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Sample records for abiotic reductive dissolution

  1. Abiotic carbonate dissolution traps carbon in a semiarid desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, Keyu; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Yuqing; Qin, Shugao; Wu, Bin; Liu, Jiabin

    2016-03-01

    It is generally considered that desert ecosystems release CO2 to the atmosphere, but recent studies in drylands have shown that the soil can absorb CO2 abiotically. However, the mechanisms and exact location of abiotic carbon absorption remain unclear. Here, we used soil sterilization, 13CO2 addition, and detection methods to trace 13C in the soil of the Mu Us Desert, northern China. After 13CO2 addition, a large amount of 13CO2 was absorbed by the sterilised soil, and 13C was found enriched both in the soil gaseous phase and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Further analysis indicated that about 79.45% of the total 13C absorbed by the soil was trapped in DIC, while the amount of 13C in the soil gaseous phase accounted for only 0.22% of the total absorbed 13C. However, about 20.33% of the total absorbed 13C remained undetected. Our results suggest that carbonate dissolution might occur predominately, and the soil liquid phase might trap the majority of abiotically absorbed carbon. It is possible that the trapped carbon in the soil liquid phase leaches into the groundwater; however, further studies are required to support this hypothesis.

  2. Abiotic carbonate dissolution traps carbon in a semiarid desert

    PubMed Central

    Fa, Keyu; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Yuqing; Qin, Shugao; Wu, Bin; Liu, Jiabin

    2016-01-01

    It is generally considered that desert ecosystems release CO2 to the atmosphere, but recent studies in drylands have shown that the soil can absorb CO2 abiotically. However, the mechanisms and exact location of abiotic carbon absorption remain unclear. Here, we used soil sterilization, 13CO2 addition, and detection methods to trace 13C in the soil of the Mu Us Desert, northern China. After 13CO2 addition, a large amount of 13CO2 was absorbed by the sterilised soil, and 13C was found enriched both in the soil gaseous phase and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Further analysis indicated that about 79.45% of the total 13C absorbed by the soil was trapped in DIC, while the amount of 13C in the soil gaseous phase accounted for only 0.22% of the total absorbed 13C. However, about 20.33% of the total absorbed 13C remained undetected. Our results suggest that carbonate dissolution might occur predominately, and the soil liquid phase might trap the majority of abiotically absorbed carbon. It is possible that the trapped carbon in the soil liquid phase leaches into the groundwater; however, further studies are required to support this hypothesis. PMID:27020762

  3. Reductive dissolution of goethite by phenolic reductants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaKind, Judy S.; Stone, Alan T.

    1989-05-01

    The reductive dissolution of goethite (α-FeOOH) and hematite (α-Fe 2O 3) by phenolic reductants has been examined in order to improve the understanding of iron transformations in soils, sediments and aquifers. Rates of goethite reductive dissolution by hydroquinone increased as the pH was increased from pH 1.8 to 4.65, arid the following reaction stoichiometry was obeyed: 2 α- FeOOH + QH2 = 2 Fe2+ + Q + 4 OH-. As the pH was increased from pH 4.5 to 6.0, the reductive dissolution rate decreased to below the detection limit. At pH 3.4, the reductive dissolution of hematite was two orders of magnitude slower than goethite. The relationship between structure and reactivity was examined for a series of mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxybenzene reductants. Rates of reductive dissolution decreased in the following order: catechol ˜- hydroquinone > 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid > resorcinol-phenol-4-hydroxybenzoic acid.

  4. Abiotic CO2 reduction during geologic carbon sequestration facilitated by Fe(II)-bearing minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, L. C.; Maher, K.; Bird, D. K.; Brown, G. E.; Thomas, B.; Johnson, N. C.; Rosenbauer, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Redox reactions involving subsurface minerals and fluids and can lead to the abiotic generation of hydrocarbons from CO2 under certain conditions. Depleted oil reservoirs and saline aquifers targeted for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) can contain significant quantities of minerals such as ferrous chlorite, which could facilitate the abiotic reduction of carbon dioxide to n-carboxylic acids, hydrocarbons, and amorphous carbon (C0). If such reactions occur, the injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) could significantly alter the oxidation state of the reservoir and cause extensive reorganization of the stable mineral assemblage via dissolution and reprecipitation reactions. Naturally occurring iron oxide minerals such as magnetite are known to catalyze CO2 reduction, resulting in the synthesis of organic compounds. Magnetite is thermodynamically stable in Fe(II) chlorite-bearing mineral assemblages typical of some reservoir formations. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrate that GCS reservoirs buffered by the chlorite-kaolinite-carbonate(siderite/magnesite)-quartz assemblage favor the reduction of CO2 to n-carboxylic acids, hydrocarbons, and C0, although the extent of abiotic CO2 reduction may be kinetically limited. To investigate the rates of abiotic CO2 reduction in the presence of magnetite, we performed batch abiotic CO2 reduction experiments using a Dickson-type rocking hydrothermal apparatus at temperatures (373 K) and pressures (100 bar) within the range of conditions relevant to GCS. Blank experiments containing CO2 and H2 were used to rule out the possibility of catalytic activity of the experimental apparatus. Reaction of brine-suspended magnetite nanoparticles with scCO2 at H2 partial pressures typical of reservoir rocks - up to 100 and 0.1 bars respectively - was used to investigate the kinetics of magnetite-catalyzed abiotic CO2 reduction. Later experiments introducing ferrous chlorite (ripidolite) were carried out to determine the potential for

  5. Dissolution and reduction of magnetite by bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostka, J. E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is an iron oxide of mixed oxidation state [Fe(II), Fe(III)] that contributes largely to geomagnetism and plays a significant role in diagenesis in marine and freshwater sediments. Magnetic data are the primary evidence for ocean floor spreading and accurate interpretation of the sedimentary magnetic record depends on an understanding of the conditions under which magnetite is stable. Though chemical reduction of magnetite by dissolved sulfide is well known, biological reduction has not been considered likely based upon thermodynamic considerations. This study shows that marine and freshwater strains of the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens are capable of the rapid dissolution and reduction of magnetite, converting millimolar amounts to soluble Fe(II)in a few days at room temperature. Conditions under which magnetite reduction is optimal (pH 5-6, 22-37 degrees C) are consistent with an enzymatic process and not with simple chemical reduction. Magnetite reduction requires viable cells and cell contact, and it appears to be coupled to electron transport and growth. In a minimal medium with formate or lactate as the electron donor, more than 10 times the amount of magnetite was reduced over no carbon controls. These data suggest that magnetite reduction is coupled to carbon metabolism in S. putrefaciens. Bacterial reduction rates of magnetite are of the same order of magnitude as those estimated for reduction by sulfide. If such remobilization of magnetite occurs in nature, it could have a major impact on sediment magnetism and diagenesis.

  6. Dissolution and reduction of magnetite by bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kostka, J E; Nealson, K H

    1995-10-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is an iron oxide of mixed oxidation state [Fe(II), Fe(III)] that contributes largely to geomagnetism and plays a significant role in diagenesis in marine and freshwater sediments. Magnetic data are the primary evidence for ocean floor spreading and accurate interpretation of the sedimentary magnetic record depends on an understanding of the conditions under which magnetite is stable. Though chemical reduction of magnetite by dissolved sulfide is well known, biological reduction has not been considered likely based upon thermodynamic considerations. This study shows that marine and freshwater strains of the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens are capable of the rapid dissolution and reduction of magnetite, converting millimolar amounts to soluble Fe(II)in a few days at room temperature. Conditions under which magnetite reduction is optimal (pH 5-6, 22-37 degrees C) are consistent with an enzymatic process and not with simple chemical reduction. Magnetite reduction requires viable cells and cell contact, and it appears to be coupled to electron transport and growth. In a minimal medium with formate or lactate as the electron donor, more than 10 times the amount of magnetite was reduced over no carbon controls. These data suggest that magnetite reduction is coupled to carbon metabolism in S. putrefaciens. Bacterial reduction rates of magnetite are of the same order of magnitude as those estimated for reduction by sulfide. If such remobilization of magnetite occurs in nature, it could have a major impact on sediment magnetism and diagenesis. PMID:11539843

  7. ABIOTIC REDUCTION OF NITRO AROMATIC PESTICIDES IN ANAEROBIC LABORATORY SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapid abiotic reduction of nitro aromatic pesticides occurs in homogeneous solutions of quinone redox couples, which were selected to model the redox-labile functianal groups in natural organic matter. he kinetics of methyl parathion disappearance are first order in methyl parath...

  8. Reductive Dissolution of Goethite and Hematite by Reduced Flavins

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-10-02

    The abiotic reductive dissolution of goethite and hematite by the reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) and riboflavin (RBFH2), electron transfer mediators (ETM) secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella, was investigated under stringent anaerobic conditions. In contrast to the rapid redox reaction rate observed for ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite (Shi et al., 2012), the reductive dissolution of crystalline goethite and hematite was slower, with the extent of reaction limited by the thermodynamic driving force at circumneutral pH. Both the initial reaction rate and reaction extent increased with decreasing pH. On a unit surface area basis, goethite was less reactive than hematite between pH 4.0 and 7.0. AH2DS, the reduced form of the well-studied synthetic ETM anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), yielded higher rates than FMNH2 under most reaction conditions, despite the fact that FMNH2 was a more effective reductant than AH2DS for ferryhydrite and lepidocrocite. Two additional model compounds, methyl viologen and benzyl viologen, were investigated under similar reaction conditions to explore the relationship between reaction rate and thermodynamic properties. Relevant kinetic data from the literature were also included in the analysis to span a broad range of half-cell potentials. Other conditions being equal, the surface area normalized initial reaction rate (ra) increased as the redox potential of the reductant became more negative. A non-linear, parabolic relationship was observed between log ra and the redox potential for eight reducants at pH 7.0, as predicted by Marcus theory for electron transfer. When pH and reductant concentration were fixed, log ra was positively correlated to the redox potential of four Fe(III) oxides over a wide pH range, following a non-linear parabolic relationship as well.

  9. Reductive dissolution of goethite and hematite by reduced flavins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-11-01

    The abiotic reductive dissolution of goethite and hematite by the reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) and riboflavin (RBFH2), electron shuttles secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella, was investigated under stringent anaerobic conditions. At pH 7.0, the reductive dissolution rates of goethite were 3.5 μmoles m-2 h-1 by 50 μM FMNH2 and 0.27 μmoles m-2 h-1 by 50 μM RBFH2; the reductive dissolution rates of hematite were 29 μmoles m-2 h-1 by 50 μM FMNH2 and 151 μmoles m-2 h-1 by 50 μM RBFH2. The extent of reaction was limited by the thermodynamic driving force at circumneutral pH. Both the initial reaction rate and reaction extent increased with decreasing pH. On a unit surface area basis, goethite was less reactive than hematite between pH 4.0 and 7.0. AH2DS, the reduced form of the well-studied synthetic electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, yielded higher rates than FMNH2 under most reaction conditions. Two additional model compounds, methyl viologen and benzyl viologen, were investigated under similar reaction conditions to explore the relationship between reaction rate and thermodynamic properties. Relevant kinetic data from the literature were also included in the analysis to span a large range in half-cell potentials. Other conditions being equal, the surface area normalized initial reaction rate (ra) increased as the redox potential of the reductant became more negative. A non-linear relationship was observed between log ra and the redox potential for eight reductants at pH 7.0. When pH and reductant concentration were fixed, log ra was positively correlated to the redox potential of four Fe(III) oxides over a wide pH range, following a non-linear relationship as well.

  10. Abiotic Reductive Immobilization of U(VI) by Biogenic Mackinawite

    SciTech Connect

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Newville, Mathew; Lanzirotti, Anthony; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F.

    2013-03-01

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in-situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U6+ reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe1+xS, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U6+ abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U6+ indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of Fe(II) and sulfide bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U6+ reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U6+ reduction.

  11. Kinetics of Abiotic Uranium(VI) Reduction by Sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, S.; Davis, J. A.; Hayes, K. F.

    2010-12-01

    Uranium(VI) reduction is an important process affecting the radionuclide’s fate under sulfate reducing conditions. In this work, kinetics of abiotic U(VI) reduction by dissolved sulfide was studied using a batch reactor. The effects of solution pH, dissolved carbonate, Ca(II), U(VI), and S(-II) concentration on the reduction kinetics were tested. The ranges of these experimental variables were designed to cover the variation in groundwater chemistry observed at the Old Rifle uranium mill tailings site (Colorado, USA). Dissolved U concentration was monitored as a function of time using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to measure the rate of U(VI) reduction. Solid phase reduction products were identified using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results showed that changes in the experimental variables significantly affected U(VI) reduction kinetics by dissolved sulfide. U(VI) reduction occurred under circumneutral pH while no reduction was observed under alkaline conditions. The reduction rate was slowed by increased dissolved carbonate concentration. One solid phase reduction product was identified as nanoscale uraninite (UO2+x(s)). Thermodynamic modeling showed that the dissolved U(VI) aqueous species changed as a function of solution conditions correlated with the change in the reduction rate. These results show that U(VI) aqueous speciation is important in determining abiotic U(VI) reduction kinetics by dissolved sulfide. This study also illustrates the potential importance of dissolved sulfide in field-scale modeling of U reactive transport, and is expected to contribute to the understanding of long-term effects of biostimulation on U transport at the Rifle site.

  12. Reductive transformation of carbamazepine by abiotic and biotic processes.

    PubMed

    König, Anne; Weidauer, Cindy; Seiwert, Bettina; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Unger, Tina; Jekel, Martin

    2016-09-15

    The antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) is ubiquitously present in the anthropogenic water cycle and is therefore of concern regarding the potable water supply. Despite of its persistent behavior in the aquatic environment, a redox dependent removal at bank filtration sites with anaerobic aquifer passage was reported repeatedly but not elucidated in detail yet. The reductive transformation of CBZ was studied, using abiotic systems (catalytic hydrogenation, electrochemistry) as well as biologically active systems (column systems, batch degradation tests). In catalytic hydrogenation CBZ is gradually hydrogenated and nine transformation products (TPs) were detected by liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry. 10,11-Dihydro-CBZ ((2H)-CBZ) was the major stable product in these abiotic, surface catalyzed reduction processes and turned out to be not a precursor of the more hydrogenated TPs. In the biotic reduction processes the formation of (2H)-CBZ alone could not explain the observed CBZ decline. There, also traces of (6H)-CBZ and (8H)-CBZ were formed by microbes under anaerobic conditions and four phase-II metabolites of reduced CBZ could be detected and tentatively identified. Thus, the spectrum of reduction products of CBZ is more diverse than previously thought. In environmental samples CBZ removal along an anaerobic soil passage was confirmed and (2H)-CBZ was determined at one of the sites. PMID:27267475

  13. Simulating Metabolic Reductive Decholorination with Multiple Cultures during Bioenhanced PCE-NAPL Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Abriola, L.; Christ, J.; Amos, B. K.; Suchomel, E. J.; Pennell, K. D.; Loeffler, F.

    2009-12-01

    A recently conducted laboratory experiment investigating metabolic reductive dechlorination in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones demonstrated enhanced DNAPL dissolution by increasing the driving force for mass transfer due to reductions in the aqueous phase. Tetrachloroethene (PCE) was degraded sequentially to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) through trichloroethylene (TCE) and to ethene via vinyl chloride (VC) by Geobacter and Dehalococcoides, respectively. Significant PCE dechlorination led to bioenhanced DNAPL dissolution, with a 5-fold increase in dissolution observed relative to an abiotic system. A multiphase, compositional simulator, the Michigan Subsurface Environmental Simulator (MISER), was modified to model 9 chemical constituents and 3 microbial populations (a fermentor and two dechlorinators) within the column. Monod kinetics, including electron donor thresholds, electron acceptor competition, and competitive inhibition, were used to model contaminant dechlorination and biomass growth. The model was calibrated to the experimental data using effluent concentrations. Model results were compared to analyses of side port samples collected along the column length to determine the ability of the model to reproduce the biomass growth and reductive dechlorination occurring within the column. Results suggest that the model as formulated is capable of capturing the general trends observed in the column. Work is on-going to investigate the influence of initial biomass distribution, DNAPL source zone distribution, and applied boundary conditions on bioenhanced dissolution predictions. This model is expected to provide valuable insights for future experimental design and identification of conditions that may govern bioenhanced dissolution in the field.

  14. Carbon isotope fractionation during abiotic reductive dehalogenation of trichloroethene (TCE).

    PubMed

    Bill, M; Schüth, C; Barth, J A; Kalin, R M

    2001-08-01

    Dehalogenation of trichloroethene (TCE) in the aqueous phase, either on palladium catalysts with hydrogen as the reductant or on metallic iron, was associated with strong changes in delta13C. In general, the delta13C of product phases were more negative than those of the parent compound and were enriched with time and fraction of TCE remaining. For dehalogenation with iron, the delta13C of TCE and products varied from -42/1000 to +5/1000. For the palladium experiments, the final product, ethane, reached the initial delta13C of TCE at completion of the dehalogenation reaction. During dehalogenation, the carbon isotope fractionation between TCE and product phases was not constant. The variation in delta13C of TCE and products offers a new monitoring tool that operates independently of the initial concentration of pollutants for abiotic degradation processes of TCE in the subsurface, and may be useful for evaluation of remediation efficiency. PMID:11513419

  15. Interactions between Biological and Abiotic Pathways in the Reduction of Chlorinated Solvents

    EPA Science Inventory

    While biologically mediated reductive dechlorination continues to be a significant focus of chlorinated solvent remediation, there has been an increased interest in abiotic reductive processes for the remediation of chlorinated solvents. In situ chemical reduction (ISCR) uses zer...

  16. Reduction of ferrihydrite with adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter: microbial reduction by Geobacter bremensis vs. abiotic reduction by Na-dithionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Hädrich, A.; Neidhardt, J.; Küsel, K.; Keller, T. F.; Jandt, K. D.; Totsche, K. U.

    2014-09-01

    Ferrihydrite is a widespread poorly crystalline Fe oxide which becomes easily coated by natural organic matter in the environment. This mineral-bound organic matter entirely changes the mineral surface properties and therefore the reactivity of the original mineral. Here, we investigated 2-line ferrihydrite, ferrihydrite with adsorbed organic matter, and ferrihydrite coprecipitated with organic matter for microbial and abiotic reduction of Fe(III). Ferrihydrite-organic matter associations with different organic matter loadings were reduced either by Geobacter bremensis or abiotically by Na-dithionite. Both types of experiments showed decreasing initial Fe-reduction rates and decreasing degrees of reduction with increasing amounts of mineral-bound organic matter. At similar organic matter loadings, coprecipitated ferrihydrites were more reactive than ferrihydrites with adsorbed organic matter. The difference can be explained by the smaller crystal size and poor crystallinity of such coprecipitates. At small organic matter loadings the poor crystallinity of coprecipitates led to even faster Fe-reduction rates than found for pure ferrihydrite. The amount of mineral-bound organic matter also affected the formation of secondary minerals: goethite was only found after reduction of organic matter-free ferrihydrite and siderite was only detected when ferrihydrites with relatively low amounts of mineral-bound organic matter were reduced. We conclude that direct contact of G. bremensis to the Fe oxide mineral surface was inhibited by attached organic matter. Consequently, mineral-bound organic matter shall be taken into account as a factor in slowing down reductive dissolution.

  17. Citrate influences microbial Fe hydroxide reduction via a dissolution-disaggregation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunschweig, Juliane; Klier, Christine; Schröder, Christian; Händel, Matthias; Bosch, Julian; Totsche, Kai U.; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2014-08-01

    abiotic dissolution kinetics revealed that colloid stabilization was most pronounced at citrate:Fe ratios of 0.1 - 0.5, whereas higher ratios led to enhanced dissolution of both colloidal and larger aggregated fractions. Mathematical simulation of the microbial reduction kinetics under consideration of partial dissolution and colloid stabilization showed that the bioaccessibility increases in the order large aggregates < stable colloids < Fe-citrate. These findings indicate that much of the organic acid driven mobilization of Fe oxy(hydr)oxides is most likely due to colloid formation and stabilization rather than solubilisation.

  18. The Use of Chemical Probes for the Characterization of the Predominant Abiotic Reductants in Anaerobic Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the predominant chemical reductants and pathways for electron transfer in anaerobic systems is paramount to the development of environmental fate models that incorporate pathways for abiotic reductive transformations. Currently, such models do not exist. In this chapt...

  19. Reductive degradation of chloramphenicol using bioelectrochemical system (BES): a comparative study of abiotic cathode and biocathode.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Liu, Hao; Liang, Bin; Song, Rentao; Yan, Qun; Wang, Aijie

    2013-09-01

    Reductive degradation of choramphenicol (CAP) using Bioelectrochemical system (BES) with both abiotic cathode and biocathode was investigated. It was found that the CAP reduction efficiency during the first 24 h reached 86.3% of the biocathode group, while which was only 62.9% in the case of abiotic cathode. Except for the cathode potential, other indicators of the cathode performance as the cathode current, the current response of the cyclic voltammetry, the ohm resistance, and the polarization resistance of the biocathode group were all better than those of the abiotic group. Moreover, specific CAP reductive rate of the biocathode with sludge fermentation liquid (0.199 h(-1)) as carbon source was close to that of the glucose (0.215 h(-1)), but was about 3.2 times of the abiotic cathode group (0.062 h(-1)). It suggested that the introduction of biocathode would better the cathode performance, and then further increase the CAP reduction. PMID:23849757

  20. Reduction of ferrihydrite with adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter: microbial reduction by Geobacter bremensis vs. abiotic reduction by Na-dithionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Hädrich, A.; Neidhardt, J.; Küsel, K.; Keller, T. F.; Jandt, K. D.; Totsche, K. U.

    2014-04-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is a widespread poorly crystalline Fe oxide which becomes easily coated by natural organic matter (OM) in the environment. This mineral-bound OM entirely changes the mineral surface properties and therefore the reactivity of the original mineral. Here, we investigated the reactivity of 2-line Fh, Fh with adsorbed OM and Fh coprecipitated with OM towards microbial and abiotic reduction of Fe(III). As a surrogate for dissolved soil OM we used a water extract of a Podzol forest floor. Fh-OM associations with different OM-loadings were reduced either by Geobacter bremensis or abiotically by Na-dithionite. Both types of experiments showed decreasing initial Fe reduction rates and decreasing degrees of reduction with increasing amounts of mineral-bound OM. At similar OM-loadings, coprecipitated Fhs were more reactive than Fhs with adsorbed OM. The difference can be explained by the smaller crystal size and poor crystallinity of such coprecipitates. At small OM loadings this led to even faster Fe reduction rates than found for pure Fh. The amount of mineral-bound OM also affected the formation of secondary minerals: goethite was only found after reduction of OM-free Fh and siderite was only detected when Fhs with relatively low amounts of mineral-bound OM were reduced. We conclude that direct contact of G. bremensis to the Fe oxide mineral surface was inhibited when blocked by OM. Consequently, mineral-bound OM shall be taken into account besides Fe(II) accumulation as a further widespread mechanism to slow down reductive dissolution.

  1. Effect of abiotic factors on the mercury reduction process by humic acids in aqueous systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mercury (Hg) in the environment can have serious toxic effects on a variety of living organisms, and is a pollutant of concern worldwide. The reduction of mercury from the toxic Hg2+ form to Hg0 is especially important. One pathway for this reduction to occur is through an abiotic process with humic...

  2. Reductive dissolution and metal transport in lake coeur d alenesediments

    SciTech Connect

    Sengor, Sevinc.S.; Spycher, Nicolas.F.; Ginn, Timothy.R.; Moberly, James; Peyton, B.; Sani, Rajesh.K.

    2007-04-27

    The benthic sediments in Lake Coeur d Alene, northern Idaho,have been contaminated by metals (primarily Zn, Pb, and Cu) from decadesof upstream mining activities. As part of ongoing research on thebiogeo-chemical cycling of metals in this area, a diffusivereactive-transport model has been developed to simulate metal transportin the lake sediments. The model includes 1-D inorganic diffusivetransport coupled to a biotic reaction network with multiple terminalelectron acceptors under redox disequilibrium conditions. Here, the modelis applied to evaluate the competing effects of heavy-metal mobilizationthrough biotic reductive dissolution of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, andimmobilization as biogenic sulfide minerals. Results indicate that therelative rates of Fe and sulfate reduction could play an important rolein metal transport through the envi-ronment, and that the formation of(bi)sulfide complexes could significantly enhance metal solubility, aswell as desorption from Fe hydroxides.

  3. PbO2(s, plattnerite) reductive dissolution by natural organic matter: reductant and inhibitory subfractions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhi; Stone, Alan T

    2009-05-15

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is a diverse collection of molecules, each possessing its own reductant, complexant, and adsorption properties. Here, we are interested in the ability of NOM to bring about the reductive dissolution of Pb(IV)O2(s). Adding the coagulants FeCl3 or Al2(SO4)3 followed by membrane filtration is one way to remove a subset of NOM molecules from surface water samples. Another is to pass water samples through a granular activated carbon (GAC) column. Results from applying these treatments to Great Dismal Swamp water (DSW) and Nequasset Bog Water (NBW) can best be explained as follows: (i) GAC column treatment is more efficient at removing the NOM fraction most responsible for reductive dissolution. (ii) Coagulation/filtration, with either coagulant, is most efficient at removing a second, inhibitory fraction. Inhibition may arise from (i) adsorption at the mineral/water interface, which blocks approach of reductant molecules and (ii) a micelle-like aggregate nature, which provides hydrophobic pockets that capture reductantmolecules, again keeping them away from the mineral/water interface. Hypotheses regarding reductant and inhibitory fractions are further evaluated using representative low-molecular-weight compounds. Substituted hydroquinones are used as mimics of the reductant fraction, and malonic acid, quinic acid, trehalose, alginic acid, and polygalacturonic acid are used as mimics of the inhibitory fraction. PMID:19544861

  4. Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Singer, David M.; Bargar, John R.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2013-09-15

    Laboratory experiments were performed as a function of aqueous Fe(II) concentration to determine the uptake and oxidation of Fe(II), and Fe(II)-mediated abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aquifer sediments from the Rifle IFRC field site in Colorado, USA. Mössbauer analysis of the sediments spiked with aqueous 57Fe(II) showed that 57Fe(II) was oxidized on the mineral surfaces to 57Fe(III) and most likely formed a nano-particulate Fe(III)-oxide or ferrihydrite-like phase. The extent of 57Fe oxidation decreased with increasing 57Fe(II) uptake, such that 100 % was oxidized at 7.3 μmol/g Fe and 52 % at 39.6 μmol/g Fe, indicating that the sediments had a finite capacity for oxidation of Fe(II). Abiotic U(VI) reduction was observed by XANES spectroscopy only when the Fe(II) uptake was greater than approximately 20 μmol/g and surface-bound Fe(II) was present. The level of U(VI) reduction increased with increasing Fe(II)- loading above this level to a maximum of 18 and 36 % U(IV) at pH 7.2 (40.7 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (56.1 μmol/g Fe), respectively in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. Greater U(VI) reduction was observed in CO2 free systems [up to 44 and 54 % at pH 7.2 (17.3 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (54.8 μmol/g Fe), respectively] compared to 400 ppm CO2 systems, presumably due to differences in aqueous U(VI) speciation. While pH affects the amount of Fe(II) uptake onto the solid phase, with greater Fe(II) uptake at higher pH, similar amounts of U(VI) reduction were observed at pH 7.2 and 8.3 for a similar Fe(II) uptake. Thus, it appears that abiotic U(VI) reduction is controlled primarily by Fe(II) concentration and aqueous U(VI) speciation. The range of Fe(II) loadings tested in this study are within the range observed in bioreduced sediments, suggesting that Fe(II)-mediated abiotic U(VI) reduction may indeed play a role in field settings.

  5. Abiotic U(VI) reduction by sorbed Fe(II) on natural sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Singer, David M.; Bargar, John; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2013-09-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed as a function of aqueous Fe(II) concentration to determine the uptake and oxidation of Fe(II), and Fe(II)-mediated abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aquifer sediments from the DOE Rifle field research site in Colorado, USA. Mössbauer analysis of the sediments spiked with aqueous 57Fe(II) showed that 57Fe(II) was oxidized on the mineral surfaces to 57Fe(III) and most likely formed a nano-particulate Fe(III)-oxide or ferrihydrite-like phase. The extent of 57Fe oxidation decreased with increasing 57Fe(II) uptake, such that 98% was oxidized at 7.3 μmol/g Fe and 41% at 39.6 μmol/g Fe, indicating that the sediments had a limited capacity for oxidation of Fe(II). Abiotic U(VI) reduction was observed by XANES spectroscopy only when the Fe(II) uptake was greater than approximately 20 μmol/g and surface-bound Fe(II) was present, possibly as oligomeric Fe(II) surface species. The degree of U(VI) reduction increased with increasing Fe(II)-loading above this level to a maximum of 18% and 36% U(IV) at pH 7.2 (40.7 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (56.1 μmol/g Fe), respectively in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. Greater U(VI) reduction was observed in CO2-free systems [up to 44% and 54% at pH 7.2 (17.3 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (54.8 μmol/g Fe), respectively] compared to 400 ppm CO2 systems, presumably due to differences in aqueous U(VI) speciation. While pH affects the amount of Fe(II) uptake onto the solid phase, with greater Fe(II) uptake at higher pH, similar amounts of U(VI) reduction were observed at pH 7.2 and 8.3 for a similar Fe(II) uptake. Thus, it appears that abiotic U(VI) reduction is controlled primarily by sorbed Fe(II) concentration and aqueous U(VI) speciation. The range of Fe(II) loadings tested in this study are within the range observed in biostimulation experiments at the Rifle site, suggesting that Fe(II)-mediated abiotic U(VI) reduction could play a significant role in field settings.

  6. Mechanism of reductive dissolution of lepidocrocite by S(-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrends, Thilo; Hellige, Katrin; Peiffer, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    Reduction of ferric oxides by dissolved sufide species plays an important role in the redox dynamics of anaerobic subsurface environments. For example, S(-II) may be the dominant reductant for ferric oxides in sulfidic sediments and the reaction significantly contributes to the retention of reduced sulfur in these environments. The mechanism and rates of the reductive dissolution of ferric oxides by S(-II) have been frequently investigated and the reaction is generally considered to be a surface controlled process. The proposed mechanism includes the reduction of Fe(III) at the mineral surface upon S(-II) adsorption followed by the release of Fe(II) into solution, which is eventually followed by the precipitation of FeS at suitable conditions. However, several reported experimental observations, such as the remarkable high rate of lepidocrocite (g-FeOOH) reduction and the accumulation of surface bound Fe(II) (Poulton et al., 2004) are difficult to align with the proposed reaction mechanism. Here, we report experimental results which indicate that the prevailing idea about a surface controlled reaction between lepidocrocite and S(-II) has to be revised. We have studied the reaction of lepidocrocite and S(-II) in batch reactors at constant pH 8.0 by adding Na2S solution to the ferric oxide suspension. During the reaction, wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and spectra from X-ray absorption (XANES and EXAFS) at the Fe K-edge (about 7.1 keV) were collected in situ by pumping suspension through a capillary, which was positioned inside the X-ray beam. These experiments were performed at the beamline BM26a (DUBBLE) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France (Nikitenko et al., 2008). Combining WAXS, XANES, and EXAFS allowed us to follow the change in the long-range periodic structure of the minerals simultaneously with changes in Fe redox state and local coordination environment. At pH 8.0 the reaction between lepidocrocite and S(-II) was

  7. Archaeal (Per)Chlorate Reduction at High Temperature: An Interplay of Biotic and Abiotic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebensteiner, Martin G.; Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Schaap, Peter J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Lomans, Bart P.

    2013-04-01

    Perchlorate and chlorate anions [(per)chlorate] exist in the environment from natural and anthropogenic sources, where they can serve as electron acceptors for bacteria. We performed growth experiments combined with genomic and proteomic analyses of the hyperthermophile Archaeoglobus fulgidus that show (per)chlorate reduction also extends into the archaeal domain of life. The (per)chlorate reduction pathway in A. fulgidus relies on molybdo-enzymes that have similarity with bacterial enzymes; however, chlorite is not enzymatically split into chloride and oxygen. Evidence suggests that it is eliminated by an interplay of abiotic and biotic redox reactions involving sulfur compounds. Biological (per)chlorate reduction by ancient archaea at high temperature may have prevented accumulation of perchlorate in early terrestrial environments and consequently given rise to oxidizing conditions on Earth before the rise of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  8. Dissolution-Driven Permeability Reduction of a Fractured Carbonate Caprock

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Brian R.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Bromhal, Grant S.; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Tappero, Ryan; Peters, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Geochemical reactions may alter the permeability of leakage pathways in caprocks, which serve a critical role in confining CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration. A caprock specimen from a carbonate formation in the Michigan sedimentary Basin was fractured and studied in a high-pressure core flow experiment. Inflowing brine was saturated with CO2 at 40°C and 10 MPa, resulting in an initial pH of 4.6, and had a calcite saturation index of −0.8. Fracture permeability decreased during the experiment, but subsequent analyses did not reveal calcite precipitation. Instead, experimental observations indicate that calcite dissolution along the fracture pathway led to mobilization of less soluble mineral particles that clogged the flow path. Analyses of core sections via electron microscopy, synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction imaging, and the first application of microbeam Ca K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure, provided evidence that these occlusions were fragments from the host rock rather than secondary precipitates. X-ray computed tomography showed a significant loss of rock mass within preferential flow paths, suggesting that dissolution also removed critical asperities and caused mechanical closure of the fracture. The decrease in fracture permeability despite a net removal of material along the fracture pathway demonstrates a nonintuitive, inverse relationship between dissolution and permeability evolution in a fractured carbonate caprock. PMID:23633894

  9. Dissolution-Driven Permeability Reduction of a Fractured Carbonate Caprock

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Brian R; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Bromhal, Grant S; McIntyre, Dustin L; Tappero, Ryan; Peters, Catherine

    2013-04-01

    Geochemical reactions may alter the permeability of leakage pathways in caprocks, which serve a critical role in confining CO{sub 2} in geologic carbon sequestration. A caprock specimen from a carbonate formation in the Michigan sedimentary Basin was fractured and studied in a high-pressure core flow experiment. Inflowing brine was saturated with CO{sub 2} at 40°C and 10 MPa, resulting in an initial pH of 4.6, and had a calcite saturation index of −0.8. Fracture permeability decreased during the experiment, but subsequent analyses did not reveal calcite precipitation. Instead, experimental observations indicate that calcite dissolution along the fracture pathway led to mobilization of less soluble mineral particles that clogged the flow path. Analyses of core sections via electron microscopy, synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction imaging, and the first application of microbeam Ca K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure, provided evidence that these occlusions were fragments from the host rock rather than secondary precipitates. X-ray computed tomography showed a significant loss of rock mass within preferential flow paths, suggesting that dissolution also removed critical asperities and caused mechanical closure of the fracture. The decrease in fracture permeability despite a net removal of material along the fracture pathway demonstrates a nonintuitive, inverse relationship between dissolution and permeability evolution in a fractured carbonate caprock.

  10. Abiotic reduction of trifluralin and pendimethalin by sulfides in black-carbon-amended coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenwen; Liu, Xinhui; Xia, Shuhua; Liang, Baocui; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Dinitroaniline herbicides such as trifluralin and pendimethalin are persistent bioaccumulative toxins to aquatic organisms. Thus, in-situ remediation of contaminated sediments is desired. This study investigated whether black carbons (BCs), including apple wood charcoal (BC1), rice straw biochar (BC2), and activated carbon (BC3), could facilitate abiotic reduction of trifluralin and pendimethalin by sulfides of environmentally-relevant concentrations in anoxic coastal sediments. The reduction rates of trifluralin and pendimethalin increased substantially with increasing BC dosages in the sediments. This enhancing effect was dependent on BC type with the greatest for BC3 followed by BC1 and BC2, which well correlated with their specific surface area. The pseudo-first order reduction rate constants (kobs) for BC3-amended sediment (2%) were 13- and 14 times the rate constants in the BC-free sediment. The reduction rates increased with increasing temperature from 8 to 25°C in the BC-amended sediment, following the Arrhenius relationship. Finally, through molecular modeling by density functional theory and reaction species identification from mass spectra, molecular pathways of trifluralin and pendimethalin reduction were elucidated. In contrary to the separate sequential reduction of each nitro group to amine group, both nitro groups, first reduced to nitroso, then eventually to amine groups. PMID:26905610

  11. Products of abiotic U(VI) reduction by biogenic magnetite and vivianite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramani, Harish; Alessi, Daniel S.; Suvorova, Elena I.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Dippon, Urs; Kappler, Andreas; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2011-05-01

    Reductive immobilization of uranium by the stimulation of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) has been investigated as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. In those environments, DMRB may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, such as ferric iron which can lead to the formation of reactive biogenic Fe(II) phases. These biogenic phases could potentially mediate abiotic U(VI) reduction. In this work, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was used to synthesize two biogenic Fe(II)-bearing minerals: magnetite (a mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) oxide) and vivianite (an Fe(II)-phosphate). Analysis of abiotic redox interactions between these biogenic minerals and U(VI) showed that both biogenic minerals reduced U(VI) completely. XAS analysis indicates significant differences in speciation of the reduced uranium after reaction with the two biogenic Fe(II)-bearing minerals. While biogenic magnetite favored the formation of structurally ordered, crystalline UO 2, biogenic vivianite led to the formation of a monomeric U(IV) species lacking U-U associations in the corresponding EXAFS spectrum. To investigate the role of phosphate in the formation of monomeric U(IV) such as sorbed U(IV) species complexed by mineral surfaces, versus a U(IV) mineral, uranium was reduced by biogenic magnetite that was pre-sorbed with phosphate. XAS analysis of this sample also revealed the formation of monomeric U(IV) species suggesting that the presence of phosphate hinders formation of UO 2. This work shows that U(VI) reduction products formed during in situ biostimulation can be influenced by the mineralogical and geochemical composition of the surrounding environment, as well as by the interfacial solute-solid chemistry of the solid-phase reductant.

  12. Abiotic nitrogen fixation on terrestrial planets: reduction of NO to ammonia by FeS.

    PubMed

    Summers, David P; Basa, Ranor C B; Khare, Bishun; Rodoni, David

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the abiotic fixation of nitrogen and how such fixation can be a supply of prebiotic nitrogen is critical for understanding both the planetary evolution of, and the potential origin of life on, terrestrial planets. As nitrogen is a biochemically essential element, sources of biochemically accessible nitrogen, especially reduced nitrogen, are critical to prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life. Loss of atmospheric nitrogen can result in loss of the ability to sustain liquid water on a planetary surface, which would impact planetary habitability and hydrological processes that shape the surface. It is known that NO can be photochemically converted through a chain of reactions to form nitrate and nitrite, which can be subsequently reduced to ammonia. Here, we show that NO can also be directly reduced, by FeS, to ammonia. In addition to removing nitrogen from the atmosphere, this reaction is particularly important as a source of reduced nitrogen on an early terrestrial planet. By converting NO directly to ammonia in a single step, ammonia is formed with a higher product yield (~50%) than would be possible through the formation of nitrate/nitrite and subsequent conversion to ammonia. In conjunction with the reduction of NO, there is also a catalytic disproportionation at the mineral surface that converts NO to NO₂ and N₂O. The NO₂ is then converted to ammonia, while the N₂O is released back in the gas phase, which provides an abiotic source of nitrous oxide. PMID:22283408

  13. Real-Time Manganese Phase Dynamics during Biological and Abiotic Manganese Oxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jena E; Savalia, Pratixa; Davis, Ryan; Kocar, Benjamin D; Webb, Samuel M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fischer, Woodward W

    2016-04-19

    Manganese oxides are often highly reactive and easily reduced, both abiotically, by a variety of inorganic chemical species, and biologically during anaerobic respiration by microbes. To evaluate the reaction mechanisms of these different reduction routes and their potential lasting products, we measured the sequence progression of microbial manganese(IV) oxide reduction mediated by chemical species (sulfide and ferrous iron) and the common metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under several endmember conditions, using synchrotron X-ray spectroscopic measurements complemented by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy on precipitates collected throughout the reaction. Crystalline or potentially long-lived phases produced in these experiments included manganese(II)-phosphate, manganese(II)-carbonate, and manganese(III)-oxyhydroxides. Major controls on the formation of these discrete phases were alkalinity production and solution conditions such as inorganic carbon and phosphate availability. The formation of a long-lived Mn(III) oxide appears to depend on aqueous Mn(2+) production and the relative proportion of electron donors and electron acceptors in the system. These real-time measurements identify mineralogical products during Mn(IV) oxide reduction, contribute to understanding the mechanism of various Mn(IV) oxide reduction pathways, and assist in interpreting the processes occurring actively in manganese-rich environments and recorded in the geologic record of manganese-rich strata. PMID:27018915

  14. Model-based Analysis of Mixed Uranium(VI) Reduction by Biotic and Abiotic Pathways During in Situ Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jiao; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2013-10-24

    Uranium bioremediation has emerged as a potential strategy of cleanup of radionuclear contamination worldwide. An integrated geochemical & microbial community model is a promising approach to predict and provide insights into the bioremediation of a complicated natural subsurface. In this study, an integrated column-scale model of uranium bioremediation was developed, taking into account long-term interactions between biotic and abiotic processes. It is also combined with a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis to track the fate and cycling of biogenic species. As compared with other bioremediation models, the model increases the resolution of the connection of microbial community to geochemistry and establishes direct quantitative correlation between overall community evolution and geochemical variation, thereby accurately predicting the community dynamics under different sedimentary conditions. The thermodynamic analysis examined a recently identified homogeneous reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) under dynamic sedimentary conditions across time and space. It shows that the biogenic Fe(II) from Geobacter metabolism can be removed rapidly by the biogenic sulphide from sulfate reducer metabolism, hence constituting one of the reasons that make the abiotic U(VI) reduction thermodynamically infeasible in the subsurface. Further analysis indicates that much higher influent concentrations of both Fe(II) and U(VI) than normal are required to for abiotic U(VI) reduction to be thermodynamically feasible, suggesting that the abiotic reduction cannot be an alternative to the biotic reduction in the remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater.

  15. Microbially Induced Reductive Dissolution of Trace Element-Rich Lacustrine Iron-Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, S. A.; Kulczykci, E.; O'Neill, A. H.; Roberts, J. A.; Fowle, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    Iron (oxy)hydroxides are ubiquitous components of surfacial materials and are often the dominant redox buffering solid phases in soils and sediments. As a result, the geochemical behavior of these minerals has a profound influence on the global biogeochemical cycling of trace elements, including heavy metals and arsenic (As), in addition to nutrients such as, sulfur (S), carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P). Understanding the behavior of trace elements and nutrients during biological and abiotic processes that effect iron (Fe) mineral phase transformations is paramount for predicting their distribution, mobility, and bioavailability in the environment. To evaluate the impact of dissimilatory Fe-reduction (DIR) on trace element mobility we have conducted batch incubations of Fe-rich lateritic lacustrine sediments. In contrast to mid-latitude lakes where Fe (oxy)hydroxides constitute only a small fraction of the total sediment, tropical lake sediments have been known to comprise up to 40-60 wt. % Fe-oxides. Under suboxic and nonsulphidogenic conditions it is likely that DIR plays a prominent role in early diagenesis and therefore may exert control on the fate and distribution of many trace elements in this environment (e.g. Crowe et al. 2004). In batch incubations conducted in a minimal media of similar composition to typical freshwater the lacustrine Fe-oxides were reductively dissolved at a rate very similar to pure synthetic goethite of similar surface area (measured by N2-BET). This is in contrast to the slower rates previously observed for trace element substituted Fe-oxides. These slower rates have been attributed to surface passivation by secondary Al and Cr mineral precipitation. We propose that these passivation effects may be offset in minimal media incubations by enhanced microbial metabolism due the presence of nutrients (P, Co and other metals) in the lacustrine Fe-oxides. These nutrients became available with progressive reduction as the

  16. Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes by iron-bearing phyllosilicates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woojin; Batchelor, Bill

    2004-09-01

    Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes (tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethylene (c-DCE), and vinylchloride (VC)) by iron-bearing phyllosilicates (biotite, vermiculite, and montmorillonite) was characterized to obtain better understanding of the behavior of these contaminants in systems undergoing remediation by natural attenuation and redox manipulation. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate dechlorination kinetics and some experiments were conducted with addition of Fe(II) to simulate impact of microbial iron reduction. A modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model adequately described reductive dechlorination kinetics of target organics by the iron-bearing phyllosilicates. The rate constants stayed between 0.08 (+/-10.4%) and 0.401 (+/-8.1%) day(-1) and the specific initial reductive capacity of iron-bearing phyllosilicates for chlorinated ethylenes stayed between 0.177 (+/-6.1%) and 1.06 (+/-7.1%) microM g(-1). The rate constants for the reductive dechlorination of TCE at reactive biotite surface increased as pH (5.5-8.5) and concentration of sorbed Fe(II) (0-0.15 mM g(-1)) increased. The appropriateness of the model is supported by the fact that the rate constants were independent of solid concentration (0.0085-0.17 g g(-1)) and initial TCE concentration (0.15-0.60 mM). Biotite had the greatest rate constant among the phyllosilicates both with and without Fe(II) addition. The rate constants were increased by a factor of 1.4-2.5 by Fe(II) addition. Between 1.8% and 36% of chlorinated ethylenes removed were partitioned to the phyllosilicates. Chloride was produced as a product of degradation and no chlorinated intermediates were observed throughout the experiment. PMID:15268967

  17. A Review of Alumina Feeding and Dissolution Factors in Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Pascal; Taylor, Mark P.; Metson, James B.

    2016-05-01

    Modern aluminum reduction cells use point feeding technology to replenish alumina as it is consumed by the electrolytic process. The dissolution of alumina has become increasingly difficult to control as the cell sizes and electrolysis intensity have increased. The mass of alumina added per unit time is now much higher than a decade ago, and must take place within a smaller electrolyte mixing volume. In order to replenish the alumina concentration evenly, the alumina needs to be delivered, dispersed, dissolved, and distributed throughout the reduction cell. The dissolution itself follows a 4-step process that can be limited by a multitude of factors. The status of the research on each of these factors is reviewed in the present paper. Although research in laboratory cells has been conducted many times, and the impact of many factors on dissolution has been measured, published observations of alumina feeding on industrial cells are very sparse, especially regarding the dissolution dynamics in the space-time domain and the impact of the feeder hole condition. The present paper therefore presents a qualitative model of the factors governing alumina dissolution in industrial cells and offers the hypothesis that maintenance of the feeder hole condition is central to ensuring alumina dissolution and prevention of sludging.

  18. Iron isotope fractionation during proton-promoted, ligand-controlled, and reductive dissolution of Goethite.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Jan G; Kraemer, Stephan M; Teutsch, Nadya; Borer, Paul M; Halliday, Alex N; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2006-06-15

    Iron isotope fractionation during dissolution of goethite (alpha-FeOOH) was studied in laboratory batch experiments. Proton-promoted (HCl), ligand-controlled (oxalate dark), and reductive (oxalate light) dissolution mechanisms were compared in order to understand the behavior of iron isotopes during natural weathering reactions. Multicollector ICP-MS was used to measure iron isotope ratios of dissolved iron in solution. The influence of kinetic and equilibrium isotope fractionation during different time scales of dissolution was investigated. Proton-promoted dissolution did not cause iron isotope fractionation, concurrently demonstrating the isotopic homogeneity of the goethite substrate. In contrast, both ligand-controlled and reductive dissolution of goethite resulted in significant iron isotope fractionation. The kinetic isotope effect, which caused an enrichment of light isotopes in the early dissolved fractions, was modeled with an enrichment factor for the 57Fe/ 54Fe ratio of -2.6 per thousandth between reactive surface sites and solution. Later dissolved fractions of the ligand-controlled experiments exhibit a reverse trend with a depletion of light isotopes of approximately 0.5 per thousandth in solution. We interpret this as an equilibrium isotope effect between Fe(III)-oxalate complexes in solution and the goethite surface. In conclusion, different dissolution mechanisms cause diverse iron isotope fractionation effects and likely influence the iron isotope signature of natural soil and weathering environments. PMID:16830543

  19. A Review of Alumina Feeding and Dissolution Factors in Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Pascal; Taylor, Mark P.; Metson, James B.

    2016-08-01

    Modern aluminum reduction cells use point feeding technology to replenish alumina as it is consumed by the electrolytic process. The dissolution of alumina has become increasingly difficult to control as the cell sizes and electrolysis intensity have increased. The mass of alumina added per unit time is now much higher than a decade ago, and must take place within a smaller electrolyte mixing volume. In order to replenish the alumina concentration evenly, the alumina needs to be delivered, dispersed, dissolved, and distributed throughout the reduction cell. The dissolution itself follows a 4-step process that can be limited by a multitude of factors. The status of the research on each of these factors is reviewed in the present paper. Although research in laboratory cells has been conducted many times, and the impact of many factors on dissolution has been measured, published observations of alumina feeding on industrial cells are very sparse, especially regarding the dissolution dynamics in the space-time domain and the impact of the feeder hole condition. The present paper therefore presents a qualitative model of the factors governing alumina dissolution in industrial cells and offers the hypothesis that maintenance of the feeder hole condition is central to ensuring alumina dissolution and prevention of sludging.

  20. Transformations of mercury, iron, and sulfur during the reductive dissolution of iron oxyhydroxide by sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowey, Aaron J.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2007-02-01

    Methylmercury can accumulate in fish to concentrations unhealthy for humans and other predatory mammals. Most sources of mercury (Hg) emit inorganic species to the environment. Therefore, ecological harm occurs when inorganic Hg is converted to methylmercury. Sulfate- and iron-reducing bacteria (SRB and FeRB) methylate Hg, but the effects of processes involving oxidized and reduced forms of sulfur and iron on the reactivity of Hg, including the propensity of inorganic Hg to be methylated, are poorly understood. Under abiotic conditions, using a laboratory flow reactor, bisulfide (HS -) was added at 40 to 250 μM h -1 to 5 g L -1 goethite (α-FeOOH) suspensions to which Hg(II) was adsorbed (30-100 nmol m -2) at pH 7.5. Dissolved Hg initially decreased from 10 3 or 10 4 nM (depending on initial conditions) to 10 -1 nM, during which the concentration of Hg(II) adsorbed to goethite decreased by 80% and metacinnabar (β-HgS (s)) formed, based on identification using Hg L III-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic analysis. The apparent coordination of oxygens surrounding Hg(II), measured with EXAFS spectroscopy, increased during one flow experiment, suggesting desorption of monodentate-bound Hg(II) while bidentate-bound Hg(II) persisted on the goethite surface. Further sulfidation increased dissolved Hg concentrations by one to two orders of magnitude (0.5 to 10 nM or 30 nM), suggesting that byproducts of bisulfide oxidation and Fe(III) reduction, primarily polysulfide and potentially Fe(II), enhanced the dissolution of β-HgS (s) and/or desorption of Hg(II). Rapid accumulation of Fe(II) in the solid phase (up to 40 μmol g -1) coincided with faster elevation of dissolved Hg concentrations. Fe(II) served as a proxy for elemental sulfur [S(0)], as S(0) was the dominant bisulfide oxidation product coupled to Fe(III) reduction, based on sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. In one experiment, dissolved Hg

  1. Biotite dissolution and Cr(VI) reduction at elevated pH and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y. Thomas; Bigham, Jerry M.; Traina, Samuel J.

    2005-08-01

    The effects of elevated pH, ionic strength, and temperature on sediments in the vadose zone are of primary importance in modeling contaminant transport and understanding the environmental impact of tank leakage at nuclear waste storage facilities like those of the Hanford site. This study was designed to investigate biotite dissolution under simulated high level waste (HLW) conditions and its impact on Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization. Biotite dissolution increased with NaOH concentrations in the range of 0.1 to 2 mol L -1. There was a corresponding release of K, Fe, Si, and Al to solution, with Si and Al showing a complex pattern due to the formation of secondary zeolite minerals. Dissolved Fe concentrations were an order of magnitude lower than the other elements, possibly due to the formation of green rust and Fe(OH) 2. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) also increased with increased NaOH concentration. A homogeneous reduction of chromate by Fe(II) aq released through biotite dissolution was probably the primary pathway responsible for this reaction. Greater ionic strengths increased biotite dissolution and consequently increased Fe(II) aq release and Cr(VI) removal. The results indicated that HLW would cause phyllosilicate dissolution and the formation of secondary precipitates that would have a major impact on radionuclide and contaminant transport in the vadose zone at the Hanford site.

  2. Investigation of Dissolution Parameters for PbO2 Using Waste Cellulosic Reductants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcali, Mehmet Hakan; Zeytuncu, Bihter

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we aimed to establish the optimum reductive leaching process with diluted acetic acid for the lead dioxide recovery from lead-acid battery paste. The effects of various reducing agents, acid concentrations, pulp densities, reaction temperatures, and leaching times on the dissolution of lead dioxide were investigated. Lead dioxide dissolution by reductive acidic media is a chemically controlled process with activation energy of 44.51 ± 1.23 kJ/mol. After leaching, lead acetate ions were precipitated with chromic acid as the lead chromate (PbCrO4) compound. Lead acetate salt was also precipitated from the leaching solution using a crystallization method. These lead compounds can potentially be used in many industries (e.g., pigment application to detect the poisonous gas hydrogen sulfide). Our findings indicate that this process could be effective in leaching lead dioxide.

  3. Investigation of Dissolution Parameters for PbO2 Using Waste Cellulosic Reductants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcali, Mehmet Hakan; Zeytuncu, Bihter

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to establish the optimum reductive leaching process with diluted acetic acid for the lead dioxide recovery from lead-acid battery paste. The effects of various reducing agents, acid concentrations, pulp densities, reaction temperatures, and leaching times on the dissolution of lead dioxide were investigated. Lead dioxide dissolution by reductive acidic media is a chemically controlled process with activation energy of 44.51 ± 1.23 kJ/mol. After leaching, lead acetate ions were precipitated with chromic acid as the lead chromate (PbCrO4) compound. Lead acetate salt was also precipitated from the leaching solution using a crystallization method. These lead compounds can potentially be used in many industries ( e.g., pigment application to detect the poisonous gas hydrogen sulfide). Our findings indicate that this process could be effective in leaching lead dioxide.

  4. TRANSFORMATIONS OF HALOGENATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS: OXIDATION, REDUCTION, SUBSTITUTION, AND DEHYDROHALOGENATION REACTIONS OCCUR ABIOTICALLY OR IN MICROBIAL AND MAMMALIAN SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current understanding of abiotic and biotic chemistry of halogenated aliphatic compounds is systematized and summarized. Knowledge of abiotic transformations can provide a conceptual framework for understanding biologically mediated transformations. Most abiotic transformatio...

  5. Fe(III) mineral reduction followed by partial dissolution and reactive oxygen species generation during 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene transformation by the aerobic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M; Ziganshina, Elvira E; Byrne, James; Gerlach, Robin; Struve, Ellen; Biktagirov, Timur; Rodionov, Alexander; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the factors that influence pollutant transformation in the presence of ferric (oxyhydr)oxides is crucial to the efficient application of different remediation strategies. In this study we determined the effect of goethite, hematite, magnetite and ferrihydrite on the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) by Yarrowia lipolytica AN-L15. The presence of ferric (oxyhydr)oxides led to a small decrease in the rate of TNT removal. In all cases, a significant release of NO2 (-) from TNT and further NO2 (-) oxidation to NO3 (-) was observed. A fraction of the released NO2 (-) was abiotically decomposed to NO and NO2, and then NO was likely oxidized abiotically to NO2 by O2. ESR analysis revealed the generation of superoxide in the culture medium; its further protonation at low pH resulted in the formation of hydroperoxyl radical. Presumably, a fraction of NO released during TNT degradation reacted with superoxide and formed peroxynitrite, which was further rearranged to NO3 (-) at the acidic pH values observed in this study. A transformation and reduction of ferric (oxyhydr)oxides followed by partial dissolution (in the range of 7-86% of the initial Fe(III)) were observed in the presence of cells and TNT. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed some minor changes for goethite, magnetite and ferrihydrite samples during their incubation with Y. lipolytica and TNT. This study shows that i) reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated during TNT transformation by Y. lipolytica participate in the abiotic conversion of TNT and ii) the presence of iron(III) minerals leads to a minor decrease in TNT transformation. PMID:25852985

  6. Simultaneous reductive dissolution of iron oxide and oxidation of iodide in ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kitae; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-04-01

    Iron is an important trace element controlling the metabolism and growth of all kinds of living species. Especially, the bio-availability of iron has been regarded as the limiting factor for primary productivity in HNLC (High Nutrients Low Chlorophyll) regions including Southern ocean. The dissolution of iron oxide provides enhanced the bio-availability of iron for phytoplankton growth. The halogen chemistry in polar regions is related to various important environmental processes such as Antarctic Ozone Depletion Event(ODE), mercury depletion, oxidative processes in atmosphere, and the formation of CCN (Cloud Condensation Nuclei). In this study, we investigated the reductive dissolution of iron oxide particles to produce Fe(II)aq and simultaneous oxidation of I- (iodide) to I3- (tri-iodide) in ice phase under UV irradiation or dark condition. The reductive generation of Fe(II)aq from iron oxides and oxidation of iodide to I3- were negligible in water but significantly accelerated in frozen solution both in the presence and absence of light. The enhanced reductive generation of Fe(II)aq and oxidative formation of I3- in ice were observed regardless of the various types of iron oxides [hematite (α-Fe2O3) maghemite (γ- Fe2O3), goethite (α-FeOOH), lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and, magnetite (Fe3O4)]. We explained that the enhanced redox production of Fe(II)aq and I3- in ice is contributed to the freeze concentration of iodides, protons, and dissolved oxygen in the unfrozen solution. When the concentration of both iodides and protons were raised by 10-fold each, the formation of Fe(II)aq in water under UV irradiation was approached to those in ice. The outdoor experiments were carried out under ambient solar radiation in winter season of mid-latitude (Pohang, Korea: 36°N latitude) and also confirmed that the production of Fe(II)aq via reductive dissolution of iron oxide and I3- generation via I- oxidation were enhanced in frozen solution. These results suggest that iron

  7. CHARACTERIZING THE ABIOTIC REDUCTANTS FOR NITROAROMATIC COMPOUNDS AS A FUNCTION OF REDOX ZONATION IN ANOXIC SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reductive transformation is the dominant reaction pathway for the degradation of nitroaromatic compounds in anaerobic environments (Larson and Weber, 1994). Proposed reductants cover a spectrum ranging from reduced rninerals and organic matter to microbial enzyme systems. Transfo...

  8. Reduction of Soluble Iron and Reductive Dissolution of Ferric Iron-Containing Minerals by Moderately Thermophilic Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Toni A. M.; Johnson, D. Barrie

    1998-01-01

    Five moderately thermophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria, including representative strains of the three classified species (Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, Sulfobacillus acidophilus, and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans), were shown to be capable of reducing ferric iron to ferrous iron when they were grown under oxygen limitation conditions. Iron reduction was most readily observed when the isolates were grown as mixotrophs or heterotrophs with glycerol as an electron donor; in addition, some strains were able to couple the oxidation of tetrathionate to the reduction of ferric iron. Cycling of iron between the ferrous and ferric states was observed during batch culture growth in unshaken flasks incubated under aerobic conditions, although the patterns of oxidoreduction of iron varied in different species of iron-oxidizing moderate thermophiles and in strains of a single species (S. acidophilus). All three bacterial species were able to grow anaerobically with ferric iron as a sole electron acceptor; the growth yields correlated with the amount of ferric iron reduced when the isolates were grown in the absence of oxygen. One of the moderate thermophiles (identified as a strain of S. acidophilus) was able to bring about the reductive dissolution of three ferric iron-containing minerals (ferric hydroxide, jarosite, and goethite) when it was grown under restricted aeration conditions with glycerol as a carbon and energy source. The significance of iron reduction by moderately thermophilic iron oxidizers in both environmental and applied contexts is discussed. PMID:9603832

  9. Role of microbial iron reduction in the dissolution of iron hydroxysulfate minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, E.J.P.; Nadeau, T.-L.; Voytek, M.A.; Landa, E.R.

    2006-01-01

    Iron-hydroxysulfate minerals can be important hosts for metals such as lead, mercury, copper, zinc, silver, chromium, arsenic, and selenium and for radionuclides such as 226Ra. These mineral-bound contaminants are considered immobilized under oxic conditions. However, when anoxic conditions develop, the activities of sulfate- or iron-reducing bacteria could result in mineral dissolution, releasing these bound contaminants. Reduction of structural sulfate in the iron-hydroxysulfate mineral jarosite by sulfate-reducing bacteria has previously been demonstrated. The primary objective of this work was to evaluate the potential for anaerobic dissolution of the iron-hydroxysulfate minerals jarosite and schwertmannite at neutral PH by iron-reducing bacteria. Mineral dissolution was tested using a long-term cultivar, Geobacter metallireducens strain GS-15, and a fresh isolate Geobacter sp. strain ENN1, previously undescribed. ENN1 was isolated from the discharge site of Shadle Mine, in the southern anthracite coalfield of Pennsylvania, where schwertmannite was the predominant iron-hydroxysulfate mineral. When jarosite from Elizabeth Mine (Vermont) was provided as the sole terminal electron acceptor, resting cells of both G. metallireducens and ENN1 were able to reduce structural Fe(III), releasing Fe+2, SO4-2, and K+ ions. A lithified jarosite sample from Utah was more resistant to microbial attack, but slow release of Fe+2 was observed. Neither bacterium released Fe+2 from poorly crystalline synthetic schwertmannite. Our results indicate that exposure of jarosite to iron-reducing conditions at neutral pH is likely to promote the mobility of hazardous constituents and should therefore be considered in evaluating waste disposal and/or reclamation options involving jarosite-bearing materials.

  10. Dimensionality reduction, and function approximation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) micro- and nanoparticle dissolution rate

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Varun Kumar; Jackowski, Konrad; Abraham, Ajith; Snášel, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) micro- and nanoparticles’ dissolution rates plays a significant role in pharmaceutical and medical industries. The prediction of PLGA dissolution rate is crucial for drug manufacturing. Therefore, a model that predicts the PLGA dissolution rate could be beneficial. PLGA dissolution is influenced by numerous factors (features), and counting the known features leads to a dataset with 300 features. This large number of features and high redundancy within the dataset makes the prediction task very difficult and inaccurate. In this study, dimensionality reduction techniques were applied in order to simplify the task and eliminate irrelevant and redundant features. A heterogeneous pool of several regression algorithms were independently tested and evaluated. In addition, several ensemble methods were tested in order to improve the accuracy of prediction. The empirical results revealed that the proposed evolutionary weighted ensemble method offered the lowest margin of error and significantly outperformed the individual algorithms and the other ensemble techniques. PMID:25709436

  11. Hydrous manganese oxide doped gel probe sampler for measuring in situ reductive dissolution rates. 2. Field deployment.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, Claire E; Griffis, Sarah D; Wildman, Richard A; Hering, Janet G

    2010-01-01

    In situ rates of reductive dissolution in submerged shoreline sediments at Lake Tegel (Berlin, Germany) were measured with a novel hydrous manganese (Mn) oxide-doped gel probe sampler in concert with equilibrium gel probe and sequential extraction measurements. Rates were low in the top 8 cm, then showed a peak from 8 to 14 cm, with a maximum at 12 cm depth. This rate corresponded with a peak in dissolved porewater iron (Fe) at 11 cm depth. Below 14 cm, the reductive dissolution rate reached an intermediate steady value. Lower rates at depth corresponded with increases in operationally defined fractions of carbonate-bound and organic- and sulfide-bound Mn and Fe as detected by sequential extraction. Observed rates of reductive dissolution, which reflect a capacity for Mn reduction rather than actual rates under ambient conditions, appear to correlate with porewater chemistry and sequential extraction fractions as expected in early sediment diagenesis, and are consistent with previous measurements of in situ reductive dissolution rates. Significant downward advection in this bank filtration setting depletes the Mn and Fe oxides in the sediments and enhances the transport of dissolved Fe and Mn into the infiltrating water. PMID:20039732

  12. Technetium Reduction and Permanent Sequestration by Abiotic and Biotic Formation of Low-Solubility Sulfide Mineral Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Tratnyek, Paul G.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Fan, Dimin; Anitori, Roberto; Szecsody, Jim; Jansik, Danielle

    2015-11-14

    One way to minimize the mobility of the TcVII oxyanion pertechnetate (TcO4-) is to effect reduction under sulfidogenic conditions (generated abiotically by Fe0 or biotically) to form TcSx, which is significantly slower to oxidize than TcIVO2. In sediment systems, TcSx and other precipitates may oxidize more slowly due to oxygen diffusion limitations to these low permeability precipitate zones. In addition, the TcO4- reduction rate may be more rapid in the presence of sediment because of additional reductive surface phases. This project aims to provide a fundamental understanding of the feasibility of immobilization of TcO4- as TcSx in the vadose zone or groundwater by application nano zero-valent iron (nZVI), and sulfide or sulfate. Biotic batch experiments have used the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfotomaculum reducens. The iron sulfide mineral mackinawite was generated under these conditions, while vivianite was formed in nZVI only controls. The sulfide/bacteria-containing system consistently reduced aqueous pertechnetate rapidly (> 95% in the first hour), a rate similar to that for the sulfide-free, nZVI only system. Reduced Tc (aged for 3 months) generated in both SRB/nZVI systems was highly resistant to reoxidation. In reduced samples, Tc was found associated with solid phases containing Fe and S (D. reducens/nZVI) or Fe (nZVI only). Experiments using D. reducens without nZVI provided some additional insights. Firstly, stationary phase cultures were able to slowly reduce pertechnetate. Secondly, addition of pertechnetate at the beginning of cell growth (lag phase) resulted in a faster rate of Tc reduction, possibly indicating a direct (e.g. enzymatic) role for D. reducens in Tc reduction. Abiotic batch experiments were conducted with Na2S as the sulfide source. Pertechnetate reduction was

  13. Bacterial reductive dissolution of crystalline Fe(III) oxide in continuous-flow column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, E.E.; Urrutia, M.M.; Mann, C.J.

    2000-03-01

    Bacterial reductive dissolution of synthetic crystalline Fe(III) oxide-coated sand was studied in continuous-flow column reactors in comparison with parallel batch cultures. The cumulative amount of aqueous Fe(II) exported from the columns over a 6-month incubation period corresponded to (95.0 {+-} 3.7)% (n = 3) of their original Fe(III) content. Wet-chemical analysis revealed that only (6.5 {+-} 3.2)% of the initial Fe(III) content remained in the columns at the end of the experiment. The near-quantitative removal of Fe was visibly evidenced by extensive bleaching of color from the sand in the columns. In contrast to the column reactors, Fe(II) production quickly reached an asymptote in batch cultures, and only (13.0 {+-} 2.2)% (n = 3) of the Fe(III) oxide content was reduced. Sustained bacterial-cell growth occurred in the column reactors, leading to the production and export of a quantity of cells 100-fold greater than that added during inoculation. Indirect estimates of cell growth, based on the quantity of Fe(III) reduced, suggest that only an approximate doubling of initial cell abundance was likely to have occurred in the batch cultures. Their results indicate that removal of biogenic Fe(II) via aqueous-phase transport in the column reactors decreased the passivating influence of surface-bound Fe(II) on oxide reduction activity, thereby allowing a dramatic increase in the extent of Fe(III) oxide reduction and associated bacterial growth. These findings have important implications for understanding the fate of organic and inorganic contaminants whose geochemical behavior is linked to Fe(III) oxide reduction.

  14. Extraction of copper from an oxidized (lateritic) ore using bacterially catalysed reductive dissolution.

    PubMed

    Nancucheo, Ivan; Grail, Barry M; Hilario, Felipe; du Plessis, Chris; Johnson, D Barrie

    2014-01-01

    An oxidized lateritic ore which contained 0.8 % (by weight) copper was bioleached in pH- and temperature-controlled stirred reactors under acidic reducing conditions using pure and mixed cultures of the acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Sulfur was provided as the electron donor for the bacteria, and ferric iron present in goethite (the major ferric iron mineral present in the ore) acted as electron acceptor. Significantly more copper was leached by bacterially catalysed reductive dissolution of the laterite than in aerobic cultures or in sterile anoxic reactors, with up to 78 % of the copper present in the ore being extracted. This included copper that was leached from acid-labile minerals (chiefly copper silicates) and that which was associated with ferric iron minerals in the lateritic ore. In the anaerobic bioreactors, soluble iron in the leach liquors was present as iron (II) and copper as copper (I), but both metals were rapidly oxidized (to iron (III) and copper (II)) when the reactors were aerated. The number of bacteria added to the reactors had a critical role in dictating the rate and yield of copper solubilised from the ore. This work has provided further evidence that reductive bioprocessing, a recently described approach for extracting base metals from oxidized deposits, has the potential to greatly extend the range of metal ores that can be biomined. PMID:24687752

  15. Abiotic reduction of aquifer materials by dithionite: A promising in-situ remediation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, J.E.; Szecsody, J.E.; Schaef, H.T.; Gorby, Y.A.; Fruchter, J.S.; Templeton, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted with Hanford sediments to develop the capability to predict (1) the longevity of dithionite in these systems, (2) its efficiency as a reductant of structural iron, and (3) the longevity and reactivity of the reduced iron with soluble inorganic and organic species. After an initial induction period, the loss of dithionite by disproportionation and oxidation could be described by pseudo-first-order (PFO) kinetics. Other than the initial reaction with ferric iron, the primary factor promoting loss of dithionite in this system was disproportion nation via heterogeneous catalysis at mineral surfaces. The efficiency of the reduction of structural iron was nearly 100% for the first fourth of the ferric iron, but declined exponentially with higher degrees of reduction so that 75% of the ferric iron could be reduced. This decrease in reduction efficiency probably was related to differences in the accessibility of ferric iron in the mineral particles, with iron in clay-sized particles being the most accessible and that in silt- and sand-sized particles less accessible. Flow-through column studies showed that a reduced-sediment barrier created in this manner could maintain a reducing environment.

  16. Nitrogen Assimilation, Abiotic Stress and Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: The Full Circle of Reductants.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) is well-known as the main regulatory enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in living organisms. Namely, in Planta, different G6PDH isoforms may occur, generally localized in cytosol and plastids/chloroplasts. These enzymes are differently regulated by distinct mechanisms, still far from being defined in detail. In the last decades, a pivotal function for plant G6PDHs during the assimilation of nitrogen, providing reductants for enzymes involved in nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation, has been described. More recently, several studies have suggested a main role of G6PDH to counteract different stress conditions, among these salinity and drought, with the involvement of an ABA depending signal. In the last few years, this recognized vision has been greatly widened, due to studies clearly showing the non-conventional subcellular localization of the different G6PDHs, and the peculiar regulation of the different isoforms. The whole body of these considerations suggests a central question: how do the plant cells distribute the reductants coming from G6PDH and balance their equilibrium? This review explores the present knowledge about these mechanisms, in order to propose a scheme of distribution of reductants produced by G6PDH during nitrogen assimilation and stress. PMID:27187489

  17. Nitrogen Assimilation, Abiotic Stress and Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: The Full Circle of Reductants

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) is well-known as the main regulatory enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in living organisms. Namely, in Planta, different G6PDH isoforms may occur, generally localized in cytosol and plastids/chloroplasts. These enzymes are differently regulated by distinct mechanisms, still far from being defined in detail. In the last decades, a pivotal function for plant G6PDHs during the assimilation of nitrogen, providing reductants for enzymes involved in nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation, has been described. More recently, several studies have suggested a main role of G6PDH to counteract different stress conditions, among these salinity and drought, with the involvement of an ABA depending signal. In the last few years, this recognized vision has been greatly widened, due to studies clearly showing the non-conventional subcellular localization of the different G6PDHs, and the peculiar regulation of the different isoforms. The whole body of these considerations suggests a central question: how do the plant cells distribute the reductants coming from G6PDH and balance their equilibrium? This review explores the present knowledge about these mechanisms, in order to propose a scheme of distribution of reductants produced by G6PDH during nitrogen assimilation and stress. PMID:27187489

  18. An experimental and ab initio study on the abiotic reduction of uranyl by ferrous iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. D.; Marcano, M. C.; Rosso, K. M.; Becker, U.

    2015-05-01

    It is important to understand the mechanisms controlling the removal of uranyl from solution from an environmental standpoint, particularly whether soluble Fe(II) is capable of reducing soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Experiments were performed to shed light into discrepancies of recent studies about precipitation of U-containing solids without changing oxidation states versus precipitation/reduction reactions, especially with respect to the kinetics of these reactions. To understand the atomistic mechanisms, thermodynamics, and kinetics of these redox processes, ab initio electron transfer (ET) calculations, using Marcus theory, were applied to study the reduction of U(VI)aq to U(V)aq by Fe(II)aq (the first rate-limiting ET-step). Outer-sphere (OS) and inner-sphere (IS) Fe-U complexes were modeled to represent simple species within a homogeneous environment through which ET could occur. Experiments on the chemical reduction were performed by reacting 1 mM Fe(II)aq at pH 7.2 with high (i.e., 0.16 mM) and lower (i.e., 0.02 mM) concentrations of U(VI)aq. At higher U concentration, a rapid decrease in U(VI)aq was observed within the first hour of reaction. XRD and XPS analyses of the precipitates confirmed the presence of (meta)schoepite phases, where up to ∼25% of the original U was reduced to U4+ and/or U5+-containing phases. In contrast, at 0.02 mM U, the U(VI)aq concentration remained fairly constant for the first 3 h of reaction and only then began to decrease due to slower precipitation kinetics. XPS spectra confirm the partial chemical reduction U associated with the precipitate (up to ∼30%). Thermodynamic calculations support that the reduction of U(VI)aq to U(IV)aq by Fe(II)aq is energetically unfavorable. The batch experiments in this study show U(VI) is removed from solution by precipitation and that transitioning to a heterogeneous system in turn enables the solid U phase to be partially reduced. Ab initio ET calculations revealed that OS ET is

  19. Reductive dissolution of Pu(IV) by Clostridium sp. under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Francis, Arokiasamy J; Dodge, Cleveland J; Gillow, Jeffrey B

    2008-04-01

    An anaerobic, gram positive, spore-forming bacterium Clostridium sp., common in soils and wastes, capable of reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), Mn(IV) to Mn(II), Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), and U(VI) to U(IV), reduced Pu(IV) to Pu(III). Addition of 242Pu (IV)-nitrate to the bacterial growth medium at pH 6.4 resulted in the precipitation of Pu as amorphous Pu(OH)4 due to hydrolysis and polymerization reactions. The Pu (1 x 10(-5) M) had no effect upon growth of the bacterium as evidenced by glucose consumption; carbon dioxide and hydrogen production; a decrease in pH of the medium from 6.4 to 3.0 due to production of acetic and butyric acids from glucose fermentation; and a change in the Eh of the culture medium from +50 to -180 mV. Commensurate with bacterial growth, Pu was rapidly solubilized as evidenced by an increase in Pu concentration in solution which passed through a 0.03 microm filtration. Selective solvent extraction of the culture by thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) indicated the presence of a reduced Pu species in the soluble fraction. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopic (XANES) analysis of Pu in the culture sample at the Pu LIII absorption edge (18.054 keV) showed a shift of -3 eV compared to a Pu(IV) standard indicating reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III). These results suggestthat, although Pu generally exists as insoluble Pu(IV) in the environment, under appropriate conditions, anaerobic microbial activity could affect the long-term stability and mobility of Pu by its reductive dissolution. PMID:18504965

  20. Stable Isotope Systematics of Abiotic Nitrite Reduction Coupled with Anaerobic Iron Oxidation: The Role of Reduced Clays and Fe-bearing Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabb, K. C.; Buchwald, C.; Hansel, C. M.; Wankel, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, it is widely assumed that nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) reduction is primarily the result of microbial respiration. However, it has also been shown that abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite by reduced iron (Fe(II)), whether mineral-bound or surface-associated, may also occur under certain environmentally relevant conditions. With a range of experimental conditions, we investigated the nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope systematics of abiotic nitrite reduction by Fe(II) in an effort to characterize biotic and abiotic processes in the environment. While homogenous reactions between NO2- and Fe(II) in artificial seawater showed little reduction, heterogeneous reactions involving Fe-containing minerals showed considerable nitrite loss. Specifically, rapid nitrite reduction was observed in experiments that included reduced clays (illite, Na-montmorillonite, and nontronite) and those that exhibited iron oxide formation (ferrihydrite, magnetite and/or green rust). While these iron oxides and clay minerals offer both a source of reduced iron in the mineral matrix as well as a surface for Fe(II) activation, control experiments with corundum as a non-Fe containing mineral surface showed little NO2- loss, implicating a more dominant role of structural Fe in the clays during nitrite reduction. The isotope effects for 15N and 18O (15ɛ and 18ɛ) ranged from 5 to 14‰ for 15ɛ and 5 to 17‰ for 18ɛ and were typically coupled such that 15ɛ ~ 18ɛ. Reactions below pH 7 were slower and the 18ɛ was affected by oxygen atom exchange with water. Although little data exist for comparison with the dual isotopes of microbial NO2- reduction, these data serve as a benchmark for evaluating the role of abiotic processes in N reduction, particularly in sediment systems low in organic carbon and high in iron.

  1. Reduction of photosynthetic sensitivity in response to abiotic stress in tomato is mediated by a new generation plant activator

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Yield losses as a result of abiotic stress factors present a significant challenge for the future of global food production. While breeding technologies provide potential to combat negative stress-mediated outcomes over time, interventions which act to prime plant tolerance to stress, via the use of phytohormone-based elicitors for example, could act as a valuable tool for crop protection. However, the translation of fundamental biology into functioning solution is often constrained by knowledge-gaps. Results Photosynthetic and transcriptomic responses were characterised in young tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings in response to pre-treatment with a new plant health activator technology, ‘Alethea’, followed by a subsequent 100 mM salinity stress. Alethea is a novel proprietary technology composed of three key constituent compounds; the hitherto unexplored compound potassium dihydrojasmonate, an analogue of jasmonic acid; sodium benzoate, a carboxylic acid precursor to salicylic acid, and the α-amino acid L-arginine. Salinity treatment led to a maximal 47% reduction in net photosynthetic rate 8 d following NaCl treatment, yet in Alethea pre-treated seedlings, sensitivity to salinity stress was markedly reduced during the experimental period. Microarray analysis of leaf transcriptional responses showed that while salinity stress and Alethea individually impacted on largely non-overlapping, distinct groups of genes, Alethea pre-treatment substantially modified the response to salinity. Alethea affected the expression of genes related to biotic stress, ethylene signalling, cell wall synthesis, redox signalling and photosynthetic processes. Since Alethea had clear effects on photosynthesis/chloroplastic function at the physiological and molecular levels, we also investigated the ability of Alethea to protect various crop species against methyl viologen, a potent generator of oxidative stress in chloroplasts. Alethea pre-treatment produced

  2. The study of abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite in Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariën, A.; Bleyen, N.; Aerts, S.; Valcke, E.

    In Belgium, Boom Clay is studied as a reference host rock for the geological disposal of high-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Compatibility studies at the SCK•CEN aim at investigating a perturbation of the capacity of Boom Clay to retard the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere, after disposal of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste in the clay ( Valcke et al., 2009; Aertsens et al., 2009; Bleyen et al., 2010). One of the geo-chemical perturbations is the possible oxidation of Boom Clay by the large amounts of nitrate that will be released by Eurobitum. A more oxidised Boom Clay could have a lower reducing capacity towards redox sensitive radionuclides, possibly enhancing their migration. As the conditions in the Boom Clay formation around a disposal gallery for Eurobitum are far from optimal for the growth of prokaryotes (limited space in the far-field, high pH in the near-field, gamma radiation by the waste during the first ∼300 years (effect limited to the primary and secondary waste package)), the impact of microbially mediated reduction of nitrate and nitrite is unclear. Therefore, batch tests are performed at the SCK•CEN to study whether nitrate and nitrite can directly oxidise the main redoxactive components of Boom Clay (dissolved organic matter, kerogen, pyrite) without the mediation of prokaryotes. In a first series of batch tests, which are reported in this paper, the activity of denitrifying and nitrate reducing prokaryotes was inhibited by the addition of NaN 3. NaN 3 revealed to be an efficient inhibitor for these prokaryotes without affecting considerably the geochemistry of Boom Clay and/or Boom Clay pore water. Neither in batch tests with the Boom Clay slurries (with NaNO 3 (0.1 and 1 M) or NaNO 2 (0.1 M)) and with Boom Clay water (with 0.05 and 0.2 M NaNO 3) a pure chemical nitrate or nitrite reduction was observed after respectively 3, 7 and 17 weeks and 1 year (Boom Clay slurries) and about 2 years (Boom Clay

  3. QSARS FOR PREDICTING BIOTIC AND ABIOTIC REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION RATE CONSTANTS OF HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS IN ANOXIC SEDIMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are developed relating biotic and abiotic pseudo-first-order disappearance rate constants of halogenated hydrocarbons in anoxic sediments to a number of readily available molecular descriptors. ased upon knowledge of the under...

  4. Microbially enhanced dissolution and reductive dechlorination of PCE by a mixed culture: model validation and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingjie; Abriola, Linda M; Amos, Benjamin K; Suchomel, Eric J; Pennell, Kurt D; Löffler, Frank E; Christ, John A

    2013-08-01

    Reductive dechlorination catalyzed by organohalide-respiring bacteria is often considered for remediation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones due to cost savings, ease of implementation, regulatory acceptance, and sustainability. Despite knowledge of the key dechlorinators, an understanding of the processes and factors that control NAPL dissolution rates and detoxification (i.e., ethene formation) is lacking. A recent column study demonstrated a 5-fold cumulative enhancement in tetrachloroethene (PCE) dissolution and ethene formation (Amos et al., 2009). Spatial and temporal monitoring of key geochemical and microbial (i.e., Geobacter lovleyi and Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains) parameters in the column generated a data set used herein as the basis for refinement and testing of a multiphase, compositional transport model. The refined model is capable of simulating the reactive transport of multiple chemical constituents produced and consumed by organohalide-respiring bacteria and accounts for substrate limitations and competitive inhibition. Parameter estimation techniques were used to optimize the values of sensitive microbial kinetic parameters, including maximum utilization rates, biomass yield coefficients, and endogenous decay rates. Comparison and calibration of model simulations with the experimental data demonstrate that the model is able to accurately reproduce measured effluent concentrations, while delineating trends in dechlorinator growth and reductive dechlorination kinetics along the column. Sensitivity analyses performed on the optimized model parameters indicate that the rates of PCE and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) transformation and Dehalococcoides growth govern bioenhanced dissolution, as long as electron donor (i.e., hydrogen flux) is not limiting. Dissolution enhancements were shown to be independent of cis-DCE accumulation; however, accumulation of cis-DCE, as well as column length and flow rate (i.e., column residence time

  5. Microbially enhanced dissolution and reductive dechlorination of PCE by a mixed culture: Model validation and sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingjie; Abriola, Linda M.; Amos, Benjamin K.; Suchomel, Eric J.; Pennell, Kurt D.; Löffler, Frank E.; Christ, John A.

    2013-08-01

    Reductive dechlorination catalyzed by organohalide-respiring bacteria is often considered for remediation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones due to cost savings, ease of implementation, regulatory acceptance, and sustainability. Despite knowledge of the key dechlorinators, an understanding of the processes and factors that control NAPL dissolution rates and detoxification (i.e., ethene formation) is lacking. A recent column study demonstrated a 5-fold cumulative enhancement in tetrachloroethene (PCE) dissolution and ethene formation (Amos et al., 2009). Spatial and temporal monitoring of key geochemical and microbial (i.e., Geobacter lovleyi and Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains) parameters in the column generated a data set used herein as the basis for refinement and testing of a multiphase, compositional transport model. The refined model is capable of simulating the reactive transport of multiple chemical constituents produced and consumed by organohalide-respiring bacteria and accounts for substrate limitations and competitive inhibition. Parameter estimation techniques were used to optimize the values of sensitive microbial kinetic parameters, including maximum utilization rates, biomass yield coefficients, and endogenous decay rates. Comparison and calibration of model simulations with the experimental data demonstrate that the model is able to accurately reproduce measured effluent concentrations, while delineating trends in dechlorinator growth and reductive dechlorination kinetics along the column. Sensitivity analyses performed on the optimized model parameters indicate that the rates of PCE and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) transformation and Dehalococcoides growth govern bioenhanced dissolution, as long as electron donor (i.e., hydrogen flux) is not limiting. Dissolution enhancements were shown to be independent of cis-DCE accumulation; however, accumulation of cis-DCE, as well as column length and flow rate (i.e., column residence time

  6. Evidence for ligand hydrolysis and Fe(III) reduction in the dissolution of goethite by desferrioxamine-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanova, Anna A.; Persson, Per; Loring, John S.

    2010-12-01

    Desferrioxamine-B (DFOB) is a bacterial trihydroxamate siderophore and probably the most studied to date. However, the manner in which DFOB adsorbs at mineral surfaces and promotes dissolution is still under discussion. Here we investigated the adsorption and dissolution reactions in the goethite-DFOB system using both in situ infrared spectroscopic and quantitative analytical methods. Experiments were carried out at a total DFOB concentration of 1 μmol/m 2, at pH 6, and in the absence of visible light. Our infrared spectroscopic results indicated that the adsorption of DFOB was nearly complete after a 4-h reaction time. In an attempt to determine the coordination mode at the goethite surface, we compared the spectrum of adsorbed DFOB after a 4-h reaction time to the spectra of model aqueous species. However, this approach proved too simplistic in the case of such a complex ligand as DFOB, and we suggest that a more detailed investigation (IR in D 2O, EXAFS of adsorbed model complexes) is needed to elucidate the structure of the adsorbed siderophore. Between a 4-h and 4-day reaction time, we observed the growth of carboxylate stretching bands at 1548 and 1404 cm -1, which are indicators of DFOB hydrolysis. Acetate, a product of DFOB hydrolysis at its terminal hydroxamate group, was quantified by ion chromatography. Its rate of formation was linear and nearly the same as the rate of Fe(III) dissolution. The larger hydrolysis product, a hydroxylamine fragment, was not detected by LC-MS. However, a signal due to the oxidized form of this fragment, a nitroso compound, was found to increase linearly with time, which is an indirect indication for Fe(III) reduction. Based on these findings, we propose that DFOB undergoes metal-enhanced hydrolysis at the mineral surface followed by the reduction of surface Fe(III). While Fe(II) was not detected in solution, this is likely because it remains adsorbed at the goethite surface or becomes buried in the goethite crystal by

  7. Recovery of Nickel and Cobalt from Laterite Tailings by Reductive Dissolution under Aerobic Conditions Using Acidithiobacillus Species.

    PubMed

    Marrero, J; Coto, O; Goldmann, S; Graupner, T; Schippers, A

    2015-06-01

    Biomining of sulfidic ores has been applied for almost five decades. However, the bioprocessing of oxide ores such as laterites lags commercially behind. Recently, the Ferredox process was proposed to treat limonitic laterite ores by means of anaerobic reductive dissolution (AnRD), which was found to be more effective than aerobic bioleaching by fungi and other bacteria. We show here that the ferric iron reduction mediated by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans can be applied to an aerobic reductive dissolution (AeRD) of nickel laterite tailings. AeRD using a consortium of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans extracted similar amounts of nickel (53-57%) and cobalt (55-60%) in only 7 days as AnRD using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The economic and environmental advantages of AeRD for processing of laterite tailings comprise no requirement for an anoxic atmosphere, 1.8-fold less acid consumption than for AnRD, as well as nickel and cobalt recovered in a ferrous-based pregnant leach solution (PLS), facilitating the subsequent metal recovery. In addition, an aerobic acid regeneration stage is proposed. Therefore, AeRD process development can be considered as environmentally friendly for treating laterites with low operational costs and as an attractive alternative to AnRD. PMID:25923144

  8. Single-walled carbon nanotube transparent conductive films fabricated by reductive dissolution and spray coating for organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Ostfeld, Aminy E.; Arias, Ana Claudia; Catheline, Amélie; Ligsay, Kathleen; Kim, Kee-Chan; Fogden, Siân; Chen, Zhihua; Facchetti, Antonio

    2014-12-22

    Solutions of unbundled and unbroken single-walled carbon nanotubes have been prepared using a reductive dissolution process. Transparent conductive films spray-coated from these solutions show a nearly twofold improvement in the ratio of electrical conductivity to optical absorptivity versus those deposited from conventional aqueous dispersions, due to substantial de-aggregation and sizable nanotube lengths. These transparent electrodes have been utilized to fabricate P3HT-PCBM organic solar cells achieving power conversion efficiencies up to 2.3%, comparable to those of solar cells using indium tin oxide transparent electrodes.

  9. Simultaneous Release of Fe and As during the Reductive Dissolution of Pb-As Jarosite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32

    SciTech Connect

    Smeaton, Christina M; Walshe, Gillian E; Smith, Adrian M.L.; Hudson-Edwards, Karen A; Dubbin, William E; Wright, Kate; Beale, Andrew M; Fryer, Brian J; Weisener, Christopher G

    2012-11-05

    Jarosites are produced during metallurgical processing, on oxidized sulfide deposits, and in acid mine drainage environments. Despite the environmental relevance of jarosites, few studies have examined their biogeochemical stability. This study demonstrates the simultaneous reduction of structural Fe(III) and aqueous As(V) during the dissolution of synthetic Pb–As jarosite (PbFe3(SO4,AsO4)2(OH)6) by Shewanella putrefaciens using batch experiments under anaerobic circumneutral conditions. Fe(III) reduction occurred immediately in inoculated samples while As(V) reduction was observed after 72 h. XANES spectra showed As(III) (14.7%) in the solid phase at 168 h coincident with decreased aqueous As(V). At 336 h, XANES spectra and aqueous speciation analysis demonstrated 20.2% and 3.0% of total As was present as As(III) in the solid and aqueous phase, respectively. In contrast, 12.4% of total Fe was present as aqueous Fe(II) and was below the detection limits of XANES in the solid phase. TEM-EDS analysis at 336 h showed secondary precipitates enriched in Fe and O with minor amounts of As and Pb. Based on experimental data and thermodynamic modeling, we suggest that structural Fe(III) reduction was thermodynamically driven while aqueous As(V) reduction was triggered by detoxification induced to offset the high As(V) (328 μM) concentrations released during dissolution.

  10. Ultrasound-assisted reductive dissolution of CeO2 and PuO2 in the presence of Ti particles.

    PubMed

    Beaudoux, Xavier; Virot, Matthieu; Chave, Tony; Leturcq, Gilles; Jouan, Gauthier; Venault, Laurent; Moisy, Philippe; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2016-06-01

    PuO2 is considered an important material for current and future nuclear fuel; however it is a very refractive compound towards dissolution. Among other techniques, its reprocessing can be performed via complexing dissolution in concentrated and boiling nitric acid containing hydrofluoric acid, or via oxidant dissolution in the presence of reagents with redox couples having high potentials such as Ce(iv)/Ce(iii), or Ag(ii)/Ag(i). Reductive dissolution can be performed under softer conditions and is considered an alternative to these methods which may suffer from several drawbacks (corrosion, effluent management, compatibility with nuclear waste disposal, etc.). In this study, a sonochemical and reductive approach is investigated for PuO2 dissolution under relatively mild conditions. At the first stage, the experiments are performed with CeO2 as an inactive surrogate for PuO2. The quantitative dissolution of both oxides can be achieved under ultrasound (20 kHz, 0.35-0.70 W mL(-1)) in 0.5 M HNO3/0.1 M [N2H5NO3]/2 M HCOOH sparged with Ar at 33-35 °C in the presence of Ti particles as a generating source of reductive species. Ultrasound enables the depassivation of the Ti surface (usually strongly passivated in nitric solutions) through acoustic cavitation which then allows further generation of the intermediate Ti(iii) reductive species. Dissolution rates and yields can be further increased with the injection of dilute fluoride aliquots (NH4F or HF) in the sonicated solution to favor Ti chemical depassivation. The rapid and complete dissolution of PuO2 under selected conditions is accompanied by Pu(iii) accumulation in solution. PMID:27145713

  11. Reductive Reactivity of Iron(III) Oxides in the East China Sea Sediments: Characterization by Selective Extraction and Kinetic Dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang-Jin; Zhu, Mao-Xu; Yang, Gui-Peng; Huang, Xiang-Li

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Fe(III) oxides in gravity-core sediments collected from the East China Sea inner shelf were quantified by using three selective extractions (acidic hydroxylamine, acidic oxalate, bicarbonate-citrate buffered sodium dithionite). Also the reactivity of Fe(III) oxides in the sediments was characterized by kinetic dissolution using ascorbic acid as reductant at pH 3.0 and 7.5 in combination with the reactive continuum model. Three parameters derived from the kinetic method: m0 (theoretical initial amount of ascorbate-reducible Fe(III) oxides), k′ (rate constant) and γ (heterogeneity of reactivity), enable a quantitative characterization of Fe(III) oxide reactivity in a standardized way. Amorphous Fe(III) oxides quantified by acidic hydroxylamine extraction were quickly consumed in the uppermost layer during early diagenesis but were not depleted over the upper 100 cm depth. The total amounts of amorphous and poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides are highly available for efficient buffering of dissolved sulfide. As indicated by the m0, k′ and γ, the surface sediments always have the maximum content, reactivity and heterogeneity of reactive Fe(III) oxides, while the three parameters simultaneously downcore decrease, much more quickly in the upper layer than at depth. Albeit being within a small range (within one order of magnitude) of the initial rates among sediments at different depths, incongruent dissolution could result in huge discrepancies of the later dissolution rates due to differentiating heterogeneity, which cannot be revealed by selective extraction. A strong linear correlation of the m0 at pH 3.0 with the dithionite-extractable Fe(III) suggests that the m0 may represent Fe(III) oxide assemblages spanning amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Maximum microbially available Fe(III) predicted by the m0 at pH 7.5 may include both amorphous and a fraction of other less reactive Fe(III) phases. PMID:24260377

  12. Reductive reactivity of iron(III) oxides in the east china sea sediments: characterization by selective extraction and kinetic dissolution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang-Jin; Zhu, Mao-Xu; Yang, Gui-Peng; Huang, Xiang-Li

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Fe(III) oxides in gravity-core sediments collected from the East China Sea inner shelf were quantified by using three selective extractions (acidic hydroxylamine, acidic oxalate, bicarbonate-citrate buffered sodium dithionite). Also the reactivity of Fe(III) oxides in the sediments was characterized by kinetic dissolution using ascorbic acid as reductant at pH 3.0 and 7.5 in combination with the reactive continuum model. Three parameters derived from the kinetic method: m 0 (theoretical initial amount of ascorbate-reducible Fe(III) oxides), k' (rate constant) and γ (heterogeneity of reactivity), enable a quantitative characterization of Fe(III) oxide reactivity in a standardized way. Amorphous Fe(III) oxides quantified by acidic hydroxylamine extraction were quickly consumed in the uppermost layer during early diagenesis but were not depleted over the upper 100 cm depth. The total amounts of amorphous and poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides are highly available for efficient buffering of dissolved sulfide. As indicated by the m 0, k' and γ, the surface sediments always have the maximum content, reactivity and heterogeneity of reactive Fe(III) oxides, while the three parameters simultaneously downcore decrease, much more quickly in the upper layer than at depth. Albeit being within a small range (within one order of magnitude) of the initial rates among sediments at different depths, incongruent dissolution could result in huge discrepancies of the later dissolution rates due to differentiating heterogeneity, which cannot be revealed by selective extraction. A strong linear correlation of the m 0 at pH 3.0 with the dithionite-extractable Fe(III) suggests that the m 0 may represent Fe(III) oxide assemblages spanning amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Maximum microbially available Fe(III) predicted by the m 0 at pH 7.5 may include both amorphous and a fraction of other less reactive Fe(III) phases. PMID:24260377

  13. Reductive dissolution and reactive solute transport in a sewage-contaminated glacial outwash aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, R.W.; Bennett, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    Contamination of shallow ground water by sewage effluent typically contains reduced chemical species that consume dissolved oxygen, developing either a low oxygen geochemical environment or an anaerobic geochemical environment. Based on the load of reduced chemical species discharged to shallow ground water and the amounts of reactants in the aquifer matrix, it should be possible to determine chemical processes in the aquifer and compare observed results to predicted ones. At the Otis Air Base research site (Cape Cod, Massachusetts) where sewage effluent has infiltrated the shallow aquifer since 1936, bacterially mediated processes such as nitrification, denitrification, manganese reduction, and iron reduction have been observed in the contaminant plume. In specific areas of the plume, dissolved manganese and iron have increased significantly where local geochemical conditions are favorable for reduction and transport of these constituents from the aquifer matrix. Dissolved manganese and iron concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 7.3 mg/L, and 0.001 to 13.0 mg/L, respectively, for 21 samples collected from 1988 to 1989. Reduction of manganese and iron is linked to microbial oxidation of sewage carbon, producing bicarbonate and the dissolved metal ions as by-products. Calculated production and flux of CO2 through the unsaturated zone from manganese reduction in the aquifer was 0.035 g/m2/d (12% of measured CO2 flux during winter). Manganese is limited in the aquifer, however. A one-dimensional, reaction-coupled transport model developed for the mildly reducing conditions in the sewage plume nearest the source beds showed that reduction, transport, and removal of manganese from the aquifer sediments should result in iron reduction where manganese has been depleted.

  14. Identification of abiotic and biotic reductive dechlorination in a chlorinated ethene plume after thermal source remediation by means of isotopic and molecular biology tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badin, Alice; Broholm, Mette M.; Jacobsen, Carsten S.; Palau, Jordi; Dennis, Philip; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Thermal tetrachloroethene (PCE) remediation by steam injection in a sandy aquifer led to the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from aquifer sediments resulting in more reduced redox conditions, accelerated PCE biodegradation, and changes in microbial populations. These changes were documented by comparing data collected prior to the remediation event and eight years later. Based on the premise that dual C-Cl isotope slopes reflect ongoing degradation pathways, the slopes associated with PCE and TCE suggest the predominance of biotic reductive dechlorination near the source area. PCE was the predominant chlorinated ethene near the source area prior to thermal treatment. After thermal treatment, cDCE became predominant. The biotic contribution to these changes was supported by the presence of Dehalococcoides sp. DNA (Dhc) and Dhc targeted rRNA close to the source area. In contrast, dual C-Cl isotope analysis together with the almost absent VC 13C depletion in comparison to cDCE 13C depletion suggested that cDCE was subject to abiotic degradation due to the presence of pyrite, possible surface-bound iron (II) or reduced iron sulphides in the downgradient part of the plume. This interpretation is supported by the relative lack of Dhc in the downgradient part of the plume. The results of this study show that thermal remediation can enhance the biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes, and that this effect can be traced to the mobilisation of DOC due to steam injection. This, in turn, results in more reduced redox conditions which favor active reductive dechlorination and/or may lead to a series of redox reactions which may consecutively trigger biotically induced abiotic degradation. Finally, this study illustrates the valuable complementary application of compound-specific isotopic analysis combined with molecular biology tools to evaluate which biogeochemical processes are taking place in an aquifer contaminated with chlorinated ethenes.

  15. Identification of abiotic and biotic reductive dechlorination in a chlorinated ethene plume after thermal source remediation by means of isotopic and molecular biology tools.

    PubMed

    Badin, Alice; Broholm, Mette M; Jacobsen, Carsten S; Palau, Jordi; Dennis, Philip; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Thermal tetrachloroethene (PCE) remediation by steam injection in a sandy aquifer led to the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from aquifer sediments resulting in more reduced redox conditions, accelerated PCE biodegradation, and changes in microbial populations. These changes were documented by comparing data collected prior to the remediation event and eight years later. Based on the premise that dual C-Cl isotope slopes reflect ongoing degradation pathways, the slopes associated with PCE and TCE suggest the predominance of biotic reductive dechlorination near the source area. PCE was the predominant chlorinated ethene near the source area prior to thermal treatment. After thermal treatment, cDCE became predominant. The biotic contribution to these changes was supported by the presence of Dehalococcoides sp. DNA (Dhc) and Dhc targeted rRNA close to the source area. In contrast, dual C-Cl isotope analysis together with the almost absent VC (13)C depletion in comparison to cDCE (13)C depletion suggested that cDCE was subject to abiotic degradation due to the presence of pyrite, possible surface-bound iron (II) or reduced iron sulphides in the downgradient part of the plume. This interpretation is supported by the relative lack of Dhc in the downgradient part of the plume. The results of this study show that thermal remediation can enhance the biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes, and that this effect can be traced to the mobilisation of DOC due to steam injection. This, in turn, results in more reduced redox conditions which favor active reductive dechlorination and/or may lead to a series of redox reactions which may consecutively trigger biotically induced abiotic degradation. Finally, this study illustrates the valuable complementary application of compound-specific isotopic analysis combined with molecular biology tools to evaluate which biogeochemical processes are taking place in an aquifer contaminated with chlorinated ethenes. PMID:27318432

  16. Reduction of nitrogen compounds in oceanic basement and its implications for HCN formation and abiotic organic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide is an excellent organic reagent and is central to most of the reaction pathways leading to abiotic formation of simple organic compounds containing nitrogen, such as amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. Reduced carbon and nitrogen precursor compounds for the synthesis of HCN may be formed under off-axis hydrothermal conditions in oceanic lithosphere in the presence of native Fe and Ni and are adsorbed on authigenic layer silicates and zeolites. The native metals as well as the molecular hydrogen reducing CO2 to CO/CH4 and NO3-/NO2- to NH3/NH4+ are a result of serpentinization of mafic rocks. Oceanic plates are conveyor belts of reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds from the off-axis hydrothermal environments to the subduction zones, where compaction, dehydration, desiccation and diagenetic reactions affect the organic precursors. CO/CH4 and NH3/NH4+ in fluids distilled out of layer silicates and zeolites in the subducting plate at an early stage of subduction will react upon heating and form HCN, which is then available for further organic reactions to, for instance, carbohydrates, nucleosides or even nucleotides, under alkaline conditions in hydrated mantle rocks of the overriding plate. Convergent margins in the initial phase of subduction must, therefore, be considered the most potent sites for prebiotic reactions on Earth. This means that origin of life processes are, perhaps, only possible on planets where some kind of plate tectonics occur. PMID:19849830

  17. Reduction of nitrogen compounds in oceanic basement and its implications for HCN formation and abiotic organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Holm, Nils G; Neubeck, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide is an excellent organic reagent and is central to most of the reaction pathways leading to abiotic formation of simple organic compounds containing nitrogen, such as amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. Reduced carbon and nitrogen precursor compounds for the synthesis of HCN may be formed under off-axis hydrothermal conditions in oceanic lithosphere in the presence of native Fe and Ni and are adsorbed on authigenic layer silicates and zeolites. The native metals as well as the molecular hydrogen reducing CO2 to CO/CH4 and NO3-/NO2- to NH3/NH4+ are a result of serpentinization of mafic rocks. Oceanic plates are conveyor belts of reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds from the off-axis hydrothermal environments to the subduction zones, where compaction, dehydration, desiccation and diagenetic reactions affect the organic precursors. CO/CH4 and NH3/NH4+ in fluids distilled out of layer silicates and zeolites in the subducting plate at an early stage of subduction will react upon heating and form HCN, which is then available for further organic reactions to, for instance, carbohydrates, nucleosides or even nucleotides, under alkaline conditions in hydrated mantle rocks of the overriding plate. Convergent margins in the initial phase of subduction must, therefore, be considered the most potent sites for prebiotic reactions on Earth. This means that origin of life processes are, perhaps, only possible on planets where some kind of plate tectonics occur. PMID:19849830

  18. Observations of magnetite dissolution in poorly drained soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimley, D.A.; Arruda, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    Dissolution of strongly magnetic minerals is a common and relatively rapid phenomenon in poorly drained soils of the central United States, resulting in low magnetic susceptibility (MS). Low Eh reducing conditions are primarily responsible for magnetic mineral dissolution; a process likely mediated by iron-reducing bacteria in the presence of soil organic matter. Based on transects across drainage sequences from nine sites, natural magnetic minerals (>5 ??m) extracted from surface soil consist of 54% ?? 18% magnetite, 21% ?? 11% titanomagnetite, and 17% ?? 14% ilmenite. Magnetite and titanomagnetite dissolution, assessed by scanning electron microscopy on a 0-to-3 scale, inversely correlates with surface soil MS (r = 0.53), a proxy for soil drainage at studied transects. Altered magnetite typically displays etch pits 5 ??m) include 26% ?? 18% anthropogenic fly ash that also exhibits greater dissolution in low MS soils (r = 0.38), indicating detectable alteration can occur within 150 years in low Eh soils. Laboratory induced reduction of magnetite, titanomagnetite, and magnetic fly ash, with a citrate-bicarbonate- dithionite solution, resulted in dissolution textures similar to those of in situ soil particles. Although experiments indicate that reductive dissolution of magnetite can occur abiotically under extreme conditions, bacteria likely play an important role in the natural environment. ?? 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  19. Potential Role of Nitrite for Abiotic Fe(II) Oxidation and Cell Encrustation during Nitrate Reduction by Denitrifying Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Klueglein, Nicole; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Floetenmeyer, Matthias; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms have been observed to oxidize Fe(II) at neutral pH under anoxic and microoxic conditions. While most of the mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria become encrusted with Fe(III)-rich minerals, photoautotrophic and microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers avoid cell encrustation. The Fe(II) oxidation mechanisms and the reasons for encrustation remain largely unresolved. Here we used cultivation-based methods and electron microscopy to compare two previously described nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers ( Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002) and two heterotrophic nitrate reducers (Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 19367 and P. denitrificans Pd 1222). All four strains oxidized ∼8 mM Fe(II) within 5 days in the presence of 5 mM acetate and accumulated nitrite (maximum concentrations of 0.8 to 1.0 mM) in the culture media. Iron(III) minerals, mainly goethite, formed and precipitated extracellularly in close proximity to the cell surface. Interestingly, mineral formation was also observed within the periplasm and cytoplasm; intracellular mineralization is expected to be physiologically disadvantageous, yet acetate consumption continued to be observed even at an advanced stage of Fe(II) oxidation. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were detected by lectin staining with fluorescence microscopy, particularly in the presence of Fe(II), suggesting that EPS production is a response to Fe(II) toxicity or a strategy to decrease encrustation. Based on the data presented here, we propose a nitrite-driven, indirect mechanism of cell encrustation whereby nitrite forms during heterotrophic denitrification and abiotically oxidizes Fe(II). This work adds to the known assemblage of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in nature and complicates our ability to delineate microbial Fe(II) oxidation in ancient microbes preserved as fossils in the geological record. PMID:24271182

  20. Constraining the role of iron in environmental nitrogen transformations: Dual stable isotope systematics of abiotic NO2- reduction by Fe(II) and its production of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Carolyn; Grabb, Kalina; Hansel, Colleen M.; Wankel, Scott D.

    2016-08-01

    Despite mounting evidence for biogeochemical interactions between iron and nitrogen, our understanding of their environmental importance remains limited. Here we present an investigation of abiotic nitrite (NO2-) reduction by Fe(II) or 'chemodenitrification', and its relevance to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), specifically focusing on dual (N and O) isotope systematics under a variety of environmental conditions. We observe a range of kinetic isotope effects that are regulated by reaction rates, with faster rates at higher pH (∼8), higher concentrations of Fe(II) and in the presence of mineral surfaces. A clear non-linear relationship between rate constant and kinetic isotope effects of NO2- reduction was evident (with larger isotope effects at slower rates) and is interpreted as reflecting the dynamics of Fe(II)-N reaction intermediates. N and O isotopic composition of product N2O also suggests a complex network of parallel and/or competing pathways. Our findings suggest that NO2- reduction by Fe(II) may represent an important abiotic source of environmental N2O, especially in iron-rich environments experiencing dynamic redox variations. This study provides a multi-compound, multi-isotope framework for evaluating the environmental occurrence of abiotic NO2- reduction and N2O formation, helping future studies constrain the relative roles of abiotic and biological N2O production pathways.

  1. Stable Isotope Fractionation of Tetrachloroethene during Reductive Dechlorination by Sulfurospirillum multivorans and Desulfitobacterium sp. Strain PCE-S and Abiotic Reactions with Cyanocobalamin

    PubMed Central

    Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Andert, Janet; Beck, Kirsten; Kästner, Matthias; Diekert, Gabriele; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2005-01-01

    Carbon stable isotope fractionation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) during reductive dechlorination by whole cells and crude extracts of Sulfurospirillum multivorans and Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE-S and the abiotic reaction with cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12) was studied. Fractionation was largest during the reaction with cyanocobalamin with αC = 1.0132. Stable isotope fractionation was lower but still in a similar order of magnitude for Desulfitobacterium sp. PCE-S (αC = 1.0052 to 1.0098). The isotope fractionation of PCE during dehalogenation by S. multivorans was lower by 1 order of magnitude (αC = 1.00042 to 1.0017). Additionally, an increase in isotope fractionation was observed with a decrease in cell integrity for both strains. For Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE-S, the carbon stable isotope fractionation factors were 1.0052 and 1.0089 for growing cells and crude extracts, respectively. For S. multivorans, αC values were 1.00042, 1.00097, and 1.0017 for growing cells, crude extracts, and the purified PCE reductive dehalogenase, respectively. For the field application of stable isotope fractionation, care is needed as fractionation may vary by more than an order of magnitude depending on the bacteria present, responsible for degradation. PMID:16000743

  2. A kinetic pressure effect on the experimental abiotic reduction of aqueous CO2 to methane from 1 to 3.5 kbar at 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Codi; Cody, George D.; Davis, Jeffrey M.

    2015-02-01

    Aqueous abiotic methane concentrations in a range of geologic settings are below levels expected for equilibrium with coexisting CO2 and H2, indicating that kinetics can control the speciation of reduced carbon-bearing fluids. Previous studies have suggested that mineral catalysts or gas-phase reactions may increase the rate of methanogenesis. Here, we report on experiments that indicate pressure can also accelerate aqueous reduction of CO2 to CH4. Four series of cold-seal hydrothermal experiments were performed from 1 to 3.5 kbar at 300 °C for two weeks and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The starting fluids were 10-20-μL solutions of 70-mmolal 13C-labeled formic acid (H13COOH) contained in welded gold capsules. Increasing pressure (P) resulted in a systematic, reproducible log-linear increase in 13CH4 yields. The pressure effect could be quantified the log-linear slope, Δlog[13CH4]/ΔP (log mmolal per kbar). The mean slope was 0.66 ± 0.05 (±1s.e.), indicating that 13CH4 yields increased by an average factor of 40-50 over a P range of 2.5 kbar. Pressure-independent variations in [13CH4] were observed as scatter about the log-linear regressions and as variations in the y-intercepts of the regressions. These variations were attributed to trace amounts of catalytic Fe along the inner capsule wall that remained despite cleaning the Au capsules in nitric acid prior to each experimental series. The mechanism for the pressure-dependent effect was interpreted to result from one or more of the following three processes: reduction of a metastable reaction intermediate such as methanol, formation of Fe-carbonyl complexes in the fluid, and/or heterogeneous catalysis by Fe. The results suggest that pressure may influence aqueous abiotic CH4 yields in certain geological environments, particularly when the relative effects of other kinetic factors such as temperature are diminished, e.g., in cool forearcs or other settings with a steep geothermal

  3. Final Report for "Toward Quantifying Kinetics of Biotic and Abiotic Metal Reduction with Electrical Geophysical Methods" DE-FG02-08ER64520

    SciTech Connect

    Singha, Kamini; Brantley, Susan

    2012-06-07

    Although changes in the bulk electrical conductivity in aquifers have been attributed to microbial activity, electrical conductivity has never been used to infer biogeochemical reaction rates quantitatively. To explore the use of electrical conductivity to measure reaction rates, we conducted iron oxide reduction experiments of increasing biological complexity. To quantify reaction rates, we proposed composite reactions that incorporated the stiochiometry of five different types of reactions: redox, acid-based, sorption, dissolution/precipitation, and biosynthesis. In batch and column experiments, such reaction stiochiometries inferred from a few chemical measurements allowed quantification of the Fe-oxide reduction rate based on changes in electrical conductivity. The relationship between electrical conductivity and fluid chemistry did not hold during the latter stages of the column experiment when electrical conductivity increased while fluid chemistry remained constant. Growth of an electrically conductive biofilm could explain this late stage electrical conductivity increase. This work demonstrates that measurements of electrical conductivity and flow rate, combined with a few direct chemical measurements, can be used to quantify biogeochemical reaction rates in controlled laboratory situations and may be able to detect the presence of biofilms.

  4. Biotic and abiotic reduction and solubilization of Pu(IV)O₂•xH₂O(am) as affected by anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA).

    PubMed

    Plymale, Andrew E; Bailey, Vanessa L; Fredrickson, James K; Heald, Steve M; Buck, Edgar C; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Resch, Charles T; Moore, Dean A; Bolton, Harvey

    2012-02-21

    This study measured reductive solubilization of plutonium(IV) hydrous oxide (Pu(IV)O(2)·xH(2)O((am))) with hydrogen (H(2)) as electron donor, in the presence or absence of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB), anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), and ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA). In PIPES buffer at pH 7 with excess H(2), Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens both solubilized <0.001% of 0.5 mM Pu(IV)O(2)·xH(2)O((am)) over 8 days, with or without AQDS. However, Pu((aq)) increased by an order of magnitude in some treatments, and increases in solubility were associated with production of Pu(III)((aq)). The solid phase of these treatments contained Pu(III)(OH)(3(am)), with more in the DMRB treatments compared with abiotic controls. In the presence of EDTA and AQDS, PuO(2)·xH(2)O((am)) was completely solubilized by S. oneidensis and G. sulfurreducens in ∼24 h. Without AQDS, bioreductive solubilization was slower (∼22 days) and less extensive (∼83-94%). In the absence of DMRB, EDTA facilitated reductive solubilization of 89% (without AQDS) to 98% (with AQDS) of the added PuO(2)·xH(2)O((am)) over 418 days. An in vitro assay demonstrated electron transfer to PuO(2)·xH(2)O((am)) from the S. oneidensis outer-membrane c-type cytochrome MtrC. Our results (1) suggest that PuO(2)·xH(2)O((am)) reductive solubilization may be important in reducing environments, especially in the presence of complexing ligands and electron shuttles, (2) highlight the environmental importance of polynuclear, colloidal Pu, (3) provide additional evidence that Pu(III)-EDTA is a more likely mobile form of Pu than Pu(IV)-EDTA, and (4) provide another example of outer-membrane cytochromes and electron-shuttling compounds facilitating bioreduction of insoluble electron acceptors in geologic environments. PMID:22276620

  5. Constraining the role of iron in environmental nitrogen transformations. Dual stable isotope systematics of abiotic NO2- reduction by Fe(II) and its production of N2O

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, David; Wankel, Scott David; Buchwald, Carolyn; Hansel, Colleen

    2015-09-16

    Redox reactions involving nitrogen and iron have been shown to have important implications for mobilization of priority contaminants. Thus, an understanding of the linkages between their biogeochemical cycling is critical for predicting subsurface mobilization of radionuclides such as uranium. Despite mounting evidence for biogeochemical interactions between iron and nitrogen, our understanding of their environmental importance remains limited. Here we present an investigation of abiotic nitrite (NO2-) reduction by Fe(II) or ‘chemodenitrification,’ and its relevance to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), specifically focusing on dual (N and O) isotope systematics under a variety of environmentally relevant conditions. We observe a range of kinetic isotope effects that are regulated by reaction rates, with faster rates at higher pH (~8), higher concentrations of Fe(II) and in the presence of mineral surfaces. A clear non-linear relationship between rate constant and kinetic isotope effects of NO2- reduction was evident (with larger isotope effects at slower rates) and is interpreted as reflecting the dynamics of Fe(II)-N reaction intermediates. N and O isotopic composition of product N2O also suggests a complex network of parallel and/or competing pathways. Our findings suggest that NO2- reduction by Fe(II) may represent an important abiotic source of environmental N2O, especially in iron-rich environments experiencing dynamic redox variations. This study provides a multi-compound, multi-isotope framework for evaluating the environmental occurrence of abiotic NO2- reduction and N2O formation, helping future studies constrain the relative roles of abiotic and biological N2O production pathways.

  6. DOWNSTREAM IMPACTS OF SLUDGE MASS REDUCTION VIA ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION ON DWPF PROCESSING OF SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE - 9382

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Hay, M; Daniel McCabe, D

    2009-01-14

    The SRS sludge that was to become a major fraction of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) contained a large fraction of H-Modified PUREX (HM) sludge, containing a large fraction of aluminum compounds that could adversely impact the processing and increase the vitrified waste volume. It is beneficial to reduce the non-radioactive fraction of the sludge to minimize the number of glass waste canisters that must be sent to a Federal Repository. Removal of aluminum compounds, such as boehmite and gibbsite, from sludge can be performed with the addition of NaOH solution and heating the sludge for several days. Preparation of SB5 involved adding sodium hydroxide directly to the waste tank and heating the contents to a moderate temperature through slurry pump operation to remove a fraction of this aluminum. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with demonstrating this process on actual tank waste sludge in our Shielded Cells Facility. This paper evaluates some of the impacts of aluminum dissolution on sludge washing and DWPF processing by comparing sludge processing with and without aluminum dissolution. It was necessary to demonstrate these steps to ensure that the aluminum removal process would not adversely impact the chemical and physical properties of the sludge which could result in slower processing or process upsets in the DWPF.

  7. 10 CFR 960.4-2-6 - Dissolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... host rock within the site was subject to significant dissolution during the Quaternary Period. (c..., dissolution cavities, significant volumetric reduction of the host rock or surrounding strata, or...

  8. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jian-Xin; Wang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Cun; Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L

    2014-08-30

    The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils. PMID:25064258

  9. Evaluation of premeability-porosity relationships linked to mineral dissolution-precipitation using global implicit approach with a reduction scheme and operator splitting approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolfaghari, R.; Shao, H.; Kolditz, O.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical simulation of reactive transport processes is essential in long term behavior assessment of hazardous materials. To simulate reactive transport processes global implicit approach (GIA) and operator splitting approach are commonly used. GIA has been getting more attentions due to advances in computational power and the lack of numerical accuracy and efficacy of operator splitting methods for simulating long term processes over the past few years. We have investigated the Efficiency and accuracy of these methods in handling slow reacting-processes in long term scenarios. GIA with reduction scheme proposed by Kräutel et al. (2010) and sequential non-iterative approach (SNIA) approach have been implemented into OpenGeoSys (OGS6) to solve reactive transport problems. The new reduction scheme in GIA uses a reformulation to reduce the number of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations by decoupling of equations and elimination of unknowns. The new reformulation divides components and species of the chemical system into decoupled linear reaction invariant components and coupled nonlinear reaction variant ones. A local chemical solver is used to handle the chemical problem in GIA and SNIA approaches. Equilibrium/ kinetic mineral reaction is treated as a complementarity problem in the local problem. In this context, a series of benchmarks have been adopted to assess the performance of GIA with reduction scheme and SNIA. The benchmarks objective is to simulate mineral dissolution-precipitation induced porosity changes and the resulting effects on the solute migration. The Carman-Kozeny relationship is used to describe changes in permeability as a function of porosity. The results produced by three codes of OGS6, OGS-PHREEQC and MIN3P have been compared and evaluated based on the benchmarks for the numerical accuracy and efficacy.

  10. Dissolution-and-reduction CVD synthesis of few-layer graphene on ultra-thin nickel film lifted off for mode-locking fiber lasers

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kaung-Jay; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Wu, Chung-Lun; Lin, Sheng-Fong; Yang, Chun-Yu; Lin, Shih-Meng; Tsai, Din-Ping; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2015-01-01

    The in-situ dissolution-and-reduction CVD synthesized few-layer graphene on ultra-thin nickel catalyst film is demonstrated at temperature as low as 550 °C, which can be employed to form transmission-type or reflection-type saturable absorber (SA) for mode-locking the erbium-doped fiber lasers (EDFLs). With transmission-type graphene SA, the EDFL shortens its pulsewidth from 483 to 441 fs and broadens its spectral linewidth from 4.2 to 6.1 nm with enlarging the pumping current from 200 to 900 mA. In contrast, the reflection-type SA only compresses the pulsewidth from 875 to 796 fs with corresponding spectral linewidth broadened from 2.2 to 3.3 nm. The reflection-type graphene mode-locker increases twice of its equivalent layer number to cause more insertion loss than the transmission-type one. Nevertheless, the reflection-type based saturable absorber system can generate stabilized soliton-like pulse easier than that of transmission-type system, because the nonlinearity induced self-amplitude modulation depth is simultaneously enlarged when passing through the graphene twice under the retro-reflector design. PMID:26328535

  11. Biotic and Abiotic Reduction and Solubilization of Pu(IV)O2•xH2O(am) as Affected by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Plymale, Andrew E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.; Bolton, Harvey

    2012-01-24

    In the presence of hydrogen (H{sub 2}), the synthetic chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), and the electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens both reductively solubilized 100% of added 0.5 mM plutonium (IV) hydrous oxide (Pu(IV)O{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}) in {approx}24 h at pH 7 in a non-complexing buffer. In the absence of AQDS, bioreduction was much slower ({approx}22 days) and less extensive ({approx}83-94%). In the absence of DMRB but under comparable conditions, 89% (without AQDS) to 98% (with AQDS) of added 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was reductively solubilized over 418 days. Under comparable conditions but in the absence of EDTA, <0.001% of the 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was solubilized, with or without bacteria. However, Pu(aq) increased by as much as an order of magnitude in some EDTA-free treatments, both biotic and abiotic, and increases in solubility were associated with the production of both Pu(OH)3(am) and Pu(III)(aq). Incubation with DMRB in the absence of EDTA increased the polymeric and crystalline content of the PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} and also decreased Pu solubility in 6-N HCl. Results from an in vitro assay demonstrated electron transfer to PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} from the S. oneidensis outer-membrane c-type cytochrome MtrC, and EDTA increased the oxidation of MtrC by PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}. Our results suggest that PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} biotic and abiotic reduction and solubilization may be important in anoxic, reducing environments, especially where complexing ligands and electron shuttling compounds are present.

  12. Diagnosing Abiotic Degradation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abiotic degradation of chlorinated solvents in ground water can be difficult to diagnose. Under current practice, most of the “evidence” is negative; specifically the apparent disappearance of chlorinated solvents with an accumulation of vinyl chloride, ethane, ethylene, or ...

  13. A novel determination of calcite dissolution kinetics in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhas, Adam V.; Rollins, Nick E.; Berelson, William M.; Dong, Sijia; Erez, Jonathan; Adkins, Jess F.

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel determination of the dissolution kinetics of inorganic calcite in seawater. We dissolved 13 C -labeled calcite in unlabeled seawater, and traced the evolving δ13 C composition of the fluid over time to establish dissolution rates. This method provides sensitive determinations of dissolution rate, which we couple with tight constraints on both seawater saturation state and surface area of the dissolving minerals. We have determined dissolution rates for two different abiotic calcite materials and three different grain sizes. Near-equilibrium dissolution rates are highly nonlinear, and are well normalized by geometric surface area, giving an empirical dissolution rate dependence on saturation state (Ω) of: This result substantiates the non-linear response of calcite dissolution to undersaturation. The bulk dissolution rate constant calculated here is in excellent agreement with those determined in far from equilibrium and dilute solution experiments. Plots of dissolution versus undersaturation indicates the presence of at least two dissolution mechanisms, implying a criticality in the calcite-seawater system. Finally, our new rate determination has implications for modeling of pelagic and seafloor dissolution. Nonlinear dissolution kinetics in a simple 1-D lysocline model indicate a possible transition from kinetic to diffusive control with increasing water depth, and also confirm the importance of respiration-driven dissolution in setting the shape of the calcite lysocline.

  14. Abiotic origin of biopolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Stephen-Sherwood, E.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of methods have been investigated in different laboratories for the polymerization of amino acids and nucleotides under abiotic conditions. They include (1) thermal polymerization; (2) direct polymerization of certain amino acid nitriles, amides, or esters; (3) polymerization using polyphosphate esters; (4) polymerization under aqueous or drying conditions at moderate temperatures using a variety of simple catalysts or condensing agents like cyanamide, dicyandiamide, or imidazole; and (5) polymerization under similar mild conditions but employing activated monomers or abiotically synthesized high-energy compounds such as adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). The role and significance of these methods for the synthesis of oligopeptides and oligonucleotides under possible primitive-earth conditions is evaluated. It is concluded that the more recent approach involving chemical processes similar to those used by contemporary living organisms appears to offer a reasonable solution to the prebiotic synthesis of these biopolymers.

  15. Reductive Sequestration Of Pertechnetate (99TcO4–) By Nano Zerovalent Iron (nZVI) Transformed By Abiotic Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Dimin; Anitori, Roberto; Tebo, Bradley M.; Tratnyek, Paul G.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bowden, Mark E.; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.

    2013-04-24

    Under anoxic conditions, soluble 99TcO4– can be reduced to less soluble TcO2•nH2O, but the oxide is highly susceptible to reoxidation. Here we investigate an alternative strategy for remediation of Tc-contaminated groundwater whereby sequestration as Tc sulfide is favored by sulfidic conditions stimulated by nano zero-valent iron (nZVI). nZVI was pre-exposed to increasing concentrations of sulfide in simulated Hanford groundwater for 24 hrs to mimic the stages of aquifer sulfate reduction and onset of biotic sulfidogenesis. Solid-phase characterizations of the sulfidated nZVI confirmed the formation of nanocrystalline FeS phases, but higher S/Fe ratios (>0.112) did not result in the formation of significantly more FeS. The kinetics of Tc sequestration by these materials showed faster Tc removal rates with increasing S/Fe between S/Fe = 0–0.056, but decreasing Tc removal rates with S/Fe > 0.224. The more favorable Tc removal kinetics at low S/Fe could be due to a higher affinity of TcO4– for FeS (over iron oxides), and electron microscopy confirmed that the majority of the Tc was associated with FeS phases. The inhibition of Tc removal at high S/Fe appears to have been caused by excess HS–. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that as S/Fe increased, Tc speciation shifted from TcO2•nH2O to TcS2. The most substantial change of Tc speciation occurred at low S/Fe, coinciding with the rapid increase of Tc removal rate. This agreement further confirms the importance of FeS in Tc sequestration.

  16. Effects of Bacillus subtilis endospore surface reactivity on the rate of forsterite dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, Z.; Gorman-Lewis, D.

    2013-12-01

    . Additional analyses including Mg concentrations, microprobe and BET analyses support mineral dissolution rate calculations and stoichiometry considerations. All experimental assays containing endospores show increased forsterite dissolution rates relative to abiotic controls. Forsterite dissolution rates increased by approximately one order of magnitude in dialysis bound, biotic experiments relative to abiotic assays. Homogenous biotic assays exhibited a more complex dissolution rate profile that changes over time. All microbially mediated forsterite dissolution rates returned to abiotic control rates after 10 to 15 days of incubation. This shift in dissolution rate likely corresponds to maximum endospore surface adsorption capacity. The Bacillus subtilis endospore surface serves as a first-order proxy for studying the effect of metabolizing microbe surfaces on silicate dissolution rates. Comparisons with published abiotic, microbial, and organic acid mediated forsterite dissolution rates will provide insight on the importance of bacterial surfaces in primary mineral dissolution processes.

  17. Effect of particle size reduction on dissolution and oral absorption of a poorly water-soluble drug, cilostazol, in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Jun-ichi; Kamada, Naoki; Miyake, Masateru; Yamada, Keigo; Mukai, Tadashi; Odomi, Masaaki; Toguchi, Hajime; Liversidge, Gary G; Higaki, Kazutaka; Kimura, Toshikiro

    2006-03-10

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of particle size on the dissolution and oral absorption of cilostazol. Three types of suspensions having different particle size distributions were prepared of the hammer-milled, the jet-milled cilostazol crystals and the NanoCrystal spray-dried powder of cilostazol. In vitro dissolution rate of cilostazol was significantly increased by reducing the particle size. The dissolution curves of the cilostazol suspensions were in good agreement with the simulation based on the Noyes-Whitney equation. The bioavailability of cilostazol after oral administration to dogs was increased with reducing the particle size. While positive food effect on the absorption was observed for the suspensions made of the hammer-milled and the jet-milled crystals, no significant food effect was found for the suspension made of the NanoCrystal cilostazol spray-dried powder. These results could be qualitatively predicted from the in vitro dissolution data using the bio-relevant media, FaSSIF and FeSSIF. In conclusion, the NanoCrystal technology is found to be efficient to improve the oral bioavailability of cilostazol and to avoid the food effect on the absorption. PMID:16410029

  18. Formulations for iron oxides dissolution

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl P.; Chiarizia, Renato

    1992-01-01

    A mixture of a di- or polyphosphonic acid and a reductant wherein each is present in a sufficient amount to provide a synergistic effect with respect to the dissolution of metal oxides and optionally containing corrosion inhibitors and pH adjusting agents.

  19. Nanosizing of drugs: Effect on dissolution rate

    PubMed Central

    Dizaj, S. Maleki; Vazifehasl, Zh.; Salatin, S.; Adibkia, Kh.; Javadzadeh, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The solubility, bioavailability and dissolution rate of drugs are important parameters for achieving in vivo efficiency. The bioavailability of orally administered drugs depends on their ability to be absorbed via gastrointestinal tract. For drugs belonging to Class II of pharmaceutical classification, the absorption process is limited by drug dissolution rate in gastrointestinal media. Therefore, enhancement of the dissolution rate of these drugs will present improved bioavailability. So far several techniques such as physical and chemical modifications, changing in crystal habits, solid dispersion, complexation, solubilization and liquisolid method have been used to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble drugs. It seems that improvement of the solubility properties ofpoorly water soluble drugscan translate to an increase in their bioavailability. Nowadays nanotechnology offers various approaches in the area of dissolution enhancement of low aqueous soluble drugs. Nanosizing of drugs in the form of nanoparticles, nanocrystals or nanosuspensions not requiring expensive facilities and equipment or complicated processes may be applied as simple methods to increase the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble drugs. In this article, we attempted to review the effects of nanosizing on improving the dissolution rate of poorly aqueous soluble drugs. According to the reviewed literature, by reduction of drug particle size into nanometer size the total effective surface area is increased and thereby dissolution rate would be enhanced. Additionally, reduction of particle size leads to reduction of the diffusion layer thickness surrounding the drug particles resulting in the increment of the concentration gradient. Each of these process leads to improved bioavailability. PMID:26487886

  20. Abiotic Buildup of Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagal-Goldman, S. D.; Meadows, V. S.

    2010-10-01

    Two of the best biosignature gases for remote detection of life on extrasolar planets are oxygen (O2) and its photochemical byproduct, ozone (O3). The main reason for their prominence as biosignatures is that large abiotic fluxes of O2 and O3 are not considered sustainable on geological and astronomical timescales. We show here how buildup of O3 can occur on planets orbiting M stars, even in the absence of the large biological fluxes. This is possible because the destruction of O2 and O3 is driven by UV photochemistry. This chemistry is much slower on planets around these stars, due to the smaller incident UV flux. Because the destruction of these gases is slower, O3 can build up to detectable levels even if the O3 source is small. We will present atmospheric profiles of these gases for planets around AD Leo (an M dwarf) as well as spectra that show the implications for missions such as Darwin and the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF).

  1. Boehmite Actual Waste Dissolutions Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Lanee A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2008-07-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level waste (HLW) sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of HLW requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove a significant quantity of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum is found in the form of gibbsite, sodium aluminate and boehmite. Gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic. Boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. Samples were taken from four Hanford tanks and homogenized in order to give a sample that is representative of REDOX (Reduction Oxidation process for Pu recovery) sludge solids. Bench scale testing was performed on the homogenized waste to study the dissolution of boehmite. Dissolution was studied at three different hydroxide concentrations, with each concentration being run at three different temperatures. Samples were taken periodically over the 170 hour runs in order to determine leaching kinetics. Results of the dissolution studies and implications for the proposed processing of these wastes will be discussed.

  2. Confounding Impacts of Iron Reduction on Arsenic Retention

    SciTech Connect

    Tufano, K.J.; Fendorf, S.

    2009-05-26

    A transition from oxidizing to reducing conditions has long been implicated to increase aqueous As concentrations, for which reductive dissolution of iron (hydr)oxides is commonly implicated as the primary culprit. Confounding our understanding of processes controlling As retention, however, is that reductive transformation of ferrihydrite has recently been shown to promote As retention rather than release. To resolve the role iron phases have in regulating arsenic concentrations, here we examine As desorption from ferrihydrite-coated sands presorbed with As(lll); experiments were performed at circumneutral pH under Fe-reducing conditions with the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN-32 over extended time periods. We reveal that with the initial phase of iron reduction, ferrihydrite undergoes transformation to secondary phases and increases As(lll) retention (relative to abiotic controls). However, with increased reaction time, cessation of the phase transitions and ensuing reductive dissolution result in prolonged release of As(III) to the aqueous phase. Our results suggest that As(lll) retention during iron reduction is temporally dependent on secondary precipitation of iron phases; during transformation to secondary phases, particularly magnetite, As(lll) retention is enhanced even relative to oxidized systems. However, conditions that retard secondary transformation (more stable iron oxides or limited iron reducing bacterial activity), or prolonged anaerobiosis, will lead to both the dissolution of ferric (hydr)oxides and release of As(lll) to the aqueous phase.

  3. INFLUENCE OF PH AND OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL (EH) ON THE DISSOLUTION OF MERCURY-CONTAINING MINE WASTES FROM THE SULFUR BANK MERCURY MINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was undertaken as a part of developing treatment alternatives for waste materials, primarily waste rock and roaster tailings, from sites contaminated with mercury (Hg) mining wastes. Leaching profiles of waste rock over a range of different pH and oxidation-reduction (...

  4. Characterization and dissolution properties of ruthenium oxides.

    PubMed

    Luxton, Todd P; Eick, Matthew J; Scheckel, Kirk G

    2011-07-01

    Ruthenium oxides (RuO(2)·1·10H(2)O and RuO(2)) have been synthesized by forced hydrolysis and oxidation of ruthenium chloride. The resulting materials were extensively characterized to determine the crystallinity, surface area, and ruthenium oxidation state. Surface charging experiments indicate a large quantity of reactive functional groups for both materials and a decrease in the acidity of the surface functional groups with crystallization of the hydrous oxide. Dissolution studies conducted in acidic and basic pH environments indicate Ru-oxides are insoluble in 0.1 M HCl and slightly soluble in 0.1 M NaOH. Oxalate and ascorbate (5 mM) promoted dissolution of RuO(2)·1·10H(2)O demonstrated an increase in dissolution rates with decreasing pH and increasing ligand surface coverage. XPS analysis of the RuO(2)·1·10H(2)O surface after ligand promoted dissolution revealed the reduction of Ru(IV) to Ru(III) indicating that both ascorbate and oxalate reductively dissolve RuO(2)·1·10H(2)O. Dissolution experiments with RuO(2) resulted in dissolution only for 5 mM oxalate at pH 3. Dissolution rates calculated for RuO(2)·1·10H(2)O and RuO(2) are compared with previously published dissolution rates for iron oxides, demonstrating an order of magnitude decrease in the oxalate and ascorbate promoted dissolution. PMID:21511266

  5. ROS Regulation During Abiotic Stress Responses in Crop Plants

    PubMed Central

    You, Jun; Chan, Zhulong

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, salt and heat cause reduction of plant growth and loss of crop yield worldwide. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anions (O2•-), hydroxyl radical (OH•) and singlet oxygen (1O2) are by-products of physiological metabolisms, and are precisely controlled by enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defense systems. ROS are significantly accumulated under abiotic stress conditions, which cause oxidative damage and eventually resulting in cell death. Recently, ROS have been also recognized as key players in the complex signaling network of plants stress responses. The involvement of ROS in signal transduction implies that there must be coordinated function of regulation networks to maintain ROS at non-toxic levels in a delicate balancing act between ROS production, involving ROS generating enzymes and the unavoidable production of ROS during basic cellular metabolism, and ROS-scavenging pathways. Increasing evidence showed that ROS play crucial roles in abiotic stress responses of crop plants for the activation of stress-response and defense pathways. More importantly, manipulating ROS levels provides an opportunity to enhance stress tolerances of crop plants under a variety of unfavorable environmental conditions. This review presents an overview of current knowledge about homeostasis regulation of ROS in crop plants. In particular, we summarize the essential proteins that are involved in abiotic stress tolerance of crop plants through ROS regulation. Finally, the challenges toward the improvement of abiotic stress tolerance through ROS regulation in crops are discussed. PMID:26697045

  6. Abiotic Dissolved Organic Matter-Mineral Interaction in the Karstic Floridan Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, J.; Zimmerman, A.

    2007-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM)-mineral interaction (e.g. adsorption, desorption, mineral dissolution) in groundwater is a significant factor controlling geochemical, environmental and microbial processes and may be helpful in efforts to track groundwater sources or contaminant fate. Despite its importance, the dynamics and consequences of these abiotic interactions remain poorly understood, largely due to the inaccessibility and heterogeneity of the subsurface, as well as the chemical complexity of DOM. This study models the OM-mineral interactions that takes place in the Floridan aquifer through laboratory adsorption-desorption experiments using DOM (groundwater, river water, soil extracts) and carbonate minerals (calcite, dolomite) collected in north Florida. High performance liquid chromatography-size exclusion chromatography (HPLC-SEC) and UV-fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectrophotometry was used to examine the organic compound types exhibiting preferential affinity for carbonate minerals. Our results show that the DOM-carbonate adsorption/desorption isotherms are well described by the Freundlich model. Freundlich exponents (average value: 0.6488) less than one indicated a filling of adsorption sites. Minerals from Ocala tend to have higher adsorption affinity as well as adsorption capacity than those from Suwannee River Basin; however, both were found to have mineral dissolution. Two fluorescent signals, indicative of a fulvic-like (at excitation wavelength 295-310 nm, emission 400-420 nm) and a protein-like (275/345nm) moiety, were detected in DOM. A reduction in the fulvic-like peak intensity occurred following carbonate adsorption while the protein-like peaks remain almost unchanged indicating the preferential adsorption of fulvic acids. HPLC-SEC results (DOM properties as a function of molecular weight) will be discussed. The chemical properties of DOM in environmental groundwater samples will also be presented and evaluated in light of

  7. Continuous plutonium dissolution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, F.G.; Tesitor, C.N.

    1974-02-26

    This invention is concerned with continuous dissolution of metals such as plutonium. A high normality acid mixture is fed into a boiler vessel, vaporized, and subsequently condensed as a low normality acid mixture. The mixture is then conveyed to a dissolution vessel and contacted with the plutonium metal to dissolve the plutonium in the dissolution vessel, reacting therewith forming plutonium nitrate. The reaction products are then conveyed to the mixing vessel and maintained soluble by the high normality acid, with separation and removal of the desired constituent. (Official Gazette)

  8. Modeling of the structure-specific kinetics of abiotic, dark reduction of Hg(II) complexed by O/N and S functional groups in humic acids while accounting for time-dependent structural rearrangement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Redox transformations involving electron transfer from natural organic matter (NOM) are important for the mercury (Hg) biogeochemical cycle. In the water column light drives the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0), whereas in soils and sediments dark reduction of Hg(II) is of greater importance. The object...

  9. Dissolution of Platinum in the Operational Range of Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Keeley, Gareth P.; Geiger, Simon; Zeradjanin, Aleksandar R.; Hodnik, Nejc; Kulyk, Nadiia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract One of the most important practical issues in low‐temperature fuel‐cell catalyst degradation is platinum dissolution. According to the literature, it initiates at 0.6–0.9 VRHE, whereas previous time‐ and potential‐resolved inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP–MS) experiments, however, revealed dissolution onset at only 1.05 VRHE. In this manuscript, the apparent discrepancy is addressed by investigating bulk and nanoparticulated catalysts. It is shown that, given enough time for accumulation, traces of platinum can be detected at potentials as low as 0.85 VRHE. At these low potentials, anodic dissolution is the dominant process, whereas, at more positive potentials, more platinum dissolves during the oxide reduction after accumulation. Interestingly, the potential and time dissolution dependence is similar for both types of electrode. Dissolution processes are discussed with relevance to fuel‐cell operation and plausible dissolution mechanisms are considered. PMID:27525206

  10. Abiotic Organic Chemistry in Hydrothermal Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneit, B. R.; Rushdi, A. I.

    2004-12-01

    Abiotic organic chemistry in hydrothermal systems is of interest to biologists, geochemists and oceanographers. This chemistry consists of thermal alteration of organic matter and minor prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds. Thermal alteration has been extensively documented to yield petroleum and heavy bitumen products from contemporary organic detritus. Carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia and sulfur species have been used as precursors in prebiotic synthesis experiments to organic compounds. These inorganic species are common components of hot spring gases and marine hydrothermal systems. It is of interest to further test their reactivities in reductive aqueous thermolysis. We have synthesized organic compounds (lipids) in aqueous solutions of oxalic acid, and with carbon disulfide or ammonium bicarbonate at temperatures from 175-400° C. The synthetic lipids from oxalic acid solutions consisted of n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkyl formates, n-alkanones, n-alkenes and n-alkanes, typically to C30 with no carbon number preferences. The products from CS2 in acidic aqueous solutions yielded cyclic thioalkanes, alkyl polysulfides, and thioesters with other numerous minor compounds. The synthesis products from oxalic acid and ammonium bicarbonate solutions were homologous series of n-alkyl amides, n-alkyl amines, n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids, also to C30 with no carbon number predominance. Condensation (dehydration) reactions also occur under elevated temperatures in aqueous medium as tested by model reactions to form amide, ester and nitrile bonds. It is concluded that the abiotic formation of aliphatic lipids, condensation products (amides, esters, nitriles, and CS2 derivatives (alkyl polysulfides, cyclic polysulfides) is possible under hydrothermal conditions and warrants further studies.

  11. Bioenhanced dissolution of dense non-aqueous phase of trichloroethylene as affected by iron reducing conditions: model systems and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Paul, Laiby; Smolders, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic biotransformation of trichloroethylene (TCE) can be affected by competing electron acceptors such as Fe (III). This study assessed the role of Fe (III) reduction on the bioenhanced dissolution of TCE dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). Columns were set up as 1-D diffusion cells consisting of a lower DNAPL layer, a layer with an aquifer substratum and an upper water layer that is regularly refreshed. The substrata used were either inert sand or sand coated with 2-line ferrihydrite (HFO) or two environmental Fe (III) containing samples. The columns were inoculated with KB-1 and were repeatedly fed with formate. In none of the diffusion cells, vinyl chloride or ethene was detected while dissolved and extractable Fe (II) increased strongly during 60 d of incubation. The cis-DCE concentration peaked at 4.0 cm from the DNAPL (inert sand) while it was at 3.4 cm (sand+HFO), 1.7 cm and 2.5 cm (environmental samples). The TCE concentration gradients near the DNAPL indicate that the DNAPL dissolution rate was larger than that in an abiotic cell by factors 1.3 (inert sand), 1.0 (sand+HFO) and 2.2 (both environmental samples). This results show that high bioavailable Fe (III) in HFO reduces the TCE degradation by competitive Fe (III) reduction, yielding lower bioenhanced dissolution. However, Fe (III) reduction in environmental samples was not reducing TCE degradation and the dissolution factor was even larger than that of inert sand. It is speculated that physical factors, e.g. micro-niches in the environmental samples protect microorganisms from toxic concentrations of TCE. PMID:25460750

  12. Syntrophic Effects in a Subsurface Clostridial Consortium on Fe(III)-(Oxyhydr)oxide Reduction and Secondary Mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Madhavi; Lin, Chu-Ching; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhao, Xiuhong; Wang, Yangping; Barkay, Tamar; Yee, Nathan

    2013-07-09

    In this study, we cultivated from subsurface sediments an anaerobic Clostridia 25 consortium that was composed of a fermentative Fe-reducer Clostridium species (designated as 26 strain FGH) and a novel sulfate-reducing bacterium belonging to the Clostridia family 27 Vellionellaceae (designated as strain RU4). In pure culture, Clostridium sp. strain FGH mediated 28 the reductive dissolution/transformation of iron oxides during growth on peptone. When 29 Clostridium sp. FGH was grown with strain RU4 on peptone, the rates of iron oxide reduction 30 were significantly higher. Iron reduction by the consortium was mediated by multiple 31 mechanisms, including biotic reduction by Clostridium sp. FGH and biotic/abiotic reactions 32 involving biogenic sulfide by strain RU4. The Clostridium sp. FGH produced hydrogen during 33 fermentation, and the presence of hydrogen inhibited growth and iron reduction activity. The 34 sulfate-reducing partner strain RU4 was stimulated by the presence of H2 gas and generated 35 reactive sulfide which promoted the chemical reduction of the iron oxides. Characterization of 36 Fe(II) mineral products showed the formation of magnetite during ferrihydrite reduction, and 37 the precipitation of iron sulfides during goethite and hematite reduction. The results suggest an 38 important pathway for iron reduction and secondary mineralization by fermentative sulfate-39 reducing microbial consortia is through syntrophy-driven biotic/abiotic reactions with biogenic 40 sulfide.

  13. Effect of dechlorinating bacteria on the longevity and composition of PCE-containing nonaqueous phase liquids under equilibrium dissolution conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C.S.; Garg, S.; Hughes, J.B.

    2000-03-15

    The influence of dechlorinating microorganisms on PCE and its reduced end products in the presence of a PCE-containing nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) was investigated. Experiments were conducted in continuous-flow stirred-tank reactors (CFSTRs) containing a mixed PCE dechlorinating culture and a model NAPL consisting of PCE and tridecane. Comparisons between biotic and abiotic CFSTRs demonstrated that dechlorination resulted in a factor of 14 increase in PCE removal rates from the NAPL. The formation of dechlorination daughter products trichloroethene and cis-dichloroethene were observed, and cis-dichloroethene was not dechlorinated further. Partitioning of daughter products between phases caused temporal changes in the chlorinated ethenes distribution within the NAPL. The combined effects of dissolution and dechlorination on the removal of chlorinated ethenes from the NAPL were described using a mathematical model that approximated dechlorination as a pseudo-first-order process. Pseudo-first-order dechlorination rate coefficients for PCE and TCE were determined and were 0.18 and 0.27 h{sup {minus}1}, respectively. It was determined that total chlorinated ethenes removal from the NAPL would be achieved in 13 days in biotic CFSTRs, as compared to 77 days in the abiotic CFSTRs--corresponding to an 83% reduction in longevity of the chlorinated ethenes component of the NAPL.

  14. Oxidative Dissolution of UO2 in a Simulated Groundwater Containing Synthetic Nanocrystalline Mackinawite

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Yuqiang; Hyun, Sung Pil; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Hayes, Kim F.

    2013-02-01

    The long-term success of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium (U) depends on the stability of U(IV) precipitates (e.g., uraninite) under oxic conditions. Field and laboratory studies have implicated iron sulfide minerals as redox buffers or oxidant scavengers that may slow oxidation of reduced U(VI) solid phases by oxygen and Fe(III). Yet, the inhibition mechanism(s) and reaction rates of uraninite (UO2) oxidative dissolution by oxic species such as oxygen in FeS-bearing systems remain largely unresolved. To address this knowledge gap, abiotic batch experiments were conducted with synthetic UO2 in the presence and absence of synthetic mackinawite (FeS) under simulated groundwater conditions of pH = 7, PO2 = 0.02 atm, and PCO2 = 0.05 atm (equivalent to total dissolved carbonate of 0.01 M). The kinetic profiles of dissolved uranium indicate that FeS inhibited UO2 dissolution for 51 hr by effectively scavenging oxygen and keeping dissolved oxygen (DO) low. During this time period, oxidation of structural Fe(II) and S(-II) of FeS were found to control the DO levels, leading to the formation of iron oxyhydroxides and elemental sulfur, respectively, as verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). After FeS was depleted due to oxidation, DO levels increased and UO2 oxidative dissolution occurred at an initial rate of rm = 1.2 ± 0.4 ×10-8 mol•g-1•s-1, higher than rm = 5.4 ± 0.3 ×10-9 mol•g-1•s-1 in the control experiment where FeS was absent. Soluble U(VI) products were adsorbed by iron oxyhydroxides (i.e. nanogoethite and ferrihydrite) formed from FeS oxidation, which facilitated the detachment of U(VI) surface complexes and more rapid dissolution of UO2. XAS analysis confirmed the adsorption of U(VI) species, and also showed that U(VI) was not significantly incorporated into iron oxyhydroxide structure. This work reveals that both the oxygen scavenging by FeS and the adsorption of U(VI) to FeS oxidation

  15. Distinguishing Biotic from Abiotic Phosphate Oxygen Isotopic Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R.; Moyer, C.; Colman, A.; Liang, Y.; Dogru, D.

    2006-05-01

    On earth, phosphate has a strong biological oxygen isotope signature due to its concentration and intense cycling by living organisms as an essential nutrient. Phosphate does not undergo oxygen isotope exchange with water at low temperature without enzymatic catalysis, making the oxygen isotope ratio (18O/16O) of phosphate, δ18OP, an attractive biosignature in the search for early and extraterrestrial life. Recent laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that the δ18OP value of dissolved inorganic phosphate (PO4) records specific microbial activity and enzymatic reaction pathways in both laboratory cultures and natural waters/sediments (Blake et al., 2005; Colman et al 2005; Liang and Blake, 2005). Phosphate oxygen isotope biosignatures may be distinguished from abiotic signatures by: (1) evaluating the degree of temperature-dependent PO4-water oxygen isotope exchange in aqueous systems and deviation from equilibrium; and (2) evolution from an abiotic P reservoir signature towards a biotic P reservoir signature. Important abiotic processes potentially affecting phosphate δ18OP values include dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, recrystallization of PO4 mineral phases, diagenesis and metamorphism. For most of these processes, the recording, retention and alteration of δ18OP biosignatures have not been evaluated. Deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields are an ideal system in which to study the preservation and alteration of δ18OP biosignatures, as well as potential look-alikes produced by heat-promoted PO4 -water oxygen isotope exchange. Results from recent studies of δ18OP biosignatures in hydrothermal deposits near 9 and 21 degrees N. EPR and at Loihi seamount will be presented.

  16. HEPA filter dissolution process

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  17. Mergers, Annexations, Dissolutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Consolidations come in all shapes and sizes, including mergers, annexations and dissolutions. They do not all take place under state mandate, however. A handful of districts consolidate every year in some states like Illinois that have large numbers of small districts, many of them dual districts that serve K-8 or 9-12 in the same geographic area.…

  18. Hepa filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, Ken N.; Murphy, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  19. HEPA filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1994-02-22

    A process is described for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal. 4 figures.

  20. Plutonium oxide dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.

    1992-09-30

    Several processing options for dissolving plutonium oxide (PuO[sub 2]) from high-fired materials have been studied. The scoping studies performed on these options were focused on PuO[sub 2] typically generated by burning plutonium metal and PuO[sub 2] produced during incineration of alpha contaminated waste. At least two processing options remain applicable for dissolving high-fired PuO[sub 2] in canyon dissolvers. The options involve solid solution formation of PuO[sub 2] With uranium oxide (UO[sub 2]) and alloying incinerator ash with aluminum. An oxidative dissolution process involving nitric acid solutions containing a strong oxidizing agent, such as cerium (IV), was neither proven nor rejected. This uncertainty was due to difficulty in regenerating cerium (IV) ions during dissolution. However, recent work on silver-catalyzed dissolution of PuO[sub 2] with persulfate has demonstrated that persulfate ions regenerate silver (II). Use of persulfate to regenerate cerium (IV) or bismuth (V) ions during dissolution of PuO[sub 2] materials may warrant further study.

  1. Plutonium oxide dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.

    1992-09-30

    Several processing options for dissolving plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from high-fired materials have been studied. The scoping studies performed on these options were focused on PuO{sub 2} typically generated by burning plutonium metal and PuO{sub 2} produced during incineration of alpha contaminated waste. At least two processing options remain applicable for dissolving high-fired PuO{sub 2} in canyon dissolvers. The options involve solid solution formation of PuO{sub 2} With uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) and alloying incinerator ash with aluminum. An oxidative dissolution process involving nitric acid solutions containing a strong oxidizing agent, such as cerium (IV), was neither proven nor rejected. This uncertainty was due to difficulty in regenerating cerium (IV) ions during dissolution. However, recent work on silver-catalyzed dissolution of PuO{sub 2} with persulfate has demonstrated that persulfate ions regenerate silver (II). Use of persulfate to regenerate cerium (IV) or bismuth (V) ions during dissolution of PuO{sub 2} materials may warrant further study.

  2. Understanding gas hydrate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Laura; Chanton, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Ian; Martens, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    In order to understand the role gas hydrates play in climate change or their potential as an energy source, we must first understand their basic behaviors. One such behavior not well understood is their dissolution and the factors that control it. Theoretically, hydrates are stable in areas of high pressure, low temperature, moderate salt concentrations, and saturated methane. Yet in nature, we observe hydrate to outcrop seafloor sediments into overlying water that is under-saturated with respect to methane. How do these hydrates not dissolve away? To address this question, we combine both field and laboratory experiments. In the field, we have collected pore-waters directly surrounding gas hydrate outcrops and measured for in situ methane concentrations. This gives us an understanding of the concentration gradients, and thus methane flux, directly from the hydrate to the surrounding environment. From these samples, we found that methane concentrations decreased further from hydrate yet are always under-saturated with respect to methane hydrate. The resulting low methane gradients were then used to calculate low dissolution rates. This result suggests that hydrates are meta-stable in the environment. What controls their apparent meta-stability? We hypothesize that surrounding oils or microbial slimes help protect the hydrate and slow down their dissolution. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of laboratory experiments where hydrate was formed at in situ pressure and temperature and the source gas removed; first with no oils, then with oils. Dissolved methane concentrations were then measured in surrounding fluids over time and dissolution rates calculated. To date, both methane and mixed gas hydrate (methane, ethane, and propane) have similar dissolution rates of 0.12 mM/hr. Future experiments will add oils to determine how different hydrate dissolves with such contaminants. This study will further our understanding of factors that control hydrate

  3. Genetic diversity in pollen abiotic stress tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity in reproductive abiotic stress tolerance has been investigated by cotton breeders throughout the public and private sectors. The primary focus of these studies has been the evaluation of abiotic stress responses during the development of the flower prior to anthesis. Sterility in...

  4. Genetic Diversity in Pollen Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity in reproductive abiotic stress tolerance has been investigated by cotton breeders throughout the public and private sectors. The primary focus of these studies has been the evaluation of abiotic stress responses during the development of the flower prior to anthesis. Sterility in...

  5. Modeling of the structure-specific kinetics of abiotic, dark reduction of Hg(II) complexed by O/N and S functional groups in humic acids while accounting for time-dependent structural rearrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Skyllberg, Ulf; Wei, Shiqiang; Wang, Dingyong; Lu, Song; Jiang, Zhenmao; Flanagan, Dennis C.

    2015-04-01

    Dark reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) in deep waters, soils and sediments accounts for a large part of legacy Hg recycling back to the atmosphere. Natural organic matter (NOM) plays a dual role in the process, acting as an electron donor and complexation agent of Hg(II). Experimental determination of rates of dark Hg(II) reduction is complicated by the simultaneously ongoing kinetics of Hg(II) rearrangement from the abundant, relatively weakly bonding RO/N (carboxyl, amino) groups in NOM to the much stronger bonding RSH (thiol) group. In this study, kinetics of the rearrangement are accounted for and we report rates of dark Hg(II) reduction for two molecular structures in presence of humic acids (HA) extracted from three different sources. Values on the pseudo first-order rate constant for the proposed structure Hg(OR)2 (kredHg(OR)2) were 0.18, 0.22 and 0.35 h-1 for Peat, Coal and Soil HA, respectively, and values on the constant for the proposed structure RSHgOR (kred RSHgOR) were 0.003 and 0.006 h-1 for Peat and Soil HA, respectively. The Hg(SR)2 structure is the thermodynamically most stable, but the limited time of the experiment (53 h) did not allow for a determination of the rate of the very slow reduction of Hg(II) in this structure. For two out of three HA samples the concentration of RSH groups optimized by the kinetic model (0.6 × 10-3 RSH groups per C atoms) was in good agreement with independent estimates provided by sulfur X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (S XANES). Experiments conducted at varying concentrations of Hg(II) and HA demonstrated a positive relationship between Hg(II) reduction and concentrations of specific Hg(II) structures and electron donor groups, suggesting first order in each of these two components. The limitation of the Hg(II) reduction by electron donating groups of HA, as represented by the native reducing capacity (NRC), was demonstrated for the Coal HA sample. Normalization to NRC resulted in pseudo second-order rate

  6. Abiotic Versus Biotic Weathering Of Olivine As Possible Biosignatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longazo, Teresa G.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Clemett, Simon J.; Southam, Gordon; McKay, David S.

    2001-01-01

    We are investigating the weathering of silicate minerals by both purely inorganic, and biologically mediated processes using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). By resolving surface textures and chemical compositions of weathered surfaces at the sub-micron scale we hope to be able to distinguish abiotic from biotic weathering processes and so establish a new biosignature applicable to the study of astromaterials including but not limited to the Martian meteorites. Sterilized olivine grains (San Carlos, Arizona) no more than 1-2 mm in their longest dimension were optically assayed to be uniform in color and free of inclusions were selected as weathering subjects. Prior to all experiments surface morphologies and Fe/Mg ratios were determined for each grain using FE-SEM and EDS. Experiments were divided into two categories abiotic and biotic and were compared with "naturally" weathered samples. For the preliminary experiments, two trials (open and closed to the ambient laboratory environment) were performed under abiotic conditions, and three trials under biotic conditions (control, day 1 and day 2). The open system abiotic trials used sterile grains heated at 98 C and 200 C for both 24 and 48 hours in 1L double distilled de-ionized water. The closed system abiotic trials were conducted under the same conditions but in a sealed two layer steel/Teflon "bomb" apparatus. The biotic trials used sterile grains mounted in a flow-through device attached to a wellhead on the Columbia River aquifer. Several discolored, altered, grains were selected to document "natural" weathering surface textures for comparison with the experimental samples. Preliminary results indicate there are qualitative differences in weathered surface textures among all the designed experiments. The olivine grains in abiotic trials displayed etching, pitting, denticulate margins, dissolution and clay formation. The scale of the features

  7. DISSOLUTION OF FISSILE MATERIALS CONTAINING TANTALUM METAL

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T; Mark Crowder, M; Michael Bronikowski, M

    2007-05-29

    of fluoride by the Pu. The fluoride became unavailable to catalyze the dissolution of PuO{sub 2} as it formed on the surface of the metal. The mass of Pu dissolved is equivalent to the dissolution of 343 g of Pu in the HB-Line dissolvers. In the initial experiment with 0.175 M KF in the solution, we achieved complete dissolution of the Pu in 6 h. The mass of Pu dissolved scales to the dissolution of 358 g of Pu in the HB-Line dissolvers. The second experiment using 0.175 M KF was terminated after approximately 6 h following the dissolution of 92.7% of the Pu in the sample; however, dissolution of additional Pu was severely limited due to the slow dissolution rate observed beyond approximately 4 h. A small amount of PuO{sub 2} was also produced in the solution. The slow rate of dissolution was attributed to the diminishing surface area of the Pu and a reduction in the fluoride activity due to complexation with Pu. Given time (>4 h), the Pu metal may have dissolved using the original solution or a significant portion may have oxidized to PuO{sub 2}. If the metal oxidized to PuO{sub 2}, we expect little of the material would have dissolved due to the fluoride complexation and the low HNO{sub 3} concentration. The mass of Pu dissolved in the second experiment scales to the dissolution of 309 g of Pu in the HB-Line dissolvers. Based on the data from the Pu/Ta dissolution experiments we recommend the use of 4 M HNO{sub 3} containing 0.175 M KF for the dissolution of 300 g of Pu metal in the 15 L HB-Line dissolver. A dissolution temperature of nominally 95 C should allow for essentially complete dissolution of the metal in 6 h. Although the H{sub 2} concentration in the offgas from the experiments was at or below the detection limit of the gas chromatograph (GC) used in these experiments, small concentrations (<3 vol %) of H{sub 2} are typically produced in the offgas during Pu metal dissolutions. Therefore, appropriate controls must be established to address the small H

  8. Determinants of marriage dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim, Mohd Amirul Rafiq Abu; Shafie, Siti Aishah Mohd; Hadi, Az'lina Abdul; Razali, Nornadiah Mohd; Azid @ Maarof, Nur Niswah Naslina

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, the number of divorce cases among Muslim couples is very worrisome whereby the total cases reported in 2013 increased by half of the total cases reported in the previous year. The questions on the true key factors of dissolution of marriage continue to arise. Thus, the objective of this study is to reveal the factors that contribute to the dissolution of marriage. A total of 181 cases and ten potential determinants were included in this study. The potential determinants considered were age at marriage of husband and wife, educational level of husband and wife, employment status of husband and wife, income of husband and wife, the number of children and the presence at a counseling session. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the data. The findings revealed that four determinants, namely the income of husband and wife, number of children and the presence at a counselling session were significant in predicting the likelihood of divorce among Muslim couples.

  9. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  10. Salicylic acid-induced abiotic stress tolerance and underlying mechanisms in plants

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Iqbal R.; Fatma, Mehar; Per, Tasir S.; Anjum, Naser A.; Khan, Nafees A.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses (such as metals/metalloids, salinity, ozone, UV-B radiation, extreme temperatures, and drought) are among the most challenging threats to agricultural system and economic yield of crop plants. These stresses (in isolation and/or combination) induce numerous adverse effects in plants, impair biochemical/physiological and molecular processes, and eventually cause severe reductions in plant growth, development and overall productivity. Phytohormones have been recognized as a strong tool for sustainably alleviating adverse effects of abiotic stresses in crop plants. In particular, the significance of salicylic acid (SA) has been increasingly recognized in improved plant abiotic stress-tolerance via SA-mediated control of major plant-metabolic processes. However, the basic biochemical/physiological and molecular mechanisms that potentially underpin SA-induced plant-tolerance to major abiotic stresses remain least discussed. Based on recent reports, this paper: (a) overviews historical background and biosynthesis of SA under both optimal and stressful environments in plants; (b) critically appraises the role of SA in plants exposed to major abiotic stresses; (c) cross-talks potential mechanisms potentially governing SA-induced plant abiotic stress-tolerance; and finally (d) briefly highlights major aspects so far unexplored in the current context. PMID:26175738

  11. Plutonium dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Vest, Michael A.; Fink, Samuel D.; Karraker, David G.; Moore, Edwin N.; Holcomb, H. Perry

    1996-01-01

    A two-step process for dissolving plutonium metal, which two steps can be carried out sequentially or simultaneously. Plutonium metal is exposed to a first mixture containing approximately 1.0M-1.67M sulfamic acid and 0.0025M-0.1M fluoride, the mixture having been heated to a temperature between 45.degree. C. and 70.degree. C. The mixture will dissolve a first portion of the plutonium metal but leave a portion of the plutonium in an oxide residue. Then, a mineral acid and additional fluoride are added to dissolve the residue. Alteratively, nitric acid in a concentration between approximately 0.05M and 0.067M is added to the first mixture to dissolve the residue as it is produced. Hydrogen released during the dissolution process is diluted with nitrogen.

  12. Plutonium dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Vest, M.A.; Fink, S.D.; Karraker, D.G.; Moore, E.N.; Holcomb, H.P.

    1994-01-01

    A two-step process for dissolving Pu metal is disclosed in which two steps can be carried out sequentially or simultaneously. Pu metal is exposed to a first mixture of 1.0-1.67 M sulfamic acid and 0.0025-0.1 M fluoride, the mixture having been heated to 45-70 C. The mixture will dissolve a first portion of the Pu metal but leave a portion of the Pu in an oxide residue. Then, a mineral acid and additional fluoride are added to dissolve the residue. Alternatively, nitric acid between 0.05 and 0.067 M is added to the first mixture to dissolve the residue as it is produced. Hydrogen released during the dissolution is diluted with nitrogen.

  13. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: METAL-ENHANCED ABIOTIC DEGRADATION TECHNOLOGY - ENVIROMETAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    EnviroMetal Technologies, Inc. (ETI), of Guelph, ON, Canada, has developed the metal-enhanced abiotic degradation technology to treat halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOC) in water. A reactive, zero-valent, granular iron medium causes reductive dehalogenation of VOCs yield...

  14. Abiotic transformation of dinitrophenols under sulfate-reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gui, L.; Bouwer, E.J.

    1996-10-01

    Dinitrophenols are hazardous chemicals commonly detected in the environment. Little is known about their fate under sulfate-reducing conditions (SRC) where H{sub 2}S level is elevated due to microbial activity. Dinitrophenols are susceptible to both biotic and abiotic transformation under SRC. The objectives of this research are to investigate dinitrophenol transformation using hydrogen sulfide as a reductant, and to determine factors that affect the abiotic transformation kinetics under SRC. Dinitrophenols studied were 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), 4,6-dinitro-o-cresol (DNOC), and 2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol (dinoseb). All three dinitrophenols were transformed through an ortho-nitroreduction pathway. In the presence of H{sub 2}S as the bulk reductant and a small amount of trace metals (10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7} M), pseudo-first-order kinetics was observed. Addition of yeast extract (YE, 0.02%) enhanced dinoseb transformation rate significantly. An increase in HS concentration resulted in Michaelis-Menton type kinetics for dinoseb in the presence of trace metals and YE, suggesting that trace metals and YE functioned as electron mediators.

  15. One-dimensional model for biogeochemical interactions and permeability reduction in soils during leachate permeation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Naresh; Islam, Jahangir

    2008-02-01

    This paper uses the findings from a column study to develop a reactive model for exploring the interactions occurring in leachate-contaminated soils. The changes occurring in the concentrations of acetic acid, sulphate, suspended and attached biomass, Fe(II), Mn(II), calcium, carbonate ions, and pH in the column are assessed. The mathematical model considers geochemical equilibrium, kinetic biodegradation, precipitation-dissolution reactions, bacterial and substrate transport, and permeability reduction arising from bacterial growth and gas production. A two-step sequential operator splitting method is used to solve the coupled transport and biogeochemical reaction equations. The model gives satisfactory fits to experimental data and the simulations show that the transport of metals in soil is controlled by multiple competing biotic and abiotic reactions. These findings suggest that bioaccumulation and gas formation, compared to chemical precipitation, have a larger influence on hydraulic conductivity reduction.

  16. ABIOTIC REDUCTION AND DETOXIFICATION OF CHROMATE PRESENT IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Theoretical and experimental research has supported the assertion that Cr(III) species are the most stable, immobile, and nontoxic forms of chromium and that they may form rapidly when adequate reducing agents are introduced in an oxidized soil environment. The objective of this ...

  17. Siderophore-promoted dissolution of cobalt from hydroxide minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yuqiang; Hesterberg, Dean L.; Duckworth, Owen W.

    2010-05-01

    Recent research has revealed that siderophores, a class of biogenic ligands with high affinities for Fe(III), can also strongly complex Co(III), an element essential to the normal metabolic function of microbes and animals. This study was conducted to quantify the rates and identify the products and mechanisms of the siderophore-promoted dissolution of Co from synthetic Co-bearing minerals. The dissolution reactions of heterogenite (CoOOH) and four Co-substituted goethites (Co-FeOOH) containing different Co concentrations were investigated in the presence of a trihydroxamate siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFOB), using batch and flow-through experiments. Results showed that DFOB-promoted dissolution of Co from Co-bearing minerals may occur via pH-dependent ligand-promoted or reductive dissolution mechanisms. For heterogenite, ligand-promoted dissolution was the dominant pathway at neutral to alkaline pH, while production of dissolved Co(II) for pH <6. It was not possible from our data to decouple the separate contributions of homogenous and heterogeneous reduction reactions to the aqueous Co(II) pool. Cobalt substitution in Co-substituted goethite, possibly caused by distortion of goethite structure and increased lattice strain, resulted in enhanced total dissolution rates of both Co and Fe. The DFOB-promoted dissolution rates of Co-bearing minerals, coupled with the high affinity of Co(III) for DFOB, suggest that siderophores may be effective for increasing Co solubility, and thus possibly Co bioavailability. The results also suggest that siderophores may contribute to the mobilization of radioactive 60Co from Co-bearing mineral phases through mineral weathering and dissolution processes.

  18. Spatial and temporal distributions of Geobacter lovleyi and Dehalococcoides spp. during bioenhanced PCE-NAPL dissolution.

    PubMed

    Amos, Benjamin K; Suchomel, Eric J; Pennell, Kurt D; Löffler, Frank E

    2009-03-15

    The spatial and temporal distributions of multiple reductively dechlorinating bacteria were simultaneously assessed in a one-dimensional sand column containing a tetrachloroethene (PCE) nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source and associated plume zones. The column was uniformly inoculated with a PCE-to-ethene dechlorinating microbial consortium that contained Dehalococcoides spp., Dehalobacter spp., and Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ. Geobacter and Dehalococcoides populations grew and colonized the column material, including the mixed-NAPL (0.25 mol/mol PCE in hexadecane) source zone. In contrast, Dehalobacter cells did not colonize the porous column material, and planktonic Dehalobacter cell titers remained below the detection limit of ca. 2.6 x 10(2) cells/mL throughout the experiment. Significant PCE dechlorination was observed and resulted in bioenhanced NAPL dissolution up to 21-fold (maximum) and 5.2-fold (cumulative) relative to abiotic dissolution. cis-1,2-Dichloroethene (cis-DCE) wasthe primary dechlorination product although vinyl chloride (VC) was also formed throughout the experiment. Ethene production occurred after significant depletion of PCE from the NAPL and when cis-DCE concentrations dropped below 6 microM. Data obtained after increasing the column residence time from 1.1 to 2.8 days and introducing a VC pulse to the column indicated that both the residence time and cis-DCE inhibition limited significant VC and ethene production. Although both Geobacter and Dehalococcoides cells were present and active in the mixed-NAPL source zone and plume region, Geobacter cell numbers were typically more than 1 order of magnitude higher than Dehalococcoides cell numbers, which is consistent with the production of predominantly cis-DCE. Analysis of both liquid- and solid-phase samples indicated that Geobacter cells grew and remained attached to the porous medium within the source zone but were largely planktonic in the plume region. In contrast Dehalococcoides cell

  19. Pathways for abiotic organic synthesis at submarine hydrothermal fields

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Jill M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; German, Christopher R.; Sylva, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Arguments for an abiotic origin of low-molecular weight organic compounds in deep-sea hot springs are compelling owing to implications for the sustenance of deep biosphere microbial communities and their potential role in the origin of life. Theory predicts that warm H2-rich fluids, like those emanating from serpentinizing hydrothermal systems, create a favorable thermodynamic drive for the abiotic generation of organic compounds from inorganic precursors. Here, we constrain two distinct reaction pathways for abiotic organic synthesis in the natural environment at the Von Damm hydrothermal field and delineate spatially where inorganic carbon is converted into bioavailable reduced carbon. We reveal that carbon transformation reactions in a single system can progress over hours, days, and up to thousands of years. Previous studies have suggested that CH4 and higher hydrocarbons in ultramafic hydrothermal systems were dependent on H2 generation during active serpentinization. Rather, our results indicate that CH4 found in vent fluids is formed in H2-rich fluid inclusions, and higher n-alkanes may likely be derived from the same source. This finding implies that, in contrast with current paradigms, these compounds may form independently of actively circulating serpentinizing fluids in ultramafic-influenced systems. Conversely, widespread production of formate by ΣCO2 reduction at Von Damm occurs rapidly during shallow subsurface mixing of the same fluids, which may support anaerobic methanogenesis. Our finding of abiogenic formate in deep-sea hot springs has significant implications for microbial life strategies in the present-day deep biosphere as well as early life on Earth and beyond. PMID:26056279

  20. Pathways for abiotic organic synthesis at submarine hydrothermal fields.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Jill M; Seewald, Jeffrey S; German, Christopher R; Sylva, Sean P

    2015-06-23

    Arguments for an abiotic origin of low-molecular weight organic compounds in deep-sea hot springs are compelling owing to implications for the sustenance of deep biosphere microbial communities and their potential role in the origin of life. Theory predicts that warm H2-rich fluids, like those emanating from serpentinizing hydrothermal systems, create a favorable thermodynamic drive for the abiotic generation of organic compounds from inorganic precursors. Here, we constrain two distinct reaction pathways for abiotic organic synthesis in the natural environment at the Von Damm hydrothermal field and delineate spatially where inorganic carbon is converted into bioavailable reduced carbon. We reveal that carbon transformation reactions in a single system can progress over hours, days, and up to thousands of years. Previous studies have suggested that CH4 and higher hydrocarbons in ultramafic hydrothermal systems were dependent on H2 generation during active serpentinization. Rather, our results indicate that CH4 found in vent fluids is formed in H2-rich fluid inclusions, and higher n-alkanes may likely be derived from the same source. This finding implies that, in contrast with current paradigms, these compounds may form independently of actively circulating serpentinizing fluids in ultramafic-influenced systems. Conversely, widespread production of formate by ΣCO2 reduction at Von Damm occurs rapidly during shallow subsurface mixing of the same fluids, which may support anaerobic methanogenesis. Our finding of abiogenic formate in deep-sea hot springs has significant implications for microbial life strategies in the present-day deep biosphere as well as early life on Earth and beyond. PMID:26056279

  1. Salicylic acid-induced abiotic stress tolerance and underlying mechanisms in plants.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Iqbal R; Fatma, Mehar; Per, Tasir S; Anjum, Naser A; Khan, Nafees A

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses (such as metals/metalloids, salinity, ozone, UV-B radiation, extreme temperatures, and drought) are among the most challenging threats to agricultural system and economic yield of crop plants. These stresses (in isolation and/or combination) induce numerous adverse effects in plants, impair biochemical/physiological and molecular processes, and eventually cause severe reductions in plant growth, development and overall productivity. Phytohormones have been recognized as a strong tool for sustainably alleviating adverse effects of abiotic stresses in crop plants. In particular, the significance of salicylic acid (SA) has been increasingly recognized in improved plant abiotic stress-tolerance via SA-mediated control of major plant-metabolic processes. However, the basic biochemical/physiological and molecular mechanisms that potentially underpin SA-induced plant-tolerance to major abiotic stresses remain least discussed. Based on recent reports, this paper: (a) overviews historical background and biosynthesis of SA under both optimal and stressful environments in plants; (b) critically appraises the role of SA in plants exposed to major abiotic stresses; PMID:26175738

  2. ABIOTIC ORGANIC REACTIONS AT MINERAL SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abiotic organic reactions, such as hydrolysis, elimination, substitution, redox, and polymerization reactions, can be influenced by surfaces of clay and primary minerals, and of metal oxides. This influence is due to adsorption of the reactants to surface Lewis and Bronsted sites...

  3. Abiotic Bromination of Soil Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Leri, Alessandra C; Ravel, Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Biogeochemical transformations of plant-derived soil organic matter (SOM) involve complex abiotic and microbially mediated reactions. One such reaction is halogenation, which occurs naturally in the soil environment and has been associated with enzymatic activity of decomposer organisms. Building on a recent finding that naturally produced organobromine is ubiquitous in SOM, we hypothesized that inorganic bromide could be subject to abiotic oxidations resulting in bromination of SOM. Through lab-based degradation treatments of plant material and soil humus, we have shown that abiotic bromination of particulate organic matter occurs in the presence of a range of inorganic oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide and assorted forms of ferric iron, producing both aliphatic and aromatic forms of organobromine. Bromination of oak and pine litter is limited primarily by bromide concentration. Fresh plant material is more susceptible to bromination than decayed litter and soil humus, due to a labile pool of mainly aliphatic compounds that break down during early stages of SOM formation. As the first evidence of abiotic bromination of particulate SOM, this study identifies a mechanistic source of the natural organobromine in humic substances and the soil organic horizon. Formation of organobromine through oxidative treatments of plant material also provides insights into the relative stability of aromatic and aliphatic components of SOM. PMID:26468620

  4. Alunite dissolution rates: Dissolution mechanisms and implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. L.; Elwood Madden, A. S.; Phillips-Lander, C. M.; Pritchett, B. N.; Elwood Madden, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Alunite (KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6) is a hydrated aluminous sulfate mineral associated with acidic, oxidizing aqueous environments on Earth. Additionally, orbiting spacecraft and rovers on Mars have reported spectral data that indicate a range of mono- and polyhydrated sulfate phases and hydroxysulfate phases, suggesting such conditions also existed on Mars in the past. This study examines alunite dissolution rates in aqueous systems with varying pH, temperature, and solution chemistry conditions. Alunite dissolution rates in dilute solutions are 2-3 orders of magnitude slower than jarosite dissolution rates measured under analogous conditions. Similar to jarosite, alunite dissolution rates vary as a function of activity of H+ and OH- following the rate law log r (mol m-2 s-1) = -0.133(±0.02)pH - 10.65(±0.07) at pH < 5 and log r = 0.194(±0.04)pH - 12.53(±0.26) at pH > 5. However, minimum alunite dissolution rates are shifted to higher pH (5-5.5), likely due to differences in Fe and Al speciation. Alunite and jarosite rates converge in saturated NaCl and CaCl2 brines as the activity of water decreases, suggesting that differences in water exchange rates with Fe3+ and Al3+ control dissolution rates in dilute solutions, while metal-Cl- complexation occurs at similar rates within the brines. Particle lifetimes based on measured dissolution rates in dilute solutions show that alunite particles are expected to be preserved two orders of magnitude longer than jarosite particles over a range of pH and temperature conditions. In particular, alunite is more likely to be preserved in neutral to moderately alkaline systems compared to jarosite, which is expected to be preserved in more acidic conditions. Alunite dissolution produced amorphous Al-rich alteration products at moderate to high pH. Unlike jarosite, alunite dissolution does not show a clear trend as a function of temperature; alunite dissolution rates do not increase with increasing temperature, likely due to lower

  5. Arsenic release from flooded paddy soils is influenced by speciation, Eh, pH, and iron dissolution.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, N; Nakamura, T; Dong, D; Takahashi, Y; Amachi, S; Makino, T

    2011-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is highly mobilized when paddy soil is flooded, causing increased uptake of As by rice. We investigated factors controlling soil-to-solution partitioning of As under anaerobic conditions. Changes in As and iron (Fe) speciation due to flooded incubation of two paddy soils (soils A and B) were investigated by HPLC/ICP-MS and XANES. The flooded incubation resulted in a decrease in Eh, a rise in pH, and an increase in the As(III) fraction in the soil solid phase up to 80% of the total As in the soils. The solution-to-soil ratio of As(III) and As(V) (R(L/S)) increased with pH due to the flooded incubation. The R(L/S) for As(III) was higher than that for As(V), indicating that As(III) was more readily released from soil to solution than was As(V). Despite the small differences in As concentrations between the two soils, the amount of As dissolved by anaerobic incubation was lower in soil A. With the development of anaerobic conditions, Fe(II) remained in the soil solid phase as the secondary mineral siderite, and a smaller amount of Fe was dissolved from soil A than from soil B. The dissolution of Fe minerals rather than redox reaction of As(V) to As(III) explained the different dissolution amounts of As in the two paddy soils. Anaerobic incubation for 30 d after the incomplete suppression of microbial activity caused a drop in Eh. However, this decline in Eh did not induce the transformation of As(V) to As(III) in either the soil solid or solution phases, and the dissolution of As was limited. Microbial activity was necessary for the reductive reaction of As(V) to As(III) even when Eh reached the condition necessary for the dominance of As(III). Ratios of released As to Fe from the soils were decreased with incubation time during both anaerobic incubation and abiotic dissolution by sodium ascorbate, suggesting that a larger amount of As was associated with an easily soluble fraction of Fe (hydr) oxide in amorphous phase and/or smaller particles. PMID

  6. Statistical comparison of dissolution profiles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Snee, Ronald D; Keyvan, Golshid; Muzzio, Fernando J

    2016-05-01

    Statistical methods to assess similarity of dissolution profiles are introduced. Sixteen groups of dissolution profiles from a full factorial design were used to demonstrate implementation details. Variables in the design include drug strength, tablet stability time, and dissolution testing condition. The 16 groups were considered similar when compared using the similarity factor f2 (f2 > 50). However, multivariate ANOVA (MANOVA) repeated measures suggested statistical differences. A modified principal component analysis (PCA) was used to describe the dissolution curves in terms of level and shape. The advantage of the modified PCA approach is that the calculated shape principal components will not be confounded by level effect. Effect size test using omega-squared was also used for dissolution comparisons. Effects indicated by omega-squared are independent of sample size and are a necessary supplement to p value reported from the MANOVA table. Methods to compare multiple groups show that product strength and dissolution testing condition had significant effects on both level and shape. For pairwise analysis, a post-hoc analysis using Tukey's method categorized three similar groups, and was consistent with level-shape analysis. All these methods provide valuable information that is missed using f2 method alone to compare average profiles. The improved statistical analysis approach introduced here enables one to better ascertain both statistical significance and clinical relevance, supporting more objective regulatory decisions. PMID:26294289

  7. Interactions between gravity currents and convective dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elenius, M. T.; Voskov, D. V.; Tchelepi, H. A.

    2015-09-01

    Geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) is a promising technology for reducing atmospheric emissions. The large discrepancy in the time- and length-scales between up-dip migration of buoyant supercritical CO2 and the sinking fingers of dissolved CO2 poses a challenge for numerical simulations aimed at describing the fate of the plume. Hence, several investigators have suggested methods to simplify the problem, but to date there has been no reference solution with which these simplified models can be compared. We investigate the full problem of Darcy-based two-phase flow with gravity-current propagation and miscible convective mixing, using high-resolution numerical simulations. We build on recent developments of the Automatic Differentiation - General Purpose Research Simulator (AD-GPRS) at Stanford. The results show a CO2 plume that travels for 5000 years reaching a final distance of 14 km up-dip from the injection site. It takes another 2000 years before the CO2 is completely trapped as residual (40%) and dissolved (60%) CO2. Dissolution causes a significant reduction of the plume speed. While fingers of dissolved CO2 appear under the propagating gravity current, the resident brine does not become fully saturated with CO2 anywhere under the plume. The overall mass transfer of CO2 into the brine under the plume remains practically constant for several thousands of years. These results can be used as a benchmark for verification, or improvements, of simplified (reduced-dimensionality, upscaled) models. Our results indicate that simplified models need to account for: (i) reduced dissolution due to interaction with the plume, and (ii) gradual reduction of the local dissolution rate after the fingers begin to interact with the bottom of the aquifer.

  8. Bacterial dissolution of fluorapatite as a possible source of elevated dissolved phosphate in the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Mu-hua; Ngwenya, Bryne T.; Wang, Lin; Li, Wenchao; Olive, Valerie; Ellam, Robert M.

    2011-10-01

    In order to understand the contribution of geogenic phosphorus to lake eutrophication, we have investigated the rate and extent of fluorapatite dissolution in the presence of two common soil bacteria ( Pantoea agglomerans and Bacillus megaterium) at T = 25 °C for 26 days. The release of calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and rare earth elements (REE) under biotic and abiotic conditions was compared to investigate the effect of microorganism on apatite dissolution. The release of Ca and P was enhanced under the influence of bacteria. Apatite dissolution rates obtained from solution Ca concentration in the biotic reactors increased above error compared with abiotic controls. Chemical analysis of biomass showed that bacteria scavenged Ca, P, and REE during their growth, which lowered their fluid concentrations, leading to apparent lower release rates. The temporal evolution of pH in the reactors reflected the balance of apatite weathering, solution reactions, bacterial metabolism, and potentially secondary precipitation, which was implied in the variety of REE patterns in the biotic and abiotic reactors. Light rare earth elements (LREE) were preferentially adsorbed to cell surfaces, whereas heavy rare earth elements (HREE) were retained in the fluid phase. Decoupling of LREE and HREE could possibly be due to preferential release of HREE from apatite or selective secondary precipitation of LREE enriched phosphates, especially in the presence of bacteria. When corrected for intracellular concentrations, both biotic reactors showed high P and REE release compared with the abiotic control. We speculate that lack of this correction explains the conflicting findings about the role of bacteria in mineral weathering rates. The observation that bacteria enhance the release rates of P and REE from apatite could account for some of the phosphorus burden and metal pollution in aquatic environments.

  9. Chemical Reactivity Probes for Assessing Abiotic Natural Attenuation by Reducing Iron Minerals.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dimin; Bradley, Miranda J; Hinkle, Adrian W; Johnson, Richard L; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2016-02-16

    Increasing recognition that abiotic natural attenuation (NA) of chlorinated solvents can be important has created demand for improved methods to characterize the redox properties of the aquifer materials that are responsible for abiotic NA. This study explores one promising approach: using chemical reactivity probes (CRPs) to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of contaminant reduction by reducing iron minerals. Assays of thermodynamic CRPs were developed to determine the reduction potentials (ECRP) of suspended minerals by spectrophotometric determination of equilibrium CRP speciation and calculations using the Nernst equation. ECRP varied as expected with mineral type, mineral loading, and Fe(II) concentration. Comparison of ECRP with reduction potentials measured potentiometrically using a Pt electrode (EPt) showed that ECRP was 100-150 mV more negative than EPt. When EPt was measured with small additions of CRPs, the systematic difference between EPt and ECRP was eliminated, suggesting that these CRPs are effective mediators of electron transfer between mineral and electrode surfaces. Model contaminants (4-chloronitrobenzene, 2-chloroacetophenone, and carbon tetrachloride) were used as kinetic CRPs. The reduction rate constants of kinetic CRPs correlated well with the ECRP for mineral suspensions. Using the rate constants compiled from literature for contaminants and relative mineral reduction potentials based on ECRP measurements, qualitatively consistent trends were obtained, suggesting that CRP-based assays may be useful for estimating abiotic NA rates of contaminants in groundwater. PMID:26814150

  10. Ferrihydrite dissolution by pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic acid) and hydrolysis products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungana, Suraj; Anthony, Charles R.; Hersman, Larry E.

    2007-12-01

    Pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylate) (pdtc), a metabolic product of microorganisms, including Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas stutzeri was investigated for its ability of dissolve Fe(III)(hydr)oxides at pH 7.5. Concentration dependent dissolution of ferrihydrite under anaerobic environment showed saturation of the dissolution rate at the higher concentration of pdtc. The surface controlled ferrihydrite dissolution rate was determined to be 1.2 × 10 -6 mol m -2 h -1. Anaerobic dissolution of ferrihydrite by pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid or dipicolinic acid (dpa), a hydrolysis product of pdtc, was investigated to study the mechanism(s) involved in the pdtc facilitated ferrihydrite dissolution. These studies suggest that pdtc dissolved ferrihydrite using a reduction step, where dpa chelates the Fe reduced by a second hydrolysis product, H 2S. Dpa facilitated dissolution of ferrihydrite showed very small increase in the Fe dissolution when the concentration of external reductant, ascorbate, was doubled, suggesting the surface dynamics being dominated by the interactions between dpa and ferrihydrite. Greater than stoichiometric amounts of Fe were mobilized during dpa dissolution of ferrihydrite assisted by ascorbate and cysteine. This is attributed to the catalytic dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by the in situ generated Fe(II) in the presence of a complex former, dpa.

  11. Biological controls on dissolution of diatom frustules during their descent to the deep ocean: Lessons learned from controlled laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passow, Uta; French, Megan A.; Robert, Maya

    2011-12-01

    The majority of opal produced by diatoms dissolves during their sedimentation to the seafloor, but spatial and temporal variability of dissolution rates are large. Controlled laboratory experiments using live phytoplankton or phyto-detritus may help identify the different processes, including those that are biologically mediated or physico-chemically driven, that impact the dissolution of frustules and the aforementioned variability. Results of eight bSiO 2 dissolution experiments, seven of which were conducted at low temperatures (<6 °C) are presented within the context of earlier similar studies, and different phases of dissolution dynamics characterized. TEP concentration, aggregation and the physiological status of the diatoms determined the period during which diatoms may maintain the protective membrane that surrounds their frustule and effectively reduces or completely inhibits (lag period) dissolution for some time. Once diatoms loose the capability to maintain their protective membrane, bacterial activity compromises it. Physico-chemical dissolution, which depends on frustule structure and abiotic environmental conditions, begins once the protective membrane is damaged. The ability of diatoms to maintain their membrane, the bacterial composition and activity governing its degradation, and the physico-chemical dissolution dynamics of exposed frustules are all impacted by temperature. In our experiments instantaneous dissolution rates were not dependant on bSiO 2 concentration at low temperatures, although such a relationship was observed under otherwise identical conditions at 15 °C, implying that biotic factors rather than physico-chemical processes initially dominated dissolution at polar temperatures. Since inhibition of bSiO 2 dissolution at low temperatures was inhibited to a greater extent than organic matter degradation, we postulate that it was not reduced bacterial activity but the enhanced ability of diatoms to maintain their membrane and thus

  12. Reactive oxygen species in abiotic stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Pinja; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2010-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to accumulate during abiotic stresses, and different cellular compartments respond to them by distinctive profiles of ROS formation. In contrast to earlier views, it is becoming increasingly evident that even during stress, ROS production is not necessarily a symptom of cellular dysfunction but might represent a necessary signal in adjusting the cellular machinery to the altered conditions. ROS can modulate many signal transduction pathways, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, and ultimately influence the activity of transcription factors. However, the picture of ROS-mediated signaling is still fragmentary and the issues of ROS perception as well as the signaling specificity remain open. Here, we review some of the recent advances in plant abiotic stress signaling with emphasis on processes known to be affected heavily by ROS. PMID:20028478

  13. Abiotic immobilization/detoxification of recalcitrant organics

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, G. ); Sims, R.C. )

    1990-11-01

    In contrast to many remedial techniques that simply transfer hazardous wastes from one part of the environment to another (e.g., off-site landfilling), in situ restoration may offer a safe and cost-effective solution through transformation (to less hazardous products) or destruction of recalcitrant organics. Currently, the US Environmental Protection Agency and US Department of Energy are encouraging research that addresses the development of innovative alternatives for hazardous-waste control. One such alternative is biotic and abiotic immobilization and detoxification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNAs) as associated with the soil humification process. This paper discusses (1) the possibility of using abiotic catalysis (with manganese dioxide) to polymerize organic substances; (2) aspects associated with the thermodynamics and kinetics of the process, and (3) a simple model upon which analyses may be based. 36 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution Of Sludge Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, M.T.; Hamm, B.A.; Pike, J.A.

    2008-07-01

    High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored in aging underground storage tanks. This waste is a complex mixture of insoluble solids, referred to as sludge, and soluble salts. Continued long-term storage of these radioactive wastes poses an environmental risk. The sludge is currently being stabilized in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) through a vitrification process immobilizing the waste in a borosilicate glass matrix for long-term storage in a federal repository. Without additional treatment, the existing volume of sludge would produce nearly 8000 canisters of vitrified waste. Aluminum compounds, along with other non-radioactive components, represent a significant portion of the sludge mass currently planned for vitrification processing in DWPF. Removing the aluminum from the waste stream reduces the volume of sludge requiring vitrification and improves production rates. Treating the sludge with a concentrated sodium hydroxide (caustic) solution at elevated temperatures (>90 deg. C) to remove aluminum is part of an overall sludge mass reduction effort to reduce the number of vitrified canisters, shorten the life cycle for the HLW system, and reduce the risk associated with the long term storage of radioactive wastes at SRS. A projected reduction of nearly 900 canisters will be achieved by performing aluminum dissolution on six targeted sludge batches; however, a project to develop and install equipment will not be ready for operation until 2013. The associated upgrades necessary to implement a high temperature process in existing facilities are costly and present many technical challenges. Efforts to better understand the characteristics of the sludge mass and dissolution kinetics are warranted to overcome these challenges. Opportunities to further reduce the amount of vitrified waste and increase production rates should also be pursued. Sludge staged in Tank 51 as the next sludge batch for feed to DWPF consisted

  15. Alginic Acid Accelerates Calcite Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, T. D.; Duckworth, O. W.; McNamara, C. J.; Martin, S. T.; Mitchell, R.

    2003-12-01

    Accelerated carbonate weathering through biological activity affects both geochemical cycling and the local pH and alkalinity of terrestrial and marine waters. Microbes affect carbonate dissolution through metabolic activity, production of acidic or chelating exudates, and cation binding by cell walls. Dissolution occurs within microbial biofilms - communities of microorganisms attached to stone in an exopolymer matrix. We investigated the effect of alginic acid, a common biological polymer produced by bacteria and algae, on calcite dissolution using a paired atomic force microscopy/flow-through reactor apparatus. The alginic acid caused up to an order of magnitude increase in dissolution rate at 3 < pH < 12. Additionally, the polymer preferentially binds to the obtuse pit steps and increases step velocity. We propose that the polymer is actively chelating surficial cations reducing the activation energy and increasing dissolution rate. The role of biologically produced polymers in mineral weathering is important in the protection of cultural heritage materials and understanding of marine and terrestrial systems.

  16. Mesogenetic dissolution: Its role in porosity development in carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, S.J. ); Harris, P.M. )

    1992-05-01

    Models of porosity formation in carbonate rocks have stressed subaerial exposure and attendant shallow meteoric diagenesis. Porosity formation also occurs in deep-burial, or mesogenetic, settings as a result of dissolution enlargement of preexisting pores (porosity enhancement) and creation of new pore systems. Brines charged with organic acids, carbon dioxide, and/or hydrogen sulfide derived from organic matter diagenesis and thermochemical sulfate reduction are the likely fluids causing significant mesogenetic dissolution. Enhanced and newly created mesogenetic pore types can mimic pore types formed in shallow meteoric environments, and therefore, the mesogenetic origin of some porosity may go unrecognized.

  17. Cross-tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants: a focus on resistance to aphid infestation.

    PubMed

    Foyer, Christine H; Rasool, Brwa; Davey, Jack W; Hancock, Robert D

    2016-03-01

    Plants co-evolved with an enormous variety of microbial pathogens and insect herbivores under daily and seasonal variations in abiotic environmental conditions. Hence, plant cells display a high capacity to respond to diverse stresses through a flexible and finely balanced response network that involves components such as reduction-oxidation (redox) signalling pathways, stress hormones and growth regulators, as well as calcium and protein kinase cascades. Biotic and abiotic stress responses use common signals, pathways and triggers leading to cross-tolerance phenomena, whereby exposure to one type of stress can activate plant responses that facilitate tolerance to several different types of stress. While the acclimation mechanisms and adaptive responses that facilitate responses to single biotic and abiotic stresses have been extensively characterized, relatively little information is available on the dynamic aspects of combined biotic/abiotic stress response. In this review, we consider how the abiotic environment influences plant responses to attack by phloem-feeding aphids. Unravelling the signalling cascades that underpin cross-tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses will allow the identification of new targets for increasing environmental resilience in crops. PMID:26936830

  18. Principles of Calcite Dissolution in Human and Artificial Otoconia

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Leif Erik; Blödow, Alexander; Buder, Jana; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Human otoconia provide mechanical stimuli to deflect hair cells of the vestibular sensory epithelium for purposes of detecting linear acceleration and head tilts. During lifetime, the volume and number of otoconia are gradually reduced. In a process of degeneration morphological changes occur. Structural changes in human otoconia are assumed to cause vertigo and balance disorders such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). The aim of this study was to investigate the main principles of morphological changes in human otoconia in dissolution experiments by exposure to hydrochloric acid, EDTA, demineralized water and completely purified water respectively. For comparison reasons artificial (biomimetic) otoconia (calcite gelatin nanocomposits) and natural calcite were used. Morphological changes were detected in time steps by the use of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Under in vitro conditions three main dissolution mechanisms were identified as causing characteristic morphological changes of the specimen under consideration: pH drops in the acidic range, complex formation with calcium ions and changes of ion concentrations in the vicinity of otoconia. Shifts in pH cause a more uniform reduction of otoconia size (isotropic dissolution) whereas complexation reactions and changes of the ionic concentrations within the surrounding medium bring about preferred attacks at specific areas (anisotropic dissolution) of human and artificial otoconia. Owing to successive reduction of material, all the dissolution mechanisms finally produce fragments and remnants of otoconia. It can be assumed that the organic component of otoconia is not significantly attacked under the given conditions. Artificial otoconia serve as a suitable model system mimicking chemical attacks on biogenic specimens. The underlying principles of calcite dissolution under in vitro conditions may play a role in otoconia degeneration processes such as BPPV. PMID:25048115

  19. Effects of Sulfidation on ZnO Nanoparticle Dissolution and Aggregation in Sulfate-Containing Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Kashif; Lee, Dae Sung

    2015-09-01

    Industrial metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have recently attracted considerable attention because of their potentially hazardous impacts on ecosystems and microbial colonies in biological wastewater treatment plants. NPs dissolution and aggregation greatly determine the fate of such NPs in the environment and are relevant to their potential toxicities. Hence, we investigated the effects of sulfate on the dissolution and aggregation of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs). In addition, ZnO-NPs were sulfidized at different sulfide concentrations in an anaerobic abiotic environment to investigate the effects of sulfidation on ZnO-NPs aggregation and solubility. Increasing the sulfate concentration from 0 to 200 mg/L significantly increased ZnO-NPs dissolution from 3.99 to 6.18 mg Zn(2+)/L, whereas ZnO-NPs sulfidation reduced the Zn(2+) dissolution rate from 1.82 mg Zn(2+)/L for pristine ZnO-NPs to 0.59 mg Zn2+/L for sulfidized ones. Increasing the sulfate concentration and the sulfidation of the ZnO-NPs induced aggregation by suppressing electrostatic repulsion. The results indicate that the sulfidation of ZnO-NPs prevents the particle dissolution and is an attractive method of reducing their antimicrobial activity. PMID:26716331

  20. Dissolution of Biogenic and Synthetic UO2 under Varied Reducing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    ULRICH, KAI – UWE; SINGH, ABHAS; SCHOFIELD, ELEANOR J.; BARGAR, JOHN R.; VEERAMANI, HARISH; SHARP, JONATHAN O.; LATMANI, RIZLAN BERNIER -; GIAMMAR, DANIEL E.

    2008-01-01

    The chemical stability of biogenic UO2, a nanoparticulate product of environmental bioremediation, may be impacted by the particles’ surface free energy, structural defects, and compositional variability in analogy to abiotic UO2+x (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.25). This study quantifies and compares intrinsic solubility and dissolution rate constants of biogenic nano-UO2 and synthetic bulk UO2.00, taking molecular-scale structure into account. Rates were determined under anoxic conditions as a function of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon in continuous-flow experiments. The dissolution rates of biogenic and synthetic UO2 solids were lowest at near neutral pH and increased with decreasing pH. Similar surface area-normalized rates of biogenic and synthetic UO2 suggest comparable reactive surface site densities. This finding is consistent with the identified structural homology of biogenic UO2 and stoichiometric UO2.00. Compared to carbonate-free anoxic conditions, dissolved inorganic carbon accelerated the dissolution rate of biogenic UO2 by 3 orders of magnitude. This phenomenon suggests continuous surface oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI), with detachment of U(VI) as the rate-determining step in dissolution. Although reducing conditions were maintained throughout the experiments, the UO2 surface can be oxidized by water and radiogenic oxidants. Even in anoxic aquifers, UO2 dissolution may be controlled by surface U(VI) rather than U(IV) phases. PMID:18754482

  1. Brokenhearts: Dissolution of Romantic Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeker, F. B.; La Fong, Carl

    Results of an investigation examining the dissolution of romantic relationships are analyzed. Men and women (N=105) who had ended romantic relationships were surveyed in structured individual interviews. Commonalities and differences in respondents' perceptions of the experience were examined. Specific tests were made of a corollary to Waller's…

  2. Optimizing dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornet, Aurélien; Jannin, Sami

    2016-03-01

    This article is a short review of some of our recent developments in dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP). We present the basic principles of d-DNP, and motivate our choice to step away from conventional approaches. We then introduce a modified d-DNP recipe that can be summed up as follows:

  3. Optimizing dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Bornet, Aurélien; Jannin, Sami

    2016-03-01

    This article is a short review of some of our recent developments in dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP). We present the basic principles of d-DNP, and motivate our choice to step away from conventional approaches. We then introduce a modified d-DNP recipe that can be summed up as follows. PMID:26920826

  4. In vitro dissolution methodology, mini-Gastrointestinal Simulator (mGIS), predicts better in vivo dissolution of a weak base drug, dasatinib.

    PubMed

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Susumu; Matsui, Kazuki; Amidon, Gregory E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-08-30

    USP apparatus I and II are gold standard methodologies for determining the in vitro dissolution profiles of test drugs. However, it is difficult to use in vitro dissolution results to predict in vivo dissolution, particularly the pH-dependent solubility of weak acid and base drugs, because the USP apparatus contains one vessel with a fixed pH for the test drug, limiting insight into in vivo drug dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs. This discrepancy underscores the need to develop new in vitro dissolution methodology that better predicts in vivo response to assure the therapeutic efficacy and safety of oral drug products. Thus, the development of the in vivo predictive dissolution (IPD) methodology is necessitated. The major goals of in vitro dissolution are to ensure the performance of oral drug products and the support of drug formulation design, including bioequivalence (BE). Orally administered anticancer drugs, such as dasatinib and erlotinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), are used to treat various types of cancer. These drugs are weak bases that exhibit pH-dependent and high solubility in the acidic stomach and low solubility in the small intestine (>pH 6.0). Therefore, these drugs supersaturate and/or precipitate when they move from the stomach to the small intestine. Also of importance, gastric acidity for cancer patients may be altered with aging (reduction of gastric fluid secretion) and/or co-administration of acid-reducing agents. These may result in changes to the dissolution profiles of weak base and the reduction of drug absorption and efficacy. In vitro dissolution methodologies that assess the impact of these physiological changes in the GI condition are expected to better predict in vivo dissolution of oral medications for patients and, hence, better assess efficacy, toxicity and safety concerns. The objective of this present study is to determine the initial conditions for a mini-Gastrointestinal Simulator (mGIS) to assess in vivo

  5. Formation of Intermediate Carbon Phases in Hydrothermal Abiotic Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Q.; Foustoukos, D. I.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2005-12-01

    With high dissolved concentrations of methane and other hydrocarbon species revealed at the Rainbow and Logatchev vent systems on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, it is essential to better understand reaction pathways of abiotic organic synthesis in hydrothermal systems. Thus, we performed a hydrothermal carbon reduction experiment with 13C labeled carbon source at temperature and pressure conditions that approximate those inferred for ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems. Pentlandite, a common alteration mineral phase in subseafloor reaction zones, acted as a potential catalyst. Surface analysis techniques (XPS and ToF-SIMS) were used to characterize intermediate carbon species within this process. Time series dissolved H2 and H2S concentrations indicated thermodynamic equilibrium. Dissolved H2 and H2S concentrations of 13 and 2 mmol/kg, respectively, are approximately equivalent to measured values in Rainbow and Logatchev hydrothermal systems. Isotopically pure 13C methane and other alkane species (C2H6 and C3H8) were observed throughout the experiment, and attained steady state conditions. XPS analysis on mineral product surface indicated carbon enrichment on mineral surface following reaction. The majority of surface carbon involves species containing C-C or C-H bonds, such as alkyl or methylene groups. Alcohol and carboxyl groups in fewer amounts were also observed. ToF-SIMS analysis, which can offer isotope identification with high mass resolution, showed that most of these carbon species were 13C-labeled. Unlike gas phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, no carbide was observed on mineral product surface during the experiment. Therefore, a reaction pathway is proposed for formation of dissolved linear alkane species in hydrothermal abiotic organic synthesis, where oxygen-bearing organic compounds are expected to form in aqueous products by way of alcohol and carboxyl groups on mineral catalyst surface.

  6. Enzymatic activity in the presence of surfactants commonly used in dissolution media, Part 1: Pepsin.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Maria L; Marques, Margareth R; Olivera Me, Maria E; Stippler, Erika S

    2016-01-01

    The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) General Chapters Dissolution 〈711〉 and Disintegration and Dissolution of Dietary Supplements 〈2040〉 allows the use of enzymes in dissolution media when gelatin capsules do not conform to dissolution specifications due to cross linking. Possible interactions between enzymes and surfactants when used together in dissolution media could result in loss of the enzymatic activity. Pepsin is an enzyme commonly used in dissolution media, and in this work, the activity of pepsin was determined in the presence of different surfactants as usually found in case of dissolution tests of certain gelatin capsule formulations. Pepsin enzymatic activity was determined according to the Ninth Edition of the Food Chemicals Codex (FCC) 9 method, in dissolution conditions: simulated gastric fluid, 37 °C and 50 rpm. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), polysorbate 80 (Tween 80) and octoxynol 9 (Triton X100) in concentrations above and below their critical micellar concentrations were selected. Results showed a significant reduction in the activity of pepsin at all the concentrations of SDS assayed. On the contrary, CTAB, Tween 80, and Triton X100 did not alter the enzymatic activity at of pepsin any of the concentration assayed. This data demonstrates a rational selection of the surfactant to be used when pepsin is required in dissolution test. PMID:27047734

  7. Enzymatic activity in the presence of surfactants commonly used in dissolution media, Part 1: Pepsin

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Maria L; Marques, Margareth R; Olivera ME, Maria E; Stippler, Erika S

    2016-01-01

    The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) General Chapters Dissolution 〈711〉 and Disintegration and Dissolution of Dietary Supplements 〈2040〉 allows the use of enzymes in dissolution media when gelatin capsules do not conform to dissolution specifications due to cross linking. Possible interactions between enzymes and surfactants when used together in dissolution media could result in loss of the enzymatic activity. Pepsin is an enzyme commonly used in dissolution media, and in this work, the activity of pepsin was determined in the presence of different surfactants as usually found in case of dissolution tests of certain gelatin capsule formulations. Pepsin enzymatic activity was determined according to the Ninth Edition of the Food Chemicals Codex (FCC) 9 method, in dissolution conditions: simulated gastric fluid, 37 °C and 50 rpm. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), polysorbate 80 (Tween 80) and octoxynol 9 (Triton X100) in concentrations above and below their critical micellar concentrations were selected. Results showed a significant reduction in the activity of pepsin at all the concentrations of SDS assayed. On the contrary, CTAB, Tween 80, and Triton X100 did not alter the enzymatic activity at of pepsin any of the concentration assayed. This data demonstrates a rational selection of the surfactant to be used when pepsin is required in dissolution test. PMID:27047734

  8. Controls by saturation state on etch pit formation during calcite dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, H. Henry

    2004-01-01

    Dissolution experiments were conducted on {101¯4} cleavage faces of calcite at various under-saturations to determine how the saturation state controls etch pit formation. Experimental observations were made by using in situ fluid cell Atomic Force Microscopy. Three dissolution modes were observed. When the saturation index Ω > 0.541, no etch pit formation was seen and dissolution primarily occurred at existing steps. When Ω decreased to Ω c = 0.541-0.410, the first visible pits appeared and continuous reduction in saturation state slowly increased the pit density on terraces while dissolution simultaneously proceeded at step edges. Finally, when the saturation state fell below Ω max = ˜0.007, a precipitous increase in pit density took place that sharply contrasted to the ordered fashion of pit formation observed at saturation conditions above this level. These observations are interpreted to be two-dimensional and unassisted pit formation at Ω < ˜0.007, defect- and step-assisted dissolution in between Ω = 0.541 and 0.007, and existing step-induced dissolution for Ω > 0.541. The values of Ω c are in good agreement with the dislocation theory's predicted critical under-saturations for pit formation at line dislocations. The occurrence of Ω max is not directly predicted but is a logical consequence of dissolution thermodynamics. These findings suggest that (1) dissolution near and far from equilibrium (i.e., Ω > Ω c, Ω < Ω max) is not controlled by dislocations, therefore (2) dislocation density should significantly impact dissolution rate only in the saturation range of Ω max < Ω < Ω c; (3) dissolution kinetics and chemical affinity of dissolution reactions should have a non-linear relationship: at sufficiently close to equilibrium, when dislocations cannot open up to form etch pits, the dissolution kinetics will be limited by the number of existing steps; at far from equilibrium, when pits are able to form in defect-free regions, the dissolution

  9. DISSOLUTION AND CRYSTALLIZATION OF CALCIUM SULFITE PLATELETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the dissolution and crystallization of calcium sulfite platelets. The rates of calcium sulfite dissolution and crystallization are important in slurry scrubbing processes for flue gas desulfurization. The rates affect the scrubber solution composition, SO2 abs...

  10. Experimental observations of dolomite dissolution in geologic carbon sequestration conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Kong, X.; Tutolo, B. M.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    One sequestration scenario proposed to reduce CO2 emissions involves injecting CO2 into saline formations or hydrocarbon reservoirs, where dolomite frequently occurs. To better understand fluid-mineral interactions in these sequestration settings, we have conducted a series of single-pass, flow-through experiments on dolomite core samples with CO2-bearing brine. An important component of the experimental design was to maintain the fabric of the rock so as to more accurately simulate fluid flow in natural dolomite-bearing systems. Seven experiments were conducted at 100°C and a pore-fluid pressure of 150 bars with a fluid containing 1 molal NaCl and 0.6 molal dissolved CO2. Flow rates ranged from 0.01 to 1 ml/min. Each experiment was terminated before dissolution breakthrough, but permeability increased by approximately an order of magnitude for all experiments. In general, Ca and Mg concentrations were initially high, but then decreased with reaction progress. We hypothesize that time-dependent changes in fluid chemistry reflect reduction in reactive surface area. Fluid chemistry also indicates preferential removal of Ba, Mn, and Sr with respect to Ca and Mg. In the extreme case, 70% of the Ba was removed from one core, while only 3% of the Ca, Mg, or the entire core mass was removed by dissolution. Ongoing work is focused on identifying elemental distributions throughout the rock to better understand the dissolution process. With fluid chemistry and BET surface area, we model dissolution rate as a function of core length using reactive transport simulations and compare our whole rock, far from equilibrium dissolution rates with analogous data reported in the literature. Finally, X-ray computed tomography images enable reconstructions of dissolution patterns, and they are being used to explore the effect of pore space heterogeneity on flow path development. Geologic carbon sequestration in dolomite will produce significant dissolution at the brine/CO2 interface

  11. SERDP ER-1421 Abiotic and Biotic Mechanisms Controlling In Situ Remediation of NDMA: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; McKinley, James P.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Devary, Brooks J.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Thompson, Karen T.

    2009-09-30

    This laboratory-scale project was initiated to investigate in situ abiotic/biotic mineralization of NDMA. Under iron-reducing conditions, aquifer sediments showed rapid abiotic NDMA degradation to dimethylamine (DMA), nitrate, formate, and finally, CO2. These are the first reported experiments of abiotic NDMA mineralization. The NDMA reactivity of these different iron phases showed that adsorbed ferrous iron was the dominant reactive phase that promoted NDMA reduction, and other ferrous phases present (siderite, iron sulfide, magnetite, structural ferrous iron in 2:1 clays) did not promote NDMA degradation. In contrast, oxic sediments that were biostimulated with propane promoted biomineralization of NDMA by a cometabolic monooxygenase enzyme process. Other monooxygenase enzyme processes were not stimulated with methane or toluene additions, and acetylene addition did not block mineralization. Although NDMA mineralization extent was the highest in oxic, biostimulated sediments (30 to 82%, compared to 10 to 26% for abiotic mineralization in reduced sediments), large 1-D column studies (high sediment/water ratio of aquifers) showed 5.6 times higher NDMA mineralization rates in reduced sediment (half-life 410 ± 147 h) than oxic biomineralization (half life 2293 ± 1866 h). Sequential reduced/oxic biostimulated sediment mineralization (half-life 3180 ± 1094 h) was also inefficient compared to reduced sediment. These promising laboratory-scale results for NDMA mineralization should be investigated at field scale. Future studies of NDMA remediation should focus on the comparison of this in situ abiotic NDMA mineralization (iron-reducing environments) to ex situ biomineralization, which has been shown successful in other studies.

  12. Dissolution patterns on caramel blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Caroline; Derr, Julien; Berhanu, Michael; Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    We investigate erosion by dissolution processes. We perform laboratory experiments on hard caramel bodies, which dissolve on a short timescale, compared to geological material such as limestone. We put a block of caramel, tilted from the horizontal, in a water tank without flow. The dissolution syrup, which is denser than pure water, sinks and the flow detaching from the surface creates patterns underneath the caramel block. These patterns result from the coupled dynamics of the flow detaching and the eroding surface and are reminiscent of scallops observed in the walls of phreatic cave passages. We investigate the mechanisms of formation of these structures and their evolution depending on several parameters such as the fluid density or the flow velocity. We finally parallel the formation of patterns on melting iceberg.

  13. Dissolution Kinetics of Alumina Calcine

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2001-09-01

    Dissolution kinetics of alumina type non-radioactive calcine was investigated as part of ongoing research that addresses permanent disposal of Idaho High Level Waste (HLW). Calcine waste was produced from the processing of nuclear fuel at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Acidic radioactive raffinates were solidified at ~500°C in a fluidized bed reactor to form the dry granular calcine material. Several Waste Management alternatives for the calcine are presented in the Idaho High Level Waste Draft EIS. The Separations Alternative addresses the processing of the calcine so that the HLW is ready for removal to a national geological repository by the year 2035. Calcine dissolution is the key front-end unit operation for the separations alternative.

  14. Stable carbon isotope analysis to distinguish biotic and abiotic degradation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane in groundwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Broholm, Mette M; Hunkeler, Daniel; Tuxen, Nina; Jeannottat, Simon; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2014-08-01

    The fate and treatability of 1,1,1-TCA by natural and enhanced reductive dechlorination was studied in laboratory microcosms. The study shows that compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) identified an alternative 1,1,1-TCA degradation pathway that cannot be explained by assuming biotic reductive dechlorination. In all biotic microcosms 1,1,1-TCA was degraded with no apparent increase in the biotic degradation product 1,1-DCA. 1,1,1-TCA degradation was documented by a clear enrichment in (13)C in all biotic microcosms, but not in the abiotic control, which suggests biotic or biotically mediated degradation. Biotic degradation by reductive dechlorination of 1,1-DCA to CA only occurred in bioaugmented microcosms and in donor stimulated microcosms with low initial 1,1,1-TCA or after significant decrease in 1,1,1-TCA concentration (after∼day 200). Hence, the primary degradation pathway for 1,1,1-TCA does not appear to be reductive dechlorination via 1,1-DCA. In the biotic microcosms, the degradation of 1,1,1-TCA occurred under iron and sulfate reducing conditions. Biotic reduction of iron and sulfate likely resulted in formation of FeS, which can abiotically degrade 1,1,1-TCA. Hence, abiotic degradation of 1,1,1-TCA mediated by biotic FeS formation constitute an explanation for the observed 1,1,1-TCA degradation. This is supported by a high 1,1,1-TCA (13)C enrichment factor consistent with abiotic degradation in biotic microcosms. 1,1-DCA carbon isotope field data suggest that this abiotic degradation of 1,1,1-TCA is a relevant process also at the field site. PMID:24559936

  15. Mass exchange during simultaneous grinding and dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Aksel'rud, G.A.; Semenishin, E.M.; Kopyt, S.Ya.; Trotskii, V.I.

    1988-03-20

    Extraction of ore components of interest has a number of disadvantages, one of which being low efficiency. Combining the grinding and dissolution steps in one apparatus makes the process more efficient. Adoption of this technology, however, requires theoretical and mathematical studies. This paper reports the kinetics of simultaneous grinding and dissolution of copper-containing minerals. Simultaneous grinding and dissolution accelerated several fold the mass transfer of components of interest in the interaction of malachite and azurite with sulfuric acid solutions. The complete dissolution time was determined by adding the experimental rates of dissolution and abrasion.

  16. Biotic and abiotic experimental identification of bacterial influence on calcium isotopic signatures.

    PubMed

    Cobert, Florian; Schmitt, Anne-Désirée; Calvaruso, Christophe; Turpault, Marie-Pierre; Lemarchand, Damien; Collignon, Christelle; Chabaux, François; Stille, Peter

    2011-10-15

    In this study, we tested experimentally the influence of plant and bacterial activities on the calcium (Ca) isotope distribution between soil solutions and plant organs. Abiotic apatite weathering experiments were performed under two different pH conditions using mineral and organic acids. Biotic experiments were performed using either apatite or Ca-enriched biotite substrates in the presence of Scots pines, inoculated or not with the rhizosphere bacterial strain Bulkholderia glathei PML1(12), or the B. glathei PML1(12) alone. For each experiment, the percolate was collected every week and analyzed for Ca concentrations and Ca isotopic ratios. No Ca isotopic fractionation was observed for the different abiotic experimental settings. This indicates that no Ca isotopic fractionation occurs during apatite dissolution, whatever the nature of the acid (mineral or organic). The main result of the biotic experiments is the 0.22 ‰ (44)Ca enrichment recorded for a solution in contact with Scots pines grown on the bacteria-free apatite substrate. In contrast, the presence of bacteria did not cause Ca isotopic fractionation of the solution collected after 14 weeks of the experiments. These preliminary results suggest that bacteria influence the Ca isotopic signatures by dissolving Ca from apatite more efficiently. Therefore, Ca isotopes might be suitable for detecting bacteria-mediated processes in soils. PMID:21913253

  17. Abiotic Methane Synthesis: Caveats and New Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, R.; Sharma, A.

    2005-12-01

    The role of mineral interaction with geochemical fluids under hydrothermal conditions has invoked models of geochemical synthesis of organic molecules at deep crustal conditions. Since Thomas Gold's (1992) hypothesis of the possibility of an abiotic organic synthesis, there have been several reports of hydrocarbon formation under high pressure and temperature conditions. Several previous experimental studies have recognized that small amounts of methane (and other light HC compounds) can be synthesized via catalysis by transition metals: Fe, Ni (Horita and Berndt, 1999 Science) and Cr (Foustavous and Seyfried, 2004 Science). In light of these pioneering experiments, an investigation of the feasibility of abiotic methane synthesis at higher pressure conditions in deep geological setting and the possible role of catalysis warrants a closer look. We conducted three sets of experiments in hydrothermal diamond anvil cell using FeO nanopowder, CaCO 3 and water at 300° - 600° C and 0.5 - 5 GPa : (a) with stainless steel gasket, (b) gold-lined gasket, and (c) gold-lined gasket with added Fe and Ni nanopowder. The reactions were monitored in-situ using micro-Raman spectroscopy with 532nm and 632nm lasers. The solids phases were characterized in-situ using synchrotron X-ray diffraction at CHESS-Cornell and quenched products with an electron microprobe. Interestingly, a variable amount of hydrocarbon was observed only in runs with stainless steel gasket and with Fe, Ni nanoparticles. Experiments with gold-lined reactors did not show any hydrocarbon formation. Added high resolution microscopy of the products and their textural relationship within the diamond cell with Raman spectroscopy data show that the hydrocarbon (methane and other light fractions) synthesis is a direct result of transition metal catalysis, rather than wustite - calcium carbonate reaction as recently reported by Scott et al (2004, PNAS). The author will further present new results highlighting abiotic

  18. Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Mauro, Ernesto

    Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions. Ernesto Di Mauro Dipartimento di Genetica Bi-ologia Molecolare, Universit` "Sapienza" Roma, Italy. a At least four conditions must be satisfied for the spontaneous generation of (pre)-genetic poly-mers: 1) availability of precursors that are activated enough to spontaneously polymerize. Preliminary studies showed that (a) nucleic bases and acyclonucleosides can be synthesized from formamide H2NCOH by simply heating with prebiotically available mineral catalysts [last reviewed in (1)], and that b) nucleic bases can be phosphorylated in every possible posi-tion [2'; 3'; 5'; cyclic 2',3'; cyclic 3',5' (2)]. The higher stability of the cyclic forms allows their accumulation. 2) A polymerization mechanism. A reaction showing the formation of RNA polymers starting from prebiotically plausible precursors (3',5' cyclic GMP and 3', 5'cyclic AMP) was recently reported (3). Polymerization in these conditions is thermodynamically up-hill and an equilibrium is attained that limits the maximum length of the polymer produced to about 40 nucleotides for polyG and 100 nucleotides for polyA. 3) Ligation of the synthesized oligomers. If this type of reaction could occur according to a terminal-joining mechanism and could generate canonical 3',5' phosphodiester bonds, exponential growth would be obtained of the generated oligomers. This type of reaction has been reported (4) , limited to homogeneous polyA sequences and leading to the production of polyA dimers and tetramers. What is still missing are: 4) mechanisms that provide the proof of principle for the generation of sequence complexity. We will show evidence for two mechanisms providing this proof of principle for simple complementary sequences. Namely: abiotic sequence complementary-driven terminal ligation and sequence-complementary terminal growth. In conclusion: all the steps leading to the generation of RNA in abiotic conditions are satisfied. (1) R Saladino, C Crestini, F

  19. MICROSCALE METABOLIC, REDOX AND ABIOTIC REACTIONS IN HANFORD 300 AREA SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Beyenal, Haluk; McLEan, Jeff; Majors, Paul; Fredrickson, Jim

    2013-11-14

    The Hanford 300 Area is a unique site due to periodic hydrologic influence of river water resulting in changes in groundwater elevation and flow direction. This area is also highly subject to uranium remobilization, the source of which is currently believed to be the region at the base of the vadose zone that is subject to period saturation due to the changes in the water levels in the Columbia River. We found that microbial processes and redox and abiotic reactions which operate at the microscale were critical to understanding factors controlling the macroscopic fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The combined laboratory and field research showed how microscale conditions control uranium mobility and how biotic, abiotic and redox reactions relate to each other. Our findings extended the current knowledge to examine U(VI) reduction and immobilization using natural 300 Area communities as well as selected model organisms on redox-sensitive and redox-insensitive minerals. Using innovative techniques developed specifically to probe biogeochemical processes at the microscale, our research expanded our current understanding of the roles played by mineral surfaces, bacterial competition, and local biotic, abiotic and redox reaction rates on the reduction and immobilization of uranium.

  20. Genetic Dissection of Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum, the fifth most important cereal crop in the world is a highly versatile crop and an excellent model species due to its overall tolerance to a number of abiotic stress conditions. To gain a better understanding of the physiological and genetic basis of abiotic stress tolerance in sorghum w...

  1. Cell wall remodeling under abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Plants exposed to abiotic stress respond to unfavorable conditions on multiple levels. One challenge under drought stress is to reduce shoot growth while maintaining root growth, a process requiring differential cell wall synthesis and remodeling. Key players in this process are the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidases, which initially cross-link phenolic compounds and glycoproteins of the cell walls causing stiffening. The function of ROS shifts after having converted all the peroxidase substrates in the cell wall. If ROS-levels remain high during prolonged stress, OH°-radicals are formed which lead to polymer cleavage. In concert with xyloglucan modifying enzymes and expansins, the resulting cell wall loosening allows further growth of stressed organs. PMID:25709610

  2. Mineralogical and isotopic record of biotic and abiotic diagenesis of the Callovian-Oxfordian clayey formation of Bure (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Gaucher, E. C.; Tournassat, C.; Agrinier, P.; Guerrot, C.; Widory, D.; Fléhoc, C.; Wille, G.; Ramboz, C.; Vinsot, A.; Buschaert, S.

    2011-05-01

    The Callovian-Oxfordian (COx) clayey unit is being studied in the Eastern part of the Paris Basin at depths between 400 and 500 m depth to assess of its suitability for nuclear waste disposal. The present study combines new mineralogical and isotopic data to describe the sedimentary history of the COx unit. Petrologic study provided evidence of the following diagenetic mineral sequence: (1) framboidal pyrite and micritic calcite, (2) iron-rich euhedral carbonates (ankerite, sideroplesite) and glauconite (3) limpid calcite and dolomite and celestite infilling residual porosity in bioclasts and cracks, (4) chalcedony, (5) quartz/calcite. Pyrite in bioturbations shows a wide range of δ 34S (-38‰ to +34.5‰), providing evidence of bacterial sulphate reduction processes in changing sedimentation conditions. The most negative values (-38‰ to -22‰), measured in the lower part of the COx unit indicate precipitation of pyrite in a marine environment with a continuous sulphate supply. The most positive pyrite δ 34S values (-14‰ up to +34.5‰) in the upper part of the COx unit indicate pyrite precipitation in a closed system. Celestite δ 34S values reflect the last evolutionary stage of the system when bacterial activity ended; however its deposition cannot be possible without sulphate supply due to carbonate bioclast dissolution. The 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio of celestite (0.706872-0.707040) is consistent with deposition from Jurassic marine-derived waters. Carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of bulk calcite and dolomite are consistent with marine carbonates. Siderite, only present in the maximum clay zone, has chemical composition and δ 18O consistent with a marine environment. Its δ 13C is however lower than those of marine carbonates, suggesting a contribution of 13C-depleted carbon from degradation of organic matter. δ 18O values of diagenetic chalcedony range between +27‰ and +31‰, suggesting precipitation from marine-derived pore waters. Late calcite

  3. Effects of arsenic incorporation on jarosite dissolution rates and reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Matthew R.; Madden, Andrew S.; Elwood Madden, Megan E.; Hu, Qinhong

    2013-07-01

    Batch dissolution experiments were undertaken on synthetic arsenojarosites at pH 2, pH 8, and in ultra-pure water to better understand the influence of As incorporation on the kinetics and reaction products of jarosite dissolution. Incongruent jarosite dissolution was observed in all experiments. Arsenojarosite lacks the pH dependency observed in K-jarosite dissolution, likely the result of surface arsenate-iron complexes preventing protonation at low pH and repelling hydroxyls at high pH. The stronger bonding of arsenate to iron, compared to sulfate to iron, leads to an enrichment of surface layer arsenate-iron complex sites, inhibiting the dissolution of jarosite with time. The secondary reaction products formed during the dissolution of arsenojarosite include maghemite, goethite, and hematite in ultra-pure water, and ferrihydrite in pH 8 Tris buffered solution. Maghemite initially forms and transitions to hematite with time in ultra-pure water, but increasing arsenic concentrations slow this transition. At pH >3.5, arsenic from the dissolution of arsenojarosite adsorbs onto newly formed reaction products. Arsenic also inhibits the formation of goethite and reduces the crystallinity of the observed maghemite reaction products. The coprecipitation of iron oxides with increasing amounts of arsenic results in a change from spherical to "worm-like" aggregate morphology and provides a sink for arsenic released during arsenojarosite dissolution. This study shows that in open systems with a flush of fresh solution, arsenic incorporation in jarosite results in an increase in dissolution rates. In closed systems, however, increasing surface arsenate-iron complexes inhibit further dissolution of the underlying bulk material, causing a reduction in dissolution rates as arsenic incorporation increases.

  4. The Stable Isotope Fractionation of Abiotic Reactions: A Benchmark in the Detection of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.

    2003-01-01

    mil to as low as -60 % (potentially comparable to that which accompanies the biosynthesis of organic matter). We need to understand what kind of fractionations are observed with reactions under the non-reducing or mildly reducing conditions now thought to be present on the early Earth. While nitrogen is receiving increased attention as a tool for these kinds of analyses, almost nothing is known about the isotope fractionation that one would expect for abiotic sources of fixed/reduced nitrogen. This project will measure the fixation from a series of abiotic reactions that may have been present on the early Earth (and other terrestrial planets) and produced organic material that could have ended up in the rock record. The work will look at a number of reactions, under a non- reducing, or mildly reducing, atmosphere, covering sources of prebiotic organic C & N from shock heating, to photochemistry, to hydrothermal reactions. Some reactions that we plan to study are; Shock heating of a non-reducing atmosphere to produce CO and NO (in collaboration with Chris McKay), formation of formaldehyde (and related compounds) from COY the formation of ammonia from nitrogen oxides (ultimately from NO) by ferrous iron reduction, and the hydrothermal synthesis of compounds including the hydrocarboxylation/hydrocarbonylation reaction (in collaboration with George Cody), reactions of oxalate to form hydrocarbons and other oxygenated compounds and the formation of lipids from oxalic/formic acid (in collaboration with Tom McCollom), and reactions of carbon monoxide & carbon dioxide with N2, ammonia or nitritehitrate to form hydrogen cyanide, nitriles, ammonia/amines and nitrous

  5. Improved abiotic stress tolerance of bermudagrass by exogenous small molecules.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zhulong; Shi, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    As a widely used warm-season turfgrass in landscapes and golf courses, bermudagrass encounters multiple abiotic stresses during the growth and development. Physiology analysis indicated that abiotic stresses induced the accumulation of ROS and decline of photosynthesis, resulting in increased cell damage and inhibited growth. Proteomic and metabolomic approaches showed that antioxidant enzymes and osmoprotectant contents (sugar, sucrose, dehydrin, proline) were extensively changed under abiotic stress conditions. Exogenous application of small molecules, such as ABA, NO, CaCl2, H2S, polyamine and melatonin, could effectively alleviate damages caused by multiple abiotic stresses, including drought, salt, heat and cold. Based on high through-put RNA seq analysis, genes involved in ROS, transcription factors, hormones, and carbohydrate metabolisms were largely enriched. The data indicated that small molecules induced the accumulation of osmoprotectants and antioxidants, kept cell membrane integrity, increased photosynthesis and kept ion homeostasis, which protected bermudagrass from damages caused by abiotic stresses. PMID:25757363

  6. Effect of bacteria and dissolved organics on mineral dissolution kinetics:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, Oleg; Shirokova, Liudmila; Benezeth, Pascale; Zabelina, Svetlana

    2010-05-01

    Quantification of the effect of microorganisms and associated organic ligands on mineral dissolution rate is one among the last remaining challenges in modeling of water-rock interactions under earth surface and subsurface environments. This is especially true for deep underground settings within the context of CO2 capture, sequestration and storage. First, elevated CO2 pressures create numerous experimental difficulties for performing robust flow-through experiments at a given saturation state. Second, reactivity of main rock-forming minerals in abiotic systems at pCO2 >> 1 atm and circumneutral pH is still poorly constrained. And third, most of microbial habitats of the subsurface biosphere are not suitable for routine culturing in the laboratory, many of them are anaerobic and even strictly anaerobic, and many bacteria and archae cultures can live only in the consortium of microorganisms which is very hard to maintain at a controlled and stable biomass concentration. For experimental modeling of bio-mineral interactions in the laboratory, two other main conceptual challenges exist. Typical concentration of dissolved organic carbon that serves as a main nutrient for heterotrophic bacteria in underground waters rarely exceeds 3-5 mg/L. Typical concentration of DOC in nutrient media used for bacteria culturing is between 100 and 10,000 mg/L. Therefore, performing mineral-bacteria interactions in the laboratory under environmentally-sound conditions requires significant dilution of the nutrient media or the use of flow-through reactors. Concerning the effect of organic ligands and bacterial excudates on rock-forming mineral dissolution, at the present time, mostly empirical (phenomenological) approach can be used. Indeed, the pioneering studies of Stumm and co-workers have established a firm basis for modeling the catalyzing and inhibiting effects of ligands on metal oxide dissolution rate. This approach, very efficient for studying the interaction of organic and

  7. DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2009-01-12

    This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

  8. Physicochemical Hydrodynamics of NAPL Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, S. K.; Ezzedine, S.; Ziagos, J. P.; Hoffman, F.; Gelinas, R. J.

    2001-05-01

    Determining the continually changing interface between the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) and aqueous phase liquid (APL) phases, and the physical and chemical processes by which mass is transferred across the interface is critical to the understanding of NAPL dissolution. Most researchers, however, address only the flux of mass from NAPL into the aqueous phase and the subsequent migration of the dissolved contaminants; little effort has been made to track the NAPL/APL interface. While it is crucial to have an accurate account of mass flux from NAPL to APL in order to design successful remediation strategies, the absence of rigor in tracking the NAPL/APL boundary interface makes such mass flux estimates less reliable. Our studies account for the moving NAPL/APL boundary interface. We introduce a new approach in developing non-linearly coupled flow and transport equations in order to include specific description of chemical dissolution processes.The governing NAPL/APL evolution equations were formulated along principles similar to the Stefan Problem of moving interfaces. Essentially, the diffusion coefficient is allowed to vary in unison with the concentration but with a near discontinuity at the threshold of the NAPL solubility limit. Below the solubility limit, the diffusion takes on its customary value throughout the aqueous phase. Meanwhile, very small values are assigned to the diffusion coefficient within the non-aqueous phase. Along the NAPL/APL interface, the diffusion coefficient is given some transition shape function, which is ultimately determined by calibration to laboratory experiments. In addition to accounting for the continuous erosion of NAPL/APL interface due to the dissolution, blobs of NAPL are allowed to diffuse and move, rather freely, under the influence of prevailing physical forces. Our numerical simulations were obtained using Adaptive Grid, Galerkin Finite Elements technique to solve the coupled flow and transport equations simultaneously

  9. Optimizing dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornet, Aurélien; Jannin, Sami

    2016-03-01

    This article is a short review of some of our recent developments in dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP). We present the basic principles of d-DNP, and motivate our choice to step away from conventional approaches. We then introduce a modified d-DNP recipe that can be summed up as follows: Using broad line polarizing agents to efficiently polarize 1H spins. Increasing the magnetic field to 6.7 T and above. Applying microwave frequency modulation. Applying 1H-13C cross polarization. Transferring hyperpolarized solution through a magnetic tunnel.

  10. ABIOTIC REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF CARBON TETRACHLORIDE AND HEXACHLOROETHANE BY ENVIRONMENTAL REDUCTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transformation rates of hexachloroethane (HCA) and carbon tetrachloride (CTET) have been measured in model systems representing the ground water environment and in slurries of fractionated Borden aquifer material. his report summarizes research conducted to identify the envir...

  11. Regulation of Photosynthesis during Abiotic Stress-Induced Photoinhibition.

    PubMed

    Gururani, Mayank Anand; Venkatesh, Jelli; Tran, Lam Son Phan

    2015-09-01

    Plants as sessile organisms are continuously exposed to abiotic stress conditions that impose numerous detrimental effects and cause tremendous loss of yield. Abiotic stresses, including high sunlight, confer serious damage on the photosynthetic machinery of plants. Photosystem II (PSII) is one of the most susceptible components of the photosynthetic machinery that bears the brunt of abiotic stress. In addition to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by abiotic stress, ROS can also result from the absorption of excessive sunlight by the light-harvesting complex. ROS can damage the photosynthetic apparatus, particularly PSII, resulting in photoinhibition due to an imbalance in the photosynthetic redox signaling pathways and the inhibition of PSII repair. Designing plants with improved abiotic stress tolerance will require a comprehensive understanding of ROS signaling and the regulatory functions of various components, including protein kinases, transcription factors, and phytohormones, in the responses of photosynthetic machinery to abiotic stress. Bioenergetics approaches, such as chlorophyll a transient kinetics analysis, have facilitated our understanding of plant vitality and the assessment of PSII efficiency under adverse environmental conditions. This review discusses the current understanding and indicates potential areas of further studies on the regulation of the photosynthetic machinery under abiotic stress. PMID:25997389

  12. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation`s defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO{sub 2} feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO{sub 2} dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides.

  13. Abiotic and Microbial Interactions during Anaerobic Transformations of Fe(II) and NOX-

    PubMed Central

    Picardal, Flynn

    2012-01-01

    Microbial Fe(II) oxidation using NO3- as the terminal electron acceptor [nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, NDFO] has been studied for over 15 years. Although there are reports of autotrophic isolates and stable enrichments, many of the bacteria capable of NDFO are known organotrophic NO3--reducers that require the presence of an organic, primary substrate, e.g., acetate, for significant amounts of Fe(II) oxidation. Although the thermodynamics of Fe(II) oxidation are favorable when coupled to either NO3- or NO2- reduction, the kinetics of abiotic Fe(II) oxidation by NO3- are relatively slow except under special conditions. NDFO is typically studied in batch cultures containing millimolar concentrations of Fe(II), NO3-, and the primary substrate. In such systems, NO2- is often observed to accumulate in culture media during Fe(II) oxidation. Compared to NO3-, abiotic reactions of biogenic NO2- and Fe(II) are relatively rapid. The kinetics and reaction pathways of Fe(II) oxidation by NO2- are strongly affected by medium composition and pH, reactant concentration, and the presence of Fe(II)-sorptive surfaces, e.g., Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and cellular surfaces. In batch cultures, the combination of abiotic and microbial Fe(II) oxidation can alter product distribution and, more importantly, results in the formation of intracellular precipitates and extracellular Fe(III) oxyhydroxide encrustations that apparently limit further cell growth and Fe(II) oxidation. Unless steps are taken to minimize or account for potential abiotic reactions, results of microbial NDFO studies can be obfuscated by artifacts of the chosen experimental conditions, the use of inappropriate analytical methods, and the resulting uncertainties about the relative importance of abiotic and microbial reactions. In this manuscript, abiotic reactions of NO3- and NO2- with aqueous Fe2+, chelated Fe(II), and solid-phase Fe(II) are reviewed along with factors that can influence overall NDFO reaction rates

  14. Coupled biotic-abiotic oxidation of organic matter by biogenic MnO_{2}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Julia; Peña, Jasquelin

    2016-04-01

    Some reactive soil minerals are strongly implicated in stabilising organic matter. However, others can play an active role in the oxidation of organic molecules. In natural systems, layer-type manganese oxide minerals (MnO2) typically occur as biomineral assemblages consisting of mineral particles and microbial biomass. Both the mineral and biological fractions of the assemblage can be powerful oxidants of organic C. The biological compartment relies on a set of enzymes to drive oxidative transformations of reduced C-substrates, whereas MnO2 minerals are strong, less specific abiotic oxidants that are assumed to rely on interfacial interactions between C-substrates and the mineral surface. This project aims to understand the coupling between microbial C mineralization and abiotic C oxidation mediated by MnO2 in bacterial-MnO2 assemblages. Specifically, under conditions of high C turnover, microbial respiration can significantly alter local pH, dissolved oxygen and pool of available reductants, which may modify rates and mechanism of C oxidation by biotic and abiotic components. We first investigated changes in the solution chemistry of Pseudomonas putida suspensions exposed to varying concentrations of glucose, chosen to represent readily bioavailable substrates in soils. Glucose concentrations tested ranged between 0 and 5.5mM and changes in pH, dissolved oxygen and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon were tracked over 48h. We then combined literature review and wet-chemical experiments to compile the pH dependence of rates of organic substrate oxidation by MnO2, including glucose. Our results demonstrate a strong pH dependence for these abiotic reactions. In assemblages of P. putida - MnO2, kinetic limitations for abiotic C oxidation by MnO2 are overcome by changes in biogeochemical conditions that result from bacterial C metabolism. When extrapolated to a soil solution confronted to an input of fresh dissolved organic matter, bacterial C metabolism of the

  15. Microbial- and thiosulfate-mediated dissolution of mercury sulfide minerals and transformation to gaseous mercury.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Rodríguez, Adiari I; Hansel, Colleen M; Zhang, Tong; Lamborg, Carl H; Santelli, Cara M; Webb, Samuel M; Brooks, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic heavy metal that poses significant environmental and human health risks. Soils and sediments, where Hg can exist as the Hg sulfide mineral metacinnabar (β-HgS), represent major Hg reservoirs in aquatic environments. Metacinnabar has historically been considered a sink for Hg in all but severely acidic environments, and thus disregarded as a potential source of Hg back to aqueous or gaseous pools. Here, we conducted a combination of field and laboratory incubations to identify the potential for metacinnabar as a source of dissolved Hg within near neutral pH environments and the underpinning (a)biotic mechanisms at play. We show that the abundant and widespread sulfur-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Thiobacillus extensively colonized metacinnabar chips incubated within aerobic, near neutral pH creek sediments. Laboratory incubations of axenic Thiobacillus thioparus cultures led to the release of metacinnabar-hosted Hg(II) and subsequent volatilization to Hg(0). This dissolution and volatilization was greatly enhanced in the presence of thiosulfate, which served a dual role by enhancing HgS dissolution through Hg complexation and providing an additional metabolic substrate for Thiobacillus. These findings reveal a new coupled abiotic-biotic pathway for the transformation of metacinnabar-bound Hg(II) to Hg(0), while expanding the sulfide substrates available for neutrophilic chemosynthetic bacteria to Hg-laden sulfides. They also point to mineral-hosted Hg as an underappreciated source of gaseous elemental Hg to the environment. PMID:26157421

  16. Microbial- and thiosulfate-mediated dissolution of mercury sulfide minerals and transformation to gaseous mercury

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Rodríguez, Adiari I.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Zhang, Tong; Lamborg, Carl H.; Santelli, Cara M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Brooks, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic heavy metal that poses significant environmental and human health risks. Soils and sediments, where Hg can exist as the Hg sulfide mineral metacinnabar (β-HgS), represent major Hg reservoirs in aquatic environments. Metacinnabar has historically been considered a sink for Hg in all but severely acidic environments, and thus disregarded as a potential source of Hg back to aqueous or gaseous pools. Here, we conducted a combination of field and laboratory incubations to identify the potential for metacinnabar as a source of dissolved Hg within near neutral pH environments and the underpinning (a)biotic mechanisms at play. We show that the abundant and widespread sulfur-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Thiobacillus extensively colonized metacinnabar chips incubated within aerobic, near neutral pH creek sediments. Laboratory incubations of axenic Thiobacillus thioparus cultures led to the release of metacinnabar-hosted Hg(II) and subsequent volatilization to Hg(0). This dissolution and volatilization was greatly enhanced in the presence of thiosulfate, which served a dual role by enhancing HgS dissolution through Hg complexation and providing an additional metabolic substrate for Thiobacillus. These findings reveal a new coupled abiotic-biotic pathway for the transformation of metacinnabar-bound Hg(II) to Hg(0), while expanding the sulfide substrates available for neutrophilic chemosynthetic bacteria to Hg-laden sulfides. They also point to mineral-hosted Hg as an underappreciated source of gaseous elemental Hg to the environment. PMID:26157421

  17. Recent Molecular Advances on Downstream Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Sávio Pinho; Lima, Aline Medeiros; de Souza, Cláudia Regina Batista

    2012-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as extremes of temperature and pH, high salinity and drought, comprise some of the major factors causing extensive losses to crop production worldwide. Understanding how plants respond and adapt at cellular and molecular levels to continuous environmental changes is a pre-requisite for the generation of resistant or tolerant plants to abiotic stresses. In this review we aimed to present the recent advances on mechanisms of downstream plant responses to abiotic stresses and the use of stress-related genes in the development of genetically engineered crops. PMID:22942725

  18. Chemical Priming of Plants Against Multiple Abiotic Stresses: Mission Possible?

    PubMed

    Savvides, Andreas; Ali, Shawkat; Tester, Mark; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2016-04-01

    Crop plants are subjected to multiple abiotic stresses during their lifespan that greatly reduce productivity and threaten global food security. Recent research suggests that plants can be primed by chemical compounds to better tolerate different abiotic stresses. Chemical priming is a promising field in plant stress physiology and crop stress management. We review here promising chemical agents such as sodium nitroprusside, hydrogen peroxide, sodium hydrosulfide, melatonin, and polyamines that can potentially confer enhanced tolerance when plants are exposed to multiple abiotic stresses. The challenges and opportunities of chemical priming are addressed, with the aim to boost future research towards effective application in crop stress management. PMID:26704665

  19. Dissolution of cinnabar (HgS) in the presence of natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waples, J.S.; Nagy, K.L.; Aiken, G.R.; Ryan, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    Cinnabar (HgS) dissolution rates were measured in the presence of 12 different natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolates including humic, fulvic, and hydrophobic acid fractions. Initial dissolution rates varied by 1.3 orders of magnitude, from 2.31 ?? 10-13 to 7.16 ?? 10-12 mol Hg (mg C)-1 m-2 s-1. Rates correlate positively with three DOM characteristics: specific ultraviolet absorbance (R2 = 0.88), aromaticity (R2 = 0.80), and molecular weight (R2 = 0.76). Three experimental observations demonstrate that dissolution was controlled by the interaction of DOM with the cinnabar surface: (1) linear rates of Hg release with time, (2) significantly reduced rates when DOM was physically separated from the surface by dialysis membranes, and (3) rates that approached constant values at a specific ratio of DOM concentration to cinnabar surface area, suggesting a maximum surface coverage by dissolution-reactive DOM. Dissolution rates for the hydrophobic acid fractions correlate negatively with sorbed DOM concentrations, indicating the presence of a DOM component that reduced the surface area of cinnabar that can be dissolved. When two hydrophobic acid isolates that enhanced dissolution to different extents were mixed equally, a 20% reduction in rate occurred compared to the rate with the more dissolution-enhancing isolate alone. Rates in the presence of the more dissolution-enhancing isolate were reduced by as much as 60% when cinnabar was prereacted with the isolate that enhanced dissolution to a lesser extent. The data, taken together, imply that the property of DOM that enhances cinnabar dissolution is distinct from the property that causes it to sorb irreversibly to the cinnabar surface. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan; Schöler, H. F.

    2010-05-01

    The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to volatile organic compounds was studied intensely over the last years (Keppler et al., 2000; Huber et al., 2009). It was shown that soil organic matter is oxidised due to the presence of iron (III), hydrogen peroxide and chloride and thereby produces diverse alkyl halides, which are emitted into the atmosphere. The formation of polar halogenated compounds like chlorinated acetic acids which are relevant toxic environmental substances was also found in soils and sediments (Kilian et al., 2002). The investigation of the formation of other polar halogenated and non-halogenated compounds like diverse mono- and dicarboxylic acids is going to attain more and more importance. Due to its high acidity oxalic acid might have impacts on the environment e.g., nutrient leaching, plant diseases and negative influence on microbial growth. In this study, the abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soil is examined. For a better understanding of natural degradation processes mechanistic studies were conducted using the model compound catechol as representative for structural elements of the humic substances and its reaction with iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide. Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and hydrogen peroxide is produced by bacteria or through incomplete reduction of oxygen. To find suitable parameters for an optimal reaction and a qualitative and quantitative analysis method the following reaction parameters are varied: concentration of iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide, time dependence, pH-value and influence of chloride. Analysis of oxalic acid was performed employing an ion chromatograph equipped with a conductivity detector. The time dependent reaction shows a relatively fast formation of oxalic acid, the optimum yield is achieved after 60 minutes. Compared to the concentration of catechol an excess of hydrogen peroxide as well as a low concentration of iron (III) are required. In absence of chloride the

  1. Abiotic uptake of gases by organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, A. V.

    2007-12-01

    Methodological and experimental studies of the abiotic uptake of gaseous substances by organic soils were performed. The static adsorption method of closed vessels for assessing the interaction of gases with the solid and liquid soil phases and the dynamic method of determining the sorption isotherms of gases by soils were analyzed. The theoretical substantiation of the methods and their practical implementations on the basis of a PGA-7 portable gas analyzer (Russia) were considered. Good agreement between the equilibrium sorption isotherms of the gases and the Langmuir model was revealed; for the real ranges of natural gas concentrations, this model can be reduced to the linear Henry equation. The limit values of the gas sorption (Langmuir monolayer capacity) are typical for dry samples; they vary from 670 4000 g/m3 for methane and oxygen to 20 000 25 000 g/m3 for carbon dioxide. The linear distribution coefficients of gases between the solid and gas phases of organic soils (Henry constants) are 8 18 units for poorly sorbed gases (O2, CH4) and 40 60 units for CO2. The kinetics of the chemicophysical uptake of gases by the soil studied is linear in character and obeys the relaxation kinetic model of the first order with the corresponding relaxation constants, which vary from 1 h -1 in wet samples to 10 h -1 in dry samples.

  2. Polyamines and abiotic stress tolerance in plants

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Sarvajeet Singh

    2010-01-01

    Environmental stresses including climate change, especially global warming, are severely affecting plant growth and productivity worldwide. It has been estimated that two-thirds of the yield potential of major crops are routinely lost due to the unfavorable environmental factors. On the other hand, the world population is estimated to reach about 10 billion by 2050, which will witness serious food shortages. Therefore, crops with enhanced vigour and high tolerance to various environmental factors should be developed to feed the increasing world population. Maintaining crop yields under adverse environmental stresses is probably the major challenge facing modern agriculture where polyamines can play important role. Polyamines (PAs)(putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are group of phytohormone-like aliphatic amine natural compounds with aliphatic nitrogen structure and present in almost all living organisms including plants. Evidences showed that polyamines are involved in many physiological processes, such as cell growth and development and respond to stress tolerance to various environmental factors. In many cases the relationship of plant stress tolerance was noted with the production of conjugated and bound polyamines as well as stimulation of polyamine oxidation. Therefore, genetic manipulation of crop plants with genes encoding enzymes of polyamine biosynthetic pathways may provide better stress tolerance to crop plants. Furthermore, the exogenous application of PAs is also another option for increasing the stress tolerance potential in plants. Here, we have described the synthesis and role of various polyamines in abiotic stress tolerance in plants. PMID:20592804

  3. A Role for Antibiotics in Mineral Dissolution and Biofilm Physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, D. K.

    2002-12-01

    Respiration by bacteria is remarkable due to their ability to use a variety of compounds, including insoluble minerals, as terminal electron acceptors. How bacteria solve the problem of breathing something that is solid is poorly understood, but recent evidence points to the role of redox active natural products in shuttling electrons between microbes and minerals. Given the ubiquity of these substances in natural waters and soils, we must now revisit previous conclusions about whether direct contact between microbes and minerals is necessary to promote reductive mineral dissolution. To explore the degree to which extracellular electron transfer catalyzes important biogeochemical processes, we are studying the types of molecules that function as electron shuttles, including redox active antibiotics. I will discuss my laboratory's current understanding of how interspecies exchange of these molecules promotes mineral dissolution, as well as our emerging hypotheses regarding their function in biofilms.

  4. Abiotic and biotic factors influencing the mobility of arsenic in groundwater of a through-flow island in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenov, Natalie; Wolski, Piotr; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M.; Murray-Hudson, Michael; Enriquez, Hersy; Damaraju, Sivaramakrishna; Galkaduwa, Madhubhashini B.; McKnight, Diane M.; Masamba, Wellington

    2014-10-01

    The Okavango Delta of Botswana is a large arid-zone wetland comprising 20,000 km2 of permanent and seasonal floodplains and over 100,000 islands. It has been shown that island groundwater can have very high dissolved arsenic (As) concentration, but the abiotic and biotic controls on As mobility are not well understood in this setting. At New Island, an island located in the seasonal swamp, dissolved As concentration increased from below detection limits in the surface water to 180 μg/L in groundwater, present as As(III) species. We investigated the relative importance of hydrologic, geochemical, and geomicrobial processes, as well as influences of recent extreme flooding events, in mobilizing and sequestering As in the shallow groundwater system under this island. Our results suggest that evapotranspiration and through-flow conditions control the location of the high arsenic zone. A combination of processes is hypothesized to control elevated As in the concentration zone of New Island: high evapotranspiration rates concentrate As and other solutes, more alkaline pH leads to desorption of arsenic or dissolution of arsenic sulfides, and formation of thioarsenic complexes acts to keep arsenic in solution. Evidence from X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) measurements further suggests that SRBs influence arsenic sequestration as orpiment (As2S3). Although dissolved organic matter (DOM) was not significantly correlated to dissolved As in the groundwater, our results suggest that DOM may serve as an electron donor for sulfate reduction or other microbial reactions that influence redox state and As mobility. These results have important implications for water management in the region and in other large wetland environments. The processes evaluated in this study are also relevant for arsenic removal in subsurface constructed wetland systems that may exhibit rapidly changing processes over small spatial scales.

  5. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  6. Olivine Weathering: Abiotic Versus Biotic Processes as Possible Biosignatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longazo, T. G.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Southam, G.; Clemett, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    A preliminary study to determine how abiotic versus biotic processes affect the weathering of olivine crystals. Perhaps the differences between these weathering processes could be used as biosignatures. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Abiotic stress responses in plant roots: a proteomics perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Dipanjana; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stress conditions adversely affect plant growth, resulting in significant decline in crop productivity. To mitigate and recover from the damaging effects of such adverse environmental conditions, plants have evolved various adaptive strategies at cellular and metabolic levels. Most of these strategies involve dynamic changes in protein abundance that can be best explored through proteomics. This review summarizes comparative proteomic studies conducted with roots of various plant species subjected to different abiotic stresses especially drought, salinity, flood, and cold. The main purpose of this article is to highlight and classify the protein level changes in abiotic stress response pathways specifically in plant roots. Shared as well as stressor-specific proteome signatures and adaptive mechanism(s) are simultaneously described. Such a comprehensive account will facilitate the design of genetic engineering strategies that enable the development of broad-spectrum abiotic stress-tolerant crops. PMID:24478786

  8. Circadian regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in plants

    PubMed Central

    Grundy, Jack; Stoker, Claire; Carré, Isabelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Extremes of temperatures, drought and salinity cause widespread crop losses throughout the world and impose severe limitations on the amount of land that can be used for agricultural purposes. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop crops that perform better under such abiotic stress conditions. Here, we discuss intriguing, recent evidence that circadian clock contributes to plants’ ability to tolerate different types of environmental stress, and to acclimate to them. The clock controls expression of a large fraction of abiotic stress-responsive genes, as well as biosynthesis and signaling downstream of stress response hormones. Conversely, abiotic stress results in altered expression and differential splicing of the clock genes, leading to altered oscillations of downstream stress-response pathways. We propose a range of mechanisms by which this intimate coupling between the circadian clock and environmental stress-response pathways may contribute to plant growth and survival under abiotic stress. PMID:26379680

  9. Roles of melatonin in abiotic stress resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Sun, Qianqian; Zhang, Haijun; Cao, Yunyun; Weeda, Sarah; Ren, Shuxin; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2015-02-01

    In recent years melatonin has emerged as a research highlight in plant studies. Melatonin has different functions in many aspects of plant growth and development. The most frequently mentioned functions of melatonin are related to abiotic stresses such as drought, radiation, extreme temperature, and chemical stresses. This review mainly focuses on the regulatory effects of melatonin when plants face harsh environmental conditions. Evidence indicates that environmental stress can increase the level of endogenous melatonin in plants. Overexpression of the melatonin biosynthetic genes elevates melatonin levels in transgenic plants. The transgenic plants show enhanced tolerance to abiotic stresses. Exogenously applied melatonin can also improve the ability of plants to tolerate abiotic stresses. The mechanisms by which melatonin alleviates abiotic stresses are discussed. PMID:25124318

  10. Development of Itraconazole Liquisolid Compact: Effect of Polyvinylpyrrolidone on the Dissolution Properties.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wei; Wang, Yuli; Sun, Lei; Yang, Jiahui; Shan, Li; Yang, Meiyan; Gao, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to utilize the liquisolid technique to enhance dissolution of itraconazole (ITZ). Liquisolid tablets of ITZ were formulated by using N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone as liquid vehicle, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a precipitation inhibitor and magnesium aluminometasilicate Neusilin® as a carrier and coating material. The effect of PVP level on stability of liquid medication, physicomechnanical properties and dissolution rate of liquisolid compacts was studied in detail. The crystallinity of formulated drug and the interaction between excipients were examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). All the liquisolid tablets showed higher drug dissolution rates than the conventional, directly compressed tablets. The flowability of liquisolid powders was slightly improved as the proportion of PVP in ITZ-NMP mixture increased. Moreover, the stability of liquid medication and wetting ability of liquisolid tablets were improved by PVP. The presence of low amount of PVP (≤ 1%) in liquisolid formulation could enhance dissolution of ITZ liquisolid tablets, whereas the percentage of PVP over 5% decreased the dissolution of ITZ from liquisolid tablets. Both DSC and XRPD suggested reduction or loss of ITZ crystallinity upon liquisolid formulations indicating that the drug was almost solubilized and molecularly dispersed with excipients within the liquisolid matrix. It could be shown that increased solubility, wetting properties and surface area available for dissolution contributed to the improvement of the dissolution of ITZ from liquisolid tablets. PMID:26882116

  11. H 2 inhibition of radiation induced dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trummer, Martin; Roth, Olivia; Jonsson, Mats

    2009-01-01

    In order to elucidate the effect of noble metal clusters in spent nuclear fuel on the kinetics of radiation induced spent fuel dissolution we have used Pd particle doped UO 2 pellets. The catalytic effect of Pd particles on the kinetics of radiation induced dissolution of UO 2 during γ-irradiation in HCO3- containing solutions purged with N 2 and H 2 was studied in this work. Four pellets with Pd concentrations of 0%, 0.1%, 1% and 3% were produced to mimic spent nuclear fuel. The pellets were placed in 10 mM HCO3- aqueous solutions and γ-irradiated, and the dissolution of UO22+ was measured spectrophotometrically as a function of time. Under N 2 atmosphere, 3% Pd prevent the dissolution of uranium by reduction with the radiolytically produced H 2, while the other pellets show a rate of dissolution of around 1.6 × 10 -9 mol m -2 s -1. Under H 2 atmosphere already 0.1% Pd effectively prevents the dissolution of uranium, while the rate of dissolution for the pellet without Pd is 1.4 × 10 -9 mol m -2 s -1. It is also shown in experiments without radiation in aqueous solutions containing H 2O 2 and O 2 that ɛ-particles catalyze the oxidation of the UO 2 matrix by these molecular oxidants, and that the kinetics of the catalyzed reactions is close to diffusion controlled.

  12. Comparison of biotic and abiotic treatment approaches for co-mingled perchlorate, nitrate, and nitramine explosives in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, C. E.; Fuller, M. E.; Condee, C. W.; Lowey, J. M.; Hatzinger, P. B.

    2007-01-01

    Biological and abiotic approaches for treating co-mingled perchlorate, nitrate, and nitramine explosives in groundwater were compared in microcosm and column studies. In microcosms, microscale zero-valent iron (mZVI), nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI), and nickel catalyzed the reduction of RDX and HMX from initial concentrations of 9 and 1 mg/L, respectively, to below detection (0.02 mg/L), within 2 h. The mZVI and nZVI also degraded nitrate (3 mg/L) to below 0.4 mg/L, but none of the metal catalysts were observed to appreciably reduce perchlorate (˜ 5 mg/L) in microcosms. Perchlorate losses were observed after approximately 2 months in columns of aquifer solids treated with mZVI, but this decline appears to be the result of biodegradation rather than abiotic reduction. An emulsified vegetable oil substrate was observed to effectively promote the biological reduction of nitrate, RDX and perchlorate in microcosms, and all four target contaminants in the flow-through columns. Nitrate and perchlorate were biodegraded most rapidly, followed by RDX and then HMX, although the rates of biological reduction for the nitramine explosives were appreciably slower than observed for mZVI or nickel. A model was developed to compare contaminant degradation mechanisms and rates between the biotic and abiotic treatments.

  13. 25 CFR 11.606 - Dissolution proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... marriage may initiate dissolution proceedings. (b) If a proceeding is commenced by one of the parties, the... proceeding for dissolution of marriage or legal separation shall allege that the marriage is irretrievably... under the jurisdiction of the court of each party; (2) The date of the marriage and the place at...

  14. 25 CFR 11.606 - Dissolution proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... marriage may initiate dissolution proceedings. (b) If a proceeding is commenced by one of the parties, the... proceeding for dissolution of marriage or legal separation shall allege that the marriage is irretrievably... under the jurisdiction of the court of each party; (2) The date of the marriage and the place at...

  15. Emotional and Cognitive Coping in Relationship Dissolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrape, Elizabeth R.; Jenkins, Sharon Rae; Callahan, Jennifer L.; Nowlin, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    Dissolution of a romantic relationship can adversely affect functioning among college students and represents one primary reason for seeking campus counseling. This study examined the associations among common coping strategies and distress following relationship dissolution. Avoidance and repetitive negative thinking (RNT) were significantly…

  16. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTRACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. he purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. he ...

  17. Thermal dissolution of solid fossil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    E.G. Gorlov

    2007-10-15

    The use of oil shales and coals in the processes of thermal dissolution is considered. It is shown that thermal dissolution is a mode of liquefaction of solid fossil fuels and can be used both independently and in combination with liquefaction of coals and processing of heavy petroleum residues.

  18. Stirring effect on kaolinite dissolution rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Volker; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2001-10-01

    Experiments were carried out measuring kaolinite dissolution rates using stirred and nonstirred flow-through reactors at pHs 2 to 4 and temperatures of 25°C, 50°C, and 70°C. The results show an increase of kaolinite dissolution rate with increasing stirring speed. The stirring effect is reversible, i.e., as the stirring slows down the dissolution rate decreases. The effect of stirring speed on kaolinite dissolution rate is higher at 25°C than at 50°C and 70°C and at pH 4 than at pHs 2 and 3. It is suggested that fine kaolinite particles are formed as a result of stirring-induced spalling or abrasion of kaolinite. These very fine particles have an increased ratio of reactive surface area to specific surface area, which results in enhancement of kaolinite dissolution rate. A balance between production and dissolution of the fine particles explains both the reversibility and the temperature and pH dependence of the stirring effect. Since the stirring effect on kaolinite dissolution rate varies with temperature and pH, measurement of kinetic parameters such as activation energy may be influenced by stirring. Therefore, standard use of nonagitated reaction vessels for kinetic experiments of mineral dissolution and precipitation is recommended, at least for slow reactions that are surface controlled.

  19. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. Th...

  20. 25 CFR 11.606 - Dissolution proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... marriage may initiate dissolution proceedings. (b) If a proceeding is commenced by one of the parties, the... proceeding for dissolution of marriage or legal separation shall allege that the marriage is irretrievably... under the jurisdiction of the court of each party; (2) The date of the marriage and the place at...

  1. 25 CFR 11.606 - Dissolution proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... marriage may initiate dissolution proceedings. (b) If a proceeding is commenced by one of the parties, the... proceeding for dissolution of marriage or legal separation shall allege that the marriage is irretrievably... under the jurisdiction of the court of each party; (2) The date of the marriage and the place at...

  2. 25 CFR 11.606 - Dissolution proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... marriage may initiate dissolution proceedings. (b) If a proceeding is commenced by one of the parties, the... proceeding for dissolution of marriage or legal separation shall allege that the marriage is irretrievably... under the jurisdiction of the court of each party; (2) The date of the marriage and the place at...

  3. Secondary mineralization pathways induced by dissimilatory iron reduction of ferrihydrite under advective flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, Colleen M.; Benner, Shawn G.; Neiss, Jim; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Fendorf, Scott

    2003-08-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides not only serve as potent sorbents and repositories for nutrients and contaminants but also provide a terminal electron acceptor for microbial respiration. The microbial reduction of Fe (hydr)oxides and the subsequent secondary solid-phase transformations will, therefore, have a profound influence on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe as well as associated metals. Here we elucidate the pathways and mechanisms of secondary mineralization during dissimilatory iron reduction by a common iron-reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens (strain CN32), of 2-line ferrihydrite under advective flow conditions. Secondary mineralization of ferrihydrite occurs via a coupled, biotic-abiotic pathway primarily resulting in the production of magnetite and goethite with minor amounts of green rust. Operating mineralization pathways are driven by competing abiotic reactions of bacterially generated ferrous iron with the ferrihydrite surface. Subsequent to the initial sorption of ferrous iron on ferrihydrite, goethite (via dissolution/reprecipitation) and/or magnetite (via solid-state conversion) precipitation ensues resulting in the spatial coupling of both goethite and magnetite with the ferrihydrite surface. The distribution of goethite and magnetite within the column is dictated, in large part, by flow-induced ferrous Fe profiles. While goethite precipitation occurs over a large Fe(II) concentration range, magnetite accumulation is only observed at concentrations exceeding 0.3 mmol/L (equivalent to 0.5 mmol Fe[II]/g ferrihydrite) following 16 d of reaction. Consequently, transport-regulated ferrous Fe profiles result in a progression of magnetite levels downgradient within the column. Declining microbial reduction over time results in lower Fe(II) concentrations and a subsequent shift in magnetite precipitation mechanisms from nucleation to crystal growth. While the initial precipitation rate of goethite exceeds that of magnetite, continued growth is inhibited by

  4. Characterization of Thin Film Dissolution in Water with in Situ Monitoring of Film Thickness Using Reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Yersak, Alexander S; Lewis, Ryan J; Tran, Jenny; Lee, Yung C

    2016-07-13

    Reflectometry was implemented as an in situ thickness measurement technique for rapid characterization of the dissolution dynamics of thin film protective barriers in elevated water temperatures above 100 °C. Using this technique, multiple types of coatings were simultaneously evaluated in days rather than years. This technique enabled the uninterrupted characterization of dissolution rates for different coating deposition temperatures, postdeposition annealing conditions, and locations on the coating surfaces. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) SiO2 and wet thermally grown SiO2 (wtg-SiO2) thin films were demonstrated to be dissolution-predictable barriers for the protection of metals such as copper. A ∼49% reduction in dissolution rate was achieved for ALD SiO2 films by increasing the deposition temperatures from 150 to 300 °C. ALD SiO2 deposited at 300 °C and followed by annealing in an inert N2 environment at 1065 °C resulted in a further ∼51% reduction in dissolution rate compared with the nonannealed sample. ALD SiO2 dissolution rates were thus lowered to values of wtg-SiO2 in water by the combination of increasing the deposition temperature and postdeposition annealing. Thin metal films, such as copper, without a SiO2 barrier corroded at an expected ∼1-2 nm/day rate when immersed in room temperature water. This measurement technique can be applied to any optically transparent coating. PMID:27308723

  5. Detection of Abiotic Methane in Terrestrial Continental Hydrothermal Systems: Implications for Methane on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Romanek, Christopher S.; Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Bissada, Kadry K.

    2008-01-01

    The recent detection of methane in the Martian atmosphere and the possibility that its origin could be attributed to biological activity, have highlighted the importance of understanding the mechanisms of methane formation and its usefulness as a biomarker. Much debate has centered on the source of the methane in hydrothermal fluids, whether it is formed biologically by microorganisms, diagenetically through the decomposition of sedimentary organic matter, or inorganically via reduction of CO2 at high temperatures. Ongoing research has now shown that much of the methane present in sea-floor hydrothermal systems is probably formed through inorganic CO2 reduction processes at very high temperatures (greater than 400 C). Experimental results have indicated that methane might form inorganically at temperatures lower still, however these results remain controversial. Currently, methane in continental hydrothermal systems is thought to be formed mainly through the breakdown of sedimentary organic matter and carbon isotope equilibrium between CO2 and CH4 is thought to be rarely present if at all. Based on isotopic measurements of CO2 and CH4 in two continental hydrothermal systems, we suggest that carbon isotope equilibration exists at temperatures as low as 155 C. This would indicate that methane is forming through abiotic CO2 reduction at lower temperatures than previously thought and could bolster arguments for an abiotic origin of the methane detected in the martian atmosphere.

  6. Dissolution enthalpies of cellulose in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Helena; Parviainen, Arno; Virtanen, Tommi; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Serimaa, Ritva; Grönqvist, Stina; Maloney, Thaddeus; Maunu, Sirkka Liisa

    2014-11-26

    In this work, interactions between cellulose and ionic liquids were studied calorimetrically and by optical microscopy. Two novel ionic liquids (1,5-Diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium propionate and N-methyl-1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium dimethyl phosphate) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate-water mixtures were used as solvents. Optical microscopy served in finding the extent of dissolution and identifying the dissolution pattern of the cellulose sample. Calorimetric studies identified a peak relating to dissolution of cellulose in solvent. The transition did, however, not indicate complete dissolution, but rather dissolution inside fibre or fibrils. This method was used to study differences between four cellulose samples with different pretreatment or origins. PMID:25256460

  7. Contributions of Fe Minerals to Abiotic Dechlorination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most applications of enhanced in situ bioremediation are based on biological reductive dechlorination. Anaerobic metabolism can also produce reactive minerals that allow for in situ biogeochemical transformation of chlorinated organic contaminants such as PCE, TCE, and cis-DCE. ...

  8. Variation of crystal dissolution rate based on a dissolution stepwave model.

    PubMed

    Lasaga, A C; Luttge, A

    2001-03-23

    A formulation based on defect-generated dissolution stepwaves of the variation of dissolution rate with the degree of undersaturation is validated by near-atomic-scale observations of surfaces, Monte Carlo simulations, and experimental bulk dissolution rates. The dissolution stepwaves emanating from etch pits provide a train of steps similar to those of a spiral but with different behavior. Their role in accounting for the bulk dissolution rate of crystals provides a conceptual framework for mineral dissolution far from equilibrium. Furthermore, the law extends research to conditions closer to equilibrium and predicts a nonlinear decrease in the rate of dissolution as equilibrium is approached, which has implications for understanding artificial and natural processes involving solid-fluid reactions. PMID:11264534

  9. In-life pteropod shell dissolution as an indicator of past ocean carbonate saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Smart, Christopher W.; Hart, Malcolm B.

    2013-12-01

    Recent concern over the effects of ocean acidification upon calcifying organisms has highlighted the aragonitic shelled thecosomatous pteropods as being at a high risk. Both in-situ and laboratory studies have shown that an increased dissolved CO2 concentration, leading to decreased water pH and low carbonate concentration, causes reduced calcification rates and enhanced dissolution in the shells of living pteropods. In fossil records unaffected by post-depositional dissolution, this in-life shell dissolution can be detected. Here we present the first evidence of variations of in-life pteropod shell dissolution due to variations in surface water carbonate concentration during the Late Pleistocene by analysing the surface layer of pteropod shells in marine sediment cores from the Caribbean Sea and Indian Ocean. In-life shell dissolution was determined by applying the Limacina Dissolution Index (LDX) to the sub-tropical pteropod Limacina inflata. Average shell size information shows that high in-life dissolution is accompanied by smaller shell sizes in L. inflata, which may indicate a reduction in calcification rate. Comparison of the LDX profile to Late Pleistocene Vostok atmospheric CO2 concentrations, shows that in-life pteropod dissolution is closely associated to variations in past ocean carbonate saturation. This study confirms the findings of laboratory studies, showing enhanced shell dissolution and reduced calcification in living pteropods when surface ocean carbonate concentrations were lower. Results also demonstrate that oceanic pH levels that were less acidic and changing less rapidly than those predicted for the 21st Century, negatively affected pteropods during the Late Pleistocene.

  10. Coupling microbial catabolic actions with abiotic redox processes: a new recipe for persistent organic pollutant (POP) removal.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Nam, In-Hyun; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The continuous release of toxic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) into the environment has raised a need for effective cleanup methods. The tremendous natural diversity of microbial catabolic mechanisms suggests that catabolic routes may be applied to the remediation of POP-contaminated fields. A large number of the recalcitrant xenobiotics have been shown to be removable via the natural catabolic mechanisms of microbes, and detailed biochemical studies of the catabolic methods, together with the development of sophisticated genetic engineering, have led to the use of synthetic microbes for the bioremediation of POPs. However, the steric effects of substituted halogen moieties, microbe toxicity, and the low bioavailability of POPs still deteriorate the efficiency of removal strategies based on natural and synthetic catabolic mechanisms. Recently, abiotic redox processes that induce rapid reductive dehalogenation, hydroxyl radical-based oxidation, or electron shuttling have been reasonably coupled with microbial catabolic actions, thereby compensating for the drawbacks of biotic processes in POP removal. In this review, we first compare the pros and cons of individual methodologies (i.e., the natural and synthetic catabolism of microbes and the abiotic processes involving zero-valent irons, advanced oxidation processes, and small organic stimulants) for POP removal. We then highlight recent trends in coupling the biotic-abiotic methodologies and discuss how the processes are both feasible and superior to individual methodologies for POP cleanup. Cost-effective and environmentally sustainable abiotic redox actions could enhance the microbial bioremediation potential for POPs. PMID:23153459

  11. Dissolution and corrosion inhibition of copper, zinc, and their alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jinturkar, P.; Guan, Y.C.; Han, K.N.

    1998-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of copper, zinc, and their alloys in sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) solutions with oxygen and ferric ions (Fe{sup 3+}) was studied using a potentiostat. Oxygen and Fe{sup 3+} ions were shown to play an important role in corrosion of copper and copper-zinc alloys. Cathodic reduction of oxygen mainly was controlled by chemical reaction, and that of Fe{sup 3+} ions was controlled by diffusion. The overall cathodic process was the summation of the reduction of oxygen and Fe{sup 3+} ions. Corrosion of zinc was controlled mainly by reduction of water. Corrosion inhibition using benzotriazole (BTAH) also was investigated in aerated and deaerated solutions. BTAH was found to be a useful inhibitor, and the inhibition layer was shown to be stable and persistent. Morphology of the surface of copper, zinc, and brasses after corrosion in the presence and absence of BTAH was examined by scanning electron microscopy. BTAH formed a protective layer on the surface, thereby inhibiting corrosion. Solution analysis of the dissolution of brasses showed that zinc dissolved preferentially in the initial stages, followed by simultaneous dissolution of copper and zinc.

  12. Polyamines and abiotic stress in plants: a complex relationship.

    PubMed

    Minocha, Rakesh; Majumdar, Rajtilak; Minocha, Subhash C

    2014-01-01

    The physiological relationship between abiotic stress in plants and polyamines was reported more than 40 years ago. Ever since there has been a debate as to whether increased polyamines protect plants against abiotic stress (e.g., due to their ability to deal with oxidative radicals) or cause damage to them (perhaps due to hydrogen peroxide produced by their catabolism). The observation that cellular polyamines are typically elevated in plants under both short-term as well as long-term abiotic stress conditions is consistent with the possibility of their dual effects, i.e., being protectors from as well as perpetrators of stress damage to the cells. The observed increase in tolerance of plants to abiotic stress when their cellular contents are elevated by either exogenous treatment with polyamines or through genetic engineering with genes encoding polyamine biosynthetic enzymes is indicative of a protective role for them. However, through their catabolic production of hydrogen peroxide and acrolein, both strong oxidizers, they can potentially be the cause of cellular harm during stress. In fact, somewhat enigmatic but strong positive relationship between abiotic stress and foliar polyamines has been proposed as a potential biochemical marker of persistent environmental stress in forest trees in which phenotypic symptoms of stress are not yet visible. Such markers may help forewarn forest managers to undertake amelioration strategies before the appearance of visual symptoms of stress and damage at which stage it is often too late for implementing strategies for stress remediation and reversal of damage. This review provides a comprehensive and critical evaluation of the published literature on interactions between abiotic stress and polyamines in plants, and examines the experimental strategies used to understand the functional significance of this relationship with the aim of improving plant productivity, especially under conditions of abiotic stress. PMID:24847338

  13. Polyamines and abiotic stress in plants: a complex relationship1

    PubMed Central

    Minocha, Rakesh; Majumdar, Rajtilak; Minocha, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological relationship between abiotic stress in plants and polyamines was reported more than 40 years ago. Ever since there has been a debate as to whether increased polyamines protect plants against abiotic stress (e.g., due to their ability to deal with oxidative radicals) or cause damage to them (perhaps due to hydrogen peroxide produced by their catabolism). The observation that cellular polyamines are typically elevated in plants under both short-term as well as long-term abiotic stress conditions is consistent with the possibility of their dual effects, i.e., being protectors from as well as perpetrators of stress damage to the cells. The observed increase in tolerance of plants to abiotic stress when their cellular contents are elevated by either exogenous treatment with polyamines or through genetic engineering with genes encoding polyamine biosynthetic enzymes is indicative of a protective role for them. However, through their catabolic production of hydrogen peroxide and acrolein, both strong oxidizers, they can potentially be the cause of cellular harm during stress. In fact, somewhat enigmatic but strong positive relationship between abiotic stress and foliar polyamines has been proposed as a potential biochemical marker of persistent environmental stress in forest trees in which phenotypic symptoms of stress are not yet visible. Such markers may help forewarn forest managers to undertake amelioration strategies before the appearance of visual symptoms of stress and damage at which stage it is often too late for implementing strategies for stress remediation and reversal of damage. This review provides a comprehensive and critical evaluation of the published literature on interactions between abiotic stress and polyamines in plants, and examines the experimental strategies used to understand the functional significance of this relationship with the aim of improving plant productivity, especially under conditions of abiotic stress. PMID:24847338

  14. Molecular dynamic simulations of ocular tablet dissolution.

    PubMed

    Ru, Qian; Fadda, Hala M; Li, Chung; Paul, Daniel; Khaw, Peng T; Brocchini, Steve; Zloh, Mire

    2013-11-25

    Small tablets for implantation into the subconjunctival space in the eye are being developed to inhibit scarring after glaucoma filtration surgery (GFS). There is a need to evaluate drug dissolution at the molecular level to determine how the chemical structure of the active may correlate with dissolution in the nonsink conditions of the conjunctival space. We conducted molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissolution process of tablets derived from two drugs that can inhibit fibrosis after GFS, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and the matrix metalloprotease inhibitor (MMPi), ilomastat. The dissolution was simulated in the presence of simple point charge (SPC) water molecules, and the liquid turnover of the aqueous humor in the subconjunctival space was simulated by removal of the dissolved drug molecules at regular intervals and replacement by new water molecules. At the end of the simulation, the total molecular solvent accessible surface area of 5-FU tablets increased by 60 times more than that of ilomastat as a result of tablet swelling and release of molecules into solution. The tablet dissolution pattern shown in our molecular dynamic simulations tends to correlate with experimental release profiles. This work indicates that a series of molecular dynamic simulations can be used to predict the influence of the molecular properties of a drug on its dissolution profile and could be useful during preformulation where sufficient amounts of the drug are not always available to perform dissolution studies. PMID:24073784

  15. Anaerobic abiotic transformations of cis-1,2-dichloroethene in fractured sandstone.

    PubMed

    Darlington, Ramona; Lehmicke, Leo G; Andrachek, Richard G; Freedman, David L

    2013-02-01

    A fractured sandstone aquifer at an industrial site is contaminated with trichloroethene to depths greater than 244 m. Field data indicate that trichloroethene is undergoing reduction to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE); vinyl chloride and ethene are present at much lower concentrations. Transformation of cDCE by pathways other than reductive dechlorination (abiotic and/or biotic) is of interest. Pyrite, which has been linked to abiotic transformation of chlorinated ethenes, is present at varying levels in the sandstone. To evaluate the possible role of pyrite in transforming cDCE, microcosms were prepared with groundwater, ~40 mg L(-1) cDCE+[(14)C]cDCE, and crushed solids (pure pyrite, pyrite-rich sandstone, or typical sandstone). During 120 d of incubation, the highest level of cDCE transformation occurred with typical sandstone (11-14% (14)CO(2), 1-3% (14)C-soluble products), followed by pyrite-rich sandstone (2-4% (14)CO(2), 1% (14)C-soluble products) and even lesser amounts with pure pyrite. These results indicate pyrite is not likely the mineral involved in transforming cDCE. A separate experiment using only typical sandstone compared the rate of cDCE transformation in non-sterilized, autoclaved, and propylene-oxide sterilized treatments, with pseudo-first order rate constants of 8.7, 5.4, and 1.0 yr(-1), respectively; however, transformation stopped after several months of incubation. Autoclaving increased the volume of pores, adsorption pore diameter, and surface area in comparison to non-sterilized typical sandstone. Nevertheless, autoclaving was less disruptive than chemical sterilization. The results provide definitive experimental evidence that cDCE undergoes anaerobic abiotic and biotic transformation in typical sandstone, with formation of CO(2) and soluble products. PMID:23102697

  16. Abiotic Stresses Downregulate Key Genes Involved in Nitrogen Uptake and Assimilation in Brassica juncea L.

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Parul; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought and extreme temperatures affect nitrogen (N) uptake and assimilation in plants. However, little is known about the regulation of N pathway genes at transcriptional level under abiotic stress conditions in Brassica juncea. In the present work, genes encoding nitrate transporters (NRT), ammonium transporters (AMT), nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NiR), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), asparagines synthetase (ASN) were cloned from Brassica juncea L. var. Varuna. The deduced protein sequences were analyzed to predict their subcellular localization, which confirmed localization of all the proteins in their respective cellular organelles. The protein sequences were also subjected to conserved domain identification, which confirmed presence of characteristic domains in all the proteins, indicating their putative functions. Moreover, expression of these genes was studied after 1h and 24h of salt (150 mM NaCl), osmotic (250 mM Mannitol), cold (4°C) and heat (42°C) stresses. Most of the genes encoding nitrate transporters and enzymes responsible for N assimilation and remobilization were found to be downregulated under abiotic stresses. The expression of BjAMT1.2, BjAMT2, BjGS1.1, BjGDH1 and BjASN2 was downregulated after 1hr, while expression of BjNRT1.1, BjNRT2.1, BjNiR1, BjAMT2, BjGDH1 and BjASN2 was downregulated after 24h of all the stress treatments. However, expression of BjNRT1.1, BjNRT1.5 and BjGDH2 was upregulated after 1h of all stress treatments, while no gene was found to be upregulated after 24h of stress treatments, commonly. These observations indicate that expression of most of the genes is adversely affected under abiotic stress conditions, particularly under prolonged stress exposure (24h), which may be one of the reasons of reduction in plant growth and development under abiotic stresses. PMID:26605918

  17. Microbial extracellular polysaccharides and plagioclase dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, S.A.; Barker, W.W.; Banfield, J.F.

    1999-05-01

    Bytownite feldspar was dissolved in batch reactors in solutions of starch (glucose polymer), gum xanthan (glucose, mannose, glucuronic acid), pectin (poly-galacturonic acid), and four alginates (mannuronic and guluronic acid) with a range of molecular weights (low, medium, high and uncharacterized) to evaluate the effect of extracellular microbial polymers on mineral dissolution rates. Solutions were analyzed for dissolved Si and Al as an indicator of feldspar dissolution. At neutral pH, feldspar dissolution was inhibited by five of the acid polysaccharides, gum xanthan, pectin, alginate low, alginate medium, alginate high, compared to an organic-free control. An uncharacterized alginate substantially enhanced both Si and Al release from the feldspar. Starch, a neutral polysaccharide, had no apparent effect. Under mildly acidic conditions, initial pH {approx} 4, all of the polymers enhanced feldspar dissolution compared to the inorganic controls. Si release from feldspar in starch solution exceeded the control by a factor of three. Pectin and gum xanthan increased feldspar dissolution by a factor of 10, and the alginates enhanced feldspar dissolution by a factor of 50 to 100. Si and Al concentrations increased with time, even though solutions were supersaturated with respect to several possible secondary phases. Under acidic conditions, initial pH {approx} 3, below the pK{sub a} of the carboxylic acid groups, dissolution rates increased, but the relative increase due to the polysaccharides is lower, approximately a factor of two to ten. Microbial extracellular polymers play a complex role in mineral weathering. Polymers appear to inhibit dissolution under some conditions, possibly by irreversibly binding to the mineral surfaces. The extracellular polysaccharides can also enhance dissolution by providing protons and complexing with ions in solution.

  18. In situ Characterization of Photoresist Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itani, Toshiro; Santillan, Julius Joseph

    2010-06-01

    The dissolution process plays an important role in optimizing photoresist materials and processes for next-generation lithographic technologies. In this paper, we describe the application of high-speed atomic force microscopy for in situ analysis and characterization of photoresist dissolution. In particular, the physical changes in an exposed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photoresist film are analyzed in real time - before, during, and after the development process. In this initial work, we report the dissolution characteristics of an EUV-exposed poly(4-hyrdroxystyrene)-based polymer resist processed with a tetramethylammonium hydroxide developer solution.

  19. Exploring biotic vs. abiotic controls on syngenetic carbonate and clay mineral precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Gabriela S.; McKenzie, Judith A.; Martinez Ruiz, Francisca; Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2016-04-01

    A possible syngenetic relationship between carbonate and clay mineral precipitation has been reported for sedimentary rocks deposited in both lacustrine and marine sedimentary environments throughout the geological record. In particular, the mineral dolomite is often found associated with Mg-rich clays, such as stevensite. It is notable that this carbonate/clay association has been recorded in numerous samples taken from modern dolomite precipitating environments; for example, the Coorong lakes, South Australia, coastal sabkhas, Abu Dhabi, UAE and coastal hypersaline lagoons (Lagoa Vermelha and Brejo do Espinho) east of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. An HRTEM study of samples from these three locations indicates a possible physical/chemical association between the Ca-dolomite and Mg-rich clays, demonstrating a probable co-precipitation. To test this hypothesis, we have conducted a series of biotic and abiotic laboratory experiments. If this syngenesis actually occurs in nature, what, if any, are the biogeochemical processes controlling these precipitation reactions? Our experiments were designed to determine the extent of the biotic versus abiotic component influencing the mineral precipitation and, in the case of a biotic influence, to understand the mechanism through which microorganisms might mediate the formation of clay minerals. The experiments were carried out in the Geomicrobiology Laboratory of ETH Zürich using cultures of living microbes and artificial organic compounds that simulate functional groups present in natural biofilms formed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In addition, pure inorganic experiments were designed to understand possible physico-chemical conditions for diagenetic processes that could induce dissolution of Mg-carbonates and precipitation of Mg-rich clays. Our results show a remarkable biotic influence during the formation of clay minerals. Specifically, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), released by microbes in their

  20. The interactive biotic and abiotic processes of DDT transformation under dissimilatory iron-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Wang, Fang; Gu, Chenggang; Yang, Xinglun; Kengara, Fredrick O; Bian, Yongrong; Song, Yang; Jiang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the study was to elucidate the biotic and abiotic processes under dissimilatory iron reducing conditions involved in reductive dechlorination and iron reduction. DDT transformation was investigated in cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 with/without α-FeOOH. A modified first-order kinetics model was developed and described DDT transformation well. Both the α-FeOOH reduction rate and the dechlorination rate of DDT were positively correlated to the biomass. Addition of α-FeOOH enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT by favoring the cell survival and generating Fe(II) which was absorbed on the surface of bacteria and iron oxide. 92% of the absorbed Fe(II) was Na-acetate (1M) extractable. However, α-FeOOH also played a negative role of competing for electrons as reflected by the dechlorination rate of DDT was inhibited when increasing the α-FeOOH from 1 g L(-1) to 5 g L(-1). DDT was measured to be toxic to S. putrefaciens 200. The metabolites DDD, DDE and DDMU were recalcitrant to S. putrefaciens 200. The results suggested that iron oxide was not the key factor to promote the dissipation of DDX (DDT and the metabolites), whereas the one-electron reduction potential (E1) of certain organochlorines is the main factor and that the E1 higher than the threshold of the reductive driving forces of DIRB probably ensures the occur of reductive dechlorination. PMID:26025430

  1. EVALUATION OF LOW TEMPERATURE ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION IN TANK 51

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, J

    2008-09-04

    Tank 41 that was stored and sampled in Tank 49 was determined to be supersaturated relative to aluminum. Supersaturation in Tank 49 is not a risk to LTAD. However, storing and processing of this supernate carries a risk of solids precipitation, primarily in the form of gibbsite or boehmite. Blending with the supernate in Tank 11 neither increases nor decreases this risk. LTAD was initiated as an opportunity to substantially mitigate the planned increase in canister production and DWPF lifecycle after the realization of more sludge solids stored in the HLW tanks. As determined from the preliminary evaluation of LTAD, the direct benefit of the decanted liquid stored in Tank 11 represents 45 canisters at 34% waste loading with potential indirect benefits for much larger reductions. Application of an aluminum dissolution process to the remaining high aluminum content sludge will potentially reduce the planned canister production by several hundred canisters at 34%-38% waste loading.

  2. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H.

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as amore » function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.« less

  3. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H.

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as a function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.

  4. The Alkaline Dissolution Rate of Calcite.

    PubMed

    Colombani, Jean

    2016-07-01

    Due to the widespread presence of calcium carbonate on Earth, several geochemical systems, among which is the global CO2 cycle, are controlled to a large extent by the dissolution and precipitation of this mineral. For this reason, the dissolution of calcite has been thoroughly investigated for decades. Despite this intense activity, a consensual value of the dissolution rate of calcite has not been found yet. We show here that the inconsistency between the reported values stems mainly from the variability of the chemical and hydrodynamic conditions of measurement. The spreading of the values, when compared in identical conditions, is much less than expected and is interpreted in terms of sample surface topography. This analysis leads us to propose benchmark values of the alkaline dissolution rate of calcite compatible with all the published values, and a method to use them in various chemical and hydrodynamic contexts. PMID:27282839

  5. Nylon Dissolution in Nitric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    KESSINGER, GLENF.

    2004-06-16

    H Area Operations is planning to process Pu-contaminated uranium scrap in support of de-inventory efforts. Nylon bags will be used to hold materials to be dissolved in H-Canyon. Based on this set of twelve nylon dissolutions, it is concluded that (when other variables are held constant): increased acid concentration results in increased dissolution rates; increased acid concentration results in a lower dissolution onset temperature; little, if any, H plus is consumed during the depolymerization process; and 2.0-3.0 M HNO3, with 0.025 M KF and 2 g/L B, is satisfactory for the dissolution of nylon bag materials to be used during H-Canyon processing.

  6. Dissolution rates of prehnite, epidote, and albite

    SciTech Connect

    Rosemary, N.M. )

    1991-11-01

    Dissolution rates of prehnite and epidote in aqueous solutions were measured in the temperature range 25 to 90C, and as a function of pH. The dissolution rate of albite was measured at pH 1.4 at temperatures between 25 and 90C. Batch experiments using low ionic strength pH buffers in constant temperature water batch or ovens provided data on cumulative element release as a function of time. Steady state Si, Ca, Na, and Al release data obtained from these experiments were used to obtain limiting dissolution rates, where the term limiting rate denotes dissolution of a bulk mineral under conditions where it is far from equilibrium with the fluid. At 90C and at pH 1.4 to 6, prehnite and epidote dissolution rates decrease and are proportional to approximately {minus}0.3 pH for prehnite and {minus}0.2 pH for epidote. Above pH 6, prehnite dissolution becomes pH independent, by epidote dissolution increases with rates that are proportional to between +0.3 and +0.6 pH. Prehnite and epidote dissolution is linear and stoichiometric at low pH. At pH greater than 7, both minerals initially display preferential release of Si and Al relative to Ca; however, with increasing reaction dissolution becomes stoichiometric. This suggests that a Ca-enriched layer forms but reaches a steady state thickness which does not impede subsequent linear stoichiometric release. At pH 1.4, the limiting dissolution rate for albite is linear and stoichiometric. At pH 1.4, the activation energies are 18.12 {plus minus} 0.81 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} for prehnite, 19.76 {plus minus} 1.2 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} for epidote and 17.07 {plus minus} 1.6 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} for albite. At pH 6.5, the activation energy for prehnite dissolution is 20.73 {plus minus} 3.2 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}.

  7. Conceptual and instrumental progress in dissolution DNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähnig, Fabian; Kwiatkowski, Grzegorz; Ernst, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    We discuss conceptual and instrumental progress in dissolution DNP since its introduction in 2003. In our view there are three critical steps in the dissolution DNP process: (i) The achievable polarization level in a sample. (ii) The time required to build up the polarization. (iii) The transfer of the sample to the measurement system with minimum loss of polarization. In this review we describe in detail these steps and the different methodological and instrumental implementations, which have been proposed to optimize them.

  8. Diverse roles of jasmonates and ethylene in abiotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Kemal

    2015-04-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) and ethylene (ET), often acting cooperatively, play essential roles in regulating plant defense against pests and pathogens. Recent research reviewed here has revealed mechanistic new insights into the mode of action of these hormones in plant abiotic stress tolerance. During cold stress, JAs and ET differentially regulate the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) pathway. Major JA and ET signaling hubs such as JAZ proteins, CTR1, MYC2, components of the mediator complex, EIN2, EIN3, and several members of the AP2/ERF transcription factor gene family all have complex regulatory roles during abiotic stress adaptation. Better understanding the roles of these phytohormones in plant abiotic stress tolerance will contribute to the development of crop plants tolerant to a wide range of stressful environments. PMID:25731753

  9. Current perspectives in proteomic analysis of abiotic stress in Grapevines

    PubMed Central

    George, Iniga S.; Haynes, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Grapes are an important crop plant which forms the basis of a globally important industry. Grape and wine production is particularly vulnerable to environmental and climatic fluctuations, which makes it essential for us to develop a greater understanding of the molecular level responses of grape plants to various abiotic stresses. The completion of the initial grape genome sequence in 2007 has led to a significant increase in research on grapes using proteomics approaches. In this article, we discuss some of the current research on abiotic stress in grapevines, in the context of abiotic stress research in other plant species. We also highlight some of the current limitations in grapevine proteomics and identify areas with promising scope for potential future research. PMID:25538720

  10. ELUCIDATING THE ROLE OF ELECTRON TRANSFER MEDIATORS IN REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATIONS IN NATURAL SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To study the identity and reactivity of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) in natural sediments, the reduction kinetics of a glass bead-azo dye complex were measured in abiotic and biotic model systems, as well as in natural sediments. In abiotic model systems, the bead-dye comp...

  11. Environmental Selenium Transformations: Distinguishing Abiotic and Biotic Factors Influencing Se Redox Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, C.; Kenyon, J.; James, B. R.; Santelli, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Worldwide, selenium (Se) is proving to be a significant environmental concern, with many anthropogenic activities (e.g. coal mining and combustion, phosphate mining and agricultural irrigation) releasing potentially hazardous concentrations into surface and subsurface ecosystems. The US EPA is currently considering aquatic Se regulations, however no guidelines exist for excess soil Se, despite its ability to act as a persistent Se source. Various abiotic and biological processes mediate Se oxidation/reduction (redox) transformations in soils, thus influencing its solubility and bioavailability. In this research we assess (1) the ability of metal-transforming fungal species to aerobically reduce Se (Se (IV and/or VI) to Se(0)), and (2) the relative contribution of biotic and abiotic pathways for aerobic Se transformation. The primary objective of this research is to determine what abiotic and biotic factors enhance or restrict Se bioavailability. Results indicate that fungal-mediated Se reduction may be quite widespread, with at least 7 out of 10 species of known Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi isolated from metal impacted environments also identified as capable of aerobically reducing Se(IV) and/or Se(VI) to Se(0). Increasing concentrations of selenite (SeO32-; Se(IV)) and selenate (SeO42-; Se(VI)) generally reduced fungal growth rates, although selenate was more likely to inhibit fungal growth than selenite. To study oxidation, Se(0) was combined with Mn(III/IV) (hydr)oxides (henceforth referred to as Mn oxides), Se-transforming fungi (Alternaria alternata), and oxalic acid to mimic Se biogeochemistry at the plant-soil interface. Increased pH in the presence of fungi (7.2 with fungi, 6.8 without fungi after 24 days) was observed. Additionally, a slight decrease in redox potential was measured for incubations without Mn oxides (236 mV with Mn oxides, 205 mV without Mn oxides after 24 days), indicating that Mn oxides may enhance Se oxidation. Elemental Se oxidation rates to

  12. Experimental determination of chlorite dissolution rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, C.A.; Bateman, K.; MacGregor, R.; Pearce, J.M.; Wetton, P.D.; Savage, D.

    1995-12-31

    Current concepts of the geological disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the UK envisage the construction of a mined facility (incorporating cementitious engineered barriers) in chlorite-bearing rocks. To model accurately the fluid-rock reactions within the disturbed zone surrounding a repository requires functions that describe mineral dissolution kinetics under pH conditions that vary from near neutral to highly alkaline. Therefore, an experimental study to determine the dissolution rates of Fe-rich chlorite has been undertaken as part of the Nirex Safety Assessment Research Program. Four experiments have been carried out at 25 C and four at 70 C, both sets using a range of NaCl/NaOH solutions of differing pH (of nominal pH 9.0, 10.3, 11.6 and 13.0 [at 25 C]). Dissolution rates have been calculated and were found to increase with increasing pH and temperature. However, increased pH resulted in non-stoichiometric dissolution possibly due to preferential dissolution of part of the chlorite structure relative to another, or reprecipitation of some elements as thin hydroxide or oxyhydroxide surface coatings on the chlorite. These results also show that chlorite dissolution is appreciably slower than that of albite and quartz at both 25 and 70 C, but slightly faster than that of muscovite at 70 C.

  13. Kinetics of anorthite dissolution in basaltic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yi; Zhang, Youxue; Chen, Yang; Xu, Zhengjiu

    2016-04-01

    We report convection-free anorthite dissolution experiments in a basaltic melt at 1280-1500 °C and 0.5 GPa on two different crystallographic surfaces, (1 2 1 bar) and (3 bar 0 2) to investigate dissolution kinetics. The anisotropy of the anorthite dissolution rate along these two surfaces is negligible. Time series experiments at ∼1280 °C show that anorthite dissolution is mainly controlled by diffusion in the melt within experimental uncertainty. Analytical solutions were used to model the dissolution and diffusion processes, and to obtain the diffusivities and the saturation concentrations of the equilibrium-determining component (Al2O3) for anorthite dissolution into the basaltic melt. For the first time, we are able to show the physical and chemical characteristics of quench growth effect on the near-interface melt using high spatial resolution (0.3 μm) EDS analyses. For anorthite (An# ⩾ 90) saturation in a melt with 39-53 wt% SiO2 and ⩽0.4 wt% H2O, the concentration of Al2O3 in wt% depends on temperature as follows:

  14. Abiotic systems for the catalytic treatment of solvent-contaminated water

    SciTech Connect

    Betterton, E.A.; Arnold, R.G.; Liu, Zhijie; Hollan, N.

    1996-12-31

    Three abiotic systems are described that catalyze the reductive dehalogenation of heavily halogenated environmental pollutants, including carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethene, and perchloroethene. These systems include (a) an electrolytic reactor in which the potential on the working electrode (cathode) is fixed by using a potentiostat, (b) a light-driven system consisting of a semiconductor and (covalently attached) macrocycle that can accept light transmitted via an optical fiber, and a light-driven, two-solvent (isopropanol/acetone) system that promotes dehalogenation reactions via an unknown mechanism. Each is capable of accelerating reductive dehalogenation reactions to very high rates under laboratory conditions. Typically, millimolar concentrations of aqueous-phase targets can be dehalogenated in minutes to hours. The description of each system includes the elements of reaction mechanism (to the extent known), typical kinetic data, and a discussion of the feasibility of applying this technology for the in situ destruction of hazardous compounds. 14 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Contribution of acetic acid to the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass under abiotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Trzcinski, Antoine P; Stuckey, David C

    2015-06-01

    Acetic acid was used in abiotic experiments to adjust the solution pH and investigate its influence on the chemical hydrolysis of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW). Soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) was used to measure the hydrolysis under oxidative conditions (positive oxidation-reduction potential values), and pH 4 allowed for 20% (±2%) of the COD added to be solubilized, whereas only 12% (±1%) was solubilized at pH7. Under reducing conditions (negative oxidation-reduction potential values) and pH 4, 32.3% (±3%) of the OFMSW was solubilized which shows that acidogenesis at pH 4 during the anaerobic digestion of solid waste can result in chemical hydrolysis. In comparison, bacterial hydrolysis resulted in 54% (±6%) solubilization. PMID:25794810

  16. [In vitro dissolution rate of Liuwei Wuling tablet based on biological potency and integrated dissolution].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Juan; Cheng, Ling; Shen, Cheng-ying; Li, Juan-juan; Qiu, Ling; Shen, Gang; Han, Jin; Yuan, Hai-long

    2015-11-01

    To explore the feasibility of chemical and biological method in evaluation of the in vitro dissolution rate of Liuwei Wuling tablet (LWT), this experiment investigated the inhibitory effect of LWT dissolving solutions on LX-2 hepatic stellate cells in 0.1% SDS dissolution medium in different dissolving periods. From these results, the cumulative dissolution rate of LWT was obtained based on the cell inhibitory rate. The dissolution rates of deoxyschizandrin, phillyrin, and Specnuezhenide were determined by HPLC method. A novel approach of self-defined weighting coefficient had been created to establish the integrated dissolution rate model. Then f2 similar factor method was used to evaluate the relevance of these two methods. The results showed that f2 values for deoxyschizandrin, phillyrin, Specnuezhenide, and the integrated dissolution were 61, 43, 61 and 75 respectively, indicating that the dissolution of multi-component integration could fully reflect the biological potency of the whole recipe. The dissolution evaluation method for multicomponent integration based on biological activity is expected to be one of the effective means for in vitro dissolution test of LWT. PMID:27097413

  17. Evaluating the role of re-adsorption of dissolved Hg(2+) during cinnabar dissolution using isotope tracer technique.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping; Li, Yanbin; Liu, Guangliang; Yang, Guidi; Lagos, Leonel; Yin, Yongguang; Gu, Baohua; Jiang, Guibin; Cai, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Cinnabar dissolution is an important factor controlling mercury (Hg) cycling. Recent studies have suggested the co-occurrence of re-adsorption of the released Hg during the course of cinnabar dissolution. However, there is a lack of feasible techniques that can quantitatively assess the amount of Hg re-adsorbed on cinnabar when investigating cinnabar dissolution. In this study, a new method, based on isotope tracing and dilution techniques, was developed to study the role of Hg re-adsorption in cinnabar dissolution. The developed method includes two key components: (1) accurate measurement of both released and spiked Hg in aqueous phase and (2) estimation of re-adsorbed Hg on cinnabar surface via the reduction in spiked (202)Hg(2+). By adopting the developed method, it was found that the released Hg for trials purged with oxygen could reach several hundred μgL(-1), while no significant cinnabar dissolution was detected under anaerobic condition. Cinnabar dissolution rate when considering Hg re-adsorption was approximately 2 times the value calculated solely with the Hg detected in the aqueous phase. These results suggest that ignoring the Hg re-adsorption process can significantly underestimate the importance of cinnabar dissolution, highlighting the necessity of applying the developed method in future cinnabar dissolution studies. PMID:27322904

  18. Distinct iron isotopic signatures and supply from marine sediment dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Homoky, William B.; John, Seth G.; Conway, Tim M.; Mills, Rachel A.

    2013-01-01

    Oceanic iron inputs must be traced and quantified to learn how they affect primary productivity and climate. Chemical reduction of iron in continental margin sediments provides a substantial dissolved flux to the oceans, which is isotopically lighter than the crust, and so may be distinguished in seawater from other sources, such as wind-blown dust. However, heavy iron isotopes measured in seawater have recently led to the proposition of another source of dissolved iron from ‘non-reductive’ dissolution of continental margins. Here we present the first pore water iron isotope data from a passive-tectonic and semi-arid ocean margin (South Africa), which reveals a smaller and isotopically heavier flux of dissolved iron to seawater than active-tectonic and dysoxic continental margins. These data provide in situ evidence of non-reductive iron dissolution from a continental margin, and further show that geological and hydro-climatic factors may affect the amount and isotopic composition of iron entering the ocean. PMID:23868399

  19. A proposed abiotic reaction scheme for hydroxylamine and monochloramine under chloramination relevant drinking water conditions.

    PubMed

    Wahman, David G; Speitel, Gerald E; Machavaram, Madhav V

    2014-09-01

    Drinking water monochloramine (NH2Cl) use may promote ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOB use (i) ammonia monooxygenase for biological ammonia (NH3) oxidation to hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and (ii) hydroxylamine oxidoreductase for NH2OH oxidation to nitrite. NH2Cl and NH2OH may react, providing AOB potential benefits and detriments. The NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction would benefit AOB by removing the disinfectant (NH2Cl) and releasing their growth substrate (NH3), but the NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction would also provide a possible additional inactivation mechanism besides direct NH2Cl reaction with cells. Because biological NH2OH oxidation supplies the electrons required for biological NH3 oxidation, the NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction provides a direct mechanism for NH2Cl to inhibit NH3 oxidation, starving the cell of reductant by preventing biological NH2OH oxidation. To investigate possible NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction implications on AOB, an understanding of the underlying abiotic reaction is first required. The present study conducted a detailed literature review and proposed an abiotic NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction scheme (RS) for chloramination relevant drinking water conditions (μM concentrations, air saturation, and pH 7-9). Next, RS literature based kinetics and end-products were evaluated experimentally between pHs 7.7 and 8.3, representing (i) the pH range for future experiments with AOB and (ii) mid-range pHs typically found in chloraminated drinking water. In addition, a (15)N stable isotope experiment was conducted to verify nitrous oxide and nitrogen gas production and their nitrogen source. Finally, the RS was slightly refined using the experimental data and an AQUASIM implemented kinetic model. A chloraminated drinking water relevant RS is proposed and provides the abiotic reaction foundation for future AOB biotic experiments. PMID:24862953

  20. Evaluating reaction pathways of hydrothermal abiotic organic synthesis at elevated temperatures and pressures using carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2015-04-01

    Experiments were performed to better understand the role of environmental factors on reaction pathways and corresponding carbon isotope fractionations during abiotic hydrothermal synthesis of organic compounds using piston cylinder apparatus at 750 °C and 5.5 kbars. Chemical compositions of experimental products and corresponding carbon isotopic values were obtained by a Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS system. Alkanes (methane and ethane), straight-chain saturated alcohols (ethanol and n-butanol) and monocarboxylic acids (formic and acetic acids) were generated with ethanol being the only organic compound with higher δ13C than CO2. CO was not detected in experimental products owing to the favorable water-gas shift reaction under high water pressure conditions. The pattern of δ13C values of CO2, carboxylic acids and alkanes are consistent with their equilibrium isotope relationships: CO2 > carboxylic acids > alkanes, but the magnitude of the fractionation among them is higher than predicted isotope equilibrium values. In particular, the isotopic fractionation between CO2 and CH4 remained constant at ∼31‰, indicating a kinetic effect during CO2 reduction processes. No "isotope reversal" of δ13C values for alkanes or carboxylic acids was observed, which indicates a different reaction pathway than what is typically observed during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis under gas phase conditions. Under constraints imposed in experiments, the anomalous 13C isotope enrichment in ethanol suggests that hydroxymethylene is the organic intermediate, and that the generation of other organic compounds enriched in 12C were facilitated by subsequent Rayleigh fractionation of hydroxymethylene reacting with H2 and/or H2O. Carbon isotope fractionation data obtained in this study are instrumental in assessing the controlling factors on abiotic formation of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems. Knowledge on how environmental conditions affect reaction pathways of abiotic synthesis of organic

  1. Role of bacterial siderophores in dissolution of hornblende

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liermann, Laura J.; Kalinowski, Birgitta E.; Brantley, Susan L.; Ferry, James G.

    2000-02-01

    Hornblende, a common mineral in granitic soils, may act as a source for a variety of metals needed by bacterial species for enzyme function (e.g., Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Co, Mo, V, Ni). A species of the bacterial genus Streptomyces was cultured from an Adirondack soil and isolated because of its ability to grow robustly in low Fe medium with hornblende present. Studies with unbuffered culture medium, to discover whether Streptomyces sp. cultures affected solution pH, showed a decrease of 2.0 pH units in 21 d, then an increase of 3.0 pH units at 56 d. Cells that adhered to the hornblende surface at 56 days were difficult to remove, presumably because of mycelial growth deep into pits and cracks. Decreases and increases in pH may have been due to production of organic acids and ammonia respectively. Increases in pH could also have been related to release of components during death of organisms. In a buffered medium, Streptomyces sp. increased the initial Fe release rate from hornblende approximately fivefold over that of an abiotic control. A catechol derivative, produced by the Streptomyces sp. and characterized by chromatography and mass spectrometry, is presumed to cause this Fe release enhancement. Hornblende dissolution was also analyzed in the presence of a commercially available hydroxamate siderophore, desferrioxamine mesylate (DFAM). DFAM is the methane sulfonate form of one of many siderophores known to be a product of streptomycetes. The rate of Fe release obtained when incubating the hornblende with 24 μm of DFAM was similar to the rate observed in the presence of the Streptomyces sp. isolate. Higher concentrations of DFAM increased the dissolution rate nonlinearly, described by the rate equation R = (7.6 × 10 -13)C 0.47, where R is the release rate of Fe (mol/m 2s), and C is the concentration (mol/l) of DFAM. The DFAM also increased release of Al and Si from hornblende into solution; however, these release rates were not increased by addition of the

  2. The effects of flow rate and concentration on nitrobenzene removal in abiotic and biotic zero-valent iron columns.

    PubMed

    Yin, Weizhao; Wu, Jinhua; Huang, Weilin; Li, Yongtao; Jiang, Gangbiao

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of varying nitrobenzene (NB) loadings via increasing flow rate or influent NB concentration mode on the removal efficiency in zero-valent iron (ZVI) columns sterilized (abiotic) or preloaded with acclimated microorganisms (biotic). It was shown that physical sequestration via adsorption/co-precipitation and reductive transformation of NB to aniline (AN) were the two major mechanisms for the NB removal in both abiotic and biotic ZVI columns. The NB removal efficiency decreased in both columns as the flow rate increased from 0.25 to 1.0mLmin(-1) whereas the AN recovery increased accordingly, with relatively high AN recovery observed at the flow rate of 1.0mLmin(-1). At the constant flow rate of 0.5mLmin(-1), increasing influent NB concentration from 80 to 400μmolL(-1) resulted in decreasing of the overall NB removal efficiency from 79.5 to 48.6% in the abiotic column and from 85.6 to 62.5% in the biotic column. The results also showed that the sequestration capacity and chemical reduction capacity were respectively 72% and 157.6% higher in the biotic column than in the abiotic column at the same tested hydraulic conditions and NB loadings. The optimal flow rates and influent NB concentrations were at 0.5mLmin(-1) and 80μmolL(-1) for the abiotic column and 2.0mLmin-1 and 240μmolL(-1) for the biotic column, respectively. This study indicated that microorganisms not only enhanced overall reduction of NB, but also facilitated NB sequestration within the porous media and that the optimal loading conditions for overall removal, sequestration, and reduction of NB may be different. Optimal operation conditions should be found for preferred sequestration or transformation (or both) of the target contaminants to meet different goals of groundwater remediation with the ZVI-PRB systems. PMID:27093118

  3. ABIOTIC DEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE UNDER THERMAL REMEDIATION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The degradation of TCE (C2HCl3) to carbon dioxide (CO2) and chloride (Cl-) has been reported to occur during thermal remediation of subsurface environments. The overall goal of this study was to evaluate abiotic degradation of TCE at el...

  4. Recent advances in polyamine metabolism and abiotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Parimalan; Subramani, Rajkumar; Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Amit Kumar; Singh, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Global warming is an alarming problem in agriculture and its effect on yield loss has been estimated to be five per cent for every degree centigrade rise in temperature. Plants exhibit multiple mechanisms like optimizing signaling pathway, involvement of secondary messengers, production of biomolecules specifically in response to stress, modulation of various metabolic networks in accordance with stress, and so forth, in order to overcome abiotic stress factors. Many structural genes and networks of pathway were identified and reported in plant systems for abiotic stress tolerance. One such crucial metabolic pathway that is involved in normal physiological function and also gets modulated during stress to impart tolerance is polyamine metabolic pathway. Besides the role of structural genes, it is also important to know the mechanism by which these structural genes are regulated during stress. Present review highlights polyamine biosynthesis, catabolism, and its role in abiotic stress tolerance with special reference to plant systems. Additionally, a system based approach is discussed as a potential strategy to dissect the existing variation in crop species in unraveling the interacting regulatory components/genetic determinants related to PAs mediated abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:25136565

  5. Genetic Diversity In Abiotic Stress Tolerances Among Wheat Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Landraces and close related species of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) offer a vast reservoir of genetic resources for wheat improvement to production on abiotic stressed soils. In order to utilize the wheat landrace and close relative gene pools, the evaluation of wheat landrace and close r...

  6. Are karrikins involved in plant abiotic stress responses?

    PubMed

    Li, Weiqiang; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-09-01

    Recent reports have shown that strigolactones play a positive role in plant responses to drought and salt stress through MAX2 (More Axillary Growth 2). Increasing evidence suggests that MAX2 is also involved in karrikin signaling, raising the question whether karrikins play any role in plant adaptation to abiotic stresses. PMID:26255855

  7. ABIOTIC TRANSFORMATION PATHWAYS OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information is presented for assessing the potential of an organic chemical to undergo abiotic transformation in aquatic ecosystems. hen predicting the environmental fate of an organic chemical, two primary questions must be addressed. irst, what are the reaction kinetics for the...

  8. A membraneless single compartment abiotic glucose fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaughter, Gymama; Sunday, Joshua

    2014-09-01

    A simple energy harvesting strategy has been developed to selectively catalyze glucose in the presence of oxygen in a glucose/O2 fuel cell. The anode consists of an abiotic catalyst Al/Au/ZnO, in which ZnO seed layer was deposited on the surface of Al/Au substrate using hydrothermal method. The cathode is constructed from a single rod of platinum with an outer diameter of 500 μm. The abiotic glucose fuel cell was studied in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) containing 5 mM glucose at a temperature of 22 °C. The cell is characterized according to its open-circuit voltage, polarization profile, and power density plot. Under these conditions, the abiotic glucose fuel cell possesses an open-circuit voltage of 840 mV and delivered a maximum power density of 16.2 μW cm-2 at a cell voltage of 495 mV. These characteristics are comparable to biofuel cell utilizing a much more complex system design. Such low-cost lightweight abiotic catalyzed glucose fuel cells have a great promise to be optimized, miniaturized to power bio-implantable devices.

  9. Weighing Abiotic and Biotic Influences on Weed Seed Predation Rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed seed predation is an important ecosystem service supporting weed management in low-external-input agroecosystems. Current knowledge of weed seed predation focuses on biotic mechanisms, with less understood about the relative impact of abiotic variables. In order to quantify relative contributio...

  10. Weighing Abiotic and Biotic Influences on Weed Seed Predation Rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed seed predation is an important ecosystem service supporting weed management in low-external-input agroecosystems. Current knowledge of weed seed predation in arable systems focuses on biotic mechanisms, with less understood about the relative impact of abiotic variables on this process. In orde...

  11. Genetic mapping of abiotic stress responses in sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to rich genetic diversity for tolerance to various abiotic stress conditions, sorghum is an ideal system for genetic mapping and elucidation of genome regions that confer such response among cereal crops. Coupled with the development of DNA marker technologies and most recently the sequencing o...

  12. Plastid transformation for abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Bansal, K C; Singh, A K; Wani, S H

    2012-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures are major limiting factors in plant growth and development and pose serious threat to global agricultural production. Here we describe a procedure, using a tobacco plastid transformation vector, to generate transplastomic plants with an enhanced ability to tolerate abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, or cold stress. The procedure involves biolistic delivery of a plastid transformation vector into explants, antibiotic selection procedures, and -identification of transplastomic lines. The plastid transformation vector contains an aadA gene that encodes resistance to spectinomycin as a selectable marker along with the gene of interest for developing transplastomic plants that are tolerant to abiotic stresses. Shoot buds appear over the surface of bombarded explants following spectinomycin selection. Transplastomic shoots are multiplied following several rounds of -spectinomycin selection. Homoplasmic transplastomic lines are confirmed by spectinomycin and streptomycin double selection over a period of 4-5 weeks. The available reports suggest that transplastomic technology is a useful tool for expressing genes in plastids or chloroplasts for enhancing abiotic stress tolerance in plants. PMID:22895771

  13. Recent Advances in Polyamine Metabolism and Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, Parimalan; Subramani, Rajkumar; Singh, Amit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Global warming is an alarming problem in agriculture and its effect on yield loss has been estimated to be five per cent for every degree centigrade rise in temperature. Plants exhibit multiple mechanisms like optimizing signaling pathway, involvement of secondary messengers, production of biomolecules specifically in response to stress, modulation of various metabolic networks in accordance with stress, and so forth, in order to overcome abiotic stress factors. Many structural genes and networks of pathway were identified and reported in plant systems for abiotic stress tolerance. One such crucial metabolic pathway that is involved in normal physiological function and also gets modulated during stress to impart tolerance is polyamine metabolic pathway. Besides the role of structural genes, it is also important to know the mechanism by which these structural genes are regulated during stress. Present review highlights polyamine biosynthesis, catabolism, and its role in abiotic stress tolerance with special reference to plant systems. Additionally, a system based approach is discussed as a potential strategy to dissect the existing variation in crop species in unraveling the interacting regulatory components/genetic determinants related to PAs mediated abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:25136565

  14. Use of Silicate Minerals for pH Control during Reductive Dechlorination of Chloroethenes in Batch Cultures of Different Microbial Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Elsa; Brovelli, Alessandro; Barry, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    In chloroethene-contaminated sites undergoing in situ bioremediation, groundwater acidification is a frequent problem in the source zone, and buffering strategies have to be implemented to maintain the pH in the neutral range. An alternative to conventional soluble buffers is silicate mineral particles as a long-term source of alkalinity. In previous studies, the buffering potentials of these minerals have been evaluated based on abiotic dissolution tests and geochemical modeling. In the present study, the buffering potentials of four silicate minerals (andradite, diopside, fayalite, and forsterite) were tested in batch cultures amended with tetrachloroethene (PCE) and inoculated with different organohalide-respiring consortia. Another objective of this study was to determine the influence of pH on the different steps of PCE dechlorination. The consortia showed significant differences in sensitivities toward acidic pH for the different dechlorination steps. Molecular analysis indicated that Dehalococcoides spp. that were present in all consortia were the most pH-sensitive organohalide-respiring guild members compared to Sulfurospirillum spp. and Dehalobacter spp. In batch cultures with silicate mineral particles as pH-buffering agents, all four minerals tested were able to maintain the pH in the appropriate range for reductive dechlorination of chloroethenes. However, complete dechlorination to ethene was observed only with forsterite, diopside, and fayalite. Dissolution of andradite increased the redox potential and did not allow dechlorination. With forsterite, diopside, and fayalite, dechlorination to ethene was observed but at much lower rates for the last two dechlorination steps than with the positive control. This indicated an inhibition effect of silicate minerals and/or their dissolution products on reductive dechlorination of cis-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride. Hence, despite the proven pH-buffering potential of silicate minerals, compatibility with

  15. Can the dissolution rates of individual minerals be used to describe whole rock dissolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critelli, Teresa; Marini, Luigi; Schott, Jacques; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Apollaro, Carmine; Rinder, Thomas; De Rosa, Rosanna; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2014-05-01

    There have been an exhaustive number of laboratory studies determining the dissolution rates of individual minerals, but few have focused on the dissolution rates of minerals in multi-mineralic rocks. As a result, geochemical modeling of the temporal evolution of water-rock interaction is generally based on the assumption that the dissolution rate of minerals within a rock is equal to that measured in the laboratory on individual minerals. To verify this hypothesis, we have determined experimentally the dissolution rates of a well characterized metabasalt rock (Apollaro et al., 2011; Bloise et al., 2012) from the Mt. Reventino area (Southern Italy) at 25°C in mixed flow reactors. From these experiments and rock modal analysis we have deduced the dissolution rates of the minerals present in the rock (actinolite, albite, chlorite, epidote, and phengite). The major observation of this effort include: (i) only small differences in the dissolution rates of the individual minerals were observed; these rates are close to the whole-rock dissolution rate and (ii) the dissolution rates of albite and chlorite are in close agreement with laboratory rates obtained from individual mineral dissolution experiments, whereas those of actinolite, phengite, and epidote are not consistent with those reported in literature by 1-2 orders of magnitude. These results demonstrate that the dissolution rate of a given mineral in a multi-phase rock can be affected by the presence of the other minerals. Rock dissolution kinetics are likely constrained by the dissolution rates of the more abundant, lesser reactive mineral or minerals in the rock. These unreactive minerals can prevent the dissolution of the more rapidly dissolving mineral grains by keeping them out of contact with the aqueous phase. This implies that the overall weathering rate of rocks cannot be modelled from the measured dissolution rates of its individual minerals. If confirmed through further studies, this conclusion may

  16. Dissolution rates of phyllosilicates as a function of bacterial metabolic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balland, C.; Poszwa, A.; Leyval, C.; Mustin, C.

    2010-10-01

    Weathering experiments using biotite and phlogopite in the presence of bacteria were conducted to better understand biotic dissolution kinetics and processes (proton- and ligand-promoted dissolution) under aerobic conditions. Miniature batch reactors (300 μl in microplate wells) were used at 24 °C for 3 days with and without bacterial strains. Abiotic experiments were performed with organic and nitric acids in order to calibrate the biotite-phlogopite chemical dissolution. An empirical model was used to fit the pH dependence for iron release rate (r Fe) considering the influence of both protons and ligands from acidic to neutral conditions (pH ranging from 3 to 7): rFe=kH(a)m+kL(aL)1 where k is the apparent rate constant, a H+ and a L are the activities of protons and ligands, and m and l are the reaction orders. For both minerals in most cases at a given pH, the iron release rates in the presence of bacteria were in good agreement with rates determined by the chemical model and could be explained by a combination of proton- and ligand-promoted processes. Bacteria affect mineral dissolution and iron release rates through the quantities and nature of the organic acids they produce. Three domains were differentiated and proposed as biochemical models of mica dissolution: (1) below pH 3, only proton-promoted dissolution occurred, (2) in weakly acidic solutions both ligand- and proton-promoted mechanisms were involved, and (3) iron immobilization occured, at pH values greater than 4 for biotite and greater than 5 for phlogopite. This model allows us to distinguish the "weathering pattern phenotypes" of strains. Bacteria that are isolated from horizons poor in carbon appear more efficient at weathering micas than bacterial strains isolated from environments rich in carbon. Moreover, our results suggest that the mineral could exert a control on the release of organic acids and the "weathering pattern phenotypes" of bacteria.

  17. Towards a less biased dissolution of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Thevarajah, Joel J; Bulanadi, Jerikho C; Wagner, Manfred; Gaborieau, Marianne; Castignolles, Patrice

    2016-09-01

    The dissolution of polysaccharides is notoriously challenging, especially when one needs a "true" solution. Factors influencing chitosan's solubility include composition, also known as degree of acetylation (DA). The dissolution of chitosan was investigated by visual observation, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), pressure mobilization (PM), free-solution capillary electrophoresis (CE) and real-time solution-state NMR spectroscopy. Aqueous HCl dissolves around 15% more chitosan than the commonly used aqueous acetic acid (AcOH), however aggregates were detected in SEC suggesting incomplete dissolution. Significant deacetylation of chitosan over the period needed for dissolution at high temperature was observed by NMR spectroscopy in DCl by about 20% of the initial DA value. Accurate DA determination by NMR spectroscopy may thus be possible only in the solid state (with a precision within 1% on the DA % scale above a DA of 10%). Overall a compromise between maximum solubilization and minimum degradation is required in attempting to obtain a "true" solution of chitosan. The completeness of the dissolution may be more influenced by the average DA than by molar mass. PMID:27543035

  18. Visualizing nanoparticle dissolution by imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Szakal, Christopher; Ugelow, Melissa S; Gorham, Justin M; Konicek, Andrew R; Holbrook, R David

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate the ability to visualize nanoparticle dissolution while simultaneously providing chemical signatures that differentiate between citrate-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), AgNPs forced into dissolution via exposure to UV radiation, silver nitrate (AgNO3), and AgNO3/citrate deposited from aqueous solutions and suspensions. We utilize recently developed inkjet printing (IJP) protocols to deposit the different solutions/suspensions as NP aggregates and soluble species, which separate onto surfaces in situ, and collect mass spectral imaging data via time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). Resulting 2D Ag(+) chemical images provide the ability to distinguish between the different Ag-containing starting materials and, when coupled with mass spectral peak ratios, provide information-rich data sets for quick and reproducible visualization of NP-based aqueous constituents. When compared to other measurements aimed at studying NP dissolution, the IJP-TOF-SIMS approach offers valuable information that can potentially help in understanding the complex equilibria in NP-containing solutions and suspensions, including NP dissolution kinetics and extent of overall dissolution. PMID:24611464

  19. Dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by an Aerobic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maurice, P.

    2004-12-13

    This project investigated the effects of an aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina bacterium on the dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides. The research is important because metals and radionuclides that adsorb to Fe(III)(hydr)oxides could potentially be remobilized by dissolving bacteria. We showed that P. mendocina is capable of dissolving Fe-bearing minerals by a variety of mechanisms, including production of siderophores, pH changes, and formation of reductants. The production of siderophores by P. mendocina was quantified under a variety of growth conditions. Finally, we demonstrated that microbial siderophores may adsorb to and enhance dissolution of clay minerals.

  20. Influence of abiotic stress, flower morphology, and pollen dehydration sensitivity on cotton out-crossing potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity in reproductive abiotic stress tolerance has been reported for cotton [Gossypium hirsutum (L.)] based upon the percentage of anther dehiscence of mature pollen in adverse environments. This study investigated the abiotic stress tolerance of mature pollen and identified ...

  1. Integrating omic approaches for abiotic stress tolerance in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Rupesh; Sonah, Humira; Patil, Gunvant; Chen, Wei; Prince, Silvas; Mutava, Raymond; Vuong, Tri; Valliyodan, Babu; Nguyen, Henry T.

    2014-01-01

    Soybean production is greatly influenced by abiotic stresses imposed by environmental factors such as drought, water submergence, salt, and heavy metals. A thorough understanding of plant response to abiotic stress at the molecular level is a prerequisite for its effective management. The molecular mechanism of stress tolerance is complex and requires information at the omic level to understand it effectively. In this regard, enormous progress has been made in the omics field in the areas of genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. The emerging field of ionomics is also being employed for investigating abiotic stress tolerance in soybean. Omic approaches generate a huge amount of data, and adequate advancements in computational tools have been achieved for effective analysis. However, the integration of omic-scale information to address complex genetics and physiological questions is still a challenge. In this review, we have described advances in omic tools in the view of conventional and modern approaches being used to dissect abiotic stress tolerance in soybean. Emphasis was given to approaches such as quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and genomic selection (GS). Comparative genomics and candidate gene approaches are also discussed considering identification of potential genomic loci, genes, and biochemical pathways involved in stress tolerance mechanism in soybean. This review also provides a comprehensive catalog of available online omic resources for soybean and its effective utilization. We have also addressed the significance of phenomics in the integrated approaches and recognized high-throughput multi-dimensional phenotyping as a major limiting factor for the improvement of abiotic stress tolerance in soybean. PMID:24917870

  2. Abiotic ozone and oxygen in atmospheres similar to prebiotic Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Segura, Antígona; Claire, Mark W.; Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-09-10

    The search for life on planets outside our solar system will use spectroscopic identification of atmospheric biosignatures. The most robust remotely detectable potential biosignature is considered to be the detection of oxygen (O{sub 2}) or ozone (O{sub 3}) simultaneous to methane (CH{sub 4}) at levels indicating fluxes from the planetary surface in excess of those that could be produced abiotically. Here we use an altitude-dependent photochemical model with the enhanced lower boundary conditions necessary to carefully explore abiotic O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} production on lifeless planets with a wide variety of volcanic gas fluxes and stellar energy distributions. On some of these worlds, we predict limited O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} buildup, caused by fast chemical production of these gases. This results in detectable abiotic O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} features in the UV-visible, but no detectable abiotic O{sub 2} features. Thus, simultaneous detection of O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} by a UV-visible mission is not a strong biosignature without proper contextual information. Discrimination between biological and abiotic sources of O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} is possible through analysis of the stellar and atmospheric context—particularly redox state and O atom inventory—of the planet in question. Specifically, understanding the spectral characteristics of the star and obtaining a broad wavelength range for planetary spectra should allow more robust identification of false positives for life. This highlights the importance of wide spectral coverage for future exoplanet characterization missions. Specifically, discrimination between true and false positives may require spectral observations that extend into infrared wavelengths and provide contextual information on the planet's atmospheric chemistry.

  3. Predominance of biotic over abiotic formation of halogenated hydrocarbons in hypersaline sediments in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Ruecker, A; Weigold, P; Behrens, S; Jochmann, M; Laaks, J; Kappler, A

    2014-08-19

    Volatile halogenated organic compounds (VOX) contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. There is evidence of natural VOX formation in many environments ranging from forest soils to salt lakes. Laboratory studies have suggested that VOX formation can be chemically stimulated by reactive Fe species while field studies have provided evidence for direct biological (enzymatic) VOX formation. However, the relative contribution of abiotic and biotic processes to global VOX budgets is still unclear. The goals of this study were to quantify VOX release from sediments from a hypersaline lake in Western Australia (Lake Strawbridge) and to distinguish between the relative contributions of biotic and abiotic VOX formation in microbially active and sterilized microcosms. Our experiments demonstrated that the release of organochlorines from Lake Strawbridge sediments was mainly biotic. Among the organochlorines detected were monochlorinated, e.g., chloromethane (CH3Cl), and higher chlorinated VOX compounds such as trichloromethane (CHCl3). Amendment of sediments with either Fe(III) oxyhydroxide (ferrihydrite) or a mixture of lactate/acetate or both ferrihydrite and lactate/acetate did not stimulate VOX formation. This suggests that although microbial Fe(III) reduction took place, there was no stimulation of VOX formation via Fe redox transformations or the formation of reactive Fe species under our experimental conditions. PMID:25073729

  4. EXB1/WRKY71 transcription factor regulates both shoot branching and responses to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongshu; Qin, Genji

    2016-03-01

    As the sessile organisms, plants evolve different strategies to survive in adverse environmental conditions. The elaborate regulation of shoot branching is an important strategy for plant morphological adaptation to various environments, while the regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) is pivotal for plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Recently, we have demonstrated that Arabidopsis EXB1, a WRKY transcription factor, is a positive regulator of shoot branching as a cover story in Plant Cell. Here we show that WRKY23, an EXB1 close member, has a redundant role in control of shoot branching. We further show that EXB1 is induced by H2O2, ABA or mannitol treatments, suggesting that EXB1 may also play roles in plant responses to abiotic stresses. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis using 4EnhpEXB1-EXB1GR inducible line indicates that the genes involved in oxidative stress, oxidation reduction, SA or JA signaling pathway are regulated by EXB1 induction in a short time. We suggest that EXB1/WRKY71 transcription factor may play pivotal roles in plant adaptation to environments by both morphological and physiological ways. PMID:26914912

  5. Microbiological and abiotic processes in modelling longer-term marine corrosion of steel.

    PubMed

    Melchers, Robert E

    2014-06-01

    Longer term exposure of mild steel in natural (biotic) waters progresses as a bimodal function of time, both for corrosion mass loss and for pit depth. Recent test results, however, found this also for immersion in clean fresh, almost pure and triply distilled waters. This shows chlorides or microbiological activity is not essential for the electrochemical processes producing bimodal behaviour. It is proposed that the first mode is aerobic corrosion that eventually produces a non-homogeneous corroded surface and rust coverage sufficient to allow formation of anoxic niches. Within these, aggressive autocatalytic reduction then occurs under anoxic abiotic conditions, caused by sulfide species originating from the MnS inclusions typical in steels. This is consistent with Wranglen's model for abiotic anoxic crevice and pitting corrosion without external aggressive ions. In biotic conditions, metabolites from anaerobic bacterial activity within and near the anoxic niches provides additional (sulfide) species to contribute to the severity of corrosion. Limited observational evidence that supports this hypothesis is given but further investigation is required to determine all contributor(s) to the cathodic current for the electrochemical reaction. The results are important for estimating the contribution of microbiological corrosion in infrastructure applications. PMID:24067447

  6. Effect of medium permeability anisotropy on the morphological evolution of two non-uniformities in a geochemical dissolution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Keng-Hsin; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Hsu, Shao-Yiu; Steefel, Carl

    2016-02-01

    The morphological evolutions of chemical dissolution fronts have attracted increasing interest in the field of the geological sciences and in industrial applications. Extensive research based on numerical simulations has been conducted to understand how various mechanisms and processes influence the morphological evolution of chemical dissolution fronts within geological media. Most researchers in previous studies have assumed the medium permeability to be isotropic for developing numerical models, despite isotropic geological media being uncommon in the real world. This study investigates the effect of medium permeability anisotropy on the morphological evolutions of two non-uniformities with higher permeability in a geochemical dissolution system. A series of numerical simulations are performed to evaluate the effect of medium permeability anisotropy on the morphological evolution of a chemical dissolution front. The simulation results indicate that the patterns of the dissolution reaction front are substantially affected by medium permeability anisotropy. An increase in the permeability anisotropy ratio, which is defined as the ratio of the permeability in the transverse direction to that in the longitudinal direction, enhances the dominance of the flow-focusing effect over the stabilizing or merging effect induced by diffusion/dispersion mechanism. Therefore, an increase in the permeability anisotropy ratio can increase the fingering length of the dissolution front or cause the dissolution front to have a more unstable pattern. By contrast, a reduction in the permeability anisotropy ratio will weaken the flow-focusing effect, thereby reducing the fingering length of the dissolution front or changing the front morphology such that it has a more stable status. The effect of the permeability anisotropy ratio on the morphological evolution tends to decrease when the Zhao number (negative dimensionless upstream pressure gradient) of the system increases. The

  7. Criticality safety in high explosives dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Troyer, S.D.

    1997-06-01

    In 1992, an incident occurred at the Pantex Plant in which the cladding around a fissile material component (pit) cracked during dismantlement of the high explosives portion of a nuclear weapon. Although the event did not result in any significant contamination or personnel exposures, concerns about the incident led to the conclusion that the current dismantlement process was unacceptable. Options considered for redesign, dissolution tooling design considerations, dissolution tooling design features, and the analysis of the new dissolution tooling are summarized. The final tooling design developed incorporated a number of safety features and provides a simple, self-contained, low-maintenance method of high explosives removal for nuclear explosive dismantlement. Analyses demonstrate that the tooling design will remain subcritical under normal, abnormal, and credible accident scenarios. 1 fig.

  8. Buoyant currents arrested by convective dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Christopher W.; Juanes, Ruben

    2013-05-01

    When carbon dioxide (CO2) dissolves into water, the density of water increases. This seemingly insubstantial phenomenon has profound implications for geologic carbon sequestration. Here we show, by means of laboratory experiments with analog fluids, that the up-slope migration of a buoyant current of CO2 is arrested by the convective dissolution that ensues from a fingering instability at the moving CO2-groundwater interface. We consider the effectiveness of convective dissolution as a large-scale trapping mechanism in sloping aquifers, and we show that a small amount of slope is beneficial compared to the horizontal case. We study the development and coarsening of the fingering instability along the migrating current and predict the maximum migration distance of the current with a simple sharp-interface model. We show that convective dissolution exerts a powerful control on CO2 plume dynamics and, as a result, on the potential of geologic carbon sequestration.

  9. Dissolution DNP for in vivo preclinical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comment, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    The tremendous polarization enhancement afforded by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can be taken advantage of to perform preclinical in vivo molecular and metabolic imaging. Following the injection of molecules that are hyperpolarized via dissolution DNP, real-time measurements of their biodistribution and metabolic conversion can be recorded. This technology therefore provides a unique and invaluable tool for probing cellular metabolism in vivo in animal models in a noninvasive manner. It gives the opportunity to follow and evaluate disease progression and treatment response without requiring ex vivo destructive tissue assays. Although its considerable potential has now been widely recognized, hyperpolarized magnetic resonance by dissolution DNP remains a challenging method to implement for routine in vivo preclinical measurements. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the current state-of-the-art technology for preclinical applications and the challenges that need to be addressed to promote it and allow its wider dissemination in the near future.

  10. Formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph A; Lin, Yen Ting; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms form colonies for a transient period of time to withstand environmental pressure. Bacterial biofilms are a prototypical example of such behavior. Despite significant interest across disciplines, physical mechanisms governing the formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies are still poorly understood. Starting from a kinetic description of motile and interacting cells we derive a hydrodynamic equation for their density on a surface, where most of the kinetic coefficients are estimated from experimental data for N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. We use it to describe the formation of multiple colonies with sizes consistent with experimental observations. Finally, we show how the changes in the cell-to-cell interactions lead to the dissolution of the bacterial colonies. The successful application of kinetic theory to a complex far from equilibrium system such as formation and dissolution of living bacterial colonies potentially paves the way for the physical quantification of the initial stages of biofilm formation. PMID:26465495

  11. Formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christoph A.; Lin, Yen Ting; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms form colonies for a transient period of time to withstand environmental pressure. Bacterial biofilms are a prototypical example of such behavior. Despite significant interest across disciplines, physical mechanisms governing the formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies are still poorly understood. Starting from a kinetic description of motile and interacting cells we derive a hydrodynamic equation for their density on a surface, where most of the kinetic coefficients are estimated from experimental data for N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. We use it to describe the formation of multiple colonies with sizes consistent with experimental observations. Finally, we show how the changes in the cell-to-cell interactions lead to the dissolution of the bacterial colonies. The successful application of kinetic theory to a complex far from equilibrium system such as formation and dissolution of living bacterial colonies potentially paves the way for the physical quantification of the initial stages of biofilm formation.

  12. Dissolution DNP for in vivo preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Comment, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    The tremendous polarization enhancement afforded by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can be taken advantage of to perform preclinical in vivo molecular and metabolic imaging. Following the injection of molecules that are hyperpolarized via dissolution DNP, real-time measurements of their biodistribution and metabolic conversion can be recorded. This technology therefore provides a unique and invaluable tool for probing cellular metabolism in vivo in animal models in a noninvasive manner. It gives the opportunity to follow and evaluate disease progression and treatment response without requiring ex vivo destructive tissue assays. Although its considerable potential has now been widely recognized, hyperpolarized magnetic resonance by dissolution DNP remains a challenging method to implement for routine in vivo preclinical measurements. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the current state-of-the-art technology for preclinical applications and the challenges that need to be addressed to promote it and allow its wider dissemination in the near future. PMID:26920829

  13. The efficient long-term inhibition of forsterite dissolution by common soil bacteria and fungi at Earth surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Benning, Liane G.; Lutz, Stefanie; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Pearce, Christopher R.; Plümper, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    San Carlos forsterite was dissolved in initially pure H2O in a batch reactor in contact with the atmosphere for 5 years. The reactive fluid aqueous pH remained relatively stable at pH 6.7 throughout the experiment. Aqueous Mg concentration maximized after approximately 2 years time at 3 × 10-5 mol/kg, whereas aqueous Si concentrations increased continuously with time, reaching 2 × 10-5 mol/kg after 5 years. Element release rates closely matched those determined on this same forsterite sample during short-term abiotic open system experiments for the first 10 days, then slowed substantially such that the Mg and Si release rates are approximately an order of magnitude slower than that calculated from the short-term abiotic experiments. Post-experiment analysis reveals that secondary hematite, a substantial biotic community, and minor amorphous silica formed on the dissolving forsterite during the experiment. The biotic community included bacteria, dominated by Rhizobiales (Alphaproteobacteria), and fungi, dominated by Trichocomaceae, that grew in a carbon and nutrient-limited media on the dissolving forsterite. The Mg isotope composition of the reactive fluid was near constant after 2 years but 0.25‰ heavier in δ26Mg than the dissolving forsterite. Together these results suggest long-term forsterite dissolution in natural Earth surface systems maybe substantially slower than that estimated from short-term abiotic experiments due to the growth of biotic communities on their surfaces.

  14. Do organic ligands affect calcite dissolution rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Golubev, Sergey V.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Bénézeth, Pascale

    2011-04-01

    Steady state Iceland-spar calcite dissolution rates were measured at 25 °C in aqueous solutions containing 0.1 M NaCl and up to 0.05 M dissolved bicarbonate at pH from 7.9 to 9.1 in the presence of 13 distinct dissolved organic ligands in mixed-flow reactors. The organic ligands considered in this study include those most likely to be present in either (1) aquifers at the conditions pertinent to CO 2 sequestration or (2) soil/early diagenetic environments: acetate, phthalate, citrate, EDTA 4-, succinate, D-glucosaminate, L-glutamate, D-gluconate, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, fumarate, malonate, and gallate. Results show that the presence of <0.05 mol/kg of these organic anions changes calcite dissolution rates by less than a factor of 2.5 with the exception of citrate and EDTA 4-. The presence of 0.05 mol/kg citrate and EDTA 4- increases calcite dissolution rates by as much as a factor of 35 and 500, respectively, compared to rates in organic anion-free solutions. Further calcite dissolution experiments were performed in the presence of organic polymers similar to bacterial exudates, cell exopolysaccharides, and analogs of microbial cell envelopes: alginate, lichen extract, humic acid, pectin, and gum xanthan. In no case did the presence of <100 ppm of these organics change calcite dissolution rates by more than a factor of 2.5. Results obtained in this study suggest that the presence of aqueous organic anions negligibly affects calcite forward dissolution rates in most natural environments. Some effect on calcite reactivity may be observed, however, by the presence of organic anions if they change substantially the chemical affinity of the fluid with respect to calcite.

  15. DISSOLUTION OF IRRADIATED MURR FUEL ASSEMBLIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.

    2010-06-17

    A literature survey on the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel from the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has been performed. This survey encompassed both internal and external literature sources for the dissolution of aluminum-clad uranium alloy fuels. The most limiting aspect of dissolution in the current facility configuration involves issues related to the control of the flammability of the off-gas from this process. The primary conclusion of this work is that based on past dissolution of this fuel in H-Canyon, four bundles of this fuel (initial charge) may be safely dissolved in a nitric acid flowsheet catalyzed with 0.002 M mercuric nitrate using a 40 scfm purge to control off-gas flammability. The initial charge may be followed by a second charge of up to five bundles to the same dissolver batch depending on volume and concentration constraints. The safety of this flowsheet relies on composite lower flammability limits (LFL) estimated from prior literature, pilot-scale work on the dissolution of site fuels, and the proposed processing flowsheet. Equipment modifications or improved LFL data offer the potential for improved processing rates. The fuel charging sequence, as well as the acid and catalyst concentrations, will control the dissolution rate during the initial portion of the cycle. These parameters directly impact the hydrogen and off-gas generation and, along with the purge flowrate determine the number of bundles that may be charged. The calculation approach within provides Engineering a means to determine optimal charging patterns. Downstream processing of this material should be similar to that of recent processing of site fuels requiring only minor adjustments of the existing flowsheet parameters.

  16. Dissolution enhancement of atorvastatin calcium by co-grinding technique.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Priyanka; Patravale, Vandana

    2016-08-01

    Atorvastatin calcium (AC) is a BCS class II drug which shows poor bioavailability due to inadequate dissolution. Solid dispersions present a promising option to enhance the solubility of poorly soluble drugs. Co-grinding with hydrophilic excipients is an easy and economical technique to improve the solubility of poorly soluble drugs and is free from usage of organic solvents. The aim of the present study was to explore novel carrier VBP-1 (organosulphur compound) for formulating a solid dispersion by using a simple, commercially viable co-grinding technique to enhance the dissolution of AC and to develop an oral formulation of the same. Composition of the solid dispersion was optimized based on the release profile in pH 1.2 buffer. The optimized solid dispersion was further characterized for flow properties, DSC, FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, contact angle, SEM studies and release profile in phosphate buffer pH 6.8. The developed solid dispersion gave similar release profile as the innovator formulation (Lipitor® tablets) in both pH 1.2 buffer and phosphate buffer pH 6.8. The developed solid dispersion was formulated into hard gelatin capsules (size 3). The developed capsules were found to give similar release as the innovator formulation in both pH 1.2 buffer and phosphate buffer pH 6.8. The developed capsules were found to be stable for a period of 6 months. Anti-hyperlipidemic efficacy studies in rats showed higher reduction in cholesterol and triglyceride levels by the developed capsules in comparison to pure AC. In conclusion, novel carrier VBP-1 was successfully employed to enhance the dissolution of AC using co-grinding technique. PMID:26712124

  17. Microbial dissolution of silicate materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, D.

    1996-03-26

    The objective of this research was to better understand the role of selected thermophilic bacteria in the colonization and dissolution of silicate minerals, with potential applications to the HDR Project. The demonstration of enhanced dissolution from microbial effects is critically dependent on providing a mineral bait within a media deficient in the critical nutrient found in the mineral (e.g., Fe). Reproducible experimental conditions in batch experiments require agitation to expose mineral powders, as well as nearly similar initial conditions for both inoculated cultures and controls. It is difficult, but not impossible to ensure reproducible conditions with microbes favoring filamentous growth habits.

  18. Comparison of three preservation techniques for slowing dissolution of calcareous nannofossils in organic rich sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seefelt, Ellen L.; Self-Trail, Jean; Schultz, Arthur P.

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to halt or reduce dissolution of calcareous nannofossils in organic and/or pyrite-rich sediments, three different methods of short-term storage preservation were tested for efficacy: vacuum packing, argon gas replacement, and buffered water. Abundance counts of calcareous nannofossil assemblages over a six month period showed that none of the three preservation methods were consistently effective in reducing assemblage loss due to dissolution. In most cases, the control slides made at the drill site had more abundant calcareous nannofossil assemblages than those slides made from sediments stored via vacuum packing, argon gas replacement, or buffered water. Thin section and XRD analyses showed that in most cases, <1% pyrite was needed to drive the oxidation-reduction reaction that resulted in dissolution, even in carbonate-rich sediments.

  19. Liquisolid technique for dissolution rate enhancement of a high dose water-insoluble drug (carbamazepine).

    PubMed

    Javadzadeh, Yousef; Jafari-Navimipour, Baharak; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2007-08-16

    Different liquisolid formulations of carbamazepine were accomplished by dissolving the drug in the non-toxic hydrophilic liquids, and adsorbing the solution onto the surface of silica. In order to reduce the amounts of carrier and aerosil in liquisolid formulations, some additives namely polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), hydroxypropyle methylcellulose (HPMC) and polyethylene glycol (PEG 35000) were added to liquid medication to increase loading factor. The effects of various ratios of carrier to coating material, PVP concentration, effect of aging and type of the carrier on dissolution rate of liquisolid compacts were studied. X-ray crystallography and differential scanning calorimetery (DSC) were used for evaluation of physicochemical properties of carbamazepine in liquisolid formulations. The results showed that the drug loading factor was increased significantly in the presence of additives. Liquisolid formulations containing PVP as additive, exhibited significantly higher drug dissolution rates compared to the compacts prepared by the direct compression technique. It was shown that microcrystalline cellulose had more liquid retention potential in comparison with lactose, and the formulations containing microcrystalline cellulose as carrier, showed higher dissolution rate. By decreasing the ratio of microcrystalline cellulose to silica from 20 to 10, an improvement in dissolution rate was observed. Further decrease in the ratio of microcrystalline cellulose:silica from 10 to 5 resulted in a significant reduction in dissolution rate. Increasing of PVP concentration in liquid medication caused a dramatic increase in dissolution rate at first 30min. The results showed that the dissolution rate of liquisolid tablets was not significantly affected by storing the tablets at 25 degrees C/75% relative humidity for a period of 6 months. The results of DSC and X-ray crystallography did not show any changes in crystallinity of the drug and interaction between carbamazepine and

  20. Mechanisms of plant–plant interactions: concealment from herbivores is more important than abiotic-stress mediation in an African savannah

    PubMed Central

    Louthan, Allison M.; Doak, Daniel F.; Goheen, Jacob R.; Palmer, Todd M.; Pringle, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work on facilitative plant–plant interactions has emphasized the importance of neighbours’ amelioration of abiotic stress, but the facilitative effects of neighbours in reducing plant apparency to herbivores have received less attention. Whereas theory on stress reduction predicts that competition should be more important in less stressful conditions, with facilitation becoming more important in harsh environments, apparency theory suggests that facilitation should be greater in the presence of herbivores, where it is disadvantageous to be conspicuous regardless of abiotic stress level. We tested the relative strength of neighbours’ stress reduction versus apparency reduction on survival, growth, reproduction and lifetime fitness of Hibiscus meyeri, a common forb in central Kenya, using neighbour removals conducted inside and outside large-herbivore exclosures replicated in arid and mesic sites. In the absence of herbivores, neighbours competed with H. meyeri in mesic areas and facilitated H. meyeri in arid areas, as predicted by stress-reduction mechanisms. By contrast, neighbours facilitated H. meyeri in the presence of herbivory, regardless of aridity level, consistent with plant apparency. Our results show that the facilitative effects arising from plant apparency are stronger than the effects arising from abiotic stress reduction in this system, suggesting that plant-apparency effects may be particularly important in systems with extant large-herbivore communities. PMID:24523267

  1. Abiotic Nitrous Oxide Production in Natural and Artificial Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, H.; Stanton, C. L.; Cavazos, A. R.; Ostrom, N. E.; Glass, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean contributes approximately one third of global sources of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. While nitrification is thought to be the dominant pathway for marine N2O production, mechanisms remain unresolved. Previous studies have carried the implicit assumption that marine N2O originates directly from enzymatic sources. However, abiotic production of N2O is possible via chemical reactions between nitrogenous intermediates and redox active trace metals in seawater. In this study, we investigated N2O production and isotopic composition in treatments with and without added hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and nitric oxide (NO), intermediates in microbial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, and Fe(III). Addition of substrates to sterile artificial seawater was compared with filtered and unfiltered seawater from Sapelo Island, coastal Georgia, USA. N2O production was observed immediately after addition of Fe(III) in the presence of NH2OH at pH 8 in sterile artificial seawater. Highest N2O production was observed in the presence of Fe(III), NO, and NH2OH. The isotopomer site preference of abiotically produced N2O was consistent with previous studies (31 ± 2 ‰). Higher abiotic N2O production was observed in sterile artificial seawater (salinity: 35 ppt) than filtered Sapelo Island seawater (salinity: 25 ppt) whereas diluted sterile artificial seawater (18 ppt) showed lowest N2O production, suggesting that higher salinity promotes enhanced abiotic N2O production. Addition of Fe(III) to unfiltered Sapelo Island seawater stimulated N2O production. The presence of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), which lack known N2O producing enzymes, in Sapelo Island seawater was confirmed by successful amplification of the archaeal amoA gene, whereas ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which contain N2O-producing enzymes were undetected. Given the few Fe-containing proteins present in AOA, it is likely that Fe(III) addition promoted N2O production via an abiotic vs. enzymatic N2O mechanism

  2. Improving the API dissolution rate during pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion I: Effect of the API particle size, and the co-rotating, twin-screw extruder screw configuration on the API dissolution rate.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Gogos, Costas G; Ioannidis, Nicolas

    2015-01-15

    The dissolution rate of the active pharmaceutical ingredients in pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion is the most critical elementary step during the extrusion of amorphous solid solutions - total dissolution has to be achieved within the short residence time in the extruder. Dissolution and dissolution rates are affected by process, material and equipment variables. In this work, we examine the effect of one of the material variables and one of the equipment variables, namely, the API particle size and extruder screw configuration on the API dissolution rate, in a co-rotating, twin-screw extruder. By rapidly removing the extruder screws from the barrel after achieving a steady state, we collected samples along the length of the extruder screws that were characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine the amount of undissolved API. Analyses of samples indicate that reduction of particle size of the API and appropriate selection of screw design can markedly improve the dissolution rate of the API during extrusion. In addition, angle of repose measurements and light microscopy images show that the reduction of particle size of the API can improve the flowability of the physical mixture feed and the adhesiveness between its components, respectively, through dry coating of the polymer particles by the API particles. PMID:25448572

  3. Exploring the Influence of Bioremediation on Dissolution in DNAPL Source Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abriola, L.; Pennell, K.; Löffler, F.; Ramsburg, A.; Christ, J.; Amos, B.; Suchomel, E.

    2006-12-01

    Microbial reductive dechlorination has emerged as a promising technology for remediation of chlorinated solvent contaminated source zones. Bioremediation of dense nonaqeuous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones can be undertaken as a sole treatment technology or as a "polishing" step following the application of a more aggressive treatment method, such as surfactant flushing. A quantitative assessment of the potential effectiveness of in situ source zone bioremediation requires an understanding of the influence of aggressive treatment on subsequent DNAPL bioavailability, as well as the potential bio-enhancement of DNAPL dissolution under natural gradient conditions. This presentation provides an overview of laboratory and modeling investigations designed to explore bioavailability and the influence of bioactivity on DNAPL dissolution in contaminated sandy media. A novel mathematical model was developed to simulate the interplay between DNAPL architecture, DNAPL dissolution, constituent transport, reductive dechlorination kinetics, and concentration inhibition. Model formulation and parameterization were based on results of batch experiments conducted with selected tetrachloroethene (PCE) -to- cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) dechlorinating isolates. Experiments to explore microbial activity and dissolution enhancement in the vicinity of PCE-NAPL in one dimensional sand columns containing a pure or mixed NAPL (0.25 mol/mol PCE in hexadecane) source zone were used to assess model performance. Experimental results demonstrated PCE to cis-DCE dechlorination in the vicinity of the NAPL, with a four-fold dissolution enhancement. These observations are consistent with numerical model predictions. A model sensitivity analysis reveals that dechlorination kinetics, substrate concentrations, and DNAPL saturation and distribution can each affect the extent of dissolution enhancement. The potential influence of bioactivity on source zone longevity and toxicity is also addressed

  4. Optical microscopy as a comparative analytical technique for single-particle dissolution studies.

    PubMed

    Svanbäck, Sami; Ehlers, Henrik; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2014-07-20

    Novel, simple and cost effective methods are needed to replace advanced chemical analytical techniques, in small-scale dissolution studies. Optical microscopy of individual particles could provide such a method. The aim of the present work was to investigate and verify the applicability of optical microscopy as an analytical technique for drug dissolution studies. The evaluation was performed by comparing image and chemical analysis data of individual dissolving particles. It was shown that the data obtained by image analysis and UV-spectrophotometry produced practically identical dissolution curves, with average similarity and difference factors above 82 and below 4, respectively. The relative standard deviation for image analysis data, of the studied particle size range, varied between 1.9% and 3.8%. Consequently, it is proposed that image analysis can be used, on its own, as a viable analytical technique in single-particle dissolution studies. The possibility for significant reductions in sample preparation, operational cost, time and substance consumption gives optical detection a clear advantage over chemical analytical methods. Thus, image analysis could be an ideal and universal analytical technique for rapid small-scale dissolution studies. PMID:24751345

  5. Microbial exudate promoted dissolution and transformation of chromium containing minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, E. M.; Sun, J.; Tang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Because of its utility in many industrial processes, chromium has become the second most common metal contaminant in the United States. The two most common oxidation states of chromium in nature are Cr(III), which is highly immobile, and Cr(VI), which is highly mobile and toxic. In both natural and engineered environments, the most common remediation of Cr(VI) is through reduction, which results in chromium sequestration in the low solubility mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide phases. Consequently, the stability of these minerals must be examined to assess the fate of chromium in the subsurface. We examined the dissolution of mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides in the presence of common microbial exudates, including the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB; a common organic ligand secreted by most microbes with high affinity for ferric iron and other trivalent metal ions) and oxalate (a common organic acid produced by microbes). The solids exhibited incongruent dissolution with preferential leaching of Fe from the solid phase. Over time, this leads to a more Cr rich mineral, which is known to be more soluble than the corresponding mixed mineral phase. We are currently investigating the structure of the reacted mineral phases and soluble Cr(III) species, as well as the potential oxidation and remobilization of the soluble Cr species. Results from this study will provide insights regarding the long term transport and fate of chromium in the natural environment in the presence of microbial activities.

  6. Photo-oxidative stress markers as a measure of abiotic stress-induced leaf senescence: advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Pintó-Marijuan, Marta; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-07-01

    Inside chloroplasts, several abiotic stresses (including drought, high light, salinity, or extreme temperatures) induce a reduction in CO2 assimilation rates with a consequent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, ultimately leading to leaf senescence and yield loss. Photo-oxidation processes should therefore be mitigated to prevent leaf senescence, and plants have evolved several mechanisms to either prevent the formation of ROS or eliminate them. Technology evolution during the past decade has brought faster and more precise methodologies to quantify ROS production effects and damage, and the capacities of plants to withstand oxidative stress. Nevertheless, it is very difficult to disentangle photo-oxidative processes that bring leaf defence and acclimation, from those leading to leaf senescence (and consequently death). It is important to avoid the mistake of discussing results on leaf extracts as being equivalent to chloroplast extracts without taking into account that other organelles, such as peroxisomes, mitochondria, or the apoplast also significantly contribute to the overall ROS production within the cell. Another important aspect is that studies on abiotic stress-induced leaf senescence in crops do not always include a time-course evolution of studied processes, which limits our knowledge about what photo-oxidative stress processes are required to irreversibly induce the senescence programme. This review will summarize the current technologies used to evaluate the extent of photo-oxidative stress in plants, and discuss their advantages and limitations in characterizing abiotic stress-induced leaf senescence in crops. PMID:24683180

  7. SERDP ER-1376 Enhancement of In Situ Bioremediation of Energetic Compounds by Coupled Abiotic/Biotic Processes:Final Report for 2004 - 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Comfort, Steve; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Boparai, Hardiljeet K.; Devary, Brooks J.; Thompson, Karen T.; Phillips, Jerry L.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Girvin, Donald C.; Resch, Charles T.; Shea, Patrick; Fischer, Ashley E.; Durkin, Lisa M.

    2007-08-07

    This project was initiated by SERDP to quantify processes and determine the effectiveness of abiotic/biotic mineralization of energetics (RDX, HMX, TNT) in aquifer sediments by combinations of biostimulation (carbon, trace nutrient additions) and chemical reduction of sediment to create a reducing environment. Initially it was hypothesized that a balance of chemical reduction of sediment and biostimulation would increase the RDX, HMX, and TNT mineralization rate significantly (by a combination of abiotic and biotic processes) so that this abiotic/biotic treatment may be a more efficient for remediation than biotic treatment alone in some cases. Because both abiotic and biotic processes are involved in energetic mineralization in sediments, it was further hypothesized that consideration for both abiotic reduction and microbial growth was need to optimize the sediment system for the most rapid mineralization rate. Results show that there are separate optimal abiotic/biostimulation aquifer sediment treatments for RDX/HMX and for TNT. Optimal sediment treatment for RDX and HMX (which have chemical similarities and similar degradation pathways) is mainly chemical reduction of sediment, which increased the RDX/HMX mineralization rate 100 to150 times (relative to untreated sediment), with additional carbon or trace nutrient addition, which increased the RDX/HMX mineralization rate an additional 3 to 4 times. In contrast, the optimal aquifer sediment treatment for TNT involves mainly biostimulation (glucose addition), which stimulates a TNT/glucose cometabolic degradation pathway (6.8 times more rapid than untreated sediment), degrading TNT to amino-intermediates that irreversibly sorb (i.e., end product is not CO2). The TNT mass migration risk is minimized by these transformation reactions, as the triaminotoluene and 2,4- and 2,6-diaminonitrotoluene products that irreversibly sorb are no longer mobile in the subsurface environment. These transformation rates are increased

  8. Weathering-associated bacteria from the Damma glacier forefield: physiological capabilities and impact on granite dissolution.

    PubMed

    Frey, Beat; Rieder, Stefan R; Brunner, Ivano; Plötze, Michael; Koetzsch, Stefan; Lapanje, Ales; Brandl, Helmut; Furrer, Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    Several bacterial strains isolated from granitic rock material in front of the Damma glacier (Central Swiss Alps) were shown (i) to grow in the presence of granite powder and a glucose-NH(4)Cl minimal medium without additional macro- or micronutrients and (ii) to produce weathering-associated agents. In particular, four bacterial isolates (one isolate each of Arthrobacter sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Leifsonia sp., and Polaromonas sp.) were weathering associated. In comparison to what was observed in abiotic experiments, the presence of these strains caused a significant increase of granite dissolution (as measured by the release of Fe, Ca, K, Mg, and Mn). These most promising weathering-associated bacterial species exhibited four main features rendering them more efficient in mineral dissolution than the other investigated isolates: (i) a major part of their bacterial cells was attached to the granite surfaces and not suspended in solution, (ii) they secreted the largest amounts of oxalic acid, (iii) they lowered the pH of the solution, and (iv) they formed significant amounts of HCN. As far as we know, this is the first report showing that the combined action of oxalic acid and HCN appears to be associated with enhanced elemental release from granite, in particular of Fe. This suggests that extensive microbial colonization of the granite surfaces could play a crucial role in the initial soil formation in previously glaciated mountain areas. PMID:20525872

  9. Sodium tetraphenylborate solubility and dissolution rates

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.; Peterson, R.A.; Swingle, R.F.; Reeves, C.T.

    1995-12-31

    The rate of solid sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) dissolution in In-Tank Precipitation salt solutions has been experimentally determined. The data indicates that the dissolution rate of solid NaTPB is a minor contributor the lag time experienced in the 1983 Salt Decontamination Demonstration Test and should not be considered as the rate determining step. Current analytical models for predicting the time to reach the composite lower flammability limit assume that the lag time is not more than 6 hours, and the data supports this assumption (i.e., dissolution by itself requires much less than 6 hours). The data suggests that another step--such as mass transport, the reaction of a benzene precursor or the mixing behavior--is the rate determining factor for benzene release to the vapor space in Tank 48H. In addition, preliminary results from this program show that the degree of agitation employed is not a significant parameter in determining the rate of NaTPB dissolution. As a result of this study, an improved equation for predicting equilibrium tetraphenylborate solubility with respect to temperature and sodium ion concentration has been determined.

  10. Dissolution enhancement of chlorzoxazone using cogrinding technique

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Mihir K.; Patel, Jaydeep M.; Parikh, Rajesh K.; Sheth, Navin R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present work was to improve rate of dissolution and processing parameters of BCS class II drug, chlorzoxazone using cogrinding technique in the presence of different excipients as a carrier. Materials and Methods: The drug was coground with various carriers like polyethylene glycol (PEG 4000), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) E50LV, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)K30, Kaolin and Neusilin US2 using ball mill, where only PEG 4000 improved dissolution rate of drug by bringing amorphization in 1:3 ratio. The coground mixture after 3 and 6 h was evaluated for various analytical, physicochemical and mechanical parameters. Results: The analysis showed conversion of Chlorzoxazone from its crystalline to amorphization form upon grinding with PEG 4000. Coground mixture as well as its directly compressed tablet showed 2.5-fold increment in the dissolution rate compared with pure drug. Directly compressible tablets prepared from pure drug required a large quantity of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) during compression. The coground mixture and formulation was found stable in nature even after storage (40°C/75% relative humidity). Conclusions: Cogrinding can be successfully utilized to improve the rate of dissolution of poorly water soluble drugs and hence bioavailability. PMID:26682195

  11. 12 CFR 546.4 - Voluntary dissolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... savings association's board of directors may propose a plan for dissolution of the association. The plan... approved by the association's board of directors and by the OTS, it shall be submitted to the association's... charter either for cash sufficient to pay all obligations of the association and retire all...

  12. 25 CFR 11.605 - Dissolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dissolution of marriage if: (1) The court finds that the marriage is irretrievably broken, if the finding is... affecting the attitude of one or both of the parties towards the marriage; (2) The court finds that either... of marriage, the Court of Indian Offenses shall grant the decree in that form unless the other...

  13. Dissolution of human teeth-derived hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Seok; Lee, Jong Kook

    2008-01-01

    We have been interested in human teeth which consist of hydroxyapatite (HA), but do not degrade for a long time. In order to overcome dissolution and mechanical degradation of man-made HA, biologically derived hydroxyapatite (BHA) ceramics were prepared from human teeth and their dissolving behavior was investigated in distilled water for 3-14 days and compared with an artificial HA made of synthetic HA powder. BHA ceramics were prepared by calcining freshly extracted human teeth at 900 degrees C and followed by sintering at 1200 degrees C for 2 h. All detectable peaks in the artificial HA are identical to HA lattice planes, whereas BHA consisted of a mixture of HA and beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP). Although the artificial HA was expected to be stable in water, the surface dissolution initiated at grain boundaries followed by generated many separated grains and their associated pores. On the other hand, BHA showed that definite grains considered as beta-TCP were predominantly dissolved and the grains were separated from the matrix leaving pores. In the mean time, the rest region, mainly consisting of HA, did not show any evidence of dissolution. It indicates that BHA showed rather stable grain boundaries and lack of excessive dissolution in liquid environment. PMID:17943445

  14. Slow dissolution behaviour of amorphous capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Meulenaar, Jelte; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M; Nuijen, Bastiaan

    2013-01-30

    In this article, we report the anomalous dissolution behaviour of amorphous capecitabine. In contrast to what is expected from thermodynamic theory, amorphous capecitabine dissolves significantly slower compared to its crystalline counterpart. Our experiments show that this is due to the "gelling" properties of amorphous capecitabine in an aqueous environment. The "gel", which is immediately formed upon contact with water, entraps the capecitabine and significantly slows down its dissolution. This "gelling" property is hypothesized to be related to the low glass transition temperature (Tg 19°C) of amorphous capecitabine, resulting in an instant collapse ("gelling") in an aqueous environment. From IR and DSC analysis it is shown that this collapsed capecitabine is remarkably stable and does not recrystallize upon an increased water content or temperature. This highly reproducible dissolution behaviour can be applied in the development of a sustained release dosage form as substantially less sustained release excipient is required in order to attain the desired release profile. As capecitabine is a high-dosed drug, this is highly favourable in view of the size and thus clinical feasibility of the final dosage form. Currently, we are developing and clinically testing a sustained release formulation making use of amorphous capecitabine and its remarkable dissolution behaviour. PMID:23219704

  15. Rate equations for sodium catalyzed quartz dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimstidt, J. Donald

    2015-10-01

    Quartz dissolution rate data were fit to an equation that predicts the dissolution flux (J, mol/m2 sec) as a function of temperature (T, K), sodium concentration (mNa+, molal), and hydrogen ion activity (aH+). The same data fit equally well to an equation that expresses the rate as a function of temperature, sodium concentration, and hydroxide ion activity (aOH-) . These equations are more convenient to use than those given by Bickmore et al. (2008) because rates can be predicted without the implementation of a surface speciation model. They predict that at 25 °C quartz dissolves more than 200 times faster in seawater than in pure water. These two equations fit the data just as well as five other equations from Bickmore et al. (2008) that are based on surface species concentrations. All of these rate equations contain information about the reaction mechanism(s) for quartz dissolution but that information is ambiguous because the independent variables used to develop the equations are correlated. This means that rate equations alone cannot be used to infer the dissolution mechanism. Existing surface complexation, surface charge, terrace-ledge-kink, and Lewis acid-base models must be modified and amalgamated in order to develop a reliable model of the reaction mechanism(s).

  16. Dissolution Treatment of Depleted Uranium Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gates-Anderson, D D; Laue, C A; Fitch, T E

    2004-02-09

    Researchers at LLNL have developed a 3-stage process that converts pyrophoric depleted uranium metal turnings to a solidified final product that can be transported to and buried at a permitted land disposal site. The three process stages are: (1) pretreatment; (2) dissolution; and (3) solidification. Each stage was developed following extensive experimentation. This report presents the results of their experimental studies.

  17. Oral and contact dissolution of gallstones.

    PubMed

    Schoenfield, L J; Marks, J W

    1993-04-01

    The appropriate selection of patients for treatment with oral ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA)--a drug that has virtually no side effects--results in about 50% of patients experiencing safe dissolution of gallstones within 2 years. Eligible patients have small (less than 20 mm in diameter) radiolucent gallstones in a gallbladder visualized by oral cholecystography (OCG); ideal candidates are thin women who have gallstones that are less than 15 mm in diameter, floating when observed by OCG, or of low density on computed tomographic (CT) scanning. Contact dissolution with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is rapid, effective more often than UDCA, and safe but requires the expertise of an interventional radiologist. Any size and number of cholesterol gallstones that are not CT-dense will be dissolved by MTBE, leaving at most only insoluble debris that is clinically innocuous. Although gallstones recur after dissolution by UDCA or MTBE in 50% of patients within 5 years, recurrent gallstones are usually asymptomatic and/or can probably be dissolved. We conclude that oral or contact dissolution provides an alternative treatment to cholecystectomy for about 30% of patients with symptomatic gallstones. PMID:8480875

  18. On the dissolution of iridium by aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    Hewson, John C.

    2009-08-01

    The potential for liquid aluminum to dissolve an iridium solid is examined. Substantial uncertainties exist in material properties, and the available data for the iridium solubility and iridium diffusivity are discussed. The dissolution rate is expressed in terms of the regression velocity of the solid iridium when exposed to the solvent (aluminum). The temperature has the strongest influence in the dissolution rate. This dependence comes primarily from the solubility of iridium in aluminum and secondarily from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient. This dissolution mass flux is geometry dependent and results are provided for simplified geometries at constant temperatures. For situations where there is negligible convective flow, simple time-dependent diffusion solutions are provided. Correlations for mass transfer are also given for natural convection and forced convection. These estimates suggest that dissolution of iridium can be significant for temperatures well below the melting temperature of iridium, but the uncertainties in actual rates are large because of uncertainties in the physical parameters and in the details of the relevant geometries.

  19. Efavirenz Dissolution Enhancement I: Co-Micronization

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Maíra Assis; Seiceira, Rafael Cardoso; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Hoffmeister, Cristiane Rodrigues Drago; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; Rocha, Helvécio Vinícius Antunes

    2012-01-01

    AIDS constitutes one of the most serious infectious diseases, representing a major public health priority. Efavirenz (EFV), one of the most widely used drugs for this pathology, belongs to the Class II of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System for drugs with very poor water solubility. To improve EFV’s dissolution profile, changes can be made to the physical properties of the drug that do not lead to any accompanying molecular modifications. Therefore, the study objective was to develop and characterize systems with efavirenz able to improve its dissolution, which were co-processed with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The technique used was co-micronization. Three different drug:excipient ratios were tested for each of the two carriers. The drug dispersion dissolution results showed significant improvement for all the co-processed samples in comparison to non-processed material and corresponding physical mixtures. The dissolution profiles obtained for dispersion with co-micronized SLS samples proved superior to those of co-micronized PVP, with the proportion (1:0.25) proving the optimal mixture. The improvements may be explained by the hypothesis that formation of a hydrophilic layer on the surface of the micronized drug increases the wettability of the system formed, corroborated by characterization results indicating no loss of crystallinity and an absence of interaction at the molecular level. PMID:24300394

  20. Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

  1. 25 CFR 11.605 - Dissolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dissolution of marriage if: (1) The court finds that the marriage is irretrievably broken, if the finding is... affecting the attitude of one or both of the parties towards the marriage; (2) The court finds that either... of marriage, the Court of Indian Offenses shall grant the decree in that form unless the other...

  2. 25 CFR 11.605 - Dissolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dissolution of marriage if: (1) The court finds that the marriage is irretrievably broken, if the finding is... affecting the attitude of one or both of the parties towards the marriage; (2) The court finds that either... of marriage, the Court of Indian Offenses shall grant the decree in that form unless the other...

  3. 25 CFR 11.605 - Dissolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dissolution of marriage if: (1) The court finds that the marriage is irretrievably broken, if the finding is... affecting the attitude of one or both of the parties towards the marriage; (2) The court finds that either... of marriage, the Court of Indian Offenses shall grant the decree in that form unless the other...

  4. 25 CFR 11.605 - Dissolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dissolution of marriage if: (1) The court finds that the marriage is irretrievably broken, if the finding is... affecting the attitude of one or both of the parties towards the marriage; (2) The court finds that either... of marriage, the Court of Indian Offenses shall grant the decree in that form unless the other...

  5. Natural remobilization of multicomponent DNAPL pools due to dissolution.

    PubMed

    Roy, J W; Smith, J E; Gillham, R W

    2002-12-01

    Mixtures of dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) trapped in the subsurface can act as long-term sources of contamination by dissolving into flowing groundwater. If the components have different solubilities then dissolution will alter the composition of the remaining DNAPL. We theorized that a multicomponent DNAPL pool may become mobile due to the natural dissolution process. In this study, we focused on two scenarios: (1) a DNAPL losing light component(s), with the potential for downward migration; and (2) a DNAPL losing dense component(s), with the potential for upward migration following transformation into a less dense than water nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL). We considered three binary mixtures of common groundwater contaminants: benzene and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), PCE and dichloromethane (DCM), and DCM and toluene. A number of physical properties that control the retention and transport of DNAPL in porous media were measured for the mixtures, namely: density, interfacial tension, effective solubility, and viscosity. All properties except density exhibited nonlinear relationships with changing molar ratio of the DNAPL. To illustrate the potential for natural remobilization, we modelled the following two primary mechanisms: the reduction in pool height as mass is lost by dissolution, and the changes in fluid properties with changing molar ratio of the DNAPL. The first mechanism always reduces the capillary pressure in the pool, while the second mechanism may increase the capillary pressure or alter the direction of the driving force. The difference between the rate of change of each determines whether the potential for remobilization increases or decreases. Static conditions and horizontal layering were assumed along with a one-dimensional, compositional modelling approach. Our results indicated that for initial benzene/PCE ratios greater than 25:75, the change in density was sufficiently faster than the decline in pool height to promote DNAPL

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal responses to abiotic stresses: A review.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Ingrid; Fontaine, Joël; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa

    2016-03-01

    The majority of plants live in close collaboration with a diversity of soil organisms among which arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play an essential role. Mycorrhizal symbioses contribute to plant growth and plant protection against various environmental stresses. Whereas the resistance mechanisms induced in mycorrhizal plants after exposure to abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and pollution, are well documented, the knowledge about the stress tolerance mechanisms implemented by the AMF themselves is limited. This review provides an overview of the impacts of various abiotic stresses (pollution, salinity, drought, extreme temperatures, CO2, calcareous, acidity) on biodiversity, abundance and development of AMF and examines the morphological, biochemical and molecular mechanisms implemented by AMF to survive in the presence of these stresses. PMID:26803396

  7. Demonstration of significant abiotic iron isotope fractionation in nature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, T.D.; White, A.F.; Childs, C.W.; Vivit, D.V.; Schultz, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies reveal that the mineral ferrihydrite, formed as a result of abiotic oxidation of aqueous ferrous to ferric Fe, contains Fe that is isotopically heavy relative to coexisting aqueous Fe. Because the electron transfer step of the oxidation process at pH >5 is essentially irreversible and should favor the lighter Fe isotopes in the ferric iron product, this result suggests that relatively heavy Fe isotopes are preferentially partitioned into the readily oxidized Fe(II)(OH)x(aq) species or their transition complexes prior to oxidation. The apparent Fe isotope fractionation factor, ??ferrihydrite-water, depends primarily on the relative abundances of the Fe(II)(aq) species. This study demonstrates that abiotic processes can fractionate the Fe isotopes to the same extent as biotic processes, and thus Fe isotopes on their own do not provide an effective biosignature.

  8. Effects of abiotic stress on plants: a systems biology perspective

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The natural environment for plants is composed of a complex set of abiotic stresses and biotic stresses. Plant responses to these stresses are equally complex. Systems biology approaches facilitate a multi-targeted approach by allowing one to identify regulatory hubs in complex networks. Systems biology takes the molecular parts (transcripts, proteins and metabolites) of an organism and attempts to fit them into functional networks or models designed to describe and predict the dynamic activities of that organism in different environments. In this review, research progress in plant responses to abiotic stresses is summarized from the physiological level to the molecular level. New insights obtained from the integration of omics datasets are highlighted. Gaps in our knowledge are identified, providing additional focus areas for crop improvement research in the future. PMID:22094046

  9. Abiotic mediation of a mutualism drives herbivore abundance.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Emily H; Phillips, Joseph S; Tillberg, Chadwick V; Sandrow, Cheryl; Nelson, Annika S; Mooney, Kailen A

    2016-01-01

    Species abundance is typically determined by the abiotic environment, but the extent to which such effects occur through the mediation of biotic interactions, including mutualisms, is unknown. We explored how light environment (open meadow vs. shaded understory) mediates the abundance and ant tending of the aphid Aphis helianthi feeding on the herb Ligusticum porteri. Yearly surveys consistently found aphids to be more than 17-fold more abundant on open meadow plants than on shaded understory plants. Manipulations demonstrated that this abundance pattern was not due to the direct effects of light environment on aphid performance, or indirectly through host plant quality or the effects of predators. Instead, open meadows had higher ant abundance and per capita rates of aphid tending and, accordingly, ants increased aphid population growth in meadow but not understory environments. The abiotic environment thus drives the abundance of this herbivore exclusively through the mediation of a protection mutualism. PMID:26563752

  10. Effect of background electrolytes on gypsum dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Putnis, Christine; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the dissolution behaviour of gypsum (CaSO4· 2H2O) in aqueous solutions is of primary importance in many natural and technological processes (Pachon-Rodriguez and Colombani, 2007), including the weathering of rocks and gypsum karst formations, deformation of gypsum-bearing rocks, the quality of drinking water, amelioration of soil acidity, scale formation in the oil and gas industry or measurement of water motion in oceanography. Specific ions in aqueous solutions can play important but very different roles on mineral dissolution. For example, the dissolution rates and the morphology of dissolution features may be considerably modified by the presence of the foreign ions in the solution, which adsorb at the surface and hinder the detachment of the ions building the crystal. Dissolution processes in the aqueous environment are closely related to the rearrangement of water molecules around solute ions and the interaction between the solvent molecules themselves. The rearrangement of water molecules with respect to solute species has been recognized as the main kinetic barrier for crystal dissolution in many systems (Davis, 2000; De Yoreo and Dove 2004; Wasylenki et al. 2005). Current research suggest that the control that electrolytes exert on water structure is limited to the local environment surrounding the ions and is not related to long-range electric fields emanating from the ions but results from effects associated with the hydration shell(s) of the ions (Collins et al. 2007) and the ions' capacity to break or structure water (i.e. chaotropic and kosmotropic ions, respectively). These effects will ultimately affect the kinetics of crystal dissolution, and could be correlated with the water affinity of the respective background ions following a trend known as the lyotropic or Hofmeister series (Kunz et al. 2004; Dove and Craven, 2005). In situ macroscopic and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) flow-through dissolution experiments were conducted at a

  11. Wheat EST resources for functional genomics of abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Mario; Belcaid, Mahdi; Ouellet, François; Danyluk, Jean; Monroy, Antonio F; Dryanova, Ani; Gulick, Patrick; Bergeron, Anne; Laroche, André; Links, Matthew G; MacCarthy, Luke; Crosby, William L; Sarhan, Fathey

    2006-01-01

    Background Wheat is an excellent species to study freezing tolerance and other abiotic stresses. However, the sequence of the wheat genome has not been completely characterized due to its complexity and large size. To circumvent this obstacle and identify genes involved in cold acclimation and associated stresses, a large scale EST sequencing approach was undertaken by the Functional Genomics of Abiotic Stress (FGAS) project. Results We generated 73,521 quality-filtered ESTs from eleven cDNA libraries constructed from wheat plants exposed to various abiotic stresses and at different developmental stages. In addition, 196,041 ESTs for which tracefiles were available from the National Science Foundation wheat EST sequencing program and DuPont were also quality-filtered and used in the analysis. Clustering of the combined ESTs with d2_cluster and TGICL yielded a few large clusters containing several thousand ESTs that were refractory to routine clustering techniques. To resolve this problem, the sequence proximity and "bridges" were identified by an e-value distance graph to manually break clusters into smaller groups. Assembly of the resolved ESTs generated a 75,488 unique sequence set (31,580 contigs and 43,908 singletons/singlets). Digital expression analyses indicated that the FGAS dataset is enriched in stress-regulated genes compared to the other public datasets. Over 43% of the unique sequence set was annotated and classified into functional categories according to Gene Ontology. Conclusion We have annotated 29,556 different sequences, an almost 5-fold increase in annotated sequences compared to the available wheat public databases. Digital expression analysis combined with gene annotation helped in the identification of several pathways associated with abiotic stress. The genomic resources and knowledge developed by this project will contribute to a better understanding of the different mechanisms that govern stress tolerance in wheat and other cereals. PMID

  12. Biotic and abiotic mercury methylation and demethylation in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Planas, D. )

    1994-05-01

    Inorganic mercury (Hg(II)) methylation and methylmercury (MeHg) demethylation may occur in the water column, sediment-water interface and subsurficial sediment of aquatic ecosystems. These transformations involve mainly microbial mechanisms, although abiotic methylation may play a more important role in the water compartment. The relative importance of biotic versus abiotic mechanisms of methylation has not been determined however, and abiotic demethylation remains unknown. Little quantitative information is available on the role of bacterial activity in mercury transformations. It has been reported that at least 16 genera of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms are able to methylate HG(II), and that a greater number are able to demethylate MeHg. Nevertheless, not all populations of these species are capable of methyl- and demethyl-transformations. The actual concentration of MeHg in the aquatic environment is regulated by the relative production and decomposition rates. This, in turn, depends on the availability of Hg(II), MeHg, and bacteria as well as on the physico-chemical properties of the sample. The objective of this study was to compare mercury methylation and demethylation rates in sediment samples with and without active bacterial populations. We therefore performed experiments to follow bacterial evolution during the course of Hg(II) methylation and MeHg demethylation in sediment slurries containing both sterile and non-sterile sediments.

  13. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths

    PubMed Central

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Hashimoto, Hideki; McFarlane, Ian R.; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taketa, Eisuke; Tamura, Katsunori; Takano, Mikio; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II) concentrations, Fe(III) precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II) to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III) was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II) medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter), while those in the Fe(III) medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter) with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved) of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths. PMID:27271677

  14. Lipid signalling in plant responses to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Hou, Quancan; Ufer, Guido; Bartels, Dorothea

    2016-05-01

    Lipids are one of the major components of biological membranes including the plasma membrane, which is the interface between the cell and the environment. It has become clear that membrane lipids also serve as substrates for the generation of numerous signalling lipids such as phosphatidic acid, phosphoinositides, sphingolipids, lysophospholipids, oxylipins, N-acylethanolamines, free fatty acids and others. The enzymatic production and metabolism of these signalling molecules are tightly regulated and can rapidly be activated upon abiotic stress signals. Abiotic stress like water deficit and temperature stress triggers lipid-dependent signalling cascades, which control the expression of gene clusters and activate plant adaptation processes. Signalling lipids are able to recruit protein targets transiently to the membrane and thus affect conformation and activity of intracellular proteins and metabolites. In plants, knowledge is still scarce of lipid signalling targets and their physiological consequences. This review focuses on the generation of signalling lipids and their involvement in response to abiotic stress. We describe lipid-binding proteins in the context of changing environmental conditions and compare different approaches to determine lipid-protein interactions, crucial for deciphering the signalling cascades. PMID:26510494

  15. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths.

    PubMed

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Hashimoto, Hideki; McFarlane, Ian R; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taketa, Eisuke; Tamura, Katsunori; Takano, Mikio; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II) concentrations, Fe(III) precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II) to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III) was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II) medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter), while those in the Fe(III) medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter) with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved) of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths. PMID:27271677

  16. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Narita, Norio; Enomoto, Takafumi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium (IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets. Titania works as a photocatalyst to dissociate liquid water in this process. This mechanism offers a different source of a possibility of abiotic oxygen in atmospheres of exoplanets from previously considered photodissociation of water vapor in upper atmospheres by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light. Our order-of-magnitude estimation shows that possible amounts of oxygen produced by this abiotic mechanism can be comparable with or even more than that in the atmosphere of the current Earth, depending on the amount of active surface area for this mechanism. We conclude that titania may act as a potential source of false signs of life on habitable exoplanets. PMID:26354078

  17. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Norio; Enomoto, Takafumi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium (IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets. Titania works as a photocatalyst to dissociate liquid water in this process. This mechanism offers a different source of a possibility of abiotic oxygen in atmospheres of exoplanets from previously considered photodissociation of water vapor in upper atmospheres by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light. Our order-of-magnitude estimation shows that possible amounts of oxygen produced by this abiotic mechanism can be comparable with or even more than that in the atmosphere of the current Earth, depending on the amount of active surface area for this mechanism. We conclude that titania may act as a potential source of false signs of life on habitable exoplanets. PMID:26354078

  18. Abscisic Acid and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Crop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Saroj K.; Reddy, Kambham R.; Li, Jiaxu

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress is a primary threat to fulfill the demand of agricultural production to feed the world in coming decades. Plants reduce growth and development process during stress conditions, which ultimately affect the yield. In stress conditions, plants develop various stress mechanism to face the magnitude of stress challenges, although that is not enough to protect them. Therefore, many strategies have been used to produce abiotic stress tolerance crop plants, among them, abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone engineering could be one of the methods of choice. ABA is an isoprenoid phytohormone, which regulates various physiological processes ranging from stomatal opening to protein storage and provides adaptation to many stresses like drought, salt, and cold stresses. ABA is also called an important messenger that acts as the signaling mediator for regulating the adaptive response of plants to different environmental stress conditions. In this review, we will discuss the role of ABA in response to abiotic stress at the molecular level and ABA signaling. The review also deals with the effect of ABA in respect to gene expression. PMID:27200044

  19. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Norio; Enomoto, Takafumi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-12-01

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium (IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets. Titania works as a photocatalyst to dissociate liquid water in this process. This mechanism offers a different source of a possibility of abiotic oxygen in atmospheres of exoplanets from previously considered photodissociation of water vapor in upper atmospheres by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light. Our order-of-magnitude estimation shows that possible amounts of oxygen produced by this abiotic mechanism can be comparable with or even more than that in the atmosphere of the current Earth, depending on the amount of active surface area for this mechanism. We conclude that titania may act as a potential source of false signs of life on habitable exoplanets.Reference:Narita N. et al.,Scientific Reports 5, Article number: 13977 (2015)http://www.nature.com/articles/srep13977

  20. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Hyacinthe Le; Philippe, Florian; Domon, Jean-Marc; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic), transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i) an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii) an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions. PMID:27135320

  1. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Hyacinthe; Philippe, Florian; Domon, Jean-Marc; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic), transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i) an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii) an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions. PMID:27135320

  2. Dissolution of two NWCF calcines: Extent of dissolution and characterization of undissolved solids

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the dissolution characteristics of two NWCF calcine types. A two-way blended calcine made from 4 parts nonradioactive aluminum nitrate and one part WM-102 was studied to determine the extent of dissolution for aluminum-type calcines. A two-way blend of 3.5 parts fluorinel waste from WM-187 and 1 part sodium waste from WM-185 was used to determine the extent of dissolution for zirconium-type calcines. This study was necessary to develop suitable aqueous separation flowsheets for the partitioning of actinides and fission products from ICPP calcines and to determine the disposition of the resulting undissolved solids (UDS). The dissolution flowsheet developed by Herbst was used to dissolve these two NWCF calcine types. Results show that greater than 95 wt% of aluminum and zirconium calcine types were dissolved after a single batch contact with 5 M HNO{sub 3}. A characterization of the UDS indicates that the weight percent of TRU elements in the UDS resulting from both calcine type dissolutions increases by approximately an order of magnitude from their concentrations prior to dissolution. Substantial activities of cesium and strontium are also present in the UDS resulting from the dissolution of both calcine types. Multiple TRU, Cs, and Sr analyses of both UDS types show that these solids are relatively homogeneous. From this study, it is estimated that between 63.5 and 635 cubic meters of UDS will be generated from the dissolution of 3800 M{sub 3} of calcine. The significant actinide and fission product activities in these UDS will preclude their disposal as low-level waste. If the actinide and fission activity resulting from the UDS is the only considered source in the dissolved calcine solutions, an estimated 99.9 to 99.99 percent of the solids must be removed from this solution for it to meet non-TRU Class A low-level waste.

  3. Impact of iron chelators on short-term dissolution of basaltic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Anne; Rossano, Stéphanie; Trcera, Nicolas; Verney-Carron, Aurélie; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D.; Catillon, Gilles; Razafitianamaharavo, Angelina; Guyot, François

    2015-08-01

    Although microorganisms seem to play an important role in the alteration processes of basaltic glasses in solution, the elementary mechanisms involved remain unclear in particular with regard to the role of organic ligands excreted by the cells. Two glasses, one with Fe and one without Fe were synthesized to model basaltic glass compositions. Fe in the glass was mostly Fe(III) for enhancing interaction with siderophores, yet with small but significant amounts of Fe(II) (between 10% and 30% of iron). The prepared samples were submitted to abiotic alteration experiments in buffered (pH 6.4) diluted solutions of metal-specific ligands, namely oxalic acid (OA, 10 mM), desferrioxamine (DFA, 1 mM) or 2,2‧-bipyridyl (BPI, 1 mM). Element release from the glass into the solution after short term alteration (maximum 1 week) was measured by ICP-OES, and normalized mass losses and relative release ratios (with respect to Si) were evaluated for each element in each experimental condition. The presence of organic ligands had a significant effect on the dissolution of both glasses. Trivalent metals chelators (OA, DFA) impacted on the release of Fe3+ and Al3+, and thus on the global dissolution of both glasses, enhancing all release rates and dissolution stoichiometry (release rates were increased up to 7 times for Al or Fe). As expected, the mostly divalent metal chelator BPI interacted preferentially with Ca2+, Mg2+ and Fe2+. This study thus allows to highlight the central roles of iron and aluminium in interaction with some organic ligands in the alteration processes of basaltic glasses. It thus provides a step toward understanding the biological contribution of this fundamental geological process.

  4. Mg-calcite dissolution in carbonate sediments: role in ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drupp, P. S.; De Carlo, E. H.; Mackenzie, F. T.

    2014-12-01

    An array of porewater wells at two locations on Hawaiian reefs have been utilized to obtain interstitial pore fluid from various depths in permeable sandy sediments. The total alkalinity (AT) and pH (total scale) were measured for each sample (depths 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 20, 30, 40, and 60 cm) as well as calcium, magnesium, and strontium concentrations. Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations co-vary and appear to be directly related to AT and pH. The ratio of the change in calcium and magnesium (ΔCa, ΔMg) between the overlying water column and the porewater indicates that an 18 mol % Mg-calcite phase is dissolving within the sediment column. This could represent the dissolution of coralline algae such as Porolithon or Lithothamnion both of which produce ~18% Mg-calcite skeletons and are present on Hawaiian reefs. The small changes in Mg concentrations from dissolution/precipitation of high Mg-calcites is typically difficult to measure against the high background matrix of seawater and to our knowledge these data represent some of the first magnesium concentrations measured in permeable sediments. Saturation state (Ω) for Mg-calcites was calculated using both sets of stoichiometric solubility products (K) widely accepted in the literature. Depending on the K used, most of the porewater was undersaturated with respect to the high Mg calcites (>12%). Saturation states were determined using an ion activity product (IAP) calculated from the measured values of calcium and magnesium. This produces a more accurate Ω than assuming calcium and magnesium concentrations based on salinity, as is typically done in surface waters. As surface water becomes more corrosive to carbonate minerals due to enhanced ocean acidification through the next century, it is expected that dissolution of both biogenic high Mg-calcites and abiotic Mg-calcite cements will increase, potentially destabilizing reef framework and altering the biogeochemical cycling of carbon in these environments.

  5. Precipitation and Dissolution of Uranyl Phosphates in a Microfluidic Pore Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werth, C. J.; Fanizza, M.; Strathmann, T.; Finneran, K.; Oostrom, M.; Zhang, C.; Wietsma, T. W.; Hess, N. J.

    2011-12-01

    The abiotic precipitation of uranium (U(VI)) was evaluated in a microfluidic pore structure (i.e. micromodel) to assess the efficacy of using a phosphate amendment to immobilize uranium in groundwater and mitigate the risk of this contaminant to potential down-gradient receptor sites. U(VI) was mixed transverse to the direction of flow with hydrogen phosphate (HPO42-), in the presence or absence of calcium (Ca2+) or sulfate (SO42-), in order to identify precipitation rates, the morphology and types of minerals formed, and the stability of these minerals to dissolution with and without bicarbonate (HCO3-) present. Raman backscattering spectroscopy and micro X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) results both showed that the only mineral precipitated was chernikovite (also known as hydrogen uranyl phosphate; UO2HPO4), even though the formation of other minerals were thermodynamically favored depending on the experimental conditions. Precipitation and dissolution rates varied with influent conditions. Relative to when only U(VI) and HPO42- were present, precipitation rates were 2.3 times slower when SO42- was present, and 1.4 times faster when Ca2+ was present. These rates were inversely related to the size of crystals formed during precipitation. Dissolution rates for chernikovite increased with increasing HCO3- concentrations, consistent with formation of uranyl carbonate complexes in aqueous solution, and they were the fastest for chernikovite formed in the presence of SO42-, and slowest for the chernikovite formed in the presence of Ca2+. These rates are related to the ratios of mineral-water interfacial area to mineral volume. Fluorescent tracer studies and laser confocal microscopy images showed that densely aggregated precipitates blocked pores and reduced permeability. The results suggest that changes in the solute conditions evaluated affect precipitation rates, crystal morphology, and crystal stability, but not mineral type.

  6. An Investigation of Density Driven Salt Dissolution Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.

    1998-03-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to support the salt dissolution demonstration in Tank 41H. The desire was to improve upon past salt dissolution operations and develop a safe, efficient and cost effective means for future operations.

  7. In vitro Dissolution Studies on Solid Dispersions of Mefenamic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. R. S. Sambasiva; Nagabhushanam, M V; Chowdary, K. P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Solid dispersions of mefanamic acid with a water-soluble polymer polyvinyl pyrrolidine and a super disintegrant, primojel were prepared by common solvent and solvent evaporation methods employing methanol as the solvent. The dissolution rate and dissolution efficiency of the prepared solid dispersions were evaluated in comparison to the corresponding pure drug. Solid dispersions of mefenamic acid showed a marked enhancement in dissolution rate and dissolution efficiency. At 1:4 ratio of mefenamic acid-primojel a 2.61 fold increase in the dissolution rate of mefenamic acid was observed with solid dispersion. The solid dispersions in combined carriers gave much higher rates of dissolution than super disintegrants alone. Mefanamic acid-primojel-polyvinyl pyrrolidine (1:3.2:0.8) solid dispersion gave a 4.11 fold increase in the dissolution rate of mefenamic acid. Super disintegrants alone or in combination with polyvinyl pyrrolidine could be used to enhance the dissolution rate of mefenamic acid. PMID:22303074

  8. Dissolution Kinetics of Biogenic Magnesian Calcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R.; Guidry, M.; Mackenzie, F. T.; De Carlo, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is a serious concern for the health of calcifying ecosystems in the near future. During the past century, surface ocean pH has decreased by ~0.1 pH units, and is expected to decrease further by 0.3-0.4 pH units by the end of this century. The process of OA will likely result in both decreased calcification rates and increased rates of carbonate mineral dissolution, particularly involving the magnesian calcite (Mg-calcite) calcifiers found in shallow-water reef and other carbonate environments. Many Mg-calcite compositions are the most soluble of the carbonate phases commonly found in reef environments (often comprising much of the cementation and structure within a reef), and are therefore potentially the most susceptible to dissolution processes associated with OA. However, the dissolution kinetics of these phases is poorly known, limiting our ability to understand their behavior in nature. Laboratory experiments designed to investigate the mechanisms and dissolution rates of biogenic Mg-calcite mineral phases in distilled water and seawater over a range of CO2 and T conditions were conducted employing both batch and fluidized-bed reactor systems and using a variety of cleaned and annealed biogenic Mg-calcite phases. Our initial results have shown that the dissolution rate at 298 K and a pCO2 of ~350 ppm of the crustose coralline alga Amphiroa rigida (~20 mol% MgCO3) in seawater undersaturated with respect to this phase is 3.6 μmol g-1 hr-1, nearly 50% greater than that under similar conditions for aragonite. This rate and the derived experimental rate law are consistent with the preliminary findings of Walter and Morse (1985). Additional kinetic (and also solubility) data will be presented for the following species: Chiton tuberculatus (~0-4 mol% MgCO3); Echinometra mathei and/or Lytechinus variegatus (~8-12 mol% MgCO3); Homotrema rubrum (12-16 mol% MgCO3); and Lithothamnion sp. (~18-24 mol% MgCO3). Quantification of the rates of

  9. Montmorillonite Dissolution in Simulated Lung Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Wendlandt, R. F.

    2008-12-01

    Because lung fluids" first interaction is with the surface of inhaled grains, the surface properties of inhaled mineral dusts may have a generally mitigating effect on cytotoxicity and carcinogenicity. Wendlandt et al. (Appl. Geochem. 22, 2007) investigated the surface properties of respirable-sized quartz grains in bentonites and recognized pervasive montmorillonite surface coatings on silica grains. The purpose of this study was to determine the dissolution rate and biodurability of montmorillonite in simulated lung fluids and to assess its potential to mitigate silica cytotoxicity. Modified batch reaction experiments were conducted on purified and size fractionated calcic (SAz-2; 0.4-5 μm) and sodic (DC-2; 0.4-2 μm) montmorillonites for 120 to 160 days of reaction time at 37°C in both simulated extracellular lung fluid (Lu) and simulated lysosomal fluid (Ly). Modified batch experiments simulated a flow-through setup and minimized sample handling difficulties. Reacted Lu and Ly fluid was analyzed for Mg, Al, and Si on an ICP-OE spectrometer. Steady state dissolution was reached 90-100 days after the start of the experiment and maintained for 40-60 days. Measured montmorillonite dissolution rates based on BET surface areas and Si steady state release range from 4.1x10-15 mol/m2/s at the slowest to 1.0x10-14 mol/m2/s at the fastest with relative uncertainties of less than 10%. Samples reacting in Ly (pH = 4.55) dissolved faster than those in Lu (pH = 7.40), and DC-2 dissolved faster than SAz-2. The measured range of biodurabilities was 1,300 to 3,400 years for a 1 μm grain assuming a spherical volume and a molar volume equal to that of illite. The difference in salinities of the two fluids was too slight to draw conclusions about the relationship of ionic strength to dissolution rate. Results indicate that montmorillonite dissolution is incongruent and edge controlled. Dissolution rates for DC- 2 and SAz-2 clays were comparable to those reported in the

  10. Examining Two Types of Best Friendship Dissolution during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowker, Julie C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined young adolescents' experiences with best friendship dissolution. Participants were 77 sixth-grade students (M age = 11.63 years, SD = 0.36; 11.00-12.69 age range) who reported on past experiences with (1) "complete dissolutions" (when friendship ties are completely severed), and (2) "downgrade dissolutions" (when the best…

  11. Characterization and Dissolution Kinetics Testing of Radioactive H-3 Calcine

    SciTech Connect

    Garn, Troy Gerry; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2002-09-01

    Characterization and dissolution kinetics testing were performed with Idaho radioactive H-3 calcine. Calcine dissolution is the key front-end unit operation for the Separations Alternative identified in the Idaho High Level Waste Draft EIS. The impact of the extent of dissolution on the feasibility of Separations must be clearly quantified.

  12. The oxidative dissolution of arsenopyrite (FeAsS) and enargite (Cu 3AsS 4) by Leptospirillum ferrooxidans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corkhill, C. L.; Wincott, P. L.; Lloyd, J. R.; Vaughan, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenopyrite (FeAsS) and enargite (Cu 3AsS 4) fractured in a nitrogen atmosphere were characterised after acidic (pH 1.8), oxidative dissolution in both the presence and absence of the acidophilic microorganism Leptospirillum ferrooxidans. Dissolution was monitored through analysis of the coexisting aqueous solution using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and coupled ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and chemical changes at the mineral surface observed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Biologically mediated oxidation of arsenopyrite and enargite (2.5 g in 25 ml) was seen to proceed to a greater extent than abiotic oxidation, although arsenopyrite oxidation was significantly greater than enargite oxidation. These dissolution reactions were associated with the release of ˜917 and ˜180 ppm of arsenic into solution. The formation of Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides, ferric sulphate and arsenate was observed for arsenopyrite, thiosulphate and an unknown arsenic oxide for enargite. ESEM revealed an extensive coating of an extracellular polymeric substance associated with the L. ferrooxidans cells on the arsenopyrite surface and bacterial leach pits suggest a direct biological oxidation mechanism, although a combination of indirect and direct bioleaching cannot be ruled out. Although the relative oxidation rates of enargite were greater in the presence of L. ferrooxidans, cells were not in contact with the surface suggesting an indirect biological oxidation mechanism. Cells of L. ferrooxidans appear able to withstand several hundreds of ppm of As(III) and As(V).

  13. Ego-Dissolution and Psychedelics: Validation of the Ego-Dissolution Inventory (EDI)

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Matthew M.; Evans, Lisa; Nutt, David; Carhart-Harris, Robin L.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The experience of a compromised sense of “self”, termed ego-dissolution, is a key feature of the psychedelic experience. This study aimed to validate the Ego-Dissolution Inventory (EDI), a new 8-item self-report scale designed to measure ego-dissolution. Additionally, we aimed to investigate the specificity of the relationship between psychedelics and ego-dissolution. Method: Sixteen items relating to altered ego-consciousness were included in an internet questionnaire; eight relating to the experience of ego-dissolution (comprising the EDI), and eight relating to the antithetical experience of increased self-assuredness, termed ego-inflation. Items were rated using a visual analog scale. Participants answered the questionnaire for experiences with classical psychedelic drugs, cocaine and/or alcohol. They also answered the seven questions from the Mystical Experiences Questionnaire (MEQ) relating to the experience of unity with one’s surroundings. Results: Six hundred and ninety-one participants completed the questionnaire, providing data for 1828 drug experiences (1043 psychedelics, 377 cocaine, 408 alcohol). Exploratory factor analysis demonstrated that the eight EDI items loaded exclusively onto a single common factor, which was orthogonal to a second factor comprised of the items relating to ego-inflation (rho = −0.110), demonstrating discriminant validity. The EDI correlated strongly with the MEQ-derived measure of unitive experience (rho = 0.735), demonstrating convergent validity. EDI internal consistency was excellent (Cronbach’s alpha 0.93). Three analyses confirmed the specificity of ego-dissolution for experiences occasioned by psychedelic drugs. Firstly, EDI score correlated with drug-dose for psychedelic drugs (rho = 0.371), but not for cocaine (rho = 0.115) or alcohol (rho = −0.055). Secondly, the linear regression line relating the subjective intensity of the experience to ego-dissolution was significantly steeper for psychedelics

  14. Reductive Dechlorination of PCE DNAPL Source Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, B. E.; Edwards, E. A.

    2006-12-01

    A numerical modeling study was conducted to evaluate the potential impact of reductive dechlorination on enhancement of dissolution of source zones of perchloroethylene (PCE) dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). The model included three-phase (water-gas-NAPL) flow and transport with interphase mass transfer. Reductive dechlorination of PCE to ethene was simulated with Monod kinetics with hydrogen as the direct electron donor. Hydrogen was produced from the transformation of ethanol to propionate and acetate. The model also included growth of dechlorinators, fermenters and methanogens, with methane generation from hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic methanogenesis. The model was applied to the simulation of a two-dimensional bench scale study of reductive dechlorination of a PCE DNAPL source with biostimulation and bioaugmentation with a known PCE dechlorinating culture. In the bench scale study spatial and temporal variation of dissolved concentrations of chlorinated ethenes, electron donors were monitored. Quantitative PCR was also used to track the spatial and temporal variation of the dechlorinators. In this bench scale study, the maximum enhancement of PCE dissolution was approximately threefold. However, this enhancement was not sustained over the entire study, and apparent rates of PCE dissolution, as indicated by maximum dissolved concentrations of total ethenes, declined with time and increasing extent of source removal. The model was used to examine the impact on enhanced dissolution of reduction in source zone size, repartitioning of transformation products, and gas blockage from methane generation. Reductions in source zone size, coupled with a heterogeneous flow field, led to significant reductions in maximum concentrations measured in the bench scale study. Repartitioning of transformation products led to reductions in the maximum dissolved concentrations of PCE transformation products, leading to an apparent reduction in the enhancement of PCE

  15. A morpholinium ionic liquid for cellulose dissolution.

    PubMed

    Raut, Dilip G; Sundman, Ola; Su, Weiqing; Virtanen, Pasi; Sugano, Yasuhito; Kordas, Krisztian; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2015-10-01

    A series of substituted morpholinium ionic salts and allyl ammonium acetates were prepared. Amongst those, N-allyl-N-methylmorpholinium acetate ([AMMorp][OAc]) was found to dissolve cellulose readily without any pre-processing of native cellulose. At 120°C, [AMMorp][OAc] could dissolve 30 wt%, 28 wt% and 25 wt% of cellulose with degree of polymerization (DPn) - 789, 1644 and 2082 respectively, in 20 min. Importantly, SEC analysis indicated that no discernible changes occurred in terms of the degree of polymerization of the different celluloses after regeneration. Furthermore, when comparing the cellulose dissolution capability of these newly synthesized ionic liquids, it is evident that the combination of all three constituents - the morpholinium cation, the existence of an allyl group and choosing the acetate anion are essential for efficient cellulose dissolution. The structure and morphology of the regenerated cellulosic materials were characterized by SEM, XRD, TGA, CP/MAS (13)C NMR and FTIR, respectively. PMID:26076596

  16. Uranium-Molybdenum Dissolution Flowsheet Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R. A.

    2007-03-01

    The Super Kukla (SK) Prompt Burst Reactor operated at the Nevada Test Site from 1964 to 1978. The SK material is a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy material of 90% U/10% Mo by weight at approximately 20% 235U enrichment. H-Canyon Engineering (HCE) requested that the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) define a flowsheet for safely and efficiently dissolving the SK material. The objective is to dissolve the material in nitric acid (HNO3) in the H-Canyon dissolvers to a U concentration of 15-20 g/L (3-4 g/L 235U) without the formation of precipitates or the generation of a flammable gas mixture. Testing with SK material validated the applicability of dissolution and solubility data reported in the literature for various U and U-Mo metals. Based on the data, the SK material can be dissolved in boiling 3.0-6.0 M HNO3 to a U concentration of 15-20 g/L and a corresponding Mo concentration of 1.7-2.2 g/L. The optimum flowsheet will use 4.0-5.0 M HNO3 for the starting acid. Any nickel (Ni) cladding associated with the material will dissolve readily. After dissolution is complete, traditional solvent extraction flowsheets can be used to recover and purify the U. Dissolution rates for the SK material are consistent with those reported in the literature and are adequate for H-Canyon processing. When the SK material dissolved at 70-100 o C in 1-6 M HNO3, the reaction bubbled vigorously and released nitrogen oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas. Gas generation tests in 1 M and 2 M HNO3 at 100 o C generated less than 0.1 volume percent hydrogen (H2) gas. It is known that higher HNO3 concentrations are less favorable for H2 production. All tests at 70-100 o C produced sufficient gas to mix the solutions without external agitation. At room temperature in 5 M HNO3, the U-Mo dissolved slowly and the U-laden solution sank to the bottom of the dissolution vessel because of its greater density. The effect of the density difference insures that the SK material cannot dissolve and

  17. Bile acid dissolution therapy of gallbladder stones.

    PubMed

    Fromm, H; Malavolti, M

    1992-11-01

    Oral cholelitholytic bile acid therapy has become established treatment for selected patients with cholesterol gallstones. The treatment finds its clinical application both alone and in combination with ESWL. UDCA alone or, less commonly, a combination of this bile acid with CDCA is used. Optimal results can be expected only in carefully selected patients. Bile acid dissolution therapy is most successful in patients with radiolucent gallstones which are < or = 0.5 cm in diameter or are shown by OCG to be floating. Dissolution is seldom seen when the stones are > 1 cm in size. Cholelitholytic treatment in combination with ESWL yields optimal results in single radiolucent gallstones which are not greater than 2 cm. ESWL thus makes it possible to use medical treatment effectively in single 1-2 cm gallstones when bile acids alone would not be successful. Bile acid treatment is extremely safe, especially if UDCA is given without the addition of CDCA. PMID:1486209

  18. The Dissolution of an Interfween Miscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlad, D.H.; Maher, J.V.

    1999-01-01

    The disappearance of the surface tension of the interface of a binary mixture, measured using the dynamic surface light scattering technique, is slower for a binary mixture of higher density contrast. A comparison with a naive diffusion model, expected to provide a lower limit for the speed of dissolution in the absence of gravity shows that the interfacial surface tension disappears much slower than even by diffusion with the effect becoming much more pronounced when density contrast between the liquid phases is increased. Thus, the factor most likely to be responsible for this anomalously slow dissolution is gravity. A mechanism could be based on the competition between diffusive relaxation and sedimentation at the dissolving interface.

  19. Calcite dissolution in two deep eutrophic lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramisch, F.; Dittrich, M.; Mattenberger, C.; Wehrli, B.; Wueest, A.

    1999-10-01

    The calcium cycle, in particular carbonate dissolution, was analyzed in two deep eutrophic lakes, Lago di Lugano (288 m maximum depth) and Sempachersee (87 m) located in Switzerland. A box model approach was used to calculate calcite dissolution in the water column and at the sediment-water interface based on various lake monitoring data such as sediment traps, sediment cores, water and pore-water interface based on various lake monitoring data such as sediment traps, sediment cores, water and pore-water analysis. A model for stationary conditions allowing the calculation of calcite dissolution in the water column for a given particle size distribution was developed. The relative values of the simulated flux were consistent with sediment trap observations. The best fit of the dissolution rate constant of sinking calcite in Lago di Lugano was on the same order of magnitude (3 {center{underscore}dot} 10{sup {minus}10} kg{sup 1/3} s{sup {minus}1}) as published laboratory values for this surface controlled process. Both lakes show a similar specific calcite precipitation rate of 170 g Ca m{sup {minus}2} a{sup {minus}1}. The diffusive flux across the sediment-water interface amounts to about 15 and 10% of total calcite precipitation in Sempachersee and Lago di Lugano, respectively. However, 61% of the precipitated calcite is dissolved in the water column of Lago di Lugano compared to only 13% in Sempachersee. These results point towards the importance of grain size distributions and settling times in stratified deep waters as the two most important factors determining calcite retention in sediments of hard water lakes.

  20. DISSOLUTION OF ZIRCONIUM AND ALLOYS THEREFOR

    DOEpatents

    Swanson, J.L.

    1961-07-11

    The dissolution of zirconium cladding in a water solution of ammonium fluoride and ammonium nitrate is described. The method finds particular utility in processing spent fuel elements for nuclear reactors. The zirconium cladding is first dissolved in a water solution of ammonium fluoride and ammonium nitrate; insoluble uranium and plutonium fiuorides formed by attack of the solvent on the fuel materiai of the fuel element are then separated from the solution, and the fuel materiai is dissolved in another solution.

  1. Theoretical Analysis of Drug Dissolution: I. Solubility and Intrinsic Dissolution Rate.

    PubMed

    Shekunov, Boris; Montgomery, Eda Ross

    2016-09-01

    The first-principles approach presented in this work combines surface kinetics and convective diffusion modeling applied to compounds with pH-dependent solubility and in different dissolution media. This analysis is based on experimental data available for approximately 100 compounds of pharmaceutical interest. Overall, there is a linear relationship between the drug solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate expressed through the total kinetic coefficient of dissolution and dimensionless numbers defining the mass transfer regime. The contribution of surface kinetics appears to be significant constituting on average ∼20% resistance to the dissolution flux in the compendial rotating disk apparatus at 100 rpm. The surface kinetics contribution becomes more dominant under conditions of fast laminar or turbulent flows or in cases when the surface kinetic coefficient may decrease as a function of solution composition or pH. Limitations of the well-known convective diffusion equation for rotating disk by Levich are examined using direct computational modeling with simultaneous dissociation and acid-base reactions in which intrinsic dissolution rate is strongly dependent on pH profile and solution ionic strength. It is shown that concept of diffusion boundary layer does not strictly apply for reacting/interacting species and that thin-film diffusion models cannot be used quantitatively in general case. PMID:26906172

  2. Biotic and Abiotic Transformation of a Volatile Organics Plume in a Semi-Arid Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Studer, J.E.; Singletary, M.A.; Miller, D.R.

    1999-04-08

    An evaluation of biotic and abiotic attenuation processes potentially important to chlorinated and non-chlorinated volatile organic compound (VOC) fate and transport in the 148 meter thick vadose zone beneath the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) was conducted. A unique feature of this evaluation is the comparison of two estimates of VOC mass present in the soil gas, pore-water, and solid phases (but not including mass as non-aqueous phase liquid [NAPL]) of the vadose zone in 1993. One estimate, 1,800 kg, was obtained from vadose zone transport modeling that incorporated molecular diffusion and volatilization to the atmosphere, but not biotic or chemical processes. The other estimate, 2,120 kg, was obtained from the sum of VOC mass physically removed during soil vapor extraction and an estimate of VOC mass remaining in the vadose zone in 1998, both adjusted to exclude NAPL mass. This comparison indicates that biogeochemical processes were at best slightly important to historical VOC plume development. Some evidence of aerobic degradation of non-chlorinated VOCs and abiotic transformation of 1,1,1-Trichloroethane was identified. Despite potentially amenable site conditions, no evidence was found of cometabolic and anaerobic transformation pathways. Relying principally on soil-gas analytical results, an upper-bound estimate of 21% mass reduction due to natural biogeochemical processes was developed. Although available information for the CWL indicates that natural attenuation processes other than volatilization to the atmosphere did not effective y enhance groundwater protection, these processes could be important in significantly reducing groundwater contamination and exposure risks at other sites. More laboratory and field research is required to improve our collective ability to characterize and exploit natural VOC attenuation processes, especially with respect to the combination of relatively thick and dry vadose zones and chlorinated VOCs.

  3. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2007-05-24

    Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular

  4. Model Comparison for Abiotic versus Biotic Pollen Dispersal.

    PubMed

    Foster, Erich L; Chan, David M; Dyer, Rodney J

    2016-10-01

    An agent-based model with a correlated random walk is used to explore pollination within a forest. For abiotic dispersal, say via the wind, we use a purely random walk where there is no correlation between consecutive steps and for biotic dispersal, say via insect, we use a moderate or highly correlated random walk. In particular, we examine the differences in a number of biological measurement between a purely random walk and a correlated random walk in terms of gene dispersal in low and high plant densities. PMID:27550704

  5. Coupled Abiotic-Biotic Degradation of Bisphenol A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, J.; Prevatte, C.; Campagna, S. R.; Loeffler, F.

    2014-12-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant with weak estrogenic activity. BPA is readily biodegradable with oxygen available, but is recalcitrant to microbial degradation under anoxic conditions. However, BPA is susceptible to abiotic transformation under anoxic conditions. To better understand the fate of BPA in anoxic environments, the kinetics of BPA transformation by manganese oxide (d-MnO2) were investigated. BPA was rapidly transformed by MnO2 with a pseudo-first-order rate constant of 0.413 min-1. NMR and LC-MS analyses identified 4-hydroxycumyl alcohol (HCA) as a major intermediate. Up to 64% of the initial amount of BPA was recovered as HCA within 5 min, but the conversion efficiency decreased with time, suggesting that HCA was further degraded by MnO2. Further experiments confirmed that HCA was also susceptible to transformation by MnO2, albeit at 5-fold lower rates than BPA transformation. Mass balance approaches suggested that HCA was the major BPA transformation intermediate, but other compounds may also be formed. The abiotic transformation of BPA by MnO2 was affected by pH, and 10-fold higher transformation rates were observed at pH 4.5 than at pH 10. Compared to BPA, HCA has a lower octanol-water partitioning coefficient (Log Kow) of 0.76 vs 2.76 for BPA and a higher aqueous solubility of 2.65 g L-1 vs 0.31 g L-1 for BPA, suggesting higher mobility of HCA in the environment. Microcosms established with freshwater sediment materials collected from four geographically distinct locations and amended with HCA demonstrated rapid HCA biodegradation under oxic, but not under anoxic conditions. These findings suggest that BPA is not inert under anoxic conditions and abiotic reactions with MnO2 generate HCA, which has increased mobility and is susceptible to aerobic degradation. Therefore, coupled abiotic-biotic processes can affect the fate and longevity of BPA in terrestrial environments.

  6. May Cyclic Nucleotides Be a Source for Abiotic RNA Synthesis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Pino, Samanta; Botta, Giorgia; Saladino, Raffaele; di Mauro, Ernesto

    2011-12-01

    Nucleic bases are obtained by heating formamide in the presence of various catalysts. Formamide chemistry also allows the formation of acyclonucleosides and the phosphorylation of nucleosides in every possible position, also affording 2',3' and 3',5' cyclic forms. We have reported that 3',5' cyclic GMP and 3',5' cyclic AMP polymerize in abiotic conditions yielding short oligonucleotides. The characterization of this reaction is being pursued, several of its parameters have been determined and experimental caveats are reported. The yield of non-enzymatic polymerization of cyclic purine nucleotides is very low. Polymerization is strongly enhanced by the presence of base-complementary RNA sequences.

  7. Abiotic gas formation drives nitrogen loss from a desert ecosystem.

    PubMed

    McCalley, Carmody K; Sparks, Jed P

    2009-11-01

    In arid environments such as deserts, nitrogen is often the most limiting nutrient for biological activity. The majority of the ecosystem nitrogen flux is typically thought to be driven by production and loss of reactive nitrogen species by microorganisms in the soil. We found that high soil-surface temperatures (greater than 50 degrees C), driven by solar radiation, are the primary cause of nitrogen loss in Mojave Desert soils. This abiotic pathway not only enables the balancing of arid ecosystem nitrogen budgets, but also changes our view of global nitrogen cycling and the predicted impact of climate change and increased temperatures on nitrogen bioavailability. PMID:19892980

  8. Formation and dissolution of the passive film on iron studied by a light reflectance technique

    SciTech Connect

    Buechler, M.; Schmuki, P.; Boehni, H.

    1997-07-01

    The formation, growth, and dissolution of the passive film on iron in neutral and alkaline solutions was investigated using a light reflectance technique. In this study, laser light of 325 nm was used to access the amount of light absorbed in the film and to evaluate the optical absorption coefficient. After calibration, this technique allows a fast, in situ determination of the film thickness. Cyclic voltammetry and potential-step experiments with simultaneous thickness monitoring were carried out in borate buffer and in 0.1 M NaOH. For the borate buffer, anodic film formation and cathodic film dissolution are reversible, i.e., repeated anodic/cathodic cycling leads to conditions identical to the initial state. In NaOH, cathodic reduction of the film does not lead to film dissolution but to the formation of an electrochemically active layer, which does not significant contribute to the potential drop in the metal/film/electrolyte system. Hence, repeated passivation and reduction leads to successive thickening of the film, consisting of a barrier layer of constant thickness and a porous layer having increased thickness with every passivation/reduction cycle. This layer does not contribute to the passivity of iron.

  9. The dynamics of household dissolution and change in socio-economic position: A survival model in a rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sartorius, Kurt; Sartorius, Benn KD; Collinson, Mark A; Tollman, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates household dissolution and changes in asset wealth (socio-economic position) in a rural South African community containing settled refugees. Survival analysis applied to a longitudinal dataset indicated that the covariates increasing the risk of forced household dissolution were a reduction in socio-economic position (asset wealth), adult deaths and the permanent outmigration of more than 40% of the household. Conversely, the risk of dissolution was reduced by bigger households, state grants and older household heads. Significant spatial clusters of former refugee villages also showed a higher risk of dissolution after 20 years of permanent residence. A discussion of the dynamics of dissolution showed how an outflow/inflow of household assets (socio-economic position) was precipitated by each of the selected covariates. The paper shows how an understanding of the dynamics of forced household dissolution, combined with the use of geo-spatial mapping, can inform inter-disciplinary policy in a rural community. PMID:25937697

  10. The role of sulphate reduction on the reductive S decolorization of the azo dye reactive orange 14.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, F J; Enriquez, J E; Mendoza-Hernandez, M R; Razo-Flores, E; Field, J A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a broad range of sulphate concentrations (0-10g SO4(-2) L(-1)) on the reduction of an azo dye (reactive orange 14 (RO14)) by an anaerobic sludge. An increase in the sulphate concentration generally stimulated the reduction of RO14 by sludge incubations supplemented with glucose, acetate or propionate as electron donor. Sulphate and azo dye reductions took place simultaneously in all incubations. However, there was a decrease on the rate of decolorization when sulphate was supplied at 10g SO4(-2) L(-1). Abiotic incubations at different sulphide concentrations (0-2.5 g sulphide L(-1)) promoted very poor reduction of RO14. However, addition of riboflavin (20 microM), as a redox mediator, accelerated the reduction of RO14 up to 44-fold compared to a control lacking the catalyst. Our results indicate that sulphate-reduction may significantly contribute to the reduction of azo dyes both by biological mechanisms and by abiotic reductions implicating sulphide as an electron donor. The contribution of abiotic decolorization by sulphide, however, was only significant when a proper redox mediator was included. Our results also revealed that sulphate-reduction can out-compete with azo reduction at high sulphate concentrations leading to a poor decolorising performance when no sufficient reducing capacity is available. PMID:16939099

  11. Small RNAs in Plant Responses to Abiotic Stresses: Regulatory Roles and Study Methods

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Yee-Shan; Wong, Johanna Wing-Hang; Mui, Zeta; Liu, Xuan; Hui, Jerome Ho-Lam; Chan, Ting-Fung; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2015-01-01

    To survive under abiotic stresses in the environment, plants trigger a reprogramming of gene expression, by transcriptional regulation or translational regulation, to turn on protective mechanisms. The current focus of research on how plants cope with abiotic stresses has transitioned from transcriptomic analyses to small RNA investigations. In this review, we have summarized and evaluated the current methodologies used in the identification and validation of small RNAs and their targets, in the context of plant responses to abiotic stresses. PMID:26501263

  12. Kinetic dissolution of carbonates and Mn oxides in acidic water: Measurement of in situ field rates and reactive transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.G.; Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of carbonate and Mn oxide dissolution under acidic conditions were examined through the in situ exposure of pure phase samples to acidic ground water in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona. The average long-term calculated in situ dissolution rates for calcite and dolomite were 1.65??10-7 and 3.64??10-10 mmol/(cm2 s), respectively, which were about 3 orders of magnitude slower than rates derived in laboratory experiments by other investigators. Application of both in situ and lab-derived calcite and dolomite dissolution rates to equilibrium reactive transport simulations of a column experiment did not improve the fit to measured outflow chemistry: at the spatial and temporal scales of the column experiment, the use of an equilibrium model adequately simulated carbonate dissolution in the column. Pyrolusite (MnO2) exposed to acidic ground water for 595 days increased slightly in weight despite thermodynamic conditions that favored dissolution. This result might be related to a recent finding by another investigator that the reductive dissolution of pyrolusite is accompanied by the precipitation of a mixed Mn-Fe oxide species. In PHREEQC reactive transport simulations, the incorporation of Mn kinetics improved the fit between observed and simulated behavior at the column and field scales, although the column-fitted rate for Mn-oxide dissolution was about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the field-fitted rate. Remaining differences between observed and simulated contaminant transport trends at the Pinal Creek site were likely related to factors other than the Mn oxide dissolution rate, such as the concentration of Fe oxide surface sites available for adsorption, the effects of competition among dissolved species for available surface sites, or reactions not included in the model.

  13. Aluminum uptake and inhibition of enamel dissolution by sequential treatments with aluminum solutions.

    PubMed

    Kleber, C J; Putt, M S

    1994-01-01

    The effects of sequentially applied solutions containing aluminum (Al) on enamel uptake and inhibition of acid dissolution were investigated. Following 10 consecutive 5-min treatments with seven Al solutions varying in concentration from 0.15 to 2.0 mmol/l, the subsequent acid dissolution of enamel was progressively reduced from 0 to over 70%. Teeth treated with 1.5 mmol/l Al from 1 to 30 consecutive 5-min periods demonstrated a stepwise increase in the reduction of enamel acid dissolution ranging from about 10 to 90%. Following the same treatment regimen, the amount of Al deposited in the enamel varied from 2,500 ppm after a single 5-min application to approximately 9,000 ppm after 20 or 30 consecutive treatments. These experiments showed that teeth repeatedly exposed to low concentrations of Al solutions (i.e. < 2 mmol/l) progressively accumulated significant amounts of Al in the surface enamel, which was associated with a concomitant decrease in the acid dissolution rate of enamel. PMID:7850841

  14. Preparation and characterization of liquisolid compacts for improved dissolution of telmisartan.

    PubMed

    Chella, Naveen; Narra, Nataraj; Rama Rao, Tadikonda

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to obtain pH independent and improved dissolution profile for a poorly soluble drug, telmisartan using liquisolid compacts. Liquisolid compacts were prepared using Transcutol HP as vehicle, Avicel PH102 as carrier, and Aerosil 200 as a coating material. The formulations were evaluated for drug excipient interactions, change in crystallinity of drug, flow properties, and general quality control tests of tablets using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), angle of repose, and various pharmacopoeial tests. In vitro dissolution studies were performed at three pH conditions (1.2, 4.5 and 7.4). Stability studies were performed at 40°C and 75% RH for three months. The formulation was found to comply with Indian pharmacopoeial limits for tablets. FTIR studies confirmed no interaction between drug and excipients. XRD and DSC studies indicate change/reduction in crystallinity of drug. Dissolution media were selected based on the solubility studies. The optimized formulation showed pH independent release profile with significant improvement (P < 0.005) in dissolution compared to plain drug and conventional marketed formulation. No significant difference was seen in the tablet properties, and drug release profile after storage for 3 months. PMID:25371826

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Liquisolid Compacts for Improved Dissolution of Telmisartan

    PubMed Central

    Narra, Nataraj; Rama Rao, Tadikonda

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to obtain pH independent and improved dissolution profile for a poorly soluble drug, telmisartan using liquisolid compacts. Liquisolid compacts were prepared using Transcutol HP as vehicle, Avicel PH102 as carrier, and Aerosil 200 as a coating material. The formulations were evaluated for drug excipient interactions, change in crystallinity of drug, flow properties, and general quality control tests of tablets using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), angle of repose, and various pharmacopoeial tests. In vitro dissolution studies were performed at three pH conditions (1.2, 4.5 and 7.4). Stability studies were performed at 40°C and 75% RH for three months. The formulation was found to comply with Indian pharmacopoeial limits for tablets. FTIR studies confirmed no interaction between drug and excipients. XRD and DSC studies indicate change/reduction in crystallinity of drug. Dissolution media were selected based on the solubility studies. The optimized formulation showed pH independent release profile with significant improvement (P < 0.005) in dissolution compared to plain drug and conventional marketed formulation. No significant difference was seen in the tablet properties, and drug release profile after storage for 3 months. PMID:25371826

  16. Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421

    SciTech Connect

    Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel

    2013-07-01

    Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals. The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10{sup 6} cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours of cell

  17. Siderophore-Mediated Iron Dissolution from Nontronites Is Controlled by Mineral Cristallochemistry.

    PubMed

    Parrello, Damien; Zegeye, Asfaw; Mustin, Christian; Billard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria living in oxic environments experience iron deficiency due to limited solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of iron-bearing minerals. To cope with iron deprivation, aerobic bacteria have evolved various strategies, including release of siderophores or other organic acids that scavenge external Fe(III) and deliver it to the cells. This research investigated the role of siderophores produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the acquisition of Fe(III) from two iron-bearing colloidal nontronites (NAu-1 and NAu-2), comparing differences in bioavailability related with site occupancy and distribution of Fe(III) in the two lattices. To avoid both the direct contact of the mineral colloids with the bacterial cells and the uncontrolled particle aggregation, nontronite suspensions were homogenously dispersed in a porous silica gel before the dissolution experiments. A multiparametric approach coupling UV-vis spectroscopy and spectral decomposition algorithm was implemented to monitor simultaneously the solubilisation of Fe and the production of pyoverdine in microplate-based batch experiments. Both nontronites released Fe in a particle concentration-dependent manner when incubated with the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain, however iron released from NAu-2 was substantially greater than from NAu-1. The profile of organic acids produced in both cases was similar and may not account for the difference in the iron dissolution efficiency. In contrast, a pyoverdine-deficient mutant was unable to mobilize Fe(III) from either nontronite, whereas iron dissolution occurred in abiotic experiments conducted with purified pyoverdine. Overall, our data provide evidence that P. aeruginosa indirectly mobilize Fe from nontronites primarily through the production of pyoverdine. The structural Fe present on the edges of NAu-2 rather than NAu-1 particles appears to be more bio-accessible, indicating that the distribution of Fe, in the tetrahedron and/or in the octahedron sites, governs

  18. Siderophore-Mediated Iron Dissolution from Nontronites Is Controlled by Mineral Cristallochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Parrello, Damien; Zegeye, Asfaw; Mustin, Christian; Billard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria living in oxic environments experience iron deficiency due to limited solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of iron-bearing minerals. To cope with iron deprivation, aerobic bacteria have evolved various strategies, including release of siderophores or other organic acids that scavenge external Fe(III) and deliver it to the cells. This research investigated the role of siderophores produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the acquisition of Fe(III) from two iron-bearing colloidal nontronites (NAu-1 and NAu-2), comparing differences in bioavailability related with site occupancy and distribution of Fe(III) in the two lattices. To avoid both the direct contact of the mineral colloids with the bacterial cells and the uncontrolled particle aggregation, nontronite suspensions were homogenously dispersed in a porous silica gel before the dissolution experiments. A multiparametric approach coupling UV-vis spectroscopy and spectral decomposition algorithm was implemented to monitor simultaneously the solubilisation of Fe and the production of pyoverdine in microplate-based batch experiments. Both nontronites released Fe in a particle concentration-dependent manner when incubated with the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain, however iron released from NAu-2 was substantially greater than from NAu-1. The profile of organic acids produced in both cases was similar and may not account for the difference in the iron dissolution efficiency. In contrast, a pyoverdine-deficient mutant was unable to mobilize Fe(III) from either nontronite, whereas iron dissolution occurred in abiotic experiments conducted with purified pyoverdine. Overall, our data provide evidence that P. aeruginosa indirectly mobilize Fe from nontronites primarily through the production of pyoverdine. The structural Fe present on the edges of NAu-2 rather than NAu-1 particles appears to be more bio-accessible, indicating that the distribution of Fe, in the tetrahedron and/or in the octahedron sites, governs

  19. Processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production: Dissolution of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} targets by alkaline hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B.A.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1995-09-01

    Low-enriched uranium silicide targets designed to recover fission product {sup 99}Mo were dissolved in alkaline hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} plus NaOH) at about 90C. Sintering of matrix aluminum powder during irradiation and heat treatment retarded aluminum dissolution and prevented silicide particle dispersion. Gas evolved during dissolution is suspected to adhere to particles and block hydroxide ion contact with aluminum. Reduction of base concentrations from 5M to O.lM NaOH yielded similar silicide dissolution and peroxide destruction rates, simplifying later processing. Future work in particle dispersion enhancement, {sup 99}Mo separation, and waste disposal is also discussed.

  20. Calcium-Mediated Abiotic Stress Signaling in Roots

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Katie A.; Matthus, Elsa; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M.; Davies, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Roots are subjected to a range of abiotic stresses as they forage for water and nutrients. Cytosolic free calcium is a common second messenger in the signaling of abiotic stress. In addition, roots take up calcium both as a nutrient and to stimulate exocytosis in growth. For calcium to fulfill its multiple roles must require strict spatio-temporal regulation of its uptake and efflux across the plasma membrane, its buffering in the cytosol and its sequestration or release from internal stores. This prompts the question of how specificity of signaling output can be achieved against the background of calcium’s other uses. Threats to agriculture such as salinity, water availability and hypoxia are signaled through calcium. Nutrient deficiency is also emerging as a stress that is signaled through cytosolic free calcium, with progress in potassium, nitrate and boron deficiency signaling now being made. Heavy metals have the capacity to trigger or modulate root calcium signaling depending on their dose and their capacity to catalyze production of hydroxyl radicals. Mechanical stress and cold stress can both trigger an increase in root cytosolic free calcium, with the possibility of membrane deformation playing a part in initiating the calcium signal. This review addresses progress in identifying the calcium transporting proteins (particularly channels such as annexins and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels) that effect stress-induced calcium increases in roots and explores links to reactive oxygen species, lipid signaling, and the unfolded protein response. PMID:27621742

  1. Ion Transporters and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Brini, Faïçal; Masmoudi, Khaled

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation of plants to salt stress requires cellular ion homeostasis involving net intracellular Na+ and Cl− uptake and subsequent vacuolar compartmentalization without toxic ion accumulation in the cytosol. Sodium ions can enter the cell through several low- and high-affinity K+ carriers. Some members of the HKT family function as sodium transporter and contribute to Na+ removal from the ascending xylem sap and recirculation from the leaves to the roots via the phloem vasculature. Na+ sequestration into the vacuole depends on expression and activity of Na+/H+ antiporter that is driven by electrochemical gradient of protons generated by the vacuolar H+-ATPase and the H+-pyrophosphatase. Sodium extrusion at the root-soil interface is presumed to be of critical importance for the salt tolerance. Thus, a very rapid efflux of Na+ from roots must occur to control net rates of influx. The Na+/H+ antiporter SOS1 localized to the plasma membrane is the only Na+ efflux protein from plants characterized so far. In this paper, we analyze available data related to ion transporters and plant abiotic stress responses in order to enhance our understanding about how salinity and other abiotic stresses affect the most fundamental processes of cellular function which have a substantial impact on plant growth development. PMID:27398240

  2. Hexagonal Lyotropic Liquid Crystal from Simple "Abiotic" Foldamers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Bian, Zheng; Jin, Rizhe; Kang, Chuanqing; Qiu, Xuepeng; Guo, Haiquan; Du, Zhijun; Gao, Lianxun

    2016-08-01

    The motivation of foldamer chemistry is to identify novel building blocks that have the potential to imitate natural species. Peptides and peptide mimetics can form stable helical conformations and further self-assemble into diverse aggregates in water, where it is difficult to isolate a single helix. In contrast, most "abiotic" foldamers may fold into helical structures in solution, but are difficult to assemble into tertiary ones. It remains a challenge to obtain "abiotic" species similar to peptides. In this paper, a novel foldamer scaffold, in which p-phenyleneethynylene units are linked by chiral carbon atoms, was designed and prepared. In very dilute solutions, these oligomers were random coils. The hexamer and octamers could form a hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystal (LC) in CH2Cl2 when the concentrations reached the critical values. The microscopic observations indicated that they could assemble into the nanofibers in the LC. Interestingly, after some LC phases were diluted at room temperature, the nanofibers could be preserved. The good stabilities of the assemblies are possibly attributed to a more compact backbone and more rigid side chains. PMID:27547649

  3. Influence of abiotic stress signals on secondary metabolites in plants

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Akula; Ravishankar, Gokare Aswathanarayana

    2011-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites are unique sources for pharmaceuticals, food additives, flavors, and industrially important biochemicals. Accumulation of such metabolites often occurs in plants subjected to stresses including various elicitors or signal molecules. Secondary metabolites play a major role in the adaptation of plants to the environment and in overcoming stress conditions. Environmental factors viz. temperature, humidity, light intensity, the supply of water, minerals, and CO2 influence the growth of a plant and secondary metabolite production. Drought, high salinity, and freezing temperatures are environmental conditions that cause adverse effects on the growth of plants and the productivity of crops. Plant cell culture technologies have been effective tools for both studying and producing plant secondary metabolites under in vitro conditions and for plant improvement. This brief review summarizes the influence of different abiotic factors include salt, drought, light, heavy metals, frost etc. on secondary metabolites in plants. The focus of the present review is the influence of abiotic factors on secondary metabolite production and some of important plant pharmaceuticals. Also, we describe the results of in vitro cultures and production of some important secondary metabolites obtained in our laboratory. PMID:22041989

  4. Abiotic factors influence plant storage lipid accumulation and composition.

    PubMed

    Singer, Stacy D; Zou, Jitao; Weselake, Randall J

    2016-02-01

    The demand for plant-derived oils has increased substantially over the last decade, and is sure to keep growing. While there has been a surge in research efforts to produce plants with improved oil content and quality, in most cases the enhancements have been small. To add further complexity to this situation, substantial differences in seed oil traits among years and field locations have indicated that plant lipid biosynthesis is also influenced to a large extent by multiple environmental factors such as temperature, drought, light availability and soil nutrients. On the molecular and biochemical levels, the expression and/or activities of fatty acid desaturases, as well as diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1, have been found to be affected by abiotic factors, suggesting that they play a role in the lipid content and compositional changes seen under abiotic stress conditions. Unfortunately, while only a very small number of strategies have been developed as of yet to minimize these environmental effects on the production of storage lipids, it is clear that this feat will be of the utmost importance for developing superior oil crops with the capability to perform in a consistent manner in field conditions in the future. PMID:26795146

  5. Calcium-Mediated Abiotic Stress Signaling in Roots.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Katie A; Matthus, Elsa; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M; Davies, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Roots are subjected to a range of abiotic stresses as they forage for water and nutrients. Cytosolic free calcium is a common second messenger in the signaling of abiotic stress. In addition, roots take up calcium both as a nutrient and to stimulate exocytosis in growth. For calcium to fulfill its multiple roles must require strict spatio-temporal regulation of its uptake and efflux across the plasma membrane, its buffering in the cytosol and its sequestration or release from internal stores. This prompts the question of how specificity of signaling output can be achieved against the background of calcium's other uses. Threats to agriculture such as salinity, water availability and hypoxia are signaled through calcium. Nutrient deficiency is also emerging as a stress that is signaled through cytosolic free calcium, with progress in potassium, nitrate and boron deficiency signaling now being made. Heavy metals have the capacity to trigger or modulate root calcium signaling depending on their dose and their capacity to catalyze production of hydroxyl radicals. Mechanical stress and cold stress can both trigger an increase in root cytosolic free calcium, with the possibility of membrane deformation playing a part in initiating the calcium signal. This review addresses progress in identifying the calcium transporting proteins (particularly channels such as annexins and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels) that effect stress-induced calcium increases in roots and explores links to reactive oxygen species, lipid signaling, and the unfolded protein response. PMID:27621742

  6. Influence of Dissolved Organic Matter and Fe (II) on the Abiotic Reduction of Pentachloronitrobenzene

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitroaromatic pesticides (NAPs) are hydrophobic contaminants that can accumulate in sediments by the deposition of suspended solids from surface waters. Fe(II) and dissolved organic matter (DOM), present in suboxic and anoxic zones of freshwater sediments, can transform NAPs in n...

  7. Systematic review of forsterite dissolution rate data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimstidt, J. Donald; Brantley, Susan L.; Olsen, Amanda A.

    2012-12-01

    This paper demonstrates a method for systematic analysis of published mineral dissolution rate data using forsterite dissolution as an example. The steps of the method are: (1) identify the data sources, (2) select the data, (3) tabulate the data, (4) analyze the data to produce a model, and (5) report the results. This method allows for a combination of critical selection of data, based on expert knowledge of theoretical expectations and experimental pitfalls, and meta-analysis of the data using statistical methods. Application of this method to all currently available forsterite dissolution rates (0 < pH < 14, and 0 < T < 150 °C) normalized to geometric surface area produced the following rate equations: For pH < 5.6 and 0° < T < 150 °C, based on 519 data logr=6.05(0.22)-0.46(0.02)pH-3683.0(63.6)1/T(R2=0.88) For pH > 5.6 and 0° < T < 150 °C, based on 125 data logr=4.07(0.38)-0.256(0.023)pH-3465(139)1/T(R2=0.92) The R2 values show that ˜10% of the variance in r is not explained by variation in 1/T and pH. Although the experimental error for rate measurements should be ± ˜30%, the observed error associated with the log r values is ˜0.5 log units (±300% relative error). The unexplained variance and the large error associated with the reported rates likely arises from the assumption that the rates are directly proportional to the mineral surface area (geometric or BET) when the rate is actually controlled by the concentration and relative reactivity of surface sites, which may be a function of duration of reaction. Related to these surface area terms are other likely sources of error that include composition and preparation of mineral starting material. Similar rate equations were produced from BET surface area normalized rates. Comparison of rate models based on geometric and BET normalized rates offers no support for choosing one normalization method over the other. However, practical considerations support the use of geometric surface area normalization

  8. Dissolution rate enhancement of piroxicam by ordered mixing.

    PubMed

    Saharan, Vikas Anand; Choudhury, Pratim Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Micronized piroxicam was mixed with lactose, mannitol, sorbitol, maltitol and sodium chloride to produce ordered mixture in a glass vial by manual hand shaking method. The effect of excipients, surfactant, superdisintegrant, drug concentration and carrier particle size on dissolution rate was investigated. Dissolution rate studies of the prepared ordered mixtures revealed that all water soluble excipients increased the dissolution rate of piroxicam when compared to the dissolution rate of piroxicam or its suspension. Ordered mixture formulation PLF4, consisting of lactose as water soluble excipient, SSG (8% w/s) and SLS (1% w/w), released piroxcam at a very fast rate so much so that about 90% of the composition had passed into solution within 2 min. The order of the dissolution rate enhancement for ordered mixtures of various water soluble excipients was: lactose > mannitol > maltitol > sorbitol > sodium chloride. Carrier granules of size 355-710 µm were most effective in increasing the dissolution rate of drug from ordered mixtures. Decreasing the carrier particle size reduced drug dissolution from ordered mixtures. The dissolution rate of ordered mixtures consisting of 1-5% w/w piroxicam was superior to dissolution rate of piroxicam suspension. The dissolution data fitting and the resulting regression parameters indicated Hixson Crowell, cube root law, as the best fit to drug release data of ordered mixtures. PMID:22713937

  9. Dissolution kinetics of single crystals of alpha-lactose monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, S L; Ristic, R I; Sheen, D B; Sherwood, J N

    2002-10-01

    The dissolution kinetics of alpha-lactose monohydrate (alphaLM) single crystals were studied by a flow-cell method at different undersaturations. Linear dissolution profiles were obtained as a function of time for all the faces except the (010) face. The dissolution rates, obtained from these profiles, were anisotropic and varied considerably with undersaturation. At low undersaturations (0-2%), the order of dissolution rate was (110) > (100) > (011) = (110) > (010). This order changed with increasing undersaturation (>5%) to (011) > (100) > (110) > (110) > (010). In alphaLM crystals in which lattice strain was induced by synchrotron X-irradiation, the rates of dissolution of all faces increased with increasing strain. The increase was less significant for the (011) faces than for the remainder. Under this constraint, the (010) face became the fastest dissolving one and the [011]face became the slowest one. The results of all experiments are explained on the basis that although dislocations may act as initiating dissolution centers at very low undersaturations, these sources rapidly give way to two-dimensional nucleation of randomly distributed dissolution sites as the undersaturation is increased. Under these conditions, which better reflect the normal dissolution processes of materials, bulk lattice strain plays the most significant role in defining the dissolution rate. The results show a potential route to the controlled engineering of the dissolution behavior of crystalline materials. PMID:12226843

  10. Discriminative Dissolution Method for Benzoyl Metronidazole Oral Suspension.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Aline Santos; da Rosa Silva, Carlos Eduardo; Paula, Fávero Reisdorfer; da Silva, Fabiana Ernestina Barcellos

    2016-06-01

    A dissolution method for benzoyl metronidazole (BMZ) oral suspensions was developed and validated using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. After determination of sink conditions, dissolution profiles were evaluated using different dissolution media and agitation speeds. The sample insertion mode in dissolution media was also evaluated. The best conditions were obtained using a paddle, 50 rpm stirring speed, simulated gastric fluid (without pepsin) as the dissolution medium, and sample insertion by a syringe. These conditions were suitable for providing sink conditions and discriminatory power between different formulations. Through the tested conditions, the results can be considered specific, linear, precise, accurate, and robust. The dissolution profiles of five samples were compared using the similarity factor (f 2) and dissolution efficiency. The dissolution kinetics were evaluated and described by the Weibull model. Whereas there is no monograph for this pharmaceutical formulation, the dissolution method proposed can be considered suitable for quality control and dissolution profile comparison of different commercial formulations. PMID:26349689

  11. Fluorinated dissolution inhibitors for 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Alyssandrea H.; Bae, Young C.; Liu, Xiang-Qian; Ober, Christopher K.; Houlihan, Francis M.; Dabbagh, Gary; Novembre, Anthony E.

    2002-07-01

    Fluorinated dissolution inhibitors (DIs) for 157 nm lithography were designed and synthesized as part of an ongoing study on the structure/property relationships of photoresist additives. The problem of volatilization of small DI candidates was observed from matrices such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(hexafluorohydroxy-isopropyl styrene) (PHFHIPS) during post-apply bake cycles using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). To avoid this problem, low volatility fluorinated inhibitors were designed and synthesized. Three fluorinated DIs, perfluorosuberic acid bis-(2,2,2,-trifluoro-1-phenyl-1-trifluoromethyl-ethyl) ester (PFSE1), perfluorosuberic acid bis-[1-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ethyl] ester (PFSE2) and a fluorinated phenylmethanediol diester (FPMD1), largely remained in a PHFHIPS film during the post-apply bake. The dissolution behavior of the two fluorinated diesters was studied and found to slow down the dissolution rate of PHFHIPS with inhibition factors of 1.9 and 1.6, respectively. The absorbance of PHFHIPS films containing 10 wt% of the diester inhibitors is 3.6 AU/micron compared with an absorbance of 3.3 AU/micron for the polymer itself. The absorbance of 10% FPMD1 in PHFHIPS was measured as 3.5 AU/micron compared with an absorbance of 3.4 AU/micron for the polymer itself. Thus, the non-volatility and transparency of the fluorinated inhibitors at 157 nm as well as their ability to reduce the development rate of fluorinated polymers make them suitable for use in a 157 nm resist system.

  12. Dissolution of FB-Line Cabinet Sweepings

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, Mark L.

    2005-06-14

    Three FB-Line samples were received by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization and evaluation for suitability for HB-Line dissolution. These samples are part of a larger sampling/evaluation program in support of FB-Line deinventory efforts. The samples studied were identified as MC04-147- HBL, MC04-148-HBL, and FBL-SWP-04-016-HBL (N). The first sample, MC04-147-HBL, is a portion of FB-Line Packaging and Stabilization (P&S) materials. The second sample, MC04-148-HBL, is a sweeping from Cabinet 6-8, which is not representative of the mechanical line. The third sample, FBL-SWP-04-016-HBL (N), is an FB-Line North cabinet sweeping. The samples were described by FB-Line personnel as containing plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) which had not been high-fired. This description was generally confirmed by solids analysis and off gas measurements. All three samples were dissolved in 8 M HNO{sub 3}/0.1 M KF at 90-100 C leaving minor amounts of solid residue. During dissolution, sample MC04-147 did not generate hydrogen gas. Sample MC04-148 generated modest amounts of gas, which contained 4.0 to 4.7 volume percent (vol %) hydrogen (H{sub 2}) at a ratio of up to 8.4 x 10{sup -5} mol H{sub 2}/g sample. Sample FBL-SWP-04-016-HBL (N) was nearly completely soluble in 8 M HNO{sub 3}and produced a very small amount of gas. Apparently, the CaF{sub 2} in that sample dissolves and provides sufficient fluoride to support the dissolution of other components.

  13. Mesoscale Approach to Feldspar Dissolution: Quantification of Dissolution Incongruency Based on Al/Si Ordering State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Min, Y.; Jun, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolution mechanism of aluminosilicates is important for understanding natural and anthropogenic carbon cycles. The total mass of atmospheric CO2 is regulated by the weathering of silicate minerals, and the fate of geologically sequestered CO2 is affected by the interactions between brine, sandstone, caprock, and CO2, which is initiated by mineral dissolution. It has been shown through both experimental and ab initio studies that the dissolution/weathering reactivities of Al and Si in the matrix of an aluminosilicate can be different under many conditions. A subsequent observation is that the release rates of Al and Si, both from the same mineral, may not be stoichiometric when compared to the bulk chemistry of the mineral. For a very long time, the relationship between mineral dissolution incongruency and mineral crystallographic properties remain largely qualitative and descriptive. Here we study the dissolution incongruency of feldspars, the most abundant aluminosilicate on earth. Mineral dissolution experiments for a series of alkali feldspars (albite, anorthoclase, sanidine, and microcline) and plagioclases (oligoclase, andesine, labradorite, bytownite, and anorthite) were conducted at pH 1.68 under ambient conditions. Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and water chemistry analysis (ICP-MS) are combined to examine the effect of Al/Si ordering on mineral dissolution. Our analysis based on a C1 structure model shows that the incongruency, stemming from the different reactivities of Al-O-Si and Si-O-Si linkages in feldspar's framework, is quantifiable and closely related to the Al/Si ordering state of a feldspar. Our results also suggest that the more random the Al/Si distribution of a mineral, the greater the dissolution incongruency. Our results have significant implications for understanding water-rock interactions. First, when studying the effect of water chemistry on water-rock interaction, smaller

  14. Effects of Al/Si ordering on feldspar dissolution: Part II. The pH dependence of plagioclases' dissolution rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Min, Yujia; Jun, Young-Shin

    2014-02-01

    The rate of mineral dissolution in an aquatic environment is sensitive to the pH of the contacting solution. The pH dependence of mineral dissolution rate has been interpreted by the Transition State Theory-Surface Complexation Model (TST-SCM) formalism in terms of pH-sensitive variability in surface chemistry. In this study, we provide an alternative interpretation for the experimentally observed nonlinear pH dependence of feldspar dissolution rates. The interpretation is based on a new formalism for feldspar dissolution which, while compatible with the TST-SCM formalism, incorporates the effects of both surface chemistry and bulk chemistry on feldspar dissolution into the quantification of dissolution rate. The pH dependence of dissolution rate varies from one feldspar specimen to another because different TOT linkages within one solid matrix can respond differently to the attack of proton. Our results suggest that the pH dependence of feldspar dissolution rate is not a constant in general, and could be affected by pH, substitutional Al/Si ordering, chemical composition of the specimen, and the relative rapidness of linkage hydrolysis according to different mechanisms. The rate law proposed in this study is able to capture the experimentally observed pH dependence of the dissolution rates of a series of plagioclases, including albite, andesine, labradorite, bytownite, and anorthite. The effectiveness of the newly proposed formalism for feldspar dissolution, hence, suggests that dissolution reactions of minerals are combinations of surface renewal and heterogeneous chemical reactions. The currently widely used TST-SCM-based rate laws can be further improved by taking into account the effects of bulk chemistry and surface renewal in the prediction of mineral dissolution rates. An improved formalism for mineral dissolution will be mineral-specific, and will reflect the effects of the temporal decay in the availability of reactive surface sites as well as the

  15. Dissolution of Uranium Oxides Under Alkaline Oxidizing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven C.; Peper, Shane M.; Douglas, Matthew; Ziegelgruber, Kate L.; Finn, Erin C.

    2009-11-01

    Bench scale experiments were conducted to determine the dissolution characteristics of uranium oxide powders (UO2, U3O8, and UO3) in aqueous peroxide-carbonate solutions. Experimental parameters included H2O2 concentration, carbonate counter cation (NH4+, Na+, K+, and Rb+), and pH. Results indicate the dissolution rate of UO2 in 1 M (NH4)2CO3 increases linearly with peroxide concentration ranging from 0.05 – 2 M. The three uranium oxide powders exhibited different dissolution patterns however, UO3 exhibited prompt complete dissolution. Carbonate counter cation affected the dissolution kinetics. There is minimal impact of solution pH, over the range 8.8 to 10.6, on initial dissolution rate.

  16. Use of partial dissolution techniques in geochemical exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.

    1984-01-01

    Application of partial dissolution techniques to geochemical exploration has advanced from an early empirical approach to an approach based on sound geochemical principles. This advance assures a prominent future position for the use of these techniques in geochemical exploration for concealed mineral deposits. Partial dissolution techniques are classified as single dissolution or sequential multiple dissolution depending on the number of steps taken in the procedure, or as "nonselective" extraction and as "selective" extraction in terms of the relative specificity of the extraction. The choice of dissolution techniques for use in geochemical exploration is dictated by the geology of the area, the type and degree of weathering, and the expected chemical forms of the ore and of the pathfinding elements. Case histories have illustrated many instances where partial dissolution techniques exhibit advantages over conventional methods of chemical analysis used in geochemical exploration. ?? 1984.

  17. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.

  18. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U),more » i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.« less

  19. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction.

    PubMed

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth's history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth's crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  20. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    PubMed Central

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  1. Dissolution kinetics of calcium phosphate coatings.

    PubMed

    Burke, E M; Lucas, L C

    1998-01-01

    Plasma spray and high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) techniques produce coatings with varying composition and amounts of amorphous and crystalline phases. For coatings containing greater amorphous phases, a higher release of calcium ions is evident when samples are placed in Hank's calcium-free balanced salt solutions. Calcium is released from the amorphous phases in the coating, a conclusion that is supported by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) results. Ion beam sputtering and RF magnetron sputtering under lower energy conditions produce amorphous coatings that will dissolve in a very short time period. When heat treated, crystalline phases are produced in the coatings. Heat-treated coatings are significantly more stable than the amorphous coatings. The dissolution rates of both amorphous and crystalline coatings produced by RF magnetron sputtering have been measured under constant solution conditions at pH 6.50. No reprecipitation is possible under these conditions. The amorphous coating dissolved at a significantly higher rate than the heat-treated coating. Reprecipitation of calcium phosphate onto amorphous coatings is possible in a physiological pH solution. Under these conditions, the dissolution rate of the amorphous coating is four times slower than at the pH 6.50 conditions. PMID:10196809

  2. Bench Scale Saltcake Dissolution Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTOLD, D.B.; PACQUET, E.A.

    2000-12-06

    A potential scenario for retrieving saltcake from single shell tanks is the ''Rainbird{reg_sign} sprinkler'' method. Water is distributed evenly across the surface of the saltcake and allowed to percolate by gravity through the waste. The salt dissolves in the water, forming a saturated solution. The saturated liquid is removed by a saltwell pump situated near the bottom of the tank. By this method, there is never a large inventory of liquid in the tank that could pose a threat of leakage. There are many variables or factors that can influence the hydrodynamics of this retrieval process. They include saltcake porosity; saltwell pumping rate; salt dissolution chemistry; factors that could promote flow channeling (e.g. tank walls, dry wells, inclusions or discontinuities in the saltcake); method of water distribution; plug formation due to crystal formations or accumulation of insoluble solids. A brief literature search indicates that very little experimental data exist on these aspects of saltcake dissolution (Wiersma 1996, 1997). The tests reported here were planned (Herting, 2000) to provide preliminary data and information for planning future, scaled-up tests of the sprinkler method.

  3. Abiotic Formation of Methyl Halides in the Terrestrial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppler, F.

    2011-12-01

    Methyl chloride and methyl bromide are the most abundant chlorine and bromine containing organic compounds in the atmosphere. Since both compounds have relatively long tropospheric lifetimes they can effectively transport halogen atoms from the Earth's surface, where they are released, to the stratosphere and following photolytic oxidation form reactive halogen gases that lead to the chemical destruction of ozone. Methyl chloride and methyl bromide account for more than 20% of the ozone-depleting halogens delivered to the stratosphere and are predicted to grow in importance as the chlorine contribution to the stratosphere from anthropogenic CFCs decline. Today methyl chloride and methyl bromide originate mainly from natural sources with only a minor fraction considered to be of anthropogenic origin. However, until as recently as 2000 most of the methyl chloride and methyl bromide input to the atmosphere was considered to originate from the oceans, but investigations in recent years have clearly demonstrated that terrestrial sources such as biomass burning, wood-rotting fungi, coastal salt marshes, tropical vegetation and organic matter degradation must dominate the atmospheric budgets of these trace gases. However, many uncertainties still exist regarding strengths of both sources and sinks, as well as the mechanisms of formation of these naturally occurring halogenated gases. A better understanding of the atmospheric budget of both methyl chloride and methyl bromide is therefore required for reliable prediction of future ozone depletion. Biotic and abiotic methylation processes of chloride and bromide ion are considered to be the dominant pathways of formation of these methyl halides in nature. In this presentation I will focus on abiotic formation processes in the terrestrial environment and the potential parameters that control their emissions. Recent advances in our understanding of the abiotic formation pathway of methyl halides will be discussed. This will

  4. Nitrogen isotopic fractionation during abiotic synthesis of organic solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuga, Maïa; Carrasco, Nathalie; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Bernard, Sylvain; Rigaudier, Thomas; Fleury, Benjamin; Tissandier, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    The formation of organic compounds is generally assumed to result from abiotic processes in the Solar System, with the exception of biogenic organics on Earth. Nitrogen-bearing organics are of particular interest, notably for prebiotic perspectives but also for overall comprehension of organic formation in the young Solar System and in planetary atmospheres. We have investigated abiotic synthesis of organics upon plasma discharge, with special attention to N isotope fractionation. Organic aerosols were synthesized from N2-CH4 and N2-CO gaseous mixtures using low-pressure plasma discharge experiments, aimed at simulating chemistry occurring in Titan's atmosphere and in the protosolar nebula, respectively. The nitrogen content, the N speciation and the N isotopic composition were analyzed in the resulting organic aerosols. Nitrogen is efficiently incorporated into the synthesized solids, independently of the oxidation degree, of the N2 content of the starting gas mixture, and of the nitrogen speciation in the aerosols. The aerosols are depleted in 15N by 15-25‰ relative to the initial N2 gas, whatever the experimental setup is. Such an isotopic fractionation is attributed to mass-dependent kinetic effect(s). Nitrogen isotope fractionation upon electric discharge cannot account for the large N isotope variations observed among Solar System objects and reservoirs. Extreme N isotope signatures in the Solar System are more likely the result of self-shielding during N2 photodissociation, exotic effect during photodissociation of N2 and/or low temperature ion-molecule isotope exchange. Kinetic N isotope fractionation may play a significant role in the Titan's atmosphere. On the Titan's night side, 15N-depletion resulting from electron driven reactions may counterbalance photo-induced 15N enrichments occurring on the day's side. We also suggest that the low δ15N values of Archaean organic matter (Beaumont and Robert, 1999) are partly the result of abiotic synthesis of

  5. On the dissolution properties of GaAs in Ga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, M. C.; Moynahan, A. H.

    1977-01-01

    The dissolution of GaAs in Ga was studied to determine the nature and cause of faceting effects. Ga was allowed to dissolve single crystalline faces under isothermal conditions. Of the crystalline planes with low number indices, only the (100) surface showed a direct correlation of dissolution sites to dislocations. The type of dissolution experienced depended on temperature, and there were three distinct types of behavior.

  6. Dissolution Studies With Pilot Plant and Actual INTEC Calcines

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, Ronald Scott; Garn, Troy Gerry

    1999-04-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/ Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive A1(NO3)3 solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated >95 wt. % of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt. % dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt. % dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines.

  7. Dissolution studies with pilot plant and actual INTEC calcines

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, R.S.; Garn, T.G.

    1999-04-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated {gt}95 wt.% of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt.% dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt.% dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines.

  8. Dissolution of beryllium in artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2011-05-01

    Dissolution of a lung burden of poorly soluble beryllium particles is hypothesized to be necessary for development of chronic beryllium lung disease (CBD) in humans. As such, particle dissolution rate must be sufficient to activate the lung immune response and dissolution lifetime sufficient to maintain chronic inflammation for months to years to support development of disease. The purpose of this research was to investigate the hypothesis that poorly soluble beryllium compounds release ions via dissolution in lung fluid. Dissolution kinetics of 17 poorly soluble particulate beryllium materials that span extraction through ceramics machining (ores, hydroxide, metal, copper-beryllium [CuBe] fume, oxides) and three CuBe alloy reference materials (chips, solid block) were measured over 31 d using artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid (pH 4.5). Differences in beryllium-containing particle physicochemical properties translated into differences in dissolution rates and lifetimes in artificial phagolysosomal fluid. Among all materials, dissolution rate constant values ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-10)gcm(-2)d(-1) and half-times ranged from tens to thousands of days. The presence of magnesium trisilicate in some beryllium oxide materials may have slowed dissolution rates. Materials associated with elevated prevalence of CBD had faster beryllium dissolution rates [10(-7)-10(-8)gcm(-2)d(-1)] than materials not associated with elevated prevalence (p<0.05). PMID:21251696

  9. The dissolution behavior of scorodite in acidic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Preeti

    2001-11-01

    The safe disposal of arsenic-containing waste has been a difficult problem for the mining and metallurgical industry. One of the solutions to the arsenic problem is the precipitation of scorodite, an arsenic-containing mineral. Scorodite is reported to be relatively stable over a wide range of pH, and therefore may be a preferred disposal option. The effect of organic complexing agents on scorodite stability, however, is largely unknown. The present study is a phenomenological investigation into the dissolution kinetics of scorodite in the presence of oxalic acid under varying conditions of pH, oxalic acid concentration and temperature. The effect of scorodite particle size was also investigated. The morphological changes accompanying the dissolution process were examined by SEM and TEM analyses. Dissolution curves were divided into a linear induction period and a post-induction period. Activation energies were determined. Complete dissolution data were fit to the Prout-Tompkins/Austin-Rickett model. Dissolution data are indicative of auto-accelerated processes. The rapid increase in dissolution rate following the induction period is believed to be associated with an increase in the effective surface area. Pitting was observed on the surface of scorodite in the early stages of dissolution. In the later stages of dissolution, these pits were observed to grow and coalesce, in many cases resulting in the formation of dissolution holes.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of NaCl dissolution.

    PubMed

    Lanaro, Gabriele; Patey, G N

    2015-03-19

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the dissolution of NaCl nanocrystals (containing ∼2400 ions) in water. We focus on systems under sink conditions at 300 K, but the influences of concentration and temperature are also investigated. Cubical, spherical, tablet-shaped, and rod-shaped nanocrystals are considered, and it is shown that the initial shape can influence the dissolution process. Dissolution is observed to occur in three stages: an initial period where the most exposed ions are removed from the crystal surface, and the crystal takes on a solution-annealed shape which persists throughout the second stage of dissolution; a second long intermediate stage where dissolution roughly follows a fixed rate law; and a final stage where the small residual crystal (≲200 ions) dissolves at an ever increasing rate until it disappears. The second stage of dissolution which applies for most of the dissolution process is well described by classical rate equations which simply assume that the dissolution rate is proportional to an active surface area from which ions are most easily detached from the crystal. The active area depends on the initial crystal shape. We show that for our model NaCl nanocrystals the rate-determining step for dissolution under sink conditions is ion detachment from the crystal, and that diffusion layers do not exist for these systems. PMID:25704286

  11. Effect of thermal gelation on dissolution from coated tablets.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J B; Alvino, T P

    1976-04-01

    Tablets with a methylcellulose coating were found to exhibit lower dissolution profiles than those coated with a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose coating at 37 degrees, and the cause was investigated. The differences are attributed to thermal gelation of the methylcellulose at temperatures near 37 degrees, which creates a barrier to the dissolution process and essentially changes the dissolution mechanism. This mechanism is substantiated by the fact that at temperatures below the gel point and at increased agitation, the effect disappears. The retarded dissolution effect is not peculiar to the drug involved. PMID:1271258

  12. Mathematical modeling of variables involved in dissolution testing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zongming

    2011-11-01

    Dissolution testing is an important technique used for development and quality control of solid oral dosage forms of pharmaceutical products. However, the variability associated with this technique, especially with USP apparatuses 1 and 2, is a concern for both the US Food and Drug Administration and pharmaceutical companies. Dissolution testing involves a number of variables, which can be divided into four main categories: (1) analyst, (2) dissolution apparatus, (3) testing environment, and (4) sample. Both linear and nonlinear models have been used to study dissolution profiles, and various mathematical functions have been used to model the observed data. In this study, several variables, including dissolved gases in the dissolution medium, off-center placement of the test tablet, environmental vibration, and various agitation speeds, were modeled. Mathematical models including Higuchi, Korsmeyer-Peppas, Weibull, and the Noyes-Whitney equation were employed to study the dissolution profile of 10 mg prednisone tablets (NCDA #2) using the USP paddle method. The results showed that the nonlinear models (Korsmeyer-Peppas and Weibull) accurately described the entire dissolution profile. The results also showed that dissolution variables affected dissolution rate constants differently, depending on whether the tablets disintegrated or dissolved. PMID:21702052

  13. Development and application of a screening model for evaluating bioenhanced dissolution in DNAPL source zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Thomas J.; Abriola, Linda M.; Gibson, Jenny L.; Smits, Kathleen M.; Christ, John A.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ bioremediation, a widely applied treatment technology for source zones contaminated with dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), has proven economical and reasonably efficient for long-term management of contaminated sites. Successful application of this remedial technology, however, requires an understanding of the complex interaction of transport, mass transfer, and biotransformation processes. The bioenhancement factor, which represents the ratio of DNAPL mass transfer under microbially active conditions to that which would occur under abiotic conditions, is commonly used to quantify the effectiveness of a particular bioremediation remedy. To date, little research has been directed towards the development and validation of methods to predict bioenhancement factors under conditions representative of real sites. This work extends an existing, first-order, bioenhancement factor expression to systems with zero-order and Monod kinetics, representative of many source-zone scenarios. The utility of this model for predicting the bioenhancement factor for previously published laboratory and field experiments is evaluated. This evaluation demonstrates the applicability of these simple bioenhancement factors for preliminary experimental design and analysis, and for assessment of dissolution enhancement in ganglia-contaminated source zones. For ease of application, a set of nomographs is presented that graphically depicts the dependence of bioenhancement factor on physicochemical properties. Application of these nomographs is illustrated using data from a well-documented field site. Results suggest that this approach can successfully capture field-scale, as well as column-scale, behavior. Sensitivity analyses reveal that bioenhanced dissolution will critically depend on in-situ biomass concentrations.

  14. Development and application of a screening model for evaluating bioenhanced dissolution in DNAPL source zones.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Thomas J; Abriola, Linda M; Gibson, Jenny L; Smits, Kathleen M; Christ, John A

    2015-12-01

    In-situ bioremediation, a widely applied treatment technology for source zones contaminated with dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), has proven economical and reasonably efficient for long-term management of contaminated sites. Successful application of this remedial technology, however, requires an understanding of the complex interaction of transport, mass transfer, and biotransformation processes. The bioenhancement factor, which represents the ratio of DNAPL mass transfer under microbially active conditions to that which would occur under abiotic conditions, is commonly used to quantify the effectiveness of a particular bioremediation remedy. To date, little research has been directed towards the development and validation of methods to predict bioenhancement factors under conditions representative of real sites. This work extends an existing, first-order, bioenhancement factor expression to systems with zero-order and Monod kinetics, representative of many source-zone scenarios. The utility of this model for predicting the bioenhancement factor for previously published laboratory and field experiments is evaluated. This evaluation demonstrates the applicability of these simple bioenhancement factors for preliminary experimental design and analysis, and for assessment of dissolution enhancement in ganglia-contaminated source zones. For ease of application, a set of nomographs is presented that graphically depicts the dependence of bioenhancement factor on physicochemical properties. Application of these nomographs is illustrated using data from a well-documented field site. Results suggest that this approach can successfully capture field-scale, as well as column-scale, behavior. Sensitivity analyses reveal that bioenhanced dissolution will critically depend on in-situ biomass concentrations. PMID:26484479

  15. An Abiotic Glass-Bead Collector Exhibiting Active Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Youhei; Kanda, Masato; Yamamoto, Daigo; Shioi, Akihisa

    2015-09-01

    Animals relocate objects as needed by active motion. Active transport is ubiquitous in living organisms but has been difficult to realize in abiotic systems. Here we show that a self-propelled droplet can gather scattered beads toward one place on a floor and sweep it clean. This is a biomimetic active transport with loadings and unloadings, because the transport was performed by a carrier and the motion of the carrier was maintained by the energy of the chemical reaction. The oil droplet produced fluctuation of the local number density of the beads on the floor, followed by its autocatalytic growth. This mechanism may inspire the technologies based on active transport wherein chemical and physical substances migrate as in living organisms.

  16. Temporal dynamics of biotic and abiotic drivers of litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Shaw, E Ashley; Wall, Diana H; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Climate, litter quality and decomposers drive litter decomposition. However, little is known about whether their relative contribution changes at different decomposition stages. To fill this gap, we evaluated the relative importance of leaf litter polyphenols, decomposer communities and soil moisture for litter C and N loss at different stages throughout the decomposition process. Although both microbial and nematode communities regulated litter C and N loss in the early decomposition stages, soil moisture and legacy effects of initial differences in litter quality played a major role in the late stages of the process. Our results provide strong evidence for substantial shifts in how biotic and abiotic factors control litter C and N dynamics during decomposition. Taking into account such temporal dynamics will increase the predictive power of decomposition models that are currently limited by a single-pool approach applying control variables uniformly to the entire decay process. PMID:26947573

  17. Spectral induced polarization signatures of abiotic FeS precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Doherty, R.; Williams, K. H.

    2010-01-15

    In recent years, geophysical methods have been shown to be sensitive to microbial induced mineralization processes. The spectral induced polarization (SIP) method appears to be very promising for monitoring mineralization and microbial processes. With this work, we study the links of mineralization and SIP signals, in the absence of microbial activity. We recorded the SIP response during abiotic FeS precipitation. We show that the SIP signals are diagnostic of FeS mineralization and can be differentiated from SIP signals from bio-mineralization processes. More specifically the imaginary conductivity shows almost linear dependence on the amount of FeS precipitating out of solution, above the threshold value 0.006 gr under our experimental conditions. This research has direct implications for the use of the SIP method as a monitoring, and decision making, tool for sustainable remediation of metals in contaminated soils and groundwater.

  18. Endophytic fungi: resource for gibberellins and crop abiotic stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Hussain, Javid; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-03-01

    The beneficial effects of endophytes on plant growth are important for agricultural ecosystems because they reduce the need for fertilizers and decrease soil and water pollution while compensating for environmental perturbations. Endophytic fungi are a novel source of bioactive secondary metabolites; moreover, recently they have been found to produce physiologically active gibberellins as well. The symbiosis of gibberellins producing endophytic fungi with crops can be a promising strategy to overcome the adverse effects of abiotic stresses. The association of such endophytes has not only increased plant biomass but also ameliorated plant-growth during extreme environmental conditions. Endophytic fungi represent a trove of unexplored biodiversity and a frequently overlooked component of crop ecology. The present review describes the role of gibberellins producing endophytic fungi, suggests putative mechanisms involved in plant endophyte stress interactions and discusses future prospects in this field. PMID:23984800

  19. Oxidation of Black Carbon by Biotic and Abiotic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-hsin; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Thies, Janice E.; Burton, Sarah D.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2006-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to quantify the relative importance of either biotic or abiotic oxidation of biomass-derived black carbon (BC) and to characterize the surface properties and charge characteristics of oxidized particulate BC. We incubated BC and BC-soil mixtures at two different temperatures (30 C and 70 C) with and without microbial inoculation, nutrient additions, or manure amendments for four months. Abiotic processes were more important for oxidation of BC than biotic processes during this short-term incubation, as inoculation with microorganisms did not change any of the measured parameters. Black C incubated at both 30 C and 70 C without microbial activity showed dramatic decreases in pH (in water) from 5.4 to 5.2 and 3.4, as well as increases in cation exchange capacity (CEC at pH 7) by 53% and 538% and in oxygen (O) contents by 4% and 38%, respectively. Boehm titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested that the formation of carboxylic functional groups was the reason for the enhanced CEC during oxidation. The analyses of BC surface properties by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the oxidation of BC particles initiated on the surface. Incubation at 30 C only enhanced oxidation on particle surfaces, while oxidation during incubation at 70 C penetrated into the interior of particles. Such short-term oxidation of BC has great significance for the stability of BC in soils as well as for its effects on soil fertility and biogeochemistry.

  20. Method for improving dissolution efficiency in gas-absorption and liquid extraction processes

    DOEpatents

    Kanak, Brant E.; Stephenson, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    This invention is a method for improving dissolution efficiency in processes in which a feed fluid is introduced to a zone where it is contacted with a liquid solvent for preferentially removing a component of the feed and where part of the solvent so contacted undergoes transfer into the feed fluid to saturate the same. It has been found that such transfer significantly impairs dissolution efficiency. In accordance with the invention, an amount of the above-mentioned solvent is added to the feed fluid being introduced to the contact zone, the solvent being added in an amount sufficient to effect reduction or elimination of the above-mentioned transfer. Preferably, the solvent is added to the feed fluid in an amount saturating or supersaturating the feed fluid under the conditions prevailing in the contact zone.

  1. Method for improving dissolution efficiency in gas-absorption and liquid extraction processes. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Kanak, B.E.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1980-01-11

    A method is described for improving dissolution efficiency in processes in which a feed fluid is introduced to a zone where it is contacted with a liquid solvent for preferentially removing a component of the feed and where part of the solvent so contacted undergoes transfer into the feed fluid to saturate the same. It has been found that such transfer significantly impairs dissolution efficiency. In accordance with the invention, an amount of the above-mentioned solvent is added to the feed fluid being introduced to the contact zone, the solvent being added in an amount sufficient to effect reduction or elimination of the above-mentioned transfer. Preferably, the solvent is added to the feed fluid in an amount saturating or supersaturating the feed fluid under the conditions prevailing in the contact zone.

  2. Preparation, characterization and dissolution of passive oxide film on the 400 series stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyaseelan, V. S.; Rufus, A. L.; Chandramohan, P.; Subramanian, H.; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Full system decontamination of Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) resulted in low decontamination factors (DF) on stainless steel (SS) surfaces. Hence, studies were carried out with 403 SS and 410 SS that are the material of construction of "End-Fitting body" and "End-Fitting Liner tubes". Three formulations were evaluated for the dissolution of passive films formed over these alloys viz., i) Two-step process consisting of oxidation and reduction reactions, ii) Dilute Chemical Decontamination (DCD) and iii) High Temperature Process. The two-step and high temperature processes could dissolve the oxide completely while the DCD process could remove only 60%. Various techniques like XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDX were used for assessing the dissolution process. The two-step process is time consuming, laborious while the high temperature process is less time consuming and is recommended for SS decontamination.

  3. K Basin sludge dissolution engineering study

    SciTech Connect

    Westra, A.G.

    1998-08-28

    The purpose of this engineering study is to investigate the available technology related to dissolution of the K Basin sludge in nitric acid. The conclusion of this study along with laboratory and hot cell tests with actual sludge samples will provide the basis for beginning conceptual design of the sludge dissolver. The K Basin sludge contains uranium oxides, fragments of metallic U, and some U hydride as well as ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum oxides and hydroxides, windblown sand that infiltrated the basin enclosure, ion exchange resin, and miscellaneous materials. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be conditioned so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System waste acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the underground storage tanks. Sludge conditioning will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and then reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. There will be five distinct feed streams to the sludge conditioning process two from the K East (KE) Basin and three from the K West (KW) Basin. The composition of the floor and pit sludges which contain more iron oxides and sand than uranium is much different than the canister sludges which are composed of mostly uranium oxides. The sludge conditioning equipment will be designed to process all of the sludge streams, but some of the operating parameters will be adjusted as necessary to handle the different sludge stream compositions. The volume of chemical additions and the amount of undissolved solids will be much different for floor and pit sludge than for canister sludge. Dissolution of uranium metal and uranium dioxide has been studied quite thoroughly and much information is available. Both uranium metal and uranium dioxide have been dissolved on a large scale in nuclear fuel

  4. Dolomite Dissolution in Alkaline Cementious Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittermayr, Florian; Klammer, Dietmar; Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Chemical alteration of concrete has gained much attention over the past years as many cases of deterioration due to sulphate attack, thaumasite formation (TSA) or alkali silica reactions (ASR) have been reported in various constructions (Schmidt et al, 2009). Much less is known about the so called alkali carbonate reaction (ACR). It is believed that dolomite aggregates can react with the alkalis from the cement, dissolve and form calcite and brucite (Katayama, 2004). Due to very low solubility of dolomite in alkaline solutions this reaction seems doubtful. In this study we are trying to gain new insides about the conditions that can lead to the dissolution of dolomite in concrete. Therefore we investigated concrete samples from Austrian tunnels that show partially dissolved dolomite aggregates. Petrological analysis such as microprobe, SEM and Raman spectroscopy as well as a hydrochemical analysis of interstitial solutions and ground water and modelling with PhreeqC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999) are carried out. In addition a series of batch experiments is set up. Modelling approaches by PhreeqC show a thermodynamically possibility in the alkaline range when additional Ca2+ in solution causes dolomite to become more and more undersaturated as calcite gets supersaturated. Interacting ground water is enriched in Ca2+and saturated with respect to gypsum as marine evaporites are found in situ rocks. Furthermore it is more likely that Portlandite (Ca(OH)2) plays a more important role than Na and K in the cement. Portlandite acts as an additional Ca2+ source and is much more abundant than the alkalies. Some interstitial solutions are dominated mainly by Na+ and SO42- and reach concentrations up to 30 g/l TDS. It is believed that solutions can even reach thenardite saturation as efflorescences are found on the tunnel walls. In consequence dolomite solubility increases with increasing ionic strength. pH > 11 further accelerate the process of dedolomitization by the removal

  5. Dissolution and compaction instabilities in geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanou, I.; Sulem, J.; de Sauvage, J.

    2014-12-01

    Compaction bands play an important role in reservoir engineering and geological storage. Their presence in geological formations may also provide useful information on various geological processes. Several mechanisms can be involved at different scales and may be responsible for compaction band instabilities [1]. Compaction bands can be seen as a particular instability of the governing mathematical system leading to localization of deformation [2-4]. In a saturated porous rock, the progressive mechanical damage of the solid skeleton during compaction, results in the increase of the interface area of the reactants and consequently in the acceleration of the dissolution rate of the solid phase [2,5]. Thus, the solid skeleton is degraded more rapidly (mass removal because of dissolution), the overall mechanical properties of the system diminish (contraction of the elastic domain - chemical softening), deformations increase and the solid skeleton is further damaged (intergranular fractures, debonding, breakage of the porous network etc.). The stability of this positive feedback process is investigated analytically through linear stability analysis by considering the strong chemo-poro-mechanical coupling due to chemical dissolution. The post bifurcation behavior is then studied analytically and numerically revealing the compaction band thickness and periodicity. The effect of various parameters is studied as for instance the influence of the hydraulic diffusivity on the compaction band thickness. [1] P. Baud, S. Vinciguerra, C. David, A. Cavallo, E. Walker and T. Reuschlé (2009), Pure Appl. Geophys., 166(5-7), 869-898 [2] I. Stefanou and J. Sulem (2014), JGR: Solid Earth, 119(2), 880-899. doi:10.1002/2013JB010342I [3] J.W. Rudnicki and J.R. Rice (1975), Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 23(6),: 371-394 [4] K.A. Issen and J.W. Rudnicki (2000), JGR, 105(B9), 21529. doi:10.1029/2000JB900185 [5] R. Nova, R. Castellanza and C. Tamagnini (2003), International

  6. Dissolution of Technetium(IV) Oxide by Natural and Synthetic Organic Ligands Under both Reducing and Oxidizing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Baohua; Dong, W.; Liang, Liyuan; Wall, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc) in nuclear waste is a significant environmental concern due to its long half-life and high mobility in the subsurface. Reductive precipitation of Tc(IV) oxides [TcO2(s)] is an effective means of immobilizing Tc, thereby impeding its migration in groundwater. However, TcO2(s) is subject to dissolution by oxidants and/or complexing agents. In this study we ascertain the effects of a synthetic organic ligand, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), and two natural humic isolates on the dissolution and solubility of Tc(IV) oxides. Pure synthetic TcO2(s) (0.23 mM) was used in batch experiments to determine dissolution kinetics at pH ~6 under both reducing and oxidizing conditions. All organic ligands were found to enhance the dissolution of Tc(IV) oxides, increasing their solubility from ~10-8 M (without ligands) to 4 10-7 M under strictly anoxic conditions. Reduced Tc(IV) was also found to re-oxidize rapidly under oxic conditions, with an observed oxidative dissolution rate approximately an order of magnitude higher than that of ligand-promoted dissolution under reducing conditions. Significantly, oxidative dissolution was inhibited by EDTA but enhanced by humic acid compared with experiments without any complexing agents. The redox functional properties of humics, capable of facilitating intra-molecular electron transfer, may account for this increased oxidation rate under oxic conditions. Our results highlight the importance of complex interactions for the stability and mobility of Tc, and thus for the long-term fate of Tc in contaminated environments.

  7. Dissolution of Arsenic Minerals Mediated by Dissimilatory Arsenate Reducing Bacteria: Estimation of the Physiological Potential for Arsenic Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Lukasz, Drewniak; Liwia, Rajpert; Aleksandra, Mantur; Aleksandra, Sklodowska

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was characterization of the isolated dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the context of their potential for arsenic removal from primary arsenic minerals through reductive dissolution. Four strains, Shewanella sp. OM1, Pseudomonas sp. OM2, Aeromonas sp. OM4, and Serratia sp. OM17, capable of anaerobic growth with As (V) reduction, were isolated from microbial mats from an ancient gold mine. All of the isolated strains: (i) produced siderophores that promote dissolution of minerals, (ii) were resistant to dissolved arsenic compounds, (iii) were able to use the dissolved arsenates as the terminal electron acceptor, and (iii) were able to use copper minerals containing arsenic minerals (e.g., enargite) as a respiratory substrate. Based on the results obtained in this study, we postulate that arsenic can be released from some As-bearing polymetallic minerals (such as copper ore concentrates or middlings) under reductive conditions by dissimilatory arsenate reducers in indirect processes. PMID:24724102

  8. Dissolution of arsenic minerals mediated by dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria: estimation of the physiological potential for arsenic mobilization.

    PubMed

    Lukasz, Drewniak; Liwia, Rajpert; Aleksandra, Mantur; Aleksandra, Sklodowska

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was characterization of the isolated dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the context of their potential for arsenic removal from primary arsenic minerals through reductive dissolution. Four strains, Shewanella sp. OM1, Pseudomonas sp. OM2, Aeromonas sp. OM4, and Serratia sp. OM17, capable of anaerobic growth with As (V) reduction, were isolated from microbial mats from an ancient gold mine. All of the isolated strains: (i) produced siderophores that promote dissolution of minerals, (ii) were resistant to dissolved arsenic compounds, (iii) were able to use the dissolved arsenates as the terminal electron acceptor, and (iii) were able to use copper minerals containing arsenic minerals (e.g., enargite) as a respiratory substrate. Based on the results obtained in this study, we postulate that arsenic can be released from some As-bearing polymetallic minerals (such as copper ore concentrates or middlings) under reductive conditions by dissimilatory arsenate reducers in indirect processes. PMID:24724102

  9. Helium enrichment during convective carbon dioxide dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, T.; Hesse, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by observed variations of the CO2/He ratios in natural carbon dioxide (CO2) reservoirs, such as the Bravo Dome field in northeastern New Mexico, we have performed laboratory experiments equilibrating gas mixtures containing Helium (He) and CO2 with water, at close to ambient conditions in a closed system. The experimental design allows for continuous measurement of headspace pressure as well as timed interval measurements of the CO2/He ratios and the δ13C value of CO2 in the headspace. Results from three dissolution experiments are reported: 1) pure Helium system, 2) 98% CO2 + 2% Nitrogen system, and 3) 97% CO2 and 3% Helium. Final equilibrated experimental results are compared to theoretical results obtained using Henry's Law relationships. The evolution of the amount of dissolved CO2 computed from gas pressure and gas compositions are in good agreement with Henry's Law relationships. For example, the CO2 + N2 system was initially pressurized with pure CO2 to 1323 mbar and after six days it equilibrated to a measured headspace pressure of 596 mbar. This compares very well with a calculated equilibrium headspace pressure of 592 mbar for this system. The CO2 + He system was pressurized to 1398 mbar CO2 and after six days equilibrated to a measured headspace pressure of 397 mbar. This measured pressure is slightly higher than the predicted equilibrated headspace pressure of 341 mbar, indicating a possible leak in the system during this particular experiment. In both experiments the initial pH of the water was 9.3 and the final equilibrated pH was 5.4. The δ13C value of equilibrated headspace CO2 was within 0.25‰ of its starting δ13C value, demonstrating insignificant carbon isotope fractionation at low pH. Measured Helium/ CO2 ratios throughout the CO2+Helium experiment preserve a non-linear trend of increasing He/ CO2 ratios through time that correlate very well with the measured pressure drop from CO2 dissolution. This indicates that gas composition

  10. New mixing system in dissolution isoperibol microcalorimeter.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Giraldo-Gutierréz, Liliana

    2007-04-01

    In order to determine dissolution enthalpies of small amounts of easily or slightly soluble solids, a new cell for batch isoperibolic microcalorimetry was developed at the Universities of the Andes and the National of Colombia. An innovative mixing system for avoiding error due to the common effect of the brittle point breakage has been designed for this cell. The cell has a capacity of 40 ml and the sample holder can bear solid samples between 10.0 and 30.0 mg. The high stability of the base line allows solution experiments to be extended over several hours. All measurements reported were conducted at 298.15 K using water as solvent. PMID:17477696

  11. Uranium Metal Analysis via Selective Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2008-09-10

    Uranium metal, which is present in sludge held in the Hanford Site K West Basin, can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during sludge handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage operations by its oxidation/corrosion in water. A thorough knowledge of the uranium metal concentration in sludge therefore is essential to successful sludge management and waste process design. The goal of this work was to establish a rapid routine analytical method to determine uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of up to 1000-fold higher total uranium concentrations (i.e., up to 30 wt% and more uranium) for samples to be taken during the upcoming sludge characterization campaign and in future analyses for sludge handling and processing. This report describes the experiments and results obtained in developing the selective dissolution technique to determine uranium metal concentration in K Basin sludge.

  12. Dehydration, dissolution, and melting of cyclodextrin crystals.

    PubMed

    Specogna, Erika; Li, King Wo; Djabourov, Madeleine; Carn, Florent; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2015-01-29

    Cyclodextrins are a family of oligosaccharides with a toroid shape that exhibit a unique ability of entrapping guest molecules in their internal cavity. Water is the primary guest molecule and is omnipresent in the crystalline phases stabilizing the overall architecture. Despite the presence of water molecules inside the cavity, cyclodextrins provide a hydrophobic environment where poorly soluble molecules can easily fit. In this investigation we put in evidence different types of water in the hydrated α-, β-, and γ-cyclodextrin crystals. Thermogravimetric measurements identify various binding sites of water and highlight the difference between the crystals equilibrated under various humid atmospheres. We establish by microcalorimetry the limit of solubility versus temperature and measure for the first time the melting temperatures of the hydrated crystals. Dissolution and melting enthalpies are derived and the solubility curves are compared to existing literature. The specific features of each cyclodextrin are underlined. PMID:25565266

  13. Homopolymer Dissolution in a Hydrophilic Ionic Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoagland, David; Harner, John

    2010-03-01

    Dissolution, structure, and dynamics of both neutral and charged polymers dissolved in a hydrophilic room temperature ionic liquid (IL), ethylmethylimidazolium ethyl sulfate [EMIM][EtSO4], have been studied by classical physicochemical methods (static and dynamic light scattering, intrinsic viscosity, refractometry) to determine differences in solution behavior from conventional aqueous and organic solvents. This IL is water miscible. Many neutral polymers and charged polymer salts molecularly dissolve, although solubility doesn't correlate with polymer hydrophilicity. Model neutral soluble polymers are polyvinylpyrrolidone and hydroroxyethyl cellulose while sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) and the iodo salt of methyl-quaternized poly(vinyl pyridine) fill the same role for charged polymers. The latter display none of the polyelectrolyte effects found in low ionic strength water, consistent with strong electrostatic screening in IL. In virial coefficient and coil size, the IL acts for these neutral and charged polymers as a classical good solvent. (Support: UMass MRSEC)

  14. Glass dissolution rate measurement and calculation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Maxime; Ull, Aurélien; Nicoleau, Elodie; Inagaki, Yaohiro; Odorico, Michaël; Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Aqueous dissolution rate measurements of nuclear glasses are a key step in the long-term behavior study of such waste forms. These rates are routinely normalized to the glass surface area in contact with solution, and experiments are very often carried out using crushed materials. Various methods have been implemented to determine the surface area of such glass powders, leading to differing values, with the notion of the reactive surface area of crushed glass remaining vague. In this study, around forty initial dissolution rate measurements were conducted following static and flow rate (SPFT, MCFT) measurement protocols at 90 °C, pH 10. The international reference glass (ISG), in the forms of powders with different particle sizes and polished monoliths, and soda-lime glass beads were examined. Although crushed glass grains clearly cannot be assimilated with spheres, it is when using the samples geometric surface (Sgeo) that the rates measured on powders are closest to those found for monoliths. Overestimation of the reactive surface when using the BET model (SBET) may be due to small physical features at the atomic scale-contributing to BET surface area but not to AFM surface area. Such features are very small compared with the thickness of water ingress in glass (a few hundred nanometers) and should not be considered in rate calculations. With a SBET/Sgeo ratio of 2.5 ± 0.2 for ISG powders, it is shown here that rates measured on powders and normalized to Sgeo should be divided by 1.3 and rates normalized to SBET should be multiplied by 1.9 in order to be compared with rates measured on a monolith. The use of glass beads indicates that the geometric surface gives a good estimation of glass reactive surface if sample geometry can be precisely described. Although data clearly shows the repeatability of measurements, results must be given with a high uncertainty of approximately ±25%.

  15. Wollastonite: Incongruent dissolution and leached layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissbart, Erich J.; Rimstidt, J. Donald

    2000-12-01

    Measurements of the dissolution rates of wollastonite in solutions with pH ranging from 2 to 6 in an externally recycled mixed flow reactor show that the concentrations of Ca and Si in the reactor effluent decline with time following a power law behavior. After 24 h of reaction, the release rate of Si was 1.90 × 10 -9 mol/m 2 s and the release rate of Ca was 9.09 × 10 -9 mol/m 2 s and these rates were effectively independent of pH. The more rapid release of Ca relative to Si produced a leached layer with an average thickness, x, that is a function of both hydrogen ion activity and time: x = (1.19 × 10 -9)( aH+) 0.121t0.412. The rate of Si release from the hydrated silica leached layer was thousands of times faster than the dissolution rate of vitreous silica. We believe that this is best explained by the release of large silica polymers from the leached layer. The rate of silica release declined as a power law function of time. This behavior is consistent with the idea that the silica in the leached layer undergoes reconstruction reactions that produce regions that are more polymerized and therefore dissolve at a slower rate. In addition, we found that the specific surface of the reacted grains increases as the leached layer grows. This additional surface area appears to come from crazing of the surface and the development of internal porosity. These results are not consistent with the idea that the dissolving mineral will eventually display a steady state behavior.

  16. Abiotic Stresses Antagonize the Rice Defence Pathway through the Tyrosine-Dephosphorylation of OsMPK6

    PubMed Central

    Kishi-Kaboshi, Mitsuko; Matsushita, Akane; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Goto, Shingo; Takahashi, Akira; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, survive environmental changes by prioritizing their responses to the most life-threatening stress by allocating limited resources. Previous studies showed that pathogen resistance was suppressed under abiotic stresses. Here, we show the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Phosphorylation of WRKY45, the central transcription factor in salicylic-acid (SA)-signalling-dependent pathogen defence in rice, via the OsMKK10-2–OsMPK6 cascade, was required to fully activate WRKY45. The activation of WRKY45 by benzothiadiazole (BTH) was reduced under low temperature and high salinity, probably through abscisic acid (ABA) signalling. An ABA treatment dephosphorylated/inactivated OsMPK6 via protein tyrosine phosphatases, OsPTP1/2, leading to the impaired activation of WRKY45 and a reduction in Magnaporthe oryzae resistance, even after BTH treatment. BTH induced a strong M. oryzae resistance in OsPTP1/2 knockdown rice, even under cold and high salinity, indicating that OsPTP1/2 is the node of SA-ABA signalling crosstalk and its down-regulation makes rice disease resistant, even under abiotic stresses. These results points to one of the directions to further improve crops by managing the tradeoffs between different stress responses of plants. PMID:26485146

  17. Plant abiotic stress diagnostic by laser induced chlorophyll fluorescence spectral analysis of in vivo leaf tissue of biofuel species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia-Neto, Artur S.; Silva, Elias A., Jr.; Costa, Ernande B.; Bueno, Luciano A.; Silva, Luciana M. H.; Granja, Manuela M. C.; Medeiros, Maria J. L.; Câmara, Terezinha J. R.; Willadino, Lilia G.

    2010-02-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is exploited to evaluate the effect of abiotic stresses upon the evolution and characteristics of in vivo chlorophyll emission spectra of leaves tissues of brazilian biofuel plants species(Saccharum officinarum and Jatropha curcas). The chlorophyll fluorescence spectra of 20 min predarkened intact leaves were studied employing several excitation wavelengths in the UV-VIS spectral region. Red(Fr) and far-red (FFr) chlorophyll fluorescence emission signals around 685 nm and 735 nm, respectively, were analyzed as a function of the stress intensity and the time of illumination(Kautsky effect). The Chl fluorescence ratio Fr/FFr which is a valuable nondestructive indicator of the chlorophyll content of leaves was investigated during a period of time of 30 days. The dependence of the Chl fluorescence ratio Fr/FFr upon the intensity of the abiotic stress(salinity) was examined. The results indicated that the salinity plays a major hole in the chlorophyll concentration of leaves in both plants spieces, with a significant reduction in the chlorophyll content for NaCl concentrations in the 25 - 200 mM range. The laser induced chlorophyll fluorescence analysis allowed detection of damage caused by salinity in the early stages of the plants growing process, and can be used as an early-warning indicator of salinity stress

  18. DISSOLUTION AND COMPATIBILITY STUDY OF BINARY AND TERNARY INTERACTIVE MIXTURES OF INDOMETHACIN: COMPARISON WITH COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE CAPSULES.

    PubMed

    Maswadeh, Hamzah M

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to use Weibull distribution function and Baker-Lonsdale models to study the dissolution kinetics of prepared binary and ternary interactive mixtures containing indomethacin in comparison with three commercially available capsules of indomethacin, namely, Rothacin®, Indomin® and Indylon®. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in conjunction with cloud point method was used to study the compatibility of indomethacin with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and lactose and to provide an explanation(s) for the insignificant increase in dissolution rate observed in the ternary interactive mixture as well as for the reduction in the dissolution rate observed from the binary system in our previous study. Results showed that the Weibull distribution function equation was the best fit to the dissolution data for all formulations used in this study. DSC curves showed that the decrease in dissolution rate from the binary and ternary interactive mixtures was due to incompatibility of indomethacin with PVP. Also DSC curves showed that lactose was compatible with indomethacin and that lactose was used as excipient in two commercial products (Rothacin® and Indylon®). Results from the cloud point method showed that the addition of indomethacin to 1% PVP solution containing ammonium sulfate (with cloud point at 76°C) reduces the cloud point of PVP indicating that there is an interaction between indomethacin and PVP, while the cloud point of 1% PVP containing ammonium sulfate was not affected by the addition of lactose. PMID:27476292

  19. Dissolution mechanism of soda-lime silicate glass and of PNL 76-68 in the presence of dissolved Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Sang, J.C.; Guo, Y.; Barkatt, A.; Adel-Hadadi, M.A.; Marbury, G.S.; Barkatt, A.

    1994-12-31

    Leaching studies were performed on powdered PNL 76-68 glass in de-ionized water in the presence of Mg solute. The results showed that the presence of Mg in the leachant greatly reduced the rate of glass dissolution. The equation Q = kt{sup {alpha}} was used to express the experimental data. In the absence of Mg, {alpha} was about 1, i.e., the amount of glass dissolved was linear with time. In the presence of Mg, {alpha} was close to 0.5, i.e. the extracted amount was proportional to the square root of time. Therefore, the reduction of the dissolution rate of PNL 76-68 glass in the presence of Mg solute could be explained as a result of a change in the glass dissolution mechanism. Comparative leaching studies on bulk soda-lime silicate glass in a sodium borate buffered system (pH 8.1) showed the same results. The presence of Mg in the leachant reduced the rate of glass dissolution. In the absence of Mg, {alpha} was about 1, while in the presence of Mg, {alpha} was 0.5. This change in {alpha} was not caused by changes in pH, and it represents a real change in the glass dissolution mechanism.

  20. Reductive leaching of low-grade manganese ore with pre-processed cornstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ai-fei; Wu, Meng-ni; Liu, Peng-wei; Feng, Ya-li; Li, Hao-ran

    2015-12-01

    Cornstalk is usually directly used as a reductant in reductive leaching manganese. However, low utilization of cornstalk makes low manganese dissolution ratio. In the research, pretreatment for cornstalk was proposed to improve manganese dissolution ratio. Cornstalk was preprocessed by a heated sulfuric acid solution (1.2 M of sulfuric acid concentration) for 10 min at 80°C. Thereafter, both the pretreated solution and the residue were used as a reductant for manganese leaching. This method not only exhibited superior activity for hydrolyzing cornstalk but also enhanced manganese dissolution. These effects were attributed to an increase in the amount of reductive sugars resulting from lignin hydrolysis. Through acid pretreatment for cornstalk, the manganese dissolution ratio was improved from 50.14% to 83.46%. The present work demonstrates for the first time the effective acid pretreatment of cornstalk to provide a cost-effective reductant for manganese leaching.

  1. Uranium carbide dissolution in nitric solution: Sonication vs. silent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virot, Matthieu; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Chave, Tony; Dacheux, Nicolas; Moisy, Philippe; Nikitenko, Sergey I.

    2013-10-01

    The dissolution of uranium carbide (UC) in nitric acid media is considered by means of power ultrasound (sonication) or magnetic stirring. The induction period required to initiate UC dissolution was found to be dramatically shortened when sonicating a 3 M nitric solution (Ar, 20 kHz, 18 W cm-2, 20 °C). At higher acidity, magnetic stirring offers faster dissolution kinetics compared to sonication. Ultrasound-assisted UC dissolution is found to be passivated after ∼60% dissolution and remains incomplete whatever the acidity which is confirmed by ICP-AES, LECO and SEM-EDX analyses. In general, the kinetics of UC dissolution is linked to the in situ generation of nitrous acid in agreement with the general mechanism of UC dissolution; the nitrous acid formation is reported to be faster under ultrasound at low acidity due to the nitric acid sonolysis. The carbon balance shared between the gaseous, liquid, and solid phases is strongly influenced by the applied dissolution procedure and HNO3 concentration.

  2. 20 CFR 404.1219 - Dissolution of political subdivision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dissolution of political subdivision. 404.1219 Section 404.1219 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... Agreements Is Obtained and Continues § 404.1219 Dissolution of political subdivision. If a...

  3. 20 CFR 404.1219 - Dissolution of political subdivision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dissolution of political subdivision. 404.1219 Section 404.1219 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... Agreements Is Obtained and Continues § 404.1219 Dissolution of political subdivision. If a...

  4. 20 CFR 404.1219 - Dissolution of political subdivision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dissolution of political subdivision. 404.1219 Section 404.1219 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... Agreements Is Obtained and Continues § 404.1219 Dissolution of political subdivision. If a...

  5. 20 CFR 404.1219 - Dissolution of political subdivision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dissolution of political subdivision. 404.1219 Section 404.1219 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... Agreements Is Obtained and Continues § 404.1219 Dissolution of political subdivision. If a...

  6. 20 CFR 404.1219 - Dissolution of political subdivision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dissolution of political subdivision. 404.1219 Section 404.1219 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... Agreements Is Obtained and Continues § 404.1219 Dissolution of political subdivision. If a...

  7. Kinetic study of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Permsukarome, P.; Chang, C.; Fogler, H.S.

    1997-09-01

    The kinetics of dissolution of pentane-insoluble solid asphaltene precipitates by amphiphile/alkane solutions were investigated using a differential reactor flow system. Two amphiphiles, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and nonylphenol, and five alkane solvents, ranging from hexane to hexadecane, were used. Results showed that the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids could be approximated with a first-order kinetics with respect to the undissolved asphaltene mass in solution. The specific dissolution rate constant, k, varied with the concentration of amphiphiles, the type of alkane solvents, the temperature, and the fluid flow rate. The rate of asphaltene dissolution displayed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics with respect to the concentration of amphiphiles. Increasing the temperature of amphiphile/alkane fluids also enhanced the rate of asphaltene dissolution. The apparent activation energy for asphaltene dissolution was approximated to be 4--7 kcal/mol. The rate of asphaltene dissolution was also greater in amphiphile solutions containing lighter alkanes, such as hexane, with lower viscosities. These trends suggest that both surface reaction and mass transfer processes are important to the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids.

  8. Dissolution of populations of ultrafine grains with applications to feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, S. J.; Nesbitt, H. W.

    1988-06-01

    Mineral dissolution studies are difficult to interpret when the solid reactant displays a wide range in grain sizes, since the rate of dissolution of the finest grains may not be simply related to their surface area. The transient apparent rate of dissolution of a population of fine-grained reactants is modeled to predict changes to the solution composition, as well as changes in the size distribution of ultra-fine particles as functions of time. The model is applied to the experimental data on Amelia albite of HOLDREN and BERNER (1979) from which both solution composition and grain size distribution have been obtained. The observed size distribution cannot be duplicated if the dissolution rate is proportional to surface area ( i.e.dV/dt = Kr 2); other contributions to the rate, such as dependence on grain size and the specific contributions from edges and corners, must be invoked. The observed grain size distribution and pseudo-parabolic rate can be reproduced when the rate of dissolution of the fine grains is proportional to its radius ( i.e.dV/dt = kr ). The rate constant, k, is consistent with a rate limited by dissolution at the edges of the grains. The possibility of predicting both the contribution of ultra-fine particles to the observed dissolution rate and the time evolution of the grain size distribution makes the model a useful tool for interpreting mineral dissolution data.

  9. 10 CFR 960.4-2-6 - Dissolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dissolution. 960.4-2-6 Section 960.4-2-6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Postclosure Guidelines § 960.4-2-6 Dissolution. (a) Qualifying condition. The site shall...

  10. 10 CFR 960.4-2-6 - Dissolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dissolution. 960.4-2-6 Section 960.4-2-6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Postclosure Guidelines § 960.4-2-6 Dissolution. (a) Qualifying condition. The site shall...

  11. 10 CFR 960.4-2-6 - Dissolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dissolution. 960.4-2-6 Section 960.4-2-6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Postclosure Guidelines § 960.4-2-6 Dissolution. (a) Qualifying condition. The site shall...

  12. Thermal dissolution of maize starches in aqueous medium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starches are not soluble in neutral water at room temperature. However, if they are heated in a closed container beyond the boiling point of water, they eventually dissolve. The dissolution temperature depends on the type of starch. The dissolution process was monitored in real time by measuring ...

  13. Overview of chemical modeling of nuclear waste glass dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1991-02-01

    Glass dissolution takes place through metal leaching and hydration of the glass surface accompanied by development of alternation layers of varying crystallinity. The reaction which controls the long-term glass dissolution rate appears to be surface layer dissolution. This reaction is reversible because the buildup of dissolved species in solution slows the dissolution rate due to a decreased dissolution affinity. Glass dissolution rates are therefore highly dependent on silica concentrations in solution because silica is the major component of the alteration layer. Chemical modeling of glass dissolution using reaction path computer codes has successfully been applied to short term experimental tests and used to predict long-term repository performance. Current problems and limitations of the models include a poorly defined long-term glass dissolution mechanism, the use of model parameters determined from the same experiments that the model is used to predict, and the lack of sufficient validation of key assumptions in the modeling approach. Work is in progress that addresses these issues. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Weathering-Associated Bacteria from the Damma Glacier Forefield: Physiological Capabilities and Impact on Granite Dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Beat; Rieder, Stefan R.; Brunner, Ivano; Plötze, Michael; Koetzsch, Stefan; Lapanje, Ales; Brandl, Helmut; Furrer, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Several bacterial strains isolated from granitic rock material in front of the Damma glacier (Central Swiss Alps) were shown (i) to grow in the presence of granite powder and a glucose-NH4Cl minimal medium without additional macro- or micronutrients and (ii) to produce weathering-associated agents. In particular, four bacterial isolates (one isolate each of Arthrobacter sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Leifsonia sp., and Polaromonas sp.) were weathering associated. In comparison to what was observed in abiotic experiments, the presence of these strains caused a significant increase of granite dissolution (as measured by the release of Fe, Ca, K, Mg, and Mn). These most promising weathering-associated bacterial species exhibited four main features rendering them more efficient in mineral dissolution than the other investigated isolates: (i) a major part of their bacterial cells was attached to the granite surfaces and not suspended in solution, (ii) they secreted the largest amounts of oxalic acid, (iii) they lowered the pH of the solution, and (iv) they formed significant amounts of HCN. As far as we know, this is the first report showing that the combined action of oxalic acid and HCN appears to be associated with enhanced elemental release from granite, in particular of Fe. This suggests that extensive microbial colonization of the granite surfaces could play a crucial role in the initial soil formation in previously glaciated mountain areas. PMID:20525872

  15. AtMYB12 regulates flavonoids accumulation and abiotic stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feibing; Kong, Weili; Wong, Gary; Fu, Lifeng; Peng, Rihe; Li, Zhenjun; Yao, Quanhong

    2016-08-01

    In plants, transcriptional regulation is the most important tool for modulating flavonoid biosynthesis. The AtMYB12 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana has been shown to regulate the expression of key enzyme genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis, leading to the increased accumulation of flavonoids. In this study, the codon-optimized AtMYB12 gene was chemically synthesized. Subcellular localization analysis in onion epidermal cells indicated that AtMYB12 was localized to the nucleus. Its overexpression significantly increased accumulation of flavonoids and enhanced salt and drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that overexpression of AtMYB12 resulted in the up-regulation of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis, abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis, proline biosynthesis, stress responses and ROS scavenging under salt and drought stresses. Further analyses under salt and drought stresses showed significant increases of ABA, proline content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities, as well as significant reduction of H2O2 and malonaldehyde (MDA) content. The results demonstrate the explicit role of AtMYB12 in conferring salt and drought tolerance by increasing the levels of flavonoids and ABA in transgenic Arabidopsis. The AtMYB12 gene has the potential to be used to enhance tolerance to abiotic stresses in plants. PMID:27033553

  16. Abiotic and biotic controls of organic matter cycling in a managed stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Jennifer W.; Grimm, Nancy B.

    2011-06-01

    Urbanization often alters the physical, chemical, and biological structure of aquatic ecosystems embedded within them, creating managed ecosystems with different structure and functioning as compared to their unmanaged counterparts. Our work focused on patterns in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) along a managed stream in Phoenix, Arizona. We documented longitudinal changes in DOC concentrations and quality (defined as chemical complexity and measured as specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm, SUVA) along a 66 km stream dominated by treated wastewater effluent. DOC concentrations along the stream declined by an average of 64%, and chemical complexity increased substantially. We posed four hypotheses to explain changes in downstream water chemistry; including hydrologic dilution, microbial mineralization, abiotic sorption to suspended sediments, and photodegradation by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Only the second and fourth hypotheses represent permanent removal mechanisms. Our data most strongly supported predictions from the dilution hypothesis and microbial mineralization as an explanation for the changes in DOC chemistry. Surface-subsurface water linkages were important but altered from unmanaged streams, as deep groundwater was used to augment surface flows. Variation in the use of groundwater was linked to human decision making and engineering related to water management. Reduction in geomorphic complexity increased the importance of dilution in explaining patterns but also increased the importance of UV oxidation as a mechanism influencing DOC chemistry. Our findings suggest urban stream management has shifted dependence on microbially mediated C removal mechanisms to hydrologic dilution to reduce output concentrations. This shift lowers contaminant removal potential and increases dependence on limited groundwater resources.

  17. Wetting effects versus ion pairs diffusivity: interactions of anionic surfactants with highly soluble cationic drugs and its impact on tablet dissolution.

    PubMed

    Desai, Divyakant; Wong, Benjamin; Huang, Yande; Ye, Qingmei; Guo, Hang; Huang, Ming; Timmins, Peter

    2015-07-01

    A study was conducted to develop a mechanistic understanding of dissolution of a highly soluble cationic drug, metformin hydrochloride, under the influence of anionic surfactants, sodium alkyl sulfates. The surfactants did not influence the saturated solubility of the drug, but reduced the surface tension of the dissolution media as the alkyl chain length increased. Their influence on tablet wetting based on the contact angles did not show any trend. The dissolution of 850 mg metformin hydrochloride tablets in 0.1 N HCl and pH 4.5 acetate buffer with 0.01% (w/v) sodium n-octyl sulfate (C8), sodium n-decyl sulfate (C10), or sodium n-tetradecyl sulfate (C14) was similar to the control, but was enhanced by sodium lauryl sulfate (C12). At 0.1% (w/v) concentration, the dissolution was not enhanced by C12 because the reduction in surface tension was counterbalanced by an increase in hydrophobic ion pairs that showed slower diffusivity by nuclear magnetic resonance. At 0.1% (w/v), metformin also formed an insoluble salt (1:2 molar ratios) with C10 (pH 1.2), C12, and C14 (pH 1.2 and 4.5) but not with C8. Three competing factors influenced the drug dissolution by surfactants: reduction in surface tension of the dissolution media, ion pairs with low diffusivity, and formation of an insoluble salt. PMID:26017286

  18. Convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, Jerome A.; Hesse, Marc A.; Riaz, Amir; Hallworth, Mark A.; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.; Huppert, Herbert E.

    2010-11-01

    Geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is a means of reducing anthropogenic emissions. Dissolution of CO2 into the brine, resulting in stable stratification, increases storage security. The dissolution rate is determined by convection in the brine driven by the increase of brine density with CO2 saturation. We present a new analogue fluid system that reproduces the convective behaviour of CO2-enriched brine. Laboratory experiments and high-resolution numerical simulations show that the convective flux scales with the Rayleigh number to the 4/5 power, in contrast with a classical linear relationship. A scaling argument for the convective flux incorporating lateral diffusion from downwelling plumes explains this nonlinear relationship for the convective flux, provides a physical picture of high Rayleigh number convection in a porous medium, and predicts the CO2 dissolution rates in CO2 accumulations. These estimates of the dissolution rate show that convective dissolution can play an important role in enhancing storage security.

  19. Aluminum Target Dissolution in Support of the Pu-238 Program

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H

    2014-09-01

    Selection of an aluminum alloy for target cladding affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the caustic dissolution step, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. We present a study to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal alloy, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as a function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. These data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Temperature logging during the transients has been investigated as a means to generate kinetic and mass transport data on the dissolution process. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.

  20. Microbial reduction of iodate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Councell, T.B.; Landa, E.R.; Lovley, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The different oxidation species of iodine have markedly different sorption properties. Hence, changes in iodine redox states can greatly affect the mobility of iodine in the environment. Although a major microbial role has been suggested in the past to account for these redox changes, little has been done to elucidate the responsible microorganisms or the mechanisms involved. In the work presented here, direct microbial reduction of iodate was demonstrated with anaerobic cell suspensions of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans which reduced 96% of an initial 100 ??M iodate to iodide at pH 7 in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, whereas anaerobic cell suspensions of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens were unable to reduce iodate in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer (pH 7). Both D. desulfuricans and S. putrefaciens were able to reduce iodate at pH 7 in 10 mM HEPES buffer. Both soluble ferrous iron and sulfide, as well as iron monosulfide (FeS) were shown to abiologically reduce iodate to iodide. These results indicate that ferric iron and/or sulfate reducing bacteria are capable of mediating both direct, enzymatic, as well as abiotic reduction of iodate in natural anaerobic environments. These microbially mediated reactions may be important factors in the fate and transport of 129I in natural systems.

  1. Review of recent transgenic studies on abiotic stress tolerance and future molecular breeding in potato

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Akira; Huynh, Huu Duc; Endo, Tsukasa; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Global warming has become a major issue within the last decade. Traditional breeding programs for potato have focused on increasing productivity and quality and disease resistance, thus, modern cultivars have limited tolerance of abiotic stresses. The introgression of abiotic stress tolerance into modern cultivars is essential work for the future. Recently, many studies have investigated abiotic stress using transgenic techniques. This manuscript focuses on the study of abiotic stress, in particular drought, salinity and low temperature, during this century. Dividing studies into these three stress categories for this review was difficult. Thus, based on the study title and the transgene property, transgenic studies were classified into five categories in this review; oxidative scavengers, transcriptional factors, and above three abiotic categories. The review focuses on studies that investigate confer of stress tolerance and the identification of responsible factors, including wild relatives. From a practical application perspective, further evaluation of transgenic potato with abiotic stress tolerance is required. Although potato plants, including wild species, have a large potential for abiotic stress tolerance, exploration of the factors responsible for conferring this tolerance is still developing. Molecular breeding, including genetic engineering and conventional breeding using DNA markers, is expected to develop in the future. PMID:25931983

  2. Multiple sulfur isotopes fractionations associated with abiotic sulfur transformations in Yellowstone National Park geothermal springs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The paper presents a quantification of main (hydrogen sulfide and sulfate), as well as of intermediate sulfur species (zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), thiosulfate, sulfite, thiocyanate) in the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) hydrothermal springs and pools. We combined these measurements with the measurements of quadruple sulfur isotope composition of sulfate, hydrogen sulfide and zero-valent sulfur. The main goal of this research is to understand multiple sulfur isotope fractionation in the system, which is dominated by complex, mostly abiotic, sulfur cycling. Results Water samples from six springs and pools in the Yellowstone National Park were characterized by pH, chloride to sulfate ratios, sulfide and intermediate sulfur species concentrations. Concentrations of sulfate in pools indicate either oxidation of sulfide by mixing of deep parent water with shallow oxic water, or surface oxidation of sulfide with atmospheric oxygen. Thiosulfate concentrations are low (<6 μmol L-1) in the pools with low pH due to fast disproportionation of thiosulfate. In the pools with higher pH, the concentration of thiosulfate varies, depending on different geochemical pathways of thiosulfate formation. The δ34S values of sulfate in four systems were close to those calculated using a mixing line of the model based on dilution and boiling of a deep hot parent water body. In two pools δ34S values of sulfate varied significantly from the values calculated from this model. Sulfur isotope fractionation between ZVS and hydrogen sulfide was close to zero at pH < 4. At higher pH zero-valent sulfur is slightly heavier than hydrogen sulfide due to equilibration in the rhombic sulfur–polysulfide – hydrogen sulfide system. Triple sulfur isotope (32S, 33S, 34S) fractionation patterns in waters of hydrothermal pools are more consistent with redox processes involving intermediate sulfur species than with bacterial sulfate reduction. Small but resolved differences in ∆33S among

  3. Carbon isotopic fractionation of CFCs during abiotic and biotic degradation.

    PubMed

    Archbold, Marie E; Elliot, Trevor; Kalin, Robert M

    2012-02-01

    Carbon stable isotope ((13)C) fractionation in chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds arising from abiotic (chemical) degradation using zero-valent iron (ZVI) and biotic (landfill gas attenuation) processes is investigated. Batch tests (at 25 °C) for CFC-113 and CFC-11 using ZVI show quantitative degradation of CFC-113 to HCFC-123a and CFC-1113 following pseudo-first-order kinetics corresponding to a half-life (τ(1/2)) of 20.5 h, and a ZVI surface-area normalized rate constant (k(SA)) of -(9.8 ± 0.5) × 10(-5) L m(-2) h(-1). CFC-11 degraded to trace HCFC-21 and HCFC-31 following pseudo-first-order kinetics corresponding to τ(1/2) = 17.3 h and k(SA) = -(1.2 ± 0.5) × 10(-4) L m(-2) h(-1). Significant kinetic isotope effects of ε(‰) = -5.0 ± 0.3 (CFC-113) and -17.8 ± 4.8 (CFC-11) were observed. Compound-specific carbon isotope analyses also have been used here to characterize source signatures of CFC gases (HCFC-22, CFC-12, HFC-134a, HCFC-142b, CFC-114, CFC-11, CFC-113) for urban (UAA), rural/remote (RAA), and landfill (LAA) ambient air samples, as well as in situ surface flux chamber (FLUX; NO FLUX) and landfill gas (LFG) samples at the Dargan Road site, Northern Ireland. The latter values reflect biotic degradation and isotopic fractionation in LFG production, and local atmospheric impact of landfill emissions through the cover. Isotopic fractionations of Δ(13)C ∼ -13‰ (HCFC-22), Δ(13)C ∼ -35‰ (CFC-12) and Δ(13)C ∼ -15‰ (CFC-11) were observed for LFG in comparison to characteristic solvent source signatures, with the magnitude of the isotopic effect for CFC-11 apparently similar to the kinetic isotope effect for (abiotic) ZVI degradation. PMID:22191586

  4. Final report - Reduction of mercury in saturated subsurface sediments and its potential to mobilize mercury in its elemental form

    SciTech Connect

    Bakray, Tamar

    2013-06-13

    The goal of our project was to investigate Hg(II) reduction in the deep subsurface. We focused on microbial and abiotic pathways of reduction and explored how it affected the toxicity and mobility of Hg in this unique environment. The project’s tasks included: 1. Examining the role of mer activities in the reduction of Hg(II) in denitrifying enrichment cultures; 2. Investigating the biotic/abiotic reduction of Hg(II) under iron reducing conditions; 3. Examining Hg(II) redox transformations under anaerobic conditions in subsurface sediments from DOE sites.

  5. On the effects of fission product noble metal inclusions on the kinetics of radiation induced dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trummer, Martin; Nilsson, Sara; Jonsson, Mats

    2008-08-01

    Radiation induced oxidative dissolution of UO 2 is a key process for the safety assessment of future geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel. This process is expected to govern the rate of radionuclide release to the biosphere. In this work, we have studied the catalytic effects of fission product noble metal inclusions on the kinetics of radiation induced dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. The experimental studies were performed using UO 2 pellets containing 0%, 0.1%, 1% and 3% Pd as a model for spent nuclear fuel. H 2O 2 was used as a model for radiolytical oxidants (previous studies have shown that H 2O 2 is the most important oxidant in such systems). The pellets were immersed in aqueous solution containing H 2O 2 and HCO3- and the consumption of H 2O 2 and the dissolution of uranium were analyzed as a function of H 2 pressure (0-40 bar). The noble metal inclusions were found to catalyze oxidation of UO 2 as well as reduction of surface bound oxidized UO 2 by H 2. In both cases the rate of the process increases with increasing Pd content. The reduction process was found to be close to diffusion controlled. This process can fully account for the inhibiting effect of H 2 observed in several studies on spent nuclear fuel dissolution.

  6. Carbonate ions and arsenic dissolution by groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, M.-J.; Nriagu, J.; Haack, S.

    2000-01-01

    solutions. The effects of pH and redox conditions on As dissolution were examined. Results showed that As was not leached significantly out of the Marshall Sandstone samples after 3 d using either deionized water or groundwater, but As was leached efficiently by sodium bicarbonate, potassium bicarbonate, and ferric chloride solutions. The leaching rate with sodium bicarbonate was about 25% higher than that with potassium bicarbonate. The data indicated that bicarbonate ion was involved primarily in As dissolution and that hydroxyl radical ion did not affect As dissolution to any significant degree. The amount of As leached was dependent upon the sodium bicarbonate concentration, increasing with reaction time for each concentration. Significant As leaching was found in the extreme pH ranges of <1.9 and 8.0-10.4. The resulting arseno-carbonate complexes formed were stable in groundwater.

  7. A Model of Continental Growth and Mantle Degassing Comparing Biotic and Abiotic Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höning, D.; Hansen-Goos, H.; Spohn, T.

    2012-12-01

    While examples for interaction of the biosphere with the atmosphere can be easily cited (e.g., production and consumption of O2), interaction between the biosphere and the solid planet and its interior is much less established. It has been argued (e.g., Rosing et al. 2006; Sleep et al, 2012) that the formation of continents could be a consequence of bioactivity harvesting solar energy through photosynthesis to help build the continents and that the mantle should carry a chemical biosignature. We present an interaction model that includes mantle convection, mantle water vapor degassing at mid-oceanic ridges and regassing through subduction zones, continental crust formation and erosion and water storage and transport in a porous oceanic crust that includes hydrous mineral phases. The mantle viscosity in this model depends on the water concentration in the mantle. We use boundary layer theory of mantle convection to parameterize the mantle convection flow rate and assume that the plate speed equals the mantle flow rate. The biosphere enters the calculation through the assumption that the continental erosion rate is enhanced by a factor of several through bioactivity and through an assumed reduction of the kinetic barrier to diagenetic and metamorphic reactions (e.g., Kim et al. 2004) in the sedimentary basins in subduction zones that would lead to increased water storage capacities. We further include a stochastic model of continent-to-continent interactions that limits the effective total length of subduction zones. We use present day parameters of the Earth and explore a phase plane spanned by the percentage of surface coverage of the Earth by continents and the total water content of the mantle. We vary the ratio of the erosion rate in a postulated abiotic Earth to the present Earth, as well as the activation barrier to diagenetic and metamorphic reactions that affect the water storage capacity of the subducting crust. We find stable and unstable fixed points in

  8. Instabilities in geomaterials induced by dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanou, I.; Sulem, J.

    2015-12-01

    Deformation bands play an important role in reservoir engineering, geological storage, underwater landslides and slow geological procedures. Various mechanisms can be involved at different scales and may be responsible for deformation bands. Mechanical and chemical degradation of the grain skeleton is a softening factor that can lead to compaction, shear or even dilation band formation [1]-[3]. The present study is twofold. On one hand it focuses on the mathematical modeling of chemically induced strain localization instabilities in porous rocks and on the other hand it explores the conditions for their creation [4], [5]. In a saturated porous rock, the progressive mechanical damage of the solid skeleton during deformation, results in the increase of the interface area of the reactants and consequently in the acceleration of the dissolution rate of the solid phase [6]. Under the presence of dissolving fluids the solid skeleton is degraded more rapidly (mass removal because of dissolution), the overall mechanical properties of the system diminish (contraction of the elastic domain - chemical softening), deformations increase and the solid skeleton is further damaged (intergranular fractures, debonding, breakage of the porous network etc.). Based on a micromechanical model, the conditions for deformation band triggering are investigated analytically. The heterogeneity of the microstructure in terms of chemical reactivity of the constituents of the REV is taken into account resulting in a characteristic internal length of the system. The post bifurcation behavior is finally studied both analytically and numerically revealing the thickness of the localized zone. References[1] I. Stefanou and J. Sulem, DOI: 10.1002/2013JB010342 [2] M. Cha and J. C. Santamarina, DOI: 10.1680/geot.14P.115 [3] M. D. Ingraham, K. A. Issen, and D. J. Holcomb, DOI: 10.1007/s11440-013-0275-y [4] K. A. Issen and J. W. Rudnicki, DOI: 10.1029/2000JB900185 [5] J. W. Rudnicki and J. R. Rice, DOI

  9. Circadian Redox Signaling in Plant Immunity and Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Spoel, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Plant crops are critically important to provide quality food and bio-energy to sustain a growing human population. Circadian clocks have been shown to deliver an adaptive advantage to plants, vastly increasing biomass production by efficient anticipation to the solar cycle. Plant stress, on the other hand, whether biotic or abiotic, prevents crops from reaching maximum productivity. Recent Advances: Stress is associated with fluctuations in cellular redox and increased phytohormone signaling. Recently, direct links between circadian timekeeping, redox fluctuations, and hormone signaling have been identified. A direct implication is that circadian control of cellular redox homeostasis influences how plants negate stress to ensure growth and reproduction. Critical Issues: Complex cellular biochemistry leads from perception of stress via hormone signals and formation of reactive oxygen intermediates to a physiological response. Circadian clocks and metabolic pathways intertwine to form a confusing biochemical labyrinth. Here, we aim to find order in this complex matter by reviewing current advances in our understanding of the interface between these networks. Future Directions: Although the link is now clearly defined, at present a key question remains as to what extent the circadian clock modulates redox, and vice versa. Furthermore, the mechanistic basis by which the circadian clock gates redox- and hormone-mediated stress responses remains largely elusive. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 3024–3039. PMID:23941583

  10. Abiotic photophosphorylation model based on abiogenic flavin and pteridine pigments.

    PubMed

    Telegina, Taisiya A; Kolesnikov, Michael P; Vechtomova, Yulia L; Buglak, Andrey A; Kritsky, Mikhail S

    2013-05-01

    A model for abiotic photophosphorylation of adenosine diphosphate by orthophosphate with the formation of adenosine triphosphate was studied. The model was based on the photochemical activity of the abiogenic conjugates of pigments with the polymeric material formed after thermolysis of amino acid mixtures. The pigments formed showed different fluorescence parameters depending on the composition of the mixture of amino acid precursors. Thermolysis of the mixture of glutamic acid, glycine, and lysine (8:3:1) resulted in a predominant formation of a pigment fraction which had the fluorescence maximum at 525 nm and the excitation band maxima at 260, 375, and 450 nm and was identified as flavin. When glycine in the initial mixture was replaced with alanine, a product formed whose fluorescence parameters were typical to pteridines (excitation maximum at 350 nm, emission maximum at 440 nm). When irradiated with the quasi-monochromatic light (over the range 325-525 nm), microspheres in which flavin pigments were prevailing showed a maximum photophosphorylating activity at 375 and 450 nm, and pteridine-containing chromoproteinoid microspheres were most active at 350 nm. The positions and the relative height of maxima in the action spectra correlate with those in the excitation spectra of the pigments, which point to the involvement of abiogenic flavins and pteridines in photophosphorylation. PMID:23689512

  11. Wheat proteomics: proteome modulation and abiotic stress acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Kamal, Abu H. M.; Hossain, Zahed

    2014-01-01

    Cellular mechanisms of stress sensing and signaling represent the initial plant responses to adverse conditions. The development of high-throughput “Omics” techniques has initiated a new era of the study of plant molecular strategies for adapting to environmental changes. However, the elucidation of stress adaptation mechanisms in plants requires the accurate isolation and characterization of stress-responsive proteins. Because the functional part of the genome, namely the proteins and their post-translational modifications, are critical for plant stress responses, proteomic studies provide comprehensive information about the fine-tuning of cellular pathways that primarily involved in stress mitigation. This review summarizes the major proteomic findings related to alterations in the wheat proteomic profile in response to abiotic stresses. Moreover, the strengths and weaknesses of different sample preparation techniques, including subcellular protein extraction protocols, are discussed in detail. The continued development of proteomic approaches in combination with rapidly evolving bioinformatics tools and interactive databases will facilitate understanding of the plant mechanisms underlying stress tolerance. PMID:25538718

  12. Abiotic environmental factors influencing blowfly colonisation patterns in the field.

    PubMed

    George, Kelly A; Archer, Melanie S; Toop, Tes

    2013-06-10

    The accuracy of minimum post-mortem interval (mPMI) estimates usually hinges upon the ability of forensic entomologists to predict the conditions under which calliphorids will colonise bodies. However, there can be delays between death and colonisation due to poorly understood abiotic and biotic factors, hence the need for a mPMI. To quantify the importance of various meteorological and light-level factors, beef liver baits were placed in the field (Victoria, Australia) on 88 randomly selected days over 3 years in all seasons and observed every 60-90 min for evidence of colonisation. Baits were exposed during daylight, and the following parameters were measured: barometric pressure, light intensity, wind speed, ambient temperature, relative humidity and rainfall. Collected data were analysed using backward LR logistic regression to produce an equation of colonisation probability. This type of analysis removes factors with the least influence on colonisation in successive steps until all remaining variables significantly increase the accuracy of predicting colonisation presence or absence. Ambient temperature was a positive predictor variable (an increase in temperature increased the probability of calliphorid colonisation). Relative humidity was a negative predictor variable (an increase in humidity decreased the probability of calliphorid colonisation). Barometric pressure, light intensity, wind speed and rainfall did not enhance the accuracy of the probability model; however, analysis of species activity patterns suggests that heavy rainfall and strong wind speeds inhibit calliphorid colonisation. PMID:23683914

  13. Comparative study of biogenic and abiotic iron-containing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z.; Shopska, M.; Paneva, D.; Kovacheva, D.; Kadinov, G.; Mitov, I.

    2016-12-01

    Series of iron-based biogenic materials prepared by cultivation of Leptothrix group of bacteria in different feeding media ( Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria isolation medium, Adler, Lieske and silicon-iron-glucose-peptone) were studied. Control samples were obtained in the same conditions and procedures but the nutrition media were not infected with bacteria, i.e. they were sterile. Room and low temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS) were used to reveal the composition and physicochemical properties of biomass and respective control samples. Comparative analysis showed differences in their composition and dispersity of present phases. Sample composition included different ratio of nanodimensional iron oxyhydroxide and oxide phases. Relaxation phenomena such as superparamagnetism or collective magnetic excitation behaviour were registered for some of them. The experimental data showed that the biogenic materials were enriched in oxyhydroxides of high dispersion. Catalytic behaviour of a selected biomass and abiotic material were studied in the reaction of CO oxidation. In situ diffuse-reflectance (DR) IRS was used to monitor the phase transformations in the biomass and CO conversion.

  14. Identification of Cassava MicroRNAs under Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Ballén-Taborda, Carolina; Plata, Germán; Ayling, Sarah; Rodríguez-Zapata, Fausto; Becerra Lopez-Lavalle, Luis Augusto; Duitama, Jorge; Tohme, Joe

    2013-01-01

    The study of microRNAs (miRNAs) in plants has gained significant attention in recent years due to their regulatory role during development and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Although cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is tolerant to drought and other adverse conditions, most cassava miRNAs have been predicted using bioinformatics alone or through sequencing of plants challenged by biotic stress. Here, we use high-throughput sequencing and different bioinformatics methods to identify potential cassava miRNAs expressed in different tissues subject to heat and drought conditions. We identified 60 miRNAs conserved in other plant species and 821 potential cassava-specific miRNAs. We also predicted 134 and 1002 potential target genes for these two sets of sequences. Using real time PCR, we verified the condition-specific expression of 5 cassava small RNAs relative to a non-stress control. We also found, using publicly available expression data, a significantly lower expression of the predicted target genes of conserved and nonconserved miRNAs under drought stress compared to other cassava genes. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis along with condition specific expression of predicted miRNA targets, allowed us to identify several interesting miRNAs which may play a role in stress-induced posttranscriptional regulation in cassava and other plants. PMID:24328029

  15. Identification of Cassava MicroRNAs under Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ballén-Taborda, Carolina; Plata, Germán; Ayling, Sarah; Rodríguez-Zapata, Fausto; Tohme, Joe

    2013-01-01

    The study of microRNAs (miRNAs) in plants has gained significant attention in recent years due to their regulatory role during development and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Although cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is tolerant to drought and other adverse conditions, most cassava miRNAs have been predicted using bioinformatics alone or through sequencing of plants challenged by biotic stress. Here, we use high-throughput sequencing and different bioinformatics methods to identify potential cassava miRNAs expressed in different tissues subject to heat and drought conditions. We identified 60 miRNAs conserved in other plant species and 821 potential cassava-specific miRNAs. We also predicted 134 and 1002 potential target genes for these two sets of sequences. Using real time PCR, we verified the condition-specific expression of 5 cassava small RNAs relative to a non-stress control. We also found, using publicly available expression data, a significantly lower expression of the predicted target genes of conserved and nonconserved miRNAs under drought stress compared to other cassava genes. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis along with condition specific expression of predicted miRNA targets, allowed us to identify several interesting miRNAs which may play a role in stress-induced posttranscriptional regulation in cassava and other plants. PMID:24328029

  16. Understanding molecular mechanism of higher plant plasticity under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hong-Bo; Guo, Qing-Jie; Chu, Li-Ye; Zhao, Xi-Ning; Su, Zhong-Liang; Hu, Ya-Chen; Cheng, Jiang-Feng

    2007-01-15

    Higher plants play the most important role in keeping a stable environment on the earth, which regulate global circumstances in many ways in terms of different levels (molecular, individual, community, and so on), but the nature of the mechanism is gene expression and control temporally and spatially at the molecular level. In persistently changing environment, there are many adverse stress conditions such as cold, drought, salinity and UV-B (280-320 mm), which influence plant growth and crop production greatly. Plants differ from animals in many aspects, but the important may be that plants are more easily influenced by environment than animals. Plants have a series of fine mechanisms for responding to environmental changes, which has been established during their long-period evolution and artificial domestication. These mechanisms are involved in many aspects of anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, genetics, development, evolution and molecular biology, in which the adaptive machinery related to molecular biology is the most important. The elucidation of it will extremely and purposefully promote the sustainable utilization of plant resources and make the best use of its current potential under different scales. This molecular mechanism at least include environmental signal recognition (input), signal transduction (many cascade biochemical reactions are involved in this process), signal output, signal responses and phenotype realization, which is a multi-dimensional network system and contain many levels of gene expression and regulation. We will focus on the molecular adaptive machinery of higher plant plasticity under abiotic stresses. PMID:16914294

  17. Soluble sugars—Metabolism, sensing and abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Mariana; Prado, Carolina; Podazza, Griselda; Interdonato, Roque; González, Juan A; Hilal, Mirna

    2009-01-01

    Plants are autotrophic and photosynthetic organisms that both produce and consume sugars. Soluble sugars are highly sensitive to environmental stresses, which act on the supply of carbohydrates from source organs to sink ones. Sucrose and hexoses both play dual functions in gene regulation as exemplified by the upregulation of growth-related genes and downregulation of stress-related genes. Although coordinately regulated by sugars, these growth- and stress-related genes are upregulated or downregulated through HXK-dependent and/or HXK-independent pathways. Sucrose-non-fermenting-1- (SNF1-) related protein pathway, analogue to the protein kinase (SNF-) yeast-signalling pathway, seems also involved in sugar sensing and transduction in plants. However, even if plants share with yeast some elements involved in sugar sensing, several aspects of sugar perception are likely to be peculiar to higher plants. In this paper, we have reviewed recent evidences how plants sense and respond to environmental factors through sugar-sensing mechanisms. However, we think that forward and reverse genetic analysis in combination with expression profiling must be continued to uncover many signalling components, and a full biochemical characterization of the signalling complexes will be required to determine specificity and cross-talk in abiotic stress signalling pathways. PMID:19816104

  18. Inhibition of radiation induced dissolution of UO2 by sulfide - A comparison with the hydrogen effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Miao; Barreiro Fidalgo, Alexandre; Sundin, Sara; Jonsson, Mats

    2013-03-01

    In this work we have studied the influence of H2S on radiation induced dissolution of spent nuclear fuel using simple model systems. The reaction between H2O2 and H2S/HS- has been studied experimentally as well as the effect of H2S/HS- on γ-radiation induced dissolution of a UO2 pellet. The experiments clearly show that the reaction of H2O2 and H2S/HS- is fairly rapid and that H2O2 and H2S/HS- stoichiometry is favorable for inhibition. Radiolysis experiments show that H2S/HS- can effectively protect UO2 from oxidative dissolution. The effect depends on sulfide concentration in combination with dose rate. Autoclave experiments were also conducted to study the role of H2S/HS- in the reduction of U(VI) in the presence and absence of H2 and Pd particles in anoxic aqueous solution. The aqueous solutions were pressurized with H2 or N2 and two different concentrations of H2S/HS- were used in the presence and absence of Pd. No catalytic effect of Pd on the U(VI) reduction by H2S/HS- could be found in N2 atmosphere. U(VI) reduction was found to be proportional to H2S/HS- concentration in H2 and N2 atmosphere. It is clearly shown the Pd catalyzed H2 effect is more powerful than the effect of H2S/HS-. H2S/HS- poisoning of the Pd catalyst is not observed under the present conditions.

  19. Dissolution enhancement of fenofibrate by micronization, cogrinding and spray-drying: comparison with commercial preparations.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Markus; Kunath, Klaus; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2008-02-01

    Several techniques were compared for improving the dissolution of fenofibrate, a poorly soluble drug. Particle size reduction was realized by jet milling (micronization; cogrinding with lactose, polyvinylpyrrolidone or sodium lauryl sulphate) and by media milling using a bead mill (nanosizing) with subsequent spray-drying. Solid state characterization by X-ray diffraction and Differential Scanning Calorimetry verified the maintenance of the crystalline state of the drug after dry milling and its conversion to the amorphous state during spray-drying. Micronization of fenofibrate enhanced its dissolution rate in biorelevant media (8.2% in 30min) compared to crude material (1.3% in 30min). Coground mixtures of the drug increased the dissolution rate further (up to 20% in 30min). Supersaturated solutions were generated by nanosizing combined with spray-drying, this process converted fenofibrate to the amorphous state. Fenofibrate drug products commercially available on the German and French markets dissolved similarly to crude or micronized fenofibrate, but significantly slower than the coground or spray-dried fenofibrate mixtures. The results suggest that cogrinding and spray-drying are powerful techniques for the preparation of rapidly dissolving formulations of fenofibrate, and could potentially lead to improvements in the bioavailability of oral fenofibrate products. PMID:17574403

  20. Dissolution, Cyclodextrin-Enhanced Solubilization, and Mass Removal of an Ideal Multicomponent Organic Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling were conducted to examine the influence of a hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) solution on the dissolution of single- and three-component organic liquids. The results of batch experiments showed that HPCD-enhanced solubilization of the organic-liquid mixtures was ideal (describable using Raoult’s Law), and that solubilization-enhancement factors were independent of mixture composition. Addition of the HPCD solution to columns containing residual saturations of the organic liquid enhanced the dissolution and removal of all three compounds in the mixture. The results of the column experiments and multicomponent rate-limited dissolution modeling suggest that solubilization was ideal for both water and cyclodextrin flushing. Concomitantly, the mass-flux reduction versus mass removal behavior was ideal for all experiments. Mass transfer was increased for HPCD solubilization relative to the water flushing due to solubility and concentration-gradient enhancement. Organic-liquid composition did not significantly impact mass transfer coefficients, and fractional mass removal behavior during HPCD solubilization was nearly identical for each compound whether present as a single component or in a mixture. Additionally, mass transfer coefficients for aqueous and HPCD solubilization for single and multicomponent mixtures were not statistically different upon normalizing by the solubility enhancement factor. PMID:19233508

  1. Effects of ocean acidification on the dissolution rates of reef-coral skeletons

    PubMed Central

    van Woesik, Kelly; van Woesik, Liana; van Woesik, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification threatens the foundation of tropical coral reefs. This study investigated three aspects of ocean acidification: (i) the rates at which perforate and imperforate coral-colony skeletons passively dissolve when pH is 7.8, which is predicted to occur globally by 2100, (ii) the rates of passive dissolution of corals with respect to coral-colony surface areas, and (iii) the comparative rates of a vertical reef-growth model, incorporating passive dissolution rates, and predicted sea-level rise. By 2100, when the ocean pH is expected to be 7.8, perforate Montipora coral skeletons will lose on average 15 kg CaCO3 m−2 y−1, which is approximately −10.5 mm of vertical reduction of reef framework per year. This rate of passive dissolution is higher than the average rate of reef growth over the last several millennia and suggests that reefs composed of perforate Montipora coral skeletons will have trouble keeping up with sea-level rise under ocean acidification. Reefs composed of primarily imperforate coral skeletons will not likely dissolve as rapidly, but our model shows they will also have trouble keeping up with sea-level rise by 2050. PMID:24282670

  2. Calcite cement generations after sulphate dissolution - Evidence for uplift diagenesis in Capitan and Zechstein carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, G. ); Lee, M. ); Darke, G. )

    1991-03-01

    Upper Permian Capitan shelf margin and U.K. Zechstein carbonates contain evidence of former replacive anhydrite, formed early during their diagenetic histories. Both sequences were uplifted during the last 90 Ma with consequent sulfate hydration and dissolution. Resultant open cavities are occluded by calcite cements. Cement generations in the two areas are strikingly similar, although the areas were in contrasting climatic belts during uplift. Earliest uplift cements contain relics/evidence of former sulfates with minor bacteriogenic sulfide and precipitation from sulfate reduction. Two major generations of cavity-lining calcite cements formed after sulfate dissolution. Geochemical and isotopic analyses demonstrate these cements to be aquifer-related. The earlier luminescent cements, precipitated from stagnant anoxic waters, were etched and corroded, before minor iron oxide precipitation. These iron oxides enable paleomagnetic dating of uplift. The corrosion marks an anoxic-oxic transition within the pore fluids, with a later incursion of active oxic fluids, from which were precipitated iron-free nonluminescent columnar cements. Cores through the Zechstein carbonates show that cement phases develop successively as uplift proceeds. Thus cement generations were not precipitated synchronously but are representative of different levels within a downwards-penetrating aquifer. The cements relate to successive stages of aquifer evolution and allow a common history of uplift diagenesis to be determined for both areas, although on different continents and within different climatic zones. A similar cement sequence related to downwards aquifer penetration is thus predicted for other areas where sulfate dissolution has occurred on uplift.

  3. Oxidative dissolution of biogenic uraninite in groundwater at Old Rifle, CO

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Kate M.; Veeramani, Harish; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Blue, Lisa Y.; Giammar, Dianiel E.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Suvorova, Elena; Yabusaki, Steve; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Mehta, Apurva; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Reductive bioremediation is currently being explored as a possible strategy for uranium-contaminated aquifers such as the Old Rifle site (Colorado). The stability of U(IV) phases under oxidizing conditions is key to the performance of this procedure. An in situ method was developed to study oxidative dissolution of biogenic uraninite (UO2), a desirable U(VI) bioreduction product, in the Old Rifle, CO, aquifer under different variable oxygen conditions. Overall uranium loss rates were 50–100 times slower than laboratory rates. After accounting for molecular diffusion through the sample holders, a reactive transport model using laboratory dissolution rates was able to predict overall uranium loss. The presence of biomass further retarded diffusion and oxidation rates. These results confirm the importance of diffusion in controlling in-aquifer U(IV) oxidation rates. Upon retrieval, uraninite was found to be free of U(VI), indicating dissolution occurred via oxidation and removal of surface atoms. Interaction of groundwater solutes such as Ca2+ or silicate with uraninite surfaces also may retard in-aquifer U loss rates. These results indicate that the prolonged stability of U(IV) species in aquifers is strongly influenced by permeability, the presence of bacterial cells and cell exudates, and groundwater geochemistry.

  4. Characteristics and electrochemical mechanisms of a nanosilver solution formed by anodic dissolution with high DC voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Nguyen Duc; Thuy, Nguyen Minh; Nhi Tru, Nguyen

    2013-08-01

    Nanosilver solution, prepared by anodic dissolution with high DC voltage in doubly distilled water, is free of undesirable chemicals and forms a highly pure product which is suitable for different applications, especially in the medical and pharmaceutical fields. In this study high DC voltage electrolysis was implemented to form nanosilver solutions with varying electrode diameters, anode-cathode distances, and electrolysis duration. The process was monitored while the cell was in operation, and the characteristics of the resulting solution were analysed afterwards. Cell reactions included: colour changes in the solution bulk due to the reduction of silver ions forming nanoparticles, anodic dissolution of silver, intense gas evolution at both electrodes, and chemical reactions in the solution causing nanosilver formation. UV-Vis characteristics, particle size distribution, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, solution concentrations, conductivities, and ζ-potentials were all found to depend on the electrode's distances, temperature, electrolysis duration, and current density. Nanosilver preparation can thus be considered a combination of electrochemical reactions (such as silver dissolution at anode and water decomposition to generate hydrogen and oxygen), and chemical reactions between the electrolytic products from the solution bulk.

  5. Effects of ocean acidification on the dissolution rates of reef-coral skeletons.

    PubMed

    van Woesik, Robert; van Woesik, Kelly; van Woesik, Liana; van Woesik, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification threatens the foundation of tropical coral reefs. This study investigated three aspects of ocean acidification: (i) the rates at which perforate and imperforate coral-colony skeletons passively dissolve when pH is 7.8, which is predicted to occur globally by 2100, (ii) the rates of passive dissolution of corals with respect to coral-colony surface areas, and (iii) the comparative rates of a vertical reef-growth model, incorporating passive dissolution rates, and predicted sea-level rise. By 2100, when the ocean pH is expected to be 7.8, perforate Montipora coral skeletons will lose on average 15 kg CaCO3 m(-2) y(-1), which is approximately -10.5 mm of vertical reduction of reef framework per year. This rate of passive dissolution is higher than the average rate of reef growth over the last several millennia and suggests that reefs composed of perforate Montipora coral skeletons will have trouble keeping up with sea-level rise under ocean acidification. Reefs composed of primarily imperforate coral skeletons will not likely dissolve as rapidly, but our model shows they will also have trouble keeping up with sea-level rise by 2050. PMID:24282670

  6. Comparison of the effect of chitosan and polyvinylpyrrolidone on dissolution properties and analgesic effect of naproxen.

    PubMed

    Zerrouk, Naima; Mennini, Natascia; Maestrelli, Francesca; Chemtob, Chantal; Mura, Paola

    2004-01-01

    The solubilizing and absorption enhancer properties towards naproxen of chitosan and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) have been investigated. Solid binary systems prepared at various drug-polymer ratios by mixing, cogrinding or kneading, were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, and tested for dissolution behavior. Both carriers improved drug dissolution and their performance depended on the drug-polymer ratio and the system preparation method. Chitosan was more effective than PVP, despite the greater amorphizing power of PVP as revealed by solid state analyses. The 3/7 (w/w) drug-carrier coground systems with chitosan and PVP were the best products enabling, respectively, an improvement of 4.8 and 3.6 times of drug dissolution efficiency. In vivo experiments in mice demonstrated that administration of 45 mg/kg of drug coground with PVP or chitosan resulted, respectively, in a 25 and 60% reduction of acetic acid-induced writhings in comparison to pure drug, which, instead, was statistically ineffective as compared to the control group. Moreover, the 3/7 (w/w) drug-chitosan coground product demonstrated an antiwrithing potency 2.4 times higher than the coground with PVP. Thus, the direct-compression properties and antiulcerogenic activity, combined with the demonstrated solubilizing power and analgesic effect enhancer ability towards the drug, make chitosan particularly suitable for developing a reduced-dose fast-release solid oral dosage form of naproxen. PMID:14729084

  7. Oxidative Dissolution of Biogenic Uraninite in Groundwater at Old Rifle, CO

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Kate M.; Veeramani, Harish; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Blue, Lisa; Giammar, Daniel E.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Suvorova, Elena; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Mehta, Apurva; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John R.

    2011-09-12

    Reductive bioremediation is currently being explored as a possible strategy for uranium contaminated aquifers such as the Old Rifle site (Colorado, USA). The stability of U(IV) phases under oxidizing conditions is a key to the performance of this procedure. Biogenic uraninite, a bioreduction product for which kinetic and thermodynamic parameters are known, was deployed into wells using a novel membrane-walled cell to observe the rates and mechanisms of oxidative dissolution in situ in aquifers with different dissolved oxygen conditions. Observed in-aquifer dissolution rates were at least 50 to 100 times lower than measured in laboratory continuous flow reactors with artificial ground water. Upon retrieval, uraninite was found to have similar structure and stoichiometry as the parent material and to be free of U(VI), indicating dissolution occurs via oxidation and removal of surface atoms. Reactive transport modeling suggests that molecular diffusion is likely to be an important factor in limiting the rates of in-aquifer oxidation, and the presence of biomass enhances this effect. Interaction of ground water solutes such as Ca2+ or silicate with uraninite surfaces also may retard in-aquifer U loss rates. These results constrain in-aquifer oxidation rates and indicate U(VI) is more stable in oxic ground water than previously expected.

  8. Effect of Phosphate, Fluoride, and Nitrate on Gibbsite Dissolution Rate and Solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Herting, Daniel L.

    2014-01-29

    Laboratory tests have been completed with simulated tank waste samples to investigate the effects of phosphate, fluoride, and nitrate on the dissolution rate and equilibrium solubility of gibbsite in sodium hydroxide solution at 22 and 40{degrees}C. Results are compared to relevant literature data and to computer model predictions. The presence of sodium nitrate (3 M) caused a reduction in the rate of gibbsite dissolution in NaOH, but a modest increase in the equilibrium solubility of aluminum. The increase in solubility was not as large, though, as the increase predicted by the computer model. The presence of phosphate, either as sodium phosphate or sodium fluoride phosphate, had a negligible effect on the rate of gibbsite dissolution, but caused a slight increase in aluminum solubility. The magnitude of the increased solubility, relative to the increase caused by sodium nitrate, suggests that the increase is due to ionic strength (or water activity) effects, rather than being associated with the specific ion involved. The computer model predicted that phosphate would cause a slight decrease in aluminum solubility, suggesting some Al-PO4 interaction. No evidence was found of such an interaction.

  9. Oxidative Dissolution of Biogenic Uraninite in Groundwater at Old Rifle, CO.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kate M; Veeramani, Harish; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Blue, Lisa Y; Giammar, Daniel E; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Stubbs, Joanne E; Suvorova, Elena; Yabusaki, Steve; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Mehta, Apurva; Long, Philip E; Bargar, John R

    2011-10-15

    Reductive bioremediation is currently being explored as a possible strategy for uranium-contaminated aquifers such as the Old Rifle site (Colorado). The stability of U(IV) phases under oxidizing conditions is key to the performance of this procedure. An in situ method was developed to study oxidative dissolution of biogenic uraninite (UO₂), a desirable U(VI) bioreduction product, in the Old Rifle, CO, aquifer under different variable oxygen conditions. Overall uranium loss rates were 50-100 times slower than laboratory rates. After accounting for molecular diffusion through the sample holders, a reactive transport model using laboratory dissolution rates was able to predict overall uranium loss. The presence of biomass further retarded diffusion and oxidation rates. These results confirm the importance of diffusion in controlling in-aquifer U(IV) oxidation rates. Upon retrieval, uraninite was found to be free of U(VI), indicating dissolution occurred via oxidation and removal of surface atoms. Interaction of groundwater solutes such as Ca²⁺ or silicate with uraninite surfaces also may retard in-aquifer U loss rates. These results indicate that the prolonged stability of U(IV) species in aquifers is strongly influenced by permeability, the presence of bacterial cells and cell exudates, and groundwater geochemistry. PMID:21910475

  10. Predicting carbonate mineral precipitation/dissolution events during progressive diagenesis of clastic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Surdam, R.C.; MacGowan, D.B.; Dunn, T.L. ); Moraes, M. )

    1991-03-01

    There is an observable, regular progression of early and late carbonate cements that is separated by carbonate mineral dissolution in many sandstones during progressive burial and diagenesis. The distribution of early cements is a function of incipient hydration of framework grains, sulfate reduction, and bacterial methanogenesis. These early cements typically precipitate from the sediment water interace to burial depths corresponding to about 80C. The distribution of late carbonate cements is a function of the relationship of organic acid anions, aluminosilicate reactions and CO{sub 2} in formation waters. Elevated PCO{sub 2} in a fluid where the pH is buffered by