter was exquisitely auxin sensitive; and (3) CnAIP2 promoted the transition from vegetative growth to reproductive initiation (i.e. flowering). The nature of the effects of CnAIP2 on these processes and other evidence place CnAIP2 in the category of a "global" regulator, whose actions are antagonistic to those of ABI3.

  19. Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-22

    This ASTER image was acquired on December 12, 2000, and covers an area of 38 x 48 km. Pine Island Glacier has undergone a steady loss of elevation with retreat of the grounding line in recent decades. Now, space imagery has revealed a wide new crack that some scientists think will soon result in a calving event. Glaciologist Robert Bindschadler of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center predicts this crack will result in the calving of a major iceberg, probably in less than 18 months. Discovery of the crack was possible due to multi-year image archives and high resolution imagery. This image is located at 74.1 degrees south latitude and 105.1 degrees west longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11095

  20. Pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    PubMed

    Futai, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    After devastating vast areas of pine forests in Asian countries, the pine wilt disease spread into European forests in 1999 and is causing worldwide concern. This disease involves very complicated interactions between a pathogenic nematode, its vector beetle, host pine species, and fungi in dead hosts. Pathogenicity of the pine wood nematode is determined not only by its physical and chemical traits but also by its behavioral traits. Most life history traits of the pine wood nematode, such as its phoretic relationship with vector beetles, seem to be more effective in virulent than in avirulent isolates or species. As the pathogenicity determinants, secreted enzymes, and surface coat proteins are very important, they have therefore been studied intensively. The mechanism of quick death of a large pine tree as a result of infection by a tiny nematode could be ascribed to the dysfunction of the water-conducting system caused by the death of parenchyma cells, which must have originally evolved as an inherent resistant system.

  1. HOW to Manage Eastern White Pine to Minimize Damage from Blister Rust and White Pine Weevil

    Treesearch

    Steven Katovich; Manfred E. Mielke

    1993-01-01

    White pine was once a dominant forest species in the north central and northeastern United States. Following logging in the late 1800's and the early part of this century, two major pests, white pine blister rust, Cronartium ribicola J.C.Fisch., and white pine weevil, Pissodes strobi (Peck), combined to reduce the value of white pine. Blister rust was introduced...

  2. Relative Suitability of Virginia Pine and Loblolly Pine as Host Species for Dendroctonus frontalis (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Treesearch

    Jessica S. Veysey; Matthew P. Ayres; Maria J. Lombardero; Richard W. Hofstetter; Kier D. Klepzig

    2003-01-01

    Dendroctonus frontalis is a major disturbance agent in American pine forests, but attack preferences for various host species, and their relative suitability for reproduction, are poorly knowi). We studied patterns of beetle attack and reproduction during an infestation of stands contairiing Virginia pine and lol~lolly pine. Nearly all Virginia pine...

  3. Scar markers in a longleaf pine x slash pine F1 family

    Treesearch

    C. Weng; Thomas L. Kubisiak; M. Stine

    1998-01-01

    Sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers were derived from random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) that segregate in a longleaf pine x slash pine F1 family. Nine RAPD fragments, five from longleaf pine and four from slash pine, were cloned and end sequenced. A total of 13 SCAR primer pairs, with lengths between 17 and 24...

  4. Limber pine forests on the leading edge of white pine blister rust distribution in Northern Colorado

    Treesearch

    Jennifer G. Klutsch; Betsy A. Goodrich; Anna W. Schoettle

    2011-01-01

    The combined threats of the current mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae, MPB) epidemic with the imminent invasion of white pine blister rust (caused by the non-native fungus Cronartium ribicola, WPBR) in limber pine (Pinus flexilis) forests in northern Colorado threatens the limber pine's regeneration cycle and ecosystem function. Over one million...

  5. White-pine weevil attack: susceptibility of western white pine in the Northeast

    Treesearch

    Ronald C. Wilkinson

    1981-01-01

    Heights were measured and white-pine weevil (Pissodes strobi (Peck)) attacks were recorded on 668 western white pines (Pinus monticola Douglas) interplanted among 109 eastern white pines (Pinus strobus L.) in a 10-year-old plantation in southern Maine. Less than 13 percent of the western white pines were...

  6. A ponderosa pine-lodgepole pine spacing study in central Oregon: results after 20 years.

    Treesearch

    K.W. Seidel

    1989-01-01

    The growth response after 20 years from an initial spacing study established in a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) plantation was measured in central Oregon. The study was designed to compare the growth rates of pure ponderosa pine, pure lodgepole pine, and a...

  7. Influence of pine straw harvesting, prescribed fire, and fertilization on a Louisiana longleaf pine site

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood

    2009-01-01

    This research was initiated in a 34-year-old, direct-seeded stand of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) to study how pine straw management practices (harvesting, fire, and fertilization) affected the longleaf pine overstory and pine straw yields. A randomized complete block split-plot design was installed with two main plot treatments...

  8. Strategies for managing whitebark pine in the presence of white pine blister rust [Chapter 17

    Treesearch

    Raymond J. Hoff; Dennis E. Ferguson; Geral I. McDonald; Robert E. Keane

    2001-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is one of many North American white pine species (Pinus subgenus Strobus) susceptible to the fungal disease white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola). Blister rust has caused severe mortality (often reaching nearly 100 percent) in many stands of white bark pine north of 45° latitude in western North America. The rust is slowly...

  9. Assessing longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) restoration after southern pine beetle kill using a compact experimental design

    Treesearch

    J.-P. Berrill; C.M. Dagley

    2010-01-01

    A compact experimental design and analysis is presented of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) survival and growth in a restoration project in the Piedmont region of Georgia, USA. Longleaf pine seedlings were planted after salvage logging and broadcast burning in areas of catastrophic southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis) attacks on even-aged mixed pine-hardwood...

  10. Field Tests of Pine Oil as a Repellent for Southern Pine Bark Beetles

    Treesearch

    J.C. Nod; F.L. Hastings; A.S. Jones

    1990-01-01

    An experimental mixture of terpene hydrocarbons derived from wood pulping, BBR-2, sprayed on the lower 6 m of widely separated southern pine trees did not protect nearby trees from southern pine beetle attacks. Whether treated trees were protected from southern pine beetle was inconclusive. The pine oil mixture did not repellpsfrom treated trees or nearby untreated...

  11. ABI4 Regulates Primary Seed Dormancy by Regulating the Biogenesis of Abscisic Acid and Gibberellins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Kai; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Shengfu; Chen, Mingluan; Wu, Yaorong; Tang, Sanyuan; Liu, Chunyan; Feng, Yuqi; Cao, Xiaofeng; Xie, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Seed dormancy is an important economic trait for agricultural production. Abscisic acid (ABA) and Gibberellins (GA) are the primary factors that regulate the transition from dormancy to germination, and they regulate this process antagonistically. The detailed regulatory mechanism involving crosstalk between ABA and GA, which underlies seed dormancy, requires further elucidation. Here, we report that ABI4 positively regulates primary seed dormancy, while negatively regulating cotyledon greening, by mediating the biogenesis of ABA and GA. Seeds of the Arabidopsis abi4 mutant that were subjected to short-term storage (one or two weeks) germinated significantly more quickly than Wild-Type (WT), and abi4 cotyledons greened markedly more quickly than WT, while the rates of germination and greening were comparable when the seeds were subjected to longer-term storage (six months). The ABA content of dry abi4 seeds was remarkably lower than that of WT, but the amounts were comparable after stratification. Consistently, the GA level of abi4 seeds was increased compared to WT. Further analysis showed that abi4 was resistant to treatment with paclobutrazol (PAC), a GA biosynthesis inhibitor, during germination, while OE-ABI4 was sensitive to PAC, and exogenous GA rescued the delayed germination phenotype of OE-ABI4. Analysis by qRT-PCR showed that the expression of genes involved in ABA and GA metabolism in dry and germinating seeds corresponded to hormonal measurements. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation qPCR (ChIP-qPCR) and transient expression analysis showed that ABI4 repressed CYP707A1 and CYP707A2 expression by directly binding to those promoters, and the ABI4 binding elements are essential for this repression. Accordingly, further genetic analysis showed that abi4 recovered the delayed germination phenotype of cyp707a1 and cyp707a2 and further, rescued the non-germinating phenotype of ga1-t. Taken together, this study suggests that ABI4 is a key factor that

  12. Mountain Pine Beetles Use Volatile Cues to Locate Host Limber Pine and Avoid Non-Host Great Basin Bristlecone Pine

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Curtis A.; Runyon, Justin B.; Jenkins, Michael J.; Giunta, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    The tree-killing mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) is an important disturbance agent of western North American forests and recent outbreaks have affected tens of millions of hectares of trees. Most western North American pines (Pinus spp.) are hosts and are successfully attacked by mountain pine beetles whereas a handful of pine species are not suitable hosts and are rarely attacked. How pioneering females locate host trees is not well understood, with prevailing theory involving random landings and/or visual cues. Here we show that female mountain pine beetles orient toward volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from host limber pine (Pinus flexilis James) and away from VOCs of non-host Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva Bailey) in a Y-tube olfactometer. When presented with VOCs of both trees, females overwhelmingly choose limber pine over Great Basin bristlecone pine. Analysis of VOCs collected from co-occurring limber and Great Basin bristlecone pine trees revealed only a few quantitative differences. Noticeable differences included the monoterpenes 3-carene and D-limonene which were produced in greater amounts by host limber pine. We found no evidence that 3-carene is important for beetles when selecting trees, it was not attractive alone and its addition to Great Basin bristlecone pine VOCs did not alter female selection. However, addition of D-limonene to Great Basin bristlecone pine VOCs disrupted the ability of beetles to distinguish between tree species. When presented alone, D-limonene did not affect behavior, suggesting that the response is mediated by multiple compounds. A better understanding of host selection by mountain pine beetles could improve strategies for managing this important forest insect. Moreover, elucidating how Great Basin bristlecone pine escapes attack by mountain pine beetles could provide insight into mechanisms underlying the incredible longevity of this tree species. PMID:26332317

  13. Mistletoe lectin is not the only cytotoxic component in fermented preparations of Viscum album from white fir (Abies pectinata)

    PubMed Central

    Eggenschwiler, Jenny; von Balthazar, Leopold; Stritt, Bianca; Pruntsch, Doreen; Ramos, Mac; Urech, Konrad; Rist, Lukas; Simões-Wüst, A Paula; Viviani, Angelika

    2007-01-01

    Background Preparations of mistletoe (Viscum album) are the form of cancer treatment that is most frequently used in the complementary medicine. Previous work has shown that these preparations are able to exert cytotoxic effects on carcinoma cells, the extent of which might be influenced by the host tree species and by the content of mistletoe lectin. Methods Using colorimetric assays, we have now compared the cytotoxic effects of Viscum album preparations (VAPs) obtained from mistletoe growing on oak (Quercus robur and Q. petraea, VAP-Qu), apple tree (Malus domestica,, VAP-M), pine (Pinus sylvestris, VAP-P) or white fir (Abies pectinata, VAP-A), on the in vitro growth of breast and bladder carcinoma cell lines. While MFM-223, KPL-1, MCF-7 and HCC-1937 were the breast carcinoma cell lines chosen, the panel of tested bladder carcinoma cells comprised the T-24, TCC-SUP, UM-UC-3 and J-82 cell lines. Results Each of the VAPs inhibited cell growth, but the extent of this inhibition differed with the preparation and with the cell line. The concentrations of VAP-Qu, VAP-M and VAP-A which led to a 50 % reduction of cell growth (IC50) varied between 0.6 and 0.03 mg/ml. Higher concentrations of VAP-P were required to obtain a comparable effect. Purified mistletoe lectin I (MLI) led to an inhibition of breast carcinoma cell growth at concentrations lower than those of VAPs, but the sensitivity towards purified MLI did not parallel that towards VAPs. Bladder carcinoma cells were in most cases more sensitive to VAPs treatment than breast carcinoma cells. The total mistletoe lectin content was very high in VAP-Qu (54 ng/mg extract), intermediate in VAP-M (25 ng/mg extract), and very low in VAP-P (1.3 ng/mg extract) and in VAP-A (1 ng/mg extract). As to be expected from the low content of mistletoe lectin, VAP-P led to relatively weak cytotoxic effects. Most remarkably, however, the lectin-poor VAP-A revealed a cytotoxic effect comparable to, or even stronger than, that of the

  14. Identification and functional analysis of two alternatively spliced transcripts of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3) in linseed flax (Linum usitatissimum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Zhang, Tianbao; Song, Xiaxia; Zhang, Jianping; Dang, Zhanhai; Pei, Xinwu; Long, Yan

    2018-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a popular phenomenon in different types of plants. It can produce alternative spliced transcripts that encode proteins with altered functions. Previous studies have shown that one transcription factor, ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3), which encodes an important component in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, is subjected to alternative splicing in both mono- and dicotyledons. In the current study, we identified two homologs of ABI3 in the genome of linseed flax. We screened two alternatively spliced flax LuABI3 transcripts, LuABI3-2 and LuABI3-3, and one normal flax LuABI3 transcript, LuABI3-1. Sequence analysis revealed that one of the alternatively spliced transcripts, LuABI3-3, retained a 6 bp intron. RNA accumulation analysis showed that all three transcripts were expressed during seed development, while subcellular localization and transgene experiments showed that LuABI3-3 had no biological function. The two normal transcripts, LuABI3-1 and LuABI3-2, are the important functional isoforms in flax and play significant roles in the ABA regulatory pathway during seed development, germination, and maturation.

  15. Nantucket Pine Tip Moth Control and Loblolly Pine Growth in Intensive Pine Culture: Two-Year Results

    Treesearch

    David L. Kulhavy; Jimmie L. Yeiser; L. Allen Smith

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-two treatments replicated four times were applied to planted loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L. on bedded industrial forest land in east Texas for measurement of growth impact of Nantucket pine tip moth (NPTM), Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock), and effects on pine growth over 2 years. Treatments were combinations of Velpar, Oust, and Arsenal...

  16. A comparison of loblolly pine growth and yield on pure pine and mixed pine-hardwood sites

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood; John R. Toliver

    1989-01-01

    The case histories of four loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) sites were examined to determine if differences in growth and yield could be associated with stand type. The stand types were pure loblolly pine and mixed loblolly pine-hardwood. All sites were located on silt loam soils and mechanical site preparation was carried out on all sites before...

  17. Role of Phytotoxins in Pine Wilt Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Hachiro

    1988-01-01

    Characteristic rapid death of pines after infection by Bursaphelenchus xylophilus suggests the involvement of phytotoxins in the pine wilt disease syndrome. Crude extract from diseased pine is toxic to pine seedlings, whereas an extract from healthy pine is not. The response of seedlings to the crude toxin is more prominent in susceptible pine species than in resistant ones. Benzoic acid, catechol, dihydroconiferyl alcohol, 8-hydroxycarvotanacetone (carvone hydrate), and 10-hydroxyverbenone, which are toxic, low molecular weight metabolites, can be isolated from diseased pines. Other unidentified toxins are also found. The toxicity of some of these metabolites correlates positively to the susceptibility of pines to B. xylophilus. Some of these abnormal metabolites show synergistic toxicity when in combination. The D-isomer of 8-hydroxycarvotanacetone, dihydroconiferylalcohol, and 10-hydroxyverbenone inhibited the reproduction of B. xylophilus. Cellulase excreted by pinewood nematode also may be involved in rapid wilting. PMID:19290208

  18. Hybrids of sugar pine by embryo culture

    Treesearch

    E. C. Stone; J. W. Duffield

    1950-01-01

    A modified embryo culture technique was used to facilitate germination of seed obtained after pollinating sugar pine with pollen from blister rust- resistant Armand and Korean pines. Resulting seedlings appear to be hybrids.

  19. Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) marker reveals genetic diversity of Dendrobium nobile Lindl., an endangered medicinal orchid species.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Paromik; Kumaria, Suman; Kumar, Shrawan; Tandon, Pramod

    2013-10-15

    Genetic variability in the wild genotypes of Dendrobium nobile Lindl. collected from different parts of Northeast India, was analyzed using a Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) marker system. A total of sixty individuals comprising of six natural populations were investigated for the existing natural genetic diversity. One hundred and thirty two (132) amplicons were produced by SCoT marker generating 96.21% polymorphism. The PIC value of the SCoT marker system was 0.78 and the Rp values of the primers ranged between 4.43 and 7.50. The percentage of polymorphic loci (Pp) ranging from 25% to 56.82%, Nei's gene diversity (h) from 0.08 to 0.15 with mean Nei's gene diversity of 0.28, and Shannon's information index (I) values ranging from 0.13 to 0.24 with an average value of 0.43 were recorded. The gene flow value (0.37) and the diversity among populations (0.57) demonstrated higher genetic variation among the populations. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed 43.37% of variation within the populations, whereas 56.63% variation was recorded among the populations. Cluster analysis also reveals high genetic variation among the genotypes. Present investigation suggests the effectiveness of SCoT marker system to estimate the genetic diversity of D. nobile and that it can be seen as a preliminary point for future research on the population and evolutionary genetics of this endangered orchid species of medicinal importance. © 2013.

  20. Establishing Longleaf Pine Seedlings Under a Loblolly Pine Canopy (User’s Guide)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    converting loblolly pine stands to longleaf pine dominance ..................... 5 3. WHERE DO THE GUIDELINES APPLY? GEOGRAPHIC, EDAPHIC, AND STAND STRUCTURE ...watching, hunting, and off-road vehicle use, and yield valuable products including quality saw- timber and pine needles for landscaping. Longleaf pines...U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2003). The foraging habitat guidelines specify characteristics of the pine canopy structure , the abundance of

  1. Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS): bone marrow-derived stem cells in the treatment of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jeffrey N.; Levy, Steven; Benes, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    The Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS) is currently the largest-scale stem cell ophthalmology trial registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT01920867). SCOTS utilizes autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) to treat optic nerve and retinal diseases. Treatment approaches include a combination of retrobulbar, subtenon, intravitreal, intra-optic nerve, subretinal, and intravenous injection of autologous BMSCs according to the nature of the disease, the degree of visual loss, and any risk factors related to the treatments. Patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy had visual acuity gains on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) of up to 35 letters and Snellen acuity improvements from hand motion to 20/200 and from counting fingers to 20/100. Visual field improvements were noted. Macular and optic nerve head nerve fiber layer typically thickened. No serious complications were seen. The increases in visual acuity obtained in our study were encouraging and suggest that the use of autologous BMSCs as provided in SCOTS for ophthalmologic mitochondrial diseases including Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy may be a viable treatment option. PMID:27904503

  2. Genetic variation, population structure and linkage disequilibrium in Switchgrass with ISSR, SCoT and EST-SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yan, Haidong; Jiang, Xiaomei; Wang, Xiaoli; Huang, Linkai; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Xinquan; Zhang, Lexin

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate genetic variation, population structure, and the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD), 134 switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum L.) samples were analyzed with 51 markers, including 16 ISSRs, 20 SCoTs, and 15 EST-SSRs. In this study, a high level of genetic variation was observed in the switchgrass samples and they had an average Nei's gene diversity index (H) of 0.311. A total of 793 bands were obtained, of which 708 (89.28 %) were polymorphic. Using a parameter marker index (MI), the efficiency of the three types of markers (ISSR, SCoT, and EST-SSR) in the study were compared and we found that SCoT had a higher marker efficiency than the other two markers. The 134 switchgrass samples could be divided into two sub-populations based on STRUCTURE, UPGMA clustering, and principal coordinate analyses (PCA), and upland and lowland ecotypes could be separated by UPGMA clustering and PCA analyses. Linkage disequilibrium analysis revealed an average r 2 of 0.035 across all 51 markers, indicating a trend of higher LD in sub-population 2 than that in sub-population 1 ( P  < 0.01). The population structure revealed in this study will guide the design of future association studies using these switchgrass samples.

  3. A Hydraulically Operated Pine Cone Cutter

    Treesearch

    Carl W. Fatzinger; M.T. Proveaux

    1971-01-01

    Mature cones of slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm. var. elliottii) and longleaf pine (P. palustris Mill.) can be easily bisected along their longitudinal axes with the hydraulic pine cone cutter described. This cutter eliminates the two major problems of earlier models--undue operator fatigue and the...

  4. Hybridization of foxtail and bristlecone pines

    Treesearch

    William B. < /p> Critchfield

    1977-01-01

    The pines have been more successful than most of their coniferous relatives in occupying marginal habitats at the upper and lower edges of the forest zone in western North America. Among the groups restricted to such habitats is subsection Baljourianae of Pinus, comprising the fox tail and bristlecone pines. These pines...

  5. Shortleaf pine: a species at risk?

    Treesearch

    Charles G. Tauer; Shiqin Xu; C. Dana Nelson; James M. Guldin

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1950s the existence of natural hybrids between shortleaf pine and loblolly pine has been recognized and reported in the literature. In a range-wide study of isoenzyme diversity in shortleaf pine, we found 16 percent of the trees from western populations were hybrids, based on the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) locus. In stands thought to be pure shortleaf...

  6. Shortleaf pine: a species at risk?

    Treesearch

    Charles G. Tauer; Shiqin Xu; C. Dana Nelson; James M. Guldin

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1950s the existence of natural hybrids between shortleaf pine and loblolly pine has been recognized and reported in the literature. In a range-wide study of isoenzyme diversity in shortleaf pine. we found 16 percent of the trees from western populations were hybrids. based on the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) locus. In stands thought to be pure shortleaf...

  7. Cone Analysis of Southern Pines - A Guidebook

    Treesearch

    D.L. Bramlett; E.W. Belcher; G.L. DeBarr; G.D. Hertel; Robert P. Karrfalt; C.W. Lantz; T. Miller; K.D. Ware; H.O. Yates

    1977-01-01

    Southern pine tree improvement programs require an ample supply of improved seeds, but productron from southern pine seed orchards has often been disappointing. If high productron is to be malntained yields must be monitored and causes of seed losses must be identified. Techniques for determining seed efficiency were first used for red pine, Pinus resinosa...

  8. Ecology of southwestern ponderosa pine forests

    Treesearch

    William H. Moir; Brian W. Geils; Mary Ann Benoit; Dan Scurlock

    1997-01-01

    Ponderosa pine forests are important because of their wide distribution, commercial value, and because they provide habitat for many plants and animals. Ponderosa pine forests are noted for their variety of passerine birds resulting from variation in forest composition and structure modified by past and present human use. Subsequent chapters discuss how ponderosa pine...

  9. Guidelines for whitebark pine planting prescriptions

    Treesearch

    Glenda L. Scott; Ward W. McCaughey; Kay Izlar

    2011-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is a keystone species in high-elevation ecosystems of the western United States. Unfortunately many fragile subalpine ecosystems are losing whitebark pine as a functional community component due to the combined effects of an introduced disease, insects and succession. Planting whitebark pine is one part of a multifaceted restoration...

  10. Bending strength of Chilean radiata pine poles

    Treesearch

    Gina Cerda; Ronald W. Wolfe

    2003-01-01

    Because radiata pine has thrived in south-central Chile since it was introduced there more than a century ago, pine plantation productivity there has grown tremendously. Plantation owners are seeking new markets for this material. One potential market is utility poles. The American National Standards Institute 05.1 standard (ANSI 05.1) provides a means for radiata pine...

  11. Fire effects in northeastern forests: jack pine.

    Treesearch

    Cary Rouse

    1986-01-01

    The jack pine ecosystem has evolved through fire. Jack pine, although easily killed by fire, has developed serotinous cones that depend upon high heat to open and release the seeds. Without a fire to enable the cones to open, jack pine would be replaced by another species. Prescribed fire can be an economical management tool for site preparation in either a natural...

  12. Mechanical Control of Southern Pine Beetle Infestations

    Treesearch

    Ronald F. Billings

    2011-01-01

    Periodic outbreaks of the southern pine beetle (SPB) may affect thousands of acres of commercial pine forests in the Southeastern United States, Mexico, and Central America. Accordingly, this species is the target of more aggressive and effective suppression programs than any other bark beetle pest in the world. The strategy for controlling the southern pine beetle...

  13. Are we over-managing longleaf pine?

    Treesearch

    John S. Kush; Rebecca J. Barlow; John C. Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) is not loblolly (Pinus taeda L.) or slash pine (Pinus elliottii L.). There is the need for a paradigmatic shift in our thinking about longleaf pine. All too often we think of longleaf as an intolerant species, slow-grower, difficult to regenerate, and yet it dominated the pre...

  14. Crossability and relationships of Washoe pine

    Treesearch

    William B. Critchfield

    1984-01-01

    Washoe pine, related to ponderosa pine but occurring at higher elevations along the western edge of the Great Basin, crosses freely with the Rocky Mountain race of ponderosa despite evidence of long-term separation. Washoe is morphologically distinct from the parapatric Pacific race of ponderosa pine, and the two taxa are kept separate partly by genetic barriers that...

  15. The Longleaf Pine Ecosystem of the South

    Treesearch

    Kenneth W. Outcalt

    2000-01-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris P. Mill. [Pinaceae]) was the most prevalent pine type in the southern US Stands of longleaf were also habitat for a vast array of plant species. Decades of timber harvest followed by conversion to agriculture, urban development, or to other pine species, have reduced longleaf dominated areas to less than 5% of its...

  16. Silvical characteristics of Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana)

    Treesearch

    Albert G., Jr. Snow

    1960-01-01

    Virginia pine has finally attained its rightful place among trees of commercial importance. It has done so in spite of being called "scrub pine" and "poverty pine" - and in spite of the term "forest weed", which has lingered long in the speech of oldtimers who remember the days of timber-plenty.

  17. Crossing the western pines at Placerville, California

    Treesearch

    W. B. Critchfield; S. L. Krugman

    1967-01-01

    The results of hybridizing the western pine species by the Institute of Forest Genetics are described and discussed. It has been found that the hard, (yellow) pines can generally be crossed successfully only with similar species native to the same part of the world. In contrast, the soft (white) pines of the Western Hemisphere have been crossed successfully with soft...

  18. Light acclimation of photosynthesis in two closely related firs (Abies pinsapo Boiss. and Abies alba Mill.): the role of leaf anatomy and mesophyll conductance to CO2

    PubMed Central

    Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Flexas, Jaume; Galmés, Jeroni; Niinemets, Ülo; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2016-01-01

    Leaves growing in the forest understory usually present a decreased mesophyll conductance (gm) and photosynthetic capacity. The role of leaf anatomy in determining the variability in gm among species is known, but there is a lack of information on how the acclimation of gm to shade conditions is driven by changes in leaf anatomy. Within this context, we demonstrated that Abies pinsapo Boiss. experienced profound modifications in needle anatomy to drastic changes in light availability that ultimately led to differential photosynthetic performance between trees grown in the open field and in the forest understory. In contrast to A. pinsapo, its congeneric Abies alba Mill. did not show differences either in needle anatomy or in photosynthetic parameters between trees grown in the open field and in the forest understory. The increased gm values found in trees of A. pinsapo grown in the open field can be explained by occurrence of stomata at both needle sides (amphistomatous needles), increased chloroplast surface area exposed to intercellular airspace, decreased cell wall thickness and, especially, decreased chloroplast thickness. To the best of our knowledge, the role of such drastic changes in ultrastructural needle anatomy in explaining the response of gm to the light environment has not been demonstrated in field conditions. PMID:26543153

  19. Tappable Pine Trees: Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: The University of Florida is working to increase the amount of turpentine in harvested pine from 4% to 20% of its dry weight. While enhanced feedstocks for biofuels have generally focused on fuel production from leafy plants and grasses, the University of Florida is experimenting with enhancing fuel production in a species of pine that is currently used in the paper pulping industry. Pine trees naturally produce around 3-5% terpene content in the wood—terpenes are the energy-dense fuel molecules that are the predominant components of turpentine. The team aims to increase the terpene storage potential and production capacitymore » while improving the terpene composition to a point at which the trees could be tapped while alive, like sugar maples. Growth and production from these trees will take years, but this pioneering technology could have significant impact in making available an economical and domestic source of aviation and diesel biofuels.« less

  20. Spin-orbit coupling enhanced superconductivity in Bi-rich compounds ABi3 (A = Sr and Ba)

    PubMed Central

    Shao, D. F.; Luo, X.; Lu, W. J.; Hu, L.; Zhu, X. D.; Song, W. H.; Zhu, X. B.; Sun, Y. P.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Bi-based compounds have attracted attentions because of the strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC). In this work, we figured out the role of SOC in ABi3 (A = Sr and Ba) by theoretical investigation of the band structures, phonon properties, and electron-phonon coupling. Without SOC, strong Fermi surface nesting leads to phonon instabilities in ABi3. SOC suppresses the nesting and stabilizes the structure. Moreover, without SOC the calculation largely underestimates the superconducting transition temperatures (Tc), while with SOC the calculated Tc are very close to those determined by measurements on single crystal samples. The SOC enhanced superconductivity in ABi3 is due to not only the SOC induced phonon softening, but also the SOC related increase of electron-phonon coupling matrix elements. ABi3 can be potential platforms to construct heterostructure of superconductor/topological insulator to realize topological superconductivity. PMID:26892681

  1. Adaptive evolution of Mediterranean pines.

    PubMed

    Grivet, Delphine; Climent, José; Zabal-Aguirre, Mario; Neale, David B; Vendramin, Giovanni G; González-Martínez, Santiago C

    2013-09-01

    Mediterranean pines represent an extremely heterogeneous assembly. Although they have evolved under similar environmental conditions, they diversified long ago, ca. 10 Mya, and present distinct biogeographic and demographic histories. Therefore, it is of special interest to understand whether and to what extent they have developed specific strategies of adaptive evolution through time and space. To explore evolutionary patterns, the Mediterranean pines' phylogeny was first reconstructed analyzing a new set of 21 low-copy nuclear genes with multilocus Bayesian tree reconstruction methods. Secondly, a phylogenetic approach was used to search for footprints of natural selection and to examine the evolution of multiple phenotypic traits. We identified two genes (involved in pines' defense and stress responses) that have likely played a role in the adaptation of Mediterranean pines to their environment. Moreover, few life-history traits showed historical or evolutionary adaptive convergence in Mediterranean lineages, while patterns of character evolution revealed various evolutionary trade-offs linking growth-development, reproduction and fire-related traits. Assessing the evolutionary path of important life-history traits, as well as the genomic basis of adaptive variation is central to understanding the past evolutionary success of Mediterranean pines and their future response to environmental changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemodiversity of the Essential Oil from Leaves of Abies nebrodensis (Lojac.) Mattei.

    PubMed

    Schicchi, Rosario; Geraci, Anna; Rosselli, Sergio; Maggio, Antonella; Bruno, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    Abies nebrodensis (Lojac.) Mattei (Pinaceae) is a species occurring in a very small population only in a restricted area of Sicily. Its taxonomic classification as different species has been object of discussion. In this work the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves is presented for the first time and compared to the essential oils from other euroasiatic species reported in literature. Peculiar characteristics of the essential oil of A. nebrodensis are highlighted. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  3. A leucine repeat motif in AbiA is required for resistance of Lactococcus lactis to phages representing three species.

    PubMed

    Dinsmore, P K; O'Sullivan, D J; Klaenhammer, T R

    1998-05-28

    The abiA gene encodes an abortive bacteriophage infection mechanism that can protect Lactococcus species from infection by a variety of bacteriophages including three unrelated phage species. Five heptad leucine repeats suggestive of a leucine zipper motif were identified between residues 232 and 266 in the predicted amino acid sequence of the AbiA protein. The biological role of residues in the repeats was investigated by incorporating amino acid substitutions via site-directed mutagenesis. Each mutant was tested for phage resistance against three phages, phi 31, sk1, and c2, belonging to species P335, 936, and c2, respectively. The five residues that comprise the heptad repeats were designated L234, L242, A249, L256, and L263. Three single conservative mutations of leucine to valine in positions L235, L242, and L263 and a double mutation of two leucines (L235 and L242) to valines did not affect AbiA activity on any phages tested. Non-conservative single substitutions of charged amino acids for three of the leucines (L235, L242, and L256) virtually eliminated AbiA activity on all phages tested. Substitution of the alanine residue in the third repeat (A249) with a charged residue did not affect AbiA activity. Replacement of L242 with an alanine elimination phage resistance against phi 31, but partial resistance to sk1 and c2 remained. Two single proline substitutions for leucines L242 and L263 virtually eliminated AbiA activity against all phages, indicating that the predicted alpha-helical structure of this region is important. Mutations in an adjacent region of basic amino acids had various effects on phage resistance, suggesting that these basic residues are also important for AbiA activity. This directed mutagenesis analysis of AbiA indicated that the leucine repeat structure is essential for conferring phage resistance against three species of lactococcal bacteriophages.

  4. Transactivation of the Brassica napus napin promoter by ABI3 requires interaction of the conserved B2 and B3 domains of ABI3 with different cis-elements: B2 mediates activation through an ABRE, whereas B3 interacts with an RY/G-box.

    PubMed

    Ezcurra, I; Wycliffe, P; Nehlin, L; Ellerström, M; Rask, L

    2000-10-01

    The transcriptional activator ABI3 is a key regulator of gene expression during embryo maturation in crucifers. In monocots, the related VP1 protein regulates the Em promoter synergistically with abscisic acid (ABA). We identified cis-elements in the Brassica napus napin napA promoter mediating regulation by ABI3 and ABA, by analyzing substitution mutation constructs of napA in transgenic tobacco plantlets ectopically expressing ABI3. In transient analysis using particle bombardment of tobacco leaf sections, a tetramer of the distB ABRE (abscisic acid-responsive element) mediated transactivation by ABI3 and ABI3-dependent response to ABA, whereas a tetramer of the composite RY/G complex, containing RY repeats and a G-box, mediated only ABA-independent transactivation by ABI3. Deletion of the conserved B2 and B3 domains of ABI3 abolished transactivation of napA by ABI3. The two domains of ABI3 interact with different cis-elements: B2 is necessary for ABA-independent and ABA-dependent activations through the distB ABRE, whereas B3 interacts with the RY/G complex. Thus B2 mediates the interaction of ABI3 with the protein complex at the ABRE. The regulation of napA by ABI3 differs from Em regulation by VP1, in that the B3 domain of ABI3 is essential for the ABA-dependent regulation of napA.

  5. How the pine seeds attach to/detach from the pine cone scale?

    PubMed

    Song, Kahye; Chang, Shyr-Shea; Lee, Sang Joon

    2017-01-01

    One of the primary purposes of pine cones is the protection and distant dispersal of pine seeds. Pine cones open and release their embedded seeds on dry and windy days for long-distance dispersal. In this study, how the pine seed attach to/ detach from the pine cone scale for efficient seed dispersal were experimentally investigated by using X-ray micro-imaging technique. The cone and seeds adhere to one another in the presence of water, which could be explained by the surface tension and the contact angle hysteresis. Otherwise, without water, the waterproof seed wing surface permits rapid drying for detach and dispersion. On the other hand, during wildfires, pine cones open their seed racks and detach the pine seeds from pine cones for rapid seed dispersal. Due to these structural advantages, pine seeds are released safely and efficiently on adjust condition. These advantageous structure could be mimicked in practical applications.

  6. Potential Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) and Inter-retrotransposon Amplified Polymorphism (IRAP) Markers for Evaluation of Genetic Diversity and Conservation of Wild Pistacia Species Population.

    PubMed

    Sorkheh, Karim; Amirbakhtiar, Nazanin; Ercisli, Sezai

    2016-08-01

    Wild pistachio species is important species in forests regions Iran and provide protection wind and soil erosion. Even though cultivation and utilization of Pistacia are fully exploited, the evolutionary history of the Pistacia genus and the relationships among the species and accessions is still not well understood. Two molecular marker strategies, SCoT and IRAP markers were analyzed for assessment of 50 accessions of this species accumulated from diverse geographical areas of Iran. A thorough of 115 bands were amplified using eight IRAP primers, of which 104 (90.4 %) have been polymorphic, and 246 polymorphic bands (68.7 %) had been located in 358 bands amplified by way of forty-four SCoT primers. Average PIC for IRAP and SCoT markers became 0.32 and 0.48, respectively. This is exposed that SCoT markers have been extra informative than IRAP for the assessment of variety among pistachio accessions. Primarily based on the two extraordinary molecular markers, cluster evaluation revealed that the 50 accessions taken for the evaluation may be divided into three distinct clusters. Those results recommend that the performance of SCoT and IRAP markers was highly the equal in fingerprinting of accessions. The results affirmed a low genetic differentiation among populations, indicating the opportunity of gene drift most of the studied populations. These findings might render striking information in breeding management strategies for genetic conservation and cultivar improvement.

  7. A Loblolly Pine Management Guide: Natural Regeneration of Loblolly Pine

    Treesearch

    M. Boyd Edwards

    1987-01-01

    For many landowners, low cost makes natural regeneration an attractive alternative to planting when loblolly pine stands are harvested. Clearcutting, seed-tree, shelterwood, and selection methods can be used. Keys to success are a suitable seedbed.an adequate seed supply, sufficient moisture. and freedom from excessive competition.

  8. Pine needle abortion biomarker detected in bovine fetal fluids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pine needle abortion is a naturally occurring condition in free-range cattle caused by the consumption of pine needles from select species of cypress, juniper, pine, and spruce trees. Confirmatory diagnosis of pine needle abortion has previously relied on a combined case history of pine needle cons...

  9. Successional trends of six mature shortleaf pine forests in Missouri

    Treesearch

    Michael C. Stambaugh; Rose-Marie Muzika

    2007-01-01

    Many of Missouri's mature oak-shortleaf pine (Quercus-Pinus echinata) forests are in a mid-transition stage characterized by partial pine overstory, limited pine recruitment, and minimal pine regeneration. Restoration of shortleaf pine communities at a large scale necessitates the understanding and management of natural regeneration. To...

  10. Underplanting shortleaf pine at Coldwater Conservation Area in Missouri

    Treesearch

    Jason Jensen; David Gwaze

    2007-01-01

    Restoring shortleaf pine throughout its native range in the Ozark Highlands is a high priority in Missouri. Restoring shortleaf pine on former pine and oak-pine sites is a longterm strategy for mitigating chronic oak decline (Law et al. 2004). Underplanting or preharvest planting is one method that has potential for restoring shortleaf pine.

  11. Restoration planting options for limber pines in Colorado and Wyoming

    Treesearch

    Anne Marie Casper; William R. Jacobi; Anna W. Schoettle; Kelly S. Burns

    2011-01-01

    Limber Pine (Pinus flexilis) populations in the southern Rocky Mountains are severely threatened by the combined impacts of mountain pine beetles and white pine blister rust. Limber pineʼs critical role in these high elevation ecosystems heightens the importance of mitigating these impacts. To develop forest-scale planting methods, six limber pine seedling...

  12. Patterns of auxin distribution during gravitational induction of reaction wood in poplar and pine.

    PubMed

    Hellgren, Jenny M; Olofsson, Kjell; Sundberg, Björn

    2004-05-01

    Gravistimulation of tree stems affects wood development by unilaterally inducing wood with modified properties, called reaction wood. Commonly, it also stimulates cambial growth on the reaction wood side. Numerous experiments involving applications of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or IAA-transport inhibitors have suggested that reaction wood is induced by a redistribution of IAA around the stem. However, in planta proof for this model is lacking. Therefore, we have mapped endogenous IAA distribution across the cambial region tissues in both aspen (Populus tremula, denoted poplar) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) trees forming reaction wood, using tangential cryosectioning combined with sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Moreover, we have documented the kinetics of IAA during reaction wood induction in these species. Our analysis of endogenous IAA demonstrates that reaction wood is formed without any obvious alterations in IAA balance. This is in contrast to gravitropic responses in roots and shoots where a redistribution of IAA has been documented. It is also of interest that cambial growth on the tension wood side was stimulated without an increase in IAA. Taken together, our results suggest a role for signals other than IAA in the reaction wood response, or that the gravitational stimulus interacts with the IAA signal transduction pathway.

  13. Declining pine growth in Central Spain coincides with increasing diurnal temperature range since the 1970s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büntgen, Ulf; Martínez-Peña, Fernando; Aldea, Jorge; Rigling, Andreas; Fischer, Erich M.; Camarero, J. Julio; Hayes, Michael J.; Fatton, Vincent; Egli, Simon

    2013-08-01

    Growing evidence suggests environmental change to be most severe across the semi-arid subtropics, with past, present and projected drying of the Mediterranean Basin posing a key multidisciplinary challenge. Consideration of a single climatic factor, however, often fails to explain spatiotemporal growth dynamics of drought-prone ecosystems. Here, we present annually resolved and absolutely dated ring width measurements of 871 Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) from 18 individual plot sites in the Central Spanish Pinar Grande forest reserve. Although comprising tree ages from 6 to 175 years, this network correlates surprisingly well with the inverse May-July diurnal temperature range (r = 0.84; p < 0.00011956-2011). Ring width extremes were triggered by pressure anomalies of the North Atlantic Oscillation, and the long-term growth decline coincided with Iberian-wide drying since the mid-1970s. Climate model simulations not only confirm this negative trend over the last decades but also project drought to continuously increase over the 21st century. Associated ecological effects and socio-economic consequences should be considered to improve adaptation strategies of agricultural and forest management, as well as biodiversity conservation and ecosystem service.

  14. Genetic diversity within and among populations of shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)

    Treesearch

    Shiqin Xu; C.G. Tauer; C. Dana Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Shortleaf pine (n=93) and loblolly pine (n=112) trees representing 22 seed sources or 16 physiographic populations were sampled from Southwide Southern Pine Seed Source Study plantings located in Oklahoma, Arkansas and Mississippi. The sampled trees were grown from shortleaf pine and loblolly pine seeds formed in 1951 and 1952, prior to the start of intensive forest...

  15. Peatland pines as a proxy for water table fluctuations: disentangling tree growth, hydrology and possible human influence.

    PubMed

    Smiljanić, Marko; Seo, Jeong-Wook; Läänelaid, Alar; van der Maaten-Theunissen, Marieke; Stajić, Branko; Wilmking, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Dendrochronological investigations of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing on Männikjärve peatland in central Estonia showed that annual tree growth of peatland pines can be used as a proxy for past variations of water table levels. Reconstruction of past water table levels can help us to better understand the dynamics of various ecological processes in peatlands, e.g. the formation of vegetation patterns or carbon and nitrogen cycling. Männikjärve bog has one of the longest water table records in the boreal zone, continuously monitored since 1956. Common uncertainties encountered while working with peatland trees (e.g. narrow, missing and wedging rings) were in our case exacerbated with difficulties related to the instability of the relationship between tree growth and peatland environment. We hypothesized that the instable relationship was mainly due to a significant change of the limiting factor, i.e. the rise of the water table level due to human activity. To test our hypothesis we had to use several novel methods of tree-ring chronology analysis as well as to test explicitly whether undetected missing rings biased our results. Since the hypothesis that the instable relationship between tree growth and environment was caused by a change in limiting factor could not be rejected, we proceeded to find possible significant changes of past water table levels using structural analysis of the tree-ring chronologies. Our main conclusions were that peatland pines can be proxies to water table levels and that there were several shifting periods of high and low water table levels in the past 200 years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of genetic diversity in Vigna unguiculata L. (Walp) accessions using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphic markers.

    PubMed

    Igwe, David Okeh; Afiukwa, Celestine Azubike; Ubi, Benjamin Ewa; Ogbu, Kenneth Idika; Ojuederie, Omena Bernard; Ude, George Nkem

    2017-11-17

    Assessment of genetic diversity of Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp (cowpea) accessions using informative molecular markers is imperative for their genetic improvement and conservation. Use of efficacious molecular markers to obtain the required knowledge of the genetic diversity within the local and regional germplasm collections can enhance the overall effectiveness of cowpea improvement programs, hence, the comparative assessment of Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and Start codon targeted (SCoT) markers in genetic diversity of V. unguiculata accessions from different regions in Nigeria. Comparative analysis of the genetic diversity of eighteen accessions from different locations in Nigeria was investigated using ISSR and SCoT markers. DNA extraction was done using Zymogen Kit according to its manufacturer's instructions followed by amplifications with ISSR and SCoT and agarose gel electrophoresis. The reproducible bands were scored for analyses of dendrograms, principal component analysis, genetic diversity, allele frequency, polymorphic information content, and population structure. Both ISSR and SCoT markers resolved the accessions into five major clusters based on dendrogram and principal component analyses. Alleles of 32 and 52 were obtained with ISSR and SCoT, respectively. Numbers of alleles, gene diversity and polymorphic information content detected with ISSR were 9.4000, 0.7358 and 0.7192, while SCoT yielded 11.1667, 0.8158 and 0.8009, respectively. Polymorphic loci were 70 and 80 in ISSR and SCoT, respectively. Both markers produced high polymorphism (94.44-100%). The ranges of effective number of alleles (Ne) were 1.2887 ± 0.1797-1.7831 ± 0.2944 and 1.7416 ± 0.0776-1.9181 ± 0.2426 in ISSR and SCoT, respectively. The Nei's genetic diversity (H) ranged from 0.2112 ± 0.0600-0.4335 ± 0.1371 and 0.4111 ± 0.0226-0.4778 ± 0.1168 in ISSR and SCoT, respectively. Shannon's information index (I) from ISSR and SCoT were 0

  17. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles induce embolism in drought stressed conifers (Norway spruce, stone pine).

    PubMed

    Mayr, Stefan; Gruber, Andreas; Bauer, Helmut

    2003-07-01

    Freezing and thawing lead to xylem embolism when gas bubbles caused by ice formation expand during the thaw process. However, previous experimental studies indicated that conifers are resistant to freezing-induced embolism, unless xylem pressure becomes very negative during the freezing. In this study, we show that conifers experienced freezing-induced embolism when exposed to repeated freeze-thaw cycles and simultaneously to drought. Simulating conditions at the alpine timberline (128 days with freeze-thaw events and thawing rates of up to 9.5 K h(-1) in the xylem of exposed twigs during winter), young trees of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] and stone pine (Pinus cembra L.) were exposed to 50 and 100 freeze-thaw cycles. This treatment caused a significant increase in embolism rates in drought-stressed samples. Upon 100 freeze-thaw cycles, vulnerability thresholds (50% loss of conductivity) were shifted 1.8 MPa (Norway spruce) and 0.8 MPa (stone pine) towards less negative water potentials. The results demonstrate that freeze-thaw cycles are a possible reason for winter-embolism in conifers observed in several field studies. Freezing-induced embolism may contribute to the altitudinal limits of conifers.

  18. Participatory genetic improvement: longleaf pine

    Treesearch

    C. Dana Nelson; Gwendolyn Boyd; Randall J. Rousseau; Barbara S. Crane; Craig S. Echt; Kurt H. Johnsen

    2015-01-01

    University-industry-state cooperative tree improvement has been highly successful in the southern United States. Over nearly 60 years, three cooperative programs have led the way in developing and deploying genetically improved planting stocks for loblolly (Pinus taeda L.) and slash (P. elliottii Engelm.) pines. However, much lower levels of success have been achieved...

  19. Pine Shoot Beetle Research Update

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack; Therese M. Poland

    2000-01-01

    Established populations of the pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (L.) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), were first detected in the US in 1992. As of January 2000, T. piniperda was known to be established in 271 counties in 11 US states (IL, IN, MD, MI, NH, NY, OH, PA, VT, WI, WV) and 25 counties in Ontario and 8 counties in Quebec,...

  20. Multiaged silviculture of ponderosa pine

    Treesearch

    Kevin L. O' Hara

    2005-01-01

    Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa P. & C. Lawson) is highly suitable for management using multiaged systems. This suitability is primarily the result of a frequent, low severity disturbance regime, but also because it naturally occurs at low densities and has a long history of management to promote multiple age classes. Several different stocking...