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Sample records for ability index wai

  1. Development of WAIS-III General Ability Index Minus WMS-III memory discrepancy scores.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Tulsky, David S

    2006-09-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between intellectual functioning and memory ability has received some support as a useful means for evaluating memory impairment. In recent additions to Wechlser scale interpretation, the WAIS-III General Ability Index (GAI) and the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index (DMI) were developed. The purpose of this investigation is to develop base rate data for GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores using data from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (weighted N = 1250). Base rate tables were developed using the predicted-difference method and two simple-difference methods (i.e., stratified and non-stratified). These tables provide valuable data for clinical reference purposes to determine the frequency of GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores in the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample.

  2. Development of the WAIS-III general ability index estimate (GAI-E).

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Schoenberg, Mike R; Chelune, Gordon J; Scott, James G; Adams, Russell L

    2005-02-01

    The WAIS-III General Ability Index (GAI; Tulsky, Saklofske, Wilkins, & Weiss, 2001) is a recently developed, 6-subtest measure of global intellectual functioning. However, clinical use of the GAI is currently limited by the absence of a method to estimate premorbid functioning as measured by this index. The purpose of this study was to develop regression equations to estimate GAI scores from demographic variables and WAIS-III subtest performance. Participants consisted of those subjects in the WAIS-III standardization sample that has complete demographic data (N=2,401) and were randomly divided into two groups. The first group (n=1,200) was used to develop the formulas (i.e., Development group) and the second (n=1,201) group was used to validate the prediction algorithms (i.e., Validation group). Demographic variables included age, education, ethnicity, gender and region of country. Subtest variables included vocabulary, information, picture completion, and matrix reasoning raw scores. Ten regression algorithms were generated designed to estimate GAI. The GAI-Estimate (GAI-E) algorithms accounted for 58% to 82% of the variance. The standard error of estimate ranged from 6.44 to 9.57. The correlations between actual and estimated GAI ranged from r=.76 to r=.90. These algorithms provided accurate estimates of GAI in the WAIS-III standardization sample. Implications for estimating GAI in patients with known or suspected neurological dysfunction is discussed and future research is proposed.

  3. WAIS-III General Ability Index in neuropsychiatry and forensic psychiatry inpatient samples.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Grant L; Lange, Rael T; Viljoen, Hendré; Brink, Johann

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the WAIS-III General Ability Index (GAI) in a sample of 33 neuropsychiatry inpatients and 47 forensic psychiatry inpatients. The GAI is comprised of the six subtests that form the Verbal Comprehension and the Perceptual Organization Indexes. The GAI, although highly correlated with the FSIQ, was on average 5.3 points higher in the neuropsychiatry sample and 4.2 points higher in the forensic psychiatry sample. The GAI was significantly higher than the Working Memory and the Processing Speed Indexes in both groups. The GAI, a composite measure of verbal and nonverbal intellect, appears to be an appropriate measure for use in day-to-day clinical practice in neuropsychology. To facilitate clinical use, statistically reliable difference scores between the GAI and the WMI and PSI, for the 95% confidence interval, are presented.

  4. Analysis of WAIS-IV Index Score Scatter Using Significant Deviation from the Mean Index Score

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregoire, Jacques; Coalson, Diane L.; Zhu, Jianjun

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) does not include verbal IQ and performance IQ scores, as provided in previous editions of the scale; rather, this edition provides comparisons among four index scores, allowing analysis of an individual's WAIS-IV performance in more discrete domains of cognitive ability. To supplement…

  5. Prediction of WAIS Scores from Group Ability Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Charles G.; Klett, William G.

    1973-01-01

    In a search for an adequate but efficient substitute, the authors have instituted three evaluations of the relationships between potential WAIS-substitutes and the WAIS itself. The present report describes the first of these researches-- a study of the relationships between the four group ability tests and the WAIS in a mental hospital setting.…

  6. Development of demographic norms for four new WAIS-III/WMS-III indexes.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Taylor, Michael J; Woodward, Todd S; Heaton, Robert K

    2006-06-01

    Following the publication of the third edition Wechsler scales (i.e., WAIS-III and WMS-III), demographically corrected norms were made available in the form of a computerized scoring program (i.e., WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant). These norms correct for age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Since then, four new indexes have been developed: the WAIS-III General Ability Index, the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index, and the two alternate Immediate and Delayed Memory Indexes. The purpose of this study was to develop demographically corrected norms for the four new indexes using the standardization sample and education oversample from the WAIS-III and WMS-III. These norms were developed using the same methodology as the demographically corrected norms made available in the WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant.

  7. Analysis of WAIS-IV index score scatter using significant deviation from the mean index score.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Jacques; Coalson, Diane L; Jianjun Zhu

    2011-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) does not include verbal IQ and performance IQ scores, as provided in previous editions of the scale; rather, this edition provides comparisons among four index scores, allowing analysis of an individual's WAIS-IV performance in more discrete domains of cognitive ability. To supplement the pairwise index score comparisons included in the WAIS-IV manuals, this article describes the use of the mean of the four index scores (the average index score) as a baseline for analyzing index score variability and as a method for identifying strengths and weaknesses within an individual's index score pattern. Davis's formula was used to calculate critical values for the identification of index scores with a statistically significant difference from the average index score. Subsequent analysis of the WAIS-IV normative sample indicates that variability in performance at the index score level is not uncommon in the general population. More than 70% of individuals in the normative sample have at least one index score that differs significantly from their mean index score. This variability in index score performance appears to have little relationship to age or gender, but it is strongly related to the full-scale IQ.

  8. Comparison of WAIS-III Short Forms for Measuring Index and Full-Scale Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girard, Todd A.; Axelrod, Bradley N.; Wilkins, Leanne K.

    2010-01-01

    This investigation assessed the ability of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) short forms to estimate both index and IQ scores in a large, mixed clinical sample (N = 809). More specifically, a commonly used modification of Ward's seven-subtest short form (SF7-A), a recently proposed index-based SF7-C and eight-subtest…

  9. Comparison of WAIS-III short forms for measuring index and full-scale scores.

    PubMed

    Girard, Todd A; Axelrod, Bradley N; Wilkins, Leanne K

    2010-09-01

    This investigation assessed the ability of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) short forms to estimate both index and IQ scores in a large, mixed clinical sample (N = 809). More specifically, a commonly used modification of Ward's seven-subtest short form (SF7-A), a recently proposed index-based SF7-C and eight-subtest short form (SF8) were evaluated. All three SFs proved adequate for estimating verbal comprehension, perceptual organization, and full-scale intelligence within considerably less time relative to an SF11 that provides full measurement of WAIS index scores. The SF7-A provided the best combination overall in terms of psychometric performance and estimated time savings. However, SF8 best represents all four factors and allows measurement of processing speed. The SF7-C was most hampered by inclusion of the Block Design subtest in the current assessment, but may prove advantageous in future extensions to the WAIS-IV.

  10. Development of Demographic Norms for Four New WAIS-III/WMS-III Indexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Rael T.; Chelune, Gordon J.; Taylor, Michael J.; Woodward, Todd S.; Heaton, Robert K.

    2006-01-01

    Following the publication of the third edition Wechsler scales (i.e., WAIS-III and WMS-III), demographically corrected norms were made available in the form of a computerized scoring program (i.e., WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant). These norms correct for age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Since then, four new indexes have been…

  11. WAIS-IV Verbal Comprehension Index and Perceptual Reasoning Index performance is unaffected by cold-pressor pain induction.

    PubMed

    Etherton, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive complaints are frequently reported by patients with chronic pain, but studies of the effects of pain on different forms of cognition have been inconsistent. In two studies, cold-pressor pain was induced in nonclinical undergraduate volunteers who, under normal conditions, took Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI) subtests (Study 1, n=57) or Perceptual Reasoning Index (PRI) subtests (Study 2, n=59) followed by a different VCI or PRI subtest taken during either cold-pressor pain induction or a nonpainful control condition. Pain was not associated with significant reduction in subtest scaled score performance. Results indicate that cold-pressor pain in nonclinical volunteers does not impair Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) VCI or PRI performance and suggest that pain per se should not be expected to substantially influence these cognitive abilities. Viewed together with previous Processing Speed Index and Working Memory Index studies, no cognitive or intellectual functions measured by the WAIS-IV are affected by induced pain. Generalizability of these findings may be limited by the fact that patients with chronic pain may differ in their pain experience from nonclinical volunteers with induced pain.

  12. WAIS-III FSIQ and GAI in ability-memory discrepancy analysis.

    PubMed

    Glass, Laura A; Bartels, Jared M; Ryan, Joseph J

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation compares WAIS-III FSIQ-WMS-III with GAI-WMS-III discrepancies in 135 male inpatients with suspected memory impairment. Full Scale IQ and GAI scores were highly correlated, r= .96, with mean values of 92.10 and 93.59, respectively. Additional analyses with the ability composites compared to each WMS-III index (IMI, GMI, and DMI), the GAI consistently produced larger difference scores than did the FSIQ; however, effect sizes were relatively small (ES= .12). Lastly, case-by-case analyses demonstrated concordance rates of 86% for the FSIQ-IMI and GAI-IMI comparisons, 85% for the FSIQ-GMI and GAI-GMI, and 82% for the FSIQ-DMI and GAI-DMI.

  13. Representation of the Cattell-Horn-Carroll Theory of Cognitive Abilities in the Factor Structure of the Dutch-Language Version of the WAIS-IV.

    PubMed

    van Aken, Loes; van der Heijden, Paul T; van der Veld, William M; Hermans, Laureen; Kessels, Roy P C; Egger, Jos I M

    2015-09-30

    The Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory of cognitive abilities has been guiding in the revision of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth edition (WAIS-IV). Especially the measurement of fluid reasoning (Gf) is improved. A total of five CHC abilities are included in the WAIS-IV subtests. Using confirmatory factor analysis, a five-factor model based on these CHC abilities is evaluated and compared with the four index scores in the Dutch-language version of the WAIS-IV. Both models demonstrate moderate fit, preference is given to the five-factor CHC model both on statistical and theoretical grounds. Evaluation of the WAIS-IV according to CHC terminology enhances uniformity, and can be important when interpreting possible sources of index discrepancies. To optimally assemblage CHC and WAIS-IV, more knowledge of the interaction of abilities is needed. This can be done by incorporating intelligence testing in neuropsychological assessment. Using this functional approach contributes to a better understanding of an individual's cognitive profile.

  14. An Investigation of the General Abilities Index in a Group of Diagnostically Mixed Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Allyson G.; DeLisle, Michelle M.; Parker, Kevin C. H.

    2008-01-01

    The General Ability Index (GAI) was compared with Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) Full Scale Intelligence Quotient (FSIQ) from the WAIS-III in data obtained from 381 adults assessed for reported learning or attention problems between 1998 and 2005. Not only did clients with more neurocognitively based disorders (i.e.,…

  15. WAIS-III factor index score patterns after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Paul; Donders, Jacobus

    2003-06-01

    Profile subtypes, based on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) factor index scores, were examined in a sample of 166 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) by means of a two-stage clustering procedure. Three reliable subtypes were found that were differentiated primarily by level of performance across all factor index scores, although each of them demonstrated a relative weakness on the Processing Speed index. These subtypes were then validated on the basis of demographic variables, injury parameters, and additional psychometric measures that had not been included in the clustering procedures. The results indicated that performance on the WAIS-III after TBI was affected by both injury severity and level of education. It is concluded that there is no unique "signature" profile on the WAIS-III after TBI, except that a relative strength on the Processing Speed index is uncommon with this condition.

  16. Values for Comparison of WAIS-III Index Scores With Overall Means

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longman, R. Stewart

    2004-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III; Wechsler, 1997b) provides factor-based index scores but allows only for pairwise comparison of these scores, producing inflated Type I error rates and reducing profile interpretability. This article provides tables for simultaneous comparison to the overall mean index score, thus…

  17. Seven Questions about the WAIS-III Regarding Differences in Abilities across the 16 to 89 Year Life Span.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Alan S.

    2000-01-01

    Data from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) manual and data provided by the test publisher were analyzed to address seven questions about differences in human cognitive abilities as they are measured by the WAIS-III across the 16-89 year age span. All seven questions were of a practical, clinical nature. (Author/MKA)

  18. Application of new WAIS-III/WMS-III discrepancy scores for evaluating memory functioning: relationship between intellectual and memory ability.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J

    2006-05-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between memory and intellectual ability has received some support as a means for evaluating memory impairment. Recently, comprehensive base rate tables for General Ability Index (GAI) minus memory discrepancy scores (i.e., GAI-memory) were developed using the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (Lange, Chelune, & Tulsky, in press). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of GAI-memory discrepancy scores to identify memory impairment in 34 patients with Alzheimer's type dementia (DAT) versus a sample of 34 demographically matched healthy participants. On average, patients with DAT obtained significantly lower scores on all WAIS-III and WMS-III indexes and had larger GAI-memory discrepancy scores. Clinical outcome analyses revealed that GAI-memory scores were useful at identifying memory impairment in patients with DAT versus matched healthy participants. However, GAI-memory discrepancy scores failed to provide unique interpretive information beyond that which is gained from the memory indexes alone. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

  19. A Comparison of the CPI, Franck, MMPI, and WAIS Masculinity Femininity Indexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Dorothea; And Others

    1970-01-01

    The WAIS M index did not correlate significantly with any of the other measures for either sex and thus should not be interpreted as a personality indicator of sexual inversion or homosexuality. It represents solely sex differences in certain aspects of intellectual performance. (Author)

  20. Clinical validation of Canadian WAIS-III Index short forms in inpatient neuropsychiatry and forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Iverson, Grant L; Viljoen, Hendré; Brink, Johann

    2007-05-01

    Recent research has provided some support for the concurrent validity of two-subtest short forms for estimating Canadian WAIS-III Index scores in the standardization sample (Lange & Iverson, in press). The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of using various two-subtest short forms to estimate Canadian WAIS-III Index scores in a clinical population. Participants were 100 inpatients from two large psychiatric hospitals in British Columbia, Canada. Using all possible two-subtest combinations, estimated VCI, POI, and WMI scores were generated by prorating subtest scaled scores and using the Canadian normative data (Wechsler, 2001). The agreement rate between full form and short form index scores was very high for all subtest combinations (range = 90-98%). Two-subtest short forms were useful for estimating VCI, POI, and WMI scores in this population.

  1. Expanding the WAIS-III Estimate of Premorbid Ability for Canadians (EPAC).

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Schoenberg, Mike R; Saklofske, Donald H; Woodward, Todd S; Brickell, Tracey A

    2006-07-01

    Since the release of the Canadian WAIS-III normative data in 2001 (Wechsler, 2001), the clinical application of these norms has been limited by the absence of a method to estimate premorbid functioning. However, Lange, Schoenberg, Woodward, and Brickell (2005) recently developed regression algorithms that estimate premorbid FSIQ, VIQ and PIQ scores for use with the Canadian WAIS-III norms. The purpose of this study was to expand work by Lange and colleagues by developing regression algorithms to estimate premorbid GAI (Saklofske et al., 2005), VCI, and POI scores. Participants were the Canadian WAIS-III standardization sample (n = 1,105). The sample was randomly divided into two groups (Development and Validation group). Using the Development group, a total of 14 regression algorithms were generated to estimate GAI, VCI, and POI scores by combining subtest performance (i.e., Vocabulary, Information, Matrix Reasoning, and Picture Completion) with demographic variables (i.e., age, education, ethnicity, region of the country, and gender). The algorithms accounted for a maximum of 77% of the variance in GAI, 78% of the variance in VCI, and 63% of the variance in POI. In the Validation Group, correlations between predicted and obtained scores were high (GAI = .70 to .88; VCI = .87 to .88; POI = .71 to .80). Evaluation of prediction errors revealed that the majority of estimated GAI, VCI, and POI scores fell within a 95% CI band (93.5% to 97.0%) and within 10 points of obtained index scores (72.3% to 85.6%) depending on the subtests used. These algorithms provide a promising means for estimating premorbid GAI, VCI, and POI scores using the Canadian WAIS-III norms.

  2. Substitution of supplementary subtests for core subtests on composite reliability of WAIS--IV Indexes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph J; Glass, Laura A

    2010-02-01

    The effects of replacing core subtests with supplementary subtests on composite-score reliabilities were evaluated for the WAIS-IV Indexes. Composite score reliabilities and SEMs (i.e., confidence intervals around obtained scores) are provided for the 13 unique Index scores calculated following the subtest substitution guidelines of Wechsler in 2008. In all instances, unique Index composite-score reliabilities were comparable to their respective core Index score composite reliabilities, and measurement error never increased by more than 1 point. Using the standard Verbal Comprehension Index and Perceptual Reasoning Index and the unique subtest combinations for the Working Memory and Processing Speed indexes, which have the lowest composite-score reliabilities, decreased Full Scale composite reliability by .01, while the associated confidence interval of +/- 6 represents an increase in measurement error of 1 IQ point.

  3. Concurrent validity of abbreviated WAIS-III index scores in geriatric outpatients with suspected dementia.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Brian L; Weaver, Linda E

    2006-04-01

    Assessments of older adults with suspected dementia can be time limited and clinicians might consider using abbreviated versions of measures. The present study examined the concurrent validity of abbreviated WAIS-III index scores in a sample of geriatric patients referred for assessment of suspected dementia (N=43; mean age=63.8 years). All 2-subtest estimates of the Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization, and Working Memory index scores accurately estimated more than 80% of cases within +/-2 standard errors of measurement (S.E.M.), and in most cases, more than 90% of cases were accurate at this level. While none of the 1-subtest estimates of these index scores were as accurate, both of the 1-subtest estimates of the Processing Speed index had high clinical accuracy. Abbreviated versions of the four index scores can be substituted in situations with this clinical population where testing time is limited or a patient fatigues easily.

  4. WAIS-III index score profiles in the Canadian standardization sample.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T

    2007-01-01

    Representative index score profiles were examined in the Canadian standardization sample of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III). The identification of profile patterns was based on the methodology proposed by Lange, Iverson, Senior, and Chelune (2002) that aims to maximize the influence of profile shape and minimize the influence of profile magnitude on the cluster solution. A two-step cluster analysis procedure was used (i.e., hierarchical and k-means analyses). Cluster analysis of the four index scores (i.e., Verbal Comprehension [VCI], Perceptual Organization [POI], Working Memory [WMI], Processing Speed [PSI]) identified six profiles in this sample. Profiles were differentiated by pattern of performance and were primarily characterized as (a) high VCI/POI, low WMI/PSI, (b) low VCI/POI, high WMI/PSI, (c) high PSI, (d) low PSI, (e) high VCI/WMI, low POI/PSI, and (f) low VCI, high POI. These profiles are potentially useful for determining whether a patient's WAIS-III performance is unusual in a normal population.

  5. The relationships between WAIS-IV factor index scores and educational level: A bifactor model approach.

    PubMed

    Abad, Francisco J; Sorrel, Miguel A; Román, Francisco J; Colom, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    IQ summary scores may not involve equivalent psychological meaning for different educational levels. Ultimately, this relates to the distinction between constructs and measurements. Here, we explore this issue studying the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) for Spain. A representative sample of 743 individuals (374 females and 369 males) who completed the 15 subtests comprising this intelligence battery was considered. We analyzed (a) the best latent factor structure for modeling WAIS-IV subtest performance, (b) measurement invariance across educational levels, and (c) the relationships of educational level/attainment with latent factors, Full Scale IQ (FSIQ), and index factor scores. These were the main findings: (a) the bifactor model provides the best fit; (b) there is partial invariance, and therefore it is concluded that the battery is a proper measure of the constructs of interest for the educational levels analyzed (nevertheless, the relevance of g decreases at high educational levels); (c) at the latent level, g and, to a lesser extent, Verbal Comprehension and Processing Speed, are positively related to educational level/attainment; (d) despite the previous finding, we find that Verbal Comprehension and Processing Speed factor index scores have reduced incremental validity beyond FSIQ; and (e) FSIQ is a slightly biased measure of g. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. WAIS-III processing speed index scores after TBI: the influence of working memory, psychomotor speed and perceptual processing.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jan E; Clement, Pamelia F; Curtiss, Glenn

    2003-08-01

    This study investigates the extent to which working memory, motor speed and perceptual processing speed influence Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) Processing Speed Index (PSI) scores. Sixty-eight adult outpatients with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) of varying severity and complete data on all outcome measures were identified. Two cases with outlying values on one outcome measure were omitted from the final sample. Working memory was measured by the Working Memory Index score from the WAIS-III. Motor speed was measured as score on the Halstead-Reitan Finger Oscillation Test (finger tapping) and perceptual processing as score on the Trail Making Test--Part B. In hierarchical multiple regression analyses, working memory accounted for 10% of the variance in PSI scores, whereas motor speed only accounted for 3%. An independent measure of perceptual processing, Trail Making Test--B, accounted for 26% of the variance in WAIS-III PSI scores. The total variance accounted for by the three factors was 56%. Findings confirm that the WAIS-III PSI scores of individuals who have received a TBI reflect perceptual processing speed, with an additional component attributable to working memory. Motor speed made only a small contribution to WAIS-III PSI scores in the present sample.

  7. Is health, measured by work ability index, affected by 12-hour rotating shift schedules?

    PubMed

    Yong, Mei; Nasterlack, Michael; Pluto, Rolf-Peter; Elmerich, Kathrin; Karl, Dorothee; Knauth, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Two forms of continuously forward rotating 12-h shift schedules exist at BASF's Ludwigshafen site. These shift schedules were compared with a daytime working system to investigate potential differential effects on employee's health status assessed with the Work Ability Index (WAI). In the 3 x 12 system, a 12-h day shift is followed 24 h later by a 12-h night shift, and after a day off the employee returns to the day shift. The 4 x 12 schedule follows the same pattern except that there are 2 days off between the night and next day shift. A total of 924 participants (278 3 x 12 and 321 4 x 12 shiftworkers and 325 day workers) were recruited. A self-administered questionnaire was used to obtain information about shiftwork schedule, demographic characteristics, and lifestyle and social factors, and the WAI was applied. The outcomes of interest were the WAI sum score and its seven dimensions. In examining the relationship with the WAI categories, a Proportional Odds Model (POM) was used to identify the potential determinants. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the impact of age on single dimensions of WAI after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Increasing age and obesity (BMI > or = 30) were the only significant determinants of poorer WAI. Although a positive association was found linking the second WAI dimension (work ability in relation to job demands) with age, an inverse association was demonstrated consistently between age and the third and fourth WAI dimensions, i.e., number of diagnosed diseases and estimated work impairment due to disease, after adjustment for potential confounders. The age-dependency was moderate overall, but seemed to be stronger among shift- than day workers, although this difference did not reach statistical significance. There was no significant differential impact of the working time systems on the WAI sum score or on the individual WAI dimensions. Thus, there is no indication of an excessive adverse health impact

  8. Pain, malingering, and performance on the WAIS-III Processing Speed Index.

    PubMed

    Etherton, Joseph L; Bianchini, Kevin J; Heinly, Matthew T; Greve, Kevin W

    2006-10-01

    Pain patients often report cognitive symptoms and many will include them in their claims of disability. The Processing Speed Index (PSI) of the WAIS-III was investigated as one aspect of cognitive functioning in six groups. Slight impairment was found for PSI and Digit Symbol subtest performance, but not for Symbol Search, in a Laboratory-induced Pain group and a Clinical Pain group. The lowest scores were found in a Simulator group instructed to fake cognitive impairment and a Clinical Pain group diagnosed as Malingering. Results suggest that PSI scores are only slightly reduced by laboratory-induced pain or chronic pain, and that unexpectedly low scores in the absence of significant/documented brain dysfunction suggest poor effort or deliberate misrepresentation.

  9. Analysis of the WAIS-III Index score scatter using the significant deviation from the mean of the four Index scores.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Jacques

    2005-06-01

    Despite their validity and their potential clinical interest, the WAIS-III Index scores seem less used by clinicians than the traditional IQs. One of reason of this lack of interest in the Indices is the relative complexity of their interpretation. We advocate the use of the average index score as a baseline to analyze the Index score variability and to identify strengths and weaknesses in the profile of the Index scores. Davis's formula provides reference values to be used to highlight the Index scores significantly moving away from the baseline. The usefulness of this method is illustrated with the analysis the Index score scatter in the standardization sample of the French adaptation of the WAIS-III. A rather important dispersion of the Index scores around the average index score was observed, a large percentage of standardization sample showing one or two Index scores significantly different from the baseline.

  10. Incremental criterion validity of WAIS-IV factor index scores: relationships with WIAT-II and WIAT-III subtest and composite scores.

    PubMed

    Canivez, Gary L

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined the incremental validity of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-4th Edition (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008a) factor index scores in predicting academic achievement on the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-2nd Edition (WIAT-II; Psychological Corporation, 2002a) and on the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-3rd Edition (WIAT-III; Wechsler, 2009a) beyond that predicted by the WAIS-IV Full Scale IQ (FSIQ). As with previous intelligence test incremental validity studies, the WAIS-IV FSIQ accounted for statistically significant and generally large portions of WIAT-II and WIAT-III subtest and composite score variance. WAIS-IV factor index scores combined to provide statistically significant increments in variance accounted for in most WIAT-II and WIAT-III subtest and composite scores over and above the FSIQ score; however, the effect sizes ranged from trivial to medium as observed in investigations with other intelligence tests (i.e., Glutting, Watkins, Konold, & McDermott, 2006; Youngstrom, Kogos, & Glutting, 1999). Individually, the WAIS-IV factor index scores provided trivial to small unique contributions to predicting WIAT-II and WIAT-III scores. This finding indicated that the FSIQ should retain primacy and greatest interpretive weight in WAIS-IV interpretation, as previously indicated by WAIS-IV subtest variance partitions form hierarchical exploratory factor analyses (Canivez & Watkins, 2010a, 2012b).

  11. Development of the WAIS-III estimate of premorbid ability for Canadians (EPAC).

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Schoenberg, Mike R; Woodward, Todd S; Brickell, Tracey A

    2005-12-01

    This study developed regression algorithms for estimating IQ scores using the Canadian WAIS-III norms. Participants were the Canadian WAIS-III standardization sample (n = 1,105). The sample was randomly divided into two groups (Development and Validation groups). The Development group was used to generate 12 regression algorithms for FSIQ and three algorithms each for VIQ and PIQ. Algorithms combined demographic variables with WAIS-III subtest raw scores. The algorithms accounted for 48-78% of the variance in FSIQ, 70-71% in VIQ, and 45-55% in PIQ. In the Validation group, the majority of the sample had predicted IQs that fell within a 95% CI band (FSIQ=92-94%; VIQ=93-95%; PIQ=94-94%). These algorithms yielded reasonably accurate estimates of FSIQ, VIQ, and PIQ in this healthy adult population. It is anticipated that these algorithms will be useful as a means for estimating premorbid IQ scores in a clinical population. However, prior to clinical use, these algorithms must be validated for this purpose.

  12. Examining the relationship between WAIS-III premorbid intellectual functioning and WMS-III memory ability to evaluate memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous research by Lange and Chelune (2006) by evaluating the clinical utility of GAI-memory discrepancy scores to detect memory impairment using estimated premorbid GAI scores (i.e., GAI-E) rather than obtained GAI scores. Participants were 34 patients with Alzheimer's-type dementia and a sub-sample of 34 demographically matched participants from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample. GAI-memory discrepancy scores were more effective at differentiating Alzheimer's patients versus healthy controls when using estimated premorbid GAI scores than obtained GAI scores. However, GAI(E)-memory discrepancy scores failed to provide unique interpretive information beyond that which is gained from interpretation of the memory index scores alone. This was most likely due to the prevalence of obvious memory impairment in this patient population. Future research directions are discussed.

  13. Expanding the ecological validity of WAIS-IV and WMS-IV with the Texas functional living scale.

    PubMed

    Whipple Drozdick, Lisa; Munro Cullum, C

    2011-06-01

    Assessment of functional status is an important aspect of clinical evaluation. As part of the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV), participants completed the Texas Functional Living Scale (TFLS), a measure of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living. The relationships between TFLS and WAIS-IV and WMS-IV were examined in both normally developing and clinical samples. In general, the highest correlations were between TFLS and measures of general cognitive ability (WAIS-IV FSIQ [Full Scale IQ] and GAI [General Ability Index]) and working memory (WAIS-IV WMI [Working Memory Index] and WMS-IV VWMI [Visual Working Memory Index]). Across the clinical populations, working memory subtests were generally strongly related to TFLS performance, although this relationship was more consistent with WAIS-IV than WMS-IV. Contrast scaled scores are presented for the TFLS based on WAIS-IV or WMS-IV performance. These scores allow the evaluation of functional abilities within the context of cognitive and memory ability, enhancing and expanding the utility of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV.

  14. Cold pressor-induced pain does not impair WAIS-IV processing speed index or working memory index performance.

    PubMed

    Etherton, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain frequently involves cognitive complaints such as concentration and memory deficits, but studies of the effects of pain on cognition have not consistently demonstrated deficits and have not typically utilized standard neuropsychological instruments. Effects of cold pressor-induced pain on Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition Processing Speed Index (PSI) and Working Memory Index (WMI) performance was examined in nonclinical volunteers (n = 40). All took one PSI subtest and one WMI subtest normally, and then took different PSI and WMI subtests during cold pressor-induced pain or painless warm-water immersion. Scaled scores for normal administration versus pain or painless water immersion did not differ and there was no interaction between group (control vs. pain) and manner of administration, despite moderately severe mean pain ratings (M = 6.8 on a 0-10 pain-rating scale). Results indicate that induced pain in nonclinical volunteers does not impair PSI or WMI performance, and they suggest that chronic pain per se should not be expected to substantially affect these cognitive functions. However, patients with chronic pain may differ from nonclinical volunteers in their experience of pain, potentially limiting generalizability.

  15. Work Ability Index, Absenteeism and Depression Among Patients with Burnout Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pranjic, Nurka; Males-Bilic, Ljiljana

    2014-01-01

    Goal: The aim of this study is to estimate the association of burnout syndrome and depression; burnout syndrome and sick leave; and burnout syndrome with Work Ability Index in patients who suffer from stress at work. Material and methods: The control clinical study was conducted in the Teaching Department for Professional Pathology and Toxicology at the Primary Health Care Center Tuzla in the period from 2009 to 2014. The study included 140 patients exposed to different levels of stress at work. Besides conducted interviews and anamnesis with working anamnesis, physical examination, all patients were subjected to diagnostic package of questionnaires for assessing exposure to stress at work and its effects on health and work ability and Hamilton Rating Scale for screening depression. All patients were referred to the Department with suspected distress and burnout syndrome. For this study we used a questionnaire for measuring intensity of burnout (two categories exclude suffering from burnout syndrome: successfully overcome stress at work and sometimes feel stress at work and the other two reveal the initial and very high burn-out syndrome. Studied group was consisted of patients categorized with burnout syndrome (n=88). Results: The questionnaire on the Work Ability Index (WAI) estimated characteristics of sick leave and prognostic factors with current work ability index. Lack of support at work with poor personal relations is the most common factor with the mobbing in burnout syndrome. Significantly more patients with the burnout syndrome suffered very severe depression 49%:37%; more use long sick leaves 53%:21%; several of them have poor WAI 51%:31% compared to those who are only exposed to stress at work (p=0.001). We found that the burn-out syndrome is predictor for developing depression (β=0.312, 95% CI, 0.114-0.353, p=0.001); absenteeism (β=0.285, 95% CI, 0.093-0.334, p=0.001); and a decline in working ability (β=0.413, 95% CI, 0.297-0.648). All the

  16. Mobbing, Stress, and Work Ability Index among Physicians in Bosnia and Herzegovina: Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Pranjić, Nurka; Maleš-Bilić, Ljiljana; Beganlić, Azijada; Mustajbegović, Jadranka

    2006-01-01

    Aim To assess the frequency of reported mobbing and the association among mobbing, working environment factors, stress, health outcome, personality type, and work ability index in a sample of physicians in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Method We conducted a questionnaire survey using a validated self-reported questionnaire among 511 physicians in national health sector of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The questions covered five major categories of mobbing behavior. Characteristics of the work, perceived work environment and its effects, stress, health, and satisfaction with work and life were assessed by the standardized abridged form of Occupational Stress Questionnaire (OSQ). A standardized questionnaire Work Ability Index (WAI) was used to determine the relation between mobbing and work ability. Results Of 511 surveyed physicians, 387 (76%) physicians self-reported mobbing behavior in the working environment and 136 (26%) was exposed to persistent mobbing. More than a half of the physicians experienced threats to their professional status and almost a half felt isolated. Logistic regression analysis showed that lack of motivation, loss of self-esteem, loss of confidence, fatigue, and depressiveness were significantly associated with lack of support from colleagues. Intention to leave work was associated with lack of support from colleagues (OR 2.3, 95% CI, 1.065-3.535, t = 4.296, P = 0.003) and lack of support from superiors (OR 1.526, 95% CI, 0.976-2.076, t = 5.753; P = 0.001). Isolation or exclusion and threats to professional status were predictors for mental health symptoms. Persistent mobbing experience was a significant predictor for sick leave. Conclusion Exposure to persistent threat to professional status and isolation or exclusion as forms of mobbing are associated with mental health disturbances and lack of self-esteem and confidence. Setting up a system of support for physicians exposed to mobbing may have important benefits. PMID:17042067

  17. Memory and motor skill components of the WAIS-III Digit Symbol-Coding subtest.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, D S; Ryan, J J

    2001-02-01

    We examined motor skill and memory components of the Digit Symbol-Coding subtest of the WAIS-III in a clinical sample. Research using previous versions of the WAIS in non-clinical samples has suggested that the age-related decline in Digit Symbol-Coding scores is more related to motor ability rather than to the memory requirements of the test. Our results extend this conclusion to a clinical sample, using the WAIS-II. Copy scores measure motor skill on the Digit Symbol-Coding subtest, and Incidental Learning scores (Free Recall and Pairing) measure memory. A large proportion of Digit Symbol-Coding variance was explained by Copy scores with Incidental Learning scores controlled, but Incidental Learning scores explained little additional variance when Copy scores were controlled. The same pattern was found when we used the Immediate Memory and General Memory Indexes from the Wechsler Memory Scale-II as independent measures of memory.

  18. Independent examination of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV): what does the WAIS-IV measure?

    PubMed

    Benson, Nicholas; Hulac, David M; Kranzler, John H

    2010-03-01

    Published empirical evidence for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) does not address some essential questions pertaining to the applied practice of intellectual assessment. In this study, the structure and cross-age invariance of the latest WAIS-IV revision were examined to (a) elucidate the nature of the constructs measured and (b) determine whether the same constructs are measured across ages. Results suggest that a Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC)-inspired structure provides a better description of test performance than the published scoring structure does. Broad CHC abilities measured by the WAIS-IV include crystallized ability (Gc), fluid reasoning (Gf), visual processing (Gv), short-term memory (Gsm), and processing speed (Gs), although some of these abilities are measured more comprehensively than are others. Additionally, the WAIS-IV provides a measure of quantitative reasoning (QR). Results also suggest a lack of cross-age invariance resulting from age-related differences in factor loadings. Formulas for calculating CHC indexes and suggestions for interpretation are provided.

  19. Orthogonal higher order structure and confirmatory factor analysis of the French Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III).

    PubMed

    Golay, Philippe; Lecerf, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    According to the most widely accepted Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence measurement, each subtest score of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) should reflect both 1st- and 2nd-order factors (i.e., 4 or 5 broad abilities and 1 general factor). To disentangle the contribution of each factor, we applied a Schmid-Leiman orthogonalization transformation (SLT) to the standardization data published in the French technical manual for the WAIS-III. Results showed that the general factor accounted for 63% of the common variance and that the specific contributions of the 1st-order factors were weak (4.7%-15.9%). We also addressed this issue by using confirmatory factor analysis. Results indicated that the bifactor model (with 1st-order group and general factors) better fit the data than did the traditional higher order structure. Models based on the CHC framework were also tested. Results indicated that a higher order CHC model showed a better fit than did the classical 4-factor model; however, the WAIS bifactor structure was the most adequate. We recommend that users do not discount the Full Scale IQ when interpreting the index scores of the WAIS-III because the general factor accounts for the bulk of the common variance in the French WAIS-III. The 4 index scores cannot be considered to reflect only broad ability because they include a strong contribution of the general factor.

  20. Predictive Ability of the General Ability Index (GAI) versus the Full Scale IQ among Gifted Referrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Ellen W.; Kingsley, Jessica M.; Thompson, Dawna F.

    2010-01-01

    The General Ability Index (GAI) is a composite ability score for the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) that minimizes the impact of tasks involving working memory and processing speed. The goal of the current study was to compare the degree to which the Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) and the GAI predict academic achievement…

  1. The WAIS-III and major depression: absence of VIQ/PIQ differences.

    PubMed

    Gorlyn, Marianne; Keilp, John G; Oquendo, Maria A; Burke, Ainsley K; Sackeim, Harold A; John Mann, J

    2006-10-01

    Poor Performance IQ (PIQ) relative to Verbal IQ (VIQ) is a standard finding in depressed patients administered the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R). This study examined performance of depressed subjects on the instrument's latest revision, the WAIS-III, which provides a more detailed subdomain profile of intellectual functioning. WAIS-III IQ, index and subscale scores were compared between 121 unmedicated subjects in major depressive episode and 41 healthy volunteers, using demographically adjusted T-score conversions. Depressed subjects had significantly lower PIQ scores, but neither the absolute VIQ/PIQ difference nor prevalence of VIQ/PIQ discrepancies >1 SD differed between groups. Index score differences were exclusively in Processing Speed, and subtest differences only on timed tasks. WAIS-III scores did not differ between subjects with major depressive and bipolar disorders, nor between subjects with and without melancholia or history of suicidal behavior. Results suggest general intellectual performance in depression is best characterized by deficits in processing speed, rather than global nonverbal abilities, and that this deficit is consistent across depression subtypes.

  2. WAIS-IV profile of cognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Michel, Natalie M; Goldberg, Joel O; Heinrichs, R Walter; Miles, Ashley A; Ammari, Narmeen; McDermid Vaz, Stephanie

    2013-08-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) has been used extensively to study impairment across a range of cognitive domains in schizophrenia. However, cognitive performance among those with the illness has yet to be examined using the newest edition of this measure. Hence, the current study aims first, to provide WAIS-IV normative data for Canadian individuals with schizophrenia of low average intelligence; second, to examine schizophrenia performance on all WAIS-IV subtest, index and general intelligence scores relative to healthy comparison subjects; and third, to revalidate the pattern of impairment identified in this clinical group using the WAIS-III, where processing speed (PS) was most affected, followed by working memory (WM), perceptual reasoning (PR) and verbal comprehension (VC). The WAIS-IV was administered to outpatients with schizophrenia and their performance compared with age, gender, and education matched controls. WAIS-IV schizophrenia performance data are provided. Analyses revealed significant impairment on several tasks, including the new Cancellation subtest and the VC supplemental subtest, Comprehension. At the index score level, group differences in PS were significantly larger than those observed in all other cognitive domains. Impairments were also observed in WM amid relatively preserved performance in VC, thereby confirming the pattern of impairment identified using the WAIS-III.

  3. European and American WAIS III Norms: Cross-National Differences in Performance Subtest Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roivainen, Eka

    2010-01-01

    For this study, European WAIS III performance subtest norms were compared to the original US norms. When European WAIS III raw scores were scored using US norms, the resulting perceptual organization index (POI) means were significantly higher than the processing speed index (PSI) means. The POI/PSI difference is roughly 5-10 points for the German…

  4. Discrepancy Score Reliabilities in the WAIS-IV Standardization Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Laura A.; Ryan, Joseph J.; Charter, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    In the present investigation, the authors provide internal consistency reliabilities for Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) subtest and Index discrepancy scores using the standardization sample as the data source. Reliabilities ranged from 0.55 to 0.88 for subtest discrepancy scores and 0.80 to 0.91 for Index discrepancy…

  5. WAIS-III IQs, Horn's Theory, and Generational Changes from Young Adulthood to Old Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Alan S.

    2001-01-01

    Examined age changes in intellectual ability in the range from 16 to 89 years through 2 studies that involved IQs on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale III (WAIS-III). Results are interpreted in the context of the fluid-crystallized intelligence theory of J. Horn. Studies used WAIS-III standardization data for 2,450 adults and longitudinal data…

  6. WAIS Searching of the Current Contents Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banholzer, P.; Grabenstein, M. E.

    The Homer E. Newell Memorial Library of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is developing capabilities to permit Goddard personnel to access electronic resources of the Library via the Internet. The Library's support services contractor, Maxima Corporation, and their subcontractor, SANAD Support Technologies have recently developed a World Wide Web Home Page (http://www-library.gsfc.nasa.gov) to provide the primary means of access. The first searchable database to be made available through the HomePage to Goddard employees is Current Contents, from the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). The initial implementation includes coverage of articles from the last few months of 1992 to present. These records are augmented with abstracts and references, and often are more robust than equivalent records in bibliographic databases that currently serve the astronomical community. Maxima/SANAD selected Wais Incorporated's WAIS product with which to build the interface to Current Contents. This system allows access from Macintosh, IBM PC, and Unix hosts, which is an important feature for Goddard's multiplatform environment. The forms interface is structured to allow both fielded (author, article title, journal name, id number, keyword, subject term, and citation) and unfielded WAIS searches. The system allows a user to: Retrieve individual journal article records. Retrieve Table of Contents of specific issues of journals. Connect to articles with similar subject terms or keywords. Connect to other issues of the same journal in the same year. Browse journal issues from an alphabetical list of indexed journal names.

  7. Diagnostic Utility of WISC-IV General Abilities Index and Cognitive Proficiency Index Difference Scores among Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devena, Sarah E.; Watkins, Marley W.

    2012-01-01

    The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition General Abilities Index and Cognitive Proficiency Index have been advanced as possible diagnostic markers of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. This hypothesis was tested with a hospital sample with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (n = 78), a referred but nondiagnosed…

  8. Prorating WAIS - IV summary scores for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph J; Umfleet, Laura Glass; Gontkovsky, Samuel T

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated the utility of prorating appropriate combinations of two, six and eight Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Fourth Edition (WAIS - IV) subtests for estimating the Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI), Perceptual Reasoning Index (PRI), Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) and General Ability Index (GAI) in a sample of individuals diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). Forty-eight outpatients completed the WAIS - IV and Wechsler Memory Scale - Fourth Edition (WMS - IV) as part of a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Means for age, education and duration of diagnosis were 42.35, 14.21 and 8.30 years, respectively. Paired t-tests showed no significant differences between prorated and standard means for VCI (93.46 vs. 93.73), PRI (90.19 vs. 89.44), FSIQ (88.53 vs. 88.47) or GAI (90.56 vs. 90.65). Correlations between prorated and standard composites were ≥0.89 in every instance. Correlations between the standard and prorated composites and education, disability status and WMS - IV indexes did not reveal a single contrast, where the correlations were significantly different. The present findings support the use of the two-subtest VCI and PRI composites and the eight-subtest FSIQ and four-subtest GAI in the assessment of patients with MS.

  9. WAIS-IV GAI and CPI discrepancies in multiple sclerosis and traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    J Ryan, Joseph; Kreiner, David S; Glass Umfleet, Laura; Gontkovsky, Samuel T; Myers-Fabian, Allison

    2016-10-25

    We examined relationships between the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) General Ability Index (GAI) and Cognitive Proficiency Index (CPI) in two clinical samples. The mean pattern produced by 42 individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 47 with traumatic brain injury (TBI) was the same, GAI > CPI. This pattern occurred in 61.9% and 78.7% of the protocols of patients with MS or TBI, respectively. The MS sample earned a significantly larger CPI mean than did patients with TBI. The group means did not differ on the GAI. Patients with TBI had significantly larger GAI-CPI discrepancy score means than those with MS. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis assessed the ability of GAI-CPI discrepancies to differentiate the samples. The area under curve (AUC) was 0.67, 95% [0.55, 0.78], which indicated low accuracy in terms of group classification.

  10. Effects of Marker Variables on WAIS Communalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puhan, Biranchi N.

    1981-01-01

    One hundred undergraduate arts students were tested on all the scales of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales (WAIS) and the Differential Aptitude Tests. Varimax solutions were extracted on WAIS scores under four analytic conditions. No progressive increment in the WAIS communalities was marked as the marker variables increased. (Author/RL)

  11. Gender and age do not influence the ability to work.

    PubMed

    Padula, Rosimeire Simprini; da Silva Valente, Luciana do Socorro; de Moraes, Mônica Vasconcelos; Chiavegato, Luciana Dias; Cabral, Cristina Maria Nunes

    2012-01-01

    Work capacity is related to physical, environmental and psychosocial factors and is influenced by individual characteristics and occupations. The aim of this study was to evaluated the relationship between work capacity, gender and age. 360 people employed at an institution of higher education of both genders and similar age were asked to participate in this study. The ability to work was analyzed using Work Ability Index (WAI). Descriptive statistical, Pearson correlations and ANOVA test was applied. Of these, 197 workers who participated in the study completed and returned the questionnaire. The results show there weren't any significant differences between work ability in relation to gender and age, but we observed an increase variability of responses for WAI score in older workers. No significant differences in the perception of the ability of work between men and women..

  12. What Factors Underlie the Aging Effects on WAIS-R and WAIS-III Subtests?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregoire, Jacques

    2001-01-01

    Studied the factors underlying the aging effects seen on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults-Revised (WAIS-R) and the scale's third edition (WAIS-III) using the French standardization samples of 1,104 for the WAIS-III and 1,000 for the WAIS-R. Results show that the observed decline in scores for both tests cannot be fully explained with a…

  13. Interpreting WAIS-III performance after primary brain tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marta de A; Simões, Mário R; Castro-Caldas, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The literature lacks information on the performance of patients with brain tumors on the Wechsler Intelligence Scales. This study aimed to explore the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) performance profile of 23 consecutive patients with brain tumors and 23 matched controls selected from the Portuguese WAIS-III standardization sample, using the technical manual steps recommended for score interpretation. The control group was demographically matched to the tumor group regarding gender, age, education, profession, and geographic region. The technical manual steps recommended for score interpretation were applied. Patients with brain tumors had significantly lower performances on the Performance IQ, Full-Scale IQ, Perceptual Organization Index, Working Memory Index, Processing Speed Index, Arithmetic, Object Assembly, and Picture Arrangement, though all scaled scores were within the normal range according to the manual tables. Only Vocabulary and Comprehension scatter scores were statistically different between groups. No strengths or weaknesses were found for either group. The mean discrepancy scores do not appear to have clinical value for this population. In conclusion, the study results did not reveal a specific profile for patients with brain tumors on the WAIS-III.

  14. Does high scatter affect the predictive validity of WAIS-III IQs?

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph J; Kreiner, David S; Burton, D Bradley

    2002-01-01

    We tested the assumption that high amounts of intersubtest scatter on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) subtest profiles compromise predictive validity of the IQs for predicting Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WMS-III) indexes. Data from a sample of 80 male Veteran's Administration medical center patients were analyzed, half with high intersubtest scatter and half with low scatter. The 2 groups were matched on Full Scale IQ. Correlations of WAIS-III Full Scale IQ with WMS-III indexes were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Further, the regression equations for predicting WMS-III indexes did not depend on the amount of scatter. The results suggest that, when differences in IQ are controlled, the validity of WAIS-III scores in predicting memory performance does not depend on the amount of intersubtest scatter. Further research is needed with samples from different populations using a variety of criterion variables.

  15. Reliabilities of the WAIS-III for discrepancy scores: generalization to a clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kristina I; Ryan, Joseph J

    2004-12-01

    Internal consistency reliabilities for WAIS-III IQ, Index, and subtest discrepancy scores are provided for 100 men in a treatment program for substance abuse disorders. There were 63 Euro-Americans and 37 African Americans. Means for age, education, and Full Scale IQ were 46.1 yr. (SD=8.8), 12.7 yr. (SD=1.5), and 93.8 (SD=14.0), respectively. Reliabilities ranged from .34 to .86. Compared with the WAIS-III standardization sample, discrepancy score reliability coefficients differed only for the Verbal Comprehension Index vs Perceptual Organization Index contrast, which was higher in the patient sample. Interpretation of discrepancy scores for the WAIS-III appears to be useful in a clinical sample with substance abuse as in a purportedly normal sample.

  16. Relative subtest scatter in the WAIS-IV standardization sample.

    PubMed

    Binder, Laurence M; Binder, Adrienne L

    2011-01-01

    The frequencies of differences between highest and lowest subtest scores as a function of highest subtest score (relative scatter), are reported for the standardization sample of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV (WAIS-IV). Large differences between highest and lowest subtest scores were common. The degree of relative scatter was related to the height of the highest subtest score. For the 10 core WAIS-IV subtests, the correlation between the level of the highest subtest score and the amount of scatter was r = .62; for all 15 subtests the correlation was. 63. The level of the highest subtest score was more strongly related to scatter than was Full Scale IQ. Clinical implications for inferring cognitive impairment and estimating premorbid abilities are discussed. When considering the possibility of acquired cognitive impairment, we recommend caution in the interpretation of subtest score differences.

  17. Bifactor Modeling and the Estimation of Model-Based Reliability in the WAIS-IV.

    PubMed

    Gignac, Gilles E; Watkins, Marley W

    2013-09-01

    Previous confirmatory factor analytic research that has examined the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) has endorsed either higher order models or oblique factor models that tend to amalgamate both general factor and index factor sources of systematic variance. An alternative model that has not yet been examined for the WAIS-IV is the bifactor model. Bifactor models allow all subtests to load onto both the general factor and their respective index factor directly. Bifactor models are also particularly amenable to the estimation of model-based reliabilities for both global composite scores (ω h ) and subscale/index scores (ω s ). Based on the WAIS-IV normative sample correlation matrices, a bifactor model that did not include any index factor cross loadings or correlated residuals was found to be better fitting than the conventional higher order and oblique factor models. Although the ω h estimate associated with the full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) scores was respectably high (.86), the ω s estimates associated with the WAIS-IV index scores were very low (.13 to .47). The results are interpreted in the context of the benefits of a bifactor modeling approach. Additionally, in light of the very low levels of unique internal consistency reliabilities associated with the index scores, it is contended that clinical index score interpretations are probably not justifiable.

  18. Age-related commonalities and differences in the relationship between executive functions and intelligence: Analysis of the NAB executive functions module and WAIS-IV scores.

    PubMed

    Buczylowska, Dorota; Petermann, Franz

    2016-08-02

    Data from five subtests of the Executive Functions Module of the German Neuropsychological Assessment Battery (NAB) and all ten core subtests of the German Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) were used to examine the relationship between executive functions and intelligence in a comparison of two age groups: individuals aged 18-59 years and individuals aged 60-88 years. The NAB subtests Categories and Word Generation demonstrated a consistent correlation pattern for both age groups. However, the NAB Judgment subtest correlated more strongly with three WAIS-IV indices, the Full Scale IQ (FSIQ), and the General Ability Index (GAI) in the older adult group than in the younger group. Additionally, in the 60-88 age group, the Executive Functions Index (EFI) was more strongly correlated with the Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI) than with the Perceptual Reasoning Index (PRI). Both age groups demonstrated a strong association of the EFI with the FSIQ and the Working Memory Index (WMI). The results imply the potential diagnostic utility of the Judgment subtest and a significant relationship between executive functioning and crystallized intelligence at older ages. Furthermore, it may be concluded that there is a considerable age-independent overlap between the EFI and general intelligence, as well as between the EFI and working memory.

  19. Interpreting change on the WAIS-III/WMS-III in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Iverson, G L

    2001-02-01

    Clinicians should note that there is considerable variability in the reliabilities of the index and subtest scores derived from the third editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III). The purpose of this article is to review these reliabilities and to illustrate how they can be used to interpret change in patients' performances from test to retest. The WAIS-III IQ and Index scores are consistently the most reliable scores, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The most internally consistent WAIS-III subtests are Vocabulary, Information, Digit Span, Matrix Reasoning, and Arithmetic. Information and Vocabulary have the highest test-retest reliability. On the WMS-III, the Auditory Immediate Index, Immediate Memory Index, Auditory Delayed Index, and General Memory Index are the most reliable, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The Logical Memory I and Verbal Paired Associates I subtests are the most reliable. Data from three clinical groups (i.e., Alzheimer's disease, chronic alcohol abuse, and schizophrenia) were extracted from the Technical Manual [Psychological Corporation (1997). WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual. San Antonio: Harcourt Brace] for the purpose of calculating reliable change estimates. A table of confidence intervals for test-retest measurement error is provided to help the clinician determine if patients have reliably improved or deteriorated on follow-up testing.

  20. Comparison of seven-subtest and Satz-Mogel short forms of the WAIS-III.

    PubMed

    Kulas, Joseph F; Axelrod, Bradley N

    2002-07-01

    Intellectual functioning remains an important domain of functioning to be measured. To reduce the lengthy administration time, numerous short forms of the WAIS-III have been devised. The present study aimed to compare two methods of applying short forms of the WAIS-III within a clinical population. The results revealed that both item-reduced and selected subtest short forms provide excellent predictions of full administration WAIS-III summary and index scores. The Satz-Mogel short form appeared to provide higher predictive power than the seven-subtest short forms and accounted for a higher number of cases within 6 points of the obtained scores from the full administration. However, the Satz-Mogel short form was inferior to the seven-subtest short forms in terms of the reliability of the index and summary IQ scores. As found in previous research, a trade-off occurs between the predictive power and the reliability of a short form.

  1. Discriminatory Ability of Visceral Adiposity Index (VAI) in Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome: A Population Based Study.

    PubMed

    Motamed, N; Khonsari, M R; Rabiee, B; Ajdarkosh, H; Hemasi, G R; Sohrabi, M R; Maadi, M; Zamani, F

    2017-03-01

    Background Visceral adiposity index (VAI) has been suggested as an index of visceral adiposity. This study was conducted to determine the discriminatory ability of VAI in diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Methods and materials We used the data of 5 312 subjects aged 18-74 years of a cohort study conducted among 6 140 individuals aged 10-90 years in Amol, northern Iran. The city population was divided into 16 strata based on gender and age groups in 10-year intervals. The subjects were randomly selected from each stratum. MetS was defined based on National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATPIII), American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI) update of Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII), International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and joint interim statement (JIS) definitions. The discriminatory ability of VAI and other obesity measures were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results While waist circumference (WC) showed the highest discriminatory ability for MetS in IDF definition in men (AUC=0.899 [CI=0.888-0.910]), VAI had the greatest discriminatory ability according to other definitions in men and women. The related AUCs of VAI were 0.866 (95%CI: 0.850-0.881), 0.829 (95%CI: 0.813-0.846), 0.859 (95%CI: 0.844-0.873) and 0.876 (95%CI: 0.863-0.889) based on NCEP/ATPIII, AHA/NHLBI update of ATPIII, IDF and JIS definition in men, and also 0.888 (95%CI: 0.875-0.902), 0.894 (95%CI: 0.881-0.907), 0.883 (95%CI: 0.869-0.897) and 0.879 (95%CI: 0.864-0.894) in women, respectively. Conclusion VAI showed an excellent discriminatory ability in diagnosis of MetS. Considering its relatively simple calculation, this index could be suggested as a reliable tool in medical practice.

  2. Performance characteristics of postacute traumatic brain injury patients on the WAIS-III and WMS-III.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, B N; Fichtenberg, N L; Liethen, P C; Czarnota, M A; Stucky, K

    2001-12-01

    Publication of the third editions of the Wechsler intelligence and memory batteries in 1997 created a need for research identifying Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition/Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III/WMS-III) profile patterns associated with neuropathology. The WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual offers data on various diagnostic groups, including traumatic brain injury (TBI). Hawkins (1998) employed Technical Manual data to propose certain diagnostic guidelines. In order to validate the conclusions put forth by Hawkins as they apply to brain injury, we examined WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles in an independent sample of 46 TBI cases. As expected, the WAIS-III Processing Speed Index (PSI) was more sensitive to brain injury than other WAIS-III composites; and specific WAIS-III scores were stronger than certain WMS-III scores. On the other hand, the predicted relationship for WMS-III auditory and visual indexes was not found. The lack of specificity for TBI of the proposed index comparisons confirms the need to validate such hypotheses in independent samples.

  3. Examination of repeated sprinting ability and fatigue index of soccer players according to their positions.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Turgut

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate repeated sprinting ability and fatigue index of amateur soccer players according to their positions. A total of 85 amateur soccer players were examined in different clubs in Turkey. The repeated sprint test, which was designed by Bangsbo, was used for soccer players. We did not find any statistical differences for repeated sprints, best time, average time, and fatigue index values according to positions of soccer players (p>0.05). On the other hand, there was a statistical difference between 7 maximal sprints for the defense players, midfielders, and forwards (p<0.05) but there was not a statistical difference between 7 maximal sprints for the goalkeeper (p>0.05). In conclusion, it is considered that speed at soccer is very important and there must be fast moving players in all positions. This study reveals that defense players, midfielders and forwards are able to maintain 5 repeated sprints at the same compactness during the match. For goalkeepers, it could not be found any difference at the repeated sprints. It is considered that on choosing or transferring players, the trainers must take into account their sprint abilities. But repeated sprints are not a specific indicator for goal keepers, and this characteristic should not be used for the choice of goalkeepers. In addition, the players' ability of managing to do several repeated sprints at the same compactness during the match should be pursued by the trainers. And it should be given place to the repeated sprint exercises in the training schedules.

  4. Bifactor Modeling and the Estimation of Model-Based Reliability in the WAIS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gignac, Gilles E.; Watkins, Marley W.

    2013-01-01

    Previous confirmatory factor analytic research that has examined the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) has endorsed either higher order models or oblique factor models that tend to amalgamate both general factor and index factor sources of systematic variance. An alternative model that has not yet…

  5. WAIS-III Percentile Scores by Education and Sex for U.S. and Canadian Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longman, R. Stewart; Saklofske, Donald H.; Fung, Tak S.

    2007-01-01

    Tables are presented for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) IQ and index scores by education level for both the U.S. and Canadian normative samples. This allows clinicians to provide more accurate identification of relative strengths or weaknesses, compared to expectations from an individual's background, rather than…

  6. Normal aging increases cognitive heterogeneity: analysis of dispersion in WAIS-III scores across age.

    PubMed

    Ardila, Alfredo

    2007-11-01

    Individual differences in cognitive decline during normal aging need further delineation. The purpose of this study was to find the score dispersions in the WAIS-III subtests at different ages. Norms presented in the Administration and Scoring Manual [Wechsler, D. (1997). WAIS-III: Administration and scoring manual. San Antonio: The Psychological Corporation] were used. The WAIS-III was standardized and normalized using 2450 American adults divided into 13 age ranges and 4 education groups. Means and standard deviations for the different WAIS-III subtests were deduced and the ratio Percentage of the mean="(standard deviation/mean)x100" was calculated. It was hypothesized that during normal aging, whereas mean scores decrease, score dispersions increase, pointing to an increased heterogeneity in intellectual abilities in older individuals. In all subtests, except Digit Span, it was found that score dispersions indeed increased during aging. However, in some subtests, increase in dispersion was less than 20% (Block Design, Object Assembly, and Information), whereas in others, increase in dispersion was over 200% (Matrix Reasoning, L-N Sequencing, Digit-Symbol, Picture Completion, and Picture Arrangement). It was proposed that cognitive heterogeneity during normal aging is related to those abilities measured with these latter subtests, basically, executive functions, attention, and selected non-verbal abilities. In other abilities (e.g., visuoconstructive abilities and fund of general information), normal aging is associated with a more homogenous pattern of decline.

  7. Stress and work ability in oil industry workers.

    PubMed

    Bresić, Jozo; Knezević, Bojana; Milosević, Milan; Tomljanović, Tomislav; Golubić, Rajna; Golubović, Rajna; Mustajbegović, Jadranka

    2007-12-01

    This cross-sectional study conducted between March and June 2006 examined stress at work and work ability of 180 people with different workplaces within an oil company. Office, laboratory, and oil-field workers were invited to complete the "Occupational Stress Assessment Questionnaire--the Oil Industry Version and Work Ability Index (WAI) Questionnaire". The overall response rate was 69.4%, and the final sample size was 125 workers who completed the questionnaires (57 office, 41 laboratory, 27 oil-field workers). Office, laboratory, and oil-field workers differed significantly with respect to age (P<0.001). The oldest were oil-field workers and the youngest were office workers. The average WAI score for office workers was 44.9, for laboratory workers 43.2 and for field workers 39.7, indicating satisfying work ability. After adjusting for age, the difference in WAI score between the groups of workers was still significant (P<0.001). Over 75% of all workers believed their job was stressful, but the perception of specific stressors depended on the workplace.

  8. Epilepsy & IQ: the clinical utility of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) indices in the neuropsychological assessment of people with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Sallie; McGrath, Katherine; Thompson, Pamela J

    2014-01-01

    We examined Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) General Ability Index (GAI) and Full Scale Intelligence Quotient (FSIQ) discrepancies in 100 epilepsy patients; 44% had a significant GAI > FSIQ discrepancy. GAI-FSIQ discrepancies were correlated with the number of antiepileptic drugs taken and duration of epilepsy. Individual antiepileptic drugs differentially interfere with the expression of underlying intellectual ability in this group. FSIQ may significantly underestimate levels of general intellectual ability in people with epilepsy. Inaccurate representations of FSIQ due to selective impairments in working memory and reduced processing speed obscure the contextual interpretation of performance on other neuropsychological tests, and subtle localizing and lateralizing signs may be missed as a result.

  9. Speech based transmission index for all: An intelligibility metric for variable hearing ability.

    PubMed

    Mechergui, Nader; Djaziri-Larbi, Sonia; Jaïdane, Mériem

    2017-03-01

    A method to measure the speech intelligibility in public address systems for normal hearing and hearing impaired persons is presented. The proposed metric is an extension of the speech based Speech Transmission Index to account for accurate perceptual masking and variable hearing ability: The sound excitation pattern generated at the ear is accurately computed using an auditory filter model, and its shapes depend on frequency, sound level, and hearing impairment. This extension yields a better prediction of the intensity of auditory masking which is used to rectify the modulation transfer function and thus to objectively assess the speech intelligibility experienced by hearing impaired as well as by normal hearing persons in public spaces. The proposed metric was developed within the framework of the European Active and Assisted Living research program, and was labeled "SB-STI for All." Extensive subjective in-Lab and in vivo tests have been conducted and the proposed metric proved to have a good correlation with subjective intelligibility scores.

  10. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV.

    PubMed

    Holdnack, James A; Xiaobin Zhou; Larrabee, Glenn J; Millis, Scott R; Salthouse, Timothy A

    2011-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV Adult battery (i.e., age 16-69 years) co-norming sample (n = 900) to test 13 measurement models. The results indicated that two models fit the data equally well. One model is a seven-factor solution without a hierarchical general ability factor: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Auditory Working Memory, Visual Working Memory, Auditory Memory, and Visual Memory. The second model is a five-factor model composed of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Memory with a hierarchical general ability factor. Interpretative implications for each model are discussed.

  11. Utility of a seven-subtest version of the WAIS-R among an Alzheimer's disease sample.

    PubMed

    Schopp, L H; Callahan, C D; Johnstone, B; Schwake, C J

    1998-10-01

    Recent health care sector changes have created a need for shorter, more focused neuropsychological assessments. The WAIS-R provides useful information on patients' general cognitive abilities, but poses problems in that it is time-consuming and may contribute to fatigue, especially among geriatric patients with dementia. This study evaluated Ward's (1990) 7-subtest version of the WAIS-R among 32 patients with presumptive Alzheimer's disease. Among all patients, the abbreviated test underestimated full WAIS-R scores by an average of 2.0, 0.2, and 1.8 points for the Verbal Intelligence Quotient (VIQ), Performance Intelligent Quotient (PIQ), and Full-Scale Intelligence Quotient (FSIQ). This general finding held true regardless of whether scores were generated using the standard WAIS-R method (for patients age 75 and younger) or using age corrections (i.e., Mayo Older Americans' Normative Studies [MOANS]) for older patients. Most patients scored within the mean standard errors of measurement defined in the WAIS-R manual for VIQ, PIQ, and FSIQ. In general, the 7-subtest and full versions of the WAIS-R yielded similar findings among this closely screened sample, but further testing among a more typical sample of patients with multiple risk factors for dementing conditions is needed.

  12. Two- and three-factor solutions of the WAIS-III.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A S; Lichtenberger, E O; McLean, J E

    2001-09-01

    The third edition of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale manual reports four-factor solutions for the WAIS-III, and subsequent research has validated four-factor solutions for a variety of samples. These four factors consistently correspond to the four Factor Indexes that are yielded by the WAIS-III. However, the WAIS-III still provides Verbal and Performance IQs, in addition to the Indexes, making it desirable to examine two-factor solutions as well. In addition, because the Wechsler literature includes much interpretation of three-factor solutions, these solutions were likewise examined. Principal factor analysis followed by Varimax and Oblimin rotations of two and three factors were performed on data for the total WAIS-III sample ages 16 to 89 years (N=2,450). The two-factor solutions were viewed as a construct validation of Wechsler's two separate IQs, although the Working Memory subtests tended to load higher on the Performance scale than on their intended scale (Verbal); three-factor solutions were interpreted within the context of Horn's expanded fluid-crystallized theory and research on working memory. Both the two- and three-factor Varimax-rotated solutions were related to similar factor analyses conducted previously for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III. Coefficients of congruence between like-named factors consistently exceeded .90, and usually .98, across different Wechsler batteries.

  13. WAIS-IV subtest covariance structure: conceptual and statistical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ward, L Charles; Bergman, Maria A; Hebert, Katina R

    2012-06-01

    D. Wechsler (2008b) reported confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) with standardization data (ages 16-69 years) for 10 core and 5 supplemental subtests from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV). Analyses of the 15 subtests supported 4 hypothesized oblique factors (Verbal Comprehension, Working Memory, Perceptual Reasoning, and Processing Speed) but also revealed unexplained covariance between Block Design and Visual Puzzles (Perceptual Reasoning subtests). That covariance was not included in the final models. Instead, a path was added from Working Memory to Figure Weights (Perceptual Reasoning subtest) to improve fit and achieve a desired factor pattern. The present research with the same data (N = 1,800) showed that the path from Working Memory to Figure Weights increases the association between Working Memory and Matrix Reasoning. Specifying both paths improves model fit and largely eliminates unexplained covariance between Block Design and Visual Puzzles but with the undesirable consequence that Figure Weights and Matrix Reasoning are equally determined by Perceptual Reasoning and Working Memory. An alternative 4-factor model was proposed that explained theory-implied covariance between Block Design and Visual Puzzles and between Arithmetic and Figure Weights while maintaining compatibility with WAIS-IV Index structure. The proposed model compared favorably with a 5-factor model based on Cattell-Horn-Carroll theory. The present findings emphasize that covariance model comparisons should involve considerations of conceptual coherence and theoretical adherence in addition to statistical fit.

  14. Association Among Sociodemograhic Factors, Work Ability, Health Behavior, and Mental Health Status for Young People After Prolonged Unemployment.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Kirsi; Manninen, Pirjo; Räsänen, Kimmo

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the associations of prolonged unemployment, health, and work ability among young workers using data from the 2008-2010 Occupational Health Counselling project in Kuopio, Eastern Finland. The total sample for this study was 190 young unemployed adults. The questionnaire included the Work Ability Index (WAI), the Beck Depression Inventory, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, and the Occupational Health Counselling Survey. Multivariate analyses revealed that men had a higher prevalence of prolonged unemployment than women. Using drugs for purposes other than treatment was associated independently with an increased prevalence of prolonged unemployment. Low WAI scores were associated with a higher prevalence of prolonged unemployment. This study showed that attention should be paid to male workers, those who have poor or moderate work ability and workers who use drugs. Young unemployed workers should be recognized at an early stage. A comprehensive, flexible network of community resources is essential to support young unemployed adults.

  15. WAIS-IV visual puzzles in a mixed clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Fallows, Robert R; Hilsabeck, Robin C

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about which cognitive functions underlie the new Visual Puzzles subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV). The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between Visual Puzzles and common neuropsychological measures in a mixed clinical sample. A total of 44 veterans (75% men) were administered the WAIS-IV as part of a neuropsychological evaluation. Average age was 47.4 years (SD = 11.8), and average education was 13.8 years (SD = 2.3). Correlations were conducted to examine relationships between Visual Puzzles, demographic variables, and neuropsychological measures. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to determine which measures contributed the most variance to Visual Puzzles. Visual Puzzles correlated significantly with measures of visuospatial reasoning, verbal learning and recall, mental flexibility, processing speed, and naming, which accounted for 50% of the variance in Visual Puzzles performance. The results indicate that Visual Puzzles is not a pure measure of visuoperceptual reasoning, at least in a mixed clinical sample, because memory, mental flexibility, processing speed, and language abilities also contribute to successful performance of the task. Thus it may be important to consider other aspects of cognitive functioning when interpreting Visual Puzzles performance.

  16. Co-norming the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Is there a test-order effect on IQ and memory scores?

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Tulsky, D S

    2000-11-01

    Test-order effect on the WAIS-III and WMS-III scores was evaluated using the WMS-III standardization sample. Participants completed the standardization editions of the WAIS-III and WMS-III in one session, with the tests administered in roughly counterbalanced order. Repeated measure MANOVA analyses were conducted to determine if there was an overall test-order effect for subtest, index, or IQ scores. No significant test-order effects were found for either the WAIS-III index or IQ scores or for the WMS-III index scores. At the subtest level, the majority of the WAIS-III and WMS-III subtests did not show a significant test-order effect. The exceptions were Digit Span and Digit Symbol-Coding on the WAIS-III and Faces II and Logical Memory II on the WMS-III. Although statistically significant test-order effects were found on these subtests, the effect sizes were small. This study indicates that the test-order effect is not a potential threat to the internal validity of the WAIS-III and WMS-III normative data. The practical implications of the current study are discussed.

  17. Practice effects on the WAIS-III across 3- and 6-month intervals.

    PubMed

    Basso, Michael R; Carona, Francine D; Lowery, Natasha; Axelrod, Bradley N

    2002-02-01

    Fifty-one participants (age M = 24.6; education M = 14.4 years) were administered the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Third Edition (WAIS-III) at baseline and at an interval of either 3 or 6 months later. Full Scale IQ (FSIQ), Verbal IQ (VIQ), Performance IQ (PIQ), Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI), Perceptual Organization Index (POI), and Processing Speed Index (PSI) scores improved significantly across time, whereas no significant change occurred on the Working Memory Index. Specifically, test scores increased approximately 3, 11, 6, 4, 8, and 7 points, respectively on the VIQ, PIQ, FSIQ, VCI, POI, and PSI for both groups. Notably, the degree of improvement was similar regardless of whether the inter-test interval was 3 or 6 months. These findings suggest that prior exposure to the WAIS-III yields considerable increases in test scores. Reliable change indices indicated that large confidence intervals might be expected. As such, users of the WAIS-III should interpret reevaluations across these intervals cautiously.

  18. WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles of mildly to severely brain-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D C; Ledbetter, M F; Cohen, N J; Marmor, D; Tulsky, D S

    2000-01-01

    Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III; The Psychological Corporation, 1997) scores of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI, n = 23) to moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (M-S TBI, n = 22) were compared to those of 45 matched normal control patients. WAIS-III results revealed that IQ and index scores of MTBI patients did not significantly differ from those of controls, whereas M-S TBI patients received significantly lower mean scores on all measures. All M-S TBI patients' WMS-III index scores also revealed significantly lower scores in comparison to those of control participants, with the exception of Delayed Auditory Recognition. MTBI patients showed significantly lower mean index scores compared to normal controls on measures of immediate and delayed auditory memory, immediate memory, visual delayed memory, and general memory. Eta-squared analyses revealed that WMS-III visual indexes and WAIS-III processing speed showed particularly large effect sizes. These results suggest that symptomatic MTBI patients obtain some low WMS-III test scores comparable to those of more severely injured patients.

  19. Graduate Student WAIS-III Scoring Accuracy Is a Function of Full Scale IQ and Complexity of Examiner Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Richard, David C. S.

    2005-01-01

    Research on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) suggests that practicing clinical psychologists and graduate students make item-level scoring errors that affect IQ, index, and subtest scores. Studies have been limited in that Full-Scale IQ (FSIQ) and examiner administration,…

  20. Structural validity of the Dutch-language version of the WAIS-III in a psychiatric sample.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Paul; van den Bos, Pancras; Mol, Bart; Kessels, Roy P C

    2013-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008 ) no longer provides the "traditional" Verbal IQ and Performance IQ deviation scores. In the current study, we investigated the structural validity of these scores in the scale's predecessor, the WAIS-Third Edition (WAIS-III; Wechsler, 1997c ), which is still widely used in clinical practice, especially outside the United States. Confirmative (CFA) and exploratory factor analyses (EFA) were performed on WAIS-III data from a Dutch sample of 247 psychiatric patients. Four competing models were tested in the CFA on 11 subtests. The model that fit the data best was a model in which subtests loaded on the four factor indexes (i.e., 3 Verbal Comprehension subtests, 3 Perceptual Organization subtests, 3 Working Memory subtests, and 2 Processing Speed subtests) as proposed by the manual (Wechsler, 1997b ). In the EFA on 13 subtests with four factors extracted, all subtests were found to load on the factors in accordance with the WAIS-III test manual. However, Picture Arrangement, Arithmetic, and Picture Completion showed only moderate loadings on the proposed factors. Implications for clinical practice are discussed.

  1. A Validated Seven-Subtest Short Form for the WAIS-IV.

    PubMed

    Meyers, John E; Zellinger, Margaret M; Kockler, Tim; Wagner, Mark; Miller, Ronald Mellado

    2013-03-26

    This study presents a short form of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008 ) using the subtests (Block Design, Similarities, Digit Span, Arithmetic, Information, Coding, and Picture Completion) suggested by Ward ( 1990 ). These seven subtests were used to predict the full WAIS-IV Full-Scale IQ, as well as the Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Working Memory, and Processing Speed Index scores. Two different data sets were used: the first consisted of 70 subjects and the second consisted of 32 subjects. The first data set was used to create a linear regression and the second data set was used to validate the results and compare to the prorated score method from the WAIS-IV manual. The prorated estimated scores correlated significantly with their counterparts and proved to be a better method of estimating the Full-Scale IQ and most of the index scores, but the regression equation was better at predicting the Processing Speed Index. The current study is consistent with the Ward ( 1990 ) and Pilgrim, Meyers, Bayless, & Whetstone ( 1999 ) studies and represents a reliable and valid way of assessing intellectual functioning in an abbreviated format.

  2. High-index-contrast grating reflector with beam steering ability for the transmitted beam.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Luca; Malureanu, Radu; Mørk, Jesper; Chung, Il-Sug

    2011-11-07

    High-index contrast grating mirrors providing wave front control of the transmitted light as well as high reflectivity over a broad bandwidth are suggested and both numerically and experimentally investigated. General design rules to engineer these structures for different applications are derived. Such grating mirrors would have a significant impact on low cost laser fabrication, since a more efficient integration of optoelectronic modules can be achieved by avoiding expensive external lens systems.

  3. Orthogonal Higher Order Structure and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the French Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golay, Philippe; Lecerf, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    According to the most widely accepted Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence measurement, each subtest score of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) should reflect both 1st- and 2nd-order factors (i.e., 4 or 5 broad abilities and 1 general factor). To disentangle the contribution of each factor, we applied a…

  4. Math anxiety differentially affects WAIS-IV arithmetic performance in undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Melissa T; Frakey, Laura L

    2013-06-01

    Previous research has shown that math anxiety can influence the math performance level; however, to date, it is unknown whether math anxiety influences performance on working memory tasks during neuropsychological evaluation. In the present study, 172 undergraduate students completed measures of math achievement (the Math Computation subtest from the Wide Range Achievement Test-IV), math anxiety (the Math Anxiety Rating Scale-Revised), general test anxiety (from the Adult Manifest Anxiety Scale-College version), and the three Working Memory Index tasks from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV Edition (WAIS-IV; Digit Span [DS], Arithmetic, Letter-Number Sequencing [LNS]). Results indicated that math anxiety predicted performance on Arithmetic, but not DS or LNS, above and beyond the effects of gender, general test anxiety, and math performance level. Our findings suggest that math anxiety can negatively influence WAIS-IV working memory subtest scores. Implications for clinical practice include the utilization of LNS in individuals expressing high math anxiety.

  5. Is body mass index in old age related to cognitive abilities? The Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 Study.

    PubMed

    Corley, Janie; Gow, Alan J; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J

    2010-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the previously reported association between a higher body mass index (BMI) and poorer cognition in later adulthood is an artifact of confounding by previous cognitive ability and socioeconomic status. Participants were 1,079 adults aged about 70 years in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 Study, on whom there are IQ data from age 11. Cognitive outcome measures included: IQ at age 70 using the same test that was administered at age 11; composite measures of general cognitive ability (g factor), speed of information processing, and memory; and two tests of verbal ability. People classified as overweight or obese in later adulthood had significantly lower scores on tests of childhood IQ, age 70 IQ, g factor, and verbal ability. There was no significant association with processing speed or memory performance. After adjusting for childhood IQ and social class in general linear models, associations with age 70 IQ and g factor were nonsignificant or attenuated. However, throughout the models, there was a persistent (inverse) relationship between BMI and performance on the National Adult Reading Test (NART) and Wechsler Test of Adult Reading (WTAR), which remained significant after full adjustment for all sociodemographic and health covariates (for the NART, p = .025; for the WTAR, p = .011). The findings suggest that the previously reported BMI-cognition associations in later adulthood could be largely accounted for by prior ability and socioeconomic status, and by the possible influence of these factors on the adoption of health behaviors in adulthood.

  6. Risk factors and prevalence of declined work ability among dairy farmers.

    PubMed

    Karttunen, J P; Rautiainen, H

    2011-07-01

    Farm work, particularly with livestock, exposes farmers to injuries, occupational diseases, and disabling health conditions, which in many cases result in early retirement and loss of quality of life. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for declined work ability among full-time dairy farmers. We conducted a postal survey using the standard Work Ability Index (WAI) questionnaire augmented with a form containing questions about working conditions and lifestyle factors that potentially affect work ability. We received 399 usable responses (245 female and 154 male; 41.5% response rate). The prevalence of declined work ability (poor or moderate WAI score) was 39% overall, 44% among females, and 32% among males. Older age, small herd size, lack of mental breaks from work, inadequate leisure, and non-use of alcohol were significantly associated with declined work ability. The odds ratios for these risk factors ranged from 2.04 to 4.67. Current injuries and diseases are part of the WAI questionnaire contributing to declined work ability. This study indicates that interventions are needed, particularly among older farmers and farmers with injuries or diseases, to restore their work ability. Life-long measures to maintain work ability are also important, preventing the steep decline in work ability currently occurring among older farmers. Based on this study, we recommend guidance addressing the identified risk factors, particularly the importance of organizing both farm and domestic work with adequate rest, leisure time, and mental breaks as counterbalance to the daily workload among livestock farmers.

  7. WAIS-III percentile scores by education and sex for U.S. and Canadian populations.

    PubMed

    Longman, R Stewart; Saklofske, Donald H; Fung, Tak S

    2007-12-01

    Tables are presented for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) IQ and index scores by education level for both the U.S. and Canadian normative samples. This allows clinicians to provide more accurate identification of relative strengths or weaknesses, compared to expectations from an individual's background, rather than the general population. Because sex differences are notable on the Processing Speed Index, data for this measure are presented separately. The similarities and differences between the two national samples are noted, with particular reference to the relatively weaker demographic effects found in the Canadian sample.

  8. Work ability among nursing personnel in public hospitals and health centers in Campinas--Brazil.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Inês; Chillida, Manuela de Santana Pi; Moreno, Luciana Contrera

    2012-01-01

    Nursing personnel is essential in hospital, health centers and enterprises and is the large work force in health system. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a large city in two public hospitals and five health centre with the objective of to evaluate the work ability and health aspects of nursing staff. The sample was composed by 570 workers. The Work Ability Index - WAI and a questionnaire with socio-demographic, health and life style data was applied. The majority of workers was women (83%), married (50.4%), and was working in night shift work (65.6%); 61.4% was auxiliary nursing, 22.3% was registered nurses (RN). The average age was 38.9 years (SD 7.8) and the Body Mass Index mean was 25.8 (SD 5.3). Only 17.2% referred to practice at least 150 minutes of physical exercise five times per week or more. 26.8% had a second job. The work ability mean was 39.3 (SD 5.3) points. Age had a negative correlation with WAI (p=0.0052). Public hospital and health centre workers had poor work ability score when compared with workers from another branches. Public policies related to workplace health promotion need to be implemented in public hospital and health centre to improve the work ability.

  9. Short form of the WAIS-III for use with patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Blyler, C R; Gold, J M; Iannone, V N; Buchanan, R W

    2000-12-15

    The recent publication of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III), the most widely used standard test of intelligence, requires the development of a new short form for use with patients with schizophrenia for many clinical and research purposes. We used regression analyses of complete WAIS-III data on 41 outpatients with schizophrenia and 41 education-, and age-matched healthy subjects to determine the best combination of subtests to use as a short form. Excluding three subtests that are time-consuming to administer, and requiring that the solution includes one subtest from each of the four WAIS index scores, the combination that most fully accounted for the variance in full-scale IQ (FSIQ) for both participants with schizophrenia (R(2)=0.90) and healthy controls (R(2)=0.86) included the information, block design, arithmetic, and digit symbol subtests. When the restrictions regarding which subtests could enter were relaxed, the best four-subtest solution included information, block design, comprehension, and similarities. Although the latter explained 95% of the variance in FSIQ for schizophrenia participants and 90% of the variance for healthy controls, it consistently overestimated FSIQ for the schizophrenia group. We recommend the four-factor short form for use in future research and clinical practice in which a quick, accurate IQ estimate is desired.

  10. Correlation of the LNNB-III with the WAIS-III in a mixed psychiatric and brain-injured population.

    PubMed

    Devaraju-Backhaus, S; Espe-Pfeifer, P; Mahrou, M L; Golden, C J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery-Third Edition (LNNB-III) and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III). Participants were 85 adults referred for neuropsychological evaluation. The mean age of participants was 38.73 years (SD = 16.54) and average education was 13.07 years (SD = 2.60). The sample was predominantly female (52.9%), right-handed (86.3%), and Caucasian (68.6%), with the remainder of the population classified as Hispanic (13.7%), African-American (5.9%), or other (11.8%). Diagnoses included 26% psychiatric disorders, 64% neurological disorders, and 10% with no diagnosis. Pearson product correlation yielded a number of significant relationships between the WAIS-III IQ scores and the LNNB-III scales. The highest correlations were with the LNNB Intelligence, Visual-Spatial, Complex Auditory, and Arithmetic scales. Additionally, significant correlations were found between the WAIS-III subtests and a moderate proportion of the LNNB-III subtests. Correlations were also reported for the new WAIS-III scales, Letter-Number Sequencing and Matrix Reasoning. The results suggest that similar abilities are being assessed on both tests. These findings allow clinicians to not only evaluate the consistency of performance across this testing battery, but provide a useful screening instrument for intelligence.

  11. Concurrent Validity of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales-Third Edition Index Score Short Forms in the Canadian Standardization Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Rael T.; Iverson, Grant L.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the concurrent validity of estimated Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales-Third Edition (WAIS-III) index scores using various one- and two-subtest combinations. Participants were the Canadian WAIS-III standardization sample. Using all possible one- and two-subtest combinations, an estimated Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI), an…

  12. The First Annual West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert A. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of abstracts presented at the workshop are presented. The goal was to answer the question, what is the future behavior and potential for rapid collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS)? The workshop was organized into four sessions corresponding to the four objectives identified as necessary to reach the WAIS workshop goal: history, current behavior, internal dynamics, and environmental interactions. Presentations were organized by their relevance to each objective, rather than by discipline.

  13. Speed and memory in the WAIS-III Digit Symbol--Coding subtest across the adult lifespan.

    PubMed

    Joy, Stephen; Kaplan, Edith; Fein, Deborah

    2004-09-01

    The primary role of speed in determining Digit Symbol scores is well established. Among the important questions that remain to be resolved are: (1) whether speed accounts for all of the age-related decline in Digit Symbol scores, and (2) whether memory ability makes any significant contribution to Digit Symbol performance, especially after controlling for speed. We analyzed data from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample to resolve these issues. As expected, speed (Digit Symbol-Copy) correlated very strongly with Digit Symbol--Coding. Memory (Digit Symbol--Incidental Learning or WMS-III index scores) correlated more moderately with Digit Symbol-Coding. Even after controlling for variance in Coding explained by Copying, a statistically significant proportion of the residual variance was explicable in terms of memory functions. The contribution of memory to Digit Symbol--Coding, while relatively small, is real. In addition, a small portion of the age-associated decline in Coding scores cannot be accounted for by Copying scores.

  14. An examination of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) in individuals with complicated mild, moderate and Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    PubMed

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Kirsch, Ned L; Kisala, Pamela A; Tulsky, David S

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the clinical utility of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) in individuals with complicated mild, moderate or severe TBI. One hundred individuals with TBI (n = 35 complicated mild or moderate TBI; n = 65 severe TBI) and 100 control participants matched on key demographic variables from the WAIS-IV normative dataset completed the WAIS-IV. Univariate analyses indicated that participants with severe TBI had poorer performance than matched controls on all index scores and subtests (except Matrix Reasoning). Individuals with complicated mild/moderate TBI performed more poorly than controls on the Working Memory Index (WMI), Processing Speed Index (PSI), and Full Scale IQ (FSIQ), and on four subtests: the two processing speed subtests (SS, CD), two working memory subtests (AR, LN), and a perceptual reasoning subtest (BD). Participants with severe TBI had significantly lower scores than the complicated mild/moderate TBI on PSI, and on three subtests: the two processing speed subtests (SS and CD), and the new visual puzzles test. Effect sizes for index and subtest scores were generally small-to-moderate for the group with complicated mild/moderate and moderate-to-large for the group with severe TBI. PSI also showed good sensitivity and specificity for classifying individuals with severe TBI versus controls. Findings provide support for the clinical utility of the WAIS-IV in individuals with complicated mild, moderate, and severe TBI.

  15. WAIS-R Factors and Performance on the Luria-Nebraska's Intelligence, Memory, and Motor Scales: A Canonical Model of Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Patrick C.; Macciocchi, Stephen N.

    1986-01-01

    Pattern and level of performance on the WAIS-R (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised) and the Luria-Nebraska's Intelligence, Memory, and Motor Scales were examined for 93 neurologically impaired adults. Each set of procedures evidently is indexing the same theoretical constructs. (Author/ABB)

  16. Using estimated factor scores from a bifactor analysis to examine the unique effects of the latent variables measured by the WAIS-IV on academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Kranzler, John H; Benson, Nicholas; Floyd, Randy G

    2015-12-01

    This study used estimated factor scores from a bifactor analysis of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) to examine the unique effects of its latent variables on academic achievement. In doing so, we addressed the potential limitation of multicollinearity in previous studies of the incremental validity of the WAIS-IV. First, factor scores representing psychometric g and 4 group factors representing the WAIS-IV index scales were computed from a bifactor model. Subtest and composite scores for the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-Third Edition (WIAT-II) were then predicted from these estimated factor scores in simultaneous multiple regression. Results of this study only partially replicated the findings of previous research on the incremental validity of scores that can be derived from performance on the WAIS-IV. Although we found that psychometric g is the most important underlying construct measured by the WAIS-IV for the prediction of academic achievement in general, results indicated that the unique effect of Verbal Comprehension is also important for predicting achievement in reading, spelling, and oral communication skills. Based on these results, measures of both psychometric g and Verbal Comprehension could be cautiously interpreted when considering high school students' performance in these areas of achievement.

  17. How Much Does WAIS-IV Perceptual Reasoning Decline Across the 20 to 90-Year Lifespan When Processing Speed is Controlled?

    PubMed

    Scheiber, Caroline; Chen, Hsinyi; Kaufman, Alan S; Weiss, Lawrence G

    2017-01-01

    The most prominent pattern of cognitive change over the lifespan centers on the difference between patterns of maintained abilities on tests of crystallized knowledge and patterns of steady decline on tests of problem solving and processing speed. Whereas the maintained-vulnerable dichotomy is well established in the literature, questions remain about cognitive decline in problem solving when processing speed is controlled. This relationship has been examined in cross-sectional studies that typically used non-clinical tests with non-representative samples of adults. This study extended these findings to the most popular clinical test, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale -4th ed. (WAIS-IV), using its carefully stratified sample as the source of data (ages 20-90 for Indexes, ages 16-90 for Perceptual Reasoning subtests). Multivariate Analysis of Covariance (MANCOVA) revealed that 70-80% of the variance in declining reasoning ability was shared with the speed factor. This was true (a) on the index and subtest level and (b) regardless of the type of problem-solving task employed. Such robust findings have important clinical and research implications for neuropsychologists, who most frequently use the Wechsler scales as part of their assessment battery.

  18. An alternative Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) factor structure of the WAIS-IV: age invariance of an alternative model for ages 70-90.

    PubMed

    Niileksela, Christopher R; Reynolds, Matthew R; Kaufman, Alan S

    2013-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) is by the far the most popular intelligence test for the assessment of adults in clinical and neuropsychological practice. Despite a number of studies examining the factor structure of the WAIS-IV from a Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) perspective (Benson, Hulac, & Kranzler, 2010; Ward, Bergman, & Hebert, 2012), a CHC interpretation of the WAIS-IV for individuals ages 70 and above has been absent from the literature. The exclusion of individuals ages 70 and above in previous research is likely due to the absence of several key supplemental subtests used to create a full CHC model. We provide an alternative five-factor CHC model of the WAIS-IV which includes only the subtests administered to individuals ages 70 and above in the standardization sample. Our results show (a) the alternative CHC model fits the data well; (b) this alternative CHC model met criteria for partial strict measurement invariance across the life span (only Similarities showed noninvariance) using strict criteria; (c) the five factors for ages 70-90 measure the same five CHC broad abilities identified in previous analyses reported for ages 16-69; and (d) the five-factor CHC solution for ages 70-90 is valid for the entire WAIS-IV age range and can be used whenever examiners administer the core battery but opt not to administer supplemental subtests.

  19. Sperm DNA Fragmentation Index and Hyaluronan Binding Ability in Men from Infertile Couples and Men with Testicular Germ Cell Tumor.

    PubMed

    Marchlewska, Katarzyna; Filipiak, Eliza; Walczak-Jedrzejowska, Renata; Oszukowska, Elzbieta; Sobkiewicz, Slawomir; Wojt, Malgorzata; Chmiel, Jacek; Kula, Krzysztof; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate sperm DNA fragmentation and sperm functional maturity in men from infertile couples (IC) and men with testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT). Materials and Methods. Semen samples were collected from 312 IC men and 23 men with TGCT before unilateral orchiectomy and oncological treatment. The sperm chromatin dispersion test was performed to determine DNA fragmentation index (DFI) and the ability of sperm to bind with hyaluronan (HA) was assessed. Results. In comparison with the IC men, the men with TGCT had a higher percentage of sperm with fragmented DNA (median 28% versus 21%; p < 0.01) and a lower percentage of HA-bound sperm (24% versus 66%; p < 0.001). Normal results of both analyses were observed in 24% of IC men and 4% of men with TGCT. Negative Spearman's correlations were found between DFI and the percentage of HA-bound sperm in the whole group and in IC subjects and those with TGCT analyzed separately. Conclusions. Approximately 76% of IC men and 96% with TGCT awaiting orchiectomy demonstrated DNA fragmentation and/or sperm immaturity. We therefore recommend sperm banking after unilateral orchiectomy, but before irradiation and chemotherapy; the use of such a deposit appears to be a better strategy to obtain functionally efficient sperms.

  20. Sperm DNA Fragmentation Index and Hyaluronan Binding Ability in Men from Infertile Couples and Men with Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Filipiak, Eliza; Walczak-Jedrzejowska, Renata; Oszukowska, Elzbieta; Sobkiewicz, Slawomir; Wojt, Malgorzata; Chmiel, Jacek; Kula, Krzysztof; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate sperm DNA fragmentation and sperm functional maturity in men from infertile couples (IC) and men with testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT). Materials and Methods. Semen samples were collected from 312 IC men and 23 men with TGCT before unilateral orchiectomy and oncological treatment. The sperm chromatin dispersion test was performed to determine DNA fragmentation index (DFI) and the ability of sperm to bind with hyaluronan (HA) was assessed. Results. In comparison with the IC men, the men with TGCT had a higher percentage of sperm with fragmented DNA (median 28% versus 21%; p < 0.01) and a lower percentage of HA-bound sperm (24% versus 66%; p < 0.001). Normal results of both analyses were observed in 24% of IC men and 4% of men with TGCT. Negative Spearman's correlations were found between DFI and the percentage of HA-bound sperm in the whole group and in IC subjects and those with TGCT analyzed separately. Conclusions. Approximately 76% of IC men and 96% with TGCT awaiting orchiectomy demonstrated DNA fragmentation and/or sperm immaturity. We therefore recommend sperm banking after unilateral orchiectomy, but before irradiation and chemotherapy; the use of such a deposit appears to be a better strategy to obtain functionally efficient sperms. PMID:27999814

  1. Corsi's block-tapping task: standardization and location in factor space with the WAIS-R for two normal samples of older adults.

    PubMed

    Saggino, Aristide; Balsamo, Michela; Grieco, Anna; Cerbone, Maria Rosaria; Raviele, Nicla Nicolina

    2004-06-01

    Corsi's block-tapping task and WAIS-R were administered to two Italian samples of 200 normal older adults (aged 65-74 years and 75-100 years). Corsi's reliabilities and standardization data are shown. Additionally, Corsi's location in the factor space of cognitive abilities represented by the 11 WAIS-R subtests is presented. Corsi's test seems to be a reliable one for older Italians. It seems also to be a measure of general intelligence in those 65-74 years of age and a measure of the Freedom from Distractibility factor in subjects 75 years and older.

  2. Concurrent validity of WAIS-III short forms in a geriatric sample with suspected dementia: verbal, performance and full scale IQ scores.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Brian L; Weaver, Linda E

    2005-12-01

    Evaluation of intellectual abilities using the WAIS-III is a common component of neuropsychological assessments. However, clinicians might be interested in administering reliable and valid short forms due to practical and clinical reasons. The present study examined the concurrent validity of eight short forms of the WAIS-III with full form IQ scores in a sample (n=43) of geriatric outpatients referred for assessment of suspected dementia. There were no significant differences between the short and full form VIQ scores at P<.01, while half of the short form PIQ and FSIQ scores were significantly different from their respective full form scores at P<.01. Correlations between short and full form IQ scores ranged from .89 to .99. Seven-subtest short forms were able to accurately estimate over 80% of scores within +/-2 S.E.M.s. This study supports limited use of WAIS-III short forms when conducting evaluations of older adults with suspected dementia.

  3. Advanced clinical interpretation of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV: prevalence of low scores varies by level of intelligence and years of education.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Brian L; Holdnack, James A; Iverson, Grant L

    2011-06-01

    Clinicians can use the base rates of low scores in healthy people to reduce the likelihood of misdiagnosing cognitive impairment. In the present study, base rates were developed for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV) using 900 healthy adults and validated on 28 patients with moderate or severe traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Results indicated that healthy people obtain some low scores on the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV, with prevalence rates increasing with fewer years of education and lower predicted intelligence. When applying the base rates information to the clinical sample, the TBI patients were 13 times more likely to be identified as having a low cognitive profile compared with the controls. Using the base rates information is a psychometrically advanced method for establishing criteria to determine low cognitive abilities on the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV.

  4. Approaches for predicting long-term sickness absence. Re: Schouten et al. "Screening manual and office workers for risk of long-term sickness absence: cut-off points for the Work Ability Index".

    PubMed

    van Amelsvoort, Ludovic Gpm; Jansen, Nicole W H; Kant, I Jmert

    2015-05-01

    We read with much interest the article of Schouten et al (1) on identifying workers with a high risk for future long-term sickness absence using the Work Ability Index (WAI). The ability to identify high-risk workers might facilitate targeted interventions for such workers and, consequently, can reduce sickness absence levels and improve workers' health. Earlier studies by both Tamela et al (2), Kant et al (3), and Lexis et al (4) have demonstrated that such an approach, based on the identification of high-risk workers and a subsequent intervention, can be effectively applied in practice to reduce sickness absence significantly. The reason for our letter on Schouten et al's article is twofold. First, by including workers already on sick leave in a study predicting long-term sick leave will result in an overestimation of the predictive properties of the instrument and biased predictors, especially when also the outcome of interest is included as a factor in the prediction model. Second, we object to the use of the term "screening" when subjects with the condition screened for are included in the study. Reinforced by the inclusion of sickness absence in the prediction model, including workers already on sick leave will shift the focus of the study findings towards the prediction of (re)current sickness absence and workers with a below-average return-to-work rate, rather than the identification of workers at high risk for the onset of future long-term sickness absence. The possibilities for prevention will shift from pure secondary prevention to a mix of secondary and tertiary prevention. As a consequence, the predictors of the model presented in the Schouten et al article can be used as a basis for tailoring neither preventive measures nor interventions. Moreover, including the outcome (sickness absence) as a predictor in the model, especially in a mixed population including workers with and without the condition (on sick leave), will result in biased predictors and

  5. IQ estimate smackdown: comparing IQ proxy measures to the WAIS-III.

    PubMed

    Spinks, Ruth; McKirgan, Lowell W; Arndt, Stephan; Caspers, Kristin; Yucuis, Rebecca; Pfalzgraf, Christopher J

    2009-07-01

    Brief assessments of general cognitive ability are frequently needed by neuropsychologists, and many methods of estimating intelligence quotient (IQ) have been published. While these measures typically present overall correlations with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Full Scale IQ, it is tacitly acknowledged that these estimates are most accurate within 1 standard deviation of the mean and that accuracy diminishes moving toward the tails of the IQ distribution. However, little work has been done to systematically characterize proxy measures at the tails of the IQ distribution. Additionally, while these measures are all correlated with the WAIS, multiple proxy measures are rarely presented in one manuscript. The current article has two goals: (1) Examine various IQ proxies against Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (Third Version) scores, showing the overall accuracy of each measure against the gold standard IQ measure. This comparison will assist in selecting the best proxy measure for particular clinical constraints. (2) The sample is then divided into three groups (below, average, and above-average ability), and each group is analyzed separately to characterize proxy performance at the tails of the IQ distribution. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance compares the different proxy measures across ability levels. All IQ estimates are represented in tables so that they can be examined side by side.

  6. Associations between work ability, health-related quality of life, physical activity and fitness among middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Sörensen, Lars E; Pekkonen, Mika M; Männikkö, Kaisa H; Louhevaara, Veikko A; Smolander, Juhani; Alén, Markku J

    2008-11-01

    The Work ability of ageing work force is a matter of major concern in many countries. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between perceived work ability and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and to investigate their associations with age, physical activity and physical fitness in middle-aged men working in blue-collar occupations. The study population consisted of 196 middle-aged (aged 40-60 years) men (construction and industrial work) attending occupationally orientated early medical rehabilitation. They were mostly healthy having only symptoms of musculoskeletal or psychological strain. Perceived work ability was assessed with the work ability index (WAI) and HRQoL with the Rand, 36-item health survey (Rand-36). Information on physical activity was obtained with a structured questionnaire. Cardiorespiratory fitness was estimated with a submaximal exercise test on a cycle-ergometer. The WAI was significantly (p<0.001) associated with the total score of Rand-36, and with all its domains. Age, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness were neither associated with the WAI, nor did physical activity predict any of the dimensions of Rand-36. Cardiorespiratory fitness was associated with the physical functioning dimension of the Rand-36 whilst age was positively associated with the dimensions of the energy, emotional well being and social functioning of the Rand-36. The present study on middle-aged men showed a close relationship between perceived work ability and the HRQoL. It is suggested that the promotion of work ability may have beneficial effects on quality of life.

  7. Diagnostic ability of %p2PSA and prostate health index for aggressive prostate cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenying; Wang, Meilin; Wang, Li; Adams, Tamara S.; Tian, Ye; Xu, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    The role of [-2]proPSA (p2PSA) based diagnostic tests for the detection of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) has not been fully evaluated. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic performance of p2PSA/free PSA (%p2PSA) and prostate health index (Phi) tests for PCa and to evaluate their ability in discriminating between aggressive and non-aggressive PCa. A total of 16 articles were included in this meta-analysis. For the detection of PCa, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, and AUC were 0.86 (95% CI, 0.84–0.87), 0.40 (95% CI, 0.39–042) and 0.72 (95% CI, 0.67–0.77) for %p2PSA respectively, and were 0.85 (95% CI, 0.83–0.86), 0.45 (95% CI, 0.44–0.47) and 0.70 (95% CI = 0.65–0.74) for Phi, respectively. In addition, the sensitivity for discriminating PCa between higher Gleason score (≥7) and lower Gleason score (<7) was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.93–0.98) and 0.90 (95% CI, 0.87–0.92) for %p2PSA and Phi respectively, and the specificity was low, only 0.09 (95% CI, 0.06–0.12) and 0.17 (95% CI, 0.14–0.19) for %p2PSA and Phi, respectively. Phi and %p2PSA have a high diagnostic accuracy rates and can be used in PCa diagnosis. Phi and %p2PSA may be useful as tumor markers in predicating patients harboring more aggressive disease and guiding biopsy decisions. PMID:24852453

  8. College Student Performance on the General Ability Measure for Adults and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults-Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassiter, Kerry S.; Bell, Nancy L.; Hutchinson, Melody B.; Matthews, T. Darin

    2001-01-01

    Examines the concurrent validity of the General Ability Measure for Adults (GAMA) and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III). A comparison of the sample's mean scores indicates similar GAMA and WAIS-III Performance IQ scores. In contrast, the sample's mean GAMA IQ score was significantly lower than the sample's mean Full…

  9. Cautions in Interpretation of Comparisons between the WAIS-R and the Wechsler Memory Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prifitera, Aurelio; Barley, William D.

    1985-01-01

    Wechsler Memory Scale Memory Quotient (WMS MQ) 12 points below Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Full-Scale IQ (WAIS FSIQ) may indicate memory impairment. Investigated the relation of FSIQ to MQ when the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised rather than the WAIS is used. Discrepancy between FSIQ and MQ occurred less often with WAIS-R than with…

  10. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of Frontal Cortex Decreases Performance on the WAIS-IV Intelligence Test

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Kristin K.; Mellin, Juliann M.; Lustenberger, Caroline M.; Boyle, Michael R.; Lee, Won Hee; Peterchev, Angel V.; Frohlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates excitability of motor cortex. However, there is conflicting evidence about the efficacy of this non-invasive brain stimulation modality to modulate performance on cognitive tasks. Previous work has tested the effect of tDCS on specific facets of cognition and executive processing. However, no randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study has looked at the effects of tDCS on a comprehensive battery of cognitive processes. The objective of this study was to test if tDCS had an effect on performance on a comprehensive assay of cognitive processes, a standardized intelligence quotient (IQ) test. The study consisted of two substudies and followed a double-blind, between-subjects, sham-controlled design. In total, 41 healthy adult participants completed the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) as a baseline measure. At least one week later, participants in substudy 1 received either bilateral tDCS (anodes over both F4 and F3, cathode over Cz, 2mA at each anode for 20 minutes) or active sham tDCS (2mA for 40 seconds), and participants in substudy 2 received either right or left tDCS (anode over either F4 or F3, cathode over Cz, 2mA for 20 minutes). In both studies, the WAIS-IV was immediately administered following stimulation to assess for performance differences induced by bilateral and unilateral tDCS. Compared to sham stimulation, right, left, and bilateral tDCS reduced improvement between sessions on Full Scale IQ and the Perceptual Reasoning Index. This demonstration that frontal tDCS selectively degraded improvement on specific metrics of the WAIS-IV raises important questions about the often proposed role of tDCS in cognitive enhancement. PMID:25934490

  11. Outcome of Occupational Latex Allergy—Work Ability and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Nienhaus, Albert; Kromark, Kathrin; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; van Kampen, Vera; Merget, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Objective The quality of life (QOL) and work ability of health care workers allergic to natural rubber latex (NRL) were assessed after implementation of regulations on powder-free NRL gloves in Germany. Methods 196 HCW with reported NRL allergy answered a questionnaire (response rate 58%) containing the Work Ability Index (WAI), Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniAQLQ), and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Results 63.2% still had NRL-related symptoms during the last 6 month. However on a scale from 0 to 10, the intensity of NRL-related symptoms decreased from 8.5 before to 2.3 after implementation of regulations on powder-free NRL gloves. A higher number of subjects were able to avoid NRL in the private than in the work environment (85% vs. 61%). NRL-related symptoms decreased and WAI increased with successful avoidance of NRL at workplace (b = 0.23, p = 0.003). QOL was only little affected by NRL allergy (mean: MiniAQLQ = 6.0; DLQI = 4.1). Conclusions Although there was improvement after implementation of powder-free NRL gloves, there is still a considerable number of HCW with NRL-related symptoms. Further investigations on latex avoidance and the cause of persisiting allergic symptoms in HCW with NRL allergy are therefore needed. PMID:18941629

  12. The WAIS-III and WAIS-IV: Daubert motions favor the certainly false over the approximately true.

    PubMed

    Flynn, James R

    2009-01-01

    Daubert motions oppose adjusting IQ scores. They argue that the rate of IQ gains over time (the Flynn Effect) cannot be set at 0.3 points per year with scientific exactitude; therefore, the adjustment formula that rate implies is inadmissible in capital cases. This ignores the fact that there is universal agreement in the scientific community that there have been substantial gains and that, therefore, the worst possible option is to simply leave inflated IQ scores unadjusted. That would undermine equity entirely. New data from the WAIS-IV are included in a meta-analysis of 14 combinations of Wechsler and Binet IQ tests. The overall average is a rate of 0.311 points per year; the average within Wechsler tests is 0.299 point per year. A new estimate of the extent to which the WAIS-III inflated IQs, even at the time it was normed, yields 1.65 points (rather than 2.34 points). However, two new studies comparing the WAIS-III to the Woodcock-Johnson III and the Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Scale give huge estimates. It is recommended that WAIS-III scores be set aside and subjects tested on the WAIS-IV and the Stanford-Binet 5.

  13. Use of the WAIS-III picture completion subtest as an embedded measure of response bias.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Ryan E; Boone, Kyle Brauer; Miora, Deborah; Skidmore, Sherry; Cottingham, Maria; Victor, Tara; Ziegler, Elizabeth; Zeller, Michelle

    2010-10-01

    In the present study a large sample of credible patients (n = 172) scored significantly higher than a large sample of noncredible participants (n = 195) on several WAIS-III Picture Completion variables: Age Adjusted Scaled Score, raw score, a "Rarely Missed" index (the nine items least often missed by credible participants), a "Rarely Correct" index (nine items correct <26% of the time in noncredible participants and with at least a 25 percentage-point lower endorsement rate as compared to credible participants), and a "Most Discrepant" index (the six items that were the most discrepant in correct endorsement between groups-at least a 40 percentage point difference). Comparison of the various scores showed that the "Most Discrepant" index outperformed all the others in identifying response bias (nearly 65% sensitivity at 92.8% specificity as compared to at most 59% sensitivity for the other scores). While no differences in Picture Completion scores were observed between less-educated (<12 years) and better-educated (≥12 years) credible participants, noncredible participants with <12 years of education scored significantly poorer than noncredible participants with 12 or more years of education. On the "Most Discrepant" index, 76.7% of less-educated noncredible participants were detected as compared to 58.3% of better-educated noncredible participants. Results of the current study suggest that the Picture Completion subtest of the WAIS-III is an effective measure of response bias, and that it may have a unique role in identifying suboptimal effort in less-educated test takers.

  14. The Speech Intelligibility Index and the Pure-Tone Average as Predictors of Lexical Ability in Children Fit with Hearing Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiles, Derek J.; Bentler, Ruth A.; McGregor, Karla K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether a clinically obtainable measure of audibility, the aided Speech Intelligibility Index (SII; American National Standards Institute, 2007), is more sensitive than the pure-tone average (PTA) at predicting the lexical abilities of children who wear hearing aids (CHA). Method: School-age CHA and age-matched children with…

  15. Continuous norming: implications for the WAIS-R.

    PubMed

    Zachary, R A; Gorsuch, R L

    1985-01-01

    Following Gorsuch (1983, 1984), a method for generating continuously adjusted age norms is illustrated using the normative data for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) (Wechsler, 1981). Specific procedures for calculating age-adjusted Verbal, Performance, and Full Scale IQ scores also are demonstrated, with a worked example. Compared to the original tabled norms for the WAIS-R, IQ scores based on continuous norming are more accurate because they involve an analytic smoothing procedure that eliminates the inaccuracies introduced by traditional tabled norms and because people are compared against their exact age groups.

  16. Evaluation of two brief and reliable estimates of the WAIS-R.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, B N; Naugle, R I

    1998-05-01

    Performance of 200 mixed neuropsychiatric patients on the WAIS-R were compared to the summary scores for Kaufman's Brief Intelligence Test (K-BIT) and a seven subtest short form of the WAIS-R. Correlations between verbal, non-verbal, and composite of the full WAIS-R with the K-BIT were significantly lower than the correlations with the WAIS-R shore form. The percentage of cases on the short forms that fell within 5 points of the full WAIS-R was higher for the seven subtest version of the WAIS-R than the K-BIT. Specifically, Verbal, Nonverbal/Performance, and Composite/Full Scale scores on the WAIS-R short form feel within 5 points for 89%, 74%, and 92% of the cases while on the K-BIT only 52%, 40%, and 50% fell within 5 points.

  17. Continuous Norming: Implications for the WAIS-R.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachary, Robert A.; Gorsuch, Richard L.

    1985-01-01

    Illustrates a method for generating continuously adjusted age norms using the normative data for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R). Specific procedures for calculating age-adjusted Verbal, Performance, and Full Scale IQ scores also are demonstrated, with a worked example. Comparisons show continuous norming scores are more…

  18. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  19. Age Dedifferentiation Hypothesis: Evidence form the WAIS III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juan-Espinosa, Manuel; Garcia, Luis F.; Escorial, Sergio; Rebollo, Irene; Colom, Roberto; Abad, Francisco J.

    2002-01-01

    Used the Spanish standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale III (WAIS III) (n=1,369) to test the age dedifferentiation hypothesis. Results show no changes in the percentage of variance accounted for by "g" and four group factors when restriction of range is controlled. Discusses an age indifferentation hypothesis. (SLD)

  20. WAIS-IV Subtest Covariance Structure: Conceptual and Statistical Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, L. Charles; Bergman, Maria A.; Hebert, Katina R.

    2012-01-01

    D. Wechsler (2008b) reported confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) with standardization data (ages 16-69 years) for 10 core and 5 supplemental subtests from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV). Analyses of the 15 subtests supported 4 hypothesized oblique factors (Verbal Comprehension, Working Memory, Perceptual Reasoning,…

  1. Sex Differences on the Dutch WAIS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Sluis, Sophie; Posthuma, Danielle; Dolan, Conor V.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Colom, Roberto; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2006-01-01

    Using multi-group covariance and means structure analysis (MG-CMSA), this study investigated whether sex differences were present on the Dutch WAIS-III, and if so, whether these sex differences were attributable to differences in general intelligence ("g"). The sample consisted of 294 females and 228 males between 18 and 46 years old.…

  2. Gender-related risk factors improve mortality predictive ability of VACS Index among HIV-infected women

    PubMed Central

    COHEN, Mardge H; HOTTON, Anna L; HERSHOW, Ronald C; LEVINE, Alexandra; BACCHETTI, Peter; GOLUB, Elizabeth T.; ANASTOS, Kathryn; YOUNG, Mary; GUSTAFSON, Deborah; WEBER, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Background Adding gender-related modifiable characteristics or behaviors to the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) Index might improve the accuracy of predicting mortality among HIV-infected women on treatment. We evaluated the VACS Index in women with HIV, determined whether additional variables would improve mortality prediction, and quantified the potential for improved survival associated with reduction in these additional risk factors. Methods The VACS Index (based on age, CD4 count, HIV-1 RNA, hemoglobin, AST, ALT, platelets, creatinine and Hepatitis C status) was validated in HIV-infected women in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) between January 1996 and December 2007. Models were constructed adding race, depression, abuse, smoking, substance use, transactional sex, and comorbidities to determine whether predictability improved. Population attributable fractions were calculated. Results The VACS Index accurately predicted 5-year mortality in 1057 WIHS women with 1 year on HAART with c-index 0.83 (95% CI 0.79–0.87). In multivariate analysis, the VACS Index score (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] for 5-point increment 1.30; 95% CI 1.25–1.35), depressive symptoms (aHR 1.73; 95% CI 1.17–2.56) and history of transactional sex (aHR 1.93; 95% CI 1.33–1.82) were independent statistically significant predictors of mortality. Conclusions Including depression and transactional sex significantly improved the performance of the VACS Index in predicting mortality among HIV-infected women. Providing treatment for depression and addressing economic and psychosocial instability in HIV infected women would improve health and perhaps point to a broader public health approach to reducing HIV mortality. PMID:26284531

  3. Modeling individual subtests of the WAIS IV with multiple latent factors.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Dennis J

    2013-01-01

    Performance on a cognitive test can be viewed either as measuring a unitary function or as reflecting the operation of multiple factors. Individual subtests in batteries designed to measure human abilities are commonly modeled as a single latent factor. Several latent factors are then used to model groups of subtests. However these latent factors are not independent as they are related through hierarchical or oblique structures. As a result, the simple structure of subtest performance results in complex latent factors. The present study used structural equation modeling to evaluate several multidimensional models of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) subtests. Multidimensional models of subtest performance provided better model fit as compared to several previously proposed one dimensional models. These multidimensional models also generalized well to new samples of populations differing in age from that used to estimate the model parameters. Overall these results show that models that describe subtests as multidimensional functions of uncorrelated factors provided a better fit to the WAIS-IV correlations than models that describe subtests as one dimensional functions of correlated factors. There appears to be a trade-off in modeling subtests as one dimensional and modeling with homogeneous latent traits. More consideration should be given to models that include multiple uncorrelated latent factors as determinants of the performance on a given subtest. These results support the view that performance on any given cognitive test is potentially the result of multiple factors. Simple structure may be too simple.

  4. Modeling Individual Subtests of the WAIS IV with Multiple Latent Factors

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    Performance on a cognitive test can be viewed either as measuring a unitary function or as reflecting the operation of multiple factors. Individual subtests in batteries designed to measure human abilities are commonly modeled as a single latent factor. Several latent factors are then used to model groups of subtests. However these latent factors are not independent as they are related through hierarchical or oblique structures. As a result, the simple structure of subtest performance results in complex latent factors. The present study used structural equation modeling to evaluate several multidimensional models of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales- fourth edition (WAIS-IV) subtests. Multidimensional models of subtest performance provided better model fit as compared to several previously proposed one dimensional models. These multidimensional models also generalized well to new samples of populations differing in age from that used to estimate the model parameters. Overall these results show that models that describe subtests as multidimensional functions of uncorrelated factors provided a better fit to the WAIS-IV correlations than models that describe subtests as one dimensional functions of correlated factors. There appears to be a trade-off in modeling subtests as one dimensional and modeling with homogeneous latent traits. More consideration should be given to models that include multiple uncorrelated latent factors as determinants of the performance on a given subtest. These results support the view that performance on any given cognitive test is potentially the result of multiple factors. Simple structure may be too simple. PMID:24058643

  5. Gender differences on WAIS-III incidental learning, pairing, and free recall.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph J; Kreiner, David S; Tree, Heather A

    2008-01-01

    Gender differences on Digit-Symbol-Coding-Incidental Learning, Pairing, and Free Recall were examined using the standardization sample of the WAIS-III. Males earned significantly higher scores on both Pairing and Free Recall, but effect sizes were small. Gender effects were not significant when age and educational level were included in the model or when differences in ability level were considered. The results showed a tendency for increased performance on both Pairing and Free Recall for individuals with higher levels of education or higher ability levels and for younger examinees. The findings support the use of combined norms on these procedures for males and females but indicate a need for adjusting scores based on differences in age and education.

  6. Visuospatial characteristics of an elderly Chinese population: results from the WAIS-R block design test.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shufei; Zhu, Xinyi; Huang, Xin; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Visuospatial deficits have long been recognized as a potential predictor of dementia, with visuospatial ability decline having been found to accelerate in later stages of dementia. We, therefore, believe that the visuospatial performance of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia (Dem) might change with varying visuospatial task difficulties. This study administered the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) Block Design Test (BDT) to determine whether visuospatial ability can help discriminate between MCI patients from Dem patients and normal controls (NC). Results showed that the BDT could contribute to the discrimination between MCI and Dem. Specifically, simple BDT task scores could best distinguish MCI from Dem patients, while difficult BDT task scores could contribute to discriminating between MCI and NC. Given the potential clinical value of the BDT in the diagnosis of Dem and MCI, normative data stratified by age and education for the Chinese elderly population are presented for use in research and clinical settings.

  7. WAIS-III reliability data for clinical groups.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Tulsky, D S; Price, L; Chen, H Y

    2001-11-01

    Reliability estimates for psychological tests are almost always reported for nonclinical populations (e.g., the normative samples). Such practice will no longer be sufficient as the new standards for testing call for an adequate assessment of psychometric properties within the specific population being tested. The purpose of this study was to provide internal consistency reliability estimates for clinical groups on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition. The study included data from 403 clinical participants composed of 10 groups of adults recruited as part of the WAIS-III clinical validity studies. Split-half reliability coefficients were obtained for these groups replicating the procedure used in the WAIS-III. With 8 of the clinical groups, the split-half reliability coefficients were comparable to, or even higher than, those reported for the WAIS-III standardization sample. In general, the split-half coefficients for the Verbal subtests tended to be higher than the coefficients for the Performance subtests. The high magnitude and general pattern of these coefficients demonstrate that the WAIS-III scales do not include additional error variance above and beyond what is reported in the WAIS-III-WMS-III Technical Manual when it was used to assess certain clinical groups. For the ADHD/ADD and learning disabilities groups, however, the internal consistencies coefficients of some subtests were relatively lower, although not statistically significant, than the normative sample. These findings may reflect more heterogeneity within the groups. The implications for assessment and for using alternate methods of determining the psychometric properties in these populations are discussed.

  8. Work ability and health of security guards at a public University: a cross-sectional study 1

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Marluce Rodrigues; Ferreira, Aldo Pacheco; Greco, Rosangela Maria; Teixeira, Liliane Reis; Teixeira, Maria Teresa Bustamante

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to evaluate the work ability and health status of security guards at a public University. Methods: a cross-sectional, descriptive, and analytical study was carried with 119 security guards. The following instruments were used: Work Ability Index (WAI), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ, short), Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), Medical Outcomes Study (MOS), and Demand-Control-Support (DCS). Descriptive statistics were used to describe the study samples and the Spearman's coefficient correlation was performed to assess the WAI. Significance level was set at 5%. Results: samples were composed by men; the mean age was 54.9 years (SD=5.7); 80% had partners, and 75% had basic education. The majority (95%) had only one job, the average length of service was 24.8 years (SD=11), ranging from 3 to 43 years. 88.9% worked ≤40 hours and 75% did not work at night shift or rotating shifts. The average score given to work ability was good (40.7 points), with significant correlation to social support at work (p-value=0.002), health conditions (p-value=0.094), and depression symptoms (p-value=0.054). Conclusion: this study showed that many characteristics might affect the work ability scores. Considering the results, we note that healthy life habits and a reorganization of work environments should be encouraged. PMID:27463107

  9. Work improvement factors for the amelioration of work ability, with a focus on individual capacity to deal with stress in an IT company.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Masanori; Higuchi, Yoshiyuki; Kumashiro, Masaharu; Yamato, Hiroshi; Sugimura, Hisamichi

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore factors that ameliorate work ability by focusing on workers' capacity to deal with stress.The subjects were 1,330 workers from the Japanese information technology (IT) sector. Each subject completed questionnaires in 2011 and 2012 that consisted of the work ability index (WAI), the three-item sense of coherence (SOC), and the Mental Health Improvement and Reinforcement Research of Recognition (MIRROR). The results of the WAI were also obtained in 2013. The median SOC score in 2011 was used to divide the subjects into two groups, the Low SOC group and the High SOC group, then we verified the factors that contributed to improved work ability in both of these groups over a two-year period. Results indicate that an improvement in work ability in the Low SOC group could be predicted by giving workers opportunities for education or training, by making efforts to reduce the stress of commuting, by clarifying their assignments, and by establishing support systems when troubles occur. For the High SOC group, such improvements could be predicted by giving workers job control, by giving education or training for the promotion of their abilities, and by establishing a system for assuming responsibility. In conclusion, improvements in the work environment can increase the work ability of Japanese IT workers in conformity with their capacity to deal with stress.

  10. Working alliance inventory applied to virtual and augmented reality (WAI-VAR): psychometrics and therapeutic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Miragall, Marta; Baños, Rosa M.; Cebolla, Ausiàs; Botella, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric properties of the Working Alliance Inventory-Short (WAI-S) adaptation to Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) therapies (WAI-VAR). The relationship between the therapeutic alliance (TA) with VR and AR and clinically significant change (CSC) is also explored. Seventy-five patients took part in this study (74.7% women, Mage = 34.41). Fear of flying and adjustment disorder patients received VR therapy, and cockroach phobia patients received AR therapy. Psychometric properties, CSC, one-way ANOVA, Spearman’s Correlations and Multiple Regression were calculated. The WAI-VAR showed a unidimensional structure, high internal consistency and adequate convergent validity. “Not changed” patients scored lower on the WAI-VAR than “improved” and “recovered” patients. Correlation between the WAI-VAR and CSC was moderate. The best fitting model for predicting CSC was a linear combination of the TA with therapist (WAI-S) and the TA with VR and AR (WAI-VAR), due to the latter variable slightly increased the percentage of variability accounted for in CSC. The WAI-VAR is the first validated instrument to measure the TA with VR and AR in research and clinical practice. This study reveals the importance of the quality of the TA with technologies in achieving positive outcomes in the therapy. PMID:26500589

  11. Working alliance inventory applied to virtual and augmented reality (WAI-VAR): psychometrics and therapeutic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Miragall, Marta; Baños, Rosa M; Cebolla, Ausiàs; Botella, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric properties of the Working Alliance Inventory-Short (WAI-S) adaptation to Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) therapies (WAI-VAR). The relationship between the therapeutic alliance (TA) with VR and AR and clinically significant change (CSC) is also explored. Seventy-five patients took part in this study (74.7% women, M age = 34.41). Fear of flying and adjustment disorder patients received VR therapy, and cockroach phobia patients received AR therapy. Psychometric properties, CSC, one-way ANOVA, Spearman's Correlations and Multiple Regression were calculated. The WAI-VAR showed a unidimensional structure, high internal consistency and adequate convergent validity. "Not changed" patients scored lower on the WAI-VAR than "improved" and "recovered" patients. Correlation between the WAI-VAR and CSC was moderate. The best fitting model for predicting CSC was a linear combination of the TA with therapist (WAI-S) and the TA with VR and AR (WAI-VAR), due to the latter variable slightly increased the percentage of variability accounted for in CSC. The WAI-VAR is the first validated instrument to measure the TA with VR and AR in research and clinical practice. This study reveals the importance of the quality of the TA with technologies in achieving positive outcomes in the therapy.

  12. Independent Examination of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV): What Does the WAIS-IV Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Nicholas; Hulac, David M.; Kranzler, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Published empirical evidence for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) does not address some essential questions pertaining to the applied practice of intellectual assessment. In this study, the structure and cross-age invariance of the latest WAIS-IV revision were examined to (a) elucidate the nature of the constructs…

  13. Cognitive profiles of adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder and those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder based on the WAIS-III.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Chieko; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro; Itahashi, Takashi; Tani, Masayuki; Yamada, Takashi; Ota, Haruhisa; Iwanami, Akira; Kato, Nobumasa

    2017-02-01

    The cognitive profile differences between adult patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are not well characterized. We examined the cognitive profiles of adults having either ASD (n=120) or ADHD (n=76) with no intellectual disabilities (IQ≥70) using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale III (WAIS-III). Verbal Intelligence (VIQ) - Performance Intelligence (PIQ) difference discrepancies were detected between the two groups. Information subtest scores of the Verbal Comprehension index and Arithmetic and Digit Span subtests of the Freedom from Distractibility index were significantly higher in ASD than in ADHD, while the Picture Completion subtest was significantly lower in ASD. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the difference in the cognitive profiles of adults with ASD and those with ADHD based on the WAIS III with a large number of participants.

  14. The effect of cognitive, personality, and background factors on the WAIS-III Arithmetic subtest.

    PubMed

    Karzmark, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In the Wechsler system the Arithmetic subtest has been viewed as a measure of concentration, working memory, or freedom from distractibility. However, a wide range of other influences on Arithmetic performance has been proposed. The current study was intended to examine these to further characterize what is measured by the Arithmetic subtest. Participants were 118 adults referred for neuropsychological assessment. The results indicate a strong association between WAIS-III Arithmetic and the other WMI (Working Memory Index) subtests. Arithmetic also showed a high association with Arithmetic skill and verbal memory. Moderate contributions to Arithmetic performance were found for most other cognitive measures. Measures of anxiety and of background factors, such as perceived difficulty learning Arithmetic, were weakly related to Arithmetic scores. These results suggest that although Arithmetic may be considered a measure of concentration or working memory, many other factors influence it and its specificity as a concentration measure is limited.

  15. Digit Symbol-Incidental Learning in the WAIS-III: construct validity and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Joy, Stephen; Kaplan, Edith; Fein, Deborah

    2003-05-01

    We analyzed WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization data for evidence of the construct validity and clinical utility of the Digit Symbol-Incidental Learning procedures (Pairing and Free Recall). Scores on both tests correlated moderately with WMS-III memory index scores (mean r=.38 for Pairing and .36 for Free Recall). Cutoff scores can be used to identify younger and older adults likely to suffer from memory impairment. In the standardization sample (which excludes neurological patients), these have moderate positive predictive power (averaging .56 if either test yields a positive finding), moderate negative predictive power (.76), and high specificity (.88), but low sensitivity (.35). In a clinical sample, the same cutoff scores were much more sensitive, correctly identifying 88% of a group of patients with Alzheimer's Disease. Examinees who obtain these low scores should receive follow-up memory testing. Very high scores are associated with a reduced risk of memory impairment.

  16. Factors affecting work ability in day and shift-working nurses.

    PubMed

    Camerino, Donatella; Conway, Paul Maurice; Sartori, Samantha; Campanini, Paolo; Estryn-Béhar, Madeleine; van der Heijden, Beatrice Isabella Johanna Maria; Costa, Giovanni

    2008-04-01

    Satisfactory work ability is sustained and promoted by good physical and mental health and by favorable working conditions. This study examined whether favorable and rewarding work-related factors increased the work ability among European nurses. The study sample was drawn from the Nurses' Early Exit Study and consisted of 7,516 nursing staff from seven European countries working in state-owned and private hospitals. In all, 10.8% were day, 4.2% were permanent night, 20.9% were shift without night shift, and 64.1% were shift workers with night shifts. Participants were administered a composite questionnaire at baseline (Time 0) and 1 yr later (Time 1). The Work Ability Index (WAI) at Time 1 was used as the outcome measure, while work schedule, sleep, rewards (esteem and career), satisfaction with pay, work involvement and motivation, and satisfaction with working hours at Time 0 were included as potential determinants of work ability. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted after adjusting for a number of confounders (i.e., country, age, sex, type of employment, family status, and other job opportunities in the same area). Work schedule was not related to Time 1 changes in WAI. Higher sleep quality and quantity and more favorable psychosocial factors significantly increased work ability levels. Higher sleep quality and quantity did not mediate the effect of work schedule on work ability. No relevant interaction effects on work ability were observed between work schedule and the other factors considered at Time 0. As a whole, sleep and satisfaction with working time were gradually reduced from day work to permanent night work. However, scores on work involvement, motivation, and satisfaction with pay and rewards were the highest in permanent night workers and the lowest in rotating shift workers that included night shifts.

  17. COGNITIVE ABILITY, SOCIAL DESIRABILITY, BODY MASS INDEX, AND SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS AS CORRELATES OF FOURTH-GRADE CHILDREN’S DIETARY-REPORTING ACCURACY

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Albert F.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Hitchcock, David B.; Finney, Christopher J.; Royer, Julie A.; Guinn, Caroline H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the relationship of reporting accuracy in 24-h dietary recalls to child respondent characteristics—cognitive ability, social desirability, body mass index (BMI) percentile, and socioeconomic status (SES). Subjects/Methods Fourth-grade children (mean age 10.1 years) were observed eating two school meals and interviewed about dietary intake for 24-h that included those meals. (Eight multiple-pass interview protocols operationalized the conditions of an experiment that crossed two retention intervals—short and long—with four prompts [ways of eliciting reports in the first pass].) Academic achievement test scores indexed cognitive ability; social desirability was assessed by questionnaire; height and weight were measured to calculate BMI; nutrition-assistance program eligibility information was obtained to index SES. Reported intake was compared to observed intake to calculate measures of reporting accuracy for school meals at the food-item (omission rate; intrusion rate) and energy (correspondence rate; inflation ratio) levels. Complete data were available for 425 of 480 validation-study participants. Results Controlling for manipulated variables and other measured respondent characteristics, for one or more of the outcome variables, reporting accuracy increased with cognitive ability (omission rate, intrusion rate, correspondence rate, P < .001); decreased with social desirability (correspondence rate, P < .0004); decreased with BMI percentile (correspondence rate, P = .001), and was better by higher than by lower SES children (intrusion rate, P = .001). Some of these effects were moderated by interactions with retention interval and sex. Conclusions Children’s dietary-reporting accuracy is systematically related to such respondent characteristics as cognitive ability, social desirability, BMI percentile, and SES. PMID:27222153

  18. Utility of a clinically derived abbreviated form of the WAIS-III.

    PubMed

    Wymer, Joy H; Rayls, Katrina; Wagner, Mark T

    2003-12-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) often poses problems for many populations due to the length of administration. Twenty geriatric subjects were administered the full WAIS-III. Three abbreviated forms of the WAIS-III (Satz-Mogel abbreviation; seven-subtest short form; and a clinically derived abbreviation) were evaluated by rescoring original full WAIS-III protocols. Results showed that the abbreviated WAIS-III protocols were highly correlated with complete protocols, and classification rules were the highest for the clinically derived abbreviation. The clinically derived abbreviation was reevaluated in a college LD/ADHD population yielding similarly high correlations. Results support the use of abbreviated forms of the WAIS-III in the evaluation of elderly patients and young adults, and point to the clinically derived abbreviation as providing the smallest discrepancies from FSIQ.

  19. Validity of the Ward seven-subtest WAIS-III short form in a neuropsychological population.

    PubMed

    Pilgrim, B M; Meyers, J E; Bayless, J; Whetstone, M M

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the Ward 7-subtest short form of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) in a neuropsychological clinic sample finds that the short form retains equivalent psychometric properties to those previously reported for the same short form of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R). The correlations found for the 7-subtest form of the WAIS-III were .95 for Performance IQ, .97 for Verbal IQ, and .98 for Full Scale IQ. The 7-subtest short form of the WAIS-III was also found to perform similarly to its WAIS-R counterpart on other markers of test accuracy. These results support the continued use of the Ward 7-subtest short form of the WAIS-III in a neuropsychological population.

  20. Bacterial Production and Contamination Mineralization in Sediments of the Ala Wai Canal, Oahu, Hawaii

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-29

    Ala Wai Canal , Oahu, Hawaii September 29, 2009 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Michael T. MonTgoMery richard B. coffin ThoMas...Sediments of the Ala Wai Canal , Oahu, Hawaii Michael T. Montgomery, Richard B. Coffin, Thomas J. Boyd, Leila J. Hamdan, Joseph P. Smith, Rebecca E. Plummer,1...Montgomery (202) 404-6419 The Ala Wai canal is a small, man-made estuary that was dredged from August 2002 to October 2003 to increase water circulation

  1. Accuracy of WISC-III and WAIS-IV short forms in patients with neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    van Ool, Jans S; Hurks, Petra P M; Snoeijen-Schouwenaars, Francesca M; Tan, In Y; Schelhaas, Helenius J; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Hendriksen, Jos G M

    2017-02-02

    The assessment of intellectual abilities is intensive, time-consuming, and might be considered burdensome for patients. We examined psychometric qualities of short forms (SFs) of the Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children (WISC-third edition) and for adults (WAIS-fourth edition), in children (n = 986; Mage = 10.9) and adults (n = 324; Mage = 40.9) with neurological disorders. SF estimates were compared with Full Scale IQ (FSIQ), obtained by a complete administration, for the entire sample and for the subgroups FSIQ < 80 and FSIQ ≥ 80. The FSIQ was correctly identified within ± 7 points in 86% of children and 87% of adults. There were, however, some differences regarding the optimal SF subtest combination between subgroups. Although clinical inferences should not be made, SFs may be useful in research settings to obtain a global estimate of intelligence, and in clinical settings to screen periodically for possible intellectual deterioration.

  2. Validity of demographically corrected norms for the WAIS-III.

    PubMed

    Strong, Carrie-Ann H; Donders, Jacobus; van Dyke, Sarah

    2005-08-01

    The diagnostic validity of new demographically corrected WAIS-III norms was investigated using a sample of 100 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a matched control group from the standardization sample. Demographically corrected norms were compared to traditional age-corrected norms. Although education accounted for incremental variance in WAIS-III factor scores in patients with TBI, above and beyond the effects of injury severity, the demographically corrected norms did not yield statistically different diagnostic classification of individuals with moderate-severe TBI than the traditional norms. In participants with relatively low levels of educational attainment, sensitivity to length of coma was less for demographically corrected norms then for traditional age-corrected norms. Nevertheless, when using a discrepancy between Verbal Comprehension and Processing speed, diagnostic accuracy rates were again similar for both sets of norms. It is concluded that the demographically corrected WAIS-III norms do not offer a clear advantage or disadvantage compared to traditional age-corrected norms in the assessment of patients with TBI who are Caucasian and who have at least a middle school level of education.

  3. Optimal short forms of the Spanish WAIS (EIWA).

    PubMed

    Demsky, Y; Gass, C; Edwards, W T; Golden, C J

    1998-12-01

    Although the Spanish version of the WAIS (Escala de Inteligencia Wechsler para Adultos, EIWA) is widely used as a measure of intelligence in Spanish-speaking populations, little is known about the psychometric characteristics of the test beyond the information given in the test manual. Despite this, users have assumed that the test functions clinically and statistically as does the original WAIS. This assumption has been applied to the area of short test forms which are assumed to be as valid as those used with the WAIS. The present study is an attempt to determine the optimal two-, three-, four-, and five-test short forms for estimation of Full Scale IQ based on the EIWA standardization test data. In addition, the relative amount of common and specific variance in the EIWA subtests was determined, along with the degree of measurement error. The study emphasizes the limitations of using the EIWA arising from its out-of-date norms, use of a restricted Spanish-speaking population, and failure to make updates since its introduction. These cautions suggest that the EIWA (long and short forms) should not be used for determining IQs; instead its use should be limited to research and to tracking cognitive changes over time.

  4. An exploratory study of the use of the Wechsler Digit-Symbol Incidental Learning procedure with the WAIS-IV.

    PubMed

    Ashendorf, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) does not include the optional Incidental Learning procedure for the Digit-Symbol subtest (now simply called Coding) that had been available in the WAIS-Third Edition (WAIS-III). However, the procedure itself has been shown to have some utility in assessment of incidental memory processes. The current study of a mixed clinical outpatient sample (n = 75) sought to identify salient characteristics of the Incidental Learning tasks as applied to WAIS-IV Coding. Findings showed that the Pairing procedure, when applied to the WAIS-IV, has different characteristics than it did with the WAIS-III; it is more difficult overall, and different items tend to be more prominently recalled than others. The Free Recall procedure for the WAIS-IV is comparable to the WAIS-III version in overall difficulty. Implications and implementation of the current findings are discussed.

  5. Pattern of proliferative index (Ki-67) after anti-androgen manipulation reflects the ability of irradiation to control prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hintz, Brace L; Koo, Charles; Murphy, James F

    2004-02-01

    Anti-androgen (AA) therapy will cause hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cells to undergo apoptosis and/or enter the resting phase of the cell cycle. Although the decrease of tumor burden would be an advantage for tumor control when irradiation is subsequently added, the cells in resting phase would seemingly be less vulnerable to the usual type of radiation-induced cell killing via DNA strand breakage. In this study of patients with prostate cancer, we examined the proliferative index via Ki-67 staining of biopsy material before, during, and after withdrawal of leuprolide. We studied 15 previously untreated patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Prostate biopsies were taken at three times: 1) initial diagnosis; 2) after 3 consecutive months of intramuscular 7.5 mg depot; and c) 6 weeks after the last dose. External beam radiation (EBRT) then delivered 66 Gy in 33 sessions to local fields. We used the ASTRO definition of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure. We measured serum luteinizing hormone and total testosterone coinciding with each biopsy date. Immunohistochemical staining was performed using Ki-67 antibody clone MIB-1. The follow-up ranged from 36 to 73 months (median 52 months). We discerned two perturbation patterns of Ki-67 with hormonal manipulation. Pattern 1 demonstrated a drop of Ki-67 labeling after leuprolide was in effect and then after leuprolide withdrawal, the Ki-67 rebounded to less than 120% of baseline. Pattern 2 also showed an initial drop with leuprolide but rebounded to more than 120%. Among eight patients demonstrating pattern 1, only one patient had a PSA failure. In contrast among patients with pattern 2, six of seven failed biochemically (Fisher's exact, p = 0.018). All patients had a LH less than 1.0 during leuprolide effect that rose with its withdrawal. There was no correlation of PSA failure with whether total testosterone did or did not rise to more than 100 ng/dl by the time of the withdrawal phase biopsy. Neither the

  6. Association of an individual's ability to overcome desire to fall asleep with a higher anterior-posterior gradient in electroencephalographic indexes of sleep pressure.

    PubMed

    Putilov, Arcady A; Donskaya, Olga G

    2017-03-01

    Individual differences in ability to overcome desire to fall asleep cannot be accurately predicted from subjective and objective measurements of sleepiness level. Previously, we showed that an exponential buildup of sleep pressure during prolonged wakefulness can be accurately traced with electroencephalographic (EEG) indexes, such as Spectral Sleep Pressure Component (SSPC) score and score on the 2nd principal component (2PC) of the EEG spectrum. The anterior-posterior gradients in SSPC and 2PC scores were calculated as the differences between frontal and occipital scores and examined as possible correlates of individual's ability to overcome desire of falling asleep. Fifteen young and 15 older adults participated in two identically designed sleep deprivation experiments. After, at least, 12hours of wakefulness, resting EEG recordings were obtained from frontal and occipital derivations with 2-h intervals during 26-50hours. Due to irresistible desire to sleep, 11 young and 5 older adults completed <25 required EEG recordings. SSPC and 2PC scores were computed and, by subtracting occipital scores from frontal scores, the anterior-posterior gradients in SSPC and 2PC scores were calculated on one-min intervals of 5-min eyes closed EEG records. The analysis of these anterior-posterior gradients revealed their age-related difference and association with the number of completed EEG recording sessions (13-25). This association remained significant after accounting for age, alertness-sleepiness level, minute of eyes closed recording, and day of experiment. It seems that the anterior-posterior gradients in the EEG indexes of sleep pressure are the objective correlates of individual's ability to overcome desire to fall asleep.

  7. The Psychometric Properties of the WAI in a Career Counseling Setting: Comparison with a Personal Counseling Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perdrix, Sophie; de Roten, Yves; Kolly, Stephane; Rossier, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Working Alliance Inventory-Client version (WAI-C) and Working Alliance Inventory-Short and revised (WAI-SR) in a career counseling setting. Moreover, it compared the impact of career versus personal counseling settings based on results obtained using the WAI-SR. Subjects were 188…

  8. Are Cross-National Differences in IQ Profiles Stable? A Comparison of Finnish and U.S. WAIS Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roivainen, Eka

    2013-01-01

    To study the concept of national IQ profile, we compared U.S. and Finnish WAIS, WAIS-R, and WAIS III nonverbal and working memory subtest norms. The U.S. standardization samples had consistently higher scores on the Coding and Digit span subtests, while the Finnish samples had higher scores on the Block design subtest. No stable cross-national…

  9. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a…

  10. WAIS-IV and Clinical Validation of the Four- and Five-Factor Interpretative Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Lawrence G.; Keith, Timothy Z.; Zhu, Jianjun; Chen, Hsinyi

    2013-01-01

    The fourth edition of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-IV) is a revised and substantially updated version of its predecessor. The purposes of this research were to determine the constructs measured by the test and the consistency of measurement across large normative and clinical samples. Competing higher order WAIS-IV four- and…

  11. Revisiting the Factor Structure of the WAIS-R: Insights through Nested Factor Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gignac, Gilles E.

    2005-01-01

    Past attempts to model via confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) intersubtest covariation have used an oblique factor or a higher order modeling approach. The attempts have failed to yield adequate model fit, based on current CFA recommendations. Using the WAIS-R standardization data, it is…

  12. Seating Arrangement and Anxiety as Related to WAIS-R Subtest Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steyaert, James P.; Snyder, John F.

    Performance on the Digit Span (DSP) and Digit Symbol (DSY) subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) have been said to be vulnerable to the effects of anxiety, seating arrangements, and sex of subject. To determine the effects of these variables on anxiety and test performance on the WAIS-R DSP and DSY subtests, 40 male and 40…

  13. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of frontal cortex decreases performance on the WAIS-IV intelligence test.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Kristin K; Mellin, Juliann M; Lustenberger, Caroline M; Boyle, Michael R; Lee, Won Hee; Peterchev, Angel V; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-09-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates excitability of motor cortex. However, there is conflicting evidence about the efficacy of this non-invasive brain stimulation modality to modulate performance on cognitive tasks. Previous work has tested the effect of tDCS on specific facets of cognition and executive processing. However, no randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study has looked at the effects of tDCS on a comprehensive battery of cognitive processes. The objective of this study was to test if tDCS had an effect on performance on a comprehensive assay of cognitive processes, a standardized intelligence quotient (IQ) test. The study consisted of two substudies and followed a double-blind, between-subjects, sham-controlled design. In total, 41 healthy adult participants were included in the final analysis. These participants completed the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) as a baseline measure. At least one week later, participants in substudy 1 received either bilateral tDCS (anodes over both F4 and F3, cathode over Cz, 2 mA at each anode for 20 min) or active sham tDCS (2 mA for 40 s), and participants in substudy 2 received either right or left tDCS (anode over either F4 or F3, cathode over Cz, 2 mA for 20 min). In both studies, the WAIS-IV was immediately administered following stimulation to assess for performance differences induced by bilateral and unilateral tDCS. Compared to sham stimulation, right, left, and bilateral tDCS reduced improvement between sessions on Full Scale IQ and the Perceptual Reasoning Index. This demonstration that frontal tDCS selectively degraded improvement on specific metrics of the WAIS-IV raises important questions about the often proposed role of tDCS in cognitive enhancement.

  14. Measurement of recovery after traumatic brain injury: a cognitive-neuropsychological comparison of the WAIS-R with the cognitive assessment system (CAS) in a single case of atypical language lateralization.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Simon M

    2007-01-01

    A 20-year-old preferentially left-handed male suffered an extensive right, focal, medial, prefrontal hematoma and contusion with associated swelling, and an initially undetected progressive loss of consciousness following trauma to the forehead. Performance on the Cognitive Assessment System (CAS) at 1 and 6 months after traumatic brain injury was compared with performance on the WAIS-R at 6 months post-injury. The patient demonstrated significant residualized impairment on selected subtests of the CAS at 6 months post-injury (all ps < 0.05). The patient was also significantly impaired on the Information, Vocabulary, Arithmetic and Comprehension verbal subtests of the WAIS-R. The magnitude of these WAIS-R subtest discrepancies occurred with a low base rate (< 1%) in the WAIS-R standardization sample. In addition there was a significant VIQ versus PIQ discrepancy favouring PIQ of a magnitude occurring in less than 5% of the WAIS-R standardization sample. These findings could not be explained on the basis of any prior learning disability, poor educational opportunities, medication use, response bias, confabulation, or low level of general ability. The low scores on the verbal subtests of the WAIS-R in conjunction with the impairment on the CAS subtests are highly suggestive of lasting frontal-executive dysfunction in this patient. Incidental findings of persisting anomia, impaired processing of proverbs, acalculia, and fluctuating verbal attention, as well as impaired retrieval of verbal information in the context of intact PIQ and superior constructional praxis suggest some degree of bilateral representation of linguistic functions. The differential assessment of cognitive domains by these two instruments as well as theoretical concordance in the pattern of results is also addressed.

  15. Null sex differences in general intelligence: evidence from the WAIS-III.

    PubMed

    Colom, Roberto; García, Luis F; Juan-Espinosa, Manuel; Abad, Francisco J

    2002-05-01

    There is an increasing number of studies claiming that the sex differences in general intelligence are "real." The empirical evidence is based on the summation of the standardized sex differences in several cognitive batteries. However, the scientific construct of general ability rests on the correlations among test scores, rather than on their summation. The latter (ability in general) is an arbitrary variable, not a scientific construct. General ability is not a function of any particular cognitive test, but a source of variance evidenced by the correlation between several diverse tests, each of which reflects general ability (g) to some extent, but also group factors and test specificity. Because there are important educational, economic, and social consequences of a group difference in general ability, it is especially germane to evaluate the possibility of an average sex difference in its proxy measures, such as IQ. The Spanish standardization of the WAIS-III is analyzed in the present study. The sample was made up of 703 females and 666 males, aged 15-94, drawn as a representative sample of the population in terms of educational level and geographical location. Although a male advantage of 3.6 IQ points is observed, the difference is in "ability in general," not in "general ability" (g). Given that the main ingredient of the strong association between IQ and a broad range of social correlates is g, and given that there is no sex difference in g, then the average IQ sex-difference favoring males must be attributed to specific group factors and test specificity.

  16. Classification Accuracy of Sequentially Administered WAIS-IV Short Forms.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph J; Kreiner, David S; Gontkovsky, Samuel T; Glass Umfleet, Laura

    2015-01-01

    A Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) short form (SF) may be effective for ruling out subnormal intelligence. To create a useful SF, subtest administration should follow the order prescribed in the manual and, depending upon individual performance, be terminated after completion of 2, 3, 4, or 5 subtests. One hundred and twenty-two patients completed the WAIS-IV. In two analyses, Full-Scale IQs (FSIQs) ≤69 and ≤79 were classified as impairment. Classification accuracy statistics indicated that all SFs using both cutoff scores exceeded the base rate (i.e., 14% and 34%) of subnormal intelligence, with hit rates ranging from 84% to 95%. The FSIQ cutoff of ≤69 had poor sensitivity for detecting impaired intellectual functioning with the 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-subtest SFs; specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were excellent for each SF. With the FSIQ cutoff of ≤79, sensitivity was strong to excellent for the 3-, 4-, and 5-subtest SFs as were specificity, PPV, and NPV.

  17. Graduate student WAIS-III scoring accuracy is a function of full scale IQ and complexity of examiner tasks.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Christopher J; Richard, David C S

    2005-12-01

    Research on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) suggests that practicing clinical psychologists and graduate students make item-level scoring errors that affect IQ, index, and subtest scores. Studies have been limited in that Full-Scale IQ (FSIQ) and examiner administration, recording, and scoring tasks have not been systematically varied. In this study, graduate student participants score a high (FSIQ = 112) and low (FSIQ = 85) IQ record form in one of two stimulus conditions: digitized film clips (N = 13) or partially completed record forms (N = 11). Results demonstrate that examiners are less accurate in the high IQ condition, and that recording examinee responses from scoring video clips results in more scoring errors. Obtained FSIQs are significantly higher than criterion IQ scores in the high IQ condition (8.46 for video condition, 2.55 for record form condition). Self-reported proficiency in WAIS-III administration and scoring is positively related to number of scoring errors.

  18. A brief report on WAIS-R normative data collection in Mayo's Older African Americans Normative Studies.

    PubMed

    Lucas, John A; Ivnik, Robert J; Smith, Glenn E; Ferman, Tanis J; Willis, Floyd B; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R

    2005-06-01

    Historically, neuropsychological measures such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) have yielded unacceptably high rates of misdiagnosis of impairment among cognitively normal African Americans, primarily due to poor test specificity and inadequate representation of ethnic minorities in the normative sample. In this report, we briefly review these issues and describe efforts by investigators in Mayo's Older African Americans Normative Studies (MOAANS) to develop more appropriate norms for African American elders on the WAIS-R. During MOAANS data collection, the third edition of the WAIS (WAIS-III) was introduced with updated representation of ethnic minorities in the normative database. More recently, specific demographic corrections for African Americans have been derived for WAIS-III subtest scores and indices. As such, WAIS-R normative estimates are not presented here. Interested readers who wish to obtain a full set of MOAANS WAIS-R norms, however, are invited to contact the authors for these data.

  19. A comparison of Boolean-based retrieval to the WAIS system for retrieval of aeronautical information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchionini, Gary; Barlow, Diane

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation of an information retrieval system using a Boolean-based retrieval engine and inverted file architecture and WAIS, which uses a vector-based engine, was conducted. Four research questions in aeronautical engineering were used to retrieve sets of citations from the NASA Aerospace Database which was mounted on a WAIS server and available through Dialog File 108 which served as the Boolean-based system (BBS). High recall and high precision searches were done in the BBS and terse and verbose queries were used in the WAIS condition. Precision values for the WAIS searches were consistently above the precision values for high recall BBS searches and consistently below the precision values for high precision BBS searches. Terse WAIS queries gave somewhat better precision performance than verbose WAIS queries. In every case, a small number of relevant documents retrieved by one system were not retrieved by the other, indicating the incomplete nature of the results from either retrieval system. Relevant documents in the WAIS searches were found to be randomly distributed in the retrieved sets rather than distributed by ranks. Advantages and limitations of both types of systems are discussed.

  20. The level of leisure time physical activity is associated with work ability-a cross sectional and prospective study of health care workers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With increasing age, physical capacity decreases, while the need and time for recovery increases. At the same time, the demands of work usually do not change with age. In the near future, an aging and physically changing workforce risks reduced work ability. Therefore, the impact of different factors, such as physical activity, on work ability is of interest. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the association between physical activity and work ability using both cross sectional and prospective analyses. Methods This study was based on an extensive questionnaire survey. The number of participants included in the analysis at baseline in 2004 was 2.783, of whom 2.597 were also included in the follow-up in 2006. The primary outcome measure was the Work Ability Index (WAI), and the level of physical activity was measured using a single-item question. In the cross-sectional analysis we calculated the level of physical activity and the prevalence of poor or moderate work ability as reported by the participants. In the prospective analysis we calculated different levels of physical activity and the prevalence of positive changes in WAI-category from baseline to follow-up. In both the cross sectional and the prospective analyses the prevalence ratio was calculated using Generalized Linear Models. Results The cross-sectional analysis showed that with an increased level of physical activity, the reporting of poor or moderate work ability decreased. In the prospective analysis, participants reporting a higher level of physical activity were more likely to have made an improvement in WAI from 2004 to 2006. Conclusions The level of physical activity seems to be related to work ability. Assessment of physical activity may also be useful as a predictive tool, potentially making it possible to prevent poor work ability and improve future work ability. For employers, the main implications of this study are the importance of promoting and facilitating the

  1. FMRI correlates of the WAIS-III symbol search subtest.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Lawrence H; Paskavitz, James F; O'Connor, Matthew J; Browndyke, Jeffrey N; Wellen, Jeremy W; Cohen, Ronald A

    2005-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) experiments frequently administer substantially adapted cognitive tests. This study was designed to identify FMRI correlates of a well-standardized clinical measure presented with minor adaptations. We administered the WAIS-III Symbol Search (SS) and a visuospatial control task to fifteen adults during FMRI. SS-related brain activity was identified, followed by analyses of activity related to performance level. Compared to the control task, SS was associated with greater activity in bilateral medial occipital, occipitoparietal, occipitotemporal, parietal, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (DLPFC). Across both tasks, slower processing speed was also related to greater activity in these areas, except right DLPFC. Greater activity in left DLPFC was specifically related to slower processing speed during SS. Performance was consistent with education levels. Findings suggest that SS performance involves regions associated with executive and visual processing. Furthermore, slower SS performance was related to greater recruitment of left hemisphere regions associated with executive function in other studies.

  2. Predicting scores of the Halstead Category Test with the WAIS-III.

    PubMed

    Titus, Jeffrey B; Retzlaff, Paul D; Dean, Raymond S

    2002-09-01

    The Halstead Category Test (HCT) and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) are two of the most widely used neuropsychological tests. Often assessment conclusions are dependent upon the comparison of these measures. Therefore, it is crucial for clinicians to know how they relate to one another. This study examined the relationship between the HCT and the WAIS-III with undergraduate psychology students. Correlational analyses were conducted between HCT scores and WAIS-III subtests, Verbal and Performance IQ, and Full Scale IQ scores. Additionally, the new WAIS-III scales (Letter-Number Sequencing, Matrix Reasoning, and Symbol Search) were further examined. Regression analyses were run to develop predictor equations for the HCT using VIQ, PIQ, and FSIQ. Finally, predictor tables were generated between the HCT and VIQ, PIQ, and FSIQ to provide assessment of brain dysfunction for clinical use.

  3. Wais-III norms for working-age adults: a benchmark for conducting vocational, career, and employment-related evaluations.

    PubMed

    Fjordbak, Timothy; Fjordbak, Bess Sirmon

    2005-02-01

    The Wechsler Intelligence Scales are routinely used to assess threshold variables which correlate with subsequent job performance. Intellectual testing within educational and clinical settings accommodates natural developmental changes by referencing results to restricted age-band norms. However, accuracy in vocational and career consultation, as well as equity in hiring and promotion requires the application of a single normative benchmark unbiased by chronological age. Such unitary norms for working-age adults (18- to 64-yr.-olds) were derived from the WAIS-III standardization sample in accord with the proportional representation of the seven age-bands subsumed within this age range. Tabular summaries of results are given for the conversion of raw scores to scaled scores for the working-age population which can be used to derive IQ values and Index Scores.

  4. Item difficulty scaling for WAIS-III picture arrangement.

    PubMed

    Costello, Raymond M; Connolly, Sean G

    2005-06-01

    Only one study regarding the sequencing of items of the WAIS-III Picture Arrangement subtest was located in a search of published literature. That study of 50 alcohol abusers failed to demonstrate that the items are sequenced in the perfect order of difficulty as suggested by the test publisher. The current study was accomplished to replicate or refute the prior study and to extend findings into related matters. Two laboratories provided four archival samples of 100 cases. Only five items appear properly placed, with one (OPENS) especially misplaced. A new sequence is recommended so that clinicians can administer the test more efficiently and examine errors from a process approach to evaluation. Difficult items were not passed as often as expected by Hispanic respondents. This finding was considered an artifact related to archival convenience sampling and may not be representative as a general finding regarding Hispanic performance until experimental sampling techniques or proper statistical controls can be applied. Statistically controlling for IQ, through analysis of covariance, eliminated ethnicity effects on total score for the PA subtest.

  5. Long-Term IQ Stability Using the WISC-IV and WAIS-IV among a Sample of Special Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Hayley

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the stability of scores on the WISC-IV and WAIS-IV over an approximate six-year period. Previous research using older versions of the WISC and WAIS have suggested that these scales demonstrate strong stability of scores. Since research that has compared the stability of scores between the WISC-IV and the WAIS-IV is…

  6. Comparison of Scores on the WAIS and Its Puerto Rican Counterpart, Escala de Inteligencia Wechsler para Adultos, in an Institutionalized Latin American Psychiatric Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Todd McLin; Rodriguez, Vene L.

    1979-01-01

    Compared vocabulary and block design subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) and its Puerto Rican counterpart, the Escala de Inteligencia Wechsler para Adultos (EIWA), in hospitalized Latins and Trans-Caribbean Blacks. EIWA scores were significantly higher than WAIS scores. Equivalence of EIWA and WAIS estimates is questioned.…

  7. Stanford-Binet and WAIS IQ Differences and Their Implications for Adults with Intellectual Disability (aka Mental Retardation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Wayne; Miezejeski, Charles; Ryan, Robert; Zigman, Warren; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon; Urv, Tiina

    2010-01-01

    Stanford-Binet and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) IQs were compared for a group of 74 adults with intellectual disability (ID). In every case, WAIS Full Scale IQ was higher than the Stanford-Binet Composite IQ, with a mean difference of 16.7 points. These differences did not appear to be due to the lower minimum possible score for the…

  8. Comparison of the WAIS-III and WISC-IV in 16-Year-Old Special Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Shirley; Duff, Simon; Davidson, Terry; Whitaker, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous research with earlier versions of the WISC and WAIS has demonstrated that when administered to people who have intellectual disabilities, the WAIS produced higher IQ scores than the WISC. The aim of this study was to examine whether these differences still exist. A comparison of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third…

  9. Factor Structure of the Norwegian Version of the WAIS-III in a Clinical Sample: The Arithmetic Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egeland, Jens; Bosnes, Ole; Johansen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Confirmatory Factor Analyses (CFA) of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) lend partial support to the four-factor model proposed in the test manual. However, the Arithmetic subtest has been especially difficult to allocate to one factor. Using the new Norwegian WAIS-III version, we tested factor models differing in the number of…

  10. Construct Validity of WAIS-R Factors: Neuropsychological Test Correlates in Adults Referred for Evaluation of Possible Head Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Elisabeth M. S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A 3-factor solution of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Revised (WAIS-R) in 260 adults with suspected head injury suggested relatively good construct validity for the factors, based on correlations with neuropsychological tests. Findings are discussed in terms of the multidimensional nature of neuropsychological tests and WAIS-R factors.…

  11. Factor Analysis of the Spanish Version of the WAIS: The Escala de Inteligencia Wechsler para Adultos (EIWA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Francisco C., Jr.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The standardization of the Escala de Inteligencia Wechsler para Adultos (EIWA) and the original Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) were subjected to principal components analysis to examine their comparability for 616 EIWA subjects and 800 WAIS subjects. Similarity of factor structures of both scales is supported. (SLD)

  12. The ability of bispectral index to detect intra-operative wakefulness during total intravenous anaesthesia compared with the isolated forearm technique.

    PubMed

    Russell, I F

    2013-05-01

    It has been suggested that monitoring during total intravenous anaesthesia should include aspects of brain function. The current study used a manually adjusted target-controlled infusion of propofol for anaesthesia, guided to a bispectral index range of 55-60. Intra-operative responsiveness, as assessed by the isolated forearm technique, was compared with whether the bispectral index predicted/identified a patient's appropriate hand movements in responses to commands. Twenty-two women underwent major gynaecological surgery with total intravenous anaesthesia, propofol, remifentanil and atracurium. Sixteen women responded, on 80 occasions, with appropriate hand movements to commands during surgery, of which the bispectral index detected 47 (sensitivity 59%). The bispectral index suggested consciousness 220 times in the absence of movement responses (specificity 85%). The positive predictive value of a bispectral index response was 18%. While two women had vague recall about squeezing fingers, none had recall of surgery. For patients who responded more than once during surgery the bispectral index value associated with a response was not constant. Although there was no difference in the median (IQR [range]) effect site propofol concentration between intra-operative responses (2.0 (1.5-2.3 [1.2-4.0]) μg.ml(-1)) and eye opening after surgery (2.1 (1.7-2.8 [1.5-3.9]) μg.ml(-1)), the median (IQR [range]) bispectral index value at eye opening after surgery was significantly higher than that associated with responses during surgery: 75 (70-78 [51-93]) vs 61 (52-67 [37-80]) respectively, (p < 0.001). The manual control of propofol intravenous anaesthesia to target a bispectral index range of 55-60 may result in an unacceptable number of patients who are conscious during surgery (albeit without recall).

  13. [Relationship between self-reported ADHD symptoms and WAIS-IV performance].

    PubMed

    Theiling, J; Petermann, F; Daseking, M

    2013-11-01

    This study has examined the relationship between cognitive functions and self-reported symptoms in ADHD adults. Cognitive functions were investigated with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV (WAIS-IV) in N=113 ADHD adults. The severity of self-reported symptoms was based on a screening questionnaire (ADHS-E). Results indicated only weak correlations between self-reported ADHD symptoms and WAIS-IV performance. The ADHS-E scale "Emotion & Affect" accounted for a small but significant variance on most WAIS-IV indices and turned out to be the most important variable to explain performance. The findings suggest that concurrent and discrepant information contribute to a differentiated examination on adult ADHD and that both objective performance diagnostics and self-reports complement each other within the diagnostic process.

  14. Measurement Invariance of Core Cognitive Abilities in Heterogeneous Neurological and Community Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Stephen C.; Cook, Mark J.; Bardenhagen, Fiona J.; Shores, E. Arthur; Carstairs, Jane R.

    2004-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis of Australian adaptations of combined Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) and Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) scores was conducted in a sample of 277 participants undergoing investigation for neurological disorders. The best-fitting model was a six-factor model representing the latent abilities of…

  15. Two New Empirically Derived Reasons To Use the Assessment of Basic Learning Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, David F.; Williams, W. Larry; Follette, William C.

    2002-01-01

    Scores on the Assessment of Basic Learning Abilities (ABLA), Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, and the Wechsler Intelligences Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) were obtained for 30 adults with mental retardation. Correlations between the Vineland domains and ABLA were all significant. No participants performing below ABLA Level 6 were testable on the…

  16. Brief report: The use of WAIS-III in adults with HFA and Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spek, Antoinette A; Scholte, Evert M; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina A

    2008-04-01

    The WAIS III was administered to 16 adults with high functioning autism (HFA) and 27 adults with Asperger syndrome. Differences between Verbal Intelligence (VIQ) and Performance Intelligence (PIQ) were not found. Processing Speed problems in people with HFA appeared. At the subtest level, the Asperger syndrome group performed weak on Digit Span. Comprehension and Block Design were relative strengths. In the HFA group, performance on Digit-Symbol Coding and Symbol Search was relatively poor. Strengths were found on Information and Matrix Reasoning. The results suggest that the VIQ-PIQ difference cannot distinguish between HFA and Asperger syndrome. WAIS III Factor Scale and Subtest patterning provides a more valid indicator.

  17. Clinical utility of demographically corrected WAIS-III subtest scores after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Blake, Treena M; Fichtenberg, Norman L; Abeare, Christopher A

    2009-04-01

    The present study explored the diagnostic accuracy of demographically corrected norms for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) in a diverse sample of 57 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a matched group of 61 pseudoneurologic controls. The use of demographic corrections did not significantly improve the sensitivity or specificity of WAIS-III subtest scores to TBI relative to traditional age-corrected norms. Overall classification rates were quite good for both normative systems. Although the demographic corrections attenuate ethnicity differences on the subtest scores of TBI patients, the updated norms are no more or less beneficial than traditional age-corrected norms for neurodiagnostic purposes.

  18. Brief Report: The Use of WAIS-III in Adults with HFA and Asperger Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scholte, Evert M.; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina A.

    2007-01-01

    The WAIS III was administered to 16 adults with high functioning autism (HFA) and 27 adults with Asperger syndrome. Differences between Verbal Intelligence (VIQ) and Performance Intelligence (PIQ) were not found. Processing Speed problems in people with HFA appeared. At the subtest level, the Asperger syndrome group performed weak on Digit Span. Comprehension and Block Design were relative strengths. In the HFA group, performance on Digit-Symbol Coding and Symbol Search was relatively poor. Strengths were found on Information and Matrix Reasoning. The results suggest that the VIQ-PIQ difference cannot distinguish between HFA and Asperger syndrome. WAIS III Factor Scale and Subtest patterning provides a more valid indicator. PMID:17879152

  19. Assessment of work ability of health professionals in the mobile emergency unit.

    PubMed

    Santos, Y; Porto, F; Marques, L; Tomaz, A; Toledo, R; Lucena, N

    2012-01-01

    Ergonomics is the study of a workplace and the worker. Its aim is to better adapt the workplace to man by preserving the body for short and long term work. This helps to adjust and improve functionality, thus preserving the body for short and long term work. It was through the observation of SAMU's (Mobile Emergency Unit) professional's helpers that the interest to evaluate these individuals arose. In addition, the aim of this research is to investigate the work ability of health professionals that work for SAMU/JP. The population was composed of 97 health professionals who currently work for SAMU/JP. A sociodemographic questionnaire was used as data collection instrument and it was validated by the index of the Work Ability (WAI). The research took place in 2010, in the headquarters of SAMU, in the city of João Pessoa, state of Paraíba - Brazil. The data analysis was carried out by simple descriptive statistics followed by comparison of the results with the pertinent literature. The quantity of daily sleeping hours, the levels of satisfaction in the job and the number of diagnosed diseases were among the most worrying factors. In spite of this, the health professionals obtained a work ability average considered to be "good".

  20. Biculturalism and Native American College Students' Performance on the WAIS-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducheneaux, Teton; McDonald, J. D.

    This study investigated the impact of cultural identification of Native American college students on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III). It assessed the relationship between cultural identification and cognitive-testing scores between a group of off-reservation students attending the University of North Dakota (UND) and…

  1. Factor Analysis of the WAIS and Twenty French-Kit Reference Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Philip H.

    1979-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) and 20 tests from the French Kit were administered to over 100 undergraduates. Analyses revealed ten factors: verbal comprehension, visualization, memory span, syllogistic reasoning, general reasoning, induction, mechanical knowledge, number facility, spatial orientation, and associative memory.…

  2. The Use of WAIS-III in Adults with HFA and Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spek, Antoinette A.; Scholte, Evert M.; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina A.

    2008-01-01

    The WAIS III was administered to 16 adults with high functioning autism (HFA) and 27 adults with Asperger syndrome. Differences between Verbal Intelligence (VIQ) and Performance Intelligence (PIQ) were not found. Processing Speed problems in people with HFA appeared. At the subtest level, the Asperger syndrome group performed weak on Digit Span.…

  3. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Delyana I.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Schindler, Dwayne; Messier, Claude

    2013-01-01

    New editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence and Memory scales are now available. Yet, given the significant changes in these new releases and the skepticism that has met them, independent evidence on their psychometric properties is much needed but currently lacking. We administered the WAIS-IV and the Older Adult version of the WMS-IV to 145…

  4. Correcting for Cultural Factors in Evaluating Intellectual Deficit on the WAIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overall, John E.; Levin, Harvey S.

    1978-01-01

    Estimates were obtained of the effects of ethnic group, sex, education, and clinical diagnosis on WAIS IQ scores of psychiatric patients. Expected IQ scores for segments of the general population were calculated by adding or subtracting these effects from an expected IQ for a White high school graduate. (Author/SJL)

  5. Sensitivity and specificity of WAIS-III/WMS-III demographically corrected factor scores in neuropsychological assessment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M J; Heaton, R K

    2001-11-01

    This study explored the neurodiagnostic utility of 6 factor scores identified by recent exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization, Processing Speed, Working Memory, Auditory Memory and Visual Memory. Factor scores were corrected for age. education, sex and ethnicity to minimize their influences on diagnostic accuracy. Cut-offs at 1, 1.5 and 2 standard deviations (SDs) below the standardization sample mean were applied to data from the overlapping test normative samples (N = 1073) and 6 clinical samples described in the WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual (N = 126). The analyses suggest that a I SD cut-off yields the most balanced levels of sensitivity and specificity; more strict (1.5 or 2 SD) cut-offs generally result in trading modest gains in specificity for larger losses in sensitivity. Finally, using combinations of WAIS-III/WMS-III factors together as test batteries, we explored the sensitivity and specificity implications of varying diagnostic decision rules (e.g.,1 vs. 2 impaired factors = "impairment"). For most of the disorders considered here, even a small (e.g., 3 factor) WAIS-III/WMS-III battery provides quite good overall diagnostic accuracy.

  6. Concurrent Validity of Three WAIS-R Short Forms in Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedict, Ralph H. B.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The concurrent validities of 3 short forms of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) were compared for their prediction of full-scale IQ for 145 male and 159 female psychiatric inpatients. Results support previous research showing better predictive accuracy for L. C. Ward's (1990) seven-subtest short form than the others. (SLD)

  7. WAIS Digit Span-Based Indicators of Malingered Neurocognitive Dysfunction: Classification Accuracy in Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinly, Matthew T.; Greve, Kevin W.; Bianchini, Kevin J.; Love, Jeffrey M.; Brennan, Adrianne

    2005-01-01

    The present study determined specificity and sensitivity to malingered neurocognitive dysfunction (MND) in traumatic brain injury (TBI) for several Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Digit Span scores. TBI patients (n = 344) were categorized into one of five groups: no incentive, incentive only, suspect, probable MND, and definite MND.…

  8. Identifying Major Profile Patterns in a Population: An Exploratory Study of WAIS and GATB Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Mark L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Results of profile analysis via multidimensional scaling (PAMS), a technique for studying the most prominent profiles in a battery of measures, are reported for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Revised (WAIS) and the General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB). PAMS profiles and the methodological features of the PAMS approach are discussed. (SLD)

  9. 29 CFR 1982.115 - Special circumstances; wai-ver of rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTING RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE 9/11 COMMISSION ACT OF 2007 Miscellaneous Provisions § 1982.115 Special... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special circumstances; wai-ver of rules. 1982.115 Section... TRANSIT SYSTEMS SECURITY ACT OF 2007, ENACTED AS SECTION 1413 OF THE IMPLEMENTING RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE...

  10. Reappraisal of the Validity of WAIS, WISC, and WPPSI Short Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, A. B.

    1970-01-01

    Data from the WAIS, WISC, and WPPSI Standardization samples were used to reappraise validity of all short forms of two, three, four, and five subtests. Results were compared with those given by McNemar's formula. The corrected formula gave lower values and selected "best short forms that differed from McNemar's formula. (Author)

  11. The influence of psychosocial factors at work and life style on health and work ability among professional workers

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, T. I. J.; Alavinia, S. M.; Bredt, F. J.; Lindeboom, D.; Elders, L. A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this article is to explore the associations of psychosocial factors at work, life style, and stressful life events on health and work ability among white-collar workers. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among workers in commercial services (n = 1141). The main outcome variables were work ability, measured by the work ability index (WAI), and mental and physical health, measured by the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). Individual characteristics, psychosocial factors at work, stressful life events, and lifestyle factors were determined by a questionnaire. Maximum oxygen uptake, weight, height, and biceps strength were measured during a physical examination. Results Work ability of white-collar workers in commercial services industry was strongly associated with psychosocial factors at work such as teamwork, stress handling, and self-development and, to a lesser extent, with stressful life events, lack of physical activity, and obesity. Determinants of mental health were very similar to those of work ability, whereas physical health was influenced primarily by life style factors. With respect to work ability, the influence of unhealthy life style seems more important for older workers, than for their younger colleagues. Conclusion Among white-collar workers mental and physical health were of equal importance to work ability, but only mental health and work ability shared the same determinants. The strong associations between psychosocial factors at work and mental health and work ability suggest that in this study population health promotion should address working conditions rather than individual life style factors. PMID:18175140

  12. Age-related invariance of abilities measured with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV.

    PubMed

    Sudarshan, Navaneetham J; Bowden, Stephen C; Saklofske, Donald H; Weiss, Lawrence G

    2016-11-01

    Assessment of measurement invariance across populations is essential for meaningful comparison of test scores, and is especially relevant where repeated measurements are required for educational assessment or clinical diagnosis. Establishing measurement invariance legitimizes the assumption that test scores reflect the same psychological trait in different populations or across different occasions. Examination of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) U.S. standardization samples revealed that a first-order 5-factor measurement model was best fitting across 9 age groups from 16 years to 69 years. Strong metric invariance was found for 3 of 5 factors and partial intercept invariance for the remaining 2. Pairwise comparisons of adjacent age groups supported the inference that cognitive-trait group differences are manifested by group differences in the test scores. In educational and clinical settings these findings provide theoretical and empirical support to interpret changes in the index or subtest scores as reflecting changes in the corresponding cognitive abilities. Further, where clinically relevant, the subtest score composites can be used to compare changes in respective cognitive abilities. The model was supported in the Canadian standardization data with pooled age groups but the sample sizes were not adequate for detailed examination of separate age groups in the Canadian sample. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Structural Validity of the WAIS-III among Postsecondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Marley W.; Kuterbach, James M.; Morgan, Rebecca J.; FitzGerald, Julie L.; Neuhard, Rachel M.; Arthur, April G.; Bucknavage, Leah B.

    2004-01-01

    The recent influx of students with disabilities into postsecondary education has generated a concomitant increase in the demand for psychoeducational assessments that include a measure of cognitive ability, either to identify ability-achievement discrepancies or to rule out alternate or comorbid diagnoses. The most commonly recommended cognitive…

  14. Atmospheric CO2 Over the Last 1000 Years: WAIS Divide Ice Core Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, J.; Brook, E. J.

    2009-04-01

    How atmospheric CO2 varied over the last thousands years is of great interest because we may see not only natural, but also anthropogenic variations (Ruddiman, Climatic Change, 2003). The Law Dome ice cores reveal decadal to centennial variations in CO2 over the last 2000 years (MacFarling Meure et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 2006). However, these variations have not yet been well confirmed in other ice core records. Here we use a newly drilled WAIS Divide ice core, which is ideal for this purpose because WAIS Divide has relatively high snow accumulation rate and small gas age distribution that allow us to observe decadal CO2 variations with minimal damping. We have started an extensive study of CO2 in WAIS Divide core. So far we have obtained data for 960-1940 A.D. from the WDC05-A core drilled in 2005-2006. 344 ice samples from 103 depths were analyzed and the standard error of the mean is ~0.8 ppm on average. Ancient air in 8~12 g of bubbly ice is liberated by crushing with steel pins at -35 °C and trapped in stainless steel tubes at -262 °C. CO2 mixing ratio in the extracted air is precisely determined using a gas chromatographic method. Details of the high-precision methods are described in Ahn et al. (J. of Glaciology, in press). Our new results show preindustrial atmospheric CO2 variability of ~ 10 ppm. The most striking feature of the record is a rapid atmospheric CO2 decrease of 7~8 ppm within ~20 years at ~ 1600 A.D. Considering the larger smoothing of gas records in the WAIS Divide relative to Law Dome, our results confirm the atmospheric CO2 decrease of ~10 ppm in Law Dome records observed at this time. However, this event is not significant in the Dronning Maud Land ice core (Siegenthaler et al., Tellus, 2005), probably due to more extensive smoothing of gas records in the core. Similar rapid changes of CO2 at other times in the WAIS Divide record need to be confirmed with higher resolution studies. We also found that our WAIS Divide CO2 data are

  15. Expansion and re-examination of Digit Span effort indices on the WAIS-IV.

    PubMed

    Young, J Christopher; Sawyer, R John; Roper, Brad L; Baughman, Brandon C

    2012-01-01

    The Digit Span subtest was significantly revised for the WAIS-IV as an ordinal sequencing trial was added to increase working memory demands. The present investigation sought to validate an expanded version of Reliable Digit Span (RDS-R) as well as age-corrected scaled score (ACSS) from the recently revised Digit Span. Archival data were collected from 259 veterans completing the WAIS-IV Digit Span subtest and Word Memory Test (WMT). Veterans failing the WMT performed significantly worse (p < .001) on the ACSS, RDS-R, and traditional RDS. Operational characteristics of the ACSS, RDS-R, and RDS were essentially equivalent; however, sensitivity was quite modest when selecting cutoffs with strong specificity. While current results suggest that Digit Span effort indices can contribute to the detection of suboptimal effort, additional symptom validity indicators should be employed to compensate for limited sensitivity.

  16. Using Firn Air for Facility Cooling at the WAIS Divide Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-17

    65% in conver- sion of electrical power into the theoretical fan power calculated as de- scribed above. The gross cooling effect delivered is simply...ER D C/ CR RE L TR -1 4- 19 Engineering for Polar Operations, Logistics, and Research (EPOLAR) Using Firn Air for Facility Cooling at...Facility Cooling at the WAIS Divide Site Jason Weale, Mary Albert, Gary Phetteplace Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) U.S. Army

  17. Identification of a social cognition construct for the WAIS-III.

    PubMed

    Allen, Daniel N; Barchard, Kimberly A

    2009-10-01

    Recent studies of autism and schizophrenia examining the factor structure of the subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised have identified a factor that is thought to assess social cognitive (SC) processes or social context. The objective of the current study was to determine whether a similar factor could be identified using confirmatory factor analysis of the 14 Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) subtests in the standardization sample. A five-factor model that included an SC factor along with verbal comprehension, perceptual organization, working memory, and processing speed factors provided the best fit of the data. The SC factor was composed of the Picture Arrangement, Picture Completion, and Object Assembly subtests when all 14 WAIS-III subtests were included. These results provide support for the construct validity of SC factors measured by the WAIS-III in the standardization sample, although additional research is necessary to determine its stability across age groups and clinical populations, as well as its sensitivity to various forms of brain dysfunction.

  18. The WAIS-R factors: usefulness and construct validity in neuropsychological assessments.

    PubMed

    Berger, S

    1998-01-01

    One-hundred and twelve patients were administered the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), an abbreviated Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised, and the Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery. In order to replicate an earlier study (Sherman, Strauss, Spellacy, & Hunter, 1995), correlations were generated between the WAIS-R factor scores and neuropsychological and memory tests. The Verbal Comprehension factor (Factor 1) correlated with Speech Sounds Perception Test (SSPT), the Seashore Rhythm Test (SSRT), the Category Test, and memory indices. The Perceptual Organizational factor (Factor 2) correlated with the time, memory, and location scores of the Tactual Performance Test, the SSPT, SSRT, the Category Test, Trails A, Trails B, memory indices, and finger tapping. The Freedom From Distractibility factor (Factor 3) was correlated with the Category Test, the SSPT, the SSRT, Trails A, Trails B, immediate Logical Memory, and Visual Reproduction. Modest correlations suggest that the WAIS-R factors may be useful for understanding underlying cognitive performance and can be functional for generating hypotheses, but should not be utilized exclusively to make clinical inferences.

  19. Updating to the WAIS-III and WMS-III: considerations for research and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Tulsky, D S; Ledbetter, M F

    2000-09-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) are the most commonly used intelligence and memory scales in both clinical and neuropsychology. In 1997, updated versions of these instruments (the WAIS-III and WMS-III) were published. Because of the extensive use of the WAIS-R and WMS-R in the field and the body of accumulated research, there is naturally some reluctance by clinicians and researchers to update to the new versions. It is sometimes difficult for clinicians who test individuals on repeated occasions to switch over to the new versions of the scales because of the difficulty of interpreting score discrepancy between the 2 versions. Researchers, especially those conducting longitudinal research, have a similar difficulty in changing measurement devices because of the possible threat of internal validity. This article reviews the substantive revisions of the scales and outlines those issues that users should take into consideration when updating to the new versions.

  20. WAIS-R subtest profile and cortical perfusion in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, G E; Prohovnik, I; Stern, Y; Mayeux, R

    1994-01-01

    WAIS-R profiles were investigated in 28 Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 21 healthy elderly subjects. The Fuld subtest profile, previously reported to have potential as a diagnostic marker for AD, was observed in 35.7% of our AD patients and 4.8% of the controls. We compared AD patients with the Fuld profile (ADF+) to a group of patients without the profile (ADF-) with similar demographics and dementia severity and demographically matched normals using regional Cerebral Blood Flow. Both AD groups showed reduced blood flow in the parietotemporal cortex compared to normals, but the ADF+ patients had greater flow reductions than the ADF- group. Examination of WAIS-R performance indicated that the ADF+ group had lower scores than the ADF- patients on the Digit Symbol and Block Design subtests, and further, that these two subtests were associated with the parietotemporal perfusion deficit in our AD sample. Our findings do not support the use of the Fuld profile as a diagnostic marker for AD, but do provide physiological evidence for behavioral heterogeneity among AD patients based on WAIS-R subtest performance.

  1. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition Short Form for Index and IQ Scores in a Psychiatric Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Bruce K.; Girard, Todd A.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2007-01-01

    An eight-subtest short form (SF8) of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition (WAIS-III), maintaining equal representation of each index factor, was developed for use with psychiatric populations. Data were collected from a mixed inpatient/outpatient sample (99 men and 101 women) referred for neuropsychological assessment. Psychometric…

  2. Validity of two selected-item short forms of the WAIS-III in an intellectually deficient sample.

    PubMed

    Alley, Pamala J; Allen, Ryan A; Leverett, J Patrick

    2007-12-01

    Various short forms of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III; D. Wechsler, 1997) have been investigated, but limited information is available regarding the usefulness of any WAIS-III abbreviation with intellectually deficient individuals. Our study compared the validities of two WAIS-III selected-item short forms in a sample of 59 individuals with full scale IQs (FSIQs) of 79 or lower. The performance of both short forms was adequate, but the results gave a consistent edge to an adapted version of the Satz-Mogel (1962) short form in comparison to the abbreviated form by J. H. Wymer, K. Rayls, and M. T. Wagner (2003). The correlation (r = .98) of Satz-Mogel estimates with WAIS-III FSIQ scores was slightly higher than the correlation (r = .97) for estimates from Wymer et al.'s abbreviated form, and Satz-Mogel estimates did not differ significantly from actual FSIQs. In comparison to individual classification (FSIQ > 70 versus FSIQ < or = 70) obtained with the full WAIS-III, the misclassification rate was somewhat lower for the Satz-Mogel short form. Although both short forms performed reasonably well, practitioners should be cautious when utilizing any short form to make decisions about individuals.

  3. Investigation of the Factor Structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV): Exploratory and Higher Order Factor Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canivez, Gary L.; Watkins, Marley W.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV; D. Wechsler, 2008a) standardization sample using exploratory factor analysis, multiple factor extraction criteria, and higher order exploratory factor analysis (J. Schmid & J. M. Leiman, 1957) not included in the WAIS-IV Technical…

  4. Stanford-Binet & WAIS IQ Differences and Their Implications for Adults with Intellectual Disability (aka Mental Retardation).

    PubMed

    Silverman, Wayne; Miezejeski, Charles; Ryan, Robert; Zigman, Warren; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon; Urv, Tiina

    2010-03-01

    Stanford-Binet and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) IQs were compared for a group of 74 adults with intellectual disability (ID). In every case, WAIS Full Scale IQ was higher than the Stanford-Binet Composite IQ, with a mean difference of 16.7 points. These differences did not appear to be due to the lower minimum possible score for the Stanford-Binet. Additional comparisons with other measures suggested that the WAIS might systematically underestimate severity of intellectual impairment. Implications of these findings are discussed regarding determination of disability status, estimating prevalence of ID, assessing dementia and aging-related cognitive declines, and diagnosis of ID in forensic cases involving a possible death penalty.

  5. Social perception and WAIS-IV Performance in adolescents and adults diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome and Autism.

    PubMed

    Holdnack, James; Goldstein, Gerald; Drozdick, Lisa

    2011-06-01

    Previous research using the Wechsler scales has identified areas of cognitive weaknesses in children, adolescents, and adults diagnosed with Autism or Asperger's syndrome. The current study evaluates cognitive functioning in adolescents and adults diagnosed with Autism or Asperger's syndrome using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and the Social Perception subtest from the Advanced Clinical Solutions. Deficits in social perception, verbal comprehension, and processing speed were found in the Autism sample. Additionally, they exhibited inconsistent performance on auditory working memory and perceptual reasoning tasks. The Asperger's syndrome group had better overall cognitive skills than the Autism group, but compared with controls, they had weaknesses in processing speed, social perception, and components of auditory working memory. Both groups had relatively low scores on the WAIS-IV Comprehension subtest compared with the other verbal comprehension subtests. Clinical application and utility of the WAIS-IV and Social Perception in Autism Spectrum Disorders are discussed.

  6. Depositional phasing of volcanic aerosols in the WAIS Divide ice core over the past 2400 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffman, B. G.; Kreutz, K. J.; Breton, D. J.; Dunbar, N. W.; Kurbatov, A.

    2011-12-01

    Explosive volcanic events originating in the tropics are an intermittent but significant factor in climate forcing, with the potential to cause global cooling for up to several years. Evidence of prehistoric eruptions in the form of tephra has been documented in sedimentary records throughout the globe, including the polar ice sheets. The chemical record of volcanic aerosols is also found in ice core records. While the record of tropical volcanism observed in Antarctic ice cores (based on sulfate deposition) is consistent regionally, little to no evidence of insoluble aerosols (ash particles) from tropical eruptions has been found. The upper 577 m (2400 years) of the WAIS Divide deep ice core (WDC06A) was melted using the UMaine WAIS Melt Monitor system, which allows accurate mm-scale depth co-registration of electrical conductivity and particle data, with subsequent collection of discrete samples for expanded particle, glaciochemical and geochemical analysis. The concentration and size distribution of microparticles were measured using a flow-through Klotz Abakus laser particle detector, developed by Ruth et al (2002) and calibrated with Coulter-Counter measurements. High-resolution analysis of ice spanning these volcanic intervals indicates that insoluble aerosols consistently arrive sooner than soluble aerosols (i.e., sulfate) at the WAIS Divide site (e.g., the Kuwae, Vanuatu eruption of ~1452 C.E.; Figure 1). We have observed this phasing difference for multiple tropical eruptions, including Agung (1963 C.E.), Krakatau/Tarawera (1886/1883), Tambora (1815), Kuwae (~1452) and Unknown (~1259). This phasing difference, which is on the order of 6-18 months, appears to be related to the eruptive column height and atmospheric transport of material.

  7. IQ and ability across the adult life span.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Sallie

    2011-07-01

    The experience of cognitive decline can be a potent source of anxiety and concern for many people. While an IQ consistent with estimated optimal levels or previously recorded scores may indicate no significant change in cognitive function, the patient may be accurately reporting a normal age-related deterioration in actual ability. The aim of this article is to chart the age-related changes in intellectual abilities evident on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV). The norms from the WAIS-IV manual were examined to plot the age-related changes in Full-Scale IQ (FSIQ) and composite scores across the adult life span, while holding actual ability level constant across the age groups. Here we present a graphical representation of the normal cognitive developments and declines in FSIQ, Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Working Memory, and Processing Speed across the adult life span. This graphical representation provides a rational basis for the identification of atypical profiles/complaints of cognitive deterioration that may require further specialist neuropsychological evaluation. These graphs can be used to provide reassurance for healthy adults with concerns of cognitive decline and as an educative tool for their referring agencies.

  8. Validation of WAIS-III four-subtest short forms in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Reid-Arndt, Stephanie A; Allen, Brittany J; Schopp, Laura

    2011-10-01

    In an effort to identify four-subtest Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) short forms valid for estimating Full-Scale IQ (FSIQ) among individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI), seven tetrad versions of the WAIS-III were evaluated in a convenience sample of patients referred for neuropsychological assessment (n = 176). Estimated FSIQ scores were compared to actual FSIQ scores via correlation analyses, repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs), and frequency analyses. All short form-estimated FSIQ scores correlated highly with actual scores (all rs > .91, ps < .001). Repeated-measures ANOVAs identified no significant differences between actual and short form-estimated FSIQ scores for two of the seven short forms. These same two short forms had the highest percentage of scores within ±5 points of actual FSIQ scores (75.6% and 71.6%). Thus, two tetrad versions were consistently superior to others in accuracy of estimating FSIQ; these may be helpful when time constraints or other issues necessitate use of an abbreviated battery for estimating FSIQ among individuals with TBI.

  9. Application of hierarchical genetic models to Raven and WAIS subtests: a Dutch twin study.

    PubMed

    Rijsdijk, Frühling V; Vernon, P A; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2002-05-01

    Hierarchical models of intelligence are highly informative and widely accepted. Application of these models to twin data, however, is sparse. This paper addresses the question of how a genetic hierarchical model fits the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) subtests and the Raven Standard Progressive test score, collected in 194 18-year-old Dutch twin pairs. We investigated whether first-order group factors possess genetic and environmental variance independent of the higher-order general factor and whether the hierarchical structure is significant for all sources of variance. A hierarchical model with the 3 Cohen group-factors (verbal comprehension, perceptual organisation and freedom-from-distractibility) and a higher-order g factor showed the best fit to the phenotypic data and to additive genetic influences (A), whereas the unique environmental source of variance (E) could be modeled by a single general factor and specifics. There was no evidence for common environmental influences. The covariation among the WAIS group factors and the covariation between the group factors and the Raven is predominantly influenced by a second-order genetic factor and strongly support the notion of a biological basis of g.

  10. WAIS-III and WMS-III performance in chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Keilp, John G; Corbera, Kathy; Slavov, Iordan; Taylor, Michael J; Sackeim, Harold A; Fallon, Brian A

    2006-01-01

    There is controversy regarding the nature and degree of intellectual and memory deficits in chronic Lyme disease. In this study, 81 participants with rigorously diagnosed chronic Lyme disease were administered the newest revisions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III), and compared to 39 nonpatients. On the WAIS-III, Lyme disease participants had poorer Full Scale and Performance IQ's. At the subtest level, differences were restricted to Information and the Processing Speed subtests. On the WMS-III, Lyme disease participants performed more poorly on Auditory Immediate, Immediate, Auditory Delayed, Auditory Recognition Delayed, and General Memory indices. Among WMS-III subtests, however, differences were restricted to Logical Memory (immediate and delayed) and Family Pictures (delayed only), a Visual Memory subtest. Discriminant analyses suggest deficits in chronic Lyme are best characterized as a combination of memory difficulty and diminished processing speed. Deficits were modest, between one-third and two-thirds of a standard deviation, consistent with earlier studies. Depression severity had a weak relationship to processing speed, but little other association to test performance. Deficits in chronic Lyme disease are consistent with a subtle neuropathological process affecting multiple performance tasks, although further work is needed to definitively rule out nonspecific illness effects.

  11. Predicting denial function of schizophrenic patients by the picture completion subtest of WAIS-R.

    PubMed

    Rina, Hasako; Terao, Takeshi; Nakano, Hideki; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Iwata, Noboru; Nakamura, Jun

    2004-11-01

    In the previous study, picture completion (PC) test scores of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised (WAIS-R) were negatively associated with recognition of mental illness measured by Schedule for the Assessment of Insight (SAI). Therefore, it can be hypothesized that function measured by the PC test is positively associated with denial function. To investigate this hypothesis, we investigated the relationship between two picture tests (picture completion and picture arrangement) of the WAIS-R and denial function tests (lie scale, frequency scale and correction scale) of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) in 26 schizophrenic patients. As a result, the lie scale score and the correction scale score were positively and significantly associated with picture completion whereas no scale score was significantly associated with picture arrangement. The present findings suggest that the positive association between function measured by the PC test and denial function measured by lie and correction scale scores. Further studies are warranted to investigate the usefulness of the PC test for the measurement of denial function in schizophrenia.

  12. Serious problems with the Mexican norms for the WAIS-III when assessing mental retardation in capital cases.

    PubMed

    Suen, Hoi K; Greenspan, Stephen

    2009-07-01

    A Spanish-language translation of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III), normed in Mexico, is sometimes used when evaluating Spanish-speaking defendants in capital cases in order to diagnose possible mental retardation (MR). Although the manual for the Mexican test suggests use of the U.S. norms when diagnosing MR, the Mexican norms-which produce full-scale scores on average 12 points higher-are sometimes used for reasons that are similar to those used by proponents for "race-norming" in special education. Such an argument assumes, however, that the Mexican WAIS-III norms are valid. In this paper, we examined the validity of the Mexican WAIS-III norms and found six very serious problems with those norms: (1) extremely poor reliability, (2) lack of a meaningful reference population, (3) lack of score normalization, (4) exclusion of certain groups from the standardization sample, (5) use of incorrect statistics and calculations, and (6) incorrect application of the true score confidence interval method. An additional problem is the apparent absence of any social policy consensus within Mexico as to the definition and boundary parameters of MR. Taken together, these concerns lead one to the inescapable conclusion that the Mexican WAIS-III norms are not interpretable and should not be used for any high-stakes purpose, especially one as serious as whether a defendant should qualify for exemption against imposition of the death penalty.

  13. Expanding the Ecological Validity of WAIS-IV and WMS-IV with the Texas Functional Living Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drozdick, Lisa Whipple; Cullum, C. Munro

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of functional status is an important aspect of clinical evaluation. As part of the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV), participants completed the Texas Functional Living Scale (TFLS), a measure of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living. The…

  14. The Distribution of Scaled Scores and Possible Floor Effects on the WISC-III and WAIS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Simon; Wood, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Objective: It has been suggested that, as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III) give a scaled score of one even if a client scores a raw score of zero, these assessments may have a hidden floor effect at low IQ levels. The study looked for…

  15. Malingering in Toxic Exposure. Classification Accuracy of Reliable Digit Span and WAIS-III Digit Span Scaled Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greve, Kevin W.; Springer, Steven; Bianchini, Kevin J.; Black, F. William; Heinly, Matthew T.; Love, Jeffrey M.; Swift, Douglas A.; Ciota, Megan A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the sensitivity and false-positive error rate of reliable digit span (RDS) and the WAIS-III Digit Span (DS) scaled score in persons alleging toxic exposure and determined whether error rates differed from published rates in traumatic brain injury (TBI) and chronic pain (CP). Data were obtained from the files of 123 persons…

  16. Musical ability.

    PubMed

    Sloboda, J

    1993-01-01

    Musical ability is the ability to 'make sense' of music, and develops in most people over the first decade of life through normal enculturation. Whether this ability is developed to a high level usually depends on the decision to start learning a musical instrument, which forces high levels of focused cognitive engagement (practice) with musical materials. Performance ability has both technical and expressive aspects. These aspects are not always developed equally well. Factors contributing to the development of a well-balanced musical performer include (a) lengthy periods of engagement with music through practice and exploration, (b) high levels of material and emotional support from parents and other adults, (c) relationships with early teachers characterized by warmth and mutual liking, and (d) early experiences with music that promote, rather than inhibit, intense sensuous/affective experiences. It is argued that much formal education inhibits the development of musical ability through over-emphasis on assessment, creating performance anxiety, coupled with class and sex stereotyping of approved musical activities. Early free exploration of a medium is a necessity for the development of high levels of musicality.

  17. Validity of WAIS-III performance scale subtests completed with the non-dominant hand.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph J; Tree, Heather A

    2007-01-01

    Many patients with hemiplegia use only the non-dominant hand to complete the WAIS-III. It is not known to what degree this administrative change alters scores on specific subtests. To answer this question, we compared scores on Digit Symbol-Coding, Block Design, Picture Arrangement, Object Assembly, and Symbol Search via standard administration (SA) with scores from non-dominant hand administration (NDA). Fifty-eight college students were assigned to either SA or NDA groups. There were 29 SAs and 29 NDAs with means for age of 19.48 years (SD=1.15) and 25.68 years (SD=7.46). Relative to the SA group, the average Digit Symbol-Coding and Symbol Search scores were reduced by 4.04 and 1.62 points by NDA. Scores on the other subtests were not adversely affected by NDA.

  18. Administration frequencies of WAIS-III supplementary and optional subtests of board-certified clinical neuropsychologists.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph J; Glass, Laura A; Tree, Heather A

    2008-01-01

    The present investigation surveyed board-certified clinical neuropsychologists in four geographic regions of the United States regarding their administration practices of the WAIS-III supplementary subtests (Letter-Number Sequencing, Symbol Search), optional subtest (Object Assembly), and optional procedures (Digit Symbol-Incidental Learning and Digit Symbol-Copy). Approximately 56% of the surveys were returned and usable. Regardless of geographic region, Letter-Number Sequencing and Symbol Search were the most popular of the supplementary/optional components because they were administered more than 70% of the time. The Digit Symbol-Incidental Learning and Digit Symbol-Copy procedures were the second most frequently administered tasks. Object Assembly was the least frequently administered component by practitioners across the four geographic regions.

  19. [Short form of the WAIS-III for use with patients with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Fuentes Durá, Inmaculada; Romero Peris, María; Dasí Vivó, Carmen; Ruiz Ruiz, Juan Carlos

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study is to obtain a sufficiently guaranteed, abridged, Spanish version of the WAIS-III and thereby reduce the time needed to administer the complete scale. Although the samples used were based both on normal individuals (41 participants with no known history of mental illness) as well as individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia (41 participants), the real focus of the study was the clinical group because this is where the greatest advantages can be obtained by shortening the time to administer the scale. The data demonstrates that the best combination of tests was: Similarities, Picture Completion, Digit Span and Digit Symbol-coding because, with this reduced form, it was possible to obtain a linear correlation between the IQ of the complete scale and that of the abridged form of .91 in the clinical and .86 in the control group. For both groups, the differences between the real IQ averages and the estimated ones were nonsignificant.

  20. Latent mnemonic strengths are latent: a comment on Mickes, Wixted, and Wais (2007).

    PubMed

    Rouder, Jeffrey N; Pratte, Michael S; Morey, Richard D

    2010-06-01

    Mickes, Wixted, and Wais (2007) proposed a simple test of latent strength variability in recognition memory. They asked participants to rate their confidence using either a 20-point or a 99-point strength scale and plotted distributions of the resulting ratings. They found 25% more variability in ratings for studied than for new items, which they interpreted as providing evidence that latent mnemonic strength distributions are 25% more variable for studied than for new items. We show here that this conclusion is critically dependent on assumptions--so much so that these assumptions determine the conclusions. In fact, opposite conclusions, such that study does not affect the variability of latent strength, may be reached by making different but equally plausible assumptions. Because all measurements of mnemonic strength variability are critically dependent on untestable assumptions, all are arbitrary. Hence, there is no principled method for assessing the relative variability of latent mnemonic strength distributions.

  1. WAIS-III Matrix Reasoning test performance in a mixed clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Dugbartey, A T; Sanchez, P N; Rosenbaum, J G; Mahurin, R K; Davis, J M; Townes, B D

    1999-11-01

    This study examined the relationship between the Matrix Reasoning subtest (MRT) of the WAIS-III and a selected number of neuropsychological tests in a heterogeneous clinical sample of English-speaking American (n = 41), and non-English-speaking immigrant (n = 14) adults. A moderate association between the Halstead Category Test and the MRT (-.58) was found in the English-speaking sample. Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant association between measures of verbal abstract reasoning and verbal fluency, and performance on the MRT. Among the immigrant sample, the MRT was also found to be significantly associated with verbal fluency task performance, as well as with the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence. Correlational analyses therefore suggest a strong verbal mediation element in the MRT, and that labeling it a nonverbal task may be misleading.

  2. Interpretation of VIQ-PIQ and intersubtest differences on the Spanish version of the WAIS.

    PubMed

    Demsky, Y I; Gass, C S; Golden, C J

    1998-03-01

    Although the Spanish version of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS; Escala de Inteligencia Wechsler para Adultos [EIWA]) is the most frequently used intellectual assessment for Spanish speaking clients in the United States, there is little information available on score differences necessary to establish reliable and abnormal differences between Performance IQ (PIQ) and Verbal IQ (VIQ), and between the various subtests of the EIWA. The present study, based on EIWA standardization data (N = 616 Puerto Ricans), reports reliability data and base rates to assist in evaluating the clinical significance of PIQ-VIQ differences. The results demonstrated substantial similarity between the EIWA and the English versions of the Wechsler tests. The interpretation of these differences is discussed, and tables are presented of statistically and clinically significant differences.

  3. Physical properties of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide deep core: Development, evolution, and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fegyveresi, John M.

    The physical properties of the WAIS Divide deep ice core record meteorological conditions during and shortly after deposition, mean temperature during transformation to ice, deformation within the ice, and may retain information on past surface elevations. The WAIS Divide (WDC06A) core was recovered from West Antarctica (79°28.058' S, 112°05.189' W, ˜1760 m elevation, ˜3450 m ice thickness) on the Ross Sea side of the ice-divide with the Amundsen Sea drainage. My observations of the core were supplemented by near-surface studies spanning five consecutive austral summer seasons (2008--2012). Near-surface processes including intense summertime solar heating produce distinct seasonal strata. Prominent "glazed" crusts form very near the surface during times of steep temperature gradients and subsequently develop polygonal cracks, allowing ventilation of deeper firn. The near-surface seasonal contrasts persist to, and beyond the bubble-trapping depth, where they have a weak effect on total trapped air. A new record of total air content also shows that impurities may affect this important parameter, complicating interpretation of past elevation changes. Paleoclimatic interpretation of the number-density of bubbles is extended successfully here through the "brittle ice" zone, providing a record of surface temperature spanning ˜5500 years. This new record reveals relatively stable values through the first half of the interval, with a very-slight warming early, followed by a slight cooling over the most recent two millennia. Bubbles were found to be preferentially elongated parallel to the basal planes of enclosing grains, with less overall elongation of bubbles in grains with lower resolved shear stresses on their basal planes, as expected if grain deformation occurs primarily on basal planes and proportional to the stress.

  4. Investigation of the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV): exploratory and higher order factor analyses.

    PubMed

    Canivez, Gary L; Watkins, Marley W

    2010-12-01

    The present study examined the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV; D. Wechsler, 2008a) standardization sample using exploratory factor analysis, multiple factor extraction criteria, and higher order exploratory factor analysis (J. Schmid & J. M. Leiman, 1957) not included in the WAIS-IV Technical and Interpretation Manual (D. Wechsler, 2008b). Results indicated that the WAIS-IV subtests were properly associated with the theoretically proposed first-order factors, but all but one factor-extraction criterion recommended extraction of one or two factors. Hierarchical exploratory analyses with the Schmid and Leiman procedure found that the second-order g factor accounted for large portions of total and common variance, whereas the four first-order factors accounted for small portions of total and common variance. It was concluded that the WAIS-IV provides strong measurement of general intelligence, and clinical interpretation should be primarily at that level.

  5. Factor structure of the Norwegian version of the WAIS-III in a clinical sample: the arithmetic problem.

    PubMed

    Egeland, Jens; Bosnes, Ole; Johansen, Hans

    2009-09-01

    Confirmatory Factor Analyses (CFA) of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) lend partial support to the four-factor model proposed in the test manual. However, the Arithmetic subtest has been especially difficult to allocate to one factor. Using the new Norwegian WAIS-III version, we tested factor models differing in the number of factors and in the placement of the Arithmetic subtest in a mixed clinical sample (n = 272). Only the four-factor solutions had adequate goodness-of-fit values. Allowing Arithmetic to load on both the Verbal Comprehension and Working Memory factors provided a more parsimonious solution compared to considering the subtest only as a measure of Working Memory. Effects of education were particularly high for both the Verbal Comprehension tests and Arithmetic.

  6. Development and comparison of layer-counted chronologies from the WAIS Divide and EDML ice cores, Antarctica, over the last glacial transition (10-15 ka BP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstrup, Mai; Vinther, Bo M.; Sigl, Michael; McConnell, Joe; Svensson, Anders M.; Wegner, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Some ice cores can be very precisely dated far back in time by counting the annual layering in various impurity records, and the most robust chronologies rely on the parallel analysis of annual features expressed in multiple data sets. Layer-counted Antarctic ice-core chronologies are now emerging: Multi-parameter layer counting has been carried out for the Holocene and late glacial section of the EDML ice core, Dronning Maud Land (Vinther et al., in prep.), and a layer-counted timescale for the WAIS Divide core, West Antarctica, reaching back to 30 kyr BP, was recently completed (WDC06A-7; WAIS Divide Members, 2013). Beyond 24 kyr b2k, the main part of this timescale relies solely on electrical measurements on the core. We here use a novel statistical framework for automated annual layer counting (Winstrup et al., 2012) to extend and improve the two chronologies from EDML and WAIS Divide. Using this method, we have 1) revised the multi-parameter layer counts for the EDML ice core back to 15 kyr BP, and 2) employed high-resolution chemistry measurements from WAIS Divide to obtain a layer-counted multi-parameter timescale for WAIS Divide over the same period (10-15 ka b2k). The EDML and WAIS Divide ice cores have been tightly synchronized using volcanic marker horizons, thus allowing a detailed comparison of annual layer counts between tie points using the various approaches. The corresponding timescales are compared also to the EDML timescale from the flow-model based AICC2012 chronology (Veres, 2012). For the Holocene section of the period (10-11.7 ka BP), all timescales show very good agreement. The peculiar accumulation anomaly observed in the WAIS Divide layer thicknesses in the beginning of the Holocene is confirmed by the multi-parameter layer counts from both WAIS Divide and EDML. The transition into the Holocene has generally proven a difficult period to date by annual layer counting, since the appearance of an annual layer in the various records can change

  7. Smoking is associated with lower performance in WAIS-R Block Design scores in adults with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Katiane L S; Bau, Claiton H D; Grevet, Eugenio H; Sousa, Nyvia O; Garcia, Christiane R; Victor, Marcelo M; Fischer, Aline G; Salgado, Carlos A I; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo

    2008-04-01

    Adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are predisposed to smoking, but the neuropsychological correlates of this association have not been elucidated so far. The present study evaluates possible associations between cognitive performance and smoking and other comorbidities in adults with ADHD. Two hundred and sixty-four (264) patients were evaluated in the adult ADHD outpatient clinic of the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. The diagnoses were based on the DSM-IV criteria and interviews were performed with the Portuguese version of K-SADS-E for ADHD and oppositional-defiant disorder. Axis I psychiatric comorbidities were evaluated with the SCID-IV and the cognitive performance with the Vocabulary and Block Design subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R). The evaluation of the influence of the WAIS-R scores on each dependent variable was performed with logistic regression analyses. Lower scores in the Block Design subtest of WAIS-R were associated with smoking and the presence of anxiety disorder. These results suggest that a subgroup of ADHD patients with lower Block Design subtest scores may be at increased risk of smoking as a cognitive enhancement. Our findings also confirmed the previously suggested association between anxiety and lower Block Design scores.

  8. Estimation of WAIS-III intelligence from combined performance and demographic variables: development of the OPIE-3.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Mike R; Scott, James G; Duff, Kevin; Adams, Russell L

    2002-12-01

    Data from the WAIS-III standardization sample (The Psychological Corporation, 1997) was used to generate several FSIQ estimation formulas that used demographic variables and current WAIS-III subtest performance. The standardization sample (N=2,450) was randomly divided into two groups, the first was used to develop the formulas and the second group was used to validate the prediction equations. Age, education, ethnicity, gender, region of the country as well as Vocabulary, Information, Matrix Reasoning, and Picture Completion subtests raw scores were used as predictor variables. Regression formulas were generated using four subtest, two subtest, single verbal, two performance subtest, and single performance algorithms. The four-subtest model combined Information, Vocabulary, Matrix Reasoning, and Picture Completion raw scores with demographic variables. The two-subtest algorithm used Vocabulary and Matrix Reasoning raw scores with demographic variables. Formulas to estimate FSIQ using only verbal or performance subtests were developed for use with lateralized populations. The formulas for estimating premorbid FSIQ were highly significant and accurate in predicting FSIQ scores of participants in the WAIS-III normative sample.

  9. A confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-III in a clinical sample with crossvalidation in the standardization sample.

    PubMed

    Burton, D Bradley; Ryan, Joseph J; Axelrod, Bradley N; Schellenberger, Tony

    2002-05-01

    A maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) was performed by applying LISREL 8 to a clinical sample (n=328). Analyses were designed to determine which of the nine hypothesized oblique factor solutions could best explain intelligence as measured by the WAIS-III in the general clinical sample. Competing latent variable models were identified in previous studies and a priori model modifications were made to test derivations of the nine base models. Results in the clinical sample were crossvalidated by testing all models in the normative sample used in the standardization of the scale. Findings in both the clinical and standardization samples supported a six-factor model including Semantic Memory, Verbal Reasoning, Constructional Praxis, Visual Reasoning, Working Memory, and Processing Speed factors. Our analysis differed from that presented in the WAIS-III manual as we tested more complex models of intelligence in addition to the ones evaluated by the test publishers. As a result, a six-factor model that corresponded to an expanded version of a model based on Horn's Gf-Gc theory was empirically supported as having the best fit to the data. More complex derivations of this model failed to achieve sufficient goodness of fit.

  10. Author Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diodato, Virgil P.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the effectiveness of using author-supplied indexing to increase subject control in information retrieval, and describes a study which compared author indexing for articles published in "American Mathematical Society" journals to indexing of the same articles by an editor of "Mathematical Reviews." Nine references are…

  11. Demographic adjustments for the Spanish version of the WAIS-III.

    PubMed

    Choca, James P; Krueger, Kristin R; de la Torre, Gabriel G; Corral, S; Garside, Dan

    2009-09-01

    The Spanish version of the third edition of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) by TEA Ediciones is an excellent addition to available instruments for Spanish speakers. The Spanish norms function similarly to US norms for individuals aged 16-35. The norms become increasingly different for individuals 35 and older, seemingly because of the lower levels of formal education of the older Spanish cohorts. Using data from a random half of the Spanish sample, the authors developed regression equations to adjust the scaled scores for individuals with a low level of education. The adjustment is made to the level that would have been expected if the individual had 12 years of education, the median level of education of the US norms. The article includes the methodology and values necessary to make the adjustments. The scaled scores were then adjusted for individuals on the second random half of the Spanish sample and compared to the United States norms. The results showed the adjustments succeed in bringing the Spanish norms closer to the US norms.

  12. Electrical stratigraphy of the WAIS Divide ice core: Identification of centimeter-scale irregular layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fudge, T. J.; Taylor, Kendrick C.; Waddington, Edwin D.; Fitzpatrick, Joan J.; Conway, Howard

    2016-07-01

    Multitrack electrical conductivity measurements imaged a continuous record of the two-dimensional electrical stratigraphy for the deepest 40% of the WAIS Divide ice core (1956 m to 3405 m, 11.5 to 68 ka). The electrical stratigraphy showed clear banding driven primarily by annual variations. Centimeter-scale pinched layers and other irregularities were concentrated between 2700 m and 2900 m (27 ka to 33 ka); below 2900 m, decreasing amplitude of conductance variations likely due to diffusion prevented confident interpretation of both annual and irregular layering. The effective diffusivity at -30°C is 2.2 × 10-8 m2 yr-1, approximately 5 times greater than for self-diffusion of water molecules, implying diffusion at grain boundaries. The irregular layering indicates that the centimeter-scale layering was disturbed in sections even though other records, such as atmospheric methane, indicate meter and larger layering is not compromised. Preservation of irregular layering at deposition is unlikely to be the cause of the identified irregular layering; instead, the irregular layering likely arises from variations in the deformation of ice.

  13. Cortical areas related to performance of WAIS Digit Symbol Test: a functional imaging study.

    PubMed

    Usui, Nobuo; Haji, Tomoki; Maruyama, Masakazu; Katsuyama, Narumi; Uchida, Shinya; Hozawa, Atsushi; Omori, Kahoru; Tsuji, Ichiro; Kawashima, Ryuta; Taira, Masato

    2009-09-29

    Many neuropsychological studies have shown that the Digit Symbol Test (DST) of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) is useful for screening for dysfunctions of the brain. However, it remains unclear which brain areas are actually involved in the performance of DST and what brain functions are used for executing this test. In this study, we examined the cortical areas related to cognitive aspects of DST using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and determined executive brain functions involved in this test on the basis of fMRI results. Eleven healthy young adults (mean=21.6 years) performed a modified DST (mDST) task and its control task, which required a simple graphomotor response during fMRI data acquisition. The direct comparison of brain activations between the mDST task and the control task revealed greater activations in a fronto-parietal cortical network, including the bilateral inferior frontal sulci, left middle frontal gyrus (close to the frontal eye field) and left posterior parietal cortex. These activations are interpreted as reflecting the visual search process and/or the updating process of working memory during the mDST task execution. Furthermore, we found a positive correlation between the number of correct responses and activations in the bilateral inferior frontal regions, suggesting that these prefrontal areas have a crucial role in the performance of DST in a healthy young adult population.

  14. Intrasubtest scatter on the WAIS-III information subtest and psychometrically defined retrieval deficits.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J J; Paul, C A; Arb, J D

    1999-12-01

    Milberg, et al. (1996) postulated that significant intrasubtest scatter on the Wechsler Information subtest reflects impaired retrieval. From a pool of 205 male referrals at a VA medical center with complete WAIS-III and WMS-III protocols, 28 participants with impaired retrieval (Group I) defined by a high Retrieval Composite score were identified. A sample (Group II) without similar evidence of impaired retrieval was matched to Group I on age, education, Full Scale IQ, race, and diagnosis. Intrasubtest scatter on the Information subtest was the same across groups (Group I M = 6.3, SD = 2.7; Group II M = 6.9, SD = 3.4). A second study identified impaired retrieval using the WMS-III Word Lists subtest. 21 participants (Group III) had impaired retrieval indicated by a Recognition scaled score being > or = 4 points higher than the Delayed Recall scaled score. A matched sample (Group IV) of VA patients without similar evidence of impaired retrieval was constituted. Intrasubtest scatter on the Information subtest did not differ across groups (Group III M = 6.6, SD = 2.4; Group IV M = 6.0, SD = 2.5). Evaluations of the retrieval deficit hypothesis should be based on responses of participants whose Information performance is characterized by abnormal amounts of intrasubtest scatter. It is possible that a specific amount of response variability must be present within the subtest before retrieval problems can be detected.

  15. Measuring Working Memory With Digit Span and the Letter-Number Sequencing Subtests From the WAIS-IV: Too Low Manipulation Load and Risk for Underestimating Modality Effects.

    PubMed

    Egeland, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) is one of the most frequently used tests among psychologists. In the fourth edition of the test (WAIS-IV), the subtests Digit Span and Letter-Number Sequencing are expanded for better measurement of working memory (WM). However, it is not clear whether the new extended tasks contribute sufficient complexity to be sensitive measures of manipulation WM, nor do we know to what degree WM capacity differs between the visual and the auditory modality because the WAIS-IV only tests the auditory modality. Performance by a mixed sample of 226 patients referred for neuropsychological examination on the Digit Span and Letter-Number Sequencing subtests from the WAIS-IV and on Spatial Span from the Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition was analyzed in two confirmatory factor analyses to investigate whether a unitary WM model or divisions based on modality or level/complexity best fit the data. The modality model showed the best fit when analyzing summed scores for each task as well as scores for the longest span. The clinician is advised to apply tests with higher manipulation load and to consider testing visual span as well before drawing conclusions about impaired WM from the WAIS-IV.

  16. The National Adult Reading Test: restandardisation against the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth edition.

    PubMed

    Bright, Peter; Hale, Emily; Gooch, Vikki Jayne; Myhill, Thomas; van der Linde, Ian

    2016-09-14

    Since publication in 1982, the 50-item National Adult Reading Test (NART; Nelson, 1982 ; NART-R; Nelson & Willison, 1991 ) has remained a widely adopted method for estimating premorbid intelligence both for clinical and research purposes. However, the NART has not been standardised against the most recent revisions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III; Wechsler, 1997 , and WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008 ). Our objective, therefore, was to produce reliable standardised estimates of WAIS-IV IQ from the NART. Ninety-two neurologically healthy British adults were assessed and regression equations calculated to produce population estimates of WAIS-IV full-scale IQ (FSIQ) and constituent index scores. Results showed strong NART/WAIS-IV FSIQ correlations with more moderate correlations observed between NART error and constituent index scores. FSIQ estimates were closely similar to the published WAIS and WAIS-R estimates at the high end of the distribution, but at the lower end were approximately equidistant from the highly discrepant WAIS (low) and WAIS-R (high) values. We conclude that the NART is likely to remain an important tool for estimating the impact of neurological damage on general cognitive ability. We advise caution in the use of older published WAIS and/or WAIS-R estimates for estimating premorbid WAIS-IV FSIQ, particularly for those with low NART scores.

  17. The Vocational Commitment Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Susan F.; Hubbard, Constance F.

    1973-01-01

    The Index is the result of an effort made to examine all components of vocational commitment and to translate this information into an instrument which could be used to assess the relationship of an individual to a vocation.. The predictive ability of the 74-item device requires further research. (Author/AG)

  18. Socio-economic, health and nutritional status of the villagers in the Nong Wai irrigation area, Khon Kaen, Northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Harinasuta, C; Sornamani, S; Migasena, P; Vivatanasesth, P; Pongpaew, P; Intarakao, C; Vudhivai, N

    1976-12-01

    Studies were carried out from June 1974 to May 1975 on the socio-economic status, health and nutritional status of the people in 4 villages, in the irrigation area of the Nong Wai Pioneer Agricultural Project of Khon Kaen Province, Northeast Thailand. The result obtained were compared with those in 2 non-irrigated villages in the same province, in order to identify the health and nutritional problems which might arise during the water resource development in the irrigation area. It was found that in the irrigated villages 90% of the peoples were farmers, while in the non-irrigated villages all were farmers. The socio-economic status of the people in the irrigated villages was much better than those in the non-irrigated ones. The income per family in the former was about three times greater than that in the latter. In the study of the health conditions of the villagers, the vulnerable age group including pre-school children under 7 years of age and school children in the elementary school class 1 and class 2, aged 7-9 years old, served as subjects for investigation. Haematological and physical examinations revealed many children with mild to moderate anaemia, vitamin B2 deficiency and a few cases of hepatomegaly. Anaemic children were found to be more prevalent in the non-irrigated villages than in the irrigated area. The overall parasitic infection rates in children in the irrigated and non-irrigated villages were similar with respect to severity of the infection. Hookworm infection, opisthorchiasis, strongyloidiasis and giardiasis were the leading parasitic infections, while amoebiasis was rare. Ascariasis and trichuriasis were not found. However, the first two helminthic infections had a low grade of intensity. The nutritional status of pre-school children, showed that there were more children with good growth in the irrigated villages than in the non-irrigated one. Serum proteins, albumin and globulin, and urinary urea nitrogen-creatinine ratio revealed normal

  19. Effects of Surface-Water Diversion on Streamflow, Recharge, Physical Habitat, and Temperature, Na Wai `Eha, Maui, Hawai`i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.; Wolff, Reuben H.; Perreault, Jeff A.

    2010-01-01

    The perennial flow provided by Waihe‘e River, Waiehu Stream, ‘Īao Stream, and Waikapū Stream, collectively known as Nā Wai ‘Ehā (“The Four Streams”), made it possible for widespread agricultural activities to flourish in the eastern part of West Maui, Hawai‘i. The streams of the Nā Wai ‘Ehā area flow in their upper reaches even during extended dry-weather conditions because of persistent groundwater discharge to the streams. Overall, the lower reaches of these streams lose water, which may contribute to groundwater recharge. During climate years 1984–2007 (when complete streamflow records were available for Waihe‘e River and ‘Īao Stream), Waihe‘e River had the greatest median flow of the four streams upstream of the uppermost diversion on each stream. The median flows, in million gallons per day, during climate years 1984–2007 were: 34 for Waihe‘e River near an altitude of 605 feet; 25 for ‘Īao Stream near an altitude of 780 feet; and estimated to be 4.3 for Waikapū Stream near an altitude of 1,160 feet; 3.2 for North Waiehu Stream near an altitude of 880 feet; and 3.2 for South Waiehu Stream near an altitude of 870 feet. Existing stream diversions in the Nā Wai ‘Ehā area have a combined capacity exceeding at least 75 million gallons per day and are capable of diverting all or nearly all of the dry-weather flows of these streams, leaving some downstream reaches dry. Hourly photographs collected during 2006–2008 indicate that some stream reaches downstream of diversions are dry more than 50 percent of the time. Many of these reaches would be perennial or nearly perennial in the absence of diversions.

  20. Millennial and Sub-millennial Variability of Total Air Content from the WAIS Divide Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Jon; Brook, Edward; Fegyveresi, John; Lee, James; Mitchell, Logan; Sowers, Todd; Alley, Richard; McConnell, Joe; Severinghaus, Jeff; Baggenstos, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of ancient air bubbles trapped in ice is integral to the reconstruction of climate over the last 800 ka. While mixing ratios of greenhouse gases along with isotopic ratios are being studied in ever increasing resolution, one aspect of the gas record that continues to be understudied is the total air content (TAC) of the trapped bubbles. Published records of TAC are often too low in temporal resolution to adequately capture sub-millennial scale variability. Here we present a high-resolution TAC record (10-50 year sampling resolution) from the WAIS Divide ice core, measured at Oregon State and Penn State Universities. The records cover a variety of climatic conditions over the last 56 ka and show millennial variability of up to 10% and sub-millennial variability between 2.5 and 3.5%. We find that using the pore close off volume parameterization (Delomotte et al., J. Glaciology, 1999, v.45), along with the site temperature derived from isotopes, our TAC record implies unrealistically large changes in surface pressure or elevation. For example, the TAC decreases by ~10% between 19.5ka and 17.3ka, and would imply an elevation increase of nearly 800m. The total accumulation of ice over this period is just 280m (Fudge et al. Nature 2013), making the calculated elevation interpretation implausible. To resolve this discrepancy, we investigate the millennial and sub-millennial variability in our TAC record as a function of changes in firn densification and particularly layering. The firn is the uppermost layer of an ice sheet where snow is compressed into ice, trapping ancient air. Thus firn processes are important for the interpretation of total air content as well as other gas records. We compare our TAC record with proxies for dust, temperature and accumulation to determine how processes other than elevation affect TAC.

  1. Lack of Correlation of WAIS Digit Span with Clox 1 and the Dementia Rating Scale in MCI.

    PubMed

    Lortie, Jevin Jay; Remington, Ruth; Hoffmann, Heather; Shea, Thomas B

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with MCI declined in performance over 6 months in the Clock-drawing (Clox 1) and the WAIS Digit Span tests, but not in the Dementia Rating Scale (DRS). Individual performance on Clox 1 and Digit Span did not correlate after 6 months. Performance on the Digit Span Test also did not correlate with the DRS, but performance on Clox 1 correlated with the DRS. Performance in Clox 1 was, therefore, not a predictor of performance in the Digit Span Test. These findings support the use of a test battery containing the Digit Span test to detect and track cognitive decline in MCI.

  2. Characterization of Deep Internal Layers and Basal Conditions Around the WAIS Divide Drill Site by Surface-Based Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, C. M.; Blake, W. A.; Gogineni, P. S.; Allen, C. T.; Leuschen, C. J.; Braaten, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    We used an ultra-wideband, very high frequency (120 to 300 MHz) surface-based radar to simultaneously map ice thickness, deep internal layers and the ice-bed interface around the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide deep drill site at a fine resolution. The radar was built by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) as part of the Polar Radar for Ice Sheet Measurements (PRISM) project with the main goal of developing and testing surface-operated radars to characterize ice thickness and bedrock conditions in Antarctica and Greenland. The system was fine-tuned in the field to a center frequency of 150 MHz with a bandwidth of 20 MHz to produce greater sensitivity. The survey covered a 30 km by 8 km area with 1-km line spacing along a polar stereographic grid that overlapped both the drill site and the WAIS Divide. The data have been processed for general use and are available on the CReSIS website (www.cresis.ku.edu). Echograms and digital ice thickness, bed elevation and bed reflectivity maps have been produced while analysis continues. Our major findings to date include: 1) internal layers are observed nearly continuously to 2800 m depth, as much as 500 m below the deepest previously mapped layers in this region, 2) internal layers have been detected to within 350 m of the bed, covering about 90% of the ice thickness, 3) ice thickness varies between approximately 3100 m and 3550 m over the grid and is about 3500 m at the drill site, 4) basal returns were mapped nearly continuously along grid lines and vary by more than 30 dB, indicating a wet bed at the drill site and frozen conditions elsewhere. The data will aid rigorous interpretations of the WAIS ice cores (including impurity records and the depth/age scale) and the morphology and evolution of the WAIS (mean annual accumulation rates, spatial extent, divide migration and volcanism). Fine-resolution information on deep internal layers, basal conditions and ice thickness/bed elevation will help

  3. WAIS-IV administration errors: effects of altered response requirements on Symbol Search and violation of standard surface-variety patterns on Block Design.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph J; Swopes-Willhite, Nicole; Franklin, Cassi; Kreiner, David S

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized a sample of 50 college students to assess the possibility that responding to the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) Symbol Search subtest items with an "x" instead of a "single slash mark" would affect performance. A second sample of 50 college students was used to assess the impact on WAIS-IV Block Design performance of presenting all the items with only red surfaces facing up. The modified Symbol Search and Block Design administrations yielded mean scaled scores and raw scores that did not differ significantly from mean scores obtained with standard administrations. Findings should not be generalized beyond healthy, well-educated young adults.

  4. An evaluation of the clinical utility of the OPIE-3 as an estimate of premorbid WAIS-III FSIQ.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Mike R; Duff, Kevin; Scott, James G; Adams, Russell L

    2003-08-01

    The clinical utility of the Oklahoma Premorbid Intelligence Estimate--3 (OPIE-3; Schoenberg, Scott, Duff, & Adams, 2002) in estimating premorbid FSIQ was investigated with the WAIS-III standardization sample. The OPIE-3 algorithms combine Vocabulary, Information, Matrix Reasoning, and Picture Completion subtest raw scores with demographic variables to predict FSIQ. Estimated WAIS-III FSIQ scores are presented for patients' diagnosed with dementia, traumatic brain injury, Huntington's disease, Korsakoff's disease, chronic alcohol use, temporal lobectomy, and schizophrenia. A group of patients with depression was employed as a clinical control group. The OPIE-3V and OPIE-3MR algorithms performed well, with the average predicted FSIQ of the combined clinical sample approximating the mean FSIQ of healthy adults. The OPIE-3(Best), which is a procedure that employs either the OPIE-3V, OPIE-3MR, or OPIE-3(2ST) algorithms in a best performance method, is presented. Recommendations in the application of the OPIE-3 are made and future research is proposed.

  5. The WAIS Divide deep ice core WD2014 chronology - Part 2: Annual-layer counting (0-31 ka BP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigl, M.; Fudge, T. J.; Winstrup, M.; Cole-Dai, J.; Ferris, D.; McConnell, J. R.; Taylor, K. C.; Welten, K. C.; Woodruff, T. E.; Adolphi, F.; Bisiaux, M.; Brook, E. J.; Buizert, C.; Caffee, M. W.; Dunbar, N. W.; Edwards, R.; Geng, L.; Iverson, N.; Koffman, B.; Layman, L.; Maselli, O. J.; McGwire, K.; Muscheler, R.; Nishiizumi, K.; Pasteris, D. R.; Rhodes, R. H.; Sowers, T. A.

    2015-07-01

    We present the WD2014 chronology for the upper part (0-2850 m, 31.2 ka BP) of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide ice core. The chronology is based on counting of annual layers observed in the chemical, dust and electrical conductivity records. These layers are caused by seasonal changes in the source, transport, and deposition of aerosols. The measurements were interpreted manually and with the aid of two automated methods. We validated the chronology by comparing to two high-accuracy, absolutely dated chronologies. For the Holocene, the cosmogenic isotope records of 10Be from WAIS Divide and 14C for Intcal13 demonstrated WD2014 was consistently accurate to better than 0.5 % of the age. For the glacial period, comparisons to the Hulu Cave chronology demonstrated WD2014 had an accuracy of better than 1 % of the age at three abrupt climate change events between 27 and 31 ka. WD2014 has consistently younger ages than Greenland ice-core chronologies during most of the Holocene. For the Younger Dryas-Preboreal transition (11 546 ka BP, 24 years younger) and the Bølling-Allerød Warming (14 576 ka, 7 years younger) WD2014 ages are within the combined uncertainties of the timescales. Given its high accuracy, WD2014 can become a reference chronology for the Southern Hemisphere, with synchronization to other chronologies feasible using high quality proxies of volcanism, solar activity, atmospheric mineral dust, and atmospheric methane concentrations.

  6. The WAIS Divide deep ice core WD2014 chronology - Part 2: Annual-layer counting (0-31 ka BP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigl, Michael; Fudge, Tyler J.; Winstrup, Mai; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Ferris, David; McConnell, Joseph R.; Taylor, Ken C.; Welten, Kees C.; Woodruff, Thomas E.; Adolphi, Florian; Bisiaux, Marion; Brook, Edward J.; Buizert, Christo; Caffee, Marc W.; Dunbar, Nelia W.; Edwards, Ross; Geng, Lei; Iverson, Nels; Koffman, Bess; Layman, Lawrence; Maselli, Olivia J.; McGwire, Kenneth; Muscheler, Raimund; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Pasteris, Daniel R.; Rhodes, Rachael H.; Sowers, Todd A.

    2016-03-01

    We present the WD2014 chronology for the upper part (0-2850 m; 31.2 ka BP) of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide (WD) ice core. The chronology is based on counting of annual layers observed in the chemical, dust and electrical conductivity records. These layers are caused by seasonal changes in the source, transport, and deposition of aerosols. The measurements were interpreted manually and with the aid of two automated methods. We validated the chronology by comparing to two high-accuracy, absolutely dated chronologies. For the Holocene, the cosmogenic isotope records of 10Be from WAIS Divide and 14C for IntCal13 demonstrated that WD2014 was consistently accurate to better than 0.5 % of the age. For the glacial period, comparisons to the Hulu Cave chronology demonstrated that WD2014 had an accuracy of better than 1 % of the age at three abrupt climate change events between 27 and 31 ka. WD2014 has consistently younger ages than Greenland ice core chronologies during most of the Holocene. For the Younger Dryas-Preboreal transition (11.595 ka; 24 years younger) and the Bølling-Allerød Warming (14.621 ka; 7 years younger), WD2014 ages are within the combined uncertainties of the timescales. Given its high accuracy, WD2014 can become a reference chronology for the Southern Hemisphere, with synchronization to other chronologies feasible using high-quality proxies of volcanism, solar activity, atmospheric mineral dust, and atmospheric methane concentrations.

  7. Late-Holocene climate evolution at the WAIS Divide site, West Antarctica: Bubble number-density estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fegyveresi, John M.; Alley, R.B.; Spencer, M.K.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.; Steig, E.J.; White, J.W.C.; McConnell, J.R.; Taylor, K.C.

    2011-01-01

    A surface cooling of ???1.7??C occurred over the ???two millennia prior to ???1700 CE at the West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) Divide site, based on trends in observed bubble number-density of samples from the WDC06A ice core, and on an independently constructed accumulation-rate history using annual-layer dating corrected for density variations and thinning from ice flow. Density increase and grain growth in polar firn are both controlled by temperature and accumulation rate, and the integrated effects are recorded in the number-density of bubbles as the firn changes to ice. Numberdensity is conserved in bubbly ice following pore close-off, allowing reconstruction of either paleotemperature or paleo-accumulation rate if the other is known. A quantitative late-Holocene paleoclimate reconstruction is presented for West Antarctica using data obtained from the WAIS Divide WDC06A ice core and a steady-state bubble number-density model. The resultant temperature history agrees closely with independent reconstructions based on stable-isotopic ratios of ice. The ???1.7??C cooling trend observed is consistent with a decrease in Antarctic summer duration from changing orbital obliquity, although it remains possible that elevation change at the site contributed part of the signal. Accumulation rate and temperature dropped together, broadly consistent with control by saturation vapor pressure.

  8. Five millennia of surface temperatures and ice core bubble characteristics from the WAIS Divide deep core, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fegyveresi, John M.; Alley, Richard B.; Fitzpatrick, Joan J.; Cuffey, Kurt M.; McConnell, Joseph R.; Voigt, Donald E.; Spencer, Matthew K.; Stevens, Nathan T.

    2016-03-01

    Bubble number densities from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide deep core in West Antarctica record relatively stable temperatures during the middle Holocene followed by late Holocene cooling. We measured bubble number density, shape, size, and arrangement on new samples of the main WAIS Divide deep core WDC06A from ~580 m to ~1600 depth. The bubble size, shape, and arrangement data confirm that the samples satisfy the requirements for temperature reconstructions. A small correction for cracks formed after core recovery allows extension of earlier work through the "brittle ice" zone, and a site-specific calibration reduces uncertainties. Using an independently constructed accumulation rate history and a steady state bubble number density model, we determined a temperature reconstruction that agrees closely with other independent estimates, showing a stable middle Holocene, followed by a cooling of ~1.25°C in the late Holocene. Over the last ~5 millennia, accumulation has been higher during warmer times by ~12%°C-1, somewhat stronger than for thermodynamic control alone, suggesting dynamic processes.

  9. Adult Dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder in Finland--Project DyAdd: WAIS-III cognitive profiles.

    PubMed

    Laasonen, Marja; Leppämäki, Sami; Tani, Pekka; Hokkanen, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The project Adult Dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder in Finland (Project DyAdd) compares adults (n = 119, 18-55 years) with dyslexia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyslexia together with ADHD (comorbid), and healthy controls with neuropsychological, psychophysical, and biological methods. The focus of this article is on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III). The clinical groups performed well compared to the norms, and they did not differ from each other. However, compared to the controls, all of them were slightly poorer in their Full IQ, and of the factors, processing speed was relatively difficult for all of them. In addition to the group comparisons, a cluster analysis based on subtest scores was conducted over the clinical groups. It did not suggest a solution that would differentiate between the clinical groups. Instead, four clusters emerged: above average, average, poor perceptual organization, and poor working memory. Thus, differentiating between these clinical groups with the WAIS-III was not possible. However, all of them shared a relative difficulty in processing speed, and group-independent clusters with perceptual or memory difficulties emerged.

  10. Discrepancies between bilinguals' performance on the Spanish and English versions of the WAIS Digit Span task: Cross-cultural implications.

    PubMed

    López, Enrique; Steiner, Alexander J; Hardy, David J; IsHak, Waguih W; Anderson, W Brantley

    2016-01-01

    This study explored within-subjects differences in the performance of 40 bilingual participants on the English and Spanish versions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Digit Span task. To test the linguistic hypothesis that individuals would perform worse in Spanish because of its syllabic demand, we compared the number of syllables correctly recalled by each participant for every correct trial. Our analysis of the correct number of syllables remembered per trial showed that participants performed significantly better (i.e., recalling more syllables) in Spanish than in English on the total score. Findings suggest the Spanish version of the Digit Span (total score) was significantly more difficult than the English version utilizing traditional scoring methods. Moreover, the Forward Trial, rather than the Backward Trial, was more likely to show group differences between both language versions. Additionally, the Spanish trials of the Digit Span were correlated with language comprehension and verbal episodic memory measures, whereas the English trials of the Digit Span were correlated with confrontational naming and verbal fluency tasks. The results suggest that more research is necessary to further investigate other cognitive factors, rather than just syllabic demand, that might contribute to performance and outcome differences on the WAIS Digit Span in Spanish-English bilinguals.

  11. Multi-Group Covariance and Mean Structure Modeling of the Relationship between the WAIS-III Common Factors and Sex and Educational Attainment in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Conor V.; Colom, Roberto; Abad, Francisco J.; Wicherts, Jelte M.; Hessen, David J.; van de Sluis, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    We investigated sex effects and the effects of educational attainment (EA) on the covariance structure of the WAIS-III in a subsample of the Spanish standardization data. We fitted both first order common factor models and second order common factor models. The latter include general intelligence ("g") as a second order common factor.…

  12. Complete Genome Sequences of Caldicellulosiruptor sp. Strain Rt8.B8, Caldicellulosiruptor sp. Strain Wai35.B1, and "Thermoanaerobacter cellulolyticus".

    PubMed

    Lee, Laura L; Izquierdo, Javier A; Blumer-Schuette, Sara E; Zurawski, Jeffrey V; Conway, Jonathan M; Cottingham, Robert W; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, I-Min A; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Shapiro, Nicole; Nordberg, Henrik P; Cantor, Michael N; Hua, Susan X; Woyke, Tanja; Kelly, Robert M

    2015-05-14

    The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacteria capable of lignocellulose deconstruction. Currently, complete genome sequences for eleven Caldicellulosiruptor species are available. Here, we report genome sequences for three additional Caldicellulosiruptor species: Rt8.B8 DSM 8990 (New Zealand), Wai35.B1 DSM 8977 (New Zealand), and "Thermoanaerobacter cellulolyticus" strain NA10 DSM 8991 (Japan).

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of Caldicellulosiruptor sp. Strain Rt8.B8, Caldicellulosiruptor sp. Strain Wai35.B1, and “Thermoanaerobacter cellulolyticus”

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Laura L.; Izquierdo, Javier A.; Blumer-Schuette, Sara E.; Zurawski, Jeffrey V.; Conway, Jonathan M.; Cottingham, Robert W.; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, I-Min A.; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T.B.K.; Shapiro, Nicole; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Cantor, Michael N.; Hua, Susan X.; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacteria capable of lignocellulose deconstruction. Currently, complete genome sequences for eleven Caldicellulosiruptor species are available. Here, we report genome sequences for three additional Caldicellulosiruptor species: Rt8.B8 DSM 8990 (New Zealand), Wai35.B1 DSM 8977 (New Zealand), and “Thermoanaerobacter cellulolyticus” strain NA10 DSM 8991 (Japan). PMID:25977428

  14. Exploratory and Higher-Order Factor Analyses of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) Adolescent Subsample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canivez, Gary L.; Watkins, Marley W.

    2010-01-01

    The factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008a) with the adolescent participants (ages 16-19 years; N = 400) in the standardization sample was assessed using exploratory factor analysis, multiple factor extraction criteria, and higher-order exploratory factor analyses. Results from…

  15. Advanced Clinical Interpretation of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV: Prevalence of Low Scores Varies by Level of Intelligence and Years of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Brian L.; Holdnack, James A.; Iverson, Grant L.

    2011-01-01

    Clinicians can use the base rates of low scores in healthy people to reduce the likelihood of misdiagnosing cognitive impairment. In the present study, base rates were developed for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV) using 900 healthy adults and validated on 28 patients…

  16. Cognitive Profiles of Adults with Asperger's Disorder, High-Functioning Autism, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified Based on the WAIS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanai, Chieko; Tani, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro; Yamada, Takashi; Ota, Haruhisa; Watanabe, Hiromi; Iwanami, Akira; Kato, Nobumasa

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the cognitive profiles of high-functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) in adults based on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale III (WAIS-III). We examined cognitive profiles of adults with no intellectual disability (IQ greater than 70), and in adults with Asperger's disorder (AS; n = 47), high-functioning autism (HFA;…

  17. Could test length or order affect scores on letter number sequencing of the WAIS-III and WMS-III? Ruling out effects of fatigue.

    PubMed

    Tulsky, D S; Zhu, J

    2000-11-01

    The Letter Number Sequencing subtest of the WAIS-III and WMS-III was administered at the end of the standardization edition of the WMS-III. It was not administered as part of the WAIS-III standardization battery. Nevertheless, the subtest was included in the published version of the WAIS-III. This study examines differences between examinees administered the Letter Number Sequencing subtest at three different times during a psychological battery: (1) as part of the published battery, (2) as part of the WMS-III when the WMS-III was administered as the first test in a sequence, and (3) as part of the WMS-III standardization when the WAIS-III was administered immediately preceding the WMS-III. The participants were 372 examinees ( n = 124 in each condition) who were matched on key demographic variables. A repeated measures MANOVA yielded no difference in subtest scores when administered in any of these conditions. The results show no evidence of fatigue or ordering effects on the Letter Number Sequencing subtest.

  18. Adult Life-Span Patterns in WAIS-R Block Design Performance: Cross-Sectional versus Longitudinal Age Gradients and Relations to Demographic Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronnlund, Michael; Nilsson, Lars-Goran

    2006-01-01

    Aging patterns in WAIS-R Block Design Test (BDT) were examined cross-sectionally and longitudinally. One sample (35-80 years, n=1000) was assessed in 1988-1990 and five years later (836 returned). An independent cohort-matched sample (n=974) was assessed at Time 2 to control for practice effects. Relations between BDT, gender, and education were…

  19. Effects on WAIS-III Performance IQ (PIQ) and Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) When Object Assembly Is Substituted for Each Standard Performance Scale Subtest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joseph J.; Morris, Jeri; Brown, Kristina I.; Glass, Laura A.

    2006-01-01

    According to the "WAIS-III Administration and Scoring Manual," Object Assembly (OA) may be substituted for any spoiled Performance subtest. This assertion has not been evaluated in a clinical sample. The present investigation reports differences that resulted in Performance IQ (PIQ) and Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) when OA replaced each of the Performance…

  20. WAIS-IV and WISC-IV Structural Validity: Alternate Methods, Alternate Results. Commentary on Weiss et al. (2013a) and Weiss et al. (2013b)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canivez, Gary L.; Kush, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Weiss, Keith, Zhu, and Chen (2013a) and Weiss, Keith, Zhu, and Chen (2013b), this issue, report examinations of the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV), respectively; comparing Wechsler Hierarchical Model (W-HM) and…

  1. Norm Comparisons of the Spanish-language and English-language WAIS-III: Implications for Clinical Assessment and Test Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Funes, Cynthia M.; Rodriguez, Juventino Hernandez; Lopez, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a systematic comparison of the norms of three Spanish-language WAIS-III batteries from Mexico, Spain and Puerto Rico, and the US English-language WAIS-III battery. Specifically, we examined the performance of the four normative samples on two identical subtests (Digit Span and Digit Symbol-Coding) and one nearly identical subtest (Block Design). We found that across most age groups the means associated with the Spanish-language versions of the three subtests were lower than the means of the US English-language version. In addition, we found that for most age ranges the Mexican subsamples scored lower than the Spanish subsamples. Lower educational levels of Mexicans and Spaniards compared to US residents are consistent with the general pattern of findings. These results suggest that because of the different norms, applying any of the three Spanish-language versions of the WAIS-III generally risks underestimating deficits, and that applying the English-language WAIS-III norms risks overestimating deficits of Spanish-speaking adults. There were a few exceptions to these general patterns. For example, the Mexican subsample aged 70 and above performed significantly better on the Digit Symbol and Block Design than the US and Spanish subsamples. Implications for the clinical assessment of US Spanish-speaking Latinos and test adaptation are discussed with an eye toward improving the clinical care for this community. PMID:26950442

  2. Impaired Picture Arrangement subscores (WAIS-III) associated with decreased place orientation and frontal/occipital blood flow in Alzheimer's disease: Implications for social judgment dysfunction. The Osaki-Tajiri Project.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuka; Meguro, Kenichi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kei; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi

    2016-10-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients manifest not only memory impairment but also deficit of social judgment. However, contrary to frequently recognized deficit, only two neuropsychological tests have been established for assessing "judgment" : the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument domain Abstraction & judgment and the Picture Arrangement subscale of WAIS-III. For the former, we previously reported an association with decreased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the left parietal lobe. Herein, we analyzed the scores of the Picture Arrangement test. Forty-nine AD patients were classified into two groups, i.e., the high and low PA score groups. The (99m)Tc-ECD SPECT investigation was performed with the voxel-based analysis using SPM5. The Mini-Mental State Examination subscores of "place orientation" showed a correlation with the PA scores. The low PA score group exhibited significantly decreased rCBFs in the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus (LIFG), Left Superior Frontal Gyrus (LSFG) and Right Occipital Lobe (ROL), compared with the high PA score group. The ability of PA may be associated with the place orientation, which may be necessary to re-arrange the pictures. The ROL was related to visual recognition. The LSFG may be involved in executive function or "frontal reasoning."

  3. A Prediction of Increase in Subglacial Volcanism Beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) as Future Deglaciation Caused by Ocean Circulation Proceeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.; LeMasurier, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    Many decades of aeromagnetic surveying (e.g. Behrendt, 1964; 2013; and others) over the West Antarctic Ice sheet (WAIS) have shown >1000 high amplitude, shallow source magnetic anomalies interpreted as as indicating subglacial volcanic centers of late Cenozoic age to presently active. Similar anomalies exist over exposed volcanic rocks bordering the WAIS in places.Recent papers (e.g. Wouters et al., 2015; Paolo, et al.; 2015 and others) based on satellite altimetry have shown dramatic thinning and retreat of ice shelves, particularly those bordering the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, caused by melting from circulation of warming sea water. Previous workers have shown that when ice shelves collapse, the ice streams previously dammed by them accelerate an order of magnitude higher velocity, and surface elevation decreases. GRACE satellite interpretations (e.g. Velicogna et al., and others) indicate mass loss of WAIS in recent years.The bed elevation beneath the WAIS deepens inland from the Amundsen and Bellingshausen coasts, although high relief volcanic topography is present in a number of areas beneath the ice.Crowley et a. (2015) have shown that glacial cycles may drive production of oceanic crust by lowering pressure in the mantle resulting in increased melting and magma production. Increased volcanism due to deglaciation in Iceland has apparently produced increased in volcanic activity there. Deglaciation of the Norwegian continental shelf has resulted in faulting of the sea floor and similar faulting has been reported of the Ross Sea shelf following deglaciation there.I suggest here that as the WAIS collapses in the future resulting from climate change, an increase in volcanic activity beneath the ice might be expected. This may provide a feedback mechanism for increase in ice melting.

  4. Neurophysiological measures of working memory and individual differences in cognitive ability and cognitive style.

    PubMed

    Gevins, A; Smith, M E

    2000-09-01

    The capacity to deliberately control attention in order to hold and manipulate information in working memory is critical to higher cognitive functions. This suggests that between-subject differences in general cognitive ability might be related to observable differences in the activity of brain systems that support working memory and attention control. To test this notion, electroencephalograms were recorded from 80 healthy young adults during spatial working memory tasks. Measures of task-related neurophysiological and behavioral variables were derived from these data and compared to scores on a test battery commonly used to assess general cognitive ability (the WAIS-R). Subjects who scored high on the psychometric test also tended to respond faster in the experimental tasks without any loss of accuracy. The amplitude of the late positive component of the event-related potential was larger in high-ability subjects, and the frontal midline theta component of the EEG signal was also selectively enhanced in this group under conditions of sustained performance and high working memory load. These results suggest that subjects who scored high on the WAIS-R were better able to focus and sustain attention to task performance. Changes in the EEG alpha rhythm in response to manipulations of task practice and load were also examined and compared between frontal and parietal regions. The results indicated that high-ability subjects developed strategies that made relatively greater use of parietal regions, whereas low-ability subjects relied more exclusively on frontal regions. Other analyses indicated that hemispheric asymmetries in alpha band measures distinguish between individuals with relatively high verbal aptitude and those with relatively high nonverbal aptitude. In particular, subjects with a verbal cognitive style tended to make greater use of the left parietal region during task performance, and subjects with a nonverbal style tended to make greater use of the right

  5. INDEXING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Kock, L.J.

    1959-09-22

    A device is presented for loading and unloading fuel elements containing material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy. The device comprises a combination of mechanical features Including a base, a lever pivotally attached to the base, an Indexing plate on the base parallel to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed In rows, each aperture having a keyway, an Index pin movably disposed to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed in rows, each aperture having a keyway, an index pin movably disposed on the lever normal to the plane rotation, a key on the pin, a sleeve on the lever spaced from and parallel to the index pin, a pair of pulleys and a cable disposed between them, an open collar rotatably attached to the sleeve and linked to one of the pulleys, a pin extending from the collar, and a bearing movably mounted in the sleeve and having at least two longitudinal grooves in the outside surface.

  6. A Comparison Study of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised in a College Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, R. Spencer

    1983-01-01

    Compared the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) and the WAIS-Revised (WAIS-R) in a sample of college students (N=70). A highly significant test order interaction was found. The WAIS-R will result in significantly higher ability estimates when administered following the WAIS than the WAIS will when following the WAIS-R. (JAC)

  7. Malingering in toxic exposure: classification accuracy of reliable digit span and WAIS-III Digit Span scaled scores.

    PubMed

    Greve, Kevin W; Springer, Steven; Bianchini, Kevin J; Black, F William; Heinly, Matthew T; Love, Jeffrey M; Swift, Douglas A; Ciota, Megan A

    2007-03-01

    This study examined the sensitivity and false-positive error rate of reliable digit span (RDS) and the WAIS-III Digit Span (DS) scaled score in persons alleging toxic exposure and determined whether error rates differed from published rates in traumatic brain injury (TBI) and chronic pain (CP). Data were obtained from the files of 123 persons referred for neuropsychological evaluation related to alleged exposure to environmental and industrial substances. Malingering status was determined using the criteria of Slick, Sherman, and Iverson (1999). The sensitivity and specificity of RDS and DS in toxic exposure are consistent with those observed in TBI and CP. These findings support the use of these malingering indicators in cases of alleged toxic exposure and suggest that the classification accuracy data of indicators derived from studies of TBI patients may also be validly applied to cases of alleged toxic exposure.

  8. A cross-cultural study with culture fair normative indications on WAIS-III Digit Symbol-Incidental Learning.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth-Edwards, Ann B; Donnelly, Martin J R; Reid, Iain; Radloff, Sarah E

    2004-10-01

    The WAIS-III Digit Symbol-Incidental Learning optional procedure, including Pairing and Free Recall, was administered to a southern African sample (N=68, age range 19-30), which was stratified for ethnicity in association with language of origin (white English first language versus black African first language), educational level (Grade 12 and Graduate), and quality of education (advantaged and disadvantaged). ('African language' is the term used to denote the indigenous languages of black populations in southern Africa). Results yielded no significant differences for ethnicity/language of origin, level or quality of education, indicating that Digit Symbol-Incidental Learning may be a relatively culture independent task with utility as a neuropsychological screening instrument. Broad normative guidelines are provided for diagnostic purposes, and comparisons are made with available norms.

  9. Performance differences between adult heterosexual and homosexual men on the Digit-Symbol Substitution subtest of the WAIS-R.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Qazi; Wilson, Glenn D; Abrahams, Sharon

    2004-02-01

    Previous evidence suggests that sexual orientation influences performance on a number of cognitive functions known to be sexually dimorphic. This investigation examined the performance of 240 right-handed subjects (60 heterosexual men, 60 homosexual men, 60 heterosexual women and 60 homosexual women) on one of the most commonly used neuropsychological tests to show normative sex differences, the Digit-Symbol Substitution test of the WAIS-R. Analysis of scaled Digit-Symbol scores revealed that heterosexual women and homosexual men outperformed heterosexual men. The magnitude of these differences were modest by standard criteria. No differences were found between heterosexual and homosexual women. The findings implicate within-sex variation in one test that relies on intact executive function.

  10. AgrAbility Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... It’s About Hope AgrAbility on Twitter AgrAbility on Facebook AgrAbility on You Tube AgrAbility… It’s About Hope ... summary report available... AgrAbility Harvest Get a copy Facebook Posts National AgrAbility Project 12 hours ago Good ...

  11. Norm comparisons of the Spanish-language and English-language WAIS-III: Implications for clinical assessment and test adaptation.

    PubMed

    Funes, Cynthia M; Rodriguez, Juventino Hernandez; Lopez, Steven Regeser

    2016-12-01

    This study provides a systematic comparison of the norms of 3 Spanish-language Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales (WAIS-III) batteries from Mexico, Spain, and Puerto Rico, and the U.S. English-language WAIS-III battery. Specifically, we examined the performance of the 4 normative samples on 2 identical subtests (Digit Span and Digit Symbol-Coding) and 1 nearly identical subtest (Block Design). We found that across most age groups the means associated with the Spanish-language versions of the 3 subtests were lower than the means of the U.S. English-language version. In addition, we found that for most age ranges the Mexican subsamples scored lower than the Spanish subsamples. Lower educational levels of Mexicans and Spaniards compared to U.S. residents are consistent with the general pattern of findings. These results suggest that because of the different norms, applying any of the 3 Spanish-language versions of the WAIS-III generally risks underestimating deficits, and that applying the English-language WAIS-III norms risks overestimating deficits of Spanish-speaking adults. There were a few exceptions to these general patterns. For example, the Mexican subsample ages 70 years and above performed significantly better on the Digit Symbol and Block Design than did the U.S. and Spanish subsamples. Implications for the clinical assessment of U.S. Spanish-speaking Latinos and test adaptation are discussed with an eye toward improving the clinical care for this community. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. A cross-cultural comparison between South African and British students on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales Third Edition (WAIS-III).

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, Kate; Alloway, Tracy; Copello, Evan; Milligan, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    There is debate regarding the appropriate use of Western cognitive measures with individuals from very diverse backgrounds to that of the norm population. Given the dated research in this area and the considerable socio-economic changes that South Africa has witnessed over the past 20 years, this paper reports on the use of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Third Edition (WAIS-III), the most commonly used measure of intelligence, with an English second language, multilingual, low socio-economic group of black, South African university students. Their performance on the WAIS-III was compared to that of a predominantly white, British, monolingual, higher socio-economic group. A multi-group confirmatory factor analysis showed that the WAIS-III lacks measurement invariance between the two groups, suggesting that it may be tapping different constructs in each group. The UK group significantly outperformed the SA group on the knowledge-based verbal, and some non-verbal subtests, while the SA group performed significantly better on measures of Processing Speed (PS). The groups did not differ significantly on the Matrix Reasoning subtest and on those working memory subtests with minimal reliance on language, which appear to be the least culturally biased. Group differences were investigated further in a set of principal components analyses, which revealed that the WAIS-III scores loaded differently for the UK and SA groups. While the SA group appeared to treat the PS subtests differently to those measuring perceptual organization and non-verbal reasoning, the UK group seemed to approach all of these subtests similarly. These results have important implications for the cognitive assessment of individuals from culturally, linguistically, and socio-economically diverse circumstances.

  13. Conceptions of Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jagacinski, Carolyn M.; Nicholls, John G.

    Two different conceptions of ability are proposed. The first conception of ability is more differentiated and generally employed by adults and older children. Here ability level is defined with reference to the performance of others assuming that optimum effort was employed. High ability means higher than others. The second conception of ability…

  14. The joint WAIS-III and WMS-III factor structure: development and cross-validation of a six-factor model of cognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Tulsky, David S; Price, Larry R

    2003-06-01

    During the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (3rd ed.; WMS-III) the participants in the normative study completed both scales. This "co-norming" methodology set the stage for full integration of the 2 tests and the development of an expanded structure of cognitive functioning. Until now, however, the WAIS-III and WMS-III had not been examined together in a factor analytic study. This article presents a series of confirmatory factor analyses to determine the joint WAIS-III and WMS-III factor structure. Using a structural equation modeling approach, a 6-factor model that included verbal, perceptual, processing speed, working memory, auditory memory, and visual memory constructs provided the best model fit to the data. Allowing select subtests to load simultaneously on 2 factors improved model fit and indicated that some subtests are multifaceted. The results were then replicated in a large cross-validation sample (N = 858).

  15. The isotope records from WAIS Divide and US ITASE: climate in West Antarctica over the past two millennia (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steig, E. J.; White, J. W.; Kuettel, M.; Ding, Q.; Hoffmann, G.; Schneider, D. P.; Mayewski, P. A.; Dixon, D. A.; Taylor, K.

    2010-12-01

    Central West Antarctica has warmed at the surface and in the troposphere over the last 50 years. We use stable isotope records from US ITASE and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide ice cores to place this warming in a long term context. The mean of the 14 records provides an estimate of mean δ18O in precipitation over West Antarctica for the last 200 years, while the standard error provides an estimate of the uncertainty in individual annual or decadal values. Given a linear δ18O/temperature scaling of 0.8‰/°C, the ice core isotope ratios show same the magnitude of warming since 1957 as instrumental temperatures. It is very likely (95% confidence) the two decades 1935-1944 and 1991-2000 are the most isotopically elevated in the last 200 years, and likely (90% confidence) that the 1990s were more elevated than the 1935-1945 decade. This is significant because these two decades are also the warmest globally. Winter warming in West Antarctica is strongly related to atmospheric circulation anomalies forced by warming in the central tropical Pacific (Ding et al., this meeting, and in review), which was also anomalously warm in 1935-1944 and the 1990s. Tracer-enabled general circulation model experiments show that the same circulation anomalies lead to enrichment of stable isotope ratios in West Antarctic precipitation, with δ18O/temperature scaling similar to observations. The 2000 year long record from WAIS Divide shows that the 1990s in West Antarctica is not unprecedented, but that events of similar magnitude occur only a few times in the last 2000 years. High frequency variability in West Antarctic δ18O is superimposed on an overall decline of about 1.6‰ in the last 2000 years, similar to that observed in East Antarctic cores such as Vostok and Taylor Dome. The long term decline in δ18O at WAIS Divide contrasts with the records from Byrd and Siple Dome, which show rising isotope profiles over the past 5000 years. The parsimonious explanation is that

  16. Geophysical evidence of a Large Igneous Province (LIP) in the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS), and its potential influence on the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    The WAIS flows through the volcanically active WARS. The inland rift shoulder ranges from 4-5 km elevation, (5-7 km relief, the greatest in the world); it is coincident with the Transantarctic Mountains from northern Victoria land bordering the Ross Sea, south along the west and south side of the Ross Ice Shelf to the Horlick Mountains. It forms the boundary between East and West Antarctica in this area, but diverges to the Ellsworth Mountains and forms the inland boundary of the WAIS and WARS there. Throughout the WARS shoulder to the Horlick Mountains, exposures of mostly late Cenozoic alkaline volcanic rocks are reported, as is the case in the coastal Marie Byrd Land area on the Southern Ocean aide of the WARS. The Transantarctic Mountains, continue at a much lower elevation (2000-750 m) to form the boundary between East and West Antarctica in the Filchner Ice Shelf area. Aeromagnetic and radar ice-sounding surveys over the WAIS indicated numerous high-amplitude (100->1000 nT),5-50-km width, shallow-source, magnetic anomalies over a very extensive area (>500,000 km2 ) that has been interpreted as evidence of mostly subglacial volcanic eruptions (“volcanic centers”). Behrendt et al, (2005, 2008) interpreted these anomalies as >1000 "volcanic centers" requiring high remanent normal (and at least 10% reversed) magnetizations in the present field direction. These data were interpreted to show that >80% of the anomaly sources at the bed of the WAIS, were modified by the moving ice, requiring a younger age than the WAIS (~25 Ma). Several active volcanoes have shown evidence of eruption through the WAIS and several other active volcanoes are present beneath the WAIS. Although exposed volcanoes surrounding the WAIS extend in age to ~34 Ma., Mt Erebus (<1 Ma), Mt. Melbourne (<0.26 Ma), and Mt. Takahe (<0.1 Ma) are examples of active volcanoes in the WAIS area. However, most "volcanic centers" are buried beneath the WAIS. If only a very small percentage of these >1000

  17. WAIS-III VIQ-PIQ and VCI-POI discrepancies in lateralized cerebral damage.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph J; Bartels, Jared M; Morris, Jeri; Cluff, Richard B; Gontkovsky, Samuel T

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated Verbal IQ (VIQ)-Performance IQ (PIQ) and Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI)-Perceptual Organization Index (POI) discrepancies among 16 patients with right-sided and 20 with left-sided cerebral lesions. Means for age and education among left hemisphere-damaged patients were 46.25 years (SD = 17.42) and 12.17 years (SD = 2.87). Means and standard deviations for age and education were 47.86 years (SD = 16.83) and 12.27 years (SD = 2.46) for those with right-sided damage. Left hemisphere lesions produced nonsignificant VIQ < PIQ and VCI < POI means, whereas right hemisphere damage resulted in significant VIQ > PIQ and VCI > POI mean discrepancies. Additional analyses indicated that neither discrepancy score was effective in identifying lateralized brain damage.

  18. Temporal Relations and Intelligence: Correlating Relational Performance with Performance on the WAIS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hora, Denis; Pelaez, Martha; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Rae, Gordon; Robinson, Karen; Chaudhary, Tahir

    2008-01-01

    Relational frame theory (RFT) explicitly suggests that derived relational responding underlies complex verbally-based cognitive performances. The current study investigated whether the ability to respond in accordance with temporal relations between stimuli was predictive of performance on the four indices of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale,…

  19. Intelligent Use of Intelligence Tests: Empirical and Clinical Support for Canadian WAIS-IV Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jessie L.; Weiss, Lawrence G.; Beal, A. Lynne; Saklofske, Donald H.; Zhu, Jianjun; Holdnack, James A.

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that Canadians produce higher raw scores than their U.S. counterparts on intellectual assessments. As a result of these differences in ability along with smaller variability in the population's intellectual performance, Canadian normative data will yield lower standard scores for most raw score points compared to U.S. norms.…

  20. WISC-IV and Low IQ: Review and Comparison with the WAIS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The WISC-IV is likely to be in common use for the assessment of children with low intellectual ability for the next 10-12 years. There are several concerns about its uses with these children. Some children may not understand the instructions on some subtests, notably for letter-number sequencing. There may be an unacknowledged floor effect that…

  1. From IGY to IPY: Volcanism Associated With the West Antarctic Rift System Interpreted From Geophysical Observations, and Possible Effects on the Stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    Observations from a few oversnow and airborne magnetic profiles acquired over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) during the International Geophysical Year (1957-58) indicated numerous high amplitude, shallow source, magnetic anomalies over a very extensive area of the presently known West Antarctic rift system. Aeromagnetic surveys over the WAIS in the early 1960s and later combined with radar ice sounding in 1978- 79 defined an area >500,000 km2; these anomalies range from 100->1000 nT as observed ~1 km over the 2-3 km thick moving ice. Behrendt et al, (1962, 1964, 1994, and 2005) and Jankowski et al. (1983) interpreted these anomalies as indicating "volcanic centers." Detailed aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding surveys since 1993 have shown that >80% of these anomaly sources have been modified by the moving ice into which they were injected requiring a younger age than the WAIS (~25 Ma). Behrendt et al., (1994; 2007) conservatively estimated >1 x 106 km3 volume of volcanic sources to account for the area of the "volcanic center" anomalies and suggested the presence of a large igneous province (LIP) if this volume was intruded within a time interval of 1-10 Ma. Active volcanism at a few widely spaced exposures of alkaline volcanic rocks associated with the West Antarctic rift, which extend in age to ~34 Ma in the WAIS area, and interpreted active subglacial volcanism revealed by aerogeophysical data (Blankenship et al., 1993; and Corr and Vaughan, 2008) have raised the question of possible volcanic effects on the regime of the WAIS. Vogel and Tulaczyk (2006) argued that subglacial volcanism may play a "crucial roll" in WAIS stability, but LeMasurier (2008) has discounted this as unlikely. In my presentation I will review the geophysical evidence acquired from the IGY to the IPY, and conclude that whether unlikely or not, future effects on the stability of the WAIS should not be ignored.

  2. WANTED: Fully Automated Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Royal

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of indexing focuses on the possibilities of fully automated indexing. Topics discussed include controlled indexing languages such as subject heading lists and thesauri, free indexing languages, natural indexing languages, computer-aided indexing, expert systems, and the need for greater creativity to further advance automated indexing.…

  3. Indictment of Ability Grouping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Bruce

    1972-01-01

    The use of ability grouping restricts students to interact with others who have been identified as similar in ability and carries with it the stigma of failure and the operation of the self-fulfilling prophecy. (Author)

  4. Ageing, working hours and work ability.

    PubMed

    Costa, G; Sartori, S

    2007-11-01

    The current paper reports the main results of several studies carried out on Italian workers using the work ability index as a complementary tool for workers' periodical health surveillance. The work ability index shows a general decreasing trend over the years, but it changes differently according to working conditions and personal health status. In jobs with higher mental involvement and autonomy, but lower physical constraint, it remains quite constant and high over the years, while it significantly decreases with a steeper trend the higher the physical work load and the lower the job control are. Sex and working hours appear to act concurrently in influencing work ability, particularly in association with more physically demanding jobs. It is therefore necessary to adopt flexible interventions, able to give ageing shift workers a proper support for maintaining a satisfactory work ability, by means of actions addressed both to work organization and psycho-physical conditions.

  5. WAIS-III Digit Symbol-Incidental Learning base rates: findings for college student and patient samples.

    PubMed

    Schnakenberg-Ott, Summer; Ryan, Joseph J; Tree, Heather A

    2004-12-01

    Frequencies for Pairing and Free Recall of the WAIS-III Digit Symbol-Incidental Learning procedure were determined separately for 104 college students and 73 patients with substance abuse disorders. Means for age and education were 22.2 yr. (SD=5.1) and 14.7 yr. (SD=1.0) and 46.0 yr. and 12.2 yr. (SD=9.4), respectively. Base rate tables indicated that for Pairing, 93% of students and 89% of patients paired the number 1 with the appropriate symbol. Conversely, only 43% of students correctly paired the number 3 with its associated symbol, while 30% of patients paired the number 4 with its appropriate symbol. When Free Recall was assessed, 98% of students remembered the first symbol, but only 61% recalled the third. The most frequently recalled symbol by patients was the ninth (97%) and the most infrequently recalled symbol was the fourth (50%). The present base rate tables may be helpful for detecting unusual recall frequencies on the Incidental Learning procedures.

  6. Cross-cultural effects on IQ test performance: a review and preliminary normative indications on WAIS-III test performance.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth-Edwards, Ann B; Kemp, Ryan D; Rust, Annegret L; Muirhead, Joanne G L; Hartman, Nigel P; Radloff, Sarah E

    2004-10-01

    This article presents a review of cross-cultural influences on Wechsler IQ tests, together with a preliminary investigation into WAIS-III test performance (English administration) for a southern African sample (age range 19-30) stratified for white English first language and black African first language, level and quality of education. ('African language' is the term used to denote the indigenous languages of black populations in southern Africa). A two-way ANOVA revealed highly significant effects for both level and quality of education within the black African first language group. Scores for the white English and black African first language groups with advantaged education were comparable with the US standardization, whereas scores for black African first language participants with disadvantaged education were significantly lower than this. Thus indications from this research are that normative studies should take account of the influential variable of quality of education, in addition to level of education. Alternatively faulty conclusions may be drawn about the effects of ethnicity, with the potential for neuropsychological misdiagnosis.

  7. Assessment of traumatic brain injury patients by WAIS-R, P300, and performance on oddball task.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yasuo; Ando, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Michio

    2005-01-01

    The present research investigates factors that prevent traumatic brain injury patients from returning to work. Participants included 40 patients and 40 healthy individuals. Participants' intelligence quotients and the P300 component of event-related potentials elicited during an auditory oddball task were compared. The patients' mean intelligence quotient was significantly lower than that of the control group. However, some patients had normative intelligence, suggesting that the WAIS-R test results could not fully explain their inability to return to work. The peak of the P300 component could not be determined from recordings of 9 patients. When compared to the control group, the mean latency and amplitude for the remaining 31 patients were significantly longer and smaller, respectively. The mean reaction time of the patients was significantly longer than that of the controls. Omission errors were significantly more frequent in the patient group than among controls, suggesting that the patients were suffering from deficits in the allocation and maintenance of attention. Based on the number of omission errors, patients were divided into a group comprising individuals who committed fewer than two omissions (n=26) and a group comprised of individuals who committed more than three omissions (n=14). The frequent omission errors observed among individuals in the latter group may indicate their inability to sustain an adequate level of vigilance. This deficit would be a factor preventing the patients' return to work.

  8. In vivo experimental testing of the FW axial blood pump for left ventricular support in Fu Wai Hospital.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Hu, Sheng-Shou; Zhou, Jian-Ye; Sun, Han-Song; Tang, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Zhe; Li, Guo-Rong; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Gui, Xin-Min

    2009-01-01

    A fully implantable, axial flow blood pump has been developed in Fu Wai Hospital aiming for clinical use. This ventricular assist device (VAD), which was developed after numerous CFD analyses for the flow characteristics of the pump, is 58.5-mm long, 30-mm wide (including DC motor), and weighs 240 g. The pump can deliver 5 L/min for pressures of 100 mm Hg over 8,000 rpm. In this study, short-term hemocompatibility effects of the axial left ventricular assist device (LVAD) (FW blood pump) were evaluated in four healthy sheep. The device was implanted into the left ventricular apex of beating hearts. The outflow graft of each device was anastomosed to the descending aorta. The hemolysis, which was evaluated in vivo by free hemoglobin value, was below 30 mg/dL. Evaluation of serum biochemical data showed that implantation of the FW blood pump in sheep with normal hearts did not impair end organ function. Gross and microscopic sections of kidney, liver, and lung revealed no evidence of microemboli. Performance of the pump in vivo was considered sufficient for a LVAD, although further design improvement is necessary in terms of hemolysis and antithrombosis to improve biocompatibility of the pump.

  9. Possible Effects on the Stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and Associated Sea-level Rise From Active-Recent Subglacial Volcanism Interpreted from Aeromagnetic and Radar Ice-sounding Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    Aeromagnetic profiles (>10,000 km) acquired in the early 1960s over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) combined with coincident aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding in 1978-79 indicated numerous high-amplitude, shallow-source, magnetic anomalies over a very extensive area of the volcanically active West Antarctic rift system interpreted as caused by subglacial volcanic rocks. These early aerogeophysical surveys defined this area as >500,000 km2. Five-kilometer spaced coincident aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding surveys since 1990 provide three dimensional characterization of the magnetic field and bed topography beneath the ice sheet. These 5-50-km width, semicircular magnetic anomalies range from 100->1000 nT as observed ~1 km over the 2-3 km thick ice. Behrendt et al, (2005, 2008) interpreted these anomalies as indicating >1000 "volcanic centers". requiring high remanent normal (and at least 10% reversed) magnetizations in the present field direction. These data have shown that >80% of the anomaly sources at the bed of the WAIS, have been modified by the moving ice into which they were injected, requiring a younger age than the WAIS (about 25 Ma). Behrendt et al., (1994; 2007) conservatively estimated >1 x 106 km3 volume of volcanic sources to account for the area of the "volcanic center" anomalies. Although exposed volcanoes surrounding the WAIS extend in age to ~34 m.y., Mt Erebus, (<1 Ma) Mt. Melbourne, (<0.26 Ma), and Mt. Takahae (<0.1 Ma) are examples of exposed active volcanoes in the WAIS area. However, the great volume of volcanic centers is buried beneath the WAIS. If only a very small percentage of these >1000 volcanic, magnetic-anomaly sources are active today, or in the recent past, in the drainage area of the WAIS, subglacial volcanism may still have a significant effect on the dynamics of the WAIS. Interpreted active subglacial volcanism is revealed by aerogeophysical data reported by Blankenship et al., (1993, Mt. Casertz), and Corr and Vaughan

  10. Modeled Aeromagnetic Anomalies, Controlled By Radar Ice Sounding, As Evidence for Subglacial Volcanic Activity in the West Antarctic Rift System (WR) Beneath the Area of the Divide of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Thwaites and Pine Island ice shelves, buttressing the WAIS, have passed the turning point as they are eaten away by warmer ocean waters (Joghin et al., 2014; Rignot et al., 2014). There is an increasing evidence (aeromagnetic, radar ice-sounding, high heat flow, subglacial volcanic seismicity, and several exposed and subglacial active volcanoes), for volcanic activity in the WR beneath the WAIS, which flows through it. The 5-km, orthogonally line spaced, central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey defined >400 high amplitude volcanic magnetic anomalies correlated with glacial bed topography. Modeled anomalies defined magnetic properties; interpreted volcanic edifices were mostly removed by the moving ice into which they were erupted. Very high apparent susceptibility contrasts (.001->.3 SI) are typical of measured properties from volcanic exposures in the WAIS area. About 90% of the magnetic sources have normal magnetization in the present field direction. Two explanations as to why the anomalies are not approximately 50% negative: (1) Volcanic activity resulting in these anomalies occurred in a predominantly normal field (unlikely). (2) Sources are a combination of induced and remanent magnetization resulting in anomalies of low amplitude (induced cancels remanent) and are not recognized because they are <100 nT (most probable). About 18 high relief, (~600-2000 m) "volcanic centers" beneath the WAIS surface, probably were erupted subaerially when the WAIS was absent; nine of these are in the general area beneath the divide of the WAIS. A 70-km wide, ring of interpreted subglacial volcanic rocks may define a volcanic caldera underlying thedivide (Behrendt et al., 1998). A 2 km-high subaerially erupted volcano (subglacial Mt Thiel, ~78o30'S, 111oW) ~ 100 km north of the WAISCORE, could be the source an ash layer observed in the core. Models by Tulaczyk and Hossainzadeh (2011) indicate >4mm/yr basal melting beneath the WAIS, supportive of high heat flow

  11. The NLM Indexing Initiative's Medical Text Indexer.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Alan R; Mork, James G; Gay, Clifford W; Humphrey, Susanne M; Rogers, Willie J

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Text Indexer (MTI) is a program for producing MeSH indexing recommendations. It is the major product of NLM's Indexing Initiative and has been used in both semi-automated and fully automated indexing environments at the Library since mid 2002. We report here on an experiment conducted with MEDLINE indexers to evaluate MTI's performance and to generate ideas for its improvement as a tool for user-assisted indexing. We also discuss some filtering techniques developed to improve MTI's accuracy for use primarily in automatically producing the indexing for several abstracts collections.

  12. A Windshear Hazard Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hinton, David A.; Bowles, Roland L.

    2000-01-01

    An aircraft exposed to hazardous low-level windshear may suffer a critical loss of airspeed and altitude, thus endangering its ability to remain airborne. In order to characterize this hazard, a nondimensional index was developed based oil aerodynamic principals and understanding of windshear phenomena, 'This paper reviews the development and application of the Bowles F-tactor. which is now used by onboard sensors for the detection of hazardous windshear. It was developed and tested during NASA/I:AA's airborne windshear program and is now required for FAA certification of onboard radar windshear detection systems. Reviewed in this paper are: 1) definition of windshear and description of atmospheric phenomena that may cause hazardous windshear. 2) derivation and discussion of the F-factor. 3) development of the F-factor hazard threshold, 4) its testing during field deployments, and 5) its use in accident reconstructions,

  13. The “Wireless Sensor Networks for City-Wide Ambient Intelligence (WISE-WAI)” Project

    PubMed Central

    Casari, Paolo; Castellani, Angelo P.; Cenedese, Angelo; Lora, Claudio; Rossi, Michele; Schenato, Luca; Zorzi, Michele

    2009-01-01

    This paper gives a detailed technical overview of some of the activities carried out in the context of the “Wireless Sensor networks for city-Wide Ambient Intelligence (WISE-WAI)” project, funded by the Cassa di Risparmio di Padova e Rovigo Foundation, Italy. The main aim of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of large-scale wireless sensor network deployments, whereby tiny objects integrating one or more environmental sensors (humidity, temperature, light intensity), a microcontroller and a wireless transceiver are deployed over a large area, which in this case involves the buildings of the Department of Information Engineering at the University of Padova. We will describe how the network is organized to provide full-scale automated functions, and which services and applications it is configured to provide. These applications include long-term environmental monitoring, alarm event detection and propagation, single-sensor interrogation, localization and tracking of objects, assisted navigation, as well as fast data dissemination services to be used, e.g., to rapidly re-program all sensors over-the-air. The organization of such a large testbed requires notable efforts in terms of communication protocols and strategies, whose design must pursue scalability, energy efficiency (while sensors are connected through USB cables for logging and debugging purposes, most of them will be battery-operated), as well as the capability to support applications with diverse requirements. These efforts, the description of a subset of the results obtained so far, and of the final objectives to be met are the scope of the present paper. PMID:22408513

  14. Fairness and Ability Grouping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Kenneth A.

    1983-01-01

    A recent controversy regarding ability grouping is that it is often perceived as a means whereby racial or class bias can be subtly transformed into mechanisms of discrimination which exhibit the appearance of fairness and objectivity. This article addresses the question of fairness in ability grouping. (CJB)

  15. The relationship between the WAIS-III digit symbol Coding and executive functioning.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew S; Pierson, Eric E

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the performance of college students (N = 63) on the Coding subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition and examined whether differences in performance could in part be explained by performance on the Delis-Kaplan Executive Functions System Trail-Making Test. The results of a multiple regression analysis indicated that performance on Coding was correlated most with Letter-Number Sequencing and to a lesser extent with Visual Scanning and with Number Sequencing approaching significance. There was no significant relationship with Letter Sequencing or Motor Speed. The three significant predictor variables were then entered into a stepwise hierarchical regression analysis. Subsequent models using Visual Scanning and Number Sequencing did not improve the predictive value of the model. These results are consistent with other recent reports suggesting that performance on Coding taps cognitive skills and abilities beyond that of simple motor speed or paired-associative learning. The findings also suggest a limited improvement in understanding test performance using a process analysis approach.

  16. Indexing Consistency and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunde, Pranas; Dexter, Margaret E.

    A measure of indexing consistency is developed based on the concept of 'fuzzy sets'. It assigns a higher consistency value if indexers agree on the more important terms than if they agree on less important terms. Measures of the quality of an indexer's work and exhaustivity of indexing are also proposed. Experimental data on indexing consistency…

  17. Measuring creative imagery abilities

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska, Dorota M.; Karwowski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Over the decades, creativity and imagination research developed in parallel, but they surprisingly rarely intersected. This paper introduces a new theoretical model of creative visual imagination, which bridges creativity and imagination research, as well as presents a new psychometric instrument, called the Test of Creative Imagery Abilities (TCIA), developed to measure creative imagery abilities understood in accordance with this model. Creative imagination is understood as constituted by three interrelated components: vividness (the ability to create images characterized by a high level of complexity and detail), originality (the ability to produce unique imagery), and transformativeness (the ability to control imagery). TCIA enables valid and reliable measurement of these three groups of abilities, yielding the general score of imagery abilities and at the same time making profile analysis possible. We present the results of nine studies on a total sample of more than 1700 participants, showing the factor structure of TCIA using confirmatory factor analysis, as well as provide data confirming this instrument's validity and reliability. The availability of TCIA for interested researchers may result in new insights and possibilities of integrating the fields of creativity and imagination science. PMID:26539140

  18. Question of Ages of Cenozoic Volcanic Centers Inferred Beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) in the West Antarctic Rift System (WR) from Coincident Aeromagnetic and Radar Ice Sounding Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.; Finn, C. A.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2007-12-01

    The recently acquired radar ice sounding surveys (Holt, et al., 2006) extending the 1990s Central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey to the Amundsen and Bellingshausen sea coasts allows us to revise a thought experiment reported by Behrendt et al., 1991 from very limited bed elevation data. Were the ice of the WAIS flowing through the WR to be compressed to the density of crustal rock, almost all of the area beneath the WAIS would be at or above sea level, much >1 km elevation. There are only about 10-20% of the very deep areas (such as the Bentley subglacial trench and the Byrd Subglacial Basin) filled with 3-4-km thick ice that would be well below sea level. The age of the 5-7-km high rift shoulder bounding the asymmetric WR from northern Victoria Land through the Horlick Mountains (where it diverges from the Transantarctic Mountains) to the Ellsworth Mountains has been reported as old as Cretaceous. Volcanic exposures associated with the West Antarctic rift system in the present WAIS area extend at least to 34 Ma and the West Antarctic ice sheet has flowed through the rift possibly as far back in time as 25 Ma. Active volcanism has been reported for the WR at only a few widely scattered locations, so speculations about present volcanic activity beneath the WAIS are quite uncertain, and it is probably quite rare. The Central West Antarctic aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding survey carried out in the 1990s revealed about 1000 "volcanic centers" characterized by 100-1000 nT shallow source magnetic anomalies, at least 400 of which have associated bed topography. About 80% of these show relief <200 m and have been interpreted as smoothed off as they were erupted (injected) into the moving WAIS. Several kilometer-thick highly magnetic sources are required to fit these anomalies requiring high remanent magnetizations in the present field direction. We interpreted these sources as subvolcanic intrusions which must be younger than about 100 Ma because the

  19. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), but not the Defence Mechanism Test (DMTm), separates schizophrenics and normal controls in a factorial cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, S A

    1998-06-01

    Ten schizophrenic patients and ten healthy control subjects matched with respect to sex, age and education were tested by a psychological test battery including WAIS, WCST, FAS and a modified version of the tachistoscopic Defence Mechanism Test (DMTm). In a Q-factor analysis two factors were derived in the analysis of DMTm test scores. The distribution of cases among these factors was wholly at random. On the other hand, when analysing WAIS scores, five factors were derived and schizophrenic cases as well as control subjects were almost unequivocally clustered by different factors. It is argued that also if an unequivocal categorisation of cases had been achieved in the analysis of DMTm data, such a finding might well have been interpreted as an effect of anomalies in cerebral structures assumed to be of critical importance in the filtering of signals in the stream of visual perception. The existence of such anomalies in schizophrenics is now well established by neuroimaging as well as postmortem studies, and findings are also well in accordance with phenomenological and physiological data. The failure of DMTm to separate schizophrenic and control subjects does thus make the second and important step in a discussion on validity entirely superfluous, namely whether signs recorded really measure what they are assumed to measure, in this case defence mechanisms in a psychoanalytic sense.

  20. Human abilities: emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Mayer, John D; Roberts, Richard D; Barsade, Sigal G

    2008-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) involves the ability to carry out accurate reasoning about emotions and the ability to use emotions and emotional knowledge to enhance thought. We discuss the origins of the EI concept, define EI, and describe the scope of the field today. We review three approaches taken to date from both a theoretical and methodological perspective. We find that Specific-Ability and Integrative-Model approaches adequately conceptualize and measure EI. Pivotal in this review are those studies that address the relation between EI measures and meaningful criteria including social outcomes, performance, and psychological and physical well-being. The Discussion section is followed by a list of summary points and recommended issues for future research.

  1. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen

    1999-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  2. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen

    2001-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  3. Automating Index Preparation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-23

    Automating Index Preparation* Pehong Chent Michael A. Harrison Computer Science Division University of CaliforniaI Berkeley, CA 94720 March 23, 1987...Abstract Index preparation is a tedious and time-consuming task. In this paper we indicate * how the indexing process can be automated in a way which...identified and analyzed. Specifically, we describe a framework for placing index commands in the document and a general purpose index processor which

  4. Ability Is Ageless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Experience Works is a national organization that provides training and employment services to older adults. Its Prime Time Awards Program honors contributions of older workers in their 70s and beyond, demonstrating the continued ability and productivity of this population as well as the benefits they derive from productive work. (SK)

  5. Computerized Adaptive Ability Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    The general objective of a research program on adaptive testing was to identify several sources of potential error in test scores, and to study adaptive testing as a means for reducing these errors. Errors can result from the mismatch of item difficulty to the individual's ability; the psychological effects of testing and the test environment; the…

  6. Priming Ability Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Nicola S.; Malouff, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined whether priming self-schemas relating to successful emotional competency results in better emotional intelligence performance. In the first study participants were randomly assigned to a successful emotional competency self-schema prime condition or a control condition and then completed an ability measure of emotional…

  7. Promoting Logical Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Alan R.

    1973-01-01

    This article reports one search for factors or conditions shaping the child's growth in logical ability. The search indicated the existence of a relationship between the quantity of teacher talk that contains the language of logic and the change exhibited by students. Implications for classroom practice are discussed. (JA)

  8. Conservatism and Cognitive Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankov, Lazar

    2009-01-01

    Conservatism and cognitive ability are negatively correlated. The evidence is based on 1254 community college students and 1600 foreign students seeking entry to United States' universities. At the individual level of analysis, conservatism scores correlate negatively with SAT, Vocabulary, and Analogy test scores. At the national level of…

  9. Seasonal to centennial-scale variability of microparticle concentration and size distribution in the WAIS Divide ice core over the past 2.4 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutz, K. J.; Koffman, B. G.; Breton, D. J.; Dunbar, N. W.; Kurbatov, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present results from continuous analysis of mineral dust in the upper 577 m (2.4 ka) of the WAIS Divide deep ice core, WDC06A. The core was melted using the UMaine WAIS Melt Monitor system, which allows accurate mm-scale depth co-registration of electrical conductivity and particle data, with subsequent collection of discrete samples for expanded particle, glaciochemical and geochemical analysis. The concentration and size distribution of microparticles were measured using a flow-through Klotz Abakus laser particle detector, developed by Ruth et al (2002) and calibrated with Coulter-Counter measurements. We found that background dust concentrations during the past two millennia have been low, comparable to other sites in interior Antarctica. Particle concentration ranges seasonally from ~20-1000 particles/ml. Particle deposition generally shows an annual signal, although the phasing varies relative to seasonal chemical indicators such as nssSO42-. Dust deposition on decadal to centennial timescales appears to be linked to hemispheric-scale climate variability during the late Holocene, and particularly to the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) climate oscillation. We compared the coarse particle percentage (5-10 μm diameter relative to 1-10 μm diameter) to a proxy record of the SAM developed using sea salt concentrations in the Law Dome, East Antarctica, ice core (Goodwin et al, 2004). Spectral characteristics of the coarse particle percentage at WAIS Divide seem to match the Law Dome proxy for the SAM. This suggests a coherent signal for the SAM and the potential to develop a particle size distribution proxy for the strength of the circum-Antarctic atmospheric circulation. Within the past two centuries of dust deposition, there were several dusty decades in the early-to-mid 1900s followed by a dramatic increase around 1980. Given that the particle size distribution does not show significant coeval change, we infer that this increased dust deposition has been driven

  10. CENDI Indexing Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The CENDI Indexing Workshop held at NASA Headquarters, Two Independence Square, 300 E Street, Washington, DC, on September 21-22, 1994 focused on the following topics: machine aided indexing, indexing quality, an indexing pilot project, the MedIndEx Prototype, Department of Energy/Office of Scientific and Technical Information indexing activities, high-tech coding structures, category indexing schemes, and the Government Information Locator Service. This publication consists mostly of viewgraphs related to the above noted topics. In an appendix is a description of the Government Information Locator Service.

  11. Effects on WAIS-III performance IQ (PIQ) and full scale IQ (FSIQ) when object assembly is substituted for each standard performance scale subtest.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph J; Morris, Jeri; Brown, Kristina I; Glass, Laura A

    2006-12-01

    According to the WAIS-III Administration and Scoring Manual, Object Assembly (OA) may be substituted for any spoiled Performance subtest. This assertion has not been evaluated in a clinical sample. The present investigation reports differences that resulted in Performance IQ (PIQ) and Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) when OA replaced each of the Performance subtests. Participants were 47 referrals for neuropsychological assessment (age M = 45.98 years, SD = 9.82; education M = 13.82 years, SD = 2.78). Results indicated that OA may replace any Performance subtest without seriously altering the summary scores. Differences between the standard IQs and OA-based composites were < 2 points for PIQ and < 1 point for FSIQ. More than 90% of the OA-based composites fell within the 90% confidence limits of the corresponding IQ.

  12. [Textual research on the engraved editions of Nei wai yan fang mi chuan (Secret Teaching of Proved Prescriptions for Internal and External Diseases)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Zhao Lian's book Nei wai yan fang mi chuan (Secret Teaching of Proved Prescriptions for Internal and External Diseases) was firstly engraved in the 21st year of Guangxu reign of the Qing dynasty. There are altogether four different engraved editions separately collected in the Library of Academy of Medical Sciences, Library of Zhenjiang City, Library of Changchun University of TCM, and Library of Shanghai University of TCM, printed in different times with different sizes of its contents. It is better to call all these editions the engraved versions of Guangxu reign. All of them are engraved and printed after the mother edition with some blocks hollowed-out and supplemented. Hence, the title "engraved edition of Yiyou or the 11th year of Guangxu reign (1885) of the Qing dynasty" carried in The General Catalogue of Ancient Books of TCM is wrong.

  13. Assessment of a model for achieving competency in administration and scoring of the WAIS-IV in post-graduate psychology students.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rachel M; Davis, Melissa C

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for an evidence-based approach to training professional psychologists in the administration and scoring of standardized tests such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) due to substantial evidence that these tasks are associated with numerous errors that have the potential to significantly impact clients' lives. Twenty three post-graduate psychology students underwent training in using the WAIS-IV according to a best-practice teaching model that involved didactic teaching, independent study of the test manual, and in-class practice with teacher supervision and feedback. Video recordings and test protocols from a role-played test administration were analyzed for errors according to a comprehensive checklist with self, peer, and faculty member reviews. 91.3% of students were rated as having demonstrated competency in administration and scoring. All students were found to make errors, with substantially more errors being detected by the faculty member than by self or peers. Across all subtests, the most frequent errors related to failure to deliver standardized instructions verbatim from the manual. The failure of peer and self-reviews to detect the majority of the errors suggests that novice feedback (self or peers) may be ineffective to eliminate errors and the use of more senior peers may be preferable. It is suggested that involving senior trainees, recent graduates and/or experienced practitioners in the training of post-graduate students may have benefits for both parties, promoting a peer-learning and continuous professional development approach to the development and maintenance of skills in psychological assessment.

  14. The NLM Indexing Initiative.

    PubMed

    Aronson, A R; Bodenreider, O; Chang, H F; Humphrey, S M; Mork, J G; Nelson, S J; Rindflesch, T C; Wilbur, W J

    2000-01-01

    The objective of NLM's Indexing Initiative (IND) is to investigate methods whereby automated indexing methods partially or completely substitute for current indexing practices. The project will be considered a success if methods can be designed and implemented that result in retrieval performance that is equal to or better than the retrieval performance of systems based principally on humanly assigned index terms. We describe the current state of the project and discuss our plans for the future.

  15. Gradient Index Lens Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-19

    Finally, an assessment of the current technologies in gradient index has been made. This includes a series of recommendations w’iich will be...17 III. Ray Tracing in Anamorphic Gradient Index Media ......... 20 IV. Fabrication of Six Gradient Index Samples ............. 27 V. Technology ...for a basic understanding of what can and cannot be done with gradient index lenses, aside from any lack of technology for making a paricular gradient

  16. Kaiser's Systematic Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a system of subject indexing developed by Julius Kaiser (1868-1927) which is based on "concretes" and "processes" to govern the form of subject headings and subdivisions. Elements of amplification, guides for the subject index, and criticism of Kaiser's systematic indexing are noted. Five sources are given. (EJS)

  17. Automatic Versus Manual Indexing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Meulen, W. A.; Janssen, P. J. F. C.

    1977-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of results in terms of recall and precision from queries submitted to systems with automatic and manual subject indexing. Differences were attributed to query formulation. The effectiveness of automatic indexing was found equivalent to manual indexing. (Author/KP)

  18. The Europe 2020 Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasimeni, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new index to quantify, measure and monitor the progress towards the objectives of the Europe 2020 strategy. This index is based on a set of relevant, accepted, credible, easy to monitor and robust indicators presented by the European Commission at the time the strategy was launched. The internal analysis of the index shows…

  19. Negative Magnetic Anomalies Observed in the Central West Antarctica (CWA) Aerogeophysical Survey Over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), Whose Sources are Volcanic Centers (e.g. Mt Resnik) at the Base of the ice >780 Ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.; Finn, C. A.; Morse, D. L.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of a block of coincident aeromagnetic and radar ice-sounding data (from the CWA aerogeophysical survey) over the WAIS reveals ~1000 50->1000-nT, shallow -source, ``volcanic" magnetic anomalies, interpreted as caused by late Cenozoic alkaline magmatism associated with the West Antarctic rift system (WR). About 400 of these anomalies (conservatively selected) have topographic expression at the bed of the WAIS; >80% of these topographic features have <200 m bed relief. There are ~100 short-wavelength, steep-gradient, negative magnetic anomalies observed in the CWA survey, or ~10% of the ~1000 ``volcanic" anomalies. These negative anomalies indicate volcanic activity during a time of magnetic field reversal from normal to reversed polarity at least as old as 780 Ka (the Brunes-Matuyama reversal). The sources of ~18 of the anomalies, half concentrated in the area of the WAIS divide, have high bed-elevation (above sea level after ice removal and glacial rebound), very magnetic topography of high bed relief, up to 2 km. Five of these peaks have associated negative magnetic anomalies. One of the high topographic features, Mt. Resnik, marked by a complex negative anomaly, is a conical peak 300 m below the surface of the WAIS, and has ~2 km topographic relief. We interpret a magnetic model fit to this anomaly as comprising reversely magnetized (in the present field direction), 0.5-2.5-km thick volcanic flows at the summit overlying normally magnetized flows. Published models (1996) reported for the Hut Point anomaly, at Ross Island, Antarctica, a similar anomaly to Mt. Resnik, also required both normal and reversed magnetizations correlated with drill holes into dated volcanic flows (also part of the late Cenozoic WR) crossing the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary (780 Ka). Because of their form similar to exposed volcanoes in the WAIS area with edifices primarily comprising subaerially-erupted, very magnetic volcanic flows, which have resisted glacial erosion, Behrendt et

  20. General English Ability, Specific Purpose English Ability, and Computer Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prapphal, Kanchana

    2003-01-01

    Aims to answer the following research questions: (1) Are general English ability and specific purpose English ability related to computer skills? and (2) Is general English ability transferable to specific purpose English ability? Subjects were third year science students enrolled in an English for academic purposes course. (Author/VWL)

  1. Ability Grouping in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneer, Marian E.

    1982-01-01

    Psychomotor ability differences in students are a result of innate motor ability, fitness, neurologic development, psychology, experience, and students' interests and goals. Models and procedures for serving students with ability differences, in the areas of ability identification, curriculum development, and instruction, are described. (CJ)

  2. How to Calculate an Employee Relations Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cash, William B., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Proposes using an employee relations index (ERI) to measure factors affecting employee relations and job performance ability. Examines five of ten major ERI factors: attenance, turnover, safety, grievances/complaints, and motor vehicle accidents. Discusses weighing the factors and interpreting the outcome. (CSS)

  3. NASA Indexing Benchmarks: Evaluating Text Search Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esler, Sandra L.; Nelson, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    The current proliferation of on-line information resources underscores the requirement for the ability to index collections of information and search and retrieve them in a convenient manner. This study develops criteria for analytically comparing the index and search engines and presents results for a number of freely available search engines. A product of this research is a toolkit capable of automatically indexing, searching, and extracting performance statistics from each of the focused search engines. This toolkit is highly configurable and has the ability to run these benchmark tests against other engines as well. Results demonstrate that the tested search engines can be grouped into two levels. Level one engines are efficient on small to medium sized data collections, but show weaknesses when used for collections 100MB or larger. Level two search engines are recommended for data collections up to and beyond 100MB.

  4. Cost Index Flying

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    continually alter applicable cost indexes . Computed KC-10 Cost Index Equation Using the dollar figures given above, our CI equation reads : CI = CT / C...COST INDEX FLYING GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER John M. Mirtich, Major, USAF AFIT/IMO/ENS/11-11 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY...AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED

  5. The dimensions of indexing.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, W John; Kim, Won

    2003-01-01

    Indexing of documents is an important strategy intended to make the literature more readily available to the user. Here we describe several dimensions of indexing that are important if indexing is to be optimal. These dimensions are coverage, predictability, and transparency. MeSH terms and text words are compared in MEDLINE in regard to these dimensions. Part of our analysis consists in applying AdaBoost with decisions trees as the weak learners to estimate how reliably index terms are being assigned and how complex the criteria are by which they are being assigned. Our conclusions are that MeSH terms are more predictable and more transparent than text words.

  6. Magnetic Anisotropy and Paleomagnetic Study of Dikes Emplaced in the Wai'anae Volcano, Oahu, Hawaii: a Re-evaluation of the AMS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, B.; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2004-12-01

    The Wai'anae Volcano is the older of two shield volcanoes that make up the island of O'ahu. Previous age determinations suggest that the subaerial portion of the edifice erupted between approximately 3.7 and 2.7 Ma. The eroded Wai'anae Volcano had a well-developed caldera centered near the back of its two most prominent valleys, and two major rift zones: a prominent north-west rift zone, well defined by a complex of sub-parallel dikes trending approximately N52W, and a more diffuse south rift zone, trending between S20W to due south. In order to investigate the volcanic evolution, the plumbing and the triggering mechanisms of the catastrophic mass wasting occurred in the volcano we have undertaken a paleomagnetic and AMS study of 7 dikes from the volcano. We drilled the dikes paying special attention to the chilled margins were we recovered a minimum of 8 and up to 23 samples per margin. The width of the dikes ranges between 0.5 to 4 m. In terms of the paleomagnetic results at least 20 samples per intrusive were stepwise demagnetized by a.f. from 5 to 100mT. Companion specimens from the same core were demagnetized at 15 temperature steps. In both cases demagnetization diagrams obtained with each technique showed a stable Characteristic direction of remanence (ChRM) determined with no ambiguity. The ChRM was calculated using principal component analysis for the demagnetization diagrams with a well-defined component trending to the origin. In addition, low field susceptibility vs temperature (k-T) and SIRM experiments were able to identify magnetite (575oC) and a low temperature mineral phase at about 250-300o C which probably reflects the presence of titanomagnetite. The determined directions of the intrusives resulted in normal and reversed polarities indicating that such dikes were emplaced at different periods of time covering a gap of 350 kyrs. Magnetic fabric studies of the dikes along a NW-SE section across the present southwestern part of the Waianae volcano

  7. The curvature index and synchronization of dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Sheng; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2012-06-01

    We develop a quantity, named the curvature index, for dynamical systems. This index is defined as the limit of the average curvature of the trajectory during evolution, which measures the bending of the curve on an attractor. The curvature index has the ability to differentiate the topological change of an attractor, as its alterations exhibit the structural changes of a dynamical system. Thus, the curvature index may indicate thresholds of some synchronization regimes. The Rössler system and a time-delay system are simulated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the index, respectively.

  8. Indexing for Invention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breton, Ernest J.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the development of a functional indexing system that is tailored to the thinking involved in the process of invention. Classification by function is discussed; matrix representation is explained; a controlled vocabulary of verbs, objects, and modifiers is described; and the relation to other indexing systems is examined. (13 references)…

  9. Indexing Editorial Cartoons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapple-Sokol, Angie

    1996-01-01

    Discusses access to editorial cartoons, including the importance and worth of editorial cartoons; sources, including newspapers, museums, and special cartoon collections; indexing and classification; subject access; indexing by illustrator and subject; technology and access, including digital data; access to special collections; and access to…

  10. Linked Phrase Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craven, Timothy C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a computer-assisted system for the production of printed indexes based on networks of concept relations expressed in natural-language-like form. The LIPHIS is designed to handle more complex networks of concept relations, and so produce better indexing of highly detailed subjects. (Author/CWM)

  11. EMMSE Media Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Clifford A., Comp.; McKinstry, Herbert A., Comp.

    This index provides a topical taxonomy of media which have been selected for their relevance in the teaching of materials science and engineering. The index is keyed to a matrix which matches topical and/or class material with six classifications of media: print, 16mm film, super 8 film, slide/tape, videotape, and other (including interactive…

  12. A Computer Calculated Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Francis J.

    The Gunning Fog Index of readability indicates both the average length of words and the difficult words (three or more syllables) in written material. This document describes a business communication course at Wayne State University in which students calculate the Gunning Fog Index of two of their writing assignments with the aid of the…

  13. Transfer Index: One Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinselman, James L.

    A transfer index of the proportion of students in California's community colleges transferring to the University of California (UC) and the California State University (CSU) system for fall 1982, 1983, and 1984 is presented in this report. Introductory material provides one definition of an appropriate index of transfer rates, i.e., the ratio of…

  14. Universal Index System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Steve; Roussopoulos, Nick; Sellis, Timos; Wallace, Sarah

    1993-01-01

    The Universal Index System (UIS) is an index management system that uses a uniform interface to solve the heterogeneity problem among database management systems. UIS provides an easy-to-use common interface to access all underlying data, but also allows different underlying database management systems, storage representations, and access methods.

  15. Children's Stress Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Dianne, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This double issue of the "ZPG Reporter" focuses on the theme of ZPG's Children's Stress Index", the first national survey of children's well-being based on population- related pressures. Using an extensive list of social, economic, and environmental factors that affect the lives of children, the index ranks 828 cities, counties, and…

  16. A Factor Simplicity Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2003-01-01

    Proposes an index for assessing the degree of factor simplicity in the context of principal components and exploratory factor analysis. The index does not depend on the scale of the factors, and its maximum and minimum are related only to the degree of simplicity in the loading matrix. (SLD)

  17. Gradient index retroreflector

    DOEpatents

    Layne, Clyde B.

    1988-01-01

    A retroreflector is formed of a graded index lens with a reflective coating at one end. The lens has a length of an odd multiple of a quarter period thereof. Hexagonally shaped graded index lenses may be closely packed in an array to form a retroreflecting surface.

  18. Bias and other limitations affect measures of journals in integrative and complementary medicineKa-wai Fan, PhD.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ka-wai

    2015-07-01

    Publishing articles in a prestigious journal is a golden rule for university professors and researchers nowadays. Impact factor, journal rank, and citation count, included in Science Citation Index managed by Thomson Reuters Web of Science, are the most important indicators for evaluating the quality of academic journals. By listing the journals encompassed in the "Integrative and Complementary Medicine" category of Science Citation Index from 2003 to 2013, this paper examines the publication trends of journals in the category. The examination includes number, country of origin, ranking, and languages of journals. Moreover, newly listed or removed journals in the category, journal publishers, and open access strategies are examined. It is concluded that the role of journal publisher should not be undermined in the "Integrative and Complementary Medicine" category.

  19. The WAIS Melt Monitor: An automated ice core melting system for meltwater sample handling and the collection of high resolution microparticle size distribution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, D. J.; Koffman, B. G.; Kreutz, K. J.; Hamilton, G. S.

    2010-12-01

    Paleoclimate data are often extracted from ice cores by careful geochemical analysis of meltwater samples. The analysis of the microparticles found in ice cores can also yield unique clues about atmospheric dust loading and transport, dust provenance and past environmental conditions. Determination of microparticle concentration, size distribution and chemical makeup as a function of depth is especially difficult because the particle size measurement either consumes or contaminates the meltwater, preventing further geochemical analysis. Here we describe a microcontroller-based ice core melting system which allows the collection of separate microparticle and chemistry samples from the same depth intervals in the ice core, while logging and accurately depth-tagging real-time electrical conductivity and particle size distribution data. This system was designed specifically to support microparticle analysis of the WAIS Divide WDC06A deep ice core, but many of the subsystems are applicable to more general ice core melting operations. Major system components include: a rotary encoder to measure ice core melt displacement with 0.1 millimeter accuracy, a meltwater tracking system to assign core depths to conductivity, particle and sample vial data, an optical debubbler level control system to protect the Abakus laser particle counter from damage due to air bubbles, a Rabbit 3700 microcontroller which communicates with a host PC, collects encoder and optical sensor data and autonomously operates Gilson peristaltic pumps and fraction collectors to provide automatic sample handling, melt monitor control software operating on a standard PC allowing the user to control and view the status of the system, data logging software operating on the same PC to collect data from the melting, electrical conductivity and microparticle measurement systems. Because microparticle samples can easily be contaminated, we use optical air bubble sensors and high resolution ice core density

  20. Potential vorticity index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcilon, Albert; Weng, Hengyi

    1990-01-01

    Using standard data analysis techniques, researchers explore the links between disturbance growth and quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity (PV) gradients; appearance and disappearance of cutoff lows and blocking highs and their relation to a zonal index (properly defined in terms of PV); and teleconnections between different flow patterns and their relation to the zonal index. It was found that the PV index and the eddy index correlate better than a zonal index (defined by zonal wind) and the eddy index. In the frequency domain there are three frequencies (.03, .07 and .17 cpd (cycle per day) corresponding to periods of 33, 14 and 6 days) at which PV index and the eddy index exhibit local maxima. The high correlation found at periods of 33 days is mainly due to eddy activity at high latitudes while the local correlation maxima found at the shorter periods are mainly due mid-latitude eddy activity. The correlation between the PV index and the geopotential height anomaly at 500 mb, at each grid point in the Northern Hemisphere, shows the existence of most of the teleconnection patterns summarized by Wallace and Gutzler (1981): the North Atlantic Oscillation, the North Pacific Oscillation, and the Pacific/North American patterns. Results show that the Isentropic Potential Vorticity (IPV) analysis can be a very useful and powerful tool when used to understand the dynamics of several large scale atmospheric systems. Although the data are limited to only one winter, and it is difficult to assess the statistical significance of the correlation coefficients presented here, the results are encouraging from physical viewpoint.

  1. Index Construction, A Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    Application in Science, S5G37 Technology , and Humanities, N.Y., N.Y: John Wiley & Sons, C 1969. Z695.9 Harrod, Leonard Montague, ed. Indexers on... Indexing Terminology, Posting Terms and KWOC, DESK Alexandria, VA: DDC, May, 1979. Z1035.1 Library of Congress. Main Reading Room, Reference Collection...A1544 750 INDEX CONSTRUCTON AR BI OGRAPHYU ARMY FIEL ARTILERY SHOOL FORT SIL OR MILE R SEP 84 USA FASM -DSB- A0 VNtASIIEFG 5/2 NI MONSOONSfl 0841

  2. Glycemic index and disease.

    PubMed

    Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier

    2002-07-01

    It has been suggested that foods with a high glycemic index are detrimental to health and that healthy people should be told to avoid these foods. This paper takes the position that not enough valid scientific data are available to launch a public health campaign to disseminate such a recommendation. This paper explores the glycemic index and its validity and discusses the effect of postprandial glucose and insulin responses on food intake, obesity, type 1 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Presented herein are the reasons why it is premature to recommend that the general population avoid foods with a high glycemic index.

  3. Preschoolers' dot enumeration abilities are markers of their arithmetic competence.

    PubMed

    Gray, Sarah A; Reeve, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The abilities to enumerate small sets of items (e.g., dots) and to compare magnitudes are claimed to be indexes of core numerical competences that scaffold early math development. Insofar as this is correct, these abilities may be diagnostic markers of math competence in preschoolers. However, unlike magnitude comparison abilities, little research has examined preschoolers' ability to enumerate small sets, or its significance for emerging math abilities; which is surprising since dot enumeration is a marker of school-aged children's math competence. It is nevertheless possible that general cognitive functions (working memory, response inhibition in particular) are associated with preschoolers' math abilities and underlie nascent dot enumeration abilities. We investigated whether preschoolers' dot enumeration abilities predict their non-verbal arithmetic ability, over and above the influence of working memory and response inhibition. Two measures of dot enumeration ability were examined-inverse efficiency and paradigm specific (response time profiles) measures-to determine which has the better diagnostic utility as a marker of math competence. Seventy-eight 42-to-57 month-olds completed dot enumeration, working memory, response inhibition, and non-verbal addition and subtraction tasks. Dot enumeration efficiency predicted arithmetic ability over and above the influence of general cognitive functions. While dot enumeration efficiency was a better predictor of arithmetic ability than paradigm specific response time profiles; the response time profile displaying the smallest subitizing range and steepest subitizing slope, also displayed poor addition abilities, suggesting a weak subitizing profile may have diagnostic significance in preschoolers. Overall, the findings support the claim that dot enumeration abilities and general cognitive functions are markers of preschoolers' math ability.

  4. NASA 1981 photography index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    An index of representative photographs is presented. Color transparencies and black and white glossies of major launches, Mariner spacecraft, Pioneer spacecraft, planets and other space phenomena, Skylab, space shuttle, Viking spacecraft, and Voyager spacecraft are included.

  5. Pesticide Use Site Index

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pesticide Use Site Index will help a company (or other applicant) identify which data requirements are needed to register a pesticide product. It provides information on pesticide use sites and pesticide major use patterns.

  6. Gradient Index Lens Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-25

    over six to nine readings at two to three input polarizations each. The first set of index values is calculated assuming ei = 450 These values are...TECHNICAL REPORT RG-CR-84-2 Sli GRADIENT INDEX LENS RESEARCH Prepared by: Duncan T. Moore The Institute of Optics University of Rochester Rochester...CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (Miten Data Fntered) READ INSTRUCTIONSREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFORE COMPLETING FORM 1. REPORT NU14MU R GOVT ACCESSION No. 3

  7. JSC document index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) document index is intended to provide a single source listing of all published JSC-numbered documents their authors, and the designated offices of prime responsibility (OPR's) by mail code at the time of publication. The index contains documents which have been received and processed by the JSC Technical Library as of January 13, 1988. Other JSC-numbered documents which are controlled but not available through the JSC Library are also listed.

  8. New generic indexing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeston, Michael

    1996-01-01

    There has been no fundamental change in the dynamic indexing methods supporting database systems since the invention of the B-tree twenty-five years ago. And yet the whole classical approach to dynamic database indexing has long since become inappropriate and increasingly inadequate. We are moving rapidly from the conventional one-dimensional world of fixed-structure text and numbers to a multi-dimensional world of variable structures, objects and images, in space and time. But, even before leaving the confines of conventional database indexing, the situation is highly unsatisfactory. In fact, our research has led us to question the basic assumptions of conventional database indexing. We have spent the past ten years studying the properties of multi-dimensional indexing methods, and in this paper we draw the strands of a number of developments together - some quite old, some very new, to show how we now have the basis for a new generic indexing technology for the next generation of database systems.

  9. Specific Abilities May Increment Psychometric g for High Ability Populations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-14

    factoring of cognitive ability batteries yields primary group factors that are highly g-loaded ( Carroll , 1993). Using military data, Ree and Earles... Carroll , J. B. (1993). Human Cognitive Abilities. New York: Cambridge University Press. Detterman, D. K., Daniel, M. H. (1989). Correlations of

  10. Needs for Research in Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milstead, Jessica L.

    1994-01-01

    Uncovers issues in indexing that need scientific research, including the cognitive processes of indexers and users; vocabulary control; how best to supplement human indexers' intellectual effort with computer capabilities; structure and layout of indexes on the printed page and on the computer screen; and evaluation of indexes. (Contains 21…

  11. A suggested generalization for the lacunarity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon-Carter, J.; Lobato-Calleros, C.; Escarela-Perez, R.; Rodriguez, E.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2009-10-01

    Nowadays, lacunarity is a well-accepted concept to complement fractality studies of complex sets. Lacunarity features are used to assess the largeness of gaps or holes of complex signals and images. As it stands, the lacunarity analysis used is an index averaging the behavior of small- and large-size structures in a given set. The aim of this work is to propose a generalized lacunarity concept on the basis of generalized moments. In this form, the lacunarity index, depending on a discrimination parameter, is oriented to quantify lacunarity associated with objects of different size. Textbook and real images are used to illustrate the ability of the generalized lacunarity index for displaying interesting features of real complex sets.

  12. Quarantine document system indexing procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Quarantine Document System (QDS) is described including the indexing procedures and thesaurus of indexing terms. The QDS consists of these functional elements: acquisition, cataloging, indexing, storage, and retrieval. A complete listing of the collection, and the thesaurus are included.

  13. Beyond the Kubler index

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Velde, B.

    1989-01-01

    The value of peak width at half-height for the illite 001 XRD reflection is known as the Kubler index or the illite "crystallinity' index. This measurement, which has been related to the degree of metamorphism of very low-grade, pelitic rocks, is a function of at least two crystal-chemical factors: 1) illite X-ray scattering domain size; and 2) illite structural distortions (especially swelling). Reynolds' NEWMOD computer program is used to construct a grid with which these two contributions to illite peak width can be determined independently from measurements of the 001 peak width at half-height and the Srodon intensity ratio. This method yields more information about changes undergone by illite during metamorphism than application of the Kubler index method alone. -Authors

  14. Implicit Learning as an Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Scott Barry; DeYoung, Caroline G.; Gray, Jeremy R.; Jimenez, Luis; Brown, Jamie; Mackintosh, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    The ability to automatically and implicitly detect complex and noisy regularities in the environment is a fundamental aspect of human cognition. Despite considerable interest in implicit processes, few researchers have conceptualized implicit learning as an ability with meaningful individual differences. Instead, various researchers (e.g., Reber,…

  15. The Measurement of Translation Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Variables that constitute translation ability are discussed, based on a two-year development and validation study of job-related tests of translation ability for the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The project involved the development of two parallel forms of the Spanish into English Verbatim Translation Exam (SEVTE). (five references) (LB)

  16. Strategies of Adaptive Ability Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    A number of strategies are described for adapting ability test items to individual differences in ability levels of testees. Each strategy consists of a different set of rules for selecting the sequence of test items to be administered to a given testee. Advantages and disadvantages of each strategy are discussed, and research issues unique to the…

  17. Direct-write graded index materials realized in protein hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehr, Bryan; Scrymgeour, David A.

    2016-09-01

    The ability to create optical materials with arbitrary index distributions would prove transformative for optics design and applications. However, current fabrication techniques for graded index (GRIN) materials rely on diffusion profiles and therefore are unable to realize arbitrary distribution GRIN design. Here, we demonstrate the laser direct writing of graded index structures in protein-based hydrogels using multiphoton lithography. We show index changes spanning a range of 10-2, which is comparable with laser densified glass and polymer systems. Further, we demonstrate the conversion of these written density variation structures into SiO2, opening up the possibility of transforming GRIN hydrogels to a wide range of material systems.

  18. The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoms, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index Martin Thoms, Melissa Parsons, Phil Morley Bushfire and Natural Hazards Cooperative Research Centre, Geography and Planning, University of New England, Armidale NSW 2351, Australia. Natural hazard management policy directions in Australia - and indeed internationally - are increasingly being aligned to ideas of resilience. Resilience to natural hazards is the ability of individuals and communities to cope with disturbance and adversity and to maintain adaptive behaviour. Operationalizing the measurement and assessment of disaster resilience is often undertaken using a composite index, but this exercise is yet to be undertaken in Australia. The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index is a top-down, national scale assessment of the resilience of communities to natural hazards. Resilience is assessed based on two sets of capacities: coping and adaptive capacities. Coping capacity relates to the factors influencing the ability of a community to prepare for, absorb and recover from a natural hazard event. Adaptive capacity relates to the arrangements and processes that enable adjustment through learning, adaptation and transformation. Indicators are derived under themes of social character, economic capital, infrastructure and planning, emergency services, community capital, information and engagement and governance/leadership/policy, using existing data sets (e.g. census data) or evaluation of policy and procedure (e.g. disaster management planning). A composite index of disaster resilience is then computed for each spatial division, giving national scale coverage. The results of the Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index will be reported in a State of Disaster Resilience report, due in 2018. The index is co-designed with emergency service agencies, and will support policy development, planning, community engagement and emergency management.

  19. Indexes of severity: conceptual development.

    PubMed Central

    Krischer, J P

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of severity index development is presented in relation to conceptual issues in index definition, analytic issues in index formulation and validation issues in index application. The CHOP index is discussed along with six severity indexes described in an earlier paper dealing with underlying concepts to illustrate the material presented. Replies are provided to specific questions raised in an accompanying paper discussing the Injury Severity Score. This conceptual material is presented to provide a foundation for severity index development, to suggest criteria to be used in their formulation and testing, and to identify analyses that can lead to the successful selection and application of an index for a defined purpose. PMID:468553

  20. The WAIS Divide deep ice core WD2014 chronology - Part 1: Methane synchronization (68-31 ka BP) and the gas age-ice age difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buizert, C.; Cuffey, K. M.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Baggenstos, D.; Fudge, T. J.; Steig, E. J.; Markle, B. R.; Winstrup, M.; Rhodes, R. H.; Brook, E. J.; Sowers, T. A.; Clow, G. D.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.; Sigl, M.; McConnell, J. R.; Taylor, K. C.

    2015-02-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide (WAIS Divide, WD) ice core is a newly drilled, high-accumulation deep ice core that provides Antarctic climate records of the past ∼68 ka at unprecedented temporal resolution. The upper 2850 m (back to 31.2 ka BP) have been dated using annual-layer counting. Here we present a chronology for the deep part of the core (67.8-31.2 ka BP), which is based on stratigraphic matching to annual-layer-counted Greenland ice cores using globally well-mixed atmospheric methane. We calculate the WD gas age-ice age difference (Δage) using a combination of firn densification modeling, ice-flow modeling, and a data set of δ15N-N2, a proxy for past firn column thickness. The largest Δage at WD occurs during the Last Glacial Maximum, and is 525 ± 120 years. Internally consistent solutions can be found only when assuming little to no influence of impurity content on densification rates, contrary to a recently proposed hypothesis. We synchronize the WD chronology to a linearly scaled version of the layer-counted Greenland Ice Core Chronology (GICC05), which brings the age of Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events into agreement with the U/Th absolutely dated Hulu Cave speleothem record. The small Δage at WD provides valuable opportunities to investigate the timing of atmospheric greenhouse gas variations relative to Antarctic climate, as well as the interhemispheric phasing of the "bipolar seesaw".

  1. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) processing speed scores as measures of noncredible responding: The third generation of embedded performance validity indicators.

    PubMed

    Erdodi, Laszlo A; Abeare, Christopher A; Lichtenstein, Jonathan D; Tyson, Bradley T; Kucharski, Brittany; Zuccato, Brandon G; Roth, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    Research suggests that select processing speed measures can also serve as embedded validity indicators (EVIs). The present study examined the diagnostic utility of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) subtests as EVIs in a mixed clinical sample of 205 patients medically referred for neuropsychological assessment (53.3% female, mean age = 45.1). Classification accuracy was calculated against 3 composite measures of performance validity as criterion variables. A PSI ≤79 produced a good combination of sensitivity (.23-.56) and specificity (.92-.98). A Coding scaled score ≤5 resulted in good specificity (.94-1.00), but low and variable sensitivity (.04-.28). A Symbol Search scaled score ≤6 achieved a good balance between sensitivity (.38-.64) and specificity (.88-.93). A Coding-Symbol Search scaled score difference ≥5 produced adequate specificity (.89-.91) but consistently low sensitivity (.08-.12). A 2-tailed cutoff on the Coding/Symbol Search raw score ratio (≤1.41 or ≥3.57) produced acceptable specificity (.87-.93), but low sensitivity (.15-.24). Failing ≥2 of these EVIs produced variable specificity (.81-.93) and sensitivity (.31-.59). Failing ≥3 of these EVIs stabilized specificity (.89-.94) at a small cost to sensitivity (.23-.53). Results suggest that processing speed based EVIs have the potential to provide a cost-effective and expedient method for evaluating the validity of cognitive data. Given their generally low and variable sensitivity, however, they should not be used in isolation to determine the credibility of a given response set. They also produced unacceptably high rates of false positive errors in patients with moderate-to-severe head injury. Combining evidence from multiple EVIs has the potential to improve overall classification accuracy. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. A new bipolar ice core record of volcanism from WAIS Divide and NEEM and implications for climate forcing of the last 2000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigl, Michael; McConnell, Joseph R.; Layman, Lawrence; Maselli, Olivia; McGwire, Ken; Pasteris, Daniel; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Steffensen, JøRgen Peder; Vinther, Bo; Edwards, Ross; Mulvaney, Robert; Kipfstuhl, Sepp

    2013-02-01

    Volcanism is a natural climate forcing causing short-term variations in temperatures. Histories of volcanic eruptions are needed to quantify their role in climate variability and assess human impacts. We present two new seasonally resolved, annually dated non-sea-salt sulfur records from polar ice cores—WAIS Divide (WDC06A) from West Antarctica spanning 408 B.C.E. to 2003 C.E. and NEEM (NEEM-2011-S1) from Greenland spanning 78 to 1997 C.E.—both analyzed using high-resolution continuous flow analysis coupled to two mass spectrometers. The high dating accuracy allowed placing the large bi-hemispheric deposition event ascribed to the eruption of Kuwae in Vanuatu (previously thought to be 1452/1453 C.E. and used as a tie-point in ice core dating) into the year 1458/1459 C.E. This new age is consistent with an independent ice core timescale from Law Dome and explains an apparent delayed response in tree rings to this volcanic event. A second volcanic event is detected in 1453 C.E. in both ice cores. We show for the first time ice core signals in Greenland and Antarctica from the strong eruption of Taupo in New Zealand in 232 C.E. In total, 133 volcanic events were extracted from WDC06A and 138 from NEEM-2011-S1, with 50 ice core signals—predominantly from tropical source volcanoes—identified simultaneously in both records. We assess the effect of large bipolar events on temperature-sensitive tree ring proxies. These two new volcanic records, synchronized with available ice core records to account for spatial variability in sulfate deposition, provide a basis for improving existing time series of volcanic forcing.

  3. A Sociodemographic Risk Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kristin Anderson; Vandivere, Sharon; Redd, Zakia

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we conceptualize and develop an index of sociodemographic risk that we hypothesize will be an improvement over the standard poverty measure as a measure of risk for children's development. The poverty line is widely used in government statistics and in research but is also widely acknowledged to have multiple shortcomings. Using…

  4. Space Photography 1977 Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An index is provided to representative photographs and transparencies available from NASA. Subjects include spacecraft, astronauts, lunar surface, planets and outer space phenomena, earth observations, and aviation. High altitude aircraft infrared photographs are included along with artists' conceptions of space shuttle and space colonies.

  5. Nitrate Leaching Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Nitrate Leaching Index is a rapid assessment tool that evaluates nitrate (NO3) leaching potential based on basic soil and climate information. It is the basis for many nutrient management planning efforts, but it has considerable limitations because of : 1) an oversimplification of the processes...

  6. Graded-index magnonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. S.; Kruglyak, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    The wave solutions of the Landau-Lifshitz equation (spin waves) are characterized by some of the most complex and peculiar dispersion relations among all waves. For example, the spin-wave ("magnonic") dispersion can range from the parabolic law (typical for a quantum-mechanical electron) at short wavelengths to the nonanalytical linear type (typical for light and acoustic phonons) at long wavelengths. Moreover, the long-wavelength magnonic dispersion has a gap and is inherently anisotropic, being naturally negative for a range of relative orientations between the effective field and the spin-wave wave vector. Nonuniformities in the effective field and magnetization configurations enable the guiding and steering of spin waves in a deliberate manner and therefore represent landscapes of graded refractive index (graded magnonic index). By analogy to the fields of graded-index photonics and transformation optics, the studies of spin waves in graded magnonic landscapes can be united under the umbrella of the graded-index magnonics theme and are reviewed here with focus on the challenges and opportunities ahead of this exciting research direction.

  7. Drug Impact Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Center for Drug-Free Schools and Communities.

    The Drug Impact Index provides a set of indicators designed to determine the extent of the local drug problem in a community. Each indicator includes a technical note on the data sources, a graph showing comparative statistics on that indicator for the Portland area and for the State of Oregon, and brief remarks on the implications of the data.…

  8. [Comparative study of theoretical literature on cold pathogenic disease in Wai tai mi yao fang (Arcane Essentials from the Imperial Library) and Tai ping sheng hui fang (Taiping Holy Prescriptions for Universal Relief)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huirui; Liang, Yongxuan

    2014-09-01

    In the Wai tai mi yao fang (Arcane Essentials from the Imperial Library) compiled in 752, its portion on cold pathogenic disorders embodies the achievements before the mid Tang Dynasty, whereas that in the Tai ping sheng hui fang (Taiping Holy Prescriptions for Universal Relief), compiled in 992 embodies those before the early Song Dynasty. Comparison on the theory of cold disorders in both books reveal that, during the 2 centuries period from mid Tang to early Song Dynasties, the texts as a carrier for the transmission of such theory in both show no distinct changes, but only with minor revisions and improvements.

  9. [Driving ability with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Küst, J; Dettmers, C

    2014-07-01

    Driving is an important issue for young patients, especially for those whose walking capacity is impaired. Driving might support the patient's social and vocational participation. The question as to whether a patient with multiple sclerosis (MS) is restricted in the ability to drive a car depends on neurological and neuropsychological deficits, self-awareness, insight into deficits and ability to compensate for loss of function. Because of the enormous variability of symptoms in MS the question is highly individualized. A practical driving test under supervision of a driving instructor (possibly accompanied by a neuropsychologist) might be helpful in providing both patient and relatives adequate feedback on driving abilities.

  10. Balance ability and athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Hrysomallis, Con

    2011-03-01

    The relationship between balance ability and sport injury risk has been established in many cases, but the relationship between balance ability and athletic performance is less clear. This review compares the balance ability of athletes from different sports, determines if there is a difference in balance ability of athletes at different levels of competition within the same sport, determines the relationship of balance ability with performance measures and examines the influence of balance training on sport performance or motor skills. Based on the available data from cross-sectional studies, gymnasts tended to have the best balance ability, followed by soccer players, swimmers, active control subjects and then basketball players. Surprisingly, no studies were found that compared the balance ability of rifle shooters with other athletes. There were some sports, such as rifle shooting, soccer and golf, where elite athletes were found to have superior balance ability compared with their less proficient counterparts, but this was not found to be the case for alpine skiing, surfing and judo. Balance ability was shown to be significantly related to rifle shooting accuracy, archery shooting accuracy, ice hockey maximum skating speed and simulated luge start speed, but not for baseball pitching accuracy or snowboarding ranking points. Prospective studies have shown that the addition of a balance training component to the activities of recreationally active subjects or physical education students has resulted in improvements in vertical jump, agility, shuttle run and downhill slalom skiing. A proposed mechanism for the enhancement in motor skills from balance training is an increase in the rate of force development. There are limited data on the influence of balance training on motor skills of elite athletes. When the effectiveness of balance training was compared with resistance training, it was found that resistance training produced superior performance results for

  11. The COPD Helplessness Index

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Patricia P.; Yelin, Edward H.; Iribarren, Carlos; Knight, Sara J.; Blanc, Paul D.; Eisner, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Psychologic factors affect how patients with COPD respond to attempts to improve their self-management skills. Learned helplessness may be one such factor, but there is no validated measure of helplessness in COPD. Methods: We administered a new COPD Helplessness Index (CHI) to 1,202 patients with COPD. Concurrent validity was assessed through association of the CHI with established psychosocial measures and COPD severity. The association of helplessness with incident COPD exacerbations was then examined by following subjects over a median 2.1 years, defining COPD exacerbations as COPD-related hospitalizations or ED visits. Results: The CHI demonstrated internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.75); factor analysis was consistent with the CHI representing a single construct. Greater CHI-measured helplessness correlated with greater COPD severity assessed by the BODE (Body-mass, Obstruction, Dyspnea, Exercise) Index (r = 0.34; P < .001). Higher CHI scores were associated with worse generic (Short Form-12, Physical Component Summary Score) and respiratory-specific (Airways Questionnaire 20) health-related quality of life, greater depressive symptoms, and higher anxiety (all P < .001). Controlling for sociodemographics and smoking status, helplessness was prospectively associated with incident COPD exacerbations (hazard ratio = 1.31; P < .001). After also controlling for the BODE Index, helplessness remained predictive of COPD exacerbations among subjects with BODE Index ≤ median (hazard ratio = 1.35; P = .01), but not among subjects with higher BODE Index values (hazard ratio = 0.93; P = .34). Conclusions: The CHI is an internally consistent and valid measure, concurrently associated with health status and predictively associated with COPD exacerbations. The CHI may prove a useful tool in analyzing differential clinical responses mediated by patient-centered attributes. PMID:19837823

  12. WAIS-IV Digit Span variables: are they valuable for use in predicting TOMM and MSVT failure?

    PubMed

    Whitney, Kriscinda A; Shepard, Polly H; Davis, Jeremy J

    2013-01-01

    The Digit Span (DS) task in the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition differs substantially from earlier versions of the measure, with one of the major changes being the addition of a sequencing component. In the present investigation, the usefulness of the new sequencing task and other DS variables (i.e., DS Age-Scaled Score, DS Forward Total, DS Backward Total, and Reliable DS) was investigated with regard to the ability of these variables to predict negative response bias. Negative response bias was first defined and examined using below-cutoff performance on the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) (N = 99). Then, for comparison purposes, negative response bias was examined using below-cutoff performance on the Medical Symptom Validity Test (MSVT; N = 95). Study participants included primarily middle-aged outpatients at a Veterans Affairs medical center. Findings from this retrospective analysis showed that, regardless of whether the TOMM or the MSVT was used as the negative response bias criterion, of all the DS variables examined, DS Sequencing Total showed the best classification accuracy. Yet, due to its relatively low positive and negative predictive power, DS Sequencing Total is not recommended for use in isolation to identify negative response bias.

  13. Fiber optic refractive index monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Jonathan David

    2002-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

  14. Numerical ability predicts mortgage default.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Kristopher; Goette, Lorenz; Meier, Stephan

    2013-07-09

    Unprecedented levels of US subprime mortgage defaults precipitated a severe global financial crisis in late 2008, plunging much of the industrialized world into a deep recession. However, the fundamental reasons for why US mortgages defaulted at such spectacular rates remain largely unknown. This paper presents empirical evidence showing that the ability to perform basic mathematical calculations is negatively associated with the propensity to default on one's mortgage. We measure several aspects of financial literacy and cognitive ability in a survey of subprime mortgage borrowers who took out loans in 2006 and 2007, and match them to objective, detailed administrative data on mortgage characteristics and payment histories. The relationship between numerical ability and mortgage default is robust to controlling for a broad set of sociodemographic variables, and is not driven by other aspects of cognitive ability. We find no support for the hypothesis that numerical ability impacts mortgage outcomes through the choice of the mortgage contract. Rather, our results suggest that individuals with limited numerical ability default on their mortgage due to behavior unrelated to the initial choice of their mortgage.

  15. Variable Lifting Index (VLI)

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Thomas; Occhipinti, Enrico; Colombini, Daniela; Alvarez-Casado, Enrique; Fox, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We seek to develop a new approach for analyzing the physical demands of highly variable lifting tasks through an adaptation of the Revised NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Lifting Equation (RNLE) into a Variable Lifting Index (VLI). Background: There are many jobs that contain individual lifts that vary from lift to lift due to the task requirements. The NIOSH Lifting Equation is not suitable in its present form to analyze variable lifting tasks. Method: In extending the prior work on the VLI, two procedures are presented to allow users to analyze variable lifting tasks. One approach involves the sampling of lifting tasks performed by a worker over a shift and the calculation of the Frequency Independent Lift Index (FILI) for each sampled lift and the aggregation of the FILI values into six categories. The Composite Lift Index (CLI) equation is used with lifting index (LI) category frequency data to calculate the VLI. The second approach employs a detailed systematic collection of lifting task data from production and/or organizational sources. The data are organized into simplified task parameter categories and further aggregated into six FILI categories, which also use the CLI equation to calculate the VLI. Results: The two procedures will allow practitioners to systematically employ the VLI method to a variety of work situations where highly variable lifting tasks are performed. Conclusions: The scientific basis for the VLI procedure is similar to that for the CLI originally presented by NIOSH; however, the VLI method remains to be validated. Application: The VLI method allows an analyst to assess highly variable manual lifting jobs in which the task characteristics vary from lift to lift during a shift. PMID:26646300

  16. Potential vorticity index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcilon, Albert; Weng, Hengyi

    1991-01-01

    Based on the European Center For Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) First Global Atmospheric Research Program Global Experiment (FGGE) IIIb data set in the 1978 to 1979 winter, a potential vorticity (PV) index was defined as a measure of the zonally averaged, mid-latitude PV gradient on the 300 K isentropic surface in the Northern Hemisphere. The evolution of that index and its relation to teleconnection patterns of 500 mb geopotential height anomaly are studied. The results of the temporal and spatial variation of blocking and cyclogenesis in the 1978 to 1979 winter and its relation to global and local PV gradients were obtained. Complex empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analyses were performed, using the same FGGE data set for the 1978 to 1979 winter, for a representative high latitude band and mid latitude band geopotential height anomalies at 500 mb, phi sub h, phi sub m, and PV gradient at 300 K, delta(Q), at each longitude for the three month period. The focus of current research is the following: (1) to perform Fourier analyses for the first three EOF's of phi sub h, phi sub m, and delta(Q) at given latitude bands, and to find the dominant wavenumbers and frequencies which are responsible for these EOF's; (2) to compare the results from EOF and Fourier analyses which will be used to explore the relations of blocking and cyclogensis with local and global PV gradients; and (3) to study the time dependence of the local PV gradients and relate it to the PV index vacillation cycles observed in the PV index cycle.

  17. New weather index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the University of Delaware have refined the wind-chill factor, a common measurement of weather discomfort, into a new misery register called the weather stress index. In addition to the mix of temperature and wind speed data used to calculate wind chill, the recipe for the index adds two new ingredients—humidity and a dash of benchmark statistics—to estimate human reaction to weather conditions. NOAA says that the weather stress index estimates human reaction to weather conditions and that the reaction depends on variations from the ‘normal’ conditions in the locality involved.Discomfort criteria for New Orleans, La., and Bismarck, N.D., for example, differ drastically. According to NOAA, when it's the middle of winter and it's -10°C with a relative humidity of 80% and 24 km/h winds, persons in New Orleans would be highly stressed while those in Bismarck wouldn't bat an eye.

  18. Index of cyber integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gustave

    2014-05-01

    Unfortunately, there is no metric, nor set of metrics, that are both general enough to encompass all possible types of applications yet specific enough to capture the application and attack specific details. As a result we are left with ad-hoc methods for generating evaluations of the security of our systems. Current state of the art methods for evaluating the security of systems include penetration testing and cyber evaluation tests. For these evaluations, security professionals simulate an attack from malicious outsiders and malicious insiders. These evaluations are very productive and are able to discover potential vulnerabilities resulting from improper system configuration, hardware and software flaws, or operational weaknesses. We therefore propose the index of cyber integrity (ICI), which is modeled after the index of biological integrity (IBI) to provide a holistic measure of the health of a system under test in a cyber-environment. The ICI provides a broad base measure through a collection of application and system specific metrics. In this paper, following the example of the IBI, we demonstrate how a multi-metric index may be used as a holistic measure of the health of a system under test in a cyber-environment.

  19. Indexing Overlap and Consistency between the "Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals" and the "Architectural Periodicals Index."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giral, Angela; Taylor, Arlene G.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the overlap of article coverage and the consistency of indexing between the "Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals" and the "Architectural Periodicals Index." The historical backgrounds of the two indexes are described, possibilities for collaboration between them are considered, and implications for users are…

  20. Estimation abilities of large numerosities in Kindergartners

    PubMed Central

    Mejias, Sandrine; Schiltz, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The approximate number system (ANS) is thought to be a building block for the elaboration of formal mathematics. However, little is known about how this core system develops and if it can be influenced by external factors at a young age (before the child enters formal numeracy education). The purpose of this study was to examine numerical magnitude representations of 5–6 year old children at 2 different moments of Kindergarten considering children's early number competence as well as schools' socio-economic index (SEI). This study investigated estimation abilities of large numerosities using symbolic and non-symbolic output formats (8–64). In addition, we assessed symbolic and non-symbolic early number competence (1–12) at the end of the 2nd (N = 42) and the 3rd (N = 32) Kindergarten grade. By letting children freely produce estimates we observed surprising estimation abilities at a very young age (from 5 year on) extending far beyond children's symbolic explicit knowledge. Moreover, the time of testing has an impact on the ANS accuracy since 3rd Kindergarteners were more precise in both estimation tasks. Additionally, children who presented better exact symbolic knowledge were also those with the most refined ANS. However, this was true only for 3rd Kindergarteners who were a few months from receiving math instructions. In a similar vein, higher SEI positively impacted only the oldest children's estimation abilities whereas it played a role for exact early number competences already in 2nd and 3rd graders. Our results support the view that approximate numerical representations are linked to exact number competence in young children before the start of formal math education and might thus serve as building blocks for mathematical knowledge. Since this core number system was also sensitive to external components such as the SEI this implies that it can most probably be targeted and refined through specific educational strategies from preschool on. PMID

  1. EXPLORATORY RESEARCH ON COMMUNICATION ABILITIES AND CREATIVE ABILITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TAYLOR, CALVIN W.; AND OTHERS

    THIS STUDY SOUGHT TO IDENTIFY VARIABLES RELATED TO EFFECTIVENESS OF COMMUNICATION IN MILITARY OPERATIONS. THE GOAL WAS TO DEVELOP TESTS TO CLASSIFY OFFICERS AND AIRMEN, BASED UPON ALL OF THE BROAD COMMUNICATION ABILITIES NEEDED IN THE AIR FORCE. THE RESEARCH OUTLINE CONSISTED OF REVIEWING COMMUNICATION STUDIES AND OTHER TESTS, PREPARING A REDUCED…

  2. Inhibitory Control Predicts Grammatical Ability

    PubMed Central

    Ibbotson, Paul; Kearvell-White, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence that individual variation in grammatical ability can be predicted by individual variation in inhibitory control. We tested 81 5-year-olds using two classic tests from linguistics and psychology (Past Tense and the Stroop). Inhibitory control was a better predicator of grammatical ability than either vocabulary or age. Our explanation is that giving the correct response in both tests requires using a common cognitive capacity to inhibit unwanted competition. The implications are that understanding the developmental trajectory of language acquisition can benefit from integrating the developmental trajectory of non-linguistic faculties, such as executive control. PMID:26659926

  3. 29. TRACK LAYOUT, INDEX TO DRAWINGS AND INDEX TO MATERIALS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. TRACK LAYOUT, INDEX TO DRAWINGS AND INDEX TO MATERIALS, REED & STEM ARCHITECTS, ST. PAUL, NEW YORK, 1909 (Burlington Northern Collection, Seattle, Washington) - Union Passenger Station Concourse, 1713 Pacific Avenue, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  4. Cognitive Abilities of Maltreated Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viezel, Kathleen D.; Freer, Benjamin D.; Lowell, Ari; Castillo, Jenean A.

    2015-01-01

    School psychologists should be aware of developmental risk factors for children who have been abused or neglected. The present study used the "Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition" to examine the cognitive abilities of 120 children in foster care subsequent to maltreatment. Results indicated that, compared to a…

  5. Competence: Commodification of Human Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Soonghee

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the meaning and presumptions of competence in the concrete context of knowledge capitalism. First, the nature of competence as a "commodification of human ability" that obtains a standardized monetary value to sell in the labor market, is elucidated by applying Karl Marx's critical theory. Second, it is…

  6. Emotional Intelligence and Leadership Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbst, H. H.; Maree, J. G.; Sibanda, E.

    2006-01-01

    While exceptional leaders share certain qualities like a strong personal ethic and a compelling vision of the future, research has failed to provide conclusive "proof" of the link between a leader's effectiveness and his/ her emotional intelligence (defined from a cognitive perspective, as a set of abilities). Given the increased…

  7. Ability Estimation for Conventional Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jwa K.; Nicewander, W. Alan

    1993-01-01

    Bias, standard error, and reliability of five ability estimators were evaluated using Monte Carlo estimates of the unknown conditional means and variances of the estimators. Results indicate that estimates based on Bayesian modal, expected a posteriori, and weighted likelihood estimators were reasonably unbiased with relatively small standard…

  8. Learning Anatomy Enhances Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Klaassen, Tim P. F. M.; Donders, A. R. T.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability is an important factor in learning anatomy. Students with high scores on a mental rotation test (MRT) systematically score higher on anatomy examinations. This study aims to investigate if learning anatomy also oppositely improves the MRT-score. Five hundred first year students of medicine ("n" = 242, intervention) and…

  9. Challenging High-Ability Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scager, Karin; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Pilot, Albert; Wubbels, Theo

    2014-01-01

    The existing literature on indicators of an optimal learning environment for high-ability students frequently discusses the concept of challenge. It is, however, not clear what, precisely, constitutes appropriate challenge for these students. In this study, the authors examined an undergraduate honours course, Advanced Cell Biology, which has…

  10. Technology and Motor Ability Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Lang, Yong; Luo, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    As a new member joining the technology family, active video games have been developed to promote physical exercise. This working-in-progress paper shares an ongoing project on examining the basic motor abilities that are enhanced through participating in commercially available active video games. [For the full proceedings see ED557181.

  11. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Cell Shape Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adia-Nimuwa, Usienemfon; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Stellation is a measure of cell physiology and pathology for several cell groups including neural, liver and pancreatic cells. In the present work, we compare the results of a conventional two-dimensional shape index study of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescent microscopy images with the results obtained using a new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index similar to sphericity index. The stellation of astrocytes is investigated on nanofibrillar scaffolds composed of electrospun polyamide nanofibers that has demonstrated promise for central nervous system (CNS) repair. Recent work by our group has given us the ability to clearly segment the cells from nanofibrillar scaffolds in AFM images. The clear-featured AFM images indicated that the astrocyte processes were longer than previously identified at 24h. It was furthermore shown that cell spreading could vary significantly as a function of environmental parameters, and that AFM images could record these variations. The new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index incorporates the new information: longer stellate processes and cell spreading. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  12. Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Nuttall, Frank Q.

    2015-01-01

    The body mass index (BMI) is the metric currently in use for defining anthropometric height/weight characteristics in adults and for classifying (categorizing) them into groups. The common interpretation is that it represents an index of an individual’s fatness. It also is widely used as a risk factor for the development of or the prevalence of several health issues. In addition, it is widely used in determining public health policies.The BMI has been useful in population-based studies by virtue of its wide acceptance in defining specific categories of body mass as a health issue. However, it is increasingly clear that BMI is a rather poor indicator of percent of body fat. Importantly, the BMI also does not capture information on the mass of fat in different body sites. The latter is related not only to untoward health issues but to social issues as well. Lastly, current evidence indicates there is a wide range of BMIs over which mortality risk is modest, and this is age related. All of these issues are discussed in this brief review. PMID:27340299

  13. 2013 Traffic Safety Culture Index

    MedlinePlus

    ... death in the United States. 2013 Traffic Safety Culture Index January 2014 607 14th Street, NW, Suite ... org | 202-638-5944 Title 2013 Traffic Safety Culture Index (January 2014) About the Sponsor AAA Foundation ...

  14. Levels of Stress as Reported by Parents and Its Relationship to Their Child's Cognitive Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodbury, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if any relationship exists between "Parenting Stress Index" factors and child's cognitive abilities (Cattell-Horn-Carroll Theory of general intelligence). The participant population consisted of 16 mothers and 16 children. The cognitive abilities were measured by using one of the following measures: (1)…

  15. Global Enhanced Vegetation Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    By carefully measuring the wavelengths and intensity of visible and near-infrared light reflected by the land surface back up into space, the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Team can quantify the concentrations of green leaf vegetation around the world. The above MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) map shows the density of plant growth over the entire globe. Very low values of EVI (white and brown areas) correspond to barren areas of rock, sand, or snow. Moderate values (light greens) represent shrub and grassland, while high values indicate temperate and tropical rainforests (dark greens). The MODIS EVI gives scientists a new tool for monitoring major fluctuations in vegetation and understanding how they affect, and are affected by, regional climate trends. For more information, read NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Land Group/Vegetation Indices, Alfredo Huete, Principal Investigator, and Kamel Didan, University of Arizona

  16. [Ankle brachial index measurement].

    PubMed

    Rucigaj, Tanja Planinsek

    2014-10-01

    Ultrasound examinations are noninvasive diagnostic methods which, along with appropriate history and clinical examination, provide basic information on the etiology and spread of the disease, as well as on treatment options required in patients with chronic venous insufficiency and arterial flow impairment. Doppler flow meter offers useful data on venous blood return, primarily in great veins, while both deep and superficial veins as well as arteries can be visualized and data on venous and arterial hemodynamics obtained by duplex ultrasonography. In addition, Doppler flow meter provides data on the peripheral arterial system action through ankle brachial index measurement, which will guide the choice of compression therapy when deciding on the treatment of peripheral arterial disease and mixed arteriovenous leg ulcers. However, diagnosis of arterial insufficiency requires additional examinations.

  17. Imagery Ability and Task Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-24

    size of the dots was varied to test visual * . acuity , the number of dots was varied to test the ability to maintain complex images, and the trajectory...REPORT NUMBER 12. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER Technical Report #2 Ti b i / V Q/) _ 4. TITLE ( amd Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT...Mental imagery Visual thinking Spatial reasoning . 20. ABSTRACT (Continue an reverse aide If necesery mid identify by block numtber) Kosslyn, Brunn

  18. Visual Discriminatory Ability Among Prereaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, John Raymond; Ryckman, David B.

    The ability of 50 lower middle-class and 25 upper middle-class prereading children to discriminate between pairs of uppercase alphabet letters was tested. A set of 3x5 cards with a sample stimulus in the upper center section of each card and two alternative choice stimuli just below and to the right and left of the sample was used. The 650 total…

  19. [Vision and car driving ability].

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Helmut

    2011-05-01

    Visual functions relevant for car driving are: Visual acuity, contrast and twilight vision, visual field, ocular motility and alignment and colour vision. Generally accepted and standardized tests are available for visual acuity and visual field. Maximum permissible values have been defined arbitrarily and are hardly supported by studies. European standards have been published comprising also contrast and twilight vision. When examining driving ability progressive and treatable ocular disorders such as cataract and glaucoma have to be considered.

  20. Implicit learning as an ability.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Scott Barry; Deyoung, Colin G; Gray, Jeremy R; Jiménez, Luis; Brown, Jamie; Mackintosh, Nicholas

    2010-09-01

    The ability to automatically and implicitly detect complex and noisy regularities in the environment is a fundamental aspect of human cognition. Despite considerable interest in implicit processes, few researchers have conceptualized implicit learning as an ability with meaningful individual differences. Instead, various researchers (e.g., Reber, 1993; Stanovich, 2009) have suggested that individual differences in implicit learning are minimal relative to individual differences in explicit learning. In the current study of English 16-17year old students, we investigated the association of individual differences in implicit learning with a variety of cognitive and personality variables. Consistent with prior research and theorizing, implicit learning, as measured by a probabilistic sequence learning task, was more weakly related to psychometric intelligence than was explicit associative learning, and was unrelated to working memory. Structural equation modeling revealed that implicit learning was independently related to two components of psychometric intelligence: verbal analogical reasoning and processing speed. Implicit learning was also independently related to academic performance on two foreign language exams (French, German). Further, implicit learning was significantly associated with aspects of self-reported personality, including intuition, Openness to Experience, and impulsivity. We discuss the implications of implicit learning as an ability for dual-process theories of cognition, intelligence, personality, skill learning, complex cognition, and language acquisition.

  1. Comparison of mitotic index and Ki67 index in the prognostication of canine cutaneous mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Berlato, D; Murphy, S; Monti, P; Stewart, J; Newton, J R; Flindall, A; Maglennon, G A

    2015-06-01

    Proliferation markers are commonly used for prognostication of mast cell tumours. The aim of the study is to compare the relative abilities of Ki67 and mitotic index to predict survival in the same cohort of dogs with cutaneous MCTs. Histological grade, mitotic index and Ki67 index were performed in all samples and clinical information was obtained by a follow-up questionnaire. Ninety-five dogs were included in the study with a median follow-up of 1145 days. Survival times varied significantly between categories of histological grade, mitotic index and Ki67 index. Multivariable analyses showed that the risk of dying due to MCT was similar in dogs with increased Ki67 index [hazard ratio, HR: 3.0 (95% CI 1.3-6.8)] or increased mitotic index [HR: 2.7 (95% CI 1.1-6.5)]. In conclusion, both mitotic index and Ki67 index were able to independently differentiate MCTs with worse prognosis. This distinction is particularly meaningful in selecting intermediate grade MCTs that may benefit from more aggressive local or systemic treatment.

  2. Effects of mental practice on normal adult balance ability.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of mental practice on the balance abilities of normal individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental or control group (n=15 each). Participants in both groups performed balance training in a seated position on a gym ball for 20 minutes per session, five sessions per week, for 4 weeks. Members of the experimental group also performed mental practice for 10 minutes before the balance training. After the intervention, balance measuring equipment (Good Balance, Metitur, Finland) was used to quantitatively measure balance ability. [Results] Significant post-training gains were observed in the mediolateral, index of balance function, and time variables of participants of the experimental group. [Conclusion] The application of mental practice with balance training positively affected balance ability.

  3. The glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Wolever, T M

    1990-01-01

    Different starchy foods produce different glycemic responses when fed individually, and there is evidence that this also applies in the context of the mixed meal. Methods of processing, and other factors unrelated to the nutrient composition of foods may also have major effects on the glycemic response. The reason for differences in glycemic response appears to relate to the rate at which the foods are digested and the many factors influencing this. The glycemic index (GI) is a system of classification in which the glycemic responses of foods are indexed against a standard (white bread). This allows the results of different investigators to be pooled. GI values also depend upon a number of nonfood-related variables. The method of calculation of the glycemic response area is most important, but the method of blood sampling and length of time of studies also may have effects. Variability of glycemic responses arises from day-to-day variation in the same subject and variation between different subjects. There is less variability between the GI values of different subjects than there is within the same subject from day to day. Therefore, the mean GI values of foods are independent of the glucose tolerance status of the subjects being tested. Potentially clinically useful starchy foods producing relatively flat glycemic responses have been identified, including legumes, pasta, barley, bulgur, parboiled rice and whole grain breads such as pumpernickel. Specific incorporation of these foods into diets have been associated with reduced blood glucose, insulin, and lipid levels. Low-GI foods may influence amino acid metabolism although the implications of these are unknown. In addition, low GI foods increase colonic fermentation. The physiologic and metabolic implications of this relate to increased bacterial urea utilization, and to the production and absorption of short chain fatty acids in the colon. The application of the GI to therapeutic diets should be in the context

  4. A Profile of Children's Reading Abilities as Indexed in Five Perceptual Processing Experiments. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorson, Esther L.

    Six separate experiments were undertaken to test the hypothesis that poor readers in first, second, and third grade would have more difficulty with simple perceptual discriminations than would good readers in the same grades. Various tasks were used in the experiments, including discrimination of line orientations, checking letters in three-letter…

  5. Abilities of preschoolers: comparing different tools

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a strong need for studies evaluating tests in terms both of psychometric properties (i.e. their efficacy or ability to be helpful in reaching a diagnosis) and of their cost-effectiveness (i.e. their efficiency). These data are essential for planning a correct evaluation to identify children's needs (both educational and abilitative). Methods We evaluated 58 children attending for the first time the last year of the Scuola dell'Infanzia. Parental view was obtained with Child Behaviour Check-List and Conners' Rating Scales - Revised, and family socio-economic status was evaluated using Hollingshead's Four Factor Index; teacher compiled the IPDA questionnaire; children were administered Raven's Progressive Matrices, Modified Bell Cancellation Test, BVN 5-11 (a neuropsychological battery). Results A correlational analysis was conducted using Spearman's Rho (since variables were not normally distributed). These asymptomatic children show a good global cognitive functioning, but also a deficit of attention and of Executive Functions. Some of the tests used seem more cost-effective than others and there are some redundancies in information obtained. Conclusions Our data show that there are significant correlations between different neuropsychological and behavioural measures. It is therefore possible to rationalize diagnostic protocols without a significant information reduction. A deeper analysis will require a preliminary definition of the psychometric properties of used tools. PMID:22281207

  6. Paleomagnetism and Magma Flow Direction in Dikes of the Wai'anae Volcano, O'ahu, Hawai'i Determined From Magnetic Fabric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdon, F.; Herrero-Bervera, E.; Valet, J. P.

    2002-12-01

    In order to investigate the volcanic evolution the plumbing and the triggering mechanisms of the catastrophic mass wasting that had occurred in the Wai'anae Volcano, O'ahu, Hawai'i we have undertaken a paleomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) study of a set of dikes from the volcano. We have drilled a set of dikes and have recovered a minimum of 8 and up to 23 samples per intrusive. The width of the dikes ranges between 0.5 to 1.5 m. In terms of the paleomagnetic results, at least 8 samples per intrusive were stepwise demagnetized by a.f. from 5 to 100 mT. Companion specimens from the same core were demagnetized at 15 temperature steps. In both cases, demagnetization diagrams obtained with each technique showed a stable characteristic direction of remanence (ChRM) with no ambiguity. The ChRM was calculated using principal component analysis for the demagnetization diagrams with a well-defined component trending to the origin. No bias or systematic departure from the origin was accepted, and in all cases the ChRM relied on a minimum of seven successive directions isolated during stepwise demagnetization. In addition, low-field susceptibility vs temperature (k-T) and SIRM experiments were performed on at least one sample per intrusive. As a result of such tests, we were able to identify magnetite (at 575oC) and a low-temperature mineral phase at about 250-300o C, which probably reflects the presence of titanomagnetite with low Ti content as indicated by its large susceptibility. The determined directions of the intrusives resulted in normal and reversed polarities, indicating that such dikes were emplaced at different periods of time covering a gap of 350 kyrs. AMS was determined for all the studied dikes, and statistically significant AMS clusters were found in all of them. For all the lineated dikes, the mean maximum AMS (Kmax) coincides with the macroscopic lineations to within 10 to 20o. The AMS ellipsoid shape in about half of the samples is

  7. Applied Parallel Metadata Indexing

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, Michael R

    2012-08-01

    The GPFS Archive is parallel archive is a parallel archive used by hundreds of users in the Turquoise collaboration network. It houses 4+ petabytes of data in more than 170 million files. Currently, users must navigate the file system to retrieve their data, requiring them to remember file paths and names. A better solution might allow users to tag data with meaningful labels and searach the archive using standard and user-defined metadata, while maintaining security. last summer, I developed the backend to a tool that adheres to these design goals. The backend works by importing GPFS metadata into a MongoDB cluster, which is then indexed on each attribute. This summer, the author implemented security and developed the user interfae for the search tool. To meet security requirements, each database table is associated with a single user, which only stores records that the user may read, and requires a set of credentials to access. The interface to the search tool is implemented using FUSE (Filesystem in USErspace). FUSE is an intermediate layer that intercepts file system calls and allows the developer to redefine how those calls behave. In the case of this tool, FUSE interfaces with MongoDB to issue queries and populate output. A FUSE implementation is desirable because it allows users to interact with the search tool using commands they are already familiar with. These security and interface additions are essential for a usable product.

  8. Development of a Climate Resilience Screening Index (CRSI) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A Climate Resilience Screening Index is being developed that is applicable at multiple scales for the United States. Those scales include national, state, county and community. The index will be applied at the first three scales and at selected communities. The index was developed in order to explicitly include domains, indicators and metrics addressing environmental, economic and societal aspects of climate resilience. In addition, the index uses indicators and metrics that assess ecosystem, economic, governance and social services at these scales. Finally, we are developing forecasting approaches that can relate intended changes in services and governance to likely levels of changes in the resiliency of communities to climate change impacts. The present challenge is the incorporation of the index, its relationships to governance and the developing forecasting tools into Federal decision-making across US government and into state/county/community decision-making across the US. Governmental acceptance of changes to policies often can be just as challenging as the initial technical acceptance of the index and its relation to climate change. Climate Resilience Index is a requested product by ORD AA and EPA Administrator through SHC Program. Index needed to assess states', counties', and communities' abilities of recovery from climate events. Audience: Internal EPA (Administrator, IO, OLEM, OW and OAR) and external (states, counties and communities). Product

  9. Indexing molecules with chemical graph identifiers.

    PubMed

    Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Garriga-Sust, Rut; Mestres, Jordi

    2011-09-01

    Fast and robust algorithms for indexing molecules have been historically considered strategic tools for the management and storage of large chemical libraries. This work introduces a modified and further extended version of the molecular equivalence number naming adaptation of the Morgan algorithm (J Chem Inf Comput Sci 2001, 41, 181-185) for the generation of a chemical graph identifier (CGI). This new version corrects for the collisions recognized in the original adaptation and includes the ability to deal with graph canonicalization, ensembles (salts), and isomerism (tautomerism, regioisomerism, optical isomerism, and geometrical isomerism) in a flexible manner. Validation of the current CGI implementation was performed on the open NCI database and the drug-like subset of the ZINC database containing 260,071 and 5,348,089 structures, respectively. The results were compared with those obtained with some of the most widely used indexing codes, such as the CACTVS hash code and the new InChIKey. The analyses emphasize the fact that compound management activities, like duplicate analysis of chemical libraries, are sensitive to the exact definition of compound uniqueness and thus still depend, to a minor extent, on the type and flexibility of the molecular index being used.

  10. Nuclear Energy Standards. KWIC index

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The KWIC Index is an alphabetical listing that provides rapid identification of NE standards based upon the specific subject areas. This index facilitates identification of a NE standard by major or key words located in the center of the alphabetical index listing. Alphanumerical designations for specific NE standards are shown in the right-hand column. Standards referenced in this listing include those that are active, inactive, or discontinued.

  11. Aeronautical Engineering: 1983 cumulative index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (158) through NASA SP-7037 (169) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, report number, and accession number indexes.

  12. Hardware Index to Permutation Converter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    Hardware Index to Permutation Converter J. T. Butler T. Sasao Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of Computer Science...generates a permutation in response to an index. Since there are n! n-element permutations , the index ranges from 0 to n! − 1. Such a circuit is needed...in the hardware implementation of unique- permutation hash functions to specify how parallel machines interact through a shared memory. Such a circuit

  13. Computer aided indexing at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchan, Ronald L.

    1987-01-01

    The application of computer technology to the construction of the NASA Thesaurus and in NASA Lexical Dictionary development is discussed in a brief overview. Consideration is given to the printed and online versions of the Thesaurus, retrospective indexing, the NASA RECON frequency command, demand indexing, lists of terms by category, and the STAR and IAA annual subject indexes. The evolution of computer methods in the Lexical Dictionary program is traced, from DOD and DOE subject switching to LCSH machine-aided indexing and current techniques for handling natural language (e.g., the elimination of verbs to facilitate breakdown of sentences into words and phrases).

  14. Semiotics and Indexing: An Analysis of the Subject Indexing Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Jens-Erik

    2001-01-01

    Explains some major problems related to the subject indexing process and proposes semiotics as a framework for understanding the interpretive nature of the process. Explores the approach to studies of indexing and library and information science suggested by Fairthorne, Blair, Benediktsson, and others. Offers an explanation of what occurs in the…

  15. Malaysian Education Index (MEI): An Online Indexing and Repository System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabilan, Muhammad Kamarul; Ismail, Hairul Nizam; Yaakub, Rohizani; Yusof, Najeemah Mohd; Idros, Sharifah Noraidah Syed; Umar, Irfan Naufal; Arshad, Muhammad Rafie Mohd.; Idrus, Rosnah; Rahman, Habsah Abdul

    2010-01-01

    This "Project Sheet" describes an on-going project that is being carried out by a group of educational researchers, computer science researchers and librarians from Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang. The Malaysian Education Index (MEI) has two main functions--(1) Online Indexing System, and (2) Online Repository System. In this brief…

  16. Environmental Terminology Index (Permuted Index). Volume 2. Preliminary Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge National Lab., TN.

    This Environmental Terminology Index or Thesaurus was developed to help meet the urgent need for world-wide communication on practical as well as basic environmental problems. This working draft of the Index includes terms in the areas of physical sciences, social sciences, earth sciences, biology, and ecology. This edition of the thesaurus…

  17. Birthweight for length: ponderal index, body mass index or Benn index?

    PubMed

    Cole, T J; Henson, G L; Tremble, J M; Colley, N V

    1997-01-01

    This study compares how effectively the ponderal index and the body mass index adjust birthweight for length at different gestations, and derives an improved index suitable for all gestations. The study was a cross-sectional survey, in a London teaching hospital, using a total of 999 neonates of 33 weeks gestation or later. Main outcome measures were the ponderal index (birthweight/length3), body mass index (birthweight/length2), and Benn index (birthweight/length(n)), where the length power n varies with gestation and is estimated by log-log regression. Results showed that up to 39 weeks gestation, the ponderal index is uncorrelated with length and so is a good index of birthweight for length. Past 39 weeks gestation, the ponderal index is negatively correlated with length, while the body mass index is uncorrelated, so that the body mass index is better. Neither index is optimal at all gestations. Deriving the Benn index (birthweight/length(n)) for each week of gestation, choosing n to make the index uncorrelated with length, shows that n falls steadily and very significantly (p < 0.0001) with increasing gestation. This in turn means that predicted birthweight for length depends on gestation: for a neonate 48 cm long, predicted birthweight varies from 2485 g at 34 weeks to 3030 g at 43 weeks, a 20% range. However, for a 54 cm long infant, predicted birthweight is the same at all gestations. A Benn index where the value of n changes linearly with gestation is described. We conclude that the ponderal index is not appropriate for measuring intra-uterine malnutrition, as it fails to adjust for length at all gestations. No other index of birthweight/length(n) with constant n is any better, as different gestations require different indices. Birthweight predicted from an infant's length depends on the infant's gestation. If, as Barker proposes, thinness at birth assessed by birthweight for length is used to predict later health status, more account needs to be taken of

  18. Assessment of the relationship between physical working conditions and different levels of work ability.

    PubMed

    Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Ghaffari, Mostafa; Abdi, Alireza; Mirzamohammadi, Elham; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Rahimpour, Farzaneh; Fazlalizadeh, Maryam; Mohammadi, Saber

    2014-04-20

    Early leaving of workplace by work forces is one of the fundamental problems worldwide. Maintenance and enhancement of employees work ability are important for raising productivity. This study investigated the relationship between work ability index and physical working conditions and was carried out in 2013 on 641 workers at a manufacturing plant in Tehran. Work ability was assessed by the questionnaire of work ability index and the participants were classified into four work ability groups of poor, moderate, good, and excellent. Physical working conditions were evaluated by the MUSIC-Norrtalje questionnaire and the participants were classified into two groups with proper and poor physical working conditions. The mean score of work ability questionnaire was 42.40; and 2.5% (16 persons), 9.2% (59 persons), 38.2% (245 persons), and 50.1% (321 persons) of the participants were in poor, moderate, good, and excellent work ability groups, respectively. The mean score of physical working conditions questionnaire was 20.06. The results of logistic regression analysis showed that even after adjusting the confounding variables, a significant correlation existed between work ability and physical working conditions (p < 0.05). According to the results of this study, there may be a correlation between physical working conditions such as awkward postures, repetitive movements, load lifting, exposure to whole body vibration and so on with work ability. Therefore it seems that enhancement of the quality of physical working conditions may increase work ability.

  19. The Pemberton Happiness Index

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro; de Camargos, Mayara Goulart; Demarzo, Marcelo Marcos Piva; Hervás, Gonzalo; Vázquez, Carmelo; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Pemberton Happiness Index (PHI) is a recently developed integrative measure of well-being that includes components of hedonic, eudaimonic, social, and experienced well-being. The PHI has been validated in several languages, but not in Portuguese. Our aim was to cross-culturally adapt the Universal Portuguese version of the PHI and to assess its psychometric properties in a sample of the Brazilian population using online surveys. An expert committee evaluated 2 versions of the PHI previously translated into Portuguese by the original authors using a standardized form for assessment of semantic/idiomatic, cultural, and conceptual equivalence. A pretesting was conducted employing cognitive debriefing methods. In sequence, the expert committee evaluated all the documents and reached a final Universal Portuguese PHI version. For the evaluation of the psychometric properties, the data were collected using online surveys in a cross-sectional study. The study population included healthcare professionals and users of the social network site Facebook from several Brazilian geographic areas. In addition to the PHI, participants completed the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Diener and Emmons’ Positive and Negative Experience Scale (PNES), Psychological Well-being Scale (PWS), and the Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS). Internal consistency, convergent validity, known-group validity, and test–retest reliability were evaluated. Satisfaction with the previous day was correlated with the 10 items assessing experienced well-being using the Cramer V test. Additionally, a cut-off value of PHI to identify a “happy individual” was defined using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve methodology. Data from 1035 Brazilian participants were analyzed (health professionals = 180; Facebook users = 855). Regarding reliability results, the internal consistency (Cronbach alpha = 0.890 and 0.914) and test–retest (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.814) were

  20. Measuring women's perceived ability to overcome barriers to healthcare seeking in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, women must overcome numerous barriers when they need modern healthcare. Respect of gender norms within the household and the community may still influence women's ability to obtain care. A lack of gender-sensitive instruments for measuring women's ability to overcome barriers compromises attempts to adequately quantify the burden and risk of exclusion they face when seeking modern healthcare. The aim of this study was to create and validate a synthetic measure of women's access to healthcare from a publicly available and possibly internationally comparable population-based survey. Method Seven questionnaire items from the Burkina Faso 2003 DHS were combined to create the index. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used to test the reliability of the index. Exploratory factor analyses (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were applied to evaluate the factorial structure and construct validity of the index while taking into account the hierarchical structure of the data. Results The index has a Cronbach's alpha of 0.75, suggesting adequate reliability. In EFA, three correlated factors fitted the data best. In CFA, the construct of perceived ability to overcome barriers to healthcare seeking emerged as a second-order latent variable with three domains: socioeconomic barriers, geographical barriers and psychosocial barriers. Model fit indices support the index's global validity for women of reproductive age in Burkina Faso. Evidence for construct validity comes from the finding that women's index scores increase with household living standard. Conclusion The DHS items can be combined into a reliable and valid, gender-sensitive index quantifying reproductive-age women's perceived ability to overcome barriers to healthcare seeking in Burkina Faso. The index complies conceptually with the sector-cross-cutting capability approach and enables measuring directly the perceived access to healthcare. Therefore it can help to improve the

  1. Direct-write graded index materials realized in protein hydrogels

    DOE PAGES

    Kaehr, Bryan; Scrymgeour, David A.

    2016-09-20

    Here, the ability to create optical materials with arbitrary index distributions would prove transformative for optics design and applications. However, current fabrication techniques for graded index (GRIN) materials rely on diffusion profiles and therefore are unable to realize arbitrary distribution GRIN design. Here, we demonstrate the laser direct writing of graded index structures in protein-based hydrogels using multiphoton lithography. We show index changes spanning a range of 10–2, which is comparable with laser densified glass and polymer systems. Further, we demonstrate the conversion of these written density variation structures into SiO2, opening up the possibility of transforming GRIN hydrogels tomore » a wide range of material systems.« less

  2. Direct-write graded index materials realized in protein hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Kaehr, Bryan; Scrymgeour, David A.

    2016-09-20

    Here, the ability to create optical materials with arbitrary index distributions would prove transformative for optics design and applications. However, current fabrication techniques for graded index (GRIN) materials rely on diffusion profiles and therefore are unable to realize arbitrary distribution GRIN design. Here, we demonstrate the laser direct writing of graded index structures in protein-based hydrogels using multiphoton lithography. We show index changes spanning a range of 10–2, which is comparable with laser densified glass and polymer systems. Further, we demonstrate the conversion of these written density variation structures into SiO2, opening up the possibility of transforming GRIN hydrogels to a wide range of material systems.

  3. Emotional abilities as predictors of risky driving behavior among a cohort of middle aged drivers.

    PubMed

    Arnau-Sabatés, Laura; Sala-Roca, Josefina; Jariot-Garcia, Mercè

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between emotional abilities and the influence of this relationship on self reported drivers' risky attitudes. The risky driving attitudes and emotional abilities of 177 future driving instructors were measured. The results demonstrate that risky attitudes correlate negatively with emotional abilities. Regression analysis showed that adaptability and interpersonal abilities explained the differences observed in the global risk attitude index. There were some differences in the specific risk factors. The variability observed in the speed and distraction and fatigue factors could also be explained by interpersonal and adaptability abilities. Nevertheless the tendency to take risks was explained by stress management and also interpersonal components. Emotional abilities have the weakest relation with alcohol and drugs factor, and in this case the variability observed was explained by the adaptability component. The results obtained highlight the importance take off including emotional abilities in prevention programs to reduce risky driving behaviors.

  4. How To Create a Great Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bradley

    2003-01-01

    Contends that the index at the back of a book is an important reader service. Discusses how and why to index, and how to make indexes interesting. Outlines programs, such as Filemaker and Adobe, which help the indexing process. (PM)

  5. Simplifying the Water Poverty Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Danny I.; Ogwang, Tomson; Opio, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, principal components methodology is used to derive simplified and cost effective indexes of water poverty. Using a well known data set for 147 countries from which an earlier five-component water poverty index comprising of "Resources," "Access," "Capacity," "Use" and "Environment" was constructed, we find that a simplified…

  6. The Earliest Hebrew Citation Indexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Bella Hass

    1997-01-01

    Describes early Hebrew citation indexes, both embedded and book-length, and discusses terminological variation, format, precision of locators, the order of index entries and assumption of user knowledge, knowledge of the compilers, and recommendations for further research. (59 references) (LRW)

  7. Estrada index and Chebyshev polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginosar, Yuval; Gutman, Ivan; Mansour, Toufik; Schork, Matthias

    2008-03-01

    Let G be a graph whose eigenvalues are λ1, λ2,…, λn. The Estrada index of G is equal to ∑i=1ne. We point out certain classes of graphs whose characteristic polynomials are closely connected to the Chebyshev polynomials of the second kind. Various relations, in particular approximations, for the Estrada index of these graphs are obtained.

  8. Index of Refraction without Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, N.; Henriksen, P. N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents several activities that permit students to determine the index of refraction of transparent solids and liquids using simple equipment without the need for geometrical relationships, special lighting or optical instruments. Graphical analysis of the measured data is shown to be a useful method for determining the index of…

  9. Linguistic Indexicality in Algebra Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staats, Susan; Batteen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In discussion-oriented classrooms, students create mathematical ideas through conversations that reflect growing collective knowledge. Linguistic forms known as indexicals assist in the analysis of this collective, negotiated understanding. Indexical words and phrases create meaning through reference to the physical, verbal and ideational context.…

  10. Indexing by Latent Semantic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deerwester, Scott; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes a new method for automatic indexing and retrieval called latent semantic indexing (LSI). Problems with matching query words with document words in term-based information retrieval systems are discussed, semantic structure is examined, singular value decomposition (SVD) is explained, and the mathematics underlying the SVD model is…

  11. On the Interchangeability of Individually Administered and Group Administered Ability Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevo, Baruch; Sela, Roni

    2003-01-01

    This research studied the interchangeability of individually administered and group administered cognitive tests. Seventy undergraduate students took the Hebrew version of the WAIS-R (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised), and their IQs were measured. They also took the IPET (Israeli Psychometric Entrance Test) and their IPET scores were…

  12. [ATD index in Perthes disease].

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewski, Andrzej; Synder, Marek; Szymczak, Wiesław; Kowalewski, Maciej; Kozłowski, Piotr

    2003-01-01

    Authors present an estimation of articulo-trochanteric-distance (ATD) and ATD index in patients with Perthes disease and if there is any correlation between ATD and ATD index and age at the onset, gender, type of treatment, Herring and Stulberg classification. The study population consisted of 242 patients (35 female and 207 male) who had reached skeletal maturity at last follow up. The mean age at the onset of symptoms was 7 years and 4 months. All patients were treated by containment methods (bed rest and traction in abduction, brace, Petri cast, varus osteotomy, Salter osteotomy and shelf operation). ATD was estimated according to the Edgren methods and ATD index was calculated as relation ATD on Perthes site to ATD in normal joint. The late results were classified according to the Stulberg classification. Statistical analysis did not revealed any correlation between the age at the onset, gender and ATD index and ATD during last follow up. Both parameters decreased with poor results according to the Stulberg classifications. ATD index and ATD were statistically significant less after surgical treatment than after non-operative treatment. The same relations were seen between patients with leg length discrepancy (LLD) and without LLD. Patients in Herring group A had statistically significant bigger both parameters than patients in group B, C and patients in Herring group B than C. Articulo-trochanteric-distance and ATD index decreased during follow up and ATD decreased also in normal joint. In our opinion ATD index is a more reliable radiological parameter than ATD. ATD index decreases with bigger necrosis of the femoral head and poor result according to the Stulberg classification. This parameter is an evidence of the dysfunction proximal femoral growth plate in patients with LLD. The most decreased ATD index was observed after surgical treatment. There was no correlation between the age at the onset, gender and ATD index at last follow up.

  13. Convergent Validity of the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS) Using the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability, Third Edition (WJ-III) with University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krach, S. Kathleen; Loe, Scott A.; Jones, W. Paul; Farrally, Autumn

    2009-01-01

    Validity studies with the Reynolds Intellectual Ability scales (RIAS) indicated that RIAS composite intelligence index (CIX) and verbal intelligence index (VIX) scores have moderate-to-high correlation with comparable scores on other instruments. The authors of the RIAS described the VIX scale as a measure of crystallized ability and the nonverbal…

  14. Source Indexing in Science Journals and Indexing Services: A Survey of Current Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diodato, Virgil; Pearson, Karen

    1986-01-01

    Study of state of source indexing (indexing data published simultaneously with articles they represent) examines aspects of 685 science journals: science fields using source indexing; source indexing formats; assignment of indexing terms from controlled vocabularies; suppliers of indexing (authors, editors, indexers); use of source indexing by…

  15. Retrospective indexing (RI) - A computer-aided indexing technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchan, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    An account is given of a method for data base-updating designated 'computer-aided indexing' (CAI) which has been very efficiently implemented at NASA's Scientific and Technical Information Facility by means of retrospective indexing. Novel terms added to the NASA Thesaurus will therefore proceed directly into both the NASA-RECON aerospace information system and its portion of the ESA-Information Retrieval Service, giving users full access to material thus indexed. If a given term appears in the title of a record, it is given special weight. An illustrative graphic representation of the CAI search strategy is presented.

  16. Index to NASA News Releases 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This issue of the index to NASA News Releases contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, during 1995. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject index, Personal name index, News release number index, Accession number index, Speeches, and News releases.

  17. Cardioprotective abilities of white wine.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianhua; Tosaki, Arpad; Cordis, Gerald A; Bertelli, Alberto A E; Bertelli, Aldo; Maulik, Nilanjana; Das, Dipak K

    2002-05-01

    To study if white wines, like red wine, can also protect the heart from ischemia reperfusion injury, ethanol-free extracts of three different white wines (WW1, WW2 and WW3) (100 mg/100 g body weight) were given orally to Sprague Dawley rats (200 g body weight) for three weeks. Control rats were given water only for the same period of time. After three weeks, rats were anesthetized and sacrificed, and the hearts excised for the preparation of isolated working rat heart. All hearts were subjected to 30 min global ischemia followed by two hours of reperfusion. The results demonstrated that among the three different white wines, only WW2 showed cardioprotection as evidenced by improved post-ischemic ventricular recovery compared to control. The amount of malonaldehyde production in white wine-fed rat hearts were lower compared to that found in control hearts indicating reduced formation of the reactive oxygen species. In vitro studies using chemiluminescence technique revealed that these white wines scavenged both superoxide anions and hydroxyl radicals. The results of our study demonstrated that only WW2 white wine provided cardioprotection as evidenced by the improved the post-ischemic contractile recovery and reduced myocardial infarct size. The cardioprotective effect of this white wine may be attributed, at least in part, from its ability to function as an in vivo antioxidant.

  18. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Fallfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trial, Joan G.; Wade, Charles S.; Stanley, Jon G.; Nelson, Patrick C.

    1983-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop riverine and lacustrine habitat models for fallfish (Semotilis corporalis), a freshwater species. The models are scaled to produce an index of habitat suitability between 0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1 (optimally suitable habitat) for freshwater, marine and estuarine areas of the continental United States. Habitat suitability indexes (HSI's) are designed for use with the habitat evaluation procedures developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Also included are discussions of Suitability Index (SI) curves as used in the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) and SI curves available for an IFIM analysis of Fallfish habitat.

  19. Indexing of multidimensional lookup tables in embedded systems.

    PubMed

    Vrhel, Michael J

    2004-10-01

    The proliferation of color devices and the desire to have them accurately communicate color information has led to a need for embedded systems that perform color conversions. A common method for performing color space conversions is to characterize the device with a multidimensional lookup table (MLUT). To reduce cost, many of the embedded systems have limited computational abilities. This leads to a need for the design of efficient methods for performing MLUT indexing and interpolation. This paper examines and compares two methods of MLUT indexing within embedded systems. The comparison is made in terms of colorimetric accuracy and computational cost.

  20. Video Analytics for Indexing, Summarization and Searching of Video Archives

    SciTech Connect

    Trease, Harold E.; Trease, Lynn L.

    2009-08-01

    This paper will be submitted to the proceedings The Eleventh IASTED International Conference on. Signal and Image Processing. Given a video or video archive how does one effectively and quickly summarize, classify, and search the information contained within the data? This paper addresses these issues by describing a process for the automated generation of a table-of-contents and keyword, topic-based index tables that can be used to catalogue, summarize, and search large amounts of video data. Having the ability to index and search the information contained within the videos, beyond just metadata tags, provides a mechanism to extract and identify "useful" content from image and video data.

  1. Bone strength and athletic ability in hominids: Ardipithecus ramidus to Homo sapiens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. A.

    2013-03-01

    The ability of the femur to resist bending stresses is determined by its midlength cross-sectional geometry, its length and the elastic properties of the mineral part of the bone. The animal's athletic ability, determined by a ``bone strength index,'' is limited by this femoral bending strength in relation to the loads on the femur. This analysis is applied to the fossil record for Homo sapiens, Homo neanderthalensis, Homo erectus, Homo habilis, Australopithecus afarensis and Ardipithecus ramidus. Evidence that the femoral bone strength index of modern Homo sapiens has weakened over the last 50,000 years is found.

  2. Rational thinking and cognitive sophistication: development, cognitive abilities, and thinking dispositions.

    PubMed

    Toplak, Maggie E; West, Richard F; Stanovich, Keith E

    2014-04-01

    We studied developmental trends in 5 important reasoning tasks that are critical components of the operational definition of rational thinking. The tasks measured denominator neglect, belief bias, base rate sensitivity, resistance to framing, and the tendency toward otherside thinking. In addition to age, we examined 2 other individual difference domains that index cognitive sophistication: cognitive ability (intelligence and executive functioning) and thinking dispositions (actively open-minded thinking, superstitious thinking, and need for cognition). All 5 reasoning domains were consistently related to cognitive sophistication regardless of how it was indexed (age, cognitive ability, thinking dispositions). The implications of these findings for taxonomies of developmental trends in rational thinking tasks are discussed.

  3. Ability to Consent to Parkinson Disease Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... asked the participants questions about their understanding, appreciation, reasoning, and choice. These 4 areas make up decision- ... decision-making capacity Types of abilities Understanding Appreciation Reasoning Choice Meaning of abilities Know the basic facts ...

  4. AgrAbility: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... AgrAbility Services Equipment and Vehicle Modifications Financing-Related Matters Other Modifications Other Disability and Agricultural-related questions Main Menu Home About AgrAbility State Projects Directory The Toolbox AT Database Resources Veterans & ...

  5. Improvement of Speaking Ability through Interrelated Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Guoqiang

    2009-01-01

    How to improve students' ability of speaking English? That is the key point we are concerned about. This paper discusses the possibility and necessity of improving students' ability by combining the four skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.

  6. The abilities of a musical savant and his family.

    PubMed

    Young, R L; Nettelbeck, T

    1995-06-01

    The ability of a male autistic savant (TR) to play two unfamiliar piano pieces after listening to a tape-recording was tested, closely following the procedures of Sloboda, Hermelin, and O'Connor (1985). Other components of TR's musical ability--pitch recognition, improvisation, and ability to provide harmonic accompaniment--were also examined. TR's musical precocity was examined in relation to his general level of intellectual functioning as indexed by a battery of standardized psychological tests of intelligence, memory, reading, visual organization, and creativity. His parents and two male siblings also completed tests of intelligence. Results from psychometric testing indicated that TR has idiosyncratic levels of cognitive functioning with difficulties in verbal reasoning but high levels of concentration and memory. His speed of information processing, as indicated by Inspection Time, and was better than average. TR demonstrated perfect pitch recognition and other family members also demonstrated excellent relative pitch. TR's ability to recall and perform structured music within both the diatonic and whole-tone systems was exceptional but dependent upon his familiarity with musical structure and was therefore organized and rule-driven. Furthermore, TR demonstrated competence in improvisation and composition, albeit restricted by his adherence to structural representations of familiar musical rules.

  7. Dyslexia Limits the Ability to Categorize Talker Dialect

    PubMed Central

    Long, Gayle Beam; Jacewicz, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether the underlying phonological impairment in dyslexia is associated with a deficit in categorizing regional dialects. Method Twenty adults with dyslexia, 20 school-age children with dyslexia, and 40 corresponding control listeners with average reading ability listened to sentences produced by multiple talkers (both sexes) representing two dialects: Midland dialect in Ohio (same as listeners' dialect) and Southern dialect in Western North Carolina. Participants' responses were analyzed using signal detection theory. Results Listeners with dyslexia were less sensitive to talker dialect than listeners with average reading ability. Children were less sensitive to dialect than adults. Under stimulus uncertainty, listeners with average reading ability were biased toward Ohio dialect, whereas listeners with dyslexia were unbiased in their responses. Talker sex interacted with sensitivity and bias differently for listeners with dyslexia than for listeners with average reading ability. The correlations between dialect sensitivity and phonological memory scores were strongest for adults with dyslexia. Conclusions The results imply that the phonological deficit in dyslexia arises from impaired access to intact phonological representations rather than from poorly specified representations. It can be presumed that the impeded access to implicit long-term memory representations for indexical (dialect) information is due to less efficient operations in working memory, including deficiencies in utilizing talker normalization processes. PMID:27575597

  8. Ozone - Current Air Quality Index

    MedlinePlus

    Local Air Quality Conditions Zip Code: State : My Current Location Forecast Current AQI AQI Loop More Maps AQI: Good (0 - ... September 2016, Busan, South Korea. More more announcements Air Quality Basics Air Quality Index | Ozone | Particle Pollution | Smoke ...

  9. Antimicrobial Pesticide Use Site Index

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Use Site Index provides guidance to assist applicants for antimicrobial pesticide registration by helping them identify the data requirements necessary to register a pesticide or support their product registrations.

  10. Environmental Quality Index - Overview Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    A better estimate of overall environmental quality is needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between environmental conditions and humanhealth. Described in this report is the effort to construct an environmental quality index representing multiple domains of the ...

  11. Stator Indexing in Multistage Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barankiewicz, Wendy S.

    1997-01-01

    The relative circumferential location of stator rows (stator indexing) is an aspect of multistage compressor design that has not yet been explored for its potential impact on compressor aerodynamic performance. Although the inlet stages of multistage compressors usually have differing stator blade counts, the aft stages of core compressors can often have stage blocks with equal stator blade counts in successive stages. The potential impact of stator indexing is likely greatest in these stages. To assess the performance impact of stator indexing, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center used the 4 ft diameter, four-stage NASA Low Speed Axial Compressor for detailed experiments. This compressor has geometrically identical stages that can circumferentially index stator rows relative to each other in a controlled manner; thus it is an ideal test rig for such investigations.

  12. Energy Index For Aircraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chidester, Thomas R. (Inventor); Lynch, Robert E. (Inventor); Lawrence, Robert E. (Inventor); Amidan, Brett G. (Inventor); Ferryman, Thomas A. (Inventor); Drew, Douglas A. (Inventor); Ainsworth, Robert J. (Inventor); Prothero, Gary L. (Inventor); Romanowski, Tomothy P. (Inventor); Bloch, Laurent (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for analyzing, separately or in combination, kinetic energy and potential energy and/or their time derivatives, measured or estimated or computed, for an aircraft in approach phase or in takeoff phase, to determine if the aircraft is or will be put in an anomalous configuration in order to join a stable approach path or takeoff path. A 3 reference value of kinetic energy andor potential energy (or time derivatives thereof) is provided, and a comparison index .for the estimated energy and reference energy is computed and compared with a normal range of index values for a corresponding aircraft maneuver. If the computed energy index lies outside the normal index range, this phase of the aircraft is identified as anomalous, non-normal or potentially unstable.

  13. Statistical Approaches to Automatic Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harter, Stephen P.

    1978-01-01

    Views automatic indexing as a two-tiered word frequency analysis that involves selection of a technical vocabulary and identification of document keywords. Assumptions, criteria, evaluation, and relevance are discussed. (JD)

  14. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Bullfrog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graves, Brent M.; Anderson, Stanley H.

    1987-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  15. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Bobcat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyle, Katherine A.; Fendley, Timothy T.

    1987-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the bobcat (Felis rufus). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  16. Utility of the MMPI Pain Assessment Index in Predicting Outcome After Lumbar Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Judith; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the ability of the Pain Assesment Index, determined from presurgery Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory scores, to predict outcome subsequent to lumbar laminectomy and discectomy. The PAI was found to have good ability to identify patients who were doing well after surgery, but low power in predicting which patients would have…

  17. Predicting Academic Achievement with Cognitive Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohde, Treena Eileen; Thompson, Lee Anne

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explain variation in academic achievement with general cognitive ability and specific cognitive abilities. Grade point average, Wide Range Achievement Test III scores, and SAT scores represented academic achievement. The specific cognitive abilities of interest were: working memory, processing speed, and…

  18. Innovative Allies: Spatial and Creative Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coxon, Steve V.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial and creative abilities are important for innovations in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, but talents are rarely developed from these abilities by schools, including among gifted children and adolescents who have a high potential to become STEM innovators. This article provides an overview of each ability and makes…

  19. The Stratified Adaptive Computerized Ability Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    This report describes the stratified adaptive (stradaptive) test as a strategy for tailoring an ability test to individual differences in testee ability; administration of the test is controlled by a time-shared computer system. The rationale of this method is described as it derives from Binet's strategy of ability test administration and…

  20. PC index and magnetic substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Janzhura, Alexander; Sormakov, Dmitry; Podorozhkina, Nataly

    PC index is regarded as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere as distinct from the AL and Dst indices, which are regarded as characteristics of the energy that realize in the magnetosphere in form of substorm and magnetic storms. This conclusion is based on results of analysis of relationships between the polar cap magnetic activity (PC-index) and parameters of the solar wind, on the one hand, relationships between changes of PC and development of magnetospheric substorms (AL-index) and magnetic storms (Dst-index), on the other hand. This paper describes in detail the following main results which demonstrate a strong connection between the behavior of PC and development of magnetic disturbances in the auroral zone: (1) magnetic substorms are preceded by the РС index growth (isolated and extended substorms) or long period of stationary PC (postponed substorms), (2) the substorm sudden onsets are definitely related to such PC signatures as leap and reverse, which are indicative of sharp increase of the PC growth rate, (3) substorms generally start to develop when the PC index exceeds the threshold level ~ 1.5±0.5 mV/m, irrespective of the substorm growth phase duration and type of substorm, (4) linear dependency of AL values on PC is typical of all substorm events irrespective of type and intensity of substorm.

  1. Vascular Reactivity is Impaired and Associated With Walking Ability in Patients With Intermittent Claudication.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rita de Cassia Gengo E; Wolosker, Nelson; Yugar-Toledo, Juan Carlos; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda Marciano

    2015-08-01

    We verified whether vascular reactivity is impaired and whether there is any association between vascular reactivity, walking ability, and peripheral artery disease (PAD) severity in patients with intermittent claudication (IC). We studied 63 patients and 17 age- and sex-matched volunteers without PAD. Vascular reactivity was evaluated in the brachial artery during reactive hyperemia (flow-mediated dilation [FMD]) and after a sublingual single dose of nitroglycerin (nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation [NID]). Walking ability was verified by a 6-minute walk test. Vascular reactivity and walking ability were significantly worse in patients with IC compared with control participants. The ankle-brachial index correlated with FMD, NID, as well as total and pain-free distances. The NID and walking ability progressively decreased as PAD severity increased. Walking ability correlated with NID but not with FMD. In patients with IC, vascular reactivity is impaired and is related to the severity of PAD and to walking ability.

  2. Urine concentrating and diluting ability during aging.

    PubMed

    Sands, Jeff M

    2012-12-01

    Urine concentrating ability is reduced during normal aging in people and rats. The abundance of many of the key transport proteins that contribute to urine concentrating ability is reduced in the kidney medulla of aged rats. The reductions in water, sodium, and urea transport protein abundances, and their reduced response to water restriction, contribute to the reduced ability of aged rats to concentrate their urine and conserve water. If similar mechanisms occur in human kidneys, it would provide a molecular explanation for the reduced urine concentrating ability in aging and may provide opportunities for novel therapeutic approaches to improve urine concentrating ability and/or nocturnal polyuria.

  3. Quality indexing with computer-aided lexicography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchan, Ronald L.

    1992-01-01

    Indexing with computers is a far cry from indexing with the first indexing tool, the manual card sorter. With the aid of computer-aided lexicography, both indexing and indexing tools can provide standardization, consistency, and accuracy, resulting in greater quality control than ever before. A brief survey of computer activity in indexing is presented with detailed illustrations from NASA activity. Applications from techniques mentioned, such as Retrospective Indexing (RI), can be made to many indexing systems. In addition to improving the quality of indexing with computers, the improved efficiency with which certain tasks can be done is demonstrated.

  4. Apparently abnormal Wechsler Memory Scale index score patterns in the normal population.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Roman Marcus; Grups, Josefine; Evans, Brittney; Simco, Edward; Mittenberg, Wiley

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition may involve examination of multiple memory index score contrasts and similar comparisons with Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition ability indexes. Standardization sample data suggest that 15-point differences between any specific pair of index scores are relatively uncommon in normal individuals, but these base rates refer to a comparison between a single pair of indexes rather than multiple simultaneous comparisons among indexes. This study provides normative data for the occurrence of multiple index score differences calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations and validated against standardization data. Differences of 15 points between any two memory indexes or between memory and ability indexes occurred in 60% and 48% of the normative sample, respectively. Wechsler index score discrepancies are normally common and therefore not clinically meaningful when numerous such comparisons are made. Explicit prior interpretive hypotheses are necessary to reduce the number of index comparisons and associated false-positive conclusions. Monte Carlo simulation accurately predicts these false-positive rates.

  5. Lapses in Sustained Attention and Their Relation to Executive Control and Fluid Abilities: An Individual Differences Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Nash; Redick, Thomas S.; Lakey, Chad E.; Young, Diana L.

    2010-01-01

    A latent variable analysis was conducted to examine the nature of individual differences in lapses of attention and their relation to executive and fluid abilities. Participants performed a sustained attention task along with multiple measures of executive control and fluid abilities. Lapses of attention were indexed based on the slowest reaction…

  6. Enhanced Nonlinear Refractive Index in ɛ -Near-Zero Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspani, L.; Kaipurath, R. P. M.; Clerici, M.; Ferrera, M.; Roger, T.; Kim, J.; Kinsey, N.; Pietrzyk, M.; Di Falco, A.; Shalaev, V. M.; Boltasseva, A.; Faccio, D.

    2016-06-01

    New propagation regimes for light arise from the ability to tune the dielectric permittivity to extremely low values. Here, we demonstrate a universal approach based on the low linear permittivity values attained in the ɛ -near-zero (ENZ) regime for enhancing the nonlinear refractive index, which enables remarkable light-induced changes of the material properties. Experiments performed on Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films show a sixfold increase of the Kerr nonlinear refractive index (n2) at the ENZ wavelength, located in the 1300 nm region. This in turn leads to ultrafast light-induced refractive index changes of the order of unity, thus representing a new paradigm for nonlinear optics.

  7. Face recognition: a model specific ability.

    PubMed

    Wilmer, Jeremy B; Germine, Laura T; Nakayama, Ken

    2014-01-01

    In our everyday lives, we view it as a matter of course that different people are good at different things. It can be surprising, in this context, to learn that most of what is known about cognitive ability variation across individuals concerns the broadest of all cognitive abilities; an ability referred to as general intelligence, general mental ability, or just g. In contrast, our knowledge of specific abilities, those that correlate little with g, is severely constrained. Here, we draw upon our experience investigating an exceptionally specific ability, face recognition, to make the case that many specific abilities could easily have been missed. In making this case, we derive key insights from earlier false starts in the measurement of face recognition's variation across individuals, and we highlight the convergence of factors that enabled the recent discovery that this variation is specific. We propose that the case of face recognition ability illustrates a set of tools and perspectives that could accelerate fruitful work on specific cognitive abilities. By revealing relatively independent dimensions of human ability, such work would enhance our capacity to understand the uniqueness of individual minds.

  8. Face recognition: a model specific ability

    PubMed Central

    Wilmer, Jeremy B.; Germine, Laura T.; Nakayama, Ken

    2014-01-01

    In our everyday lives, we view it as a matter of course that different people are good at different things. It can be surprising, in this context, to learn that most of what is known about cognitive ability variation across individuals concerns the broadest of all cognitive abilities; an ability referred to as general intelligence, general mental ability, or just g. In contrast, our knowledge of specific abilities, those that correlate little with g, is severely constrained. Here, we draw upon our experience investigating an exceptionally specific ability, face recognition, to make the case that many specific abilities could easily have been missed. In making this case, we derive key insights from earlier false starts in the measurement of face recognition’s variation across individuals, and we highlight the convergence of factors that enabled the recent discovery that this variation is specific. We propose that the case of face recognition ability illustrates a set of tools and perspectives that could accelerate fruitful work on specific cognitive abilities. By revealing relatively independent dimensions of human ability, such work would enhance our capacity to understand the uniqueness of individual minds. PMID:25346673

  9. Effective indexing for face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochenkov, I.; Sochenkova, A.; Vokhmintsev, A.; Makovetskii, A.; Melnikov, A.

    2016-09-01

    Face recognition is one of the most important tasks in computer vision and pattern recognition. Face recognition is useful for security systems to provide safety. In some situations it is necessary to identify the person among many others. In this case this work presents new approach in data indexing, which provides fast retrieval in big image collections. Data indexing in this research consists of five steps. First, we detect the area containing face, second we align face, and then we detect areas containing eyes and eyebrows, nose, mouth. After that we find key points of each area using different descriptors and finally index these descriptors with help of quantization procedure. The experimental analysis of this method is performed. This paper shows that performing method has results at the level of state-of-the-art face recognition methods, but it is also gives results fast that is important for the systems that provide safety.

  10. Thesaurus-Based Automatic Indexing: A Study of Indexing Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Priscilla Louise

    This study examines automatic indexing performed with a manually constructed thesaurus on a document collection of titles and abstracts of library science master's papers. Errors are identified when the meaning of a posted descriptor, as identified by context in the thesaurus, does not match that of the passage of text which occasioned the…

  11. Indexes to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Digests and indexes for issuances of the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and licensing Board Panel (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ) the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM) are presented in this document. These digests and indexes are intended to serve as a guide to the issuances. Information elements are displayed in one or more of five separate formats arranged as follows: Case Name Index; Headers and Digests; Legal Citations Index; Subject Index; and Facility Index.

  12. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Marten

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.

    1982-01-01

    Habitat preferences and species characteristics of the pine marten (Martes americana) are described in this publication. It is one of a series of Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models and was developed through an analysis of available scientific data on the species-habitat requirements of the pine marten. Habitat use information is presented in a review of the literature, followed by the development of a HSI model. The model is presented in three formats: graphic, word and mathematical. Suitability index graphs quantify the species-habitat relationship. These data are then synthesized into a model which is designed to provide information for use in impact assessment and habitat management activities.

  13. Graphic Abilities in Relation to Mathematical and Scientific Ability in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavridou, Fotini; Kakana, Domna

    2008-01-01

    Background: The study investigated a small range of cognitive abilities, related to visual-spatial intelligence, in adolescents. This specific range of cognitive abilities was termed "graphic abilities" and defined as a range of abilities to visualise and think in three dimensions, originating in the domain of visual-spatial…

  14. Steps/day ability to predict anthropometric changes is not affected by its plausibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated whether treating steps/day data for implausible values (<500 or >30,000) affected the ability of these data to predict intervention-induced anthropometric (waist circumference, body mass index, percent body fat, and fat mass) changes. Data were from 269 African American participants wh...

  15. Development of Walking and Self-Sufficiency Ability Related to Nutrition among People with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantmüller, Éva; Gyuró, Monika; Karácsony, Ilona

    2015-01-01

    Development of the walking ability and self-care of patients with Down syndrome is affected by their body weight determining their lifestyle to a great extent. Objectives: The study aimed at the determination of body mass index for persons living in residential institutions and families, exploration its impact on walking and self-care as two,…

  16. There Is No Shame in Pain: Coping and Functional Ability in Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, M. Renee

    1999-01-01

    Discusses coping and personal adjustment to chronic pain for adolescents with sickle cell anemia and presents a model of illness behavior for these adolescents. Offers a framework of disease severity and disease impact, and suggests using functional ability as an index of coping and personal adjustment. Contains 59 references. (SLD)

  17. The Consequence of Combined Pain and Stress on Work Ability in Female Laboratory Technicians: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Kenneth; Friborg, Maria Kristine; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal pain and stress-related disorders are leading causes of impaired work ability, sickness absences and disability pensions. However, knowledge about the combined detrimental effect of pain and stress on work ability is lacking. This study investigates the association between pain in the neck-shoulders, perceived stress, and work ability. In a cross-sectional survey at a large pharmaceutical company in Denmark 473 female laboratory technicians replied to questions about stress (Perceived Stress Scale), musculoskeletal pain intensity (scale 0–10) of the neck and shoulders, and work ability (Work Ability Index). General linear models tested the association between variables. In the multi-adjusted model, stress (p < 0.001) and pain (p < 0.001) had independent main effects on the work ability index score, and there was no significant stress by pain interaction (p = 0.32). Work ability decreased gradually with both increased stress and pain. Workers with low stress and low pain had the highest Work Ability Index score (44.6 (95% CI 43.9–45.3)) and workers with high stress and high pain had the lowest score (32.7 (95% CI 30.6–34.9)). This cross-sectional study indicates that increased stress and musculoskeletal pain are independently associated with lower work ability in female laboratory technicians. PMID:26690466

  18. The Consequence of Combined Pain and Stress on Work Ability in Female Laboratory Technicians: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Jay, Kenneth; Friborg, Maria Kristine; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2015-12-11

    Musculoskeletal pain and stress-related disorders are leading causes of impaired work ability, sickness absences and disability pensions. However, knowledge about the combined detrimental effect of pain and stress on work ability is lacking. This study investigates the association between pain in the neck-shoulders, perceived stress, and work ability. In a cross-sectional survey at a large pharmaceutical company in Denmark 473 female laboratory technicians replied to questions about stress (Perceived Stress Scale), musculoskeletal pain intensity (scale 0-10) of the neck and shoulders, and work ability (Work Ability Index). General linear models tested the association between variables. In the multi-adjusted model, stress (p < 0.001) and pain (p < 0.001) had independent main effects on the work ability index score, and there was no significant stress by pain interaction (p = 0.32). Work ability decreased gradually with both increased stress and pain. Workers with low stress and low pain had the highest Work Ability Index score (44.6 (95% CI 43.9-45.3)) and workers with high stress and high pain had the lowest score (32.7 (95% CI 30.6-34.9)). This cross-sectional study indicates that increased stress and musculoskeletal pain are independently associated with lower work ability in female laboratory technicians.

  19. The relationship between comprehension and metacomprehension ability.

    PubMed

    Maki, R H; Jonas, D; Kallod, M

    1994-03-01

    We investigated the relationship between the ability to comprehend text and the ability to predict future performance and to assess past performance on text. Subjects were poor at predicting performance, which may be why prediction accuracy did not relate to measures of comprehension ability. Measures of comprehension ability did relate to the accuracy with which subjects assessed their performance on tests. Better and faster comprehenders judged their relative levels of test performance over sections of text more accurately than did poorer and slower comprehenders.

  20. Scottish country dance: benefits to functional ability in older women.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Susan; Nelson, Norah; Dougall, Paul K; Bampouras, Theodoros M

    2014-01-01

    The effects of long-term participation in Scottish country dance on body composition, functional ability, and balance in healthy older females were examined. Participants were grouped into dancers and physically active nondancers (ages 60-70 and 70-80 for both groups). Physical activity, body composition (body-mass index, skinfold thickness, waist-to-hip ratio), functional ability (6-min walk distance, 6-m walk time, 8-ft up-and-go time, lower body flexibility, shoulder flexibility), and static balance were measured. Younger dancers and physically active nondancers had similar 6-min walk distance, 6-m walk time, and 8-ft up-and-go time results; however, while older dancers performed similarly to younger dancers, older physically active nondancers performed poorer than their younger counterparts (p < .05). Body composition and static balance were the same for all groups. Regular physical activity can maintain body composition and postural stability with advancing age; however, Scottish country dance can delay the effects of aging on locomotion-related functional abilities.

  1. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile. Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This index contains the unit titles from all 60 Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) lists. It is intended to facilitate the combination of units from different OCAPs in order to develop curricula that meet specific program needs (e.g., learner differences, labor market demands, and technological developments). OCAP titles are as follows:…

  2. A Glossary of Indexing Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Brian

    An expansion of a list developed at a British library school, this glossary contains terminology used in indexing work done by libraries and information scientists. Entries are arranged alphabetically and vary in length from one line to one page. There may be up to three parts in each entry. The first is a basic definition with examples where…

  3. Teaching Physiology with Citation Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemm, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    Explains use of the Citation Index in writing term papers by assigning an older publication as a starting point in a literature search. By reading the original research report and following its subsequent use by other researchers, the student discovers the impact of the original research. (CS)

  4. Index of Spectrum Signature Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    Frederick Research Corporation. Alexandria. VA 163 AN/APG-030 Radar Receiver Heasureaents Electromagnetic Coapatibilitv Analysis Center, US Navv Marine ... Electromagnetic Compatibility Characteristics of the W 86 Gun Fire Control Svstem. Naval HEapons Lab, Dahlgren, VA 501 Partial Spectrum Signature...ECAC-I-IO-(SS) DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Center Annapolis, Maryland 21402 INDEX OF SPECTRUM SIGNATURE DATA

  5. An ESL Index of Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    1978-01-01

    Reports on the progress being made in an attempt to establish a second language acquisition index of development that would gauge a learner's second language proficiency. A project was undertaken involving the analysis of 212 compositions written by university students of English as a second language. (CFM)

  6. Refractive Index Enhancement in Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-29

    experimentally demonstrated the key ingredients of this approach in Rubidium vapor where we have observe enhanced refractive index with vanishing absorption...beam, Ep. We have recently experimentally demonstrated this effect in a 1-mm-long Rubidium (Rb) vapor cell at high vapor densities. Here, we utilize

  7. Competency Index. [Health Technology Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This competency index lists the competencies included in the 62 units of the Tech Prep Competency Profiles within the Health Technologies Cluster. The unit topics are as follows: employability skills; professionalism; teamwork; computer literacy; documentation; infection control and risk management; medical terminology; anatomy, physiology, and…

  8. 1988 Bulletin compilation and index

    SciTech Connect

    1989-02-01

    This document is published to provide current information about the national program for managing spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This document is a compilation of issues from the 1988 calendar year. A table of contents and one index have been provided to assist in finding information.

  9. USGS 1-min Dst index

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gannon, J.L.; Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We produce a 1-min time resolution storm-time disturbance index, the USGS Dst, called Dst8507-4SM. This index is based on minute resolution horizontal magnetic field intensity from low-latitude observatories in Honolulu, Kakioka, San Juan and Hermanus, for the years 1985-2007. The method used to produce the index uses a combination of time- and frequency-domain techniques, which more clearly identifies and excises solar-quiet variation from the horizontal intensity time series of an individual station than the strictly time-domain method used in the Kyoto Dst index. The USGS 1-min Dst is compared against the Kyoto Dst, Kyoto Sym-H, and the USGS 1-h Dst (Dst5807-4SH). In a time series comparison, Sym-H is found to produce more extreme values during both sudden impulses and main phase maximum deviation, possibly due to the latitude of its contributing observatories. Both Kyoto indices are shown to have a peak in their distributions below zero, while the USGS indices have a peak near zero. The USGS 1-min Dst is shown to have the higher time resolution benefits of Sym-H, while using the more typical low-latitude observatories of Kyoto Dst. ?? 2010.

  10. Index and Description of Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Univ., NY. Inst. for Developmental Studies.

    The tests described in this index are used by the Institute for Developmental Studies in its principal areas of research and do not include recently developed tests. The research at the Institute is concerned with (1) the relationship of differing environments to language development, (2) classroom communication between teachers and children of…

  11. Mining and Indexing Graph Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Dayu

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are widely used to model structures and relationships of objects in various scientific and commercial fields. Chemical molecules, proteins, malware system-call dependencies and three-dimensional mechanical parts are all modeled as graphs. In this dissertation, we propose to mine and index those graph data to enable fast and scalable search.…

  12. Coming to Schools: Creativity Indexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    At a time when U.S. political and business leaders are raising concerns about the need to better nurture creativity and innovative thinking among young people, several states are exploring the development of an index that would gauge the extent to which schools provide opportunities to foster those qualities. In Massachusetts, a new state…

  13. Future of gradient index optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hideki; Hamanaka, Kenjiro; Graham, Alan C., III; Zhu, X. Frank

    2001-11-01

    First developed over 30 years ago, gradient index lenses play an important role not only in telecommunications technology, but also in applications such as information interface and biomedical technology. Traditional manufacturing consists of doping a certain ion, A+ into the mother glass, drawing the glass into rods and then immersing the rods into s molten salt bath containing another certain ion B+. During a thermal ion exchange process, the original ion migrates out of the mother glass, and is replaced by the alternate ion, creating a refractive index variation. Current research is being conducted to improve the thermal ion exchange technology, and open new applications. This research includes extending working distances to greater than 100mm, decreasing the lens diameter, increasing the effective radius, and combining the technology with other technologies such as photolithographically etched masks to produce arrays of gradient index lenses. As a result of this ongoing research, the gradient index lens is expected to continue to be the enabling optical technology in the first decade of the new millennium and beyond.

  14. National hospital input price index.

    PubMed

    Freeland, M S; Anderson, G; Schendler, C E

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 per cent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies.

  15. Witten index for noncompact dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Joo; Yi, Piljin

    2016-06-01

    Among gauged dynamics motivated by string theory, we find many with gapless asymptotic directions. Although the natural boundary condition for ground states is L 2, one often turns on chemical potentials or supersymmetric mass terms to regulate the infrared issues, instead, and computes the twisted partition function. We point out how this procedure generically fails to capture physical L 2 Witten index with often misleading results. We also explore how, nevertheless, the Witten index is sometimes intricately embedded in such twisted partition functions. For d = 1 theories with gapless continuum sector from gauge multiplets, such as non-primitive quivers and pure Yang-Mills, a further subtlety exists, leading to fractional expressions. Quite unexpectedly, however, the integral L 2 Witten index can be extracted directly and easily from the twisted partition function of such theories. This phenomenon is tied to the notion of the rational invariant that appears naturally in the wall-crossing formulae, and offers a general mechanism of reading off Witten index directly from the twisted partition function. Along the way, we correct early numerical results for some of mathcal{N} = 4 , 8 , 16 pure Yang-Mills quantum mechanics, and count threshold bound states for general gauge groups beyond SU( N ).

  16. Childhood cognitive ability and body composition in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Kumpulainen, S M; Heinonen, K; Salonen, M K; Andersson, S; Wolke, D; Kajantie, E; Eriksson, J G; Raikkonen, K

    2016-01-01

    Background: Childhood cognitive ability has been identified as a novel risk factor for adulthood overweight and obesity as assessed by adult body mass index (BMI). BMI does not, however, distinguish fat-free and metabolically harmful fat tissue. Hence, we examined the associations between childhood cognitive abilities and body fat percentage (BF%) in young adulthood. Methods: Participants of the Arvo Ylppö Longitudinal Study (n=816) underwent tests of general reasoning, visuomotor integration, verbal competence and language comprehension (M=100; s.d.=15) at the age of 56 months. At the age of 25 years, they underwent a clinical examination, including measurements of BF% by the InBody 3.0 eight-polar tactile electrode system, weight and height from which BMI (kg m−2) was calculated and waist circumference (cm). Results: After adjustments for sex, age and BMI-for-age s.d. score at 56 months, lower general reasoning and visuomotor integration in childhood predicted higher BMI (kg m−2) increase per s.d. unit decrease in cognitive ability (−0.32, 95% confidence interval −0.60,−0.05; −0.45, −0.75,−0.14, respectively) and waist circumference (cm) increase per s.d. unit decrease in cognitive ability (−0.84, −1.56,−0.11; −1.07,−1.88,−0.26, respectively) in adulthood. In addition, lower visuomotor integration predicted higher BF% per s.d. unit decrease in cognitive ability (−0.62,−1.14,−0.09). Associations between general reasoning and BMI/waist were attenuated when adjusted for smoking, alcohol consumption, intake of fruits and vegetables and physical activity in adulthood, and all associations, except for visuomotor integration and BMI, were attenuated when adjusted for parental and/or own attained education and/or birth weight. Conclusions: Of the measured childhood cognitive abilities, only lower visuomotor integration was associated with BF% in adulthood. This challenges the view that cognitive ability, at least when measured in

  17. 75 FR 29479 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Proposed Changes Affecting Hospital and Critical Access Hospital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... Wide Area Information Server (WAIS) through the Internet and via asynchronous dial-in. Internet users... address is http://www.gpoaccess.gov/index.html ), by using local WAIS client software, or by telnet...

  18. Optimal vortex formation as an index of cardiac health.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Morteza; Rambod, Edmond; Kheradvar, Arash; Sahn, David J; Dabiri, John O

    2006-04-18

    Heart disease remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Previous research has indicated that the dynamics of the cardiac left ventricle (LV) during diastolic filling may play a critical role in dictating overall cardiac health. Hence, numerous studies have aimed to predict and evaluate global cardiac health based on quantitative parameters describing LV function. However, the inherent complexity of LV diastole, in its electrical, muscular, and hemodynamic processes, has prevented the development of tools to accurately predict and diagnose heart failure at early stages, when corrective measures are most effective. In this work, it is demonstrated that major aspects of cardiac function are reflected uniquely and sensitively in the optimization of vortex formation in the blood flow during early diastole, as measured by a dimensionless numerical index. This index of optimal vortex formation correlates well with existing measures of cardiac health such as the LV ejection fraction. However, unlike existing measures, this previously undescribed index does not require patient-specific information to determine numerical index values corresponding to normal function. A study of normal and pathological cardiac health in human subjects demonstrates the ability of this global index to distinguish disease states by a straightforward analysis of noninvasive LV measurements.

  19. Bone strength and athletic ability in hominids: Ardipithecus ramidus to Homo sapiens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Scott

    2012-10-01

    A methodology for the evaluation of the athletic ability of animals based on the strength of their femur and their body mass is developed. The ability of the femur to resist bending stresses is determined by its midlength cross-sectional geometry, its length and the elastic properties of the mineral part of the bone. The animal's athletic ability, determined by a ``bone strength index,'' is limited by this femoral bending strength in relation to the loads on the femur. This analysis is applied to the fossil record for Homo sapiens, Homo neanderthalensis, Homo erectus, Homo habilis, Australopithecus afarensis and Ardipithecus ramidus. Evidence that the femoral bone strength index of modern Homo sapiens has weakened over the last 50,000 years is found.

  20. Effects of occupationally-oriented rehabilitation on farmers' work techniques, musculoskeletal symptoms, and work ability.

    PubMed

    Nevala-Puranen, N

    1996-09-01

    Changes in work techniques, musculoskeletal symptoms and work ability were studied after occupationally-oriented rehabilitation courses for farmers experiencing low back or shoulder pain. Fifty-two women and 43 men participated. The OWAS analysis of work postures, biomechanical modeling of lifting techniques, and a questionnaire were used before and after the courses and after 1 year of follow-up. Bent and twisted postures or postures with the arms over the shoulders occurred more seldom after the courses and the follow-up. Changes in lifting techniques were minor. The musculoskeletal pain index decreased by 12 and 3 points for the women and men, respectively. The mean work ability index increased from 33.5 (men and women) to 36.5 (women) and 35.1 (men). This study showed that rehabilitation can produce significant, long-lasting effects on rehabilitees' work techniques, work ability, and subjective well-being.