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Sample records for abiotic iron reduction

  1. Iron-mediated microbial oxidation and abiotic reduction of organic contaminants under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Nicole B; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Straub, Kristina L; Fontana, Daniela; Schwarzenbach, René P

    2007-11-15

    In anoxic environments, the oxidation of organic compounds, such as BTEX fuel components, by dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction can generate reactive mineral-bound Fe(II) species, which in turn are able to reduce other classes of organic and inorganic groundwater contaminants. In this study, we designed and evaluated an anaerobic batch reactor that mimicks iron-reducing conditions to investigate the factors that favor the coupling of microbial toluene oxidation and abiotic reduction of nitroaromatic contaminants. We investigated the influence of different Fe(III)-bearing minerals and combinations thereof on the coupling of these two processes. Results from laboratory model systems show that complete oxidation of toluene to CO2 by Geobacter metallireducens in the presence of Fe(III)-bearing minerals leads to the formation of mineral-bound Fe(II) species capable of the reduction of 4-nitroacetophenone. Whereas significant microbial toluene oxidation was only observed in the presence of amorphous Fe(III) phases, reduction of nitroaromatic compounds only proceeded with Fe(II) species bound to crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Our results suggest that in anoxic soils and sediments containing amorphous and crystalline iron phases simultaneously, coupling of microbial oxidation and abiotic reduction of organic compounds may allow for concurrent natural attenuation of different contaminant classes.

  2. Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes by iron-bearing phyllosilicates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woojin; Batchelor, Bill

    2004-09-01

    Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes (tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethylene (c-DCE), and vinylchloride (VC)) by iron-bearing phyllosilicates (biotite, vermiculite, and montmorillonite) was characterized to obtain better understanding of the behavior of these contaminants in systems undergoing remediation by natural attenuation and redox manipulation. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate dechlorination kinetics and some experiments were conducted with addition of Fe(II) to simulate impact of microbial iron reduction. A modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model adequately described reductive dechlorination kinetics of target organics by the iron-bearing phyllosilicates. The rate constants stayed between 0.08 (+/-10.4%) and 0.401 (+/-8.1%) day(-1) and the specific initial reductive capacity of iron-bearing phyllosilicates for chlorinated ethylenes stayed between 0.177 (+/-6.1%) and 1.06 (+/-7.1%) microM g(-1). The rate constants for the reductive dechlorination of TCE at reactive biotite surface increased as pH (5.5-8.5) and concentration of sorbed Fe(II) (0-0.15 mM g(-1)) increased. The appropriateness of the model is supported by the fact that the rate constants were independent of solid concentration (0.0085-0.17 g g(-1)) and initial TCE concentration (0.15-0.60 mM). Biotite had the greatest rate constant among the phyllosilicates both with and without Fe(II) addition. The rate constants were increased by a factor of 1.4-2.5 by Fe(II) addition. Between 1.8% and 36% of chlorinated ethylenes removed were partitioned to the phyllosilicates. Chloride was produced as a product of degradation and no chlorinated intermediates were observed throughout the experiment.

  3. Electrical Signatures Associated with Abiotic and In Vitro Dissimilatory Iron Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regberg, A. B.; Brantley, S. L.; Singha, K.; Tien, M.

    2007-05-01

    Several researchers have described anomalous electrical signatures associated with bacterial activity in anoxic zones in aquifers containing organic contaminants. It is thought that these signals can be attributed to (bio)geochemical changes caused by the oxidation of organic contaminants and the reduction of associated species like iron oxides. We report laboratory observations of changes in electrical conductivity (EC) that can be attributed to specific (bio)geochemical reactions involving reductive dissolution of iron oxides enzymatically and nonenzymatically. Abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite by ascorbic acid in batch experiments causes a cumulative 20- 40% increase in measured conductivity, (EC increases by ~300 μ S/cm). This change can be attributed to a decrease in conductivity (Δ EC) from increasing proton activity (Δ pH = 3.25 --> 5.07, Δ EC = -200 μ S/cm) and an increase in dissolved Fe(II) (Δ [Fe] = 2.2 - 3.3 mM, Δ EC = 400 -700 μ S/cm). Conductivity is presumably unaffected by Fe(II) sorbed to the ferrihydrite. Rates calculated from this method are comparable to literature rates for similar experiments. In a similar in vitro system, total membrane fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were used to reduce ferrihydrite in the presence of formate and HEPES buffer. A 10 - 15% increase in conductivity was observed in the batch experiment (Δ EC = ~280 μ S/cm). This Δ EC is attributed to an increase in the concentration of de-protonated HEPES as well as carbonate ion as formate is oxidized. Fe(II) released in this system is quickly sorbed onto the ferrihydrite surface and is not thought to change conductivity. Despite the sorption of iron in these in vitro experiments, conductivity changes measurably and documents the rate of the reaction. Accessory changes like buffer de- protonation play an important role in interpreting the electrical signals caused by dissimilatory iron reduction. In order to accurately interpret field data it is necessary

  4. Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes by iron-bearing soil minerals. 2. Green rust.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woojin; Batchelor, Bill

    2002-12-15

    Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes by the sulfate form of green rust (GR(SO4)) was examined in batch reactors. Dechlorination kinetics were described by a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The rate constant for reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes at reactive GR(SO4) surfaces was in the range of 0.592 (+/-4.4%) to 1.59 (+/-6.3%) day(-1). The specific reductive capacity of GR(SO4) for target organics was in the range of 9.86 (+/-10.1%) to 18.0 (+/-4.3%) microM/g and sorption coefficient was in the range of 0.53 (+/-2.4%) to 1.22 (+/-4.3%) mM(-1). Surface area-normalized pseudo-first-order initial rate constants for chlorinated ethylenes by GR(SO4) were 3.4 to 8.2 times greater than those by pyrite. Chlorinated ethylenes were mainly transformed to acetylene, and no detectable amounts of chlorinated intermediates were observed. The rate constants for the reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) increased as pH increased (6.8 to 10.1) but were independent of solid concentration and initial TCE concentration. Magnetite and/or maghemite were produced by the oxidation of GR(SO4) by TCE. These findings are relevant to the understanding of the role of abiotic reductive dechlorination during natural attenuation in environments that contain GR(SO4).

  5. Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes by iron-bearing soil minerals. 1. Pyrite and magnetite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woojin; Batchelor, Bill

    2002-12-01

    Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes (tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC)) by pyrite and magnetite was characterized in a batch reactor system. Dechlorination kinetics was adequately described by a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood model that includes the effect of a decreasing reductive capacity of soil mineral. The kinetic rate constant for the reductive dechlorination of target organics at reactive sites of soil minerals was in the range of 0.185 (+/- 0.023) to 1.71 (+/- 0.06) day(-1). The calculated specific reductive capacity of soil minerals for target organics was in the range of 0.33 (+/- 0.02) to 2.26 (+/- 0.06) microM/g and sorption coefficient was in the range of 0.181 (+/- 0.006) to 0.7 (+/- 0.022) mM(-1). Surface area-normalized pseudo-first-order initial rate constants for target organics by pyrite were found to be 23.5 to 40.3 times greater than those by magnetite. Target organics were mainly transformed to acetylene and small amount of chlorinated intermediates, which suggests that beta-elimination was the main dechlorination pathway. The dechlorination of VC followed a hydrogenolysis pathway to produce ethylene and ethane. The addition of Fe(II) increased the dechlorination rate of cis-DCE and VC in magnetite suspension by nearly a factor of 10. The results obtained in this research provide basic knowledge to better predict the fate of chlorinated ethylenes and to understand the potential of abiotic processes in natural attenuation.

  6. Stable Isotope Systematics of Abiotic Nitrite Reduction Coupled with Anaerobic Iron Oxidation: The Role of Reduced Clays and Fe-bearing Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabb, K. C.; Buchwald, C.; Hansel, C. M.; Wankel, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, it is widely assumed that nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) reduction is primarily the result of microbial respiration. However, it has also been shown that abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite by reduced iron (Fe(II)), whether mineral-bound or surface-associated, may also occur under certain environmentally relevant conditions. With a range of experimental conditions, we investigated the nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope systematics of abiotic nitrite reduction by Fe(II) in an effort to characterize biotic and abiotic processes in the environment. While homogenous reactions between NO2- and Fe(II) in artificial seawater showed little reduction, heterogeneous reactions involving Fe-containing minerals showed considerable nitrite loss. Specifically, rapid nitrite reduction was observed in experiments that included reduced clays (illite, Na-montmorillonite, and nontronite) and those that exhibited iron oxide formation (ferrihydrite, magnetite and/or green rust). While these iron oxides and clay minerals offer both a source of reduced iron in the mineral matrix as well as a surface for Fe(II) activation, control experiments with corundum as a non-Fe containing mineral surface showed little NO2- loss, implicating a more dominant role of structural Fe in the clays during nitrite reduction. The isotope effects for 15N and 18O (15ɛ and 18ɛ) ranged from 5 to 14‰ for 15ɛ and 5 to 17‰ for 18ɛ and were typically coupled such that 15ɛ ~ 18ɛ. Reactions below pH 7 were slower and the 18ɛ was affected by oxygen atom exchange with water. Although little data exist for comparison with the dual isotopes of microbial NO2- reduction, these data serve as a benchmark for evaluating the role of abiotic processes in N reduction, particularly in sediment systems low in organic carbon and high in iron.

  7. Abiotic reduction of nitroaromatic contaminants by iron(II) complexes with organothiol ligands.

    PubMed

    Naka, Daisuke; Kim, Dongwook; Carbonaro, Richard F; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2008-06-01

    Complexation of Fe(II) by dissolved and surface-bound ligands can significantly modify the metal's redox reactivity, and recent work reveals that Fe(II) complexes with selected classes of organic ligands are potent reductants that may contribute to the natural attenuation of subsurface contaminants. In the present study, we investigated the reactivity of Fe(II)-organothiol ligand complexes with nitroaromatic contaminants (NACs; ArNO(2)). Experimental results show that NACs are unreactive in Fe(2+)-only and ligand-only solutions but are reduced to the corresponding aniline compounds (ArNH(2)) in solutions containing both Fe(II) and a number of organothiol ligands. Observed reaction rates are highly dependent on the structure of the Fe(II)-complexing ligand, solution composition, Fe(II) speciation, and NAC structure. For two model ligands, cysteine and thioglycolic acid, observed pseudo-first order rate constants for 4-chloronitrobenzene reduction (k(obs); 1/s) are linearly correlated with the concentration of the respective 1:2 Fe(II)- organothiol complexes (FeL(2)(2-)), and k(obs) measurements are accurately predicted by k(obs) = k(FeL(2-)(2))[FeL(2-)(2)], where k(FeL(2-)(2)) = 1.70 (+/-0.59) 1/M/s and 26.0 (+/-4.8) 1/M/s for cysteine and thioglycolic acid, respectively. The high reactivity of these Fe(II) complexes is attributed to a lowering of the standard one-electron reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple on complexation by organothiol ligands. The relative reactivity of a series of substituted NACs with individual Fe(II) complexes can be described by linear free-energy relationships with the apparent one-electron reduction potentials of the NACs. Tests also show that organothiol ligands can further promote NAC reduction indirectly by re-reducing the Fe(III) that forms when Fe(II) complexes are oxidized by reactions with the NACs.

  8. Constraining the role of iron in environmental nitrogen transformations: Dual stable isotope systematics of abiotic NO2- reduction by Fe(II) and its production of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Carolyn; Grabb, Kalina; Hansel, Colleen M.; Wankel, Scott D.

    2016-08-01

    Despite mounting evidence for biogeochemical interactions between iron and nitrogen, our understanding of their environmental importance remains limited. Here we present an investigation of abiotic nitrite (NO2-) reduction by Fe(II) or 'chemodenitrification', and its relevance to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), specifically focusing on dual (N and O) isotope systematics under a variety of environmental conditions. We observe a range of kinetic isotope effects that are regulated by reaction rates, with faster rates at higher pH (∼8), higher concentrations of Fe(II) and in the presence of mineral surfaces. A clear non-linear relationship between rate constant and kinetic isotope effects of NO2- reduction was evident (with larger isotope effects at slower rates) and is interpreted as reflecting the dynamics of Fe(II)-N reaction intermediates. N and O isotopic composition of product N2O also suggests a complex network of parallel and/or competing pathways. Our findings suggest that NO2- reduction by Fe(II) may represent an important abiotic source of environmental N2O, especially in iron-rich environments experiencing dynamic redox variations. This study provides a multi-compound, multi-isotope framework for evaluating the environmental occurrence of abiotic NO2- reduction and N2O formation, helping future studies constrain the relative roles of abiotic and biological N2O production pathways.

  9. Constraining the role of iron in environmental nitrogen transformations. Dual stable isotope systematics of abiotic NO2- reduction by Fe(II) and its production of N2O

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, David; Wankel, Scott David; Buchwald, Carolyn; Hansel, Colleen

    2015-09-16

    Redox reactions involving nitrogen and iron have been shown to have important implications for mobilization of priority contaminants. Thus, an understanding of the linkages between their biogeochemical cycling is critical for predicting subsurface mobilization of radionuclides such as uranium. Despite mounting evidence for biogeochemical interactions between iron and nitrogen, our understanding of their environmental importance remains limited. Here we present an investigation of abiotic nitrite (NO2-) reduction by Fe(II) or ‘chemodenitrification,’ and its relevance to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), specifically focusing on dual (N and O) isotope systematics under a variety of environmentally relevant conditions. We observe a range of kinetic isotope effects that are regulated by reaction rates, with faster rates at higher pH (~8), higher concentrations of Fe(II) and in the presence of mineral surfaces. A clear non-linear relationship between rate constant and kinetic isotope effects of NO2- reduction was evident (with larger isotope effects at slower rates) and is interpreted as reflecting the dynamics of Fe(II)-N reaction intermediates. N and O isotopic composition of product N2O also suggests a complex network of parallel and/or competing pathways. Our findings suggest that NO2- reduction by Fe(II) may represent an important abiotic source of environmental N2O, especially in iron-rich environments experiencing dynamic redox variations. This study provides a multi-compound, multi-isotope framework for evaluating the environmental occurrence of abiotic NO2- reduction and N2O formation, helping future studies constrain the relative roles of abiotic and biological N2O production pathways.

  10. Abiotic Reductive Immobilization of U(VI) by Biogenic Mackinawite

    SciTech Connect

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Newville, Mathew; Lanzirotti, Anthony; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F.

    2013-03-01

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in-situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U6+ reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe1+xS, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U6+ abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U6+ indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of Fe(II) and sulfide bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U6+ reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U6+ reduction.

  11. Abiotic reductive immobilization of U(VI) by biogenic mackinawite.

    PubMed

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas C; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Newville, Matt; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F

    2013-03-05

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U(VI) reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe 1+x S, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U(VI) abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS, and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U(VI) indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of sulfide-bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U(VI) reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U(VI) reduction.

  12. Reductive Sequestration Of Pertechnetate (99TcO4–) By Nano Zerovalent Iron (nZVI) Transformed By Abiotic Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Dimin; Anitori, Roberto; Tebo, Bradley M.; Tratnyek, Paul G.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bowden, Mark E.; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.

    2013-04-24

    Under anoxic conditions, soluble 99TcO4– can be reduced to less soluble TcO2•nH2O, but the oxide is highly susceptible to reoxidation. Here we investigate an alternative strategy for remediation of Tc-contaminated groundwater whereby sequestration as Tc sulfide is favored by sulfidic conditions stimulated by nano zero-valent iron (nZVI). nZVI was pre-exposed to increasing concentrations of sulfide in simulated Hanford groundwater for 24 hrs to mimic the stages of aquifer sulfate reduction and onset of biotic sulfidogenesis. Solid-phase characterizations of the sulfidated nZVI confirmed the formation of nanocrystalline FeS phases, but higher S/Fe ratios (>0.112) did not result in the formation of significantly more FeS. The kinetics of Tc sequestration by these materials showed faster Tc removal rates with increasing S/Fe between S/Fe = 0–0.056, but decreasing Tc removal rates with S/Fe > 0.224. The more favorable Tc removal kinetics at low S/Fe could be due to a higher affinity of TcO4– for FeS (over iron oxides), and electron microscopy confirmed that the majority of the Tc was associated with FeS phases. The inhibition of Tc removal at high S/Fe appears to have been caused by excess HS–. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that as S/Fe increased, Tc speciation shifted from TcO2•nH2O to TcS2. The most substantial change of Tc speciation occurred at low S/Fe, coinciding with the rapid increase of Tc removal rate. This agreement further confirms the importance of FeS in Tc sequestration.

  13. Linear free energy relationships for the biotic and abiotic reduction of nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Luan, Fubo; Gorski, Christopher A; Burgos, William D

    2015-03-17

    Nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants that are susceptible to biological and abiotic reduction. Prior works have found that for the abiotic reduction of NACs, the logarithm of the NACs’ rate constants correlate with one-electron reduction potential values of the NACs (EH,NAC1) according to linear free energy relationships (LFERs). Here, we extend the application of LFERs to the bioreduction of NACs and to the abiotic reduction of NACs by bioreduced (and pasteurized) iron-bearing clay minerals. A linear correlation (R2=0.96) was found between the NACs’ bioreduction rate constants (kobs) and EH,NAC1 values. The LFER slope of log kobs versus EH,NAC1/(2.303RT/F) was close to one (0.97), which implied that the first electron transfer to the NAC was the rate-limiting step of bioreduction. LFERs were also established between NAC abiotic reduction rate constants by bioreduced iron-bearing clay minerals (montmorillonite SWy-2 and nontronite NAu-2). The second-order NAC reduction rate constants (k) by bioreduced SWy-2 and NAu-2 were well correlated to EH,NAC1 (R2=0.97 for both minerals), consistent with bioreduction results. However, the LFER slopes of log k versus EH,NAC1/(2.303RT/F) were significantly less than one (0.48–0.50) for both minerals, indicating that the first electron transfer to the NAC was not the rate-limiting step of abiotic reduction. Finally, we demonstrate that the rate of 4-acetylnitrobenzene reduction by bioreduced SWy-2 and NAu-2 correlated to the reduction potential of the clay (EH,clay, R2=0.95 for both minerals), indicating that the clay reduction potential also influences its reactivity.

  14. Abiotic nitrogen reduction on the early Earth.

    PubMed

    Brandes, J A; Boctor, N Z; Cody, G D; Cooper, B A; Hazen, R M; Yoder, H S

    1998-09-24

    The production of organic precursors to life depends critically on the form of the reactants. In particular, an environment dominated by N2 is far less efficient in synthesizing nitrogen-bearing organics than a reducing environment rich in ammonia. Relatively reducing lithospheric conditions on the early Earth have been presumed to favour the generation of an ammonia-rich atmosphere, but this hypothesis has not been studied experimentally. Here we demonstrate mineral-catalysed reduction of N2, NO2- and NO3- to ammonia at temperatures between 300 and 800 degrees C and pressures of 0.1-0.4 GPa-conditions typical of crustal and oceanic hydrothermal systems. We also show that only N2 is stable above 800 degrees C, thus precluding significant atmospheric ammonia formation during hot accretion. We conclude that mineral-catalysed N2 reduction might have provided a significant source of ammonia to the Hadean ocean. These results also suggest that, whereas nitrogen in the Earth's early atmosphere was present predominantly as N2, exchange with oceanic, hydrothermally derived ammonia could have provided a significant amount of the atmospheric ammonia necessary to resolve the early-faint-Sun paradox.

  15. The interactive biotic and abiotic processes of DDT transformation under dissimilatory iron-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Wang, Fang; Gu, Chenggang; Yang, Xinglun; Kengara, Fredrick O; Bian, Yongrong; Song, Yang; Jiang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the study was to elucidate the biotic and abiotic processes under dissimilatory iron reducing conditions involved in reductive dechlorination and iron reduction. DDT transformation was investigated in cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 with/without α-FeOOH. A modified first-order kinetics model was developed and described DDT transformation well. Both the α-FeOOH reduction rate and the dechlorination rate of DDT were positively correlated to the biomass. Addition of α-FeOOH enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT by favoring the cell survival and generating Fe(II) which was absorbed on the surface of bacteria and iron oxide. 92% of the absorbed Fe(II) was Na-acetate (1M) extractable. However, α-FeOOH also played a negative role of competing for electrons as reflected by the dechlorination rate of DDT was inhibited when increasing the α-FeOOH from 1 g L(-1) to 5 g L(-1). DDT was measured to be toxic to S. putrefaciens 200. The metabolites DDD, DDE and DDMU were recalcitrant to S. putrefaciens 200. The results suggested that iron oxide was not the key factor to promote the dissipation of DDX (DDT and the metabolites), whereas the one-electron reduction potential (E1) of certain organochlorines is the main factor and that the E1 higher than the threshold of the reductive driving forces of DIRB probably ensures the occur of reductive dechlorination.

  16. Chemical Reactivity Probes for Assessing Abiotic Natural Attenuation by Reducing Iron Minerals.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dimin; Bradley, Miranda J; Hinkle, Adrian W; Johnson, Richard L; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2016-02-16

    Increasing recognition that abiotic natural attenuation (NA) of chlorinated solvents can be important has created demand for improved methods to characterize the redox properties of the aquifer materials that are responsible for abiotic NA. This study explores one promising approach: using chemical reactivity probes (CRPs) to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of contaminant reduction by reducing iron minerals. Assays of thermodynamic CRPs were developed to determine the reduction potentials (ECRP) of suspended minerals by spectrophotometric determination of equilibrium CRP speciation and calculations using the Nernst equation. ECRP varied as expected with mineral type, mineral loading, and Fe(II) concentration. Comparison of ECRP with reduction potentials measured potentiometrically using a Pt electrode (EPt) showed that ECRP was 100-150 mV more negative than EPt. When EPt was measured with small additions of CRPs, the systematic difference between EPt and ECRP was eliminated, suggesting that these CRPs are effective mediators of electron transfer between mineral and electrode surfaces. Model contaminants (4-chloronitrobenzene, 2-chloroacetophenone, and carbon tetrachloride) were used as kinetic CRPs. The reduction rate constants of kinetic CRPs correlated well with the ECRP for mineral suspensions. Using the rate constants compiled from literature for contaminants and relative mineral reduction potentials based on ECRP measurements, qualitatively consistent trends were obtained, suggesting that CRP-based assays may be useful for estimating abiotic NA rates of contaminants in groundwater.

  17. Comparative study of biogenic and abiotic iron-containing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z.; Shopska, M.; Paneva, D.; Kovacheva, D.; Kadinov, G.; Mitov, I.

    2016-12-01

    Series of iron-based biogenic materials prepared by cultivation of Leptothrix group of bacteria in different feeding media ( Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria isolation medium, Adler, Lieske and silicon-iron-glucose-peptone) were studied. Control samples were obtained in the same conditions and procedures but the nutrition media were not infected with bacteria, i.e. they were sterile. Room and low temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS) were used to reveal the composition and physicochemical properties of biomass and respective control samples. Comparative analysis showed differences in their composition and dispersity of present phases. Sample composition included different ratio of nanodimensional iron oxyhydroxide and oxide phases. Relaxation phenomena such as superparamagnetism or collective magnetic excitation behaviour were registered for some of them. The experimental data showed that the biogenic materials were enriched in oxyhydroxides of high dispersion. Catalytic behaviour of a selected biomass and abiotic material were studied in the reaction of CO oxidation. In situ diffuse-reflectance (DR) IRS was used to monitor the phase transformations in the biomass and CO conversion.

  18. Abiotic reduction reactions of anthropogenic organic chemicals in anaerobic systems: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macalady, Donald L.; Tratnyek, Paul G.; Grundl, Timothy J.

    1986-02-01

    This review is predicated upon the need for a detailed process-level understanding of factors influencing the reduction of anthropogenic organic chemicals in natural aquatic systems. In particular, abiotic reductions of anthropogenic organic chemicals are reviewed. The most important reductive reaction is alkyl dehalogenation (replacement of chloride with hydrogen) which occurs in organisms, sediments, sewage sludge, and reduced iron porphyrin model systems. An abiotic mechanism involving a free radical intermediate has been proposed. The abstraction of vicinal dihalides (also termed dehalogenation) is another reduction that may have an abiotic component in natural systems. Reductive dehalogenation of aryl halides has recently been reported and further study of this reaction is needed. Several other degradation reactions of organohalides that occur in anaerobic environments are mentioned, the most important of which is dehydrohalogenation. The reduction of nitro groups to amines has also been thoroughly studied. The reactions can occur abiotically, and are affected by the redox conditions of the experimental system. However, a relationship between nitro-reduction rate and measured redox potential has not been clearly established. Reductive dealkylation of the N- and O-heteroatom of hydrocarbon pollutants has been observed but not investigated in detail. Azo compounds can be reduced to their hydrazo derivatives and a thorough study of this reaction indicates that it can be caused by extracellular electron transfer agents. Quinone-hydroquinone couples are important reactive groups in humic materials and similar structures in resazurin and indigo carmine make them useful as models for environmental redox conditions. The interconversion of sulfones, sulfoxides, and sulfides is a redox process and is implicated in the degradation of several pesticides though the reactions need more study. Two reductive heterocyclic cleavage reactions are also mentioned. Finally, several

  19. Kinetics of Abiotic Uranium(VI) Reduction by Sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, S.; Davis, J. A.; Hayes, K. F.

    2010-12-01

    Uranium(VI) reduction is an important process affecting the radionuclide’s fate under sulfate reducing conditions. In this work, kinetics of abiotic U(VI) reduction by dissolved sulfide was studied using a batch reactor. The effects of solution pH, dissolved carbonate, Ca(II), U(VI), and S(-II) concentration on the reduction kinetics were tested. The ranges of these experimental variables were designed to cover the variation in groundwater chemistry observed at the Old Rifle uranium mill tailings site (Colorado, USA). Dissolved U concentration was monitored as a function of time using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to measure the rate of U(VI) reduction. Solid phase reduction products were identified using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results showed that changes in the experimental variables significantly affected U(VI) reduction kinetics by dissolved sulfide. U(VI) reduction occurred under circumneutral pH while no reduction was observed under alkaline conditions. The reduction rate was slowed by increased dissolved carbonate concentration. One solid phase reduction product was identified as nanoscale uraninite (UO2+x(s)). Thermodynamic modeling showed that the dissolved U(VI) aqueous species changed as a function of solution conditions correlated with the change in the reduction rate. These results show that U(VI) aqueous speciation is important in determining abiotic U(VI) reduction kinetics by dissolved sulfide. This study also illustrates the potential importance of dissolved sulfide in field-scale modeling of U reactive transport, and is expected to contribute to the understanding of long-term effects of biostimulation on U transport at the Rifle site.

  20. Review of Abiotic Degradation of Chlorinated Solvents by Reactive Iron Minerals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abiotic degradation of chlorinated solvents by reactive iron minerals such as iron sulfides, magnetite, green rust, and other Fe(II)-containing minerals has been observed in both laboratory and field conditions. These reactive iron minerals typically form under iron and sulfate ...

  1. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  2. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, Michael R.; Arnold, Robert G.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  3. Interactions between Biological and Abiotic Pathways in the Reduction of Chlorinated Solvents

    EPA Science Inventory

    While biologically mediated reductive dechlorination continues to be a significant focus of chlorinated solvent remediation, there has been an increased interest in abiotic reductive processes for the remediation of chlorinated solvents. In situ chemical reduction (ISCR) uses zer...

  4. The Use of Chemical Probes for the Characterization of the Predominant Abiotic Reductants in Anaerobic Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the predominant chemical reductants and pathways for electron transfer in anaerobic systems is paramount to the development of environmental fate models that incorporate pathways for abiotic reductive transformations. Currently, such models do not exist. In this chapt...

  5. Accessible reactive surface area and abiotic redox reactivity of iron oxyhydroxides in acidic brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehlau, Jennifer H.; Toner, Brandy M.; Arnold, William A.; Penn, R. Lee

    2017-01-01

    The reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in low pH and high ionic strength solutions was quantified to assess abiotic contributions to oxidation-reduction chemistry in acidic brine environments, such as mine groundwater seepage, lakes in Western Australia, and acid mine drainage settings, which are of global interest for their environmental impacts and unique geomicrobiology. Factors expected to influence accessible and reactive surface area, including Fe(II) adsorption and aggregate size, were measured as a function of pH and CaCl2 concentration and related to the kinetics of redox reactions in aqueous suspensions of synthetic goethite (α-FeOOH), akaganeite (β-FeOOH), and ferrihydrite (Fe10O14(OH)2) nanoparticles. Aqueous conditions and iron oxyhydroxides were chosen based on characterization of natural iron-rich mine microbial mats located in Soudan Underground Mine State Park, Minnesota, USA. Quinone species were used as redox sensors because they are well-defined probes and are present in natural organic matter. Fe(II) adsorption to the iron oxyhydroxide mineral surfaces from aqueous solution was measurable only at pH values above 4 and either decreased or was not affected by CaCl2 concentration. Concentrations at or above 0.020 M CaCl2 in acetate buffer (pH 4.5) induced particle aggregation. Assessment of Fe(II) adsorption and particle aggregation in acidic brine suggested that accessible reactive surface area may be limited in acidic brines. This was supported by observations of decreasing benzoquinone reduction rate by adsorbed Fe(II) at high CaCl2 concentration. In contrast, the hydroquinone oxidation rate increased at high CaCl2 concentrations, which may be due to suppressed adsorption of Fe(II) generated by the reaction. Results suggest that iron geochemical cycling in acidic brine environments will be substantially different than for iron oxyhydroxides in low-saline waters with circumneutral pH. These findings have implications for acidic

  6. Real-Time Manganese Phase Dynamics during Biological and Abiotic Manganese Oxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jena E; Savalia, Pratixa; Davis, Ryan; Kocar, Benjamin D; Webb, Samuel M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fischer, Woodward W

    2016-04-19

    Manganese oxides are often highly reactive and easily reduced, both abiotically, by a variety of inorganic chemical species, and biologically during anaerobic respiration by microbes. To evaluate the reaction mechanisms of these different reduction routes and their potential lasting products, we measured the sequence progression of microbial manganese(IV) oxide reduction mediated by chemical species (sulfide and ferrous iron) and the common metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under several endmember conditions, using synchrotron X-ray spectroscopic measurements complemented by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy on precipitates collected throughout the reaction. Crystalline or potentially long-lived phases produced in these experiments included manganese(II)-phosphate, manganese(II)-carbonate, and manganese(III)-oxyhydroxides. Major controls on the formation of these discrete phases were alkalinity production and solution conditions such as inorganic carbon and phosphate availability. The formation of a long-lived Mn(III) oxide appears to depend on aqueous Mn(2+) production and the relative proportion of electron donors and electron acceptors in the system. These real-time measurements identify mineralogical products during Mn(IV) oxide reduction, contribute to understanding the mechanism of various Mn(IV) oxide reduction pathways, and assist in interpreting the processes occurring actively in manganese-rich environments and recorded in the geologic record of manganese-rich strata.

  7. Effect of abiotic factors on the mercury reduction process by humic acids in aqueous systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mercury (Hg) in the environment can have serious toxic effects on a variety of living organisms, and is a pollutant of concern worldwide. The reduction of mercury from the toxic Hg2+ form to Hg0 is especially important. One pathway for this reduction to occur is through an abiotic process with humic...

  8. Ferric iron reduction by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Nyhus, K J; Wilborn, A T; Jacobson, E S

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans must reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II) prior to uptake. We investigated mechanisms of reduction using the chromogenic ferrous chelator bathophenanthroline disulfonate. Iron-depleted cells reduced 57 nmol of Fe(III) per 10(6) cells per h, while iron-replete cells reduced only 8 nmol of Fe(III). Exponential-phase cells reduced the most and stationary-phase cells reduced the least Fe(III), independent of iron status. Supernatants from iron-depleted cells reduced up to 2 nmol of Fe(III) per 10(6) cells per h, while supernatants from iron-replete cells reduced 0.5 nmol of Fe(III), implying regulation of the secreted reductant(s). One such reductant is 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3HAA), which was found at concentrations up to 29 microM in iron-depleted cultures but <2 microM in cultures supplemented with iron. Moreover, when washed and resuspended in low iron medium, iron-depleted cells secreted 20.4 microM 3HAA, while iron-replete cells secreted only 4.5 microM 3HAA. Each mole of 3HAA reduced 3 mol of Fe(III), and increasing 3HAA concentrations correlated with increasing reducing activity of supernatants; however, 3HAA accounted for only half of the supernatant's reducing activity, indicating the presence of additional reductants. Finally, we found that melanized stationary-phase cells reduced 2 nmol of Fe(III) per 10(6) cells per h--16 times the rate of nonmelanized cells--suggesting that this redox polymer participates in reduction of Fe(III). PMID:9009293

  9. Sulfur-mediated electron shuttling during bacterial iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Theodore M; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Mishra, Bhoopesh; DiChristina, Thomas J; Kemner, Kenneth M

    2014-05-30

    Microbial reduction of ferric iron [Fe(III)] is an important biogeochemical process in anoxic aquifers. Depending on groundwater pH, dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria can also respire alternative electron acceptors to survive, including elemental sulfur (S(0)). To understand the interplay of Fe/S cycling under alkaline conditions, we combined thermodynamic geochemical modeling with bioreactor experiments using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Under these conditions, S. oneidensis can enzymatically reduce S(0) but not goethite (α-FeOOH). The HS(-) produced subsequently reduces goethite abiotically. Because of the prevalence of alkaline conditions in many aquifers, Fe(III) reduction may thus proceed via S(0)-mediated electron-shuttling pathways.

  10. Direct Reduction of Iron Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, M.

    1981-04-01

    In the search for a pure, available iron source, steelmakers are focusing their attention on Directly Reduced Iron (DRI). This material is produced by the reaction of a low gangue iron ore with a hydrocarbonaceous substance. Commercially, DRI is generated in four different reactors: shaft (moving-bed), rotary kiln, fluidized bed, and retort (fixed-bed). Annual worldwide production capacity approaches 33 million metric tons. Detailed assessments have been made of the uses of DRI, especially as a substitute for scrap in electric furnace (EF) steelmaking. DRI is generally of a quality superior to current grades of scrap, with steels produced more efficiently in the EF and containing lower levels of impurities. However, present economics favor EF steel production with scrap. But this situation could change within this decade because of a developing scarcity of good quality scrap.

  11. Abiotic remediation of nitro-aromatic groundwater contaminants by zero-valent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, A.; Tratnyek, P.G.

    1994-03-18

    Recent laboratory and field experiments have shown that some halogenated hydrocarbons undergo rapid reductive dehalogenation with zero-valent iron and the application of this process is being developed for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. However, from can also reduce other organic substances and is commonly used to synthesize reduction products nitro compounds.

  12. Abiotic formation of hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds during thermal decomposition of iron oxalate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollom, T. M.; Simoneit, B. R.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of organic compounds during the decomposition of iron oxalate dihydrate (IOD) was investigated as a possible analog for abiotic organic synthesis in geological systems. After heating at 330 degrees C for 2-4 days, IOD decomposed to a mixture of the minerals siderite and magnetite plus gas and non-volatile organic compounds. The organic products included an extremely large variety of compounds, making identification of individual reaction products difficult. However, the non-volatile products were dominated by several homologous series of alkylated cyclic compounds mostly containing a single aromatic ring, including alkylphenols, alkylbenzenes, alkyltetrahydronaphthols, and alkyltetrahydronaphthalenes. Traces of n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkanones, and n-alkanes were also identified. Carbon in the gas phase was predominantly CO2 (+CO?), with lesser amounts of light hydrocarbons to > C6 including all possible branched and normal isomers of the alkanes and alkenes. The organic products were apparently the result of two concurrent reaction processes: (1) condensation of the two-carbon units present in the initial oxalate moiety, and (2) Fischer-Tropsch-type synthesis from CO2 or CO generated during the experiment. Compounds produced by the former process may not be characteristic of synthesis from the single-carbon precursors which predominate in geologic systems, suggesting iron oxalate decomposition may not provide a particularly suitable analog for investigation of abiotic organic synthesis. When water was included in the reaction vessels, CO2 and traces of methane and light hydrocarbon gases were the only carbon products observed (other than siderite), suggesting that the presence of water allowed the system to proceed rapidly towards equilibrium and precluded the formation of metastable organic intermediates.

  13. Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Singer, David M.; Bargar, John R.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2013-09-15

    Laboratory experiments were performed as a function of aqueous Fe(II) concentration to determine the uptake and oxidation of Fe(II), and Fe(II)-mediated abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aquifer sediments from the Rifle IFRC field site in Colorado, USA. Mössbauer analysis of the sediments spiked with aqueous 57Fe(II) showed that 57Fe(II) was oxidized on the mineral surfaces to 57Fe(III) and most likely formed a nano-particulate Fe(III)-oxide or ferrihydrite-like phase. The extent of 57Fe oxidation decreased with increasing 57Fe(II) uptake, such that 100 % was oxidized at 7.3 μmol/g Fe and 52 % at 39.6 μmol/g Fe, indicating that the sediments had a finite capacity for oxidation of Fe(II). Abiotic U(VI) reduction was observed by XANES spectroscopy only when the Fe(II) uptake was greater than approximately 20 μmol/g and surface-bound Fe(II) was present. The level of U(VI) reduction increased with increasing Fe(II)- loading above this level to a maximum of 18 and 36 % U(IV) at pH 7.2 (40.7 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (56.1 μmol/g Fe), respectively in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. Greater U(VI) reduction was observed in CO2 free systems [up to 44 and 54 % at pH 7.2 (17.3 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (54.8 μmol/g Fe), respectively] compared to 400 ppm CO2 systems, presumably due to differences in aqueous U(VI) speciation. While pH affects the amount of Fe(II) uptake onto the solid phase, with greater Fe(II) uptake at higher pH, similar amounts of U(VI) reduction were observed at pH 7.2 and 8.3 for a similar Fe(II) uptake. Thus, it appears that abiotic U(VI) reduction is controlled primarily by Fe(II) concentration and aqueous U(VI) speciation. The range of Fe(II) loadings tested in this study are within the range observed in bioreduced sediments, suggesting that Fe(II)-mediated abiotic U(VI) reduction may indeed play a role in field settings.

  14. Genes for iron-sulphur cluster assembly are targets of abiotic stress in rice, Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xuejiao; Qin, Lu; Liu, Peiwei; Wang, Meihuan; Ye, Hong

    2014-03-01

    Iron-sulphur (Fe-S) cluster assembly occurs in chloroplasts, mitochondria and cytosol, involving dozens of genes in higher plants. In this study, we have identified 41 putative Fe-S cluster assembly genes in rice (Oryza sativa) genome, and the expression of all genes was verified. To investigate the role of Fe-S cluster assembly as a metabolic pathway, we applied abiotic stresses to rice seedlings and analysed Fe-S cluster assembly gene expression by qRT-PCR. Our data showed that genes for Fe-S cluster assembly in chloroplasts of leaves are particularly sensitive to heavy metal treatments, and that Fe-S cluster assembly genes in roots were up-regulated in response to iron toxicity, oxidative stress and some heavy metal assault. The effect of each stress treatment on the Fe-S cluster assembly machinery demonstrated an unexpected tissue or organelle specificity, suggesting that the physiological relevance of the Fe-S cluster assembly is more complex than thought. Furthermore, our results may reveal potential candidate genes for molecular breeding of rice.

  15. Technetium Reduction and Permanent Sequestration by Abiotic and Biotic Formation of Low-Solubility Sulfide Mineral Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Tratnyek, Paul G.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Fan, Dimin; Anitori, Roberto; Szecsody, Jim; Jansik, Danielle

    2015-11-14

    One way to minimize the mobility of the TcVII oxyanion pertechnetate (TcO4-) is to effect reduction under sulfidogenic conditions (generated abiotically by Fe0 or biotically) to form TcSx, which is significantly slower to oxidize than TcIVO2. In sediment systems, TcSx and other precipitates may oxidize more slowly due to oxygen diffusion limitations to these low permeability precipitate zones. In addition, the TcO4- reduction rate may be more rapid in the presence of sediment because of additional reductive surface phases. This project aims to provide a fundamental understanding of the feasibility of immobilization of TcO4- as TcSx in the vadose zone or groundwater by application nano zero-valent iron (nZVI), and sulfide or sulfate. Biotic batch experiments have used the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfotomaculum reducens. The iron sulfide mineral mackinawite was generated under these conditions, while vivianite was formed in nZVI only controls. The sulfide/bacteria-containing system consistently reduced aqueous pertechnetate rapidly (> 95% in the first hour), a rate similar to that for the sulfide-free, nZVI only system. Reduced Tc (aged for 3 months) generated in both SRB/nZVI systems was highly resistant to reoxidation. In reduced samples, Tc was found associated with solid phases containing Fe and S (D. reducens/nZVI) or Fe (nZVI only). Experiments using D. reducens without nZVI provided some additional insights. Firstly, stationary phase cultures were able to slowly reduce pertechnetate. Secondly, addition of pertechnetate at the beginning of cell growth (lag phase) resulted in a faster rate of Tc reduction, possibly indicating a direct (e.g. enzymatic) role for D. reducens in Tc reduction. Abiotic batch experiments were conducted with Na2S as the sulfide source. Pertechnetate reduction was

  16. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  17. Influence of Various Levels of Iron and Other Abiotic Factors on Siderophorogenesis in Paddy Field Cyanobacterium Anabaena oryzae.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anumeha; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Siderophore production in Anabaena oryzae was investigated under the influence of various levels of iron and other abiotic factors such as pH, temperature, light and different nitrogen sources. Optimization of culture conditions under controlled mechanisms of these abiotic factors lead to the siderophore production in significant amount. Under iron-starved condition, A. oryzae extracellularly releases 89.17% hydroxymate-type siderophore. Slightly alkaline pH and 30 °C temperature was found stimulatory for the cyanobacterial growth and siderophorogenesis (88.52% SU and 83.87% SU, respectively). Excess iron loading had a negative impact on siderophore production along with the alterations in the morphology and growth. Further, scanning electron microphotographs signified that higher concentrations of iron lead to complete damage of the cells and alterations in membrane proteins possibly transporters responsible for exchange of siderophore complex from environment to the cell. SDS-PAGE analysis of whole cell proteins showed overexpression of low molecular weight proteins ranges between 20.1 to 29.0 kDa up to 100-μM iron concentrations. These polypeptides/proteins might be involved in maintaining iron homeostasis by regulating siderophore production. Results suggest that lower concentrations of iron ≤ 50 μM along with other abiotic factors are stimulatory, whereas higher concentrations (>50 μM) are toxic. Data further suggested that cyanobacterium A. oryzae can serve as a potential biofertilizer especially in iron-rich soil through sequestration by the power of natural Fe(III)-siderophore complex formation.

  18. Interaction of abiotic and microbial processes in hexachloroethane reduction in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, A. Lynn; Gschwend, Philip M.

    1994-01-01

    In order to gain insight into mechanisms of hexachloroethane reduction, hexa- and pentachloroethane transformation rates were measured in anaerobic groundwater samples. For samples spiked with pentachloroethane, disappearance of pentachloroethane was accompanied by tetrachloroethylene production. Transformation rates were similar in unpoisoned and in HgCl2-poisoned samples, and rates were within ±20% of predictions based on measured pH and second-order dehydrochlorination rate constants determined in clean laboratory systems, indicating that the fate of pentachloroethane in this system is dominated by abiotic reactions. No hexachloroethane transformation was observed in HgCl2-poisoned samples, whereas in unpoisoned samples, hexachloroethane disappearance was accompanied by production of tetrachloroethylene as well as traces of pentachloroethane. Although only minor amounts of pentachloroethane accumulated, as much as 30% of the hexachloroethane transformation pathway proceeds via a pentachloroethane intermediate. This suggests that the microbial reduction of hexachloroethane proceeds at least in part through a free-radical mechanism. To the extent that hexachloroethane reduction to tetrachloroethylene occurs through a pentachloroethane intermediate, the first step in the sequence, the microbially-mediated step, is the slow step; the subsequent abiotic dehydrohalogenation step occurs much more rapidly.

  19. Archaeal (Per)Chlorate Reduction at High Temperature: An Interplay of Biotic and Abiotic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebensteiner, Martin G.; Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Schaap, Peter J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Lomans, Bart P.

    2013-04-01

    Perchlorate and chlorate anions [(per)chlorate] exist in the environment from natural and anthropogenic sources, where they can serve as electron acceptors for bacteria. We performed growth experiments combined with genomic and proteomic analyses of the hyperthermophile Archaeoglobus fulgidus that show (per)chlorate reduction also extends into the archaeal domain of life. The (per)chlorate reduction pathway in A. fulgidus relies on molybdo-enzymes that have similarity with bacterial enzymes; however, chlorite is not enzymatically split into chloride and oxygen. Evidence suggests that it is eliminated by an interplay of abiotic and biotic redox reactions involving sulfur compounds. Biological (per)chlorate reduction by ancient archaea at high temperature may have prevented accumulation of perchlorate in early terrestrial environments and consequently given rise to oxidizing conditions on Earth before the rise of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  20. Abiotic stress growth conditions induce different responses in kernel iron concentration across genotypically distinct maize inbred varieties.

    PubMed

    Kandianis, Catherine B; Michenfelder, Abigail S; Simmons, Susan J; Grusak, Michael A; Stapleton, Ann E

    2013-01-01

    The improvement of grain nutrient profiles for essential minerals and vitamins through breeding strategies is a target important for agricultural regions where nutrient poor crops like maize contribute a large proportion of the daily caloric intake. Kernel iron concentration in maize exhibits a broad range. However, the magnitude of genotype by environment (GxE) effects on this trait reduces the efficacy and predictability of selection programs, particularly when challenged with abiotic stress such as water and nitrogen limitations. Selection has also been limited by an inverse correlation between kernel iron concentration and the yield component of kernel size in target environments. Using 25 maize inbred lines for which extensive genome sequence data is publicly available, we evaluated the response of kernel iron density and kernel mass to water and nitrogen limitation in a managed field stress experiment using a factorial design. To further understand GxE interactions we used partition analysis to characterize response of kernel iron and weight to abiotic stressors among all genotypes, and observed two patterns: one characterized by higher kernel iron concentrations in control over stress conditions, and another with higher kernel iron concentration under drought and combined stress conditions. Breeding efforts for this nutritional trait could exploit these complementary responses through combinations of favorable allelic variation from these already well-characterized genetic stocks.

  1. Abiotic stress growth conditions induce different responses in kernel iron concentration across genotypically distinct maize inbred varieties

    PubMed Central

    Kandianis, Catherine B.; Michenfelder, Abigail S.; Simmons, Susan J.; Grusak, Michael A.; Stapleton, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    The improvement of grain nutrient profiles for essential minerals and vitamins through breeding strategies is a target important for agricultural regions where nutrient poor crops like maize contribute a large proportion of the daily caloric intake. Kernel iron concentration in maize exhibits a broad range. However, the magnitude of genotype by environment (GxE) effects on this trait reduces the efficacy and predictability of selection programs, particularly when challenged with abiotic stress such as water and nitrogen limitations. Selection has also been limited by an inverse correlation between kernel iron concentration and the yield component of kernel size in target environments. Using 25 maize inbred lines for which extensive genome sequence data is publicly available, we evaluated the response of kernel iron density and kernel mass to water and nitrogen limitation in a managed field stress experiment using a factorial design. To further understand GxE interactions we used partition analysis to characterize response of kernel iron and weight to abiotic stressors among all genotypes, and observed two patterns: one characterized by higher kernel iron concentrations in control over stress conditions, and another with higher kernel iron concentration under drought and combined stress conditions. Breeding efforts for this nutritional trait could exploit these complementary responses through combinations of favorable allelic variation from these already well-characterized genetic stocks. PMID:24363659

  2. Asynchronous Reductive Release of Iron and Organic Carbon from Hematite-Humic Acid Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, D.; Poulson, S.; Sumaila, S.; Dynes, J.; McBeth, J. M.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Association with solid-phase iron plays an important role in the accumulation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM). Ferric minerals are subject to redox reactions, which can compromise the stability of iron-bound SOM. To date, there is limited information available concerning the fate of iron-bound SOM during redox reactions. In this study, we investigated the release kinetics of hematite-bound organic carbon (OC) during the abiotic reduction of hematite-humic acid (HA) complexes by dithionite, as an analog for the fate of iron-bound SOM in natural redox reactions. Carbon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was used to examine the ratio of the aromatic, phenolic and carboxylic/imide functional groups of the adsorbed OC before and after reduction. Our results indicate that the reductive release of iron obeyed first-order kinetics with release rate constants of 6.67×10-3 to 13.0×10-3 min-1. The iron-bound OC was released rapidly during the initial stage with release rate constants of 0.011 to 1.49 min-1, and then became stable with residual fractions of 4.6% to 58.2% between 120 and 240 min. The release rate of aromatic OC was much faster than for the non-aromatic fraction of HA, and 90% of aromatic OC was released within the first hour for most samples. The more rapid release of aromatic OC was attributed to its potential distribution on the outer layer because of steric effects and the possible reduction of quinoids. Our findings show that in the reductive reaction the mobilization of iron-bound organic carbon was asynchronous with the reduction of iron, and aromatic carbon was released more readily than other organic components. This study illustrates the importance of evaluating the stability of iron-bound SOM, especially under aerobic-anaerobic transition conditions.

  3. Reductive iron assimilation and intracellular siderophores assist extracellular siderophore-driven iron homeostasis and virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron is an essential nutrient and prudent iron acquisition and management are key traits of a successful pathogen. Fungi use nonribosomally synthesized secreted iron chelators (siderophores) or Reductive Iron Assimilation (RIA) mechanisms to acquire iron in a high affinity manner. Previous studies...

  4. Abiotic nitrogen fixation on terrestrial planets: reduction of NO to ammonia by FeS.

    PubMed

    Summers, David P; Basa, Ranor C B; Khare, Bishun; Rodoni, David

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the abiotic fixation of nitrogen and how such fixation can be a supply of prebiotic nitrogen is critical for understanding both the planetary evolution of, and the potential origin of life on, terrestrial planets. As nitrogen is a biochemically essential element, sources of biochemically accessible nitrogen, especially reduced nitrogen, are critical to prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life. Loss of atmospheric nitrogen can result in loss of the ability to sustain liquid water on a planetary surface, which would impact planetary habitability and hydrological processes that shape the surface. It is known that NO can be photochemically converted through a chain of reactions to form nitrate and nitrite, which can be subsequently reduced to ammonia. Here, we show that NO can also be directly reduced, by FeS, to ammonia. In addition to removing nitrogen from the atmosphere, this reaction is particularly important as a source of reduced nitrogen on an early terrestrial planet. By converting NO directly to ammonia in a single step, ammonia is formed with a higher product yield (~50%) than would be possible through the formation of nitrate/nitrite and subsequent conversion to ammonia. In conjunction with the reduction of NO, there is also a catalytic disproportionation at the mineral surface that converts NO to NO₂ and N₂O. The NO₂ is then converted to ammonia, while the N₂O is released back in the gas phase, which provides an abiotic source of nitrous oxide.

  5. Uranium(VI) reduction by iron(II) monosulfide mackinawite.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sung Pil; Davis, James A; Sun, Kai; Hayes, Kim F

    2012-03-20

    Reaction of aqueous uranium(VI) with iron(II) monosulfide mackinawite in an O(2) and CO(2) free model system was studied by batch uptake measurements, equilibrium modeling, and L(III) edge U X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Batch uptake measurements showed that U(VI) removal was almost complete over the wide pH range between 5 and 11 at the initial U(VI) concentration of 5 × 10(-5) M. Extraction by a carbonate/bicarbonate solution indicated that most of the U(VI) removed from solution was reduced to nonextractable U(IV). Equilibrium modeling using Visual MINTEQ suggested that U was in equilibrium with uraninite under the experimental conditions. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy showed that the U(IV) phase associated with mackinawite was uraninite. Oxidation experiments with dissolved O(2) were performed by injecting air into the sealed reaction bottles containing mackinawite samples reacted with U(VI). Dissolved U measurement and XAS confirmed that the uraninite formed from the U(VI) reduction by mackinawite did not oxidize or dissolve under the experimental conditions. This study shows that redox reactions between U(VI) and mackinawite may occur to a significant extent, implying an important role of the ferrous sulfide mineral in the redox cycling of U under sulfate reducing conditions. This study also shows that the presence of mackinawite protects uraninite from oxidation by dissolved O(2). The findings of this study suggest that uraninite formation by abiotic reduction by the iron sulfide mineral under low temperature conditions is an important process in the redistribution and sequestration of U in the subsurface environments at U contaminated sites.

  6. Reduction of ferrihydrite with adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter: microbial reduction by Geobacter bremensis vs. abiotic reduction by Na-dithionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Hädrich, A.; Neidhardt, J.; Küsel, K.; Keller, T. F.; Jandt, K. D.; Totsche, K. U.

    2014-09-01

    Ferrihydrite is a widespread poorly crystalline Fe oxide which becomes easily coated by natural organic matter in the environment. This mineral-bound organic matter entirely changes the mineral surface properties and therefore the reactivity of the original mineral. Here, we investigated 2-line ferrihydrite, ferrihydrite with adsorbed organic matter, and ferrihydrite coprecipitated with organic matter for microbial and abiotic reduction of Fe(III). Ferrihydrite-organic matter associations with different organic matter loadings were reduced either by Geobacter bremensis or abiotically by Na-dithionite. Both types of experiments showed decreasing initial Fe-reduction rates and decreasing degrees of reduction with increasing amounts of mineral-bound organic matter. At similar organic matter loadings, coprecipitated ferrihydrites were more reactive than ferrihydrites with adsorbed organic matter. The difference can be explained by the smaller crystal size and poor crystallinity of such coprecipitates. At small organic matter loadings the poor crystallinity of coprecipitates led to even faster Fe-reduction rates than found for pure ferrihydrite. The amount of mineral-bound organic matter also affected the formation of secondary minerals: goethite was only found after reduction of organic matter-free ferrihydrite and siderite was only detected when ferrihydrites with relatively low amounts of mineral-bound organic matter were reduced. We conclude that direct contact of G. bremensis to the Fe oxide mineral surface was inhibited by attached organic matter. Consequently, mineral-bound organic matter shall be taken into account as a factor in slowing down reductive dissolution.

  7. Model-based Analysis of Mixed Uranium(VI) Reduction by Biotic and Abiotic Pathways During in Situ Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jiao; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2013-10-24

    Uranium bioremediation has emerged as a potential strategy of cleanup of radionuclear contamination worldwide. An integrated geochemical & microbial community model is a promising approach to predict and provide insights into the bioremediation of a complicated natural subsurface. In this study, an integrated column-scale model of uranium bioremediation was developed, taking into account long-term interactions between biotic and abiotic processes. It is also combined with a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis to track the fate and cycling of biogenic species. As compared with other bioremediation models, the model increases the resolution of the connection of microbial community to geochemistry and establishes direct quantitative correlation between overall community evolution and geochemical variation, thereby accurately predicting the community dynamics under different sedimentary conditions. The thermodynamic analysis examined a recently identified homogeneous reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) under dynamic sedimentary conditions across time and space. It shows that the biogenic Fe(II) from Geobacter metabolism can be removed rapidly by the biogenic sulphide from sulfate reducer metabolism, hence constituting one of the reasons that make the abiotic U(VI) reduction thermodynamically infeasible in the subsurface. Further analysis indicates that much higher influent concentrations of both Fe(II) and U(VI) than normal are required to for abiotic U(VI) reduction to be thermodynamically feasible, suggesting that the abiotic reduction cannot be an alternative to the biotic reduction in the remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater.

  8. Nature and Reactivity of Sediment-Associated Spiked Fe(II) Toward Abiotic Uranium Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukkadapu, R.; Fox, P. M.; Davis, J.

    2011-12-01

    Uranium (U) is a priority contaminant at U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites. Mobility of U in contaminated aquifers is governed by a complex assortment of site-specific biogeochemical and hydrological properties, sediment Fe-mineralogy, and redox status. There is a particular interest in understanding factors governing U attenuation to Fe-mineralogy under natural conditions. Thus, the goal of this work is to investigate geochemical effects of Fe redox state on U mobility under conditions relevant to the Rifle aquifer, an UMTRA site. Particularly, the focus is to gain insights into the degree and mechanism of Fe(II) uptake by Rifle sediments that exhibit complex Fe-mineralogy composed of various Fe-oxides and Fe-containing clays and on the possibility of abiotic U(VI) reduction by adsorbed Fe(II) and secondary Fe(II) minerals. Earlier field studies where Fe(II)-amended groundwater was injected into the Rifle aquifer indicated: a) Fe(II) uptake by Rifle sediments is extensive and b) abiotic U(VI) reduction by Fe(II) may be important at pH 8.3. Batch reactions between Rifle sediment and 57Fe(II) (57Fe isotope is a Mossbauer sensitive nuclide with a natural abundance of 2%) under conditions relevant to the Rifle aquifer indicated that, depending on the solution conditions: a) a large fraction of the spiked 57Fe(II) (55-100%) is oxidized to 57Fe(III) on sediment surfaces and, at pH 7.2, the degree of oxidation decreased as Fe(II) loading increased; b) the 57Fe(II)-oxidation is coupled to the transformation of an intrinsic ferrihydrite-like mineral to a nanoparticulate, Fe(II)/57Fe(III)-like mineral phase, and c) increasing pH from 7.2 to 8.3 and including carbonate in the medium has little or no effect on percent oxidation or mineral transformation. Preliminary X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy studies suggested that 20-30% of abiotic U(VI) reduction occurred, both at pH 7.2 and 8.3, in the sediments

  9. Combined abiotic and biotic in-situ reduction of hexavalent chromium in groundwater using nZVI and whey: A remedial pilot test.

    PubMed

    Němeček, Jan; Pokorný, Petr; Lacinová, Lenka; Černík, Miroslav; Masopustová, Zuzana; Lhotský, Ondřej; Filipová, Alena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2015-12-30

    The paper describes a pilot remediation test combining two Cr(VI) geofixation methods - chemical reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and subsequent biotic reduction supported by whey. Combination of the methods exploited the advantages of both - a rapid decrease in Cr(VI) concentrations by nZVI, which prevented further spreading of the contamination and facilitated subsequent use of the cheaper biological method. Successive application of whey as an organic substrate to promote biotic reduction of Cr(VI) after application of nZVI resulted in a further and long-term decrease in the Cr(VI) contents in the groundwater. The effect of biotic reduction was observed even in a monitoring well located at a distance of 22 m from the substrate injection wells after 10 months. The results indicated a reciprocal effect of both the phases - nZVI oxidized to Fe(III) during the abiotic phase was microbially reduced back to Fe(II) and acted as a reducing agent for Cr(VI) even when the microbial density was already low due to the consumed substrate. Community analysis with pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes further confirmed partial recycling of nZVI in the form of Fe(II), where the results showed that the Cr(VI) reducing process was mediated mainly by iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  10. Microbial reduction of iron in smectite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Joseph W.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2006-06-01

    Bacteria-mediated changes in the oxidation state of iron in soil clay minerals play an important role in determining the chemical and physical properties of soils and sediments. As structural Fe(III) in the octahedral sheet of smectites is reduced to Fe(II) by bacteria, specific surface area decreases, cation exchange capacity (CEC) increases, swelling in water decreases, reactivity with organic chemicals and pesticides increases, and the potential for mineral dissolution and transformation increases. Changes in clay mineral structure due to bacterial reduction is, however, small. Because of the large potential for the redox state of soil minerals to change with natural environmental conditions, the chemical properties of the soil must be regarded as constantly changing. The resulting dynamic nature of soil behavior must be taken into account in management strategies to maximize soil fertility and structural performance. To cite this article: J.W. Stucki, J.E. Kostka, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  11. Arsenic Mobilization Influenced By Iron Reduction And Sulfidogenesis Under Dynamic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocar, B. D.; Stewart, B. D.; Herbel, M.; Fendorf, S.

    2004-12-01

    Sulfidogenesis and iron reduction are ubiquitous processes that occur in a variety of anoxic subsurface and surface environments, which profoundly impact the cycling of arsenic. Of the iron (hydr)oxides, ferrihydrite possesses one of the highest capacities to retain arsenic, and is globally distributed within soils and sediments. Upon dissimilatory iron reduction, ferrihydrite may transform to lower surface area minerals, such as goethite and magnetite, which decreases arsenic retention, thus enhancing its transport. Here we examine how arsenic retained on ferrihydrite is mobilized under dynamic flow in the presence of Sulfurosprillum barnesii strain SES-3, a bacteria capable of reducing both As(V) and Fe(III). Ferrihydrite coated sands, loaded with 150 mg kg-1 As(V), were inoculated with S. barnesii, packed into a column and reacted with a synthetic groundwater solution. Within several days after initiation of flow, the concentration of arsenic in the column effluent increased dramatically coincident with the mineralogical transformation of ferrihydrite and As(V) reduction to As(III). Following the initial pulse of arsenic, effluent concentration then declined to less than 10 μ M. Thus, arsenic release into the aqueous phase is contingent upon the incongruent reduction of As(V) and Fe(III) as mediated by biological activity. Reaction of abiotically or biotically generated dissolved sulfide with iron (hydr)oxides may have a dramatic influence on the fate of arsenic within surface and subsurface environments. Accordingly, we examined the reaction of dissolved bisulfide and iron (hydr)oxide complexed with arsenic in both batch and column systems. Low ratios of sulfide to iron in batch reaction systems result in the formation of elemental sulfur and concomitant arsenic release from the iron (hydr)oxide surface. High sulfide to iron ratios, in contrast, appear to favor the formation of iron and arsenic sulfides. Our findings demonstrate that iron (hydr)oxides may

  12. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents by zero-valent iron, iron oxide and iron sulfide minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P.

    1996-10-01

    The degradation of chlorinated solvents by reduction at the surface of zero-valent metals and bimetallic systems has emerged as an important approach to the in-situ remediation of ground water. Reduction by iron metal was studied in batch and column systems to develop a mechanistic understanding of the reaction chemistry and to determine the factors that affect dechlorination rate and long term performance in field applications.

  13. Reduction of ferrihydrite with adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter: microbial reduction by Geobacter bremensis vs. abiotic reduction by Na-dithionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Hädrich, A.; Neidhardt, J.; Küsel, K.; Keller, T. F.; Jandt, K. D.; Totsche, K. U.

    2014-04-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is a widespread poorly crystalline Fe oxide which becomes easily coated by natural organic matter (OM) in the environment. This mineral-bound OM entirely changes the mineral surface properties and therefore the reactivity of the original mineral. Here, we investigated the reactivity of 2-line Fh, Fh with adsorbed OM and Fh coprecipitated with OM towards microbial and abiotic reduction of Fe(III). As a surrogate for dissolved soil OM we used a water extract of a Podzol forest floor. Fh-OM associations with different OM-loadings were reduced either by Geobacter bremensis or abiotically by Na-dithionite. Both types of experiments showed decreasing initial Fe reduction rates and decreasing degrees of reduction with increasing amounts of mineral-bound OM. At similar OM-loadings, coprecipitated Fhs were more reactive than Fhs with adsorbed OM. The difference can be explained by the smaller crystal size and poor crystallinity of such coprecipitates. At small OM loadings this led to even faster Fe reduction rates than found for pure Fh. The amount of mineral-bound OM also affected the formation of secondary minerals: goethite was only found after reduction of OM-free Fh and siderite was only detected when Fhs with relatively low amounts of mineral-bound OM were reduced. We conclude that direct contact of G. bremensis to the Fe oxide mineral surface was inhibited when blocked by OM. Consequently, mineral-bound OM shall be taken into account besides Fe(II) accumulation as a further widespread mechanism to slow down reductive dissolution.

  14. Identification of abiotic and biotic reductive dechlorination in a chlorinated ethene plume after thermal source remediation by means of isotopic and molecular biology tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badin, Alice; Broholm, Mette M.; Jacobsen, Carsten S.; Palau, Jordi; Dennis, Philip; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Thermal tetrachloroethene (PCE) remediation by steam injection in a sandy aquifer led to the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from aquifer sediments resulting in more reduced redox conditions, accelerated PCE biodegradation, and changes in microbial populations. These changes were documented by comparing data collected prior to the remediation event and eight years later. Based on the premise that dual C-Cl isotope slopes reflect ongoing degradation pathways, the slopes associated with PCE and TCE suggest the predominance of biotic reductive dechlorination near the source area. PCE was the predominant chlorinated ethene near the source area prior to thermal treatment. After thermal treatment, cDCE became predominant. The biotic contribution to these changes was supported by the presence of Dehalococcoides sp. DNA (Dhc) and Dhc targeted rRNA close to the source area. In contrast, dual C-Cl isotope analysis together with the almost absent VC 13C depletion in comparison to cDCE 13C depletion suggested that cDCE was subject to abiotic degradation due to the presence of pyrite, possible surface-bound iron (II) or reduced iron sulphides in the downgradient part of the plume. This interpretation is supported by the relative lack of Dhc in the downgradient part of the plume. The results of this study show that thermal remediation can enhance the biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes, and that this effect can be traced to the mobilisation of DOC due to steam injection. This, in turn, results in more reduced redox conditions which favor active reductive dechlorination and/or may lead to a series of redox reactions which may consecutively trigger biotically induced abiotic degradation. Finally, this study illustrates the valuable complementary application of compound-specific isotopic analysis combined with molecular biology tools to evaluate which biogeochemical processes are taking place in an aquifer contaminated with chlorinated ethenes.

  15. Recovery of Iron from Copper Tailings by Direct Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jing; Xia, De-Hong; Gu, Jing; Liu, Kai-Qi; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Shou-Zeng; Qi, Zhao-Dong; Ao, Wen-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Direct reduction of copper tailings were performed to recover iron efficiently by carbon-containing pellets, and the metallization rate was gained by chemical analysis method. The results showed that the metallization rate of copper tailings was up to 85.32% and the best reduction parameters are also found. Content of precious metals, such as, gold, silver in copper tailings can be enriched by 1.8~1.9 times through removing iron. The apparent activation energy of direct reduction of iron oxide in copper tailings is calculated to be 125.4 kJ/mol and the restrictive factor of reduction process is solid diffusion.

  16. Iron Isotope Fractionation Reveals Structural Change upon Microbial and Chemical Reduction of Nontronite NAu-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Wu, L.; Shi, B.; Smeaton, C. M.; Li, W.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C.; Roden, E. E.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Iron (Fe) isotope fractionations were determined during reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-1 biologically by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and chemically by dithionite. ~10% reduction was achieved in biological reactors, with similar reduction extents obtained by dithionite. We hypothesize that two stages occurred in our reactors. Firstly, reduction started from edge sites of clays and the produced Fe(II) partially remained in situ and partially was released into solution. Next aqueous Fe(II) adsorbed onto basal planes. The basal sorbed Fe(II) then undergoes electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) with octahedral Fe(III) in clays, with the most negative fractionation factor Δ56Febasal Fe(II)-structural Fe(III)of -1.7‰ when basal sorption reached a threshold value. Secondly, when the most reactive Fe(III) was exhausted, bioreduction significantly slowed down and chemical reduction was able to achieve 24% due to diffusion of small size dithionite. Importantly, no ETAE occurred between basal Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) due to blockage of pathways by collapsed clay layers. This two-stage process in our reduction experiments is distinctive from abiotic exchange experiments by mixing aqueous Fe(II) and NAu-1, where no structural change of clay would block ETAE between basal Fe(II) and structural Fe(III). The separation of reduction sites (clay edges) and sorption sites (basal planes) is unique to clay minerals with layered structure. In contrast, reduction and sorption occur on the same sites on the surfaces of Fe oxyhydroxides, where reduction does not induce structure change. Thus, the Fe isotope fractionations are the same for reduction and abiotic exchange experiments for Fe oxides. Our study reveals important changes in electron transfer and atom exchange pathways upon reduction of clay minerals by dissimilatory Fe reducing bacteria, which is prevalent in anoxic soils and sediments.

  17. Methanogens rapidly transition from methane production to iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Sivan, O; Shusta, S S; Valentine, D L

    2016-03-01

    Methanogenesis, the microbial methane (CH4 ) production, is traditionally thought to anchor the mineralization of organic matter as the ultimate respiratory process in deep sediments, despite the presence of oxidized mineral phases, such as iron oxides. This process is carried out by archaea that have also been shown to be capable of reducing iron in high levels of electron donors such as hydrogen. The current pure culture study demonstrates that methanogenic archaea (Methanosarcina barkeri) rapidly switch from methanogenesis to iron-oxide reduction close to natural conditions, with nitrogen atmosphere, even when faced with substrate limitations. Intensive, biotic iron reduction was observed following the addition of poorly crystalline ferrihydrite and complex organic matter and was accompanied by inhibition of methane production. The reaction rate of this process was of the first order and was dependent only on the initial iron concentrations. Ferrous iron production did not accelerate significantly with the addition of 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) but increased by 11-28% with the addition of phenazine-1-carboxylate (PCA), suggesting the possible role of methanophenazines in the electron transport. The coupling between ferrous iron and methane production has important global implications. The rapid transition from methanogenesis to reduction of iron-oxides close to the natural conditions in sediments may help to explain the globally-distributed phenomena of increasing ferrous concentrations below the traditional iron reduction zone in the deep 'methanogenic' sediment horizon, with implications for metabolic networking in these subsurface ecosystems and in past geological settings.

  18. Biotic and a-biotic Mn and Fe cycling in deep sediments across a gradient of sulfate reduction rates along the California margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider-Mor, A.; Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

    2011-12-01

    The coupling between the biological and a-biotic processes controlling trace metals in deep marine sediments are not well understood, although the fluxes of elements and trace metals across the sediment-water interface can be a major contribution to ocean water. Four marine sediment profiles (ODP leg 167 sites 1011, 1017, 1018 and 1020)were examined to evaluate and quantify the biotic and abiotic reaction networks and fluxes that occur in deep marine sediments. We compared biogeochemical processes across a gradient of sulfate reduction (SR) rates with the objective of studying the processes that control these rates and how they affect major elements as well as trace metal redistribution. The rates of sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) were constrained using a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow). Constraints for the model include: sediment and pore water concentrations, as well as %CaCO3, %biogenic silica, wt% carbon and δ13C of total organic carbon (TOC), particulate organic matter (POC) and mineral associated carbon (MAC). The sites are distinguished by the depth of AMO: a shallow zone is observed at sites 1018 (9 to 19 meters composite depth (mcd)) and 1017 (19 to 30 mcd), while deeper zones occur at sites 1011 (56 to 76 mcd) and 1020 (101 to 116 mcd). Sulfate reduction rates at the shallow AMO sites are on the order 1x10-16 mol/L/yr, much faster than rates in the deeper zone sulfate reduction (1-3x10-17 mol/L/yr), as expected. The dissolved metal ion concentrations varied between the sites, with Fe (0.01-7 μM) and Mn (0.01-57 μM) concentrations highest at Site 1020 and lowest at site 1017. The highest Fe and Mn concentrations occurred at various depths, and were not directly correlated with the rates of sulfate reduction and the maximum alkalinity values. The main processes that control cycling of Fe are the production of sulfide from sulfate reduction and the distribution of Fe-oxides. The Mn distribution

  19. Assessing chromate reduction by dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria using mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Liu, Yiwen; Gao, Shu-Hong; Dai, Xiaohu; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-11-01

    Chromate (Cr (VI)) is a ubiquitous contaminant in aquifers and soils, which can be reduced to its trivalent counterpart (Cr (III)), with the hazard being relieved. The coupling microbial and chemical reduction by dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (IRB) is a promising approach for the reduction of Cr (VI) to Cr (III). In this work, three mathematical models with different Cr (VI) reduction pathways were proposed and compared based on their ability to predict the performance of an IRB-based stirred-flow reactor treating Cr (VI) contaminated medium and to provide insights into the possible chemical or microbial pathways for Cr (VI) reduction in the system. The Cr (VI) reduction was considered as chemical reaction between Fe (II) and Cr (VI), direct microbial reduction by IRB and combined biotic-abiotic reduction in these three models, respectively. Model evaluation results indicated that the model incorporating both chemical and microbial Cr (VI) reductions could well describe the system performance. In contrast, the other two single-pathway models were not capable of predicting the experimental data, suggesting that both chemical and microbial pathways contributed to Cr (VI) reduction by IRB. The validity of the two-pathway model was further confirmed by an independent experimental data set with different conditions. The results further revealed that the organic carbon availability and Cr (VI) loading rates for the IRB in the system determined the relative contributions of chemical and microbial pathways to overall Cr (VI) reduction.

  20. Iron Corrosion Observations: Pu(VI)-Fe Reduction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Donald T.; Swanson, Juliet S.; Richmann, Michael K.; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Borkowski, Marian

    2012-09-11

    Iron and Pu Reduction: (1) Very different appearances in iron reaction products were noted depending on pH, brine and initial iron phase; (2) Plutonium was associated with the Fe phases; (3) Green rust was often noted at the higher pH; (4) XANES established the green rust to be an Fe2/3 phase with a bromide center; and (5) This green rust phase was linked to Pu as Pu(IV).

  1. Thermodynamic controls on the microbial reduction of iron-bearing nontronite and uranium.

    PubMed

    Luan, Fubo; Gorski, Christopher A; Burgos, William D

    2014-01-01

    Iron-bearing phyllosilicate minerals help establish the hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of redox transition zones because of their small size, limited hydraulic conductivity, and redox buffering capacity. The bioreduction of soluble U(VI) to sparingly soluble U(IV) can promote the reduction of clay-Fe(III) through valence cycling. The reductive precipitation of U(VI) to uraninite was previously reported to occur only after a substantial percentage of clay-Fe(III) had been reduced. Using improved analytical techniques, we show that concomitant bioreduction of both U(VI) and clay-Fe(III) by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 can occur. Soluble electron shuttles were previously shown to enhance both the rate and extent of clay-Fe(III) bioreduction. Using extended incubation periods, we show that electron shuttles enhance only the rate of reduction (overcoming a kinetic limitation) and not the final extent of reduction (a thermodynamic limitation). The first 20% of clay-Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-2 was relatively "easy" (i.e., rapid) to bioreduce; the next 15% of clay-Fe(III) was "harder" (i.e., kinetically limited) to bioreduce, and the remaining 65% of clay-Fe(III) was effectively biologically unreducible. In abiotic experiments with NAu-2 and biogenic uraninite, 16.4% of clay-Fe(III) was reduced in the presence of excess uraninite. In abiotic experiments with NAu-2 and reduced anthraquinone 2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS), 18.5-19.1% of clay-Fe(III) was reduced in the presence of excess and variable concentrations of AH2DS. A thermodynamic model based on published values of the nonstandard state reduction potentials at pH 7.0 (E'H) showed that the abiotic reactions between NAu-2 and uraninite had reached an apparent equilibrium. This model also showed that the abiotic reactions between NAu-2 and AH2DS had reached an apparent equilibrium. The final extent of clay-Fe(III) reduction correlated well with the standard state reduction potential at pH 7.0 (E°'H) of all of the

  2. Reduction and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metal ions using combined zero valent iron and anaerobic bacteria. Year one technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Weathers, L.J.; Katz, L.E.

    1997-10-01

    'The objective of this project is to design a combined abiotic/microbial, reactive, permeable, in-situ barrier with sufficient reductive potential to prevent downgradient migration of toxic metal ions. The field-scale application of this technology would utilize anaerobic digester sludge, Fe(O) particles for supporting anaerobic biofilms, and suitable aquifer material for construction of the barrier. The major goals for Year 1 were to establish the sulfate reducing mixed culture, to obtain sources of iron metal, and to conduct background experiments which will establish baseline rates for abiotic chromium reduction rates. Research completed to date is described.'

  3. Reduction experiment of iron scale by adding waste plastics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongmin; Chen, Shuwen; Miao, Xincheng; Yuan, Hao

    2009-01-01

    The special features of waste plastics in China are huge in total amount, various in type and dispersive in deposition. Therefore, it is necessary to try some new ways that are fit to Chinese situation for disposing waste plastics as metallurgical raw materials more effectively and flexibly. Owing to its high ferrous content and less impurity, the iron scale became ideal raw material to produce pure iron powder. One of the methods to produce pure iron powder is Hoganas Method, by which, after one or multistage of reduction steps, the iron scale can be reduced pure iron powder. However, combining utilization of waste plastics and iron powder production, a series of reduction experiments were arranged and investigated, which is hoped to take use of both thermal and chemical energy contained in waste plastics as well as to improve the reducing condition of iron scale, and hence to develop a new metallurgical way of disposing waste plastics. The results show that under these experimental conditions, the thermal-decomposition of water plastics can conduce to an increase of porosity in the reduction systems. Moreover, better thermodynamics and kinetics conditions for the reduction of scale can be reached. As a result, the reduction rate is increased.

  4. Formation and characterization of metallic iron grains in coal-based reduction of oolitic iron ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yong-sheng; Han, Yue-xin; Li, Yan-feng; Li, Yan-jun

    2017-02-01

    To reveal the formation and characteristics of metallic iron grains in coal-based reduction, oolitic iron ore was isothermally reduced in various reduction times at various reduction temperatures. The microstructure and size of the metallic iron phase were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and a Bgrimm process mineralogy analyzer. In the results, the reduced Fe separates from the ore and forms metallic iron protuberances, and then the subsequent reduced Fe diffuses to the protuberances and grows into metallic iron grains. Most of the metallic iron grains exist in the quasi-spherical shape and inlaid in the slag matrix. The cumulative frequency of metallic iron grain size is markedly influenced by both reduction time and temperature. With increasing reduction temperature and time, the grain size of metallic iron obviously increases. According to the classical grain growth equation, the growth kinetic parameters, i.e., time exponent, growth activation energy, and pre-exponential constant, are estimated to be 1.3759 ± 0.0374, 103.18 kJ·mol-1, and 922.05, respectively. Using these calculated parameters, a growth model is established to describe the growth behavior of metallic iron grains.

  5. Minerals Masquerading As Enzymes: Abiotic Oxidation Of Soil Organic Matter In An Iron-Rich Humid Tropical Forest Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    Oxidative reactions play an important role in decomposing soil organic matter fractions that resist hydrolytic degradation, and fundamentally affect the cycling of recalcitrant soil carbon across ecosystems. Microbial extracellular oxidative enzymes (e.g. lignin peroxidases and laccases) have been assumed to provide a dominant role in catalyzing soil organic matter oxidation, while other potential oxidative mechanisms remain poorly explored. Here, we show that abiotic reactions mediated by the oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) could explain high potential oxidation rates in humid tropical forest soils, which often contain high concentrations of Fe(II) and experience rapid redox fluctuations between anaerobic and aerobic conditions. These abiotic reactions could provide an additional mechanism to explain high rates of decomposition in these ecosystems, despite frequent oxygen deficits. We sampled humid tropical forest soils in Puerto Rico, USA from various topographic positions, ranging from well-drained ridges to riparian valleys that experience broad fluctuations in redox potential. We measured oxidative activity by adding the model humic compound L-DOPA to soil slurries, followed by colorimetric measurements of the supernatant solution over time. Dilute hydrogen peroxide was added to a subset of slurries to measure peroxidative activity. We found that oxidative and peroxidative activity correlated positively with soil Fe(II) concentrations, counter to prevailing theory that low redox potential should suppress oxidative enzymes. Boiling or autoclaving sub-samples of soil slurries to denature any enzymes present typically increased peroxidative activity and did not eliminate oxidative activity, further suggesting the importance of an abiotic mechanism. We found substantial differences in the oxidation products of the L-DOPA substrate generated by our soil slurries in comparison with oxidation products generated by a purified enzyme (mushroom tyrosinase

  6. Biochemical Analyses of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruebush, S. S.; Tien, M.; Icopini, G. A.; Brantley, S. L.

    2002-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis demonstrates respiratory flexibility by the transfer of electrons to Fe (III) and Mn (IV) oxides under anaerobic conditions. Researchers postulate that the bacterium utilizes surface proteins to facilitate the respiratory mechanism for dissimilatory iron(III) reduction. Previous genetic and biochemical studies has shown that iron reduction is associated with the outer membrane of the cell. The identity of the terminal reductase is not yet known. S. oneidensis has been shown to use soluble extra-cellular compounds to facilitate iron(III) reduction as well as expression of novel proteins on the cell surface when interacting with iron(III) oxides. Our results show that the outer membrane fraction possess enzymatic activity for converting Fe(III) to Fe(II) as measured by ferrozine complexation. AQDS, extra-cellular organic extracts, and iron(III) both soluble and solid have been assayed for activity with outer membrane fractions. Zymograms of the membrane fractions separated by isoelectric focusing and native PAGE electrophoresis stained using ferrozine have implicated proteins that are directly involved in the Fe(III) reduction process. A proteomics analysis of outer membrane proteins has also been implemented to identify different expression patterns under Fe(III) reducing conditions. Proteins that are unique to Fe(III) reduction have been isolated and identified using N-terminal sequence analysis. We will also attempt to examine the effect of enzymatic iron(III) reduction on isotopic partitioning from in vitro assays.

  7. Reduction and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metal ions using combined zero valent iron and anaerobic bacteria. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Weathers, L.

    1998-06-01

    'Previous research findings indicate that both zero valent iron and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) can yield significant decreases in Cr(VI) or U(VI) concentrations due to abiotic and microbial reduction, respectively. The major hypothesis associated with this research project is that a combined abiotic-biological system can synergistically combine both processes to maximize metal ion reduction in an engineered permeable reactive barrier. The overall goal of this project is to design a combined abiotic/microbial, reactive, permeable, in-situ barrier with sufficient reductive potential to prevent downgradient migration of toxic metal ions. The field-scale application of this technology would utilize anaerobic digester sludge, Fe(O) particles for supporting anaerobic biofilms, and suitable aquifer material for construction of the barrier. Successful completion of this goal requires testing of the two hypotheses listed above by evaluating: (1) the rates of abiotic metal ion reduction, and (2) the rates of microbial metal ion reduction in microbial and combined abiotic/microbial reduction systems under a range of environmental conditions. This report summarizes work after one and one-half years of a three year project. Abiotic studies: The thrust of the abiotic research conducted to date has been to determine the rates of Cr(VI) reduction in batch reactors and to evaluate the role of aquifer materials on those rates. Experiments have been conducted to determine the rates of reduction by Fe(II) and Fe(O). The parameters that have been evaluated are the effect of pH and the presence of sulfide and aquifer material.'

  8. Removal of EDB and 1,2-DCA by Abiotic Reaction with Iron (II) Sulfide

    EPA Science Inventory

    To properly evaluate the risk associated with exposure to EDB and 1,2-DCA in ground water from old spills of leaded gasoline, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms that may attenuate concentrations of these compounds in ground water. TCE reacts rapidly with iron (II) sulf...

  9. Modeling RDX Reduction within Iron Bed Reactors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    completely flushed. The third test case for the hypothetical batch reactor was conducted with a constant RDX loading as prescribed for a water...of RDX. Likewise, constant concentrations of RDX degradation products are produced. The results for all three of the hypothetical batch reactor ...a model to predict the degradation of RDX and its degradation products within an iron bed reactor . A batch reactor model and a one- dimensional (1D

  10. Recent Developments in Homogeneous Dinitrogen Reduction by Molybdenum and Iron

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, K. Cory; Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of gaseous nitrogen (N2) is a challenge for industrial, biological and synthetic chemists, who want to understand the formation of ammonia (NH3) for agriculture and also want to form N-C and N-Si bonds for fine chemical synthesis. The iron-molybdenum active site of nitrogenase has inspired chemists to explore the ability of iron and molybdenum complexes to bring about transformations related to N2 reduction. This area of research has gained significant momentum, and the last two years have witnessed a number of significant advances in synthetic Fe-N2 and Mo-N2 chemistry. In addition, the identities of all atoms in the iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase have finally been elucidated, and the discovery of a carbide has generated new questions and targets for coordination chemists. This Perspective summarizes the recent work on iron and molydenum complexes, and highlights the opportunities for continued research. PMID:23787744

  11. Distribution Behavior of Phosphorus and Metallization of Iron Oxide in Carbothermic Reduction of High-Phosphorus Iron Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Ji-Whoe; Kim, Dong-Yuk; Jung, Sung-Mo

    2015-10-01

    Distribution behavior of phosphorus and metallization of iron ore in the carbothermic reduction of high-phosphorus iron ore were investigated. Reduction degree of the iron oxide was evaluated by quadruple mass spectrometry connected to thermogravimetric analysis. The distribution of some elements including phosphorus was examined by electron probe micro-analyzer mapping analyses. The reduction behavior of high-phosphorus iron ore was evaluated as a function of reduction temperature, C/O molar ratio, and CaO addition. High reduction temperature accelerated the reduction of both iron oxide and hydroxylapatite, and high C/O molar ratio also promotes both of them. Those were contradictory to the targets of higher reduction degree of iron oxide and of lower one of hydroxylapatite. It was confirmed that appropriate amount of CaO addition could enhance the reduction of iron oxide, and regulate the reduction of hydroxylapatite.

  12. Ligand-Enhanced Abiotic Iron Oxidation and the Effects of Chemical versus Biological Iron Cycling in Anoxic Environments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a newly isolated, genetically tractable bacterium (Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain MAI-1) and explores the extent to which its nitrate-dependent iron-oxidation activity is directly biologically catalyzed. Specifically, we focused on the role of iron chelating ligands in promoting chemical oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrite under anoxic conditions. Strong organic ligands such as nitrilotriacetate and citrate can substantially enhance chemical oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrite at circumneutral pH. We show that strain MAI-1 exhibits unambiguous biological Fe(II) oxidation despite a significant contribution (∼30–35%) from ligand-enhanced chemical oxidation. Our work with the model denitrifying strain Paracoccus denitrificans further shows that ligand-enhanced chemical oxidation of Fe(II) by microbially produced nitrite can be an important general side effect of biological denitrification. Our assessment of reaction rates derived from literature reports of anaerobic Fe(II) oxidation, both chemical and biological, highlights the potential competition and likely co-occurrence of chemical Fe(II) oxidation (mediated by microbial production of nitrite) and truly biological Fe(II) oxidation. PMID:23402562

  13. Superoxide generated from the glutathione-mediated reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of chloroplastic ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Brian; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Abdel-Ghany, Salah; Pilon, Marinus; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A; Sagi, Moshe; Van Hoewyk, Doug

    2016-09-01

    Selenium assimilation in plants is facilitated by several enzymes that participate in the transport and assimilation of sulfate. Manipulation of genes that function in sulfur metabolism dramatically affects selenium toxicity and accumulation. However, it has been proposed that selenite is not reduced by sulfite reductase. Instead, selenite can be non-enzymatically reduced by glutathione, generating selenodiglutathione and superoxide. The damaging effects of superoxide on iron-sulfur clusters in cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins are well known. However, it is unknown if superoxide damages chloroplastic iron-sulfur proteins. The goals of this study were twofold: to determine whether decreased activity of sulfite reductase impacts selenium tolerance in Arabidopsis, and to determine if superoxide generated from the glutathione-mediated reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of ferredoxin. Our data demonstrate that knockdown of sulfite reductase in Arabidopsis does not affect selenite tolerance or selenium accumulation. Additionally, we provide in vitro evidence that the non-enzymatic reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of ferredoxin, a plastidial protein that is an essential component of the photosynthetic light reactions. Damage to ferredoxin's iron-sulfur cluster was associated with formation of apo-ferredoxin and impaired activity. We conclude that if superoxide damages iron-sulfur clusters of ferredoxin in planta, then it might contribute to photosynthetic impairment often associated with abiotic stress, including toxic levels of selenium.

  14. CHARACTERIZING THE ABIOTIC REDUCTANTS FOR NITROAROMATIC COMPOUNDS AS A FUNCTION OF REDOX ZONATION IN ANOXIC SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reductive transformation is the dominant reaction pathway for the degradation of nitroaromatic compounds in anaerobic environments (Larson and Weber, 1994). Proposed reductants cover a spectrum ranging from reduced rninerals and organic matter to microbial enzyme systems. Transfo...

  15. Reductive denitrification of nitrate by scrap iron filings.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhi-Wei; Xu, Xin-Hua; Wang, Da-Hui

    2005-03-01

    Reduction of nitrate by zero-valent iron is a highly exergonic reaction that has long been known to occur. Use of scrap iron filings (SIF) as the PRB (Permeable Reactive Barrier) material can be used to recycle certain by-products, and identify cheaper replacements for expensive conventional PRB materials, especially pure metallic iron. The feasibility of reductive denitrification of nitrate by SIF was studied by batch experiments. Operational parameters such as pH value, SIF dosage and initial concentration of nitrate were investigated. The removal efficiency of nitrate reached 80% under the conditions of pH of 2.5, nitrate initial concentration of 45 mg/L and SIF dosage of 100 g/L within 4 h. Results indicated that nitrate removal is inversely related to pH. Low pH value condition favors for the nitrate transformation. Different from the results of others who studied nitrate reduction using iron powder, we found that there was a lag time before nitrate reduction occurs, even at low pH. Finally, the possible mechanism of nitrate reduction by Fe0 is discussed.

  16. COUPLED IRON CORROSION AND CHROMATE REDUCTION: MECHANISMS FOR SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reduction of chromium from the Cr(VI) to the Cr- (Ill) state by the presence of elemental, or zero-oxidation-state, iron metal was studied to evaluate the feasibility of such a process for subsurface chromate remediation. Reactions were studied in systems of natural aquifer m...

  17. Influence of Microbial Iron and Nitrate Reduction on Subsurface Iron Biogeochemistry and Contaminant Metal Mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn W. Picardal

    2002-04-10

    Although toxic metal and radionuclide contaminants can not be destroyed, their toxicity and mobility can be dramatically altered by microbial activity. In addition to toxic metals, many contaminated sites contain both iron-containing minerals and co-contaminants such as nitrate NO{sub 3}{sup -}. Successful implementation of metal and radionuclide bioremediation strategies in such environments requires an understanding of the complex microbial and geochemical interactions that influence the redox speciation and mobility of toxic metals. Our specific objectives have been to (1) determine the effect of iron oxide mineral reduction on the mobility of sorbed, representative toxic metals (Zn{sup 2+}), (2) study the biogeochemical interactions that may occur during microbial reduction of NO{sub 3}{sup -} and iron oxide minerals, and (3) evaluate the kinetics of NO{sub 3}{sup -}-dependent, microbial oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe{sup 2+}).

  18. Speciation-dependent microbial reduction of uranium within iron-coated sands.

    PubMed

    Neiss, Jim; Stewart, Brandy D; Nico, Peter S; Fendorf, Scott

    2007-11-01

    Transport of uranium within surface and subsurface environments is predicated largely on its redox state. Uranyl reduction may transpire through either biotic (enzymatic) or abiotic pathways; in either case, reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) results in the formation of sparingly soluble UO2 precipitates. Biological reduction of U(VI), while demonstrated as prolific under both laboratory and field conditions, is influenced by competing electron acceptors (such as nitrate, manganese oxides, or iron oxides) and uranyl speciation. Formation of Ca-UO2-CO3 ternary complexes, often the predominate uranyl species in carbonate-bearing soils and sediments, decreases the rate of dissimilatory U(VI) reduction. The combined influence of uranyl speciation within a mineralogical matrix comparable to natural environments and under hydrodynamic conditions, however, remains unresolved. We therefore examined uranyl reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens within packed mineral columns of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand under conditions conducive or nonconducive to Ca-UO2-CO3 species formation. The results are dramatic. In the absence of Ca, where uranyl carbonato complexes dominate, U(VI) reduction transpires and consumes all of the U(VI) within the influent solution (0.166 mM) over the first 2.5 cm of the flow field for the entirety of the 54 d experiment. Over 2 g of U is deposited during this reaction period, and despite ferrihydrite being a competitive electron acceptor, uranium reduction appears unabated for the duration of our experiments. By contrast, in columns with 4 mM Ca in the influent solution (0.166 mM uranyl), reduction (enzymatic or surface-bound Fe(III) mediated) appears absent and breakthrough occurs within 18 d (at a flow rate of 3 pore volumes per day). Uranyl speciation, and in particular the formation of ternary Ca-UO2-CO3 complexes, has a profound impact on U(VI) reduction and thus transport within anaerobic systems.

  19. Iron reduction and mineralization of deep-sea iron reducing bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 at elevated hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Wu, W F; Wang, F P; Li, J H; Yang, X W; Xiao, X; Pan, Y X

    2013-11-01

    In this study, iron reduction and concomitant biomineralization of a deep-sea iron reducing bacterium (IRB), Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, were systematically examined at different hydrostatic pressures (0.1, 5, 20, and 50 MPa). Our results indicate that bacterial iron reduction and induced biomineralization are influenced by hydrostatic pressure. Specifically, the iron reduction rate and extent consistently decreases with the increase in hydrostatic pressure. By extrapolation, the iron reduction rate should drop to zero by ~68 MPa, which suggests a possible shut-off of enzymatic iron reduction of WP3 at this pressure. Nano-sized superparamagnetic magnetite minerals are formed under all the experimental pressures; nevertheless, even as magnetite production decreases, the crystallinity and grain size of magnetite minerals increase at higher pressure. These results imply that IRB may play an important role in iron reduction, biomineralization, and biogeochemical cycling in deep-sea environments.

  20. A bioinspired iron catalyst for nitrate and perchlorate reduction.

    PubMed

    Ford, Courtney L; Park, Yun Ji; Matson, Ellen M; Gordon, Zachary; Fout, Alison R

    2016-11-11

    Nitrate and perchlorate have considerable use in technology, synthetic materials, and agriculture; as a result, they have become pervasive water pollutants. Industrial strategies to chemically reduce these oxyanions often require the use of harsh conditions, but microorganisms can efficiently reduce them enzymatically. We developed an iron catalyst inspired by the active sites of nitrate reductase and (per)chlorate reductase enzymes. The catalyst features a secondary coordination sphere that aids in oxyanion deoxygenation. Upon reduction of the oxyanions, an iron(III)-oxo is formed, which in the presence of protons and electrons regenerates the catalyst and releases water.

  1. Nitrogen Assimilation, Abiotic Stress and Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: The Full Circle of Reductants.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Sergio

    2016-05-11

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) is well-known as the main regulatory enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in living organisms. Namely, in Planta, different G6PDH isoforms may occur, generally localized in cytosol and plastids/chloroplasts. These enzymes are differently regulated by distinct mechanisms, still far from being defined in detail. In the last decades, a pivotal function for plant G6PDHs during the assimilation of nitrogen, providing reductants for enzymes involved in nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation, has been described. More recently, several studies have suggested a main role of G6PDH to counteract different stress conditions, among these salinity and drought, with the involvement of an ABA depending signal. In the last few years, this recognized vision has been greatly widened, due to studies clearly showing the non-conventional subcellular localization of the different G6PDHs, and the peculiar regulation of the different isoforms. The whole body of these considerations suggests a central question: how do the plant cells distribute the reductants coming from G6PDH and balance their equilibrium? This review explores the present knowledge about these mechanisms, in order to propose a scheme of distribution of reductants produced by G6PDH during nitrogen assimilation and stress.

  2. Nitrogen Assimilation, Abiotic Stress and Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: The Full Circle of Reductants

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) is well-known as the main regulatory enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in living organisms. Namely, in Planta, different G6PDH isoforms may occur, generally localized in cytosol and plastids/chloroplasts. These enzymes are differently regulated by distinct mechanisms, still far from being defined in detail. In the last decades, a pivotal function for plant G6PDHs during the assimilation of nitrogen, providing reductants for enzymes involved in nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation, has been described. More recently, several studies have suggested a main role of G6PDH to counteract different stress conditions, among these salinity and drought, with the involvement of an ABA depending signal. In the last few years, this recognized vision has been greatly widened, due to studies clearly showing the non-conventional subcellular localization of the different G6PDHs, and the peculiar regulation of the different isoforms. The whole body of these considerations suggests a central question: how do the plant cells distribute the reductants coming from G6PDH and balance their equilibrium? This review explores the present knowledge about these mechanisms, in order to propose a scheme of distribution of reductants produced by G6PDH during nitrogen assimilation and stress. PMID:27187489

  3. Abiotic reduction reactions of dichloroacetamide safeners: transformations of "inert" agrochemical constituents.

    PubMed

    Sivey, John D; Roberts, A Lynn

    2012-02-21

    Safeners are so-called "inert" constituents of herbicide formulations added to protect crops from the toxic effects of herbicides. We examined the reactivity of three dichloroacetamide safeners and 12 structural analogues [all neutral compounds of the form Cl(2)CXC(═O)NRR'; X = H, Cl; R-groups include alkyl, branched alkyl, n-allyl, and cyclic moieties] in one homogeneous and two heterogeneous reductant systems: solutions of Cr(H(2)O)(6)(2+), suspensions of Fe(II)-amended goethite, and suspensions of Fe(II)-amended hematite. Analyses of reaction products indicate each safener can undergo stepwise hydrogenolysis (replacement of chlorine by hydrogen) in each system at near-neutral pH. The first hydrogenolysis step generates compounds similar (in one case, identical) to herbicide active ingredients. Rates of product formation and (when reactions were sufficiently fast) parent loss were quantified; reaction rates in heterogeneous systems spanned 2 orders of magnitude and were strongly influenced by R-group structure. The length of n-alkyl R-groups exerted opposite effects on hydrogenolysis rates in homogeneous versus heterogeneous systems: as R-group size increased, reduction rates in heterogeneous systems increased, whereas reduction rates in the homogeneous system decreased. Branched alkyl R-groups decreased hydrogenolysis rates relative to their straight-chain homologues in both homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. Reaction rates in heterogeneous systems can be described via polyparameter linear free energy relationships employing molecular parameters likely to influence dichloroacetamide adsorption. The propensity of dichloroacetamide safeners to undergo reductive transformations into herbicide-like products challenges their classification as "inert" agrochemical ingredients.

  4. Immobilization of uranium and arsenic by injectible iron and hydrogen stimulated autotrophic sulphate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghardt, D.; Simon, E.; Knöller, K.; Kassahun, A.

    2007-12-01

    The main object of the study was the development of a long-term efficient and inexpensive in-situ immobilization technology for uranium (U) and arsenic (As) in smaller and decentralized groundwater discharges from abandoned mining processing sites. Therefore, corrosion of grey cast iron (gcFe) and nano-scale iron particles (naFe) as well as hydrogen stimulated autotrophic sulphate reduction (aSR) were investigated. Two column experiments with sulphate reducing bacterias (SRB) (biotic gcFe , biotic naFe) and one abiotic gcFe-column experiment were performed. In the biotic naFe column, no particle translocation was observed and a temporary but intensive naFe corrosion indicated by a decrease in Eh, a pH increase and H 2 evolution. Decreasing sulphate concentrations and 34S enrichment in the column effluent indicated aSR. Fe(II) retention could be explained by siderite and consequently FeS precipitation by geochemical modeling (PhreeqC). U and As were completely immobilised within the biotic naFe column. In the biotic gcFe column, particle entrapment in open pore spaces resulted in a heterogeneous distribution of Fe-enriched zones and an increase in permeability due to preferential flow. However, Fe(II) concentrations in the effluent indicated a constant and lasting gcFe corrosion. An efficient immobilization was found for As, but not for U.

  5. Reduction of photosynthetic sensitivity in response to abiotic stress in tomato is mediated by a new generation plant activator

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Yield losses as a result of abiotic stress factors present a significant challenge for the future of global food production. While breeding technologies provide potential to combat negative stress-mediated outcomes over time, interventions which act to prime plant tolerance to stress, via the use of phytohormone-based elicitors for example, could act as a valuable tool for crop protection. However, the translation of fundamental biology into functioning solution is often constrained by knowledge-gaps. Results Photosynthetic and transcriptomic responses were characterised in young tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings in response to pre-treatment with a new plant health activator technology, ‘Alethea’, followed by a subsequent 100 mM salinity stress. Alethea is a novel proprietary technology composed of three key constituent compounds; the hitherto unexplored compound potassium dihydrojasmonate, an analogue of jasmonic acid; sodium benzoate, a carboxylic acid precursor to salicylic acid, and the α-amino acid L-arginine. Salinity treatment led to a maximal 47% reduction in net photosynthetic rate 8 d following NaCl treatment, yet in Alethea pre-treated seedlings, sensitivity to salinity stress was markedly reduced during the experimental period. Microarray analysis of leaf transcriptional responses showed that while salinity stress and Alethea individually impacted on largely non-overlapping, distinct groups of genes, Alethea pre-treatment substantially modified the response to salinity. Alethea affected the expression of genes related to biotic stress, ethylene signalling, cell wall synthesis, redox signalling and photosynthetic processes. Since Alethea had clear effects on photosynthesis/chloroplastic function at the physiological and molecular levels, we also investigated the ability of Alethea to protect various crop species against methyl viologen, a potent generator of oxidative stress in chloroplasts. Alethea pre-treatment produced

  6. Reductive iron assimilation and intracellular siderophores assist extracellular siderophore-driven iron homeostasis and virulence.

    PubMed

    Condon, Bradford J; Oide, Shinichi; Gibson, Donna M; Krasnoff, Stuart B; Turgeon, B Gillian

    2014-08-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient and prudent iron acquisition and management are key traits of a successful pathogen. Fungi use nonribosomally synthesized secreted iron chelators (siderophores) or reductive iron assimilation (RIA) mechanisms to acquire iron in a high affinity manner. Previous studies with the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus identified two genes, NPS2 and NPS6, encoding different nonribosomal peptide synthetases responsible for biosynthesis of intra- and extracellular siderophores, respectively. Deletion of NPS6 results in loss of extracellular siderophore biosynthesis, attenuated virulence, hypersensitivity to oxidative and iron-depletion stress, and reduced asexual sporulation, while nps2 mutants are phenotypically wild type in all of these traits but defective in sexual spore development when NPS2 is missing from both mating partners. Here, it is reported that nps2nps6 mutants have more severe phenotypes than both nps2 and nps6 single mutants. In contrast, mutants lacking the FTR1 or FET3 genes encoding the permease and ferroxidase components, respectively, of the alternate RIA system, are like wild type in all of the above phenotypes. However, without supplemental iron, combinatorial nps6ftr1 and nps2nps6ftr1 mutants are less virulent, are reduced in growth, and are less able to combat oxidative stress and to sporulate asexually, compared with nps6 mutants alone. These findings demonstrate that, while the role of RIA in metabolism and virulence is overshadowed by that of extracellular siderophores as a high-affinity iron acquisition mechanism in C. heterostrophus, it functions as a critical backup for the fungus.

  7. Reductive immobilization of uranium(VI) by amorphous iron sulfide.

    PubMed

    Hua, Bin; Deng, Baolin

    2008-12-01

    Batch experiments were used to evaluate the reductive immobilization of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) by synthesized, amorphous iron sulfide (FeS) in the anoxic environment. The tests were initiated by spiking 168.0 microM U(VI) to 0.18 g/L FeS suspensions under a CO2-free condition with pH varied from 5.99 to 10.17. The immobilization rate of U(VI) was determined by monitoring the changes of aqueous U(VI) concentration, and the reduction rate of U(VI) associated with FeS was determined by the difference between the total spiked U(VI) and the extractable amount of U(VI) by 25 mM NaHCO3 solution. The results showed that a rapid removal of U(VI) from the aqueous phase occurred within 1 h under all pH conditions accompanied by a simultaneous release of Fe(ll), whereas the reduction of U(VI) associated with FeS took hours to over a week for completion. The reduction rate was greatly increased with decreasing pH within the examined pH range. Product analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the formation of U3O8/4O9/UO2, polysulfide, and ferric iron.

  8. Reduction of lateritic iron ore briquette using coal bed reductant by isothermal - temperature gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulhan, Zulfiadi; Himawan, David Mangatur; Dimyati, Arbi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, isothermal-temperature gradient method was used to separate iron and alumina in lateritic iron ore as an alternative technique. The lateritic iron ore was ground to obtain grain size of less than 200 mesh and agglomerated in the form of cylindrical briquette using a press machine. The iron oxide in the briquette was reduced by addition of coal so that all surface of the briquette was covered by the coal. The temperature profile for the reduction process of the briquette was divided into three stages: the first stage was isothermal at 1000°C, the second stage was temperature gradient at varies heating rate of 5, 6.67 and 8.33°C/minutes from 1000 to 1400°C, and the final stage was isothermal at 1400°C. The effect of dehydroxylation of lateritic iron ore was studied as well. Aluminum distribution inside and outside the briquette was analyzed by scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The analysis results showed that the aluminum content increased from 8.01% at the outside of the briquette to 13.12% in the inside of the briquette. On contrary, iron content is higher at the outside of the briquette compared to that in the inside. These phenomena indicated that aluminum tends to migrate into the center of the briquette while iron moves outward to the surface of briquette. Furthermore, iron metallization of 91.03% could be achieved in the case of without dehydroxylation treatment. With the dehydroxylation treatment, iron metallization degree was increased up to 95.27%.

  9. Study on Metallized Reduction and Magnetic Separation of Iron from Fine Particles of High Iron Bauxite Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Gen; Chu, Man-Sheng; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Jue

    2017-01-01

    High iron bauxite ore is a typical unmanageable polyparagenetic resource and owns high comprehensive utilization value. Separation of iron from fine particles of high iron bauxite ore by the process of metallized reduction and magnetic dressing was researched systemically. The effect of magnetic field intensity, reduction temperature, reduction time, mole ratio of fixed carbon to reducible oxygen (FC/O) and ore particles size on separation indexes was researched. The results show that, with the conditions of reduction temperature of 1,400 °C, reduction time of 180 min, FC/O of 2.0, ore particle size of -2.0 mm and magnetic field intensity of 40 KA/m, about 89.24 % of the iron could be removed from high iron bauxite ore as metallic iron. Meanwhile, 86.09 % of the aluminum is stayed in non-magnetic fraction as alumina. However, the formation of hercynite (FeAl2O4) limits the reduction rate of iron oxides to metallic iron. The lower reduction conditions and higher recovery ratio of iron could be achieved with adopting ore-coal composite agglomerates or adding catalyst.

  10. Direct reduction of iron ore by biomass char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Hai-bin; Hu, Zheng-wen; Zhang, Jian-liang; Li, Jing; Liu, Zheng-jian

    2013-06-01

    By using thermogravimetric analysis the process and mechanism of iron ore reduced by biomass char were investigated and compared with those reduced by coal and coke. It is found that biomass char has a higher reactivity. The increase of carbon-to-oxygen mole ratio (C/O) can lead to the enhancement of reaction rate and reduction fraction, but cannot change the temperature and trend of each reaction. The reaction temperature of hematite reduced by biomass char is at least 100 K lower than that reduced by coal and coke, the maximum reaction rate is 1.57 times as high as that of coal, and the final reaction fraction is much higher. Model calculation indicates that the use of burden composed of biomass char and iron ore for blast furnaces can probably decrease the temperature of the thermal reserve zone and reduce the CO equilibrium concentration.

  11. Microbial iron reduction under deep subsurface pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Testemale, D.; Hazemann, J.; Oger, P.

    2009-12-01

    The deep subsurface is characterized by hostile conditions in terms of temperature, pressure and nutrient availability. Our current view of the biosphere extension is restricted to depths shallower than the isotherm associated to the highest observed temperature for life, i.e. 122°C. At this temperature, depending on the geological setting, pressure varies between ambient pressure at geothermal springs and 350 MPa in cold subduction zones. In this high-pressure biosphere, biological iron reduction is an important process linked to carbon oxidation. Among the factors governing reaction rates and yields in the deep subsurface, pressure could be of importance due its effects on kinetic and equilibrium reactions. The understanding and modelling of Fe reduction in natural environments, especially in the subsurface, can be first comprehended thanks to studies of Fe reduction in pure cultures; indeed the study of the effects of high pressure on Fe-reducing bacteria in pure cultures can serve as a basic model for the effects of pressure on Fe reduction in the subsurface. We investigated the effects of pressure on the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) by the bacterial model Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. This strain is a mesophilic and piezosensitive counterpart of the psychrophilic and piezophilic Shewanella representatives that have been frequently isolated from deep-sea environments. Kinetics of Fe(III) reduction to Fe(II) were monitored in situ by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) in an appropriate pressure vessel dedicated to in situ XAS measurements (Testemale et al. 2005). Measurements were performed at the BM30B beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facilty (Grenoble, France). Experiments were conducted from 0.1 MPa to 100 MPa at MR-1 optimal temperature (30°C). Iron reduction was monitored until 100 MPa in cultures of MR-1 at a concentration of 10e8 cells/ml. This shows that the metabolic activity of a piezosensitive microbe extends far beyond its pressure

  12. Role of microbial iron reduction in the dissolution of iron hydroxysulfate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Elizabeth J. P.; Nadeau, Tracie-Lynn; Voytek, Mary A.; Landa, Edward R.

    2006-03-01

    Iron-hydroxysulfate minerals can be important hosts for metals such as lead, mercury, copper, zinc, silver, chromium, arsenic, and selenium and for radionuclides such as 226Ra. These mineral-bound contaminants are considered immobilized under oxic conditions. However, when anoxic conditions develop, the activities of sulfate- or iron-reducing bacteria could result in mineral dissolution, releasing these bound contaminants. Reduction of structural sulfate in the iron-hydroxysulfate mineral jarosite by sulfate-reducing bacteria has previously been demonstrated. The primary objective of this work was to evaluate the potential for anaerobic dissolution of the iron-hydroxysulfate minerals jarosite and schwertmannite at neutral pH by iron-reducing bacteria. Mineral dissolution was tested using a long-term cultivar, Geobacter metallireducens strain GS-15, and a fresh isolate Geobacter sp. strain ENN1, previously undescribed. ENN1 was isolated from the discharge site of Shadle Mine, in the southern anthracite coalfield of Pennsylvania, where schwertmannite was the predominant iron-hydroxysulfate mineral. When jarosite from Elizabeth Mine (Vermont) was provided as the sole terminal electron acceptor, resting cells of both G. metallireducens and ENN1 were able to reduce structural Fe(III), releasing Fe+2, SO4-2, and K+ ions. A lithified jarosite sample from Utah was more resistant to microbial attack, but slow release of Fe+2 was observed. Neither bacterium released Fe+2 from poorly crystalline synthetic schwertmannite. Our results indicate that exposure of jarosite to iron-reducing conditions at neutral pH is likely to promote the mobility of hazardous constituents and should therefore be considered in evaluating waste disposal and/or reclamation options involving jarosite-bearing materials.

  13. Role of microbial iron reduction in the dissolution of iron hydroxysulfate minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, E.J.P.; Nadeau, T.-L.; Voytek, M.A.; Landa, E.R.

    2006-01-01

    Iron-hydroxysulfate minerals can be important hosts for metals such as lead, mercury, copper, zinc, silver, chromium, arsenic, and selenium and for radionuclides such as 226Ra. These mineral-bound contaminants are considered immobilized under oxic conditions. However, when anoxic conditions develop, the activities of sulfate- or iron-reducing bacteria could result in mineral dissolution, releasing these bound contaminants. Reduction of structural sulfate in the iron-hydroxysulfate mineral jarosite by sulfate-reducing bacteria has previously been demonstrated. The primary objective of this work was to evaluate the potential for anaerobic dissolution of the iron-hydroxysulfate minerals jarosite and schwertmannite at neutral PH by iron-reducing bacteria. Mineral dissolution was tested using a long-term cultivar, Geobacter metallireducens strain GS-15, and a fresh isolate Geobacter sp. strain ENN1, previously undescribed. ENN1 was isolated from the discharge site of Shadle Mine, in the southern anthracite coalfield of Pennsylvania, where schwertmannite was the predominant iron-hydroxysulfate mineral. When jarosite from Elizabeth Mine (Vermont) was provided as the sole terminal electron acceptor, resting cells of both G. metallireducens and ENN1 were able to reduce structural Fe(III), releasing Fe+2, SO4-2, and K+ ions. A lithified jarosite sample from Utah was more resistant to microbial attack, but slow release of Fe+2 was observed. Neither bacterium released Fe+2 from poorly crystalline synthetic schwertmannite. Our results indicate that exposure of jarosite to iron-reducing conditions at neutral pH is likely to promote the mobility of hazardous constituents and should therefore be considered in evaluating waste disposal and/or reclamation options involving jarosite-bearing materials.

  14. Role of microbial iron reduction in the dissolution of iron hydroxysulfate minerals - article no. G01012

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.J.P.; Nadeau, T.L.; Voytek, M.A.; Landa, E.R.

    2006-03-28

    Reduction of structural sulfate in the iron-hydroxysulfate mineral jarosite by sulfate-reducing bacteria has previously been demonstrated. The primary objective of this work was to evaluate the potential for anaerobic dissolution of the iron-hydroxysulfate minerals jarosite and schwertmannite at neutral pH by iron-reducing bacteria. Mineral dissolution was tested using a long-term cultivar, Geobacter metallireducens strain GS-15, and a fresh isolate Geobacter sp. strain ENN1, previously undescribed. ENN1 was isolated from the discharge site of Shadle Mine, in the southern anthracite coalfield of Pennsylvania, where schwertmannite was the predominant iron-hydroxysulfate mineral. When jarosite from Elizabeth Mine (Vermont) was provided as the sole terminal electron acceptor, resting cells of both G. metallireducens and ENN1 were able to reduce structural Fe(III), releasing Fe{sup +2}, SO{sub 4}{sup -2}, and K{sup +} ions. A lithified jarosite sample from Utah was more resistant to microbial attack, but slow release of Fe{sup +2} was observed. Neither bacterium released Fe{sup +2} from poorly crystalline synthetic schwertmannite. Our results indicate that exposure of jarosite to iron-reducing conditions at neutral pH is likely to promote the mobility of hazardous constituents and should therefore be considered in evaluating waste disposal and/or reclamation options involving jarosite-bearing materials.

  15. Ultrafast reduction of the total magnetization in iron

    SciTech Connect

    Fognini, A. Michlmayr, T. U.; Salvatella, G.; Vaterlaus, A.; Acremann, Y.; Wetli, C.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Beye, M.; Eschenlohr, A.; Pontius, N.; Föhlisch, A.; Stamm, C.; Hieke, F.; Dell'Angela, M.; Wurth, W.; Jong, S. de; Dürr, H. A.; and others

    2014-01-20

    Surprisingly, if a ferromagnet is exposed to an ultrafast laser pulse, its apparent magnetization is reduced within less than a picosecond. Up to now, the total magnetization, i.e., the average spin polarization of the whole valence band, was not detectable on a sub-picosecond time scale. Here, we present experimental data, confirming the ultrafast reduction of the total magnetization. Soft x-ray pulses from the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) extract polarized cascade photoelectrons from an iron layer excited by a femtosecond laser pulse. The spin polarization of the emitted electrons is detected by a Mott spin polarimeter.

  16. Reductive dehalogenation of trichloroethylene using zero-valent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Gotpagar, J.; Grulke, E.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    1997-12-31

    Reductive dehalogenation of hazardous organics using zero-valent metals is a promising technology. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of feed concentration, initial pH, metal loading and particle size of metal on the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE), using zero-valent iron. The degradation rate was found to be first order with respect to the organic molecule, thus the conversion was independent of initial TCE concentration. The amount of TCE degraded at any given time was found to be directly proportional to the dissolved iron in solution. The metal surface area plays a crucial role in the process. Twofold increase in the pseudo first order rate constant was obtained when the metal particle size was decreased from 370 {mu}m by factor of 2.5. For iron surface area per unit volume (S/V) of solution < 1000 m{sup -1}, the TCE degradation rate constant increased linearly with S/V ratio. 20 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Graphite-mediated reduction of 2,4-dinitrotoluene with elemental iron.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seok-Young; Cha, Daniel K; Chiu, Pei C

    2002-05-15

    The mechanism and pathway through which 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) is reduced with elemental iron were investigated through batch experiments performed utilizing the same iron surface area, with high-purity iron powder and Master Builders scrap iron. In addition to different kinetics and adsorption patterns, the distribution of two intermediates, 4-amino-2-nitrotoluene (4A2NT) and 2-amino-4-nitrotoluene (2A4NT), contrasted sharply. This suggests that different mechanisms are involved in DNT reduction with pure iron and scrap iron. We hypothesized that exposed graphite in scrap iron transferred reductants from iron to adsorbed nitroaromatic molecules. This hypothesis was supported by an experiment conducted using two-compartment dialysis cells in which ONT and pure iron powder were separated by a graphite sheet. Results indicate that graphite-mediated, indirect reduction of DNT occurred primarily through reduction of the ortho nitro group to form 2A4NT, whereas DNT reduction at the iron (hydr/oxide) surface occurred via para nitro reduction to give 4A2NT. Based on pH and product analysis, atomic hydrogen probably accounted for most of the reducing equivalents that passed through the graphite, reacting with adsorbed DNT mainly through ortho nitro reduction. In contrast, electron was a minor fraction of the reducing equivalents, reducing DNT mainly through para nitro reduction. The implications of graphite as a reaction site and conductor of electron and atomic hydrogen are discussed with respect to treatment processes involving iron.

  18. Diversity of Contaminant Reduction Reactions by Zero-Valent Iron: Role of the Reductate

    SciTech Connect

    Miehr, R; Tratnyek, Paul G.; Bandstra, J; Scherer, Michelle; Alowitz, M; Bylaska, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    The reactions of 8 model contaminants with 9 types of granular Fe(0) were studied in batch experiments using consistent experimental conditions. The model contaminants (herein referred to as reductates because they were reduced by the iron metal) included cations (Cu2+), anions (CrO42-; NO3-; and 5,5,7,7-indigotetrasulfonate), and neutral species (2-chloroacetophenone; 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene; carbon tetrachloride; and trichloroethene). The diversity of this range of reductates offers a uniquely broad perspective on the reactivity of Fe(0). Rate constants for disappearance of the reductates vary over as much as 4 orders of magnitude for particular reductates (due to differences in the 9 types of iron) but differences among the reductates were even larger, ranging over almost 7 orders of magnitude. Various ways of summarizing the data all suggest that relative reactivities with Fe(0) varies in the order: Cu2, I4S > 2CAP, TNT > CT, Cr6 > TCE > NO3. Although the reductate h as the largest effect on disappearance kinetics, more subtle differences in reactivity due to the type of Fe(0) suggests that removal of Cr6 and NO3 (the inorganic anions) involves adsorption to oxides on the Fe(0), whereas the disappearance kinetics of all other types of reductants is favored by reduction on comparatively oxide-free metal. Correlation analysis of the disappearance rate constants using descriptors of the reductates calculated by molecular modeling (energies of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, LUMO, highest occupied molecular orbitals, HOMO, and HOMO-LUMO gaps) showed that reactivities generally increase with decreasing ELUMO and increasing EGAP (and, therefore, increasing chemical hardness h).

  19. Microbially Induced Reductive Dissolution of Trace Element-Rich Lacustrine Iron-Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, S. A.; Kulczykci, E.; O'Neill, A. H.; Roberts, J. A.; Fowle, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    Iron (oxy)hydroxides are ubiquitous components of surfacial materials and are often the dominant redox buffering solid phases in soils and sediments. As a result, the geochemical behavior of these minerals has a profound influence on the global biogeochemical cycling of trace elements, including heavy metals and arsenic (As), in addition to nutrients such as, sulfur (S), carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P). Understanding the behavior of trace elements and nutrients during biological and abiotic processes that effect iron (Fe) mineral phase transformations is paramount for predicting their distribution, mobility, and bioavailability in the environment. To evaluate the impact of dissimilatory Fe-reduction (DIR) on trace element mobility we have conducted batch incubations of Fe-rich lateritic lacustrine sediments. In contrast to mid-latitude lakes where Fe (oxy)hydroxides constitute only a small fraction of the total sediment, tropical lake sediments have been known to comprise up to 40-60 wt. % Fe-oxides. Under suboxic and nonsulphidogenic conditions it is likely that DIR plays a prominent role in early diagenesis and therefore may exert control on the fate and distribution of many trace elements in this environment (e.g. Crowe et al. 2004). In batch incubations conducted in a minimal media of similar composition to typical freshwater the lacustrine Fe-oxides were reductively dissolved at a rate very similar to pure synthetic goethite of similar surface area (measured by N2-BET). This is in contrast to the slower rates previously observed for trace element substituted Fe-oxides. These slower rates have been attributed to surface passivation by secondary Al and Cr mineral precipitation. We propose that these passivation effects may be offset in minimal media incubations by enhanced microbial metabolism due the presence of nutrients (P, Co and other metals) in the lacustrine Fe-oxides. These nutrients became available with progressive reduction as the

  20. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part III. Shrinkage of composite pellets during reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    This article involves the evaluation of the volume change of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets and its implications on reduction kinetics under conditions prevalent in a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) that were simulated in the laboratory. The pellets, in general, were found to shrink considerably during the reduction due to the loss of carbon and oxygen from the system, sintering of the iron-oxide, and formation of a molten slag phase at localized regions inside the pellets due to the presence of binder and coal/wood-charcoal ash at the reduction temperatures. One of the shortcomings of the RHF ironmaking process has been the inability to use multiple layers of composite pellets because of the impediment in heat transport to the lower layers of a multilayer bed. However, pellet shrinkage was found to have a strong effect on the reduction kinetics by virtue of enhancing the external heat transport to the lower layers. The volume change of the different kinds of composite pellets was studied as a function of reduction temperature and time. The estimation of the change in the amount of external heat transport with varying pellet sizes for a particular layer of a multilayer bed was obtained by conducting heat-transfer tests using inert low-carbon steel spheres. It was found that if the pellets of the top layer of the bed shrink by 30 pct, the external heat transfer to the second layer increases by nearly 6 times.

  1. Application of ultrasound to enhance the zero-valent iron-initiated abiotic degradation of halogenated aliphatic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Nancy Elaine

    Permeable iron barriers, while effective as a near-passive in situ remediation technology for halogenated organic solvents, are susceptible to the loss of reactivity over time, most probably due to a build up of corrosion products or other precipitates on the iron surface. If such material can be removed, a barrier's lifetime can be significantly extended. This proof-of-concept project employed ultrasonic energy to rejuvenate an iron surface. Through batch studies, iron's capacity to degrade dissolved chlorinated solvents under various conditions before and after sonication was examined. The impact of iron pretreatment, groundwater quality, and sonication and the nature of the deposits formed on iron during solvent degradation were determined in order to evaluate the physical mechanism of ultrasonic enhancement of iron and to develop guidelines for barrier design and an ultrasound delivery system for a future field study. Iron (coarse filings, 100-mesh powder, or foamed pellets) placed in deoxygenated natural groundwater was exposed to 330 W-hr of ultrasonic energy prior to the introduction of trichloroethylene (TCE). The iron was also subjected to various pretreatments to create surface conditions with differing rates of activity for chlorinated solvent degradation. Aqueous concentrations of TCE and any degradation products were monitored over time. Geochemical modeling indicated that an iron barrier in this water would be subject to heavy precipitation of carbonates and hydroxides. Sonication positively impacted iron's degradation of chlorinated solvents, probably most directly linked to an increase in active specific surface area, achieved by removing deposits and/or etching the surface, as suggested by scanning electron micrographs. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that sonication also changes the chemical composition of the outermost 40 Angstroms of an iron surface. For some degraded irons, activity was restored to near initial rates

  2. Iron concretions within a highly altered unit of the Berlins Porphyry, New Zealand: an abiotic or biotic story?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Toni L.; Oze, Christopher; Horton, Travis W.

    2016-09-01

    The Berlins Porphyry located on the South Island of New Zealand provides an opportunity to examine iron concretions formed in a subterranean system. Specifically, an alteration zone within the Berlins Porphyry contains iron concretions similar to sedimentary biologically-mediated iron concretions. Here, we provide evidence for two sources of dissolved Fe (II) that potentially aided in the formation of the iron concretions. Furthermore, we discuss the potential for microbial involvement in the anaerobic oxidation of Fe (II) to Fe (III) to form magnetite. Evidence in support of this hypothesis includes the low concentrations of iron and sulfur in the white hydrothermally altered porphyry outcrop and concretion cores; concentrated pyrite and magnetite mineralisation surrounding the cores; and δ13C values indicative of organic carbon (averaging -26 ‰ ± 4 ‰) within the iron cement, porphyry-core-boundary and outer weathered rinds of the concretions. Overall, these unusually preserved iron concretions could represent a new environmental niche for microorganisms and a potential analogue for microbially induced iron-oxidation. More importantly, this study illustrates the many obstacles involved in analysing and interpreting potential subterranean biosignatures.

  3. Enzymatic iron and uranium reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Roden, E.E.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Woodward, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The potential for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to enzymatically reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) was investigated. Five species of Desulfovibrio as well as Desulfobacterium autotrophicum and Desulfobulbus propionicus reduced Fe(III) chelated with nitrilotriacetic acid as well as insoluble Fe(III) oxide. Fe(III) oxide reduction resulted in the accumulation of magnetite and siderite. Desulfobacter postgatei reduced the chelated Fe(III) but not Fe(III) oxide. Desulfobacter curvatus, Desulfomonile tiedjei, and Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans did not reduce Fe(III). Only Desulfovibrio species reduced U(VI). U(VI) reduction resulted in the precipitation of uraninite. None of the SRB that reduced Fe(III) or U(VI) appeared to conserve enough energy to support growth from this reaction. However, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans metabolized H2 down to lower concentrations with Fe(III) or U(VI) as the electron acceptor than with sulfate, suggesting that these metals may be preferred electron acceptors at the low H2 concentrations present in most marine sediments. Molybdate did not inhibit Fe(III) reduction by D. desulfuricans. This indicates that the inability of molybdate to inhibit Fe(III) reduction in marine sediments does not rule out the possibility that SRB are important catalysts for Fe(III) reduction. The results demonstrate that although SRB were previously considered to reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) indirectly through the production of sulfide, they may also directly reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) through enzymatic mechanisms. These findings, as well as our recent discovery that the So-reducing microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans can reduce Fe(III), demonstrate that there are close links between the microbial sulfur, iron, and uranium cycles in anaerobic marine sediments. ?? 1993.

  4. Hydrogen Reduction of Zinc and Iron Oxides Containing Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Siqueira, Rogério Navarro C.; de Albuquerque Brocchi, Eduardo; de Oliveira, Pamela Fernandes; Motta, Marcelo Senna

    2013-10-01

    Zinc is a metal of significant technological importance and its production from secondary sources has motivated the development of alternative processes, such as the chemical treatment of electrical arc furnace (EAF) dust. Currently, the extraction of zinc from the mentioned residue using a carbon-containing reducing agent is in the process of being established commercially and technically. In the current study, the possibility of reducing zinc from an EAF dust sample through a H2 constant flux in a horizontal oven is studied. The reduction of a synthetic oxide mixture of analogous composition is also investigated. The results indicated that the reduction process is thermodynamically viable for temperatures higher than 1123 K (850 °C), and all zinc metal produced is transferred to the gas stream, enabling its complete separation from iron. The same reaction in the presence of zinc crystals was considered for synthesizing FeZn alloys. However, for the experimental conditions employed, although ZnO reduction was indeed thermodynamically hindered because of the presence of zinc crystals (the metal's partial pressure was enhanced), the zinc metal's escape within the gaseous phase could not be effectively avoided.

  5. Delineating Climatic Regions Where Upland Soil Iron Reduction Is Potentially Important At The Ecosystem Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A.; Hodges, C. A.; Chadwick, O.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial iron(III) reduction is often coupled to carbon mineralization, resulting in net CO2 efflux from the soil profile. Recent reports of iron reduction in upland ecosystems suggests this process is not limited to flooded soils and sediments. However, quantifying ecosystem-scale iron reduction rates is challenging because the intermittent anoxia (low-oxygen) that facilitates iron reduction varies spatially throughout the landscape. To approach this challenge, we have measured the soil iron reduction potential using localized passive redox sensors across four climate gradients ranging from <600 mm y-1 to >4000 mm y-1 rainfall on soils derived from Hawaiian basalt aged 0.3 to 4,100 ky. At each site we installed ten iron metal-rods with a uniform surface coating of Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide. The rods were pushed into the soil to a depth of 90 cm and left in place for 14 d. Extracted rods were washed and imaged to quantify the fraction of Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide coating that was dissolved. In addition, we have characterized the iron mineral composition from surface and sub-surface horizons at similar sites using Mössbauer spectroscopy. Our results suggest that when annual rainfall exceeds 1800 - 2000 mm y-1, iron reduction is a common feature within the soil profile, regardless of soil age. In addition, we find that the pedogenesis of iron minerals proceeds along distinct trajectories above and below this iron reduction threshold.

  6. Characteristics and kinetic analysis of AQS transformation and microbial goethite reduction: Insight into “redox mediator-microbe-iron oxide” interaction process

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Weihuang; Shi, Mengran; Yu, Dan; ...

    2016-03-29

    Here, the characteristics and kinetics of redox transformation of a redox mediator, anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), during microbial goethite reduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12, a dissimilatory iron reduction bacterium (DIRB), were investigated to provide insights into “redox mediator-iron oxide” interaction in the presence of DIRB. Two pre-incubation reaction systems of the “strain S12-goethite” and the “strain S12-AQS” were used to investigate the dynamics of goethite reduction and AQS redox transformation. Results show that the concentrations of goethite and redox mediator, and the inoculation cell density all affect the characteristics of microbial goethite reduction, kinetic transformation between oxidized and reduced species of themore » redox mediator. Both abiotic and biotic reactions and their coupling regulate the kinetic process for “Quinone-Iron” interaction in the presence of DIRB. Our results provide some new insights into the characteristics and mechanisms of interaction among “quinone-DIRB- goethite” under biotic/abiotic driven.« less

  7. Characteristics and kinetic analysis of AQS transformation and microbial goethite reduction: Insight into “redox mediator-microbe-iron oxide” interaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Weihuang; Shi, Mengran; Yu, Dan; Liu, Chongxuan; Huang, Tinglin; Wu, Fengchang

    2016-03-29

    Here, the characteristics and kinetics of redox transformation of a redox mediator, anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), during microbial goethite reduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12, a dissimilatory iron reduction bacterium (DIRB), were investigated to provide insights into “redox mediator-iron oxide” interaction in the presence of DIRB. Two pre-incubation reaction systems of the “strain S12-goethite” and the “strain S12-AQS” were used to investigate the dynamics of goethite reduction and AQS redox transformation. Results show that the concentrations of goethite and redox mediator, and the inoculation cell density all affect the characteristics of microbial goethite reduction, kinetic transformation between oxidized and reduced species of the redox mediator. Both abiotic and biotic reactions and their coupling regulate the kinetic process for “Quinone-Iron” interaction in the presence of DIRB. Our results provide some new insights into the characteristics and mechanisms of interaction among “quinone-DIRB- goethite” under biotic/abiotic driven.

  8. Nitrite reduction and formation of corrosion coatings in zerovalent iron systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong H; Zhang, Tian C

    2006-08-01

    Batch tests were conducted to investigate nitrite reduction in a zerovalent iron (Fe0) system under various conditions. Nitrite at 1.4 mM initial concentration was slowly reduced to nitrogen gas in the first stage (days 1-6), which was mediated by an amorphous, Fe(II)-rich iron oxide coating. The second stage (days 7-14) featured a rapid reduction of nitrite to both ammonia and nitrogen gas and the formation of a more crystalline, magnetite form iron oxide coating. Water reduction by Fe0 occurred concurrently with nitrite reduction from the beginning and contributed significantly to the overall iron corrosion. Nitrite at 14 mM was found to passivate the surface of Fe0 grains with respect to nitrite reduction. Adding aqueous Fe2+ significantly accelerated reduction of nitrite by Fe0 to nitrogen gas with lepidocrocite as the main iron corrosion product. Substantially, though still substoichiometrically, 0.55 mol of Fe2+ were concomitantly consumed per 1.0 mol nitrite reduction, indicating that Fe0 was the main electron source. In the presence of Fe2+, nitrite reduction out-competed water reduction in terms of contributing to the overall iron corrosion. Results of this study help understand complicated interactions between water reduction and nitrite reduction, the roles of surface-bound Fe2+, and the evolution of the iron corrosion coating.

  9. Abiotic transformation of high explosives by freshly precipitated iron minerals in aqueous Fe¹¹ solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Boparai, Hardiljeet K.; Comfort, Steve; Satapanajaru, Tunlawit; Szecsody, James E.; Grossl, Paul; Shea, Patrick

    2010-05-11

    Zerovalent iron barriers have become a viable treatment for field-scale cleanup of various ground water contaminants. While contact with the iron surface is important for contaminant destruction, the interstitial pore water within and near the iron barrier will be laden with aqueous, adsorbed and precipitated FeII phases. These freshly precipitated iron minerals could play an important role in transforming high explosives (HE). Our objective was to determine the transformation of RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine), HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine), and TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) by freshly precipitated iron FeII/FeIII minerals. This was accomplished by quantifying the effects of initial FeII concentration, pH, and the presence of aquifer solids (FeIII phases) on HE transformation rates. Results showed that at pH 8.2, freshly precipitated iron minerals transformed RDX, HMX, and TNT with reaction rates increasing with increasing FeII concentrations. RDX and HMX transformations in these solutions also increased with increasing pH (5.8-8.55). By contrast, TNT transformation was not influenced by pH (6.85-8.55) except at pH values <6.35. Transformations observed via LC/MS included a variety of nitroso products (RDX, HMX) and amino degradation products (TNT). XRD analysis identified green rust and magnetite as the dominant iron solid phases that precipitated from the aqueous FeII during HE treatment under anaerobic conditions. Geochemical modeling also predicted FeII activity would likely be controlled by green rust and magnetite. These results illustrate the important role freshly precipitated FeII/FeIII minerals in aqueous FeII solutions play in the transformation of high explosives.

  10. EFFECT OF BACTERIAL SULFATE REDUCTION ON IRON-CORROSION SCALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron-sulfur geochemistry is important in many natural and engineered environments including drinking water systems. In the anaerobic environment beneath scales of corroding iron drinking water distribution system pipes, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) produce sulfide from natura...

  11. Abiotic stress growth conditions induce different responses in kernel iron concentration across genotypically distinct maize inbred varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The improvement of grain nutrient profiles for essential minerals and vitamins through breeding strategies is a target important for agricultural regions where nutrient poor crops like maize contribute a large proportion of the daily caloric intake. Kernel iron concentration in maize exhibits a broa...

  12. Influence of iron sulfides on abiotic oxidation of UO2 by nitrite and dissolved oxygen in natural sediments.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Julian; Bi, Yuqiang; Hayes, Kim F

    2015-01-20

    Iron sulfide precipitates formed under sulfate reducing conditions may buffer U(IV) insoluble solid phases from reoxidation after oxidants re-enter the reducing zone. In this study, sediment column experiments were performed to quantify the effect of biogenic mackinawite on U(IV) stability in the presence of nitrite or dissolved oxygen (DO). Two columns, packed with sediment from an abandoned U contaminated mill tailings site near Rifle, CO, were biostimulated for 62 days with an electron donor (3 mM acetate) in the presence (BRS+) and absence (BRS−) of 7 mM sulfate. The bioreduced sediment was supplemented with synthetic uraninite (UO2(s)), sterilized by gamma-irradiation, and then subjected to a sequential oxidation by nitrite and DO. Biogenic iron sulfides produced in the BRS+ column, mostly as mackinawite, inhibited U(IV) reoxidation and mobilization by both nitrite and oxygen. Most of the influent nitrite (0.53 mM) exited the columns without oxidizing UO2, while a small amount of nitrite was consumed by iron sulfides precipitates. An additional 10-day supply of 0.25 mM DO influent resulted in the release of about 10% and 49% of total U in BRS+ and BRS– columns, respectively. Influent DO was effectively consumed by biogenic iron sulfides in the BRS+ column, while DO and a large U spike were detected after only a brief period in the effluent in the BRS– column.

  13. Recovery of Iron from Chromium Vanadium-Bearing Titanomagnetite Concentrate by Direct Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingyu; Zhou, Shengfan; Wang, Xuewen; Chen, Bianfang; Yang, Haoxiang; Wang, Saikui; Luo, Pengfei

    2016-10-01

    The recovery of iron from chromium vanadium-bearing titanomagnetite concentrate was investigated by direct reduction, followed by magnetic separation. The results indicated that the metallization rate of iron can reach 98.9% at a temperature of 1200°C for a reduction duration of 60 min with the addition of 16% graphite powder and 0.5% sodium oxalate. Although the addition of borax, sodium carbonate and sodium oxalate to the chromium vanadium-bearing titanomagnetite concentrate can all improve the metallization rate of iron, the effect of sodium oxalate was the best. Sodium oxalate not only increases the metallization rate of iron but also promotes the growth of metallic iron. After magnetic separating, the recovery of iron was 92.8% and the iron content of magnetic concentrate was 88.4%.

  14. Reductive transformation of p-nitrotoluene by a new iron-fly ash packing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Baizhen; Jin, Ruofei; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-11-01

    A new iron-fly ash packing was studied for reductive transformation of p-nitrotoluene. The packing was made of iron, fly ash and kaolin with the mass ratio of 36:7:2. A reactor was designed to investigate the long-term performance of the packing. The results showed that the reduction of p-nitrotoluene increased with decreasing pH, because the reduction potential of reaction increased with the concentration of H(+). The pH was one of the key factors impacting the reductive transformation of p-nitrotoluene. Comparing iron-activated carbon packing with the new iron-fly ash packing, the reduction efficiencies were respectively 76.61% and 75.36% after 20days. The reduction efficiency for both was around 50% at 40days. It was evident that these two kinds of packing had no significant difference in their capability for p-nitrotoluene reductive transformation. Compared with iron-activated carbon, the new iron-fly ash packing had obvious advantages in terms of manufacturing costs and environmental pollution degradation. This study showed that the new iron-fly ash packing had good performance in reductive transformation of nitrotoluene compounds.

  15. Iron reduction potentiates hydroxyl radical formation only in flavonols.

    PubMed

    Macáková, Kateřina; Mladěnka, Přemysl; Filipský, Tomáš; Říha, Michal; Jahodář, Luděk; Trejtnar, František; Bovicelli, Paolo; Proietti Silvestri, Ilaria; Hrdina, Radomír; Saso, Luciano

    2012-12-15

    Flavonoids, substantial components of the human diet, are generally considered to be beneficial. However, they may possess possible pro-oxidative effects, which could be based on their reducing potential. The aims of this study were to evaluate the ability of 26 flavonoids to reduce ferric ions at relevant pH conditions and to find a possible relationship with potentiation of hydroxyl radical production. A substantial ferric ions reduction was achieved under acidic conditions, particularly by flavonols and flavanols with the catecholic ring B. Apparently corresponding bell-shaped curves displaying the pro-oxidant effect of flavonols quercetin and kaempferol on iron-based Fenton reaction were documented. Several flavonoids were efficient antioxidants at very low concentrations but rather inefficient or pro-oxidative at higher concentrations. Flavonols, morin and rutin were progressively pro-oxidant, while 7-hydroxyflavone and hesperetin were the only flavonoids with dose-dependent inhibition of hydroxyl radical production. Conclusively, administration of flavonoids may lead to unpredictable consequences with few exceptions.

  16. Ascorbate Efflux as a New Strategy for Iron Reduction and Transport in Plants*

    PubMed Central

    Grillet, Louis; Ouerdane, Laurent; Flis, Paulina; Hoang, Minh Thi Thanh; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Lobinski, Ryszard; Curie, Catherine; Mari, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is essential for virtually all living organisms. The identification of the chemical forms of iron (the speciation) circulating in and between cells is crucial to further understand the mechanisms of iron delivery to its final targets. Here we analyzed how iron is transported to the seeds by the chemical identification of iron complexes that are delivered to embryos, followed by the biochemical characterization of the transport of these complexes by the embryo, using the pea (Pisum sativum) as a model species. We have found that iron circulates as ferric complexes with citrate and malate (Fe(III)3Cit2Mal2, Fe(III)3Cit3Mal1, Fe(III)Cit2). Because dicotyledonous plants only transport ferrous iron, we checked whether embryos were capable of reducing iron of these complexes. Indeed, embryos did express a constitutively high ferric reduction activity. Surprisingly, iron(III) reduction is not catalyzed by the expected membrane-bound ferric reductase. Instead, embryos efflux high amounts of ascorbate that chemically reduce iron(III) from citrate-malate complexes. In vitro transport experiments on isolated embryos using radiolabeled 55Fe demonstrated that this ascorbate-mediated reduction is an obligatory step for the uptake of iron(II). Moreover, the ascorbate efflux activity was also measured in Arabidopsis embryos, suggesting that this new iron transport system may be generic to dicotyledonous plants. Finally, in embryos of the ascorbate-deficient mutants vtc2-4, vtc5-1, and vtc5-2, the reducing activity and the iron concentration were reduced significantly. Taken together, our results identified a new iron transport mechanism in plants that could play a major role to control iron loading in seeds. PMID:24347170

  17. Interactions between microbial iron reduction and metal geochemistry: effect of redox cycling on transition metal speciation in iron bearing sediments.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D Craig; Picardal, Flynn F; Coby, Aaron J

    2006-03-15

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respectto Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a -3x increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by approximately 12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These

  18. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: METAL-ENHANCED ABIOTIC DEGRADATION TECHNOLOGY - ENVIROMETAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    EnviroMetal Technologies, Inc. (ETI), of Guelph, ON, Canada, has developed the metal-enhanced abiotic degradation technology to treat halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOC) in water. A reactive, zero-valent, granular iron medium causes reductive dehalogenation of VOCs yield...

  19. Iron release and uptake by plant ferritin: effects of pH, reduction and chelation.

    PubMed Central

    Laulhere, J P; Briat, J F

    1993-01-01

    Ferritins are iron-storage proteins that accumulate in plastids during seed formation, and also in leaves during senescence or iron overload. Iron release from ferritins occurs during growth of seedlings and greening of plastids. Depending on the concentration of the reducing agent ascorbate, either an overall iron release or uptake by ferritins from iron(III) citrate may occur. We have designed methods to measure these simultaneous and independent uptake and release fluxes. Each individual step of the exchange was studied using different iron chelates and an excess of ligand. It is shown that: (i) the chelated form of iron, and not ionic Fe3+, is the substrate for iron reduction, which controls the subsequent uptake by ferritin; (ii) iron uptake by ferritins is faster at pH 8.4 than at pH 7 or 6 and is inhibited by an excess of strongly binding free ligands; and (iii) strongly binding free ligands are inhibitory during iron release by ascorbate. When reactions are allowed to proceed simultaneously, the iron chelating power is shown to be a key factor in the overall exchange. The interactions of iron chelating power, reducing capacity and pH are discussed with regard to their influence on the biochemical mobilization of iron. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8457196

  20. Dominance of sulfur-fueled iron oxide reduction in low-sulfate freshwater sediments

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Colleen M; Lentini, Chris J; Tang, Yuanzhi; Johnston, David T; Wankel, Scott D; Jardine, Philip M

    2015-01-01

    A central tenant in microbial biogeochemistry is that microbial metabolisms follow a predictable sequence of terminal electron acceptors based on the energetic yield for the reaction. It is thereby oftentimes assumed that microbial respiration of ferric iron outcompetes sulfate in all but high-sulfate systems, and thus sulfide has little influence on freshwater or terrestrial iron cycling. Observations of sulfate reduction in low-sulfate environments have been attributed to the presumed presence of highly crystalline iron oxides allowing sulfate reduction to be more energetically favored. Here we identified the iron-reducing processes under low-sulfate conditions within columns containing freshwater sediments amended with structurally diverse iron oxides and fermentation products that fuel anaerobic respiration. We show that despite low sulfate concentrations and regardless of iron oxide substrate (ferrihydrite, Al-ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite), sulfidization was a dominant pathway in iron reduction. This process was mediated by (re)cycling of sulfur upon reaction of sulfide and iron oxides to support continued sulfur-based respiration—a cryptic sulfur cycle involving generation and consumption of sulfur intermediates. Although canonical iron respiration was not observed in the sediments amended with the more crystalline iron oxides, iron respiration did become dominant in the presence of ferrihydrite once sulfate was consumed. Thus, despite more favorable energetics, ferrihydrite reduction did not precede sulfate reduction and instead an inverse redox zonation was observed. These findings indicate that sulfur (re)cycling is a dominant force in iron cycling even in low-sulfate systems and in a manner difficult to predict using the classical thermodynamic ladder. PMID:25871933

  1. Characteristics and kinetics of iron release from the ferritin under the EGCG reduction.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xuetao; Huang, Lin; Lin, Qing; Huang, Heqing

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism of iron release from ferritin in vivo is still unclear even though it represents a key step of the metabolism of iron in vivo. Here, both interaction intensity and binding stability between epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) from tea and liver ferritin of Dasyatis akajei (DALF) were investigated using UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectrometry, respectively. The results indicated that EGCG could reduce the iron within the ferritin shell directly in the absence of chemical reducers such as Na(2)S(2)O(4), but this process was strictly pH-dependent, and the rate of iron release is faster at low pH than at high pH. The kinetic study of iron release showed that this process fitted the law of zero order reaction, which differed from that of first order reaction by various chemical reducers such as Vitamin C. In addition, Both fluorescence and CD spectrometry were further used to study the reduction mechanism of iron release in vitro, showing that there was a slight conformation change of the ferritin shell during EGCG reduction because of a complex formation of DALF-EGCG. It appears that chemical reducers with large molecular sizes reduce the iron across the protein shell by the way of an electron transfer pathway (ETP). A novel pathway for iron release from DALF with EGCG reduction is suggested to explain for a reductive route of iron metabolism by biological reducers in vivo.

  2. Peculiarities of the iron reduction mechanism in Fe-Al-K system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylova, A. Yu.; Chernavskii, P. A.; Lyadov, A. S.; Sagitov, S. A.; Krylova, M. V.; Khadzhiev, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature-programmed reduction was used in combination with measurements of magnetization to determine the peculiarities of iron reduction in the Fe-K-Al system. It was found that reduction by hydrogen proceeds with the formation of metallic iron through the stage of magnetite formation (Fe3O4); the effective activation energies are 63 and 39 kJ/mol for the I and II stages, respectively. It was shown that substituting carbon oxide for hydrogen leads to iron reduction proceeding only to the stage of magnetite formation ( E Fe 3O4 = 94 kJ/mol). The magnetite interacts with CO to produce carbide (presumably Hegge carbide Fe2C). Iron reduction in the synthesis gas occurs with the preferential participation of hydrogen or carbon dioxide, depending on the rate of temperature rise.

  3. Processes affecting reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents by zero-valent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Matheson, L.J.; Tratnyek, P.G.

    1993-12-31

    Zero-valent iron may participate in the reductive dechlorination process by three different mechanisms: direct, electrolytic reduction; reduction by hydrogen produced during the corrosion process; and reduction by dissolved (ferrous) iron that is also produced by corroding iron. The first step of electrolytic reduction is presumably, the transfer of one electron from the metal surface to the organic molecule. This results in an organic anion radical that may then lose a halide anion to give a carbon-centered radical, and oxidized iron, which is eventually released to the solution as Fe{sup 2+}. The goal of this research is to provide a comprehensive survey of the mechanisms that affect the performance of this reactive barrier technology.

  4. Formation of iron (hydr)oxides during the abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of arsenate.

    PubMed

    Song, Jia; Jia, Shao-Yi; Yu, Bo; Wu, Song-Hai; Han, Xu

    2015-08-30

    Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) is a common pathway in the formation of Fe (hydr)oxides under natural conditions, however, little is known regarding the presence of arsenate on this process. In hence, the effect of arsenate on the precipitation of Fe (hydr)oxides during the oxidation of Fe(II) is investigated. Formation of arsenic-containing Fe (hydr)oxides is constrained by pH and molar ratios of As:Fe during the oxidation Fe(II). At pH 6.0, arsenate inhibits the formation of lepidocrocite and goethite, while favors the formation of ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. At pH 7.0, arsenate promotes the formation of hollow-structured Fe (hydr)oxides containing arsenate, as the As:Fe ratio reaches 0.07. Arsenate effectively inhibits the formation of magnetite at pH 8.0 even at As:Fe ratio of 0.01, while favors the formation of lepidocrocite and green rust, which can be latterly degenerated and replaced by ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. This study indicates that arsenate and low pH value favor the slow growth of dense-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like spherical ferric arsenate. With the rapid oxidation rate of Fe(II) at high pH, ferric (hydr)oxides prefer to precipitate in the formation of loose-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like lepidocrocite and green rust.

  5. Magnetic susceptibility as a proxy for investigating microbially mediated iron reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mewafy, F.M.; Atekwana, E.A.; Werkema, D.D.; Slater, L.D.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Revil, A.; Skold, M.; Delin, G.N.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated magnetic susceptibility (MS) variations in hydrocarbon contaminated sediments. Our objective was to determine if MS can be used as an intrinsic bioremediation indicator due to the activity of iron-reducing bacteria. A contaminated and an uncontaminated core were retrieved from a site contaminated with crude oil near Bemidji, Minnesota and subsampled for MS measurements. The contaminated core revealed enriched MS zones within the hydrocarbon smear zone, which is related to iron-reduction coupled to oxidation of hydrocarbon compounds and the vadose zone, which is coincident with a zone of methane depletion suggesting aerobic or anaerobic oxidation of methane is coupled to iron-reduction. The latter has significant implications for methane cycling. We conclude that MS can serve as a proxy for intrinsic bioremediation due to the activity of iron-reducing bacteria iron-reducing bacteria and for the application of geophysics to iron cycling studies. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Magnetic susceptibility as a proxy for investigating microbially mediated iron reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewafy, Farag M.; Atekwana, Estella A.; Werkema, D. Dale, Jr.; Slater, Lee D.; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Revil, André; Skold, Magnus; Delin, Geoffrey N.

    2011-11-01

    We investigated magnetic susceptibility (MS) variations in hydrocarbon contaminated sediments. Our objective was to determine if MS can be used as an intrinsic bioremediation indicator due to the activity of iron-reducing bacteria. A contaminated and an uncontaminated core were retrieved from a site contaminated with crude oil near Bemidji, Minnesota and subsampled for MS measurements. The contaminated core revealed enriched MS zones within the hydrocarbon smear zone, which is related to iron-reduction coupled to oxidation of hydrocarbon compounds and the vadose zone, which is coincident with a zone of methane depletion suggesting aerobic or anaerobic oxidation of methane is coupled to iron-reduction. The latter has significant implications for methane cycling. We conclude that MS can serve as a proxy for intrinsic bioremediation due to the activity of iron-reducing bacteria iron-reducing bacteria and for the application of geophysics to iron cycling studies.

  7. Reaction mechanisms involved in reduction of halogenated hydrocarbons using sulfated iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, S.M.; Cipollone, M.G.; Wolfe, N.L.

    1995-12-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the mechanisms and pathways involved in the reduction of halogenated hydrocarbons represented by trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with sulfated iron aqueous media. Results suggested that iron sulfide acted as the dehalogenation center. Zero-valent iron acted as a generator for molecular hydrogen through its reaction with water. Results of experiments in which iron sulfide was replaced by other transition metal sulfides and experiments in which zero-valent iron was replaced by other sources of molecular hydrogen will be reported. The main reduction product of chloroethylene derivatives was ethyne which under the catalytic reaction of zero-valent iron was reduced further to ethene and finally to ethane. Intermediate products were identified using GC-MS. Mechanisms and pathways will be presented.

  8. Uptake of non-transferrin-bound iron by both reductive and nonreductive processes is modulated by intracellular iron.

    PubMed

    Randell, E W; Parkes, J G; Olivieri, N F; Templeton, D M

    1994-06-10

    Non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) uptake occurs in a variety of cells by a saturable, specific and temperature-sensitive process. Our previous studies indicated that NTBI uptake by cardiac myocytes and Hep G2 cells was reversibly up-regulated by iron deposition. In the present work we have characterized this up-regulation and examined its mechanism by comparing the uptake of oxidized (Fe3+) and ascorbate-reduced (Fe2+) forms of iron. Iron loading markedly enhanced the uptake of iron both in the presence and absence of ascorbate, but the increment was greater when ascorbate was absent. This up-regulation is partially inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating a requirement for protein synthesis. Uptake by the iron-loaded cells was less sensitive to thiol-alkylating agents and competing metal ions, but was more sensitive to proteolysis. Iron loading causes an increase in both Km and Vmax for uptake of both Fe2+ and Fe3+, although the values differ, suggesting distinct rate-limiting steps for uptake of Fe2+ and Fe3+. Consistent with this idea, uptake of the two ions showed differential sensitivity to thiol reagents, competing metal ions and monensin. The Fe(2+)-specific chelators bathophenanthroline disulfonate and ferrozine markedly inhibited iron uptake whether ascorbate was present or not, indicating that Fe3+ uptake is dependent on reduction to the ferrous state. This requirement for reduction was independent of the iron status of the cells, demonstrating that the process of up-regulation is not due to the appearance of a new mechanism for translocation of Fe3+ without reduction. Taken together, the evidence favors a model of NTBI transport where an obligate and rate-determining reduction of Fe3+ occurs prior to or during uptake, followed by translocation through an Fe2+ carrier. The distinct translocation mechanisms of uptake in the presence and absence of ascorbate suggest that exogenous Fe2+ does not access the carrier available to the nascent

  9. Labile iron potentiates ascorbate-dependent reduction and mobilization of ferritin iron.

    PubMed

    Badu-Boateng, Charles; Pardalaki, Sofia; Wolf, Claude; Lajnef, Sonia; Peyrot, Fabienne; Naftalin, Richard J

    2017-03-21

    Ascorbate mobilizes iron from equine spleen ferritin by two separate processes. Ascorbate alone mobilizes ferritin iron with an apparent Km (ascorbate) ≈1.5mM. Labile iron >2μM, complexed with citrate (10mM), synergises ascorbate-dependent iron mobilization by decreasing the apparent Km (ascorbate) to ≈270μM and raising maximal mobilization rate by ≈5-fold. Catalase reduces the apparent Km(ascorbate) for both ascorbate and ascorbate+iron dependent mobilization by ≈80%. Iron mobilization by ascorbate alone has a higher activation energy (Ea=45.0±5.5kJ/mole) than when mediated by ascorbate with labile iron (10μM) (Ea=13.7±2.2kJ/mole); also mobilization by iron-ascorbate has a three-fold higher pH sensitivity (pH range 6.0-8.0) than with ascorbate alone. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits ascorbate's iron mobilizing action. EPR and autochemiluminescence studies show that ascorbate and labile iron within ferritin enhances radical formation, whereas ascorbate alone produces negligible radicals. These findings suggest that iron catalysed single electron transfer reactions from ascorbate, involving ascorbate or superoxide and possibly ferroxidase tyrosine radicals, accelerate iron mobilization from the ferroxidase centre more than EPR silent, bi-dentate two-electron transfers. These differing modes of electron transference from ascorbate mirror the known mono and bidentate oxidation reactions of dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide with di-ferrous iron at the ferroxidase centre. This study implies that labile iron, at physiological pH, complexed with citrate, synergises iron mobilization from ferritin by ascorbate (50-4000μM). This autocatalytic process can exacerbate oxidative stress in ferritin-containing inflamed tissue.

  10. Synchronous Volatilization of Sn, Zn, and As, and Preparation of Direct Reduction Iron (DRI) from a Complex Iron Concentrate via CO Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanghui; You, Zhixiong; Zhang, Yuanbo; Rao, Mingjun; Wen, Peidan; Guo, Yufeng; Jiang, Tao

    2014-09-01

    Sn-, Zn-, and As-bearing iron ores are typical complex ores and are abundantly reserved in China. This kind of ore is difficult to use effectively due to the complicated relationships between iron and the other valuable metal minerals. Excessive Sn, Zn, and As contents would adversely affect ferrous metallurgy operation as well as the quality of the products. In this study, thermodynamic calculations revealed that it was feasible to synchronously volatilize Sn, Zn, and As via CO reduction. Experimental results showed that preoxidation was necessary for the subsequent reductive volatilization of Zn from the pellets, and the proper preoxidation temperature was 700-725°C under air atmosphere. Synchronous volatilization of Sn, Zn, and As was realized by roasting under weak reductive atmosphere after the pellets were preoxidized. The volatilization ratios of 75.88% Sn, 78.88% Zn, and 84.43% As were obtained, respectively, under the conditions by reduction at 1000°C for 100 min with mixed gas of 50% CO + 50% CO2 (in vol.). A metallic pellet (direct reduction iron) with total iron grade of 87.36%, Fe metallization ratio of 89.27%, and residual Sn, Zn, and As contents of 0.071%, 0.009%, and 0.047%, respectively, was prepared. Sn and As were mainly volatilized during weak reductive atmosphere roasting, and those volatilized in the metallization reduction process were negligible. Most of Zn (78.88%) was volatilized during weak reductive atmosphere roasting, while the metallization reduction process only contributed to 16.10% of total Zn volatilization.

  11. Heterogeneous reductive dehalogenation of PCB contaminated transformer oil and brominated diphenyl ethers with zero valent iron.

    PubMed

    Habekost, A; Aristov, N

    2012-09-01

    Reductive dechlorination and debromination of halogenated biphenyls (PCBs) and diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) occurs efficiently at moderately elevated temperatures (350-600 °C) with zero valent iron (iron powder) in a nitrogen atmosphere. The proton donors tested were waste transformer oil, iso-octane, and n-decane. Observation of production of biphenyl and diphenyl ether and their condensation products indicates that the reaction is not simple pyrolysis, but a reduction. No halogenated organic products are observed.

  12. [Influence of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction on the Speciation and Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil].

    PubMed

    Si, You-bin; Wang, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction by microbes is an important process of producing energy in the oxidation of organic compounds under anaerobic condition with Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor and Fe(II) as the reduction product. This process is of great significance in element biogeochemical cycle. Iron respiration has been described as one of the most ancient forms of microbial metabolism on the earth, which is bound up with material cycle in water, soil and sediments. Dissimilatory iron reduction plays important roles in heavy metal form transformation and the remediation of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated soils. In this paper, we summarized the research progress of iron reduction in the natural environment, and discussed the influence and the mechanism of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation and bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. The effects of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation of heavy metals may be attributed to oxidation and reduction, methytation and immobilization of heavy metals in relation to their bioavailability in soils. The mechanisms of Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction on heavy metal form transformation contain biological and chemical interactions, but the mode of interaction remains to be further investigated.

  13. Role of superoxide in the photochemical reduction of iron in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Andrew L.; Waite, T. David

    2006-08-01

    We have conducted a series of laboratory studies to investigate the generation of ferrous iron and reactive oxygen species when solutions of seawater containing natural organic matter (NOM) and ferric iron are exposed to simulated sunlight. Total ferrous iron and hydrogen peroxide were measured at nanomolar concentrations with high temporal resolution using chemiluminescence-based methods. In all cases, ferrous iron concentrations rapidly peaked at several nanomoles per litre after a few minutes, and then declined over time, while hydrogen peroxide concentrations increased in a non-linear manner. Although concentrations of both species depended on the concentration of NOM, hydrogen peroxide concentrations were only minimally affected by the presence of iron. Increasing the NOM concentration while the total iron concentration was maintained constant led to an increase in the maximum ferrous iron concentration, suggesting that superoxide-mediated reduction of iron may be a major pathway for ferrous iron formation. This was supported by measurements of superoxide production from irradiation of NOM in the absence of iron and kinetic calculations, as well as an experiment in which superoxide dismutase was added. Further analysis of the data suggested that dissolved oxygen and photo-produced hydrogen peroxide were the primary oxidants of the Fe(II) formed. Thus we propose that superoxide and ferrous iron may be intricately coupled in the system, and that their generation is determined by the supply of NOM available to harvest light and donate electrons.

  14. Studies on the reduction kinetics of hematite iron ore pellets with noncoking coals for sponge iron plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Mohapatra, P.; Patel, S.K.

    2009-07-01

    In the present investigation, fired pellets were made by mixing hematite iron ore fines of -100, -16+18, and -8+10 mesh size in different ratios and studies on their reduction kinetics in Lakhanpur, Orient OC-2 and Belpahar coals were carried out at temperatures ranging from 850{sup o}C to 1000{sup o}C with a view toward promoting the massive utilization of fines in ironmaking. The rate of reduction in all the fired iron ore pellets increased markedly with an increase in temperature up to 1000{sup o}C, and it was more intense in the first 30min. The values of activation energy, calculated from integral and differential approaches, for the reduction of fired pellets (prepared from iron ore fines of -100 mesh size) in coals were found to be in the range 131-148 and 130-181 kJ mol{sup -1} (for =0.2 to 0.8), indicating the process is controlled by a carbon gasification reaction. The addition of selected larger size particles in the matrix of -100 mesh size fines up to the extent studied decreased the activation energy and slightly increased the reduction rates of resultant fired pellets. In comparison to coal, the reduction of fired pellets in char was characterized by significantly lower reduction rates and higher activation energy.

  15. Reduction of nitrogen compounds in oceanic basement and its implications for HCN formation and abiotic organic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide is an excellent organic reagent and is central to most of the reaction pathways leading to abiotic formation of simple organic compounds containing nitrogen, such as amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. Reduced carbon and nitrogen precursor compounds for the synthesis of HCN may be formed under off-axis hydrothermal conditions in oceanic lithosphere in the presence of native Fe and Ni and are adsorbed on authigenic layer silicates and zeolites. The native metals as well as the molecular hydrogen reducing CO2 to CO/CH4 and NO3-/NO2- to NH3/NH4+ are a result of serpentinization of mafic rocks. Oceanic plates are conveyor belts of reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds from the off-axis hydrothermal environments to the subduction zones, where compaction, dehydration, desiccation and diagenetic reactions affect the organic precursors. CO/CH4 and NH3/NH4+ in fluids distilled out of layer silicates and zeolites in the subducting plate at an early stage of subduction will react upon heating and form HCN, which is then available for further organic reactions to, for instance, carbohydrates, nucleosides or even nucleotides, under alkaline conditions in hydrated mantle rocks of the overriding plate. Convergent margins in the initial phase of subduction must, therefore, be considered the most potent sites for prebiotic reactions on Earth. This means that origin of life processes are, perhaps, only possible on planets where some kind of plate tectonics occur. PMID:19849830

  16. Reduction of nitrogen compounds in oceanic basement and its implications for HCN formation and abiotic organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Holm, Nils G; Neubeck, Anna

    2009-10-22

    Hydrogen cyanide is an excellent organic reagent and is central to most of the reaction pathways leading to abiotic formation of simple organic compounds containing nitrogen, such as amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. Reduced carbon and nitrogen precursor compounds for the synthesis of HCN may be formed under off-axis hydrothermal conditions in oceanic lithosphere in the presence of native Fe and Ni and are adsorbed on authigenic layer silicates and zeolites. The native metals as well as the molecular hydrogen reducing CO2 to CO/CH4 and NO3-/NO2- to NH3/NH4+ are a result of serpentinization of mafic rocks. Oceanic plates are conveyor belts of reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds from the off-axis hydrothermal environments to the subduction zones, where compaction, dehydration, desiccation and diagenetic reactions affect the organic precursors. CO/CH4 and NH3/NH4+ in fluids distilled out of layer silicates and zeolites in the subducting plate at an early stage of subduction will react upon heating and form HCN, which is then available for further organic reactions to, for instance, carbohydrates, nucleosides or even nucleotides, under alkaline conditions in hydrated mantle rocks of the overriding plate. Convergent margins in the initial phase of subduction must, therefore, be considered the most potent sites for prebiotic reactions on Earth. This means that origin of life processes are, perhaps, only possible on planets where some kind of plate tectonics occur.

  17. Iron Reduction and Radionuclide Immobilization: Kinetic, Thermodynamic and Hydrologic controls & Reaction-Based Modeling - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    William D. Burgos

    2004-06-18

    Our research focused on (1) microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) individually, and concomitantly in natural sediments, (2) Fe(III) oxide surface chemistry, specifically with respect to reactions with Fe(II)and U(VI), (3) the influence of humic substances on Fe(III) and U(VI) bioreduction, and on U(VI) complexation, and (4) the development of reaction-based reactive transport biogeochemical models to numerically simulate our experimental results. We have continued our investigations on microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Modeling our earlier experimental results required assumption of a hydrated surface for hematite, more reactive than predicted based on theoretical solubility (Burgos et al.2002). Subsequent studies with Shewanella putrefaciens and Geobacter sulfurreducens confirmed the rates of Fe(III) bioreduction depend on oxide surface area rather than oxide thermodynamic properties (Roden,2003a,b;2004; Burgos et al,2003). We examined the potential for bioreduction of U(VI) by Geobacter sulfurreducens in the presence of synthetic Fe(III) oxides and natural Fe(III) oxide-containing solids (Jeon et al,2004a,b) in which more than 95% of added U(VI) was sorbed to mineral surfaces. The results showed a significant portion of solid-associated U(VI) was resistant to both enzymatic and abiotic (Fe(II)-driven) reduction, but the rate and extent of bioreduction of U(VI) was increased due to the addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). We conducted long-term semicontinuous culture and column experiments on coupled Fe(III) oxide/U(VI) reduction. These experiments were conducted with natural subsurface sediment from the Oyster site in Virginia, whose Fe content and microbial reducibility are comparable to ORNL FRC sediments (Jeon et al, 2004b). The results conclusively demonstrated the potential for sustained removal of U(VI) from solution via DMRB activity in excess of the U(VI) sorption capacity of the natural mineral assemblages. Jang (2004) demonstrated

  18. Structural and magnetic properties of iron nanowires and iron nanoparticles fabricated through a reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei Syuan; Lin, Hong Ming; Brzozka, Katarzyna; Lewinska, Sabina; Nedelko, Natalia; Slawska-Waniewska, Anna; Borysiuk, Jolanta; Wasik, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Summary The main goal of this work is to study the structural and magnetic properties of iron nanowires and iron nanoparticles, which have been fabricated in almost the same processes. The only difference in the synthesis is an application of an external magnetic field in order to form the iron nanowires. Both nanomaterials have been examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry and Mössbauer spectrometry to determine their structures. Structural investigations confirm that obtained iron nanowires as well as nanoparticles reveal core–shell structures and they are composed of crystalline iron cores that are covered by amorphous or highly defected phases of iron and iron oxides. Magnetic properties have been measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The obtained values of coercivity, remanent magnetization, saturation magnetization as well as Curie temperature differ for both studied nanostructures. Higher values of magnetizations are observed for iron nanowires. At the same time, coercivity and Curie temperature are higher for iron nanoparticles. PMID:26425415

  19. Evidence for Localization of Reaction Upon Reduction of Carbon Tetrachloride by Granular Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; Lea, Alan S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.; Miehr, R.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2002-10-01

    The distribution of reaction sites on iron particles exposed to water containing carbon tetrachloride has been examined by measuring the locations of reaction products. The uniformity or localization of reaction sites has implications for understanding and modeling the reduction of environmental contaminants by iron in ground water systems. Granular iron surfaces similar to those being used for environmental remediation applications were studied using surfaces analysis techniques to develop an understanding of the physical and chemical structure of the surface and oxide films. Scanning Auger microscopy and imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry revealed that granular iron exposed to carbon tetrachloride-saturated water exhibits chloride-enriched regions occurred at pits rather than on the passive oxide film on the metal. Understanding the nature of the local solute reduction sites will play an important role in modeling the kinetics of reaction at passive iron oxide films in environmental systems.

  20. Evolution of the Microbial Community Structure and Iron Reduction Rate in a Column Biostimulation Experiment During the Transition From Iron to Sulfate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Elbishlawi, H.; Hettich, R. L.; Kerkhof, L.; Komlos, J.; Kukkadapu, R. P.; Lipton, M. S.; Long, P. E.; McGuinness, L.; Moon, H.; Peacock, A. D.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Williams, K. H.

    2007-12-01

    During the biostimulation of iron reducers for the purpose of concurrent biological reduction of U(VI), it has been postulated that iron reduction proceeds while bioavailable iron is present, after which the system switches to sulfate reduction if sulfate is present. Field experiments from the Rifle Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site in Colorado showing that the onset of sulfate reduction has been associated with decreased removal of U(VI) from groundwater support this hypothesis. However, column experiments using sediments from the Rifle site and synthetic groundwater with comparable (7 mM) sulfate levels as in the field, showed that the onset of sulfate reduction occurred within a month with no negative effect on U(VI) reduction. Separate column experiments using low (9 uM) sulfate concentrations showed that iron reduction can be maintained for over 200 days with no indication of iron limitations. To address the discrepancy between field and column experiments, an experiment is being conducted to determine the activity of iron reducers before and after the onset of sulfate reduction. Since Fe(II) buildup is difficult to quantify in the presence of sulfate reduction, the sediments were augmented with Fe- 57 goethite. Minute changes in the Fe-57 goethite can be detected via Mössbauer spectroscopy. Ten columns (2.5 cm internal diameter and 15 cm in length), loaded with sediment from the Rifle site, have been set up and are being operated at 17 °C. Groundwater from the Rifle site, amended with 3mM acetate and 20 μM U(VI), is pumped through the columns at a rate of 0.035 ml/min. Column effluent concentrations are being monitored for acetate, Fe(II), U(VI), and sulfate. Columns are sacrificed at 10 day intervals and the sediment samples are analyzed for Fe(II), U(IV), and acid volatile sulfides using standard analytical procedures. Changes in Fe-57 goethite measured using Mössbauer spectroscopy during biostimulation of the native microorganisms at 10-day

  1. Reduction of iron-bearing lunar minerals for the production of oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massieon, Charles; Cutler, Andrew; Shadman, Farhang

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the reduction of simulants of the iron-bearing lunar minerals olivine ((Fe,Mg)2SiO4), pyroxene ((Fe,Mg,Ca)SiO3), and ilmenite (FeTiO3) are investigated, extending previous work with ilmenite. Fayalite is reduced by H2 at 1070 K to 1480 K. A layer of mixed silica glass and iron forms around an unreacted core. Reaction kinetics are influenced by permeation of hydrogen through this layer and a reaction step involving dissociated hydrogen. Reaction mechanisms are independent of Mg content. Augite, hypersthene, and hedenbergite are reduced in H2 at the same temperatures. The products are iron metal and lower iron silicates mixed throughout the mineral. Activation energy rises with calcium content. Ilmenite and fayalite are reduced with carbon deposited on partially reduced minerals via the CO disproportionation reaction. Reduction with carbon is rapid, showing the carbothermal reduction of lunar minerals is possible.

  2. The use of coal in a solid phase reduction of iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhihina, I. D.; Hodosov, I. E.

    2015-09-01

    The results of the research process of producing metalized products by solid-phase reduction of iron using solid carbonaceous reducing agents. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out on the model of the unit the Fe-C-O and system with iron ore and coal. As a result of modeling the thermodynamic boundary reducing, oxidizing, and transition areas and the value of the ratio of carbon and oxygen in the system. Simulation of real systems carried out with the gas phase obtained in the pyrolys of coal. The simulation results allow to determine the optimal cost of coal required for complete reduction of iron ore from a given composition. The kinetics of the processes of solid-phase reduction of iron using coal of various technological brands.

  3. Interactions Between Microbial Iron Reduction and Metal Geochemistry: Effect of Redox Cycling on Transition Metal Speciation in Iron Bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    D. Craig Cooper; Flynn W. Picardal; Aaron J. Coby

    2006-02-01

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respect to Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a ~3× increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by ~12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These data suggest

  4. Electron transfer at the mineral/water interface: Selenium reduction by ferrous iron sorbed on clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlet, L.; Scheinost, A. C.; Tournassat, C.; Greneche, J. M.; Géhin, A.; Fernández-Martínez, A.; Coudert, S.; Tisserand, D.; Brendle, J.

    2007-12-01

    surface H 2 species, and are then available for the later Se(IV) reduction. The slow reaction rate indicates a diffusion controlled process. Homogeneous precipitation of an iron selenite was thermodynamically predicted and experimentally observed only in the absence of clay. Interestingly, half of Fe was oxidized in this precipitate (Mössbauer). Since DFT calculations predicted the oxidation of Fe at the water-FeSe solid interface only and not in the bulk phase, we derived an average particle size of this precipitate which does not exceed 2 nm. A comparison with the Mössbauer and XAS spectra of the clay samples demonstrates that such homogenous precipitation can be excluded as a mechanism for the observed slow Se reduction, emphasizing the role of abiotic, heterogeneous precipitation and reduction for the removal of Se from subsurface waters.

  5. INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF URANIUM UNDER IRON-REDUCING CONDITIONS: REDUCTION OF UVI BY BIOGENIC FEII/FEIII HYDROXIDE (GREEN RUST)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2006-12-31

    The recent identification of green rusts (GRs) as products of the reduction of FeIII oxyhydroxides by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, coupled with the ability of synthetic (GR) to reduce UVI species to insoluble UO2, suggests that biogenic green rusts (BioGRs) may play an important role in the speciation (and thus mobility) of U in FeIII-reducing environments. The objective of our research was to examine the potential for BioGR to affect the speciation of U under FeIII-reducing conditions. To meet this objective, we designed and executed a hypothesis-driven experimental program to identify key factors leading to the formation of BioGRs as products of dissimilatory FeIII reduction, to determine the key factors controlling the reduction of UVI to UIV by GRs, and to identify the resulting U-bearing mineral phases. The results of this research significantly increase our understanding of the coupling of biotic and abiotic processes with respect to the speciation of U in iron-reducing environments. In particular, the reduction of UVI to UIV by BioGR with the subsequent formation of U-bearing mineral phases may be effective for immobilizing U in suboxic subsurface environments. This information has direct applications to contaminant transport modeling and bioremediation engineering for natural or enhanced in situ remediation of subsurface contamination.

  6. Reduction kinetics of iron-based oxygen carriers using methane for chemical-looping combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming; Wang, Shuzhong; Wang, Longfei; Lv, Mingming

    2014-12-01

    The performance of three iron-based oxygen carriers (pure Fe2O3, synthetic Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 and iron ore) in reduction process using methane as fuel is investigated in thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA). The reaction rate and mechanism between three oxygen carriers and methane are investigated. On the basis of reactivity in reduction process, it may be concluded that Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 has the best reactivity with methane. The reaction rate constant is found to be in the following order: Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 > pure Fe2O3 > iron ore and the activation energy varies between 49 and 184 kJ mol-1. Reduction reactions for the pure Fe2O3 and synthetic Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 are well represented by the reaction controlling mechanism, and for the iron ore the phase-boundary controlled (contracting cylinder) model dominates. The particles of iron ore and synthetic Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 have better stability than that of pure Fe2O3 when the reaction temperature is limited to lower than 1223 K. These preliminary results suggest that iron-based mixed oxygen carrier particles are potential to be used in methane chemical looping process, but the reactivity of the iron ore needs to be increased.

  7. Phosphorus Migration During Direct Reduction of Coal Composite High-Phosphorus Iron Ore Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Xue, Qingguo; Wang, Guang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jingsong

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the direct reduction process and phosphorus migration features of high-phosphorus iron ores using simulated experiments. Results show that iron oxide was successfully reduced, and a Fe-Si-Al slag formed in carbon-bearing pellets at 1473 K (1200 °C). Fluorapatite then began to decompose into Ca3(PO4)2 and CaF2. As the reaction continued, Ca3(PO4)2 and Fe-Si-Al slag reacted quickly with each other to generate CaAl2Si2O8 and P2, while CaF2 turned into SiF4 gas in the presence of high SiO2. A small amount remained in the slag phase and formed CaAl2Si2O8. Further analysis detailed the migration process of the phosphorus into iron phases, as well as the relationship between carburization and phosphorus absorption in the iron phases. As carbon content in the iron phase increased, the austenite grain boundary melted and formed a large quantity of liquid iron which quickly absorbed the phosphorus. Based on the results of simulation and analysis, this paper proposed a method which reduced the absorption of P by the metallic iron formed and reduced P content in metallic iron during direct reduction.

  8. An inorganic geochemical argument for coupled anaerobic oxidation of methane and iron reduction in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Riedinger, N; Formolo, M J; Lyons, T W; Henkel, S; Beck, A; Kasten, S

    2014-03-01

    Here, we present results from sediments collected in the Argentine Basin, a non-steady state depositional marine system characterized by abundant oxidized iron within methane-rich layers due to sediment reworking followed by rapid deposition. Our comprehensive inorganic data set shows that iron reduction in these sulfate and sulfide-depleted sediments is best explained by a microbially mediated process-implicating anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to iron reduction (Fe-AOM) as the most likely major mechanism. Although important in many modern marine environments, iron-driven AOM may not consume similar amounts of methane compared with sulfate-dependent AOM. Nevertheless, it may have broad impact on the deep biosphere and dominate both iron and methane cycling in sulfate-lean marine settings. Fe-AOM might have been particularly relevant in the Archean ocean, >2.5 billion years ago, known for its production and accumulation of iron oxides (in iron formations) in a biosphere likely replete with methane but low in sulfate. Methane at that time was a critical greenhouse gas capable of sustaining a habitable climate under relatively low solar luminosity, and relationships to iron cycling may have impacted if not dominated methane loss from the biosphere.

  9. In situ observation of reduction kinetics and 2D mapping of chemical state for heterogeneous reduction in iron-ore sinters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Murao, R.; Ohta, N.; Noami, K.; Uemura, Y.; Niwa, Y.; Kimijima, K.; Takeichi, Y.; Nitani, H.

    2016-05-01

    Iron-ore sinters constitute the major component of the iron-bearing burden in blast furnaces, and the mechanism of their reduction is one of the key processes in iron making. The heterogeneous reduction of sintered oxides was investigated by the combination of X-ray fluorescence and absorption fine structure, X-ray diffraction, and computed tomography. Two - dimensional mapping of the chemical states (CSs) was performed. The iron CSs FeIII, FeII, and Fe0 exhibited a heterogeneous distribution in a reduced sinter. The reduction started near micro pores, at iron-oxide grains rather than calcium-ferrite ones. The heterogeneous reduction among grains in a sinter may cause the formation of micro cracks. These results provide fundamental insights into heterogeneous reduction schemes for iron-ore sinters.

  10. Anoxic nitrate reduction coupled with iron oxidation and attenuation of dissolved arsenic and phosphate in a sand and gravel aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Böhlke, J. K.

    2017-01-01

    . Additionally, Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing microbial enrichment cultures were obtained from aquifer sediments. Growth experiments with the cultures sequentially produced nitrite and nitrous oxide from nitrate while simultaneously oxidizing Fe(II). Field and culture results suggest that nitrogen oxide reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in the aquifer are a complex interaction of coupled biotic and abiotic reactions. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that anoxic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation can occur in groundwater; that it could control iron speciation; and that the process can impact the mobility of other chemical species (e.g., phosphate and arsenic) not directly involved in the oxidation-reduction reaction.

  11. Anoxic nitrate reduction coupled with iron oxidation and attenuation of dissolved arsenic and phosphate in a sand and gravel aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2017-01-01

    weeks. Additionally, Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing microbial enrichment cultures were obtained from aquifer sediments. Growth experiments with the cultures sequentially produced nitrite and nitrous oxide from nitrate while simultaneously oxidizing Fe(II). Field and culture results suggest that nitrogen oxide reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in the aquifer are a complex interaction of coupled biotic and abiotic reactions. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that anoxic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation can occur in groundwater; that it could control iron speciation; and that the process can impact the mobility of other chemical species (e.g., phosphate and arsenic) not directly involved in the oxidation–reduction reaction.

  12. Reduction of soot emissions by iron pentacarbonyl in isooctane diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.B.; Masiello, K.A.; Hahn, D.W.

    2008-07-15

    Light-scattering measurements, in situ laser-induced fluorescence, and thermophoretic sampling with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, were performed in laboratory isooctane diffusion flames seeded with 4000 ppm iron pentacarbonyl. These measurements allowed the determination of the evolution of the size, number density, and volume fraction of soot particles through the flame. Comparison to unseeded flame data provided a detailed assessment of the effects of iron addition on soot particle inception, growth, and oxidation processes. Iron was found to produce a minor soot-enhancing effect at early residence times, while subsequent soot particle growth was largely unaffected. It is concluded that primarily elemental iron is incorporated within the soot particles during particle inception and growth. However, iron addition was found to enhance the rate of soot oxidation during the soot burnout regime, yielding a two-thirds reduction in overall soot emissions. In situ spectroscopic measurements probed the transient nature of elemental iron throughout the flame, revealing significant loss of elemental iron, presumably to iron oxides, with increasing flame residence, suggesting catalysis of soot oxidation via iron oxide species. (author)

  13. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Aging of Graphitic Cast Irons and Machinability

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Von L.

    2012-09-19

    The objective of this task was to determine whether ductile iron and compacted graphite iron exhibit age strengthening to a statistically significant extent. Further, this effort identified the mechanism by which gray iron age strengthens and the mechanism by which age-strengthening improves the machinability of gray cast iron. These results were then used to determine whether age strengthening improves the machinability of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron alloys in order to develop a predictive model of alloy factor effects on age strengthening. The results of this work will lead to reduced section sizes, and corresponding weight and energy savings. Improved machinability will reduce scrap and enhance casting marketability. Technical Conclusions: Age strengthening was demonstrated to occur in gray iron ductile iron and compacted graphite iron. Machinability was demonstrated to be improved by age strengthening when free ferrite was present in the microstructure, but not in a fully pearlitic microstructure. Age strengthening only occurs when there is residual nitrogen in solid solution in the Ferrite, whether the ferrite is free ferrite or the ferrite lamellae within pearlite. Age strengthening can be accelerated by Mn at about 0.5% in excess of the Mn/S balance Estimated energy savings over ten years is 13.05 trillion BTU, based primarily on yield improvement and size reduction of castings for equivalent service. Also it is estimated that the heavy truck end use of lighter castings for equivalent service requirement will result in a diesel fuel energy savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

  14. Iron reduction and magnetite biomineralization mediated by a deep-sea iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenfang; Li, Bi; Hu, Jing; Li, Jinhua; Wang, Fengping; Pan, Yongxin

    2011-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) plays an important role in element biogeochemical cycling. However, little is known about DIR processes and the mineralization abilities of strains found in deep oceans, where ecology, nutrient availability, and diversity are significantly different. Shewanella piezotoleransWP3 is a psychrotolerant and piezotolerant iron-reducing strain with a complex respiration net which has been recently isolated from West Pacific deep-sea sediments at a water depth of ˜1914 m. In this study, we have investigated the biomineralization process ofS. piezotoleransWP3 at 0.1 MPa (˜1 atmospheric pressure) and 20°C (optimum growth temperature). A series of magnetic measurements in combination with X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and chemical methods were applied to characterize the iron reduction process and biominerals. The results demonstrate thatS. piezotoleransWP3 can reduce hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) at a much faster rate than that of most other reported strains and produce superparamagnetic magnetite particles with an average grain size of 4-6 nm after 72 h. Time course multiple magnetic parameters can be used to effectively monitor the transformation process from weak antiferromagnetic HFO to strong ferrimagnetic magnetite. Changes in concentration-sensitive and grain size-sensitive magnetic parameters suggest that the biomineralization process is characterized by recurring magnetic mineral formation and particle growth. Owing to its high iron reduction rate,S. piezotoleransWP3 may contribute to iron mineral transformation and element cycling in deep oceans. Our results additionally suggest that the multiple-parameter rock-magnetic method is a fast, sensitive, nondestructive and quantitative approach for monitoring DIR biomineralization processes involving magnetic minerals.

  15. Direct evidence of iron uptake by the Gram-positive siderophore-shuttle mechanism without iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Allred, Benjamin E; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2014-09-19

    Iron is an essential element for all organisms, and microorganisms produce small molecule iron-chelators, siderophores, to efficiently acquire Fe(III). Gram-positive bacteria possess lipoprotein siderophore-binding proteins (SBPs) on the membrane. Some of the SBPs bind both apo-siderophores (iron-free) and Fe-siderophore (iron-chelated) and only import Fe-siderophores. When the SBP initially binds an apo-siderophore, the SBP uses the Gram-positive siderophore-shuttle mechanism (the SBPs exchange Fe(III) from a Fe-siderophore to the apo-siderophore bound to the protein) and/or displacement mechanism (the apo-siderophore bound to the SBP is released and a Fe-siderophore is then bound to the protein) to import the Fe-siderophore. Previously, we reported that the Bacillus cereus SBP, YxeB, exchanges Fe(III) from a ferrioxamine B (FO) to a desferrioxamine B (DFO) bound to YxeB using the siderophore-shuttle mechanism although the iron exchange was indirectly elucidated. Synthetic Cr-DFO (inert metal FO analog) and Ga-DFO (nonreducible FO analog) are bound to YxeB and imported via YxeB and the corresponding permeases and ATPase. YxeB exchanges Fe(III) from FO and Ga(III) from Ga-DFO to DFO bound to the protein, indicating that the metal-exchange occurs without metal reduction. YxeB also binds DFO derivatives including acetylated DFO (apo-siderophore) and acetylated FO (AcFO, Fe-siderophore). The iron from AcFO is transferred to DFO when bound to YxeB, giving direct evidence of iron exchange. Moreover, YxeB also uses the displacement mechanism when ferrichrome (Fch) is added to the DFO:YxeB complex. Uptake by the displacement mechanism is a minor pathway compared to the shuttle mechanism.

  16. Enhancement of iron toxicity in L929 cells by D-glucose: accelerated(re-)reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Lehnen-Beyel, Ilka; Groot, Herbert De; Rauen, Ursula

    2002-01-01

    It has recently been shown that an increase in the cellular chelatable iron pool is sufficient to cause cell damage. To further characterize this kind of injury, we artificially enhanced the chelatable iron pool in L929 mouse fibroblasts using the highly membrane-permeable complex Fe(III)/8-hydroxyquinoline. This iron complex induced a significant oxygen-dependent loss of viability during an incubation period of 5 h. Surprisingly, the addition of L-glucose strongly enhanced this toxicity whereas no such effect was exerted by L-glucose and 2-deoxyglucose. The assumption that this increase in toxicity might be due to an enhanced availability of reducing equivalents formed during the metabolism of L-glucose was supported by NAD(P)H measurements which showed a 1.5-2-fold increase in the cellular NAD(P)H content upon addition of L-glucose. To assess the influence of this enhanced cellular reducing capacity on iron valence we established a new method to measure the reduction rate of iron based on the fluorescent iron(II) indicator PhenGreen SK. We could show that the rate of intracellular iron reduction was more than doubled in the presence of L-glucose. A similar acceleration was achieved by adding the reducing agents ascorbate and glutathione (the latter as membrane-permeable ethyl ester). Glutathione ethyl ester, as well as the thiol reagent N -acetylcysteine, also caused a toxicity increase comparable with L-glucose. These results suggest an enhancement of iron toxicity by L-glucose via an accelerated (re-)reduction of iron with NAD(P)H serving as central electron provider and ascorbate, glutathione or possibly NAD(P)H itself as final reducing agent. PMID:12193041

  17. Ligand-based reduction of CO2 and release of CO on iron(II).

    PubMed

    Thammavongsy, Zachary; Seda, Takele; Zakharov, Lev N; Kaminsky, Werner; Gilbertson, John D

    2012-09-03

    A synthetic cycle for the CO(2)-to-CO conversion (with subsequent release of CO) based on iron(II), a redox-active pydridinediimine ligand (PDI), and an O-atom acceptor is reported. This conversion is a passive-type ligand-based reduction, where the electrons for the CO(2) conversion are supplied by the reduced PDI ligand and the ferrous state of the iron is conserved.

  18. Computational study: Reduction of iron corrosion in lead coolant of fast nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Arkundato, Artoto; Su'ud, Zaki; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Widayani

    2012-06-20

    In this paper we report molecular dynamics simulation results of iron (cladding) corrosion in interaction with lead coolant of fast nuclear reactor. The goal of this work is to study effect of oxygen injection to the coolant to reduce iron corrosion. By evaluating diffusion coefficients, radial distribution functions, mean-square displacement curves and observation of crystal structure of iron before and after oxygen injection, we concluded that a significant reduction of corrosion can be achieved by issuing about 2% of oxygen atoms into lead coolant.

  19. Manganese inhibition of microbial iron reduction in anaerobic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Potential mechanisms for the lack of Fe(II) accumulation in Mn(IV)-containing anaerobic sediments were investigated. The addition of Mn(IV) to sediments in which Fe(II) reduction was the terminal electron-accepting process removed all the pore-water Fe(II), completely inhibited net Fe(III) reduction, and stimulated Mn(IV) reduction. Results demonstrate that preferential reduction of Mn(IV) by FE(III)-reducing bacteria cannot completely explain the lack of Fe(II) accumulation in anaerobic, Mn(IV)-containing sediments, and indicate that Mn(IV) oxidation of Fe(II) is the mechanism that ultimately prevents Fe(II) accumulation. -Authors

  20. A kinetic pressure effect on the experimental abiotic reduction of aqueous CO2 to methane from 1 to 3.5 kbar at 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Codi; Cody, George D.; Davis, Jeffrey M.

    2015-02-01

    Aqueous abiotic methane concentrations in a range of geologic settings are below levels expected for equilibrium with coexisting CO2 and H2, indicating that kinetics can control the speciation of reduced carbon-bearing fluids. Previous studies have suggested that mineral catalysts or gas-phase reactions may increase the rate of methanogenesis. Here, we report on experiments that indicate pressure can also accelerate aqueous reduction of CO2 to CH4. Four series of cold-seal hydrothermal experiments were performed from 1 to 3.5 kbar at 300 °C for two weeks and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The starting fluids were 10-20-μL solutions of 70-mmolal 13C-labeled formic acid (H13COOH) contained in welded gold capsules. Increasing pressure (P) resulted in a systematic, reproducible log-linear increase in 13CH4 yields. The pressure effect could be quantified the log-linear slope, Δlog[13CH4]/ΔP (log mmolal per kbar). The mean slope was 0.66 ± 0.05 (±1s.e.), indicating that 13CH4 yields increased by an average factor of 40-50 over a P range of 2.5 kbar. Pressure-independent variations in [13CH4] were observed as scatter about the log-linear regressions and as variations in the y-intercepts of the regressions. These variations were attributed to trace amounts of catalytic Fe along the inner capsule wall that remained despite cleaning the Au capsules in nitric acid prior to each experimental series. The mechanism for the pressure-dependent effect was interpreted to result from one or more of the following three processes: reduction of a metastable reaction intermediate such as methanol, formation of Fe-carbonyl complexes in the fluid, and/or heterogeneous catalysis by Fe. The results suggest that pressure may influence aqueous abiotic CH4 yields in certain geological environments, particularly when the relative effects of other kinetic factors such as temperature are diminished, e.g., in cool forearcs or other settings with a steep geothermal

  1. Synthesis of iron nanoparticles via chemical reduction with palladium ion seeds.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Ehrman, Sheryl H

    2007-01-30

    We report on the synthesis of highly monodisperse iron nanoparticles, using a chemical reduction method. Iron nanoparticles with an average diameter of 6 nm and a geometric standard deviation of 1.3 were synthesized at a pH of 9.50 from ferric chloride precursor with sodium borohydride as the reducing agent, polyacrylic acid as the dispersing agent, and palladium ions as seeds for iron nanoparticle nucleation. The resulting nanoparticles were ferromagnetic at 5 K and superparamagnetic at 350 K. The dispersing agent polyacrylic acid (PAA) was shown to prevent iron nanoparticles and possibly palladium clusters from aggregating; in the absence of PAA, only aggregated iron nanoparticles were obtained. The addition of palladium ions decreased the diameter of iron nanoparticles presumably by providing sites for heterogeneous nucleation onto palladium clusters. In the absence of palladium ions, the mean diameter of iron nanoparticles was approximately 110 nm and the standard deviation increased to 2.0. The pH of the solution also was found to have a significant effect on the particle diameter, likely by affecting PAA ionization and altering the conformation of the polymer chains. At lower pH (8.75), the PAA is less ionized and its ability to disperse palladium clusters is reduced, so the number of palladium seeds decreases. Therefore, the resulting iron nanoparticles were larger, 59 nm in diameter, versus 6 nm for nanoparticles formed at a pH of 9.50.

  2. Electrochemical reduction of nitroaromatic compounds by single sheet iron oxide coated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Zhi; Hansen, Hans Christian B; Bjerrum, Morten Jannik

    2016-04-05

    Nitroaromatic compounds are substantial hazard to the environment and to the supply of clean drinking water. We report here the successful reduction of nitroaromatic compounds by use of iron oxide coated electrodes, and demonstrate that single sheet iron oxides formed from layered iron(II)-iron(III) hydroxides have unusual electrocatalytic reactivity. Electrodes were produced by coating of single sheet iron oxides on indium tin oxide electrodes. A reduction current density of 10 to 30μAcm(-2) was observed in stirred aqueous solution at pH 7 with concentrations of 25 to 400μM of the nitroaromatic compound at a potential of -0.7V vs. SHE. Fast mass transfer favors the initial reduction of the nitroaromatic compound which is well explained by a diffusion layer model. Reduction was found to comprise two consecutive reactions: a fast four-electron first-order reduction of the nitro-group to the hydroxylamine-intermediate (rate constant=0.28h(-1)) followed by a slower two-electron zero-order reduction resulting in the final amino product (rate constant=6.9μM h(-1)). The zero-order of the latter reduction was attributed to saturation of the electrode surface with hydroxylamine-intermediates which have a more negative half-wave potential than the parent compound. For reduction of nitroaromatic compounds, the SSI electrode is found superior to metal electrodes due to low cost and high stability, and superior to carbon-based electrodes in terms of high coulombic efficiency and low over potential.

  3. Kinetics and corrosion products of aqueous nitrate reduction by iron powder without reaction conditions control.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaomeng; Guan, Xiaohong; Ma, Jun; Ai, Hengyu

    2009-01-01

    Although considerable research has been conducted on nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron powder (Fe0), these studies were mostly operated under anaerobic conditions with invariable pH that was unsuitable for practical application. Without reaction conditions (dissolved oxygen or reaction pH) control, this work aimed at subjecting the kinetics of denitrification by microscale Fe0 (160-200 mesh) to analysis the factors affecting the denitrification of nitrate and the composition of iron reductive products coating upon the iron surface. Results of the kinetics study have indicated that a higher initial concentration of nitrate would yield a greater reaction rate constant. The reduction rate of nitrate increased with increasing Fe0 dosage. The reaction can be described as a pseudo-first order reaction with respect to nitrate concentration or Fe0 dosage. Experimental results also suggested that nitrate reduction by microscale Fe0 without reaction condition control primarily was an acid-driven surface-mediated process, and the reaction order was 0.65 with respect to hydrogen ion concentration. The analyses of X-ray diffractometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that a black coating, consisted of Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and FeO(OH), was formed on the surface of iron grains as an iron corrosion product when the system initial pH was lower than 5. The proportion of FeO(OH) increased as reaction time went on, whereas the proportion of Fe3O4 decreased.

  4. Direct Reduction of Ferrous Oxides to form an Iron-Rich Alternative Charge Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, H. İbrahim; Turgut, Enes; Atapek, Ş. H.; Alkan, Attila

    2015-12-01

    In this study, production of sponge iron by direct reduction of oxides and the effect of reductant on metallization were investigated. In the first stage of the study, scale formed during hot rolling of slabs was reduced in a rotating furnace using solid and gas reductants. Coal was used as solid reductant and hydrogen released from the combustion reaction of LNG was used as the gas one. The sponge iron produced by direct reduction was melted and solidified. In the second stage, Hematite ore in the form of pellets was reduced using solid carbon in a furnace heated up to 1,100°C for 60 and 120 minutes. Reduction degree of process was evaluated as a function of time and the ratio of Cfix/Fetotal. In the third stage, final products were examined using scanning electron microscope and microanalysis was carried out by energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer attached to the electron microscope. It is concluded that (i) direct reduction using both solid and gas reductants caused higher metallization compared to using only solid reductant, (ii) as the reduction time and ratio of Cfix/Fetotal increased %-reduction of ore increased.

  5. SERDP ER-1421 Abiotic and Biotic Mechanisms Controlling In Situ Remediation of NDMA: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; McKinley, James P.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Devary, Brooks J.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Thompson, Karen T.

    2009-09-30

    This laboratory-scale project was initiated to investigate in situ abiotic/biotic mineralization of NDMA. Under iron-reducing conditions, aquifer sediments showed rapid abiotic NDMA degradation to dimethylamine (DMA), nitrate, formate, and finally, CO2. These are the first reported experiments of abiotic NDMA mineralization. The NDMA reactivity of these different iron phases showed that adsorbed ferrous iron was the dominant reactive phase that promoted NDMA reduction, and other ferrous phases present (siderite, iron sulfide, magnetite, structural ferrous iron in 2:1 clays) did not promote NDMA degradation. In contrast, oxic sediments that were biostimulated with propane promoted biomineralization of NDMA by a cometabolic monooxygenase enzyme process. Other monooxygenase enzyme processes were not stimulated with methane or toluene additions, and acetylene addition did not block mineralization. Although NDMA mineralization extent was the highest in oxic, biostimulated sediments (30 to 82%, compared to 10 to 26% for abiotic mineralization in reduced sediments), large 1-D column studies (high sediment/water ratio of aquifers) showed 5.6 times higher NDMA mineralization rates in reduced sediment (half-life 410 ± 147 h) than oxic biomineralization (half life 2293 ± 1866 h). Sequential reduced/oxic biostimulated sediment mineralization (half-life 3180 ± 1094 h) was also inefficient compared to reduced sediment. These promising laboratory-scale results for NDMA mineralization should be investigated at field scale. Future studies of NDMA remediation should focus on the comparison of this in situ abiotic NDMA mineralization (iron-reducing environments) to ex situ biomineralization, which has been shown successful in other studies.

  6. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene by sulfidated nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Rajajayavel, Sai Rajasekar C; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2015-07-01

    Direct injection of reactive nanoscale zerovalent iron particles (NZVI) is considered to be a promising approach for remediation of aquifers contaminated by chlorinated organic pollutants. In this study we show that the extent of sulfidation of NZVI enhances the rate of dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) compared to that by unamended NZVI, and the enhancement depends on the Fe/S molar ratio. Experiments where TCE was reacted with NZVI sulfidated to different extents (Fe/S molar ratios 0.62-66) showed that the surface-area normalized first-order TCE degradation rate constant increased up to 40 folds compared to non-sulfidated NZVI. Fe/S ratios in the range of 12-25 provided the highest TCE dechlorination rates, and rates decreased at both higher and lower Fe/S. In contrast, sulfidated NZVI exposed to water in the absence of TCE showed significantly lower hydrogen evolution rate (2.75 μmol L(-1) h(-1)) compared to that by an unamended NZVI (6.92 μmol L(-1) h(-1)), indicating that sulfidation of NZVI suppressed corrosion reactions with water. Sulfide (HS(-)) ions reacted rapidly with NZVI and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed formation of a surface layer of FeS and FeS2. We propose that more electrons are preferentially conducted from sulfidated NZVI than from unamended NZVI to TCE, likely because of greater binding of TCE on the reactive sites of the iron sulfide outer layer. Resuspending sulfidated NZVI in sulfide-free or sulfide containing solutions altered the TCE degradation rate constants because of changes in the FeS layer thickness. Sulfidated NZVI maintained its high reactivity in the presence of multiple mono and divalent ions and with polyelectrolyte coatings. Thus, sulfide ions in groundwater can significantly alter NZVI reactivity.

  7. The Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site (IFC) at Rifle, Colorado: Preliminary Results on Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Iron Reduction and Uranium Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, P. E.; Banfield, J.; Bush, R.; Campbell, K.; Chandler, D. P.; Davis, J. A.; Dayvault, R.; Druhan, J.; Elifantz, H.; Englert, A.; Hettich, R. L.; Holmes, D.; Hubbard, S.; Icenhower, J.; Jaffe, P. R.; Kerkhof, L. J.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Lesher, E.; Lipton, M.; Lovley, D.; Morris, S.; Morrison, S.; Mouser, P.; Newcomer, D.; N'guessan, L.; Peacock, A.; Qafoku, N.; Resch, C. T.; Spane, F.; Spaulding, B.; Steefel, C.; Verberkmoes, N.; Wilkins, M.; Williams, K. H.; Yabusaki, S. B.

    2007-12-01

    The IFC at Rifle, Colorado was recently funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to address knowledge gaps in 1) geochemical and microbial controls on stimulated U(VI) bioreduction by iron-reducers, 2) U(VI) sorption under Fe-reducing conditions, 3) post-biostimulation U(VI) stability and removal, and 4) rates of natural bioreduction of U(VI). The over-arching goal of the project is to develop a mechanistic understanding of bioreductive and abiotic processes that control uranium mobility targeting new knowledge that can be translated into scientifically defensible flow and reactive transport process models. The Rifle IFC will conduct a focused set of field and lab experiments that use recently developed sciences of proteogenomics and stable isotope probing to track microbial metabolic status during acetate amendment. This information will be linked to changes in Fe redox status and sulfide minerals, with field-scale changes detected by non-invasive hydrogeophysics, including 3-D resistivity tomography. A key goal of the project is to combine abiotic sorption processes under reducing conditions with biotic processes controlling U(VI) reduction. The initial field-scale experiment for the Rifle IFC was conducted during the summer of 2007 with the objectives of collecting simultaneous metagenomic and proteomic samples during acetate amendment and to assess the impact of intentionally decreasing electron donor concentration on the metabolic processes of iron reducers. The 2007 experiment replicated previous field experiments, producing dominance of Geobacter sp. in groundwater within 10 days after the start of acetate amendment. The experiment also confirmed the importance of heterogeneities in controlling the flux of electron donor and the impact of naturally reduced zones on the duration of Fe reduction.

  8. Deep reduction behavior of iron oxide and its effect on direct CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Changqing; Liu, Xinglei; Qin, Wu; Lu, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Shi, Simo; Yang, Yongping

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of metal oxide oxygen carrier has been attractive for direct CO oxidation and CO2 separation. To investigate the reduction behaviors of iron oxide prepared by supporting Fe2O3 on γ-Al2O3 and its effect on CO oxidation, fluidized-bed combustion experiments, thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) experiments, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out. Gas yield (γCO2) increases significantly with the increase of temperature from 693 K to 1203 K, while carbon deposition decreases with the increase of temperature from 743 K to 1203 K, where temperature is a very important factor for CO oxidation by iron oxide. Further, it were quantitatively detected that the interaction between CO and Fe2O3, breakage of O-Fe bonds and formation of new C-O bonds, and effect of reduction degree were quantitatively detected. Based on adsorptions under different temperatures and reducing processes from Fe3+ into Fe2+, Fe+ and then into Fe, it was found that Fe2+ → Fe+ was the reaction-controlling step and the high oxidation state of iron is active for CO oxidation, where efficient partial reduction of Fe2O3 into FeO rather than complete reduction into iron may be more energy-saving for CO oxidation.

  9. Sulfate reduction and iron sulfide mineral formation in the southern East China Sea continental slope sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Saulwood; Huang, Kuo-Ming; Chen, Shin-Kuan

    2002-10-01

    Sulfate reduction rate, organic carbon and sulfide burial rate; organic carbon, carbonate carbon, and reactive iron contents; grain size; and sedimentation rate were determined in sediments of the southern East China Sea continental slope. The results show high sulfate reduction and pyrite sulfur burial rates in slope areas with high organic carbon and sedimentation rates. Unusually high rates of organic carbon deposition enhance sulfate reduction and pyrite sulfide burial in the region. Both sulfate reduction rates and pyrite sulfur burial rates increased linearly with increasing organic carbon burial rate, indicating that deposition of organic carbon on the slope is the primary controlling factor for pyrite formation. Abundant reactive iron indicated that iron is not limiting pyrite formation. Pyrite is the predominant sulfide mineral; however, acid volatile sulfide constituted up to 50% of total sulfide at some stations. Up to 240 μmol/g of pyrite sulfur and 5 mmol/m 2/day of sulfate reduction rates were found in the slope sediment. Sulfate reduction rate and pyrite sulfur did not decrease with increasing overlying water depth. High organic carbon burial rates enhanced the sulfate reduction rate and subsequently the rate of pyrite sulfur burial in the slope region. As a result, the southern East China Sea continental slope environment is an efficient pyrite sulfur burial environment.

  10. Mechanism of the reduction of hexavalent chromium by organo-montmorillonite supported iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pingxiao; Li, Shuzhen; Ju, Liting; Zhu, Nengwu; Wu, Jinhua; Li, Ping; Dang, Zhi

    2012-06-15

    Iron nanoparticles exhibit greater reactivity than micro-sized Fe(0), and they impart advantages for groundwater remediation. In this paper, supported iron nanoparticles were synthesized to further enhance the speed and efficiency of remediation. Natural montmorillonite and organo-montmorillonite were chosen as supporting materials. The capacity of supported iron nanoparticles was evaluated, compared to unsupported iron nanoparticles, for the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI). The reduction of Cr(VI) was much greater with organo-montmorillonite supported iron nanoparticles and fitted the pseudo-second order equation better. With a dose at 0.47 g/L, a total removal capacity of 106 mg Cr/g Fe(0) was obtained. Other factors that affect the efficiency of Cr(VI) removal, such as pH values, the initial Cr(VI) concentration and storage time of nanoparticles were investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) were used to figure out the mechanism of the removal of Cr(VI). XPS indicated that the Cr(VI) bound to the particle surface was completely reduced to Cr(III) under a range of conditions. XANES confirmed that the Cr(VI) reacted with iron nanoparticles was completely reduced to Cr(III).

  11. Effects of microbial iron reduction and oxidation on the immobilization and mobilization of copper in synthesized Fe(III) minerals and Fe-rich soils.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chaohua; Zhang, Youchi; Zhang, Lei; Luo, Wensui

    2014-04-01

    The effects of microbial iron reduction and oxidation on the immobilization and mobilization of copper were investigated in a high concentration of sulfate with synthesized Fe(III) minerals and red earth soils rich in amorphous Fe (hydr)oxides. Batch microcosm experiments showed that red earth soil inoculated with subsurface sediments had a faster Fe(III) bioreduction rate than pure amorphous Fe(III) minerals and resulted in quicker immobilization of Cu in the aqueous fraction. Coinciding with the decrease of aqueous Cu, SO4(2-) in the inoculated red earth soil decreased acutely after incubation. The shift in the microbial community composite in the inoculated soil was analyzed through denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Results revealed the potential cooperative effect of microbial Fe(III) reduction and sulfate reduction on copper immobilization. After exposure to air for 144 h, more than 50% of the immobilized Cu was remobilized from the anaerobic matrices; aqueous sulfate increased significantly. Sequential extraction analysis demonstrated that the organic matter/sulfide-bound Cu increased by 52% after anaerobic incubation relative to the abiotic treatment but decreased by 32% after oxidation, indicating the generation and oxidation of Cu-sulfide coprecipitates in the inoculated red earth soil. These findings suggest that the immobilization of copper could be enhanced by mediating microbial Fe(III) reduction with sulfate reduction under anaerobic conditions. The findings have an important implication for bioremediation in Cucontaminated and Fe-rich soils, especially in acid-mine-drainage-affected sites.

  12. Simultaneous reductive dissolution of iron oxide and oxidation of iodide in ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kitae; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-04-01

    Iron is an important trace element controlling the metabolism and growth of all kinds of living species. Especially, the bio-availability of iron has been regarded as the limiting factor for primary productivity in HNLC (High Nutrients Low Chlorophyll) regions including Southern ocean. The dissolution of iron oxide provides enhanced the bio-availability of iron for phytoplankton growth. The halogen chemistry in polar regions is related to various important environmental processes such as Antarctic Ozone Depletion Event(ODE), mercury depletion, oxidative processes in atmosphere, and the formation of CCN (Cloud Condensation Nuclei). In this study, we investigated the reductive dissolution of iron oxide particles to produce Fe(II)aq and simultaneous oxidation of I- (iodide) to I3- (tri-iodide) in ice phase under UV irradiation or dark condition. The reductive generation of Fe(II)aq from iron oxides and oxidation of iodide to I3- were negligible in water but significantly accelerated in frozen solution both in the presence and absence of light. The enhanced reductive generation of Fe(II)aq and oxidative formation of I3- in ice were observed regardless of the various types of iron oxides [hematite (α-Fe2O3) maghemite (γ- Fe2O3), goethite (α-FeOOH), lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and, magnetite (Fe3O4)]. We explained that the enhanced redox production of Fe(II)aq and I3- in ice is contributed to the freeze concentration of iodides, protons, and dissolved oxygen in the unfrozen solution. When the concentration of both iodides and protons were raised by 10-fold each, the formation of Fe(II)aq in water under UV irradiation was approached to those in ice. The outdoor experiments were carried out under ambient solar radiation in winter season of mid-latitude (Pohang, Korea: 36°N latitude) and also confirmed that the production of Fe(II)aq via reductive dissolution of iron oxide and I3- generation via I- oxidation were enhanced in frozen solution. These results suggest that iron

  13. Acetate, lactate, propionate, and isobutyrate as electron donors for iron and sulfate reduction in Arctic marine sediments, Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Finke, Niko; Vandieken, Verona; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2007-01-01

    The contribution of volatile fatty acids (VFA) as e(-)-donors for anaerobic terminal oxidation of organic carbon through iron and sulfate reduction was studied in Arctic fjord sediment. Dissolved inorganic carbon, Fe(2+), VFA concentrations, and sulfate reduction were monitored in slurries from the oxidized (0-2 cm) and the reduced (5-9 cm) zone. In the 0-2 cm layer, 2/3 of the mineralization could be attributed to sulfate reduction and 1/3 to iron reduction. In the 5-9 cm layer, sulfate reduction was the sole mineralization process. Acetate and lactate turnover rates were measured by radiotracer. Inhibition of sulfate reduction with selenate resulted in the accumulation of acetate, propionate, and isobutyrate. The acetate turnover rates determined by radiotracer and accumulation after inhibition were similar. VFA turnover accounted for 21% and 52% of the mineralization through sulfate reduction in the 0-2 and 5-9 cm layer, respectively. Acetate and lactate turnover in the inhibited 0-2 cm slurry was attributed to iron reduction and accounted for 10% and 2% of the iron reduction. Therefore, 88% and 79% of the iron and sulfate reduction in the 0-2 cm layer, respectively, must be fueled by alternative e(-)-donors. The accumulation of VFA in the selenate-inhibited 0-2 cm slurry did not enhance iron reduction, indicating that iron reducers were not limited by VFA availability.

  14. Oxidation of aromatic contaminants coupled to microbial iron reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Baedecker, M.J.; Lonergan, D.J.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Siegel, D.I.

    1989-01-01

    THE contamination of sub-surface water supplies with aromatic compounds is a significant environmental concern1,2. As these contaminated sub-surface environments are generally anaerobic, the microbial oxidation of aromatic compounds coupled to nitrate reduction, sulphate reduction and methane production has been studied intensively1-7. In addition, geochemical evidence suggests that Fe(III) can be an important electron acceptor for the oxidation of aromatic compounds in anaerobic groundwater. Until now, only abiological mechanisms for the oxidation of aromatic compounds with Fe(III) have been reported8-12. Here we show that in aquatic sediments, microbial activity is necessary for the oxidation of model aromatic compounds coupled to Fe(III) reduction. Furthermore, a pure culture of the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium GS-15 can obtain energy for growth by oxidizing benzoate, toluene, phenol or p-cresol with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor. These results extend the known physiological capabilities of Fe(III)-reducing organisms and provide the first example of an organism of any type which can oxidize an aromatic hydrocarbon anaerobically. ?? 1989 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. H{sub 2} from biosyngas via iron reduction and oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Straus, J.; Terry, P.

    1995-09-01

    The production of hydrogen from the steam-oxidation of iron is a long-known phenomenon. The rise in interest in the production and storage of hydrogen justifies the examination of this process (and of the reverse process, the reduction of iron oxide) for commercial use. Under NREL subcontract ZAR-4-13294-02, a process simulation program was developed and used as a design tool to analyze various configurations of the iron-hydrogen purification/storage scheme. Specifically, analyses were performed to determine the effectiveness of this scheme in conjunction with biomass-derived gasified fuel streams (biosyngas). The results of the computer simulations led to a selection of a two-stage iron oxide reduction process incorporating interstage water and CO{sub 2} removal. Thermal analysis shows that the iron-hydrogen process would yield essentially the same quantity of clean hydrogen per unit of biomass as the conventional route. The iron-hydrogen process benefits from the excellent match potentially achievable between the otherwise-unusable energy fraction in the off-gas of the reduction reactor and the parasitic thermal, mechanical and electrical energy needs of some typical gasifier systems. The program simulations and economic analysis suggest that clean hydrogen from biomass feedstock could cost about 20% less via the iron-hydrogen method than by conventional methods of purification (using the same feedstock). Cost analyses show that lower capital costs would be incurred in generating clean hydrogen by utilizing this approach, especially in response to the fluctuating demand profile of a utility.

  16. Abiotic pyrite formation produces a large Fe isotope fractionation.

    PubMed

    Guilbaud, Romain; Butler, Ian B; Ellam, Rob M

    2011-06-24

    The iron isotope composition of sedimentary pyrite has been proposed as a potential proxy to trace microbial metabolism and the redox evolution of the oceans. We demonstrate that Fe isotope fractionation accompanies abiotic pyrite formation in the absence of Fe(II) redox change. Combined fractionation factors between Fe(II)(aq), mackinawite, and pyrite permit the generation of pyrite with Fe isotope signatures that nearly encapsulate the full range of sedimentary δ(56)Fe(pyrite) recorded in Archean to modern sediments. We propose that Archean negative Fe isotope excursions reflect partial Fe(II)(aq) utilization during abiotic pyrite formation rather than microbial dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction. Late Proterozoic to modern sediments may reflect greater Fe(II)(aq) utilization and variations in source composition.

  17. REDUCTION OF AZO DYES WITH ZERO-VALENT IRON. (R827117)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reduction of azo dyes by zero-valent iron metal (Fe0) at pH 7.0 in 10 mM HEPES buffer was studied in aqueous, anaerobic batch systems. Orange II was reduced by cleavage of the azo linkage, as evidenced by the production of sulfanilic acid (a substituted ani...

  18. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part I. Estimation of the rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    A new ironmaking concept using iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets has been proposed, which involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) and an iron bath smelter. This part of the research focuses on studying the two primary chemical kinetic steps. Efforts have been made to experimentally measure the kinetics of the carbon gasification by CO{sub 2} and wustite reduction by CO by isolating them from the influence of heat- and mass-transport steps. A combined reaction model was used to interpret the experimental data and determine the rate constants. Results showed that the reduction is likely to be influenced by the chemical kinetics of both carbon oxidation and wustite reduction at the temperatures of interest. Devolatilized wood-charcoal was observed to be a far more reactive form of carbon in comparison to coal-char. Sintering of the iron-oxide at the high temperatures of interest was found to exert a considerable influence on the reactivity of wustite by virtue of altering the internal pore surface area available for the reaction. Sintering was found to be predominant for highly porous oxides and less of an influence on the denser ores. It was found using an indirect measurement technique that the rate constants for wustite reduction were higher for the porous iron-oxide than dense hematite ore at higher temperatures (> 1423 K). Such an indirect mode of measurement was used to minimize the influence of sintering of the porous oxide at these temperatures.

  19. MASS TRANSPORT EFFECTS ON THE KINETICS OF NITROBENZENE REDUCTION BY IRON METAL. (R827117)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the importance of external mass transport on the overall rates of
    contaminant reduction by iron metal (Fe0), we have compared measured
    rates of surface reaction for nitrobenzene (ArNO2) to estimated rates
    of external mass transport...

  20. A Comparative Study of Iron Uptake Rates and Mechanisms amongst Marine and Fresh Water Cyanobacteria: Prevalence of Reductive Iron Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Hagar; Kranzler, Chana; Keren, Nir; Shaked, Yeala

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution, we address the question of iron bioavailability to cyanobacteria by measuring Fe uptake rates and probing for a reductive uptake pathway in diverse cyanobacterial species. We examined three Fe-substrates: dissolved inorganic iron (Fe') and the Fe-siderophores Ferrioxamine B (FOB) and FeAerobactin (FeAB). In order to compare across substrates and strains, we extracted uptake rate constants (kin = uptake rate/[Fe-substrate]). Fe' was the most bioavailable Fe form to cyanobacteria, with kin values higher than those of other substrates. When accounting for surface area (SA), all strains acquired Fe' at similar rates, as their kin/SA were similar. We also observed homogeneity in the uptake of FOB among strains, but with 10,000 times lower kin/SA values than Fe'. Uniformity in kin/SA suggests similarity in the mechanism of uptake and indeed, all strains were found to employ a reductive step in the uptake of Fe' and FOB. In contrast, different uptake pathways were found for FeAB along with variations in kin/SA. Our data supports the existence of a common reductive Fe uptake pathway amongst cyanobacteria, functioning alone or in addition to siderophore-mediated uptake. Cyanobacteria combining both uptake strategies benefit from increased flexibility in accessing different Fe-substrates. PMID:25768677

  1. Obligatory Reduction of Ferric Chelates in Iron Uptake by Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Chaney, Rufus L.; Brown, John C.; Tiffin, Lee O.

    1972-01-01

    The contrasting Fe2+ and Fe3+ chelating properties of the synthetic chelators ethylenediaminedi (o-hydroxyphenylacetate) (EDDHA) and 4,7-di(4-phenylsulfonate)-1, 10-phenanthroline (bathophenanthrolinedisulfonate) (BPDS) were used to determine the valence form of Fe absorbed by soybean roots supplied with Fe3+-chelates. EDDHA binds Fe3+ strongly, but Fe2+ weakly; BPDS binds Fe2+ strongly but Fe3+ weakly. Addition of an excess of BPDS to nutrient solutions containing Fe3+-chelates inhibited soybean Fe uptake-translocation by 99+%; [Fe(II) (BPDS)3]4− accumulated in the nutrient solution. The addition of EDDHA caused little or no inhibition. These results were observed with topped and intact soybeans. Thus, separation and absorption of Fe from Fe3+-chelates appear to require reduction of Fe3+-chelate to Fe2+-chelate at the root, with Fe2+ being the principal form of Fe absorbed by soybean. PMID:16658143

  2. Rate of the reduction of the iron oxides in red mud by hydrogen and converted gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplov, O. A.; Lainer, Yu. A.

    2013-01-01

    The drying and gas reduction of the iron oxides in the red mud of bauxite processing are studied. It is shown that at most 25% of aluminum oxide are fixed by iron oxides in this red mud, and the other 75% are fixed by sodium aluminosilicates. A software package is developed to calculate the gas reduction of iron oxides, including those in mud. Small hematite samples fully transform into magnetite in hydrogen at a temperature below 300°C and a heating rate of 500 K/h, and complete reduction of magnetite to metallic iron takes place below 420°C. The densification of a thin red mud layer weakly affects the character and temperature range of magnetizing calcination, and the rate of reduction to iron decreases approximately twofold and reduction covers a high-temperature range (above 900°C). The substitution of a converted natural gas for hydrogen results in a certain delay in magnetite formation and an increase in the temperature of the end of reaction to 375°C. In the temperature range 450-550°C, the transformation of hematite into magnetite in red mud pellets 1 cm in diameter in a converted natural gas is 30-90 faster than the reduction of hematite to iron in hydrogen. The hematite-magnetite transformation rate in pellets is almost constant in the temperature range under study, and reduction occurs in a diffusion mode. At a temperature of ˜500°C, the reaction layer thickness of pellets in a shaft process is calculated to be ˜1 m at a converted-gas flow rate of 0.1 m3/(m2 s) and ˜2.5 m at a flow rate of 0.25 m3/(m2 s). The specific capacity of 1 m2 of the shaft cross section under these conditions is 240 and 600 t/day, respectively. The use of low-temperature gas reduction processes is promising for the development of an in situ optimum red mud utilization technology.

  3. Reduction of 1,2-dibromoethane in the presence of zero-valent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, V.K.; Burris, D.R.

    1999-08-01

    The degradation reaction of 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide or EDB) in water was studied in the presence of zero-valent iron (acid-cleaned, cast iron) in well-mixed batch aqueous systems. The observed products were ethylene and bromide ions. Carbon and bromine mass recoveries of >95% were obtained. Bromoethane and vinyl bromide were not observed. The reduction rates of bromoethane and vinyl bromide with iron indicate that they should have been observed if they were significant reaction intermediates for EDB. The results indicate that reductive {beta}-elimination may be the dominant reaction pathway. Reaction kinetics are rapid and pseudo-first order. The activation energy was determined to be 50 kJ/mol, indicating that the reaction rate may not be aqueous phase diffusion controlled but rather controlled by the chemical reaction rate on the iron surface. Metallic iron may be a suitable treatment approach for EDB-contaminated groundwater in above-ground, as well as in situ applications, due to rapid kinetics and nontoxic products.

  4. Effects of Iron and Nitrogen Limitation on Sulfur Isotope Fractionation during Microbial Sulfate Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Shuhei; Bosak, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing microbes utilize sulfate as an electron acceptor and produce sulfide that is depleted in heavy isotopes of sulfur relative to sulfate. Thus, the distribution of sulfur isotopes in sediments can trace microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), and it also has the potential to reflect the physiology of sulfate-reducing microbes. This study investigates the relationship between the availability of iron and reduced nitrogen and the magnitude of S-isotope fractionation during MSR by a marine sulfate-reducing bacterium, DMSS-1, a Desulfovibrio species, isolated from salt marsh in Cape Cod, MA. Submicromolar levels of iron increase sulfur isotope fractionation by about 50% relative to iron-replete cultures of DMSS-1. Iron-limited cultures also exhibit decreased cytochrome c-to-total protein ratios and cell-specific sulfate reduction rates (csSRR), implying changes in the electron transport chain that couples carbon and sulfur metabolisms. When DMSS-1 fixes nitrogen in ammonium-deficient medium, it also produces larger fractionation, but it occurs at faster csSRRs than in the ammonium-replete control cultures. The energy and reducing power required for nitrogen fixation may be responsible for the reverse trend between S-isotope fractionation and csSRR in this case. Iron deficiency and nitrogen fixation by sulfate-reducing microbes may lead to the large observed S-isotope effects in some euxinic basins and various anoxic sediments. PMID:23001667

  5. Effects of iron and nitrogen limitation on sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Sim, Min Sub; Ono, Shuhei; Bosak, Tanja

    2012-12-01

    Sulfate-reducing microbes utilize sulfate as an electron acceptor and produce sulfide that is depleted in heavy isotopes of sulfur relative to sulfate. Thus, the distribution of sulfur isotopes in sediments can trace microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), and it also has the potential to reflect the physiology of sulfate-reducing microbes. This study investigates the relationship between the availability of iron and reduced nitrogen and the magnitude of S-isotope fractionation during MSR by a marine sulfate-reducing bacterium, DMSS-1, a Desulfovibrio species, isolated from salt marsh in Cape Cod, MA. Submicromolar levels of iron increase sulfur isotope fractionation by about 50% relative to iron-replete cultures of DMSS-1. Iron-limited cultures also exhibit decreased cytochrome c-to-total protein ratios and cell-specific sulfate reduction rates (csSRR), implying changes in the electron transport chain that couples carbon and sulfur metabolisms. When DMSS-1 fixes nitrogen in ammonium-deficient medium, it also produces larger fractionation, but it occurs at faster csSRRs than in the ammonium-replete control cultures. The energy and reducing power required for nitrogen fixation may be responsible for the reverse trend between S-isotope fractionation and csSRR in this case. Iron deficiency and nitrogen fixation by sulfate-reducing microbes may lead to the large observed S-isotope effects in some euxinic basins and various anoxic sediments.

  6. Reduction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Zero-Valent Iron and Palladium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Hun; Shin, Won Sik; Ko, Seok-Oh; Kim, Myung-Chul

    2004-03-31

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is an alternative technology for soil and groundwater remediation. Zero valent iron, which is the most popular PRB material, is only applicable to halogenated aliphatic organics and some heavy metals. The objective of this study was to investigate reductive dechlorination of halogenated compounds and reduction of non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons using zero valent metals (ZVMs) and catalysts as reactive materials for PRBs. A group of small aromatic hydrocarbons such as monochlorophenols, phenol and benzene were readily reduced with palladium catalyst and zero valent iron. Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also tested with the catalysts and zero valent metal combinations. The aromatic rings were reduced and partly reduced PAHs were found as the daughter compounds. The current study demonstrates reduction of aromatic compounds by ZVMs and modified catalysts and implicates that PRB is applicable not only for halogenated organic compounds but nonhalogenated aromatic compounds such as PAHs.

  7. Reductive Dechlorination of Trichloroethene by Zero-valent Iron Nanoparticles: Reactivity Enhancement through Sulfidation Treatment.

    PubMed

    Han, Yanlai; Yan, Weile

    2016-12-06

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) synthesized in the presence of reduced sulfur compounds have been shown to degrade trichloroethene (TCE) at significantly higher rates. However, the applicability of sulfidation as a general means to enhance nZVI reactivity under different particle preparation conditions and the underlying cause for this enhancement effect are not well understood. In this study, the effects of sulfidation reagent, time point of sulfidation, and sulfur loading on the resultant particles were assessed through TCE degradation experiments. Up to 60-fold increase in TCE reaction rates was observed upon sulfidation treatment, with products being fully dechlorinated hydrocarbons. While the reactivity of these sulfur-treated nZVI (S-nZVI) was relatively unaffected by the sulfidation reagent (viz., sodium sulfide, dithionite, or thiosulfate) or the sequence of sulfidation relative to iron reduction, TCE reaction rates were found to depend strongly on sulfur to iron ratio. At a low sulfur loading, TCE degradation was accelerated with increasing sulfur dose. The rate constant reached a limiting value, however, as the sulfur to iron mole ratio was greater than 0.025. Different from previous propositions that iron sulfidation leads to more efficient TCE or tetrachloroethene (PCE) degradation by enabling depassivation of iron surface, affording catalytic pathways, or facilitating electron transfer, we show that the role of sulfur in nZVI lies essentially in its ability to poison hydrogen recombination, which drives surface reactions to favor reduction by atomic hydrogen. This implies that the reactivity of S-nZVI is contaminant-specific and is selective against the background reaction of water reduction. As the effect of sulfur manifests through surface processes, sulfidation represents a broadly applicable surface modification approach to modulate or increase the reactivity of nZVI for treating TCE and other related contaminants.

  8. Thermodynamic estimation on the reduction behavior of iron-chromium ore with carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Mitsutaka; Higuchi, Kenichi; Nagasaka, Tetsuya; Banya, Shiro

    1998-04-01

    Recently, a number of efforts have been made to produce a crude stainless steel melt by direct smelting of iron-chromium ore in a basic oxygen furnace (BOF) without use of ferrochromium alloys, in order to save electric energy and production costs. In this paper, the thermodynamics for reduction of iron-chromium ore by carbon is discussed. The thermodynamic properties of iron-chromium ore were evaluated from previous work on the activities of constituents in the FeO {center_dot} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-MgO {center_dot} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-MgO {center_dot} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} iron-chromite spinel-structure solid solution saturated with (Cr, Al){sub 2}O{sub 3}, and those of the Fe-Cr-C alloy were estimated by a sublattice model. The stability diagrams were drawn for carbon reduction of pure FeO {center_dot} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (Fe{sub 0.5}Mg{sub 0.5})O {center_dot} (Cr{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.2}){sub 2}O{sub 3} iron-chromite solid solution, and South African iron-chromium ore. The evaluated stability diagrams agreed well with the literature data. It was concluded that the lowest temperature for reduction of FeO {center_dot} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the iron-chromium ore was 1390 K and a temperature higher than 1470 K would be necessary to reduce Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in MgO {center_dot} (Cr,Al){sub 2}O{sub 3} in the prereduction process of iron-chromium ore. The composition of liquid Fe-Cr-C alloy in equilibrium with iron-chromium ore was also estimated under 1 atm of CO at steelmaking temperature. The predicted metal composition showed reasonable agreement with the literature values.

  9. An iron-iron hydrogenase mimic with appended electron reservoir for efficient proton reduction in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Becker, René; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Li, Ping; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N H

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy requires cheap and abundant, yet stable and efficient, hydrogen production catalysts. Nature shows the potential of iron-based catalysts such as the iron-iron hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, which catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rates similar to platinum with low overpotential. However, existing synthetic H2ase mimics generally suffer from low efficiency and oxygen sensitivity and generally operate in organic solvents. We report on a synthetic H2ase mimic that contains a redox-active phosphole ligand as an electron reservoir, a feature that is also crucial for the working of the natural enzyme. Using a combination of (spectro)electrochemistry and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, we elucidate the unique redox behavior of the catalyst. We find that the electron reservoir actively partakes in the reduction of protons and that its electron-rich redox states are stabilized through ligand protonation. In dilute sulfuric acid, the catalyst has a turnover frequency of 7.0 × 10(4) s(-1) at an overpotential of 0.66 V. This catalyst is tolerant to the presence of oxygen, thereby paving the way for a new generation of synthetic H2ase mimics that combine the benefits of the enzyme with synthetic versatility and improved stability.

  10. An iron-iron hydrogenase mimic with appended electron reservoir for efficient proton reduction in aqueous media

    PubMed Central

    Becker, René; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Li, Ping; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N. H.

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy requires cheap and abundant, yet stable and efficient, hydrogen production catalysts. Nature shows the potential of iron-based catalysts such as the iron-iron hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, which catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rates similar to platinum with low overpotential. However, existing synthetic H2ase mimics generally suffer from low efficiency and oxygen sensitivity and generally operate in organic solvents. We report on a synthetic H2ase mimic that contains a redox-active phosphole ligand as an electron reservoir, a feature that is also crucial for the working of the natural enzyme. Using a combination of (spectro)electrochemistry and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, we elucidate the unique redox behavior of the catalyst. We find that the electron reservoir actively partakes in the reduction of protons and that its electron-rich redox states are stabilized through ligand protonation. In dilute sulfuric acid, the catalyst has a turnover frequency of 7.0 × 104 s−1 at an overpotential of 0.66 V. This catalyst is tolerant to the presence of oxygen, thereby paving the way for a new generation of synthetic H2ase mimics that combine the benefits of the enzyme with synthetic versatility and improved stability. PMID:26844297

  11. Ammonia from iron(II) reduction of nitrite and the Strecker synthesis: do iron(II) and cyanide interfere with each other?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, D. P.; Lerner, N.

    1998-01-01

    The question of whether the production of ammonia, from the reduction of nitrite by iron(II), is compatible with its use in the Strecker synthesis of amino acids, or whether the iron and the cyanide needed for the Strecker synthesis interfere with each other, is addressed. Results show that the presence of iron(II) appears to have little, or no, effect on the Strecker synthesis. The presence of cyanide does interfere with reduction of nitrite, but the reduction proceeds at cyanide/iron ratios of less than 4:1. At ratios of about 2:1 and less there is only a small effect. The reduction of nitrite and the Strecker can be combined to proceed in each other's presence, to yield glycine from a mixture of nitrite, Fe+2, formaldehyde, and cyanide.

  12. Phosphane-free green protocol for selective nitro reduction with an iron-based catalyst.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Upendra; Verma, Praveen Kumar; Kumar, Neeraj; Kumar, Vishal; Bala, Manju; Singh, Bikram

    2011-05-16

    Iron phthalocyanine with iron sulfate has been successfully applied for high chemo- and regioselective reduction of aromatic nitro compounds to give the corresponding amines in a green solvent system without using any toxic ligand. The catalytic systems were also compatible with a large range of other reducible functional groups, such as keto, acid, amide, ester, halogen, lactone, nitrile, N-benzyl, O-benzyl, hydroxy, and heterocycles. In the present study, dinitro compounds have been regioselectively reduced to the corresponding amines with high yield. In most of the cases the conversion and selectivity was greater than 99% as determined by GC-MS analysis.

  13. Technetium Reduction in Sediments of a Shallow Aquifer Exhibiting Dissimilatory Iron Reduction Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Wildung, Raymond E.; Li, Shu-Mei W.; Murray, Christopher J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Xie, YuLong; Hess, Nancy J.; Roden, Eric E.

    2004-07-01

    Pertechnetate ion [Tc(VII)O4-] reduction rate was determined in core samples from a shallow sandy aquifer located on the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain. The aquifer is generally low in dissolved O2 (<1 mg L-1) and composed of weakly indurated late Pleistocene sediments differing markedly in physicochemical properties. Thermodynamic calculations, x-ray absorption spectroscopy and statistical analyses were used to establish the dominant reduction mechanisms, constraints on Tc solubility, and the oxidation state, and speciation of sediment reduction products. The extent of Tc(VII) reduction differed markedly between sediments (ranging from 0 % to 100% after 10 days of equilibration), with low solubility Tc(IV) hydrous oxide the major solid phase reduction product. The dominant electron donor in the sediments proved to be (0.5M HCl extractable) Fe(II). Sediment Fe(II)/Tc(VII) concentrations >4.3 were generally sufficient for complete reduction of Tc(VII) added [1-2.5 mmol (dry wt. sediment) g-1]. At these Fe(II) concentrations, the Tc (VII) reduction rate exceeded that observed previously for Fe(II)-mediated reduction on isolated solids of geologic or biogenic origin, suggesting that sediment Fe(II) was either more reactive and/or that electron shuttles played a role in sediment Tc(VII) reduction processes. In buried peats, Fe(II) in excess did not result in complete Tc(VII) reduction, perhaps because organic complexation of Tc(IV) limited formation of the Tc(IV) hydrous oxide. In some sands exhibiting Fe(II)/Tc(VII) concentrations <1.1, there was presumptive evidence for direct enzymatic reduction of Tc(VII). Addition of organic electron donors (acetate, lactate) resulted in microbial reduction of (up to 35%) Fe(III) and corresponding increases in extractable Fe(II) in sands that exhibited lowest initial Tc(VII) reduction and highest hydraulic conductivities, suggesting that accelerated microbial reduction of Fe(III) could offer a viable means of attenuating mobile Tc

  14. Landfill-stimulated iron reduction and arsenic release at the Coakley Superfund Site (NH).

    PubMed

    deLemos, Jamie L; Bostick, Benjamin C; Renshaw, Carl E; Stürup, Stefan; Feng, Xiahong

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic is a contaminant at more than one-third of all Superfund Sites in the United States. Frequently this contamination appearsto resultfrom geochemical processes rather than the presence of a well-defined arsenic source. Here we examine the geochemical processes that regulate arsenic levels at the Coakley Landfill Superfund Site (NH), a site contaminated with As, Cr, Pb, Ni, Zn, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Long-term field observations indicate that the concentrations of most of these contaminants have diminished as a result of treatment by monitored natural attenuation begun in 1998; however, dissolved arsenic levels increased modestly over the same interval. We attribute this increase to the reductive release of arsenic associated with poorly crystalline iron hydroxides within a glaciomarine clay layer within the overburden underlying the former landfill. Anaerobic batch incubations that stimulated iron reduction in the glaciomarine clay released appreciable dissolved arsenic and iron. Field observations also suggest that iron reduction associated with biodegradation of organic waste are partly responsible for arsenic release; over the five-year study period since a cap was emplaced to prevent water flow through the site, decreases in groundwater dissolved benzene concentrations at the landfill are correlated with increases in dissolved arsenic concentrations, consistent with the microbial decomposition of both benzene and other organics, and reduction of arsenic-bearing iron oxides. Treatment of contaminated groundwater increasingly is based on stimulating natural biogeochemical processes to degrade the contaminants. These results indicate that reducing environments created within organic contaminant plumes may release arsenic. In fact, the strong correlation (>80%) between elevated arsenic levels and organic contamination in groundwater systems at Superfund Sites across the United States suggests that arsenic contamination caused by natural degradation of

  15. Technetium reduction in sediments of a shallow aquifer exhibiting dissimilatory iron reduction potential.

    PubMed

    Wildung, R E; Li, S W; Murray, C J; Krupka, K M; Xie, Y; Hess, N J; Roden, E E

    2004-07-01

    Pertechnetate ion [Tc(VII)O(4) (-)] reduction rate was determined in core samples from a shallow sandy aquifer located on the US Atlantic Coastal Plain. The aquifer is generally low in dissolved O(2) (<1 mg L(-1)) and composed of weakly indurated late Pleistocene sediments differing markedly in physicochemical properties. Thermodynamic calculations, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and statistical analyses were used to establish the dominant reduction mechanisms, constraints on Tc solubility, and the oxidation state, and speciation of sediment reduction products. The extent of Tc(VII) reduction differed markedly between sediments (ranging from 0% to 100% after 10 days of equilibration), with low solubility Tc(IV) hydrous oxide the major solid phase reduction product. The dominant electron donor in the sediments proved to be (0.5 M HCl extractable) Fe(II). Sediment Fe(II)/Tc(VII) concentrations >4.3 were generally sufficient for complete reduction of Tc(VII) added [1-2.5 micromol (dry wt. sediment) g(-1)]. At these Fe(II) concentrations, the Tc (VII) reduction rate exceeded that observed previously for Fe(II)-mediated reduction on isolated solids of geologic or biogenic origin, suggesting that sediment Fe(II) was either more reactive and/or that electron shuttles played a role in sediment Tc(VII) reduction processes. In buried peats, Fe(II) in excess did not result in complete removal of Tc from solution, perhaps because organic complexation of Tc(IV) limited formation of the Tc(IV) hydrous oxide. In some sands exhibiting Fe(II)/Tc(VII) concentrations <1.1, there was presumptive evidence for direct enzymatic reduction of Tc(VII). Addition of organic electron donors (acetate, lactate) resulted in microbial reduction of (up to 35%) Fe(III) and corresponding increases in extractable Fe(II) in sands that exhibited lowest initial Tc(VII) reduction and highest hydraulic conductivities, suggesting that accelerated microbial reduction of Fe(III) could offer a viable means of

  16. Isolation of microorganisms involved in reduction of crystalline iron(III) oxides in natural environments

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomoyuki; Aoyagi, Tomo; Itoh, Hideomi; Narihiro, Takashi; Oikawa, Azusa; Suzuki, Kiyofumi; Ogata, Atsushi; Friedrich, Michael W.; Conrad, Ralf; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of crystalline Fe(III) oxides is one of the most important electron sinks for organic compound oxidation in natural environments. Yet the limited number of isolates makes it difficult to understand the physiology and ecological impact of the microorganisms involved. Here, two-stage cultivation was implemented to selectively enrich and isolate crystalline iron(III) oxide reducing microorganisms in soils and sediments. Firstly, iron reducers were enriched and other untargeted eutrophs were depleted by 2-years successive culture on a crystalline ferric iron oxide (i.e., goethite, lepidocrocite, hematite, or magnetite) as electron acceptor. Fifty-eight out of 136 incubation conditions allowed the continued existence of microorganisms as confirmed by PCR amplification. High-throughput Illumina sequencing and clone library analysis based on 16S rRNA genes revealed that the enrichment cultures on each of the ferric iron oxides contained bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria (mainly Geobacteraceae), followed by Firmicutes and Chloroflexi, which also comprised most of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified. Venn diagrams indicated that the core OTUs enriched with all of the iron oxides were dominant in the Geobacteraceae while each type of iron oxides supplemented selectively enriched specific OTUs in the other phylogenetic groups. Secondly, 38 enrichment cultures including novel microorganisms were transferred to soluble-iron(III) containing media in order to stimulate the proliferation of the enriched iron reducers. Through extinction dilution-culture and single colony isolation, six strains within the Deltaproteobacteria were finally obtained; five strains belonged to the genus Geobacter and one strain to Pelobacter. The 16S rRNA genes of these isolates were 94.8–98.1% identical in sequence to cultured relatives. All the isolates were able to grow on acetate and ferric iron but their physiological characteristics differed considerably in

  17. Reduction of copper sulphate with elemental iron for preparation of copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazim, Muhammad

    Reduction of copper sulphate with elemental iron also known as cementation is a well known process used for the recovery of copper for a long time. In this study, the kinetics of the reaction of copper sulphate with iron wire and iron powder has been investigated. The reaction kinetics was studied as a function of different process parameters such as initial concentration, temperature and pH. In this research work, the effects of the above three parameters were studied for both types of iron substrates. It was found that with the iron wire the reaction obeys first order kinetics with respect to copper concentration whereas with the iron powder the order was found to be 1.5. The initial concentration was found to have considerable effect on the reaction kinetics of copper sulphate with elemental iron. The rate of reaction increases with an increase in the initial copper concentration up to a certain level and then decreases for the case of iron wire. However, for the reaction of copper sulphate with iron powder, the reaction rate decreases with an increase in the initial copper concentration. The effect of temperature on the reaction rate of copper sulphate for both types iron substrates (iron wire and iron powder) has also been studied in the temperature range of 23-54ºC. In both the cases, the reaction rate increases with an increase in temperature according to Arrhenius law. The activation energy for the reactions of copper sulphate with iron wire and iron powder was found to be 25.36 kJ/mol and 26.32 kJ/mol, respectively. The copper cementation reaction was found to be suitable to operate at a pH of 2.5-3 for iron wire and a pH of 3-4 for iron powder considering possible inhibition by copper hydroxyl complex formation at higher pH and the possible excess iron consumption by hydrogen reduction at lower pH. The copper particles were produced by the reduction of copper sulphate with elemental iron. The produced copper particles were obtained in the micro to nano

  18. Dissimilatory Iron Reduction and Odor Indicator Abatement by Biofilm Communities in Swine Manure Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Gonzalez, Hugo A.; Bruns, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    Animal waste odors arising from products of anaerobic microbial metabolism create community relations problems for livestock producers. We investigated a novel approach to swine waste odor reduction: the addition of FeCl3, a commonly used coagulant in municipal wastewater treatment, to stimulate degradation of odorous compounds by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB). Two hypotheses were tested: (i) FeCl3 is an effective source of redox-active ferric iron (Fe3+) for dissimilatory reduction by bacteria indigenous to swine manure, and (ii) dissimilatory iron reduction results in significant degradation of odorous compounds within 7 days. Our results demonstrated that Fe3+ from FeCl3 was reduced biologically as well as chemically in laboratory microcosms prepared with prefiltered swine manure slurry and limestone gravel, which provided pH buffering and a substrate for microbial biofilm development. Addition of a 1-g liter−1 equivalent concentration of Fe3+ from FeCl3, but not from presynthesized ferrihydrite, caused initial, rapid solids flocculation, chemical Fe3+ reduction, and Eh increase, followed by a 2-day lag period. Between 2 and 6 days of incubation, increases in Fe2+ concentrations were accompanied by significant reductions in concentrations of volatile fatty acids used as odor indicators. Increases in Fe2+ concentrations between 2 and 6 days did not occur in FeCl3-treated microcosms that were sterilized by gamma irradiation or amended with NaN3, a respiratory inhibitor. DNA sequences obtained from rRNA gene amplicons of bacterial communities in FeCl3-treated microcosms were closely related to Desulfitobacterium spp., which are known representatives of DIRB. Use of iron respiration to abate wastewater odors warrants further investigation. PMID:16151075

  19. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  20. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, B.; Andrew, J. S.; Arnold, D. P.

    2017-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain ( 100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe66Co34) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  1. Reduction and Immobilization of Radionuclides and Toxic Metal Ions Using Combined Zero Valent Iron and Anaerobic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lenly J. Weathers; Lynn E. Katz

    2002-05-29

    The use of zero valent iron, permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater remediation continues to increase. AN exciting variation of this technology involves introducing anaerobic bacteria into these barriers so that both biological and abiotic pollutant removal processes are functional. This work evaluated the hypothesis that a system combining a mixed culture of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) with zero valent iron would have a greater cr(VI) removal efficiency and a greater total Cr(VI) removal capacity than a zero valent iron system without the microorganisms. Hence, the overall goal of this research was to compare the performance of these types of systems with regard to their Cr(VI) removal efficiency and total Cr(VI) removal capacity. Both batch and continuous flow reactor systems were evaluated.

  2. Final Report for "Toward Quantifying Kinetics of Biotic and Abiotic Metal Reduction with Electrical Geophysical Methods" DE-FG02-08ER64520

    SciTech Connect

    Singha, Kamini; Brantley, Susan

    2012-06-07

    Although changes in the bulk electrical conductivity in aquifers have been attributed to microbial activity, electrical conductivity has never been used to infer biogeochemical reaction rates quantitatively. To explore the use of electrical conductivity to measure reaction rates, we conducted iron oxide reduction experiments of increasing biological complexity. To quantify reaction rates, we proposed composite reactions that incorporated the stiochiometry of five different types of reactions: redox, acid-based, sorption, dissolution/precipitation, and biosynthesis. In batch and column experiments, such reaction stiochiometries inferred from a few chemical measurements allowed quantification of the Fe-oxide reduction rate based on changes in electrical conductivity. The relationship between electrical conductivity and fluid chemistry did not hold during the latter stages of the column experiment when electrical conductivity increased while fluid chemistry remained constant. Growth of an electrically conductive biofilm could explain this late stage electrical conductivity increase. This work demonstrates that measurements of electrical conductivity and flow rate, combined with a few direct chemical measurements, can be used to quantify biogeochemical reaction rates in controlled laboratory situations and may be able to detect the presence of biofilms.

  3. Mössbauer study of carbon coated iron magnetic nanoparticles produced by simultaneous reduction/pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Fernanda G.; Ardisson, José D.; Rosmaninho, Marcelo G.; Lago, Rochel M.; Tristão, Juliana C.

    2011-11-01

    Magnetic iron nanoparticles immersed in a carbon matrix were produced by a combined process of controlled dispersion of Fe3 + ions in sucrose, thermal decomposition with simultaneous reduction of iron cores and the formation of the porous carbonaceous matrix. The materials were prepared with iron contents of 1, 4 and 8 in %wt in sucrose and heated at 400, 600 and 800°. The samples were analyzed by XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization measurements, TG, SEM and TEM. The materials prepared at 400° are composed essentially of Fe3O4 particles and carbon, while treatments at higher temperatures, e.g. 600 and 800° produced as main phases Fe0 and Fe3C. The Mössbauer spectra of samples heated at 400° showed two sextets characteristic of a magnetite phase and other contributions compatible with Fe3 + and Fe2 + phases in a carbonaceous matrix. Samples treated at temperatures above 600° showed the presence of metallic iron with concentrations between 16-43%. The samples heated at 800° produced higher amounts of Fe3C (between 20% and 58%). SEM showed for the iron 8% sample treated at 600-800°C particle sizes smaller than 50 nm. Due to the presence of Fe0 particles in the carbonaceous porous matrix the materials have great potential for application as magnetic adsorbents.

  4. Ammonia from Iron(II) Reduction of Nitrite and the Strecker Synthesis: Do Iron(II) and Cyanide Interfere with Each Other?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.; Lerner, Narcinda; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether the production of ammonia, from the reduction of nitrite by iron(II), is compatible with its use in the Strecker synthesis of amino acids, or whether the iron and the cyanide needed for the Strecker synthesis interfere with each other, is addressed. Results show that the presence of iron(II) appears to have little, or no, affect on the Strecker synthesis. The presence of cyanide does interfere with reduction of nitrite, but the reduction proceeds at cyanide/iron ratios of less than 4:1. At ratios of about 2:1 and less there is only a small effect. The two reactions can be combined to proceed in each other's presence, forming glycine from nitrite, Fe(+2), formaldehyde, and cyanide.

  5. Hematite Reduction Buffers Acid Generation and Enhances Nutrient Uptake by a Fermentative Iron Reducing Bacterium, Orenia metallireducens Strain Z6.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yiran; Sanford, Robert A; Chang, Yun-Juan; McInerney, Michael J; Fouke, Bruce W

    2017-01-03

    Fermentative iron-reducing organisms have been identified in a variety of environments. Instead of coupling iron reduction to respiration, they have been consistently observed to use ferric iron minerals as an electron sink for fermentation. In the present study, a fermentative iron reducer, Orenia metallireducens strain Z6, was shown to use iron reduction to enhance fermentation not only by consuming electron equivalents, but also by generating alkalinity that effectively buffers the pH. Fermentation of glucose by this organism in the presence of a ferric oxide mineral, hematite (Fe2O3), resulted in enhanced glucose decomposition compared with fermentation in the absence of an iron source. Parallel evidence (i.e., genomic reconstruction, metabolomics, thermodynamic analyses, and calculation of electron transfer) suggested hematite reduction as a proton-consuming reaction effectively consumed acid produced by fermentation. The buffering effect of hematite was further supported by a greater extent of glucose utilization by strain Z6 in media with increasing buffer capacity. Such maintenance of a stable pH through hematite reduction for enhanced glucose fermentation complements the thermodynamic interpretation of interactions between microbial iron reduction and other biogeochemical processes. This newly discovered feature of iron reducer metabolism also has significant implications for groundwater management and contaminant remediation by providing microbially mediated buffering systems for the associated microbial and/or chemical reactions.

  6. Synergistic iron reduction and citrate dissimilation by Shewanella alga and Aeromonas veronii

    PubMed

    Knight; Caccavo; Wudyka; Blakemore

    1996-10-17

    Two bacterial isolates from Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire, in co-culture carried out anaerobic dissimilation of citric acid with Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor. Neither isolate oxidized citrate with Fe(III) anaerobically in axenic culture. The Fe(III) reducer, Shewanella alga strain BrY, did not grow anaerobically with citrate as an energy source. The citrate utilizer, Aeromonas veronii, did not reduce iron axenically with a variety of electron donors including citrate. The onset of iron reduction by the co-culture occurred after initiation of citrate dissimilation and just prior to initiation of growth by either organism (as measured by viable plate counts). Anaerobic culture growth rates and final cell densities of each bacterial strain were greater in co-culture than in axenic cultures. By 48 h of growth, the co-culture had consumed 27 mM citrate as compared with 12 mM dissimilated by the axenic culture of A. veronii. By 48 h the co-culture produced half as much formate (6 mM) and twice as much acetate (40 mM) as did A. veronii grown axenically (12 mM and 20 mM, respectively). Formate produced from citrate by A. veronii appeared to have supported growth and Fe(III) reduction by S. alga.Although not obligatory, nutrient coupling between these two organisms illustrates that fermentative (A. veronii-type) organisms can convert organic compounds such as citrate to those used as substrates by dissimilatory Fe(III) reducers, including S. alga. This synergism broadens the range of substrates available for iron reduction, stimulates the extent and rate of organic electron donor degradation (and that of iron reduction) and enhances the growth of each participant.

  7. Bioinhibitory effect of hydrogenotrophic bacteria on nitrate reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    An, Yi; Dong, Qi; Zhang, Keqiang

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogenotrophic bacteria (HTB) were introduced into a nitrate removal system, which used nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) as reductant, to investigate its bioinhibitory effect. Based on the results, it was noted that addition of HTB culture (10-50 mL) led to 58.9-91.4% decrease in the first observed rate constant (kobs1), which represented the nitrate removal rate by nZVI, and a reduction in the generated poisonous by-products from 94.9% to 38.5%. In other words, HTB had a significant inhibitory effect on nitrate reduction by nZVI. However, the pathway of this bioinhibition only prevented the occurrence of chemical reduction, but not competition for nitrate. Furthermore, FeOOH coating was observed on the surface of nZVI, instead of Fe3O4 or Fe2O3, which could prevent electron transmission from nZVI to nitrate. Considering that FeOOH was the product of iron corrosion, the result indicated that HTB could inhibit chemical reduction by enhancing the reaction between nZVI and water.

  8. Enhanced Yields of Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria by In Situ Electrochemical Reduction of Soluble Iron in the Growth Medium

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Robert C.; Howard, Gary T.; McGinness, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    An electrochemical apparatus for culturing chemolithotrophic bacteria that respire aerobically on ferrous ions is described. Enhanced yields of the bacteria were achieved by the in situ electrochemical reduction of soluble iron in the growth medium. When subjected to a direct current of 30 A for 60 days, a 45-liter culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans grew from 6 × 107 to 9.5 × 109 cells per ml. Growth of the bacterium within the electrolytic bioreactor was linear with time. A final cell density corresponding to 4.7 g of wet cell paste per liter was achieved, and a total of 320 g of wet cell paste was harvested from one culture. The apparatus was designed to deliver protons concomitantly with electrons; therefore, the pH of the culture remained stable at 1.6 ± 0.1 for the duration of growth. This laboratory-scale apparatus may be readily adapted to pilot or production scale. It is thus anticipated that abundant numbers of iron-oxidizing bacteria may be obtained for both fundamental and applied studies. PMID:16349344

  9. Oxygen isotope fractionation of dissolved oxygen during reduction by ferrous iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Poulson, Simon R.

    2009-01-01

    The oxygen isotope fractionation factor of dissolved oxygen gas has been measured during inorganic reduction by aqueous FeSO 4 at 10-54 °C under neutral (pH 7) and acidic (pH 2) conditions, with Fe(II) concentrations ranging up to 0.67 mol L -1, in order to better understand the geochemical behavior of oxygen in ferrous iron-rich groundwater and acidic mine pit lakes. The rate of oxygen reduction increased with increasing temperature and increasing Fe(II) concentration, with the pseudo-first-order rate constant k ranging from 2.3 to 82.9 × 10 -6 s -1 under neutral conditions and 2.1 to 37.4 × 10 -7 s -1 under acidic conditions. The activation energy of oxygen reduction was 30.9 ± 6.6 kJ mol -1 and 49.7 ± 13.0 kJ mol -1 under neutral and acidic conditions, respectively. Oxygen isotope enrichment factors ( ɛ) become smaller with increasing temperature, increasing ferrous iron concentration, and increasing reaction rate under acidic conditions, with ɛ values ranging from -4.5‰ to -11.6‰. Under neutral conditions, ɛ does not show any systematic trends vs. temperature or ferrous iron concentration, with ɛ values ranging from -7.3 to -10.3‰. Characterization of the oxygen isotope fractionation factor associated with O 2 reduction by Fe(II) will have application to elucidating the process or processes responsible for oxygen consumption in environments such as groundwater and acidic mine pit lakes, where a number of possible processes (e.g. biological respiration, reduction by reduced species) may have taken place.

  10. Nickel and iron pincer complexes as catalysts for the reduction of carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sumit; Bhattacharya, Papri; Dai, Huiguang; Guan, Hairong

    2015-07-21

    The reductions of aldehydes, ketones, and esters to alcohols are important processes for the synthesis of chemicals that are vital to our daily life, and the reduction of CO2 to methanol is expected to provide key technology for carbon management and energy storage in our future. Catalysts that affect the reduction of carbonyl compounds often contain ruthenium, osmium, or other precious metals. The high and fluctuating price, and the limited availability of these metals, calls for efforts to develop catalysts based on more abundant and less expensive first-row transition metals, such as nickel and iron. The challenge, however, is to identify ligand systems that can increase the thermal stability of the catalysts, enhance their reactivity, and bypass the one-electron pathways that are commonly observed for first-row transition metal complexes. Although many other strategies exist, this Account describes how we have utilized pincer ligands along with other ancillary ligands to accomplish these goals. The bis(phosphinite)-based pincer ligands (also known as POCOP-pincer ligands) create well-defined nickel hydride complexes as efficient catalysts for the hydrosilylation of aldehydes and ketones and the hydroboration of CO2 to methanol derivatives. The hydride ligands in these complexes are substantially nucleophilic, largely due to the enhancement by the strongly trans-influencing aryl groups. Under the same principle, the pincer-ligated nickel cyanomethyl complexes exhibit remarkably high activity (turnover numbers up to 82,000) for catalytically activating acetonitrile and the addition of H-CH2CN across the C═O bonds of aldehydes without requiring a base additive. Cyclometalation of bis(phosphinite)-based pincer ligands with low-valent iron species "Fe(PR3)4" results in diamagnetic Fe(II) hydride complexes, which are active catalysts for the hydrosilylation of aldehydes and ketones. Mechanistic investigation suggests that the hydride ligand is not delivered to the

  11. Changes in Iron, Sulfur, and Arsenic Speciation Associated with Bacterial Sulfate Reduction in Ferrihydrite-Rich Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saalfield, S.; Bostick, B

    2009-01-01

    Biologically mediated redox processes have been shown to affect the mobility of iron oxide-bound arsenic in reducing aquifers. This work investigates how dissimilatory sulfate reduction and secondary iron reduction affect sulfur, iron, and arsenic speciation. Incubation experiments were conducted with As(III/V)-bearing ferrihydrite in carbonate-buffered artificial groundwater enriched with lactate (10 mM) and sulfate (0.08-10 mM) and inoculated with Desulfovibrio vulgaris (ATCC 7757, formerly D. desulfuricans), which reduces sulfate but not iron or arsenic. Sulfidization of ferrihydrite led to formation of magnetite, elemental sulfur, and trace iron sulfides. Observed reaction rates imply that the majority of sulfide is recycled to sulfate, promoting microbial sulfate reduction in low-sulfate systems. Despite dramatic changes in Fe and S speciation, and minimal formation of Fe or As sulfides, most As remained in the solid phase. Arsenic was not solubilized in As(V)-loaded incubations, which experienced slow As reduction by sulfide, whereas As(III)-loaded incubations showed limited and transient As release associated with iron remineralization. This suggests that As(III) production is critical to As release under reducing conditions, with sulfate reduction alone unlikely to release As. These data also suggest that bacterial reduction of As(V) is necessary for As sequestration in sulfides, even where sulfate reduction is active.

  12. Utilization of waste polyethylene terephthalate as a reducing agent in the reduction of iron ore composite pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Gökhan; Birol, Burak; Sarıdede, Muhlis Nezihi

    2014-08-01

    The increasing consumption of plastics inevitably results in increasing amounts of waste plastics. Because of their long degradation periods, these wastes negatively affect the natural environment. Numerous studies have been conducted to recycle and eliminate waste plastics. The potential for recycling waste plastics in the iron and steel industry has been underestimated; the high C and H contents of plastics may make them suitable as alternative reductants in the reduction process of iron ore. This study aims to substitute plastic wastes for coal in reduction melting process and to investigate their performance during reduction at high temperature. We used a common type of waste plastic, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), because of its high carbon and hydrogen contents. Composite pellets containing PET wastes, coke, and magnetite iron ore were reduced at selected temperatures of 1400 and 1450°C for reduction time from 2 to 10 min to investigate the reduction melting behavior of these pellets. The results showed that an increased temperature and reduction time increased the reduction ratio of the pellets. The optimum experimental conditions for obtaining metallic iron (iron nuggets) were reduction at 1450°C for 10 min using composite pellets containing 60% PET and 40% coke.

  13. Ligand effects on nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron: Role of surface complexation.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojie; Chen, Zhihao; Wang, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Shujuan

    2017-05-01

    Surface passivation is a key limiting factor in the application of zero-valent iron (ZVI) for water remediation. Addition of ligands is a useful approach to overcome this issue. In this work, a small amount of acetylacetone (AA) (0.5 mM) was found highly efficient to enhance the reduction of nitrate by ZVI at near neutral conditions (pH 6.0) with the formation of considerable black coating on ZVI. At an initial nitrate concentration of 20 mg N/L, the pseudo first-order reduction rate constant of nitrate in the ZVI-AA-NO3(-) system was 0.0991 h(-1), which was 52 times higher than that in the ZVI-NO3(-) system. Under otherwise identical conditions, the other five ligands, including EDTA, formate, acetate, oxalate, and phosphate, had negligible effects. Based on the pKa values of these ligands and the final species of iron, the ligand effects on nitrate reduction by ZVI were summarized from three aspects: (1) the ability to offer potentially dissociable protons from the ligands; (2) the complexation ability to eliminate iron (hydr)oxide precipitates from the surface of ZVI; and (3) the ability to lower down the redox potentials of iron species. The good performance of AA in these three aspects makes it advantage over the other ligands. A cycle test up to six runs demonstrates that AA could continuously take effect in the ZVI system. The results here point out the potential of AA as an effective ligand in ZVI system for enhanced contaminant transformation.

  14. Role of ascorbic acid in transferrin-independent reduction and uptake of iron by U-937 cells.

    PubMed

    May, J M; Qu, Z C; Mendiratta, S

    1999-06-01

    The role of ascorbic acid in transferrin-independent ferric iron reduction and uptake was evaluated in cultured U-937 monocytic cells. Uptake of 55Fe by U-937 cells was doubled by 100 microM extracellular ascorbate, and by pre-incubation of cells with 100 microM dehydroascorbic acid, the two-electron-oxidized form of ascorbate. Reduction of extracellular ferric citrate also was enhanced by loading the cells with dehydroascorbic acid. Dehydroascorbic acid was taken up rapidly by the cells and reduced to ascorbate, such that the latter reached intracellular concentrations as high as 6 mM. However, some ascorbate did escape the cells and could be detected at concentrations of up to 1 microM in the incubation medium. Further, addition of ascorbate oxidase almost reversed the effects of dehydroascorbic acid on both 55Fe uptake and ferric citrate reduction. Thus, it is likely that extracellular ascorbate reduced ferric to ferrous iron, which was then taken up by the cells. This hypothesis also was supported by the finding that during loading with ferric citrate, only extracellular ascorbate increased the pool of intracellular ferrous iron that could be chelated with cell-penetrant ferrous iron chelators. In contrast to its inhibition of ascorbate-dependent ferric iron reduction, ascorbate oxidase was without effect on ascorbate-dependent reduction of extracellular ferricyanide. This indicates that the cells use different mechanisms for reduction of ferric iron and ferricyanide. Therefore, extracellular ascorbate derived from cells can enhance transferrin-independent iron uptake by reducing ferric to ferrous iron, but intracellular ascorbate neither contributes to this reduction nor modifies the redox status of intracellular free iron.

  15. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  16. Zero valent iron simultaneously enhances methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-05-15

    Zero valent iron (ZVI) packed anaerobic granular sludge reactors have been developed for improved anaerobic wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe the enhanced methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors with the addition of ZVI. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using long-term experimental data sets from two independent ZVI-enhanced anaerobic granular sludge reactors with different operational conditions. The model satisfactorily describes the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, sulfate reduction and methane production data from both systems. Results show ZVI directly promotes propionate degradation and methanogenesis to enhance methane production. Simultaneously, ZVI alleviates the inhibition of un-dissociated H2S on acetogens, methanogens and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) through buffering pH (Fe(0) + 2H(+) = Fe(2+) + H2) and iron sulfide precipitation, which improve the sulfate reduction capacity, especially under deterioration conditions. In addition, the enhancement of ZVI on methane production and sulfate reduction occurs mainly at relatively low COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 2-4.5) rather than high COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 16.7) compared to the reactor without ZVI addition. The model proposed in this work is expected to provide support for further development of a more efficient ZVI-based anaerobic granular system.

  17. Reductive dehalogenation of trichloroethylene with zero-valent iron: Surface profiling microscopy and rate enhancement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gotpagar, J.; Lyuksyutov, S.; Cohn, R.; Grulke, E.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    1999-11-23

    Mechanistic aspects of the reductive dehalogenation of trichloroethylene using zerovalent iron are studied with three different surface characterization techniques. These include scanning electron microscopy, surface profilometry, and atomic force microscopy. It was found that the pretreatment of an iron surface by chloride ions causes enhancement in the initial degradation rates. This enhancement was attributed to the increased roughness of the iron surface due to crevice corrosion obtained by pretreatment. The results indicate that the fractional active site concentration for the reactive sorption of trichloroethylene is related to the number of defects/abnormalities present on the surface of the iron. This was elucidated with the help of atomic force microscopy. Two possible mechanisms include (1) a direct hydrogenation in the presence of defects acting as catalyst and (2) an enhancement due to the two electrochemical cells operating in proximity to each other. The result of this study has potential for further research to achieve an increase in the reaction rates by surface modifications in a practical scenario.

  18. Effect of Experimental Conditions on Cementite Formation During Reduction of Iron Ore Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Mania; Sichen, Du

    2016-12-01

    Experiments have been carried out to study the effect of temperature, gas composition, residence time, and type of iron ore pellets on formation of cementite during gaseous reduction of hematite. Industrial iron ore pellets have been reduced isothermally in a gas mixture with H2 and CO as main components. The presence of Fe3C in the partially reduced pellets shows that reduction and cementite formation take place at the same time. The maximum content of cementite is identified in the samples reduced by H2-CO at 1123 K (850 °C). The decrease in the carbide content due to addition of 1 pct CO2 to the initial gas mixture reveals the major influence of carbon potential in the gas atmosphere. Further increase of CO2 content increases the Fe3C. The variations of the amount of cementite with the CO2 content suggest that both the thermodynamics and kinetics of cementite formation are affected by the gas composition. Cementite decomposes to graphite and iron particles in reducing and inert atmospheres as the residence time of pellets at high temperature is increased above 60 minutes.

  19. Study of nonisothermal reduction of iron ore-coal/char composite pellet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S. K.; Ghosh, A.

    1994-01-01

    Cold-bonded composite pellets, consisting of iron ore fines and fines of noncoking coal or char, were prepared by steam curing at high pressure in an autoclave employing inorganic binders. Dry compressive strength ranged from 200 to 1000 N for different pellets. The pellets were heated from room temperature to 1273 K under flowing argon at two heating rates. Rates of evolution of product gases were determined from gas Chromatographie analysis, and the temperature of the sample was monitored by thermocouple as a function of time during heating. Degree of reduction, volume change, and compressive strength of the pellets upon reduction were measured subsequently. Degree of reduction ranged from 46 to 99 pct. Nonisothermal devolatilization of coal by this procedure also was carried out for comparison. It has been shown that a significant quantity (10 to 20 pct of the pellet weight) of extraneous H2O and CO2 was retained by dried pellets. This accounted for the generation of additional quantities of H2 and CO during heating. Carbon was the major reductant, but reduction by H2 also was significant. Ore-coal and ore-char composites exhibited a comparable degree of reduction. However, the former showed superior postreduction strength due to a smaller amount of swelling upon reduction.

  20. NO x Reduction in the Iron Ore Sintering Process with Flue Gas Recirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Fan, Xiaohui; Gan, Min; Chen, Xuling; Lv, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Flue gas recirculation (FGR) has been implemented for exhaust gas emissions reduction in iron ore sintering. However, the mechanism of NO x reduction through FGR is still unclear. In this paper, the laboratory pot-grate sintering test showed a 30% reduction in gas flow and 15.51% reduction in NO x emissions achieved with a 30% FGR ratio, and the sinter indexes almost matched those of the conventional process. In the sinter zone, NO-CO catalytic reduction occurs in the range of 500-900°C. When the sinter temperature is 700°C, the highest nitrogen reduction ratio (NRR) achieved is 8%; however, the NO x reduction is inhibited as the post-combustion of CO starts when the temperature increases beyond 700°C. NO x in the flue gas is mainly a product of the fuel combustion in the combustion zone, as the nitrogen conversion rate reaches 50-60%, because the N-containing intermediates exist during the fuel combustion. The existence of NO in the FGR gas inhibits the NO x generation from the fuel combustion, and the NO elimination—through the NO-carbon reaction—is significant in the combustion zone. The NRR in the combustion zone reaches a range of 18-20%.

  1. Reduction of Hexavalent Uranium from Organic Complexes by Sulfate- and Iron-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, R.; Robinson, K. G.; Reed, G. D.; Sayler, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of organic-hexavalent-uranium [U(VI)] complexation on U(VI) reduction by a sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) and an iron-reducing bacterium (Shewanella alga) was evaluated. Four aliphatic ligands (acetate, malonate, oxalate, and citrate) and an aromatic ligand (tiron [4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulfonic acid]) were used to study complexed-uranium bioavailability. The trends in uranium reduction varied with the nature and the amount of U(VI)-organic complex formed and the type of bacteria present. D. desulfuricans rapidly reduced uranium from a monodentate aliphatic (acetate) complex. However, reduction from multidentate aliphatic complexes (malonate, oxalate, and citrate) was slower. A decrease in the amount of organic-U(VI) complex in solution significantly increased the rate of reduction. S. alga reduced uranium more rapidly from multidentate aliphatic complexes than from monodentate aliphatic complexes. The rate of reduction decreased with a decrease in the amount of multidentate complexes present. Uranium from an aromatic (tiron) complex was readily available for reduction by D. desulfuricans, while an insignificant level of U(VI) from the tiron complex was reduced by S. alga. These results indicate that selection of bacteria for rapid uranium reduction will depend on the organic composition of waste streams. PMID:16535729

  2. Assessment of reduction behavior of hematite iron ore pellets in coal fines for application in sponge ironmaking

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Patel, S.K.

    2009-07-01

    Studies on isothermal reduction kinetics (with F grade coal) in fired pellets of hematite iron ores, procured from four different mines of Orissa, were carried out in the temperature range of 850-1000C to provide information for the Indian sponge iron plants. The rate of reduction in all the fired iron ore pellets increased markedly with a rise of temperature up to 950C, and thereafter it decreased at 1000C. The rate was more intense in the first 30 minutes. All iron ores exhibited almost complete reduction in their pellets at temperatures of 900 and 950C in 2 hours' heating time duration, and the final product morphologies consisted of prominent cracks. The kinetic model equation 1-(1-a){sup 1/3}=kt was found to fit best to the experimental data, and the values of apparent activation energy were evaluated. Reductions of D. R. Pattnaik and M. G. Mohanty iron ore pellets were characterized by higher activation energies (183 and 150 kJ mol{sup -1}), indicating carbon gasification reaction to be the rate-controlling step. The results established lower values of activation energy (83 and 84 kJ mol{sup -1}) for the reduction of G. M. OMC Ltd. and Sakaruddin iron ore pellets, proposing their overall rates to be controlled by indirect reduction reactions.

  3. High Potential for Iron Reduction in Upland Soils from Diverse Terrestrial Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. H.; Liptzin, D.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in the redox state of iron (Fe) can be coupled to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon (C), nitrogen, and phosphorus. The importance of Fe in catalyzing redox-driven biogeochemical cycling has been underappreciated in terrestrial ecosystems because they are not typically thought of as anaerobic environments. However, upland soils can experience anaerobic conditions following rainfall events or in microsites of high biological oxygen consumption. Measurements of Fe reduction rates in soils are difficult to compare among studies from different ecosystems, so we used the same assay to quantify potential Fe reduction in soils from upland environments (annual grassland, drained peatland pasture, and a rainforest) that varied in poorly crystalline Fe and total C. We slurried the soils and incubated them in a glovebox with a dinitrogen headspace. To evaluate the role of C availability in potential Fe reduction, we added sodium acetate daily at rates up to 0.6 mg C/g soil/d. We measured methane (CH4) production, acid- extractable Fe(II), citrate-ascorbate extractable Fe oxides, and pH over 5 days to determine the timing and magnitude of Fe reduction. In relatively dry soils (< 20 % gravimetric soil moisture), Fe reduction began after one day of anaerobic incubation as slurries, but all of the soils demonstrated high Fe reduction potential. On day 3, Fe reduction rates for the 0.05 mg C/g soil/d treatment were 1535 ± 51 μg Fe(III) g-1 d-1 in the annual grassland soil, 1205 ± 42 μg Fe(III) g-1 d-1 in the drained peatland soil, and 826 ± 54 μg Fe(III) g-1 d-1 in the rainforest soil. This contrasts with the trend in poorly crystalline Fe oxide pools across the sites: 3.87 ± 0.06 μg Fe(III) g-1 in the annual grassland, 7.49 μg Fe(III) g-1 in the drained peatland, and 20.84 ± 0.19 μg Fe(III) g-1 in the rainforest soil. Across all sites, small C additions (< 0.05 mg C/g soil/day) increased Fe reduction rates while larger C additions decreased Fe reduction. Iron

  4. Reduction of iron loss in thin grain-oriented silicon steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Fukunaga, H.; Ishiyama, K.; Arai, K.I.

    1997-09-01

    The authors investigated the effect of the intermediate annealing conditions on the grain textures and the magnetic properties in thin grain-oriented silicon steel sheets produced by the three-stage rolling method. It was found that the lower the intermediate annealing temperature is, the better the [001] orientation is achieved. In addition, the reduction of the intermediate annealing temperatures improves dc magnetic properties (B{sub 8}, Hc) and enables to reduce the iron loss in thin silicon steels. The measured iron loss W13/50 under the applied tensile strength of 2 kg/mm{sup 2} was 0.28 W/kg, which is less than that of the conventional (300 {micro}m) grain-oriented silicon steels by about 50%.

  5. Analysis of flow decay potential on Galileo. [oxidizer flow rate reduction by iron nitrate precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Frisbee, R. H.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The risks posed to the NASA's Galileo spacecraft by the oxidizer flow decay during its extended mission to Jupiter is discussed. The Galileo spacecraft will use nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)/monomethyl hydrazine bipropellant system with one large engine thrust-rated at a nominal 400 N, and 12 smaller engines each thrust-rated at a nominal 10 N. These smaller thrusters, because of their small valve inlet filters and small injector ports, are especially vulnerable to clogging by iron nitrate precipitates formed by NTO-wetted stainless steel components. To quantify the corrosion rates and solubility levels which will be seen during the Galileo mission, corrosion and solubility testing experiments were performed with simulated Galileo materials, propellants, and environments. The results show the potential benefits of propellant sieving in terms of iron and water impurity reduction.

  6. Measuring the Kinetics of the Reduction of Iron Oxide with Carbon Monoxide in a Fluidized Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnt, C. D.; Cleeton, J. P.; Miiller, C. M.; Scotr, S. A.; Dennis, J. S.

    Combusting a solid fuel in the presence of a metal oxide rather than air, chemical looping combustion, generates CO2suitable for sequestration and the reduced metal. For the case of iron, the reduced oxide can be re-oxidized with steam to produce high-purity hydrogen. The reduction reactions of iron oxide in carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide mixtures were investigated in a fluidized bed. Activation energies and pre-exponential factors for the reactions (i) 3 Fe2O3+CO⇌2 Fe3O4+CO2 and⇌(ii)0.947 Fe3O4+0.788 CO⇌3 Fe0.947O+0.788 CO2⇌were determined. The reaction order was verified to be unity, and the change in rate with conversion was examined.

  7. Copper increases reductive dehalogenation of haloacetamides by zero-valent iron in drinking water: Reduction efficiency and integrated toxicity risk.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Bond, Tom; Gao, Naiyun; Bin, Xu; Wang, Qiongfang; Ding, Shunke

    2016-12-15

    The haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogen-containing disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs), are highly cytotoxic and genotoxic, and typically occur in treated drinking waters at low μg/L concentrations. Since many drinking distribution and storage systems contain unlined cast iron and copper pipes, reactions of HAcAms with zero-valent iron (ZVI) and metallic copper (Cu) may play a role in determining their fate. Moreover, ZVI and/or Cu are potentially effective HAcAm treatment technologies in drinking water supply and storage systems. This study reports that ZVI alone reduces trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) to sequentially form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) and then monochloroacetamide (MCAcAm), whereas Cu alone does not impact HAcAm concentrations. The addition of Cu to ZVI significantly improved the removal of HAcAms, relative to ZVI alone. TCAcAm and their reduction products (DCAcAm and MCAcAm) were all decreased to below detection limits at a molar ratio of ZVI/Cu of 1:1 after 24 h reaction (ZVI/TCAcAm = 0.18 M/5.30 μM). TCAcAm reduction increased with the decreasing pH from 8.0 to 5.0, but values from an integrated toxic risk assessment were minimised at pH 7.0, due to limited removal MCAcAm under weak acid conditions (pH = 5.0 and 6.0). Higher temperatures (40 °C) promoted the reductive dehalogenation of HAcAms. Bromine was preferentially removed over chlorine, thus brominated HAcAms were more easily reduced than chlorinated HAcAms by ZVI/Cu. Although tribromoacetamide was more easily reduced than TCAcAm during ZVI/Cu reduction, treatment of tribromoacetamide resulted in a higher integrated toxicity risk than TCAcAm, due to the formation of monobromoacetamide (MBAcAm).

  8. The Preparation and Reduction Behavior of Charcoal Composite Iron Oxide Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Hirokazu; Usui, Tateo; Harada, Takeshi

    In the energy conversion, biomass has novel advantage, i.e., no CO2 emission, because of carbon neutral. Charcoal composite iron oxide pellets were proposed to decrease CO2 emission for the ironmaking. These pellets were promising to decrease the initial temperature for reduction reaction of carbon composite iron ore agglomerate under a rising temperature condition, such as in a blast furnace shaft. In order to obtain charcoal, Japanese cedar and cypress were carbonized from room temperature to maximum carbonization temperature (TC, max = 1273 K) at a heating rate of 200 K/h, and kept at TC, max until arrival time of 6 h. Reducing gases of CO and CH4 started releasing from relatively low temperature (500 K). In the total gas volume of carbonization, H2 gas of Japanese cedar was more than that of Japanese cypress. These woods have more CO gas volume than Newcastle blend coal has. The obtained charcoal was mixed with reagent grade hematite in the mass ratio of one to four. Then, a small amount of Bentonite was added to the mixture as a binder, and the charcoal composite iron oxide pellets were prepared and reduced at 1273, 1373 and 1473 K in nitrogen gas atmosphere. It was conirmed by the generated gas analysis during reduction reaction that charcoal composite iron oxide pellets had higher reducibility than char composite pellets using Newcastle blend coal. From the XRD analysis of the reduced pellets, it was found that the original Fe2O3 was almost reduced to Fe for 60 min at 1273 K, 20 min at 1373 K and 5~15 min at 1473 K.

  9. Effects of Redox Cycling of Iron in Nontronite on Reduction of Technetium

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Junjie; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Dong, Hailiang; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Zhang, Jing; Kim, Jinwook

    2012-01-06

    In situ technetium-99 (99Tc) immobilization by Fe(II) associated with clay minerals has been studied and is a potential cost-effective method for Tc remediation at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Fe redox cycling are common in sedimentary environments, however their effect on Tc reduction and immobilization has not yet been investigated. The objective of this project was therefore to study how multiple cycles of reduction-reoxidation of Fe-rich clay mineral, nontronite, affected its reactivity toward Tc (VII) reduction. Iron-rich nontronite NAu-2 was used as a model clay mineral. NAu-2 suspension was first bioreduced by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, which consequently was re-oxidized by air. Three cycles of reduction-oxidation were conducted and bioreduced NAu-2 samples from all three cycles were collected and used for Tc(VII) reduction experiments. Each redox cycle resulted in a small fraction of dissolution of small size and/or poorly crystalline NAu-2. The released Fe(II) from the dissolution was likely adsorbed onto NAu-2 surface/edge sites with a high reactivity. Upon exposure to O2, this reactive Fe(II) fraction was oxidized more rapidly than structural Fe(II) and may have accounted for a two-step reoxidation kinetics of NAu-2 associated Fe(II): rapid oxidation over first few hours followed by slow oxidation. Progressive increase of this reactive fraction of Fe(II), from increased dissolution, accounted for the successively higher rate of bioreduction and reoxidation with increased redox cycles. The same Fe redistribution accounted for two-step Tc(VII) reduction kinetics as well. Rapid Tc(VII) reduction in the first few hours may be attributed to a small fraction of highly reactive Fe(II) at the NAu-2 surface/edge sites, and more steady Tc(VII) reduction over longer time may be carried out by structural Fe(II). Similar to the increased rates of Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation, the Tc(VII) reduction rate also increased with redox

  10. Expression of Iron-Related Proteins at the Neurovascular Unit Supports Reduction and Reoxidation of Iron for Transport Through the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Annette; Skjørringe, Tina; Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Siupka, Piotr; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Nielsen, Morten Schallburg; Thomsen, Lars Lykke; Moos, Torben

    2016-12-01

    The mechanisms for iron transport through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remain a controversy. We analyzed for expression of mRNA and proteins involved in oxidation and transport of iron in isolated brain capillaries from dietary normal, iron-deficient, and iron-reverted rats. The expression was also investigated in isolated rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs) and in immortalized rat brain endothelial (RBE4) cells grown as monoculture or in hanging culture inserts with defined BBB properties. Transferrin receptor 1, ferrireductases Steap 2 and 3, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), ferroportin, soluble and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored ceruloplasmin, and hephaestin were all expressed in brain capillaries in vivo and in isolated RBECs and RBE4 cells. Gene expression of DMT1, ferroportin, and soluble and GPI-anchored ceruloplasmin were significantly higher in isolated RBECs with induced BBB properties. Primary pericytes and astrocytes both expressed ceruloplasmin and hephaestin, and RBECs, pericytes, and astrocytes all exhibited ferrous oxidase activity. The coherent protein expression of these genes was demonstrated by immunocytochemistry. The data show that brain endothelial cells provide the machinery for receptor-mediated uptake of ferric iron-containing transferrin. Ferric iron can then undergo reduction to ferrous iron by ferrireductases inside endosomes followed by DMT1-mediated pumping into the cytosol and subsequently cellular export by ferroportin. The expression of soluble ceruloplasmin by brain endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes that together form the neurovascular unit (NVU) provides the ferroxidase activity necessary to reoxidize ferrous iron once released inside the brain.

  11. Reduction phases of thin iron-oxide nanowires upon thermal treatment and Li exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Angelucci, Marco Frau, Eleonora; Grazia Betti, Maria; Hassoun, Jusef; Hong, Inchul; Panero, Stefania; Scrosati, Bruno; Mariani, Carlo

    2014-04-28

    Iron oxide nanostructures, a promising alternative to carbon-based anode in lithium-ion batteries, can be produced using a hard template route. This procedure guarantees the formation of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires with comparable diameter and size (average diameter 8 nm) with a dominant cubic γ-phase at the surface. Lithium exposure of the iron oxide nanowires in ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) conditions induces reduction of the Fe ion, leading to a Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and then to a Fe{sup 2+} phase, as determined by means of core-level photoemission spectroscopy. Mild annealing of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in UHV determines an oxygen content reduction for the nanowires at lower temperature with respect to the bulk phase. The morphology and the evolution of the electronic properties upon reduction have been compared to those of micro-sized bulk-like grains, to unravel the role of the reduced size and surface-volume ratio.

  12. Uranium(VI) Reduction by Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron in Anoxic Batch Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Sen; Hua, Bin; Bao, Zhengyu; Yang, John; Liu, Chongxuan; Deng, Baolin

    2010-11-17

    This study investigated the influences of pH, bicarbonate, and calcium on U(VI) adsorption and reduction by synthetic nanosize zero valent iron (nano Fe0) particles under an anoxic condition. The results showed that about 87.1%, 82.7% and 78.3% of U(VI) could be reduced within 96 hours in the presence of 10 mM bicarbonate at pHs 6.92, 8.03 and 9.03, respectively. The rates of U(VI) reduction and adsorption by nano Fe0, however, varied significantly with increasing pH and concentrations of bicarbonate and/or calcium. Solid phase analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the formation of UO2 and iron (hydr)oxides as a result of the redox interactions between adsorbed U(VI) and nano Fe0. This study highlights the potential important role of groundwater chemical composition in controlling the rates of U(VI) reductive immobilization using nano Fe0 in subsurface environments.

  13. The effects of anions on the kinetics of reductive elimination of iron from monoferrictransferrins by thiols.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, D A; Egan, T J; Marques, H M

    1990-03-29

    The kinetics of reductive elimination of iron from the human serum monoferric transferrins by thioglycollate (TG), 3-mercaptopropionate (MP), cysteine (Cys), cysteamine (Cym) and 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) have been studied at 37 degrees C using bathophenanthroline sulphonate (BPS) as the ferrous ion acceptor. Analysis of the entire course of the reaction was possible only with thioglycollate since the other thiols cause eventual protein precipitation; in these cases, initial rates were used. The rate of iron release is linearly dependent on thiol concentration at low concentrations of reductant (less than approx. 0.2 M) and increases more rapidly with higher concentrations (up to 0.5-0.75 M). The thiols fall into two distinct groups, with TG, MP and Cys reacting at approx. the same rate, which is an order of magnitude faster than the reaction with Cym and ME. The carboxylate functionality present in the first group may be responsible for the faster reaction rate, by competitively weakening the interaction between the protein and synergistic anion. The pH-dependence of the rate of reductive elimination appears to depend on ionizable functionalities on both the protein and reducing agent. The addition of NaCl, NaClO4, NaHCO3 and Na2HPO4 increases the rate of iron release from the monoferric transferrins. The last two have particularly large accelerating effects and, in the case of the N-terminal monoferrictransferrin, gave saturation kinetics, suggesting that the observed effect is due to conformational changes in the protein caused by binding of ions. The role of the Fe-synergistic anion complex in the transferrins as a 'trapped intermediate' is considered.

  14. Iron reduction in the DAMO/Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 coculture system and the fate of Fe(II).

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang; Li, Shan-Wei; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Ding, Jing; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation processes play important roles in the global iron and carbon cycle, respectively. This study explored the ferrihydrite reduction process with methane as a carbon source in a coculture system of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) microbes enriched in laboratory and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and then characterized the reduced products. Ferrihydrite reduction was also studied in the DAMO and Shewanella systems alone. The ferrihydrite was reduced slightly (<13.3%) in the separate systems, but greatly (42.0-88.3%) in the coculture system. Isotope experiment of (13)CH4 addition revealed that DAMO microbes coupled to S. oneidensis MR-1 in a ferric iron reduction process with (13)CH4 consumption and (13)CO2 production. Compared with ferrihydrite, the reduced products showed increased crystallinity (from amorphous state to crystallinity 77.1%) and magnetism (from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic). The produced ferrous iron was formed into minerals primarily composed of siderite with a small amount vivianite and magnetite. A portion of products covered the cell surface and hindered further reactions. The results presented herein widen the current understanding of iron metabolism and mineralization in the ocean, and show that the coculture systems of DAMO microbes and Shewanella have the potential to be globally important to iron reduction and methane oxidation.

  15. Iron oxide reduction in deep Baltic Sea sediments: the potential role of anaerobic oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Matthias; Slomp, Caroline P.; Dijkstra, Nikki; Sapart, Célia J.; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kasten, Sabine; Riedinger, Natascha; Barker Jørgensen, Bo

    2015-04-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and its emission from marine sediments to the atmosphere is largely controlled by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Traditionally, sulfate is considered to be the most important electron acceptor for AOM in marine sediments. However, recent studies have shown that AOM may also be coupled to the reduction of iron (Fe) oxides (Beal et al., 2009; Riedinger et al., 2014; Egger et al., 2014). In the Baltic Sea, the transition from the Ancylus freshwater phase to the Littorina brackish/marine phase (A/L-transition) ca. 9-7 ka ago (Zillén et al., 2008) resulted in the accumulation of methanogenic brackish/marine sediments overlying Fe-oxide rich lacustrine deposits. The downward diffusion of methane from the brackish/marine sediments into the lake sediments leads to an ideal diagenetic system to study a potential coupling between Fe oxide reduction and methane oxidation. Here, we use porewater and sediment geochemical data obtained at sites M0063 and M0065 during the IODP Baltic Sea Paleoenvironment Expedition 347 in 2013 to identify the potential mechanisms responsible for the apparent Fe oxide reduction in the non-sulfidic limnic sediments below the A/L transition. In this presentation, we will review the various explanations for the elevated ferrous Fe in the porewater in the lake sediments and we will specifically address the potential role of the reaction of methane with Fe-oxides. References: Beal E. J., House C. H. and Orphan V. J. (2009) Manganese- and iron-dependent marine methane oxidation. Science 325, 184-187. Egger M., Rasigraf O., Sapart C. J., Jilbert T., Jetten M. S. M., Röckmann T., van der Veen C., Banda N., Kartal B., Ettwig K. F. and Slomp C. P. (2014) Iron-mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane in brackish coastal sediments. Environ. Sci. Technol. 49, 277-283. Riedinger N., Formolo M. J., Lyons T. W., Henkel S., Beck A. and Kasten S. (2014) An inorganic geochemical argument for coupled anaerobic oxidation of

  16. Properties and effects of remaining carbon from waste plastics gasifying on iron scale reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongmin; Chen, Shuwen; Miao, Xincheng; Yuan, Hao

    2011-06-01

    The carbonous activities of three kinds of carbon-bearing materials gasified from plastics were tested with coal coke as reference. The results showed that the carbonous activities of these remaining carbon-bearing materials were higher than that of coal-coke. Besides, the fractal analyses showed that the porosities of remaining carbon-bearing materials were higher than that of coal-coke. It revealed that these kinds of remaining carbon-bearing materials are conducive to improve the kinetics conditions of gas-solid phase reaction in iron scale reduction.

  17. Kinetics of homogeneous and surface-catalyzed mercury(II) reduction by iron(II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amirbahman, Aria; Kent, Douglas B.; Curtis, Gary P.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Production of elemental mercury, Hg(0), via Hg(II) reduction is an important pathway that should be considered when studying Hg fate in environment. We conducted a kinetic study of abiotic homogeneous and surface-catalyzed Hg(0) production by Fe(II) under dark anoxic conditions. Hg(0) production rate, from initial 50 pM Hg(II) concentration, increased with increasing pH (5.5–8.1) and aqueous Fe(II) concentration (0.1–1 mM). The homogeneous rate was best described by the expression, rhom = khom [FeOH+] [Hg(OH)2]; khom = 7.19 × 10+3 L (mol min)−1. Compared to the homogeneous case, goethite (α-FeOOH) and hematite (α-Fe2O3) increased and γ-alumina (γ-Al2O3) decreased the Hg(0) production rate. Heterogeneous Hg(0) production rates were well described by a model incorporating equilibrium Fe(II) adsorption, rate-limited Hg(II) reduction by dissolved and adsorbed Fe(II), and rate-limited Hg(II) adsorption. Equilibrium Fe(II) adsorption was described using a surface complexation model calibrated with previously published experimental data. The Hg(0) production rate was well described by the expression rhet = khet [>SOFe(II)] [Hg(OH)2], where >SOFe(II) is the total adsorbed Fe(II) concentration; khet values were 5.36 × 10+3, 4.69 × 10+3, and 1.08 × 10+2 L (mol min)−1 for hematite, goethite, and γ-alumina, respectively. Hg(0) production coupled to reduction by Fe(II) may be an important process to consider in ecosystem Hg studies.

  18. Characterization of a tricationic trigonal bipyramidal iron(IV) cyanide complex, with a very high reduction potential, and its iron(II) and iron(III) congeners.

    PubMed

    England, Jason; Farquhar, Erik R; Guo, Yisong; Cranswick, Matthew A; Ray, Kallol; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2011-04-04

    Currently, there are only a handful of synthetic S = 2 oxoiron(IV) complexes. These serve as models for the high-spin (S = 2) oxoiron(IV) species that have been postulated, and confirmed in several cases, as key intermediates in the catalytic cycles of a variety of nonheme oxygen activating enzymes. The trigonal bipyramidal complex [Fe(IV)(O)(TMG(3)tren)](2+) (1) was both the first S = 2 oxoiron(IV) model complex to be generated in high yield and the first to be crystallographically characterized. In this study, we demonstrate that the TMG(3)tren ligand is also capable of supporting a tricationic cyanoiron(IV) unit, [Fe(IV)(CN)(TMG(3)tren)](3+) (4). This complex was generated by electrolytic oxidation of the high-spin (S = 2) iron(II) complex [Fe(II)(CN)(TMG(3)tren)](+) (2), via the S = 5/2 complex [Fe(III)(CN)(TMG(3)tren)](2+) (3), the progress of which was conveniently monitored by using UV-vis spectroscopy to follow the growth of bathochromically shifting ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) bands. A combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Mössbauer and NMR spectroscopies was used to establish that 4 has a S = 0 iron(IV) center. Consistent with its diamagnetic iron(IV) ground state, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of 4 indicated a significant contraction of the iron-donor atom bond lengths, relative to those of the crystallographically characterized complexes 2 and 3. Notably, 4 has an Fe(IV/III) reduction potential of ∼1.4 V vs Fc(+/o), the highest value yet observed for a monoiron complex. The relatively high stability of 4 (t(1/2) in CD(3)CN solution containing 0.1 M KPF(6) at 25 °C ≈ 15 min), as reflected by its high-yield accumulation via slow bulk electrolysis and amenability to (13)C NMR at -40 °C, highlights the ability of the sterically protecting, highly basic peralkylguanidyl donors of the TMG(3)tren ligand to support highly charged high-valent complexes.

  19. Characterization of a Tricationic Trigonal Bipyramidal Iron(IV) Cyanide Complex, with a Very High Reduction Potential, and Its Iron(II) and Iron(III) Congeners

    PubMed Central

    England, Jason; Farquhar, Erik R.; Guo, Yisong; Cranswick, Matthew A.; Ray, Kallol

    2011-01-01

    Currently, there are only a handful of synthetic S = 2 oxoiron(IV) complexes. These serve as models for the high-spin (S = 2) oxoiron(IV) species that have been postulated, and confirmed in several cases, as key intermediates in the catalytic cycles of a variety of non-heme oxygen activating enzymes. The trigonal bipyramidal complex [FeIV(O)(TMG3tren)]2+ (1) was both the first S = 2 oxoiron(IV) model complex to be generated in high yield and the first to be crystallographically characterized. In this study, we demonstrate that the TMG3tren ligand is also capable of supporting a tricationic cyanoiron(IV) unit, [FeIV(CN)(TMG3tren)]3+ (4). This complex was generated by electrolytic oxidation of the high-spin (S = 2) iron(II) complex [FeII(CN)(TMG3tren)]+ (2), via the S = 5/2 complex [FeIII(CN)(TMG3tren)]2+ (3), the progress of which was conveniently monitored by using UV-Vis spectroscopy to follow the growth of bathochromically shifting LMCT bands. A combination of XAS, Mössbauer and NMR spectroscopies was used to establish that 4 has a S = 0 iron(IV) center. Consistent with its diamagnetic iron(IV) ground state, EXAFS analysis of 4 indicated a significant contraction of the iron-donor atom bond lengths, relative to those of the crystallographically characterized complexes 2 and 3. Notably, 4 has an FeIV/III reduction potential of ~1.4 V vs Fc+/o, the highest value yet observed for a monoiron complex. The relatively high stability of 4 (t1/2 in CD3CN solution containing 0.1 M KPF6 at 25 °C ≈ 15 min), as reflected by its high-yield accumulation via slow bulk electrolysis and amenability to 13C NMR at −40 °C, highlights the ability of the sterically protecting, highly basic peralkylguanidyl donors of the TMG3tren ligand to support highly charged high-valent complexes. PMID:21381646

  20. One-step synthesis of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woongchul; Yang, Gang; Kim, Suk Lae; Liu, Peng; Sue, Hung-Jue; Yu, Choongho

    2016-05-01

    Prohibitively expensive precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been one of the major hurdles in a wide use of electrochemical cells. Recent significant efforts to develop precious metal free catalysts have resulted in excellent catalytic activities. However, complicated and time-consuming synthesis processes have negated the cost benefit. Moreover, detailed analysis about catalytically active sites and the role of each element in these high-performance catalysts containing nanomaterials for large surface areas are often lacking. Here we report a facile one-step synthesis method of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube (CNT) catalysts without precious metals. Our catalysts show excellent long-term stability and onset ORR potential comparable to those of other precious metal free catalysts, and the maximum limiting current density from our catalysts is larger than that of the Pt-based catalysts. We carry out a series of synthesis and characterization experiments with/without iron and nitrogen in CNT, and identify that the coordination of nitrogen and iron in CNT plays a key role in achieving the excellent catalytic performances. We anticipate our one-step process could be used for mass production of precious metal free electrocatalysts for a wide range of electrochemical cells including fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  1. Eltrombopag inhibits the proliferation of leukemia cells via reduction of intracellular iron and induction of differentiation.

    PubMed

    Roth, Michael; Will, Britta; Simkin, Guillermo; Narayanagari, Swathi; Barreyro, Laura; Bartholdy, Boris; Tamari, Roni; Mitsiades, Constantine S; Verma, Amit; Steidl, Ulrich

    2012-07-12

    Eltrombopag (EP) is a small-molecule, nonpeptide thrombopoietin receptor (TPO-R) agonist that has been approved recently for the treatment of thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Prior studies have shown that EP stimulates megakaryopoiesis in BM cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, and the results also suggested that it may inhibit leukemia cell growth. In the present study, we studied the effects of EP on leukemia cell proliferation and the mechanism of its antiproliferative effects. We found that EP leads to a decreased cell division rate, a block in G(1) phase of cell cycle, and increased differentiation in human and murine leukemia cells. Because EP is species specific in that it can only bind TPO-R in human and primate cells, these findings further suggested that the antileukemic effect is independent of TPO-R. We found that treatment with EP leads to a reduction in free intracellular iron in leukemic cells in a dose-dependent manner. Experimental increase of intracellular iron abrogated the antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing effects of EP, demonstrating that its antileukemic effects are mediated through modulation of intracellular iron content. Finally, determination of EP's antileukemic activity in vivo demonstrated its ability to prolong survival in 2 mouse models of leukemia.

  2. Kinetics and mechanisms of iron sulfide reductions in hydrogen and in carbon monoxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiltowski, T.; Hinckley, C.C.; Smith, Gerard V.; Nishizawa, T.; Saporoschenko, Mykola; Shiley, R.H.; Webster, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The reduction of iron sulfides by hydrogen and by carbon monoxide has been studied using plug flow and thermogravimetric methods. The reactions were studied in the 523-723??K temperature range and were found to be first-order processes. Plug flow studies were used to correlate reaction rates between pyrite and the gases as a function of the surface area of the pyrite. The rate of H2S formation increases with the surface area of the pyrite sample. The results of thermogravimetric experiments indicate that the reactions consist of several steps. Rate constants for the pyrite reduction by H2 and by CO were obtained. The activation energies increased with degree of reduction. Values of Ea were 113.2 (step I) and 122.5 kJ/mole (step II) for pyrite reduction with CO and 99.4 (step I), 122.4 (step II), 125.2 (step III), and 142.6 kJ/mole (step IV) for pyrite reduction with hydrogen. ?? 1987.

  3. The role of iron in hexavalent chromium reduction by municipal landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Li, Yarong; Low, Gary K-C; Scott, Jason A; Amal, Rose

    2009-01-30

    The function of iron (ferric (Fe(III)) and ferrous (Fe(II))) in the hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) reduction mechanism by bacteria in municipal landfill leachate (MLL) was assessed. Evidence of an "electron shuttle" mechanism was observed, whereby the Cr(VI) was reduced to trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) by Fe(II) with the resulting Fe(III) bacterially re-reduced to Fe(II). Typically, investigations on this electron shuttle mechanism have been performed in an artificial medium. As MLL comprises an elaborate mixture of bacteria, humic materials and organic and inorganic species, additional complexities were evident within the cycle in this study. Bioavailability of the Fe(III) for bacterial reduction, availability of bacterially produced Fe(II) for chemical Cr(VI) reduction and hydrolysis of Fe(II) and Fe(III) become prevalent during each phase of the shuttle cycle when MLL is present. Each of these factors contributes to the overall rate of bacterial Cr(VI) reduction in this media. This work highlights the need to consider local environmental conditions when assessing the bacterial reduction of Cr(VI).

  4. Shewanella spp. Use Acetate as an Electron Donor for Denitrification but Not Ferric Iron or Fumarate Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sukhwan; Sanford, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Lactate but not acetate oxidation was reported to support electron acceptor reduction by Shewanella spp. under anoxic conditions. We demonstrate that the denitrifiers Shewanella loihica strain PV-4 and Shewanella denitrificans OS217 utilize acetate as an electron donor for denitrification but not for fumarate or ferric iron reduction. PMID:23396327

  5. Carbothermic Reduction of Nickeliferous Laterite Ores for Nickel Pig Iron Production in China: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Mingjun; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Yuanbo; Fan, Xiaohui

    2013-11-01

    Both the consumption and production of crude stainless steel in China rank first in the world. In 2011, the nickel production in China amounted to 446 kilotons, with the proportion of electrolytic nickel and nickel pig iron (NPI) registering 41.5% and 56.5%, respectively. NPI is a low-cost feedstock for stainless steel production when used as a substitute for electrolytic nickel. The existing commercial NPI production processes such as blast furnace smelting, rotary kiln-electric furnace smelting, and Krupp-Renn (Nipon Yakin Oheyama) processes are discussed. As low-temperature (below 1300°C) reduction of nickeliferous laterite ores followed by magnetic separation could provide an alternative avenue without smelting at high temperature (~1500°C) for producing ferronickel with low cost, the fundamentals and recent developments of the low-temperature reduction of nickeliferous laterite ores are reviewed.

  6. Reduction Smelting Low Ferronickel from Pre-concentrated Nickel-Iron Ore of Nickel Laterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Deqing; Zhou, Xianlin; Luo, Yanhong; Pan, Jian; Bai, Bing

    2016-11-01

    The research of smelting low ferronickel from pre-concentrate nickel-iron ore with 2.76 % Ni and 38.00 % Fetotal was carried out to find an effective way for stainless steel enterprises to use the low-nickel laterite reasonable. The results show that Ni and Fe both have a certain degree of enrichment, and impurities and harm elements have different degrees of reduction after pre-concentration of nickel-iron ore. Most valuable metal did not compound with impurities which greatly accelerated the speed and extent of melt separation reduction. Good alloy of 6.58 % Ni with the overall recoveries of 93.38 % and 89.95 % Fetotal with the overall recoveries of 89.57 % was manufactured under the following conditions: 10 % coke, 1.0 binary basicity, 18 % MgO and 3 % Al2O3 in slag, melting at 1,550 °C for 10 min. The product can be used for the feed of producing stainless steel.

  7. Enhanced reduction of chlorophenols by nanoscale zerovalent iron supported on organobentonite.

    PubMed

    Li, Yimin; Zhang, Yun; Li, Jianfa; Sheng, Guodong; Zheng, Xuming

    2013-07-01

    The reactivity of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) on removing chlorophenols (2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol) was remarkably enhanced by using a hydrophobic support of organobentonite (CTMA-Bent), namely the bentonite modified with organic cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) cations. The complete dechlorination of chlorophenols and total conversion into phenol using this novel NZVI/CTMA-Bent combination was observed in batch experiments. The kinetic studies suggested that the reduction of chlorophenols by NZVI was accelerated due to the enhanced adsorption onto CTMA-Bent, which facilitated the mass transfer of chlorophenols from aqueous to iron surface. The enhanced reduction rate by NZVI/CTMA-Bent was positively related to the hydrophobicity of chlorophenols, and an increasing linear relationship was obtained between the relative enhancement on reaction rate constants (k2/k1) and logKow values of chlorophenols. XPS results suggested there were fewer precipitates of ferric (hydro)xides formed on the surface of NZVI/CTMA-Bent, which may also lead to the improved reactivity and repetitive usability of NZVI/CTMA-Bent on removing chlorophenols.

  8. Why copper is preferred over iron for oxygen activation and reduction in haem-copper oxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagi-Damodaran, Ambika; Michael, Matthew A.; Zhu, Qianhong; Reed, Julian; Sandoval, Braddock A.; Mirts, Evan N.; Chakraborty, Saumen; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Haem-copper oxidase (HCO) catalyses the natural reduction of oxygen to water using a haem-copper centre. Despite decades of research on HCOs, the role of non-haem metal and the reason for nature's choice of copper over other metals such as iron remains unclear. Here, we use a biosynthetic model of HCO in myoglobin that selectively binds different non-haem metals to demonstrate 30-fold and 11-fold enhancements in the oxidase activity of Cu- and Fe-bound HCO mimics, respectively, as compared with Zn-bound mimics. Detailed electrochemical, kinetic and vibrational spectroscopic studies, in tandem with theoretical density functional theory calculations, demonstrate that the non-haem metal not only donates electrons to oxygen but also activates it for efficient O-O bond cleavage. Furthermore, the higher redox potential of copper and the enhanced weakening of the O-O bond from the higher electron density in the d orbital of copper are central to its higher oxidase activity over iron. This work resolves a long-standing question in bioenergetics, and renders a chemical-biological basis for the design of future oxygen-reduction catalysts.

  9. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes by iron metal and metal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, R.G.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    Reductive dechlorination using zero valent metals such as iron has seen an increase in interest over the past few years with the extension of iron dechlorination to in-situ treatment of ground water using a process developed by Gillham and O`Hannes in 1994. Earlier applications included the use of metals for water treatment for the degradation of halogenated pesticides. This increased interest is demonstrated by the recent ACS symposium on zero valent metal dechlorination. The work that will be presented involves the reduction of selected chlorinated alkanes and alkenes beginning with chlorobutanes. The position of the chlorines on the carbon chain relative to each other was studied by determining the rates of the dechlorination processes. These studies were carried out in seated batch reactors so that loss of the chlorinated hydrocarbons was minimized and total carbon and chloride mass balances could be obtained. The goal of the studies was to understand the mechanism of the reaction that is believed to follow metal corrosion processes involving two electron transfer reactions.

  10. Why copper is preferred over iron for oxygen activation and reduction in haem-copper oxidases.

    PubMed

    Bhagi-Damodaran, Ambika; Michael, Matthew A; Zhu, Qianhong; Reed, Julian; Sandoval, Braddock A; Mirts, Evan N; Chakraborty, Saumen; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Haem-copper oxidase (HCO) catalyses the natural reduction of oxygen to water using a haem-copper centre. Despite decades of research on HCOs, the role of non-haem metal and the reason for nature's choice of copper over other metals such as iron remains unclear. Here, we use a biosynthetic model of HCO in myoglobin that selectively binds different non-haem metals to demonstrate 30-fold and 11-fold enhancements in the oxidase activity of Cu- and Fe-bound HCO mimics, respectively, as compared with Zn-bound mimics. Detailed electrochemical, kinetic and vibrational spectroscopic studies, in tandem with theoretical density functional theory calculations, demonstrate that the non-haem metal not only donates electrons to oxygen but also activates it for efficient O-O bond cleavage. Furthermore, the higher redox potential of copper and the enhanced weakening of the O-O bond from the higher electron density in the d orbital of copper are central to its higher oxidase activity over iron. This work resolves a long-standing question in bioenergetics, and renders a chemical-biological basis for the design of future oxygen-reduction catalysts.

  11. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction

    PubMed Central

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, ‘model’ organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria. PMID:26000653

  12. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, 'model' organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria.

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of the carbothermic reduction of a high-phosphorus oolitic iron ore by FactSage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wen; Tang, Qiong-yao; Chen, Jiang-an; Sun, Ti-chang

    2016-10-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of the carbothermic reduction of high-phosphorus oolitic iron ore (HPOIO) was conducted by the FactSage thermochemical software. The effects of temperature, C/O ratio, additive types, and dosages both on the reduction of fluorapatite and the formation of liquid slag were studied. The results show that the minimum thermodynamic reduction temperature of fluorapatite by carbon decreases to about 850°C, which is mainly ascribed to the presence of SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe. The reduction rate of fluorapatite increases and the amount of liquid slag decreases with the rise of C/O ratio. The reduction of fluorapatite is hindered by the addition of CaO and Na2CO3, thereby allowing the selective reduction of iron oxides upon controlled C/O ratio. The thermodynamic results obtain in the present work are in good agreement with the experimental results available in the literatures.

  14. Understanding the role of multiheme cytochromes in iron(III) reduction and arsenic mobilization by Shewanella sp. ANA-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, C.; Duenas, R.; Saltikov, C.

    2006-12-01

    The reduction of Fe (III) to Fe (II) and of arsenate (As (V)) to arsenite (As (III)) by Fe (III) reducing and As (V) respiring prokaryotes such as the bacterium Shewanella sp. ANA-3 may contribute to arsenic mobilization in aquifers contaminated with arsenic, specifically in places such as Bangladesh. Under oxic conditions As (V) predominates and is often adsorbed onto mineral surfaces such as amorphous ferrihydrite. However, under anoxic conditions As (III) predominates, sorbs to fewer minerals, and has a greater hydrologic mobility compared to As (V). The genetic mechanism underlying arsenic release from subsurface material most likely involves a combination of respiratory gene clusters (e.g. mtr/omc and arr). In this study, we are investigating the genetic pathways underlying arsenic mobilization. We have generated various mutations in the mtr/omc gene cluster, which encodes several outermembrane decaheme c-type cytochromes. Deletions in one mtr/omc gene did not eliminate iron reduction. However, strains carrying multiple gene deletions were greatly impaired in iron reduction abilities. Work is currently underway to generate combinations of iron reduction and arsenate reduction single and double mutants that will be used to investigate microbial mobilization of arsenic in flow-through columns containing As (V)-HFO coated sand. This work will address the importance of arsenate reduction and iron reduction in the mobilization of arsenic.

  15. Reduction of trichloroethylene and nitrate by zero-valent iron with peat.

    PubMed

    Min, Jee-Eun; Kim, Meejeong; Pardue, John H; Park, Jae-Woo

    2008-02-01

    The feasibility of using zero-valent iron (ZVI) and peat mixture as in situ barriers for contaminated sediments and groundwater was investigated. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)), redox sensitive contaminants were reduced by ZVI and peat soil mixture under anaerobic condition. Peat was used to support the sorption of TCE, microbial activity for biodegradation of TCE and denitrification while TCE and nitrate were reduced by ZVI. Decreases in TCE concentrations were mainly due to ZVI, while peat supported denitrifying microbes and further affected the sorption of TCE. Due to the competition of electrons, nitrate reduction was inhibited by TCE, while TCE reduction was not affected by nitrate. From the results of peat and sterilized peat, it can be concluded that peat was involved in both dechlorination and denitrification but biological reduction of TCE was negligible compared to that of nitrate. The results from hydrogen and methane gas analyses confirmed that hydrogen utilization by microbes and methanogenic process had occurred in the ZVI-peat system. Even though effect of the peat on TCE reduction were quantitatively small, ZVI and peat contributed to the removal of TCE and nitrate independently. The 16S rRNA analysis revealed that viable bacterial diversity was narrow and the most frequently observed genera were Bacillus and Staphylococcus spp.

  16. Availability of Ferric Iron for Microbial Reduction in Bottom Sediments of the Freshwater Tidal Potomac River

    PubMed Central

    Lovley, Derek R.; Phillips, Elizabeth J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of Fe(III), its availability for microbial reduction, and factors controlling Fe(III) availability were investigated in sediments from a freshwater site in the Potomac River Estuary. Fe(III) reduction in sediments incubated under anaerobic conditions and depth profiles of oxalate-extractable Fe(III) indicated that Fe(III) reduction was limited to depths of 4 cm or less, with the most intense Fe(III) reduction in the top 1 cm. In incubations of the upper 4 cm of the sediments, Fe(III) reduction was as important as methane production as a pathway for anaerobic electron flow because of the high rates of Fe(III) reduction in the 0- to 0.5-cm interval. Most of the oxalate-extractable Fe(III) in the sediments was not reduced and persisted to a depth of at least 20 cm. The incomplete reduction was not the result of a lack of suitable electron donors. The oxalate-extractable Fe(III) that was preserved in the sediments was considered to be in a form other than amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide, since synthetic amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide, amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide adsorbed onto clay, and amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide saturated with adsorbed phosphate or fulvic acids were all readily reduced. Fe3O4 and the mixed Fe(III)-Fe(II) compound(s) that were produced during the reduction of amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide in an enrichment culture were oxalate extractable but were not reduced, suggesting that mixed Fe(III)-Fe(II) compounds might account for the persistence of oxalate-extractable Fe(III) in the sediments. The availability of microbially reducible Fe(III) in surficial sediments demonstrates that microbial Fe(III) reduction can be important to organic matter decomposition and iron geochemistry. However, the overall extent of microbial Fe(III) reduction is governed by the inability of microorganisms to reduce most of the Fe(III) in the sediment. PMID:16347168

  17. Effect of carbon species on the reduction and melting behavior of boron-bearing iron concentrate/carbon composite pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang; Ding, Yin-gui; Wang, Jing-song; She, Xue-feng; Xue, Qing-guo

    2013-06-01

    Iron nugget and boron-rich slag can be obtained in a short time through high-temperature reduction of boronbearing iron concentrate by carbonaceous material, both of which are agglomerated together as a carbon composite pellet. This is a novel flow sheet for the comprehensive utilization of boron-bearing iron concentrate to produce a new kind of man-made boron ore. The effect of reducing agent species (i.e., carbon species) on the reduction and melting process of the composite pellet was investigated at a laboratory scale in the present work. The results show that, the reduction rate of the composite pellet increases from bituminite, anthracite, to coke at temperatures ranging from 950 to 1300°C. Reduction temperature has an important effect on the microstructure of reduced pellets. Carbon species also affects the behavior of reduced metallic iron particles. The anthracite-bearing composite pellet melts faster than the bituminitebearing composite pellet, and the coke-bearing composite pellet cannot melt due to the high fusion point of coke ash. With anthracite as the reducing agent, the recovery rates of iron and boron are 96.5% and 95.7%, respectively. This work can help us get a further understanding of the new process mechanism.

  18. Ferric iron-bearing sediments as a mineral trap for CO2 sequestration: Iron reduction using sulfur-bearing waste gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palandri, J.L.; Kharaka, Y.K.

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel method for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 in ferrous carbonate, using ferric iron present in widespread redbeds and other sediments. Iron can be reduced by SO2 that is commonly a component of flue gas produced by combustion of fossil fuel, or by adding SO2 or H2S derived from other industrial processes to the injected waste gas stream. Equilibrium and kinetically controlled geochemical simulations at 120 bar and 50 and 100 ??C with SO2 or H2S show that iron can be transformed almost entirely to siderite thereby trapping CO2, and simultaneously, that sulfur can be converted predominantly to dissolved sulfate. If there is an insufficient amount of sulfur-bearing gas relative to CO2 as for typical flue gas, then some of the iron is not reduced, and some of the CO2 is not sequestered. If there is an excess of sulfur-bearing gas, then complete iron reduction is ensured, and some of the iron precipitates as pyrite or other solid iron sulfide, depending on their relative precipitation kinetics. Gas mixtures with insufficient sulfur relative to CO2 can be used in sediments containing Ca, Mg, or other divalent metals capable of precipitating carbonate minerals. For quartz arenite with an initial porosity of 21% and containing 0.25 wt.% Fe2O3, approximately 0.7 g of CO2 is sequestered per kg of rock, and the porosity decrease is less than 0.03%. Sequestration of CO2 using ferric iron has the advantage of disposing of SO2 that may already be present in the combustion gas. ?? 2005 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Reductive degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A over iron-silver bimetallic nanoparticles under ultrasound radiation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Si; Yang, Shaogui; Wang, Xiaodong; Sun, Cheng

    2010-04-01

    The present study described the degradation behavior of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in Fe-Ag suspension solutions under ultrasonic radiation (US). The Fe-Ag bimetallic nanoparticles with core-shell structure were successfully synthesized by reduction and deposition of Ag on nanoscale Fe surface, and were further characterized by BET, XRD, TEM, SEM, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. The results revealed that the displacement plating produced a non-uniform overlayer of Ag additive on iron; the as-synthesized bimetallic nanoparticles were spherical with diameters of 20-100 nm aggregated in the form of chains. Batch studies demonstrated that the TBBPA (2 mg L(-1)) was completely degraded in 20 min over Fe-Ag nanoparticles, which has higher degradation efficiency than Fe(0) nanoparticles under US. The effects of Fe-Ag bimetallic nanoparticles loading, initial TBBPA concentration, pH of the solution, Ag loading and temperature on the reduction efficiency of TBBPA under US were investigated. The complete reduction of TBBPA in 20 min was determined selectively under the conditions of pH (pH=6.0+/-0.5), Ag loading(1 wt.%) at 30 degrees C over the fabricated Fe-Ag nanoparticles. Additionally, the major intermediates identified by LC-MS technique were tri-BBPA, di-BBPA, mono-BBPA and BPA and the degradation mechanism was also proposed.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of pathways involved in trichloroethylene reduction by zero-valent metals: Iron and zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, W.; Roberts, A.L.; Burris, D.R.; Campbell, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    In order to design in situ remediation systems using zero-valent metals, the mechanism and kinetics of chlorinated solvent degradation by zero-valent metals need clarification. These issues are addressed by conducting detailed investigations of the pathways involved in trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction by two zero-valent metals. Analyses are based on batch reaction data for chloroethylene reduction by iron and zinc. Experiments were conducted using TCE and each readily available reaction product of TCE degradation as a starting material and monitoring the disappearance of the parent chemical and the appearance of reaction products over time. Models were developed by working backwards through the hypothesized reaction sequence. Determining rate constants for the latter steps in the pathway, inserting them into the more complex models for more highly oxidized compounds, and obtaining rate constants for the remaining steps in the transformation of the oxidized species was repeated until a model for trichloroethylene was developed. Results indicate that reactions may not occur via a process of sequential hydrogenolysis or hydrogenation. Ethylene and/or ethane production are too rapid to be accounted for in this manner. The product distribution, especially the presence of acetylene, can only be explained by invoking reductive elimination reactions.

  1. Ammonia on the prebiotic Earth: Iron(II) reduction of nitrite. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.; Chang, Sherwood

    1994-01-01

    Theories for the origin of life require the availability of reduced nitrogen. In the non-reducing atmosphere suggested by geochemical evidence, production in the atmosphere and survival of NH3 against photochemical destruction are problematic. Electric discharges and impact shocks would produce NO rather than HCN or NH3. Conversion of NO to nitrous and nitric acid (by way of HNO) and precipitation in acid rain would provide a source of fixed nitrogen to the early ocean. One solution to the NH3 problem may have been the reduction of nitrite/nitrate in the ocean with aqueous ferrous iron, Fe(2+): 6Fe(+2) + 7 H2O + NO2(-) yields 3Fe2O3 + 11 H(+) + NH3. We have measured the kinetics of this reaction as a function of temperature, pH, and concentrations of salts, Fe(+2), and NO2(-). Cations (Na(+), Mg(2+), K(+)) and anions (Cl(-), Br(-), SO4(2-)) increase the rate by factors of 4 to 8. Although a competing pathway yields N2, the efficiency of the conversion of nitrite to ammonia ranges from 25% to 85%. Nitrate reduction was not consistently reproducible; however, when it was observed, its rate was slower by at least 8X than that of nitrite reduction. If the prebiotic atmosphere contained 0.2 to 10 atmospheres CO2 as suggested by Walker (1985), the Fe(+2) concentration and the rate would have been limited by siderite (FeCO3) solubility.

  2. Z-Selective Olefin Synthesis via Iron-Catalyzed Reductive Coupling of Alkyl Halides with Terminal Arylalkynes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Selective catalytic synthesis of Z-olefins has been challenging. Here we describe a method to produce 1,2-disubstituted olefins in high Z selectivity via reductive cross-coupling of alkyl halides with terminal arylalkynes. The method employs inexpensive and nontoxic catalyst (iron(II) bromide) and reductant (zinc). The substrate scope encompasses primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl halides, and the reaction tolerates a large number of functional groups. The utility of the method is demonstrated in the synthesis of several pharmaceutically relevant molecules. Mechanistic study suggests that the reaction proceeds through an iron-catalyzed anti-selective carbozincation pathway. PMID:25831473

  3. Simultaneous Cr(VI) reduction and non-ionic surfactant oxidation by peroxymonosulphate and iron powder.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Angela; Pagano, Michele; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Lopez, Antonio; Ciannarella, Ruggiero; Locaputo, Vito

    2013-05-01

    Some industrial wastewaters contain both hexavalent chromium and surfactants. In this work, their removal from aqueous solution by zero-valent iron (ZVI) and peroxymonosulphate (PMS) was studied using Brij 35 as a representative non-ionic surfactant. The performance of the ZVI/PMS system in the simultaneous removal of both pollutants was compared to that achieved with control solutions containing either Cr(VI) or Brij 35 separately. Reactions were carried out over 24h at initial pH=2.3 with variable initial amounts of Cr(VI) and Brij 35. The results showed that surfactant removal was enhanced in the system also containing Cr(VI). Surfactant degradation followed zero-order kinetics and produced formic acid as the main by-product, together with hydroxylated aldehydes, formates and alcohols that were identified by LC/MS. The presence of surfactant similarly enhanced Cr(VI) reduction, which also followed zero-order kinetics. Chromium removal was quantitative only when the initial chromium concentration was lower than 140 mg L(-1). Reduced chromium was mainly in the solution phase together with dissolved iron. Precipitation with NaOH was therefore required to definitively remove dissolved metals from the investigated system.

  4. Iron reduction in the sediments of a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuccillo, M.E.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Herman, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Sediments sampled at a hydrocarbon-contaminated, glacial-outwash, sandy aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, were analyzed for sediment-associated Fe with several techniques. Extraction with 0.5 M HCl dissolved poorly crystalline Fe oxides and small amounts of Fe in crystalline Fe oxides, and extracted Fe from phyllosilicates. Use of Ti-citrate-EDTA-bicarbonate results in more complete removal of crystalline Fe oxides. The average HCl-extractable Fe(III) concentration in the sediments closest to the crude-oil contamination (16.2 ??mol/g) has been reduced by up to 30% from background values (23.8 ??mol/g) as a result of Fe(III) reduction in contaminated anoxic groundwater. Iron(II) concentrations are elevated in sediments within an anoxic plume in the aquifer. Iron(II) values under the oil body (19.2 ??mol/g) are as much as 4 times those in the background sediments (4.6 ??mol/g), indicating incorporation of reduced Fe in the contaminated sediments. A 70% increase in total extractable Fe at the anoxic/oxic transition zone indicates reoxidation and precipitation of Fe mobilized from sediment in the anoxic plume. Scanning electron microscopy detected authigenic ferroan calcite in the anoxic sediments and confirmed abundant Fe(III) oxyhydroxides at the anoxic/oxic boundary. The redox biogeochemistry of Fe in this system is coupled to contaminant degradation and is important in predicting processes of hydrocarbon degradation.

  5. Carbon Monoxide Promotes Respiratory Hemoproteins Iron Reduction Using Peroxides as Electron Donors

    PubMed Central

    Sher, Elena A.; Shaklai, Mati; Shaklai, Nurith

    2012-01-01

    The physiological role of the respiratory hemoproteins (RH), hemoglobin and myoglobin, is to deliver O2 via its binding to their ferrous (FeII) heme-iron. Under variety of pathological conditions RH proteins leak to blood plasma and oxidized to ferric (FeIII, met) forms becoming the source of oxidative vascular damage. However, recent studies have indicated that both metRH and peroxides induce Heme Oxygenase (HO) enzyme producing carbon monoxide (CO). The gas has an extremely high affinity for the ferrous heme-iron and is known to reduce ferric hemoproteins in the presence of suitable electron donors. We hypothesized that under in vivo plasma conditions, peroxides at low concentration can assist the reduction of metRH in presence of CO. The effect of CO on interaction of metRH with hydrophilic or hydrophobic peroxides was analyzed by following Soret and visible light absorption changes in reaction mixtures. It was found that under anaerobic conditions and low concentrations of RH and peroxides mimicking plasma conditions, peroxides served as electron donors and RH were reduced to their ferrous carboxy forms. The reaction rates were dependent on CO as well as peroxide concentrations. These results demonstrate that oxidative activity of acellular ferric RH and peroxides may be amended by CO turning on the reducing potential of peroxides and facilitating the formation of redox-inactive carboxyRH. Our data suggest the possible role of HO/CO in protection of vascular system from oxidative damage. PMID:22427940

  6. Carbon monoxide promotes respiratory hemoproteins iron reduction using peroxides as electron donors.

    PubMed

    Sher, Elena A; Shaklai, Mati; Shaklai, Nurith

    2012-01-01

    The physiological role of the respiratory hemoproteins (RH), hemoglobin and myoglobin, is to deliver O(2) via its binding to their ferrous (Fe(II)) heme-iron. Under variety of pathological conditions RH proteins leak to blood plasma and oxidized to ferric (Fe(III), met) forms becoming the source of oxidative vascular damage. However, recent studies have indicated that both metRH and peroxides induce Heme Oxygenase (HO) enzyme producing carbon monoxide (CO). The gas has an extremely high affinity for the ferrous heme-iron and is known to reduce ferric hemoproteins in the presence of suitable electron donors. We hypothesized that under in vivo plasma conditions, peroxides at low concentration can assist the reduction of metRH in presence of CO. The effect of CO on interaction of metRH with hydrophilic or hydrophobic peroxides was analyzed by following Soret and visible light absorption changes in reaction mixtures. It was found that under anaerobic conditions and low concentrations of RH and peroxides mimicking plasma conditions, peroxides served as electron donors and RH were reduced to their ferrous carboxy forms. The reaction rates were dependent on CO as well as peroxide concentrations. These results demonstrate that oxidative activity of acellular ferric RH and peroxides may be amended by CO turning on the reducing potential of peroxides and facilitating the formation of redox-inactive carboxyRH. Our data suggest the possible role of HO/CO in protection of vascular system from oxidative damage.

  7. Amine synthesis via iron-catalysed reductive coupling of nitroarenes with alkyl halides

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Chi Wai; Hu, Xile

    2016-01-01

    (Hetero)Aryl amines, an important class of organic molecules in medicinal chemistry, are most commonly synthesized from anilines, which are in turn synthesized by hydrogenation of nitroarenes. Amine synthesis directly from nitroarenes is attractive due to improved step economy and functional group compatibility. Despite these potential advantages, there is yet no general method for the synthesis of (hetero)aryl amines by carbon–nitrogen cross-coupling of nitroarenes. Here we report the reductive coupling of nitroarenes with alkyl halides to yield (hetero)aryl amines. A simple iron catalyst enables the coupling with numerous primary, secondary and tertiary alkyl halides. Broad scope and high functional group tolerance are demonstrated. Mechanistic study suggests that nitrosoarenes and alkyl radicals are involved as intermediates. This new C–N coupling method provides general and step-economical access to aryl amines. PMID:27515391

  8. Amine synthesis via iron-catalysed reductive coupling of nitroarenes with alkyl halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Chi Wai; Hu, Xile

    2016-08-01

    (Hetero)Aryl amines, an important class of organic molecules in medicinal chemistry, are most commonly synthesized from anilines, which are in turn synthesized by hydrogenation of nitroarenes. Amine synthesis directly from nitroarenes is attractive due to improved step economy and functional group compatibility. Despite these potential advantages, there is yet no general method for the synthesis of (hetero)aryl amines by carbon-nitrogen cross-coupling of nitroarenes. Here we report the reductive coupling of nitroarenes with alkyl halides to yield (hetero)aryl amines. A simple iron catalyst enables the coupling with numerous primary, secondary and tertiary alkyl halides. Broad scope and high functional group tolerance are demonstrated. Mechanistic study suggests that nitrosoarenes and alkyl radicals are involved as intermediates. This new C-N coupling method provides general and step-economical access to aryl amines.

  9. Simulation of reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Sabuj

    The primary motivation of this work is to evaluate a new alternative ironmaking process which involves the combination of a Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF) with an iron bath smelter. This work is concerned primarily, with the productivity of the RHF. It is known that the reduction in the RHF is controlled by chemical kinetics of the carbon oxidation and wustite reduction reactions as well as by heat transfer to the pellet surface and within the pellet. It is heat transfer to the pellet which limits the number of layers of pellets in the pellet bed in the RHF and thus, the overall productivity. Different types of carbon like graphite, coal-char and wood charcoal were examined. Part of the research was to investigate the chemical kinetics by de-coupling it from the influence of heat and mass transfer. This was accomplished by carrying out reduction experiments using small iron-oxide-carbon powder composite mixtures. The reaction rate constants were determined by fitting the experimental mass loss with a mixed reaction model. This model accounts for the carbon oxidation by CO2 and wustite reduction by CO, which are the primary rate controlling surface-chemical reactions in the composite system. The reaction rate constants have been obtained using wustite-coal-char powder mixtures and wustite-wood-charcoal mixtures. The wustite for these mixtures was obtained from two iron-oxide sources: artificial porous analytical hematite (PAH) and hematite ore tailings. In the next phase of this study, larger scale experiments were conducted in a RHF simulator using spherical composite pellets. Measurement of the reaction rates was accomplished using off-gas analysis. Different combinations of raw materials for the pellets were investigated. These included artificial ferric oxide as well as naturally existing hematite and taconite ores. Graphite, coal-char and wood-charcoal were the reductants. Experiments were conducted using a single layer, a double layer and a triple layer of

  10. Reductive precipitation of uranium(VI) by zero-valent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.; Dickey, M.J.; Yin, X.; Dai, S.; Liang, L.

    1998-11-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) and several adsorbent materials in removing uranium (U) from contaminated groundwater and to investigate the rates and mechanisms that are involved in the reactions. Fe{sup 0} filings were used as reductants, and the adsorbents included peat materials, iron oxides, and a carbon-based sorbent (Cercona Bone-Char). Results indicate that Fe{sup 0} filings are much more effective than the adsorbents in removing uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) from the aqueous solution. Nearly 100% of U was removed through reactions with Fe{sup 0} at an initial concentration up to 76 mM. Results from the batch adsorption and desorption and from spectroscopic studies indicate that reductive precipitation of U on Fe{sup 0} is the major reaction pathway. Only a small percentage of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} appeared to be adsorbed on the corrosion products of Fe{sup 0} and could be desorbed by leaching with a carbonate solution. The study also showed that the reduced U(IV) species on Fe{sup 0} surfaces could be reoxidized and potentially remobilized when the reduced system becomes more oxidized. Results of this research support the application of the permeable reactive barrier technology using Fe{sup 0} as a reactive media to intercept U and other groundwater contaminants migrating to the tributaries of Bear Creek at the US Department of Energy`s Y-12 Plant located in Oak Ridge, TN.

  11. Rhizosphere iron (III) deposition and reduction in a Juncus effusus L.-dominated wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, J.V.; Emerson, D.; Megonigal, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Iron (III) plaque forms on the roots of wetland plants from the reaction of Fe(II) with O2 released by roots. Recent laboratory studies have shown that Fe plaque is more rapidly reduced than non-rhizosphere Fe(III) oxides. The goals of the current study were to determine in situ rates of: (i) Fe(III) reduction of root plaque and soil Fe(III) oxides, (ii) root Fe(III) deposition, and (iii) root and soil organic matter decomposition. Iron (III) reduction was investigated using a novel buried-bag technique in which roots and soil were buried in heat-sealed membrane bags (Versapor 200 membrane, pore size = 0.2 ??m) in late fall following plant senescence. Bags were retrieved at monthly intervals for 1 yr to assess changes in total C and Fe mass, Fe mineralogy, Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio, and the abundances of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB). The soil C and Fe pools did not change significantly throughout the year, but root C and total root Fe mass decreased by 40 and 70%, respectively. When total Fe losses were adjusted for changes in the ratio of Fe(II)/Fe(III), over 95% of the Fe(III) in the plaque was reduced during the 12-mo study, at a peak rate of 0.6 mg Fe(III) g dry weight-1 d-1 (gdw-1 d-1). These estimates exceed the crude estimate of Fe(III) accumulation [0.3 mg Fe(III) g dry weight-1 d-1] on bare-root plants that were transplanted into the wetland for a growing season. We concluded that root plaque has the potential to be reduced as rapidly as it is deposited under field conditions. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  12. Pantothenate kinase-2 (Pank2) silencing causes cell growth reduction, cell-specific ferroportin upregulation and iron deregulation.

    PubMed

    Poli, Maura; Derosas, Manuela; Luscieti, Sara; Cavadini, Patrizia; Campanella, Alessandro; Verardi, Rosanna; Finazzi, Dario; Arosio, Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Pantothenate kinase 2 (Pank2) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyses the first regulatory step of Coenzyme A synthesis and that is responsible for a genetic movement disorder named Pank-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). This is characterized by abnormal iron accumulation in the brain, particularly in the globus pallidus. We downregulated Pank2 in some cell lines by using specific siRNAs to study its effect on iron homeostasis. In HeLa cells this caused a reduction of cell proliferation and of aconitase activity, signs of cytosolic iron deficiency without mitochondrial iron deposition, and a 12-fold induction of ferroportin mRNA. Pank2 silencing caused a strong induction of ferroportin mRNA also in hepatoma HepG2, a modest one in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and none in glioma U373 cells. A reduction of cell growth was observed in all these cell types. The strong Pank2-mediated alteration of ferroportin expression in some cell types might alter iron transfer to the brain and be connected with brain iron accumulation.

  13. Rates of microbial sulfate reduction control the sizes of biogenic iron sulfide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Q.

    2005-12-01

    Sulfide minerals occur widely in freshwater and marine sediments as byproducts of microbial sulfate reduction and as end products of heavy metal bioremediation. They form when metals in the environments combine with sulfide produced from the metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria. We used chemostat bioreactors to study sizes and crystal structures of iron sulfide (FeS) minerals produced by Desulfovibrio vulgaris, D. desulfuricans strain G20, and subspecies desulfuricans. FeS nanoparticles and their aggregates are characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). FeS nanoparticles produced by sulfate reducing bacteria are extremely small, usually less than around 10 nm in diameter. Nanoparticles do not occur as individual nanoparticles, but as aggregates. The sizes of FeS aggregates are affected by sulfate reduction rates, Fe(II) concentration, pH, ionic strength, organic matter concentration, bacterial species, etc. Aggregate size ranges from about 500 nm at very large sulfate reduction rates to about 1,500 nm at very small rates. Variations in Fe(II) concentration also lead to a difference up to 500 nm in FeS aggregate size. Different bacterial species produce nanoparticle aggregates of different sizes under similar growth conditions. For example, D. vulgaris produces FeS aggregates with sizes 500 nm smaller than those by strain G20. The inverse relationship between FeS aggregate sizes and sulfate reduction rates is important in evaluating metal bioremediation strategies. Previous approaches have focused on stimulating microbial activities in natural environments. However, our experimental results suggest that increasing metabolic rates may decrease the aggregate size, increasing the mobility of colloidal aggregates. Therefore, the balance between microbial activities and sizes of biogenic aggregates may be an important consideration in the design and

  14. Inhibition of iron (III) minerals and acidification on the reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Paul, Laiby; Smolders, Erik

    2014-09-01

    Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes is inhibited by acidification and by the presence of Fe (III) as a competitive electron acceptor. Synergism between both factors on dechlorination is predicted as reductive dissolution of Fe (III) minerals is facilitated by acidification. This study was set-up to assess this synergism for two common aquifer Fe (III) minerals, goethite and ferrihydrite. Anaerobic microbial dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) by KB-1 culture and formate as electron donor was investigated in anaerobic batch containers at different solution pH values (6.2-7.2) in sand coated with these Fe minerals and a sand only as control. In the absence of Fe, lowering substrate pH from 7.2 to 6.2 increased the time for 90% TCE degradation from 14±1d to 42±4d. At pH 7.2, goethite did not affect TCE degradation time while ferrihydrite increased the degradation time to 19±1d compared to the no Fe control. At pH 6.2, 90% degradation was at 78±1 (ferrihydrite) or 131±1d (goethite). Ferrous iron production in ferrihydrite treatment increased between pH 7.2 and 6.5 but decreased by further lowering pH to 6.2, likely due to reduced microbial activity. This study confirms that TCE is increasingly inhibited by the combined effect of acidification and bioavailable Fe (III), however no evidence was found for synergistic inhibition since Fe reduction did not increase as pH decreases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where effect of pH and Fe (III) reduction on TCE was simultaneously tested. Acid Fe-rich aquifers need sufficient buffering and alkalinity to ensure swift degradation of chlorinated ethenes.

  15. A bipolar membrane combined with ferric iron reduction as an efficient cathode system in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ter Heijne, Annemiek; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; De Wilde, Vinnie; Rozendal, René A; Buisman, Cees J N

    2006-09-01

    There is a need for alternative catalysts for oxygen reduction in the cathodic compartment of a microbial fuel cell (MFC). In this study, we show that a bipolar membrane combined with ferric iron reduction on a graphite electrode is an efficient cathode system in MFCs. A flat plate MFC with graphite felt electrodes, a volume of 1.2 L and a projected surface area of 290 cm2 was operated in continuous mode. Ferric iron was reduced to ferrous iron in the cathodic compartment according to Fe(3+) + e(-) --> Fe2+ (E0 = +0.77 V vs NHE, normal hydrogen electrode). This reversible electron transfer reaction considerably reduced the cathode overpotential. The low catholyte pH required to keep ferric iron soluble was maintained by using a bipolar membrane instead of the commonly used cation exchange membrane. For the MFC with cathodic ferric iron reduction, the maximum power density was 0.86 W/m2 at a current density of 4.5 A/m2. The Coulombic efficiency and energy recovery were 80-95% and 18-29% respectively.

  16. Investigation of the long-term performance of zero-valent iron for reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, J.; Kason, M.; Melitas, N.; Li, T.

    2000-02-01

    This research investigated the long-term performance of zero-valent iron for mediating the reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE). Over a 2-year period, rates of TCE dechlorination in columns packed with iron filings were measured in simulated groundwaters containing either 3 mM CaSO{sub 4}, 5 mM CaCl{sub 2}, or 5 mM Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. At early elapsed times, TCE reaction rates were pseudo-first-order in TCE concentration and were independent of the solution pH. With increasing elapsed time, reaction rates deviated from pseudo-first-order behavior due to reactive site saturation and increased iron surface passivation toward the influent end of each column. The extent of passivation was dependent on both the TCE concentration and the background electrolyte solution. For most of the investigation, TCE reaction rates in 3 mM CaSO{sub 4} and 5 mM CaCl{sub 2} solutions were statistically identical at the 0.05 confidence level. However, TCE reaction rates in 5 mM Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} were slower. In columns operated using chloride- and sulfate-containing waters, the effective half-life for TCE dechlorination increased from approximately 400 min after 10 days elapsed to approximately 2,500 min after 667 days. The effective TCE half-life in the nitrate-containing water increased from approximately 1,500 min after 10 days to approximately 3,500 min after 667 days. Measurements of iron corrosion rates in nitrate and chloride solutions showed that nitrate contributed to increased iron surface passivation and decreased rates of iron corrosion. Corrosion current measurements indicated that halocarbon reduction on fresh iron surfaces was cathodically controlled, whereas on aged iron surfaces, iron corrosion was anodically controlled. Anodic control of iron corrosion contributed to the development of reactive site saturation with time and to similar reaction rates for TCE and perchloroethylene. Passivation of the iron surfaces was found to be dependent on the

  17. Relative contribution of iron reduction to sediments organic matter mineralization in contrasting habitats of a shallow eutrophic freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mo; Jiang, He-Long

    2016-06-01

    Iron reduction is one of the important organic matter (OM) mineralization pathway in sediments. Here we investigated the rates and the relative contribution of iron reduction to OM mineralization in Zhushan bay (ZSB, cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB)-dominated habitats) and East Taihu Lake (ETL, submerged macrophypes (SM)-dominated habitats) of Lake Taihu, China. Anaerobic microcosm incubation revealed that the rate of iron reduction at ZSB (4.42 μmol cm(-3) d(-1)) in summer was almost 1.5 times higher than at ETL (3.13 μmol cm(-3) d(-1)). Iron reduction accounted for 66.5% (ZSB) and 31.8% (ETL) of total anaerobic carbon mineralization, respectively. No detectable methanogenesis was found at ZSB, while methanogenesis was responsible for 16.7% of total anaerobic respiration in sediments of ETL. Geochemical analysis of solid phase constituents indicated that ZSB surface sediments experienced highly oxidizing conditions with much higher amorphous Fe(III) (71 mmol m(-2)) than ETL (11 mmol m(-2)). Conversely, AVS inventories at ETL (38 mmol m(-2)) were up to 30 times higher than at ZSB (1.27 mmol m(-2)), indicating significant sulfate reduction in sediments of ETL. Overall results suggested that varying carbon sources and distinct geochemical characterizations of the sediments in contrasting habitats significantly influenced the rate of iron reduction and the pathway of C mineralization in a large freshwater lake.

  18. Kinetic studies on the reduction of iron ore nuggets by devolatilization of lean-grade coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Chanchal; Gupta, Prithviraj; De, Arnab; Chaudhuri, Mahua Ghosh; Dey, Rajib

    2016-12-01

    An isothermal kinetic study of a novel technique for reducing agglomerated iron ore by volatiles released by pyrolysis of lean-grade non-coking coal was carried out at temperature from 1050 to 1200°C for 10-120 min. The reduced samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and chemical analysis. A good degree of metallization and reduction was achieved. Gas diffusion through the solid was identified as the reaction-rate-controlling resistance; however, during the initial period, particularly at lower temperatures, resistance to interfacial chemical reaction was also significant, though not dominant. The apparent rate constant was observed to increase marginally with decreasing size of the particles constituting the nuggets. The apparent activation energy of reduction was estimated to be in the range from 49.640 to 51.220 kJ/mol and was not observed to be affected by the particle size. The sulfur and carbon contents in the reduced samples were also determined.

  19. Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction by Iron Tetra-arylporphyrins Bearing Pendant Proton Relays

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, Colin T.; Matson, Benjamin D.; Mayer, James M.

    2012-03-28

    Fe(III)meso-tetra(2-carboxyphenyl)porphine chloride (1) was investigated as an electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Rotating ring-disk voltammetry and independent reactions with hydrogen peroxide indicate that 1 has very high selectivity for reduction of O2 to H2O, without forming significant amounts of H2O2. Cyclic voltammetric measurements at high substrate/catalyst ratios allowed the determination of the turnover frequency (TOF) of 1, TOF = 103 s-1. The 4-carboxyphenyl isomer of 1, in which the carboxylic acids point away from the iron center, is a substantially slower and less selective catalyst. This direct comparison demonstrates that the value of the carboxylate groups positioned to act as proton delivery relays to enhance both the TOF and selectivity of 1 as a catalyst for the ORR. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  20. Multistep Reduction Kinetics of Fine Iron Ore with Carbon Monoxide in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Zheng, Zhong; Chen, Zhiwei; Yu, Wenzhou; Yue, Junrong

    2017-04-01

    The reduction kinetics of Brazilian hematite by CO is investigated in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer (MFBRA) using an analyzing method based on Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) model at temperatures of 973 K (700 °C), 1023 K (750 °C), 1073 K (800 °C), and 1123 K (850 °C). The solid products at different reduction stages are evaluated by SEM/EDS and XRD technologies. Results indicate that the reduction process is better to be discussed in terms of a parallel reaction model that consists of the reactions of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron, rather than a stepwise route. Meanwhile, the controlling mechanism of the reduction process is found to vary with temperature and the degree of conversion. The overall process is controlled by the gas-solid reaction occurring at the iron/wüstite interface in the initial stages, and then is limited by the nucleation of wüstite, and finally shifts to diffusion control. Moreover, the reactions of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron take place simultaneously but with different time dependences, and the apparent activation energies of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron are determined as 83.61 and 80.40 KJ/mol, respectively.

  1. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Robin Gerlach; Erin K. Field; Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel; Al B. Cunningham

    2011-09-01

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  2. Evidence of Nitrogen Loss from Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Coupled with Ferric Iron Reduction in an Intertidal Wetland.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yanling; Yin, Guoyu; Lin, Xianbiao; Cheng, Lv; Li, Ye; Hu, Xiaoting

    2015-10-06

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled with nitrite reduction is an important microbial pathway of nitrogen removal in intertidal wetlands. However, little is known about the role of anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled with ferric iron reduction (termed Feammox) in intertidal nitrogen cycling. In this study, sediment slurry incubation experiments were combined with an isotope-tracing technique to examine the dynamics of Feammox and its association with tidal fluctuations in the intertidal wetland of the Yangtze Estuary. Feammox was detected in the intertidal wetland sediments, with potential rates of 0.24-0.36 mg N kg(-1) d(-1). The Feammox rates in the sediments were generally higher during spring tides than during neap tides. The tidal fluctuations affected the growth of iron-reducing bacteria and reduction of ferric iron, which mediated Feammox activity and the associated nitrogen loss from intertidal wetlands to the atmosphere. An estimated loss of 11.5-18 t N km(-2) year(-1) was linked to Feammox, accounting for approximately 3.1-4.9% of the total external inorganic nitrogen transported into the Yangtze Estuary wetland each year. Overall, the co-occurrence of ferric iron reduction and ammonium oxidation suggests that Feammox can act as an ammonium removal mechanism in intertidal wetlands.

  3. Recovery of iron and calcium aluminate slag from high-ferrous bauxite by high-temperature reduction and smelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-yi; Lü, Wei; Qi, Yuan-hong; Zou, Zong-shu

    2016-08-01

    A high-temperature reduction and smelting process was used to recover iron and calcium aluminate slag from high-ferrous bauxite. The effects of w(CaO)/ w(SiO2) ratio, anthracite ratio, and reduction temperature and time on the recovery and size of iron nuggets and on the Al2O3 grade of the calcium aluminate slag were investigated through thermodynamic calculations and experiments. The optimized process conditions were the bauxite/anthracite/slaked lime weight ratio of 100:16.17:59.37, reduction temperature of 1450°C and reduction time of 20 min. Under these conditions, high-quality iron nuggets and calcium aluminate slag were obtained. The largest size and the highest recovery rate of iron nuggets were 11.42 mm and 92.79wt%, respectively. The calcium aluminate slag mainly comprised Ca2SiO4 and Ca12Al14O33, with small amounts of FeAl2O4, CaAl2O4, and Ca2Al2SiO7.

  4. Multistep Reduction Kinetics of Fine Iron Ore with Carbon Monoxide in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Zheng, Zhong; Chen, Zhiwei; Yu, Wenzhou; Yue, Junrong

    2017-01-01

    The reduction kinetics of Brazilian hematite by CO is investigated in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer (MFBRA) using an analyzing method based on Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) model at temperatures of 973 K (700 °C), 1023 K (750 °C), 1073 K (800 °C), and 1123 K (850 °C). The solid products at different reduction stages are evaluated by SEM/EDS and XRD technologies. Results indicate that the reduction process is better to be discussed in terms of a parallel reaction model that consists of the reactions of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron, rather than a stepwise route. Meanwhile, the controlling mechanism of the reduction process is found to vary with temperature and the degree of conversion. The overall process is controlled by the gas-solid reaction occurring at the iron/wüstite interface in the initial stages, and then is limited by the nucleation of wüstite, and finally shifts to diffusion control. Moreover, the reactions of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron take place simultaneously but with different time dependences, and the apparent activation energies of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron are determined as 83.61 and 80.40 KJ/mol, respectively.

  5. Reduction of Sn-Bearing Iron Concentrate with Mixed H2/CO Gas for Preparation of Sn-Enriched Direct Reduced Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Zhixiong; Li, Guanghui; Wen, Peidan; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yuanbo; Jiang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    The development of manufacturing technology of Sn-bearing stainless steel inspires a novel concept for using Sn-bearing complex iron ore via reduction with mixed H2/CO gas to prepare Sn-enriched direct reduced iron (DRI). The thermodynamic analysis of the reduction process confirms the easy reduction of stannic oxide to metallic tin and the rigorous conditions for volatilizing SnO. Although the removal of tin is feasible by reduction of the pellet at 1223 K (950 °C) with mixed gas of 5 vol pct H2, 28.5 vol pct CO, and 66.5 vol pct CO2 (CO/(CO + CO2) = 30 pct), it is necessary that the pellet be further reduced for preparing DRI. In contrast, maintaining Sn in the metallic pellet is demonstrated to be a promising way to effectively use the ore. It is indicated that only 5.5 pct of Sn is volatilized when the pellet is reduced at 1223 K (950 °C) for 30 minutes with the mixed gas of 50 vol pct H2, 50 vol pct CO (CO/(CO + CO2) = 100 pct). A metallic pellet (Sn-bearing DRI) with Sn content of 0.293 pct, Fe metallization of 93.5 pct, and total iron content of 88.2 pct is prepared as a raw material for producing Sn-bearing stainless steel. The reduced tin in the Sn-bearing DRI either combines with metallic iron to form Sn-Fe alloy or it remains intact.

  6. Surface catalysis of uranium(VI) reduction by iron(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liger, Emmanuelle; Charlet, Laurent; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    1999-10-01

    Colloidal hematite (α-Fe2O3) is used as model solid to investigate the kinetic effect of specific adsorption interactions on the chemical reduction of uranyl (UVIO22+) by ferrous iron. Acid-base titrations and Fe(II) and uranyl adsorption experiments are performed on hematite suspensions, under O2- and CO2-free conditions. The results are explained in terms of a constant capacitance surface complexation model of the hematite-aqueous solution interface. Two distinct Fe(II) surface complexes are required to reproduce the data: (≡FeIIIOFeII)+ (or ≡FeIIIOFeII(OH2)n+) and ≡FeIIIOFeIIOH0 (or ≡FeIIIOFeII(OH2)n-1OH0). The latter complex represents a significant fraction of total adsorbed Fe(II) at pH > 6.5. Uranyl binding to the hematite particles is characterized by a sharp adsorption edge between pH 4 and pH 5.5. Because of the absence of competing aqueous carbonate complexes, uranyl remains completely adsorbed at pH > 7. A single mononuclear surface complex accounts for the adsorption of uranyl over the entire range of experimental conditions. Although thermodynamically feasible, no reaction between uranyl and Fe(II) is observed in homogeneous solution at pH 7.5, for periods of up to three days. In hematite suspensions, however, surface-bound uranyl reacts on a time scale of hours. Based on Fourier Transformed Infrared spectra, chemical reduction of U(VI) is inferred to be the mechanism responsible for the disappearance of uranyl. The kinetics of uranyl reduction are quantified by measuring the decrease with time of the concentration of U(VI) extractable from the hematite particles by NaHCO3. In the presence of excess Fe(II), the initial rate of U(VI) reduction exhibits a first-order dependence on the concentration of adsorbed uranyl. The pseudo-first-order rate constant varies with pH (range, 6-7.5) and the total (dissolved + adsorbed) concentration of Fe(II) (range, 2-160 μM). When analyzing the rate data in terms of the calculated surface speciation, the

  7. Genetic reduction of phytate in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds increases iron absorption in young women.

    PubMed

    Petry, Nicolai; Egli, Ines; Campion, Bruno; Nielsen, Erik; Hurrell, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Iron bioavailability from common beans is negatively influenced by phytic acid (PA) and polyphenols (PPs). Newly developed low-PA (lpa) beans with 90% less PA and variable PPs might improve iron bioavailability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of lpa beans on iron bioavailability in women (n = 20). We compared iron absorption from 4 different beans using a paired, double meal, crossover design. Iron absorption was measured as erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes (Fe(57), Fe(58)) from 2 lpa bean lines, one high in PPs (means ± SDs; PA = 124 ± 10 mg/100 g; PPs = 462 ± 25 mg/100 g) and one low in PPs (PA = 70 ± 10 mg/100 g; PPs = 54 ± 2 mg/100 g). The other 2 beans used were their parents with a normal PA concentration, one high in PPs (PA = 1030 ± 30 mg/100 g; PPs = 676 ± 19 mg/100 g) and one low in PPs (PA = 1360 ± 10 mg/100 g; PPs = 58 ± 1 mg/100 g). Fractional iron absorption from the lpa bean high in PPs was 6.1% (95% CI: 2.6, 14.7), which was 60 and 130% higher compared with the parent high in PPs (P < 0.001) and low in PPs (P < 0.001), respectively. The total amount of iron absorbed per test meal from the lpa bean high in PPs (372 μg; 95% CI: 160, 890) was 60 and 163% higher compared with the parent high in PPs (P < 0.001) and low in PPs (P < 0.001), respectively. Fractional iron absorption from the lpa line low in PPs (4%; 95% CI: 1.8, 8.7) was 50% higher and the total amount of iron absorbed per test meal (261 μg; 95% CI: 120, 570) was 85% higher than iron from the parent low in PPs (P < 0.001). There was no difference between the lpa beans high or low in PPs or between the parents high or low in PPs. A 90% reduction in PA leads to an increase in bioavailable iron from beans, independent of the PP concentration. The lpa mutation could be a key tool for improving iron bioavailability from beans.

  8. EFFECTS OF NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER, ANTHROPOGENIC SURFACTANTS, AND MODEL QUINONES ON THE REDUCTION OF CONTAMINANTS BY ZERO-VALENT IRON. (R827117)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies of contaminant reduction by zero-valent iron metal (Fe0) have highlighted the role of iron oxides at the metal–water interface and the effect that sorption has at the oxide–water interface on contaminant reduction kinetics. The results s...

  9. Preliminary characterization and biological reduction of putative biogenic iron oxides (BIOS) from the Tonga-Kermadec Arc, southwest Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Langley, S; Igric, P; Takahashi, Y; Sakai, Y; Fortin, D; Hannington, M D; Schwarz-Schampera, U

    2009-01-01

    Sediment samples were obtained from areas of diffuse hydrothermal venting along the seabed in the Tonga sector of the Tonga-Kermadec Arc, southwest Pacific Ocean. Sediments from Volcano 1 and Volcano 19 were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and found to be composed primarily of the iron oxyhydroxide mineral, two-line ferrihydrite. XRD also suggested the possible presence of minor amounts of more ordered iron (hydr)oxides (including six-line ferrihydrite, goethite/lepidocrocite and magnetite) in the biogenic iron oxides (BIOS) from Volcano 1; however, Mössbauer spectroscopy failed to detect any mineral phases more crystalline than two-line ferrihydrite. The minerals were precipitated on the surfaces of abundant filamentous microbial structures. Morphologically, some of these structures were similar in appearance to the known iron-oxidizing genus Mariprofundus spp., suggesting that the sediments are composed of biogenic iron oxides. At Volcano 19, an areally extensive, active vent field, the microbial cells appeared to be responsible for the formation of cohesive chimney-like structures of iron oxyhydroxide, 2-3 m in height, whereas at Volcano 1, an older vent field, no chimney-like structures were apparent. Iron reduction of the sediment material (i.e. BIOS) by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was measured, in vitro, as the ratio of [total Fe(II)]:[total Fe]. From this parameter, reduction rates were calculated for Volcano 1 BIOS (0.0521 day(-1)), Volcano 19 BIOS (0.0473 day(-1)), and hydrous ferric oxide, a synthetic two-line ferrihydrite (0.0224 day(-1)). Sediments from both BIOS sites were more easily reduced than synthetic ferrihydrite, which suggests that the decrease in effective surface area of the minerals within the sediments (due to the presence of the organic component) does not inhibit subsequent microbial reduction. These results indicate that natural, marine BIOS are easily reduced in the presence of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, and that the

  10. Perchlorate reduction by autotrophic bacteria attached to zerovalent iron in a flow-through reactor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xueyuan; Amrhein, Christopher; Deshusses, Marc A; Matsumoto, Mark R

    2007-02-01

    Biological reduction of perchlorate by autotrophic microorganisms attached to zerovalent iron (ZVI) was studied in flow-through columns. The effects of pH, flow rate, and influent perchlorate and nitrate concentrations on perchlorate reduction were investigated. Excellent perchlorate removal performance (> or = 99%) was achieved at empty bed residence times (EBRTs) ranging from 0.3 to 63 h and an influent perchlorate concentration of 40-600 microg L(-1). At the longest liquid residence times, when the influent pH was above 7.5, a significant increase of the effluent pH was observed (pH > 10.0), which led to a decrease of perchlorate removal. Experiments at short residence times revealed that the ZVI column inoculated with local soil (Colton, CA) containing a mixed culture of denitrifiers exhibited much better performance than the columns inoculated with Dechloromonas sp. HZ for reduction of both perchlorate and nitrate. As the flow rate was varied between 2 and 50 mL min(-1), corresponding to empty bed contact times of 0.15-3.8 h, a maximum perchlorate elimination capacity of 3.0 +/- 0.7 g m(-3) h(-1) was obtained in a soil-inoculated column. At an EBRT of 0.3 h and an influent perchlorate concentration of 30 microg L(-1), breakthrough (> 6 ppb) of perchlorate in the effluent did not occur until the nitrate concentration in the influent was 1500 times (molar) greater than that of perchlorate. The mass of microorganisms attached on the solid ZVI/sand was found to be 3 orders of magnitude greater than that in the pore liquid, indicating that perchlorate was primarily reduced by bacteria attached to ZVI. Overall, the process appears to be a promising alternative for perchlorate remediation.

  11. Mercury mobilization and speciation linked to bacterial iron oxide and sulfate reduction: A column study to mimic reactive transfer in an anoxic aquifer.

    PubMed

    Hellal, Jennifer; Guédron, Stéphane; Huguet, Lucie; Schäfer, Jörg; Laperche, Valérie; Joulian, Catherine; Lanceleur, Laurent; Burnol, André; Ghestem, Jean-Philippe; Garrido, Francis; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) mobility and speciation in subsurface aquifers is directly linked to its surrounding geochemical and microbial environment. The role of bacteria on Hg speciation (i.e., methylation, demethylation and reduction) is well documented, however little data is available on their impact on Hg mobility. The aim of this study was to test if (i) Hg mobility is due to either direct iron oxide reduction by iron reducing bacteria (IRB) or indirect iron reduction by sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), and (ii) to investigate its subsequent fate and speciation. Experiments were carried out in an original column setup combining geochemical and microbiological approaches that mimic an aquifer including an interface of iron-rich and iron depleted zones. Two identical glass columns containing iron oxides spiked with Hg(II) were submitted to (i) direct iron reduction by IRB and (ii) to indirect iron reduction by sulfides produced by SRB. Results show that in both columns Hg was leached and methylated during the height of bacterial activity. In the column where IRB are dominant, Hg methylation and leaching from the column was directly correlated to bacterial iron reduction (i.e., Fe(II) release). In opposition, when SRB are dominant, produced sulfide induced indirect iron oxide reduction and rapid adsorption of leached Hg (or produced methylmercury) on neoformed iron sulfides (e.g., Mackinawite) or its precipitation as HgS. At the end of the SRB column experiment, when iron-oxide reduction was complete, filtered Hg and Fe concentrations increased at the outlet suggesting a leaching of Hg bound to FeS colloids that may be a dominant mechanism of Hg transport in aquifer environments. These experimental results highlight different biogeochemical mechanisms that can occur in stratified sub-surface aquifers where bacterial activities play a major role on Hg mobility and changes in speciation.

  12. Mercury mobilization and speciation linked to bacterial iron oxide and sulfate reduction: A column study to mimic reactive transfer in an anoxic aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellal, Jennifer; Guédron, Stéphane; Huguet, Lucie; Schäfer, Jörg; Laperche, Valérie; Joulian, Catherine; Lanceleur, Laurent; Burnol, André; Ghestem, Jean-Philippe; Garrido, Francis; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) mobility and speciation in subsurface aquifers is directly linked to its surrounding geochemical and microbial environment. The role of bacteria on Hg speciation (i.e., methylation, demethylation and reduction) is well documented, however little data is available on their impact on Hg mobility. The aim of this study was to test if (i) Hg mobility is due to either direct iron oxide reduction by iron reducing bacteria (IRB) or indirect iron reduction by sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), and (ii) to investigate its subsequent fate and speciation. Experiments were carried out in an original column setup combining geochemical and microbiological approaches that mimic an aquifer including an interface of iron-rich and iron depleted zones. Two identical glass columns containing iron oxides spiked with Hg(II) were submitted to (i) direct iron reduction by IRB and (ii) to indirect iron reduction by sulfides produced by SRB. Results show that in both columns Hg was leached and methylated during the height of bacterial activity. In the column where IRB are dominant, Hg methylation and leaching from the column was directly correlated to bacterial iron reduction (i.e., FeII release). In opposition, when SRB are dominant, produced sulfide induced indirect iron oxide reduction and rapid adsorption of leached Hg (or produced methylmercury) on neoformed iron sulfides (e.g., Mackinawite) or its precipitation as HgS. At the end of the SRB column experiment, when iron-oxide reduction was complete, filtered Hg and Fe concentrations increased at the outlet suggesting a leaching of Hg bound to FeS colloids that may be a dominant mechanism of Hg transport in aquifer environments. These experimental results highlight different biogeochemical mechanisms that can occur in stratified sub-surface aquifers where bacterial activities play a major role on Hg mobility and changes in speciation.

  13. Nitrogen-doped graphene-wrapped iron nanofragments for high-performance oxygen reduction electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Na Young; Shin, Dong Yun; Park, Hee-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Joon Kwon, S.; Lim, Dong-Hee; Bong, Ki Wan; Son, Jeong Gon; Kim, Jin Young

    2017-03-01

    Transition metals, such as iron (Fe)- or cobalt (Co)-based nanomaterials, are promising electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells due to their high theoretical activity and low cost. However, a major challenge to using these metals in place of precious metal catalysts for ORR is their low efficiency and poor stability, thus new concepts and strategies should be needed to address this issue. Here, we report a hybrid aciniform nanostructures of Fe nanofragments embedded in thin nitrogen (N)-doped graphene (Fe@N-G) layers via a heat treatment of graphene oxide-wrapped iron oxide (Fe2O3) microparticles with melamine. The heat treatment leads to transformation of Fe2O3 microparticles to nanosized zero-valent Fe fragments and formation of core-shell structures of Fe nanofragments and N-doped graphene layers. Thin N-doped graphene layers massively promote electron transfer from the encapsulated metals to the graphene surface, which efficiently optimizes the electronic structure of the graphene surface and thereby triggers ORR activity at the graphene surface. With the synergistic effect arising from the N-doped graphene and Fe nanoparticles with porous aciniform nanostructures, the Fe@N-G hybrid catalyst exhibits high catalytic activity, which was evidenced by high E1/2 of 0.82 V, onset potential of 0.93 V, and limiting current density of 4.8 mA cm-2 indicating 4-electron ORR, and even exceeds the catalytic stability of the commercial Pt catalyst.

  14. Reconstruction of Extracellular Respiratory Pathways for Iron(III) Reduction in Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobic bacterium capable of respiring a multitude of electron acceptors, many of which require the Mtr respiratory pathway. The core Mtr respiratory pathway includes a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (MtrA), an integral outer-membrane β-barrel protein (MtrB), and an outer-membrane-anchored c-type cytochrome (MtrC). Together, these components facilitate transfer of electrons from the c-type cytochrome CymA in the cytoplasmic membrane to electron acceptors at and beyond the outer-membrane. The genes encoding these core proteins have paralogs in the S. oneidensis genome (mtrB and mtrA each have four while mtrC has three) and some of the paralogs of mtrC and mtrA are able to form functional Mtr complexes. We demonstrate that of the additional three mtrB paralogs found in the S. oneidensis genome, only MtrE can replace MtrB to form a functional respiratory pathway to soluble iron(III) citrate. We also evaluate which mtrC/mtrA paralog pairs (a total of 12 combinations) are able to form functional complexes with endogenous levels of mtrB paralog expression. Finally, we reconstruct all possible functional Mtr complexes and test them in a S. oneidensis mutant strain where all paralogs have been eliminated from the genome. We find that each combination tested with the exception of MtrA/MtrE/OmcA is able to reduce iron(III) citrate at a level significantly above background. The results presented here have implications toward the evolution of anaerobic extracellular respiration in Shewanella and for future studies looking to increase the rates of substrate reduction for water treatment, bioremediation, or electricity production. PMID:22363330

  15. Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron in continuous-flow system Part 1: effect of feed solution pH.

    PubMed

    Gheju, M; Iovi, A; Balcu, I

    2008-05-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium by scrap iron was investigated in continuous system, using long-term column experiments, for aqueous Cr(VI) solutions having low buffering capacities, over the pH range of 2.00-7.30. The results showed that the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution significantly affects the reduction capacity of scrap iron. The highest reduction capacity was determined to be 19.2 mg Cr(VI)/g scrap iron, at pH 2.50, and decreased with increasing the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution. A considerable decrease in scrap iron reduction capacity (25%) was also observed at pH 2.00, as compared to pH 2.50, due to the increased contribution of H(+) ions to the corrosion of scrap iron, which leads to a rapid decrease in time of the scrap iron volume. Over the pH range of 2.50-7.30, hexavalent chromium concentration increases slowly in time after its breakthrough in column effluent, until a steady-state concentration was observed; similarly, over the same pH range, the amount of solubilized Cr(III) in treated column effluent decreases in time, until a steady-state concentration was observed. The steady-state concentration in column effluent decreased for Cr(VI) and increased for Cr(III) with decreasing the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution. No steady-state Cr(VI) or Cr(III) concentrations in column effluent were observed at pH 2.00. Over the entire studied pH range, the amount of Fe(total) in treated solution increases as the initial pH of column influent is decreased; the results show also a continuously decrease in time of Fe(total) concentration, for a constant initial pH, due to a decrease in time of iron corrosion rate. Cr(III) concentration in column effluent also continuously decreased in time, for a constant initial pH, over the pH range of 2.50-7.30. This represents an advantage, because the amount of precipitant agent used to remove Fe(total) and Cr(III) from the column effluent will also decrease in time. The optimum pH for Cr(VI) reduction with scrap iron in

  16. Effects of Coating Materials and Mineral Additives on Nitrate Reduction by Zerovalent Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Jeong, H. Y.; Lee, S.; Kang, N.; Choi, H. J.; Park, M.

    2015-12-01

    In efforts to facilitate nitrate removal, a variety of coating materials and mineral additives were assessed for their effects on the nitrate reduction by zerovalent iron (ZVI). Coated ZVIs were prepared by reacting Fe particles with Cr(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and S(-II) solutions under anoxic conditions, with the resultant materials named Cr/Fe, Co/Fe, Ni/Fe, Cu/Fe, and FeS/Fe, respectively. The mineral additives used, synthesized or purchased, included goethite, magnetite, and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Kinetic experiments were performed using air-tight serum vials containing 1.0 g Fe (uncoated or coated forms) in 15 mL of 100 mg NO3×N/L solutions with pH buffered at 7.0. To monitor the reaction progress, the solution phase was analyzed for NO3-, NO2-, and NH4+ on an ion chromatography, while the headspace was analyzed for H2, N2, and O2 on a gas chromatography. By uncoated Fe, ca. 60% of nitrate was reductively transformed for 3.6 h, with NH4+ being the predominant product. Compared with uncoated one, Cr/Fe, Co/Fe, and Cu/Fe showed faster removal rates of nitrate. The observed reactivity enhancement was thought to result from additional reduction of nitrate by H atoms adsorbed on the surface of Cr, Co, or Cu metal. In contrast, both Ni/Fe and FeS/Fe showed slower removal of nitrate than uncoated Fe. In both cases, the coating, which highly disfavors the adsorption of nitrate, would form on the Fe surface. When goethite, HFO, and magnetite were amended, the nitrate reduction by Fe was significantly increased, with the effect being most evident with HFO. Although not capable of reducing nitrate, the mineral additives would serve as crystal nuclei for the corrosion products of Fe, thus making the development of passivation layers on the Fe surface less. In the future, we will perform a kinetic modeling of the experimental data to assess the relative contribution of multiple reaction paths in the nitrate reduction by Fe.

  17. Mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction via micro-electrolysis at the powdered zero-valent iron/activated carbon interface.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinghuan; Song, Guangyu; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) powder always works well only at controlled pH lower than 4 due to the formation of iron (hydr)oxides on its surface. Fe(0) powder combined with activated carbon (AC), i.e., Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis system, was first introduced to enhance nitrate reduction in aqueous solution. Comparative study was carried out to investigate nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC system and Fe(0) under near-neutral conditions, showing that the Fe(0)/AC system successfully reduced nitrate even at initial pH 6 with the reduction efficiency of up to 73%, whereas for Fe(0) only ∼10%. The effect of Fe(0) to AC mass ratio on nitrate reduction efficiency was examined. Easier nitrate reduction was achieved with more contact between Fe(0) and AC as the result of decreasing Fe(0) to AC mass ratio. Ferrous ion and oxidation-reduction potential were measured to understand the mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis. The results suggest that a relative potential difference drives much more electrons from Fe(0) to AC, thus generating adsorbed atomic hydrogen which makes it possible for nitrate to be reduced at near-neural pH. Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis thus presents a great potential for practical application in nitrate wastewater treatment without excessive pH adjustment.

  18. Reduction of SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} anions and anoxic formation of iron(II)-Iron(III) hydroxy-selenate green rust

    SciTech Connect

    Refait, P.; Simon, L.; Genin, J.M.R.

    2000-03-01

    Iron(II)-iron(III) hydroxy-salts known as green rusts were recently discovered as minerals present in hydromorphic soils and sediments. Due to their high reactivity, they are envisioned as potential reducing agents of a number of pollutants such as nitrate, chromate, or selenate. The interaction of selenate ions with such iron(II)-containing hydroxy compounds was studied by monitoring the oxidation processes of the iron phases with transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy measured at 14 K and by following the evolution of Se(VI) in solution by capillary electrophoresis. This interaction involved the hydroxy-selenate green rust, a compound isomorphous to the hydroxy-sulfate GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}). Its chemical composition, Fe{sub y}{sup II}Fe{sub 2}{sup III}(OH){sub 2(y+2)}SeO{sub 4}{center_dot}8H{sub 2}O, varied with time since y starts at 5.5 and ends at 4. GR(SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) was obtained from Fe(OH){sub 2} precipitates by simultaneous accumulation of SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} anions inside the solid phase and reduction of an equal amount of SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} anions to Se(IV) species. These species were found to be less mobile, partially bound to iron compounds and/or forming iron salts. Finally, the hydroxy-selenate GR2(SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) can form without any other oxidizing agent than selenate itself.

  19. Greek "red mud" residue: a study of microwave reductive roasting followed by magnetic separation for a metallic iron recovery process.

    PubMed

    Samouhos, Michail; Taxiarchou, Maria; Tsakiridis, Petros E; Potiriadis, Konstantinos

    2013-06-15

    The present research work is focused on the development of an alternative microwave reductive roasting process of red mud using lignite (30.15 wt.%Cfix), followed by wet magnetic separation, in order to produce a raw material suitable for sponge or cast iron production. The reduction degree of iron was controlled by both the reductive agent content and the microwave heating time. The reduction followed the Fe₂O₃ → Fe₃O₄ → FeO → Fe sequence. The dielectric constants [real (ε') and imaginary (ε″) permittivities] of red mud-lignite mixture were determined at 2.45 GHz, in the temperature range of 25-1100 °C. The effect of parameters such as temperature, intensity of reducing conditions, intensity of magnetic field and dispersing agent addition rate on the result of both processes was investigated. The phase's transformations in reduction process with microwave heating were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) in combination with thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA). The microstructural and morphological characterization of the produced calcines was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At the optimum conditions a magnetic concentrate with total iron concentration of 35.15 and 69.3 wt.% metallization degree was obtained.

  20. Investigation of In-situ Biogeochemical Reduction of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater by Reduced Iron Minerals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogeochemical transformation is a process in which chlorinated solvents are degraded abiotically by reactive minerals formed by, at least in part or indirectly from, anaerobic biological processes. Five mulch biowall and/or vegetable oil-based bioremediation applications for tr...

  1. Involvement of superoxide radical in extracellular ferric reduction by iron-deficient bean roots. [Phadeolus vulgaris L. var Prelude

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak, I.; van de Wetering, D.A.M.; Marschner, H.; Bienfait, H.F.

    1987-09-01

    The recent proposal of Tipton and Thowsen that iron-deficient plants reduce ferric chelates in cell walls by a system dependent on the leakage of malate from root cells was tested. Results are presented showing that this mechanism could not be responsible for the high rates of ferric reduction shown by roots of iron-deficient bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Prelude) plants. The role of O/sub 2/ in the reduction of ferric chelates by roots of iron-deficient bean plants was also tested. The rate of Fe(III) reduction was the same in the presence and in the absence of O/sub 2/. However, in the presence of O/sub 2/ the reaction was partially inhibited by superoxide dismutase (SOD), which indicates a role for the superoxide radical, O/sub 2//sup -/, as a facultative intermediate electron carrier. The inhibition by SOD increased with substrate pH and with decrease in concentration of the ferrous scavenger bathophenanthroline-disulfonate. The results are consistent with a mechanism for transmembrane electron in which a flavin or quinone is the final electron carrier in the plasma membrane. The results are discussed in relation to the ecological importance that O/sub 2//sup -/ may have in the acquisition of ferric iron by dicotyledonous plants.

  2. Kinetics of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Scaling From Purified Proteins to Whole Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, S.; Ross, D.; Tien, M.

    2006-12-01

    To predict biogeochemical reactions in the field, it will be necessary to predict rates and processes from fundamental biochemical observations. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a gram-negative facultative anaerobe that has a versatile respiration system capable of utilizing a large number of terminal electron acceptors. Genetic studies have identified most if not all of the proteins involved in iron reduction; however, the mechanism of iron reduction is yet to be determined. Our research is focused on how this bacterium is able to utilize solid iron forms as its terminal electron acceptor; we are also investigating the reduction of chelated iron forms such as EDTA, NTA and ferric citrate for kinetic comparison. Solid iron oxides are the predominant form which iron is found in the earth's crust under aerobic and circumneutral pH conditions. In order to fully understand how this process works, we have taken a biochemical/kinetics approach. We have measured kinetic constants at three different scales: transient-state kinetic studies using a stop flow, steady-state kinetic from isolated membrane fractions and, whole cell kinetic. With the stop flow, we have measured rate constants between hemeproteins OmcA, MtrA and CctA with EDTA-Fe3+, NTA-Fe3+ and citrate-Fe3+. For steady state kinetics with membrane fractions, we have obtained kinetic constants with EDTA-Fe3+, NTA- Fe3+, citrate-Fe3+ and goethite. The rates are expressed as per mole of MtrC. The hemeprotein MtrC, thought to be the terminal iron reductase, was quantified through Western-blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies. Second order rate constants from stop flow studies are then compared to kcat/Km values obtained from steady state kinetic studies. Similar studies were also performed with whole cells and again normalized to MtrC content. The kinetic constants scale up well for the soluble iron forms but not for the insoluble iron form (goethite). Mechanistic implications from these scale up studies will be

  3. Application of low pressure capacitively coupled rf hydrogen plasma for low temperature reduction of iron clusters in structure of fe-pillared materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starshinova, V. L.; Gorelysheva, V. E.; Shinka Jr., A. A., rev; Gnevashev, S. G.; Kulevtsov, G. N.; Shinkarev, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The unique properties of pillared materials determine their use in catalysis, purification and separation. The paper studies the reduction of composite catalysts, Fe-pillared materials. The authors compare their reduction in low temperature capacitively coupled RF hydrogen discharge of low pressure to their conventional direct hydrogen reduction in a tubular muffle furnace. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to characterize the iron-bearing phases. The results show that the reduction of iron hydro/oxide clusters associated with an aluminosilicate matrix to metallic iron is very challenging due to the degree of the pore space availability for hydrogen.

  4. Final report - Reduction of mercury in saturated subsurface sediments and its potential to mobilize mercury in its elemental form

    SciTech Connect

    Bakray, Tamar

    2013-06-13

    The goal of our project was to investigate Hg(II) reduction in the deep subsurface. We focused on microbial and abiotic pathways of reduction and explored how it affected the toxicity and mobility of Hg in this unique environment. The project’s tasks included: 1. Examining the role of mer activities in the reduction of Hg(II) in denitrifying enrichment cultures; 2. Investigating the biotic/abiotic reduction of Hg(II) under iron reducing conditions; 3. Examining Hg(II) redox transformations under anaerobic conditions in subsurface sediments from DOE sites.

  5. In situ redox manipulation of subsurface sediments from Fort Lewis, Washington: Iron reduction and TCE dechlorination mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    JE Szecsody; JS Fruchter; DS Sklarew; JC Evans

    2000-03-21

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a bench-scale study to determine how effective chemically treated Ft. Lewis sediments can degrade trichloroethylene (TCE). The objectives of this experimental study were to quantify: (1) sediment reduction and oxidation reactions, (2) TCE degradation reactions, and (3) other significant geochemical changes that occurred. Sediment reduction and oxidation were investigated to determine the mass of reducible iron in the Ft. Lewis sediments and the rate of this reduction and subsequent oxidation at different temperatures. The temperature dependence was needed to be able to predict field-scale reduction in the relatively cold ({approximately}11 C) Ft. Lewis aquifer. Results of these experiments were used in conjunction with other geochemical and hydraulic characterization to design the field-scale injection experiment and predict barrier longevity. For example, the sediment reduction rate controls the amount of time required for the dithionite solution to fully react with sediments. Sediment oxidation experiments were additionally conducted to determine the oxidation rate and provide a separate measure of the mass of reduced iron. Laboratory experiments that were used to meet these objectives included: (1) sediment reduction in batch (static) systems, (2) sediment reduction in 1-D columns, and (3) sediment oxidation in 1-D columns. Multiple reaction modeling was conducted to quantify the reactant masses and reaction rates.

  6. A Versatile Iron-Tannin-Framework Ink Coating Strategy to Fabricate Biomass-Derived Iron Carbide/Fe-N-Carbon Catalysts for Efficient Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Liang, Yan; Hu, Yaoxin; Kong, Biao; Simon, George P; Zhang, Jin; Jiang, San Ping; Wang, Huanting

    2016-01-22

    The conversion of biomass into valuable carbon composites as efficient non-precious metal oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts is attractive for the development of commercially viable polymer electrolyte membrane fuel-cell technology. Herein, a versatile iron-tannin-framework ink coating strategy is developed to fabricate cellulose-derived Fe3 C/Fe-N-C catalysts using commercial filter paper, tissue, or cotton as a carbon source, an iron-tannin framework as an iron source, and dicyandiamide as a nitrogen source. The oxygen reduction performance of the resultant Fe3C/Fe-N-C catalysts shows a high onset potential (i.e. 0.98 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)), and large kinetic current density normalized to both geometric electrode area and mass of catalysts (6.4 mA cm(-2) and 32 mA mg(-1) at 0.80 V vs RHE) in alkaline condition. This method can even be used to prepare efficient catalysts using waste carbon sources, such as used polyurethane foam.

  7. Biotic and Abiotic Reduction and Solubilization of Pu(IV)O2•xH2O(am) as Affected by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Plymale, Andrew E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.; Bolton, Harvey

    2012-01-24

    In the presence of hydrogen (H{sub 2}), the synthetic chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), and the electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens both reductively solubilized 100% of added 0.5 mM plutonium (IV) hydrous oxide (Pu(IV)O{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}) in {approx}24 h at pH 7 in a non-complexing buffer. In the absence of AQDS, bioreduction was much slower ({approx}22 days) and less extensive ({approx}83-94%). In the absence of DMRB but under comparable conditions, 89% (without AQDS) to 98% (with AQDS) of added 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was reductively solubilized over 418 days. Under comparable conditions but in the absence of EDTA, <0.001% of the 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was solubilized, with or without bacteria. However, Pu(aq) increased by as much as an order of magnitude in some EDTA-free treatments, both biotic and abiotic, and increases in solubility were associated with the production of both Pu(OH)3(am) and Pu(III)(aq). Incubation with DMRB in the absence of EDTA increased the polymeric and crystalline content of the PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} and also decreased Pu solubility in 6-N HCl. Results from an in vitro assay demonstrated electron transfer to PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} from the S. oneidensis outer-membrane c-type cytochrome MtrC, and EDTA increased the oxidation of MtrC by PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}. Our results suggest that PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} biotic and abiotic reduction and solubilization may be important in anoxic, reducing environments, especially where complexing ligands and electron shuttling compounds are present.

  8. A comparative DFT study of oxygen reduction reaction on mononuclear and binuclear cobalt and iron phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Li, Mengke; Yu, Zongxue; Ke, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyzed by mononuclear and planar binuclear cobalt (CoPc) and iron phthalocyanine (FePc) catalysts is investigated in detail by density functional theory (DFT) methods. The calculation results indicate that the ORR activity of Fe-based Pcs is much higher than that of Co-based Pcs, which is due to the fact that the former could catalyze 4e- ORRs, while the latter could catalyze only 2e- ORRs from O2 to H2O2. The original high activities of Fe-based Pcs could be attributed to their high energy level of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), which could lead to the stronger adsorption energy between catalysts and ORR species. Nevertheless, the HOMO of Co-based Pcs is the ring orbital, not the 3 d Co orbital, thereby inhibiting the electron transfer from metal to adsorbates. Furthermore, compared with mononuclear FePc, the planar binuclear FePc has more stable structure in acidic medium and more suitable adsorption energy of ORR species, making it a promising non-precious electrocatalyst for ORR.

  9. Reduction and immobilization of chromate in chromite ore processing residue with nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Du, Jingjing; Lu, Jinsuo; Wu, Qiong; Jing, Chuanyong

    2012-05-15

    Chromite ore processing residue (COPR) poses a great environmental and health risk with persistent Cr(VI) leaching. To reduce Cr(VI) and subsequently immobilize in the solid matrix, COPR was incubated with nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and the Cr(VI) speciation and leachability were studied. Multiple complementary analysis methods including leaching tests, X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to investigate the immobilization mechanism. Geochemical PHREEQC model calculation agreed well with our acid neutralizing capacity experimental results and confirmed that when pH was lowered from 11.7 to 7.0, leachate Cr(VI) concentrations were in the range 358-445mgL(-1) which contributed over 90% of dissolved Cr from COPR. Results of alkaline digestion, XANES, and XPS demonstrated that incubation COPR with nZVI under water content higher than 27% could result in a nearly complete Cr(VI) reduction in solids and less than 0.1mgL(-1) Cr(VI) in the TCLP leachate. The results indicated that remediation approaches using nZVI to reduce Cr(VI) in COPR should be successful with sufficient water content to facilitate electron transfer from nZVI to COPR.

  10. Enhanced oxygen reduction performance by novel pyridine substituent groups of iron (II) phthalocyanine with graphene composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Lili; Lv, Guojun; He, Xingquan

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel iron (II) tetrapyridyloxyphthalocyanine decorated graphene (FeTPPc/Gr) is synthesized through a simple solvothermal method. The catalytic performance of the fabricated FeTPPc/Gr for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is accessed by cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and i-t chronoamperometry methods. The FeTPPc/Gr composite catalyst for the ORR displays an enhanced electrocatalytic activity compared with other FePc/Gr catalysts. More importantly, the proposed FeTPPc/Gr catalyst towards the ORR outperforms the commercial Pt/C catalyst in terms of higher diffusion-limiting current, more positive onset potential and half-wave potential, better stability and tolerance to methanol crossover. The improved ORR performance is attributed to the activity of peripheral pyridine substituents in the FePc, which facilitate O2 absorption and increase the additional active sites. Based on our experimental results, designing novel metal-N4 macrocycles and incorporating them into graphene or graphene derivatives, with both optimal activity and durability for the ORR, may hold great promise for application in alkaline direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs).

  11. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization: Microbial and Mineralogical Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Joel E. Kostka

    2008-02-06

    This project represented a joint effort between Florida State University (FSU), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Illinois (U of I). FSU served as the lead institution and Dr. J.E. Kostka was responsible for project coordination, integration, and deliverables. This project was designed to elucidate the microbial ecology and geochemistry of metal reduction in subsurface environments at the U.S. DOE-NABIR Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORFRC). Our objectives were to: 1) characterize the dominant iron minerals and related geochemical parameters likely to limit U(VI) speciation, 2) directly quantify reaction rates and pathways of microbial respiration (terminal-electron-accepting) processes which control subsurface sediment chemistry, and 3) identify and enumerate the organisms mediating U(VI) transformation. A total of 31 publications and 47 seminars or meeting presentations were completed under this project. One M.S. thesis (by Nadia North) and a Ph.D. dissertation (by Lainie Petrie-Edwards) were completed at FSU during fall of 2003 and spring of 2005, respectively. Ph.D. students, Denise Akob and Thomas Gihring have continued the student involvement in this research since fall of 2004. All of the above FSU graduate students were heavily involved in the research, as evidenced by their regular attendance at PI meetings and ORFRC workshops.

  12. Simple-Cubic Carbon Frameworks with Atomically Dispersed Iron Dopants toward High-Efficiency Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biwei; Wang, Xinxia; Zou, Jinxiang; Yan, Yancui; Xie, Songhai; Hu, Guangzhi; Li, Yanguang; Dong, Angang

    2017-03-08

    Iron and nitrogen codoped carbons (Fe-N-C) have attracted increasingly greater attention as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Although challenging, the synthesis of Fe-N-C catalysts with highly dispersed and fully exposed active sites is of critical importance for improving the ORR activity. Here, we report a new type of graphitic Fe-N-C catalysts featuring numerous Fe single atoms anchored on a three-dimensional simple-cubic carbon framework. The Fe-N-C catalyst, derived from self-assembled Fe3O4 nanocube superlattices, was prepared by in situ ligand carbonization followed by acid etching and ammonia activation. Benefiting from its homogeneously dispersed and fully accessible active sites, highly graphitic nature, and enhanced mass transport, our Fe-N-C catalyst outperformed Pt/C and many previously reported Fe-N-C catalysts for ORR. Furthermore, when used for constructing the cathode for zinc-air batteries, our Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited current and power densities comparable to those of the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst.

  13. Syntrophic Effects in a Subsurface Clostridial Consortium on Fe(III)-(Oxyhydr)oxide Reduction and Secondary Mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Madhavi; Lin, Chu-Ching; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhao, Xiuhong; Wang, Yangping; Barkay, Tamar; Yee, Nathan

    2013-07-09

    In this study, we cultivated from subsurface sediments an anaerobic Clostridia 25 consortium that was composed of a fermentative Fe-reducer Clostridium species (designated as 26 strain FGH) and a novel sulfate-reducing bacterium belonging to the Clostridia family 27 Vellionellaceae (designated as strain RU4). In pure culture, Clostridium sp. strain FGH mediated 28 the reductive dissolution/transformation of iron oxides during growth on peptone. When 29 Clostridium sp. FGH was grown with strain RU4 on peptone, the rates of iron oxide reduction 30 were significantly higher. Iron reduction by the consortium was mediated by multiple 31 mechanisms, including biotic reduction by Clostridium sp. FGH and biotic/abiotic reactions 32 involving biogenic sulfide by strain RU4. The Clostridium sp. FGH produced hydrogen during 33 fermentation, and the presence of hydrogen inhibited growth and iron reduction activity. The 34 sulfate-reducing partner strain RU4 was stimulated by the presence of H2 gas and generated 35 reactive sulfide which promoted the chemical reduction of the iron oxides. Characterization of 36 Fe(II) mineral products showed the formation of magnetite during ferrihydrite reduction, and 37 the precipitation of iron sulfides during goethite and hematite reduction. The results suggest an 38 important pathway for iron reduction and secondary mineralization by fermentative sulfate-39 reducing microbial consortia is through syntrophy-driven biotic/abiotic reactions with biogenic 40 sulfide.

  14. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part II. Rates of reduction of composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    A new ironmaking concept is being proposed that involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) with an iron-bath smelter. The RHF makes use of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets as the charge material and the final product is direct-reduced iron (DRI) in the solid or molten state. This part of the research includes the development of a reactor that simulated the heat transfer in an RHF. The external heat-transport and high heating rates were simulated by means of infrared (IR) emitting lamps. The reaction rates were measured by analyzing the off-gas and computing both the amount of CO and CO{sub 2} generated and the degree of reduction. The reduction times were found to be comparable to the residence times observed in industrial RHFs. Both artificial ferric oxide (PAH) and naturally occurring hematite and taconite ores were used as the sources of iron oxide. Coal char and devolatilized wood charcoal were the reductants. Wood charcoal appeared to be a faster reductant than coal char. However, in the PAH-containing pellets, the reverse was found to be true because of heat-transfer limitations. For the same type of reductant, hematite-containing pellets were observed to reduce faster than taconite-containing pellets because of the development of internal porosity due to cracking and fissure formation during the Fe2O{sub 3}-to-Fe3O{sub 4} transition. This is, however, absent during the reduction of taconite, which is primarily Fe3O{sub 4}. The PAH-wood-charcoal pellets were found to undergo a significant amount of swelling at low-temperature conditions, which impeded the external heat transport to the lower layers. If the average degree of reduction targeted in an RHF is reduced from 95 to approximately 70 pct by coupling the RHF with a bath smelter, the productivity of the RHF can be enhanced 1.5 to 2 times. The use of a two- or three-layer bed was found to be superior to that of a single layer, for higher productivities.

  15. Recovery of Iron from Pyrite Cinder Containing Non-ferrous Metals Using High-Temperature Chloridizing-Reduction-Magnetic Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Guo, Hongwei; Xu, Jifang; Lv, Yanan; Xu, Zemin; Huo, Haijiang

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a new technique that uses high-temperature chloridizing -reduction-magnetic separation to recover iron from pyrite cinder containing non-ferrous metals. The effects of the reduction temperature, reduction time, and chlorinating agent dosage were investigated. The optimized process parameters were proposed as the following: CaCl2 dosage of 2 pct, chloridizing at 1398 K (1125 °C) for 10 minutes, reducing at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 80 minutes, grinding to a particle size of 78.8 pct less than 45 μm, and magnetic field intensity of 73 mT. Under the optimized conditions, the Cu, Pb, and Zn removal rates were 45.2, 99.2, and 89.1 pct, respectively. The iron content of the magnetic concentrate was 90.6 pct, and the iron recovery rate was 94.8 pct. Furthermore, the reduction behavior and separation mechanism were determined based on microstructure and phase change analyses using X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and optical microscopy.

  16. Recovery of Iron from Pyrite Cinder Containing Non-ferrous Metals Using High-Temperature Chloridizing-Reduction-Magnetic Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Guo, Hongwei; Xu, Jifang; Lv, Yanan; Xu, Zemin; Huo, Haijiang

    2017-04-01

    This study presents a new technique that uses high-temperature chloridizing -reduction-magnetic separation to recover iron from pyrite cinder containing non-ferrous metals. The effects of the reduction temperature, reduction time, and chlorinating agent dosage were investigated. The optimized process parameters were proposed as the following: CaCl2 dosage of 2 pct, chloridizing at 1398 K (1125 °C) for 10 minutes, reducing at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 80 minutes, grinding to a particle size of 78.8 pct less than 45 μm, and magnetic field intensity of 73 mT. Under the optimized conditions, the Cu, Pb, and Zn removal rates were 45.2, 99.2, and 89.1 pct, respectively. The iron content of the magnetic concentrate was 90.6 pct, and the iron recovery rate was 94.8 pct. Furthermore, the reduction behavior and separation mechanism were determined based on microstructure and phase change analyses using X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and optical microscopy.

  17. Degradation of trichloronitromethane by iron water main corrosion products.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Yub; Pearson, Carrie R; Hozalski, Raymond M; Arnold, William A

    2008-04-01

    Halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) may undergo reduction reactions at the corroded pipe wall in drinking water distribution systems consisting of cast or ductile iron pipe. Iron pipe corrosion products were obtained from several locations within two drinking water distribution systems. Crystalline-phase composition of freeze-dried corrosion solids was analyzed using X-ray diffraction, and ferrous and ferric iron contents were determined via multiple extraction methods. Batch experiments demonstrated that trichloronitromethane (TCNM), a non-regulated DBP, is rapidly reduced in the presence of pipe corrosion solids and that dissolved oxygen (DO) slows the reaction. The water-soluble iron content of the pipe solids is the best predictor of TCNM reaction rate constant. These results indicate that highly reactive DBPs that are able to compete with oxygen and residual disinfectant for ferrous iron may be attenuated via abiotic reduction in drinking water distribution systems.

  18. The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan; Schöler, H. F.

    2010-05-01

    The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to volatile organic compounds was studied intensely over the last years (Keppler et al., 2000; Huber et al., 2009). It was shown that soil organic matter is oxidised due to the presence of iron (III), hydrogen peroxide and chloride and thereby produces diverse alkyl halides, which are emitted into the atmosphere. The formation of polar halogenated compounds like chlorinated acetic acids which are relevant toxic environmental substances was also found in soils and sediments (Kilian et al., 2002). The investigation of the formation of other polar halogenated and non-halogenated compounds like diverse mono- and dicarboxylic acids is going to attain more and more importance. Due to its high acidity oxalic acid might have impacts on the environment e.g., nutrient leaching, plant diseases and negative influence on microbial growth. In this study, the abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soil is examined. For a better understanding of natural degradation processes mechanistic studies were conducted using the model compound catechol as representative for structural elements of the humic substances and its reaction with iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide. Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and hydrogen peroxide is produced by bacteria or through incomplete reduction of oxygen. To find suitable parameters for an optimal reaction and a qualitative and quantitative analysis method the following reaction parameters are varied: concentration of iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide, time dependence, pH-value and influence of chloride. Analysis of oxalic acid was performed employing an ion chromatograph equipped with a conductivity detector. The time dependent reaction shows a relatively fast formation of oxalic acid, the optimum yield is achieved after 60 minutes. Compared to the concentration of catechol an excess of hydrogen peroxide as well as a low concentration of iron (III) are required. In absence of chloride the

  19. TRANSFORMATION AND MOBILIZATION OF ARSENIC ADSORBED ON GRANULAR FERRIC HYDROXIDE UNDER BIO-REDUCTIVE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotic and abiotic reduction of arsenic (V) and iron (III) influences the partioning of arsenic (As) between the solid and aqueous phases in soils, sediments and wastes. In this study, laboratory experiments on arsenic adsorbed on granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) was performed to ...

  20. Community-based dietary phytate reduction and its effect on iron status in Malawian children.

    PubMed

    Manary, Mark J; Krebs, Nancy F; Gibson, Rosalind S; Broadhead, Robin L; Hambidge, K Michael

    2002-06-01

    This study describes a community-based method used in rural Malawi to remove dietary phytate, an inhibitor of iron absorption, and notes an improvement in the iron status of ten children who participated in the trial. Phytate was removed by soaking maize flour in excess water with phytase and decanting the water before cooking the flour. Iron status, as measured by soluble transferrin receptor and zinc protoporphyrin, was improved but not normal.

  1. Reduction of chromate from electroplating wastewater from pH 1 to 2 using fluidized zero valent iron process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiao-Shing; Cheng, Chih-Yu; Li, Chi-Wang; Chai, Pao-Hsuan; Chang, Yu-Min

    2007-04-02

    Fluidized zero valent iron (ZVI) process was conducted to reduce hexavalent chromium (chromate, CrO(4)(2-)) to trivalent chromium (Cr(3+)) from electroplating wastewater due to the following reasons: (1) Extremely low pH (1-2) for the electroplating wastewater favoring the ZVI reaction. (2) The ferric ion, produced from the reaction of Cr(VI) and ZVI, can act as a coagulant to assist the precipitation of Cr(OH)(3(s)) to save the coagulant cost. (3) Higher ZVI utilization for fluidized process due to abrasive motion of the ZVI. For influent chromate concentration of 418 mg/L as Cr(6+), pH 2 and ZVI dosage of 3g (41 g/L), chromate removal was only 29% with hydraulic detention time (HRT) of 1.2 min, but was increased to 99.9% by either increasing HRT to 5.6 min or adjusting pH to 1.5. For iron species at pH 2 and HRT of 1.2 min, Fe(3+) was more thermodynamically stable since oxidizing agent chromate was present. However, if pH was adjusted to 1.5 or 1, where chromate was completely removed, high Fe(2+) but very low Fe(3+) was present. It can be explained that ZVI reacted with chromate to produce Fe(2+) first and the presence of chromate would keep converting Fe(2+) to Fe(3+). Therefore, Fe(2+) is an indicator for complete reduction from Cr(VI) to Cr(III). X-ray diffraction (XRD) was conducted to exam the remained species at pH 2. ZVI, iron oxide and iron sulfide were observed, indicating the formation of iron oxide or iron sulfide could stop the chromate reduction reaction.

  2. Cysteine Prevents the Reduction in Keratin Synthesis Induced by Iron Deficiency in Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Irace, Carlo; Capuozzo, Antonella; Piccolo, Marialuisa; Di Pascale, Antonio; Russo, Annapina; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Lepre, Fabio; Russo, Giulia; Santamaria, Rita

    2016-02-01

    L-cysteine is currently recognized as a conditionally essential sulphur amino acid. Besides contributing to many biological pathways, cysteine is a key component of the keratin protein by its ability to form disulfide bridges that confer strength and rigidity to the protein. In addition to cysteine, iron represents another critical factor in regulating keratins expression in epidermal tissues, as well as in hair follicle growth and maturation. By focusing on human keratinocytes, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cysteine supplementation as nutraceutical on keratin biosynthesis, as well as to get an insight on the interplay of cysteine availability and cellular iron status in regulating keratins expression in vitro. Herein we demonstrate that cysteine promotes a significant up-regulation of keratins expression as a result of de novo protein synthesis, while the lack of iron impairs keratin expression. Interestingly, cysteine supplementation counteracts the adverse effect of iron deficiency on cellular keratin expression. This effect was likely mediated by the up-regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin, the main cellular proteins involved in iron homeostasis, at last affecting the labile iron pool. In this manner, cysteine may also enhance the metabolic iron availability for DNA synthesis without creating a detrimental condition of iron overload. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first study in an in vitro keratinocyte model providing evidence that cysteine and iron cooperate for keratins expression, indicative of their central role in maintaining healthy epithelia.

  3. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent Oxidation of Sediment Containing Fe-silicates and Fe-oxides: Effect of Redox Cycling on Fe(III) Bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Komlos, John; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2007-07-01

    Microbial reduction of iron has been shown to be important in the transformation and remediation of contaminated sediments. Re-oxidation of microbially reduced iron may occur in sediments that experience oxidation-reduction cycling and can thus impact the extent of contaminant remediation. The purpose of this research was to quantify iron oxidation in a flow-through column filled with biologically-reduced sediment and to compare the iron phases in the re-oxidized sediment to both the pristine and biologically-reduced sediment. The sediment contained both Fe(III)-oxides (primarily goethite) and silicate Fe (illite/vermiculite) and was biologically reduced in phosphate buffered (PB) medium during a 497 day column experiment with acetate supplied as the electron donor. Long-term iron reduction resulted in partial reduction of silicate Fe(III) without any goethite reduction, based on Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements. This reduced sediment was treated with an oxygenated PB solution in a flow-through column resulting in the oxidation of 38% of the biogenic Fe(II). Additional batch experiments showed that the Fe(III) in the oxidized sediment was more quickly reduced compared to the pristine sediment, indicating that oxidation of the sediment not only regenerated Fe(III) but also enhanced iron reduction compared to the pristine sediment. Oxidation-reduction cycling may be a viable method to extend iron-reducing conditions during in-situ bioremediation.

  4. Hydrogen production from the steam-iron process with direct reduction of iron oxide by chemical looping combustion of coal char

    SciTech Connect

    Jing-biao Yang; Ning-sheng Cai; Zhen-shan Li

    2008-07-15

    Experimental results performed with a fluidized-bed reactor supported the feasibility of the three processes including direct reduction of iron oxide by char, H{sub 2} production by the steam-iron process, and the oxidation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} resulting from the steam-iron process to the original Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by air. Chars resulting from a Chinese lignite loaded with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were used successfully as a reducing material, leading to the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to FeO and Fe for the steam-iron process, which was confirmed by both the off-gases concentrations and X-ray diffractometer analysis. The reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by K-10-char at 1073 K is desirable from the perspective of the carbon conversion rate and high concentration of CO{sub 2}. The carbon in char was completely converted to CO{sub 2} when the mass ratio of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/K-10-char was increased to 10/0.3. The oxidation rate of K-10-char by Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} without a gasifying agent was comparable to the K-10-char steam gasification rate. The fractions of FeO and Fe in the reduced residue were 43 and 57%, respectively, in the case of 3 g of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 0.5 g of K-10-char, which was verified by the total H{sub 2} yield equaling 1000 mL/g K-10-char from the steam-iron process. The time that it took to achieve complete oxidation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by air with an 8.7% O{sub 2} concentration at 1073 K was about 15 min. 53 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Influence of solution composition and column aging on the reduction of nitroaromatic compounds by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Klausen, J; Ranke, J; Schwarzenbach, R P

    2001-08-01

    Granular iron is used in reactive permeable barriers for the reductive treatment of organic and inorganic groundwater contaminants. The technology is well established, however, its long-term performance and the importance of the groundwater composition are not yet well understood. Here, the influence of chloride, nitrate, silicate, and Aldrich humic acid on the reactivity of Master Builder iron was studied under anoxic conditions using small packed columns and 2-nitrotoluene (2-NT) as a model contaminant. After initially complete reduction of 2-NT to 2-aminotoluene (2-AT) in the column, possibly under mass-transfer controlled conditions, the reactivity of the iron was found to decrease substantially. In the presence of chloride, this decrease was slowed while exposure to silicate resulted in a very quick loss of iron reactivity. Nitrate was found to interfere strongly with the effect of chloride. These observations are interpreted in terms of corrosion inhibition/promotion and competition. Our results suggest that reactive barrier performance may be strongly affected by the composition of the treated groundwater.

  6. Transformation and composition evolution of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) synthesized by borohydride reduction in static water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Airong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Wei-Xian

    2015-01-01

    The reactivity of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) toward targeted contaminants is affected by the initial nZVI composition and the iron oxides formed during the aging process in aquatic systems. In this paper, the aging effects of nZVI, prepared using a borohydride reduction method in static water over a period of 90 days (d), are investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the corrosion products of nZVI. Results show that both the structures and the compositions of the corrosion products change with the process of aging. The products of nZVI aged for 5 d in static water media are mainly magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), accompanied by lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH). For products aged 10 d, XRD data show the formation of ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. When aged up to 90 d, the products are mainly γ-FeOOH mixed with small amounts of Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3. Transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) images show that the core-shell structure forms into a hollow spherical shape after 30 d of aging in aquatic media. The results indicate first that iron ions in the Fe(0) core diffuse outwardly toward the shell, and hollowed-out iron oxide shells emerge. Then, the iron oxide shell collapses and becomes a flaky, acicular-shaped structure. The type and the crystal phase of second iron oxide minerals are vastly different at various aging times. This study helps to explain the patterns of occurrence of specific iron oxides in different natural conditions.

  7. Abiotic Bromination of Soil Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Leri, Alessandra C; Ravel, Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Biogeochemical transformations of plant-derived soil organic matter (SOM) involve complex abiotic and microbially mediated reactions. One such reaction is halogenation, which occurs naturally in the soil environment and has been associated with enzymatic activity of decomposer organisms. Building on a recent finding that naturally produced organobromine is ubiquitous in SOM, we hypothesized that inorganic bromide could be subject to abiotic oxidations resulting in bromination of SOM. Through lab-based degradation treatments of plant material and soil humus, we have shown that abiotic bromination of particulate organic matter occurs in the presence of a range of inorganic oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide and assorted forms of ferric iron, producing both aliphatic and aromatic forms of organobromine. Bromination of oak and pine litter is limited primarily by bromide concentration. Fresh plant material is more susceptible to bromination than decayed litter and soil humus, due to a labile pool of mainly aliphatic compounds that break down during early stages of SOM formation. As the first evidence of abiotic bromination of particulate SOM, this study identifies a mechanistic source of the natural organobromine in humic substances and the soil organic horizon. Formation of organobromine through oxidative treatments of plant material also provides insights into the relative stability of aromatic and aliphatic components of SOM.

  8. Insight into the phenomenology of the Cr(VI) reduction by metallic iron using an electron probe microanalyzer.

    PubMed

    Vega, António; Fiuza, António; Guimarães, Fernanda

    2010-07-20

    Research was performed to gain insight into the heterogeneous reaction of Cr(VI) reduction by zero-valent iron, which is frequently used in the treatment of contaminated groundwater using permeable reactive barriers. An electron probe microanalyzer was used to clarify in detail relevant aspects of the reaction with consequences for the conception of interpretative kinetic models. Spherical particles of iron with controlled grain sizes were used after being subjected to a previous washing with diluted acid in order to remove oxidation products. These spheres were immersed in solutions of Cr(VI) in nonagitated flasks using different operating procedures. The iron particles were photographed so that the time evolution of the grain size distribution could be established. A sample of the iron balls after the reaction and samples of the raw material and the precipitates of the reaction products were analyzed by backscattering electron images and elemental mapping produced by wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy. The analysis of the spatial distribution of the concentrations in iron, oxygen, and chromium indicates that there are three distinct mechanisms for the reaction with different limiting steps.

  9. Impact of transition metal on nitrogen retention and activity of iron-nitrogen-carbon oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Selvarani; Leonard, Nathaniel; Barton, Scott Calabrese

    2014-03-14

    Iron based nitrogen doped carbon (FeNC) catalysts are synthesized by high-pressure pyrolysis of carbon and melamine with varying amounts of iron acetate in a closed, constant-volume reactor. The optimum nominal amount of Fe (1.2 wt%) in FeNC catalysts is established through oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) polarization. Since the quantity of iron used in FeNCs is very small, the amount of Fe retained in FeNC catalysts after leaching is determined by UV-VIS spectroscopy. As nitrogen is considered to be a component of active sites, the amount of bulk and surface nitrogen retention in FeNC catalysts are measured using elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. It is found that increasing nominal Fe content in FeNC catalysts leads to a decreased level of nitrogen retention. Thermogravimetric analysis demonstrates that increasing nominal Fe content leads to increased weight loss during pyrolysis, particularly at high temperatures. Catalysts are also prepared in the absence of iron source, and with iron removed by washing with hot aqua regia post-pyrolysis. FeNC catalysts prepared with no Fe show high retained nitrogen content but poor ORR activity, and aqua regia washed catalysts demonstrate similar activity to Fe-free catalysts, indicating that Fe is an active site component.

  10. Electrocatalytic Dioxygen Reduction by Carbon Electrodes Noncovalently Modified with Iron Porphyrin Complexes: Enhancements from a Single Proton Relay.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Soumalya; Aaron, Michael S; Blagojevic, Jovan; Warren, Jeffrey J

    2015-12-07

    Oxygen reduction in acidic aqueous solution mediated by a series of asymmetric iron (III)-tetra(aryl)porphyrins adsorbed to basal- and edge- plane graphite electrodes is investigated. The asymmetric iron porphyrin systems bear phenyl groups at three meso positions and either a 2-pyridyl, a 2-benzoic acid, or a 2-hydroxyphenyl group at the remaining meso position. The presence of the three unmodified phenyl groups makes the compounds insoluble in water, enabling catalyst retention during electrochemical experiments. Resonance Raman data demonstrate that catalyst layers are maintained, but can undergo modification after prolonged catalysis in the presence of O2 . The introduction of a single proton relay group at the fourth meso position makes the asymmetric iron porphyrins markedly more robust catalysts; these molecules support higher sustained current densities than the parent iron tetraphenylporphyrin. Iron porphyrins bearing a 2-pyridyl group are the most active catalysts and operate at stable current densities ≥1 mA cm(-2) for over 5 h. Comparative analysis of the catalysts with different proton relays also is reported.

  11. Diagnosing Abiotic Degradation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abiotic degradation of chlorinated solvents in ground water can be difficult to diagnose. Under current practice, most of the “evidence” is negative; specifically the apparent disappearance of chlorinated solvents with an accumulation of vinyl chloride, ethane, ethylene, or ...

  12. Studies on a Novel Actinobacteria Species Capable of Oxidizing Ammonium under Iron Reduction Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huanh, Shan; Ruiz-Urigüen, Melany; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) was noted in a forested riparian wetland in New Jersey (1,2), and in tropical rainforest soils (3), and was coined Feammox (4). Through a 180-days anaerobic incubation of soil samples collected at the New Jersey site, and using 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE, 454-pyosequecing, and qPCR analysis, we have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6, belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria, is responsible for this Feammox process, described previously (1,2). We have enriched these Feammox bacteria in a high efficiency Feammox membrane reactor (with 85% NH4+removal per 48h), and isolated the pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain 5, in an autotrophic medium. To determine if the Feammox bacteria found in this study are common, at least at the regional scale, we analyzed a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments. Through anaerobic incubations and molecular biology analysis, the Feammox reaction and Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 were found in three of twenty soil samples collected, indicating that the Feammox pathway might be widespread in selected soil environments. Results show that soil pH and Fe(III) content are key environmental factors controlling the distributions of Feammox bacteria, which require acidic conditions and the presence of iron oxides. Results from incubation experiments conducted at different temperatures have shown that, in contrast to another anaerobic ammonium oxidation pathways (e.g., anammox), the optimal temperature of the Feammox process is ~ 20° and that the organisms are still active when the temperature is around 10°. An incubation experiment amended with acetylene gas (C2H2) as a selected inhibitor showed that in the Feammox reaction, Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. After this process, NO2- is converted to

  13. OBSERVATIONS ON THE GROWTH OF ALPHA-IRON SINGLE CRYSTALS BY HALOGEN REDUCTION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    By increasing the scale of the conventional technique for growing Fe whiskers, single crystals were produced of alpha - iron 1 to 2 mm in diameter and...reproducible source of high purity, single crystals of alpha - iron of reasonable experimental size, conveniently preoriented by growth.

  14. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  15. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-08-19

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  16. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  17. Transferrin iron uptake is stimulated by ascorbate via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lane, Darius J R; Chikhani, Sherin; Richardson, Vera; Richardson, Des R

    2013-06-01

    Although ascorbate has long been known to stimulate dietary iron (Fe) absorption and non-transferrin Fe uptake, the role of ascorbate in transferrin Fe uptake is unknown. Transferrin is a serum Fe transport protein supplying almost all cellular Fe under physiological conditions. We sought to examine ascorbate's role in this process, particularly as cultured cells are typically ascorbate-deficient. At typical plasma concentrations, ascorbate significantly increased (59)Fe uptake from transferrin by 1.5-2-fold in a range of cells. Moreover, ascorbate enhanced ferritin expression and increased (59)Fe accumulation in ferritin. The lack of effect of cycloheximide or the cytosolic aconitase inhibitor, oxalomalate, on ascorbate-mediated (59)Fe uptake from transferrin indicate increased ferritin synthesis or cytosolic aconitase activity was not responsible for ascorbate's activity. Experiments with membrane-permeant and -impermeant ascorbate-oxidizing reagents indicate that while extracellular ascorbate is required for stimulation of (59)Fe uptake from (59)Fe-citrate, only intracellular ascorbate is needed for transferrin (59)Fe uptake. Additionally, experiments with l-ascorbate analogs indicate ascorbate's reducing ene-diol moiety is necessary for its stimulatory activity. Importantly, neither N-acetylcysteine nor buthionine sulfoximine, which increase or decrease intracellular glutathione, respectively, affected transferrin-dependent (59)Fe uptake. Thus, ascorbate's stimulatory effect is not due to a general increase in cellular reducing capacity. Ascorbate also did not affect expression of transferrin receptor 1 or (125)I-transferrin cellular flux. However, transferrin receptors, endocytosis, vacuolar-type ATPase activity and endosomal acidification were required for ascorbate's stimulatory activity. Therefore, ascorbate is a novel modulator of the classical transferrin Fe uptake pathway, acting via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

  18. Nitrogenase-mimic iron-containing chalcogels for photochemical reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Kelley, Matthew S.; Wu, Weiqiang; Banerjee, Abhishek; Douvalis, Alexios P.; Wu, Jinsong; Zhang, Yongbo; Schatz, George C.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2016-01-01

    A nitrogenase-inspired biomimetic chalcogel system comprising double-cubane [Mo2Fe6S8(SPh)3] and single-cubane (Fe4S4) biomimetic clusters demonstrates photocatalytic N2 fixation and conversion to NH3 in ambient temperature and pressure conditions. Replacing the Fe4S4 clusters in this system with other inert ions such as Sb3+, Sn4+, Zn2+ also gave chalcogels that were photocatalytically active. Finally, molybdenum-free chalcogels containing only Fe4S4 clusters are also capable of accomplishing the N2 fixation reaction with even higher efficiency than their Mo2Fe6S8(SPh)3-containing counterparts. Our results suggest that redox-active iron-sulfide–containing materials can activate the N2 molecule upon visible light excitation, which can be reduced all of the way to NH3 using protons and sacrificial electrons in aqueous solution. Evidently, whereas the Mo2Fe6S8(SPh)3 is capable of N2 fixation, Mo itself is not necessary to carry out this process. The initial binding of N2 with chalcogels under illumination was observed with in situ diffuse-reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). 15N2 isotope experiments confirm that the generated NH3 derives from N2. Density functional theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations suggest that the N2 binding is thermodynamically favorable only with the highly reduced active clusters. The results reported herein contribute to ongoing efforts of mimicking nitrogenase in fixing nitrogen and point to a promising path in developing catalysts for the reduction of N2 under ambient conditions. PMID:27140630

  19. A review of iron and cobalt porphyrins, phthalocyanines, and related complexes for electrochemical and photochemical reduction of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Manbeck, Gerald F.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2015-03-30

    This review summarizes research on the electrochemical and photochemical reduction of CO₂ using a variety of iron and cobalt porphyrins, phthalocyanines, and related complexes. Metalloporphyrins and metallophthalocyanines are visible light absorbers with extremely large extinction coefficients. However, yields of photochemically-generated active catalysts for CO₂ reduction are typically low owing to the requirement of a second photoinduced electron. This requirement is not relevant to the case of electrochemical CO₂ reduction. Recent progress on efficient and stable electrochemical systems includes the use of FeTPP catalysts that have prepositioned phenyl OH groups in their second coordination spheres. This has led to remarkable progress in carrying out coupled proton-electron transfer reactions for CO₂ reduction. Such ground-breaking research has to be continued in order to produce renewable fuels in an economically feasible manner.

  20. A review of iron and cobalt porphyrins, phthalocyanines, and related complexes for electrochemical and photochemical reduction of carbon dioxide

    DOE PAGES

    Manbeck, Gerald F.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2015-03-30

    This review summarizes research on the electrochemical and photochemical reduction of CO₂ using a variety of iron and cobalt porphyrins, phthalocyanines, and related complexes. Metalloporphyrins and metallophthalocyanines are visible light absorbers with extremely large extinction coefficients. However, yields of photochemically-generated active catalysts for CO₂ reduction are typically low owing to the requirement of a second photoinduced electron. This requirement is not relevant to the case of electrochemical CO₂ reduction. Recent progress on efficient and stable electrochemical systems includes the use of FeTPP catalysts that have prepositioned phenyl OH groups in their second coordination spheres. This has led to remarkable progressmore » in carrying out coupled proton-electron transfer reactions for CO₂ reduction. Such ground-breaking research has to be continued in order to produce renewable fuels in an economically feasible manner.« less

  1. Regulation of rat liver phenylalanine hydroxylase. I. Kinetic properties of the enzyme's iron and enzyme reduction site.

    PubMed

    Shiman, R; Gray, D W; Hill, M A

    1994-10-07

    Tetrahydropterins react with phenylalanine hydroxylase at a redox site, a regulatory site, and the catalytic site, but neither the properties of nor relationships among these sites are well understood. We have studied the redox site using the fluorescent iron chelators 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene and bathophenanthroline; these compounds act as site-specific reporter groups for reactions on oxidized and reduced enzyme, respectively. The chelators bind reversibly and specifically to the enzyme's iron with 1:1 stoichiometry, high affinity (Kd values approximately 1 nM), and complete quenching of their own fluorescence. The kinetic behavior of these and other iron chelators indicates that the enzyme's iron is solvent accessible and in a hydrophobic pocket of the protein. Both ferrous and ferric chelators inhibit phenylalanine hydroxylase activity. Bathophenanthroline inhibits by binding to Fe2+ on reduced, active enzyme. 2,3-Dihydroxynaphthalene inhibits by binding to Fe3+ on enzyme that is oxidized during catalysis. This oxidation occurs approximately 1/150 enzyme turnovers, and its rate is increased when p-chloro- or p-fluorophenylalanine is used as the reaction substrate. Studies of the reaction of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) at the enzyme's redox site showed that BH4 reduces the enzyme more slowly than 6-methyltetrahydropterin under catalytic and non-catalytic conditions. Reduction occurs at a distinct site whose binding determinants and reaction characteristics are different from those of the BH4 regulatory or catalytic sites, and phenylalanine-activated enzyme is reduced more rapidly than unactivated enzyme. In reducing phenylalanine activated enzyme, BH4 donates one electron/subunit (1/iron atom); the reduction kinetics suggest a trihydrobiopterin-free radical as a reaction intermediate.

  2. Influences of humic acid, bicarbonate and calcium on Cr(VI) reductive removal by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongzhou; Rao, Pinhua; Lo, Irene M C

    2009-05-01

    The influences of various geochemical constituents, such as humic acid, HCO(3)(-), and Ca(2+), on Cr(VI) removal by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) were investigated in a batch setting. The collective impacts of humic acid, HCO(3)(-), and Ca(2+) on the Cr(VI) reduction process by Fe(0) appeared to significantly differ from their individual impacts. Humic acid introduced a marginal influence on Fe(0) reactivity toward Cr(VI) reduction, whereas HCO(3)(-) greatly enhanced Cr(VI) removal by maintaining the solution pH near neutral. The Cr(VI) reduction rate constants (k(obs)) were increased by 37.8% and 78.3%, respectively, with 2 mM and 6 mM HCO(3)(-) in solutions where humic acid and Ca(2+) were absent. Singly present Ca(2+) did not show a significant impact to Cr(VI) reduction. However, probably due to the formation of passivating CaCO(3), further addition of Ca(2+) to HCO(3)(-) containing solutions resulted in a decrease of k(obs) compared to solutions containing HCO(3)(-) alone. Ca(2+) enhanced humic acid adsorption led to a minor decrease of Cr(VI) reduction rates. In Ca(2+)-free solutions, humic acid increased the amount of total dissolved iron to 25 mg/l due to the formation of soluble Fe-humate complexes and stably dispersed fine Fe (oxy)hydroxide colloids, which appeared to suppress iron precipitation. In contrast, the coexistence of humic acid and Ca(2+) significantly promoted the aggregation of Fe (oxy)hydroxides, with which humic acid co-aggregated and co-precipitated. These aggregates would progressively be deposited on Fe(0) surfaces and impose long-term impacts on the permeability of PRBs.

  3. Abiotic origin of biopolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Stephen-Sherwood, E.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of methods have been investigated in different laboratories for the polymerization of amino acids and nucleotides under abiotic conditions. They include (1) thermal polymerization; (2) direct polymerization of certain amino acid nitriles, amides, or esters; (3) polymerization using polyphosphate esters; (4) polymerization under aqueous or drying conditions at moderate temperatures using a variety of simple catalysts or condensing agents like cyanamide, dicyandiamide, or imidazole; and (5) polymerization under similar mild conditions but employing activated monomers or abiotically synthesized high-energy compounds such as adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). The role and significance of these methods for the synthesis of oligopeptides and oligonucleotides under possible primitive-earth conditions is evaluated. It is concluded that the more recent approach involving chemical processes similar to those used by contemporary living organisms appears to offer a reasonable solution to the prebiotic synthesis of these biopolymers.

  4. Performance of a scaled-up Microbial Fuel Cell with iron reduction as the cathode reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Heijne, Annemiek; Liu, Fei; van Rijnsoever, Lucas S.; Saakes, Michel; Hamelers, Hubertus V. M.; Buisman, Cees J. N.

    Scale-up studies of Microbial Fuel Cells are required before practical application comes into sight. We studied an MFC with a surface area of 0.5 m 2 and a volume of 5 L. Ferric iron (Fe 3+) was used as the electron acceptor to improve cathode performance. MFC performance increased in time as a combined result of microbial growth at the bio-anode, increase in iron concentration from 1 g L -1 to 6 g L -1, and increased activity of the iron oxidizers to regenerate ferric iron. Finally, a power density of 2.0 W m -2 (200 W m -3) was obtained. Analysis of internal resistances showed that anode resistance decreased from 109 to 7 mΩ m 2, while cathode resistance decreased from 939 to 85 mΩ m 2. The cathode was the main limiting factor, contributing to 58% of the total internal resistance. Maximum energy efficiency of the MFC was 41%.

  5. Oxidation and reduction of bis(imino)pyridine iron dinitrogen complexes: evidence for formation of a chelate trianion.

    PubMed

    Tondreau, Aaron M; Stieber, S Chantal E; Milsmann, Carsten; Lobkovsky, Emil; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Semproni, Scott P; Chirik, Paul J

    2013-01-18

    Oxidation and reduction of the bis(imino)pyridine iron dinitrogen compound, ((iPr)PDI)FeN(2) ((iPr)PDI = 2,6-(2,6-(i)Pr(2)-C(6)H(3)-N═CMe)(2)C(5)H(3)N) has been examined to determine whether the redox events are metal or ligand based. Treatment of ((iPr)PDI)FeN(2) with [Cp(2)Fe][BAr(F)(4)] (BAr(F)(4) = B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)-C(6)H(3))(4)) in diethyl ether solution resulted in N(2) loss and isolation of [((iPr)PDI)Fe(OEt(2))][BAr(F)(4)]. The electronic structure of the compound was studied by SQUID magnetometry, X-ray diffraction, EPR and zero-field (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. These data, supported by computational studies, established that the overall quartet ground state arises from a high spin iron(II) center (S(Fe) = 2) antiferromagnetically coupled to a bis(imino)pyridine radical anion (S(PDI) = 1/2). Thus, the oxidation event is principally ligand based. The one electron reduction product, [Na(15-crown-5)][((iPr)PDI)FeN(2)], was isolated following addition of sodium naphthalenide to ((iPr)PDI)FeN(2) in THF followed by treatment with the crown ether. Magnetic, spectroscopic, and computational studies established a doublet ground state with a principally iron-centered SOMO arising from an intermediate spin iron center and a rare example of trianionic bis(imino)pyridine chelate. Reduction of the iron dinitrogen complex where the imine methyl groups have been replaced by phenyl substituents, ((iPr)BPDI)Fe(N(2))(2) resulted in isolation of both the mono- and dianionic iron dinitrogen compounds, [((iPr)BPDI)FeN(2)](-) and [((iPr)BPDI)FeN(2)](2-), highlighting the ability of this class of chelate to serve as an effective electron reservoir to support neutral ligand complexes over four redox states.

  6. Siderophore Biosynthesis but Not Reductive Iron Assimilation Is Essential for the Dimorphic Fungus Nomuraea rileyi Conidiation, Dimorphism Transition, Resistance to Oxidative Stress, Pigmented Microsclerotium Formation, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Wang, Zhongkang; Liu, Xuee; Song, Zhangyong; Li, Ren; Shao, Changwen; Yin, Youping

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an indispensable factor for the dimorphic insect pathogenic Nomuraea rileyi to form persistent microsclerotia which can replace conidia or blastospores for commercial mass production. There are two high affinity iron acquisition pathways in N. rileyi, siderophore-assisted iron mobilization and reductive iron assimilation systems. Transcription of the two iron uptake pathways related genes is induced under iron-limiting conditions. Stage-specific iron uptake-related genes expression during microsclerotia development shows siderophore-mediated iron acquisition genes are rigorously upregulated specifically during the formation and mature period while reductive iron assimilation related genes just display a higher expression at the late maturation period. Abrogation of reductive iron assimilation, by the deletion of the high affinity iron permease (NrFtrA), has no visible effect on microsclerotia biogenesis in N. rileyi. In sharp contrast, N. rileyi L-ornithine-N5-monooxygenase (NrSidA), required for synthesis of all siderophores, is absolutely necessary for the development of pigmented microsclerotia. In agreement with the lower intracellular iron contents of microsclerotia in ΔNrSidA strains, not only the pigments, but both the number and the biomass are also noticeably reduced. Certain concentration of ROS is required for promoting microsclerotia biogenesis. Combined with expression pattern analysis of related genes and quantitative of intracellular iron or extracellular siderophore in WT and mutants, these data demonstrate the lack of adequate intracellular iron caused by the loss of the siderophore results in the deficiency of ROS detoxication. Furthermore, ΔNrSidA strains show significantly increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Besides, NrSidA, but not NrFtrA, play a crucial role in vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, and dimorphic switching. Remarkably, the slower growth of the ΔNrSidA strains in vivo due to a reduced

  7. [Influencing factors and reaction mechanism of chloroacetic acid reduction by cast iron].

    PubMed

    Tang, Shun; Yang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Xie, Yue-Feng

    2014-03-01

    The chloroacetic acids are ubiquitous present as a class of trace chlorinated organic pollutants in surface and drinking water. Most of chloroacetic acids are known or suspected carcinogens and, when at high concentrations, are of great concern to human health. In order to economically remove chloroacetic acids, the degradation of chloroacetic acids by cast iron was investigated. Moreover, the effect of iron style, pretreatment process, shocking mode and dissolved oxygen on chloroacetic acids reduced by cast iron was discussed. Compared to iron source and acid pretreatment, mass transfer was more important to chloroacetic acid removal. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and monochloroacetic acid (MCAA) were the main products of anoxic and oxic degradation of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) by cast iron during the researched reaction time, respectively. With longtitudinal shock, the reaction kinetics of chloroaectic acid removal by cast iron conformed well to the pseudo first order reaction. The anoxic reaction constants of TCAA, DCAA and MCAA were 0.46 h(-1), 0.03 h(-1) and 0, and their oxic constants were 1.24 h(-1), 0.79 h(-1) and 0.28 h(-1), respectively. The removal mechanisms of chloroacetic acids were different under various oxygen concentrations, including sequential hydrogenolysis for anoxic reaction and sequential hydrogenolysis and direct transformation possible for oxic reaction, respectively.

  8. Removal of selenium from water with nanoscale zero-valent iron: mechanisms of intraparticle reduction of Se(IV).

    PubMed

    Ling, Lan; Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Wei-xian

    2015-03-15

    Increasing evidences suggest that nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is an effective agent for treatment and removal of selenium from water. For example, 1.3 mM selenite was quickly removed from water within 3 min with 5 g/L nZVI. In this work, reaction mechanisms of selenite [Se(IV)] in a single core-shell structured nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particle were studied with the method of spherical aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) integrated with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS). This method was utilized to visualize solid phase translocation and transformation of Se(IV) such as diffusion, reduction, deposition and the effect of surface defects in a single nanoparticle. Se(IV) was reduced to Se(-II) and Se(0), which then formed a 0.5 nm layer of selenium at the iron oxide-Fe(0) interface at a depth of 6 nm from the surface. The results provided near atomic-resolution proof on the intraparticle diffusion-reduction of Se(IV) induced by nZVI. The STEM mapping also discovered that defects on the surface layer accelerate the diffusion of selenium and increase the capacity of nZVI for selenium sequestration.

  9. Removal of chromium from Cr(VI) polluted wastewaters by reduction with scrap iron and subsequent precipitation of resulted cations.

    PubMed

    Gheju, M; Balcu, I

    2011-11-30

    This work presents investigations on the total removal of chromium from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions by reduction with scrap iron and subsequent precipitation of the resulted cations with NaOH. The process was detrimentally affected by a compactly passivation film occurred at scrap iron surface, mainly composed of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Maximum removal efficiency of the Cr(total) and Fe(total) achieved in the clarifier under circumneutral and alkaline (pH 9.1) conditions was 98.5% and 100%, respectively. The optimum precipitation pH range which resulted from this study is 7.6-8.0. Fe(total) and Cr(total) were almost entirely removed in the clarifier as Fe(III) and Cr(III) species; however, after Cr(VI) breakthrough in column effluent, chromium was partially removed in the clarifier also as Cr(VI), by coprecipitation with cationic species. As long the column effluent was free of Cr(VI), the average Cr(total) removal efficiency of the packed column and clarifier was 10.8% and 78.8%, respectively. Our results clearly indicated that Cr(VI) contaminated wastewater can be successfully treated by combining reduction with scrap iron and chemical precipitation with NaOH.

  10. Iron and Carbon Dynamics during Aging and Reductive Transformation of Biogenic Ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Cismasu, A Cristina; Williams, Kenneth H; Nico, Peter S

    2016-01-05

    Natural organic matter is often associated with Fe(III) oxyhydroxides, and may be stabilized as a result of coprecipitation or sorption to their surfaces. However, the significance of this association in relation to Fe and C dynamics and biogeochemical cycling, and the mechanisms responsible for organic matter stabilization as a result of interaction with minerals under various environmental conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, etc.) are not entirely understood. The preservation of mineral-bound OM may be affected by OM structure and mineral identity, and bond types between OM and minerals may be central to influencing the stability, transformation and composition of both organic and mineral components under changing environmental conditions. Here we use bulk and submicron-scale spectroscopic synchrotron methods to examine the in situ transformation of OM-bearing, biogenic ferrihydrite stalks (Gallionella ferruginea-like), which formed following injection of oxygenated groundwater into a saturated alluvial aquifer at the Rifle, CO field site. A progression from oxidizing to reducing conditions during an eight-month period triggered the aging and reductive transformation of Gallionella-like ferrihydrite stalks to Fe (hydroxy)carbonates and Fe sulfides, as well as alteration of the composition and amount of OM. Spectromicroscopic measurements showed a gradual decrease in reduced carbon forms (aromatic/alkene, aliphatic C), a relative increase in amide/carboxyl functional groups and a significant increase in carbonate in the stalk structures, and the appearance of organic globules not associated with stalk structures. Biogenic stalks lost ∼30% of their initial organic carbon content. Conversely, a significant increase in bulk organic matter accompanied these transformations. The character of bulk OM changed in parallel with mineralogical transformations, showing an increase in aliphatic, aromatic and amide functional groups. These changes likely occurred as a result of an

  11. Coupling microbial catabolic actions with abiotic redox processes: a new recipe for persistent organic pollutant (POP) removal.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Nam, In-Hyun; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The continuous release of toxic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) into the environment has raised a need for effective cleanup methods. The tremendous natural diversity of microbial catabolic mechanisms suggests that catabolic routes may be applied to the remediation of POP-contaminated fields. A large number of the recalcitrant xenobiotics have been shown to be removable via the natural catabolic mechanisms of microbes, and detailed biochemical studies of the catabolic methods, together with the development of sophisticated genetic engineering, have led to the use of synthetic microbes for the bioremediation of POPs. However, the steric effects of substituted halogen moieties, microbe toxicity, and the low bioavailability of POPs still deteriorate the efficiency of removal strategies based on natural and synthetic catabolic mechanisms. Recently, abiotic redox processes that induce rapid reductive dehalogenation, hydroxyl radical-based oxidation, or electron shuttling have been reasonably coupled with microbial catabolic actions, thereby compensating for the drawbacks of biotic processes in POP removal. In this review, we first compare the pros and cons of individual methodologies (i.e., the natural and synthetic catabolism of microbes and the abiotic processes involving zero-valent irons, advanced oxidation processes, and small organic stimulants) for POP removal. We then highlight recent trends in coupling the biotic-abiotic methodologies and discuss how the processes are both feasible and superior to individual methodologies for POP cleanup. Cost-effective and environmentally sustainable abiotic redox actions could enhance the microbial bioremediation potential for POPs.

  12. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin R.; Fiskal, Annika; Sommer, Stefan; Hensen, Christian; Lomnitz, Ulrike; Wuttig, Kathrin; Göttlicher, Jörg; Kossel, Elke; Steininger, Ralph; Canfield, Donald E.

    2016-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface. Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations >300 nM. At the boundary between sulfidic and nitrogenous conditions, iron concentrations dropped sharply to <20 nM coincident with a maximum in particulate iron concentration. Within the iron gradient, we found an increased expression of the key functional marker gene for nitrate reduction (narG). Part of this upregulation was related to the activity of known iron-oxidizing bacteria. Collectively, our data suggest that iron oxidation and removal is induced by nitrate-reducing microbes, either enzymatically through anaerobic iron oxidation or by providing nitrite for an abiotic reaction. Given the important role that iron plays in nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis and respiration, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation likely represents a key-link between the marine biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon.

  13. The Influence of Extracellular Superoxide on Iron Redox Chemistry and Bioavailability to Aquatic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Superoxide, the one-electron reduced form of dioxygen, is produced in the extracellular milieu of aquatic microbes through a range of abiotic chemical processes and also by microbes themselves. Due to its ability to promote both oxidative and reductive reactions, superoxide may have a profound impact on the redox state of iron, potentially influencing iron solubility, complex speciation, and bioavailability. The interplay between iron, superoxide, and oxygen may also produce a cascade of other highly reactive transients in oxygenated natural waters. For microbes, the overall effect of reactions between superoxide and iron may be deleterious or beneficial, depending on the organism and its chemical environment. Here I critically discuss recent advances in understanding: (i) sources of extracellular superoxide in natural waters, with a particular emphasis on microbial generation; (ii) the chemistry of reactions between superoxide and iron; and (iii) the influence of these processes on iron bioavailability and microbial iron nutrition. PMID:22514548

  14. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Erin K. Field; Robin Gerlach; Sridhar Viamajala; Laura K. Jennings; Alfred B. Cunningham; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel

    2011-09-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), to trivalent chromium, Cr(III), can be an important aspect of remediation processes at Department of Energy (DOE) and other contaminated sites. Cellulomonas species are found at several Cr(VI) contaminated and uncontaminated locations at the DOE site in Hanford, Washington. Members of this genus have demonstrated the ability to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) fermentatively and therefore play a potential role in hexavalent chromium remediation at this site. Batch studies were conducted with Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to assess the influence of various carbon sources, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds on Cr(VI) reduction. These chemical species are likely to be present in these terrestrial environments during in situ bioremediation. Results indicated that there were a number of interactions between these compounds that influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. The type of carbon source as well as the type of electron shuttle present influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. When an electron shuttle, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was present in the system, reduction rates increased significantly. Biologically reduced AQDS (AHDS) reduced Cr(VI) almost instantaneously. The presence of iron minerals and their concentrations did not significantly influence Cr(VI) reduction rates. However, strain ES6 or AQDS could directly reduce surface-associated Fe(III) to Fe(II) which was capable of reducing Cr(VI) at a near instantaneous rate. These results suggest the rate limiting step in these systems is the transfer of electrons from strain ES6 to the intermediate or terminal electron acceptor whether that is Cr(VI), Fe(III), or AQDS.

  15. Reduction of uranium(VI) by mixed iron(II)/iron(III) hydroxide (green rust): formation of UO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Edward J; Kelly, Shelly D; Cook, Russell E; Csencsits, Roseann; Kemner, Kenneth M

    2003-02-15

    Green rusts, which are mixed ferrous/ferric hydroxides, are found in many suboxic environments and are believed to play a central role in the biogeochemistry of Fe. Analysis by U LIII-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy of aqueous green rust suspensions spiked with uranyl (U(VI)) showed that U(VI) was readily reduced to U(IV) by green rust The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) date for uranium reduced by green rust indicate the formation of a UO2 phase. A theoretical model based on the crystal structure of UO2 was generated by using FEFF7 and fitted to the data for the UO2 standard and the uranium in the green rust samples. The model fits indicate that the number of nearest-neighbor uranium atoms decreases from 12 for the UO2 structure to 5.4 forthe uranium-green rust sample. With an assumed four near-neighbor uranium atoms per uranium atom on the surface of UO2, the best-fit value for the average number of uranium atoms indicates UO2 particles with an average diameter of 1.7 +/- 0.6 nm. The formation of nanometer-scale particles of UO2, suggested by the modeling of the EXAFS data, was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, which showed discrete particles (approximately 2-9 nm in diameter) of crystalline UO2. Our results clearly indicate that U(VI) (as soluble uranyl ion) is readily reduced by green rust to U(IV) in the form of relatively insoluble UO2 nanoparticles, suggesting that the presence of green rusts in the subsurface may have significant effects on the mobility of uranium, particularly under iron-reducing conditions.

  16. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, III, William R.; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Sathaye, Jayant; Xu, Tengfang

    2012-12-03

    India’s 2010 annual crude steel production was 68 Mt which accounted for nearly five percent of the world’s annual steel production in the same year. In 2007, roughly 1600 PJ were consumed by India’s iron and steel industry to produce 53 Mt of steel. We identified and analyzed 25 energy efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the processes in the Indian iron and steel industry. The Conservation Supply Curve (CSC) used in this study is an analytical tool that captures both the engineering and the economic perspectives of energy conservation. Using a bottom-up electricity CSC model and compared to an electricity price forecast the cumulative plant-level cost-effective electricity savings potential for the Indian iron and steel industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 66 TWh, and the cumulative plant-level technical electricity saving potential is only slightly greater than 66 TWh for the same period. The primary energy related CO2 emissions reduction associated with cost-effective electricity savings is 65 Mt CO2. Compared to a fuel price forecast, an estimated cumulative cost-effective fuel savings potential of 768 PJ with associated CO2 emission reduction of 67 Mt CO2 during 2010-2030 is possible. In addition, a sensitivity analysis with respect to the discount rate used is conducted to assess the effect of changes in this parameter on the results. The result of this study gives a comprehensive and easy to understand perspective to the Indian iron and steel industry and policy makers about the energy efficiency potential and its associated cost.

  17. [Reduction of chromium (VI) by nanoscale zero-valent iron supported on Al-pillared bentonite].

    PubMed

    Yin, Li-Jing; Li, Yi-Min; Zhang, Lu-Ji; Peng, Yuan-Fei; Ying, Zhe-Lan

    2009-04-15

    In the presence of Al-pillared bentonite with good sorption capacity, nanoscale zero-valent iron supported on Al-pillared bentonite (NZVI/Al-PILC) was prepared with NaBH4 and FeSO4 aqueous solution. The structure of NZVI/Al-PILC was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). The effects of pH values and initial chromium (VI) concentrations on its removal rate by NZVI/Al-PILC were investigated, and were compared with those of unsupported nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) containing the same iron mount of NZVI/Al-PILC. The results indicate that in the same experimental condition, the chromium (VI) removal by NZVI/Al-PILC reached 100% after 120 min. The removal is not only much higher than that (63.0%) of the NZVI containing same iron mount, but also superior to the sum of removal (75.4%) by NZVI containing the same iron amount and the Al-pillared bentonite containing the same clay amount with NZVI/Al-PILC.

  18. Application of a water cooling treatment and its effect on coal-based reduction of high-chromium vanadium and titanium iron ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Song-tao; Zhou, Mi; Jiang, Tao; Guan, Shan-fei; Zhang, Wei-jun; Xue, Xiang-xin

    2016-12-01

    A water cooling treatment was applied in the coal-based reduction of high-chromium vanadium and titanium (V-Ti-Cr) iron ore from the Hongge region of Panzhihua, China. Its effects on the metallization ratio ( η), S removal ratio ( R S), and P removal ratio ( R P) were studied and analyzed on the basis of chemical composition determined via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The metallic iron particle size and the element distribution of Fe, V, Cr, and Ti in a reduced briquette after water cooling treatment at 1350°C were determined and observed via scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the water cooling treatment improved the η, R S, and R P in the coal-based reduction of V-Ti-Cr iron ore compared to those obtained with a furnace cooling treatment. Meanwhile, the particle size of metallic iron obtained via the water cooling treatment was smaller than that of metallic iron obtained via the furnace cooling treatment; however, the particle size reached 70 μm at 1350°C, which is substantially larger than the minimum particle size required (20 μm) for magnetic separation. Therefore, the water cooling treatment described in this work is a good method for improving the quality of metallic iron in coal-based reduction and it could be applied in the coal-based reduction of V-Ti-Cr iron ore followed by magnetic separation.

  19. The ecotoxic potential of a new zero-valent iron nanomaterial, designed for the elimination of halogenated pollutants, and its effect on reductive dechlorinating microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Schiwy, Andreas; Maes, Hanna M; Koske, Daniel; Flecken, Mirkko; Schmidt, Kathrin R; Schell, Heico; Tiehm, Andreas; Kamptner, Andre; Thümmler, Silke; Stanjek, Helge; Heggen, Marc; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Braun, Jürgen; Schäffer, Andreas; Hollert, Henner

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ecotoxic potential of a new zero-valent iron nanomaterial produced for the elimination of chlorinated pollutants at contaminated sites. Abiotic dechlorination through the newly developed nanoscale zero-valent iron material and its effects on dechlorinating bacteria were investigated in anaerobic batch and column experiments. The aged, i.e. oxidized, iron material was characterization with dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffractometry and cell-free reactive oxygen measurements. Furthermore, it was evaluated in aerobic ecotoxicological test systems with algae, crustacean, and fish, and also applied in a mechanism specific test for mutagenicity. The anaerobic column experiments showed co-occurrence of abiotic and biological dechlorination of the common groundwater contaminant perchloroethene. No prolonged toxicity of the nanomaterial (measured for up to 300 days) towards the investigated dechlorinating microorganism was observed. The nanomaterial has a flake like appearance and an inhomogeneous size distribution. The toxicity to crustacean and fish was calculated and the obtained EC50 values were 163 mg/L and 458 mg/L, respectively. The nanomaterial showed no mutagenicity. It physically interacted with algae, which had implications for further testing and the evaluation of the results. Thus, the newly developed iron nanomaterial was slightly toxic in its reduced state but no prolonged toxicity was recorded. The aquatic tests revealed a low toxicity with EC50 values ≥ 163 mg/L. These concentrations are unlikely to be reached in the aquatic environment. Hence, this nanomaterial is probably of no environmental concern not prohibiting its application for groundwater remediation.

  20. The effect of granular ferric hydroxide amendment on the reduction of nitrate in groundwater by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Song, Hocheol; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Chon, Chul-Min; Kim, Yongje; Nam, In-Hyun; Schwartz, Franklin W; Cho, Dong-Wan

    2013-11-01

    The feasibility of using granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) with zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) for its potential utility in enhancing nitrate reduction was investigated. The addition of 10gL(-1) GFH to 25gL(-1) Fe(0) significantly enhanced nitrate removal, resulting in 93% removal of 52.2mg-NL(-1) in 36-h as compared to 23% removal with Fe(0) alone. Surface analyses of the reacted Fe(0)/GFH revealed the presence of magnetite on the Fe(0) surface, which probably served as an electron mediator for nitrate reduction. Addition of GFH to Fe(0) also resulted in lower solution pH compared to Fe(0). The rate enhancing effect of GFH on nitrate reduction was attributed to the combined effects of magnetite formation and pH buffering by GFH. GFH amendment (100gL(-1)) significantly increased reduction capacity and longevity of Fe(0) to complete several nitrate reduction cycles before inactivation, giving a total nitrate removal of 205mg-NL(-1), while unamended Fe(0) gave only 20mg-NL(-1) before inactivation during the first reduction cycle. The overall result demonstrated the potential utility of Fe(0)/GFH system that may be developed into a viable technology for removal of nitrate from groundwater.

  1. Reduction of iron oxides during the pyrometallurgical processing of red mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raspopov, N. A.; Korneev, V. P.; Averin, V. V.; Lainer, Yu. A.; Zinoveev, D. V.; Dyubanov, V. G.

    2013-01-01

    The results of experiments on the use of red mud in traditional pyrometallurgical processes and plants are presented. The red muds of the Ural Aluminum Plant (UAZ, Kamensk-Ural'skii) and the Alyum Plant (Tul'chiya) are shown to have similar phase and chemical compositions. The morphology of the iron oxides in red mud samples taken from mud storage is studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. It is found that the metallic (cast iron) and slag phases that form during the pyrometallurgical processing of red mud by melting with a carbon reducer in the temperature range 1200-1500°C are clearly separated. Cast iron can be used in steelmaking, and the slag can be used for hydrometallurgical processing and extraction of nonferrous metals and for the building industry after correcting its composition.

  2. The reduction of the Rieske iron-sulfur cluster in naphthalene dioxygenase by X-rays.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, A; Parales, J V; Parales, R E; Gibson, D T; Eklund, H; Ramaswamy, S

    2000-01-15

    Naphthalene 1,2 dioxygenase (NDO) displays characteristic UV-Vis spectra depending on the oxidation state of the Rieske center. Investigations on crystals of NDO grown for X-ray diffraction experiments showed spectra characteristic of the oxidized form. Crystals reduced in an anaerobic glovebox using sodium-dithionite showed a characteristic reduced spectrum. Spectra of crystals (cooled to 100 K) after being exposed to X-rays for data collection showed spectra corresponding to a reduced Rieske iron center, demonstrating the ability of X-rays to change the oxidation state of the Rieske iron-sulfur cluster in NDO.

  3. The role of FeS(aq) molecular clusters in microbial redox cycling and iron mineralization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschel, G.; Oduro, H.; Sperling, J.; Johnson, C.

    2008-12-01

    Iron sulfide molecular clusters, FeS(aq), are a group of polynuclear Fe-S complexes varying in size between a few and a few hundred molecules that occur in many environments and are critical parts of cycling between soluble iron and iron sulfide minerals. These clusters react uniquely with voltammetric Au-amalgam electrodes, and the signal for these molecules has now been observed in many terrestrial and marine aquatic settings. FeS(aq) clusters form when aqueous sulfide and iron(II) interact, but the source of those ions can come from abiotic or microbial sulfate and iron reduction or from the abiotic non-oxidative dissolution of iron sulfide minerals. Formation of iron sulfide minerals, principally mackinawite as the first solid nanocrystalline phase in many settings, is necessarily preceeded by formation and evolution of these molecular clusters as mineralization proceeds, and the clusters have been suggested to additionally be part of the pyritization process (Rickard and Luther, 1997; Luther and Rickard, 2005). In several systems, we have also observed FeS(aq) clusters to be the link between Fe-S mineral dissolution and oxidation of iron and sulfide, with important implications for changes to the overall oxidation pathway. Microorganisms can clearly be involved in the formation of FeS(aq) through iron and sulfate reduction, but it is not clear to date if organisms can utilize these clusters either as metabolic components or as anabolic 'building blocks' for enzyme production. Cycling of iron in the Fe-S system linked to FeS(aq) would clearly be a critical part of understanding iron isotope dynamics preserved in iron sulfide minerals. We will review ongoing work towards understanding the role of FeS(aq) in iron cycling and isotope fractionation as well as the measurement and characterization of this key class of iron complexes using environmental voltammetry.

  4. REMOVAL OF ADDED NITRATE IN THE SINGLE, BINARY, AND TERNARY SYSTEMS OF COTTON BURR COMPOST, ZEROVALENT IRON, AND SEDIMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR GROUNDWATER NITRATE REMEDIATION USING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent research has shown that carbonaceous solid materials and zerovalent iron (Fe0) may potentially be used as media in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to degrade groundwater nitrate via heterotrophic denitrification in the solid carbon system, and via abiotic reduction and ...

  5. Single-Molecule Imaging of Iron-Phthalocyanine-Catalyzed Oxygen Reduction Reaction by in Situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jing-Ying; Cai, Zhen-Feng; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-09-27

    We report herein an in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ECSTM) investigation of iron-phthalocyanine (FePc)-catalyzed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). A highly ordered FePc adlayer is revealed on a Au(111) electrode. The center ions in the FePc adlayer show uniform high contrast in an oxygen-saturated electrolyte, which is attributed to the formation of an FePc-O2 complex. In situ STM results reveal the sharp contrast change upon shifting the electrode potential to trigger the ORR. Theoretical simulation has supplied further evidence for the contrast difference of the adsorbed FePc species.

  6. Reductive transformation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene: roles of iron and natural organic matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effects of redox-active and iron-coordinating functional groups within natural organic matter (NOM) on the electron transfer interactions between Fe(II) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), an energetic residue often encountered in aqueous environments as a propellant compon...

  7. Electrochemical activity of some different iron polyphthalocyanines for the oxygen reduction reaction in acidic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreja, Ludwik; Dabrowski, Roman

    The electrochemical activity of iron polyphthalocyanines (pPcFe) synthesized from pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) or tetracyanobenzene (TCB) and dicyan It was found that pPcFe derived from PMDA has the highest activity and that the temperature dependences of electrical conductivity in vacuum and oxygen

  8. Magnetic Susceptibility as a Proxy for Investigating Microbial Mediated Iron Reduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated magnetic susceptibility (MS) variations in hydrocarbon contaminated sediments. Our objective was to determine if MS can be used as an intrinsic bioremediation indicator due to the activity of iron-reducing bacteria. A contaminated and an uncontaminated core were r...

  9. NITRATE REDUCTION BY ZEROVALENT IRON: EFFECTS OF FORMATE, OXALATE, CITRATE, CHLORIDE, SULFATE, BORATE, AND PHOSPHATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have shown that zerovalent iron (Fe0) may potentially be used as a chemical medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for nitrate remediation in groundwater; however, the effects of commonly found organic and inorganic ligands in soil and sediments on nitrate re...

  10. Hexavalent chromium reduction in contaminated soil: A comparison between ferrous sulphate and nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Di Palma, L; Gueye, M T; Petrucci, E

    2015-01-08

    Iron sulphate (FeSO4) and colloidal nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) as reducing agents were compared, with the aim of assessing their effectiveness in hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal from a contaminated industrial soil. Experiments were performed on soil samples collected from an industrial site where a nickel contamination, caused by a long-term productive activity, was also verified. The influence of reducing agents amount with respect to chromium content and the effectiveness of deoxygenation of the slurry were discussed. The soil was fully characterized before and after each test, and sequential extractions were performed to assess chemico-physical modifications and evaluate metals mobility induced by washing. Results show that both the reducing agents successfully lowered the amount of Cr(VI) in the soil below the threshold allowed by Italian Environmental Regulation for industrial reuse. Cr(VI) reduction by colloidal nZVI proved to be faster and more effective: the civil reuse of soil [Cr(VI)<2mg/kg] was only achieved using colloidal nZVI within 60min adopting a nZVI/Cr(VI) molar ratio of 30. The reducing treatment resulted in an increase in the amount of chromium in the oxide-hydroxide fraction, thus confirming a mechanism of chromium-iron hydroxides precipitation. In addition, a decrease of nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb) content in soil was also observed when acidic conditions were established.

  11. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil by in-vessel anaerobic composting with zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Long, Yu-Yang; Zhang, Chi; Du, Yao; Tao, Xiao-Qing; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    Anaerobic dechlorination is an effective degradation pathway for higher chlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The enhanced reductive dechlorination of PCB-contaminated soil by anaerobic composting with zero-valent iron (ZVI) was studied, and preliminary reasons for the enhanced reductive dechlorination with ZVI were investigated. The results show that the addition of nanoscale ZVI can enhance dechlorination during in-vessel anaerobic composting. After 140 days, the average number of removed Cl per biphenyl with 10 mg g(-1) of added nanoscale ZVI was 0.63, enhancing the dechlorination by 34 % and improving the initial dechlorination speed. The ZVI enhances dechlorination by providing a suitable acid base environment, reducing volatile fatty acid inhibition and stimulating the microorganisms. The C/N ratios for treatments with the highest rate of ZVI addition were smaller than for the control, indicating that ZVI addition can promote compost maturity.

  12. Antimalarial bicyclic peroxides belonging to the G-factor family: mechanistic aspects of their formation and iron (II) induced reduction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jeremy; Azema, Joelle; Payrastre, Corinne; Baltas, Michel; Tuccio, Beatrice; Vial, Henri; Andre-Barres, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Artemisinin and its derivatives are peroxide-containing compounds targeting P. falciparum. We review here structural analogues of bicyclic peroxides belonging to the G factors family presenting antimalarial properties. They were synthesised under Mannich type conditions, followed by an autoxidation step resulting exclusively in the peroxide. As the electron transfer from haem or free iron to the peroxide is the first step in the mode of action of artemisinin-like compounds, the redox properties of some endoperoxides were studied by electrochemistry allowing the evaluation of the reduction standard potentials. The Fe(II) induced reduction was also investigated and the reactivity of the C-centered radical intermediate formed was linked to the antimalarial activity. These bicyclic peroxides both with various hybrid molecules containing the endoperoxide framework were evaluated in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum. They exhibited moderate to good activities.

  13. Effect of reduction roasting by using bio-char derived from empty fruit bunch on the magnetic properties of Malaysian iron ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunus, Nurul A.; Ani, Mohd H.; Salleh, Hamzah M.; Rashid, Rusila Z. A.; Akiyama, Tomohiro; Purwanto, Hadi; Othman, Nur E. F.

    2014-04-01

    Beneficiation of Malaysian iron ore is becoming necessary as iron resources are depleting. However, the upgrading process is challenging because of the weak magnetic properties of Malaysian iron ore. In this study, bio-char derived from oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) was utilized as an energy source for reduction roasting. Mixtures of Malaysian iron ore and the bio-char were pressed into briquettes and subjected to reduction roasting processes at 873-1173 K. The extent of reduction was estimated on the basis of mass loss, and the magnetization of samples was measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). When reduced at 873 K, the original goethite-rich ore was converted into hematite. An increase in temperature to 1073 K caused a significant conversion of hematite into magnetite and enhanced the magnetic susceptibility and saturation magnetization of samples. The magnetic properties diminished at 1173 K as the iron ore was partially reduced to wustite. This reduction roasting by using the bio-char can assist in upgrading the iron ore by improving its magnetic properties.

  14. The Stable Isotope Fractionation of Abiotic Reactions: A Benchmark in the Detection of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.

    2003-01-01

    mil to as low as -60 % (potentially comparable to that which accompanies the biosynthesis of organic matter). We need to understand what kind of fractionations are observed with reactions under the non-reducing or mildly reducing conditions now thought to be present on the early Earth. While nitrogen is receiving increased attention as a tool for these kinds of analyses, almost nothing is known about the isotope fractionation that one would expect for abiotic sources of fixed/reduced nitrogen. This project will measure the fixation from a series of abiotic reactions that may have been present on the early Earth (and other terrestrial planets) and produced organic material that could have ended up in the rock record. The work will look at a number of reactions, under a non- reducing, or mildly reducing, atmosphere, covering sources of prebiotic organic C & N from shock heating, to photochemistry, to hydrothermal reactions. Some reactions that we plan to study are; Shock heating of a non-reducing atmosphere to produce CO and NO (in collaboration with Chris McKay), formation of formaldehyde (and related compounds) from COY the formation of ammonia from nitrogen oxides (ultimately from NO) by ferrous iron reduction, and the hydrothermal synthesis of compounds including the hydrocarboxylation/hydrocarbonylation reaction (in collaboration with George Cody), reactions of oxalate to form hydrocarbons and other oxygenated compounds and the formation of lipids from oxalic/formic acid (in collaboration with Tom McCollom), and reactions of carbon monoxide & carbon dioxide with N2, ammonia or nitritehitrate to form hydrogen cyanide, nitriles, ammonia/amines and nitrous

  15. Lactate Oxidation Coupled to Iron or Electrode Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA▿

    PubMed Central

    Call, Douglas F.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA completely oxidized lactate and reduced iron or an electrode, producing pyruvate and acetate intermediates. Compared to the current produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, G. sulfurreducens PCA produced 10-times-higher current levels in lactate-fed microbial electrolysis cells. The kinetic and comparative analyses reported here suggest a prominent role of G. sulfurreducens strains in metal- and electrode-reducing communities supplied with lactate. PMID:22003020

  16. [Enhanced reductive decoloration of methylene blue by polyacrylic acid modified zero-valent iron nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Wang, Pei; Liu, Kun-Qian

    2015-03-01

    Nano zerovalent iron ( NZVI) technology has attracted tremendous amount of interests for degrading a number of environmental contaminants found both in surface water and underground water. However, these nanoscale particles are prone to aggregate, which may result in the decrease of its reactivity in liquid phase. Iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) modified with polyacrylic acid (PAA) has enhanced the dispersion of NZVI and reduced its agglomeration. For the first time, PAA modified NPs (PAA-Fe NPs) were used for degradation of methylene blue in water phase. The PAA-Fe NPs prepared were characterized in terms of TEM, SEM, XRD and specific surface area. The results indicated that, the surface area of PAA-Fe NPs was increased, compared with unmodified pristine zero-valent iron NPs, and PAA-Fe NPs were smoother with smaller particle size. With addition of 0.1 g x L(-1) of PAA, the decolorization efficiency of methylene blue by PAA-Fe NPs was 98.84% in 60 min, which was 27.32% higher than that of pristine Fe NPs. Decolorization efficiencies were also affected by initial pH value, initial concentration of methylene blue, dosage of PAA-Fe NPs, and degradation temperature. Kinetic analyses based on the experimental data illustrated that the decolorization reaction of methylene blue fitted well to the pseudo first-order kinetics model.

  17. Enhancement of iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide by thiocyanate and accumulation of iron(II)/thiocyanate/nitric oxide complex under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Umeo; Hirota, Sachiko

    2012-01-13

    Iron(III) ingested as a food component or supplement for iron deficiencies can react with salivary SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+) and can be reduced to iron(II) by ascorbic acid in the stomach. Iron(II) generated in the stomach can react with salivary nitrite and SCN(-) to produce nitric oxide (NO) and FeSCN(+), respectively. The purpose of this investigation is to make clear the reactions among nitrite, SCN(-), iron ions, and ascorbic acid under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice. Iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to NO was enhanced by SCN(-) in acidic buffer solutions, and the oxidation product of iron(II) reacted with SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+). Almost all of the NO produced was autoxidized to N(2)O(3) under aerobic conditions. Iron(II)-dependent production of NO was also observed in acidified saliva. Under anaerobic conditions, NO transformed Fe(SCN)(2+) and FeSCN(+) to Fe(SCN)NO(+) in acidic buffer solutions. Fe(SCN)NO(+) was also formed under aerobic conditions when excess ascorbic acid was added to iron(II)/nitrite/SCN(-) systems in acidic buffer solutions and acidified saliva. The Fe(SCN)NO(+) formed was transformed to Fe(SCN)(2+) and iron(III) at pH 2.0 and pH 7.4, respectively, by O(2). Salivary glycoproteins could complex with iron(III) in the stomach preventing the formation of Fe(SCN)(2+). Ascorbic acid reduced iron(III) to iron(II) to react with nitrite and SCN(-) as described above. The above results suggest (i) that iron(II) can have toxic effects on the stomach through the formation of reactive nitrogen oxide species from NO when supplemented without ascorbic acid and through the formation of both reactive nitrogen oxide species and Fe(SCN)NO(+) when supplemented with ascorbic acid, and (ii) that the toxic effects of iron(III) seemed to be smaller than and similar to those of iron(II) when supplemented without and with ascorbic acid, respectively. Possible mechanisms that cause oxidative stress on the stomach

  18. The role of magnetite nanoparticles in the reduction of nitrate in groundwater by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dong-Wan; Song, Hocheol; Schwartz, Franklin W; Kim, Bokseong; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2015-04-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were used as an additive material in a zero-valent iron (Fe0) reaction to reduce nitrate in groundwater and its effects on nitrate removal were investigated. The addition of nano-sized magnetite (NMT) to Fe0 reactor markedly increased nitrate reduction, with the rate proportionally increasing with NMT loading. Field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that NMT aggregates were evenly distributed and attached on the Fe0 surface due to their magnetic properties. The rate enhancement effect of NMT is presumed to arise from its role as a corrosion promoter for Fe0 corrosion as well as an electron mediator that facilitated electron transport from Fe0 to adsorbed nitrate. Nitrate reduction by Fe0 in the presence of NMT proceeded much faster in groundwater (GW) than in de-ionized water. The enhanced reduction of nitrate in GW was attributed to the adsorption or formation of surface complex by the cationic components in GW, i.e., Ca2+ and Mg2+, in the Fe0-H2O interface that promoted electrostatic attraction of nitrate to the reaction sites. Moreover, the addition of NMT imparted superior longevity to Fe0, enabling completion of four nitrate reduction cycles, which otherwise would have been inactivated during the first cycle without an addition of NMT. The results demonstrate the potential applicability of a Fe0/NMT system in the treatment of nitrate-contaminated GW.

  19. Role of oxbow lakes in controlling redox geochemistry of shallow groundwater under a heterogeneous fluvial sedimentary environment in an agricultural field: Coexistence of iron and sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byoung-Young; Yun, Seong-Taek; Kim, Kyoung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to extend the knowledge of the vertical distribution of redox conditions of shallow groundwater in heterogeneous fluvial sediments near oxbow lakes. For this study, we revisited the study area of Kim et al. (2009) to examine the redox zoning in details. Three multi-level samplers were installed along a flow path near two oxbow lakes to obtain vertical profiles of the subsurface geology and hydrochemical and isotopic data (δ(18)O and δD of water, δ(15)N and δ(18)O of nitrate, and δ(34)S of sulfate) of groundwater. Geologic logging showed that characteristics of the heterogeneous subsurface geology are closely related to the pattern of vertical redox zoning. Hydrochemical data in conjunction with nitrogen and sulfur isotope data show that the redox status of groundwater near oxbow lakes is controlled by denitrification, iron reduction, and sulfate reduction. The oxidizing condition of groundwater occurs in the sand-dominant alluvium located in the up-gradient of oxbow lakes, whereas the reducing condition accompanying denitrification, iron reduction, and local sulfate reduction is developed in silt-rich alluvium in and the downgradient of oxbow lakes. The occurrence of sulfate reduction was newly found in this study. However, the vertical profiles of redox-sensitive parameters show that iron reduction and sulfate reduction occur concurrently near oxbow lakes, although the measured redox potentials suggest that thermodynamic conditions are controlled by the stability of Fe(2+)/Fe-oxides. Therefore, this study shows that the redox condition of groundwater in the iron-rich zone should be carefully interpreted. For this purpose, depth-specific sampling and careful examination of sulfur isotope data will be very useful for identifying the redox processes occurring in the zone with overlapping iron reduction and sulfate reduction in heterogeneous fluvial sediments.

  20. Role of oxbow lakes in controlling redox geochemistry of shallow groundwater under a heterogeneous fluvial sedimentary environment in an agricultural field: Coexistence of iron and sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byoung-Young; Yun, Seong-Taek; Kim, Kyoung-Ho

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to extend the knowledge of the vertical distribution of redox conditions of shallow groundwater in heterogeneous fluvial sediments near oxbow lakes. For this study, we revisited the study area of Kim et al. (2009) to examine the redox zoning in details. Three multi-level samplers were installed along a flow path near two oxbow lakes to obtain vertical profiles of the subsurface geology and hydrochemical and isotopic data (δ18O and δD of water, δ15N and δ18O of nitrate, and δ34S of sulfate) of groundwater. Geologic logging showed that characteristics of the heterogeneous subsurface geology are closely related to the pattern of vertical redox zoning. Hydrochemical data in conjunction with nitrogen and sulfur isotope data show that the redox status of groundwater near oxbow lakes is controlled by denitrification, iron reduction, and sulfate reduction. The oxidizing condition of groundwater occurs in the sand-dominant alluvium located in the up-gradient of oxbow lakes, whereas the reducing condition accompanying denitrification, iron reduction, and local sulfate reduction is developed in silt-rich alluvium in and the downgradient of oxbow lakes. The occurrence of sulfate reduction was newly found in this study. However, the vertical profiles of redox-sensitive parameters show that iron reduction and sulfate reduction occur concurrently near oxbow lakes, although the measured redox potentials suggest that thermodynamic conditions are controlled by the stability of Fe2 +/Fe-oxides. Therefore, this study shows that the redox condition of groundwater in the iron-rich zone should be carefully interpreted. For this purpose, depth-specific sampling and careful examination of sulfur isotope data will be very useful for identifying the redox processes occurring in the zone with overlapping iron reduction and sulfate reduction in heterogeneous fluvial sediments.

  1. Role of Siderophores in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in Arctic Soils : Effect of Direct Amendment of Siderophores to Arctic Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, A. J.; Dinsdale, E. A.; Lipson, D.

    2014-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR), where ferric iron (Fe3+) is reduced to ferrous iron (Fe2+) anaerobically, is an important respiratory pathway used by soil bacteria. DIR contributes to carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the wet sedge tundra biome in the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) in Alaska, and could competitively inhibit the production of methane, a stronger greenhouse gas than CO2, from arctic soils. The occurrence of DIR as a dominant anaerobic process depends on the availability of substantial levels of Fe3+ in soils. Siderophores are metabolites made by microbes to dissolve Fe3+ from soil minerals in iron deficient systems, making Fe3+ soluble for micronutrient uptake. However, as the ACP is not iron deficient, siderophores in arctic soils may play a vital role in anaerobic respiration by dissolving Fe3+ for DIR. We studied the effects of direct siderophore addition to arctic soils through a field study conducted in Barrow, Alaska, and a laboratory incubation study conducted at San Diego State University. In the field experiment, 50μM deferroxamine mesylate (a siderophore), 50μM trisodium nitrilotriacetate (an organic chelator) or an equal volume of water was added to isolated experimental plots, replicated in clusters across the landscape. Fe2+ concentrations were measured in soil pore water samples collected periodically to measure DIR over time in each. In the laboratory experiment, frozen soil samples obtained from drained thaw lake basins in the ACP, were cut into cores and treated with the above-mentioned compounds to the same final concentrations. Along with measuring Fe2+ concentrations, CO2 output was also measured to monitor DIR over time in each core. Experimental addition of siderophores to soils in both the field and laboratory resulted in increased concentrations of soluble Fe3+ and a sustained increase in Fe2+concentrations over time, along with increased respiration rates in siderophore-amended cores. These results show increased DIR in

  2. Rate and extent of aqueous perchlorate removal by iron surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moore, Angela M; De Leon, Corinne H; Young, Thomas M

    2003-07-15

    The rate and extent of perchlorate reduction on several types of iron metal was studied in batch and column reactors. Mass balances performed on the batch experiments indicate that perchlorate is initially sorbed to the iron surface, followed by a reduction to chloride. Perchlorate removal was proportional to the iron dosage in the batch reactors, with up to 66% removal in 336 h in the highest dosage system (1.25 g mL(-1)). Surface-normalized reaction rates among three commercial sources of iron filings were similar for acid-washed samples. The most significant perchlorate removal occurred in solutions with slightly acidic or near-neutral initial pH values. Surface mediation of the reaction is supported by the absence of reduction in batch experiments with soluble Fe2+ and also by the similarity in specific reaction rate constants (kSA) determined for three different iron types. Elevated soluble chloride concentrations significantly inhibited perchlorate reduction, and lower removal rates were observed for iron samples with higher amounts of background chloride contamination. Perchlorate reduction was not observed on electrolytic sources of iron or on a mixed-phase oxide (Fe3O4), suggesting that the reactive iron phase is neither pure zerovalent iron nor the mixed oxide alone. A mixed valence iron hydr(oxide) coating or a sorbed Fe2+ surface complex represent the most likely sites for the reaction. The observed reaction rates are too slow for immediate use in remediation system design, but the findings may provide a basis for future development of cost-effective abiotic perchlorate removal techniques.

  3. Abiotic degradation of plastic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángeles-López, Y. G.; Gutiérrez-Mayen, A. M.; Velasco-Pérez, M.; Beltrán-Villavicencio, M.; Vázquez-Morillas, A.; Cano-Blanco, M.

    2017-01-01

    Degradable plastics have been promoted as an option to mitigate the environmental impacts of plastic waste. However, there is no certainty about its degradability under different environmental conditions. The effect of accelerated weathering (AW), natural weathering (NW) and thermal oxidation (TO) on different plastics (high density polyethylene, HDPE; oxodegradable high density polyethylene, HDPE-oxo; compostable plastic, Ecovio ® metalized polypropylene, PP; and oxodegradable metalized polypropylene, PP-oxo) was studied. Plastics films were exposed to AW per 110 hours; to NW per 90 days; and to TO per 30 days. Plastic films exposed to AW and NW showed a general loss on mechanical properties. The highest reduction in elongation at break on AW occurred to HDPE-oxo (from 400.4% to 20.9%) and was higher than 90% for HDPE, HDPE-oxo, Ecovio ® and PP-oxo in NW. No substantial evidence of degradation was found on plastics exposed to TO. Oxo-plastics showed higher degradation rates than their conventional counterparts, and the compostable plastic was resistant to degradation in the studied abiotic conditions. This study shows that degradation of plastics in real life conditions will vary depending in both, their composition and the environment.

  4. Reduction of the Temperature Sensitivity of Halomonas hydrothermalis by Iron Starvation Combined with Microaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hallsworth, John E.; Cockell, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    The limits to biological processes on Earth are determined by physicochemical parameters, such as extremes of temperature and low water availability. Research into microbial extremophiles has enhanced our understanding of the biophysical boundaries which define the biosphere. However, there remains a paucity of information on the degree to which rates of microbial multiplication within extreme environments are determined by the availability of specific chemical elements. Here, we show that iron availability and the composition of the gaseous phase (aerobic versus microaerobic) determine the susceptibility of a marine bacterium, Halomonas hydrothermalis, to suboptimal and elevated temperature and salinity by impacting rates of cell division (but not viability). In particular, iron starvation combined with microaerobic conditions (5% [vol/vol] O2, 10% [vol/vol] CO2, reduced pH) reduced sensitivity to temperature across the 13°C range tested. These data demonstrate that nutrient limitation interacts with physicochemical parameters to determine biological permissiveness for extreme environments. The interplay between resource availability and stress tolerance, therefore, may shape the distribution and ecology of microorganisms within Earth's biosphere. PMID:25595757

  5. Microbial reduction of iodate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Councell, T.B.; Landa, E.R.; Lovley, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The different oxidation species of iodine have markedly different sorption properties. Hence, changes in iodine redox states can greatly affect the mobility of iodine in the environment. Although a major microbial role has been suggested in the past to account for these redox changes, little has been done to elucidate the responsible microorganisms or the mechanisms involved. In the work presented here, direct microbial reduction of iodate was demonstrated with anaerobic cell suspensions of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans which reduced 96% of an initial 100 ??M iodate to iodide at pH 7 in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, whereas anaerobic cell suspensions of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens were unable to reduce iodate in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer (pH 7). Both D. desulfuricans and S. putrefaciens were able to reduce iodate at pH 7 in 10 mM HEPES buffer. Both soluble ferrous iron and sulfide, as well as iron monosulfide (FeS) were shown to abiologically reduce iodate to iodide. These results indicate that ferric iron and/or sulfate reducing bacteria are capable of mediating both direct, enzymatic, as well as abiotic reduction of iodate in natural anaerobic environments. These microbially mediated reactions may be important factors in the fate and transport of 129I in natural systems.

  6. Importance of Tetrahedral Iron during Microbial Reduction of Clay Mineral NAu-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, B.; Wu, L.; Liu, K.; Smeaton, C. M.; Li, W.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C.; Roden, E. E.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Transformations between Fe(II) and Fe(III) in ferruginous clay minerals significantly impact the physicochemical properties of soils and sediments, such as the ion exchange capacity and redox potential. An increasing number of studies have focused on clay minerals that undergo redox changes, however, none have so far addressed Fe isotope fractionation during these processes. In this study, Fe isotope fractionations were determined during microbial reduction of Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-2 with different concentrations of lactate. No secondary Fe-bearing minerals, including Fe oxides, were detected by SEM in over 100 days of incubation, suggesting that the measured fractionations only reflected the net isotope effect associated with the clay minerals. The initial reduction likely started from edge sites, and the reductive dissolution released aqueous Fe(II). Basal plane sorbed Fe(II) was detectable after the extent of Fe reduction exceeded 5% and extensive electron transfer and isotope exchange had occurred between basal plane sorbed Fe(II) and structural Fe(III). With lower concentrations of the lactate(40 mM), the maximum Fe isotope fractionation was larger (∆56Febasal Fe(II)-structure Fe(III)= -4.37‰), consistent with greater adsorption than in systems with more lactate. After the Fe in reactive sites was all reduced, isotope exchange between Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) was inhibited due to blockage of electron transfer pathways by the collapse of the clay layers. The results agree with another study in our group on microbial reduction of NAu-1, despite both the smaller extent of reduction (~10% vs. 22% max bioreduction for NAu-1 and NAu-2, respectively) and smaller isotope fractionation factor than for NAu-2. We speculate that tetrahedral Fe in NAu-2 may have accelerated the electron transfer between Fe atoms, thus inducing a higher extent of reduction and a larger Fe isotope fractionation compared to NAu-1.

  7. Hydrogen and formate oxidation coupled to dissimilatory reduction of iron or manganese by Alteromonas putrefaciens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lonergan, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of Alteromonas putrefaciens to obtain energy for growth by coupling the oxidation of various electron donors to dissimilatory Fe(III) or Mn(IV) reduction was investigated. A. putrefaciens grew with hydrogen, formate, lactate, or pyruvate as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor. Lactate and pyruvate were oxidized to acetate, which was not metabolized further. With Fe(III) as the electron acceptor, A. putrefaciens had a high affinity for hydrogen and formate and metabolized hydrogen at partial pressures that were 25-fold lower than those of hydrogen that can be metabolized by pure cultures of sulfate reducers or methanogens. The electron donors for Fe(III) reduction also supported Mn(IV) reduction. The electron donors for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction and the inability of A. putrefaciens to completely oxidize multicarbon substrates to carbon dioxide distinguish A. putrefaciens from GS-15, the only other organism that is known to obtain energy for growth by coupling the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV). The ability of A. putrefaciens to reduce large quantities of Fe(III) and to grow in a defined medium distinguishes it from a Pseudomonas sp., which is the only other known hydrogen-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing microorganism. Furthermore, A. putrefaciens is the first organism that is known to grow with hydrogen as the electron donor and Mn(IV) as the electron acceptor and is the first organism that is known to couple the oxidation of formate to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV). Thus, A. putrefaciens provides a much needed microbial model for key reactions in the oxidation of sediment organic matter coupled to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

  8. Biphasic reduction model for predicting the impacts of dye-bath constituents on the reduction of tris-azo dye Direct Green-1 by zero valent iron (Fe(0)).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raja; Sinha, Alok

    2017-02-01

    Influence of common dye-bath additives, namely sodium chloride, ammonium sulphate, urea, acetic acid and citric acid, on the reductive decolouration of Direct Green 1 dye in the presence of Fe(0) was investigated. Organic acids improved dye reduction by augmenting Fe(0) corrosion, with acetic acid performing better than citric acid. NaCl enhanced the reduction rate by its 'salting out' effect on the bulk solution and by Cl(-) anion-mediated pitting corrosion of iron surface. (NH4)2SO4 induced 'salting out' effect accompanied by enhanced iron corrosion by SO4(2-) anion and buffering effect of NH4(+) improved the reduction rates. However, at 2g/L (NH4)2SO4 concentration, complexating of SO4(2-) with iron oxides decreased Fe(0) reactivity. Urea severely compromised the reduction reaction, onus to its chaotropic and 'salting in' effect in solution, and due to it masking the Fe(0) surface. Decolouration obeyed biphasic reduction kinetics (R(2)>0.993 in all the cases) exhibiting an initial rapid phase, when more than 95% dye reduction was observed, preceding a tedious phase. Maximum rapid phase reduction rate of 0.955/min was observed at pH2 in the co-presence of all dye-bath constituents. The developed biphasic model reckoned the influence of each dye-bath additive on decolouration and simulated well with the experimental data obtained at pH2.

  9. Promoted reduction of tellurite and formation of extracellular tellurium nanorods by concerted reaction between iron and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hun; Kim, Min-Gyu; Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-08-06

    The reduction of tellurite (Te(IV)) by dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, was promoted in the presence of Fe(III) in comparison with Te(IV) bioreduction in the absence of Fe(III). Electron microscopic analyses revealed that iron promoted Te(IV) reduction led to form exclusively extracellular crystalline Te(0) nanorods, as compared to the mostly intracellular formation of Te(0) nanorods in the absence of Fe(III). The Te K-edge X-ray absorption spectrometric analyses demonstrated that S. oneidensis MR-1 in the presence of Fe(III) reduced Te(IV) to less harmful metallic Te(0) nanorods through the precipitation of tellurite (Te(IV)Ox) complex by the bacterial respiration of Fe(III) to Fe(II) under anaerobic conditions. However, Fe(II) ion itself was only able to precipitate the solid tellurite (Te(IV)Ox) complex from the Te(IV) solution, which was not further reduced to Te(0). The results clearly indicated that bacterial S. oneidensis MR-1 plays important roles in the reduction and crystallization of Te(0) nanorods by as yet undetermined biochemical mechanisms. As compared to the slow bacterial Te(IV) reduction in the absence of Fe(III), the rapid reduction of Te(IV) to Te(0) by the concerted biogeochemical reaction between Fe(II) and S. oneidensis MR-1 could be applied for the sequestration and detoxification of Te(IV) in the environments as well as for the preparation of extracellular Te(0) nanorod structures.

  10. Medium effects are as important as catalyst design for selectivity in electrocatalytic oxygen reduction by iron-porphyrin complexes.

    PubMed

    Rigsby, Matthew L; Wasylenko, Derek J; Pegis, Michael L; Mayer, James M

    2015-04-08

    Several substituted iron-porphyrin complexes were evaluated for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysis in different homogeneous and heterogeneous media. The selectivity for four-electron reduction to H2O versus two-electron reduction to H2O2 varies substantially from one medium to another for a given catalyst. In many cases, the influence of the medium in which the catalyst is evaluated has a larger effect on the observed selectivity than the factors attributable to chemical modification of the catalyst. For instance, introduction of potential proton relays has variable effects depending on the catalyst medium. Thus, comparisons of selectivity results from supported and soluble molecular ORR electrocatalysts must be interpreted with caution, as selectivity is a property not only of the catalyst, but also of the larger mesoscale environment beyond the catalyst. Still, in all the direct pairwise comparisons in the same medium, the catalysts with potential proton relays have similar or better selectivity for the preferred 4e(-) path.

  11. Potential of modified iron-rich foundry waste for environmental applications: Fenton reaction and Cr(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Patrícia E F; Oliveira, Leandro D; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M

    2011-10-30

    A magnetic fraction (15%) from a waste of foundry sand (WFS), composed of sand, carbon, bentonite clay and iron (10%) was modified by thermal treatment at 400, 600 and 800°C under inert atmosphere. Mössbauer analyses showed that the thermal treatment increased the amount of Fe(3)O(4) from 25 to 55% by reduction of Fe(2)O(3) and highly dispersed Fe(3+) by the carbon present in the waste. The Fe(3)O(4) caused a significant increase on the activity of two important reactions with application in environmental remediation: the Fenton oxidation of indigo carmine dye with H(2)O(2) and the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The magnetic fraction of WFS was also mixed with hematite (Fe(2)O(3)) and thermally treated at 400, 600 and 800°C. This treatment produced large amounts of surface Fe(3)O(4) and increased substantially the rate of Fenton reaction as well as Cr(VI) reduction. This reactivity combined with the presence of carbon (an adsorbent for organic contaminants), bentonite clay (an adsorbent for metallic contaminants) and the granulometry/packing/hydrodynamic features make WFS a promising material for use in reactive permeable barriers.

  12. Medium Effects are as Important as Catalyst Design for Selectivity in Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction by Iron-porphyrin Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Rigsby, Matthew L.; Wasylenko, Derek J.; Pegis, Michael L.; Mayer, James M.

    2015-04-08

    Several substituted iron porphyrin com-plexes were evaluated for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysis in different homogeneous and heterogeneous media. The selectivity for 4-electron re-duction to H2O vs. 2-electron reduction to H2O2 varies substantially from one medium to another for a given catalyst. In many cases, the influence of the medium in which the catalyst is evaluated has a larger effect on the observed selectivity than the factors attributable to chemical modification of the catalyst. For instance, introduction of potential proton relays has variable effects depending on the catalyst medium. Thus, comparisons of ORR selectivity results need to be interpreted with caution, as the catalysis is a property not just of the catalyst, but also of the larger mesoscale environment be-yond the catalyst. Still, in all the direct pairwise comparisons in the same medium, the catalysts with potential proton relays have similar or better selectivity for the preferred 4e– path. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  13. Nitrogenase of Azotobacter chroococcum. Kinetics of the reduction of oxidized iron-protein by sodium dithionite.

    PubMed Central

    Thorneley, R N; Yates, M G; Lowe, D J

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of oxidized Fe-protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter chroococcum by sodium dithionite were studied by stopped-flow and rapid-freezing e.p.r. (electron-paramagnetic-resonance) spectroscopy. The appearance of the gav. = 1.94 e.p.r. signal (0.24 electron integrated intensity/mol) was associated with a one-electron reduction by SO2--with k greater than 10(8)M-1-S-1 at 23 degrees C. A value of k = 1.75s-1 was obtained for the rate of dissociation of S2O42- into 2SO2-- at 23 degrees C. Further reductions by SO2-- occurred in three slower phases with rate constants in the range 10(4) -10(6)M-1-S-1. These latter phases have no corresponding e.p.r. signal changes and are probably associated with enzymically inactive protein. The high rate of reduction by SO2-- of the Fe-protein alone (k greater than 10(8)M-1-S-1) relative to the rate of oxidation of the Fe-protein in the catalytically active Fe:Mo-Fe protein complex (k = 2.2 X 1O(2)s-1) and the observation that in the steady state the Fe-protein is substantially oxidized means that at normal assay concentrations another reaction must limit the rate of reduction of Fe-protein during turnover. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:180978

  14. Active site formation mechanism of carbon-based oxygen reduction catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraike, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Kim, Jaehong; Nabae, Yuta; Kakimoto, Masa-aki

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-based cathode catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer (HB-FePc) were characterized, and their active-site formation mechanism was studied by synchrotron-based spectroscopy. The properties of the HB-FePc catalyst are compared with those of a catalyst with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity synthesized from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and phenolic resin (FePc/PhRs). Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the HB-FePc catalyst does not lose its ORR activity up to 900°C, whereas that of the FePc/PhRs catalyst decreases above 700°C. Hard X-ray photoemission spectra reveal that the HB-FePc catalysts retain more nitrogen components than the FePc/PhRs catalysts between pyrolysis temperatures of 600°C and 800°C. This is because the linked structure of the HB-FePc precursor has high thermostability against nitrogen desorption. Consequently, effective doping of active nitrogen species into the sp 2 carbon network of the HB-FePc catalysts may occur up to 900°C.

  15. Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Arens, Marlene

    2013-01-31

    Iron and steel manufacturing is among the most energy-intensive industries and accounts for the largest share, approximately 27 percent, of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the manufacturing sector. The ongoing increase in world steel demand means that this industry’s energy use and CO2 emissions continue to grow, so there is significant incentive to develop, commercialize and adopt emerging energy-efficiency and CO2 emissions-reduction technologies for steel production. Although studies from around the world have identified a wide range of energy-efficiency technologies applicable to the steel industry that have already been commercialized, information is limited and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on 56 emerging iron and steel industry technologies, with the intent of providing a well-structured database of information on these technologies for engineers, researchers, investors, steel companies, policy makers, and other interested parties. For each technology included, we provide information on energy savings and environmental and other benefits, costs, and commercialization status; we also identify references for more information.

  16. Longevity of granular iron in groundwater treatment processes: solution composition effects on reduction of organohalides and nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Jörg; Vikesland, Peter J; Kohn, Tamar; Burris, David R; Ball, William P; Roberts, A Lynn

    2003-03-15

    Although granular iron permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are increasingly employed to contain subsurface contaminants, information pertaining to system longevity is sparse. The present investigation redresses this situation by examining the long-term effects of carbonate, silica, chloride, and natural organic matter (NOM) on reactivity of Master Builders iron toward organohalides and nitroaromatic contaminants. Six columns were operated for 1100 days (approximately 4500 pore volumes) and five others for 407 days (approximately 1800 pore volumes). Nine were continuously exposed to mixtures of contaminant species, while the other two were only intermittently exposed in order to differentiate deactivation induced by water (and inorganic cosolutes) from that resulting from contaminant reduction. Contaminants investigated were trichloroethylene, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, 1,1-dichloroethane, 2-nitrotoluene, 4-nitroacetophenone, and 4-nitroanisole. Column reactivity declined substantially over the first 300 days and was dependent on the feed solution chemistry. High carbonate concentrations enhanced reactivity slightly within the first 90 days but produced poorer performance over the long term. Both silica and NOM adversely affected reactivity, while chloride evinced a somewhat mixed effect. Observed contrasts in relative reactivities suggest that trichloroethylene, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, and nitroaromatic compounds all react at different types of reactive sites. Our results indicate that differences in groundwater chemistry should be considered in the PRB design process.

  17. Graphenothermal reduction synthesis of 'exfoliated graphene oxide/iron (II) oxide' composite for anode application in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petnikota, Shaikshavali; Marka, Sandeep Kumar; Banerjee, Arkaprabha; Reddy, M. V.; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.; Chowdari, B. V. R.

    2015-10-01

    Graphenothermal Reduction process is used to obtain exfoliated graphene oxide (EG)/iron (II) oxide (FeO) composite prepared at 650 °C for 5 h in argon. Structural and compositional analyses of the sample confirm the formation of EG/FeO composite. This composite shows a reversible capacity of 857 mAh g-1 at a current rate of 50 mA g-1 in the voltage range 0.005-3.0 V versus Li. An excellent capacity retention up to 60 cycles and high coulombic efficiency of 98% are also observed. Characteristic Fe2+/0 redox peaks observed in Cyclic Voltammetry measurement are explained in correlation with lithium storage mechanism. Thermal, electrical and impedance spectroscopy studies of EG/FeO composite are discussed in detail. Comparative electrochemical cycling studies of EG/FeO composite with Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 materials prepared under controlled conditions are also discussed.

  18. Microbial reduction of nitrate in the presence of zero-valent iron and biochar.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seok-Young; Seo, Yong-Deuk; Kim, Beomseok; Kim, In Young; Cha, Daniel K

    2016-01-01

    The denitrification of nitrate (NO3(-)) by mixed cultures in the presence of zero-valent iron [Fe(0)] and biochar was investigated through a series of batch experiments. It was hypothesized that biochar may provide microbes with additional electrons to enhance the anaerobic biotransformation of nitrate in the presence of Fe(0) by facilitating electron transfer. When compared to the anaerobic transformation of nitrate by microbes in the presence of Fe(0) alone, the presence of biochar significantly enhanced anaerobic denitrification by microbes with Fe(0). Graphite also promoted the anaerobic microbial transformation of nitrate with Fe(0), and it was speculated that electron-conducting graphene moieties were responsible for the improvement. The results obtained in this work suggest that nitrate can be effectively denitrified by microbes with Fe(0) and biochar in natural and engineered systems.

  19. Improved Understanding of Microbial Iron and Sulfate Reduction Through a Combination of Bottom-up and Top-down Functional Proteomics Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Ruth

    2016-02-28

    Our overall goal was to improve the understanding of microbial iron and sulfate reduction by evaluating a diverse iron and sulfate reducing organisms utilizing a multi-omics approach combining “top-down” and “bottom-up” omics methodologies. We initiated one of the first combined comparative genomics, shotgun proteomics, RTqPCR, and heterologous expression studies in pursuit of our project objectives. Within the first year of this project, we created a new bioinformatics tool for ortholog identification (“SPOCS”). SPOCS is described in our publication, Curtis et al., 2013. Using this tool we were able to identify conserved orthologous groups across diverse iron and sulfate reducing microorganisms from Firmicutes, gamma-proteobacteria and delta-proteobacteria. For six iron and sulfate reducers we also performed shotgun proteomics (“bottom-up” proteomics including accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and iTRAQ approaches). Cultures include Gram (-) and Gram (+) microbes. Gram (-) were: Geobacter sulfureducens (grown on iron citrate and fumarate), Geobacter bemidjiensis (grown on iron citrate and fumarate), Shewanella oneidiensis (grown on iron citrate and fumarate) and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans (grown on iron citrate and fumarate). Although all cultures grew on insoluble iron, the iron precipitates interfered with protein extraction and analysis; which remains a major challenge for researchers in disparate study systems. Among the Gram (-) organisms studied, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans remains the most poorly characterized. Yet, it is arguably the most versatile organisms we studied. In this work we have used comparative proteomics to hypothesize which two of the dozens of predicted c-type cytochromes within Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans may be directly involved in soluble iron reduction. Unfortunately, heterologous expression of these Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans ctype cytochromes led to poor protein production and/or formation of inclusion bodies

  20. [Experimental studies on low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO on magnetic iron-based catalysts].

    PubMed

    Yao, Gui-huan; Zhang, Qi; Qin, Ye; Wang, Fang; Lu, Fang; Gui, Ke-ting

    2009-10-15

    Low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO is a new technique needing urgent development in flue gas cleaning. Elementary studies were done about selective catalytic reduction of NO from flue gas on magnetic iron oxides with ammonia at low and medium temperatures in a fluidized bed, such as Fe3O4 and gamma-Fe2O3. Magnetic field effects for NO removal on gamma-Fe2O3 were also researched with low assisted magnetic fileds. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy was used to identify and characterize the iron oxides catalysts. Results show that gamma-Fe2O3 is active in SCR at low temperatures, and Fe3O4 is apparently less active in SCR than gamma-Fe2O3, but Fe2O3 is also active in ammonia oxidation by O2 above 25 degrees C. Therefore, the optimal catalytic temperature zone in SCR on gamma-Fe2O3 includes 250 degrees C and adjacent temperature zone below it. Furthermore, a better NO conversion, which is 90%, is obtained at 250 degrees C on the gamma-Fe2O3 particle catalyst. In addition, chemisorption of NO on gamma-Fe2O3 is accelerated by assisted magnetic fields at 150-290 degrees C, thus the NO conversion is improved and higher NO removal efficiency of 95% is obtained at 250 degrees C. But the efficiency of NO removal decreases above 290 degrees C with the magnetic field. It is concluded that gamma-FeO3 catalyst is fit to be used in low-temperature SCR of NO with ammonia at 200-250 degrees C, which may suppress oxidation of ammonia and take advantage of positive effects by external magnetic fields.

  1. IN SITU CR(VI) TREATMENT USING A FERROUS IRON-BASED REDUCTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory and field studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of a ferrous sulfate/ sodium hydrosulfite (dithionite) reductant blend in treating a hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) source area and Cr(VI) dissolved phase plume at a former industrial site in Charleston, South ...

  2. Microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and Fe cycling in iron-rich freshwater wetland sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, E.E.

    1995-12-31

    The dynamics of Fe cycling and the interaction between microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and other anaerobic microbial respiratory processes were examined in Fe-rich, sulfate-poor freshwater wetland sediments. Sediment incubation experiments demonstrated that reduction of Fe(III) oxides (amorphous, soluble in dilute HCl) dominated anaerobic carbon mineralization at Fe(III) concentrations in excess of 10 mmol per liter wet sediment. The kinetics of Fe(III) reduction were found to be first-order with respect to the concentration of Fe(III) oxide, although estimated first-order rate constants varied in relation to the absolute rates of Fe(III) reduction, suggesting a co-dependency on the concentration of easily degradable organic carbon. High concentrations of amorphous Fe(III) oxides (10-100 mmol L wet sed {sup -1}) were found in surface sediments (0-3 cm) of unvegetated zones of the wetland and in the rhizosphere (0-10 cm) of emergent aquatic plants, sufficient (based on sediment incubation experiments) to allow Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) to dominate anaerobic carbon mineralization. A rapid redox cycling of Fe is apparent in these localized zones based on observed rates of Fe(III) reduction and the abundance/depth distribution of Fe(Ill) oxides. Preliminary culture enrichment studies indicate that FeRB present in these sediments are capable of metabolizing a range of both natural and contaminant aromatic hydrocarbons, which suggests a potential for utilization of natural and/or artificial Fe-rich wetland systems for organic contaminant bioremediation.

  3. Effect of 57Fe-goethite Amendment on Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics During the Transition from Iron to Sulfate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, H.; McGuiness, L.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Peacock, A.; Komlos, J.; Kerkhof, L.; Long, P. E.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2009-12-01

    Due to an increasing interest in microbial biostimulation for the purpose of U(VI) bioreduction, which proceeds via iron reduction, there is a growing need for a better understanding of the associated biogeochemical dynamics. This includes Fe(III) availability as well as the microbial community changes, including the activity of iron-reducers during the biostimulation period even after the onset of sulfate reduction. An up-flow column experiment was conducted with Old Rifle site sediments, where half of the columns had sediment that was augmented with 57Fe-goethite to track minute goethite changes after the onset of sulfate reduction, and to study the effects of increased Fe(III) levels on the overall biostimulation dynamics. The addition of the 57Fe-goethite did not delay the onset of sulfate reduction, but slightly suppressed the overall rate of sulfate reduction and hence acetate utilization. Mossbauer analyses confirmed that there was bioavailable iron present after the onset of sulfate reduction and that iron was still being reduced during sulfate reduction. Addition of the 57Fe-goethite to the sediment had a noticeable effect on the overall composition of the microbial population. 16S rRNA analyses of biostimulatd sediment using TRFLP showed that Geobacter sp. were still active and replicating after sulfate reduction had occurred for over 30 days. DNA fingerprints of the sediment-attached microbial communities were dominated by 5 TRFs, that comprised 25-57 % of the total profile. Augmentation of sediments with the 57Fe-goethite resulted in somewhat higher numbers of Geobacter-like species throughout the experiment, and during sulfate reduction slightly lower numbers of sulfate reducers. These columns also had a slightly improved U(VI) removal efficiency, which might be attributed to the higher Geobacter-like numbers.

  4. Novel Mode of Microbial Energy Metabolism: Organic Carbon Oxidation Coupled to Dissimilatory Reduction of Iron or Manganese

    PubMed Central

    Lovley, Derek R.; Phillips, Elizabeth J. P.

    1988-01-01

    A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganism was isolated from freshwater sediments of the Potomac River, Maryland. The isolate, designated GS-15, grew in defined anaerobic medium with acetate as the sole electron donor and Fe(III), Mn(IV), or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. GS-15 oxidized acetate to carbon dioxide with the concomitant reduction of amorphic Fe(III) oxide to magnetite (Fe3O4). When Fe(III) citrate replaced amorphic Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor, GS-15 grew faster and reduced all of the added Fe(III) to Fe(II). GS-15 reduced a natural amorphic Fe(III) oxide but did not significantly reduce highly crystalline Fe(III) forms. Fe(III) was reduced optimally at pH 6.7 to 7 and at 30 to 35°C. Ethanol, butyrate, and propionate could also serve as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. A variety of other organic compounds and hydrogen could not. MnO2 was completely reduced to Mn(II), which precipitated as rhodochrosite (MnCO3). Nitrate was reduced to ammonia. Oxygen could not serve as an electron acceptor, and it inhibited growth with the other electron acceptors. This is the first demonstration that microorganisms can completely oxidize organic compounds with Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor and that oxidation of organic matter coupled to dissimilatory Fe(III) or Mn(IV) reduction can yield energy for microbial growth. GS-15 provides a model for how enzymatically catalyzed reactions can be quantitatively significant mechanisms for the reduction of iron and manganese in anaerobic environments. Images PMID:16347658

  5. The role of Cu(II) in the reduction of N-nitrosodimethylamine with iron and zinc.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Chen, Zhong-Lin; Shen, Ji-Min; Wang, Ji-He; Li, Wei-Wei; Li, Jun; Wang, Bin-Yuan; Tong, Li-Na

    2017-01-01

    The role of Cu(II) in the reduction of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) with zero-valent metals was investigated by determining the effects of Cu(II) on the removal, kinetics, products, and mechanism. NDMA removal was enhanced, and all reactions followed a pseudo-first-order kinetic model except for the Fe and Fe/0.1 mM Cu(II) systems. The iron mass-normalized pseudo-first-order rate constants (kMFe) increased with the Cu(II) concentration. The zinc mass-normalized pseudo-first-order rate constants (kMZn) were identical to those with the Cu(II) concentrations from 0.1 mM to 1.0 mM and were higher with 2.0 mM Cu(II). The types of products detected were unchanged. Some unknown products were also found. NDMA was reduced to 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine, UDMH). Then, UDMH was reduced into dimethylamine (DMA) by the Fe/Cu(II) and Zn/Cu(II) systems. Catalytic hydrogenation was proposed as the reduction mechanism. Several copper species, such as Cu(OH)2 in the Fe/Cu(II) system and Cu2O and Cu(OH)2 in the Zn/Cu(II) system enhanced NDMA reduction. Differences between the Fe/Cu(II) and Zn/Cu(II) systems were caused by the reduction potentials and surface conditions of the different metals and the copper species in the various systems.

  6. Abiotic stresses and endophyte effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abiotic stresses consist of nonorganismal, nonpathogenic factors that inhibit plant function. Tall fescue [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh.] is widely symbiotic with a naturally occurring endophytic fungus [Neotyphodium coenophialum (Morgan-Jones and Gams) Glenn, Bacon, and Hanlin], which con...

  7. Abiotic tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Bongjun; Sain, Trisha; Lacevic, Naida; Bukharina, Daria; Cha, Sang-Ho; Waas, Anthony M.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2017-03-01

    Tooth enamel comprises parallel microscale and nanoscale ceramic columns or prisms interlaced with a soft protein matrix. This structural motif is unusually consistent across all species from all geological eras. Such invariability—especially when juxtaposed with the diversity of other tissues—suggests the existence of a functional basis. Here we performed ex vivo replication of enamel-inspired columnar nanocomposites by sequential growth of zinc oxide nanowire carpets followed by layer-by-layer deposition of a polymeric matrix around these. We show that the mechanical properties of these nanocomposites, including hardness, are comparable to those of enamel despite the nanocomposites having a smaller hard-phase content. Our abiotic enamels have viscoelastic figures of merit (VFOM) and weight-adjusted VFOM that are similar to, or higher than, those of natural tooth enamels—we achieve values that exceed the traditional materials limits of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. VFOM values describe resistance to vibrational damage, and our columnar composites demonstrate that light-weight materials of unusually high resistance to structural damage from shocks, environmental vibrations and oscillatory stress can be made using biomimetic design. The previously inaccessible combinations of high stiffness, damping and light weight that we achieve in these layer-by-layer composites are attributed to efficient energy dissipation in the interfacial portion of the organic phase. The in vivo contribution of this interfacial portion to macroscale deformations along the tooth’s normal is maximized when the architecture is columnar, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of the columnar motif in the enamel of living species. We expect our findings to apply to all columnar composites and to lead to the development of high-performance load-bearing materials.

  8. Abiotic tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Bongjun; Sain, Trisha; Lacevic, Naida; Bukharina, Daria; Cha, Sang-Ho; Waas, Anthony M; Arruda, Ellen M; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2017-03-01

    Tooth enamel comprises parallel microscale and nanoscale ceramic columns or prisms interlaced with a soft protein matrix. This structural motif is unusually consistent across all species from all geological eras. Such invariability-especially when juxtaposed with the diversity of other tissues-suggests the existence of a functional basis. Here we performed ex vivo replication of enamel-inspired columnar nanocomposites by sequential growth of zinc oxide nanowire carpets followed by layer-by-layer deposition of a polymeric matrix around these. We show that the mechanical properties of these nanocomposites, including hardness, are comparable to those of enamel despite the nanocomposites having a smaller hard-phase content. Our abiotic enamels have viscoelastic figures of merit (VFOM) and weight-adjusted VFOM that are similar to, or higher than, those of natural tooth enamels-we achieve values that exceed the traditional materials limits of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. VFOM values describe resistance to vibrational damage, and our columnar composites demonstrate that light-weight materials of unusually high resistance to structural damage from shocks, environmental vibrations and oscillatory stress can be made using biomimetic design. The previously inaccessible combinations of high stiffness, damping and light weight that we achieve in these layer-by-layer composites are attributed to efficient energy dissipation in the interfacial portion of the organic phase. The in vivo contribution of this interfacial portion to macroscale deformations along the tooth's normal is maximized when the architecture is columnar, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of the columnar motif in the enamel of living species. We expect our findings to apply to all columnar composites and to lead to the development of high-performance load-bearing materials.

  9. Reduction Pathways of Cyclooctatetraene Iron Tricarbonyl as Examined Using Infrared Spectroelectrochemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-25

    Examined using Infrared Spectroelectrochemistry by 00 NM. N. Golovin and M. J. Weaver Prepared for Publication 00 00 in the I- Inorg. Chim. Acta IDTlC 0...Examined using Infrared Spectroelectrochemistry M. N. Golovin and M. J. Weaver* Department of Chemistry Purdue University West Lafayette, Indiana...spectra. Upon reduction to (COT)Fe(CO)3 : these bands are both shifted substantially to lower -19 frequencies, 1890 and 1940 cm 1 (Fig. 2B). These

  10. Methods for accelerating nitrate reduction using zerovalent iron at near-neutral pH: effects of H2-reducing pretreatment and copper deposition.

    PubMed

    Liou, Y H; Lo, S L; Lin, C I; Hu, C Y; Kuan, W H; Weng, S C

    2005-12-15

    Both surface treatments, H2-reducing pretreatment at 400 degrees C and the deposition of copper as a catalyst, were attempted to enhance the removal of nitrate (40 (mg N) L(-1)) using zerovalent iron in a HEPES buffered solution at a pH of between 6.5 and 7.5. After the iron surface was pretreated with hydrogen gas, the removal of the passive oxide layers that covered the iron was indicated by the decline in the oxygen fraction (energy dispersive X-ray analysis) and the overlap of the cyclic polarization curves. The reaction rate was doubled, and the lag of the early period disappeared. Then, the deposition of copper onto freshly pretreated iron promoted nitrate degradation more effectively than that onto a nonpretreated iron surface, because of the high dispersion and small size of the copper particles. An optimum of 0.25-0.5% (w/w) Cu/Fe accelerated the rate by more than six times that of the nonpretreated iron. The aged 0.5% (w/w) Cu/Fe with continual dipping in nitrate solution for 20 days completely restored its reactivity by a regeneration process with H2 reduction. Hence, these two iron surface treatments considerably promoted the removal of nitrate from near-neutral water; the reactivity of Cu/Fe was effectively recovered.

  11. Reduction of an azo dye acid black 24 solution using synthesized nanoscale zerovalent iron particles.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hung-Yee; Chang, Ming-Chin; Yu, Hsing-Hung; Chen, Wang-Hung

    2007-10-01

    The strong color and high total organic carbon (TOC) of laboratory-synthesized azo dye, C.I. Acid Black 24 (AB24), solution was substantially reduced with particles of chemically synthesized nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) under varied conditions of experimental variables such as NZVI dosage, initial dye concentration, and pH. From the results, the synthesized NZVI particles can effectively remove color and TOC of AB24 dye solution under certain conditions. The best removal efficiencies for color and TOC were obtained as 98.9 and 53.8%, respectively, with an initial dye concentration of 100 mg L(-1) and an NZVI dosage of 0.3348 g L(-1). Additionally, the removal rates followed an empirical rate equation with respect to the initial dye concentration as well as the NZVI dosage. The NZVI dosage addition exponentially increments the removal efficiency, with observed empirical reaction rate constants (k) of 0.046-0.603 min(-1) for added NZVI of 0.0335-0.3348 g L(-1). Moreover, the largest unit removal capacity was 609.4 mg of AB24 uptake for each gram of NZVI (i.e., 609.4 mg AB24/g NZVI). Ultimately, the ideal operation conditions were 0.1674-0.3348 g L(-1) of NZVI dosage, 15-30 min of reaction time, and pH 4-9 for 25-100 mg L(-1) of initial dye concentration.

  12. Reduction of polyethylenimine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles induced autophagy and cytotoxicity by lactosylation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiuju; Zhu, Wencheng; Yang, Li; Wu, Changqiang; Lin, Bingbing; Wu, Jun; Jin, Rongrong; Shen, Taipeng; Ai, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are excellent magnetic resonance contrast agents and surface engineering can expand their applications. When covered with amphiphilic alkyl-polyethyleneimine (PEI), the modified SPIO nanoparticles can be used as MRI visible gene/drug delivery carriers and cell tracking probes. However, the positively charged amines of PEI can also cause cytotoxicity and restricts their further applications. In this study, we used lactose to modify amphiphilic low molecular weight polyethylenimine (C12-PEI2K) at different lactosylation degree. It was found that the N-alkyl-PEI-lactobionic acid wrapped SPIO nanocomposites show better cell viability without compromising their labelling efficacy as well as MR imaging capability in RAW 264.7 cells, comparing to the unsubstituted ones. Besides, we found the PEI induced cell autophagy can be reduced via lactose modification, indicating the increased cell viability might rely on down-regulating autophagy. Thus, our findings provide a new approach to overcome the toxicity of PEI wrapped SPIO nanocomposites by lactose modification. PMID:27482464

  13. Assessment of air quality in and around a steel industry with direct reduction iron route.

    PubMed

    Jena, Pradip K; Behera, Dillip K; Mishra, C S K; Mohanty, Saswat K

    2011-10-01

    The coal based Direct Reduced Iron (DRI) route for secondary steel production is now a preferred choice in India. Steel making is invariably associated with emission of air pollutants into the environment. Air quality monitoring was carried out in Winter, Summer and Rainy seasons of 2008 in eight monitoring stations in the work zone and five stations in the residential zone of an Integrated Steel Industry located in Orissa state, India. Four air quality parameters i.e. SPM, RSPM, SO2 and NO2 were monitored. Mean SPM and RSPM values were found to be significantly high (p < 0.01) at stations nearer to source in both work zone and residential zone .The highest average SPM and RSPM values in the work zone recorded were 4869 microg/m3 and 1420 microg/m3 and in the residential zone 294 microg/m3 and 198 microg/m3 respectively. No significant difference in the SO2 and NO2 levels was observed between the work and residential zones. In general, the values of air pollutants were highest in Winter followed by Summer and Rainy season. SPM and RSPM values exceeded the National Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) in both the residential and work zones.

  14. Iron isotopes reveal distinct dissolved iron sources and pathways in the intermediate versus deep Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Abadie, Cyril; Lacan, Francois; Radic, Amandine; Pradoux, Catherine; Poitrasson, Franck

    2017-01-31

    As an essential micronutrient, iron plays a key role in oceanic biogeochemistry. It is therefore linked to the global carbon cycle and climate. Here, we report a dissolved iron (DFe) isotope section in the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean. Throughout the section, a striking DFe isotope minimum (light iron) is observed at intermediate depths (200-1,300 m), contrasting with heavier isotopic composition in deep waters. This unambiguously demonstrates distinct DFe sources and processes dominating the iron cycle in the intermediate and deep layers, a feature impossible to see with only iron concentration data largely used thus far in chemical oceanography. At intermediate depths, the data suggest that the dominant DFe sources are linked to organic matter remineralization, either in the water column or at continental margins. In deeper layers, however, abiotic non-reductive release of Fe (desorption, dissolution) from particulate iron-notably lithogenic-likely dominates. These results go against the common but oversimplified view that remineralization of organic matter is the major pathway releasing DFe throughout the water column in the open ocean. They suggest that the oceanic iron cycle, and therefore oceanic primary production and climate, could be more sensitive than previously thought to continental erosion (providing lithogenic particles to the ocean), particle transport within the ocean, dissolved/particle interactions, and deep water upwelling. These processes could also impact the cycles of other elements, including nutrients.

  15. Flavins secreted by roots of iron-deficient Beta vulgaris enable mining of ferric oxide via reductive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sisó-Terraza, Patricia; Rios, Juan J; Abadía, Javier; Abadía, Anunciación; Álvarez-Fernández, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is abundant in soils but generally poorly soluble. Plants, with the exception of Graminaceae, take up Fe using an Fe(III)-chelate reductase coupled to an Fe(II) transporter. Whether or not nongraminaceous species can convert scarcely soluble Fe(III) forms into soluble Fe forms has deserved little attention so far. We have used Beta vulgaris, one among the many species whose roots secrete flavins upon Fe deficiency, to study whether or not flavins are involved in Fe acquisition. Flavins secreted by Fe-deficient plants were removed from the nutrient solution, and plants were compared with Fe-sufficient plants and Fe-deficient plants without flavin removal. Solubilization of a scarcely soluble Fe(III)-oxide was assessed in the presence or absence of flavins, NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form) or plant roots, and an Fe(II) trapping agent. The removal of flavins from the nutrient solution aggravated the Fe deficiency-induced leaf chlorosis. Flavins were able to dissolve an Fe(III)-oxide in the presence of NADH. The addition of extracellular flavins enabled roots of Fe-deficient plants to reductively dissolve an Fe(III)-oxide. We concluded that root-secretion of flavins improves Fe nutrition in B. vulgaris. Flavins allow B. vulgaris roots to mine Fe from Fe(III)-oxides via reductive mechanisms.

  16. Aggregate-scale heterogeneity in iron (hydr)oxide reductive transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Tufano, K.J.; Benner, S.G.; Mayer, K.U.; Marcus, M.A.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2009-06-15

    There is growing awareness of the complexity of potential reaction pathways and the associated solid-phase transformations during the reduction of Fe (hydr)oxides, especially ferrihydrite. An important observation in static and advective-dominated systems is that microbially produced Fe(II) accelerates Ostwald ripening of ferrihydrite, thus promoting the formation of thermodynamically more stable ferric phases (lepidocrocite and goethite) and, at higher Fe(II) surface loadings, the precipitation of magnetite; high Fe(II) levels can also lead to green rust formation, and with high carbonate levels siderite may also be formed. This study expands this emerging conceptual model to a diffusion-dominated system that mimics an idealized micropore of a ferrihydrite-coated soil aggregate undergoing reduction. Using a novel diffusion cell, coupled with micro-x-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopies, we determined that diffusion-controlled gradients in Fe{sup 2+}{sub (aq)} result in a complex array of spatially distributed secondary mineral phases. At the diffusive pore entrance, where Fe{sup 2+} concentrations are highest, green rust and magnetite are the dominant secondary Fe (hydr)oxides (30 mol% Fe each). At intermediate distances from the inlet, green rust is not observed and the proportion of magnetite decreases from approximately 30 to <10%. Across this same transect, the proportion of goethite increases from undetectable up to >50%. At greater distances from the advective-diffusive boundary, goethite is the dominant phase, comprising between 40 and 95% of the Fe. In the presence of magnetite, lepidocrocite forms as a transient-intermediate phase during ferrihydrite-to-goethite conversion; in the absence of magnetite, conversion to goethite is more limited. These experimental observations, coupled with results of reactive transport modeling, confirm the conceptual model and illustrate the potential importance of diffusion-generated concentration gradients in

  17. Influence of organic ligands on the reduction of polyhalogenated alkanes by iron(II).

    PubMed

    Bussan, Adam L; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2007-10-01

    Experimental work demonstrates that polyhalogenated alkanes (PHAs) are rapidly reduced in aqueous solutions containing Fe(II) complexes with organic ligands that possess either catechol or organothiol Lewis base groups in their structure and are representative of extracellular ligands and metal-complexing moieties within humic substances (tiron, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, thioglycolic acid, and 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid). In solutions containing Fe(II)-tiron complexes, 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) is reduced quantitativelyto acetaldehyde, a product previously reported for reactions with Cr(II), but not with Fe-based reductants. Observed pseudo-first-order rate constants for 1,1,1-TCA reduction by Fe(II)-organic complexes (k'(obs)) generally increase with increasing pH and ligand concentration when Fe(II) concentration is fixed. For the Fe(II)-tiron system, k'(obs) is linearly correlated with the concentration of the 1:2 Fe(II)-tiron complex (FeL2(6-)), and kinetic trends can be described by k'(obs) = k(FeL2)6- [FeL2(6-)], where k(FeL2)6- is the bimolecular rate constant for PHA reaction with the 1:2 Fe(II)-tiron complex. Comparing reaction rates for 14 polyhalogenated ethanes and methanes reveals linear free energy relationships (LFERs) with molecular descriptors for PHA reduction (D(R-X'), deltaG(0'), and E(LUMO)), with the strongest correlation being obtained using carbon-halogen bond dissociation energies, D(R-X'). The collective experimental results are consistent with a dissociative one-electron transfer process occurring during the rate-limiting step.

  18. O2 reduction by a functional heme/nonheme bis-iron NOR model complex

    PubMed Central

    Collman, James P.; Dey, Abhishek; Yang, Ying; Ghosh, Somdatta; Decréau, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    O2 reactivity of a functional NOR model is investigated by using electrochemistry and spectroscopy. The electrochemical measurements using interdigitated electrodes show very high selectivity for 4e O2 reduction with minimal production of partially reduced oxygen species (PROS) under both fast and slow electron flux. Intermediates trapped at cryogenic temperatures and characterized by using resonance Raman spectroscopy under single-turnover conditions indicate that an initial bridging peroxide intermediate undergoes homolytic OO bond cleavage generating a trans heme/nonheme bis-ferryl intermediate. This bis ferryl species can oxygenate 2 equivalents of a reactive substrate. PMID:19541624

  19. O2 reduction by a functional heme/nonheme bis-iron NOR model complex.

    PubMed

    Collman, James P; Dey, Abhishek; Yang, Ying; Ghosh, Somdatta; Decréau, Richard A

    2009-06-30

    O(2) reactivity of a functional NOR model is investigated by using electrochemistry and spectroscopy. The electrochemical measurements using interdigitated electrodes show very high selectivity for 4e O(2) reduction with minimal production of partially reduced oxygen species (PROS) under both fast and slow electron flux. Intermediates trapped at cryogenic temperatures and characterized by using resonance Raman spectroscopy under single-turnover conditions indicate that an initial bridging peroxide intermediate undergoes homolytic O--O bond cleavage generating a trans heme/nonheme bis-ferryl intermediate. This bis ferryl species can oxygenate 2 equivalents of a reactive substrate.

  20. Iron(III) reduction and phosphorous solubilization in humid tropical forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretyazhko, Tanya; Sposito, Garrison

    2005-07-01

    Phosphorus is one of the nutrients most commonly limiting net primary production in soils of humid tropical forests, mainly because insoluble Al and Fe phosphates and strong sorption to Fe(III) (hydr)oxides remove P from the bioavailable pool. Recent field studies have suggested, however, that this loss may be balanced by organic P accumulation under a wet moisture regime (>3350 mm annual precipitation). It has been hypothesized that, as the moisture regime changes from dry to mesic to wet, periods of anoxic soil conditions increase in intensity and duration, depleting Fe(III) (hydr)oxides and releasing sorbed P, but also slowing organic matter turnover, thus shifting the repository of soil P from minerals to humus. Almost no quantitative information is available concerning the coupled biogeochemical behavior of Fe and P in highly weathered forest soils that would allow examination of this hypothesis. In this paper, we report a laboratory incubation study of the effects of biotic Fe(III) (hydr)oxide reduction on P solubilization in a humid tropical forest soil (Ultisol) under a wet moisture regime (3000-4000 mm annual rainfall). The objectives of our study were: (1) to quantify Fe(III) reduction and P solubilization processes in a highly weathered forest soil expected to typify the hypothesized mineral dissolution-organic matter accumulation balance; (2) to examine the influence of electron shuttling on these processes using anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a well-known surrogate for the semiquinone electron shuttles in humic substances, as an experimental probe; and (3) to characterize the chemical forms of Fe(II) and P produced under anoxic conditions, both with and without AQDS. Two series of short-term incubation experiments were carried out, one without AQDS and another with an initial AQDS concentration of 150 μM. We measured pH, pE, and the production of Fe(II), total Fe [Fe(II) + Fe(III)], inorganic P, total P (inorganic P + organic P), and biogenic

  1. Silver/iron oxide/graphitic carbon composites as bacteriostatic catalysts for enhancing oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming; You, Shijie; Gong, Xiaobo; Dai, Ying; Zou, Jinlong; Fu, Honggang

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms from anode heterotrophic bacteria are inevitably formed over cathodic catalytic sites, limiting the performances of single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Graphitic carbon (GC) - based nano silver/iron oxide (AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC) composites are prepared from waste pomelo skin and used as antibacterial oxygen reduction catalysts for MFCs. AgNPs and Fe3O4 are introduced in situ into the composites by one-step carbothermal reduction, enhancing their conductivity and catalytic activity. To investigate the effects of Fe species on the antibacterial and catalytic properties, AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC is washed with sulfuric acid (1 mol L-1) for 0.5 h, 1 h, and 5 h and marked as AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-x (x = 0.5 h, 1 h and 5 h, respectively). A maximum power density of 1712 ± 35 mW m-2 is obtained by AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-1 h, which declines by 4.12% after 17 cycles. Under catalysis of all AgNP-containing catalysts, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) proceeds via the 4e- pathway, and no toxic effects to anode microorganisms result from inhibiting the cathodic biofilm overgrowth. With the exception of AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-5 h, the AgNPs-containing composites exhibit remarkable power output and coulombic efficiency through lowering proton transfer resistance and air-cathode biofouling. This study provides a perspective for the practical application of MFCs using these efficient antibacterial ORR catalysts.

  2. Reduction of Toxoplasma gondii Development Due to Inhibition of Parasite Antioxidant Enzymes by a Dinuclear Iron(III) Compound.

    PubMed

    Portes, J A; Souza, T G; dos Santos, T A T; da Silva, L L R; Ribeiro, T P; Pereira, M D; Horn, A; Fernandes, C; DaMatta, R A; de Souza, W; Seabra, S H

    2015-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, is an obligate intracellular protozoan that can infect a wide range of vertebrate cells. Here, we describe the cytotoxic effects of the dinuclear iron compound [Fe(HPCINOL)(SO4)]2-μ-oxo, in which HPCINOL is the ligand 1-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino)-3-chloropropan-2-ol, on T. gondii infecting LLC-MK2 host cells. This compound was not toxic to LLC-MK2 cells at concentrations of up to 200 μM but was very active against the parasite, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 3.6 μM after 48 h of treatment. Cyst formation was observed after treatment, as indicated by the appearance of a cyst wall, Dolichos biflorus lectin staining, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy characteristics. Ultrastructural changes were also seen in T. gondii, including membrane blebs and clefts in the cytoplasm, with inclusions similar to amylopectin granules, which are typically found in bradyzoites. An analysis of the cell death pathways in the parasite revealed that the compound caused a combination of apoptosis and autophagy. Fluorescence assays demonstrated that the redox environment in the LLC-MK2 cells becomes oxidant in the presence of the iron compound. Furthermore, a reduction in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the treated parasites and the presence of reactive oxygen species within the parasitophorous vacuoles were observed, indicating an impaired protozoan response against these radicals. These findings suggest that this compound disturbs the redox equilibrium of T. gondii, inducing cystogenesis and parasite death.

  3. Reduction of Toxoplasma gondii Development Due to Inhibition of Parasite Antioxidant Enzymes by a Dinuclear Iron(III) Compound

    PubMed Central

    Portes, J. A.; Souza, T. G.; dos Santos, T. A. T.; da Silva, L. L. R.; Ribeiro, T. P.; Pereira, M. D.; Horn, A.; Fernandes, C.; DaMatta, R. A.; de Souza, W.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, is an obligate intracellular protozoan that can infect a wide range of vertebrate cells. Here, we describe the cytotoxic effects of the dinuclear iron compound [Fe(HPCINOL)(SO4)]2-μ-oxo, in which HPCINOL is the ligand 1-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino)-3-chloropropan-2-ol, on T. gondii infecting LLC-MK2 host cells. This compound was not toxic to LLC-MK2 cells at concentrations of up to 200 μM but was very active against the parasite, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 3.6 μM after 48 h of treatment. Cyst formation was observed after treatment, as indicated by the appearance of a cyst wall, Dolichos biflorus lectin staining, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy characteristics. Ultrastructural changes were also seen in T. gondii, including membrane blebs and clefts in the cytoplasm, with inclusions similar to amylopectin granules, which are typically found in bradyzoites. An analysis of the cell death pathways in the parasite revealed that the compound caused a combination of apoptosis and autophagy. Fluorescence assays demonstrated that the redox environment in the LLC-MK2 cells becomes oxidant in the presence of the iron compound. Furthermore, a reduction in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the treated parasites and the presence of reactive oxygen species within the parasitophorous vacuoles were observed, indicating an impaired protozoan response against these radicals. These findings suggest that this compound disturbs the redox equilibrium of T. gondii, inducing cystogenesis and parasite death. PMID:26392498

  4. Experimental analysis of arsenic precipitation during microbial sulfate and iron reduction in model aquifer sediment reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Roden, Eric E.; Crossey, Laura J.; Brealey, Adrian J.; Spilde, Michael N.

    2010-05-01

    Microbial SO 42- reduction limits accumulation of aqueous As in reducing aquifers where the sulfide that is produced forms minerals that sequester As. We examined the potential for As partitioning into As- and Fe-sulfide minerals in anaerobic, semi-continuous flow bioreactors inoculated with 0.5% (g mL -1) fine-grained alluvial aquifer sediment. A fluid residence time of three weeks was maintained over a ca. 300-d incubation period by replacing one-third of the aqueous phase volume of the reactors with fresh medium every seven days. The medium had a composition comparable to natural As-contaminated groundwater with slightly basic pH (7.3) and 7.5 μM aqueous As(V) and also contained 0.8 mM acetate to stimulate microbial activity. Medium was delivered to a reactor system with and without 10 mmol L -1 synthetic goethite (α-FeOOH). In both reactors, influent As(V) was almost completely reduced to As(III). Pure As-sulfide minerals did not form in the Fe-limited reactor. Realgar (As 4S 4) and As 2S 3(am) were undersaturated throughout the experiment. Orpiment (As 2S 3) was saturated while sulfide content was low (˜50 to 150 μM), but precipitation was likely limited by slow kinetics. Reaction-path modeling suggests that, even if these minerals had formed, the dissolved As content of the reactor would have remained at hazardous levels. Mackinawite (Fe 1 + xS; x ⩽ 0.07) formed readily in the Fe-bearing reactor and held dissolved sulfide at levels below saturation for orpiment and realgar. The mackinawite sequestered little As (<0.1 wt.%), however, and aqueous As accumulated to levels above the influent concentration as microbial Fe(III) reduction consumed goethite and mobilized adsorbed As. A relatively small amount of pyrite (FeS 2) and greigite (Fe 3S 4) formed in the Fe-bearing reactor when we injected a polysulfide solution (Na 2S 4) to a final concentration of 0.5 mM after 216, 230, 279, and 286 days. The pyrite, and to a lesser extent the greigite, that formed

  5. Mechanism and kinetics of halogenated compound removal by metallic iron: Transport in solution, diffusion and reduction within corrosion films.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shun; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Liu, Shi-Ting; Yang, Hong-Wei; Xie, Yuefeng F; Yang, Xiao-Yi

    2017-03-06

    A detailed kinetic model comprised of mass transport (ktra), pore diffusion (kdif), adsorption and reduction reaction (krea), was developed to quantitatively evaluate the effect of corrosion films on the removal rate (kobs) of halogenated compounds by metallic iron. Different corrosion conditions were controlled by adjusting the iron aging time (0 or 1 yr) and dissolved oxygen concentration (0-7.09 mg/L DO). The kobs values for bromate, mono-, di- and tri-chloroacetic acids (BrO3(-), MCAA, DCAA and TCAA) were 0.41-7.06, 0-0.16, 0.01-0.53, 0.10-0.73 h(-1), with ktra values at 13.32, 12.12, 11.04 and 10.20 h(-1), kdif values at 0.42-5.82, 0.36-5.04, 0.30-4.50, 0.30-3.90 h(-1), and krea values at 14.94-421.18, 0-0.19, 0.01-1.30, 0.10-3.98 h(-1), respectively. The variation of kobs value with reaction conditions depended on the reactant species, while those of ktra, kdif and krea values were irrelevant to the species. The effects of corrosion films on kdif and krea values were responsible for the variation of kobs value for halogenated compounds. For a mass-transfer-limited halogenated compound such as BrO3(-), an often-neglected kdif value primarily determined its kobs value when pore diffusion was the rate-limiting step of its removal. In addition, the value of kdif might influence product composition during a consecutive dechlorination, such as for TCAA and DCAA. For a reaction-controlled compound such as MCAA, an increased krea value was achieved under low oxic conditions, which was favorable to improve its kobs value. The proposed model has a potential in predicting the removal rate of halogenated compounds by metallic iron under various conditions.

  6. Metal Reduction and Mineral formation by a Psychrotolerant Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from an Iron-Rich Waters near a Hydrothermal Vent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Y.; Vali, H.; Stapleton, R. D.; Fields, M. M.; Phelps, T. J.; Zhou, J.

    2002-12-01

    Although dissimilatory metal reduction and mineral formation under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions are extensively examined, they are poorly understood under low temperature. The objective of this study was to examine metal reduction and mineral formation using a psychrotolerant iron-reducing bacterium (Shewanella alga, PV-4) isolated from iron-rich waters associated with the Naha vents off the Hawaiian coast. The psychrotolerant iron-reducing bacterium was able to use lactate, formate, and hydrogen as an electron donor while reducing Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA, Co(III)-EDTA, Cr(VI), Mn(IV), and iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) at temperatures between 0 and 37°C. The psychrotolerant bacterium exhibited diverse mineral precipitation capabilities including the formation of magnetite (Fe3O4), siderite (FeCO3), and rhodochrosite (MnCO3). Transmission electron microscopic data showed that PV-4 formed mainly superparamagnetic magnetite at temperatures ranging from 0 to 14°C and formed mainly single-domain magnetite at temperatures ranging from 18 to 37°C. This study indicats that iron-reducing bacteria may contribute to the biogeochemical cycling of metals and carbon at low temperatures and may contribute to the natural remnant magnetism of marine sediments.

  7. Modeling intrinsic bioremediation for interpret observable biogeochemical footprints of BTEX biodegradation: the need for fermentation and abiotic chemical processes.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Max; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2004-12-01

    The intrinsic bioremediation of BTEX must be documented by the stoichiometric consumption and production of several other compounds, called 'footprints' of the biodegradation reaction. Although footprints of BTEX biodegradation are easy to identify from reaction stoichiometry, they can be confounded by the stepwise nature of the biodegradation reactions and by several abiotic chemical reactions that also produce or consume the footprints. In order to track the footprints for BTEX biodegradation, the following reactions need to be considered explicitly: (1) fermentation and methanogenesis as separate processes, (2) precipitation and dissolution of calcite, (3) precipitation and dissolution of amorphous iron monosulfide (FeS), (4) conversion of FeS into the thermodynamically stable pyrite (FeS2) with loss of sulfide and abiotic formation of H2, and (5) reductive dissolution of solid iron(III) by oxidation of sulfide. We critically review the research that underlies why these mechanisms must be included and how to describe them quantitatively. A companion manuscript develops and applies a mathematical model that includes these reactions.

  8. Uranium(VI) reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron in anoxic batch systems: The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Sen; Chen, Yongheng; Xiang, Wu; Bao, Zhengyu; Liu, Chongxuan; Deng, Baolin

    2014-12-01

    The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III) on U(VI) reduction by nanoscale zerovalent iron (nanoFe0) was investigated using two iron chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and triethanolamine (TEA) under a CO2-free anoxic condition. The results showed U(VI) reduction was strongly inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA in a pH range from 6.92 to 9.03. For instance, at pH 6.92 the observed U(VI) reduction rates decreased by 80.7% and 82.3% in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA, respectively. The inhibition was attributed to the formation of stable complexes between 1,10-phenanthroline and Fe(II) or TEA and Fe(III). In the absence of iron chelators, U(VI) reduction can be enhanced by surface-bound Fe(II) on nanoFe0. Our results suggested that Fe(III) and Fe(II) probably acted as an electron shuttle to mediate the transfer of electrons from nanoFe0 to U(VI), therefore a combined system with Fe(II), Fe(III) and nanoFe0 can facilitate the U(VI) reductive immobilization in the contaminated groundwater.

  9. Enhanced Cr(VI) removal from groundwater by Fe(0)-H2O system with bio-amended iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Yin, Weizhao; Li, Yongtao; Wu, Jinhua; Chen, Guocai; Jiang, Gangbiao; Li, Ping; Gu, Jingjing; Liang, Hao; Liu, Chuansheng

    2017-02-27

    A one-pot bio-iron system was established to investigate synergetic abiotic and biotic effects between iron and microorganisms on Cr(VI) removal. More diverse iron corrosion and reactive solids, such as green rusts, lepidocrocite and magnetite were found in the bio-iron system than in the Fe(0)-H2O system, leading to 4.3 times higher Cr(VI) removal efficiency in the bio-iron system than in the Fe(0)-H2O system. The cycling experiment also showed that the Cr(VI) removal capacity of Fe(0) in the bio-iron system was 12.4 times higher than that in the Fe(0)-H2O system. A 62days of life-span could be achieved in the bio-iron system, while the Fe(0)-H2O system lost its efficacy after 30days. Enhanced effects of extra Fe(2+) on Cr(VI) removal was observed, largely contributed to the adsorbed Fe(2+) on iron surface, which could function as an extra reductant for Cr(VI) and promote the electron transfer on the solid phase. The results also showed that the reduction of Cr(VI) by microorganisms was insignificant, indicating the adsorption/co-precipitation of Cr by iron oxides on iron surface was responsible for the overall Cr(VI) removal. Our study demonstrated that the bio-amended iron corrosion could improve the performance of Fe(0) for Cr(VI) removal from groundwater.

  10. Reduction of the tyrosyl radical and the iron center in protein R2 of ribonucleotide reductase from mouse, herpes simplex virus and E. coli by p-alkoxyphenols.

    PubMed

    Pötsch, S; Sahlin, M; Langelier, Y; Gräslund, A; Lassmann, G

    1995-10-23

    The rate of reduction of the tyrosyl radical in the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (protein R2) from E. coli, mouse, and herpes simplex virus (HSV-2) by a series of p-alkoxyphenols with different alkyl chains, have been studied by stopped-flow UV-vis and stopped-flow EPR spectroscopy. The reduction and release of iron in R2 by the inhibitors was followed using bathophenanthroline as chelator of Fe2+. p-Alkoxyphenols reduce the mouse R2 tyrosyl radical 1-2 orders of magnitude faster than the HSV-2 and E. coli radical. In contrast to E. coli, the iron center in R2 from mouse and HSV-2 is reduced by the inhibitors. For mouse R2, the rate of reduction of the tyrosyl radical increases in parallel with increasing alkyl chain length of the inhibitor, an observation which may be important for the design of new antiproliferative drugs.

  11. SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yufeng; Shi, Liang; Tien, Ming

    2011-09-30

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 utilizes soluble and insoluble ferric ions as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. The components of respiratory metabolism are localized in the membrane fractions which include the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane. Many of the biological components that interact with the various iron forms are proposed to be localized in these membrane fractions. To identify the iron-binding proteins acting either as an iron transporter or as a terminal iron reductase, we used metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. This system catalyzed the oxidation of amino acids in close proximity to the iron binding site. The carbonyl groups formed from this oxidation can then be labeled with fluoresceinamine (FLNH2). The peptide harboring the FLNH2 can then be proteolytically digested, purified by HPLC and then identified by MALDI-TOF tandem MS. A predominant peptide was identified to be part of SO2907 that encodes a putative TonB-dependent receptor. Compared to wild type (wt), the so2097 gene deletion (ΔSO2907) mutant has impaired ability to reduce soluble Fe(III), but retains the same ability to respire oxygen or fumarate as the wt. The ΔSO2907 mutant was also impacted in reduction of insoluble iron. Iron binding assays using isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence tryptophan quenching demonstrated that a truncated form of heterologous-expressed SO2907 that contains the Fe(III) binding site, is capable of binding soluble Fe(III) forms with Kd of approximate 50 μM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the physiological role of SO2907 in Fe(III) reduction by MR-1.

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans CCM 4253 cultures having lost the ability to couple anaerobic elemental sulfur oxidation with ferric iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Jiri; Sedo, Ondrej; Potesil, David; Janiczek, Oldrich; Zdrahal, Zbynek; Mandl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    In extremely acidic environments, ferric iron can be a thermodynamically favorable electron acceptor during elemental sulfur oxidation by some Acidithiobacillus spp. under anoxic conditions. Quantitative 2D-PAGE proteomic analysis of a resting cell suspension of a sulfur-grown Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans CCM 4253 subculture that had lost its iron-reducing activity revealed 147 protein spots that were downregulated relative to an iron-reducing resting cell suspension of the antecedent sulfur-oxidizing culture and 111 that were upregulated. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of strongly downregulated spots identified several physiologically important proteins that apparently play roles in ferrous iron oxidation, including the outer membrane cytochrome Cyc2 and rusticyanin. Other strongly repressed proteins were associated with sulfur metabolism, including heterodisulfide reductase, thiosulfate:quinone oxidoreductase and sulfide:quinone reductase. Transcript-level analyses revealed additional downregulation of other respiratory genes. Components of the iron-oxidizing system thus apparently play central roles in anaerobic sulfur oxidation coupled with ferric iron reduction in the studied microbial strain.

  13. Role of iron in controlling speciation and mobilization of arsenic in subsurface environment.

    PubMed

    Bose, Purnendu; Sharma, Archana

    2002-11-01

    Widespread arsenic contamination of groundwater has been reported of late in Bangladesh and West Bengal state of India. On the basis of arsenic geochemistry, three probable mechanisms have been cited for arsenic mobility in aquifers of West Bengal and Bangladesh. First, mobilization of arsenic due to the oxidation of arsenic-bearing pyrite minerals. Second, dissolution of arsenic-contaminated iron oxy-hydroxides (FeOOH) due to onset of reducing conditions in the subsurface. Third, due to the release of arsenic sorbed to aquifer minerals by competitive exchange with phosphate ions, that migrates into aquifers due to application of fertilizer to surface soil. Based on the review of field data from the affected region, it appears that the second mechanism described above is the most probable. Two reduction processes associated with this mechanism were investigated, viz., reduction of iron oxy-hydroxide to iron (II), which results in the mobilization of arsenic, and reduction of arsenic (V) to arsenic (III), which may enhance mobility of arsenic under certain conditions. These reactions, in the opinion of some researchers, are possible in subsurface environments mainly through microbial intervention. However, through the data presented in this paper, it has been demonstrated that above red-ox reactions involving iron and arsenic are also possible through predominantly abiotic pathways. While these results do not necessarily imply that abiotic red-ox processes are dominant in all subsurface environments containing iron and arsenic, it is entirely possible that abiotic interactions as described here may be responsible for a substantial amount of transformations involving iron and arsenic in anoxic subsurface environments.

  14. Effect of the addition of zero valent iron (Fe(0)) on the batch biological sulphate reduction using grass cellulose as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, Jean; Schaefer, L

    2013-12-01

    Mineral mining generates acidic, saline, metal-rich mine waters, often referred to as acid mine drainage (AMD). Treatment of AMD and recovering saleable products during the treatment process are a necessity since water is, especially in South Africa, a scarce commodity. The aim of the study presented here was to investigate the effect of zero valent iron (Fe(0)) on the biological removal of sulphate from AMD in batch reactors. The performance of the reactors was assessed by means of sulphate reduction, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acid (VFA) utilisation and volatile suspended solids (VSS) concentration. To this end, three batch reactors, A, B and C (volume 2.5 L), were operated similarly with the exception of the addition of grass cuttings and iron filings. Reactors A and B received twice as much grass (100 g) as C (50 g). Reactor A received no iron filings to act as a control, while reactors B and C received 50-g iron filings for the experimental duration. The results showed that Fe(0) appears to provide sustained sulphate removal when sufficient grass substrate is available. In reactors A and C, sulphate removal efficiency was higher when the COD concentration was lower due to utilisation. In reactor B, sulphate removal efficiency was accompanied by an accumulation of COD as hydrogen (H2) provided by the Fe(0) was utilised for sulphate reduction. Furthermore, these results showed the potential of Fe(0) to enhance the participation of microorganisms in sulphate reduction.

  15. Iron oxide nanocomposite magnets produced by partial reduction of strontium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikkanen, Jussi; Paturi, Petriina

    2014-07-01

    Isotropic bulk nanocomposite permanent magnets were produced with strontium hexaferrite, SrO·6Fe2O3, and magnetite, Fe3O4, as the magnetically hard and soft components. A novels synthesis scheme based on the partial reduction of SrO·6Fe2O3 was employed. In two parallel experiments, nano- and microcrystalline SrO·6Fe2O3 particles were compacted into pellets along with a controlled, understoichiometric amount of potato starch as a reducing agent. The pellets were then sintered in a passive atmosphere. Based on XRD and room temperature magnetic hysteresis measurements, it was concluded that a fraction of the SrO·6Fe2O3 input material had been reduced into Fe3O4. In comparison with pure SrO·6Fe2O3 control pellets, these composites exhibited maximum energy product increases in excess of 5 % due to remanence boosting. The improvement of magnetic properties was attributed to an efficient exchange spring coupling between the magnetic phases. Interestingly, as the synthesis scheme also worked for microcrystalline SrO·6Fe2O3 , the method could presumably be adapted to yield crystallographically oriented bulk nanocomposite magnets.

  16. Chemical reduction synthesis and ac field effect of iron based core-shell magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Srinivasan; Bonder, Michael J.; Hadjipanayis, George C.

    2009-12-01

    High magnetization nanoparticles coated with a biocompatible polymer have attracted considerable interest in recent times as potential materials for biomedical applications associated with targeted drug delivery, detection and the treatment of cancer. This paper considers the use of sodium borohydride reduction of metal salts to form Fe based nanoparticles coated with carboxyl terminated polyethylene glycol (cPEG). By mixing the reactants in a Y-junction, the synthesis produces uniform nanoparticles in the size range 10-20 nm with a core-shell structure. The particles are subsequently coated with a 1-3 nm thick layer of cPEG. These nanoparticles are soft ferromagnets with Hc = 400 Oe. Exciting these nanoparticles with a 4 Oe, 500 kHz alternating magnetic field leads to particle heating with a maximal increase in the saturation temperature as the particle size is decreased. For the largest particles considered here, the temperature reaches 35 °C with a 10 mg sample mass whilst for the smallest nanoparticles considered the temperature exceeds 40 °C.

  17. Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions: Effect of Amended Goethite on Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Hee Sun; McGuinness, L.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Komlos, John; Kerkhoff, Lee; Long, Philip E.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2010-07-01

    There is a growing need for a better understanding of the biogeochemical dynamics involved in microbial U(VI) reduction due to an increasing interest in using biostimulation via electron donor addition as a means to remediate uranium contaminated sites. U(VI) reduction has been observed to be maximized during iron reducing conditions and to decrease upon commencement of sulfate reducing conditions. There are many unknowns regarding the impact of iron/sulfate biogeochemistry on U(VI) reduction. This includes Fe(III) availability as well as the microbial community changes, including the activity of iron-reducers during the uranium biostimulation period even after the onset of sulfate reduction. Up-flow column experiments were conducted with Old Rifle site sediments containing Fe-oxides, Fe-clays, and sulfate rich groundwater. Half of the columns had sediment that was augmented with small amounts of small-particle 57Fe-goethite to track continuously minute goethite changes, and to study the effects of increased Fe(III) levels on the overall biostimulation dynamics. The addition of the 57Fe-goethite did not delay the onset of sulfate reduction, but slightly suppressed the overall rate of sulfate reduction and hence acetate utilization, it did not affect the bacterial numbers of Geobacter-like species throughout the experiment, but did lower the numbers of sulfate reducers in the sediments. 57Fe-Mössbauer analyses (a 57Fe-specific technique) confirmed that there was bioavailable iron present after the onset of sulfate reduction and that iron was still being reduced during sulfate reduction. Addition of the 57Fe-goethite to the sediment had a noticeable effect on the overall composition of the microbial population. 16S rRNA analyses of biostimulated sediment using TRFLP (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) showed that Geobacter sp. (a known Fe-reducer) was still active and replicating during the period of significant sulfate reduction. DNA fingerprints of

  18. Biochar increases arsenic release from an anaerobic paddy soil due to enhanced microbial reduction of iron and arsenic.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Xue, Xi-Mei; Juhasz, Albert L; Chang, Zhi-Zhou; Li, Hong-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that biochar enhances microbial reduction of iron (Fe) oxyhydroxide under anaerobic incubation. However, there is a lack of data on its influence on arsenic (As) release from As-contaminated paddy soils. In this study, paddy soil slurries (120 mg As kg(-1)) were incubated under anaerobic conditions for 60 days with and without the addition of biochar (3%, w/w) prepared from rice straw at 500 °C. Arsenic release, Fe reduction, and As fractionation were determined at 1, 10, 20, 30, and 60 d, while Illumina sequencing and real-time PCR were used to characterize changes in soil microbial community structure and As transformation function genes. During the first month of incubation, As released into soil solution increased sharply from 27.9 and 55.9 to 486 and 630 μg kg(-1) in unamended and biochar amended slurries, with inorganic trivalent As (As(III)) being the dominant specie (52.7-91.0% of total As). Compared to unamended slurries, biochar addition increased As and ferrous ion (Fe(2+)) concentrations in soil solution but decreased soil As concentration in the amorphous Fe/Al oxide fraction (F3). Difference in released As between biochar and unamended treatments (ΔAs) increased with incubation time, showing strong linear relationships (R(2) = 0.23-0.33) with ΔFe(2+) and ΔF3, confirming increased As release due to enhanced Fe reduction. Biochar addition increased the abundance of Fe reducing bacteria such as Clostridum (27.3% vs. 22.7%), Bacillus (3.34% vs. 2.39%), and Caloramator (4.46% vs. 3.88%). In addition, copy numbers in biochar amended slurries of respiratory As reducing (arrA) and detoxifying reducing genes (arsC) increased 19.0 and 1.70 fold, suggesting microbial reduction of pentavalent As (As(V)) adsorbed on Fe oxides to As(III), further contributing to increased As release.

  19. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Karali, Nihan; Xu, Tengfang; Sathaye, Jayant

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the modeling work carried out in this project was to quantify long-term scenarios for the future emission reduction potentials in the iron and steel sector. The main focus of the project is to examine the impacts of carbon reduction options in the U.S. iron and steel sector under a set of selected scenarios. In order to advance the understanding of carbon emission reduction potential on the national and global scales, and to evaluate the regional impacts of potential U.S. mitigation strategies (e.g., commodity and carbon trading), we also included and examined the carbon reduction scenarios in China’s and India’s iron and steel sectors in this project. For this purpose, a new bottom-up energy modeling framework, the Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM), (Karali et al. 2012) was used to provide detailed annual projections starting from 2010 through 2050. We used the ISEEM modeling framework to carry out detailed analysis, on a country-by-country basis, for the U.S., China’s, and India’s iron and steel sectors. The ISEEM model applicable to iron and steel section, called ISEEM-IS, is developed to estimate and evaluate carbon emissions scenarios under several alternative mitigation options - including policies (e.g., carbon caps), commodity trading, and carbon trading. The projections will help us to better understand emission reduction potentials with technological and economic implications. The database for input of ISEEM-IS model consists of data and information compiled from various resources such as World Steel Association (WSA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), China Steel Year Books, India Bureau of Mines (IBM), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and recent LBNL studies on bottom-up techno-economic analysis of energy efficiency measures in the iron and steel sector of the U.S., China, and India, including long-term steel production in China. In the ISEEM-IS model, production technology and manufacturing details are

  20. Molecular-level investigation into copper complexes on vermiculite: effect of reduction of structural iron on copper complexation.

    PubMed

    Furnare, Luca J; Vailionis, Arturas; Strawn, Daniel G

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we present results that describe the speciation of Cu sorbed to the clay mineral vermiculite, with special attention to the effects of reduction on Cu sorption complexes. Sorption complexes were studied using powdered extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, polarized EXAFS spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ionic strength (I), background ion, and clay reduction (structural iron) were varied in the sorption samples. At low I EXAFS results indicate that Cu was surrounded by up to six water molecules sorbed in the interlayer of reduced vermiculite. EXAFS results from Cu-equilibrated reduced vermiculite with high I Ca background electrolyte revealed that Cu was surrounded by 4 O atoms at 1.95 Angatroms and 8 second shell O atoms at 3.14 Angstroms. Angular dependence of the second shell O atoms interpreted from the polarized-EXAFS spectra indicated that the atoms are out of plane from the basal plane of the vermiculite (inclined approximately 25 degrees from the ab plane). The local atomic environment and angular dependence of the EXAFS spectra suggest that the Cu atoms are adsorbed above the hexagonal cavities of the reduced clay mineral and form a Cu dimer in the interlayer. This adsorption mechanism was not observed in the non-reduced vermiculite under identical equilibration conditions. Our results provide molecular level evidence that Cu sorption mechanisms on vermiculite are dependent on solution conditions, such as redox potential and background electrolyte. These results can be used to develop better models of Cu sorption mechanisms on clay mineral surfaces.

  1. Tungsten carbide encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon with iron/cobalt carbides electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jinwei; Jiang, Yiwu; Zhou, Feilong; Wang, Gang; Wang, Ruilin

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a type of hybrid catalyst prepared through an environmental and simple method, combining a pyrolysis of transition metal precursors, a nitrogen-containing material, and a tungsten source to achieve a one-pot synthesis of N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides (Fe/Co/WC@NC). The obtained Fe/Co/WC@NC consists of uniform Fe3C and Co3C nanoparticles encapsulated in graphitized carbon with surface nitrogen doping, closely wrapped around a plate-like tungsten carbide (WC) that functions as an efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The introduction of WC is found to promote the ORR activity of Fe/Co-based carbide electrocatalysts, which is attributed to the synergistic catalysts of WC, Fe3C, and Co3C. Results suggest that the composite exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability, and ability for methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C for ORR in alkaline electrolyte. These advantages make Fe/Co/WC@NC a promising ORR electrocatalyst and a cost-effective alternative to Pt/C for practical application as fuel cell.

  2. Nonionic surfactant greatly enhances the reductive debromination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers by nanoscale zero-valent iron: mechanism and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Liang, Da-wei; Yang, Yu-han; Xu, Wei-wei; Peng, Si-kan; Lu, Shan-fu; Xiang, Yan

    2014-08-15

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has been considered as an effective agent for reductive debromination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). But the high lipophilicity of PBDEs will hinder their debromination owing to the inefficient contact of PBDEs with nZVI. In this study, different ionic forms of surfactants were investigated aiming to promote PBDE debromination, and the beneficial effects of surfactant were found to be: nonionic polyethylene glycol octylphenol ether (Triton X-100, TX)>cationic cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC)>anionic sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDDBS). Except for with SDDBS, the promotion effect for PBDE debromination was positively related to the surfactant concentrations until a critical micelle concentration (CMC). The debromination process of octa-BDE and its intermediates could be described as a consecutive reaction. The corresponding rate constants (k) for the debromination of parent octa-BDE (including nona- to hepta-BDEs), the intermediates hexa-, penta-, and tetra-BDEs are 1.24 × 10(-1) h(-1), 8.97 × 10(-2) h(-1), 6.50 × 10(-2) h(-1) and 2.37 × 10(-3) h(-1), respectively.

  3. Nitrogen, phosphorus and iron doped carbon nanospheres with high surface area and hierarchical porous structure for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Xiaochang; Peng, Hongliang; You, Chenghang; Liu, Fangfang; Zheng, Ruiping; Xu, Dongwei; Li, Xiuhua; Liao, Shijun

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen, phosphorus and Fe doped carbon nanospheres have been synthesized by a facile method in which polyacrylonitrile nanospheres are pyrolyzed in the presence of diammonium phosphate and iron trichloride hexahydrate. The specific surface area of the catalyst is high up to 771.3 m2 g-1, and it has a hierarchical micro-meso-macroporous structure. In an alkaline medium, the catalyst exhibits high electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as well as excellent stability and methanol tolerance-superior in each case to commercial Pt/C catalyst. The effects that adding Fe salt and phosphorus on the structure and performance of the catalyst are also investigated. We suggest that the catalyst's excellent electrocatalytic performance may be attributed to: (1) the synergistic effect, which provides more catalytic sites for the ORR, due to the nitrogen and phosphorus co-doping; (2) the strong promotion by trace Fe residues; and (3) the high surface area and excellent mass transport rate arising from the hierarchical porous structure.

  4. Carbon supported cobalt oxide nanoparticles-iron phthalocyanine as alternative cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Jalal; Yuan, Yong; Zhou, Lihua; Kim, Sunghyun

    2012-06-01

    The high cost and limited resources of precious metals as oxygen reduction catalysts (ORR) hindered the widespread use of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in practice. Here, the feasibility of metal oxide assisted metal macrocyclic complex was investigated as a catalyst for ORR in an air-cathode MFC. Electrochemical results revealed that cobalt oxide (CoOx) incorporation increased the ORR activity of iron phthalocyanine (FePc). In MFCs, the maximum power density of 654 ± 32 mW m-2 was achieved from the C-CoOx-FePc cathode, which was 37% higher than the power density of carbon supported FePc (C-FePc). The voltage output of the MFC only decreased to 85% of its initial voltage after 50 cycles, suggesting that the synthesized catalyst showed acceptable long-term stability. The voltage drop partially resulted from the covering of biofilm on the catalyst layer. This work provided a potential alternative to Pt in MFCs for sustainable energy generation.

  5. Efficient sorption and reduction of U(VI) on zero-valent iron-polyaniline-graphene aerogel ternary composite.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Feng, Shaojie; Zhao, Donglin; Chen, Shaohua; Li, Feifei; Chen, Changlun

    2017-03-15

    In this work, zero-valent iron-polyaniline-graphene aerogel composite (Fe-PANI-GA) was prepared and applied in the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions by batch sorption experiments. The experimental results showed that the Fe-PANI-GA composite had an excellent removal capacity for the removal of U(VI) in acidic solutions. The results also showed that the maximum removal capacity of the Fe-PANI-GA toward U(VI) was 350.47mg/g at pH 5.5. The sorption kinetics data were well-described by pseudo-second-order. The sorption isotherms of U(VI) fitted well with Langmuir isotherm and exhibited better removal efficiency with the increase of temperature. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔS, ΔH) indicated that the sorption of U(VI) on the Fe-PANI-GA was an endothermic and spontaneous process. Moreover, removal mechanisms were studied based on the results of XRD, FTIR and XPS. Both U(VI) sorption and partially reductive precipitation of U(VI) to U(IV) contributed to the removal of U(VI) on Fe-PANI-GA. Therefore, Fe-PANI-GA was an economic and effective material for the removal of uranium from nuclear waste in practical application.

  6. A new transgenic rice line exhibiting enhanced ferric iron reduction and phytosiderophore production confers tolerance to low iron availability in calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hiroshi; Shimochi, Erika; Hamada, Tatsuro; Senoura, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Aung, May Sann; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Ogo, Yuko; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2017-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a critical agricultural problem, especially in calcareous soil, which is distributed worldwide. Rice plants take up Fe(II) from soil through a OsIRT1 transporter (Strategy I-related system) and also take up Fe(III) via a phytosiderophore-based system (Strategy II system). However, rice plants are susceptible to low-Fe conditions because they have low Fe(III) reduction activity and low-level phytosiderophore secretion. Previously, we produced transgenic rice plants expressing a mutationally reconstructed yeast ferric chelate reductase, refre1/372, under the control of the OsIRT1 promoter. This transgenic rice line exhibited higher Fe(III) chelate reductase activity and tolerance to Fe deficiency. In addition, we produced transgenic rice overexpressing the Fe deficiency-inducible transcription factor, OsIRO2, which regulates the expression of various genes involved in the strategy II Fe(III) uptake system, including OsNAS1, OsNAAT1, OsDMAS1, OsYSL15, and TOM1. This transgenic rice exhibited improved phytosiderophore secretion ability and tolerance to Fe deficiency. In the present research, transgenic rice plants that possess both the OsIRT1 promoter-refre1/372 and the 35S promoter-OsIRO2 (RI lines) were produced to enhance both Strategy I Fe(II) reductase ability and Strategy II phytosiderophore productivity. RI lines exhibited enhanced tolerance to Fe-deficient conditions at the early and middle-late stages of growth in calcareous soil, compared to both the non-transgenic line and lines harboring either OsIRT1 promoter-refre1/372 or 35S promoter-OsIRO2 alone. RI lines also exhibited a 9-fold higher yield than the non-transgenic line. Moreover, we successfully produced Fe-deficiency-tolerant Tachisugata rice, which is a high-biomass variety used as fodder. Collectively, our results demonstrate that combined enhancement of two Fe uptake systems in rice is highly effective in conferring tolerance to low Fe availability in calcareous soil.

  7. A new transgenic rice line exhibiting enhanced ferric iron reduction and phytosiderophore production confers tolerance to low iron availability in calcareous soil

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Tatsuro; Senoura, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Aung, May Sann; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Ogo, Yuko; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2017-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a critical agricultural problem, especially in calcareous soil, which is distributed worldwide. Rice plants take up Fe(II) from soil through a OsIRT1 transporter (Strategy I-related system) and also take up Fe(III) via a phytosiderophore-based system (Strategy II system). However, rice plants are susceptible to low-Fe conditions because they have low Fe(III) reduction activity and low-level phytosiderophore secretion. Previously, we produced transgenic rice plants expressing a mutationally reconstructed yeast ferric chelate reductase, refre1/372, under the control of the OsIRT1 promoter. This transgenic rice line exhibited higher Fe(III) chelate reductase activity and tolerance to Fe deficiency. In addition, we produced transgenic rice overexpressing the Fe deficiency-inducible transcription factor, OsIRO2, which regulates the expression of various genes involved in the strategy II Fe(III) uptake system, including OsNAS1, OsNA