Science.gov

Sample records for abiotic reductive transformation

  1. Abiotic reduction reactions of dichloroacetamide safeners: transformations of "inert" agrochemical constituents.

    PubMed

    Sivey, John D; Roberts, A Lynn

    2012-02-21

    Safeners are so-called "inert" constituents of herbicide formulations added to protect crops from the toxic effects of herbicides. We examined the reactivity of three dichloroacetamide safeners and 12 structural analogues [all neutral compounds of the form Cl(2)CXC(═O)NRR'; X = H, Cl; R-groups include alkyl, branched alkyl, n-allyl, and cyclic moieties] in one homogeneous and two heterogeneous reductant systems: solutions of Cr(H(2)O)(6)(2+), suspensions of Fe(II)-amended goethite, and suspensions of Fe(II)-amended hematite. Analyses of reaction products indicate each safener can undergo stepwise hydrogenolysis (replacement of chlorine by hydrogen) in each system at near-neutral pH. The first hydrogenolysis step generates compounds similar (in one case, identical) to herbicide active ingredients. Rates of product formation and (when reactions were sufficiently fast) parent loss were quantified; reaction rates in heterogeneous systems spanned 2 orders of magnitude and were strongly influenced by R-group structure. The length of n-alkyl R-groups exerted opposite effects on hydrogenolysis rates in homogeneous versus heterogeneous systems: as R-group size increased, reduction rates in heterogeneous systems increased, whereas reduction rates in the homogeneous system decreased. Branched alkyl R-groups decreased hydrogenolysis rates relative to their straight-chain homologues in both homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. Reaction rates in heterogeneous systems can be described via polyparameter linear free energy relationships employing molecular parameters likely to influence dichloroacetamide adsorption. The propensity of dichloroacetamide safeners to undergo reductive transformations into herbicide-like products challenges their classification as "inert" agrochemical ingredients.

  2. The Use of Chemical Probes for the Characterization of the Predominant Abiotic Reductants in Anaerobic Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the predominant chemical reductants and pathways for electron transfer in anaerobic systems is paramount to the development of environmental fate models that incorporate pathways for abiotic reductive transformations. Currently, such models do not exist. In this chapt...

  3. Environmental Selenium Transformations: Distinguishing Abiotic and Biotic Factors Influencing Se Redox Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, C.; Kenyon, J.; James, B. R.; Santelli, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Worldwide, selenium (Se) is proving to be a significant environmental concern, with many anthropogenic activities (e.g. coal mining and combustion, phosphate mining and agricultural irrigation) releasing potentially hazardous concentrations into surface and subsurface ecosystems. The US EPA is currently considering aquatic Se regulations, however no guidelines exist for excess soil Se, despite its ability to act as a persistent Se source. Various abiotic and biological processes mediate Se oxidation/reduction (redox) transformations in soils, thus influencing its solubility and bioavailability. In this research we assess (1) the ability of metal-transforming fungal species to aerobically reduce Se (Se (IV and/or VI) to Se(0)), and (2) the relative contribution of biotic and abiotic pathways for aerobic Se transformation. The primary objective of this research is to determine what abiotic and biotic factors enhance or restrict Se bioavailability. Results indicate that fungal-mediated Se reduction may be quite widespread, with at least 7 out of 10 species of known Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi isolated from metal impacted environments also identified as capable of aerobically reducing Se(IV) and/or Se(VI) to Se(0). Increasing concentrations of selenite (SeO32-; Se(IV)) and selenate (SeO42-; Se(VI)) generally reduced fungal growth rates, although selenate was more likely to inhibit fungal growth than selenite. To study oxidation, Se(0) was combined with Mn(III/IV) (hydr)oxides (henceforth referred to as Mn oxides), Se-transforming fungi (Alternaria alternata), and oxalic acid to mimic Se biogeochemistry at the plant-soil interface. Increased pH in the presence of fungi (7.2 with fungi, 6.8 without fungi after 24 days) was observed. Additionally, a slight decrease in redox potential was measured for incubations without Mn oxides (236 mV with Mn oxides, 205 mV without Mn oxides after 24 days), indicating that Mn oxides may enhance Se oxidation. Elemental Se oxidation rates to

  4. Constraining the role of iron in environmental nitrogen transformations: Dual stable isotope systematics of abiotic NO2- reduction by Fe(II) and its production of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Carolyn; Grabb, Kalina; Hansel, Colleen M.; Wankel, Scott D.

    2016-08-01

    Despite mounting evidence for biogeochemical interactions between iron and nitrogen, our understanding of their environmental importance remains limited. Here we present an investigation of abiotic nitrite (NO2-) reduction by Fe(II) or 'chemodenitrification', and its relevance to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), specifically focusing on dual (N and O) isotope systematics under a variety of environmental conditions. We observe a range of kinetic isotope effects that are regulated by reaction rates, with faster rates at higher pH (∼8), higher concentrations of Fe(II) and in the presence of mineral surfaces. A clear non-linear relationship between rate constant and kinetic isotope effects of NO2- reduction was evident (with larger isotope effects at slower rates) and is interpreted as reflecting the dynamics of Fe(II)-N reaction intermediates. N and O isotopic composition of product N2O also suggests a complex network of parallel and/or competing pathways. Our findings suggest that NO2- reduction by Fe(II) may represent an important abiotic source of environmental N2O, especially in iron-rich environments experiencing dynamic redox variations. This study provides a multi-compound, multi-isotope framework for evaluating the environmental occurrence of abiotic NO2- reduction and N2O formation, helping future studies constrain the relative roles of abiotic and biological N2O production pathways.

  5. Abiotic transformation of DDT in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Pirnie, Erica F; Talley, Jeffrey W; Hundal, Lakhwinder S

    2006-11-01

    Significant concentrations of chlorinated pesticides such as 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) and its two main transformation products, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDD) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE) are still present in soil and sediment systems more than 30 years after DDT use was banned in the United States. DDT enters waterways via the runoff from industrial point sources, agricultural lands and atmospheric deposition. We evaluated zero-valent iron (Fe(0)), ferrous sulfide (FeS), as well as combining them with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as viable treatment technologies for degrading DDT in an aqueous solution. Treatment of DDT with Fe(0) and FeS resulted in approximately 88% and 56% transformation of DDT within 150h, respectively. DDE production was insignificant in all systems. The DDT removal was slower with FeS than with Fe(0), but the amounts of DDD and DDE produced did not exceed baseline. Treatment with a 1:1 mixture of Fe(0)-FeS removed about 95% of the added mass of DDT within 4days and generated significant amounts of DDD and minor amounts of DDMU. When small amounts of H(2)O(2) were introduced halfway through the Fe(0) and FeS treatment times, the mass of DDT decreased by 87% and 96%, respectively, within 2days. Our results demonstrate that mixtures of Fe(0)-FeS in combination with H(2)O(2) can be used for rapid and efficient removal of DDT from aqueous solutions.

  6. Abiotic nitrogen reduction on the early Earth.

    PubMed

    Brandes, J A; Boctor, N Z; Cody, G D; Cooper, B A; Hazen, R M; Yoder, H S

    1998-09-24

    The production of organic precursors to life depends critically on the form of the reactants. In particular, an environment dominated by N2 is far less efficient in synthesizing nitrogen-bearing organics than a reducing environment rich in ammonia. Relatively reducing lithospheric conditions on the early Earth have been presumed to favour the generation of an ammonia-rich atmosphere, but this hypothesis has not been studied experimentally. Here we demonstrate mineral-catalysed reduction of N2, NO2- and NO3- to ammonia at temperatures between 300 and 800 degrees C and pressures of 0.1-0.4 GPa-conditions typical of crustal and oceanic hydrothermal systems. We also show that only N2 is stable above 800 degrees C, thus precluding significant atmospheric ammonia formation during hot accretion. We conclude that mineral-catalysed N2 reduction might have provided a significant source of ammonia to the Hadean ocean. These results also suggest that, whereas nitrogen in the Earth's early atmosphere was present predominantly as N2, exchange with oceanic, hydrothermally derived ammonia could have provided a significant amount of the atmospheric ammonia necessary to resolve the early-faint-Sun paradox.

  7. Reductive Sequestration Of Pertechnetate (99TcO4–) By Nano Zerovalent Iron (nZVI) Transformed By Abiotic Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Dimin; Anitori, Roberto; Tebo, Bradley M.; Tratnyek, Paul G.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bowden, Mark E.; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.

    2013-04-24

    Under anoxic conditions, soluble 99TcO4– can be reduced to less soluble TcO2•nH2O, but the oxide is highly susceptible to reoxidation. Here we investigate an alternative strategy for remediation of Tc-contaminated groundwater whereby sequestration as Tc sulfide is favored by sulfidic conditions stimulated by nano zero-valent iron (nZVI). nZVI was pre-exposed to increasing concentrations of sulfide in simulated Hanford groundwater for 24 hrs to mimic the stages of aquifer sulfate reduction and onset of biotic sulfidogenesis. Solid-phase characterizations of the sulfidated nZVI confirmed the formation of nanocrystalline FeS phases, but higher S/Fe ratios (>0.112) did not result in the formation of significantly more FeS. The kinetics of Tc sequestration by these materials showed faster Tc removal rates with increasing S/Fe between S/Fe = 0–0.056, but decreasing Tc removal rates with S/Fe > 0.224. The more favorable Tc removal kinetics at low S/Fe could be due to a higher affinity of TcO4– for FeS (over iron oxides), and electron microscopy confirmed that the majority of the Tc was associated with FeS phases. The inhibition of Tc removal at high S/Fe appears to have been caused by excess HS–. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that as S/Fe increased, Tc speciation shifted from TcO2•nH2O to TcS2. The most substantial change of Tc speciation occurred at low S/Fe, coinciding with the rapid increase of Tc removal rate. This agreement further confirms the importance of FeS in Tc sequestration.

  8. Constraining the role of iron in environmental nitrogen transformations. Dual stable isotope systematics of abiotic NO2- reduction by Fe(II) and its production of N2O

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, David; Wankel, Scott David; Buchwald, Carolyn; Hansel, Colleen

    2015-09-16

    Redox reactions involving nitrogen and iron have been shown to have important implications for mobilization of priority contaminants. Thus, an understanding of the linkages between their biogeochemical cycling is critical for predicting subsurface mobilization of radionuclides such as uranium. Despite mounting evidence for biogeochemical interactions between iron and nitrogen, our understanding of their environmental importance remains limited. Here we present an investigation of abiotic nitrite (NO2-) reduction by Fe(II) or ‘chemodenitrification,’ and its relevance to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), specifically focusing on dual (N and O) isotope systematics under a variety of environmentally relevant conditions. We observe a range of kinetic isotope effects that are regulated by reaction rates, with faster rates at higher pH (~8), higher concentrations of Fe(II) and in the presence of mineral surfaces. A clear non-linear relationship between rate constant and kinetic isotope effects of NO2- reduction was evident (with larger isotope effects at slower rates) and is interpreted as reflecting the dynamics of Fe(II)-N reaction intermediates. N and O isotopic composition of product N2O also suggests a complex network of parallel and/or competing pathways. Our findings suggest that NO2- reduction by Fe(II) may represent an important abiotic source of environmental N2O, especially in iron-rich environments experiencing dynamic redox variations. This study provides a multi-compound, multi-isotope framework for evaluating the environmental occurrence of abiotic NO2- reduction and N2O formation, helping future studies constrain the relative roles of abiotic and biological N2O production pathways.

  9. Abiotic Reductive Immobilization of U(VI) by Biogenic Mackinawite

    SciTech Connect

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Newville, Mathew; Lanzirotti, Anthony; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F.

    2013-03-01

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in-situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U6+ reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe1+xS, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U6+ abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U6+ indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of Fe(II) and sulfide bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U6+ reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U6+ reduction.

  10. Abiotic reductive immobilization of U(VI) by biogenic mackinawite.

    PubMed

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas C; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Newville, Matt; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F

    2013-03-05

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U(VI) reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe 1+x S, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U(VI) abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS, and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U(VI) indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of sulfide-bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U(VI) reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U(VI) reduction.

  11. Kinetics of Abiotic Uranium(VI) Reduction by Sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, S.; Davis, J. A.; Hayes, K. F.

    2010-12-01

    Uranium(VI) reduction is an important process affecting the radionuclide’s fate under sulfate reducing conditions. In this work, kinetics of abiotic U(VI) reduction by dissolved sulfide was studied using a batch reactor. The effects of solution pH, dissolved carbonate, Ca(II), U(VI), and S(-II) concentration on the reduction kinetics were tested. The ranges of these experimental variables were designed to cover the variation in groundwater chemistry observed at the Old Rifle uranium mill tailings site (Colorado, USA). Dissolved U concentration was monitored as a function of time using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to measure the rate of U(VI) reduction. Solid phase reduction products were identified using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results showed that changes in the experimental variables significantly affected U(VI) reduction kinetics by dissolved sulfide. U(VI) reduction occurred under circumneutral pH while no reduction was observed under alkaline conditions. The reduction rate was slowed by increased dissolved carbonate concentration. One solid phase reduction product was identified as nanoscale uraninite (UO2+x(s)). Thermodynamic modeling showed that the dissolved U(VI) aqueous species changed as a function of solution conditions correlated with the change in the reduction rate. These results show that U(VI) aqueous speciation is important in determining abiotic U(VI) reduction kinetics by dissolved sulfide. This study also illustrates the potential importance of dissolved sulfide in field-scale modeling of U reactive transport, and is expected to contribute to the understanding of long-term effects of biostimulation on U transport at the Rifle site.

  12. Interaction of abiotic and microbial processes in hexachloroethane reduction in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, A. Lynn; Gschwend, Philip M.

    1994-01-01

    In order to gain insight into mechanisms of hexachloroethane reduction, hexa- and pentachloroethane transformation rates were measured in anaerobic groundwater samples. For samples spiked with pentachloroethane, disappearance of pentachloroethane was accompanied by tetrachloroethylene production. Transformation rates were similar in unpoisoned and in HgCl2-poisoned samples, and rates were within ±20% of predictions based on measured pH and second-order dehydrochlorination rate constants determined in clean laboratory systems, indicating that the fate of pentachloroethane in this system is dominated by abiotic reactions. No hexachloroethane transformation was observed in HgCl2-poisoned samples, whereas in unpoisoned samples, hexachloroethane disappearance was accompanied by production of tetrachloroethylene as well as traces of pentachloroethane. Although only minor amounts of pentachloroethane accumulated, as much as 30% of the hexachloroethane transformation pathway proceeds via a pentachloroethane intermediate. This suggests that the microbial reduction of hexachloroethane proceeds at least in part through a free-radical mechanism. To the extent that hexachloroethane reduction to tetrachloroethylene occurs through a pentachloroethane intermediate, the first step in the sequence, the microbially-mediated step, is the slow step; the subsequent abiotic dehydrohalogenation step occurs much more rapidly.

  13. Interactions between Biological and Abiotic Pathways in the Reduction of Chlorinated Solvents

    EPA Science Inventory

    While biologically mediated reductive dechlorination continues to be a significant focus of chlorinated solvent remediation, there has been an increased interest in abiotic reductive processes for the remediation of chlorinated solvents. In situ chemical reduction (ISCR) uses zer...

  14. Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes by iron-bearing soil minerals. 2. Green rust.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woojin; Batchelor, Bill

    2002-12-15

    Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes by the sulfate form of green rust (GR(SO4)) was examined in batch reactors. Dechlorination kinetics were described by a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The rate constant for reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes at reactive GR(SO4) surfaces was in the range of 0.592 (+/-4.4%) to 1.59 (+/-6.3%) day(-1). The specific reductive capacity of GR(SO4) for target organics was in the range of 9.86 (+/-10.1%) to 18.0 (+/-4.3%) microM/g and sorption coefficient was in the range of 0.53 (+/-2.4%) to 1.22 (+/-4.3%) mM(-1). Surface area-normalized pseudo-first-order initial rate constants for chlorinated ethylenes by GR(SO4) were 3.4 to 8.2 times greater than those by pyrite. Chlorinated ethylenes were mainly transformed to acetylene, and no detectable amounts of chlorinated intermediates were observed. The rate constants for the reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) increased as pH increased (6.8 to 10.1) but were independent of solid concentration and initial TCE concentration. Magnetite and/or maghemite were produced by the oxidation of GR(SO4) by TCE. These findings are relevant to the understanding of the role of abiotic reductive dechlorination during natural attenuation in environments that contain GR(SO4).

  15. The interactive biotic and abiotic processes of DDT transformation under dissimilatory iron-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Wang, Fang; Gu, Chenggang; Yang, Xinglun; Kengara, Fredrick O; Bian, Yongrong; Song, Yang; Jiang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the study was to elucidate the biotic and abiotic processes under dissimilatory iron reducing conditions involved in reductive dechlorination and iron reduction. DDT transformation was investigated in cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 with/without α-FeOOH. A modified first-order kinetics model was developed and described DDT transformation well. Both the α-FeOOH reduction rate and the dechlorination rate of DDT were positively correlated to the biomass. Addition of α-FeOOH enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT by favoring the cell survival and generating Fe(II) which was absorbed on the surface of bacteria and iron oxide. 92% of the absorbed Fe(II) was Na-acetate (1M) extractable. However, α-FeOOH also played a negative role of competing for electrons as reflected by the dechlorination rate of DDT was inhibited when increasing the α-FeOOH from 1 g L(-1) to 5 g L(-1). DDT was measured to be toxic to S. putrefaciens 200. The metabolites DDD, DDE and DDMU were recalcitrant to S. putrefaciens 200. The results suggested that iron oxide was not the key factor to promote the dissipation of DDX (DDT and the metabolites), whereas the one-electron reduction potential (E1) of certain organochlorines is the main factor and that the E1 higher than the threshold of the reductive driving forces of DIRB probably ensures the occur of reductive dechlorination.

  16. Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes by iron-bearing soil minerals. 1. Pyrite and magnetite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woojin; Batchelor, Bill

    2002-12-01

    Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes (tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC)) by pyrite and magnetite was characterized in a batch reactor system. Dechlorination kinetics was adequately described by a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood model that includes the effect of a decreasing reductive capacity of soil mineral. The kinetic rate constant for the reductive dechlorination of target organics at reactive sites of soil minerals was in the range of 0.185 (+/- 0.023) to 1.71 (+/- 0.06) day(-1). The calculated specific reductive capacity of soil minerals for target organics was in the range of 0.33 (+/- 0.02) to 2.26 (+/- 0.06) microM/g and sorption coefficient was in the range of 0.181 (+/- 0.006) to 0.7 (+/- 0.022) mM(-1). Surface area-normalized pseudo-first-order initial rate constants for target organics by pyrite were found to be 23.5 to 40.3 times greater than those by magnetite. Target organics were mainly transformed to acetylene and small amount of chlorinated intermediates, which suggests that beta-elimination was the main dechlorination pathway. The dechlorination of VC followed a hydrogenolysis pathway to produce ethylene and ethane. The addition of Fe(II) increased the dechlorination rate of cis-DCE and VC in magnetite suspension by nearly a factor of 10. The results obtained in this research provide basic knowledge to better predict the fate of chlorinated ethylenes and to understand the potential of abiotic processes in natural attenuation.

  17. Biotic and Abiotic Transformation of a Volatile Organics Plume in a Semi-Arid Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Studer, J.E.; Singletary, M.A.; Miller, D.R.

    1999-04-08

    An evaluation of biotic and abiotic attenuation processes potentially important to chlorinated and non-chlorinated volatile organic compound (VOC) fate and transport in the 148 meter thick vadose zone beneath the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) was conducted. A unique feature of this evaluation is the comparison of two estimates of VOC mass present in the soil gas, pore-water, and solid phases (but not including mass as non-aqueous phase liquid [NAPL]) of the vadose zone in 1993. One estimate, 1,800 kg, was obtained from vadose zone transport modeling that incorporated molecular diffusion and volatilization to the atmosphere, but not biotic or chemical processes. The other estimate, 2,120 kg, was obtained from the sum of VOC mass physically removed during soil vapor extraction and an estimate of VOC mass remaining in the vadose zone in 1998, both adjusted to exclude NAPL mass. This comparison indicates that biogeochemical processes were at best slightly important to historical VOC plume development. Some evidence of aerobic degradation of non-chlorinated VOCs and abiotic transformation of 1,1,1-Trichloroethane was identified. Despite potentially amenable site conditions, no evidence was found of cometabolic and anaerobic transformation pathways. Relying principally on soil-gas analytical results, an upper-bound estimate of 21% mass reduction due to natural biogeochemical processes was developed. Although available information for the CWL indicates that natural attenuation processes other than volatilization to the atmosphere did not effective y enhance groundwater protection, these processes could be important in significantly reducing groundwater contamination and exposure risks at other sites. More laboratory and field research is required to improve our collective ability to characterize and exploit natural VOC attenuation processes, especially with respect to the combination of relatively thick and dry vadose zones and chlorinated VOCs.

  18. Effect of abiotic factors on the mercury reduction process by humic acids in aqueous systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mercury (Hg) in the environment can have serious toxic effects on a variety of living organisms, and is a pollutant of concern worldwide. The reduction of mercury from the toxic Hg2+ form to Hg0 is especially important. One pathway for this reduction to occur is through an abiotic process with humic...

  19. Linear free energy relationships for the biotic and abiotic reduction of nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Luan, Fubo; Gorski, Christopher A; Burgos, William D

    2015-03-17

    Nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants that are susceptible to biological and abiotic reduction. Prior works have found that for the abiotic reduction of NACs, the logarithm of the NACs’ rate constants correlate with one-electron reduction potential values of the NACs (EH,NAC1) according to linear free energy relationships (LFERs). Here, we extend the application of LFERs to the bioreduction of NACs and to the abiotic reduction of NACs by bioreduced (and pasteurized) iron-bearing clay minerals. A linear correlation (R2=0.96) was found between the NACs’ bioreduction rate constants (kobs) and EH,NAC1 values. The LFER slope of log kobs versus EH,NAC1/(2.303RT/F) was close to one (0.97), which implied that the first electron transfer to the NAC was the rate-limiting step of bioreduction. LFERs were also established between NAC abiotic reduction rate constants by bioreduced iron-bearing clay minerals (montmorillonite SWy-2 and nontronite NAu-2). The second-order NAC reduction rate constants (k) by bioreduced SWy-2 and NAu-2 were well correlated to EH,NAC1 (R2=0.97 for both minerals), consistent with bioreduction results. However, the LFER slopes of log k versus EH,NAC1/(2.303RT/F) were significantly less than one (0.48–0.50) for both minerals, indicating that the first electron transfer to the NAC was not the rate-limiting step of abiotic reduction. Finally, we demonstrate that the rate of 4-acetylnitrobenzene reduction by bioreduced SWy-2 and NAu-2 correlated to the reduction potential of the clay (EH,clay, R2=0.95 for both minerals), indicating that the clay reduction potential also influences its reactivity.

  20. Abiotic Transformation Of Estrogens In Synthetic Municipal Wastewater: An Alternative For Treatment?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abiotic transformation of estrogens, including estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), estriol (E3) and ethinylestradiol (EE2), in the presence of model vegetable matter was confirmed in this study. Batch experiments were performed to model the catalytic conversion of E1, E2, E3, and ...

  1. Nature and Reactivity of Sediment-Associated Spiked Fe(II) Toward Abiotic Uranium Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukkadapu, R.; Fox, P. M.; Davis, J.

    2011-12-01

    Uranium (U) is a priority contaminant at U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites. Mobility of U in contaminated aquifers is governed by a complex assortment of site-specific biogeochemical and hydrological properties, sediment Fe-mineralogy, and redox status. There is a particular interest in understanding factors governing U attenuation to Fe-mineralogy under natural conditions. Thus, the goal of this work is to investigate geochemical effects of Fe redox state on U mobility under conditions relevant to the Rifle aquifer, an UMTRA site. Particularly, the focus is to gain insights into the degree and mechanism of Fe(II) uptake by Rifle sediments that exhibit complex Fe-mineralogy composed of various Fe-oxides and Fe-containing clays and on the possibility of abiotic U(VI) reduction by adsorbed Fe(II) and secondary Fe(II) minerals. Earlier field studies where Fe(II)-amended groundwater was injected into the Rifle aquifer indicated: a) Fe(II) uptake by Rifle sediments is extensive and b) abiotic U(VI) reduction by Fe(II) may be important at pH 8.3. Batch reactions between Rifle sediment and 57Fe(II) (57Fe isotope is a Mossbauer sensitive nuclide with a natural abundance of 2%) under conditions relevant to the Rifle aquifer indicated that, depending on the solution conditions: a) a large fraction of the spiked 57Fe(II) (55-100%) is oxidized to 57Fe(III) on sediment surfaces and, at pH 7.2, the degree of oxidation decreased as Fe(II) loading increased; b) the 57Fe(II)-oxidation is coupled to the transformation of an intrinsic ferrihydrite-like mineral to a nanoparticulate, Fe(II)/57Fe(III)-like mineral phase, and c) increasing pH from 7.2 to 8.3 and including carbonate in the medium has little or no effect on percent oxidation or mineral transformation. Preliminary X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy studies suggested that 20-30% of abiotic U(VI) reduction occurred, both at pH 7.2 and 8.3, in the sediments

  2. Abiotic reduction reactions of anthropogenic organic chemicals in anaerobic systems: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macalady, Donald L.; Tratnyek, Paul G.; Grundl, Timothy J.

    1986-02-01

    This review is predicated upon the need for a detailed process-level understanding of factors influencing the reduction of anthropogenic organic chemicals in natural aquatic systems. In particular, abiotic reductions of anthropogenic organic chemicals are reviewed. The most important reductive reaction is alkyl dehalogenation (replacement of chloride with hydrogen) which occurs in organisms, sediments, sewage sludge, and reduced iron porphyrin model systems. An abiotic mechanism involving a free radical intermediate has been proposed. The abstraction of vicinal dihalides (also termed dehalogenation) is another reduction that may have an abiotic component in natural systems. Reductive dehalogenation of aryl halides has recently been reported and further study of this reaction is needed. Several other degradation reactions of organohalides that occur in anaerobic environments are mentioned, the most important of which is dehydrohalogenation. The reduction of nitro groups to amines has also been thoroughly studied. The reactions can occur abiotically, and are affected by the redox conditions of the experimental system. However, a relationship between nitro-reduction rate and measured redox potential has not been clearly established. Reductive dealkylation of the N- and O-heteroatom of hydrocarbon pollutants has been observed but not investigated in detail. Azo compounds can be reduced to their hydrazo derivatives and a thorough study of this reaction indicates that it can be caused by extracellular electron transfer agents. Quinone-hydroquinone couples are important reactive groups in humic materials and similar structures in resazurin and indigo carmine make them useful as models for environmental redox conditions. The interconversion of sulfones, sulfoxides, and sulfides is a redox process and is implicated in the degradation of several pesticides though the reactions need more study. Two reductive heterocyclic cleavage reactions are also mentioned. Finally, several

  3. Abiotic transformation of carbon tetrachloride at mineral surfaces. Final report, September 1990-September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kriegman-King, M.; Reinhard, M.

    1994-02-01

    The report addresses the ability of natural mineral surfaces to abiotically transform halogenated organic compounds in subsurface environments. The research focuses on carbon tetrachloride (CC14) as the halogenated organic and biotite, vermiculite, and pyrite as the mineral surfaces. The CCl4 transformation rates and products were quantified under different environmental conditions. The disappearance of CCl4 was significantly faster in the presence of mineral surfaces than in homogeneous solution. In systems containing the sheet silicates and HS-, the rate of reaction was dependent on the temperature, hydrogen sulfide ion concentration, surface concentration, and Fe(II) content in the minerals.

  4. CHARACTERIZING THE ABIOTIC REDUCTANTS FOR NITROAROMATIC COMPOUNDS AS A FUNCTION OF REDOX ZONATION IN ANOXIC SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reductive transformation is the dominant reaction pathway for the degradation of nitroaromatic compounds in anaerobic environments (Larson and Weber, 1994). Proposed reductants cover a spectrum ranging from reduced rninerals and organic matter to microbial enzyme systems. Transfo...

  5. Iron-mediated microbial oxidation and abiotic reduction of organic contaminants under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Nicole B; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Straub, Kristina L; Fontana, Daniela; Schwarzenbach, René P

    2007-11-15

    In anoxic environments, the oxidation of organic compounds, such as BTEX fuel components, by dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction can generate reactive mineral-bound Fe(II) species, which in turn are able to reduce other classes of organic and inorganic groundwater contaminants. In this study, we designed and evaluated an anaerobic batch reactor that mimicks iron-reducing conditions to investigate the factors that favor the coupling of microbial toluene oxidation and abiotic reduction of nitroaromatic contaminants. We investigated the influence of different Fe(III)-bearing minerals and combinations thereof on the coupling of these two processes. Results from laboratory model systems show that complete oxidation of toluene to CO2 by Geobacter metallireducens in the presence of Fe(III)-bearing minerals leads to the formation of mineral-bound Fe(II) species capable of the reduction of 4-nitroacetophenone. Whereas significant microbial toluene oxidation was only observed in the presence of amorphous Fe(III) phases, reduction of nitroaromatic compounds only proceeded with Fe(II) species bound to crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Our results suggest that in anoxic soils and sediments containing amorphous and crystalline iron phases simultaneously, coupling of microbial oxidation and abiotic reduction of organic compounds may allow for concurrent natural attenuation of different contaminant classes.

  6. Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Singer, David M.; Bargar, John R.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2013-09-15

    Laboratory experiments were performed as a function of aqueous Fe(II) concentration to determine the uptake and oxidation of Fe(II), and Fe(II)-mediated abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aquifer sediments from the Rifle IFRC field site in Colorado, USA. Mössbauer analysis of the sediments spiked with aqueous 57Fe(II) showed that 57Fe(II) was oxidized on the mineral surfaces to 57Fe(III) and most likely formed a nano-particulate Fe(III)-oxide or ferrihydrite-like phase. The extent of 57Fe oxidation decreased with increasing 57Fe(II) uptake, such that 100 % was oxidized at 7.3 μmol/g Fe and 52 % at 39.6 μmol/g Fe, indicating that the sediments had a finite capacity for oxidation of Fe(II). Abiotic U(VI) reduction was observed by XANES spectroscopy only when the Fe(II) uptake was greater than approximately 20 μmol/g and surface-bound Fe(II) was present. The level of U(VI) reduction increased with increasing Fe(II)- loading above this level to a maximum of 18 and 36 % U(IV) at pH 7.2 (40.7 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (56.1 μmol/g Fe), respectively in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. Greater U(VI) reduction was observed in CO2 free systems [up to 44 and 54 % at pH 7.2 (17.3 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (54.8 μmol/g Fe), respectively] compared to 400 ppm CO2 systems, presumably due to differences in aqueous U(VI) speciation. While pH affects the amount of Fe(II) uptake onto the solid phase, with greater Fe(II) uptake at higher pH, similar amounts of U(VI) reduction were observed at pH 7.2 and 8.3 for a similar Fe(II) uptake. Thus, it appears that abiotic U(VI) reduction is controlled primarily by Fe(II) concentration and aqueous U(VI) speciation. The range of Fe(II) loadings tested in this study are within the range observed in bioreduced sediments, suggesting that Fe(II)-mediated abiotic U(VI) reduction may indeed play a role in field settings.

  7. Abiotic transformation of toxaphene by superreduced vitamin B12 and dicyanocobinamide.

    PubMed

    Ruppe, Steffen; Neumann, Anke; Diekert, Gabriele; Vetter, Walter

    2004-06-01

    Toxaphene is a complex organochlorine pesticide mixture, residues of which are widespread in the environment. Previous studies with the isolated bacterium Sulfurospirillum (formerly Dehalospirillum) multivorans resulted in an effective anaerobic biotransformation of toxaphene. Since the bacterium contains a corrinoid derivative in the active center of the tetrachloroethene dehalogenase, we attempted to use superreduced corrinoids for abiotic transformation of toxaphene. The two corrinoids studied were dicyanocobinamide and cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12). Superreduced dicyanocobinamide mediated a rapid transformation of toxaphene. More than 90% of the initial pool was transformed within 6 h. The transformation was nonselective, and even the most persistent metabolite in environmental samples, the so-called dead-end metabolite 2-exo,3-endo,6-exo,8,9,10-hexachlorobornane (B6-923 or Hx-Sed) was transformed within hours. Superreduced cyanocobalamin was also able to transform toxaphene albeit at significantly lower velocity. The lack of transformation products detectable in gas chromatograms of hexanes-extracted fractions of the assays suggests rapid, sequential dehalogenation and/or destruction of the C10-hydrocarbon backbone of the compounds of technical toxaphene.

  8. Archaeal (Per)Chlorate Reduction at High Temperature: An Interplay of Biotic and Abiotic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebensteiner, Martin G.; Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Schaap, Peter J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Lomans, Bart P.

    2013-04-01

    Perchlorate and chlorate anions [(per)chlorate] exist in the environment from natural and anthropogenic sources, where they can serve as electron acceptors for bacteria. We performed growth experiments combined with genomic and proteomic analyses of the hyperthermophile Archaeoglobus fulgidus that show (per)chlorate reduction also extends into the archaeal domain of life. The (per)chlorate reduction pathway in A. fulgidus relies on molybdo-enzymes that have similarity with bacterial enzymes; however, chlorite is not enzymatically split into chloride and oxygen. Evidence suggests that it is eliminated by an interplay of abiotic and biotic redox reactions involving sulfur compounds. Biological (per)chlorate reduction by ancient archaea at high temperature may have prevented accumulation of perchlorate in early terrestrial environments and consequently given rise to oxidizing conditions on Earth before the rise of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  9. Effect of H2 and redox condition on biotic and abiotic MTBE transformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory studies conducted with surface water sediment from a methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-contaminated site in South Carolina demonstrated that, under methanogenic conditions, [U-14C] MTBE was transformed to 14C tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) with no measurable production of 14CO2. Production of TBA was not attributed to the activity of methanogenic microorganisms, however, because comparable transformation of [U-14C] MTBE to 14C-TBA also was observed in heat-sterilized controls with dissolved H2 concentrations > 5 nM. The results suggest that the transformation of MTBE to TBA may be an abiotic process that is driven by biologically produced H2 under in situ conditions. In contrast, mineralization of [U-14C] MTBE to 14CO2 was completely inhibited by heat sterilization and only observed in treatments characterized by dissolved H2 concentrations < 2 nM. These results suggest that the pathway of MTBE transformation is influenced by in situ H2 concentrations and that in situ H2 concentrations may be an useful indicator of MTBE transformation pathways in ground water systems.

  10. Abiotic nitrogen fixation on terrestrial planets: reduction of NO to ammonia by FeS.

    PubMed

    Summers, David P; Basa, Ranor C B; Khare, Bishun; Rodoni, David

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the abiotic fixation of nitrogen and how such fixation can be a supply of prebiotic nitrogen is critical for understanding both the planetary evolution of, and the potential origin of life on, terrestrial planets. As nitrogen is a biochemically essential element, sources of biochemically accessible nitrogen, especially reduced nitrogen, are critical to prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life. Loss of atmospheric nitrogen can result in loss of the ability to sustain liquid water on a planetary surface, which would impact planetary habitability and hydrological processes that shape the surface. It is known that NO can be photochemically converted through a chain of reactions to form nitrate and nitrite, which can be subsequently reduced to ammonia. Here, we show that NO can also be directly reduced, by FeS, to ammonia. In addition to removing nitrogen from the atmosphere, this reaction is particularly important as a source of reduced nitrogen on an early terrestrial planet. By converting NO directly to ammonia in a single step, ammonia is formed with a higher product yield (~50%) than would be possible through the formation of nitrate/nitrite and subsequent conversion to ammonia. In conjunction with the reduction of NO, there is also a catalytic disproportionation at the mineral surface that converts NO to NO₂ and N₂O. The NO₂ is then converted to ammonia, while the N₂O is released back in the gas phase, which provides an abiotic source of nitrous oxide.

  11. Real-Time Manganese Phase Dynamics during Biological and Abiotic Manganese Oxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jena E; Savalia, Pratixa; Davis, Ryan; Kocar, Benjamin D; Webb, Samuel M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fischer, Woodward W

    2016-04-19

    Manganese oxides are often highly reactive and easily reduced, both abiotically, by a variety of inorganic chemical species, and biologically during anaerobic respiration by microbes. To evaluate the reaction mechanisms of these different reduction routes and their potential lasting products, we measured the sequence progression of microbial manganese(IV) oxide reduction mediated by chemical species (sulfide and ferrous iron) and the common metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under several endmember conditions, using synchrotron X-ray spectroscopic measurements complemented by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy on precipitates collected throughout the reaction. Crystalline or potentially long-lived phases produced in these experiments included manganese(II)-phosphate, manganese(II)-carbonate, and manganese(III)-oxyhydroxides. Major controls on the formation of these discrete phases were alkalinity production and solution conditions such as inorganic carbon and phosphate availability. The formation of a long-lived Mn(III) oxide appears to depend on aqueous Mn(2+) production and the relative proportion of electron donors and electron acceptors in the system. These real-time measurements identify mineralogical products during Mn(IV) oxide reduction, contribute to understanding the mechanism of various Mn(IV) oxide reduction pathways, and assist in interpreting the processes occurring actively in manganese-rich environments and recorded in the geologic record of manganese-rich strata.

  12. Reduction of ferrihydrite with adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter: microbial reduction by Geobacter bremensis vs. abiotic reduction by Na-dithionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Hädrich, A.; Neidhardt, J.; Küsel, K.; Keller, T. F.; Jandt, K. D.; Totsche, K. U.

    2014-09-01

    Ferrihydrite is a widespread poorly crystalline Fe oxide which becomes easily coated by natural organic matter in the environment. This mineral-bound organic matter entirely changes the mineral surface properties and therefore the reactivity of the original mineral. Here, we investigated 2-line ferrihydrite, ferrihydrite with adsorbed organic matter, and ferrihydrite coprecipitated with organic matter for microbial and abiotic reduction of Fe(III). Ferrihydrite-organic matter associations with different organic matter loadings were reduced either by Geobacter bremensis or abiotically by Na-dithionite. Both types of experiments showed decreasing initial Fe-reduction rates and decreasing degrees of reduction with increasing amounts of mineral-bound organic matter. At similar organic matter loadings, coprecipitated ferrihydrites were more reactive than ferrihydrites with adsorbed organic matter. The difference can be explained by the smaller crystal size and poor crystallinity of such coprecipitates. At small organic matter loadings the poor crystallinity of coprecipitates led to even faster Fe-reduction rates than found for pure ferrihydrite. The amount of mineral-bound organic matter also affected the formation of secondary minerals: goethite was only found after reduction of organic matter-free ferrihydrite and siderite was only detected when ferrihydrites with relatively low amounts of mineral-bound organic matter were reduced. We conclude that direct contact of G. bremensis to the Fe oxide mineral surface was inhibited by attached organic matter. Consequently, mineral-bound organic matter shall be taken into account as a factor in slowing down reductive dissolution.

  13. Model-based Analysis of Mixed Uranium(VI) Reduction by Biotic and Abiotic Pathways During in Situ Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jiao; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2013-10-24

    Uranium bioremediation has emerged as a potential strategy of cleanup of radionuclear contamination worldwide. An integrated geochemical & microbial community model is a promising approach to predict and provide insights into the bioremediation of a complicated natural subsurface. In this study, an integrated column-scale model of uranium bioremediation was developed, taking into account long-term interactions between biotic and abiotic processes. It is also combined with a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis to track the fate and cycling of biogenic species. As compared with other bioremediation models, the model increases the resolution of the connection of microbial community to geochemistry and establishes direct quantitative correlation between overall community evolution and geochemical variation, thereby accurately predicting the community dynamics under different sedimentary conditions. The thermodynamic analysis examined a recently identified homogeneous reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) under dynamic sedimentary conditions across time and space. It shows that the biogenic Fe(II) from Geobacter metabolism can be removed rapidly by the biogenic sulphide from sulfate reducer metabolism, hence constituting one of the reasons that make the abiotic U(VI) reduction thermodynamically infeasible in the subsurface. Further analysis indicates that much higher influent concentrations of both Fe(II) and U(VI) than normal are required to for abiotic U(VI) reduction to be thermodynamically feasible, suggesting that the abiotic reduction cannot be an alternative to the biotic reduction in the remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater.

  14. Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes by iron-bearing phyllosilicates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woojin; Batchelor, Bill

    2004-09-01

    Abiotic reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes (tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethylene (c-DCE), and vinylchloride (VC)) by iron-bearing phyllosilicates (biotite, vermiculite, and montmorillonite) was characterized to obtain better understanding of the behavior of these contaminants in systems undergoing remediation by natural attenuation and redox manipulation. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate dechlorination kinetics and some experiments were conducted with addition of Fe(II) to simulate impact of microbial iron reduction. A modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model adequately described reductive dechlorination kinetics of target organics by the iron-bearing phyllosilicates. The rate constants stayed between 0.08 (+/-10.4%) and 0.401 (+/-8.1%) day(-1) and the specific initial reductive capacity of iron-bearing phyllosilicates for chlorinated ethylenes stayed between 0.177 (+/-6.1%) and 1.06 (+/-7.1%) microM g(-1). The rate constants for the reductive dechlorination of TCE at reactive biotite surface increased as pH (5.5-8.5) and concentration of sorbed Fe(II) (0-0.15 mM g(-1)) increased. The appropriateness of the model is supported by the fact that the rate constants were independent of solid concentration (0.0085-0.17 g g(-1)) and initial TCE concentration (0.15-0.60 mM). Biotite had the greatest rate constant among the phyllosilicates both with and without Fe(II) addition. The rate constants were increased by a factor of 1.4-2.5 by Fe(II) addition. Between 1.8% and 36% of chlorinated ethylenes removed were partitioned to the phyllosilicates. Chloride was produced as a product of degradation and no chlorinated intermediates were observed throughout the experiment.

  15. Technetium Reduction and Permanent Sequestration by Abiotic and Biotic Formation of Low-Solubility Sulfide Mineral Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Tratnyek, Paul G.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Fan, Dimin; Anitori, Roberto; Szecsody, Jim; Jansik, Danielle

    2015-11-14

    rapid in the presence of sulfide and nZVI, although the rate was suppressed at the higher S/Fe ratios tested. This suppression appeared to be due to the formation of Tc-containing colloids. As with the biotic experiments, pertechnetate reduced under sulfidic conditions was highly resistant to reoxidation. The microscopic morphology of abiotically-transformed nZVI particles varied significantly with those in the biotic experiment, although mackinawite was formed in both systems (as indicated by μXRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy). Preliminary XAS analysis pointed to a mixture of Tc-O and Tc-S binding in the abiotic sulfide/nZVI system, while the major reduced solids under non-sulfidic conditions were TcO2•nH2O. The presence of sediment and advective flow to the TcO4-/nZVI/sulfide system results in additional processes occurring. Although the natural Hanford sediment used has sufficient available ferrous iron to slowly reduce TcO4-, under anaerobic conditions, that rate is orders of magnitude slower than reduction by nZVI/sulfide. Batch and 1-D column experiments showed that the TcO4- reduction rate increased with the sediment surface area (with the same nZVI mass). As in batch systems, column studies showed that the presence of sulfide with TcO4- at low (2-5 mM) concentrations increased the TcO4- reduction rate and high (10-30 mM) sulfide decreased the rate. This change is attributed to the formation of sulfide precipitates on the nZVI and sediment surfaces. Injection of low and high sulfide (i.e. pretreatment) prior to TcO4-/sulfide injection also greatly decreased the TcO4- reduction rate, likely decreasing the generation of ferrous iron from the nZVI. Although the high sulfide systems have slower Tc reduction rates, 190 times more Tc mass precipitated than in the low sulfide systems and the

  16. Multiple sulfur isotopes fractionations associated with abiotic sulfur transformations in Yellowstone National Park geothermal springs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The paper presents a quantification of main (hydrogen sulfide and sulfate), as well as of intermediate sulfur species (zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), thiosulfate, sulfite, thiocyanate) in the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) hydrothermal springs and pools. We combined these measurements with the measurements of quadruple sulfur isotope composition of sulfate, hydrogen sulfide and zero-valent sulfur. The main goal of this research is to understand multiple sulfur isotope fractionation in the system, which is dominated by complex, mostly abiotic, sulfur cycling. Results Water samples from six springs and pools in the Yellowstone National Park were characterized by pH, chloride to sulfate ratios, sulfide and intermediate sulfur species concentrations. Concentrations of sulfate in pools indicate either oxidation of sulfide by mixing of deep parent water with shallow oxic water, or surface oxidation of sulfide with atmospheric oxygen. Thiosulfate concentrations are low (<6 μmol L-1) in the pools with low pH due to fast disproportionation of thiosulfate. In the pools with higher pH, the concentration of thiosulfate varies, depending on different geochemical pathways of thiosulfate formation. The δ34S values of sulfate in four systems were close to those calculated using a mixing line of the model based on dilution and boiling of a deep hot parent water body. In two pools δ34S values of sulfate varied significantly from the values calculated from this model. Sulfur isotope fractionation between ZVS and hydrogen sulfide was close to zero at pH < 4. At higher pH zero-valent sulfur is slightly heavier than hydrogen sulfide due to equilibration in the rhombic sulfur–polysulfide – hydrogen sulfide system. Triple sulfur isotope (32S, 33S, 34S) fractionation patterns in waters of hydrothermal pools are more consistent with redox processes involving intermediate sulfur species than with bacterial sulfate reduction. Small but resolved differences in ∆33S among

  17. Reduction of ferrihydrite with adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter: microbial reduction by Geobacter bremensis vs. abiotic reduction by Na-dithionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Hädrich, A.; Neidhardt, J.; Küsel, K.; Keller, T. F.; Jandt, K. D.; Totsche, K. U.

    2014-04-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is a widespread poorly crystalline Fe oxide which becomes easily coated by natural organic matter (OM) in the environment. This mineral-bound OM entirely changes the mineral surface properties and therefore the reactivity of the original mineral. Here, we investigated the reactivity of 2-line Fh, Fh with adsorbed OM and Fh coprecipitated with OM towards microbial and abiotic reduction of Fe(III). As a surrogate for dissolved soil OM we used a water extract of a Podzol forest floor. Fh-OM associations with different OM-loadings were reduced either by Geobacter bremensis or abiotically by Na-dithionite. Both types of experiments showed decreasing initial Fe reduction rates and decreasing degrees of reduction with increasing amounts of mineral-bound OM. At similar OM-loadings, coprecipitated Fhs were more reactive than Fhs with adsorbed OM. The difference can be explained by the smaller crystal size and poor crystallinity of such coprecipitates. At small OM loadings this led to even faster Fe reduction rates than found for pure Fh. The amount of mineral-bound OM also affected the formation of secondary minerals: goethite was only found after reduction of OM-free Fh and siderite was only detected when Fhs with relatively low amounts of mineral-bound OM were reduced. We conclude that direct contact of G. bremensis to the Fe oxide mineral surface was inhibited when blocked by OM. Consequently, mineral-bound OM shall be taken into account besides Fe(II) accumulation as a further widespread mechanism to slow down reductive dissolution.

  18. Electrical Signatures Associated with Abiotic and In Vitro Dissimilatory Iron Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regberg, A. B.; Brantley, S. L.; Singha, K.; Tien, M.

    2007-05-01

    Several researchers have described anomalous electrical signatures associated with bacterial activity in anoxic zones in aquifers containing organic contaminants. It is thought that these signals can be attributed to (bio)geochemical changes caused by the oxidation of organic contaminants and the reduction of associated species like iron oxides. We report laboratory observations of changes in electrical conductivity (EC) that can be attributed to specific (bio)geochemical reactions involving reductive dissolution of iron oxides enzymatically and nonenzymatically. Abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite by ascorbic acid in batch experiments causes a cumulative 20- 40% increase in measured conductivity, (EC increases by ~300 μ S/cm). This change can be attributed to a decrease in conductivity (Δ EC) from increasing proton activity (Δ pH = 3.25 --> 5.07, Δ EC = -200 μ S/cm) and an increase in dissolved Fe(II) (Δ [Fe] = 2.2 - 3.3 mM, Δ EC = 400 -700 μ S/cm). Conductivity is presumably unaffected by Fe(II) sorbed to the ferrihydrite. Rates calculated from this method are comparable to literature rates for similar experiments. In a similar in vitro system, total membrane fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were used to reduce ferrihydrite in the presence of formate and HEPES buffer. A 10 - 15% increase in conductivity was observed in the batch experiment (Δ EC = ~280 μ S/cm). This Δ EC is attributed to an increase in the concentration of de-protonated HEPES as well as carbonate ion as formate is oxidized. Fe(II) released in this system is quickly sorbed onto the ferrihydrite surface and is not thought to change conductivity. Despite the sorption of iron in these in vitro experiments, conductivity changes measurably and documents the rate of the reaction. Accessory changes like buffer de- protonation play an important role in interpreting the electrical signals caused by dissimilatory iron reduction. In order to accurately interpret field data it is necessary

  19. Multiple abiotic stress tolerance of the transformants yeast cells and the transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a novel durum wheat catalase.

    PubMed

    Feki, Kaouthar; Kamoun, Yosra; Ben Mahmoud, Rihem; Farhat-Khemakhem, Ameny; Gargouri, Ali; Brini, Faiçal

    2015-12-01

    Catalases are reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes involved in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. In this study, we described the isolation and functional characterization of a novel catalase from durum wheat, designed TdCAT1. Molecular Phylogeny analyses showed that wheat TdCAT1 exhibited high amino acids sequence identity to other plant catalases. Sequence homology analysis showed that TdCAT1 protein contained the putative calmodulin binding domain and a putative conserved internal peroxisomal targeting signal PTS1 motif around its C-terminus. Predicted three-dimensional structural model revealed the presence of four putative distinct structural regions which are the N-terminal arm, the β-barrel, the wrapping and the α-helical domains. TdCAT1 protein had the heme pocket that was composed by five essential residues. TdCAT1 gene expression analysis showed that this gene was induced by various abiotic stresses in durum wheat. The expression of TdCAT1 in yeast cells and Arabidopsis plants conferred tolerance to several abiotic stresses. Compared with the non-transformed plants, the transgenic lines maintained their growth and accumulated more proline under stress treatments. Furthermore, the amount of H2O2 was lower in transgenic lines, which was due to the high CAT and POD activities. Taken together, these data provide the evidence for the involvement of durum wheat catalase TdCAT1 in tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in crop plants.

  20. TROPEC: Transformative Reductions in Operational Energy Consumption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    1 May 2012 1 TROPEC Transformative Reductions in Operational Energy Consumption Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188...Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions...Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports , 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents

  1. Application of dual carbon-bromine isotope analysis for investigating abiotic transformations of tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA).

    PubMed

    Kozell, Anna; Yecheskel, Yinon; Balaban, Noa; Dror, Ishai; Halicz, Ludwik; Ronen, Zeev; Gelman, Faina

    2015-04-07

    Many of polybrominated organic compounds, used as flame retardant additives, belong to the group of persistent organic pollutants. Compound-specific isotope analysis is one of the potential analytical tools for investigating their fate in the environment. However, the isotope effects associated with transformations of brominated organic compounds are still poorly explored. In the present study, we investigated carbon and bromine isotope fractionation during degradation of tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA), one of the widely used flame retardant additives, in three different chemical processes: transformation in aqueous alkaline solution (pH 8); reductive dehalogenation by zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) in anoxic conditions; oxidative degradation by H2O2 in the presence of CuO nanoparticles (nCuO). Two-dimensional carbon-bromine isotope plots (δ(13)C/Δ(81)Br) for each reaction gave different process-dependent isotope slopes (Λ(C/Br)): 25.2 ± 2.5 for alkaline hydrolysis (pH 8); 3.8 ± 0.5 for debromination in the presence of nZVI in anoxic conditions; ∞ in the case of catalytic oxidation by H2O2 with nCuO. The obtained isotope effects for both elements were generally in agreement with the values expected for the suggested reaction mechanisms. The results of the present study support further applications of dual carbon-bromine isotope analysis as a tool for identification of reaction pathway during transformations of brominated organic compounds in the environment.

  2. Abiotic selenium redox transformations in the presence of Fe(II,III) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, S.C.B.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Brown, G.E. Jr.

    1997-11-07

    Many suboxic sediments and soils contain an Fe(II,III) oxide called green rust. Spectroscopic evidence showed that selenium reduces from an oxidation state of +VI to 0 in the presence of green rust at rates comparable with those found in sediments. Selenium speciation was different in solid and aqueous phases. These redox reactions represent an abiotic pathway for selenium cycling in natural environments, which has previously been considered to be mediated principally by microorganisms. Similar green rust-mediated abiotic redox reactions are likely to be involved in the mobility of several other trace elements and contaminants in the environment. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Biotic and a-biotic Mn and Fe cycling in deep sediments across a gradient of sulfate reduction rates along the California margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider-Mor, A.; Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

    2011-12-01

    The coupling between the biological and a-biotic processes controlling trace metals in deep marine sediments are not well understood, although the fluxes of elements and trace metals across the sediment-water interface can be a major contribution to ocean water. Four marine sediment profiles (ODP leg 167 sites 1011, 1017, 1018 and 1020)were examined to evaluate and quantify the biotic and abiotic reaction networks and fluxes that occur in deep marine sediments. We compared biogeochemical processes across a gradient of sulfate reduction (SR) rates with the objective of studying the processes that control these rates and how they affect major elements as well as trace metal redistribution. The rates of sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) were constrained using a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow). Constraints for the model include: sediment and pore water concentrations, as well as %CaCO3, %biogenic silica, wt% carbon and δ13C of total organic carbon (TOC), particulate organic matter (POC) and mineral associated carbon (MAC). The sites are distinguished by the depth of AMO: a shallow zone is observed at sites 1018 (9 to 19 meters composite depth (mcd)) and 1017 (19 to 30 mcd), while deeper zones occur at sites 1011 (56 to 76 mcd) and 1020 (101 to 116 mcd). Sulfate reduction rates at the shallow AMO sites are on the order 1x10-16 mol/L/yr, much faster than rates in the deeper zone sulfate reduction (1-3x10-17 mol/L/yr), as expected. The dissolved metal ion concentrations varied between the sites, with Fe (0.01-7 μM) and Mn (0.01-57 μM) concentrations highest at Site 1020 and lowest at site 1017. The highest Fe and Mn concentrations occurred at various depths, and were not directly correlated with the rates of sulfate reduction and the maximum alkalinity values. The main processes that control cycling of Fe are the production of sulfide from sulfate reduction and the distribution of Fe-oxides. The Mn distribution

  4. Abiotic degradation of methyl parathion by manganese dioxide: Kinetics and transformation pathway.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Caixiang; Liu, Yuan; Luo, Yinwen; Wu, Sisi; Yuan, Songhu; Zhu, Zhenli

    2016-05-01

    Methyl parathion, a widely used insecticide around the world, has aroused gradually extensive concern of researchers due to its degradation product such as methyl paraoxon, with higher toxicity for mammals and more recalcitrant. Given the ubiquity of manganese dioxide (MnO2) in soils and aquatic sediments, the abiotic degradation of methyl parathion by α-MnO2 was investigated in batch experiments. It was found that methyl parathion was decomposed up to 90% by α-MnO2 in 30 h and the removal efficiency of methyl parathion depended strongly on the loading of α-MnO2 and pH value in the solution where the reactions followed pseudo-first-order model well. The coexisting metal ions (such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Mn(2+)) weakened markedly the degradation of methyl parathion by α-MnO2. However, the effect of dissolved organic matter (HA-Na) on reaction rates presented two sides: to improve hydrolysis rate but deteriorate oxidation rate of methyl parathion. Based on the degradation products identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometer (LC/HRMS), both hydrolysis and oxidation processes were proposed to be two predominant reaction mechanisms contributing to methyl parathion degradation by α-MnO2. This study provided meaningful information to elucidate the abiotic dissipation of methyl parathion by manganese oxide minerals in the environment.

  5. Enhanced secondary metabolite biosynthesis by elicitation in transformed plant root system: effect of abiotic elicitors.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Park, Don-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Plants generally produce secondary metabolites in nature as a defense mechanism against pathogenic and insect attack. In this study, we applied several abiotic elicitors in order to enhance growth and ginseng saponin biosynthesis in the hairy roots of Panax ginseng. Generally, elicitor treatments were found to inhibit the growth of the hairy roots, although simultaneously enhancing ginseng saponin biosynthesis. Tannic acid profoundly inhibited the hairy root growth during growth period. Also, ginseng saponin content was not significantly different from that of the control. The addition of selenium at inoculum time did not significantly affect ginseng saponin biosynthesis. However, when 0.5 mM selenium was added as an elicitor after 21 d of culture, ginseng saponin content and productivity increased to about 1.31 and 1.33 times control levels, respectively. Also, the addition of 20 microM NiSO4 resulted in an increase in ginseng saponin content and productivity, to about 1.20 and 1.23 times control levels, respectively, and also did not inhibit the growth of the roots. Sodium chloride treatment inhibited hairy root growth, except at a concentration of 0.3% (w/v). Increases in the amounts of synthesized ginseng saponin were observed at all concentrations of added sodium chloride. At 0.1% (w/v) sodium chloride, ginseng saponin content and productivity were increased to approx 1.15 and 1.13 times control values, respectively. These results suggest that processing time for the generation of ginseng saponin in a hairy root culture can be reduced via the application of an elicitor.

  6. Distribution transformer BIL reduction feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Baranowski, J.F.; Goedde, G.L. . Thomas A. Edison Technical Center)

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes an investigation into the feasibility of reducing basic insulation levels (BIL) for oil-immersed distribution transformers. A projected market makeup of popular kVA and system voltages was determined for the 5 kV to 35 kV insulation classes of pole-type and pad-mount distribution transformers. Reduced BIL design cases were used to determine the impact on the transformer's design and performance. The final results provide both industry cost and total owning cost savings.

  7. Influence of Dissolved Organic Matter and Fe (II) on the Abiotic Reduction of Pentachloronitrobenzene

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitroaromatic pesticides (NAPs) are hydrophobic contaminants that can accumulate in sediments by the deposition of suspended solids from surface waters. Fe(II) and dissolved organic matter (DOM), present in suboxic and anoxic zones of freshwater sediments, can transform NAPs in n...

  8. Nitrogen Assimilation, Abiotic Stress and Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: The Full Circle of Reductants.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Sergio

    2016-05-11

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) is well-known as the main regulatory enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in living organisms. Namely, in Planta, different G6PDH isoforms may occur, generally localized in cytosol and plastids/chloroplasts. These enzymes are differently regulated by distinct mechanisms, still far from being defined in detail. In the last decades, a pivotal function for plant G6PDHs during the assimilation of nitrogen, providing reductants for enzymes involved in nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation, has been described. More recently, several studies have suggested a main role of G6PDH to counteract different stress conditions, among these salinity and drought, with the involvement of an ABA depending signal. In the last few years, this recognized vision has been greatly widened, due to studies clearly showing the non-conventional subcellular localization of the different G6PDHs, and the peculiar regulation of the different isoforms. The whole body of these considerations suggests a central question: how do the plant cells distribute the reductants coming from G6PDH and balance their equilibrium? This review explores the present knowledge about these mechanisms, in order to propose a scheme of distribution of reductants produced by G6PDH during nitrogen assimilation and stress.

  9. Nitrogen Assimilation, Abiotic Stress and Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: The Full Circle of Reductants

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) is well-known as the main regulatory enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in living organisms. Namely, in Planta, different G6PDH isoforms may occur, generally localized in cytosol and plastids/chloroplasts. These enzymes are differently regulated by distinct mechanisms, still far from being defined in detail. In the last decades, a pivotal function for plant G6PDHs during the assimilation of nitrogen, providing reductants for enzymes involved in nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation, has been described. More recently, several studies have suggested a main role of G6PDH to counteract different stress conditions, among these salinity and drought, with the involvement of an ABA depending signal. In the last few years, this recognized vision has been greatly widened, due to studies clearly showing the non-conventional subcellular localization of the different G6PDHs, and the peculiar regulation of the different isoforms. The whole body of these considerations suggests a central question: how do the plant cells distribute the reductants coming from G6PDH and balance their equilibrium? This review explores the present knowledge about these mechanisms, in order to propose a scheme of distribution of reductants produced by G6PDH during nitrogen assimilation and stress. PMID:27187489

  10. RDX Transformation In Biotic and Abiotic Systems Under Poised Redox Potentials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-30

    System 11  Used 2 mM Iron (II) solutions in Tris Buffer with a Tiron ligand at pH 7.5-8 ► Ferrous Sulfate – Fe(II) ►Ferric Sulfate – Fe(III) Iron...processes of nitrate, iron, and sulfate - reducing bacteria create conditions conducive not only to direct enzymatic RDX transformations, but also to...G20 – sulfate reducer Nutrient broth:  Electron acceptor: Fe3+, NO3-, or SO43- at 10 mM  RDX at 1 or 4 ppm (5 and 20 µM)  Buffered to maintain pH 7

  11. Abiotic reduction of nitroaromatic contaminants by iron(II) complexes with organothiol ligands.

    PubMed

    Naka, Daisuke; Kim, Dongwook; Carbonaro, Richard F; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2008-06-01

    Complexation of Fe(II) by dissolved and surface-bound ligands can significantly modify the metal's redox reactivity, and recent work reveals that Fe(II) complexes with selected classes of organic ligands are potent reductants that may contribute to the natural attenuation of subsurface contaminants. In the present study, we investigated the reactivity of Fe(II)-organothiol ligand complexes with nitroaromatic contaminants (NACs; ArNO(2)). Experimental results show that NACs are unreactive in Fe(2+)-only and ligand-only solutions but are reduced to the corresponding aniline compounds (ArNH(2)) in solutions containing both Fe(II) and a number of organothiol ligands. Observed reaction rates are highly dependent on the structure of the Fe(II)-complexing ligand, solution composition, Fe(II) speciation, and NAC structure. For two model ligands, cysteine and thioglycolic acid, observed pseudo-first order rate constants for 4-chloronitrobenzene reduction (k(obs); 1/s) are linearly correlated with the concentration of the respective 1:2 Fe(II)- organothiol complexes (FeL(2)(2-)), and k(obs) measurements are accurately predicted by k(obs) = k(FeL(2-)(2))[FeL(2-)(2)], where k(FeL(2-)(2)) = 1.70 (+/-0.59) 1/M/s and 26.0 (+/-4.8) 1/M/s for cysteine and thioglycolic acid, respectively. The high reactivity of these Fe(II) complexes is attributed to a lowering of the standard one-electron reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple on complexation by organothiol ligands. The relative reactivity of a series of substituted NACs with individual Fe(II) complexes can be described by linear free-energy relationships with the apparent one-electron reduction potentials of the NACs. Tests also show that organothiol ligands can further promote NAC reduction indirectly by re-reducing the Fe(III) that forms when Fe(II) complexes are oxidized by reactions with the NACs.

  12. Stable Isotope Systematics of Abiotic Nitrite Reduction Coupled with Anaerobic Iron Oxidation: The Role of Reduced Clays and Fe-bearing Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabb, K. C.; Buchwald, C.; Hansel, C. M.; Wankel, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, it is widely assumed that nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) reduction is primarily the result of microbial respiration. However, it has also been shown that abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite by reduced iron (Fe(II)), whether mineral-bound or surface-associated, may also occur under certain environmentally relevant conditions. With a range of experimental conditions, we investigated the nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope systematics of abiotic nitrite reduction by Fe(II) in an effort to characterize biotic and abiotic processes in the environment. While homogenous reactions between NO2- and Fe(II) in artificial seawater showed little reduction, heterogeneous reactions involving Fe-containing minerals showed considerable nitrite loss. Specifically, rapid nitrite reduction was observed in experiments that included reduced clays (illite, Na-montmorillonite, and nontronite) and those that exhibited iron oxide formation (ferrihydrite, magnetite and/or green rust). While these iron oxides and clay minerals offer both a source of reduced iron in the mineral matrix as well as a surface for Fe(II) activation, control experiments with corundum as a non-Fe containing mineral surface showed little NO2- loss, implicating a more dominant role of structural Fe in the clays during nitrite reduction. The isotope effects for 15N and 18O (15ɛ and 18ɛ) ranged from 5 to 14‰ for 15ɛ and 5 to 17‰ for 18ɛ and were typically coupled such that 15ɛ ~ 18ɛ. Reactions below pH 7 were slower and the 18ɛ was affected by oxygen atom exchange with water. Although little data exist for comparison with the dual isotopes of microbial NO2- reduction, these data serve as a benchmark for evaluating the role of abiotic processes in N reduction, particularly in sediment systems low in organic carbon and high in iron.

  13. Reduction of photosynthetic sensitivity in response to abiotic stress in tomato is mediated by a new generation plant activator

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Yield losses as a result of abiotic stress factors present a significant challenge for the future of global food production. While breeding technologies provide potential to combat negative stress-mediated outcomes over time, interventions which act to prime plant tolerance to stress, via the use of phytohormone-based elicitors for example, could act as a valuable tool for crop protection. However, the translation of fundamental biology into functioning solution is often constrained by knowledge-gaps. Results Photosynthetic and transcriptomic responses were characterised in young tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings in response to pre-treatment with a new plant health activator technology, ‘Alethea’, followed by a subsequent 100 mM salinity stress. Alethea is a novel proprietary technology composed of three key constituent compounds; the hitherto unexplored compound potassium dihydrojasmonate, an analogue of jasmonic acid; sodium benzoate, a carboxylic acid precursor to salicylic acid, and the α-amino acid L-arginine. Salinity treatment led to a maximal 47% reduction in net photosynthetic rate 8 d following NaCl treatment, yet in Alethea pre-treated seedlings, sensitivity to salinity stress was markedly reduced during the experimental period. Microarray analysis of leaf transcriptional responses showed that while salinity stress and Alethea individually impacted on largely non-overlapping, distinct groups of genes, Alethea pre-treatment substantially modified the response to salinity. Alethea affected the expression of genes related to biotic stress, ethylene signalling, cell wall synthesis, redox signalling and photosynthetic processes. Since Alethea had clear effects on photosynthesis/chloroplastic function at the physiological and molecular levels, we also investigated the ability of Alethea to protect various crop species against methyl viologen, a potent generator of oxidative stress in chloroplasts. Alethea pre-treatment produced

  14. Reductive transformation of parathion and methyl parathion by Bacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Dong, Ming; Yuan, Yulan; Huang, Yao; Guo, Xinmin; Qiao, Chuanling

    2007-03-01

    Based on the results of phenotypic features, phylogenetic similarity of 16S rRNA gene sequences and BIOLOG test, a soil bacterium was identified as Bacillus sp. DM-1. Using either growing cells or a cell-free extract, it transformed parathion and methyl parathion to amino derivatives by reducing the nitro group. Pesticide transformation by a cell-free extract was specifically inhibited by three nitroreductase inhibitors, indicating the presence of nitroreductase activity. The nitroreductase activity was NAD(P)H-dependent, O(2)-insensitive, and exhibited the substrate specificity for parathion and methyl parathion. Reductive transformation significantly decreased the toxicity of pesticides.

  15. Impact of silica on the reductive transformation of schwertmannite and the mobilization of arsenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Edward D.; Johnston, Scott G.

    2012-11-01

    Schwertmannite is an important Fe(III) mineral in acid-sulfate soil and acid-mine drainage environments because it is both widespread and highly reactive towards trace elements, such as As. Transformation of schwertmannite to more crystalline phases, such as goethite, may strongly influence As mobility. However, previous research suggests that the rate and extent of schwertmannite transformation can be strongly retarded by the presence of Si - a ubiquitous species in natural waters. The present study examines the impact of Si on reductive transformation of schwertmannite and the associated behavior of Fe and coprecipitated As. Synthetic As(V)-coprecipitated schwertmannite (Fe8O8(OH)4.2(SO4)1.9(AsO4)0.0005) was subjected to microbially-mediated reducing conditions for 126 days in the presence of three environmentally-relevant Si concentrations (0, 1.9 and 9.5 mM Si). In addition, complementary sorption experiments and short-term abiotic mineral transformation experiments were conducted to examine the interactive impacts of Si and Fe2+ on schwertmannite stability. Sorption experiments revealed negligible Si sorption to schwertmannite under acidic conditions, with Si sorption only being important towards near-neutral pH. In the 126 day biotic incubations, the onset of reducing conditions in the initially acidic schwertmannite suspensions stimulated dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction, producing Fe2+ and simultaneously causing pH to increase to ∼6.5. Sorption of Si to the schwertmannite surface at this near-neutral pH partially retarded the rate of Fe2+-catalyzed transformation of schwertmannite to goethite. However, the effect of Si was minor under microbially-reducing conditions, with Fe2+ catalyzing rapid schwertmannite transformation even in the presence of abundant Si. Our short-term abiotic experiments demonstrate that the limited effect of Si is a consequence of Fe2+ being produced concurrently with increases in pH. This allows Fe2+-schwertmannite interactions to

  16. Reductive transformation of TNT by Escherichia coli: pathway description.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong; Wood, Thomas K; Smets, Barth F

    2005-05-01

    The reductive transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) was studied using aerobically grown Escherichia coli cultures. In the absence of an external carbon or energy source, E. coli resting cells transformed TNT to hydroxylaminodinitrotoluenes (2HADNT, 4HADNT, with 4HADNT as the dominant isomer), aminodinitrotoluenes (4ADNT, with sporadic detection of 2ADNT), 2,4-di(hydroxylamino)-6-nitrotoluene (24D(HA)6NT), 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene (24DA6NT), and an additional compound which was tentatively identified as a (hydroxylamino)aminonitrotoluene isomer via gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy and spectral analysis. The resting cell assay, performed in an oxygen-free atmosphere, avoided formation of azoxy dimers and provided good mass balances. Significant preference for reduction in the para versus ortho position was detected. The formation of 24D(HA)6NT, but not ADNT, appeared inhibited by the presence of TNT. The rate and extent of TNT reduction were significantly enhanced at higher cell densities, or by supplying an exogenous reducing power source, revealing the importance of enzyme concentration and reducing power. Whether the oxygen-insensitive E. coli nitroreductases, encoded by nfsA and nfsB, directly catalyze the TNT reduction or account for the complete TNT transformation pathway, remains to be determined.

  17. Transformation of the corundum structure upon high-temperature reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan'ko, A. Ja.; Rom, M. A.; Sidelnikova, N. S.; Nizhankovskiy, S. V.; Budnikov, A. T.; Grin', L. A.; Kaltaev, Kh. Sh-O.

    2008-12-01

    This paper reports on the results of investigations into the transformation of the corundum structure upon reducing annealing at high temperatures in the range from 1700 to 2050°C. It is established that the reduction results in the transformation of corundum into new phases with a lower oxygen content, including the phase with a spinel structure. These structures are assumed to be stabilized by anion vacancies. A model of the crystal structure of the spinel phase is proposed. This model provides an adequate description of the compound obtained in the experiment.

  18. Reductive transformation of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) by FeS.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Peng, Ping'an; Yu, Zhiqiang; Huang, Weilin; Zhong, Yin

    2016-09-15

    Both iron monosulfide (FeS) and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are widely found at relatively high levels in anoxic sediments, but little is known about the reactions of FeS with BFRs. Prior studies showed that FeS was variously reactive with chlorinated organic pollutants in many anoxic environments. It is intuitive that FeS is also reactive with BFRs under anoxic conditions. This study was initiated to test such a hypothesis by quantifying the rates of reductive transformation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), decabrominated diphenyl ether (decaBDE) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) using synthetic FeS as the reactive agent. The results showed that over 90% of HBCD was transformed by FeS within 24 h, whereas both TBBPA and decaBDE were found nonreactive within 2 days. The transformation of HBCD followed a pseudo-first-order rate kinetic and the observed rate constants were dependent on the initial concentrations of FeS and HBCD. The transformation rates of β- and γ-HBCD were significantly faster than that of α-HBCD. Analysis of bromine ion and other transformation products suggested that sequential dibromoelimination to form 1,5,9-cyclododecatriene was likely to be a dominant pathway for the reductive transformation of HBCD by FeS. Surface characterization of FeS by XPS indicated that both Fe(II) and S(-II) on the FeS surface might have contributed considerably to the transformation of HBCD. These findings imply that FeS may play an important role in natural attenuation of HBCD and that it may be used as a reactive agent for treating HBCD-contaminated sediments.

  19. Improvement of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Production in Echium acanthocarpum Transformed Hairy Root Cultures by Application of Different Abiotic Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zárate, Rafael; Cequier-Sánchez, Elena; Rodríguez, Covadonga; Dorta-Guerra, Roberto; El Jaber-Vazdekis, Nabil; Ravelo, Ángel G.

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acids are of great nutritional, therapeutic, and physiological importance, especially the polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids, possessing larger carbon chains and abundant double bonds or their immediate precursors. A few higher plant species are able to accumulate these compounds, like those belonging to the Echium genus. Here, the novel E. acanthocarpum hairy root system, which is able to accumulate many fatty acids, including stearidonic and α-linolenic acids, was optimized for a better production. The application of abiotic stress resulted in larger yields of stearidonic and α-linolenic acids, 60 and 35%, respectively, with a decrease in linoleic acid, when grown in a nutrient medium consisting of B5 basal salts, sucrose or glucose, and, more importantly, at a temperature of 15°C. The application of osmotic stress employing sorbitol showed no positive influence on the fatty acid yields; furthermore, the combination of a lower culture temperature and glucose did not show a cumulative boosting effect on the yield, although this carbon source was similarly attractive. The abiotic stress also influenced the lipid profile of the cultures, significantly increasing the phosphatidylglycerol fraction but not the total lipid neither their biomass, proving the appropriateness of applying various abiotic stress in this culture to achieve larger yields. PMID:25937970

  20. TRANSFORMATION AND MOBILIZATION OF ARSENIC ADSORBED ON GRANULAR FERRIC HYDROXIDE UNDER BIO-REDUCTIVE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotic and abiotic reduction of arsenic (V) and iron (III) influences the partioning of arsenic (As) between the solid and aqueous phases in soils, sediments and wastes. In this study, laboratory experiments on arsenic adsorbed on granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) was performed to ...

  1. Characteristics and kinetic analysis of AQS transformation and microbial goethite reduction: Insight into “redox mediator-microbe-iron oxide” interaction process

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Weihuang; Shi, Mengran; Yu, Dan; ...

    2016-03-29

    Here, the characteristics and kinetics of redox transformation of a redox mediator, anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), during microbial goethite reduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12, a dissimilatory iron reduction bacterium (DIRB), were investigated to provide insights into “redox mediator-iron oxide” interaction in the presence of DIRB. Two pre-incubation reaction systems of the “strain S12-goethite” and the “strain S12-AQS” were used to investigate the dynamics of goethite reduction and AQS redox transformation. Results show that the concentrations of goethite and redox mediator, and the inoculation cell density all affect the characteristics of microbial goethite reduction, kinetic transformation between oxidized and reduced species of themore » redox mediator. Both abiotic and biotic reactions and their coupling regulate the kinetic process for “Quinone-Iron” interaction in the presence of DIRB. Our results provide some new insights into the characteristics and mechanisms of interaction among “quinone-DIRB- goethite” under biotic/abiotic driven.« less

  2. Characteristics and kinetic analysis of AQS transformation and microbial goethite reduction: Insight into “redox mediator-microbe-iron oxide” interaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Weihuang; Shi, Mengran; Yu, Dan; Liu, Chongxuan; Huang, Tinglin; Wu, Fengchang

    2016-03-29

    Here, the characteristics and kinetics of redox transformation of a redox mediator, anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), during microbial goethite reduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12, a dissimilatory iron reduction bacterium (DIRB), were investigated to provide insights into “redox mediator-iron oxide” interaction in the presence of DIRB. Two pre-incubation reaction systems of the “strain S12-goethite” and the “strain S12-AQS” were used to investigate the dynamics of goethite reduction and AQS redox transformation. Results show that the concentrations of goethite and redox mediator, and the inoculation cell density all affect the characteristics of microbial goethite reduction, kinetic transformation between oxidized and reduced species of the redox mediator. Both abiotic and biotic reactions and their coupling regulate the kinetic process for “Quinone-Iron” interaction in the presence of DIRB. Our results provide some new insights into the characteristics and mechanisms of interaction among “quinone-DIRB- goethite” under biotic/abiotic driven.

  3. Abiotic transformation of high explosives by freshly precipitated iron minerals in aqueous Fe¹¹ solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Boparai, Hardiljeet K.; Comfort, Steve; Satapanajaru, Tunlawit; Szecsody, James E.; Grossl, Paul; Shea, Patrick

    2010-05-11

    Zerovalent iron barriers have become a viable treatment for field-scale cleanup of various ground water contaminants. While contact with the iron surface is important for contaminant destruction, the interstitial pore water within and near the iron barrier will be laden with aqueous, adsorbed and precipitated FeII phases. These freshly precipitated iron minerals could play an important role in transforming high explosives (HE). Our objective was to determine the transformation of RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine), HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine), and TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) by freshly precipitated iron FeII/FeIII minerals. This was accomplished by quantifying the effects of initial FeII concentration, pH, and the presence of aquifer solids (FeIII phases) on HE transformation rates. Results showed that at pH 8.2, freshly precipitated iron minerals transformed RDX, HMX, and TNT with reaction rates increasing with increasing FeII concentrations. RDX and HMX transformations in these solutions also increased with increasing pH (5.8-8.55). By contrast, TNT transformation was not influenced by pH (6.85-8.55) except at pH values <6.35. Transformations observed via LC/MS included a variety of nitroso products (RDX, HMX) and amino degradation products (TNT). XRD analysis identified green rust and magnetite as the dominant iron solid phases that precipitated from the aqueous FeII during HE treatment under anaerobic conditions. Geochemical modeling also predicted FeII activity would likely be controlled by green rust and magnetite. These results illustrate the important role freshly precipitated FeII/FeIII minerals in aqueous FeII solutions play in the transformation of high explosives.

  4. Combined abiotic and biotic in-situ reduction of hexavalent chromium in groundwater using nZVI and whey: A remedial pilot test.

    PubMed

    Němeček, Jan; Pokorný, Petr; Lacinová, Lenka; Černík, Miroslav; Masopustová, Zuzana; Lhotský, Ondřej; Filipová, Alena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2015-12-30

    The paper describes a pilot remediation test combining two Cr(VI) geofixation methods - chemical reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and subsequent biotic reduction supported by whey. Combination of the methods exploited the advantages of both - a rapid decrease in Cr(VI) concentrations by nZVI, which prevented further spreading of the contamination and facilitated subsequent use of the cheaper biological method. Successive application of whey as an organic substrate to promote biotic reduction of Cr(VI) after application of nZVI resulted in a further and long-term decrease in the Cr(VI) contents in the groundwater. The effect of biotic reduction was observed even in a monitoring well located at a distance of 22 m from the substrate injection wells after 10 months. The results indicated a reciprocal effect of both the phases - nZVI oxidized to Fe(III) during the abiotic phase was microbially reduced back to Fe(II) and acted as a reducing agent for Cr(VI) even when the microbial density was already low due to the consumed substrate. Community analysis with pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes further confirmed partial recycling of nZVI in the form of Fe(II), where the results showed that the Cr(VI) reducing process was mediated mainly by iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  5. Reduction of nitrogen compounds in oceanic basement and its implications for HCN formation and abiotic organic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide is an excellent organic reagent and is central to most of the reaction pathways leading to abiotic formation of simple organic compounds containing nitrogen, such as amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. Reduced carbon and nitrogen precursor compounds for the synthesis of HCN may be formed under off-axis hydrothermal conditions in oceanic lithosphere in the presence of native Fe and Ni and are adsorbed on authigenic layer silicates and zeolites. The native metals as well as the molecular hydrogen reducing CO2 to CO/CH4 and NO3-/NO2- to NH3/NH4+ are a result of serpentinization of mafic rocks. Oceanic plates are conveyor belts of reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds from the off-axis hydrothermal environments to the subduction zones, where compaction, dehydration, desiccation and diagenetic reactions affect the organic precursors. CO/CH4 and NH3/NH4+ in fluids distilled out of layer silicates and zeolites in the subducting plate at an early stage of subduction will react upon heating and form HCN, which is then available for further organic reactions to, for instance, carbohydrates, nucleosides or even nucleotides, under alkaline conditions in hydrated mantle rocks of the overriding plate. Convergent margins in the initial phase of subduction must, therefore, be considered the most potent sites for prebiotic reactions on Earth. This means that origin of life processes are, perhaps, only possible on planets where some kind of plate tectonics occur. PMID:19849830

  6. Reduction of nitrogen compounds in oceanic basement and its implications for HCN formation and abiotic organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Holm, Nils G; Neubeck, Anna

    2009-10-22

    Hydrogen cyanide is an excellent organic reagent and is central to most of the reaction pathways leading to abiotic formation of simple organic compounds containing nitrogen, such as amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. Reduced carbon and nitrogen precursor compounds for the synthesis of HCN may be formed under off-axis hydrothermal conditions in oceanic lithosphere in the presence of native Fe and Ni and are adsorbed on authigenic layer silicates and zeolites. The native metals as well as the molecular hydrogen reducing CO2 to CO/CH4 and NO3-/NO2- to NH3/NH4+ are a result of serpentinization of mafic rocks. Oceanic plates are conveyor belts of reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds from the off-axis hydrothermal environments to the subduction zones, where compaction, dehydration, desiccation and diagenetic reactions affect the organic precursors. CO/CH4 and NH3/NH4+ in fluids distilled out of layer silicates and zeolites in the subducting plate at an early stage of subduction will react upon heating and form HCN, which is then available for further organic reactions to, for instance, carbohydrates, nucleosides or even nucleotides, under alkaline conditions in hydrated mantle rocks of the overriding plate. Convergent margins in the initial phase of subduction must, therefore, be considered the most potent sites for prebiotic reactions on Earth. This means that origin of life processes are, perhaps, only possible on planets where some kind of plate tectonics occur.

  7. Identification of abiotic and biotic reductive dechlorination in a chlorinated ethene plume after thermal source remediation by means of isotopic and molecular biology tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badin, Alice; Broholm, Mette M.; Jacobsen, Carsten S.; Palau, Jordi; Dennis, Philip; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Thermal tetrachloroethene (PCE) remediation by steam injection in a sandy aquifer led to the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from aquifer sediments resulting in more reduced redox conditions, accelerated PCE biodegradation, and changes in microbial populations. These changes were documented by comparing data collected prior to the remediation event and eight years later. Based on the premise that dual C-Cl isotope slopes reflect ongoing degradation pathways, the slopes associated with PCE and TCE suggest the predominance of biotic reductive dechlorination near the source area. PCE was the predominant chlorinated ethene near the source area prior to thermal treatment. After thermal treatment, cDCE became predominant. The biotic contribution to these changes was supported by the presence of Dehalococcoides sp. DNA (Dhc) and Dhc targeted rRNA close to the source area. In contrast, dual C-Cl isotope analysis together with the almost absent VC 13C depletion in comparison to cDCE 13C depletion suggested that cDCE was subject to abiotic degradation due to the presence of pyrite, possible surface-bound iron (II) or reduced iron sulphides in the downgradient part of the plume. This interpretation is supported by the relative lack of Dhc in the downgradient part of the plume. The results of this study show that thermal remediation can enhance the biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes, and that this effect can be traced to the mobilisation of DOC due to steam injection. This, in turn, results in more reduced redox conditions which favor active reductive dechlorination and/or may lead to a series of redox reactions which may consecutively trigger biotically induced abiotic degradation. Finally, this study illustrates the valuable complementary application of compound-specific isotopic analysis combined with molecular biology tools to evaluate which biogeochemical processes are taking place in an aquifer contaminated with chlorinated ethenes.

  8. Assessment of the abiotic transformation of 17β-estradiol in the presence of vegetable matter--II: the role of molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Marfil-Vega, Ruth; Suidan, Makram T; Mills, Marc A

    2012-04-01

    This study characterizes the effect of oxygen in the abiotic transformation of estrogens when they are contacted with a surrogate of the vegetable wastes found in sewage. 17β-Estradiol (E2) and 17β-(14)C(4)-estradiol ((14)C-E2) were utilized as model compounds. Batch experiments were run under both oxic and anoxic conditions. In order to accomplish an accurate mass balance of the target estrogen, two analyses were performed simultaneously: first, radioactivity counting, and second, quantitation of E2 and (14)C-E2, as well as their transformation product estrone and (14)C(4)-estrone, by Liquid Chromatography tandem Mass Spectrometry. Under oxic conditions, the total concentration of (14)C-E2 was found to decrease by 78% in 72 h (15% and 7% remained in the liquid and solid phases, respectively). Conversely, when the estrogens were contacted with the synthetic influent under anoxic conditions, E2 was quantitatively recovered after 72 h (70% and 22% in aqueous and solid matrices, correspondingly). These results suggest that when the concentration of dissolved oxygen is null or limited, catalysis through an oxidative coupling mechanism is halted. Moreover, it was confirmed that the catalytic reaction occurred solely in the presence of the solid phase of the model vegetable matter.

  9. Reactivity of Fe(II)-bearing minerals toward reductive transformation of organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Martin; Schwarzenbach, René P; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2004-02-01

    Fe(II) present at surfaces of iron-containing minerals can play a significant role in the overall attenuation of reducible contaminants in the subsurface. As the chemical environment, i.e., the type and arrangement of ligands, strongly affects the redox potential of Fe(II), the presence of various mineral sorbents is expected to modulate the reactivity of surficial Fe(II)-species in aqueous systems. In a comparative study we evaluated the reactivity of ferrous iron in aqueous suspensions of siderite (FeCO3), nontronite (ferruginous smectite SWa-1), hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH), goethite (alpha-FeOOH), magnetite (Fe3O4), sulfate green rust (Fe(II)4Fe(III)2(OH)12SO4 x 4H2O), pyrite (FeS2), and mackinawite (FeS) under similar conditions (pH 7.2, 25 m2 mineral/L, 1 mM Fe(II)aq, O2 (aq) < 0.1 g/L). Surface-area-normalized pseudo first-order rate constants are reported for the reduction of hexachloroethane and 4-chloronitrobenzene representing two classes of environmentally relevant transformation reactions of pollutants, i.e., dehalogenation and nitroaryl reduction. The reactivities of the different Fe(II) mineral systems varied greatly and systematically both within and between the two data sets obtained with the two probe compounds. As a general trend, surface-area-normalized reaction rates increased in the order Fe(II) + siderite < Fe(II) + iron oxides < Fe(II) + iron sulfides. 4-Chloronitrobenzene was transformed by mineral-bound Fe(II) much more rapidly than hexachloroethane, except for suspensions of hematite, pyrite, and nontronite. The results demonstrate that abiotic reactions with surface-bound Fe(II) may affect or even dominate the long-term behavior of reducible pollutants in the subsurface, particularly in the presence of Fe(III) bearing minerals. As such reactions can be dominated by specific interactions of the oxidant with the surface, care must be taken in extrapolating reactivity data of surface-bound Fe(II) between different

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTERISTICS AFFECTING REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS IN ANOXIC SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reductive transformations are important processes for determining the fate of organic pollutants in anoxic environments. These processes are most often microbially mediated by both direct and indirect means. For example, specific bacteria transform organic pollutants directly as ...

  11. A kinetic pressure effect on the experimental abiotic reduction of aqueous CO2 to methane from 1 to 3.5 kbar at 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Codi; Cody, George D.; Davis, Jeffrey M.

    2015-02-01

    Aqueous abiotic methane concentrations in a range of geologic settings are below levels expected for equilibrium with coexisting CO2 and H2, indicating that kinetics can control the speciation of reduced carbon-bearing fluids. Previous studies have suggested that mineral catalysts or gas-phase reactions may increase the rate of methanogenesis. Here, we report on experiments that indicate pressure can also accelerate aqueous reduction of CO2 to CH4. Four series of cold-seal hydrothermal experiments were performed from 1 to 3.5 kbar at 300 °C for two weeks and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The starting fluids were 10-20-μL solutions of 70-mmolal 13C-labeled formic acid (H13COOH) contained in welded gold capsules. Increasing pressure (P) resulted in a systematic, reproducible log-linear increase in 13CH4 yields. The pressure effect could be quantified the log-linear slope, Δlog[13CH4]/ΔP (log mmolal per kbar). The mean slope was 0.66 ± 0.05 (±1s.e.), indicating that 13CH4 yields increased by an average factor of 40-50 over a P range of 2.5 kbar. Pressure-independent variations in [13CH4] were observed as scatter about the log-linear regressions and as variations in the y-intercepts of the regressions. These variations were attributed to trace amounts of catalytic Fe along the inner capsule wall that remained despite cleaning the Au capsules in nitric acid prior to each experimental series. The mechanism for the pressure-dependent effect was interpreted to result from one or more of the following three processes: reduction of a metastable reaction intermediate such as methanol, formation of Fe-carbonyl complexes in the fluid, and/or heterogeneous catalysis by Fe. The results suggest that pressure may influence aqueous abiotic CH4 yields in certain geological environments, particularly when the relative effects of other kinetic factors such as temperature are diminished, e.g., in cool forearcs or other settings with a steep geothermal

  12. High-efficiency transformation and selective tolerance against biotic and abiotic stress in mulberry, Morus indica cv. K2, by constitutive and inducible expression of tobacco osmotin.

    PubMed

    Das, Manaswini; Chauhan, Harsh; Chhibbar, Anju; Rizwanul Haq, Qazi Mohd; Khurana, Paramjit

    2011-04-01

    Osmotin and osmotin-like proteins are stress proteins belonging to the plant PR-5 group of proteins induced in several plant species in response to various types of biotic and abiotic stresses. We report here the overexpression of tobacco osmotin in transgenic mulberry plants under the control of a constitutive promoter (CaMV 35S) as well as a stress-inducible rd29A promoter. Southern analysis of the transgenic plants revealed the stable integration of the introduced genes in the transformants. Real-time PCR analysis provided evidence for the expression of osmotin in the transgenic plants under both the constitutive and stress-inducible promoters. Transgenic plants with the stress-inducible promoter were observed to better tolerate salt and drought stress than those with the constitutive promoter. Transgenic plants when subjected to simulated salinity and drought stress conditions showed better cellular membrane stability (CMS) and photosynthetic yield than non-transgenic plants under conditions of both salinity and drought stress. Proline levels were very high in transgenic plants with the constitutive promoter relative to those with the stress-inducible promoter. Fungal challenge undertaken with three fungal species known to cause serious losses to mulberry cultivation, namely, Fusarium pallidoroseum, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Colletotrichum dematium, revealed that transgenic plants with osmotin under control of the constitutive promoter had a better resistance than those with osmotin under the control of the stress-inducible promoter. Evaluation in next generation was undertaken by studying bud break in transgenic and non-transgenic plants under simulated drought (2% polyethylene glycol) and salt stress (200 mM NaCl) conditions. The axillary buds of the selected transgenic lines had a better bud break percentage under stressed conditions than buds from non-transgenic mulberry lines. A biotic assay with Bombyx mori indicated that osmotin protein had no

  13. Noise reduction combining time-frequency epsilon-filter and M-transform.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomomi; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces noise reduction combining time-frequency epsilon-filter (TF epsilon-filter) and time-frequency M-transform (TF M-transform). Musical noise is an offensive noise generated due to noise reduction in the time-frequency domain such as spectral subtraction and TF epsilon-filter. It has a deleterious effect on speech recognition. To solve the problem, M-transform is introduced. M-transform is a linear transform based on M-sequence. The method combining the time-domain epsilon-filter (TD epsilon-filter) and time-domain M-transform (TD M-transform) can reduce not only white noise but also impulse noise. Musical noise is isolated in the time-frequency domain, which is similar to impulse noise in the time domain. On these prospects, this paper aims to reduce musical noise by improving M-transform for the time-frequency domain. Noise reduction by using TD M-transform and the TD epsilon-filter is first explained to clarify its features. Then, an improved method applying M-transform to the time-frequency domain, namely TF M-transform, is described. Noise reduction combining the TF epsilon-filter and TF M-transform is also proposed. The proposed method can reduce not only high-level nonstationary noise but also musical noise. Experimental results are also given to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method.

  14. Evaluation and reduction of errors induced by the Guyan transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. L.

    1982-01-01

    The Guyan reduction refers to a method used to reduce the number of degrees of freedom in a structural model for dynamic analysis. Experience shows that, if the method is properly employed, then this reduction method does in fact provide a "reasonably" accurate approximation of the dynamic characteristics of the unreduced model. A method that provides an accurate estimate of the error in each mode of the reduced eigenvalue problem and, in addition, gives first order correction terms that greatly improve the accuracy of the eigenvectors and eigenvalues is presented. The method is demonstrated by standard COSMIC NASTRAN DAMP alters to rigid format 3, real normal mode analysis. Comparative computer time of modal extraction versus error analysis is discussed for the VAX-11/780 version of COSMIC NASTRAN.

  15. Particle field holography data reduction by Fourier transform analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Cecil F.; Trolinger, James D.

    1987-01-01

    The size distribution of a particle field hologram is obtained with a Fourier transformation of the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the reconstructed hologram. Off-axis absorption holograms of particle fields with known characteristics were obtained and analyzed with a commercially available instrument. The mean particle size of the reconstructed hologram was measured with an error of + or - 5 percent, while the distribution broadening was estimated within + or - 15 percent. Small sections of a pulsed laser hologram of a synthetic fuel spray were analyzed with this method thus yielding a spatially resolved size distribution. The method yields fast and accurate automated analysis of particle field holograms.

  16. Reduction and transformation of fluorinated graphene induced by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Mengmeng; Wang, Xu; Dong, Changshuai; Li, Baoyin; Liu, Yang; Chen, Teng; Wu, Peng; Cheng, Zheng; Liu, Xiangyang

    2015-10-07

    The effect of ultraviolet irradiation on fluorinated graphene (FG) dispersed in toluene was investigated for the first time. The chemical and physical characteristics of FG before and after ultraviolet irradiation were analyzed by UV-vis, FTIR, XPS,EDS, oxygen flask combustion (OFC), XRD, TGA, Raman, SEM, TEM and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is found that the F/C ratio initially decreases rapidly and then slowly with irradiation time, finally to 0.179 after irradiation for 48 h. The nature of partial C-F bonds transforms from covalent to "semi-covalent" bonding in the process of irradiation. The restoration of new sp(2) clusters is fast at the early stage within 6 h of irradiation, promoting the structural rearrangement. The morphology of irradiated fluorinated graphene (iFG) is not significantly destroyed by ultraviolet while more overlapped sheets are formed due to quick defluorination. Photoluminescence (PL) properties show that "blue emission" located at 432 nm is enhanced due to the recovery of sp(2) domains. In particular, compared to non-aromatic solvents, there is a "synergistic effect" between aromatic solvents and ultraviolet in the defluorination process. FG is unstable and shows some structural transformations under ultraviolet irradiation, which can be used to tune its structure and properties.

  17. Mineral transformations associated with goethite reduction by Methanosarcina barkeri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, D.; Wang, Hongfang; Dong, H.; Qiu, X.; Dong, X.; Cravotta, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the interaction between methanogens and iron-containing minerals in anoxic environments, we conducted batch culture experiments with Methanosarcina barkeri in a phosphate-buffered basal medium (PBBM) to bioreduce structural Fe(III) in goethite with hydrogen as the sole substrate. Fe(II) and methane concentrations were monitored over the course of the bioreduction experiments with wet chemistry and gas chromatography, respectively. Subsequent mineralogical changes were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the presence of an electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), 30% Fe(III) in goethite (weight basis) was reduced to Fe(II). In contrast, only 2% Fe(III) (weight basis) was bioreduced in the absence of AQDS. Most of the bioproduced Fe(II) was incorporated into secondary minerals including dufr??nite and vivianite. Our data implied a dufr??nite-vivianite transformation mechanism where a metastable dufr??nite transformed to a more stable vivianite over extended time in anaerobic conditions. Methanogenesis was greatly inhibited by bioreduction of goethite Fe(III). These results have important implications for the methane flux associated with Fe(III) bioreduction and ferrous iron mineral precipitation in anaerobic soils and sediments. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Reductive transformation of p-nitrotoluene by a new iron-fly ash packing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Baizhen; Jin, Ruofei; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-11-01

    A new iron-fly ash packing was studied for reductive transformation of p-nitrotoluene. The packing was made of iron, fly ash and kaolin with the mass ratio of 36:7:2. A reactor was designed to investigate the long-term performance of the packing. The results showed that the reduction of p-nitrotoluene increased with decreasing pH, because the reduction potential of reaction increased with the concentration of H(+). The pH was one of the key factors impacting the reductive transformation of p-nitrotoluene. Comparing iron-activated carbon packing with the new iron-fly ash packing, the reduction efficiencies were respectively 76.61% and 75.36% after 20days. The reduction efficiency for both was around 50% at 40days. It was evident that these two kinds of packing had no significant difference in their capability for p-nitrotoluene reductive transformation. Compared with iron-activated carbon, the new iron-fly ash packing had obvious advantages in terms of manufacturing costs and environmental pollution degradation. This study showed that the new iron-fly ash packing had good performance in reductive transformation of nitrotoluene compounds.

  19. The smoothing transformer, a new concept in dc side harmonic reduction of HVdc schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Enright, W.; Arrillaga, J.; Wood, A.R.; Hidalgo, F.P.

    1996-10-01

    Direct connection schemes have been a subject of recent investigation, offering operational flexibility and substantial reductions in ac components. In these schemes the use of active dc filters has been suggested to replace the conventional tuned passive filter design. This paper presents the smoothing transformer as a new means for reducing dc harmonics at characteristic and non-characteristic frequencies using only passive components. A realistic smoothing transformer design is examined using the New Zealand HVdc system operating in the direct connection mode. The steady-state and transient performance of the smoothing transformer design is compared with that of the existing dc smoothing reactor and filter bank.

  20. Heterogeneous reductive dehalogenation of PCB contaminated transformer oil and brominated diphenyl ethers with zero valent iron.

    PubMed

    Habekost, A; Aristov, N

    2012-09-01

    Reductive dechlorination and debromination of halogenated biphenyls (PCBs) and diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) occurs efficiently at moderately elevated temperatures (350-600 °C) with zero valent iron (iron powder) in a nitrogen atmosphere. The proton donors tested were waste transformer oil, iso-octane, and n-decane. Observation of production of biphenyl and diphenyl ether and their condensation products indicates that the reaction is not simple pyrolysis, but a reduction. No halogenated organic products are observed.

  1. Missing texture reconstruction method based on error reduction algorithm using Fourier transform magnitude estimation scheme.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Haseyama, Miki

    2013-03-01

    A missing texture reconstruction method based on an error reduction (ER) algorithm, including a novel estimation scheme of Fourier transform magnitudes is presented in this brief. In our method, Fourier transform magnitude is estimated for a target patch including missing areas, and the missing intensities are estimated by retrieving its phase based on the ER algorithm. Specifically, by monitoring errors converged in the ER algorithm, known patches whose Fourier transform magnitudes are similar to that of the target patch are selected from the target image. In the second approach, the Fourier transform magnitude of the target patch is estimated from those of the selected known patches and their corresponding errors. Consequently, by using the ER algorithm, we can estimate both the Fourier transform magnitudes and phases to reconstruct the missing areas.

  2. Degradation of the tricyclic antipsychotic drug chlorpromazine under environmental conditions, identification of its main aquatic biotic and abiotic transformation products by LC-MSn and their effects on environmental bacteria.

    PubMed

    Trautwein, Christoph; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2012-03-15

    The search for environmental transformation products of organic pollutants (like drugs) is a difficult task and usually only few compounds are detected. This might be due to effective degradation but could also be a result of analytical deficits dealing with complex matrices. Especially transformation products of very low concentrations in sludge were difficult to identify so far. Additionally, the use of standard separation techniques might lead to the loss of isomeric compounds, which possess identical spectroscopic and spectrometric properties. To date no complete study investigating the environmental fate of any tricyclic antipsychotic drug has been reported. Therefore, this study investigated the popular neuroleptic drug chlorpromazine and its potential transformation by all main environmental pathways: aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation as well as abiotic photolytic degradation by sunlight. Analysis of test samples by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to multiple stage mass-spectrometry (HPLC-MS(n)) allowed the detection of numerous compounds. Further, the use of a special software allowed distinguishing between transformation products of small intensities and background "noise" caused by sludge or matrix. Three aerobic tests of different bacterial density (the Closed Bottle test, OECD 301D; the Manometric Respiratory test, OECD 301F; the modified Zahn-Wellens test, 302B; one anaerobic test (a modified anaerobic degradation test according to ISO 11734) as well as a photodegradation test were performed in the present study. According to the individual test guidelines, chlorpromazine had to be classified as not biodegradable in all of the biodegradation tests. However, a special chromatographic column and gradient along with mass spectrometric fragmentation experiments of higher order uncovered the presence of a total of 61 abiotic and biotic transformation products which where formed during the course of the tests. The structures of three

  3. Auto-Bäcklund transformation and similarity reductions to the variable coefficients variant Boussinesq system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, M. H. M.; El Shikh, Rehab M.

    2008-02-01

    Based on the closed connections among the homogeneous balance (HB) method, Weiss-Tabor-Carneval (WTC) method and Clarkson-Kruskal (CK) method, we study Bäcklund transformation and similarity reductions of the variable coefficients variant Boussinesq system. In the meantime, new exact solutions also are found.

  4. Modeling of the structure-specific kinetics of abiotic, dark reduction of Hg(II) complexed by O/N and S functional groups in humic acids while accounting for time-dependent structural rearrangement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Redox transformations involving electron transfer from natural organic matter (NOM) are important for the mercury (Hg) biogeochemical cycle. In the water column light drives the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0), whereas in soils and sediments dark reduction of Hg(II) is of greater importance. The object...

  5. Automatic variance reduction for Monte Carlo simulations via the local importance function transform

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.A.

    1996-02-01

    The author derives a transformed transport problem that can be solved theoretically by analog Monte Carlo with zero variance. However, the Monte Carlo simulation of this transformed problem cannot be implemented in practice, so he develops a method for approximating it. The approximation to the zero variance method consists of replacing the continuous adjoint transport solution in the transformed transport problem by a piecewise continuous approximation containing local biasing parameters obtained from a deterministic calculation. He uses the transport and collision processes of the transformed problem to bias distance-to-collision and selection of post-collision energy groups and trajectories in a traditional Monte Carlo simulation of ``real`` particles. He refers to the resulting variance reduction method as the Local Importance Function Transform (LIFI) method. He demonstrates the efficiency of the LIFT method for several 3-D, linearly anisotropic scattering, one-group, and multigroup problems. In these problems the LIFT method is shown to be more efficient than the AVATAR scheme, which is one of the best variance reduction techniques currently available in a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo code. For most of the problems considered, the LIFT method produces higher figures of merit than AVATAR, even when the LIFT method is used as a ``black box``. There are some problems that cause trouble for most variance reduction techniques, and the LIFT method is no exception. For example, the author demonstrates that problems with voids, or low density regions, can cause a reduction in the efficiency of the LIFT method. However, the LIFT method still performs better than survival biasing and AVATAR in these difficult cases.

  6. Target oriented dimensionality reduction of hyperspectral data by Kernel Fukunaga-Koontz Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binol, Hamidullah; Ochilov, Shuhrat; Alam, Mohammad S.; Bal, Abdullah

    2017-02-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is a popular technique in remote sensing for dimensionality reduction. While PCA is suitable for data compression, it is not necessarily an optimal technique for feature extraction, particularly when the features are exploited in supervised learning applications (Cheriyadat and Bruce, 2003) [1]. Preserving features belonging to the target is very crucial to the performance of target detection/recognition techniques. Fukunaga-Koontz Transform (FKT) based supervised band reduction technique can be used to provide this requirement. FKT achieves feature selection by transforming into a new space in where feature classes have complimentary eigenvectors. Analysis of these eigenvectors under two classes, target and background clutter, can be utilized for target oriented band reduction since each basis functions best represent target class while carrying least information of the background class. By selecting few eigenvectors which are the most relevant to the target class, dimension of hyperspectral data can be reduced and thus, it presents significant advantages for near real time target detection applications. The nonlinear properties of the data can be extracted by kernel approach which provides better target features. Thus, we propose constructing kernel FKT (KFKT) to present target oriented band reduction. The performance of the proposed KFKT based target oriented dimensionality reduction algorithm has been tested employing two real-world hyperspectral data and results have been reported consequently.

  7. Radar cross-section reduction based on an iterative fast Fourier transform optimized metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yi-Chuan; Ding, Jun; Guo, Chen-Jiang; Ren, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Jia-Kai

    2016-07-01

    A novel polarization insensitive metasurface with over 25 dB monostatic radar cross-section (RCS) reduction is introduced. The proposed metasurface is comprised of carefully arranged unit cells with spatially varied dimension, which enables approximate uniform diffusion of incoming electromagnetic (EM) energy and reduces the threat from bistatic radar system. An iterative fast Fourier transform (FFT) method for conventional antenna array pattern synthesis is innovatively applied to find the best unit cell geometry parameter arrangement. Finally, a metasurface sample is fabricated and tested to validate RCS reduction behavior predicted by full wave simulation software Ansys HFSSTM and marvelous agreement is observed.

  8. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF TRU AND MIXED WASTES: ACTINIDE SPECIATION AND WASTE VOLUME REDUCTION.

    SciTech Connect

    FRANCIS, A.J.; DODGE, C.J.

    2006-11-16

    The overall goals of this research project are to determine the mechanism of microbial dissolution and stabilization of actinides in Department of Energy's (DOE) TRU wastes, contaminated sludges, soils, and sediments. This includes (1) investigations on the fundamental aspects of microbially catalyzed radionuclide and metal transformations (oxidation/reduction reactions, dissolution, precipitation, chelation); (2) understanding of the microbiological processes that control speciation and alter the chemical forms of complex inorganic/organic contaminant mixtures; and (3) development of new and improved microbially catalyzed processes resulting in immobilization of metals and radionuclides in the waste with concomitant waste volume reduction.

  9. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF TRU AND MIXED WASTES: ACTINIDE SPECIATION AND WASTE VOLUME REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    2006-06-01

    The overall goals of this research project are to determine the mechanism of microbial dissolution and stabilization of actinides in Department of Energy’s (DOE) TRU wastes, contaminated sludges, soils, and sediments. This includes (i) investigations on the fundamental aspects of microbially catalyzed radionuclide and metal transformations (oxidation/reduction reactions, dissolution, precipitation, chelation); (ii) understanding of the microbiological processes that control speciation and alter the chemical forms of complex inorganic/organic contaminant mixtures; and (iii) development of new and improved microbially catalyzed processes resulting in immobilization of metals and radionuclides in the waste with concomitant waste volume reduction.

  10. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF TRU AND MIXED WASTES: ACTINIDE SPECIATION AND WASTE VOLUME REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    2006-06-01

    The overall goals of this research project are to determine the mechanism of microbial dissolution and stabilization of actinides in Department of Energy's (DOE) TRU wastes, contaminated sludges, soils, and sediments. This includes (1) investigations on the fundamental aspects of microbially catalyzed radionuclide and metal transformations (oxidation/reduction reactions, dissolution, precipitation, chelation); (2) understanding of the microbiological processes that control speciation and alter the chemical forms of complex inorganic/organic contaminant mixtures; and (3) development of new and improved microbially catalyzed processes resulting in immobilization of metals and radionuclides in the waste with concomitant waste volume reduction.

  11. Adaptive Bayesian-based speck-reduction in SAR images using complex wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning; Yan, Wei; Zhang, Peng

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, an improved adaptive speckle reduction method is presented based on dual tree complex wavelet transform (CWT). It combines the characteristics of additive noise reduction of soft thresholding with the CWT's directional selectivity, being its main contribution to adapt the effective threshold to preserve the edge detail. A Bayesian estimator is applied to the decomposed data also to estimate the best value for the noise-free complex wavelet coefficients. This estimation is based on alpha-stable and Gaussian distribution hypotheses for complex wavelet coefficients of the signal and noise, respectively. Experimental results show that the denoising performance is among the state-of-the-art techniques based on real discrete wavelet transform (DWT).

  12. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-Induced Fe(III) Reduction Facilitates Roxarsone Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guowei; Ke, Zhengchen; Liang, Tengfang; Liu, Li; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although microbial activity and associated iron (oxy)hydroxides are known in general to affect the environmental dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid (roxarsone), the mechanistic understanding of the underlying biophysico-chemical processes remains unclear due to limited experimental information. We studied how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 –a widely distributed metal-reducing bacterium, in the presence of dissolved Fe(III), affects roxarsone transformations and biogeochemical cycling in a model aqueous system. The results showed that the MR-1 strain was able to anaerobically use roxarsone as a terminal electron acceptor and to convert it to a single product, 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzene arsonic acid (AHBAA). The presence of Fe(III) stimulated roxarsone transformation via MR-1-induced Fe(III) reduction, whereby the resulting Fe(II) acted as an efficient reductant for roxarsone transformation. In addition, the subsequent secondary Fe(III)/Fe(II) mineralization created conditions for adsorption of organoarsenic compounds to the yielded precipitates and thereby led to arsenic immobilization. The study provided direct evidence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-induced direct and Fe(II)-associated roxarsone transformation. Quantitative estimations revealed a candidate mechanism for the early-stage environmental dynamics of roxarsone in nature, which is essential for understanding the environmental dynamics of roxarsone and successful risk assessment. PMID:27100323

  13. Transformation products of submicron-sized aluminum-substituted magnetite: Color and reductant solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetite, when present as fine particles, is soluble in acid ammonium oxalate (pH equals 3). However, the commonly used extractant for free iron oxides (i.e., citrate dithionite-bicarbonate (CDB) is not very effective in dissolving magnetite in soils and geologic materials. Upon oxidation, magnetite transforms to maghemite; at elevated temperatures, maghemite inverts to hematite. This transformation causes a change in color from black to red and may affect the reductant solubility as well. The objectives here were to examine the color and reflectance spectral characteristics of products during the transformation of magnetite to maghemite to hematite and to study the effect of Al-substitution in magnetite on the above process. Reductant solubility of Al-substituted magnetite, maghemite, and hematite was also studied. In summary, the transformation of magnetite to maghemite was accompanied by a change in color from black to red because of the oxidation of Fe2(+) to Fe3(+). The phase change maghemite to hematite had a relatively minor effect on the color and the reflectance spectra.

  14. Damage Detection on Sudden Stiffness Reduction Based on Discrete Wavelet Transform

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Chen, Zhi-wei; Wang, Gan-jun; Xie, Wei-ping

    2014-01-01

    The sudden stiffness reduction in a structure may cause the signal discontinuity in the acceleration responses close to the damage location at the damage time instant. To this end, the damage detection on sudden stiffness reduction of building structures has been actively investigated in this study. The signal discontinuity of the structural acceleration responses of an example building is extracted based on the discrete wavelet transform. It is proved that the variation of the first level detail coefficients of the wavelet transform at damage instant is linearly proportional to the magnitude of the stiffness reduction. A new damage index is proposed and implemented to detect the damage time instant, location, and severity of a structure due to a sudden change of structural stiffness. Numerical simulation using a five-story shear building under different types of excitation is carried out to assess the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed damage index for the building at different damage levels. The sensitivity of the damage index to the intensity and frequency range of measurement noise is also investigated. The made observations demonstrate that the proposed damage index can accurately identify the sudden damage events if the noise intensity is limited. PMID:24991647

  15. Biotic and Abiotic Reduction and Solubilization of Pu(IV)O2•xH2O(am) as Affected by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Plymale, Andrew E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.; Bolton, Harvey

    2012-01-24

    In the presence of hydrogen (H{sub 2}), the synthetic chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), and the electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens both reductively solubilized 100% of added 0.5 mM plutonium (IV) hydrous oxide (Pu(IV)O{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}) in {approx}24 h at pH 7 in a non-complexing buffer. In the absence of AQDS, bioreduction was much slower ({approx}22 days) and less extensive ({approx}83-94%). In the absence of DMRB but under comparable conditions, 89% (without AQDS) to 98% (with AQDS) of added 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was reductively solubilized over 418 days. Under comparable conditions but in the absence of EDTA, <0.001% of the 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was solubilized, with or without bacteria. However, Pu(aq) increased by as much as an order of magnitude in some EDTA-free treatments, both biotic and abiotic, and increases in solubility were associated with the production of both Pu(OH)3(am) and Pu(III)(aq). Incubation with DMRB in the absence of EDTA increased the polymeric and crystalline content of the PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} and also decreased Pu solubility in 6-N HCl. Results from an in vitro assay demonstrated electron transfer to PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} from the S. oneidensis outer-membrane c-type cytochrome MtrC, and EDTA increased the oxidation of MtrC by PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}. Our results suggest that PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} biotic and abiotic reduction and solubilization may be important in anoxic, reducing environments, especially where complexing ligands and electron shuttling compounds are present.

  16. Genotoxic and carcinogenic products arising from reductive transformations of the azo dye, Disperse Yellow 7.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Vimal K; Shirin, Salma; Aman, Ahmed M; de Solla, Shane R; Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Langlois, Valerie S

    2016-03-01

    Selected aromatic azo and benzidine based dyes are priority compounds under the Government of Canada's Chemical Management Plan (CMP) for environmental risk assessments. Organic compounds undergo chemical and biological transformations when they interact with environmental matrices and biotic species; identifying the transformation products is thus a critical component of the risk assessment process. Here, we used zero valent iron (ZVI) to initiate the reduction of the diazo compound dye Disperse Yellow 7 (DY 7). Using state-of-the-art accurate mass Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-QToF-MS), four transformation products were conclusively identified, while a fifth product was tentatively ascertained. The conclusively established transformation products included p-phenylenediamine (p-PDA, a known genotoxin), 4-aminoazobenzene (4-AAB, a category 2 carcinogen) and 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP, a category 1 human carcinogen). 4-ABP is thought to form via a benzidine rearrangement; this is the first report of DY 7 undergoing a benzidine rearrangement. Given the importance of reduction processes in the metabolism of organic contaminants by aquatic species, we used LC-MS/MS to analyze sediment samples that had been generated previously upon exposure of Western clawed frogs (Silurana tropicalis) to DY 7 (at exposure levels where cellular stress was observed in S. tropicalis). We found p-PDA, 4-AAB, and 4-ABP were present in all exposures, but not in any of the sediment controls, demonstrating that upon release of DY 7 to the aquatic environment, sediment dwelling organisms will metabolize DY 7 to generate known (and suspected) human carcinogens, including through a previously unreported in vivo benzidine rearrangement to produce 4-ABP.

  17. Powerline interference reduction in ECG signals using empirical wavelet transform and adaptive filtering.

    PubMed

    Singh, Omkar; Sunkaria, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Separating an information-bearing signal from the background noise is a general problem in signal processing. In a clinical environment during acquisition of an electrocardiogram (ECG) signal, The ECG signal is corrupted by various noise sources such as powerline interference (PLI), baseline wander and muscle artifacts. This paper presents novel methods for reduction of powerline interference in ECG signals using empirical wavelet transform (EWT) and adaptive filtering. The proposed methods are compared with the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) based PLI cancellation methods. A total of six methods for PLI reduction based on EMD and EWT are analysed and their results are presented in this paper. The EWT-based de-noising methods have less computational complexity and are more efficient as compared with the EMD-based de-noising methods.

  18. Transformative Reduction of Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Opportunities for Change in Technologies and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vimmerstedt, Laura; Brown, Austin; Newes, Emily; Markel, Tony; Schroeder, Alex; Zhang, Yimin; Chipman, Peter; Johnson, Shawn

    2015-04-30

    The transportation sector is changing, influenced by concurrent, ongoing, dynamic trends that could dramatically affect the future energy landscape, including effects on the potential for greenhouse gas emissions reductions. Battery cost reductions and improved performance coupled with a growing number of electric vehicle model offerings are enabling greater battery electric vehicle market penetration, and advances in fuel cell technology and decreases in hydrogen production costs are leading to initial fuel cell vehicle offerings. Radically more efficient vehicles based on both conventional and new drivetrain technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions per vehicle-mile. Net impacts also depend on the energy sources used for propulsion, and these are changing with increased use of renewable energy and unconventional fossil fuel resources. Connected and automated vehicles are emerging for personal and freight transportation systems and could increase use of low- or non-emitting technologies and systems; however, the net effects of automation on greenhouse gas emissions are uncertain. The longstanding trend of an annual increase in transportation demand has reversed for personal vehicle miles traveled in recent years, demonstrating the possibility of lower-travel future scenarios. Finally, advanced biofuel pathways have continued to develop, highlighting low-carbon and in some cases carbon-negative fuel pathways. We discuss the potential for transformative reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions through these emerging transportation-sector technologies and trends and present a Clean Transportation Sector Initiative scenario for such reductions, which are summarized in Table ES-1.

  19. Diagnosing Abiotic Degradation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abiotic degradation of chlorinated solvents in ground water can be difficult to diagnose. Under current practice, most of the “evidence” is negative; specifically the apparent disappearance of chlorinated solvents with an accumulation of vinyl chloride, ethane, ethylene, or ...

  20. Final Report for "Toward Quantifying Kinetics of Biotic and Abiotic Metal Reduction with Electrical Geophysical Methods" DE-FG02-08ER64520

    SciTech Connect

    Singha, Kamini; Brantley, Susan

    2012-06-07

    Although changes in the bulk electrical conductivity in aquifers have been attributed to microbial activity, electrical conductivity has never been used to infer biogeochemical reaction rates quantitatively. To explore the use of electrical conductivity to measure reaction rates, we conducted iron oxide reduction experiments of increasing biological complexity. To quantify reaction rates, we proposed composite reactions that incorporated the stiochiometry of five different types of reactions: redox, acid-based, sorption, dissolution/precipitation, and biosynthesis. In batch and column experiments, such reaction stiochiometries inferred from a few chemical measurements allowed quantification of the Fe-oxide reduction rate based on changes in electrical conductivity. The relationship between electrical conductivity and fluid chemistry did not hold during the latter stages of the column experiment when electrical conductivity increased while fluid chemistry remained constant. Growth of an electrically conductive biofilm could explain this late stage electrical conductivity increase. This work demonstrates that measurements of electrical conductivity and flow rate, combined with a few direct chemical measurements, can be used to quantify biogeochemical reaction rates in controlled laboratory situations and may be able to detect the presence of biofilms.

  1. Notes on "Soliton solutions by Darboux transformation and some reductions for a new Hamiltonian lattice hierarchy" [Phys. Scr. 82 (2010) 015008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xi-Xiang

    We demonstrate that the Darboux transformation in the paper "Soliton solutions by Darboux transformation and some reductions for a new Hamiltonian lattice hierarchy" [Phys. Scr. 82 (2010) 015008] is incorrect, and establish a correct Darboux transformation.

  2. A Novel Nonlinear Companding Transform for PAPR Reduction in Lattice-OFDM System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Siming; Shen, Yuehong; Yuan, Zhigang; Jian, Wei; Miao, Yuwei

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a novel companding scheme is proposed to reduce the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of lattice orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (LOFDM) system. By transforming the statistics of original signals into a specified distribution form, which is defined by a continuous sine function, this scheme can achieve a simple companding form as well as an improved PAPR and bit-error-rate (BER) performance. Moreover, by introducing the variable companding parameters in the desired probability density function (PDF), a great design flexibility in the companding form and an effective trade-off between the PAPR reduction and BER performance can be achieved to satisfy various system demands. The general formulas of the proposed scheme are derived and a theoretical analysis regarding the achievable transform gain and the selection criteria of companding parameters are also conducted. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme can substantially outperform the conventional μ-law companding, exponential companding (EC), piecewise companding (PC) in terms of PAPR reduction, BER performance and bandwidth efficiency.

  3. Pathways for abiotic organic synthesis at submarine hydrothermal fields

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Jill M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; German, Christopher R.; Sylva, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Arguments for an abiotic origin of low-molecular weight organic compounds in deep-sea hot springs are compelling owing to implications for the sustenance of deep biosphere microbial communities and their potential role in the origin of life. Theory predicts that warm H2-rich fluids, like those emanating from serpentinizing hydrothermal systems, create a favorable thermodynamic drive for the abiotic generation of organic compounds from inorganic precursors. Here, we constrain two distinct reaction pathways for abiotic organic synthesis in the natural environment at the Von Damm hydrothermal field and delineate spatially where inorganic carbon is converted into bioavailable reduced carbon. We reveal that carbon transformation reactions in a single system can progress over hours, days, and up to thousands of years. Previous studies have suggested that CH4 and higher hydrocarbons in ultramafic hydrothermal systems were dependent on H2 generation during active serpentinization. Rather, our results indicate that CH4 found in vent fluids is formed in H2-rich fluid inclusions, and higher n-alkanes may likely be derived from the same source. This finding implies that, in contrast with current paradigms, these compounds may form independently of actively circulating serpentinizing fluids in ultramafic-influenced systems. Conversely, widespread production of formate by ΣCO2 reduction at Von Damm occurs rapidly during shallow subsurface mixing of the same fluids, which may support anaerobic methanogenesis. Our finding of abiogenic formate in deep-sea hot springs has significant implications for microbial life strategies in the present-day deep biosphere as well as early life on Earth and beyond. PMID:26056279

  4. Pathways for abiotic organic synthesis at submarine hydrothermal fields.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Jill M; Seewald, Jeffrey S; German, Christopher R; Sylva, Sean P

    2015-06-23

    Arguments for an abiotic origin of low-molecular weight organic compounds in deep-sea hot springs are compelling owing to implications for the sustenance of deep biosphere microbial communities and their potential role in the origin of life. Theory predicts that warm H2-rich fluids, like those emanating from serpentinizing hydrothermal systems, create a favorable thermodynamic drive for the abiotic generation of organic compounds from inorganic precursors. Here, we constrain two distinct reaction pathways for abiotic organic synthesis in the natural environment at the Von Damm hydrothermal field and delineate spatially where inorganic carbon is converted into bioavailable reduced carbon. We reveal that carbon transformation reactions in a single system can progress over hours, days, and up to thousands of years. Previous studies have suggested that CH4 and higher hydrocarbons in ultramafic hydrothermal systems were dependent on H2 generation during active serpentinization. Rather, our results indicate that CH4 found in vent fluids is formed in H2-rich fluid inclusions, and higher n-alkanes may likely be derived from the same source. This finding implies that, in contrast with current paradigms, these compounds may form independently of actively circulating serpentinizing fluids in ultramafic-influenced systems. Conversely, widespread production of formate by ΣCO2 reduction at Von Damm occurs rapidly during shallow subsurface mixing of the same fluids, which may support anaerobic methanogenesis. Our finding of abiogenic formate in deep-sea hot springs has significant implications for microbial life strategies in the present-day deep biosphere as well as early life on Earth and beyond.

  5. Abiotic origin of biopolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Stephen-Sherwood, E.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of methods have been investigated in different laboratories for the polymerization of amino acids and nucleotides under abiotic conditions. They include (1) thermal polymerization; (2) direct polymerization of certain amino acid nitriles, amides, or esters; (3) polymerization using polyphosphate esters; (4) polymerization under aqueous or drying conditions at moderate temperatures using a variety of simple catalysts or condensing agents like cyanamide, dicyandiamide, or imidazole; and (5) polymerization under similar mild conditions but employing activated monomers or abiotically synthesized high-energy compounds such as adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). The role and significance of these methods for the synthesis of oligopeptides and oligonucleotides under possible primitive-earth conditions is evaluated. It is concluded that the more recent approach involving chemical processes similar to those used by contemporary living organisms appears to offer a reasonable solution to the prebiotic synthesis of these biopolymers.

  6. Method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography using the Anscombe transformation

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Lucas R.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work proposes an accurate method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography starting from a clinical image acquired with a standard dose. Methods: The method developed in this work consists of scaling a mammogram acquired at the standard radiation dose and adding signal-dependent noise. The algorithm accounts for specific issues relevant in digital mammography images, such as anisotropic noise, spatial variations in pixel gain, and the effect of dose reduction on the detective quantum efficiency. The scaling process takes into account the linearity of the system and the offset of the detector elements. The inserted noise is obtained by acquiring images of a flat-field phantom at the standard radiation dose and at the simulated dose. Using the Anscombe transformation, a relationship is created between the calculated noise mask and the scaled image, resulting in a clinical mammogram with the same noise and gray level characteristics as an image acquired at the lower-radiation dose. Results: The performance of the proposed algorithm was validated using real images acquired with an anthropomorphic breast phantom at four different doses, with five exposures for each dose and 256 nonoverlapping ROIs extracted from each image and with uniform images. The authors simulated lower-dose images and compared these with the real images. The authors evaluated the similarity between the normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and power spectrum (PS) of simulated images and real images acquired with the same dose. The maximum relative error was less than 2.5% for every ROI. The added noise was also evaluated by measuring the local variance in the real and simulated images. The relative average error for the local variance was smaller than 1%. Conclusions: A new method is proposed for simulating dose reduction in clinical mammograms. In this method, the dependency between image noise and image signal is addressed using a novel application of the Anscombe

  7. Iron and Carbon Dynamics during Aging and Reductive Transformation of Biogenic Ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Cismasu, A Cristina; Williams, Kenneth H; Nico, Peter S

    2016-01-05

    Natural organic matter is often associated with Fe(III) oxyhydroxides, and may be stabilized as a result of coprecipitation or sorption to their surfaces. However, the significance of this association in relation to Fe and C dynamics and biogeochemical cycling, and the mechanisms responsible for organic matter stabilization as a result of interaction with minerals under various environmental conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, etc.) are not entirely understood. The preservation of mineral-bound OM may be affected by OM structure and mineral identity, and bond types between OM and minerals may be central to influencing the stability, transformation and composition of both organic and mineral components under changing environmental conditions. Here we use bulk and submicron-scale spectroscopic synchrotron methods to examine the in situ transformation of OM-bearing, biogenic ferrihydrite stalks (Gallionella ferruginea-like), which formed following injection of oxygenated groundwater into a saturated alluvial aquifer at the Rifle, CO field site. A progression from oxidizing to reducing conditions during an eight-month period triggered the aging and reductive transformation of Gallionella-like ferrihydrite stalks to Fe (hydroxy)carbonates and Fe sulfides, as well as alteration of the composition and amount of OM. Spectromicroscopic measurements showed a gradual decrease in reduced carbon forms (aromatic/alkene, aliphatic C), a relative increase in amide/carboxyl functional groups and a significant increase in carbonate in the stalk structures, and the appearance of organic globules not associated with stalk structures. Biogenic stalks lost ∼30% of their initial organic carbon content. Conversely, a significant increase in bulk organic matter accompanied these transformations. The character of bulk OM changed in parallel with mineralogical transformations, showing an increase in aliphatic, aromatic and amide functional groups. These changes likely occurred as a result of an

  8. Abiotic Bromination of Soil Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Leri, Alessandra C; Ravel, Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Biogeochemical transformations of plant-derived soil organic matter (SOM) involve complex abiotic and microbially mediated reactions. One such reaction is halogenation, which occurs naturally in the soil environment and has been associated with enzymatic activity of decomposer organisms. Building on a recent finding that naturally produced organobromine is ubiquitous in SOM, we hypothesized that inorganic bromide could be subject to abiotic oxidations resulting in bromination of SOM. Through lab-based degradation treatments of plant material and soil humus, we have shown that abiotic bromination of particulate organic matter occurs in the presence of a range of inorganic oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide and assorted forms of ferric iron, producing both aliphatic and aromatic forms of organobromine. Bromination of oak and pine litter is limited primarily by bromide concentration. Fresh plant material is more susceptible to bromination than decayed litter and soil humus, due to a labile pool of mainly aliphatic compounds that break down during early stages of SOM formation. As the first evidence of abiotic bromination of particulate SOM, this study identifies a mechanistic source of the natural organobromine in humic substances and the soil organic horizon. Formation of organobromine through oxidative treatments of plant material also provides insights into the relative stability of aromatic and aliphatic components of SOM.

  9. Aggregate-scale heterogeneity in iron (hydr)oxide reductive transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Tufano, K.J.; Benner, S.G.; Mayer, K.U.; Marcus, M.A.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2009-06-15

    There is growing awareness of the complexity of potential reaction pathways and the associated solid-phase transformations during the reduction of Fe (hydr)oxides, especially ferrihydrite. An important observation in static and advective-dominated systems is that microbially produced Fe(II) accelerates Ostwald ripening of ferrihydrite, thus promoting the formation of thermodynamically more stable ferric phases (lepidocrocite and goethite) and, at higher Fe(II) surface loadings, the precipitation of magnetite; high Fe(II) levels can also lead to green rust formation, and with high carbonate levels siderite may also be formed. This study expands this emerging conceptual model to a diffusion-dominated system that mimics an idealized micropore of a ferrihydrite-coated soil aggregate undergoing reduction. Using a novel diffusion cell, coupled with micro-x-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopies, we determined that diffusion-controlled gradients in Fe{sup 2+}{sub (aq)} result in a complex array of spatially distributed secondary mineral phases. At the diffusive pore entrance, where Fe{sup 2+} concentrations are highest, green rust and magnetite are the dominant secondary Fe (hydr)oxides (30 mol% Fe each). At intermediate distances from the inlet, green rust is not observed and the proportion of magnetite decreases from approximately 30 to <10%. Across this same transect, the proportion of goethite increases from undetectable up to >50%. At greater distances from the advective-diffusive boundary, goethite is the dominant phase, comprising between 40 and 95% of the Fe. In the presence of magnetite, lepidocrocite forms as a transient-intermediate phase during ferrihydrite-to-goethite conversion; in the absence of magnetite, conversion to goethite is more limited. These experimental observations, coupled with results of reactive transport modeling, confirm the conceptual model and illustrate the potential importance of diffusion-generated concentration gradients in

  10. Summary of transformation equations and equations of motion used in free flight and wind tunnel data reduction and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gainer, T. G.; Hoffman, S.

    1972-01-01

    Basic formulations for developing coordinate transformations and motion equations used with free-flight and wind-tunnel data reduction are presented. The general forms presented include axes transformations that enable transfer back and forth between any of the five axes systems that are encountered in aerodynamic analysis. Equations of motion are presented that enable calculation of motions anywhere in the vicinity of the earth. A bibliography of publications on methods of analyzing flight data is included.

  11. A Novel Medical Freehand Sketch 3D Model Retrieval Method by Dimensionality Reduction and Feature Vector Transformation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zhang; Sheng, Kang Bao

    2015-01-01

    To assist physicians to quickly find the required 3D model from the mass medical model, we propose a novel retrieval method, called DRFVT, which combines the characteristics of dimensionality reduction (DR) and feature vector transformation (FVT) method. The DR method reduces the dimensionality of feature vector; only the top M low frequency Discrete Fourier Transform coefficients are retained. The FVT method does the transformation of the original feature vector and generates a new feature vector to solve the problem of noise sensitivity. The experiment results demonstrate that the DRFVT method achieves more effective and efficient retrieval results than other proposed methods.

  12. A Novel Medical Freehand Sketch 3D Model Retrieval Method by Dimensionality Reduction and Feature Vector Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Zhang; Sheng, Kang Bao

    2016-01-01

    To assist physicians to quickly find the required 3D model from the mass medical model, we propose a novel retrieval method, called DRFVT, which combines the characteristics of dimensionality reduction (DR) and feature vector transformation (FVT) method. The DR method reduces the dimensionality of feature vector; only the top M low frequency Discrete Fourier Transform coefficients are retained. The FVT method does the transformation of the original feature vector and generates a new feature vector to solve the problem of noise sensitivity. The experiment results demonstrate that the DRFVT method achieves more effective and efficient retrieval results than other proposed methods. PMID:27293478

  13. Final report - Reduction of mercury in saturated subsurface sediments and its potential to mobilize mercury in its elemental form

    SciTech Connect

    Bakray, Tamar

    2013-06-13

    The goal of our project was to investigate Hg(II) reduction in the deep subsurface. We focused on microbial and abiotic pathways of reduction and explored how it affected the toxicity and mobility of Hg in this unique environment. The project’s tasks included: 1. Examining the role of mer activities in the reduction of Hg(II) in denitrifying enrichment cultures; 2. Investigating the biotic/abiotic reduction of Hg(II) under iron reducing conditions; 3. Examining Hg(II) redox transformations under anaerobic conditions in subsurface sediments from DOE sites.

  14. Retrieval of atmospheric CH4 profiles from Fourier transform infrared data using dimension reduction and MCMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukiainen, S.; Railo, J.; Laine, M.; Hakkarainen, J.; Kivi, R.; Heikkinen, P.; Chen, H.; Tamminen, J.

    2016-09-01

    We introduce an inversion method that uses dimension reduction for the retrieval of atmospheric methane (CH4) profiles. Uncertainty analysis is performed using the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) statistical estimation. These techniques are used to retrieve CH4 profiles from the ground-based spectral measurements by the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) instrument at Sodankylä (67.4°N, 26.6°E), Northern Finland. The Sodankylä FTS is part of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON), a global network that observes solar spectra in near-infrared wavelengths. The high spectral resolution of the data provides approximately 3 degrees of freedom about the vertical structure of CH4 between around 0 and 40 km. We reduce the dimension of the inverse problem by using principal component analysis. Smooth and realistic profiles are sought by estimating three parameters for the profile shape. We use Bayesian framework with adaptive MCMC to better characterize the full posterior distribution of the solution and uncertainties related to the retrieval. The retrieved profiles are validated against in situ AirCore soundings which provide an accurate reference up to 20-30 km. The method is presented in a general form, so that it can easily be adapted for other applications, such as different trace gases or satellite-borne measurements where more accurate profile information and better analysis of the uncertainties would be highly valuable.

  15. Speckle noise reduction in ultrasound images using a discrete wavelet transform-based image fusion technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Ho; Lee, Ju Hwan; Kim, Sung Min; Park, Sung Yun

    2015-01-01

    Here, the speckle noise in ultrasonic images is removed using an image fusion-based denoising method. To optimize the denoising performance, each discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and filtering technique was analyzed and compared. In addition, the performances were compared in order to derive the optimal input conditions. To evaluate the speckle noise removal performance, an image fusion algorithm was applied to the ultrasound images, and comparatively analyzed with the original image without the algorithm. As a result, applying DWT and filtering techniques caused information loss and noise characteristics, and did not represent the most significant noise reduction performance. Conversely, an image fusion method applying SRAD-original conditions preserved the key information in the original image, and the speckle noise was removed. Based on such characteristics, the input conditions of SRAD-original had the best denoising performance with the ultrasound images. From this study, the best denoising technique proposed based on the results was confirmed to have a high potential for clinical application.

  16. ORBS: A data reduction software for the imaging Fourier transform spectrometers SpIOMM and SITELLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T.; Drissen, L.; Joncas, G.

    2012-09-01

    SpIOMM (Spectromètre-Imageur de l'Observatoire du Mont Mégantic) is still the only operational astronomical Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) capable of obtaining the visible spectrum of every source of light in a field of view of 12 arc-minutes. Even if it has been designed to work with both outputs of the Michelson interferometer, up to now only one output has been used. Here we present ORBS (Outils de Réduction Binoculaire pour SpIOMM/SITELLE), the reduction software we designed in order to take advantage of the two output data. ORBS will also be used to reduce the data of SITELLE (Spectromètre-Imageur pour l' Étude en Long et en Large des raies d' Émissions) { the direct successor of SpIOMM, which will be in operation at the Canada-France- Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) in early 2013. SITELLE will deliver larger data cubes than SpIOMM (up to 2 cubes of 34 Go each). We thus have made a strong effort in optimizing its performance efficiency in terms of speed and memory usage in order to ensure the best compliance with the quality characteristics discussed with the CFHT team. As a result ORBS is now capable of reducing 68 Go of data in less than 20 hours using only 5 Go of random-access memory (RAM).

  17. Abiotic degradation of plastic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángeles-López, Y. G.; Gutiérrez-Mayen, A. M.; Velasco-Pérez, M.; Beltrán-Villavicencio, M.; Vázquez-Morillas, A.; Cano-Blanco, M.

    2017-01-01

    Degradable plastics have been promoted as an option to mitigate the environmental impacts of plastic waste. However, there is no certainty about its degradability under different environmental conditions. The effect of accelerated weathering (AW), natural weathering (NW) and thermal oxidation (TO) on different plastics (high density polyethylene, HDPE; oxodegradable high density polyethylene, HDPE-oxo; compostable plastic, Ecovio ® metalized polypropylene, PP; and oxodegradable metalized polypropylene, PP-oxo) was studied. Plastics films were exposed to AW per 110 hours; to NW per 90 days; and to TO per 30 days. Plastic films exposed to AW and NW showed a general loss on mechanical properties. The highest reduction in elongation at break on AW occurred to HDPE-oxo (from 400.4% to 20.9%) and was higher than 90% for HDPE, HDPE-oxo, Ecovio ® and PP-oxo in NW. No substantial evidence of degradation was found on plastics exposed to TO. Oxo-plastics showed higher degradation rates than their conventional counterparts, and the compostable plastic was resistant to degradation in the studied abiotic conditions. This study shows that degradation of plastics in real life conditions will vary depending in both, their composition and the environment.

  18. Coupling of Fe(II) oxidation in illite with nitrate reduction and its role in clay mineral transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Edelmann, Richard E.; Zeng, Qiang; Agrawal, Abinash

    2017-03-01

    In pedogenic and diagenetic processes, clay minerals transform from pre-existing phases to other clay minerals via intermediate interstratified clays. Temperature, pressure, chemical composition of fluids, and time are traditionally considered to be the important geological variables for clay mineral transformations. Nearly ten years ago, the role of microbes was recognized for the first time, where microbial reduction of structural Fe(III) in smectite resulted in formation of illite under ambient conditions within two weeks. However, the opposite process, the oxidation of structural Fe(II) in illite has not been studied and it remains unclear whether or not this process would result in the back reaction, e.g., from illite to smectite. The overall objective of this study was to investigate biological oxidation of structural Fe(II) in illite coupled with nitrate reduction and the effect of this process on clay mineral transformation. Laboratory incubations were set up, where structural Fe(II) in illite served as electron donor, nitrate as electron acceptor, and Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002 as mediator. Solution chemistry and gas composition were monitored over time. Mineralogical transformation resulting from bio-oxidation was characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Our results demonstrated that strain 2002 was able to couple oxidation of structural Fe(II) in illite with reduction of nitrate to N2 with nitrite as a transient intermediate. This oxidation reaction resulted in transformation of illite to smectite and ultimately to kaolinite (illite → smectite → kaolinite transformations). This study illustrates the importance of Fe redox process in mediating the smectite-illite mineral cycle with important implications for Fe redox cycling and mineral evolution in surficial earth environments.

  19. Microbial Transformation of TRU and Mixed Wastes: Actinide Speciation and Waste Volume Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Halada, Gary P.

    2004-12-01

    I. To characterize the biodegradation of cellulosic materials using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy. II. To develop an electrochemical/spectroscopic methodology to characterize TRU waste microbial transformation III. To develop molecular models of TRU complexes in order to understand microbial transformation In all cases, objectives are designed to compliment the efforts from other team members, and will be periodically coordinated through the lead P.I. at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), A.J. Francis.

  20. Elucidating the Role of Electron Shuttles in Reductive Transformations in Anaerobic Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Model studies have demonstrated that electron shuttles (ES) such as dissolved organic matter (DOM) can participate in the reduction of organic contaminants; however, much uncertainty exists concerning the significance of this solution phase pathway for contaminant reduction in na...

  1. Effects of toxicity, aeration, and reductant supply on trichloroethylene transformation by a mixed methanotrophic culture

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Cohen, L. ); McCarty, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The trichloroethylene (TCE) transformation rate and capacity of a mixed methanotrophic culture at room temperature were measured to determine the effects of time without methane (resting), use of an alternative energy source (formate), aeration, and toxicity of TCE and its transformation products. The initial specific TCE transformation rate of resting cells was 0.6 mg of TCE per mg of cells per day, and they had a finite TCE transformation capacity of 0.036 mg of TCE per mg of cells. Formate addition resulted in increased initial specific TCE transformation rates (2.1 mg/mg of cells per day) and elevated transformation capacity (0.073 mg of TCE per mg of cells). Significant declines in methane conversion rates following exposure to TCE were observed for both resting and formate-fed cells, suggesting toxic effects caused by TCE or its transformation products. TCE transformation and methane consumption rates of resting cells decreased with time much more rapidly when cells were shaken and aerated than when they remained dormant, suggesting that the transformation ability of methanotrophs is best preserved by storage under anoxic conditions.

  2. TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    LACKS,S.A.

    2003-10-09

    Transformation, which alters the genetic makeup of an individual, is a concept that intrigues the human imagination. In Streptococcus pneumoniae such transformation was first demonstrated. Perhaps our fascination with genetics derived from our ancestors observing their own progeny, with its retention and assortment of parental traits, but such interest must have been accelerated after the dawn of agriculture. It was in pea plants that Gregor Mendel in the late 1800s examined inherited traits and found them to be determined by physical elements, or genes, passed from parents to progeny. In our day, the material basis of these genetic determinants was revealed to be DNA by the lowly bacteria, in particular, the pneumococcus. For this species, transformation by free DNA is a sexual process that enables cells to sport new combinations of genes and traits. Genetic transformation of the type found in S. pneumoniae occurs naturally in many species of bacteria (70), but, initially only a few other transformable species were found, namely, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Bacillus subtilis (96). Natural transformation, which requires a set of genes evolved for the purpose, contrasts with artificial transformation, which is accomplished by shocking cells either electrically, as in electroporation, or by ionic and temperature shifts. Although such artificial treatments can introduce very small amounts of DNA into virtually any type of cell, the amounts introduced by natural transformation are a million-fold greater, and S. pneumoniae can take up as much as 10% of its cellular DNA content (40).

  3. Abiotic stresses and endophyte effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abiotic stresses consist of nonorganismal, nonpathogenic factors that inhibit plant function. Tall fescue [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh.] is widely symbiotic with a naturally occurring endophytic fungus [Neotyphodium coenophialum (Morgan-Jones and Gams) Glenn, Bacon, and Hanlin], which con...

  4. TRANSFORMER

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-25

    Transformers of a type adapted for use with extreme high power vacuum tubes where current requirements may be of the order of 2,000 to 200,000 amperes are described. The transformer casing has the form of a re-entrant section being extended through an opening in one end of the cylinder to form a coaxial terminal arrangement. A toroidal multi-turn primary winding is disposed within the casing in coaxial relationship therein. In a second embodiment, means are provided for forming the casing as a multi-turn secondary. The transformer is characterized by minimized resistance heating, minimized external magnetic flux, and an economical construction.

  5. Abiotic tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Bongjun; Sain, Trisha; Lacevic, Naida; Bukharina, Daria; Cha, Sang-Ho; Waas, Anthony M.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2017-03-01

    Tooth enamel comprises parallel microscale and nanoscale ceramic columns or prisms interlaced with a soft protein matrix. This structural motif is unusually consistent across all species from all geological eras. Such invariability—especially when juxtaposed with the diversity of other tissues—suggests the existence of a functional basis. Here we performed ex vivo replication of enamel-inspired columnar nanocomposites by sequential growth of zinc oxide nanowire carpets followed by layer-by-layer deposition of a polymeric matrix around these. We show that the mechanical properties of these nanocomposites, including hardness, are comparable to those of enamel despite the nanocomposites having a smaller hard-phase content. Our abiotic enamels have viscoelastic figures of merit (VFOM) and weight-adjusted VFOM that are similar to, or higher than, those of natural tooth enamels—we achieve values that exceed the traditional materials limits of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. VFOM values describe resistance to vibrational damage, and our columnar composites demonstrate that light-weight materials of unusually high resistance to structural damage from shocks, environmental vibrations and oscillatory stress can be made using biomimetic design. The previously inaccessible combinations of high stiffness, damping and light weight that we achieve in these layer-by-layer composites are attributed to efficient energy dissipation in the interfacial portion of the organic phase. The in vivo contribution of this interfacial portion to macroscale deformations along the tooth’s normal is maximized when the architecture is columnar, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of the columnar motif in the enamel of living species. We expect our findings to apply to all columnar composites and to lead to the development of high-performance load-bearing materials.

  6. Abiotic tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Bongjun; Sain, Trisha; Lacevic, Naida; Bukharina, Daria; Cha, Sang-Ho; Waas, Anthony M; Arruda, Ellen M; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2017-03-01

    Tooth enamel comprises parallel microscale and nanoscale ceramic columns or prisms interlaced with a soft protein matrix. This structural motif is unusually consistent across all species from all geological eras. Such invariability-especially when juxtaposed with the diversity of other tissues-suggests the existence of a functional basis. Here we performed ex vivo replication of enamel-inspired columnar nanocomposites by sequential growth of zinc oxide nanowire carpets followed by layer-by-layer deposition of a polymeric matrix around these. We show that the mechanical properties of these nanocomposites, including hardness, are comparable to those of enamel despite the nanocomposites having a smaller hard-phase content. Our abiotic enamels have viscoelastic figures of merit (VFOM) and weight-adjusted VFOM that are similar to, or higher than, those of natural tooth enamels-we achieve values that exceed the traditional materials limits of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. VFOM values describe resistance to vibrational damage, and our columnar composites demonstrate that light-weight materials of unusually high resistance to structural damage from shocks, environmental vibrations and oscillatory stress can be made using biomimetic design. The previously inaccessible combinations of high stiffness, damping and light weight that we achieve in these layer-by-layer composites are attributed to efficient energy dissipation in the interfacial portion of the organic phase. The in vivo contribution of this interfacial portion to macroscale deformations along the tooth's normal is maximized when the architecture is columnar, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of the columnar motif in the enamel of living species. We expect our findings to apply to all columnar composites and to lead to the development of high-performance load-bearing materials.

  7. Coupled biotic-abiotic oxidation of organic matter by biogenic MnO_{2}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Julia; Peña, Jasquelin

    2016-04-01

    Some reactive soil minerals are strongly implicated in stabilising organic matter. However, others can play an active role in the oxidation of organic molecules. In natural systems, layer-type manganese oxide minerals (MnO2) typically occur as biomineral assemblages consisting of mineral particles and microbial biomass. Both the mineral and biological fractions of the assemblage can be powerful oxidants of organic C. The biological compartment relies on a set of enzymes to drive oxidative transformations of reduced C-substrates, whereas MnO2 minerals are strong, less specific abiotic oxidants that are assumed to rely on interfacial interactions between C-substrates and the mineral surface. This project aims to understand the coupling between microbial C mineralization and abiotic C oxidation mediated by MnO2 in bacterial-MnO2 assemblages. Specifically, under conditions of high C turnover, microbial respiration can significantly alter local pH, dissolved oxygen and pool of available reductants, which may modify rates and mechanism of C oxidation by biotic and abiotic components. We first investigated changes in the solution chemistry of Pseudomonas putida suspensions exposed to varying concentrations of glucose, chosen to represent readily bioavailable substrates in soils. Glucose concentrations tested ranged between 0 and 5.5mM and changes in pH, dissolved oxygen and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon were tracked over 48h. We then combined literature review and wet-chemical experiments to compile the pH dependence of rates of organic substrate oxidation by MnO2, including glucose. Our results demonstrate a strong pH dependence for these abiotic reactions. In assemblages of P. putida - MnO2, kinetic limitations for abiotic C oxidation by MnO2 are overcome by changes in biogeochemical conditions that result from bacterial C metabolism. When extrapolated to a soil solution confronted to an input of fresh dissolved organic matter, bacterial C metabolism of the

  8. Thermodynamics of Manganese Oxides at Bulk and Nanoscale: Phase Formation, Transformation, Oxidation-Reduction, and Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkner, Nancy R.

    spinel Mn3O4) for smaller particle size and in the presence of surface hydration. Chemisorption of water onto anhydrous nanophase Mn2O 3 surfaces promotes rapidly reversible redox phase changes at room temperature as confirmed by calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and titration for manganese average oxidation state. Water adsorption microcalorimetry (in situ) at room temperature measured the strongly exothermic integral enthalpy of water adsorption (-103.5 kJ/mol) and monitored the energetics of the redox phase transformation. Hydration-driven redox transformation of anhydrous nanophase Mn(III) 2O3, (high surface enthalpy of anhydrous surfaces 1.77 +/- 0.10 J/m2) to Mn(II,III)3O4 (lower surface enthalpy 0.96 +/- 0.08 J/m2) occurred during the first few doses of water vapor. Surface reduction of nanoparticle bixbyite (Mn 2O3) to hausmannite (Mn3O4) occurs under conditions where no such reactions are seen or expected on grounds of bulk thermodynamics in coarse-grained materials. Layered structure manganese oxides contain alkali or alkaline earth cations and water, are generally fine-grained, and have considerable thermodynamic stability. The surface enthalpies (SE) of layered and tunnel structure complex manganese oxides are significantly lower than those of the binary manganese oxide phases. The SE for hydrous surfaces and overall manganese average oxidation state (AOS) (value in parentheses) are: cryptomelane 0.77 +/- 0.10 J/m 2 (3.78), sodium birnessite 0.69 +/- 0.13 J/m2 (3.56), potassium birnessite 0.55 +/- 0.11 J/m2 (3.52), and calcium birnessite 0.41 +/- 0.11 J/m2 (3.50). Surface enthalpies of hydrous surfaces of the calcium manganese oxide nanosheets are: deltaCa 0.39MnO2.3nH2O 0.75 +/- 0.10 J/m2 (3.89) and deltaCa0.43MnO2.3nH2O 0.57 +/- 0.12 J/m2 (3.68). The surface enthalpy of the complex manganese oxides appears to decrease with decreasing manganese average oxidation state, that is, with greater mixed valence manganese (Mn 3+/4+). Low surface energy suggests loose

  9. SERDP ER-1376 Enhancement of In Situ Bioremediation of Energetic Compounds by Coupled Abiotic/Biotic Processes:Final Report for 2004 - 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Comfort, Steve; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Boparai, Hardiljeet K.; Devary, Brooks J.; Thompson, Karen T.; Phillips, Jerry L.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Girvin, Donald C.; Resch, Charles T.; Shea, Patrick; Fischer, Ashley E.; Durkin, Lisa M.

    2007-08-07

    This project was initiated by SERDP to quantify processes and determine the effectiveness of abiotic/biotic mineralization of energetics (RDX, HMX, TNT) in aquifer sediments by combinations of biostimulation (carbon, trace nutrient additions) and chemical reduction of sediment to create a reducing environment. Initially it was hypothesized that a balance of chemical reduction of sediment and biostimulation would increase the RDX, HMX, and TNT mineralization rate significantly (by a combination of abiotic and biotic processes) so that this abiotic/biotic treatment may be a more efficient for remediation than biotic treatment alone in some cases. Because both abiotic and biotic processes are involved in energetic mineralization in sediments, it was further hypothesized that consideration for both abiotic reduction and microbial growth was need to optimize the sediment system for the most rapid mineralization rate. Results show that there are separate optimal abiotic/biostimulation aquifer sediment treatments for RDX/HMX and for TNT. Optimal sediment treatment for RDX and HMX (which have chemical similarities and similar degradation pathways) is mainly chemical reduction of sediment, which increased the RDX/HMX mineralization rate 100 to150 times (relative to untreated sediment), with additional carbon or trace nutrient addition, which increased the RDX/HMX mineralization rate an additional 3 to 4 times. In contrast, the optimal aquifer sediment treatment for TNT involves mainly biostimulation (glucose addition), which stimulates a TNT/glucose cometabolic degradation pathway (6.8 times more rapid than untreated sediment), degrading TNT to amino-intermediates that irreversibly sorb (i.e., end product is not CO2). The TNT mass migration risk is minimized by these transformation reactions, as the triaminotoluene and 2,4- and 2,6-diaminonitrotoluene products that irreversibly sorb are no longer mobile in the subsurface environment. These transformation rates are increased

  10. Reductive transformation of p-nitrophenol by Fe(II) species: the effect of anionic media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongjuan; Geng, Lina; Wang, Xiaorui; Chen, Rufen; Wei, Yu; Wu, Dong

    2013-12-15

    Electron exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) of iron minerals has been illustrated for understanding the reduction of nitroaromatic compounds (NAC). However, factors influencing Fe(II)-induced the reduction of NAC still remain elusive. In this paper, p-nitrophenol (1.5mM) was selected to explore the effects of pH, the stabilizing ligands (Cl(-), SO4(2-)) of ferrous ions and the extra addition of iron hydroxide on the reduction of NAC via Fe(II) species. The results indicate that the reduction degree of is much lower in SO4(2-) medium than that in Cl(-) medium at pH 7.6. p-Nitrophenol reduction increased in SO4(2-) medium and slightly decreased in Cl(-) medium when Fe hydroxide was extra added. Cl(-) strength (0.01-0.1 mol L(-1)) has no obvious effect on p-NP reduction. SO4(2-) species and its dosage have markedly inhibitory effect on p-NP reduction due to the selective adsorption of SO4(2-) and the formation of sulphated surface complexes on the fresh Fe hydroxide.

  11. Periodic artifact reduction in Fourier transforms of full field atomic resolution images.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Robert; Jiang, Yi; Xin, Huolin L; Kourkoutis, Lena F

    2015-04-01

    The discrete Fourier transform is among the most routine tools used in high-resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). However, when calculating a Fourier transform, periodic boundary conditions are imposed and sharp discontinuities between the edges of an image cause a cross patterned artifact along the reciprocal space axes. This artifact can interfere with the analysis of reciprocal lattice peaks of an atomic resolution image. Here we demonstrate that the recently developed Periodic Plus Smooth Decomposition technique provides a simple, efficient method for reliable removal of artifacts caused by edge discontinuities. In this method, edge artifacts are reduced by subtracting a smooth background that solves Poisson's equation with boundary conditions set by the image's edges. Unlike the traditional windowed Fourier transforms, Periodic Plus Smooth Decomposition maintains sharp reciprocal lattice peaks from the image's entire field of view.

  12. Shape Transformation Following Reduction-Sensitive PEG Cleavage of Polymer/DNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Williford, John-Michael; Ren, Yong; Huang, Kevin; Pan, Deng; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2014-01-01

    PEGylated polycation/DNA micellar nanoparticles have been developed that can undergo shape transformation upon cleavage of the PEG grafts in response to an environmental cue. As a proof-of-principle, DNA nanoparticles with higher PEG grafting density adopting long, worm- and rod-like morphologies, transition to more condensed nanoparticles with spherical and short-rod morphologies upon cleavage of a fraction of the PEG grafts from the copolymer. This shape transformation leads to increased surface charges, correlating with improved transfection efficiency. PMID:25530853

  13. Contributions of Fe Minerals to Abiotic Dechlorination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most applications of enhanced in situ bioremediation are based on biological reductive dechlorination. Anaerobic metabolism can also produce reactive minerals that allow for in situ biogeochemical transformation of chlorinated organic contaminants such as PCE, TCE, and cis-DCE. ...

  14. Reduction and coding of synthetic aperture radar data with Fourier transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilley, David G.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, aboard the Space Radar Laboratory (SRL), the two roles of Fourier Transforms for ocean image synthesis and surface wave analysis have been implemented with a dedicated radar processor to significantly reduce Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ocean data before transmission to the ground. The object was to archive the SAR image spectrum, rather than the SAR image itself, to reduce data volume and capture the essential descriptors of the surface wave field. SAR signal data are usually sampled and coded in the time domain for transmission to the ground where Fourier Transforms are applied both to individual radar pulses and to long sequences of radar pulses to form two-dimensional images. High resolution images of the ocean often contain no striking features and subtle image modulations by wind generated surface waves are only apparent when large ocean regions are studied, with Fourier transforms, to reveal periodic patterns created by wind stress over the surface wave field. Major ocean currents and atmospheric instability in coastal environments are apparent as large scale modulations of SAR imagery. This paper explores the possibility of computing complex Fourier spectrum codes representing SAR images, transmitting the coded spectra to Earth for data archives and creating scenes of surface wave signatures and air-sea interactions via inverse Fourier transformations with ground station processors.

  15. Co-ordinate transforms underpin multiscale modelling and reduction in deterministic and stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A. J.

    2007-12-01

    A persistent feature of complex systems in engineering and science is the emergence of macroscopic, coarse grained, coherent behaviour from microscale interactions. In current modeling, ranging from ecology to materials science, the underlying microscopic mechanisms are known, but the closures to translate microscale knowledge to a large scale macroscopic description are rarely available in closed form. Kevrekidis proposes new 'equation free' computational methodologies to circumvent this stumbling block in multiscale modelling. Nonlinear coordinate transforms underpin analytic techniques that support these computational methodologies. But to do so we must cross multiple space and time scales, in both deterministic and stochastic systems, and where the microstructure is either smooth or detailed. Using examples, I describe progress in using nonlinear coordinate transforms to illuminate such multiscale modelling issues.

  16. The Reduction Of Motion Artifacts In Digital Subtraction Angiography By Geometrical Image Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Pickens, David R.; Mandava, Venkateswara R.; Grefenstette, John J.

    1988-06-01

    In the diagnosis of arteriosclerosis, radio-opaque dye is injected into the interior of the arteries to make them visible. Because of its increased contrast sensitivity, digital subtraction angiography has the potential for providing diagnostic images of arteries with reduced dye volumes. In the conventional technique, a mask image, acquired before the introduction of the dye, is subtracted from the contrast image, acquired after the dye is introduced, to produce a difference image in which only the dye in the arteries is visible. The usefulness of this technique has been severely limited by the image degradation caused by patient motion during image acquisition. This motion produces artifacts in the difference image that obscure the arteries. One technique for dealing with this problem is to reduce the degradation by means of image registration. The registration is carried out by means of a geometrical transformation of the mask image before subtraction so that it is in registration with the contrast image. This paper describes our technique for determining an optimal transformation. We employ a one-to-one elastic mapping and the Jacobian of that mapping to produce a geometrical image transformation. We choose a parameterized class of such mappings and use a heuristic search algorithm to optimize the parameters to minimize the severity of the motion artifacts. To increase the speed of the optimization process we use a statistical image comparison technique that provides a quick approximate evaluation of each image transformation. We present the experimental results of the application of our registration system to mask-contrast pairs, for images acquired from a specially designed phantom (described in a companion paper), and for clinical images.

  17. Identification of thioether intermediates in the reductive transformation of gonyautoxins into saxitoxins by thiols.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Sakai, R; Kodama, M

    2000-08-21

    O-Sulfate group of gonyautoxin I and IV is transformed into methylene to form neosaxitoxin by thiols such as glutathione, a common cellular scavenger, in mild conditions. We isolated the intermediate of this conversion and propose that this reaction proceeds through formation of thiohemiketal, 1,2 shift to form stable thioether intermediate, and then redox exchange at sulfur atom to form the final product.

  18. THE REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION OF PERCHLORATE IN A FRESH WATER SEDIMENT: LABORATORY BATCH STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is widely used as a propellant in solid rocket fuel, and has recently been found in ground, surface, and drinking water, in many cases above the interim action level of 18 ppb. Perchlorate is recalcitrant to chemical reduction, however, studies of perchlorate in pure ...

  19. THE REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION OF PERCHLORATE IN A FRESH WATER SEDIMENT: LABORATORY BATCH STUDIES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is widely used as a propellant in solid rocket fuel, and has recently been found in ground, surface, and drinking water, in many cases above the interim action level of 18 ppb. Perchlorate is recalcitrant to chemical reduction, however, studies of perchlorate in pure ...

  20. ROS Regulation During Abiotic Stress Responses in Crop Plants.

    PubMed

    You, Jun; Chan, Zhulong

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, salt and heat cause reduction of plant growth and loss of crop yield worldwide. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anions (O2 (•-)), hydroxyl radical (OH•) and singlet oxygen ((1)O2) are by-products of physiological metabolisms, and are precisely controlled by enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defense systems. ROS are significantly accumulated under abiotic stress conditions, which cause oxidative damage and eventually resulting in cell death. Recently, ROS have been also recognized as key players in the complex signaling network of plants stress responses. The involvement of ROS in signal transduction implies that there must be coordinated function of regulation networks to maintain ROS at non-toxic levels in a delicate balancing act between ROS production, involving ROS generating enzymes and the unavoidable production of ROS during basic cellular metabolism, and ROS-scavenging pathways. Increasing evidence showed that ROS play crucial roles in abiotic stress responses of crop plants for the activation of stress-response and defense pathways. More importantly, manipulating ROS levels provides an opportunity to enhance stress tolerances of crop plants under a variety of unfavorable environmental conditions. This review presents an overview of current knowledge about homeostasis regulation of ROS in crop plants. In particular, we summarize the essential proteins that are involved in abiotic stress tolerance of crop plants through ROS regulation. Finally, the challenges toward the improvement of abiotic stress tolerance through ROS regulation in crops are discussed.

  1. ROS Regulation During Abiotic Stress Responses in Crop Plants

    PubMed Central

    You, Jun; Chan, Zhulong

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, salt and heat cause reduction of plant growth and loss of crop yield worldwide. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anions (O2•-), hydroxyl radical (OH•) and singlet oxygen (1O2) are by-products of physiological metabolisms, and are precisely controlled by enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defense systems. ROS are significantly accumulated under abiotic stress conditions, which cause oxidative damage and eventually resulting in cell death. Recently, ROS have been also recognized as key players in the complex signaling network of plants stress responses. The involvement of ROS in signal transduction implies that there must be coordinated function of regulation networks to maintain ROS at non-toxic levels in a delicate balancing act between ROS production, involving ROS generating enzymes and the unavoidable production of ROS during basic cellular metabolism, and ROS-scavenging pathways. Increasing evidence showed that ROS play crucial roles in abiotic stress responses of crop plants for the activation of stress-response and defense pathways. More importantly, manipulating ROS levels provides an opportunity to enhance stress tolerances of crop plants under a variety of unfavorable environmental conditions. This review presents an overview of current knowledge about homeostasis regulation of ROS in crop plants. In particular, we summarize the essential proteins that are involved in abiotic stress tolerance of crop plants through ROS regulation. Finally, the challenges toward the improvement of abiotic stress tolerance through ROS regulation in crops are discussed. PMID:26697045

  2. The social logic of naloxone: Peer administration, harm reduction, and the transformation of social policy.

    PubMed

    Faulkner-Gurstein, Rachel

    2017-03-09

    This paper examines overdose prevention programs based on peer administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone. The data for this study consist of 40 interviews and participant observation of 10 overdose prevention training sessions at harm reduction agencies in the Bronx, New York, conducted between 2010 and 2012. This paper contends that the social logic of peer administration is as central to the success of overdose prevention as is naloxone's pharmacological potency. Whereas prohibitionist drug policies seek to isolate drug users from the spaces and cultures of drug use, harm reduction strategies like peer-administered naloxone treat the social contexts of drug use as crucial resources for intervention. Such programs utilize the expertise, experience, and social connections gained by users in their careers as users. In revaluing the experience of drug users, naloxone facilitates a number of harm reduction goals. But it also raises complex questions about responsibility and risk. This paper concludes with a discussion of how naloxone's social logic illustrates the contradictions within broader neoliberal trends in social policy.

  3. Abiotic methane formation during experimental serpentinization of olivine.

    PubMed

    McCollom, Thomas M

    2016-12-06

    Fluids circulating through actively serpentinizing systems are often highly enriched in methane (CH4). In many cases, the CH4 in these fluids is thought to derive from abiotic reduction of inorganic carbon, but the conditions under which this process can occur in natural systems remain unclear. In recent years, several studies have reported abiotic formation of CH4 during experimental serpentinization of olivine at temperatures at or below 200 °C. However, these results seem to contradict studies conducted at higher temperatures (300 °C to 400 °C), where substantial kinetic barriers to CH4 synthesis have been observed. Here, the potential for abiotic formation of CH4 from dissolved inorganic carbon during olivine serpentinization is reevaluated in a series of laboratory experiments conducted at 200 °C to 320 °C. A (13)C-labeled inorganic carbon source was used to unambiguously determine the origin of CH4 generated in the experiments. Consistent with previous high-temperature studies, the results indicate that abiotic formation of CH4 from reduction of dissolved inorganic carbon during the experiments is extremely limited, with nearly all of the observed CH4 derived from background sources. The results indicate that the potential for abiotic synthesis of CH4 in low-temperature serpentinizing environments may be much more limited than some recent studies have suggested. However, more extensive production of CH4 was observed in one experiment performed under conditions that allowed an H2-rich vapor phase to form, suggesting that shallow serpentinization environments where a separate gas phase is present may be more favorable for abiotic synthesis of CH4.

  4. Abiotic methane formation during experimental serpentinization of olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollom, Thomas M.

    2016-12-01

    Fluids circulating through actively serpentinizing systems are often highly enriched in methane (CH4). In many cases, the CH4 in these fluids is thought to derive from abiotic reduction of inorganic carbon, but the conditions under which this process can occur in natural systems remain unclear. In recent years, several studies have reported abiotic formation of CH4 during experimental serpentinization of olivine at temperatures at or below 200 °C. However, these results seem to contradict studies conducted at higher temperatures (300 °C to 400 °C), where substantial kinetic barriers to CH4 synthesis have been observed. Here, the potential for abiotic formation of CH4 from dissolved inorganic carbon during olivine serpentinization is reevaluated in a series of laboratory experiments conducted at 200 °C to 320 °C. A 13C-labeled inorganic carbon source was used to unambiguously determine the origin of CH4 generated in the experiments. Consistent with previous high-temperature studies, the results indicate that abiotic formation of CH4 from reduction of dissolved inorganic carbon during the experiments is extremely limited, with nearly all of the observed CH4 derived from background sources. The results indicate that the potential for abiotic synthesis of CH4 in low-temperature serpentinizing environments may be much more limited than some recent studies have suggested. However, more extensive production of CH4 was observed in one experiment performed under conditions that allowed an H2-rich vapor phase to form, suggesting that shallow serpentinization environments where a separate gas phase is present may be more favorable for abiotic synthesis of CH4.

  5. Microbial Transformations of TRU and Mixed Wastes: Actinide Speciation and Waste Volume Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Halada, Gary P.

    2005-06-01

    Cellosic samples were prepared 1/29/92 at BNL from various sources, including white and brown paper towel, and Kimwipes. The mixed cellulosics were cut into 1 cm x 1 cm squares and transferred to glass serum bottles and various treatments were conducted: unamended (U) samples were filled with nitrogen-purged brine from G-Seep (4.1 M Na+ and 5.1 Cl- with minor amounts of Mg, K, and Ca and 0.3 M sulfate (Brush, 1990)); unamended/inoculated (UI) samples were filled with bacteria-containing surface lake water, sediment, and halite from the underground at the WIPP site; amended/inoculated (AI) samples were inoculated in this fashion and amended with nutrients; and amended/inoculated/excess nitrate (AINO3) samples were inoculated with excess nitrate in the form of KNO3 (5 g L-1 (49.5 mM)). Further information on sample preparation is available. All samples were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) at SBU to identify any transformations in cellulosic material which may have occurred during treatment and storage.

  6. Preparation of novel composites based on hydrophilized and functionalized polyacrylonitrile membrane-immobilized NZVI for reductive transformation of metronidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Liu, Peng; Ma, Jun; Liu, Huiling

    2017-02-01

    For the first time, hydrophilized and functionalized polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membrane was synthesized via two-stage process, addition of polyvinyl alcohol and in situ polymerization of acrylic acid (AA), and nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) was incorporated within modified membrane. The as-prepared PAA/PAN-NZVI (PPN) composites possessed superior reactivity for metronidazole (MNZ) with transformation ratio 2.03 and reaction rate 4.77 times higher than that by bare NZVI. Meanwhile, the enhanced stability and recyclability of PPN composites were maintained over repeated cycles. The major advantages of synthetic method lie in the remarkably increased loading and decreased agglomeration of NZVI. Moreover, with hydrophilized and functionalized synthesis processes of membrane, the potential risk of released iron ions was not a concern due to strong chelation of grafted carboxyl groups. Analyses of morphological characteristics (FE-SEM), chemical structure (FTIR), element valence and groups (XPS) of samples confirmed the successful graft of carboxylic acid groups and formation of a uniform iron nanoparticles coating onto PAN matrix. The reaction kinetics of MNZ with PPN composites were well-described by a two-parameter pseudo-first-order decay model with activation energy of 29.5 kJ/mol. The co-solutes except humic acid had a negligible effect on MNZ transformation. Determination of intermediates revealed that nitro reduction, N-denitration and hydroxyethyl cleavage were the main pathways for transformation of MNZ. The findings suggest that the novel composites possess huge potential for antibiotics wastewater treatment.

  7. Effect of liming on sulfate transformation and sulfur gas emissions in degraded vegetable soil treated by reductive soil disinfestation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Tianzhu; Zhu, Tongbin; Zhang, Jinbo; Cai, Zucong

    2015-10-01

    Reductive soil disinfestation (RSD), namely amending organic materials and mulching or flooding to create strong reductive status, has been widely applied to improve degraded soils. However, there is little information available about sulfate (SO4(2-)) transformation and sulfur (S) gas emissions during RSD treatment to degraded vegetable soils, in which S is generally accumulated. To investigate the effects of liming on SO4(2-) transformation and S gas emissions, two SO4(2-)-accumulated vegetable soils (denoted as S1 and S2) were treated by RSD, and RSD plus lime, denoted as RSD0 and RSD1, respectively. The results showed that RSD0 treatment reduced soil SO4(2-) by 51% and 61% in S1 and S2, respectively. The disappeared SO4(2-) was mainly transformed into the undissolved form. During RSD treatment, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were detected, but the total S gas emission accounted for <0.006% of total S in both soils. Compared to RSD0, lime addition stimulated the conversion of SO4(2-) into undissolved form, reduced soil SO4(2-) by 81% in S1 and 84% in S2 and reduced total S gas emissions by 32% in S1 and 57% in S2, respectively. In addition to H2S, COS and DMS, the emissions of carbon disulfide, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl disulfide were also detected in RSD1 treatment. The results indicated that RSD was an effective method to remove SO4(2-), liming stimulates the conversion of dissolved SO4(2-) into undissolved form, probably due to the precipitation with calcium.

  8. Motion artifact reduction using hybrid Fourier transform with phase-shifting methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Beiwen; Liu, Ziping; Zhang, Song

    2016-08-01

    We propose to combine the Fourier transform profilometry (FTP) and phase-shifting profilometry (PSP) to reduce motion induced artifacts. The proposed method can be divided into three steps: Step 1 is to obtain a temporarily unwrapped absolute phase map of the entire scene using the FTP method, albeit the absolute phase map has motion introduced artifacts; Step 2 is to generate continuous relative phase maps without motion artifacts for each isolated object by spatially unwrapping each isolated phase map retrieved from the FTP method; and Step 3 is to determine the absolute phase map for each isolate region by referring to the temporally unwrapped phase using PSP method. Experimental results demonstrated success of the proposed method for measuring rapidly moving multiple isolated objects.

  9. Redox transformation, solid phase speciation and solution dynamics of copper during soil reduction and reoxidation as affected by sulfate availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulda, Beate; Voegelin, Andreas; Ehlert, Katrin; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2013-12-01

    In periodically flooded soils, interactions of Cu with biogenic sulfide formed during soil reduction lead to the precipitation of sparingly soluble Cu-sulfides. In contaminated soils, however, the amounts of Cu can exceed the amount of sulfate available for microbial reduction to sulfide. In laboratory batch experiments, we incubated a paddy soil spiked to ∼4.4 mmol kg-1 (280 mg kg-1) Cu(II) to monitor temporal changes in the concentrations of dissolved Cu and the speciation of solid-phase Cu during 40 days of soil reduction and 28 days of reoxidation as a function of initially available reducible sulfate (0.06, 2.09 or 5.92 mmol kg-1). Using Cu K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy, we found that a large fraction of Cu(II) became rapidly reduced to Cu(I) (23-39%) and Cu(0) (7-17%) before the onset of sulfate reduction. Combination with results from sequential Cu extraction and chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) data suggested that complexation of Cu(I) by reduced organic S groups (Sorg) may be an important process during this early stage. In sulfate-depleted soil, Cu(0) and Cu(I)-Sorg remained the dominant species over the entire reduction period, whereas in soils with sufficient sulfate, initially formed Cu(0) and (remaining) Cu(II) became transformed into Cu-sulfide during continuing sulfate reduction. The formation of Cu(0), Cu(I)-Sorg, and Cu-sulfide led to an effective decrease in dissolved Cu concentrations. Differences in Cu speciation at the end of soil reduction however affected the dynamics of Cu during reoxidation. Whereas Cu(0) was rapidly oxidized to Cu(II), more than half of the S-coordinated Cu fraction persisted over 14 days of aeration. Our results show that precipitation of Cu(0) and complexation of Cu(I) by reduced organic S groups are important processes in periodically flooded soils if sulfide formation is limited by the amount of available sulfate or the duration of soil flooding. The speciation changes of Cu described in this study may also affect the

  10. Chemical Transformation System: Cloud Based ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM) systems that account for the fate/transport of organics frequently require physicochemical properties as well as transformation products. A myriad of chemical property databases exist but these can be difficult to access and often do not contain the proprietary chemicals that environmental regulators must consider. We are building the Chemical Transformation System (CTS) to facilitate model parameterization and analysis. CTS integrates a number of physicochemical property calculators into the system including EPI Suite, SPARC, TEST and ChemAxon. The calculators are heterogeneous in their scientific methodologies, technology implementations and deployment stacks. CTS also includes a chemical transformation processing engine that has been loaded with reaction libraries for human biotransformation, abiotic reduction and abiotic hydrolysis. CTS implements a common interface for the disparate calculators accepting molecular identifiers (SMILES, IUPAC, CAS#, user-drawn molecule) before submission for processing. To make the system as accessible as possible and provide a consistent programmatic interface, we wrapped the calculators in a standardized RESTful Application Programming Interface (API) which makes it capable of servicing a much broader spectrum of clients without constraints to interoperability such as operating system or programming language. CTS is hosted in a shared cloud environment, the Quantitative Environmental

  11. Kinetic studies of phosgene reduction via in-situ Fourier transform infrared analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Chauvel, J. P., Jr.

    1991-04-01

    Phosgene, a common reactant in the production of polyurethanes and polycarbonates, is unfortunately hazardous (threshold limit value equals 0.1 ppm). Consequently, the detection and elimination of atmospheric releases are paramount safety and environmental concerns. Proper design of systems to mitigate phosgene requires knowledge of the reaction kinetics for the chemistry involved. This paper presents our investigation of the reactions for phosgene with steam and ammonia. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) equipped with a large volume (15 L), temperature controlled (+0.5 degree(s)C), 24.5 cm path length cell was used to measure the reaction kinetics. The reaction of phosgene with steam at 110 degree(s)C followed first order kinetics (t1/2 equals 10.2 min.) producing carbon dioxide and hydrogen chloride. The reaction of phosgene with ammonia at 80 degree(s)C followed second order kinetics (t1/2 equals 1.2 min.) producing ammonium chloride and urea. It was found, however, that at 25 degree(s)C this reaction follows a previously unreported pathway producing ammonium chloride and ammonium isocyanate at a faster rate (t1/2 equals 15 sec.). Based on this reaction, a pilot scale scrubbing tower was built with a manifold to mix ammonia with ppm levels of phosgene. A complete description of the experimental conditions, the reaction pathways as a function of temperature, and the performance of the ammonia scrubbing tower are given.

  12. Sequestration of chelated copper by structural Fe(II): Reductive decomplexation and transformation of Cu(II)-EDTA.

    PubMed

    He, Hongping; Wu, Deli; Zhao, Linghui; Luo, Cong; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-05-15

    Chelated coppers, such as Cu(II)-EDTA, are characteristically refractory and difficult to break down because of their high stability and solubility. Cu(II)-EDTA sequestration by structural Fe(II) (Fe(II)) was investigated intensively in this study. Up to 101.21mgCu(II)/gFe(II) was obtained by Fe(II) in chelated copper sequestration under near neutral pH condition (pH 7.70). The mechanism of Cu(II)-EDTA sequestration by Fe(II) was concluded as follows: 3Cu(II)-EDTA+7Fe(II)+9H2O → Cu(0)↓+ Cu2O↓(the major product)+2Fe2O3·H2O↓+3Fe(II)-EDTA +14H(+) Novel results strongly indicate that Cu(II) reductive transformation induced by surface Fe(II) was mainly responsible for chelated copper sequestration. Cu(0) generation was initially facilitated, and subsequent reduction of Cu(II) into Cu(I) was closely combined with the gradual increase of ORP (Oxidation-Reduction Potential). Cu-containing products were inherently stable, but Cu2O would be reoxidized to Cu(II) with extra-aeration, resulting in the release of copper, which was beneficial to Cu reclamation. Concentration diminution of Cu(II)-EDTA within the electric double layer and competitive adsorption were responsible for the negative effects of Ca(2+), Mg(2+). By generating vivianite, PO4(3-) was found to decrease surface Fe(II) content. This study is among the first ones to identify the indispensible role of reductive decomplexation in chelated copper sequestration. Given the high feasibility and reactivity, Fe(II) may provide a potential alternative in chelated metals pollution controlling.

  13. Sustainability of Long-Term Abiotic Attenuation of Chlorinated Ethenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-28

    that contribute to abiotic transformations is critical to assess the feasibility of natural attenuation and promote the rationale design of...anaerobic glovebox. The resulting slurry was mixed for three days and then decanted into polypropylene centrifuge bottles. These bottles were...tightly sealed and centrifuged at 8000 rpm for 10 minutes. The supernatant in the bottles was discarded, and fresh nitrogen-purged deionized water was

  14. Carbon and chlorine isotope analysis to identify abiotic degradation pathways of 1,1,1-trichloroethane.

    PubMed

    Palau, Jordi; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2014-12-16

    This study investigates dual C-Cl isotope fractionation during 1,1,1-TCA transformation by heat-activated persulfate (PS), hydrolysis/dehydrohalogenation (HY/DH) and Fe(0). Compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis of 1,1,1-TCA was performed for the first time, and transformation-associated isotope fractionation ε bulk C and ε bulk Cl values were -4.0 ± 0.2‰ and no chlorine isotope fractionation with PS, -1.6 ± 0.2‰ and -4.7 ± 0.1‰ for HY/DH, -7.8 ± 0.4‰ and -5.2 ± 0.2‰ with Fe(0). Distinctly different dual isotope slopes (Δδ13C/Δδ37Cl): ∞ with PS, 0.33 ± 0.04 for HY/DH and 1.5 ± 0.1 with Fe(0) highlight the potential of this approach to identify abiotic degradation pathways of 1,1,1-TCA in the field. The trend observed with PS agreed with a C-H bond oxidation mechanism in the first reaction step. For HY/DH and Fe(0) pathways, different slopes were obtained although both pathways involve cleavage of a C-Cl bond in their initial reaction step. In contrast to the expected larger primary carbon isotope effects relative to chlorine for C-Cl bond cleavage, ε bulk C < ε bulk Cl was observed for HY/DH and in a similar range for reduction by Fe(0), suggesting the contribution of secondary chlorine isotope effects. Therefore, different magnitude of secondary chlorine isotope effects could at least be partly responsible for the distinct slopes between HY/DH and Fe(0) pathways. Following this dual isotope approach, abiotic transformation processes can unambiguously be identified and quantified.

  15. INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF URANIUM UNDER IRON-REDUCING CONDITIONS: REDUCTION OF UVI BY BIOGENIC FEII/FEIII HYDROXIDE (GREEN RUST)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2006-12-31

    The recent identification of green rusts (GRs) as products of the reduction of FeIII oxyhydroxides by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, coupled with the ability of synthetic (GR) to reduce UVI species to insoluble UO2, suggests that biogenic green rusts (BioGRs) may play an important role in the speciation (and thus mobility) of U in FeIII-reducing environments. The objective of our research was to examine the potential for BioGR to affect the speciation of U under FeIII-reducing conditions. To meet this objective, we designed and executed a hypothesis-driven experimental program to identify key factors leading to the formation of BioGRs as products of dissimilatory FeIII reduction, to determine the key factors controlling the reduction of UVI to UIV by GRs, and to identify the resulting U-bearing mineral phases. The results of this research significantly increase our understanding of the coupling of biotic and abiotic processes with respect to the speciation of U in iron-reducing environments. In particular, the reduction of UVI to UIV by BioGR with the subsequent formation of U-bearing mineral phases may be effective for immobilizing U in suboxic subsurface environments. This information has direct applications to contaminant transport modeling and bioremediation engineering for natural or enhanced in situ remediation of subsurface contamination.

  16. One-Pot Reductive 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition of Secondary Amides: A Two-Step Transformation of Primary Amides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Qiang; Lang, Qi-Wei; Hu, Xiu-Ning

    2016-11-04

    The one-pot reductive 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of secondary aromatic N-(trimethylsilylmethyl)amides with reactive dipolarophiles is reported. The method relies on the in situ generation of nonstabilized NH azomethine ylide dipoles via amide activation with triflic anhydride, partial reduction with 1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDS), and desilylation with cesium fluoride (CsF). Running under mild conditions, the reaction tolerated several sensitive functional groups and provided cycloadducts in 71-93% yields. The use of less reactive dipolarophile methyl acrylate led to the cycloadduct in only 40% yield. A (Z) geometric intermediate of NH-azomethine 1,3-dipole was postulated to account for the observed higher yields and higher cis diastereoselectivity for the substrates bearing an electron-withdrawing group. This model features an unconventional cyclic transition state via carbanion-aryl ring interaction. Because the starting secondary amides can be prepared from common primary amides, the current method also constitutes a two-step transformation of primary amides.

  17. Coupled Abiotic-Biotic Degradation of Bisphenol A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, J.; Prevatte, C.; Campagna, S. R.; Loeffler, F.

    2014-12-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant with weak estrogenic activity. BPA is readily biodegradable with oxygen available, but is recalcitrant to microbial degradation under anoxic conditions. However, BPA is susceptible to abiotic transformation under anoxic conditions. To better understand the fate of BPA in anoxic environments, the kinetics of BPA transformation by manganese oxide (d-MnO2) were investigated. BPA was rapidly transformed by MnO2 with a pseudo-first-order rate constant of 0.413 min-1. NMR and LC-MS analyses identified 4-hydroxycumyl alcohol (HCA) as a major intermediate. Up to 64% of the initial amount of BPA was recovered as HCA within 5 min, but the conversion efficiency decreased with time, suggesting that HCA was further degraded by MnO2. Further experiments confirmed that HCA was also susceptible to transformation by MnO2, albeit at 5-fold lower rates than BPA transformation. Mass balance approaches suggested that HCA was the major BPA transformation intermediate, but other compounds may also be formed. The abiotic transformation of BPA by MnO2 was affected by pH, and 10-fold higher transformation rates were observed at pH 4.5 than at pH 10. Compared to BPA, HCA has a lower octanol-water partitioning coefficient (Log Kow) of 0.76 vs 2.76 for BPA and a higher aqueous solubility of 2.65 g L-1 vs 0.31 g L-1 for BPA, suggesting higher mobility of HCA in the environment. Microcosms established with freshwater sediment materials collected from four geographically distinct locations and amended with HCA demonstrated rapid HCA biodegradation under oxic, but not under anoxic conditions. These findings suggest that BPA is not inert under anoxic conditions and abiotic reactions with MnO2 generate HCA, which has increased mobility and is susceptible to aerobic degradation. Therefore, coupled abiotic-biotic processes can affect the fate and longevity of BPA in terrestrial environments.

  18. Abiotic Organic Chemistry in Hydrothermal Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneit, B. R.; Rushdi, A. I.

    2004-12-01

    Abiotic organic chemistry in hydrothermal systems is of interest to biologists, geochemists and oceanographers. This chemistry consists of thermal alteration of organic matter and minor prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds. Thermal alteration has been extensively documented to yield petroleum and heavy bitumen products from contemporary organic detritus. Carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia and sulfur species have been used as precursors in prebiotic synthesis experiments to organic compounds. These inorganic species are common components of hot spring gases and marine hydrothermal systems. It is of interest to further test their reactivities in reductive aqueous thermolysis. We have synthesized organic compounds (lipids) in aqueous solutions of oxalic acid, and with carbon disulfide or ammonium bicarbonate at temperatures from 175-400° C. The synthetic lipids from oxalic acid solutions consisted of n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkyl formates, n-alkanones, n-alkenes and n-alkanes, typically to C30 with no carbon number preferences. The products from CS2 in acidic aqueous solutions yielded cyclic thioalkanes, alkyl polysulfides, and thioesters with other numerous minor compounds. The synthesis products from oxalic acid and ammonium bicarbonate solutions were homologous series of n-alkyl amides, n-alkyl amines, n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids, also to C30 with no carbon number predominance. Condensation (dehydration) reactions also occur under elevated temperatures in aqueous medium as tested by model reactions to form amide, ester and nitrile bonds. It is concluded that the abiotic formation of aliphatic lipids, condensation products (amides, esters, nitriles, and CS2 derivatives (alkyl polysulfides, cyclic polysulfides) is possible under hydrothermal conditions and warrants further studies.

  19. The abiotic degradation of methyl parathion in anoxic sulfur-containing system mediated by natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Caixiang; Wang, Yanxin; Tang, Mi

    2017-06-01

    Although the kinetics and transformation of methyl parathion have been investigated extensively, its abiotic degradation mechanism in anoxic sulfur-containing groundwater system is still not clear. In this work, the abiotic degradation of methyl parathion in anoxic sulfur-containing system mediated by natural organic matter (NOM) was investigated in batch experiments. It was found that the removal of methyl parathion (up to 80.7%) was greatly improved in sulfide containing NOM compared to those in sulfide alone (with 15.5%) and in NOM alone (almost negligible). Various sulfur species presented significant differences in behaviors methyl parathion degradation, but followed by the pseudo-first-order model well. No facilitated degradation of methyl parathion was observed in sulfite (SO3(2-)) or thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)) containing NOM such as anthraquinone. Although elemental sulfur (S(0)) and cysteine could further improve the degradation rate of methyl parahtion, their impacts was very limited. The removal efficiency of methyl parathion in anoxic sulfur-containing system were related remarkably with NOM concentration and solution pH. Based on the transformation products identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometer (LC/HRMS), both the nitro group reduction and hydrolysis (SN@C) processes by sulfide (HS(-)) were further proved to be two predominant reaction mechanisms for the abiotic degradation of methyl parathion in anoxic sulfur-containing system. The results of this study help to understand the natural attenuation of methyl parathion under anoxic sulfide-containing groundwater system mediated by NOM.

  20. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction.

    PubMed

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-05-05

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth's history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth's crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.

  1. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; ...

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U),more » i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.« less

  2. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.

  3. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    PubMed Central

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  4. Reductive dechlorination pathways of tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene and subsequent transformation of their dechlorination products by mackinawite (FeS) in the presence of metals.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hoon Y; Kim, Haekyung; Hayes, Kim F

    2007-11-15

    Because of frequent co-occurrence of metals with chlorinated organic pollutants, Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Hg(II) were evaluated for their impact on the dechlorination pathways of PCE and TCE and the subsequent transformation of the initial dechlorination products by FeS. PCE transforms to acetylene via beta-elimination, TCE via hydrogenolysis, and 1,1-DCE via alpha-elimination, while TCE transforms to acetylene via beta-elimination and cis-DCE and 1,1-DCE via hydrogenolysis. Acetylene subsequently transforms in FeS batches, but little transformation of cis-DCE and 1,1-DCE was observed. Branching ratio calculations indicate that the added metals decrease the reductive transformation of PCE and TCE via beta-elimination relative to hydrogenolysis, resulting in a higher production of the toxic DCE byproducts. Nonetheless, acetylene is generally the dominant product. Production of highly water-soluble compound(s) is suspected as a significant source for incomplete mass recoveries. In the transformation of PCE and TCE, the formation of unidentified product(s) is most significant in Co(II)-added FeS batches. Although nearly complete mass recoveries were observed in the other FeS batches, the subsequent transformation of acetylene would lead to the formation of unidentified product(s) over long time periods.

  5. Transformation products of antibiotic and cytostatic drugs in the aquatic cycle that result from effluent treatment and abiotic/biotic reactions in the environment: an increasing challenge calling for higher emphasis on measures at the beginning of the pipe.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Tarek; Baginska, Ewelina; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Pharmaceuticals may undergo transformation into new products during almost all possible processes along their life-cycle. This could either take place in the natural water environment and/or during water treatment processes. Numerous studies that address the issue of such transformation products (TPs) have been published, describing selected aspects of TPs in the environment and their formation within effluent and water treatment processes. In order to exemplify the number and quality of information published on TPs, we selected 21 active pharmaceutical ingredients from the groups of antibiotics and antineoplastics, and assessed the knowledge about their TPs that has been published until the end of May 2012. The goal of this work was to demonstrate, that the quality of data on pharmaceutical TPs greatly differs in terms of the availability of chemical structures for each TP, rather than to provide an exhaustive database of available TPs. The aim was to point out the challenge going along with so many TPs formed under different treatment and environmental conditions. An extensive review in the form of a table showing the existing data on 158 TPs for 15 compounds, out of 21 investigated, was presented. Numerous TPs are the result of different treatments and environmental processes. However, also numerous different TPs may be formed within only one type of treatment, applied under sometimes even very similar treatment conditions and treatments times. In general, the growing number of elucidated TPs is rationalized by ineffective removal treatments. Our results demonstrate a severe risk of drowning in much unrelated and non-assessable data, both from a scientific and from a technical treatment-related point of view. Therefore, limiting the input of pharmaceuticals into effluents as well as improving their (bio) degradability and elimination behavior, instead of only relying on advanced effluent treatments, is urgently needed. Solutions that focus on this "beginning of

  6. Abiotic pyrite formation produces a large Fe isotope fractionation.

    PubMed

    Guilbaud, Romain; Butler, Ian B; Ellam, Rob M

    2011-06-24

    The iron isotope composition of sedimentary pyrite has been proposed as a potential proxy to trace microbial metabolism and the redox evolution of the oceans. We demonstrate that Fe isotope fractionation accompanies abiotic pyrite formation in the absence of Fe(II) redox change. Combined fractionation factors between Fe(II)(aq), mackinawite, and pyrite permit the generation of pyrite with Fe isotope signatures that nearly encapsulate the full range of sedimentary δ(56)Fe(pyrite) recorded in Archean to modern sediments. We propose that Archean negative Fe isotope excursions reflect partial Fe(II)(aq) utilization during abiotic pyrite formation rather than microbial dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction. Late Proterozoic to modern sediments may reflect greater Fe(II)(aq) utilization and variations in source composition.

  7. Facile synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles by reduction phase transformation from gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Hai, Hoang Tri; Kura, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Migaku; Ogawa, Tomoyuki

    2010-01-01

    A phase transformation induced by the reduction of as-synthesized gamma-maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles was performed in solution by exploiting the reservoir of reduction gas (CO) generated from the incomplete combustion reaction of organic substances in the reactor. Results from X-ray diffraction, color indicator, and magnetic analysis using a SQUID strongly support this phase transformation. Based on this route, monodisperse magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles were simply produced in the range from 260 to 300 degrees C. Almost all aspects of the original gamma-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles, such as shape, size, and monodispersity, were maintained in the produced Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles.

  8. SV40 transformation of Swiss 3T3 cells can cause a stable reduction in the calcium requirement for growth

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A well-characterized SV40-transformed Swiss 3T3 line, SV101, and its revertants were tested for the ability to grow in reduced Ca++ (0.01 mM). Transformants and revertants did not differ from the parent 3T3 line in their Ca++ requirements. All three classes of cells grew less well in low Ca++ than in regular Ca++ (2.0 mM). SV40 transformants were then selected for the ability to grow in reduced Ca++. This new class of transformants was found to grow in 1% serum, grow in soft agarose, have a reorganized actin cytoskeleton, and express viral T antigens, as well as grow well in low Ca++. One of the selected clones was found to be T antigen-negative, yet was transformed in the serum, anchorage, actin, and Ca++ assays. It is possible that this clone was a spontaneous transformant. However, Southern blot analysis revealed the presence of integrated SV40 DNA. In addition, this analysis revealed the absence of an intact early region fragment, which codes for the viral T antigens. One explanation of this result may be that the mechanism of viral transformation for growth in low Ca++ involves viral- host DNA interactions that may not require a fully functional T antigen. In this case SV40 integration may be acting as a nonspecific cellular mutagen. PMID:6094595

  9. Using biotechnology and genomics to improve biotic and abiotic stress in apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic sequencing, molecular biology, and transformation technologies are providing valuable tools to better understand the complexity of how plants develop, function, and respond to biotic and abiotic stress. These approaches should complement but not replace a solid understanding of whole plant ...

  10. Salicylic acid-induced abiotic stress tolerance and underlying mechanisms in plants

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Iqbal R.; Fatma, Mehar; Per, Tasir S.; Anjum, Naser A.; Khan, Nafees A.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses (such as metals/metalloids, salinity, ozone, UV-B radiation, extreme temperatures, and drought) are among the most challenging threats to agricultural system and economic yield of crop plants. These stresses (in isolation and/or combination) induce numerous adverse effects in plants, impair biochemical/physiological and molecular processes, and eventually cause severe reductions in plant growth, development and overall productivity. Phytohormones have been recognized as a strong tool for sustainably alleviating adverse effects of abiotic stresses in crop plants. In particular, the significance of salicylic acid (SA) has been increasingly recognized in improved plant abiotic stress-tolerance via SA-mediated control of major plant-metabolic processes. However, the basic biochemical/physiological and molecular mechanisms that potentially underpin SA-induced plant-tolerance to major abiotic stresses remain least discussed. Based on recent reports, this paper: (a) overviews historical background and biosynthesis of SA under both optimal and stressful environments in plants; (b) critically appraises the role of SA in plants exposed to major abiotic stresses; (c) cross-talks potential mechanisms potentially governing SA-induced plant abiotic stress-tolerance; and finally (d) briefly highlights major aspects so far unexplored in the current context. PMID:26175738

  11. Impact of ferrihydrite and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate on the reductive transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by a gram-positive fermenting bacterium.

    PubMed

    Borch, Thomas; Inskeep, William P; Harwood, Jace A; Gerlach, Robin

    2005-09-15

    Batch studies were conducted to explore differences in the transformation pathways of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) reduction by a Gram-positive fermenting bacterium (Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6) in the presence and absence of ferrihydrite and the electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Strain ES6 was capable of TNT and ferrihydrite reduction with increased reduction rates in the presence of AQDS. Hydroxylaminodinitrotoluenes, 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene (2,4-DHANT), and tetranitroazoxytoluenes were the major metabolites observed in ferrihydrite- and AQDS-free systems in the presence of pure cell cultures. Ferrihydrite enhanced the production of amino derivatives because of reactions with microbially produced surface-associated Fe(ll). The presence of AQDS in the absence of ferrihydrite promoted the fast initial formation of arylhydroxylamines such as 2,4-DHANT. However, unlike in pure cell systems, these arylhydroxylamines were transformed into several unidentified polar products. When both microbially reduced ferrihydrite and AQDS were present simultaneously, the reduction of TNT was more rapid and complete via pathways thatwould have been difficult to infer solely from single component studies. This study demonstrates the complexity of TNT degradation patterns in model systems where the interactions among bacteria, Fe minerals, and organic matter have a pronounced effect on the degradation pathway of TNT.

  12. FRACTIONATION OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES DURING ABIOTIC TRANSFORMATION OF TCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    At a Superfund Site in Minnesota, ground water is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) with the contaminant plume stretching over five miles long. The ground water is iron and manganese reducing, and the complete absence of dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and ethene in th...

  13. Abiotic Reductive Dechlorination of Tetrachloroethylene and Trichloroethylene in Anaerobic Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-15

    the Presence of Chloride Green Rust (GR- Cl), pyrite , Sulfate Green Rust (GR-SO4), and Magnetite at pH 8. Lines Represent a Pseudo first-order Model...Rust (GR- Cl), Pyrite , Sulfate Green Rust (GR-SO4), and Magnetite at pH 8. Lines Represent a Pseudo first-order Model fit. The Insets Show Reaction...Rust (GR-Cl) and Pyrite at pH 8. Lines Represent a Rayleigh Model Fit. Uncertainties are 95% Confidence Intervals Calculated by Nonlinear Regression

  14. ABIOTIC REDUCTION AND DETOXIFICATION OF CHROMATE PRESENT IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Theoretical and experimental research has supported the assertion that Cr(III) species are the most stable, immobile, and nontoxic forms of chromium and that they may form rapidly when adequate reducing agents are introduced in an oxidized soil environment. The objective of this ...

  15. Artificial Neural Identification and LMI Transformation for Model Reduction-Based Control of the Buck Switch-Mode Regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rabadi, Anas N.

    2009-10-01

    This research introduces a new method of intelligent control for the control of the Buck converter using newly developed small signal model of the pulse width modulation (PWM) switch. The new method uses supervised neural network to estimate certain parameters of the transformed system matrix [Ã]. Then, a numerical algorithm used in robust control called linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization technique is used to determine the permutation matrix [P] so that a complete system transformation {[B˜], [C˜], [Ẽ]} is possible. The transformed model is then reduced using the method of singular perturbation, and state feedback control is applied to enhance system performance. The experimental results show that the new control methodology simplifies the model in the Buck converter and thus uses a simpler controller that produces the desired system response for performance enhancement.

  16. ESTIMATION OF MICROBIAL REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION RATES FOR CHLORINATED BENZENES AND PHENOLS USING A QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A set of literature data was used to derive several quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) to predict the rate constants for the microbial reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated aromatics. Dechlorination rate constants for 25 chloroaromatics were corrected for th...

  17. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: METAL-ENHANCED ABIOTIC DEGRADATION TECHNOLOGY - ENVIROMETAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    EnviroMetal Technologies, Inc. (ETI), of Guelph, ON, Canada, has developed the metal-enhanced abiotic degradation technology to treat halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOC) in water. A reactive, zero-valent, granular iron medium causes reductive dehalogenation of VOCs yield...

  18. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingjie; Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York; Li, Xuejun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ► SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ► SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ► SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  19. Anaerobic transformation of DDT related to iron(III) reduction and microbial community structure in paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Manjia; Cao, Fang; Li, Fangbai; Liu, Chengshuai; Tong, Hui; Wu, Weijian; Hu, Min

    2013-03-06

    We studied the mechanisms of microbial transformation in functional bacteria on 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) in two different field soils, Haiyan (HY) and Chenghai (CH). The results showed that microbial activities had a steady dechlorination effect on DDT and its metabolites (DDx). Adding lactate or glucose as carbon sources increased the amount of Desulfuromonas, Sedimentibacter, and Clostridium bacteria, which led to an increase in adsorbed Fe(II) and resulted in increased DDT transformation rates. The electron shuttle of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic disodium salt resulted in an increase in the negative potential of soil by mediating the electron transfer from the bacteria to the DDT. Moreover, the DDT-degrading bacteria in the CH soil were more abundant than those in the HY soil, which led to higher DDT transformation rates in the CH soil. The most stable compound of DDx was 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chloro-phenyl)ethane, which also was the major dechlorination metabolite of DDT, and 1-chloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl)ethane and 4,4'-dichlorobenzo-phenone were found to be the terminal metabolites in the anaerobic soils.

  20. Voltage Distribution of Internal Windings of Pole-Mounted Distribution Transformer by Lightning Surge and Measures for Voltage Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Hideki; Asakawa, Akira; Yokoyama, Shigeru

    When steep lightning surge enters a pole-mounted distribution transformer, the voltage distribution of the internal windings is unbalanced. It is known that a layer-to-layer short or a turn-to-turn short occurs where the voltage distribution of windings is high. In this paper, the voltage distribution of the windings was measured at the primary and secondary sides of the transformer using a testing transformer. The point of the windings where the highest voltage occurred was clarified. At the primary windings, large voltage occurs at the layer nearest the primary bushing, and the possibility of breakdown at this point is high. By field test using several types of surge arrestor, it is found that the lower the operating voltage of the surge arrestor installed in the primary side, the lower the voltage occurring at the primary windings. At the secondary windings, large voltage occurs at the layer closer to the neutral terminal, and the possibility of breakdown at this point is high. The lower the operating voltage of the surge arrestor installed in the primary side, the lower the voltage occurring at the secondary windings, too. Adding the surge arrestor in the secondary side, although effectively reduce line-to-line voltage, does not effectively reduce the voltage of the secondary windings.

  1. Review of mycotoxin reduction in food and feed: from prevention in the field to detoxification by adsorption or transformation.

    PubMed

    Jard, G; Liboz, T; Mathieu, F; Guyonvarc'h, A; Lebrihi, A

    2011-11-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites present worldwide in agricultural commodities and produced by filamentous fungi that cause a toxic response (mycotoxicosis) when ingested by animals. Prevention of mycotoxicoses includes pre- and post-harvest strategies. The best way to reduce the mycotoxin content in food and feed is the prevention of mycotoxin formation in the field, but this is often not sufficient, so other methods are needed. To decontaminate and/or detoxify mycotoxin-contaminated food and feed, the most prevalent approach in the feed industry is the inclusion of sorbent materials in the feed thus obtaining more or less selective removal of toxins by adsorption during passage through the gastrointestinal tract. Another reliable approach is to add enzymes or microorganisms capable of detoxifying some mycotoxins. Through a comprehensive review of published reports on the strategies for mycotoxin removal, this present work aims to update our understanding of mycotoxin removal. It provides an insight into the detoxification of mycotoxin present in food and feed. In the future, more emphasis needs to be placed on adsorption of mycotoxins in the gastrointestinal tract. Concerning the enzymatic transformation of mycotoxins, further efforts are required in understanding detoxification reactions, the toxicity of transformation products and in the characterization of enzymes responsible for transformations.

  2. A Pollutant Transformation Laboratory Exercise for Environmental Chemistry: The Reduction of Nitrobenzenes by Anaerobic Solutions of Humic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunnivant, Frank M.; Reynolds, Mark-Cody

    2007-01-01

    The laboratory experiment, which acts as a capstone, integrated lecture-laboratory exercise involving solution preparation, pH buffers, [E[subscript]H] (reduction potential) buffers, organic reaction mechanisms, reaction kinetics, and instrumental analysis is presented. The students completing the lecture and laboratory exercises could gain a…

  3. RBM25 Mediates Abiotic Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chunhong; Wang, Zhijuan; Yuan, Bingjian; Li, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) of pre-mRNAs is one of the most important post-transcriptional regulations that enable a single gene to code for multiple proteins resulting in the biodiversity of proteins in eukaryotes. Recently, we have shown that an Arabidopsis thaliana RNA recognition motif-containing protein RBM25 is a novel splicing factor to modulate plant response to ABA during seed germination and post-germination through regulating HAB1 pre-mRNA AS. Here, we show that RBM25 is preferentially expressed in stomata and vascular tissues in Arabidopsis and is induced by ABA and abiotic stresses. Loss-of-function mutant is highly tolerant to drought and sensitive to salt stress. Bioinformatic analysis and expression assays reveal that Arabidopsis RBM25 is induced by multiple abiotic stresses, suggesting a crucial role of RBM25 in Arabidopsis responses to adverse environmental conditions. Furthermore, we provide a comprehensive characterization of the homologous genes of Arabidopsis RBM25 based on the latest plant genome sequences and public microarray databases. Fourteen homologous genes are identified in different plant species which show similar structure in gene and protein. Notably, the promoter analysis reveals that RBM25 homologs are likely controlled by the regulators involved in multiple plant growth and abiotic stresses, such as drought and unfavorable temperature. The comparative analysis of general and unique cis regulatory elements of the RBM25 homologs highlights the conserved and unique molecular processes that modulate plant response to abiotic stresses through RBM25-mediated alternative splicing. PMID:28344583

  4. RBM25 Mediates Abiotic Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chunhong; Wang, Zhijuan; Yuan, Bingjian; Li, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) of pre-mRNAs is one of the most important post-transcriptional regulations that enable a single gene to code for multiple proteins resulting in the biodiversity of proteins in eukaryotes. Recently, we have shown that an Arabidopsis thaliana RNA recognition motif-containing protein RBM25 is a novel splicing factor to modulate plant response to ABA during seed germination and post-germination through regulating HAB1 pre-mRNA AS. Here, we show that RBM25 is preferentially expressed in stomata and vascular tissues in Arabidopsis and is induced by ABA and abiotic stresses. Loss-of-function mutant is highly tolerant to drought and sensitive to salt stress. Bioinformatic analysis and expression assays reveal that Arabidopsis RBM25 is induced by multiple abiotic stresses, suggesting a crucial role of RBM25 in Arabidopsis responses to adverse environmental conditions. Furthermore, we provide a comprehensive characterization of the homologous genes of Arabidopsis RBM25 based on the latest plant genome sequences and public microarray databases. Fourteen homologous genes are identified in different plant species which show similar structure in gene and protein. Notably, the promoter analysis reveals that RBM25 homologs are likely controlled by the regulators involved in multiple plant growth and abiotic stresses, such as drought and unfavorable temperature. The comparative analysis of general and unique cis regulatory elements of the RBM25 homologs highlights the conserved and unique molecular processes that modulate plant response to abiotic stresses through RBM25-mediated alternative splicing.

  5. Astragaloside IV controls collagen reduction in photoaging skin by improving transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling suppression and inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Li, Ran; Yan, Ning; Chen, Gang; Qian, Wen; Jiang, Hui-Li; Ji, Chao; Bi, Zhi-Gang

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light reduces levels of type I collagen in the dermis and results in human skin damage and premature skin aging (photoaging). This leads to a wrinkled appearance through the inhibition of transforming growth factor‑β (TGF‑β)/Smad signaling. UV irradiation increases type I collagen degradation through upregulating matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. Astragaloside IV (AST) is one of the major active components extracted from Astragalus membranaceus. However, its multiple anti‑photoaging effects remain to be elucidated. In the present study, the effects of AST against collagen reduction in UV‑induced skin aging in human skin fibroblasts were investigated. The expression of type I procollagen (COL1), MMP‑1, TGF‑βRⅡ and Smad7 were determined using reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and ELISA, respectively. UV irradiation inhibits type I collagen production by suppressing the TGF‑β/Smad signaling pathway and increasing COL1 degradation by inducing MMP‑1 expression. Transforming growth factor‑β type II protein and COL1 mRNA decreased but MMP‑1 and Smad7 levels increased in the photoaging model group, which was reversed by topical application of AST. AST prevents collagen reduction from UV irradiation in photoaging skin by improving TGF‑β/Smad signaling suppression and inhibiting MMP‑1, thus AST may be a potential agent against skin photoaging.

  6. Pathway of FeEDTA transformation and its impact on performance of NOx removal in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Jingkai; Zhang, Lei; Xia, Yinfeng; Liu, Nan; Li, Sujing; Zhang, Shihan

    2016-01-01

    A novel chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process, employing ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA) as a solvent, is deemed as a potential option for NOx removal from the flue gas. Previous work showed that the Fe(II)EDTA concentration was critical for the NOx removal in the CABR process. In this work, the pathway of FeEDTA (Fe(III)/Fe(II)-EDTA) transformation was investigated to assess its impact on the NOx removal in a biofilter. Experimental results revealed that the FeEDTA transformation involved iron precipitation and EDTA degradation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the iron was precipitated in the form of Fe(OH)3. The iron mass balance analysis showed 44.2% of the added iron was precipitated. The EDTA degradation facilitated the iron precipitation. Besides chemical oxidation, EDTA biodegradation occurred in the biofilter. The addition of extra EDTA helped recover the iron from the precipitation. The transformation of FeEDTA did not retard the NO removal. In addition, EDTA rather than the iron concentration determined the NO removal efficiency.

  7. Pathway of FeEDTA transformation and its impact on performance of NOx removal in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated process.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Jingkai; Zhang, Lei; Xia, Yinfeng; Liu, Nan; Li, Sujing; Zhang, Shihan

    2016-01-08

    A novel chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process, employing ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA) as a solvent, is deemed as a potential option for NOx removal from the flue gas. Previous work showed that the Fe(II)EDTA concentration was critical for the NOx removal in the CABR process. In this work, the pathway of FeEDTA (Fe(III)/Fe(II)-EDTA) transformation was investigated to assess its impact on the NOx removal in a biofilter. Experimental results revealed that the FeEDTA transformation involved iron precipitation and EDTA degradation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the iron was precipitated in the form of Fe(OH)3. The iron mass balance analysis showed 44.2% of the added iron was precipitated. The EDTA degradation facilitated the iron precipitation. Besides chemical oxidation, EDTA biodegradation occurred in the biofilter. The addition of extra EDTA helped recover the iron from the precipitation. The transformation of FeEDTA did not retard the NO removal. In addition, EDTA rather than the iron concentration determined the NO removal efficiency.

  8. Structural transformation of carbon-supported Pt3Cr nanoparticles from a disordered to an ordered phase as a durable oxygen reduction electrocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Liangliang; Li, Jun; Yuan, Ting; Zhou, Yi; Li, Xuemei; Yang, Hui

    2014-08-01

    The sluggish oxygen reduction kinetics and insufficient durability of cathode catalysts restrict the practical application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. This study focuses on the structural transformation of carbon-supported Pt3Cr from a disordered to an ordered phase and on the effect of such structural transformation on oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and durability. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy results confirm the formation of carbon-supported Pt3Cr intermetallic nanoparticles with a mean particle size of ca. 7.2 nm. Line scanning EDX reveals that the practical Pt-Cr atomic ratio is approximately 3 : 1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate that the proportion of metallic Pt increases while the binding energy of Pt 4f decreases with such structural transformation. The Pt3Cr/C intermetallic nanoparticles exhibit enhanced mass and specific activities toward the ORR compared with commercial Pt/C but slightly lower mass activity than the disordered Pt3Cr/C alloy nanoparticles. After the accelerated durability test for 5000 cycles, the Pt3Cr intermetallic nanoparticles displayed negligible decay in ORR mass activity; however the ORR mass activity on the isordered Pt3Cr alloy decreases to ca. 50%. Much enhanced durability of the Pt3Cr/C intermetallic nanoparticles toward the ORR is definitely caused by the much higher structural and compositional stabilities of the Pt3Cr/C intermetallic nanoparticles than that of the disordered Pt3Cr/C alloy nanoparticles, suggesting that the Pt3Cr intermetallic nanoparticles may serve as highly active and durable ORR electrocatalysts for practical application.

  9. Structural transformation of carbon-supported Pt₃Cr nanoparticles from a disordered to an ordered phase as a durable oxygen reduction electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Zou, Liangliang; Li, Jun; Yuan, Ting; Zhou, Yi; Li, Xuemei; Yang, Hui

    2014-09-21

    The sluggish oxygen reduction kinetics and insufficient durability of cathode catalysts restrict the practical application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. This study focuses on the structural transformation of carbon-supported Pt₃Cr from a disordered to an ordered phase and on the effect of such structural transformation on oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and durability. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy results confirm the formation of carbon-supported Pt₃Cr intermetallic nanoparticles with a mean particle size of ca. 7.2 nm. Line scanning EDX reveals that the practical Pt-Cr atomic ratio is approximately 3 : 1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate that the proportion of metallic Pt increases while the binding energy of Pt 4f decreases with such structural transformation. The Pt₃Cr/C intermetallic nanoparticles exhibit enhanced mass and specific activities toward the ORR compared with commercial Pt/C but slightly lower mass activity than the disordered Pt₃Cr/C alloy nanoparticles. After the accelerated durability test for 5000 cycles, the Pt₃Cr intermetallic nanoparticles displayed negligible decay in ORR mass activity; however the ORR mass activity on the isordered Pt₃Cr alloy decreases to ca. 50%. Much enhanced durability of the Pt₃Cr/C intermetallic nanoparticles toward the ORR is definitely caused by the much higher structural and compositional stabilities of the Pt₃Cr/C intermetallic nanoparticles than that of the disordered Pt3Cr/C alloy nanoparticles, suggesting that the Pt₃Cr intermetallic nanoparticles may serve as highly active and durable ORR electrocatalysts for practical application.

  10. Evaluation of abiotic fate mechanisms in soil slurry bioreactor treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, J.A.; McCauley, P.T.; Dosani, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    Biological treatment of contaminated soil slurries may offer a viable technology for soil bioremediation. Slurry bioreactor treatment of soils, however, has not sufficiently progressed to be a durable, reliable, and cost-effective treatment option. Critical to the evaluation of slurry bioreactors is a better description of pollutant mass transfer during the treatment phase. Losses attributable to abiotic means are generally overlooked in field application of the technology. Discussions with EPA regional personnel and inspection of active soil slurry bioreactor operations have identified operational problems such as foaming which could result in possible abiotic loss. Field bioslurry operations have adopted various approaches to reduce foaming: (1) the addition of defoaming agents, (2) the reduction of rotational speed of the agitator, and (3) the reduction of gas flow through the bioreactor system. We have conducted two bench-scale slurry bioreactor treatability studies, at the U.S. EPA Testing & Evaluation Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio, which were designed to investigate some of the operating factors leading to foam formation and identify the most advantageous means to deal with foaming. The initial study has been previously presented as a general treatability study for treatment of creosote contamination in a soil. During this study, foaming became a major problem for operation. The foaming conditions were mitigated by use of defoamer and, in the more extreme cases, through reduction of the mixer rotational speed and gas flow. A subsequent study which was devoted specifically to investigating the causes and conditions of foaming using a different batch of soil from the same site as the earlier study showed little foaming at the very beginning of the study.

  11. Influence of abiotic factors on the antimicrobial activity of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Tavaria, Freni K; Costa, Eduardo M; Gens, Eduardo J; Malcata, Francisco Xavier; Pintado, Manuela E

    2013-12-01

    In an effort to bypass the adverse secondary effects attributed to the traditional therapeutic approaches used to treat skin disorders (such as atopic dermatitis), alternative antimicrobials have recently been suggested. One such antimicrobial is chitosan, owing to the already proved biological properties associated with its use. However, the influence of abiotic factors on such activities warrants evaluation. This research effort assessed the antimicrobial activity of chitosan upon skin microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli) in vitro when subject to a combination of different abiotic factors such as pH, ionic strength, organic acids and free fatty acids. Free fatty acids, ionic strength and pH significantly affected chitosan's capability of reducing the viable numbers of S. aureus. This antimicrobial action was potentiated in the presence of palmitic acid and a lower ionic strength (0.2% NaCl), while a higher ionic strength (0.4% NaCl) favored chitosan's action upon the reduction of viable numbers of S. epidermidis and E. coli. Although further studies are needed, these preliminary results advocate that chitosan can in the future be potentially considered as an antimicrobial of choice when handling symptoms associated with atopic dermatitis.

  12. One-Step Synthesis and Magnetic Phase Transformation of Ln-TM-B Alloy by Chemical Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Woo; Kim, Young Hwan; Cha, Hyun Gil; Lee, Don Keun; Kang, Young Soo

    2007-04-11

    Binary and ternary intermetallic alloy systems are of interest for a variety of academic and technological applications. Despite recent advances in synthesizing binary alloy, there are very few reports of ternary alloy related to lanthanide series. The purpose of this work is to contribute to ternary alloy systems such as lanthanide-transition metal-boron with a simple chemical method and analysis of its magnetic behavior. Ternary Nd-Fe-B amorphous alloy was successfully synthesized with borohydride. The magnetic behavior in the process of formation of ternary Nd-Fe-B alloy and Nd2Fe14B from amorphous phase alloy is reported. Compared with the synthesis of a transition metal, the existence of a lanthanide ion makes aggregates-like particles with a diameter of 2 nm possible in the formation of a nanosphere, which is a significantly important result in terms of acceleration of the reduction-diffusion reaction for the formation of ternary alloy. In the process of reduction and diffusion, the Nd phase is diffused into the Fe-based phase, and then the ternary Nd2Fe14B intermetallic compound is fabricated.

  13. Chemical Reactivity Probes for Assessing Abiotic Natural Attenuation by Reducing Iron Minerals.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dimin; Bradley, Miranda J; Hinkle, Adrian W; Johnson, Richard L; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2016-02-16

    Increasing recognition that abiotic natural attenuation (NA) of chlorinated solvents can be important has created demand for improved methods to characterize the redox properties of the aquifer materials that are responsible for abiotic NA. This study explores one promising approach: using chemical reactivity probes (CRPs) to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of contaminant reduction by reducing iron minerals. Assays of thermodynamic CRPs were developed to determine the reduction potentials (ECRP) of suspended minerals by spectrophotometric determination of equilibrium CRP speciation and calculations using the Nernst equation. ECRP varied as expected with mineral type, mineral loading, and Fe(II) concentration. Comparison of ECRP with reduction potentials measured potentiometrically using a Pt electrode (EPt) showed that ECRP was 100-150 mV more negative than EPt. When EPt was measured with small additions of CRPs, the systematic difference between EPt and ECRP was eliminated, suggesting that these CRPs are effective mediators of electron transfer between mineral and electrode surfaces. Model contaminants (4-chloronitrobenzene, 2-chloroacetophenone, and carbon tetrachloride) were used as kinetic CRPs. The reduction rate constants of kinetic CRPs correlated well with the ECRP for mineral suspensions. Using the rate constants compiled from literature for contaminants and relative mineral reduction potentials based on ECRP measurements, qualitatively consistent trends were obtained, suggesting that CRP-based assays may be useful for estimating abiotic NA rates of contaminants in groundwater.

  14. Hydrothermal transformation of dried grass into graphitic carbon-based high performance electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haimin; Wang, Yun; Wang, Dan; Li, Yibing; Liu, Xiaolu; Liu, Porun; Yang, Huagui; An, Taicheng; Tang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Huijun

    2014-08-27

    In this work, we present a low cost and environmentally benign hydrothermal method using dried grass as the sole starting material without any synthetic chemicals to directly produce high quality nitrogen-doped carbon nanodot/nanosheet aggregates (N-CNAs), achieving a high yield of 25.2%. The fabricated N-CNAs possess an N/C atomic ratio of 3.41%, consist of three typed of doped N at a ratio of 2.6 (pyridinic):1.7 (pyrrolic):1 (graphitic). The experimental results reveal that for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the performance of N-CNAs, in terms of electrocatalytic activity, stability and resistance to crossover effects, is better or comparable to the commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. The theoretical studies further indicate that the doped pyridinic-N plays a key role for N-CNAs' excellent four-electron ORR electrocatalytic activity.

  15. Reduction of the C54-TiSi2 phase transformation temperature using refractory metal ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, R. W.; Miles, G. L.; Knotts, T. A.; Rakowski, D. W.; Clevenger, L. A.; Harper, J. M. E.; D'Heurle, F. M.; Cabral, C., Jr.

    1995-12-01

    We report that the ion implantation of a small dose of Mo into a silicon substrate before the deposition of a thin film of Ti lowers the temperature required to form the commercially important low resistivity C54-TiSi2 phase by 100-150 °C. A lesser improvement is obtained with W implantation. In addition, a sharp reduction in the dependence of C54 formation on the geometrical size of the silicided structure is observed. The enhancement in C54 formation observed with the ion implantation of Mo is not explained by ion mixing of the Ti/Si interface or implant-induced damage. Rather, it is attributed to an enhanced nucleation of C54-TiSi2 out of the precursor high resistance C49-TiSi2 phase.

  16. Syntrophic Effects in a Subsurface Clostridial Consortium on Fe(III)-(Oxyhydr)oxide Reduction and Secondary Mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Madhavi; Lin, Chu-Ching; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhao, Xiuhong; Wang, Yangping; Barkay, Tamar; Yee, Nathan

    2013-07-09

    In this study, we cultivated from subsurface sediments an anaerobic Clostridia 25 consortium that was composed of a fermentative Fe-reducer Clostridium species (designated as 26 strain FGH) and a novel sulfate-reducing bacterium belonging to the Clostridia family 27 Vellionellaceae (designated as strain RU4). In pure culture, Clostridium sp. strain FGH mediated 28 the reductive dissolution/transformation of iron oxides during growth on peptone. When 29 Clostridium sp. FGH was grown with strain RU4 on peptone, the rates of iron oxide reduction 30 were significantly higher. Iron reduction by the consortium was mediated by multiple 31 mechanisms, including biotic reduction by Clostridium sp. FGH and biotic/abiotic reactions 32 involving biogenic sulfide by strain RU4. The Clostridium sp. FGH produced hydrogen during 33 fermentation, and the presence of hydrogen inhibited growth and iron reduction activity. The 34 sulfate-reducing partner strain RU4 was stimulated by the presence of H2 gas and generated 35 reactive sulfide which promoted the chemical reduction of the iron oxides. Characterization of 36 Fe(II) mineral products showed the formation of magnetite during ferrihydrite reduction, and 37 the precipitation of iron sulfides during goethite and hematite reduction. The results suggest an 38 important pathway for iron reduction and secondary mineralization by fermentative sulfate-39 reducing microbial consortia is through syntrophy-driven biotic/abiotic reactions with biogenic 40 sulfide.

  17. Mechanisms of hydroxyl radical production from abiotic oxidation of pyrite under acidic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Songhu; Liao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (radOH) produced from pyrite oxidation by O2 have been recognized, but mechanisms regarding the production under anoxic and oxic conditions are not well understood. In this study, the mechanisms of radOH production from pyrite oxidation under anoxic and oxic conditions were explored using benzoic acid (BA) as an radOH probe. Batch experiments were conducted at pH 2.6 to explore radOH production under anoxic and oxic conditions. The cumulative radOH concentrations produced under anoxic and oxic conditions increased linearly to 7.5 and 52.2 μM, respectively within 10 h at 10 g/L pyrite. Under anoxic conditions, radOH was produced from the oxidation of H2O on the sulfur-deficient sites on pyrite surface, showing an increased production with the increase of pyrite surface exposure due to oxidation. Under oxic conditions, the formation of radOH proceeds predominantly via the two-electron reduction of O2 on pyrite surface along with a minor contribution from the oxidation of H2O on surface sulfur-defects and the reactions of Fe2+/sulfur intermediates with O2. For both O2 reduction and H2O oxidation on the surface sulfur-defects, H2O2 was the predominant intermediate, which subsequently transformed to radOH through Fenton mechanism. The radOH produced had a significant impact on the transformation of contaminants in the environment. Anoxic pyrite suspensions oxidized 13.9% As(III) (C0 = 6.67 μM) and 17.6% sulfanilamide (C0 = 2.91 μM) within 10 h at pH 2.6 and 10 g/L pyrite, while oxic pyrite suspensions improved the oxidation percentages to 55.4% for As(III) and 51.9% for sulfanilamide. The ratios of anoxic to oxic oxidation are consistent with the relative contribution of surface sulfur-defects to radOH production. However, Fe2+ produced from pyrite oxidation competed with the contaminants for radOH, which is of particular significance with the increase of time in a static environment. We conclude that radOH can be produced from abiotic oxidation of

  18. Biochar-Facilitated Microbial Reduction of Hematite.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengnan; Adhikari, Dinesh; Huang, Rixiang; Zhang, Hua; Tang, Yuanzhi; Roden, Eric; Yang, Yu

    2016-03-01

    As an important component of soil organic matter (SOM), the transformation of pyrogenic carbon plays a critical role in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and other redox-active elements such as iron (Fe). Herein, we studied the influences of wheat straw-derived biochars on the microbial reduction of 100 mM of hematite by the dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under anoxic conditions. The long-term microbial reduction extent and initial reduction rate of hematite were accelerated by more than 2-fold in the presence of 10 mg L(-1) biochar. Soluble leachate from 10 mg L(-1) biochar enhanced Fe(III) reduction to a similar degree. Microbially prereduced biochar leachate abiotically reduced hematite, consistent with the apparent electron shuttling capacity of biochar leachate. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis suggested that biochar leachate-associated semiquinone functional groups were likely involved in the redox reactions. In addition to electron shuttling effects, biochar particles sorbed 0.5-1.5 mM biogenic Fe(II) and thereby increased the long-term extent of hematite reduction by 1.4-1.7 fold. Our results suggest that Fe redox cycling may be strongly impacted by pyrogenic carbon in soils with relatively high content of indigenous pyrogenic carbon or substantial application of biochar.

  19. Transformation and composition evolution of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) synthesized by borohydride reduction in static water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Airong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Wei-Xian

    2015-01-01

    The reactivity of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) toward targeted contaminants is affected by the initial nZVI composition and the iron oxides formed during the aging process in aquatic systems. In this paper, the aging effects of nZVI, prepared using a borohydride reduction method in static water over a period of 90 days (d), are investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the corrosion products of nZVI. Results show that both the structures and the compositions of the corrosion products change with the process of aging. The products of nZVI aged for 5 d in static water media are mainly magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), accompanied by lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH). For products aged 10 d, XRD data show the formation of ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. When aged up to 90 d, the products are mainly γ-FeOOH mixed with small amounts of Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3. Transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) images show that the core-shell structure forms into a hollow spherical shape after 30 d of aging in aquatic media. The results indicate first that iron ions in the Fe(0) core diffuse outwardly toward the shell, and hollowed-out iron oxide shells emerge. Then, the iron oxide shell collapses and becomes a flaky, acicular-shaped structure. The type and the crystal phase of second iron oxide minerals are vastly different at various aging times. This study helps to explain the patterns of occurrence of specific iron oxides in different natural conditions.

  20. A Fourier transform infrared absorption difference spectrum associated with the reduction of A1 in photosystem I: are both phylloquinones involved in electron transfer?

    PubMed

    Hastings, G; Sivakumar, V

    2001-03-27

    Photoaccumulated Fourier transform infrared difference spectra associated with P700(+) and P700(+)A(1)(-) formation have been obtained using purified photosystem I particles from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. From these spectra, a difference spectrum associated with phylloquinone reduction (A(1)(-) - A(1)) has been calculated. Infrared absorption changes associated with both the loss of the ground state and formation of the anion radical are observed in the difference spectrum. Fourier transform infrared difference spectra obtained in various spectral regions indicate that two, structurally distinct phylloquinones are photoaccumulated. This could indicate that phylloquinones on both the PsaA and PsaB branches are involved in electron transfer, and that electron transfer is bi-directional in photosystem I. It could also indicate an intrinsic structural heterogeneity in the A(1) binding site of the active branch. Several FTIR difference features taken together indicate that a glutamic acid residue (at position 699 or 702 on PsaA and/or 679 or 682 on PsaB) is perturbed upon A(1) anion formation. It is suggested that the protonation state of the perturbed glutamic acid residue is influenced by hydrogen bonding to a nearby tyrosine residue at position 696/676 on PsaA/PsaB.

  1. Abiotic Immobilization of Nitrate in Forest Soils: a Double Label Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, R. W.; Ollinger, S. V.; Hobbie, E. A.; Frey, S. D.; Dail, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    Mechanisms of soil nitrogen (N) retention remain a key uncertainty in the terrestrial N cycle. During recent work at the Harvard Forest Chronic N Experiment, 15N added to soils as ammonia nitrate was observed to be rapidly immobilized after addition to soil on a time scale of minutes. In published results it was hypothesized that the rapid time of immobilization could be explained by abiotic immobilization of both ammonia and nitrate. The possibility of abiotic immobilization of nitrate has been studied since the first half of the 20th century, mainly using ideal compounds and soil sterilization techniques. However, critics of these studies have argued that while in vitro studies may indicate the possibility of an abiotic reaction, they cannot demonstrate its plausibility in soils. Soil sterilization methods have been criticized, because they are not effective enough to eliminate biotic interactions within an experimental treatment. Isotopic tracer studies have also been used but also have problems differentiating biotic and abiotic reactions. This study is an attempt to demonstrate abiotic immobilization of nitrate in soil samples through the use of double labeled nitrate (15N18O3- ). The resolution of this method depends on the biochemistry of microbial immobilization of nitrate; reduction of nitrate to nitrite, then ammonia and glutamine before incorporation into microbial biomass. Reduction of 15N18O3- before microbial utilization of the 15N implies that retention of both heavy isotopes in the soil can only occur through abiotic reaction of 15N18Ox species. In biotic immobilization the 18O is lost to the system in water. While nitrate has proven unreactive in soils, its reduced product, nitrite, is known to be readily reactive with various soil compounds. Nitrite can be introduced into the soil environment naturally by both 'leakiness' in nitrification and denitrification and may possibly be generated abiotically through methods such as the proposed Ferrous

  2. Massive production of abiotic methane during subduction evidenced in metamorphosed ophicarbonates from the Italian Alps

    PubMed Central

    Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Martinez, Isabelle; Elmaleh, Agnès; Compagnoni, Roberto; Chaduteau, Carine; Ferraris, Cristiano; Esteve, Imène

    2017-01-01

    Alteration of ultramafic rocks plays a major role in the production of hydrocarbons and organic compounds via abiotic processes on Earth and beyond and contributes to the redistribution of C between solid and fluid reservoirs over geological cycles. Abiotic methanogenesis in ultramafic rocks is well documented at shallow conditions, whereas natural evidence at greater depths is scarce. Here we provide evidence for intense high-pressure abiotic methanogenesis by reduction of subducted ophicarbonates. Protracted (≥0.5–1 Ma), probably episodic infiltration of reduced fluids in the ophicarbonates and methanogenesis occurred from at least ∼40 km depth to ∼15–20 km depth. Textural, petrological and isotopic data indicate that methane reached saturation triggering the precipitation of graphitic C accompanied by dissolution of the precursor antigorite. Continuous infiltration of external reducing fluids caused additional methane production by interaction with the newly formed graphite. Alteration of high-pressure carbonate-bearing ultramafic rocks may represent an important source of abiotic methane, with strong implications for the mobility of deep C reservoirs. PMID:28223715

  3. Massive production of abiotic methane during subduction evidenced in metamorphosed ophicarbonates from the Italian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Martinez, Isabelle; Elmaleh, Agnès; Compagnoni, Roberto; Chaduteau, Carine; Ferraris, Cristiano; Esteve, Imène

    2017-02-01

    Alteration of ultramafic rocks plays a major role in the production of hydrocarbons and organic compounds via abiotic processes on Earth and beyond and contributes to the redistribution of C between solid and fluid reservoirs over geological cycles. Abiotic methanogenesis in ultramafic rocks is well documented at shallow conditions, whereas natural evidence at greater depths is scarce. Here we provide evidence for intense high-pressure abiotic methanogenesis by reduction of subducted ophicarbonates. Protracted (>=0.5-1 Ma), probably episodic infiltration of reduced fluids in the ophicarbonates and methanogenesis occurred from at least ~40 km depth to ~15-20 km depth. Textural, petrological and isotopic data indicate that methane reached saturation triggering the precipitation of graphitic C accompanied by dissolution of the precursor antigorite. Continuous infiltration of external reducing fluids caused additional methane production by interaction with the newly formed graphite. Alteration of high-pressure carbonate-bearing ultramafic rocks may represent an important source of abiotic methane, with strong implications for the mobility of deep C reservoirs.

  4. Massive production of abiotic methane during subduction evidenced in metamorphosed ophicarbonates from the Italian Alps.

    PubMed

    Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Martinez, Isabelle; Elmaleh, Agnès; Compagnoni, Roberto; Chaduteau, Carine; Ferraris, Cristiano; Esteve, Imène

    2017-02-22

    Alteration of ultramafic rocks plays a major role in the production of hydrocarbons and organic compounds via abiotic processes on Earth and beyond and contributes to the redistribution of C between solid and fluid reservoirs over geological cycles. Abiotic methanogenesis in ultramafic rocks is well documented at shallow conditions, whereas natural evidence at greater depths is scarce. Here we provide evidence for intense high-pressure abiotic methanogenesis by reduction of subducted ophicarbonates. Protracted (≥0.5-1 Ma), probably episodic infiltration of reduced fluids in the ophicarbonates and methanogenesis occurred from at least ∼40 km depth to ∼15-20 km depth. Textural, petrological and isotopic data indicate that methane reached saturation triggering the precipitation of graphitic C accompanied by dissolution of the precursor antigorite. Continuous infiltration of external reducing fluids caused additional methane production by interaction with the newly formed graphite. Alteration of high-pressure carbonate-bearing ultramafic rocks may represent an important source of abiotic methane, with strong implications for the mobility of deep C reservoirs.

  5. Oxylipins and plant abiotic stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, T V; Zastrijnaja, O M; Klimov, V V

    2014-04-01

    Oxylipins are signaling molecules formed enzymatically or spontaneously from unsaturated fatty acids in all aerobic organisms. Oxylipins regulate growth, development, and responses to environmental stimuli of organisms. The oxylipin biosynthesis pathway in plants includes a few parallel branches named after first enzyme of the corresponding branch as allene oxide synthase, hydroperoxide lyase, divinyl ether synthase, peroxygenase, epoxy alcohol synthase, and others in which various biologically active metabolites are produced. Oxylipins can be formed non-enzymatically as a result of oxygenation of fatty acids by free radicals and reactive oxygen species. Spontaneously formed oxylipins are called phytoprostanes. The role of oxylipins in biotic stress responses has been described in many published works. The role of oxylipins in plant adaptation to abiotic stress conditions is less studied; there is also obvious lack of available data compilation and analysis in this area of research. In this work we analyze data on oxylipins functions in plant adaptation to abiotic stress conditions, such as wounding, suboptimal light and temperature, dehydration and osmotic stress, and effects of ozone and heavy metals. Modern research articles elucidating the molecular mechanisms of oxylipins action by the methods of biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics are reviewed here. Data on the role of oxylipins in stress signal transduction, stress-inducible gene expression regulation, and interaction of these metabolites with other signal transduction pathways in cells are described. In this review the general oxylipin-mediated mechanisms that help plants to adjust to a broad spectrum of stress factors are considered, followed by analysis of more specific responses regulated by oxylipins only under certain stress conditions. New approaches to improvement of plant resistance to abiotic stresses based on the induction of oxylipin-mediated processes are discussed.

  6. Exposure to cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) causes anchorage-independent growth and reduction of BRCA1 in non-transformed human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Farasani, Abdullah; Darbre, Philippa D

    2017-04-01

    Dermal absorption of components of personal care products (PCPs) may contribute to breast cancer development. Cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) are used widely in the formulation of PCPs, and their presence has been recently detected in human blood. The objectives of this study were to investigate any genotoxic effects after short- (1 week) or longer-term (30 weeks) exposure to hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) or decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) in MCF-10 A and MCF-10F immortalized non-transformed human breast epithelial cells. Genotoxic effects were assessed by an ability of cells to grow in suspension culture, from DNA damage measured by comet assays, and from a reduction in levels of DNA repair proteins measured by RT-PCR and western immunoblotting. Dose-dependent anchorage-independent growth in methocel culture was observed after exposure to D3 (10(-)(13)  M-10(-5)  M) and D4/D5 (10(-)(9)  M-10(-5)  M). DNA damage was measured by the comet assay after 1-h exposure to D3 (10(-)(6)  M-10(-5)  M) and D4 (10(-5)  M). BRCA1 mRNA and BRCA1 protein levels were reduced after 30-week exposure to 10(-5)  M D4 and D5 in both cell lines. Reduced levels of mRNAs for other DNA repair proteins (BRCA2, ATM, ATR, CHK1 and CHK2) were also observed after exposure to 10(-5)  M D5 in both cell lines, and some reductions after exposure to D3 and D4. If cVMS can not only enable anchorage-independent growth of non-transformed breast epithelial cells and damage DNA, but also compromise DNA repair systems, then there is the potential for them to impact on breast carcinogenesis. Further risk assessment now requires information concerning the extent to which cVMS may be present in human breast tissues. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. (Bio)transformation of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) in soils.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Christopher I; Abrell, Leif; Khatiwada, Raju; Chorover, Jon; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-03-05

    Recent studies have begun to assess the environmental fate and toxicity of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN), an insensitive munition compound of interest to defense agencies. Aerobic and anaerobic DNAN biotransformation in soils was evaluated in this study. Under aerobic conditions, there was little evidence of transformation; most observed removal was attributed to adsorption and subsequent slow chemical reactions. Under anaerobic conditions, DNAN was reductively (bio)transformed and the rate of the transformation was positively correlated with soil organic carbon (OC) up to a threshold of 2.07% OC. H2 addition enhanced the nitroreduction rate compared to endogenous treatments lacking H2. Heat-killed treatments provided rates similar to the endogenous treatment, suggesting that abiotic factors play a role in DNAN reduction. Ten (bio)transformation products were detected by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The proposed transformation pathway involves reduction of DNAN to aromatic amines, with putative reactive nitroso-intermediates coupling with the amines to form azo dimers. Secondary reactions include N-alkyl substitution, O-demethylation (sometimes followed by dehydroxylation), and removal of an N-containing group. Globally, our results suggest that the main reaction DNAN undergoes in anaerobic soils is nitroreduction to 2-methoxy-5-nitroaniline (MENA) and 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN), followed by anaerobic coupling reactions yielding azo-dimers. The dimers were subsequently subject to further (bio)transformations.

  8. (Bio)transformation of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) in Soils

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Christopher I.; Abrell, Leif; Khatiwada, Raju; Chorover, Jon; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have begun to assess the environmental fate and toxicity of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN), an insensitive munition compound of interest to defense agencies. Aerobic and anaerobic DNAN biotransformation in soils was evaluated in this study. Under aerobic conditions, there was little evidence of transformation; most observed removal was attributed to adsorption and subsequent slow chemical reactions. Under anaerobic conditions, DNAN was reductively (bio)transformed and the rate of the transformation was positively correlated with soil organic carbon (OC) up to a threshold of 2.07% OC. H2 addition enhanced the nitroreduction rate compared to endogenous treatments lacking H2. Heat-killed treatments provided rates similar to the endogenous treatment, suggesting that abiotic factors play a role in DNAN reduction. Ten (bio)transformation products were detected by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The proposed transformation pathway involves reduction of DNAN to aromatic amines, with putative reactive nitroso-intermediates coupling with the amines to form azo dimers. Secondary reactions include N-alkyl substitution, O-demethylation (sometimes followed by dehydroxylation), and removal of an N-containing group. Globally, our results suggest that the main reaction DNAN undergoes in anaerobic soils is nitroreduction to 2-methoxy-5-nitroaniline (MENA) and 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN), followed by anaerobic coupling reactions yielding azo-dimers. The dimers were subsequently subject to further (bio)transformations. PMID:26551225

  9. Down-regulation of transforming growth factor beta-2 expression is associated with the reduction of cyclosporin induced gingival overgrowth in rats treated with roxithromycin: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gingival overgrowth (GO) is a common side effect of the chronic use of cyclosporine (CsA), an immunosuppressant widely used to prevent rejection in transplant patients. Recent studies have reported elevated levels of specific cytokines in gingival overgrowth tissue, particularly TGF-beta, suggesting that this growth factor plays a role in the accumulation of extracellular matrix materials. The effectiveness of azithromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, in the regression of this undesirable side effect has also been demonstrated. Methods In this study, we created an experimental model for assessing the therapeutic effect of roxithromycin in GO and the expression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta2) through immunohistochemistry. We used four groups of rats totaling 32 individuals. GO was induced during five weeks and drug treatment was given on the 6th week as follows: group 1 received saline; group 2 received CsA and was treated with saline on the 6th week; group 3 received CsA and, on the 6th week, ampicilin; and group 4 received CsA during 5 weeks and, on the 6th week, was treated with roxithromycin. Results The results demonstrated that roxithromycin treatment was effective in reducing cyclosporine-induced GO in rats. Both epithelial and connective tissue showed a decrease in thickness and a significant reduction in TGF-beta2 expression, with a lower number of fibroblasts, reduction in fibrotic areas and decrease in inflammatory infiltrate. Conclusion The present data suggest that the down-regulation of TGF-beta2 expression may be an important mechanism of action by which roxithromycin inhibits GO. PMID:19995419

  10. Direct Transformation from Graphitic C3N4 to Nitrogen-Doped Graphene: An Efficient Metal-Free Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajie; Zhang, Yumin; Zhang, Xinghong; Han, Jiecai; Wang, Yi; Gu, Lin; Zhang, Zhihua; Wang, Xianjie; Jian, Jikang; Xu, Ping; Song, Bo

    2015-09-09

    Carbon-based nanomaterials provide an attractive perspective to replace precious Pt-based electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) to enhance the practical applications of fuel cells. Herein, we demonstrate a one-pot direct transformation from graphitic-phase C3N4 (g-C3N4) to nitrogen-doped graphene. g-C3N4, containing only C and N elements, acts as a self-sacrificing template to construct the framework of nitrogen-doped graphene. The relative contents of graphitic and pyridinic-N can be well-tuned by the controlled annealing process. The resulting nitrogen-doped graphene materials show excellent electrocatalytic activity toward ORR, and much enhanced durability and tolerance to methanol in contrast to the conventional Pt/C electrocatalyst in alkaline medium. It is determined that a higher content of N does not necessarily lead to enhanced electrocatalytic activity; rather, at a relatively low N content and a high ratio of graphitic-N/pyridinic-N, the nitrogen-doped graphene obtained by annealing at 900 °C (NGA900) provides the most promising activity for ORR. This study may provide further useful insights on the nature of ORR catalysis of carbon-based materials.

  11. SERDP ER-1421 Abiotic and Biotic Mechanisms Controlling In Situ Remediation of NDMA: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; McKinley, James P.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Devary, Brooks J.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Thompson, Karen T.

    2009-09-30

    This laboratory-scale project was initiated to investigate in situ abiotic/biotic mineralization of NDMA. Under iron-reducing conditions, aquifer sediments showed rapid abiotic NDMA degradation to dimethylamine (DMA), nitrate, formate, and finally, CO2. These are the first reported experiments of abiotic NDMA mineralization. The NDMA reactivity of these different iron phases showed that adsorbed ferrous iron was the dominant reactive phase that promoted NDMA reduction, and other ferrous phases present (siderite, iron sulfide, magnetite, structural ferrous iron in 2:1 clays) did not promote NDMA degradation. In contrast, oxic sediments that were biostimulated with propane promoted biomineralization of NDMA by a cometabolic monooxygenase enzyme process. Other monooxygenase enzyme processes were not stimulated with methane or toluene additions, and acetylene addition did not block mineralization. Although NDMA mineralization extent was the highest in oxic, biostimulated sediments (30 to 82%, compared to 10 to 26% for abiotic mineralization in reduced sediments), large 1-D column studies (high sediment/water ratio of aquifers) showed 5.6 times higher NDMA mineralization rates in reduced sediment (half-life 410 ± 147 h) than oxic biomineralization (half life 2293 ± 1866 h). Sequential reduced/oxic biostimulated sediment mineralization (half-life 3180 ± 1094 h) was also inefficient compared to reduced sediment. These promising laboratory-scale results for NDMA mineralization should be investigated at field scale. Future studies of NDMA remediation should focus on the comparison of this in situ abiotic NDMA mineralization (iron-reducing environments) to ex situ biomineralization, which has been shown successful in other studies.

  12. Multiple abiotic stress tolerance in Vigna mungo is altered by overexpression of ALDRXV4 gene via reactive carbonyl detoxification.

    PubMed

    Singh, Preeti; Kumar, Deepak; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2016-06-01

    Vigna mungo (blackgram) is an important leguminous pulse crop, which is grown for its protein rich edible seeds. Drought and salinity are the major abiotic stresses which adversely affect the growth and productivity of crop plants including blackgram. The ALDRXV4 belongs to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily of enzymes that catalyze the reduction of carbonyl metabolites in the cells and plays an important role in the osmoprotection and detoxification of the reactive carbonyl species. In the present study, we developed transgenic plants of V. mungo using Agrobacterium mediated transformation. The transgene integration was confirmed by Southern blot analysis whereas the expression was confirmed by RT-PCR, Western blot and enzyme activity. The T1 generation transgenic plants displayed improved tolerance to various environmental stresses, including drought, salt, methyl viologen and H2O2 induced oxidative stress. The increased aldose reductase activity, higher sorbitol content and less accumulation of the toxic metabolite, methylglyoxal in the transgenic lines under non-stress and stress (drought and salinity) conditions resulted in increased protection through maintenance of better photosynthetic efficiency, higher relative water content and less photooxidative damage. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species was remarkably decreased in the transgenic lines as compared with the wild type plants. This study of engineering multiple stress tolerance in blackgram, is the first report to date and this strategy for trait improvement is proposed to provide a novel germplasm for blackgram production on marginal lands.

  13. Phytoplankton dynamics of a subtropical reservoir controlled by the complex interplay among hydrological, abiotic, and biotic variables.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yi-Ming; Wu, Jiunn-Tzong

    2016-12-01

    This study was conducted to identify the key factors related to the spatiotemporal variations in phytoplankton abundance in a subtropical reservoir from 2006 to 2010 and to assist in developing strategies for water quality management. Dynamic factor analysis (DFA), a dimension-reduction technique, was used to identify interactions between explanatory variables (i.e., environmental variables) and abundance (biovolume) of predominant phytoplankton classes. The optimal DFA model significantly described the dynamic changes in abundances of predominant phytoplankton groups (including dinoflagellates, diatoms, and green algae) at five monitoring sites. Water temperature, electrical conductivity, water level, nutrients (total phosphorus, NO3-N, and NH3-N), macro-zooplankton, and zooplankton were the key factors affecting the dynamics of aforementioned phytoplankton. Therefore, transformations of nutrients and reactions between water quality variables and aforementioned processes altered by hydrological conditions may also control the abundance dynamics of phytoplankton, which may represent common trends in the DFA model. The meandering shape of Shihmen Reservoir and its surrounding rivers caused a complex interplay between hydrological conditions and abiotic and biotic variables, resulting in phytoplankton abundance that could not be estimated using certain variables. Additional water quality and hydrological variables at surrounding rivers and monitoring plans should be executed a few days before and after reservoir operations and heavy storm, which would assist in developing site-specific preventive strategies to control phytoplankton abundance.

  14. Abiotic Methane Synthesis: Caveats and New Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, R.; Sharma, A.

    2005-12-01

    The role of mineral interaction with geochemical fluids under hydrothermal conditions has invoked models of geochemical synthesis of organic molecules at deep crustal conditions. Since Thomas Gold's (1992) hypothesis of the possibility of an abiotic organic synthesis, there have been several reports of hydrocarbon formation under high pressure and temperature conditions. Several previous experimental studies have recognized that small amounts of methane (and other light HC compounds) can be synthesized via catalysis by transition metals: Fe, Ni (Horita and Berndt, 1999 Science) and Cr (Foustavous and Seyfried, 2004 Science). In light of these pioneering experiments, an investigation of the feasibility of abiotic methane synthesis at higher pressure conditions in deep geological setting and the possible role of catalysis warrants a closer look. We conducted three sets of experiments in hydrothermal diamond anvil cell using FeO nanopowder, CaCO 3 and water at 300° - 600° C and 0.5 - 5 GPa : (a) with stainless steel gasket, (b) gold-lined gasket, and (c) gold-lined gasket with added Fe and Ni nanopowder. The reactions were monitored in-situ using micro-Raman spectroscopy with 532nm and 632nm lasers. The solids phases were characterized in-situ using synchrotron X-ray diffraction at CHESS-Cornell and quenched products with an electron microprobe. Interestingly, a variable amount of hydrocarbon was observed only in runs with stainless steel gasket and with Fe, Ni nanoparticles. Experiments with gold-lined reactors did not show any hydrocarbon formation. Added high resolution microscopy of the products and their textural relationship within the diamond cell with Raman spectroscopy data show that the hydrocarbon (methane and other light fractions) synthesis is a direct result of transition metal catalysis, rather than wustite - calcium carbonate reaction as recently reported by Scott et al (2004, PNAS). The author will further present new results highlighting abiotic

  15. Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Mauro, Ernesto

    Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions. Ernesto Di Mauro Dipartimento di Genetica Bi-ologia Molecolare, Universit` "Sapienza" Roma, Italy. a At least four conditions must be satisfied for the spontaneous generation of (pre)-genetic poly-mers: 1) availability of precursors that are activated enough to spontaneously polymerize. Preliminary studies showed that (a) nucleic bases and acyclonucleosides can be synthesized from formamide H2NCOH by simply heating with prebiotically available mineral catalysts [last reviewed in (1)], and that b) nucleic bases can be phosphorylated in every possible posi-tion [2'; 3'; 5'; cyclic 2',3'; cyclic 3',5' (2)]. The higher stability of the cyclic forms allows their accumulation. 2) A polymerization mechanism. A reaction showing the formation of RNA polymers starting from prebiotically plausible precursors (3',5' cyclic GMP and 3', 5'cyclic AMP) was recently reported (3). Polymerization in these conditions is thermodynamically up-hill and an equilibrium is attained that limits the maximum length of the polymer produced to about 40 nucleotides for polyG and 100 nucleotides for polyA. 3) Ligation of the synthesized oligomers. If this type of reaction could occur according to a terminal-joining mechanism and could generate canonical 3',5' phosphodiester bonds, exponential growth would be obtained of the generated oligomers. This type of reaction has been reported (4) , limited to homogeneous polyA sequences and leading to the production of polyA dimers and tetramers. What is still missing are: 4) mechanisms that provide the proof of principle for the generation of sequence complexity. We will show evidence for two mechanisms providing this proof of principle for simple complementary sequences. Namely: abiotic sequence complementary-driven terminal ligation and sequence-complementary terminal growth. In conclusion: all the steps leading to the generation of RNA in abiotic conditions are satisfied. (1) R Saladino, C Crestini, F

  16. MICROSCALE METABOLIC, REDOX AND ABIOTIC REACTIONS IN HANFORD 300 AREA SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Beyenal, Haluk; McLEan, Jeff; Majors, Paul; Fredrickson, Jim

    2013-11-14

    The Hanford 300 Area is a unique site due to periodic hydrologic influence of river water resulting in changes in groundwater elevation and flow direction. This area is also highly subject to uranium remobilization, the source of which is currently believed to be the region at the base of the vadose zone that is subject to period saturation due to the changes in the water levels in the Columbia River. We found that microbial processes and redox and abiotic reactions which operate at the microscale were critical to understanding factors controlling the macroscopic fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The combined laboratory and field research showed how microscale conditions control uranium mobility and how biotic, abiotic and redox reactions relate to each other. Our findings extended the current knowledge to examine U(VI) reduction and immobilization using natural 300 Area communities as well as selected model organisms on redox-sensitive and redox-insensitive minerals. Using innovative techniques developed specifically to probe biogeochemical processes at the microscale, our research expanded our current understanding of the roles played by mineral surfaces, bacterial competition, and local biotic, abiotic and redox reaction rates on the reduction and immobilization of uranium.

  17. Cell wall remodeling under abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Plants exposed to abiotic stress respond to unfavorable conditions on multiple levels. One challenge under drought stress is to reduce shoot growth while maintaining root growth, a process requiring differential cell wall synthesis and remodeling. Key players in this process are the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidases, which initially cross-link phenolic compounds and glycoproteins of the cell walls causing stiffening. The function of ROS shifts after having converted all the peroxidase substrates in the cell wall. If ROS-levels remain high during prolonged stress, OH°-radicals are formed which lead to polymer cleavage. In concert with xyloglucan modifying enzymes and expansins, the resulting cell wall loosening allows further growth of stressed organs. PMID:25709610

  18. Abiotic formation of oligonucleotides on basalt surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otroshchenko, V. A.; Vasilyeva, N. V.; Kopilov, A. M.

    1985-06-01

    The complication and further evolution of abiotic syntheses products occurred under environmental influences at the prebiological stage. From this point of view, the influence of some types of irradiation on the organic molecules adsorbed on the surfaces of volcanic rocks, appeared to be of great importance. In this connection, the effect of gamma rays on the AMP molecules adsorbed on mineral surfaces such as cinders and ashes has been studied. It has been shown that they can polymerize with the formation of oligonucleotides. The treatment of oligomers obtained by venom phosphodiesterase has shown that a polymeric product has mainly 3' 5' and 2' 5' bonds between nucleotides. The results obtained have been discussed from the evolutionary aspect.

  19. ABIOTIC IN SITU TECHNOLOGIES FOR GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION CONFERENCE: PROCEEDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA conference on Abiotic In Situ Technologies for Groundwater Remediation was held in Dallas, TX, 8/31-9/2/99. The goal of the meeting was to disseminate current information on abiotic in situ groundwater treatment echnologies. Although much information is being provided a...

  20. Comparative study of biogenic and abiotic iron-containing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z.; Shopska, M.; Paneva, D.; Kovacheva, D.; Kadinov, G.; Mitov, I.

    2016-12-01

    Series of iron-based biogenic materials prepared by cultivation of Leptothrix group of bacteria in different feeding media ( Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria isolation medium, Adler, Lieske and silicon-iron-glucose-peptone) were studied. Control samples were obtained in the same conditions and procedures but the nutrition media were not infected with bacteria, i.e. they were sterile. Room and low temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS) were used to reveal the composition and physicochemical properties of biomass and respective control samples. Comparative analysis showed differences in their composition and dispersity of present phases. Sample composition included different ratio of nanodimensional iron oxyhydroxide and oxide phases. Relaxation phenomena such as superparamagnetism or collective magnetic excitation behaviour were registered for some of them. The experimental data showed that the biogenic materials were enriched in oxyhydroxides of high dispersion. Catalytic behaviour of a selected biomass and abiotic material were studied in the reaction of CO oxidation. In situ diffuse-reflectance (DR) IRS was used to monitor the phase transformations in the biomass and CO conversion.

  1. The Stable Isotope Fractionation of Abiotic Reactions: A Benchmark in the Detection of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.

    2003-01-01

    mil to as low as -60 % (potentially comparable to that which accompanies the biosynthesis of organic matter). We need to understand what kind of fractionations are observed with reactions under the non-reducing or mildly reducing conditions now thought to be present on the early Earth. While nitrogen is receiving increased attention as a tool for these kinds of analyses, almost nothing is known about the isotope fractionation that one would expect for abiotic sources of fixed/reduced nitrogen. This project will measure the fixation from a series of abiotic reactions that may have been present on the early Earth (and other terrestrial planets) and produced organic material that could have ended up in the rock record. The work will look at a number of reactions, under a non- reducing, or mildly reducing, atmosphere, covering sources of prebiotic organic C & N from shock heating, to photochemistry, to hydrothermal reactions. Some reactions that we plan to study are; Shock heating of a non-reducing atmosphere to produce CO and NO (in collaboration with Chris McKay), formation of formaldehyde (and related compounds) from COY the formation of ammonia from nitrogen oxides (ultimately from NO) by ferrous iron reduction, and the hydrothermal synthesis of compounds including the hydrocarboxylation/hydrocarbonylation reaction (in collaboration with George Cody), reactions of oxalate to form hydrocarbons and other oxygenated compounds and the formation of lipids from oxalic/formic acid (in collaboration with Tom McCollom), and reactions of carbon monoxide & carbon dioxide with N2, ammonia or nitritehitrate to form hydrogen cyanide, nitriles, ammonia/amines and nitrous

  2. Improved abiotic stress tolerance of bermudagrass by exogenous small molecules.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zhulong; Shi, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    As a widely used warm-season turfgrass in landscapes and golf courses, bermudagrass encounters multiple abiotic stresses during the growth and development. Physiology analysis indicated that abiotic stresses induced the accumulation of ROS and decline of photosynthesis, resulting in increased cell damage and inhibited growth. Proteomic and metabolomic approaches showed that antioxidant enzymes and osmoprotectant contents (sugar, sucrose, dehydrin, proline) were extensively changed under abiotic stress conditions. Exogenous application of small molecules, such as ABA, NO, CaCl2, H2S, polyamine and melatonin, could effectively alleviate damages caused by multiple abiotic stresses, including drought, salt, heat and cold. Based on high through-put RNA seq analysis, genes involved in ROS, transcription factors, hormones, and carbohydrate metabolisms were largely enriched. The data indicated that small molecules induced the accumulation of osmoprotectants and antioxidants, kept cell membrane integrity, increased photosynthesis and kept ion homeostasis, which protected bermudagrass from damages caused by abiotic stresses.

  3. Abiotic stresses induce different localizations of anthocyanins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kovinich, Nik; Kayanja, Gilbert; Chanoca, Alexandra; Otegui, Marisa S; Grotewold, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanins are induced in plants in response to abiotic stresses such as drought, high salinity, excess light, and cold, where they often correlate with enhanced stress tolerance. Numerous roles have been proposed for anthocyanins induced during abiotic stresses including functioning as ROS scavengers, photoprotectants, and stress signals. We have recently found different profiles of anthocyanins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants exposed to different abiotic stresses, suggesting that not all anthocyanins have the same function. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of other studies and show that anthocyanins induced in Arabidopsis in response to various abiotic stresses have different localizations at the organ and tissue levels. These studies provide a basis to clarify the role of particular anthocyanin species during abiotic stress. PMID:26179363

  4. Sulfidogenesis Controls on Ferrihydrite Transformation and Repartitioning of Sorbed Arsenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocar, B. D.; Fendorf, S.

    2007-12-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are ubiquitous sorbents of arsenic (As) that undergo reductive dissolution and transformation upon reaction with dissolved sulfide. Here, we examine diverging pathways of solid phase iron (Fe) transformation during sulfate reduction in the presence of varying As loadings. Columns initially containing As(V)- ferrihydrite coated sand, inoculated with the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), were eluted with artificial groundwater containing sulfate and lactate. Additionally, abiotic batch reaction experiments were conducted to examine Fe secondary products rapidly formed during sulfidization of As-loaded ferrihydrite. Rapid and consistent sulfate reduction coupled with lactate oxidation is observed within column solids possessing low As(V) surface coverage (10% of the adsorption maximum). Column experiments illustrated that at high As(V) surface coverage (50% of the adsorption maximum), sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation are initially slow but gradually increase over time, and all As(V) is reduced to As(III) by the end of experimentation. The dominant Fe solid-phase transformation products at low As coverage include amorphous FeS within the zone of sulfate reduction (near the inlet of the column) and magnetite downstream where Fe(II)aq concentrations exceed 1 mM. Arsenic(V) is reduced to As(III) and displaced from the zone of sulfidogenesis and Fe(III)s depletion. At higher As coverage, green rust carbonate, as opposed to magnetite, is a dominant Fe solid phase product. Independent of loading, As is strongly associated with magnetite and residual ferrihydrite, while being excluded from green rust and iron sulfide. Abiotic batch reactor experiments illustrate that As is readily released from ferrihydrite during sulfidization, and that low As loadings yield initial Fe secondary products of lepidocrocite and FeS, while high loadings inhibit rapid secondary Fe mineral formation. Our observations illustrate that

  5. Carbon tetrachloride transformation on the surface of nanoscale biogenic magnetite particles.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Michael L; Adriaens, Peter

    2004-02-15

    Iron-reducing conditions in subsurface environments promote dechlorination reactions via both biotic and abiotic pathways, the latter often mediated via biologically activated minerals formed by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB). Here we report the major products and pathways associated with the abiotic transformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by nanoscale biogenic magnetite/maghemite particles produced by the DIRB Geobacter metallireducens. Product formation and free radical/carbene trapping studies indicate that CT transformation occurs via three parallel pathways. The first pathway (hydrogenolysis) results in the formation of chloroform (45-50%) via a trichloromethyl free radical (*CCl3) and possibly a trichloromethyl carbanion (**CCl3-). The second and third pathways involve a dichlorocarbene intermediate (**CCl2), which either hydrolyzes to form CO (approximately 38%) (carbene hydrolysis), or undergoes further reduction to yield methane (8-10%) (carbene reduction). The mechanism of methane formation from **CCl2 is not known, but is speculated to involve a sequence of surface coordinated carbenoid and free radical complexes. The large fraction of relatively benign products formed by the carbene-mediated pathways suggests that magnetite/maghemite particles may have a beneficial application in the remediation of CT contaminated environments.

  6. The Promoter of AtUSP Is Co-regulated by Phytohormones and Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bhuria, Monika; Goel, Parul; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Universal stress proteins (USPs) are known to be expressed in response to various abiotic stresses in a wide variety of organisms, such as bacteria, archaebacteria, protists, algae, fungi, plants, and animals. However, in plants, biological function of most of the USPs still remains obscure. In the present study, Arabidopsis USP gene (AtUSP) showed induction in response to abscisic acid (ABA) and various abiotic stresses viz. heat, dehydration, salt, osmotic, and cold stresses. Additionally, in silico analysis of AtUSP promoter identified several cis-elements responsive to phytohormones and abiotic stresses such as ABRE, ERE, DRE, and HSE, etc. To functionally validate the AtUSP promoter, the 1115 bp region of promoter was characterized under phytohormone and abiotic stress treatments. Deletion analysis of promoter was carried out by cloning the full length promoter (D0) and its three 5′ deletion derivatives, D1 (964 bp), D2 (660 bp), and D3 (503 bp) upstream of the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene, which were then stably transformed in Arabidopsis plants. The AtUSP promoter (D0) showed minimal activity under non-stress conditions which was enhanced in response to phytohormone treatments (ABA and ACC) and abiotic stresses such as dehydration, heat, cold, salt, and osmotic stresses. The seedlings harboring D1 and D2 deletion fragments showed constitutive GUS expression even under control condition with increased activity almost under all the treatments. However, D3 seedlings exhibited complete loss of activity under control condition with induction under ACC treatment, dehydration, heat, oxidative, salt, and osmotic stresses. Thus, present study clearly showed that AtUSP promoter is highly inducible by phytohormones and multiple abiotic stresses and it can be exploited as stress inducible promoter to generate multi-stress tolerant crops with minimal effects on their other important traits. PMID:28083000

  7. Improved Tolerance to Various Abiotic Stresses in Transgenic Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Expressing Spinach Betaine Aldehyde Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Weijuan; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Hongxia; Zhang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Abiotic stresses are critical delimiters for the increased productivity and cultivation expansion of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), a root crop with worldwide importance. The increased production of glycine betaine (GB) improves plant tolerance to various abiotic stresses without strong phenotypic changes, providing a feasible approach to improve stable yield production under unfavorable conditions. The gene encoding betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) is involved in the biosynthesis of GB in plants, and the accumulation of GB by the heterologous overexpression of BADH improves abiotic stress tolerance in plants. This study is to improve sweet potato, a GB accumulator, resistant to multiple abiotic stresses by promoted GB biosynthesis. A chloroplastic BADH gene from Spinacia oleracea (SoBADH) was introduced into the sweet potato cultivar Sushu-2 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The overexpression of SoBADH in the transgenic sweet potato improved tolerance to various abiotic stresses, including salt, oxidative stress, and low temperature. The increased BADH activity and GB accumulation in the transgenic plant lines under normal and multiple environmental stresses resulted in increased protection against cell damage through the maintenance of cell membrane integrity, stronger photosynthetic activity, reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and induction or activation of ROS scavenging by the increased activity of free radical-scavenging enzymes. The increased proline accumulation and systemic upregulation of many ROS-scavenging genes in stress-treated transgenic plants also indicated that GB accumulation might stimulate the ROS-scavenging system and proline biosynthesis via an integrative mechanism. This study demonstrates that the enhancement of GB biosynthesis in sweet potato is an effective and feasible approach to improve its tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses without causing phenotypic defects. This strategy for trait improvement in

  8. The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan; Schöler, H. F.

    2010-05-01

    The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to volatile organic compounds was studied intensely over the last years (Keppler et al., 2000; Huber et al., 2009). It was shown that soil organic matter is oxidised due to the presence of iron (III), hydrogen peroxide and chloride and thereby produces diverse alkyl halides, which are emitted into the atmosphere. The formation of polar halogenated compounds like chlorinated acetic acids which are relevant toxic environmental substances was also found in soils and sediments (Kilian et al., 2002). The investigation of the formation of other polar halogenated and non-halogenated compounds like diverse mono- and dicarboxylic acids is going to attain more and more importance. Due to its high acidity oxalic acid might have impacts on the environment e.g., nutrient leaching, plant diseases and negative influence on microbial growth. In this study, the abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soil is examined. For a better understanding of natural degradation processes mechanistic studies were conducted using the model compound catechol as representative for structural elements of the humic substances and its reaction with iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide. Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and hydrogen peroxide is produced by bacteria or through incomplete reduction of oxygen. To find suitable parameters for an optimal reaction and a qualitative and quantitative analysis method the following reaction parameters are varied: concentration of iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide, time dependence, pH-value and influence of chloride. Analysis of oxalic acid was performed employing an ion chromatograph equipped with a conductivity detector. The time dependent reaction shows a relatively fast formation of oxalic acid, the optimum yield is achieved after 60 minutes. Compared to the concentration of catechol an excess of hydrogen peroxide as well as a low concentration of iron (III) are required. In absence of chloride the

  9. Recent Molecular Advances on Downstream Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Sávio Pinho; Lima, Aline Medeiros; de Souza, Cláudia Regina Batista

    2012-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as extremes of temperature and pH, high salinity and drought, comprise some of the major factors causing extensive losses to crop production worldwide. Understanding how plants respond and adapt at cellular and molecular levels to continuous environmental changes is a pre-requisite for the generation of resistant or tolerant plants to abiotic stresses. In this review we aimed to present the recent advances on mechanisms of downstream plant responses to abiotic stresses and the use of stress-related genes in the development of genetically engineered crops. PMID:22942725

  10. Polyamines and abiotic stress tolerance in plants

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Sarvajeet Singh

    2010-01-01

    Environmental stresses including climate change, especially global warming, are severely affecting plant growth and productivity worldwide. It has been estimated that two-thirds of the yield potential of major crops are routinely lost due to the unfavorable environmental factors. On the other hand, the world population is estimated to reach about 10 billion by 2050, which will witness serious food shortages. Therefore, crops with enhanced vigour and high tolerance to various environmental factors should be developed to feed the increasing world population. Maintaining crop yields under adverse environmental stresses is probably the major challenge facing modern agriculture where polyamines can play important role. Polyamines (PAs)(putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are group of phytohormone-like aliphatic amine natural compounds with aliphatic nitrogen structure and present in almost all living organisms including plants. Evidences showed that polyamines are involved in many physiological processes, such as cell growth and development and respond to stress tolerance to various environmental factors. In many cases the relationship of plant stress tolerance was noted with the production of conjugated and bound polyamines as well as stimulation of polyamine oxidation. Therefore, genetic manipulation of crop plants with genes encoding enzymes of polyamine biosynthetic pathways may provide better stress tolerance to crop plants. Furthermore, the exogenous application of PAs is also another option for increasing the stress tolerance potential in plants. Here, we have described the synthesis and role of various polyamines in abiotic stress tolerance in plants. PMID:20592804

  11. Abiotic stress and the plant circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Alfredo; Shin, Jieun

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the interaction between the circadian clock of higher plants to that of metabolic and physiological processes that coordinate growth and performance under a predictable, albeit changing environment. In this, the phytochrome and cryptochrome photoreceptors have shown to be important, but not essential for oscillator control under diurnal cycles of light and dark. From this foundation, we will examine how emerging findings have firmly linked the circadian clock, as a central mediator in the coordination of metabolism, to maintain homeostasis. This occurs by oscillator synchronization of global transcription, which leads to a dynamic control of a host of physiological processes. These include the determination of the levels of primary and secondary metabolites, and the anticipation of future environmental stresses, such as mid-day drought and midnight coldness. Interestingly, metabolic and stress cues themselves appear to feedback on oscillator function. In such a way, the circadian clock of plants and abiotic-stress tolerance appear to be firmly interconnected processes. PMID:21325898

  12. Mechanism of Uranium Reduction and Immobilization in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Roebbert, Yvonne; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-09-01

    The prevalent formation of noncrystalline U(IV) species in the subsurface and their enhanced susceptibility to reoxidation and remobilization, as compared to crystalline uraninite, raise concerns about the long-term sustainability of the bioremediation of U-contaminated sites. The main goal of this study was to resolve the remaining uncertainty concerning the formation mechanism of noncrystalline U(IV) in the environment. Controlled laboratory biofilm systems (biotic, abiotic, and mixed biotic-abiotic) were probed using a combination of U isotope fractionation and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Regardless of the mechanism of U reduction, the presence of a biofilm resulted in the formation of noncrystalline U(IV). Our results also show that biotic U reduction is the most effective way to immobilize and reduce U. However, the mixed biotic-abiotic system resembled more closely an abiotic system: (i) the U(IV) solid phase lacked a typically biotic isotope signature and (ii) elemental sulfur was detected, which indicates the oxidation of sulfide coupled to U(VI) reduction. The predominance of abiotic U reduction in our systems is due to the lack of available aqueous U(VI) species for direct enzymatic reduction. In contrast, in cases where bicarbonate is present at a higher concentration, aqueous U(VI) species dominate, allowing biotic U reduction to outcompete the abiotic processes.

  13. Circadian regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in plants

    PubMed Central

    Grundy, Jack; Stoker, Claire; Carré, Isabelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Extremes of temperatures, drought and salinity cause widespread crop losses throughout the world and impose severe limitations on the amount of land that can be used for agricultural purposes. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop crops that perform better under such abiotic stress conditions. Here, we discuss intriguing, recent evidence that circadian clock contributes to plants’ ability to tolerate different types of environmental stress, and to acclimate to them. The clock controls expression of a large fraction of abiotic stress-responsive genes, as well as biosynthesis and signaling downstream of stress response hormones. Conversely, abiotic stress results in altered expression and differential splicing of the clock genes, leading to altered oscillations of downstream stress-response pathways. We propose a range of mechanisms by which this intimate coupling between the circadian clock and environmental stress-response pathways may contribute to plant growth and survival under abiotic stress. PMID:26379680

  14. Abiotic stress responses in plant roots: a proteomics perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Dipanjana; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stress conditions adversely affect plant growth, resulting in significant decline in crop productivity. To mitigate and recover from the damaging effects of such adverse environmental conditions, plants have evolved various adaptive strategies at cellular and metabolic levels. Most of these strategies involve dynamic changes in protein abundance that can be best explored through proteomics. This review summarizes comparative proteomic studies conducted with roots of various plant species subjected to different abiotic stresses especially drought, salinity, flood, and cold. The main purpose of this article is to highlight and classify the protein level changes in abiotic stress response pathways specifically in plant roots. Shared as well as stressor-specific proteome signatures and adaptive mechanism(s) are simultaneously described. Such a comprehensive account will facilitate the design of genetic engineering strategies that enable the development of broad-spectrum abiotic stress-tolerant crops. PMID:24478786

  15. Comparisons between abiotic nitration and biotransformation reactions of phenolic micropollutants in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Kevin S; Wick, Arne; Ternes, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    The transformation of selected phenolic substances was investigated during biological wastewater treatment. A main emphasis was put on the relevance of abiotic processes leading to toxic nitrophenolic transformation products (TPs). Due to their environmental relevance, the antiseptic ortho-phenylphenol (OPP), the plastics additive bisphenol A (BPA) and the psychoactive drug dextrorphan have been studied. Batch experiments confirmed that nitro- and nitroso-phenolic TPs can be formed under acidic conditions when nitrite is present. HNO2, N2O3 and NO and NO2 radicals are likely involved in the abiotic process. It was found that the process was promoted by the freezing of water samples, since this can lead to an unexpected pH drop. However, under conditions present at wastewater treatment plants (neutral pH, low nitrite concentrations), the formation of appreciable concentrations is rather unlikely through this process, since HNO2 concentrations are extremely low and NO and NO2 radicals will also react with other wastewater constituents. Thus, the transformation of phenolic substances such as OPP and BPA is mainly caused by biotic transformation. In addition to hydroxylation as a common reaction under aerobic conditions, the formation of sulfate conjugates was detected with the original compounds as well as with nitrophenolic TPs. Therefore, even when nitro-phenolic substances are formed it is likely that they are further transformed to sulfate conjugates. In raw wastewater and WWTP effluent nitrated BPA and NO2-dextrorphan were not detected. Only nitro-OPP was found in the influent of a WWTP with 2.3 ng/L, but it was not identified in the WWTP effluents. The concentrations of dextrorphan increased slightly during WWTP passage, possibly due to the cleavage of the glucuronide-conjugate, its human metabolite form, or demethylation of the prodrug dextromethorphan.

  16. Abiotic production of iodine molecules in irradiated ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonyong; Kim, Kitae; Yabushita, Akihiro

    2015-04-01

    Reactive halogen species play an important role in Earth's environmental systems. Iodine compounds are related to ozone depletion event (ODE) during Antarctic spring, formation of CCN (cloud condensation nuclei), and controlling the atmospheric oxidizing capacity. However, the processes and mechanisms for abiotic formation of iodine compounds in polar region are still unclear. Although the chemical reactions taking place in ice are greatly different from those in aquatic environment, reaction processes of halogens in frozen condition have rarely studied compared to those in water. In this study, we investigated iodide oxidation to form triiodide (I3-) in ice phase under UV irradiation ( λ > 300 nm) and dark condition. The production of I3- through iodide oxidation, which is negligible in aqueous solution, was significantly accelerated in ice phase even in the absence of UV irradiation. The following release of gaseous iodine molecule (I2) to the atmosphere was also monitored by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). We speculate that the markedly enhanced iodide oxidation in polycrystalline ice is due to the freeze concentration of iodides, protons, and dissolved oxygen in the ice crystal grain boundaries. The experiments conducted under ambient solar radiation of the Antarctic region (King George Island, 62°13'S 58°47'W, sea level) also confirmed that the generation of I3- via iodide oxidation process is enhanced when iodide is trapped in ice. The observed intrinsic oxidative transformation of iodide to generate I3-(aq) and I2(g) in frozen environment suggests a previously unknown pathway for the substantial release of reactive iodine species to the atmosphere.

  17. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Coari, Kristin M; Martin, Rebecca C; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B

    2017-02-03

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  18. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-02-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Mercury Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Anne O.; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-04-25

    Hg is of special interest to DOE due to past intensive use in manufacture of nuclear weapons at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Because of its facile oxidation/reduction [Hg(II)/Hg(0)] chemistry, ability to bond to carbon [as in highly toxic methylmercury: MeHg(I)] and its unique physical properties [e.g., volatility of Hg(0)], Hg has a complex environmental cycle involving soils, sediments, waterways and the atmosphere and including biotic and abiotic chemical and physical transport and transformations. Understanding such processes well enough to design stewardship plans that minimize negative impacts in diverse ecological settings requires rich knowledge of the contributing abiotic and biotic processes. Prokaryotes are major players in the global Hg cycle. Facultative and anaerobic bacteria can form MeHg(I) with consequent intoxication of wildlife and humans. Sustainable stewardship of Hg-contaminated sites requires eliminating not only MeHg(I) but also the Hg(II) substrate for methylation. Fortunately, a variety of mercury resistant (HgR) aerobic and facultative bacteria and archaea can do both things. Prokaryotes harboring narrow or broad Hg resistance (mer) loci detoxify Hg(II) or RHg(I), respectively, to relatively inert, less toxic, volatile Hg(0). HgR microbes are enriched in highly contaminated sites and extensive field data show they depress levels of MeHg >500-fold in such zones. So, enhancing the natural capacity of indigenous HgR microbes to remove Hg(II) and RHg(I) from soils, sediments and waterways is a logical component of a comprehensive plan for clean up and stewardship of contaminated sites.

  20. Oxidative-coupling reaction of TNT reduction products by manganese oxide.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki-Hoon; Lim, Dong-Min; Shin, Hyunsang

    2006-03-01

    Abiotic transformation of TNT reduction products via oxidative-coupling reaction was investigated using Mn oxide. In batch experiments, all the reduction products tested were completely transformed by birnessite, one of natural Mn oxides present in soil. Oxidative-coupling was the major transformation pathway, as confirmed by mass spectrometric analysis. Using observed pseudo-first-order rate constants with respect to birnessite loadings, surface area-normalized specific rate constants, ksurf, were determined. As expected, ksurf of diaminonitrotoluenes (DATs) (1.49-1.91L/m2 d) are greater about 2 orders than that of dinitroaminotoluenes (DNTs) (1.15 x 10(-2)-2.09 x 10(-2)L/m2d) due to the increased number of amine group. In addition, by comparing the value of ksurf between DNTs or DATs, amine group on ortho position is likely to be more preferred for the oxidation by birnessite. Although cross-coupling of TNT in the presence of various mediator compounds was found not to be feasible, transformation of TNT by reduction using Fe0 followed by oxidative-coupling using Mn oxide was efficient, as evaluated by UV-visible spectrometry.

  1. Detection of Abiotic Methane in Terrestrial Continental Hydrothermal Systems: Implications for Methane on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Romanek, Christopher S.; Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Bissada, Kadry K.

    2008-01-01

    The recent detection of methane in the Martian atmosphere and the possibility that its origin could be attributed to biological activity, have highlighted the importance of understanding the mechanisms of methane formation and its usefulness as a biomarker. Much debate has centered on the source of the methane in hydrothermal fluids, whether it is formed biologically by microorganisms, diagenetically through the decomposition of sedimentary organic matter, or inorganically via reduction of CO2 at high temperatures. Ongoing research has now shown that much of the methane present in sea-floor hydrothermal systems is probably formed through inorganic CO2 reduction processes at very high temperatures (greater than 400 C). Experimental results have indicated that methane might form inorganically at temperatures lower still, however these results remain controversial. Currently, methane in continental hydrothermal systems is thought to be formed mainly through the breakdown of sedimentary organic matter and carbon isotope equilibrium between CO2 and CH4 is thought to be rarely present if at all. Based on isotopic measurements of CO2 and CH4 in two continental hydrothermal systems, we suggest that carbon isotope equilibration exists at temperatures as low as 155 C. This would indicate that methane is forming through abiotic CO2 reduction at lower temperatures than previously thought and could bolster arguments for an abiotic origin of the methane detected in the martian atmosphere.

  2. An omics approach to understand the plant abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Mousumi; Pandey, Mukeshwar; Bisen, P S

    2011-11-01

    Abiotic stress can lead to changes in development, productivity, and severe stress and may even threaten survival of plants. Several environmental stresses cause drastic changes in the growth, physiology, and metabolism of plants leading to the increased accumulation of secondary metabolites. As medicinal plants are important sources of drugs, steps are taken to understand the effect of stress on the physiology, biochemistry, genomic, proteomic, and metabolic levels. The molecular responses of plants to abiotic stress are often considered as a complex process. They are mainly based on the modulation of transcriptional activity of stress-related genes. Many genes have been induced under stress conditions. The products of stress-inducible genes protecting against these stresses includes the enzymes responsible for the synthesis of various osmoprotectants. Genetic engineering of tolerance to abiotic stresses help in molecular understanding of pathways induced in response to one or more of the abiotic stresses. Systems biology and virtual experiments allow visualizing and understanding how plants work to overcome abiotic stress. This review discusses the omic approach to understand the plant response to abiotic stress with special emphasis on medicinal plant.

  3. Transformational Learners: Transformational Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marguerite

    2009-01-01

    Transformational learning, according to Mezirow (1981), involves transforming taken-for-granted frames of reference into more discriminating, flexible "habits of mind". In teacher education, transformative learning impacts on the development of students' action theories, self-efficacy and professional attributes. Although considered…

  4. Polyamines and abiotic stress in plants: a complex relationship1

    PubMed Central

    Minocha, Rakesh; Majumdar, Rajtilak; Minocha, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological relationship between abiotic stress in plants and polyamines was reported more than 40 years ago. Ever since there has been a debate as to whether increased polyamines protect plants against abiotic stress (e.g., due to their ability to deal with oxidative radicals) or cause damage to them (perhaps due to hydrogen peroxide produced by their catabolism). The observation that cellular polyamines are typically elevated in plants under both short-term as well as long-term abiotic stress conditions is consistent with the possibility of their dual effects, i.e., being protectors from as well as perpetrators of stress damage to the cells. The observed increase in tolerance of plants to abiotic stress when their cellular contents are elevated by either exogenous treatment with polyamines or through genetic engineering with genes encoding polyamine biosynthetic enzymes is indicative of a protective role for them. However, through their catabolic production of hydrogen peroxide and acrolein, both strong oxidizers, they can potentially be the cause of cellular harm during stress. In fact, somewhat enigmatic but strong positive relationship between abiotic stress and foliar polyamines has been proposed as a potential biochemical marker of persistent environmental stress in forest trees in which phenotypic symptoms of stress are not yet visible. Such markers may help forewarn forest managers to undertake amelioration strategies before the appearance of visual symptoms of stress and damage at which stage it is often too late for implementing strategies for stress remediation and reversal of damage. This review provides a comprehensive and critical evaluation of the published literature on interactions between abiotic stress and polyamines in plants, and examines the experimental strategies used to understand the functional significance of this relationship with the aim of improving plant productivity, especially under conditions of abiotic stress. PMID:24847338

  5. Coupling microbial catabolic actions with abiotic redox processes: a new recipe for persistent organic pollutant (POP) removal.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Nam, In-Hyun; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The continuous release of toxic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) into the environment has raised a need for effective cleanup methods. The tremendous natural diversity of microbial catabolic mechanisms suggests that catabolic routes may be applied to the remediation of POP-contaminated fields. A large number of the recalcitrant xenobiotics have been shown to be removable via the natural catabolic mechanisms of microbes, and detailed biochemical studies of the catabolic methods, together with the development of sophisticated genetic engineering, have led to the use of synthetic microbes for the bioremediation of POPs. However, the steric effects of substituted halogen moieties, microbe toxicity, and the low bioavailability of POPs still deteriorate the efficiency of removal strategies based on natural and synthetic catabolic mechanisms. Recently, abiotic redox processes that induce rapid reductive dehalogenation, hydroxyl radical-based oxidation, or electron shuttling have been reasonably coupled with microbial catabolic actions, thereby compensating for the drawbacks of biotic processes in POP removal. In this review, we first compare the pros and cons of individual methodologies (i.e., the natural and synthetic catabolism of microbes and the abiotic processes involving zero-valent irons, advanced oxidation processes, and small organic stimulants) for POP removal. We then highlight recent trends in coupling the biotic-abiotic methodologies and discuss how the processes are both feasible and superior to individual methodologies for POP cleanup. Cost-effective and environmentally sustainable abiotic redox actions could enhance the microbial bioremediation potential for POPs.

  6. Abiotic Stresses Downregulate Key Genes Involved in Nitrogen Uptake and Assimilation in Brassica juncea L.

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Parul; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought and extreme temperatures affect nitrogen (N) uptake and assimilation in plants. However, little is known about the regulation of N pathway genes at transcriptional level under abiotic stress conditions in Brassica juncea. In the present work, genes encoding nitrate transporters (NRT), ammonium transporters (AMT), nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NiR), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), asparagines synthetase (ASN) were cloned from Brassica juncea L. var. Varuna. The deduced protein sequences were analyzed to predict their subcellular localization, which confirmed localization of all the proteins in their respective cellular organelles. The protein sequences were also subjected to conserved domain identification, which confirmed presence of characteristic domains in all the proteins, indicating their putative functions. Moreover, expression of these genes was studied after 1h and 24h of salt (150 mM NaCl), osmotic (250 mM Mannitol), cold (4°C) and heat (42°C) stresses. Most of the genes encoding nitrate transporters and enzymes responsible for N assimilation and remobilization were found to be downregulated under abiotic stresses. The expression of BjAMT1.2, BjAMT2, BjGS1.1, BjGDH1 and BjASN2 was downregulated after 1hr, while expression of BjNRT1.1, BjNRT2.1, BjNiR1, BjAMT2, BjGDH1 and BjASN2 was downregulated after 24h of all the stress treatments. However, expression of BjNRT1.1, BjNRT1.5 and BjGDH2 was upregulated after 1h of all stress treatments, while no gene was found to be upregulated after 24h of stress treatments, commonly. These observations indicate that expression of most of the genes is adversely affected under abiotic stress conditions, particularly under prolonged stress exposure (24h), which may be one of the reasons of reduction in plant growth and development under abiotic stresses. PMID:26605918

  7. Electrochemical evidences for promoted interfacial reactions: the role of Fe(II) adsorbed onto gamma-Al2O3 and TiO2 in reductive transformation of 2-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang-Bai; Tao, Liang; Feng, Chun-hua; Li, Xiang-Zhong; Sun, Ke-Wen

    2009-05-15

    This study was aimed at elucidating the role of adsorbed Fe(II) on minerals in the reductive transformation of 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) by using electrochemical methods. The studies of Fe(ll) adsorption and 2-NP reduction kinetics showed that the identity of minerals such as gamma-Al2O3 and TiO and the solution pH were crucial factors to determine the Fe(ll) adsorption behavior and to influence the rate constant (k) of 2-NP reduction. Furthermore, two electrochemical methods, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectrometry (EIS), were applied to characterize the Fe(II) reactivity with both the mineral-coated and mineral-free electrodes. The electrochemical evidence confirmed that the peak oxidation potential (Ep) of complex Fe(II) can be significantly affected by the solution pH;the enhanced reductive transformation of 2-NP can be related to the reduced Ep of surface-complex Fe(II) and the reduced charge transfer resistance (R(CT)) of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple. All these relationships were studied quantitatively. At pH 6.7, the measured Ep and R(CT) decreased in the order TiO2/GC < gamma-Al2O3/ GC < GC (Ep, 0.140 < 0.190 < 0.242 V; R(CT), 0.30 < 0.41 < 0.78 komega), while the 2-NP reduction on different minerals were in the order TiO2 > gamma-Al2O3 > nonmineral (k x 10-2, 7.91 > 0.64 > 0.077 min(-l)).

  8. Plant cell organelle proteomics in response to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Zahed; Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics is one of the finest molecular techniques extensively being used for the study of protein profiling of a given plant species experiencing stressed conditions. Plants respond to a stress by alteration in the pattern of protein expression, either by up-regulating of the existing protein pool or by the synthesizing novel proteins primarily associated with plants antioxidative defense mechanism. Improved protein extraction protocols and advance techniques for identification of novel proteins have been standardized in different plant species at both cellular and whole plant level for better understanding of abiotic stress sensing and intracellular stress signal transduction mechanisms. In contrast, an in-depth proteome study of subcellular organelles could generate much detail information about the intrinsic mechanism of stress response as it correlates the possible relationship between the protein abundance and plant stress tolerance. Although a wealth of reviews devoted to plant proteomics are available, review articles dedicated to plant cell organelle proteins response under abiotic stress are very scanty. In the present review, an attempt has been made to summarize all significant contributions related to abiotic stresses and their impacts on organelle proteomes for better understanding of plants abiotic stress tolerance mechanism at protein level. This review will not only provide new insights into the plants stress response mechanisms, which are necessary for future development of genetically engineered stress tolerant crop plants for the benefit of humankind, but will also highlight the importance of studying changes in protein abundance within the cell organelles in response to abiotic stress.

  9. Biochar-Facilitated Reduction of Crystalline Fe(III) in Hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Yang, Y.; Roden, E. E.; Tang, Y.; Huang, R.; Adhikari, D.

    2015-12-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter is a significant component of soil organic matter, the transformation of which may play a crucial role in the coupled redox cycles of carbon and iron. However, scant information is available for the role of pyrogenic carbon in the redox cycle of iron. Herein, we studied the influences of wheat straw-derived biochar on the microbial reduction of hematite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In the presence of 10 mg/L biochar, microbial reduction of hematite was substantially accelerated by 41% to 142%. Reduction of hematite was enhanced to similar degrees by aqueous biochar with the concentration of 1-3 mg C/L. Importance of the aqueous biochar was also supported by the response of enhancement of Fe reduction to the dose of biochar particles, closely linked to the change in aqueous biochar concentration rather than the amount of total biochar particles. Microbiologically pre-reduced biochar reduced hematite abiotically, demonstrating the electron shuttling capacity of aqueous biochar for hematite reduction. On the other side, biochar particles sorbed Fe(II) and consequently decreased the accumulation of Fe(II) in solution to facilitate the reduction of hematite further. We reported for the first time the biochar-facilitated microbial reduction of crystalline Fe(III), through electron shuttling processes mediated by aqueous biochar and complexation of Fe(II) by biochar particles. Such impacted redox cycles of Fe would be important for the soil environment with relatively high content of indigenous pyrogenic carbon or substantial application of biochar.

  10. The impact of abiotic factors on cellulose synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; McFarlane, Heather E; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants require mechanisms to sense and respond to changes in their environment, including both biotic and abiotic factors. One of the most common plant adaptations to environmental changes is differential regulation of growth, which results in growth either away from adverse conditions or towards more favorable conditions. As cell walls shape plant growth, this differential growth response must be accompanied by alterations to the plant cell wall. Here, we review the impact of four abiotic factors (osmotic conditions, ionic stress, light, and temperature) on the synthesis of cellulose, an important component of the plant cell wall. Understanding how different abiotic factors influence cellulose production and addressing key questions that remain in this field can provide crucial information to cope with the need for increased crop production under the mounting pressures of a growing world population and global climate change.

  11. Integrated metabolomics for abiotic stress responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-04-01

    Plants are considered to biosynthesize specialized (traditionally called secondary) metabolites to adapt to environmental stresses such as biotic and abiotic stresses. The majority of specialized metabolites induced by abiotic stress characteristically exhibit antioxidative activity in vitro, but their function in vivo is largely yet to be experimentally confirmed. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the identification of the role of abiotic stress-responsive specialized metabolites with an emphasis on flavonoids. Integrated 'omics' analysis, centered on metabolomics with a series of plant resources differing in their flavonoid accumulation, showed experimentally that flavonoids play a major role in antioxidation in vivo. In addition, the results also suggest the role of flavonoids in the vacuole. To obtain more in-depth insights, chemical and biological challenges need to be addressed for the identification of unknown specialized metabolites and their in vivo functions.

  12. Trehalose accumulation in rice plants confers high tolerance levels to different abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Ajay K.; Kim, Ju-Kon; Owens, Thomas G.; Ranwala, Anil P.; Choi, Yang Do; Kochian, Leon V.; Wu, Ray J.

    2002-01-01

    Trehalose is a nonreducing disaccharide of glucose that functions as a compatible solute in the stabilization of biological structures under abiotic stress in bacteria, fungi, and invertebrates. With the notable exception of the desiccation-tolerant “resurrection plants,” trehalose is not thought to accumulate to detectable levels in most plants. We report here the regulated overexpression of Escherichia coli trehalose biosynthetic genes (otsA and otsB) as a fusion gene for manipulating abiotic stress tolerance in rice. The fusion gene has the advantages of necessitating only a single transformation event and a higher net catalytic efficiency for trehalose formation. The expression of the transgene was under the control of either tissue-specific or stress-dependent promoters. Compared with nontransgenic rice, several independent transgenic lines exhibited sustained plant growth, less photo-oxidative damage, and more favorable mineral balance under salt, drought, and low-temperature stress conditions. Depending on growth conditions, the transgenic rice plants accumulate trehalose at levels 3–10 times that of the nontransgenic controls. The observation that peak trehalose levels remain well below 1 mg/g fresh weight indicates that the primary effect of trehalose is not as a compatible solute. Rather, increased trehalose accumulation correlates with higher soluble carbohydrate levels and an elevated capacity for photosynthesis under both stress and nonstress conditions, consistent with a suggested role in modulating sugar sensing and carbohydrate metabolism. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of engineering rice for increased tolerance of abiotic stress and enhanced productivity through tissue-specific or stress-dependent overproduction of trehalose. PMID:12456878

  13. Abiotic systems for the catalytic treatment of solvent-contaminated water

    SciTech Connect

    Betterton, E.A.; Arnold, R.G.; Liu, Zhijie; Hollan, N.

    1996-12-31

    Three abiotic systems are described that catalyze the reductive dehalogenation of heavily halogenated environmental pollutants, including carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethene, and perchloroethene. These systems include (a) an electrolytic reactor in which the potential on the working electrode (cathode) is fixed by using a potentiostat, (b) a light-driven system consisting of a semiconductor and (covalently attached) macrocycle that can accept light transmitted via an optical fiber, and a light-driven, two-solvent (isopropanol/acetone) system that promotes dehalogenation reactions via an unknown mechanism. Each is capable of accelerating reductive dehalogenation reactions to very high rates under laboratory conditions. Typically, millimolar concentrations of aqueous-phase targets can be dehalogenated in minutes to hours. The description of each system includes the elements of reaction mechanism (to the extent known), typical kinetic data, and a discussion of the feasibility of applying this technology for the in situ destruction of hazardous compounds. 14 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Strategies to ameliorate abiotic stress-induced plant senescence.

    PubMed

    Gepstein, Shimon; Glick, Bernard R

    2013-08-01

    The plant senescence syndrome resembles, in many molecular and phenotypic aspects, plant responses to abiotic stresses. Both processes have an enormous negative global agro-economic impact and endanger food security worldwide. Premature plant senescence is the main cause of losses in grain filling and biomass yield due to leaf yellowing and deteriorated photosynthesis, and is also responsible for the losses resulting from the short shelf life of many vegetables and fruits. Under abiotic stress conditions the yield losses are often even greater. The primary challenge in agricultural sciences today is to develop technologies that will increase food production and sustainability of agriculture especially under environmentally limiting conditions. In this chapter, some of the mechanisms involved in abiotic stress-induced plant senescence are discussed. Recent studies have shown that crop yield and nutritional values can be altered as well as plant stress tolerance through manipulating the timing of senescence. It is often difficult to separate the effects of age-dependent senescence from stress-induced senescence since both share many biochemical processes and ultimately result in plant death. The focus of this review is on abiotic stress-induced senescence. Here, a number of the major approaches that have been developed to ameliorate some of the effects of abiotic stress-induced plant senescence are considered and discussed. Some approaches mimic the mechanisms already used by some plants and soil bacteria whereas others are based on development of new improved transgenic plants. While there may not be one simple strategy that can effectively decrease all losses of crop yield that accrue as a consequence of abiotic stress-induced plant senescence, some of the strategies that are discussed already show great promise.

  15. Nitric oxide signaling in plant responses to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Weihua; Fan, Liu-Min

    2008-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays important roles in diverse physiological processes in plants. NO can provoke both beneficial and harmful effects, which depend on the concentration and location of NO in plant cells. This review is focused on NO synthesis and the functions of NO in plant responses to abiotic environmental stresses. Abiotic stresses mostly induce NO production in plants. NO alleviates the harmfulness of reactive oxygen species, and reacts with other target molecules, and regulates the expression of stress responsive genes under various stress conditions.

  16. Starch as a determinant of plant fitness under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Thalmann, Matthias; Santelia, Diana

    2017-03-09

    I. II. III. IV. V. VI. References SUMMARY: Abiotic stresses, such as drought, high salinity and extreme temperatures, pose one of the most important constraints to plant growth and productivity in many regions of the world. A number of investigations have shown that plants, including several important crops, remobilize their starch reserve to release energy, sugars and derived metabolites to help mitigate the stress. This is an essential process for plant fitness with important implications for plant productivity under challenging environmental conditions. In this Tansley insight, we evaluate the current literature on starch metabolism in response to abiotic stresses, and discuss the key enzymes involved and how they are regulated.

  17. Dual-tree complex wavelet transform and SVD based acoustic noise reduction and its application in leak detection for natural gas pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xuchao; Liang, Wei; Zhang, Laibin; Jin, Hao; Qiu, Jingwei

    2016-05-01

    During the last decades, leak detection for natural gas pipeline has become one of the paramount concerns of pipeline operators and researchers across the globe. However, acoustic wave method has been proved to be an effective way to identify and localize leakage for gas pipeline. Considering the fact that noises inevitably exist in the acoustic signals collected, noise reduction should be enforced on the signals for subsequent data mining and analysis. Thus, an integrated acoustic noise reduction method based on DTCWT and SVD is proposed in this study. The method is put forward based on the idea that noise reduction strategy should match the characteristics of the noisy signal. According to previous studies, it is known that the energy of acoustic signals collected under leaking condition is mainly concentrated in low-frequency portion (0-100 Hz). And ultralow-frequency component (0-5 Hz), which is taken as the characteristic frequency band in this study, can propagate a relatively longer distance and be captured by sensors. Therefore, in order to filter the noises and to reserve the characteristic frequency band, DTCWT is taken as the core to conduct multilevel decomposition and refining for acoustic signals and SVD is employed to eliminate noises in non-characteristic bands. Both simulation and field experiments show that DTCWT-SVD is an excellent method for acoustic noise reduction. At the end of this study, application in leakage localization shows that it becomes much easier and a little more accurate to estimate the location of leak hole after noise reduction by DTCWT-SVD.

  18. Molecular responses of genetically modified maize to abiotic stresses as determined through proteomic and metabolomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Benevenuto, Rafael Fonseca; Agapito-Tenfen, Sarah Zanon; Vilperte, Vinicius; Wikmark, Odd-Gunnar; van Rensburg, Peet Jansen; Nodari, Rubens Onofre

    2017-01-01

    Some genetically modified (GM) plants have transgenes that confer tolerance to abiotic stressors. Meanwhile, other transgenes may interact with abiotic stressors, causing pleiotropic effects that will affect the plant physiology. Thus, physiological alteration might have an impact on the product safety. However, routine risk assessment (RA) analyses do not evaluate the response of GM plants exposed to different environmental conditions. Therefore, we here present a proteome profile of herbicide-tolerant maize, including the levels of phytohormones and related compounds, compared to its near-isogenic non-GM variety under drought and herbicide stresses. Twenty differentially abundant proteins were detected between GM and non-GM hybrids under different water deficiency conditions and herbicide sprays. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that most of these proteins are assigned to energetic/carbohydrate metabolic processes. Among phytohormones and related compounds, different levels of ABA, CA, JA, MeJA and SA were detected in the maize varieties and stress conditions analysed. In pathway and proteome analyses, environment was found to be the major source of variation followed by the genetic transformation factor. Nonetheless, differences were detected in the levels of JA, MeJA and CA and in the abundance of 11 proteins when comparing the GM plant and its non-GM near-isogenic variety under the same environmental conditions. Thus, these findings do support molecular studies in GM plants Risk Assessment analyses.

  19. Transgenic Alfalfa Plants Expressing the Sweetpotato Orange Gene Exhibit Enhanced Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi; Ke, Qingbo; Kim, Myoung Duck; Kim, Sun Ha; Ji, Chang Yoon; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Park, Woo Sung; Ahn, Mi-Jeong; Li, Hongbing; Xu, Bingcheng; Deng, Xiping; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lim, Yong Pyo; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), a perennial forage crop with high nutritional content, is widely distributed in various environments worldwide. We recently demonstrated that the sweetpotato Orange gene (IbOr) is involved in increasing carotenoid accumulation and enhancing resistance to multiple abiotic stresses. In this study, in an effort to improve the nutritional quality and environmental stress tolerance of alfalfa, we transferred the IbOr gene into alfalfa (cv. Xinjiang Daye) under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase (SWPA2) promoter through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Among the 11 transgenic alfalfa lines (referred to as SOR plants), three lines (SOR2, SOR3, and SOR8) selected based on their IbOr transcript levels were examined for their tolerance to methyl viologen (MV)-induced oxidative stress in a leaf disc assay. The SOR plants exhibited less damage in response to MV-mediated oxidative stress and salt stress than non-transgenic plants. The SOR plants also exhibited enhanced tolerance to drought stress, along with higher total carotenoid levels. The results suggest that SOR alfalfa plants would be useful as forage crops with improved nutritional value and increased tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, which would enhance the development of sustainable agriculture on marginal lands. PMID:25946429

  20. Molecular responses of genetically modified maize to abiotic stresses as determined through proteomic and metabolomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Benevenuto, Rafael Fonseca; Agapito-Tenfen, Sarah Zanon; Vilperte, Vinicius; Wikmark, Odd-Gunnar; van Rensburg, Peet Jansen; Nodari, Rubens Onofre

    2017-01-01

    Some genetically modified (GM) plants have transgenes that confer tolerance to abiotic stressors. Meanwhile, other transgenes may interact with abiotic stressors, causing pleiotropic effects that will affect the plant physiology. Thus, physiological alteration might have an impact on the product safety. However, routine risk assessment (RA) analyses do not evaluate the response of GM plants exposed to different environmental conditions. Therefore, we here present a proteome profile of herbicide-tolerant maize, including the levels of phytohormones and related compounds, compared to its near-isogenic non-GM variety under drought and herbicide stresses. Twenty differentially abundant proteins were detected between GM and non-GM hybrids under different water deficiency conditions and herbicide sprays. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that most of these proteins are assigned to energetic/carbohydrate metabolic processes. Among phytohormones and related compounds, different levels of ABA, CA, JA, MeJA and SA were detected in the maize varieties and stress conditions analysed. In pathway and proteome analyses, environment was found to be the major source of variation followed by the genetic transformation factor. Nonetheless, differences were detected in the levels of JA, MeJA and CA and in the abundance of 11 proteins when comparing the GM plant and its non-GM near-isogenic variety under the same environmental conditions. Thus, these findings do support molecular studies in GM plants Risk Assessment analyses. PMID:28245233

  1. Evaluating reaction pathways of hydrothermal abiotic organic synthesis at elevated temperatures and pressures using carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2015-04-01

    Experiments were performed to better understand the role of environmental factors on reaction pathways and corresponding carbon isotope fractionations during abiotic hydrothermal synthesis of organic compounds using piston cylinder apparatus at 750 °C and 5.5 kbars. Chemical compositions of experimental products and corresponding carbon isotopic values were obtained by a Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS system. Alkanes (methane and ethane), straight-chain saturated alcohols (ethanol and n-butanol) and monocarboxylic acids (formic and acetic acids) were generated with ethanol being the only organic compound with higher δ13C than CO2. CO was not detected in experimental products owing to the favorable water-gas shift reaction under high water pressure conditions. The pattern of δ13C values of CO2, carboxylic acids and alkanes are consistent with their equilibrium isotope relationships: CO2 > carboxylic acids > alkanes, but the magnitude of the fractionation among them is higher than predicted isotope equilibrium values. In particular, the isotopic fractionation between CO2 and CH4 remained constant at ∼31‰, indicating a kinetic effect during CO2 reduction processes. No "isotope reversal" of δ13C values for alkanes or carboxylic acids was observed, which indicates a different reaction pathway than what is typically observed during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis under gas phase conditions. Under constraints imposed in experiments, the anomalous 13C isotope enrichment in ethanol suggests that hydroxymethylene is the organic intermediate, and that the generation of other organic compounds enriched in 12C were facilitated by subsequent Rayleigh fractionation of hydroxymethylene reacting with H2 and/or H2O. Carbon isotope fractionation data obtained in this study are instrumental in assessing the controlling factors on abiotic formation of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems. Knowledge on how environmental conditions affect reaction pathways of abiotic synthesis of organic

  2. A proposed abiotic reaction scheme for hydroxylamine and monochloramine under chloramination relevant drinking water conditions.

    PubMed

    Wahman, David G; Speitel, Gerald E; Machavaram, Madhav V

    2014-09-01

    Drinking water monochloramine (NH2Cl) use may promote ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOB use (i) ammonia monooxygenase for biological ammonia (NH3) oxidation to hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and (ii) hydroxylamine oxidoreductase for NH2OH oxidation to nitrite. NH2Cl and NH2OH may react, providing AOB potential benefits and detriments. The NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction would benefit AOB by removing the disinfectant (NH2Cl) and releasing their growth substrate (NH3), but the NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction would also provide a possible additional inactivation mechanism besides direct NH2Cl reaction with cells. Because biological NH2OH oxidation supplies the electrons required for biological NH3 oxidation, the NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction provides a direct mechanism for NH2Cl to inhibit NH3 oxidation, starving the cell of reductant by preventing biological NH2OH oxidation. To investigate possible NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction implications on AOB, an understanding of the underlying abiotic reaction is first required. The present study conducted a detailed literature review and proposed an abiotic NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction scheme (RS) for chloramination relevant drinking water conditions (μM concentrations, air saturation, and pH 7-9). Next, RS literature based kinetics and end-products were evaluated experimentally between pHs 7.7 and 8.3, representing (i) the pH range for future experiments with AOB and (ii) mid-range pHs typically found in chloraminated drinking water. In addition, a (15)N stable isotope experiment was conducted to verify nitrous oxide and nitrogen gas production and their nitrogen source. Finally, the RS was slightly refined using the experimental data and an AQUASIM implemented kinetic model. A chloraminated drinking water relevant RS is proposed and provides the abiotic reaction foundation for future AOB biotic experiments.

  3. Reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) in the presence of hydrous ferric oxide and hematite: effects of solid transformation, surface coverage, and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Jang, Je-Hun; Dempsey, Brian A; Burgos, William D

    2008-04-01

    Fe(II) was added to U(VI)-spiked suspensions of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) or hematite to compare the redox behaviors of uranium in the presence of two different Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides. Experiments were conducted with low or high initial sorption density of U(VI) and in the presence or absence of humic acid (HA). About 80% of U(VI) was reduced within 3 days for low sorbed U(VI) conditions, with either hematite or HFO. The {Fe(3+)} in the low U(VI) experiments at 3 days, based on measured Fe(II) and U(VI) and the assumed presence of amorphous UO(2(s)), was consistent with control by HFO for either initial Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide. After about 1 day, partial re-oxidation to U(VI) was observed in the low sorbed U(VI) experiments in the absence of HA, without equivalent increase of dissolved U(VI). No reduction of U(VI) was observed in the high sorbed U(VI) experiments; it was hypothesized that the reduction required sorption proximity of U(VI) and Fe(II). Addition of 5mg/L HA slowed the reduction with HFO and had less effect with hematite. Mössbauer spectroscopy (MBS) of (57)Fe(II)-enriched samples identified the formation of goethite, hematite, and non-stoichiometric magnetite from HFO, and the formation of HFO, hydrated hematite, and non-stoichiometric magnetite from hematite.

  4. Genetic mapping of abiotic stress responses in sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to rich genetic diversity for tolerance to various abiotic stress conditions, sorghum is an ideal system for genetic mapping and elucidation of genome regions that confer such response among cereal crops. Coupled with the development of DNA marker technologies and most recently the sequencing o...

  5. ABIOTIC DEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE UNDER THERMAL REMEDIATION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The degradation of TCE (C2HCl3) to carbon dioxide (CO2) and chloride (Cl-) has been reported to occur during thermal remediation of subsurface environments. The overall goal of this study was to evaluate abiotic degradation of TCE at el...

  6. Arsenic(V) Reduction in Relation to Iron(III) Transformation and Molecular Characterization of the Structural and Functional Microbial Community in Sediments of a Basin-Fill Aquifer in Northern Utah

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Babur S.; Muruganandam, Subathra; Meng, Xianyu; Sorensen, Darwin L.; Dupont, R. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Basin-fill aquifers of the Southwestern United States are associated with elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in groundwater. Many private domestic wells in the Cache Valley Basin, UT, have As concentrations in excess of the U.S. EPA drinking water limit. Thirteen sediment cores were collected from the center of the valley at the depth of the shallow groundwater and were sectioned into layers based on redoxmorphic features. Three of the layers, two from redox transition zones and one from a depletion zone, were used to establish microcosms. Microcosms were treated with groundwater (GW) or groundwater plus glucose (GW+G) to investigate the extent of As reduction in relation to iron (Fe) transformation and characterize the microbial community structure and function by sequencing 16S rRNA and arsenate dissimilatory reductase (arrA) genes. Under the carbon-limited conditions of the GW treatment, As reduction was independent of Fe reduction, despite the abundance of sequences related to Geobacter and Shewanella, genera that include a variety of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria. The addition of glucose, an electron donor and carbon source, caused substantial shifts toward domination of the bacterial community by Clostridium-related organisms, and As reduction was correlated with Fe reduction for the sediments from the redox transition zone. The arrA gene sequencing from microcosms at day 54 of incubation showed the presence of 14 unique phylotypes, none of which were related to any previously described arrA gene sequence, suggesting a unique community of dissimilatory arsenate-respiring bacteria in the Cache Valley Basin. PMID:24632255

  7. Integrating omic approaches for abiotic stress tolerance in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Rupesh; Sonah, Humira; Patil, Gunvant; Chen, Wei; Prince, Silvas; Mutava, Raymond; Vuong, Tri; Valliyodan, Babu; Nguyen, Henry T.

    2014-01-01

    Soybean production is greatly influenced by abiotic stresses imposed by environmental factors such as drought, water submergence, salt, and heavy metals. A thorough understanding of plant response to abiotic stress at the molecular level is a prerequisite for its effective management. The molecular mechanism of stress tolerance is complex and requires information at the omic level to understand it effectively. In this regard, enormous progress has been made in the omics field in the areas of genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. The emerging field of ionomics is also being employed for investigating abiotic stress tolerance in soybean. Omic approaches generate a huge amount of data, and adequate advancements in computational tools have been achieved for effective analysis. However, the integration of omic-scale information to address complex genetics and physiological questions is still a challenge. In this review, we have described advances in omic tools in the view of conventional and modern approaches being used to dissect abiotic stress tolerance in soybean. Emphasis was given to approaches such as quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and genomic selection (GS). Comparative genomics and candidate gene approaches are also discussed considering identification of potential genomic loci, genes, and biochemical pathways involved in stress tolerance mechanism in soybean. This review also provides a comprehensive catalog of available online omic resources for soybean and its effective utilization. We have also addressed the significance of phenomics in the integrated approaches and recognized high-throughput multi-dimensional phenotyping as a major limiting factor for the improvement of abiotic stress tolerance in soybean. PMID:24917870

  8. Reactive oxygen species signaling in plants under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Shuvasish; Panda, Piyalee; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Panda, Sanjib Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Abiotic stresses like heavy metals, drought, salt, low temperature, etc. are the major factors that limit crop productivity and yield. These stresses are associated with production of certain deleterious chemical entities called reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), superoxide radical (O₂(-)), hydroxyl radical (OH(-)), etc. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by degradation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene and interfere in various pathways of metabolic importance. Our understanding on ROS in response to abiotic stress is revolutionized with the advancements in plant molecular biology, where the basic understanding on chemical behavior of ROS is better understood. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in ROS generation and its potential role during abiotic stress is important to identify means by which plant growth and metabolism can be regulated under acute stress conditions. ROS mediated oxidative stress, which is the key to understand stress related toxicity have been widely studied in many plants and the results in those studies clearly revealed that oxidative stress is the main symptom of toxicity. Plants have their own antioxidant defense mechanisms to encounter ROS that is of enzymic and non-enzymic nature . Coordinated activities of these antioxidants regulate ROS detoxification and reduces oxidative load in plants. Though ROS are always regarded to impart negative impact on plants, some reports consider them to be important in regulating key cellular functions; however, such reports in plant are limited. Molecular approaches to understand ROS metabolism and signaling have opened new avenues to comprehend its critical role in abiotic stress. ROS also acts as secondary messenger that signals key cellular functions like cell proliferation, apoptosis and necrosis. In higher eukaryotes, ROS signaling is not fully understood. In this review we summarize our understanding on ROS

  9. Abiotic ozone and oxygen in atmospheres similar to prebiotic Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Segura, Antígona; Claire, Mark W.; Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-09-10

    The search for life on planets outside our solar system will use spectroscopic identification of atmospheric biosignatures. The most robust remotely detectable potential biosignature is considered to be the detection of oxygen (O{sub 2}) or ozone (O{sub 3}) simultaneous to methane (CH{sub 4}) at levels indicating fluxes from the planetary surface in excess of those that could be produced abiotically. Here we use an altitude-dependent photochemical model with the enhanced lower boundary conditions necessary to carefully explore abiotic O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} production on lifeless planets with a wide variety of volcanic gas fluxes and stellar energy distributions. On some of these worlds, we predict limited O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} buildup, caused by fast chemical production of these gases. This results in detectable abiotic O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} features in the UV-visible, but no detectable abiotic O{sub 2} features. Thus, simultaneous detection of O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} by a UV-visible mission is not a strong biosignature without proper contextual information. Discrimination between biological and abiotic sources of O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} is possible through analysis of the stellar and atmospheric context—particularly redox state and O atom inventory—of the planet in question. Specifically, understanding the spectral characteristics of the star and obtaining a broad wavelength range for planetary spectra should allow more robust identification of false positives for life. This highlights the importance of wide spectral coverage for future exoplanet characterization missions. Specifically, discrimination between true and false positives may require spectral observations that extend into infrared wavelengths and provide contextual information on the planet's atmospheric chemistry.

  10. Raman scattering in La1-xSrxFeO3-δ thin films: annealing-induced reduction and phase transformation.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad A; Xie, Yujun; Scafetta, Mark D; May, Steven J; Spanier, Jonathan E

    2015-04-22

    Raman scattering in thin film La0.2Sr0.8FeO3-δ on MgO(0 0 1) collected at 300 K after different stages of annealing at selected temperatures T (300 K < T < 543 K, to 10 h) and analysis reveal changes in spectral characteristics due to a loss of oxygen, onset of oxygen vacancy-induced disorder, and activation of Raman-inactive modes that are attributed to symmetry lowering. The interpretation is further supported by carrier transport measurements under identical conditions showing orders of magnitude increase in the resistivity induced by oxygen loss. After prolonged annealing in air, evolution of the spectrum signals the appearance of a possible topotactic transformation of the crystal structure from that of the rhombohedral ABO3 perovskites to that of Brownmillerite-like structure consisting of octahedrally and tetrahedrally coordinated Fe atoms.

  11. Microbiological and abiotic processes in modelling longer-term marine corrosion of steel.

    PubMed

    Melchers, Robert E

    2014-06-01

    Longer term exposure of mild steel in natural (biotic) waters progresses as a bimodal function of time, both for corrosion mass loss and for pit depth. Recent test results, however, found this also for immersion in clean fresh, almost pure and triply distilled waters. This shows chlorides or microbiological activity is not essential for the electrochemical processes producing bimodal behaviour. It is proposed that the first mode is aerobic corrosion that eventually produces a non-homogeneous corroded surface and rust coverage sufficient to allow formation of anoxic niches. Within these, aggressive autocatalytic reduction then occurs under anoxic abiotic conditions, caused by sulfide species originating from the MnS inclusions typical in steels. This is consistent with Wranglen's model for abiotic anoxic crevice and pitting corrosion without external aggressive ions. In biotic conditions, metabolites from anaerobic bacterial activity within and near the anoxic niches provides additional (sulfide) species to contribute to the severity of corrosion. Limited observational evidence that supports this hypothesis is given but further investigation is required to determine all contributor(s) to the cathodic current for the electrochemical reaction. The results are important for estimating the contribution of microbiological corrosion in infrastructure applications.

  12. Formation of pristane from α-tocopherol under simulated anoxic sedimentary conditions: A combination of biotic and abiotic degradative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Jean-François; Nassiry, Mina; Michotey, Valérie; Guasco, Sophie; Bonin, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Incubation of intact and oxidized α-tocopherol (vitamin E) in anaerobic sediment slurries allowed us to demonstrate that, as previously suggested by Goossens et al. (1984), the degradation of α-tocopherol in anoxic sediments results in the formation of pristane. The conversion of α-tocopherol to this isoprenoid alkane involves a combination of biotic and abiotic degradative processes, i.e. the anaerobic biodegradation (which seems to be mainly induced by denitrifying bacteria) of trimeric structures resulting from the abiotic oxidation of α-tocopherol. On the basis of the results obtained, it is proposed that in the marine environment most of the α-tocopherol present in phytoplanktonic cells should be quickly degraded within the water column and the oxic zone of sediments by way of aerobic biodegradation, photo- and autoxidation processes. Abiotic transformation of this compound mainly results in the production of trimeric oxidation products, sufficiently stable to be incorporated into anoxic sediments and whose subsequent anaerobic bacterial degradation affords pristane. These results confirm that the ratio pristane to phytane cannot be used as an indicator of the oxicity of the environment of deposition; in contrast, they support the use of PFI (Pristane Formation Index) as a proxy for the state of diagenesis of sedimentary organic matter.

  13. Mechanisms of plant-plant interactions: concealment from herbivores is more important than abiotic-stress mediation in an African savannah.

    PubMed

    Louthan, Allison M; Doak, Daniel F; Goheen, Jacob R; Palmer, Todd M; Pringle, Robert M

    2014-04-07

    Recent work on facilitative plant-plant interactions has emphasized the importance of neighbours' amelioration of abiotic stress, but the facilitative effects of neighbours in reducing plant apparency to herbivores have received less attention. Whereas theory on stress reduction predicts that competition should be more important in less stressful conditions, with facilitation becoming more important in harsh environments, apparency theory suggests that facilitation should be greater in the presence of herbivores, where it is disadvantageous to be conspicuous regardless of abiotic stress level. We tested the relative strength of neighbours' stress reduction versus apparency reduction on survival, growth, reproduction and lifetime fitness of Hibiscus meyeri, a common forb in central Kenya, using neighbour removals conducted inside and outside large-herbivore exclosures replicated in arid and mesic sites. In the absence of herbivores, neighbours competed with H. meyeri in mesic areas and facilitated H. meyeri in arid areas, as predicted by stress-reduction mechanisms. By contrast, neighbours facilitated H. meyeri in the presence of herbivory, regardless of aridity level, consistent with plant apparency. Our results show that the facilitative effects arising from plant apparency are stronger than the effects arising from abiotic stress reduction in this system, suggesting that plant-apparency effects may be particularly important in systems with extant large-herbivore communities.

  14. Iridium(III) Mediated Reductive Transformation of Closed-Shell Azo-Oxime to Open-Shell Azo-Imine Radical Anion: Molecular and Electronic Structure, Electron Transfer, and Optoelectronic Properties.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Shuvam; Roy, Sima; Ghorui, Tapas; Ganguly, Sanjib; Pramanik, Kausikisankar

    2016-02-15

    The hydrogen bonded bis azo-oximato [IrCl2(L(NOH))(L(NO))] 2 and its deprotonated form (Et3NH)[IrCl2(L(NO))2] (Et3NH)(+)3(-) have been isolated in the crystalline state by a facile synthetic method. The azo-oxime frameworks in 3(-) have been conveniently transformed to the azo-imine by reduction with NaBH4 or ascorbic acid. Notably, the coordinated azo-imines accept an extra electron thereby furnishing the azo-imine radical anion complex 4. The underlying reductive transformation can be best described by proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) process. Both the coordinated ligands (azo-oxime) in 3(-) are typically closed-shell monoanion (L(NO-)), but their reduced form (azo-imine) can behave as open-shell monoanion (L(NH•-)) owing to the presence of highly stabilized virtual orbitals. Remarkable enhancement of the π-acidity in azo-imine relative to the precursor azo-oxime has also been reflected from the electrochemical study. The irido complexes display rich optoelectronic properties, and the origin of the transitions has been scrutinized by the TD-DFT method. The molecular geometries of the complexes 2 and 3(-) reveal that the syn orientation of the azo-oximes frameworks is favored because of strong noncovalent H-bonding and π-π stacking interactions. In the course of the reduction of 3(-), the sterically encumbered disposition of the azo-oximes is converted to the relaxed anti form in the transformed azo-imines. Diffraction study reveals the electronic structure of 4 as [Ir(III)Cl2{(L(NH))2(•-)}]. The superior stabilization of the unpaired spin on the ligand array rather than metal has also been substantiated from EPR and DFT studies. Theoretical analysis reveals that the odd electron delocalizes primarily over both the azo-imine moieties ([IrCl2(L(NH•-))(L(NH))] ↔ ([IrCl2(L(NH))(L(NH•-))]) with no apparent contribution from metal, and this type of ligand-centered mixed valency (LCMV) can be best expressed as Robin-Day class III (fully delocalized

  15. Biotic and abiotic retention, recycling and remineralization of metals in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.; Ellwood, Michael J.; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Twining, Benjamin S.

    2017-03-01

    Trace metals shape both the biogeochemical functioning and biological structure of oceanic provinces. Trace metal biogeochemistry has primarily focused on modes of external supply of metals from aeolian, hydrothermal, sedimentary and other sources. However, metals also undergo internal transformations such as abiotic and biotic retention, recycling and remineralization. The role of these internal transformations in metal biogeochemical cycling is now coming into focus. First, the retention of metals by biota in the surface ocean for days, weeks or months depends on taxon-specific metal requirements of phytoplankton, and on their ultimate fate: that is, viral lysis, senescence, grazing and/or export to depth. Rapid recycling of metals in the surface ocean can extend seasonal productivity by maintaining higher levels of metal bioavailability compared to the influence of external metal input alone. As metal-containing organic particles are exported from the surface ocean, different metals exhibit distinct patterns of remineralization with depth. These patterns are mediated by a wide range of physicochemical and microbial processes such as the ability of particles to sorb metals, and are influenced by the mineral and organic characteristics of sinking particles. We conclude that internal metal transformations play an essential role in controlling metal bioavailability, phytoplankton distributions and the subsurface resupply of metals.

  16. Reductive Dechlorination of Carbon Tetrachloride by Tetrachloroethene and Trichloroethene Respiring Anaerobic Mixed Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickstrom, K. E.; Azizian, M.; Semprini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CT) is a toxic and recalcitrant groundwater contaminant with the potential to form a broad range of transformation products. Of the possible biochemical pathways through which CT can be degraded, reductive dehalogenation to less chlorinated compounds and mineralization to carbon dioxide (CO2) appear to be the most frequently utilized pathways by anaerobic organisms. Results will be presented from batch experiments of CT degradation by the Evanite (EV), Victoria Strain (VS) and Point Mugu (PM) anaerobic dechlorinating cultures. The cultures are grown in chemostats and are capable of transforming tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE) to ethene by halorespiration via reductive dehalogenase enzymes. For the batch CT transformation tests, the cells along with supernatant were harvested from chemostats fed PCE or TCE, but never CT. The batch reactors were initially fed 0.0085 mM CT and an excess of formate (EV and VS) or lactate (PM) as electron donor. Transformation of CT was 100% with about 20% converted to chloroform (CF) and undetected products. Multiple additions of CT showed a slowing of pseudo first-order CT transformation rates across all cultures. Batch reactors were then established and fed 0.085 mM CT with an excess of electron donor in order to better quantify the reductive pathway. CT was transformed to CF and dichloromethane (DCM), with trace amounts of chloromethane (CM) detected. Between 60-90% of the mass added to the system was accounted for, showing that the majority of the carbon tetrachloride present is being reductively dehalogenated. Results from batch reactors that were poisoned using sodium azide, and from reactors not provided electron donor will be presented to distinguish between biotic and abiotic reactions. Furthermore, results from reactors prepared with acetylene (a potent, reversible inhibitor of reductive dehalogenases (1)) will be presented as a means of identifying the enzymes involved in the

  17. Transformations of TNT and related aminotoluenes in groundwater aquifer slurries under different electron-accepting conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krumholz, L.R.; Li, J.; Clarkson, W.W.; Wilber, G.G.; Suflita, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The transport and fate of pollutants is often governed by both their tendency to sorb as well as their susceptibility to biodegradation. We have evaluated these parameters for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and several biodegradation products. Slurries of aquifer sediment and groundwater depleted TNT at rates of 27, 7.7 and 5.9 μM day−1 under methanogenic, sulfate-reducing and nitrate-reducing conditions, respectively. Abiotic losses of TNT were determined in autoclaved controls. Abiotic TNT loss and subsequent transformation of the products was also observed. These transformations were especially important during the first step in the reduction of TNT. Subsequent abiotic reactions could account for all of the transformations observed in bottles which were initially nitrate-reducing. Other controls removed TNT reduction products at much slower rates than slurries containing live organisms. 2-Amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene was produced in all slurries but disappeared in methanogenic and in sulfate-reducing slurries within several weeks. This compound was converted to 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene in all slurries with subsequent removal of the latter from methanogenic and sulfate-reducing slurries, while it persisted in autoclaved controls and in the nitrate-reducing slurries. Aquifer slurries incubated with either 2,4- or 2,6-diaminotoluene showed losses of these compounds relative to autoclaved controls under nitrate-reducing conditions but not under sulfate-reducing or methanogenic conditions. These latter compounds are important as reduced intermediates in the biodegradation of dinitrotoluenes and as industrial chemicals. In experiments to examine sorption, exposure to landfill sediment resulted in losses of approximately 15% of diaminotoluene isomers and 25% of aminodinitrotoluene isomers from initial solution concentrations within 24 h. Isotherms confirmed that the diaminotoluenes were least strongly sorbed and the amino-dinitrotoluenes most strongly sorbed to this

  18. Transformations of TNT and related aminotoluenes in groundwater aquifer slurries under different electron-accepting conditions.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, L R; Li, J; Clarkson, W W; Wilber, G G; Suflita, J M

    1997-01-01

    The transport and fate of pollutants is often governed by both their tendency to sorb as well as their susceptibility to biodegradation. We have evaluated these parameters for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and several biodegradation products. Slurries of aquifer sediment and groundwater depleted TNT at rates of 27, 7.7 and 5.9 microM day-1 under methanogenic, sulfate-reducing and nitrate-reducing conditions, respectively. Abiotic losses of TNT were determined in autoclaved controls. Abiotic TNT loss and subsequent transformation of the products was also observed. These transformations were especially important during the first step in the reduction of TNT. Subsequent abiotic reactions could account for all of the transformations observed in bottles which were initially nitrate-reducing. Other controls removed TNT reduction products at much slower rates than slurries containing live organisms. 2-Amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene was produced in all slurries but disappeared in methanogenic and in sulfate-reducing slurries within several weeks. This compound was converted to 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene in all slurries with subsequent removal of the latter from methanogenic and sulfate-reducing slurries, while it persisted in autoclaved controls and in the nitrate-reducing slurries. Aquifer slurries incubated with either 2,4- or 2,6-diaminotoluene showed losses of these compounds relative to autoclaved controls under nitrate-reducing conditions but not under sulfate-reducing or methanogenic conditions. These latter compounds are important as reduced intermediates in the biodegradation of dinitrotoluenes and as industrial chemicals. In experiments to examine sorption, exposure to landfill sediment resulted in losses of approximately 15% of diaminotoluene isomers and 25% of aminodinitrotoluene isomers from initial solution concentrations within 24 h. Isotherms confirmed that the diaminotoluenes were least strongly sorbed and the amino-dinitrotoluenes most strongly sorbed to this

  19. Chemical and physical transformations of mercury in the ocean: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batrakova, N.; Travnikov, O.; Rozovskaya, O.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury is well known as a dangerous neurotoxin enriched in the environment by human activities. It disperses over the globe, cycling between different environmental media. The ocean plays an important role in the global mercury cycle, acting both as a dispersion medium and as an exposure pathway. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on the major physical and chemical transformations of mercury in the ocean. This review describes the mechanisms and provides a compilation of available rate constants for the major processes in seawater, including oxidation and reduction reactions under light and dark conditions, biotic and abiotic methylation/demethylation, and adsorption by particles. These data could be useful for the development of transport models describing processes undergone by mercury in the ocean.

  20. Biotic and abiotic controls on co-occurring nitrogen cycling processes in shallow Arctic shelf sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTigue, N. D.; Gardner, W. S.; Dunton, K. H.; Hardison, A. K.

    2016-10-01

    The processes that convert bioavailable inorganic nitrogen to inert nitrogen gas are prominent in continental shelf sediments and represent a critical global sink, yet little is known of these pathways in the Arctic where 18% of the world's continental shelves are located. Moreover, few data from the Arctic exist that separate loss processes like denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) from recycling pathways like dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) or source pathways like nitrogen fixation. Here we present measurements of these co-occurring processes using 15N tracers. Denitrification was heterogeneous among stations and an order of magnitude greater than anammox and DNRA, while nitrogen fixation was undetectable. No abiotic factors correlated with interstation variability in biogeochemical rates; however, bioturbation potential explained most of the variation. Fauna-enhanced denitrification is a potentially important but overlooked process on Arctic shelves and highlights the role of the Arctic as a significant global nitrogen sink.

  1. Biotic and abiotic controls on co-occurring nitrogen cycling processes in shallow Arctic shelf sediments

    PubMed Central

    McTigue, N. D.; Gardner, W. S.; Dunton, K. H.; Hardison, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The processes that convert bioavailable inorganic nitrogen to inert nitrogen gas are prominent in continental shelf sediments and represent a critical global sink, yet little is known of these pathways in the Arctic where 18% of the world's continental shelves are located. Moreover, few data from the Arctic exist that separate loss processes like denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) from recycling pathways like dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) or source pathways like nitrogen fixation. Here we present measurements of these co-occurring processes using 15N tracers. Denitrification was heterogeneous among stations and an order of magnitude greater than anammox and DNRA, while nitrogen fixation was undetectable. No abiotic factors correlated with interstation variability in biogeochemical rates; however, bioturbation potential explained most of the variation. Fauna-enhanced denitrification is a potentially important but overlooked process on Arctic shelves and highlights the role of the Arctic as a significant global nitrogen sink. PMID:27782213

  2. Reduction of Dimethylnitrosamine-Induced Liver Fibrosis by the Novel Gene Regulator PI Polyamide Targeting Transforming Growth Factor β1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Inami, Makiko; Fukushima, Akiko; Ueno, Takahiro; Yamada, Tsutomu; Tsunemi, Akiko; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Fukuda, Noboru; Soma, Masayoshi; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide is a novel gene regulating agent that competitively inhibits transcription factor binding to the promoter of the specific target gene. Liver fibrosis is an integral stage in the development of chronic liver disease, and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is known to play a central role in the progression of this entity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of PI polyamide targeting TGFβ1 on rat liver fibrosis. PI polyamide was designed to inhibit activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factor binding to the TGFβ1 gene promoter. The effect of PI polyamide on hepatic stellate cells was evaluated by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in RI-T cells. To determine the effect of PI polyamide in vivo, PI polyamide was intravenously administered at a dose of 3 mg/kg/week in dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced rat model of liver fibrosis. Treatment of RI-T cells with 1.0 µM PI polyamide targeting TGFβ1 significantly inhibited TGFβ1 mRNA expression. Azan staining showed that DMN treatment significantly increased areas of fibrous materials compared with controls. PI polyamide targeting TGFβ1 significantly decreased the fibrous area compared with DMN group. mRNA expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin and matrix metalloproteinase-2 were significantly increased in DMN-treated group compared with control. Treatment with TGFβ1 PI polyamide significantly decreased mRNA expression of these genes compared with DMN group. The novel gene regulator PI polyamide targeting TGFβ1 may be a feasible therapeutic agent for the treatment of chronic liver disease.

  3. Attenuation of Tubular Injury and Renal Fibrosis by TI-HU-YIN via Reduction in Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Expression in Unilateral Ureteral Obstruction Mice.

    PubMed

    Tarng, Der-Cherng; Liu, I-Shan; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Chen, Nien-Jung

    2015-12-31

    TI-HU-YIN (JCKD), a compound composed of many Chinese herbs, is hypothesized to attenuate renal tubular injury and interstitial fibrosis. Moreover, its renoprotective effects were assessed in animal and in vitro studies. First, male C57BL/6 mice were under sham operation or unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) surgery, and then treated with phosphate buffer solution (PBS), aliskirin and valsartan (A+V), and JCKD for 14 days. At 7 and 14 days, mice were sacrificed and the kidney tissues were assessed for histopathological changes and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression. As compared to sham group, UUO-PBS group had more serious tubular dilatation and injury, α-smooth muscle actin-positive areas, F4/80-positive macrophages, and interstitial fibrosis. Impressively, these pathologic changes were significantly attenuated in UUO mice both treated with JCKD and A+V as compared to UUO-PBS group. At 14 days, TGF-β1 expression was significantly suppressed in kidney tissues of UUO-JCKD group as well as in UUO-A+V group. Second, TGF-β1 production was increased in macrophage J774 cells and NRK-52E proximal tubular cells stimulated by angiotensin (Ang)-II at 10 nM for 24 h and at 1 nM for 48 h, respectively. JCKD (≥ 400 μg/ml) inhibited the TGF-β1 production at baseline and stimulated by Ang II in both cell lines. Our study showed that JCKD reduced renal injury, macrophage infiltration and interstitial fibrosis possibly through suppressing the TGF-β1 expression in UUO mice. Accordingly, JCKD is potential to retard the progression of chronic kidney disease. Further studies are needed to validate its renoprotective effects in the inhibition of TGF-β1 expression and the amelioration of renal fibrosis.

  4. Reduction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by Clostridium acetobutylicum through hydroxylamino-nitrotoluene intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, J.B.; Wang, C.Y.; Bhadra, R.; Richardson, A.; Bennett, G.N.; Rudolph, F.B.

    1998-03-01

    Studies were conducted to isolate and identify intermediates of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) transformation by Clostridium acetobutylicum and to quantify their concentrations in active whole cell cultures. Only two intermediates of TNT reduction were detected in cell cultures and were identified as 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene and 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene. Structures were confirmed with {sup 1}H-NMR, {sup 13}C-NMR, and desorption chemical ionization mass spectroscopy. When cells were suspended in a non-growth saline medium, both hydroxylamine forms accumulated. In media capable of supporting cell growth, the 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene accumulated with concentrations of 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene remaining near detection limits. Studies using purified 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene confirmed that its biotransformation rate in active cultures greatly exceeded abiotic decomposition in aqueous medium.

  5. Hormone balance and abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Zvi; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2011-06-01

    Plant hormones play central roles in the ability of plants to adapt to changing environments, by mediating growth, development, nutrient allocation, and source/sink transitions. Although ABA is the most studied stress-responsive hormone, the role of cytokinins, brassinosteroids, and auxins during environmental stress is emerging. Recent evidence indicated that plant hormones are involved in multiple processes. Cross-talk between the different plant hormones results in synergetic or antagonic interactions that play crucial roles in response of plants to abiotic stress. The characterization of the molecular mechanisms regulating hormone synthesis, signaling, and action are facilitating the modification of hormone biosynthetic pathways for the generation of transgenic crop plants with enhanced abiotic stress tolerance.

  6. An abiotic analogue of the nuclear pore complex hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Bird, Sean P; Baker, Lane A

    2011-09-12

    We describe an abiotic hydrogel that mimics selectivity of the nuclear pore complex. Copolymerization of peptide tetramers (phenylalanine-serine-phenylalanine-glycine, FSFG) with acrylamide results in hydrophobic interactions significant enough to allow the formation of freestanding hydrogel structures. Incorporation of FSFG motifs also renders the hydrogels selective. Selective binding of importins and nuclear transport receptor-cargo complexes is qualitatively demonstrated and compared with polyacrylamide, hydrogels prepared from a control peptide, and hydrogels prepared from the nuclear pore complex protein Nsp1. These abiotic hydrogels will enable further studies of the unique transport mechanisms of the nuclear pore complex and provide an interesting paradigm for the future development of synthetic platforms for separations and selective interfaces.

  7. Abiotic mediation of a mutualism drives herbivore abundance.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Emily H; Phillips, Joseph S; Tillberg, Chadwick V; Sandrow, Cheryl; Nelson, Annika S; Mooney, Kailen A

    2016-01-01

    Species abundance is typically determined by the abiotic environment, but the extent to which such effects occur through the mediation of biotic interactions, including mutualisms, is unknown. We explored how light environment (open meadow vs. shaded understory) mediates the abundance and ant tending of the aphid Aphis helianthi feeding on the herb Ligusticum porteri. Yearly surveys consistently found aphids to be more than 17-fold more abundant on open meadow plants than on shaded understory plants. Manipulations demonstrated that this abundance pattern was not due to the direct effects of light environment on aphid performance, or indirectly through host plant quality or the effects of predators. Instead, open meadows had higher ant abundance and per capita rates of aphid tending and, accordingly, ants increased aphid population growth in meadow but not understory environments. The abiotic environment thus drives the abundance of this herbivore exclusively through the mediation of a protection mutualism.

  8. Experiments on the abiotic amplification of optical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Blair, N. E.; Dirbas, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments concerning the physical mechanisms for the abiotic generation and chemical mechanisms for the amplification of optical activity in biological compounds are reviewed. Attention is given to experiments involving the determination of the differential adsorption of racemic amino acids on d- and l-quartz, the asymmetric photolysis of racemic amino acids by circularly polarized light, and the asymmetric radiolysis of solid amino acids by longitudinally polarized electrons, and the enantiomeric enrichments thus obtained are noted. Further experiments on the amplification of the chirality in the polymerization of D, L-amino acid mixtures and the hydrolysis of D-, L-, and D, L-polypeptides are discussed. It is suggested that a repetitive cycle of partial polymerization-hydrolyses may account for the abiotic genesis of optically enriched polypeptides on the primitive earth.

  9. Transcriptional networks-crops, clocks, and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Gehan, Malia A; Greenham, Kathleen; Mockler, Todd C; McClung, C Robertson

    2015-04-01

    Several factors affect the yield potential and geographical range of crops including the circadian clock, water availability, and seasonal temperature changes. In order to sustain and increase plant productivity on marginal land in the face of both biotic and abiotic stresses, we need to more efficiently generate stress-resistant crops through marker-assisted breeding, genetic modification, and new genome-editing technologies. To leverage these strategies for producing the next generation of crops, future transcriptomic data acquisition should be pursued with an appropriate temporal design and analyzed with a network-centric approach. The following review focuses on recent developments in abiotic stress transcriptional networks in economically important crops and will highlight the utility of correlation-based network analysis and applications.

  10. SUMO, a heavyweight player in plant abiotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Castro, Pedro Humberto; Tavares, Rui Manuel; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Azevedo, Herlânder

    2012-10-01

    Protein post-translational modifications diversify the proteome and install new regulatory levels that are crucial for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Over the last decade, the ubiquitin-like modifying peptide small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) has been shown to regulate various nuclear processes, including transcriptional control. In plants, the sumoylation pathway has been significantly implicated in the response to environmental stimuli, including heat, cold, drought, and salt stresses, modulation of abscisic acid and other hormones, and nutrient homeostasis. This review focuses on the emerging importance of SUMO in the abiotic stress response, summarizing the molecular implications of sumoylation and emphasizing how high-throughput approaches aimed at identifying the full set of SUMO targets will greatly enhance our understanding of the SUMO-abiotic stress association.

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal responses to abiotic stresses: A review.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Ingrid; Fontaine, Joël; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa

    2016-03-01

    The majority of plants live in close collaboration with a diversity of soil organisms among which arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play an essential role. Mycorrhizal symbioses contribute to plant growth and plant protection against various environmental stresses. Whereas the resistance mechanisms induced in mycorrhizal plants after exposure to abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and pollution, are well documented, the knowledge about the stress tolerance mechanisms implemented by the AMF themselves is limited. This review provides an overview of the impacts of various abiotic stresses (pollution, salinity, drought, extreme temperatures, CO2, calcareous, acidity) on biodiversity, abundance and development of AMF and examines the morphological, biochemical and molecular mechanisms implemented by AMF to survive in the presence of these stresses.

  12. Biotic-Abiotic Nanoscale Interactions in Biological Fuel Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-28

    Force Office of Scientific Research 875 North Randolph Street 4027 Arlington VA 22203 email: Patrick.Bradshaw@afosr.af.mil phone : 703-588-8492...Science Center 215C Los Angeles, CA 90089-0484 email: mnaggar@usc.edu phone : 213-740-2394 2 Biotic-Abiotic Nanoscale Interactions in...aggregation – collaboration with Naval Research Lab. 2.4 As part of an international collaboration, we reported on filamentous bacteria mediating centimeter

  13. Changes in biotic and abiotic processes following mangrove clearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granek, Elise; Ruttenberg, Benjamin I.

    2008-12-01

    Mangrove forests, important tropical coastal habitats, are in decline worldwide primarily due to removal by humans. Changes to mangrove systems can alter ecosystem properties through direct effects on abiotic factors such as temperature, light and nutrient supply or through changes in biotic factors such as primary productivity or species composition. Despite the importance of mangroves as transitional habitats between land and sea, little research has examined changes that occur when they are cleared. We examined changes in a number of biotic and abiotic factors following the anthropogenic removal of red mangroves ( Rhizophora mangle) in the Panamanian Caribbean, including algal biomass, algal diversity, algal grazing rates, light penetration, temperature, sedimentation rates and sediment organic content. In this first study examining multiple ecosystem-level effects of mangrove disturbance, we found that areas cleared of mangroves had higher algal biomass and richness than intact mangrove areas. This increase in algal biomass and richness was likely due to changes in abiotic factors (e.g. light intensity, temperature), but not biotic factors (fish herbivory). Additionally the algal and cyanobacterial genera dominating mangrove-cleared areas were rare in intact mangroves and included a number of genera that compete with coral for space on reefs. Interestingly, sedimentation rates did not differ between intact and cleared areas, but the sediments that accumulated in intact mangroves had higher organic content. These findings are the first to demonstrate that anthropogenic clearing of mangroves changes multiple biotic and abiotic processes in mangrove forests and that some of these changes may influence adjacent habitats such as coral reefs and seagrass beds. Additional research is needed to further explore the community and ecosystem-level effects of mangrove clearing and their influence on adjacent habitats, but it is clear that mangrove conservation is an

  14. Wheat EST resources for functional genomics of abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Mario; Belcaid, Mahdi; Ouellet, François; Danyluk, Jean; Monroy, Antonio F; Dryanova, Ani; Gulick, Patrick; Bergeron, Anne; Laroche, André; Links, Matthew G; MacCarthy, Luke; Crosby, William L; Sarhan, Fathey

    2006-01-01

    Background Wheat is an excellent species to study freezing tolerance and other abiotic stresses. However, the sequence of the wheat genome has not been completely characterized due to its complexity and large size. To circumvent this obstacle and identify genes involved in cold acclimation and associated stresses, a large scale EST sequencing approach was undertaken by the Functional Genomics of Abiotic Stress (FGAS) project. Results We generated 73,521 quality-filtered ESTs from eleven cDNA libraries constructed from wheat plants exposed to various abiotic stresses and at different developmental stages. In addition, 196,041 ESTs for which tracefiles were available from the National Science Foundation wheat EST sequencing program and DuPont were also quality-filtered and used in the analysis. Clustering of the combined ESTs with d2_cluster and TGICL yielded a few large clusters containing several thousand ESTs that were refractory to routine clustering techniques. To resolve this problem, the sequence proximity and "bridges" were identified by an e-value distance graph to manually break clusters into smaller groups. Assembly of the resolved ESTs generated a 75,488 unique sequence set (31,580 contigs and 43,908 singletons/singlets). Digital expression analyses indicated that the FGAS dataset is enriched in stress-regulated genes compared to the other public datasets. Over 43% of the unique sequence set was annotated and classified into functional categories according to Gene Ontology. Conclusion We have annotated 29,556 different sequences, an almost 5-fold increase in annotated sequences compared to the available wheat public databases. Digital expression analysis combined with gene annotation helped in the identification of several pathways associated with abiotic stress. The genomic resources and knowledge developed by this project will contribute to a better understanding of the different mechanisms that govern stress tolerance in wheat and other cereals. PMID

  15. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Norio; Enomoto, Takafumi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-12-01

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium (IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets. Titania works as a photocatalyst to dissociate liquid water in this process. This mechanism offers a different source of a possibility of abiotic oxygen in atmospheres of exoplanets from previously considered photodissociation of water vapor in upper atmospheres by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light. Our order-of-magnitude estimation shows that possible amounts of oxygen produced by this abiotic mechanism can be comparable with or even more than that in the atmosphere of the current Earth, depending on the amount of active surface area for this mechanism. We conclude that titania may act as a potential source of false signs of life on habitable exoplanets.Reference:Narita N. et al.,Scientific Reports 5, Article number: 13977 (2015)http://www.nature.com/articles/srep13977

  16. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Narita, Norio; Enomoto, Takafumi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-09-10

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium (IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets. Titania works as a photocatalyst to dissociate liquid water in this process. This mechanism offers a different source of a possibility of abiotic oxygen in atmospheres of exoplanets from previously considered photodissociation of water vapor in upper atmospheres by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light. Our order-of-magnitude estimation shows that possible amounts of oxygen produced by this abiotic mechanism can be comparable with or even more than that in the atmosphere of the current Earth, depending on the amount of active surface area for this mechanism. We conclude that titania may act as a potential source of false signs of life on habitable exoplanets.

  17. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths.

    PubMed

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Hashimoto, Hideki; McFarlane, Ian R; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taketa, Eisuke; Tamura, Katsunori; Takano, Mikio; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-06-03

    Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II) concentrations, Fe(III) precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II) to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III) was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II) medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter), while those in the Fe(III) medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter) with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved) of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths.

  18. Abiotic carbonate dissolution traps carbon in a semiarid desert

    PubMed Central

    Fa, Keyu; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Yuqing; Qin, Shugao; Wu, Bin; Liu, Jiabin

    2016-01-01

    It is generally considered that desert ecosystems release CO2 to the atmosphere, but recent studies in drylands have shown that the soil can absorb CO2 abiotically. However, the mechanisms and exact location of abiotic carbon absorption remain unclear. Here, we used soil sterilization, 13CO2 addition, and detection methods to trace 13C in the soil of the Mu Us Desert, northern China. After 13CO2 addition, a large amount of 13CO2 was absorbed by the sterilised soil, and 13C was found enriched both in the soil gaseous phase and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Further analysis indicated that about 79.45% of the total 13C absorbed by the soil was trapped in DIC, while the amount of 13C in the soil gaseous phase accounted for only 0.22% of the total absorbed 13C. However, about 20.33% of the total absorbed 13C remained undetected. Our results suggest that carbonate dissolution might occur predominately, and the soil liquid phase might trap the majority of abiotically absorbed carbon. It is possible that the trapped carbon in the soil liquid phase leaches into the groundwater; however, further studies are required to support this hypothesis. PMID:27020762

  19. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Norio; Enomoto, Takafumi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium (IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets. Titania works as a photocatalyst to dissociate liquid water in this process. This mechanism offers a different source of a possibility of abiotic oxygen in atmospheres of exoplanets from previously considered photodissociation of water vapor in upper atmospheres by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light. Our order-of-magnitude estimation shows that possible amounts of oxygen produced by this abiotic mechanism can be comparable with or even more than that in the atmosphere of the current Earth, depending on the amount of active surface area for this mechanism. We conclude that titania may act as a potential source of false signs of life on habitable exoplanets. PMID:26354078

  20. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Hyacinthe; Philippe, Florian; Domon, Jean-Marc; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-02-16

    This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic), transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i) an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii) an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions.

  1. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths

    PubMed Central

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Hashimoto, Hideki; McFarlane, Ian R.; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taketa, Eisuke; Tamura, Katsunori; Takano, Mikio; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II) concentrations, Fe(III) precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II) to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III) was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II) medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter), while those in the Fe(III) medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter) with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved) of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths. PMID:27271677

  2. Abscisic Acid and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Crop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Saroj K.; Reddy, Kambham R.; Li, Jiaxu

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress is a primary threat to fulfill the demand of agricultural production to feed the world in coming decades. Plants reduce growth and development process during stress conditions, which ultimately affect the yield. In stress conditions, plants develop various stress mechanism to face the magnitude of stress challenges, although that is not enough to protect them. Therefore, many strategies have been used to produce abiotic stress tolerance crop plants, among them, abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone engineering could be one of the methods of choice. ABA is an isoprenoid phytohormone, which regulates various physiological processes ranging from stomatal opening to protein storage and provides adaptation to many stresses like drought, salt, and cold stresses. ABA is also called an important messenger that acts as the signaling mediator for regulating the adaptive response of plants to different environmental stress conditions. In this review, we will discuss the role of ABA in response to abiotic stress at the molecular level and ABA signaling. The review also deals with the effect of ABA in respect to gene expression. PMID:27200044

  3. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Hyacinthe Le; Philippe, Florian; Domon, Jean-Marc; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic), transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i) an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii) an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions. PMID:27135320

  4. Anaerobic aquifer transformations of 2,4-Dinitrophenol under different terminal electron accepting conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krumholz, L.R.; Suflita, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the susceptibility of 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) and 2,4-diaminophenol to anaerobic biodegradation in aquifer slurries. Aquifer microorganisms depleted 2,4-DNP at rates of 25, 9 and 0.4 μM/day under methanogenic, sulfate-reducing and nitrate-reducing conditions, respectively. Rates of abiotic, 2,4-DNP loss in autoclaved control incubations were 7.2, 6.2 and 0.95 μM/day respectively. Abiotic, 2,4-DNP reduction was especially important as the first step in its transformation. 2-Amino-4-nitrophenol was produced by this process, but this compound was further metabolized in methanogenic and sulfate-reducing aquifer slurries. This partially reduced compound persisted in autoclaved controls and in the nitrate-reducing aquifer slurries. Aquifer slurries incubated with either 2,4-DNP or 2,4-diaminophenol produced methane when incubated with no other electron acceptor suggesting that mineralization had occurred under these conditions. In parallel experiments, aquifer slurries amended with 2,6-dinitrophenol or picric acid did not produce methane at levels above the substrate unamended controls.

  5. Expression of the tetrahydrofolate-dependent nitric oxide synthase from the green alga Ostreococcus tauri increases tolerance to abiotic stresses and influences stomatal development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Foresi, Noelia; Mayta, Martín L; Lodeyro, Anabella F; Scuffi, Denise; Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; García-Mata, Carlos; Casalongué, Claudia; Carrillo, Néstor; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2015-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule with diverse biological functions in plants. NO plays a crucial role in growth and development, from germination to senescence, and is also involved in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In animals, NO is synthesized by well-described nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes. NOS activity has also been detected in higher plants, but no gene encoding an NOS protein, or the enzymes required for synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, an essential cofactor of mammalian NOS activity, have been identified so far. Recently, an NOS gene from the unicellular marine alga Ostreococcus tauri (OtNOS) has been discovered and characterized. Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transformed with OtNOS under the control of the inducible short promoter fragment (SPF) of the sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Hahb-4 gene, which responds to abiotic stresses and abscisic acid. Transgenic plants expressing OtNOS accumulated higher NO concentrations compared with siblings transformed with the empty vector, and displayed enhanced salt, drought and oxidative stress tolerance. Moreover, transgenic OtNOS lines exhibited increased stomatal development compared with plants transformed with the empty vector. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that OtNOS, unlike mammalian NOS, efficiently uses tetrahydrofolate as a cofactor in Arabidopsis plants. The modulation of NO production to alleviate abiotic stress disturbances in higher plants highlights the potential of genetic manipulation to influence NO metabolism as a tool to improve plant fitness under adverse growth conditions.

  6. O2 and H2O2 transformation steps for the oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by graphitic nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes in acidic electrolyte from first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhang; Zhong, Guoyu; Yu, Hao; Wang, Hongjuan; Peng, Feng

    2015-09-14

    It is highly challenging but extremely desirable to develop carbon catalysts with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and stability in acidic medium for commercial application. In this paper, based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations with long range interaction correction and solvation effects, the elementary transformations of all the probable intermediates in the ORR and the hydrogen peroxide reduction reaction (HPRR) over graphitic nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) in acidic medium were evaluated, and it was found that all the rate determining steps are related to the bonding hydroxyl group because of the strong interaction between the hydroxyl group and carbon. Thus, it is hard for the direct four-electron ORR and the two-electron HPRR to proceed. Together with hydrogen peroxide disproportionation (HPD), a mixed mechanism for the ORR in acidic electrolyte was proposed, where the two-electron and three-electron ORRs and HPD dominate the electrode reaction. The experimental result for the ORR catalyzed by NCNTs in acidic electrolyte also well illustrated the rationality of the theoretical calculations. This study not only gives new insights into the effect of graphitic nitrogen doping on the ORR catalyzed by carbon, but also provides a guide to design carbon catalysts with high ORR activity in acidic electrolyte.

  7. Abiotic Versus Biotic Weathering Of Olivine As Possible Biosignatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longazo, Teresa G.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Clemett, Simon J.; Southam, Gordon; McKay, David S.

    2001-01-01

    We are investigating the weathering of silicate minerals by both purely inorganic, and biologically mediated processes using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). By resolving surface textures and chemical compositions of weathered surfaces at the sub-micron scale we hope to be able to distinguish abiotic from biotic weathering processes and so establish a new biosignature applicable to the study of astromaterials including but not limited to the Martian meteorites. Sterilized olivine grains (San Carlos, Arizona) no more than 1-2 mm in their longest dimension were optically assayed to be uniform in color and free of inclusions were selected as weathering subjects. Prior to all experiments surface morphologies and Fe/Mg ratios were determined for each grain using FE-SEM and EDS. Experiments were divided into two categories abiotic and biotic and were compared with "naturally" weathered samples. For the preliminary experiments, two trials (open and closed to the ambient laboratory environment) were performed under abiotic conditions, and three trials under biotic conditions (control, day 1 and day 2). The open system abiotic trials used sterile grains heated at 98 C and 200 C for both 24 and 48 hours in 1L double distilled de-ionized water. The closed system abiotic trials were conducted under the same conditions but in a sealed two layer steel/Teflon "bomb" apparatus. The biotic trials used sterile grains mounted in a flow-through device attached to a wellhead on the Columbia River aquifer. Several discolored, altered, grains were selected to document "natural" weathering surface textures for comparison with the experimental samples. Preliminary results indicate there are qualitative differences in weathered surface textures among all the designed experiments. The olivine grains in abiotic trials displayed etching, pitting, denticulate margins, dissolution and clay formation. The scale of the features

  8. Comparative physiological, metabolomic, and transcriptomic analyses reveal mechanisms of improved abiotic stress resistance in bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.] by exogenous melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haitao; Jiang, Chuan; Ye, Tiantian; Tan, Dun-xian; Reiter, Russel J.; Zhang, Heng; Liu, Renyi; Chan, Zhulong

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), a well-known animal hormone, is also involved in plant development and abiotic stress responses. In this study, it is shown that exogenous application of melatonin conferred improved salt, drought, and cold stress resistances in bermudagrass. Moreover, exogenous melatonin treatment alleviated reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst and cell damage induced by abiotic stress; this involved activation of several antioxidants. Additionally, melatonin-pre-treated plants exhibited higher concentrations of 54 metabolites, including amino acids, organic acids, sugars, and sugar alcohols, than non-treated plants under abiotic stress conditions. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling identified 3933 transcripts (2361 up-regulated and 1572 down-regulated) that were differentially expressed in melatonin-treated plants versus controls. Pathway and gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analyses revealed that genes involved in nitrogen metabolism, major carbohydrate metabolism, tricarboxylic acid (TCA)/org transformation, transport, hormone metabolism, metal handling, redox, and secondary metabolism were over-represented after melatonin pre-treatment. Taken together, this study provides the first evidence of the protective roles of exogenous melatonin in the bermudagrass response to abiotic stresses, partially via activation of antioxidants and modulation of metabolic homeostasis. Notably, metabolic and transcriptomic analyses showed that the underlying mechanisms of melatonin could involve major reorientation of photorespiratory and carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism. PMID:25225478

  9. Abiotic and biotic factors responsible for antimonite oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingxin; Yang, Birong; Shi, Manman; Yuan, Kai; Guo, Wei; Wang, Qian; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-01-01

    Antimonite [Sb(III)]-oxidizing bacteria can transform the toxic Sb(III) into the less toxic antimonate [Sb(V)]. Recently, the cytoplasmic Sb(III)-oxidase AnoA and the periplasmic arsenite [As(III)] oxidase AioAB were shown to responsible for bacterial Sb(III) oxidation, however, disruption of each gene only partially decreased Sb(III) oxidation efficiency. This study showed that in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4, Sb(III) induced cellular H2O2 content and H2O2 degradation gene katA. Gene knock-out/complementation of katA, anoA, aioA and anoA/aioA and Sb(III) oxidation and growth experiments showed that katA, anoA and aioA were essential for Sb(III) oxidation and resistance and katA was also essential for H2O2 resistance. Furthermore, linear correlations were observed between cellular H2O2 and Sb(V) content in vivo and chemical H2O2 and Sb(V) content in vitro (R2 = 0.93 and 0.94, respectively). These results indicate that besides the biotic factors, the cellular H2O2 induced by Sb(III) also catalyzes bacterial Sb(III) oxidation as an abiotic oxidant. The data reveal a novel mechanism that bacterial Sb(III) oxidation is associated with abiotic (cellular H2O2) and biotic (AnoA and AioAB) factors and Sb(III) oxidation process consumes cellular H2O2 which contributes to microbial detoxification of both Sb(III) and cellular H2O2. PMID:28252030

  10. Abiotic and biotic factors responsible for antimonite oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingxin; Yang, Birong; Shi, Manman; Yuan, Kai; Guo, Wei; Wang, Qian; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-03-01

    Antimonite [Sb(III)]-oxidizing bacteria can transform the toxic Sb(III) into the less toxic antimonate [Sb(V)]. Recently, the cytoplasmic Sb(III)-oxidase AnoA and the periplasmic arsenite [As(III)] oxidase AioAB were shown to responsible for bacterial Sb(III) oxidation, however, disruption of each gene only partially decreased Sb(III) oxidation efficiency. This study showed that in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4, Sb(III) induced cellular H2O2 content and H2O2 degradation gene katA. Gene knock-out/complementation of katA, anoA, aioA and anoA/aioA and Sb(III) oxidation and growth experiments showed that katA, anoA and aioA were essential for Sb(III) oxidation and resistance and katA was also essential for H2O2 resistance. Furthermore, linear correlations were observed between cellular H2O2 and Sb(V) content in vivo and chemical H2O2 and Sb(V) content in vitro (R2 = 0.93 and 0.94, respectively). These results indicate that besides the biotic factors, the cellular H2O2 induced by Sb(III) also catalyzes bacterial Sb(III) oxidation as an abiotic oxidant. The data reveal a novel mechanism that bacterial Sb(III) oxidation is associated with abiotic (cellular H2O2) and biotic (AnoA and AioAB) factors and Sb(III) oxidation process consumes cellular H2O2 which contributes to microbial detoxification of both Sb(III) and cellular H2O2.

  11. Biotic and abiotic degradation of four cephalosporin antibiotics in a lake surface water and sediment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Muxian; Wang, Lianhong; Ji, Rong

    2010-09-01

    Cephalosporins are widely used veterinary and human antibiotics, but their environmental fate and impacts are still unclear. We studied degradation of four cephalosporins (cefradine, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and cefepime) from each generation in the surface water and sediment of Lake Xuanwu, China. The four cephalosporins degraded abiotically in the surface water in the dark with half-lives of 2.7-18.7d, which were almost the same as that in sterilized surface water. Under exposure to simulated sunlight, the half-lives of the cephalosporins decreased significantly to 2.2-5.0d, with the maximal decrease for ceftriaxone from 18.7d in the dark to 4.1d under the light exposure. Effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and nitrate on photodegradation of the cephalosporins were compound-specific. While DOM (5 mg L(-1)) stimulated the photodegradation of only cefradine (by 9%) and cefepime (by 34%), nitrate (10 microM) had effects only on cefepime (stimulation by 13%). Elimination rates of the cephalosporins in oxic sediment (half-lives of 0.8-3.1d) were higher than in anoxic sediment (half-lives of 1.1-4.1d), mainly attributed to biodegradation. The data indicate that abiotic hydrolysis (for cefradine, cefuroxime, and cefepime) and direct photolysis (for ceftriaxone) were the primary processes for elimination of the cephalosporins in the surface water of the lake, whereas biodegradation was responsible for the elimination of the cephalosporins in the sediment. Further studies are needed on chemical structure, toxicity, and persistence of transformation products of the cephalosporins in the environment.

  12. Abiotic versus biotic controls on soil nitrogen cycling in drylands along a 3200 km transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongwei; Zhu, Weixing; Wang, Xiaobo; Pan, Yuepeng; Wang, Chao; Xi, Dan; Bai, Edith; Wang, Yuesi; Han, Xingguo; Fang, Yunting

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen (N) cycling in drylands under changing climate is not well understood. Our understanding of N cycling over larger scales to date relies heavily on the measurement of bulk soil N, and the information about internal soil N transformations remains limited. The 15N natural abundance (δ15N) of ammonium and nitrate can serve as a proxy record for the N processes in soils. To better understand the patterns and mechanisms of N cycling in drylands, we collected soils along a 3200 km transect at about 100 km intervals in northern China, with mean annual precipitation (MAP) ranging from 36 to 436 mm. We analyzed N pools and δ15N of ammonium, dual isotopes (15N and 18O) of nitrate, and the microbial gene abundance associated with soil N transformations. We found that N status and its driving factors were different above and below a MAP threshold of 100 mm. In the arid zone with MAP below 100 mm, soil inorganic N accumulated, with a large fraction being of atmospheric origin, and ammonia volatilization was strong in soils with high pH. In addition, the abundance of microbial genes associated with soil N transformations was low. In the semiarid zone with MAP above 100 mm, soil inorganic N concentrations were low and were controlled mainly by biological processes (e.g., plant uptake and denitrification). The preference for soil ammonium over nitrate by the dominant plant species may enhance the possibility of soil nitrate losses via denitrification. Overall, our study suggests that a shift from abiotic to biotic controls on soil N biogeochemistry under global climate changes would greatly affect N losses, soil N availability, and other N transformation processes in these drylands in China.

  13. Transformation of the pesticide 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) and nitrate by iron powder and by H{sub 2}/Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Siantar, D.P.; Schreier, C.G.; Reinhard, M.

    1995-12-01

    In this study, zero-valent iron powder (Fe{sup o}) was shown to reductively dehalogenate DBCP completely under sterile (abiotic) buffered and unbuffered conditions. DBCP transformation was evidenced by the appearance of bromide and chloride ions. The effect of pH, mass transport, iron content and of dissolved oxygen (O{sub 2}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}), and nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) on DBCP transformation was investigated. There was little effect on DBCP transformation rate between pH {approx}6 and 8. Mass transport was not limiting if the iron slurries in the batch system were shaken at >340 rpm. The rate of DBCP transformation was proportional to the amount of iron. The DBCP transformation rate decreased linearly with increasing oxygen content. Sulfate did not significantly affect the rate of DBCP transformation. The presence of nitrate appeared to temporarily inhibit DBCP transformation until the NO{sub 3} was removed. Nitrate was reduced by iron to nitrite. Nitrite was also removed by iron. This system appears to be able to effectively treat DBCP nitrate and/or nitrite containing water. Comparison of DBCP transformation in groundwater using the Fe{sup o} and H{sub 2}/Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} systems shows that the H{sub 2}/Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system performs better in actual environmental conditions.

  14. Abiotic Transformations Of 17α-Estradiol In Simulated Wastewater Influent

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists from various disciplines have been studying the fate, impact and transport of estrogens in natural and engineered systems. Emphasis is mostly focused on natural and synthetic estrogens affiliated with humans and animals. It is widely accepted that Wastewater Treatmen...

  15. Abiotic and Biotic Transformation of TCE under Sulfate Reducing Conditions: the Role of Spatial Heterogeneity

    EPA Science Inventory

    At a number of sites in the USA, passive reactive barriers built with shredded plant mulch have been constructed to treat ground water contaminated with TCE. These barriers are called biowalls because anaerobic biodegradation of the plant mulch is expected to provide substrates...

  16. ABIOTIC REDOX TRANSFORMATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AT THE CLAY-WATER INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interactions of clay, water and organic compounds considerably modify the structural and physico-chemical properties of all components and create a unique domain for biological and chemical species in environments. Previous research indicates that the nature and properties of...

  17. SORPTION AND ABIOTIC REDOX TRANSFORMATION OF NITROBENZENE AT THE SMECTITE-WATER INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of the redox state of structural Fe on the surface reactivity of iron-bearing phyllosilicates in aqueous suspension was investigated using a molecular probe. For this purpose the structural Fe in montmorillonite and ferruginous smectite was chemically reduced by sodium...

  18. Distinguishing Biotic from Abiotic Phosphate Oxygen Isotopic Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R.; Moyer, C.; Colman, A.; Liang, Y.; Dogru, D.

    2006-05-01

    On earth, phosphate has a strong biological oxygen isotope signature due to its concentration and intense cycling by living organisms as an essential nutrient. Phosphate does not undergo oxygen isotope exchange with water at low temperature without enzymatic catalysis, making the oxygen isotope ratio (18O/16O) of phosphate, δ18OP, an attractive biosignature in the search for early and extraterrestrial life. Recent laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that the δ18OP value of dissolved inorganic phosphate (PO4) records specific microbial activity and enzymatic reaction pathways in both laboratory cultures and natural waters/sediments (Blake et al., 2005; Colman et al 2005; Liang and Blake, 2005). Phosphate oxygen isotope biosignatures may be distinguished from abiotic signatures by: (1) evaluating the degree of temperature-dependent PO4-water oxygen isotope exchange in aqueous systems and deviation from equilibrium; and (2) evolution from an abiotic P reservoir signature towards a biotic P reservoir signature. Important abiotic processes potentially affecting phosphate δ18OP values include dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, recrystallization of PO4 mineral phases, diagenesis and metamorphism. For most of these processes, the recording, retention and alteration of δ18OP biosignatures have not been evaluated. Deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields are an ideal system in which to study the preservation and alteration of δ18OP biosignatures, as well as potential look-alikes produced by heat-promoted PO4 -water oxygen isotope exchange. Results from recent studies of δ18OP biosignatures in hydrothermal deposits near 9 and 21 degrees N. EPR and at Loihi seamount will be presented.

  19. Graphene oxide-facilitated reduction of nitrobenzene in sulfide-containing aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heyun; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2013-05-07

    The main objective of this study was to test the possibility that graphene-based nanomaterials can mediate environmentally relevant abiotic redox reactions of organic contaminants. We investigated the effect of graphene oxide (GO) on the reduction of nitrobenzene by Na2S in aqueous solutions. With the presence of GO (typically 5 mg/L), the observed pseudofirst-order rate constant (kobs) for the reduction of nitrobenzene was raised by nearly 2 orders of magnitude (from 7.83 × 10(-5) h(-1) to 7.77 × 10(-3) h(-1)), strongly suggesting reaction mediation by GO. As reflected by the combined spectroscopic analyses, GO was reduced in the beginning of the reaction, and hence the reduced GO (RGO) mediated the reduction of nitrobenzene. It was proposed that the zigzag edges of RGO acted as the catalytic active sites, while the basal plane of RGO served as the conductor for the electron transfer during the catalytic process. Furthermore, changing the pH (5.9-9.1) and the presence of dissolved humic acid (10 mg TOC/L) were found to greatly influence the catalytic activity of RGO. The results imply that graphene-based nanomaterials may effectively mediate the reductive transformation of nitroaromatic compounds and can contribute to the natural attenuation and remediation of these chemicals.

  20. Abiotic gas formation drives nitrogen loss from a desert ecosystem.

    PubMed

    McCalley, Carmody K; Sparks, Jed P

    2009-11-06

    In arid environments such as deserts, nitrogen is often the most limiting nutrient for biological activity. The majority of the ecosystem nitrogen flux is typically thought to be driven by production and loss of reactive nitrogen species by microorganisms in the soil. We found that high soil-surface temperatures (greater than 50 degrees C), driven by solar radiation, are the primary cause of nitrogen loss in Mojave Desert soils. This abiotic pathway not only enables the balancing of arid ecosystem nitrogen budgets, but also changes our view of global nitrogen cycling and the predicted impact of climate change and increased temperatures on nitrogen bioavailability.

  1. Transgenic banana plants overexpressing a native plasma membrane aquaporin MusaPIP1;2 display high tolerance levels to different abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Sreedharan, Shareena; Shekhawat, Upendra K S; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

    2013-10-01

    Water transport across cellular membranes is regulated by a family of water channel proteins known as aquaporins (AQPs). As most abiotic stresses like suboptimal temperatures, drought or salinity result in cellular dehydration, it is imperative to study the cause-effect relationship between AQPs and the cellular consequences of abiotic stress stimuli. Although plant cells have a high isoform diversity of AQPs, the individual and integrated roles of individual AQPs in optimal and suboptimal physiological conditions remain unclear. Herein, we have identified a plasma membrane intrinsic protein gene (MusaPIP1;2) from banana and characterized it by overexpression in transgenic banana plants. Cellular localization assay performed using MusaPIP1;2::GFP fusion protein indicated that MusaPIP1;2 translocated to plasma membrane in transformed banana cells. Transgenic banana plants overexpressing MusaPIP1;2 constitutively displayed better abiotic stress survival characteristics. The transgenic lines had lower malondialdehyde levels, elevated proline and relative water content and higher photosynthetic efficiency as compared to equivalent controls under different abiotic stress conditions. Greenhouse-maintained hardened transgenic plants showed faster recovery towards normal growth and development after cessation of abiotic stress stimuli, thereby underlining the importance of these plants in actual environmental conditions wherein the stress stimuli is often transient but severe. Further, transgenic plants where the overexpression of MusaPIP1;2 was made conditional by tagging it with a stress-inducible native dehydrin promoter also showed similar stress tolerance characteristics in in vitro and in vivo assays. Plants developed in this study could potentially enable banana cultivation in areas where adverse environmental conditions hitherto preclude commercial banana cultivation.

  2. Small RNAs in Plant Responses to Abiotic Stresses: Regulatory Roles and Study Methods

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Yee-Shan; Wong, Johanna Wing-Hang; Mui, Zeta; Liu, Xuan; Hui, Jerome Ho-Lam; Chan, Ting-Fung; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2015-01-01

    To survive under abiotic stresses in the environment, plants trigger a reprogramming of gene expression, by transcriptional regulation or translational regulation, to turn on protective mechanisms. The current focus of research on how plants cope with abiotic stresses has transitioned from transcriptomic analyses to small RNA investigations. In this review, we have summarized and evaluated the current methodologies used in the identification and validation of small RNAs and their targets, in the context of plant responses to abiotic stresses. PMID:26501263

  3. Principal Components as a Data Reduction and Noise Reduction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, M. L.; Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of principal components as a pipeline data reduction technique for thematic mapper data was assessed and principal components analysis and its transformation as a noise reduction technique was examined. Two primary factors were considered: (1) how might data reduction and noise reduction using the principal components transformation affect the extraction of accurate spectral classifications; and (2) what are the real savings in terms of computer processing and storage costs of using reduced data over the full 7-band TM complement. An area in central Pennsylvania was chosen for a study area. The image data for the project were collected using the Earth Resources Laboratory's thematic mapper simulator (TMS) instrument.

  4. Calcium-Mediated Abiotic Stress Signaling in Roots

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Katie A.; Matthus, Elsa; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M.; Davies, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Roots are subjected to a range of abiotic stresses as they forage for water and nutrients. Cytosolic free calcium is a common second messenger in the signaling of abiotic stress. In addition, roots take up calcium both as a nutrient and to stimulate exocytosis in growth. For calcium to fulfill its multiple roles must require strict spatio-temporal regulation of its uptake and efflux across the plasma membrane, its buffering in the cytosol and its sequestration or release from internal stores. This prompts the question of how specificity of signaling output can be achieved against the background of calcium’s other uses. Threats to agriculture such as salinity, water availability and hypoxia are signaled through calcium. Nutrient deficiency is also emerging as a stress that is signaled through cytosolic free calcium, with progress in potassium, nitrate and boron deficiency signaling now being made. Heavy metals have the capacity to trigger or modulate root calcium signaling depending on their dose and their capacity to catalyze production of hydroxyl radicals. Mechanical stress and cold stress can both trigger an increase in root cytosolic free calcium, with the possibility of membrane deformation playing a part in initiating the calcium signal. This review addresses progress in identifying the calcium transporting proteins (particularly channels such as annexins and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels) that effect stress-induced calcium increases in roots and explores links to reactive oxygen species, lipid signaling, and the unfolded protein response. PMID:27621742

  5. Abiotic factors influence plant storage lipid accumulation and composition.

    PubMed

    Singer, Stacy D; Zou, Jitao; Weselake, Randall J

    2016-02-01

    The demand for plant-derived oils has increased substantially over the last decade, and is sure to keep growing. While there has been a surge in research efforts to produce plants with improved oil content and quality, in most cases the enhancements have been small. To add further complexity to this situation, substantial differences in seed oil traits among years and field locations have indicated that plant lipid biosynthesis is also influenced to a large extent by multiple environmental factors such as temperature, drought, light availability and soil nutrients. On the molecular and biochemical levels, the expression and/or activities of fatty acid desaturases, as well as diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1, have been found to be affected by abiotic factors, suggesting that they play a role in the lipid content and compositional changes seen under abiotic stress conditions. Unfortunately, while only a very small number of strategies have been developed as of yet to minimize these environmental effects on the production of storage lipids, it is clear that this feat will be of the utmost importance for developing superior oil crops with the capability to perform in a consistent manner in field conditions in the future.

  6. RNA helicases: diverse roles in prokaryotic response to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Owttrim, George W

    2013-01-01

    Similar to proteins, RNA molecules must fold into the correct conformation and associate with protein complexes in order to be functional within a cell. RNA helicases rearrange RNA secondary structure and RNA-protein interactions in an ATP-dependent reaction, performing crucial functions in all aspects of RNA metabolism. In prokaryotes, RNA helicase activity is associated with roles in housekeeping functions including RNA turnover, ribosome biogenesis, translation and small RNA metabolism. In addition, RNA helicase expression and/or activity are frequently altered during cellular response to abiotic stress, implying they perform defined roles during cellular adaptation to changes in the growth environment. Specifically, RNA helicases contribute to the formation of cold-adapted ribosomes and RNA degradosomes, implying a role in alleviation of RNA secondary structure stabilization at low temperature. A common emerging theme involves RNA helicases acting as scaffolds for protein-protein interaction and functioning as molecular clamps, holding RNA-protein complexes in specific conformations. This review highlights recent advances in DEAD-box RNA helicase association with cellular response to abiotic stress in prokaryotes.

  7. Influence of abiotic stress signals on secondary metabolites in plants

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Akula; Ravishankar, Gokare Aswathanarayana

    2011-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites are unique sources for pharmaceuticals, food additives, flavors, and industrially important biochemicals. Accumulation of such metabolites often occurs in plants subjected to stresses including various elicitors or signal molecules. Secondary metabolites play a major role in the adaptation of plants to the environment and in overcoming stress conditions. Environmental factors viz. temperature, humidity, light intensity, the supply of water, minerals, and CO2 influence the growth of a plant and secondary metabolite production. Drought, high salinity, and freezing temperatures are environmental conditions that cause adverse effects on the growth of plants and the productivity of crops. Plant cell culture technologies have been effective tools for both studying and producing plant secondary metabolites under in vitro conditions and for plant improvement. This brief review summarizes the influence of different abiotic factors include salt, drought, light, heavy metals, frost etc. on secondary metabolites in plants. The focus of the present review is the influence of abiotic factors on secondary metabolite production and some of important plant pharmaceuticals. Also, we describe the results of in vitro cultures and production of some important secondary metabolites obtained in our laboratory. PMID:22041989

  8. Abiotic stress and control of grain number in cereals.

    PubMed

    Dolferus, Rudy; Ji, Xuemei; Richards, Richard A

    2011-10-01

    Grain number is the only yield component that is directly associated with increased grain yield in important cereal crops like wheat. Historical yield studies show that increases in grain yield are always accompanied by an increase in grain number. Adverse weather conditions can cause severe fluctuations in grain yield and substantial yield losses in cereal crops. The problem is global and despite its impact on world food production breeding and selection approaches have only met with limited success. A specific period during early reproductive development, the young microspore stage of pollen development, is extremely vulnerable to abiotic stress in self-fertilising cereals (wheat, rice, barley, sorghum). A better understanding of the physiological and molecular processes that lead to stress-induced pollen abortion may provide us with the key to finding solutions for maintaining grain number under abiotic stress conditions. Due to the complexity of the problem, stress-proofing our main cereal crops will be a challenging task and will require joint input from different research disciplines.

  9. Abiotic Racemization Kinetics of Amino Acids in Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Andrew D.; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Lomstein, Bente Aa.

    2013-01-01

    The ratios of d- versus l-amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic matter racemize abiotically between the d- and the l-forms. Based on a heating experiment, we report kinetic parameters for racemization of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth below seafloor. Extrapolation to a typical cold deep sea sediment temperature of 3°C suggests racemization rate constants of 0.50×10−5–11×10−5 yr−1. These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of d:l amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial populations. PMID:23951211

  10. Mineral transformations during the dissolution of uranium ore minerals by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasauer, S.; Weidler, P.; Fakra, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D.

    2011-12-01

    Carnotite minerals [X2(UO2)2(VO4)2]; X = K, Ca, Ba, Mn, Na, Cu or Pb] form the major ore of uranium in the Colorado Plateau. These deposits are highly oxidized and contain U(VI) and V(IV). The biotransformation of U(VI) bound in carnotite by bacteria during dissimilatory metal reduction presents a complex puzzle in mineral chemistry. Both U(VI) and V(V) can be respired by metal reducing bacteria, and the mineral structure can change depending on the associated counterion. We incubated anaerobic cultures of S. putrefaciens CN32 with natural carnotite minerals from southeastern Utah in a nutrient-limited defined medium. Strain CN32 is a gram negative bacterium and a terrestrial isolate from New Mexico. The mineral and metal transformations were compared to a system that contained similar concentrations of soluble U(VI) and V(V). Electron (SEM, TEM) microscopies and x-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) were used in conjunction with XRD to track mineral changes, and bacterial survival was monitored throughout the incubations. Slow rates of metal reduction over 10 months for the treatment with carnotite minerals revealed distinct biotic and abiotic processes, providing insight on mineral transformation and bacteria-metal interactions. The bacteria existed as small flocs or individual cells attached to the mineral phase, but did not adsorb soluble U or V, and accumulated very little of the biominerals. Reduction of mineral V(V) necessarily led to a dismantling of the carnotite structure. Bioreduction of V(V) by CN32 contributed small but profound changes to the mineral system, resulting in new minerals. Abiotic cation exchange within the carnotite group minerals induced the rearrangement of the mineral structures, leading to further mineral transformation. In contrast, bacteria survival was poor for treatments with soluble U(VI) and V(V), although both metals were reduced completely and formed solid UO2 and VO2; we also detected V(III). For these treatments, the bacteria

  11. Reduction operators of Burgers equation.

    PubMed

    Pocheketa, Oleksandr A; Popovych, Roman O

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the problem on reduction operators and nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation is systematically treated and completed. A new proof of the theorem on the special "no-go" case of regular reduction operators is presented, and the representation of the coefficients of operators in terms of solutions of the initial equation is constructed for this case. All possible nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation to single ordinary differential equations are exhaustively described. Any Lie reduction of the Burgers equation proves to be equivalent via the Hopf-Cole transformation to a parameterized family of Lie reductions of the linear heat equation.

  12. Reduction operators of Burgers equation

    PubMed Central

    Pocheketa, Oleksandr A.; Popovych, Roman O.

    2013-01-01

    The solution of the problem on reduction operators and nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation is systematically treated and completed. A new proof of the theorem on the special “no-go” case of regular reduction operators is presented, and the representation of the coefficients of operators in terms of solutions of the initial equation is constructed for this case. All possible nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation to single ordinary differential equations are exhaustively described. Any Lie reduction of the Burgers equation proves to be equivalent via the Hopf–Cole transformation to a parameterized family of Lie reductions of the linear heat equation. PMID:23576819

  13. Abiotic Formation of Methyl Halides in the Terrestrial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppler, F.

    2011-12-01

    Methyl chloride and methyl bromide are the most abundant chlorine and bromine containing organic compounds in the atmosphere. Since both compounds have relatively long tropospheric lifetimes they can effectively transport halogen atoms from the Earth's surface, where they are released, to the stratosphere and following photolytic oxidation form reactive halogen gases that lead to the chemical destruction of ozone. Methyl chloride and methyl bromide account for more than 20% of the ozone-depleting halogens delivered to the stratosphere and are predicted to grow in importance as the chlorine contribution to the stratosphere from anthropogenic CFCs decline. Today methyl chloride and methyl bromide originate mainly from natural sources with only a minor fraction considered to be of anthropogenic origin. However, until as recently as 2000 most of the methyl chloride and methyl bromide input to the atmosphere was considered to originate from the oceans, but investigations in recent years have clearly demonstrated that terrestrial sources such as biomass burning, wood-rotting fungi, coastal salt marshes, tropical vegetation and organic matter degradation must dominate the atmospheric budgets of these trace gases. However, many uncertainties still exist regarding strengths of both sources and sinks, as well as the mechanisms of formation of these naturally occurring halogenated gases. A better understanding of the atmospheric budget of both methyl chloride and methyl bromide is therefore required for reliable prediction of future ozone depletion. Biotic and abiotic methylation processes of chloride and bromide ion are considered to be the dominant pathways of formation of these methyl halides in nature. In this presentation I will focus on abiotic formation processes in the terrestrial environment and the potential parameters that control their emissions. Recent advances in our understanding of the abiotic formation pathway of methyl halides will be discussed. This will

  14. Microbial reduction of iodate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Councell, T.B.; Landa, E.R.; Lovley, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The different oxidation species of iodine have markedly different sorption properties. Hence, changes in iodine redox states can greatly affect the mobility of iodine in the environment. Although a major microbial role has been suggested in the past to account for these redox changes, little has been done to elucidate the responsible microorganisms or the mechanisms involved. In the work presented here, direct microbial reduction of iodate was demonstrated with anaerobic cell suspensions of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans which reduced 96% of an initial 100 ??M iodate to iodide at pH 7 in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, whereas anaerobic cell suspensions of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens were unable to reduce iodate in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer (pH 7). Both D. desulfuricans and S. putrefaciens were able to reduce iodate at pH 7 in 10 mM HEPES buffer. Both soluble ferrous iron and sulfide, as well as iron monosulfide (FeS) were shown to abiologically reduce iodate to iodide. These results indicate that ferric iron and/or sulfate reducing bacteria are capable of mediating both direct, enzymatic, as well as abiotic reduction of iodate in natural anaerobic environments. These microbially mediated reactions may be important factors in the fate and transport of 129I in natural systems.

  15. Role of peroxidases in the compensation of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase knockdown in rice plants under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Aurenivia; Martins, Marcio O; Ribeiro, Carolina W; Fontenele, Adilton V; Carvalho, Fabricio E L; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Silveira, Joaquim A G

    2011-10-01

    Current studies, particularly in Arabidopsis, have demonstrated that mutants deficient in cytosolic ascorbate peroxidases (APXs) are susceptible to the oxidative damage induced by abiotic stress. In contrast, we demonstrate here that rice mutants double silenced for cytosolic APXs (APx1/2s) up-regulated other peroxidases, making the mutants able to cope with abiotic stress, such as salt, heat, high light and methyl viologen, similar to non-transformed (NT) plants. The APx1/2s mutants exhibited an altered redox homeostasis, as indicated by increased levels of H₂O₂ and ascorbate and glutathione redox states. Both mutant and NT plants exhibited similar photosynthesis (CO₂) assimilation and photochemical efficiency) under both normal and stress conditions. Overall, the antioxidative compensatory mechanism displayed by the mutants was associated with increased expression of OsGpx genes, which resulted in higher glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in the cytosolic and chloroplastic fractions. The transcript levels of OsCatA and OsCatB and the activities of catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPOD; type III peroxidases) were also up-regulated. None of the six studied isoforms of OsApx were up-regulated under normal growth conditions. Therefore, the deficiency in cytosolic APXs was effectively compensated for by up-regulation of other peroxidases. We propose that signalling mechanisms triggered in rice mutants could be distinct from those proposed for Arabidopsis.

  16. AhpC (alkyl hydroperoxide reductase) from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 protects Escherichia coli from multiple abiotic stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Yogesh; Chaurasia, Neha; Rai, Lal Chand

    2009-04-17

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) is known to detoxify peroxides and reactive sulfur species (RSS). However, the relationship between its expression and combating of abiotic stresses is still not clear. To investigate this relationship, the genes encoding the alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (ahpC) from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 were introduced into E. coli using pGEX-5X-2 vector and their possible functions against heat, salt, carbofuron, cadmium, copper and UV-B were analyzed. The transformed E. coli cells registered significantly increase in growth than the control cells under temperature (47 {sup o}C), NaCl (6% w/v), carbofuron (0.025 mg ml{sup -1}), CdCl{sub 2} (4 mM), CuCl{sub 2} (1 mM), and UV-B (10 min) exposure. Enhanced expression of ahpC gene as measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR under aforementioned stresses at different time points demonstrated its role in offering tolerance against multiple abiotic stresses.

  17. Endophytic fungi: resource for gibberellins and crop abiotic stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Hussain, Javid; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-03-01

    The beneficial effects of endophytes on plant growth are important for agricultural ecosystems because they reduce the need for fertilizers and decrease soil and water pollution while compensating for environmental perturbations. Endophytic fungi are a novel source of bioactive secondary metabolites; moreover, recently they have been found to produce physiologically active gibberellins as well. The symbiosis of gibberellins producing endophytic fungi with crops can be a promising strategy to overcome the adverse effects of abiotic stresses. The association of such endophytes has not only increased plant biomass but also ameliorated plant-growth during extreme environmental conditions. Endophytic fungi represent a trove of unexplored biodiversity and a frequently overlooked component of crop ecology. The present review describes the role of gibberellins producing endophytic fungi, suggests putative mechanisms involved in plant endophyte stress interactions and discusses future prospects in this field.

  18. Histone variants and chromatin assembly in plant abiotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Dong, Aiwu; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Genome organization into nucleosomes and higher-order chromatin structures has profound implications for the regulation of gene expression, DNA replication and repair. The structure of chromatin can be remodeled by several mechanisms; among others, nucleosome assembly/disassembly and replacement of canonical histones with histone variants constitute important ones. In this review, we provide a brief description on the current knowledge about histone chaperones involved in nucleosome assembly/disassembly and histone variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. We discuss recent advances in revealing crucial functions of histone chaperones, nucleosome assembly/disassembly and histone variants in plant response to abiotic stresses. It appears that chromatin structure remodeling may provide a flexible, global and stable means for the regulation of gene transcription to help plants more effectively cope with environmental stresses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Histone chaperones and chromatin assembly.

  19. An Abiotic Glass-Bead Collector Exhibiting Active Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Youhei; Kanda, Masato; Yamamoto, Daigo; Shioi, Akihisa

    2015-09-01

    Animals relocate objects as needed by active motion. Active transport is ubiquitous in living organisms but has been difficult to realize in abiotic systems. Here we show that a self-propelled droplet can gather scattered beads toward one place on a floor and sweep it clean. This is a biomimetic active transport with loadings and unloadings, because the transport was performed by a carrier and the motion of the carrier was maintained by the energy of the chemical reaction. The oil droplet produced fluctuation of the local number density of the beads on the floor, followed by its autocatalytic growth. This mechanism may inspire the technologies based on active transport wherein chemical and physical substances migrate as in living organisms.

  20. Spectral induced polarization signatures of abiotic FeS precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Doherty, R.; Williams, K. H.

    2010-01-15

    In recent years, geophysical methods have been shown to be sensitive to microbial induced mineralization processes. The spectral induced polarization (SIP) method appears to be very promising for monitoring mineralization and microbial processes. With this work, we study the links of mineralization and SIP signals, in the absence of microbial activity. We recorded the SIP response during abiotic FeS precipitation. We show that the SIP signals are diagnostic of FeS mineralization and can be differentiated from SIP signals from bio-mineralization processes. More specifically the imaginary conductivity shows almost linear dependence on the amount of FeS precipitating out of solution, above the threshold value 0.006 gr under our experimental conditions. This research has direct implications for the use of the SIP method as a monitoring, and decision making, tool for sustainable remediation of metals in contaminated soils and groundwater.

  1. Temporal dynamics of biotic and abiotic drivers of litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Shaw, E Ashley; Wall, Diana H; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Climate, litter quality and decomposers drive litter decomposition. However, little is known about whether their relative contribution changes at different decomposition stages. To fill this gap, we evaluated the relative importance of leaf litter polyphenols, decomposer communities and soil moisture for litter C and N loss at different stages throughout the decomposition process. Although both microbial and nematode communities regulated litter C and N loss in the early decomposition stages, soil moisture and legacy effects of initial differences in litter quality played a major role in the late stages of the process. Our results provide strong evidence for substantial shifts in how biotic and abiotic factors control litter C and N dynamics during decomposition. Taking into account such temporal dynamics will increase the predictive power of decomposition models that are currently limited by a single-pool approach applying control variables uniformly to the entire decay process.

  2. Landrace Germplasm for Improving Yield and Abiotic Stress Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Sangam L; Ceccarelli, Salvatore; Blair, Matthew W; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Are, Ashok K; Ortiz, Rodomiro

    2016-01-01

    Plant landraces represent heterogeneous, local adaptations of domesticated species, and thereby provide genetic resources that meet current and new challenges for farming in stressful environments. These local ecotypes can show variable phenology and low-to-moderate edible yield, but are often highly nutritious. The main contributions of landraces to plant breeding have been traits for more efficient nutrient uptake and utilization, as well as useful genes for adaptation to stressful environments such as water stress, salinity, and high temperatures. We propose that a systematic landrace evaluation may define patterns of diversity, which will facilitate identifying alleles for enhancing yield and abiotic stress adaptation, thus raising the productivity and stability of staple crops in vulnerable environments.

  3. A Chrysanthemum Heat Shock Protein Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Song, Aiping; Zhu, Xirong; Chen, Fadi; Gao, Haishun; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are associated with protection against various abiotic stresses. Here, the isolation of a chrysanthemum cDNA belonging to the HSP70 family is reported. The cDNA, designated CgHSP70, encodes a 647-residue polypeptide, of estimated molecular mass 70.90 kDa and pI 5.12. A sub-cellular localization assay indicated that the cDNA product is deposited in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The performance of Arabidopsis thaliana plants constitutively expressing CgHSP70 demonstrated that the gene enhances tolerance to heat, drought and salinity. When CgHSP70 was stably over-expressed in chrysanthemum, the plants showed an increased peroxidase (POD) activity, higher proline content and inhibited malondialdehyde (MDA) content. After heat stress, drought or salinity the transgenic plants were better able to recover, demonstrating CgHSP70 positive effect. PMID:24663057

  4. Carbon isotopic fractionation of CFCs during abiotic and biotic degradation.

    PubMed

    Archbold, Marie E; Elliot, Trevor; Kalin, Robert M

    2012-02-07

    Carbon stable isotope ((13)C) fractionation in chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds arising from abiotic (chemical) degradation using zero-valent iron (ZVI) and biotic (landfill gas attenuation) processes is investigated. Batch tests (at 25 °C) for CFC-113 and CFC-11 using ZVI show quantitative degradation of CFC-113 to HCFC-123a and CFC-1113 following pseudo-first-order kinetics corresponding to a half-life (τ(1/2)) of 20.5 h, and a ZVI surface-area normalized rate constant (k(SA)) of -(9.8 ± 0.5) × 10(-5) L m(-2) h(-1). CFC-11 degraded to trace HCFC-21 and HCFC-31 following pseudo-first-order kinetics corresponding to τ(1/2) = 17.3 h and k(SA) = -(1.2 ± 0.5) × 10(-4) L m(-2) h(-1). Significant kinetic isotope effects of ε(‰) = -5.0 ± 0.3 (CFC-113) and -17.8 ± 4.8 (CFC-11) were observed. Compound-specific carbon isotope analyses also have been used here to characterize source signatures of CFC gases (HCFC-22, CFC-12, HFC-134a, HCFC-142b, CFC-114, CFC-11, CFC-113) for urban (UAA), rural/remote (RAA), and landfill (LAA) ambient air samples, as well as in situ surface flux chamber (FLUX; NO FLUX) and landfill gas (LFG) samples at the Dargan Road site, Northern Ireland. The latter values reflect biotic degradation and isotopic fractionation in LFG production, and local atmospheric impact of landfill emissions through the cover. Isotopic fractionations of Δ(13)C ∼ -13‰ (HCFC-22), Δ(13)C ∼ -35‰ (CFC-12) and Δ(13)C ∼ -15‰ (CFC-11) were observed for LFG in comparison to characteristic solvent source signatures, with the magnitude of the isotopic effect for CFC-11 apparently similar to the kinetic isotope effect for (abiotic) ZVI degradation.

  5. Stress ecology in fucus: abiotic, biotic and genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Martin; Jormalainen, Veijo; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Coyer, James A; Molis, Markus; Schubert, Hendrik; Dethier, Megan; Karez, Rolf; Kruse, Inken; Lenz, Mark; Pearson, Gareth; Rohde, Sven; Wikström, Sofia A; Olsen, Jeanine L

    2011-01-01

    Stress regimes defined as the synchronous or sequential action of abiotic and biotic stresses determine the performance and distribution of species. The natural patterns of stress to which species are more or less well adapted have recently started to shift and alter under the influence of global change. This was the motivation to review our knowledge on the stress ecology of a benthic key player, the macroalgal genus Fucus. We first provide a comprehensive review of the genus as an ecological model including what is currently known about the major lineages of Fucus species with respect to hybridization, ecotypic differentiation and speciation; as well as life history, population structure and geographic distribution. We then review our current understanding of both extrinsic (abiotic/biotic) and intrinsic (genetic) stress(es) on Fucus species and how they interact with each other. It is concluded that (i) interactive stress effects appear to be equally distributed over additive, antagonistic and synergistic categories at the level of single experiments, but are predominantly additive when averaged over all studies in a meta-analysis of 41 experiments; (ii) juvenile and adult responses to stress frequently differ and (iii) several species or particular populations of Fucus may be relatively unaffected by climate change as a consequence of pre-adapted ecotypes that collectively express wide physiological tolerences. Future research on Fucus should (i) include additional species, (ii) include marginal populations as models for responses to environmental stress; (iii) assess a wider range of stress combinations, including their temporal fluctuations; (iv) better differentiate between stress sensitivity of juvenile versus adult stages; (v) include a functional genomic component in order to better integrate Fucus' ecological and evolutionary responses to stress regimes and (vi) utilize a multivariate modelling approach in order to develop and understand interaction

  6. Abiotic stresses affect Trichoderma harzianum T39-induced resistance to downy mildew in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Roatti, Benedetta; Perazzolli, Michele; Gessler, Cesare; Pertot, Ilaria

    2013-12-01

    Enhancement of plant defense through the application of resistance inducers seems a promising alternative to chemical fungicides for controlling crop diseases but the efficacy can be affected by abiotic factors in the field. Plants respond to abiotic stresses with hormonal signals that may interfere with the mechanisms of induced systemic resistance (ISR) to pathogens. In this study, we exposed grapevines to heat, drought, or both to investigate the effects of abiotic stresses on grapevine resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum T39 (T39) to downy mildew. Whereas the efficacy of T39-induced resistance was not affected by exposure to heat or drought, it was significantly reduced by combined abiotic stresses. Decrease of leaf water potential and upregulation of heat-stress markers confirmed that plants reacted to abiotic stresses. Basal expression of defense-related genes and their upregulation during T39-induced resistance were attenuated by abiotic stresses, in agreement with the reduced efficacy of T39. The evidence reported here suggests that exposure of crops to abiotic stress should be carefully considered to optimize the use of resistance inducers, especially in view of future global climate changes. Expression analysis of ISR marker genes could be helpful to identify when plants are responding to abiotic stresses, in order to optimize treatments with resistance inducers in field.

  7. Abiotic Protein Fragmentation by Manganese Oxide: Implications for a Mechanism to Supply Soil Biota with Oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Patrick N; Chacon, Stephany S; Walter, Eric D; Bowden, Mark E; Washton, Nancy M; Kleber, Markus

    2016-04-05

    The ability of plants and microorganisms to take up organic nitrogen in the form of free amino acids and oligopeptides has received increasing attention over the last two decades, yet the mechanisms for the formation of such compounds in soil environments remain poorly understood. We used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopies to distinguish the reaction of a model protein with a pedogenic oxide (Birnessite, MnO2) from its response to a phyllosilicate (Kaolinite). Our data demonstrate that birnessite fragments the model protein while kaolinite does not, resulting in soluble peptides that would be available to soil biota and confirming the existence of an abiotic pathway for the formation of organic nitrogen compounds for direct uptake by plants and microorganisms. The absence of reduced Mn(II) in the solution suggests that birnessite acts as a catalyst rather than an oxidant in this reaction. NMR and EPR spectroscopies are shown to be valuable tools to observe these reactions and capture the extent of protein transformation together with the extent of mineral response.

  8. Authentic Research Experience and "Big Data" Analysis in the Classroom: Maize Response to Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Makarevitch, Irina; Frechette, Cameo; Wiatros, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Integration of inquiry-based approaches into curriculum is transforming the way science is taught and studied in undergraduate classrooms. Incorporating quantitative reasoning and mathematical skills into authentic biology undergraduate research projects has been shown to benefit students in developing various skills necessary for future scientists and to attract students to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines. While large-scale data analysis became an essential part of modern biological research, students have few opportunities to engage in analysis of large biological data sets. RNA-seq analysis, a tool that allows precise measurement of the level of gene expression for all genes in a genome, revolutionized molecular biology and provides ample opportunities for engaging students in authentic research. We developed, implemented, and assessed a series of authentic research laboratory exercises incorporating a large data RNA-seq analysis into an introductory undergraduate classroom. Our laboratory series is focused on analyzing gene expression changes in response to abiotic stress in maize seedlings; however, it could be easily adapted to the analysis of any other biological system with available RNA-seq data. Objective and subjective assessment of student learning demonstrated gains in understanding important biological concepts and in skills related to the process of science.

  9. Using the Model Perennial Grass Brachypodium sylvaticum to Engineer Resistance to Multiple Abiotic Stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Sean; Reguera, Maria; Sade, Nir; Cartwright, Amy; Tobias, Christian; Thilmony, Roger; Blumwald, Eduardo; Vogel, John

    2015-03-20

    We are using the perennial model grass Brachypodium sylvaticum to identify combinations of transgenes that enhance tolerance to multiple, simultaneous abiotic stresses. The most successful transgene combinations will ultimately be used to create improved switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) cultivars. To further develop B. sylvaticum as a perennial model grass, and facilitate our planned transcriptional profiling, we are sequencing and annotating the genome. We have generated ~40x genome coverage using PacBio sequencing of the largest possible size selected libraries (18, 22, 25 kb). Our initial assembly using only long-read sequence contained 320 Mb of sequence with an N50 contig length of 315 kb and an N95 contig length of 40 kb. This assembly consists of 2,430 contigs, the largest of which was 1.6 Mb. The estimated genome size based on c-values is 340 Mb indicating that about 20 Mb of presumably repetitive DNA remains yet unassembled. Significantly, this assembly is far superior to an assembly created from paired-end short-read sequence, ~100x genome coverage. The short-read-only assembly contained only 226 Mb of sequence in 19k contigs. To aid the assembly of the scaffolds into chromosome-scale assemblies we produced an F2 mapping population and have genotyped 480 individuals using a genotype by sequence approach. One of the reasons for using B. sylvaticum as a model system is to determine if the transgenes adversely affect perenniality and winter hardiness. Toward this goal, we examined the freezing tolerance of wild type B. sylvaticum lines to determine the optimal conditions for testing the freezing tolerance of the transgenics. A survey of seven accessions noted significant natural variation in freezing tolerance. Seedling or adult Ain-1 plants, the line used for transformation, survived an 8 hour challenge down to -6 oC and 50% survived a challenge down to -9 oC. Thus, we will be able to easily determine if the transgenes compromise freezing tolerance. In the

  10. Abiotic regulation: a common way for proteins to modulate their functions.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhi; Fu, Xinmiao

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of protein intrinsic activity in cells is generally carried out via a combination of four common ways, i.e., allosteric regulation, covalent modification, proteolytic cleavage and association of other regulatory proteins. Accumulated evidence indicate that changes of certain abiotic factors (e.g., temperature, pH, light and mechanical force) within or outside the cells directly influence protein structure and thus profoundly modulate the functions of a wide range of proteins, termed as abiotic regulatory proteins (e.g., heat shock factor, small heat shock protein, hemoglobin, zymogen, integrin, rhodopsin). Such abiotic regulation apparently differs from the four classic ways in perceiving and response to the signals. Importantly, it enables cells to directly and also immediately response to extracellular stimuli, thus facilitating the ability of organisms to resist against and adapt to the abiotic stress and thereby playing crucial roles in life evolution. Altogether, abiotic regulation may be considered as a common way for proteins to modulate their functions.

  11. Modeling intrinsic bioremediation for interpret observable biogeochemical footprints of BTEX biodegradation: the need for fermentation and abiotic chemical processes.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Max; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2004-12-01

    The intrinsic bioremediation of BTEX must be documented by the stoichiometric consumption and production of several other compounds, called 'footprints' of the biodegradation reaction. Although footprints of BTEX biodegradation are easy to identify from reaction stoichiometry, they can be confounded by the stepwise nature of the biodegradation reactions and by several abiotic chemical reactions that also produce or consume the footprints. In order to track the footprints for BTEX biodegradation, the following reactions need to be considered explicitly: (1) fermentation and methanogenesis as separate processes, (2) precipitation and dissolution of calcite, (3) precipitation and dissolution of amorphous iron monosulfide (FeS), (4) conversion of FeS into the thermodynamically stable pyrite (FeS2) with loss of sulfide and abiotic formation of H2, and (5) reductive dissolution of solid iron(III) by oxidation of sulfide. We critically review the research that underlies why these mechanisms must be included and how to describe them quantitatively. A companion manuscript develops and applies a mathematical model that includes these reactions.

  12. Plant abiotic stress diagnostic by laser induced chlorophyll fluorescence spectral analysis of in vivo leaf tissue of biofuel species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia-Neto, Artur S.; Silva, Elias A., Jr.; Costa, Ernande B.; Bueno, Luciano A.; Silva, Luciana M. H.; Granja, Manuela M. C.; Medeiros, Maria J. L.; Câmara, Terezinha J. R.; Willadino, Lilia G.

    2010-02-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is exploited to evaluate the effect of abiotic stresses upon the evolution and characteristics of in vivo chlorophyll emission spectra of leaves tissues of brazilian biofuel plants species(Saccharum officinarum and Jatropha curcas). The chlorophyll fluorescence spectra of 20 min predarkened intact leaves were studied employing several excitation wavelengths in the UV-VIS spectral region. Red(Fr) and far-red (FFr) chlorophyll fluorescence emission signals around 685 nm and 735 nm, respectively, were analyzed as a function of the stress intensity and the time of illumination(Kautsky effect). The Chl fluorescence ratio Fr/FFr which is a valuable nondestructive indicator of the chlorophyll content of leaves was investigated during a period of time of 30 days. The dependence of the Chl fluorescence ratio Fr/FFr upon the intensity of the abiotic stress(salinity) was examined. The results indicated that the salinity plays a major hole in the chlorophyll concentration of leaves in both plants spieces, with a significant reduction in the chlorophyll content for NaCl concentrations in the 25 - 200 mM range. The laser induced chlorophyll fluorescence analysis allowed detection of damage caused by salinity in the early stages of the plants growing process, and can be used as an early-warning indicator of salinity stress

  13. Abiotic Stresses Antagonize the Rice Defence Pathway through the Tyrosine-Dephosphorylation of OsMPK6

    PubMed Central

    Kishi-Kaboshi, Mitsuko; Matsushita, Akane; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Goto, Shingo; Takahashi, Akira; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, survive environmental changes by prioritizing their responses to the most life-threatening stress by allocating limited resources. Previous studies showed that pathogen resistance was suppressed under abiotic stresses. Here, we show the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Phosphorylation of WRKY45, the central transcription factor in salicylic-acid (SA)-signalling-dependent pathogen defence in rice, via the OsMKK10-2–OsMPK6 cascade, was required to fully activate WRKY45. The activation of WRKY45 by benzothiadiazole (BTH) was reduced under low temperature and high salinity, probably through abscisic acid (ABA) signalling. An ABA treatment dephosphorylated/inactivated OsMPK6 via protein tyrosine phosphatases, OsPTP1/2, leading to the impaired activation of WRKY45 and a reduction in Magnaporthe oryzae resistance, even after BTH treatment. BTH induced a strong M. oryzae resistance in OsPTP1/2 knockdown rice, even under cold and high salinity, indicating that OsPTP1/2 is the node of SA-ABA signalling crosstalk and its down-regulation makes rice disease resistant, even under abiotic stresses. These results points to one of the directions to further improve crops by managing the tradeoffs between different stress responses of plants. PMID:26485146

  14. Abiotic Stresses Antagonize the Rice Defence Pathway through the Tyrosine-Dephosphorylation of OsMPK6.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Riichiro; Kishi-Kaboshi, Mitsuko; Matsushita, Akane; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Goto, Shingo; Takahashi, Akira; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, survive environmental changes by prioritizing their responses to the most life-threatening stress by allocating limited resources. Previous studies showed that pathogen resistance was suppressed under abiotic stresses. Here, we show the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Phosphorylation of WRKY45, the central transcription factor in salicylic-acid (SA)-signalling-dependent pathogen defence in rice, via the OsMKK10-2-OsMPK6 cascade, was required to fully activate WRKY45. The activation of WRKY45 by benzothiadiazole (BTH) was reduced under low temperature and high salinity, probably through abscisic acid (ABA) signalling. An ABA treatment dephosphorylated/inactivated OsMPK6 via protein tyrosine phosphatases, OsPTP1/2, leading to the impaired activation of WRKY45 and a reduction in Magnaporthe oryzae resistance, even after BTH treatment. BTH induced a strong M. oryzae resistance in OsPTP1/2 knockdown rice, even under cold and high salinity, indicating that OsPTP1/2 is the node of SA-ABA signalling crosstalk and its down-regulation makes rice disease resistant, even under abiotic stresses. These results points to one of the directions to further improve crops by managing the tradeoffs between different stress responses of plants.

  15. Anaerobic transformation of compounds of technical toxaphene. 2. Fate of compounds lacking geminal chlorine atoms.

    PubMed

    Ruppe, Steffen; Neumann, Anke; Braekevelt, Eric; Tomy, Gregg T; Stern, Gary A; Maruya, Keith A; Vetter, Walter

    2004-03-01

    The major toxaphene metabolites in sediment and soils (2-exo,3-endo,6-exo,8,9,10-hexachlorobornane [B6-923] and 2-endo,3-exo,5-endo,6-exo,8,9,10-heptachlorobornane [B7-1001]) were incubated with the isolated gram-negative bacterium Dehalospirillum multivorans. Within 14 d, biotransformation of B7-1001 was nearly quantitative, resulting in two penta- and six hexachlorobornanes, as well as one unsaturated hexachloro compound of technical toxaphene. The major transformation product (approximately 50% of all metabolites) was identified as 2-exo,3-endo,5-exo,8,9,10-hexachlorobornane (B6-903). Abiotic dehydrochlorination of B7-1001 with methanolic KOH resulted in the formation and subsequent identification of the lone unsaturated compound as 2,5-endo,6-exo,8,9,10-hexachloroborn-2-ene. Thus, dehydrochlorination was found to be a minor process of the anaerobic transformation of toxaphene. Biotransformation of 70% of amended B6-923 within 14 d demonstrated that reductive dechlorination was not exclusively associated with geminal Cl atoms, as previously suggested. Three pentachlorobornanes were identified as transformation products, one of which was identical with a transformation product of B7-1001. This commonality unequivocally proves this metabolite to be 2-exo,3-endo,8,9,10-pentachlorobornane. Fifteen previously unknown metabolites of B6-923, B7-1001, and other toxaphene compounds identified in this study were detected in sediment from Lake Ontario (Canada), underscoring the importance of microbial toxaphene transformation in natural, aquatic environments.

  16. Improved Alkane Production in Nitrogen-Fixing and Halotolerant Cyanobacteria via Abiotic Stresses and Genetic Manipulation of Alkane Synthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Hakuto; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to produce alkane. In this study, effects of nitrogen deficiency and salt stress on biosynthesis of alkanes were investigated in three kinds of cyanobacteria. Intracellular alkane accumulation was increased in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120, but decreased in non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 and constant in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica under nitrogen-deficient condition. We also found that salt stress increased alkane accumulation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and A. halophytica. The expression levels of two alkane synthetic genes were not upregulated significantly under nitrogen deficiency or salt stress in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The transformant Anabaena sp. PCC7120 cells with additional alkane synthetic gene set from A. halophytica increased intracellular alkane accumulation level compared to control cells. These results provide a prospect to improve bioproduction of alkanes in nitrogen-fixing halotolerant cyanobacteria via abiotic stresses and genetic engineering.

  17. Improving abiotic reducing ability of hydrothermal biochar by low temperature oxidation under air.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunfeng; Lou, Zhenjun; Yi, Peng; Chen, Junyu; Ma, Xianlong; Wang, Yang; Li, Mi; Chen, Wen; Liu, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhi; Zhang, Jia; Qian, Guangren

    2014-11-01

    Oxidized hydrothermal biochar was prepared by hydrothermal carbonization of Spartina alterniflora biomass (240°C for 4h) and subsequent oxidization (240°C for 10min) under air. Oxidized hydrochar achieved a Fe(III) reducing capacity of 2.15mmol/g at pH 2.0 with 120h, which is 1.2 times higher than un-oxidized hydrochar. Low temperature oxidization increases the contents of carboxyl and carbonyl groups on hydrochar surface. It is supposed that carboxyl groups provide bonding sites for soluble Fe species and carbonyl groups are responsible for Fe(3+) reduction. A Fenton-like process was established with Fe(2+) replaced by oxidized hydrochar and tested for methylene blue (MB) decoloration. Oxidized hydrochar achieved a MB decolorization (200mg/L, pH 7.0) rate of 99.21% within 3h and demonstrates prominent prevail over H2O2 absent control test. This study reveals low temperature oxidization is an effective way to improve and restore abiotic reducing ability of hydrochar.

  18. OsSRO1a Interacts with RNA Binding Domain-Containing Protein (OsRBD1) and Functions in Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shweta; Kaur, Charanpreet; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L.; Sopory, Sudhir K.

    2016-01-01

    SRO1 is an important regulator of stress and hormonal response in plants and functions by interacting with transcription factors and several other proteins involved in abiotic stress response. In the present study, we report OsRBD1, an RNA binding domain 1- containing protein as a novel interacting partner of OsSRO1a from rice. The interaction of OsSRO1a with OsRBD1 was shown in yeast as well as in planta. Domain–domain interaction study revealed that C-terminal RST domain of OsSRO1a interacts with the N-terminal RRM1 domain of OsRBD1 protein. Both the proteins were found to co-localize in nucleus. Transcript profiling under different stress conditions revealed co-regulation of OsSRO1a and OsRBD1 expression under some abiotic stress conditions. Further, co-transformation of both OsSRO1a and OsRBD1 in yeast conferred enhanced tolerance toward salinity, osmotic, and methylglyoxal treatments. Our study suggests that the interaction of OsSRO1a with OsRBD1 confers enhanced stress tolerance in yeast and may play an important role under abiotic stress responses in plants. PMID:26870074

  19. Review of recent transgenic studies on abiotic stress tolerance and future molecular breeding in potato

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Akira; Huynh, Huu Duc; Endo, Tsukasa; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Global warming has become a major issue within the last decade. Traditional breeding programs for potato have focused on increasing productivity and quality and disease resistance, thus, modern cultivars have limited tolerance of abiotic stresses. The introgression of abiotic stress tolerance into modern cultivars is essential work for the future. Recently, many studies have investigated abiotic stress using transgenic techniques. This manuscript focuses on the study of abiotic stress, in particular drought, salinity and low temperature, during this century. Dividing studies into these three stress categories for this review was difficult. Thus, based on the study title and the transgene property, transgenic studies were classified into five categories in this review; oxidative scavengers, transcriptional factors, and above three abiotic categories. The review focuses on studies that investigate confer of stress tolerance and the identification of responsible factors, including wild relatives. From a practical application perspective, further evaluation of transgenic potato with abiotic stress tolerance is required. Although potato plants, including wild species, have a large potential for abiotic stress tolerance, exploration of the factors responsible for conferring this tolerance is still developing. Molecular breeding, including genetic engineering and conventional breeding using DNA markers, is expected to develop in the future. PMID:25931983

  20. Review of recent transgenic studies on abiotic stress tolerance and future molecular breeding in potato.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Akira; Huynh, Huu Duc; Endo, Tsukasa; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    Global warming has become a major issue within the last decade. Traditional breeding programs for potato have focused on increasing productivity and quality and disease resistance, thus, modern cultivars have limited tolerance of abiotic stresses. The introgression of abiotic stress tolerance into modern cultivars is essential work for the future. Recently, many studies have investigated abiotic stress using transgenic techniques. This manuscript focuses on the study of abiotic stress, in particular drought, salinity and low temperature, during this century. Dividing studies into these three stress categories for this review was difficult. Thus, based on the study title and the transgene property, transgenic studies were classified into five categories in this review; oxidative scavengers, transcriptional factors, and above three abiotic categories. The review focuses on studies that investigate confer of stress tolerance and the identification of responsible factors, including wild relatives. From a practical application perspective, further evaluation of transgenic potato with abiotic stress tolerance is required. Although potato plants, including wild species, have a large potential for abiotic stress tolerance, exploration of the factors responsible for conferring this tolerance is still developing. Molecular breeding, including genetic engineering and conventional breeding using DNA markers, is expected to develop in the future.

  1. Toward understanding transcriptional regulatory networks in abiotic stress responses and tolerance in rice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abiotic stress causes loss of crop production. Under abiotic stress conditions, expression of many genes is induced, and their products have important roles in stress responses and tolerance. Progress has been made in understanding the biological roles of regulons in abiotic stress responses in rice. A number of transcription factors (TFs) regulate stress-responsive gene expression. OsDREB1s and OsDREB2s were identified as abiotic-stress responsive TFs that belong to the AP2/ERF family. Similar to Arabidopsis, these DREB regulons were most likely not involved in the abscisic acid (ABA) pathway. OsAREBs such as OsAREB1 were identified as key components in ABA-dependent transcriptional networks in rice. OsNAC/SNACs including OsNAC6 were characterized as factors that regulate expression of genes important for abiotic stress responses in rice. Here, we review on the rice abiotic-stress responses mediated by transcriptional networks, with the main focus on TFs that function in abiotic stress responses and confer stress tolerance in rice. PMID:24764506

  2. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  3. Reading Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    The parents of students who attend Decatur High School thought that there was little hope of their kids going on to college. After a year or so in Decatur's reading program, their sons and daughters were both transformed and college bound. In this article, the author describes how Decatur was able to successfully transform their students. Seven…

  4. A Model of Continental Growth and Mantle Degassing Comparing Biotic and Abiotic Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höning, D.; Hansen-Goos, H.; Spohn, T.

    2012-12-01

    While examples for interaction of the biosphere with the atmosphere can be easily cited (e.g., production and consumption of O2), interaction between the biosphere and the solid planet and its interior is much less established. It has been argued (e.g., Rosing et al. 2006; Sleep et al, 2012) that the formation of continents could be a consequence of bioactivity harvesting solar energy through photosynthesis to help build the continents and that the mantle should carry a chemical biosignature. We present an interaction model that includes mantle convection, mantle water vapor degassing at mid-oceanic ridges and regassing through subduction zones, continental crust formation and erosion and water storage and transport in a porous oceanic crust that includes hydrous mineral phases. The mantle viscosity in this model depends on the water concentration in the mantle. We use boundary layer theory of mantle convection to parameterize the mantle convection flow rate and assume that the plate speed equals the mantle flow rate. The biosphere enters the calculation through the assumption that the continental erosion rate is enhanced by a factor of several through bioactivity and through an assumed reduction of the kinetic barrier to diagenetic and metamorphic reactions (e.g., Kim et al. 2004) in the sedimentary basins in subduction zones that would lead to increased water storage capacities. We further include a stochastic model of continent-to-continent interactions that limits the effective total length of subduction zones. We use present day parameters of the Earth and explore a phase plane spanned by the percentage of surface coverage of the Earth by continents and the total water content of the mantle. We vary the ratio of the erosion rate in a postulated abiotic Earth to the present Earth, as well as the activation barrier to diagenetic and metamorphic reactions that affect the water storage capacity of the subducting crust. We find stable and unstable fixed points in

  5. Identification of Cassava MicroRNAs under Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ballén-Taborda, Carolina; Plata, Germán; Ayling, Sarah; Rodríguez-Zapata, Fausto; Tohme, Joe

    2013-01-01

    The study of microRNAs (miRNAs) in plants has gained significant attention in recent years due to their regulatory role during development and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Although cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is tolerant to drought and other adverse conditions, most cassava miRNAs have been predicted using bioinformatics alone or through sequencing of plants challenged by biotic stress. Here, we use high-throughput sequencing and different bioinformatics methods to identify potential cassava miRNAs expressed in different tissues subject to heat and drought conditions. We identified 60 miRNAs conserved in other plant species and 821 potential cassava-specific miRNAs. We also predicted 134 and 1002 potential target genes for these two sets of sequences. Using real time PCR, we verified the condition-specific expression of 5 cassava small RNAs relative to a non-stress control. We also found, using publicly available expression data, a significantly lower expression of the predicted target genes of conserved and nonconserved miRNAs under drought stress compared to other cassava genes. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis along with condition specific expression of predicted miRNA targets, allowed us to identify several interesting miRNAs which may play a role in stress-induced posttranscriptional regulation in cassava and other plants. PMID:24328029

  6. Wheat proteomics: proteome modulation and abiotic stress acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Kamal, Abu H. M.; Hossain, Zahed

    2014-01-01

    Cellular mechanisms of stress sensing and signaling represent the initial plant responses to adverse conditions. The development of high-throughput “Omics” techniques has initiated a new era of the study of plant molecular strategies for adapting to environmental changes. However, the elucidation of stress adaptation mechanisms in plants requires the accurate isolation and characterization of stress-responsive proteins. Because the functional part of the genome, namely the proteins and their post-translational modifications, are critical for plant stress responses, proteomic studies provide comprehensive information about the fine-tuning of cellular pathways that primarily involved in stress mitigation. This review summarizes the major proteomic findings related to alterations in the wheat proteomic profile in response to abiotic stresses. Moreover, the strengths and weaknesses of different sample preparation techniques, including subcellular protein extraction protocols, are discussed in detail. The continued development of proteomic approaches in combination with rapidly evolving bioinformatics tools and interactive databases will facilitate understanding of the plant mechanisms underlying stress tolerance. PMID:25538718

  7. Pressure Effects on the Abiotic Polymerization of Glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Shohei; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Hiromoto

    2007-06-01

    Polymerization experiments were performed using dry glycine under various pressures of 5 100 MPa at 150°C for 1 32 days. The series of experiments was carried out under the assumption that the pore space of deep sediments was adequate for dehydration polymerization of pre-biotic molecules. The products show various colors ranging from dark brown to light yellow, depending on the pressure. Visible and infrared spectroscopy reveal that the coloring is the result of formation of melanoidins at lower pressures. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses of the products show that: (1) glycine in all the experimental runs oligomerizes from 2-mer to 10-mer; (2) the yields are dependent on pressure up to 25 MPa and decrease slightly thereafter; and (3) polymerization progressed for the first 8 days, while the amounts of oligomers remained constant for longer-duration runs of up to 32 days. These results suggest that pressure inhibits the decomposition of amino acids and encourages polymerization in the absence of a catalyst. Our results further imply that abiotic polymerization could have occurred during diagenesis in deep sediments rather than in oceans.

  8. Soluble sugars—Metabolism, sensing and abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Mariana; Prado, Carolina; Podazza, Griselda; Interdonato, Roque; González, Juan A; Hilal, Mirna

    2009-01-01

    Plants are autotrophic and photosynthetic organisms that both produce and consume sugars. Soluble sugars are highly sensitive to environmental stresses, which act on the supply of carbohydrates from source organs to sink ones. Sucrose and hexoses both play dual functions in gene regulation as exemplified by the upregulation of growth-related genes and downregulation of stress-related genes. Although coordinately regulated by sugars, these growth- and stress-related genes are upregulated or downregulated through HXK-dependent and/or HXK-independent pathways. Sucrose-non-fermenting-1- (SNF1-) related protein pathway, analogue to the protein kinase (SNF-) yeast-signalling pathway, seems also involved in sugar sensing and transduction in plants. However, even if plants share with yeast some elements involved in sugar sensing, several aspects of sugar perception are likely to be peculiar to higher plants. In this paper, we have reviewed recent evidences how plants sense and respond to environmental factors through sugar-sensing mechanisms. However, we think that forward and reverse genetic analysis in combination with expression profiling must be continued to uncover many signalling components, and a full biochemical characterization of the signalling complexes will be required to determine specificity and cross-talk in abiotic stress signalling pathways. PMID:19816104

  9. Institutional Transformation Model

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-19

    Reducing the energy consumption of large institutions with dozens to hundreds of existing buildings while maintaining and improving existing infrastructure is a critical economic and environmental challenge. SNL's Institutional Transformation (IX) work integrates facilities and infrastructure sustainability technology capabilities and collaborative decision support modeling approaches to help facilities managers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) simulate different future energy reduction strategies and meet long term energy conservation goals.

  10. A seed preferential heat shock transcription factor from wheat provides abiotic stress tolerance and yield enhancement in transgenic Arabidopsis under heat stress environment.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Harsh; Khurana, Neetika; Agarwal, Preeti; Khurana, Jitendra P; Khurana, Paramjit

    2013-01-01

    Reduction in crop yield and quality due to various abiotic stresses is a worldwide phenomenon. In the present investigation, a heat shock factor (HSF) gene expressing preferentially in developing seed tissues of wheat grown under high temperatures was cloned. This newly identified heat shock factor possesses the characteristic domains of class A type plant HSFs and shows high similarity to rice OsHsfA2d, hence named as TaHsfA2d. The transcription factor activity of TaHsfA2d was confirmed through transactivation assay in yeast. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaHsfA2d not only possess higher tolerance towards high temperature but also showed considerable tolerance to salinity and drought stresses, they also showed higher yield and biomass accumulation under constant heat stress conditions. Analysis of putative target genes of AtHSFA2 through quantitative RT-PCR showed higher and constitutive expression of several abiotic stress responsive genes in transgenic Arabidopsis plants over-expressing TaHsfA2d. Under stress conditions, TaHsfA2d can also functionally complement the T-DNA insertion mutants of AtHsfA2, although partially. These observations suggest that TaHsfA2d may be useful in molecular breeding of crop plants, especially wheat, to improve yield under abiotic stress conditions.

  11. [Transformation toughening

    SciTech Connect

    Rafa, M.J.

    1993-04-19

    In NiAl, we have succeeded in determining the complete Ginzburg-Landau strain free energy function necessary to model the cubic to tetragonal martensite transformation in a sample of any size. We believe that this is the first time that the parameters of a Ginzburg-Landau functional and the complete strain spinodal for any three-dimensional displacive transformation were used in simulating the transformation near a crack tip under Mode I loading; the transformation pattern and toughening are different from standard transformation toughening theories. Furthermore, the strain spinodal has an approximately conical shape which can be specified by two material dependent experimentally accessible parameters, rather than the ellipsoidal shape in standard theories. Stress induced martensitic transformation in a polycrystalline sample of NiAl was simulated. In the ZrO[sub 2] system, first principles calculations to determine the semi-empirical potentials for simulating the cubic-tetragonal and tetragonal-monoclinic transformations have been started by doing a more elaborate total energy calculation.In the Al[sub 2]0[sub 3] system, we have discovered that the first principles calculations and semi-empirical potentials have just been completed byanother group in England which we will use instead to base our molecular dynamics simulations on.

  12. Reduction and Acetylation of 2,4-Dinitrotoluene by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain.

    PubMed

    Noguera, D R; Freedman, D L

    1996-07-01

    Aerobic and anoxic biotransformation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) was examined by using a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from a plant treating propellant manufacturing wastewater. DNT biotransformation in the presence and absence of oxygen was mostly reductive and was representative of the type of cometabolic transformations that occur when a high concentration of an easily degradable carbon source is present. P. aeruginosa reduced both nitro groups on DNT, with the formation of mainly 4-amino-2-nitrotoluene and 2-amino-4-nitrotoluene and small quantities of 2,4-diaminotoluene. Acetylation of the arylamines was a significant reaction. 4-Acetamide-2-nitrotoluene and the novel compounds 2-acetamide-4-nitrotoluene, 4-acetamide-2-aminotoluene, and 2,4-diacetamidetoluene were identified as DNT metabolites. The biotransformation of 2,4-diaminotoluene to 4-acetamide-2-aminotoluene was 24 times faster than abiotic transformation. 2-Nitrotoluene and 4-nitrotoluene were also reduced to their corresponding toluidines and then acetylated. However, the yield of 4-acetamidetoluene was much higher than that of 2-acetamidetoluene, demonstrating that acetylation at the position para to the methyl group was favored.

  13. Reduction and Acetylation of 2,4-Dinitrotoluene by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, D. R.; Freedman, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    Aerobic and anoxic biotransformation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) was examined by using a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from a plant treating propellant manufacturing wastewater. DNT biotransformation in the presence and absence of oxygen was mostly reductive and was representative of the type of cometabolic transformations that occur when a high concentration of an easily degradable carbon source is present. P. aeruginosa reduced both nitro groups on DNT, with the formation of mainly 4-amino-2-nitrotoluene and 2-amino-4-nitrotoluene and small quantities of 2,4-diaminotoluene. Acetylation of the arylamines was a significant reaction. 4-Acetamide-2-nitrotoluene and the novel compounds 2-acetamide-4-nitrotoluene, 4-acetamide-2-aminotoluene, and 2,4-diacetamidetoluene were identified as DNT metabolites. The biotransformation of 2,4-diaminotoluene to 4-acetamide-2-aminotoluene was 24 times faster than abiotic transformation. 2-Nitrotoluene and 4-nitrotoluene were also reduced to their corresponding toluidines and then acetylated. However, the yield of 4-acetamidetoluene was much higher than that of 2-acetamidetoluene, demonstrating that acetylation at the position para to the methyl group was favored. PMID:16535348

  14. Oxidation, Reduction, and Deoxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Robert

    In this chapter, methods for oxidation, reduction, and deoxygenation of carbohydrates are presented. In most cases, the reactions have been used on aldoses and their derivatives including glycosides, uronic acids, glycals, and other unsaturated monosaccharides. A number of reactions have also been applied to aldonolactones. The methods include both chemical and enzymatic procedures and some of these can be applied for regioselective transformation of unprotected or partially protected carbohydrates.

  15. Reduction of astrographic catalogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, J.; Prugna, F. D.; Cova, J.

    1984-01-01

    An automatic program for the reduction of overlapping Carte du Ciel plates is described. The projection and transformation equations are given and the RAA subprogram flow is outlined. The program was applied to two different sets of data, namely to nine overlapping plates of the Cape Zone of the CdC, and to fifteen plates taken with the CIDA-refractor of the open cluster Tr10.

  16. Differential kinetics and temperature dependence of abiotic and biotic processes controlling the environmental fate of TNT in simulated marine systems.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Mark A; Porter, Beth E; Price, Cynthia L; Pettway, Brad A; George, Robert D

    2011-08-01

    This work seeks to understand how the balance of abiotic and biotic kinetic processes in sediments control the residual concentration of TNT in marine systems after release from ocean-dumped source. Kinetics of TNT disappearance were followed using marine sediments at different temperatures and under both biotic and presumably abiotic conditions (through sodium azide addition). Sediments exhibiting the highest rate of TNT disappearance under biotic conditions also exhibited the highest sorption affinity for TNT under abiotic conditions. Significant temperature dependence in the abiotic processes was observed in the diffusion coefficient of TNT and not sediment sorption affinity. At higher temperature, kinetics of biotic processes outpaced abiotic processes, but at low temperature, kinetics of abiotic processes were much more significant. We concluded that the differential influence of temperature on the kinetics of abiotic and biotic processes could provide distinguishing predictions for the potential residual concentration of TNT contamination in marine-sediment systems.

  17. Triple transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Farrukh I.; Schinn, Dustin S.

    2013-08-01

    A new business plan that enables policy transformation and resource mobilization at the national and international level, while improving access to resources, will allow the Green Climate Fund to integrate development goals and action on climate change.

  18. Regulation of MIR Genes in Response to Abiotic Stress in Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Gébelin, Virginie; Leclercq, Julie; Hu, Songnian; Tang, Chaorong; Montoro, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Increasing demand for natural rubber (NR) calls for an increase in latex yield and also an extension of rubber plantations in marginal zones. Both harvesting and abiotic stresses lead to tapping panel dryness through the production of reactive oxygen species. Many microRNAs regulated during abiotic stress modulate growth and development. The objective of this paper was to study the regulation of microRNAs in response to different types of abiotic stress and hormone treatments in Hevea. Regulation of MIR genes differs depending on the tissue and abiotic stress applied. A negative co-regulation between HbMIR398b with its chloroplastic HbCuZnSOD target messenger is observed in response to salinity. The involvement of MIR gene regulation during latex harvesting and tapping panel dryness (TPD) occurrence is further discussed. PMID:24084713

  19. Regulation of MIR genes in response to abiotic stress in Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Gébelin, Virginie; Leclercq, Julie; Hu, Songnian; Tang, Chaorong; Montoro, Pascal

    2013-09-27

    Increasing demand for natural rubber (NR) calls for an increase in latex yield and also an extension of rubber plantations in marginal zones. Both harvesting and abiotic stresses lead to tapping panel dryness through the production of reactive oxygen species. Many microRNAs regulated during abiotic stress modulate growth and development. The objective of this paper was to study the regulation of microRNAs in response to different types of abiotic stress and hormone treatments in Hevea. Regulation of MIR genes differs depending on the tissue and abiotic stress applied. A negative co-regulation between HbMIR398b with its chloroplastic HbCuZnSOD target messenger is observed in response to salinity. The involvement of MIR gene regulation during latex harvesting and tapping panel dryness (TPD) occurrence is further discussed.

  20. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention.

  1. Mud, Macrofauna and Microbes: An ode to benthic organism-abiotic interactions at varying scales

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic environments are dynamic habitats, subject to variable sources and rates of sediment delivery, reworking from the abiotic and biotic processes, and complex biogeochemistry. These activities do not occur in a vacuum, and interact synergistically to influence food webs, bi...

  2. Improvement of plant abiotic stress tolerance through modulation of the polyamine pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haitao; Chan, Zhulong

    2014-02-01

    Polyamines (mainly putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), and spermine (Spm)) have been widely found in a range of physiological processes and in almost all diverse environmental stresses. In various plant species, abiotic stresses modulated the accumulation of polyamines and related gene expression. Studies using loss-of-function mutants and transgenic overexpression plants modulating polyamine metabolic pathways confirmed protective roles of polyamines during plant abiotic stress responses, and indicated the possibility to improve plant tolerance through genetic manipulation of the polyamine pathway. Additionally, putative mechanisms of polyamines involved in plant abiotic stress tolerance were thoroughly discussed and crosstalks among polyamine, abscisic acid, and nitric oxide in plant responses to abiotic stress were emphasized. Special attention was paid to the interaction between polyamine and reactive oxygen species, ion channels, amino acid and carbon metabolism, and other adaptive responses. Further studies are needed to elucidate the polyamine signaling pathway, especially polyamine-regulated downstream targets and the connections between polyamines and other stress responsive molecules.

  3. Abiotic stress in crops: candidate genes, osmolytes, polyamines and biotechnological intervention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural production and quality are adversely affected by various abiotic stresses including water deficit conditions (drought), salinity, extreme temperatures (heat, cold), light intensities beyond those saturating for photosynthesis and radiation (UVB,C). This is exacerbated when such exposure...

  4. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention. PMID:26904076

  5. Transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Luzinski, Craig

    2011-12-01

    This month, the director of the Magnet Recognition Program® takes an in-depth look at the Magnet® model component transformational leadership. The author examines the expectations for Magnet organizations around this component. What are the qualities that make a nursing leader truly transformational, and what is the best approach to successfully lead a healthcare organization through today's volatile healthcare environment?

  6. Microbial toxicity and characterization of DNAN (bio)transformation product mixtures.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Christopher I; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Alvarez-Nieto, Cristina; Abrell, Leif; Chorover, Jon; Field, Jim A

    2016-07-01

    2,4-Dinitroanisole (DNAN) is an emerging insensitive munitions compound. It undergoes rapid (bio)transformation in soils and anaerobic sludge. The primary transformation pathway catalyzed by a combination of biotic and abiotic factors is nitrogroup reduction followed by coupling of reactive intermediates to form azo-dimers. Additional pathways include N-acetylation and O-demethoxylation. Toxicity due to (bio)transformation products of DNAN has received little attention. In this study, the toxicity of DNAN (bio)transformation monomer products and azo-dimer and trimer surrogates to acetoclastic methanogens and the marine bioluminescent bacterium, Allivibrio fischeri, were evaluated. Methanogens were severely inhibited by 3-nitro-4-methoxyaniline (MENA), with a 50%-inhibiting concentration (IC50) of 25 μM, which is more toxic than DNAN with the same assay, but posed a lower toxicity to Allivibrio fischeri (IC50 = 219 μM). On the other hand, N-(5-amino-2-methoxyphenyl) acetamide (Ac-DAAN) was the least inhibitory test-compound for both microbial targets. Azo-dimer and trimer surrogates were very highly toxic to both microbial systems, with a toxicity similar or stronger than that of DNAN. A semi-quantitative LC-QTOF-MS method was employed to determine product mixture profiles at different stages of biotransformation, and compared with the microbial toxicity of the product-mixtures formed. Methanogenic toxicity increased due to putative reactive nitroso-intermediates as DNAN was reduced. However, the inhibition later attenuated as dimers became the predominant products in the mixtures. In contrast, A. fischeri tolerated the initial biotransformation products but were highly inhibited by the predominant azo-dimer products formed at longer incubation times, suggesting these ultimate products are more toxic than DNAN.

  7. A review of selection-based tests of abiotic surrogates for species representation.

    PubMed

    Beier, Paul; Sutcliffe, Patricia; Hjort, Jan; Faith, Daniel P; Pressey, Robert L; Albuquerque, Fabio

    2015-06-01

    Because conservation planners typically lack data on where species occur, environmental surrogates--including geophysical settings and climate types--have been used to prioritize sites within a planning area. We reviewed 622 evaluations of the effectiveness of abiotic surrogates in representing species in 19 study areas. Sites selected using abiotic surrogates represented more species than an equal number of randomly selected sites in 43% of tests (55% for plants) and on average improved on random selection of sites by about 8% (21% for plants). Environmental diversity (ED) (42% median improvement on random selection) and biotically informed clusters showed promising results and merit additional testing. We suggest 4 ways to improve performance of abiotic surrogates. First, analysts should consider a broad spectrum of candidate variables to define surrogates, including rarely used variables related to geographic separation, distance from coast, hydrology, and within-site abiotic diversity. Second, abiotic surrogates should be defined at fine thematic resolution. Third, sites (the landscape units prioritized within a planning area) should be small enough to ensure that surrogates reflect species' environments and to produce prioritizations that match the spatial resolution of conservation decisions. Fourth, if species inventories are available for some planning units, planners should define surrogates based on the abiotic variables that most influence species turnover in the planning area. Although species inventories increase the cost of using abiotic surrogates, a modest number of inventories could provide the data needed to select variables and evaluate surrogates. Additional tests of nonclimate abiotic surrogates are needed to evaluate the utility of conserving nature's stage as a strategy for conservation planning in the face of climate change.

  8. Spatial metabolic fingerprinting using FT-IR spectroscopy: investigating abiotic stresses on Micrasterias hardyi.

    PubMed

    Patel, Soyab A; Currie, Felicity; Thakker, Nalin; Goodacre, Royston

    2008-12-01

    The release of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) into the environment is an ecologically important topic for study because, whilst APIs have been designed to have a wide range of biological properties for the target of interest (usually in man), little information on potential ecological risks is currently available regarding their effects on the organisms that inhabit the environment. In this study, the algae Micrasterias hardyi was exposed to propranolol, metoprolol (beta-adrenergic receptor agonist drugs) and mefenamic acid (a non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug), at concentrations ranging between 0.002-0.2 mM. Initial studies showed that Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy on algal homogenates illustrated that all three APIs had a quantitative effect on the metabolism of the organisms and it was possible to estimate the level of API exposure from the FT-IR metabolic fingerprints using partial least squares (PLS) regression. From the inspection of the PLS loadings matrices it was possible to elucidate that all drugs caused effects on protein and lipid levels. Most strikingly propranolol had significant effects on the lipid components of the cell. These were dramatically reduced possibly as a consequence of loss of membrane integrity. In order to investigate this further, FT-IR microspectroscopy was used to generate detailed metabolic fingerprinting maps. These chemical maps revealed that all the drugs had a dramatic effect on the distribution of various chemical species throughout the algae, and that all drugs had an affect on protein and lipid levels. In particular, as noted in the PLS analyses for propranolol treated cells, the lipid complement found in the lipid storage areas in the processes of M. hardyi was greatly reduced. This illustrates the power of spatial metabolic fingerprinting for investigating abiotic stresses on complex biological species.

  9. Concentration effects on biotic and abiotic processes in the removal of 1,1,2-trichloroethane and vinyl chloride using carbon-amended ZVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Bradley M.; Lee, Matthew; Bastow, Trevor P.; Wilson, John T.; Donn, Michael J.; Furness, Andrew; Goodwin, Bryan; Manefield, Mike

    2016-05-01

    A permeable reactive barrier, consisting of both zero valent iron (ZVI) and a biodegradable organic carbon, was evaluated for the remediation of 1,1,2-trichloroethane (1,1,2-TCA) contaminated groundwater. During an 888 day laboratory column study, degradation rates initially stabilized with a degradation half-life of 4.4 ± 0.4 days. Based on the accumulation of vinyl chloride (VC) and limited production of 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), the dominant degradation pathway was likely abiotic dichloroelimination to form VC. Degradation of VC was not observed based on the accumulation of VC and limited ethene production. After a step reduction in the influent concentration of 1,1,2-TCA from 170 ± 20 mg L- 1 to 39 ± 11 mg L- 1, the degradation half-life decreased 5-fold to 0.83 ± 0.17 days. The isotopic enrichment factor of 1,1,2-TCA also changed after the step reduction from - 14.6 ± 0.7‰ to - 0.72 ± 0.12‰, suggesting a possible change in the degradation mechanism from abiotic reductive degradation to biodegradation. Microbiological data suggested a co-culture of Desulfitobacterium and Dehalococcoides was responsible for the biodegradation of 1,1,2-TCA to ethene.

  10. Concentration effects on biotic and abiotic processes in the removal of 1,1,2-trichloroethane and vinyl chloride using carbon-amended ZVI.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Bradley M; Lee, Matthew; Bastow, Trevor P; Wilson, John T; Donn, Michael J; Furness, Andrew; Goodwin, Bryan; Manefield, Mike

    2016-05-01

    A permeable reactive barrier, consisting of both zero valent iron (ZVI) and a biodegradable organic carbon, was evaluated for the remediation of 1,1,2-trichloroethane (1,1,2-TCA) contaminated groundwater. During an 888 day laboratory column study, degradation rates initially stabilized with a degradation half-life of 4.4±0.4 days. Based on the accumulation of vinyl chloride (VC) and limited production of 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), the dominant degradation pathway was likely abiotic dichloroelimination to form VC. Degradation of VC was not observed based on the accumulation of VC and limited ethene production. After a step reduction in the influent concentration of 1,1,2-TCA from 170±20 mg L(-1) to 39±11 mg L(-1), the degradation half-life decreased 5-fold to 0.83±0.17 days. The isotopic enrichment factor of 1,1,2-TCA also changed after the step reduction from -14.6±0.7‰ to -0.72±0.12‰, suggesting a possible change in the degradation mechanism from abiotic reductive degradation to biodegradation. Microbiological data suggested a co-culture of Desulfitobacterium and Dehalococcoides was responsible for the biodegradation of 1,1,2-TCA to ethene.

  11. Computation of transform domain covariance matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fino, B. J.; Algazi, V. R.

    1975-01-01

    It is often of interest in applications to compute the covariance matrix of a random process transformed by a fast unitary transform. Here, the recursive definition of fast unitary transforms is used to derive recursive relations for the covariance matrices of the transformed process. These relations lead to fast methods of computation of covariance matrices and to substantial reductions of the number of arithmetic operations required.

  12. Reverse engineering: a key component of systems biology to unravel global abiotic stress cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Friedel, Swetlana; Usadel, Björn; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Sreenivasulu, Nese

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the global abiotic stress response is an important stepping stone for the development of universal stress tolerance in plants in the era of climate change. Although co-occurrence of several stress factors (abiotic and biotic) in nature is found to be frequent, current attempts are poor to understand the complex physiological processes impacting plant growth under combinatory factors. In this review article, we discuss the recent advances of reverse engineering approaches that led to seminal discoveries of key candidate regulatory genes involved in cross-talk of abiotic stress responses and summarized the available tools of reverse engineering and its relevant application. Among the universally induced regulators involved in various abiotic stress responses, we highlight the importance of (i) abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) hormonal cross-talks and (ii) the central role of WRKY transcription factors (TF), potentially mediating both abiotic and biotic stress responses. Such interactome networks help not only to derive hypotheses but also play a vital role in identifying key regulatory targets and interconnected hormonal responses. To explore the full potential of gene network inference in the area of abiotic stress tolerance, we need to validate hypotheses by implementing time-dependent gene expression data from genetically engineered plants with modulated expression of target genes. We further propose to combine information on gene-by-gene interactions with data from physical interaction platforms such as protein-protein or TF-gene networks.

  13. The Arabidopsis PLAT domain protein1 promotes abiotic stress tolerance and growth in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Tae Kyung; Albacete, Alfonso; van der Graaff, Eric; Eom, Seung Hee; Großkinsky, Dominik K; Böhm, Hannah; Janschek, Ursula; Rim, Yeonggil; Ali, Walid Wahid; Kim, Soo Young; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Plant growth and consequently crop yield can be severely compromised by abiotic and biotic stress conditions. Transgenic approaches that resulted in increased tolerance against abiotic stresses often were typically accompanied by adverse effects on plant growth and fitness under optimal growing conditions. Proteins that belong to the PLAT-plant-stress protein family harbour a single PLAT (Polycystin, Lipoxygenase, Alpha-toxin and Triacylglycerol lipase) domain and are ubiquitously present in monocot and dicot plant species. Until now, only limited data is available for PLAT-plant-stress family members, which suggested that these proteins in general could promote tolerance towards stress responses. We studied the function of the Arabidopsis PLAT-plant-stress protein AtPLAT1 employing heterologous gain-of-function analysis in tobacco. AtPLAT1 conferred increased abiotic stress tolerance in tobacco, evident by improved tolerance towards cold, drought and salt stresses, and promoted growth, reflected by a faster development under non-stressed conditions. However, the overexpression of AtPLAT1 in tobacco reduced the tolerance towards biotic stress conditions and, therefore, could be involved in regulating the crosstalk between abiotic and biotic stress responses. Thus, we showed that heterologously expressed AtPLAT1 functions as positive regulator of abiotic stress tolerance and plant growth, which could be an important new asset for strategies to develop plants with improved abiotic stress tolerance, without growth and subsequent yield penalties under optimal growth conditions.

  14. Structure, function and networks of transcription factors involved in abiotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Lindemose, Søren; O'Shea, Charlotte; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Skriver, Karen

    2013-03-13

    Transcription factors (TFs) are master regulators of abiotic stress responses in plants. This review focuses on TFs from seven major TF families, known to play functional roles in response to abiotic stresses, including drought, high salinity, high osmolarity, temperature extremes and the phytohormone ABA. Although ectopic expression of several TFs has improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants, fine-tuning of TF expression and protein levels remains a challenge to avoid crop yield loss. To further our understanding of TFs in abiotic stress responses, emerging gene regulatory networks based on TFs and their direct targets genes are presented. These revealed components shared between ABA-dependent and independent signaling as well as abiotic and biotic stress signaling. Protein structure analysis suggested that TFs hubs of large interactomes have extended regions with protein intrinsic disorder (ID), referring to their lack of fixed tertiary structures. ID is now an emerging topic in plant science. Furthermore, the importance of the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation systems and modification by sumoylation is also apparent from the interactomes. Therefore; TF interaction partners such as E3 ubiquitin ligases and TF regions with ID represent future targets for engineering improved abiotic stress tolerance in crops.

  15. A novel ethylene-responsive factor from Tamarix hispida, ThERF1, is a GCC-box- and DRE-motif binding protein that negatively modulates abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liuqiang; Qin, Liping; Liu, Wenjin; Zhang, Daoyuan; Wang, Yucheng

    2014-09-01

    Ethylene-responsive factor (ERF) family is one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factor that can positively or negatively regulate abiotic stress tolerance. However, their functions in regulating abiotic stress tolerance are still not fully understood. In this study, we characterized the functions of an ERF gene from Tamarix hispida, ThERF1, which can negatively regulate abiotic stress tolerance. The expression of ThERF1 was induced by salinity, PEG-simulated drought and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. ThERF1 can specifically bind to GCC-box and DRE motifs. Overexpression of ThERF1 in transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed inhibited seed germination, and decreased fresh weight gain and root growth compared with wild-type (WT) plants. In addition, the transcript levels of several superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) genes in transgenic plants were significantly inhibited compared with in WT plants, resulting in decreased SOD and POD activities in transgenic plants under salt and drought stress conditions. Furthermore, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and cell membrane damage in ThERF1-transformed plants were all highly increased relative to WT plants. Our results suggest that ThERF1 negatively regulates abiotic stress tolerance by strongly inhibiting the expression of SOD and POD genes, leading to decreased ROS-scavenging ability.

  16. Novel DREB A-5 subgroup transcription factors from desert moss (Syntrichia caninervis) confers multiple abiotic stress tolerance to yeast.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Daoyuan; Li, Xiaoshuang; Guan, Kaiyun; Yang, Honglan

    2016-05-01

    Syntrichia caninervis Mitt. is a typical desiccation tolerant moss from a temperate desert which has been a good resource for stress tolerant gene isolation. Dehydration responsive element binding proteins (DREBs) was proven to play an important role in responding to abiotic stress, which has been identified in many plants, and were rarely reported in moss. In this study, we cloned ten DREB genes from S. caninervis, and investigated their abiotic stress response and stress tolerance. The results showed that ten ScDREB proteins belonged to the A-5 sub-group of the DREB sub-family. Six genes, ScDREB1, ScDREB2, ScDREB4, ScDREB6, ScDREB7, and ScDREB8 were involved in the ABA-dependent signal pathway and the desiccation, salt, and cold stress response. ScDREB3 also responded to desiccation, salt, and cold stresses, but was insensitive to ABA treatment. Another gene, ScDREB5, was involved in an ABA-independent cold stress-responsive signal pathway. Two genes, ScDREB9 and ScDREB10, responded slightly or had no response to neither stress factor or ABA treatment. We transformed four typical genes into yeast cells and the stress tolerance ability of transgenic yeast was evaluated. The results showed that ScDREB3 and ScDREB5 enhanced the yeast's cold and salt tolerance. ScDREB8 and ScDREB10 conferred the osmotic, salt, cold, and high temperature stresses tolerance, especially for osmotic and salt stresses. Our results indicated that A-5 sub-group DREB genes in S. caninervis played important roles in abiotic stresses response and enhanced stress tolerance to transgenic yeast. To our knowledge, this is the first report on DREB genes characterization from desiccation tolerant moss, and this study will not only provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of S. caninervis adaptation to environmental stresses, but also provides valuable gene candidates for plant molecular breeding.

  17. Heterologous expression of Anabaena PCC 7120 all3940 (a Dps family gene) protects Escherichia coli from nutrient limitation and abiotic stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Om Prakash; Kumari, Nidhi; Rai, Lal Chand

    2010-03-26

    This study presents first hand data on the cloning and heterologous expression of Anabaena PCC 7120 all3940 (a dps family gene) in combating nutrients limitation and multiple abiotic stresses. The Escherichia coli transformed with pGEX-5X-2-all3940 construct when subjected to iron, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus limitation and carbofuron, copper, UV-B, heat, salt and cadmium stress registered significant increase in growth over the cells transformed with empty vector under iron (0%), carbon (0.05%), nitrogen (3.7 mM) and phosphorus (2 mM) limitation and carbofuron (0.025 mg ml{sup -1}), CuCl{sub 2} (1 mM), UV-B (10 min), heat (47 {sup o}C), NaCl (6% w/v) and CdCl{sub 2} (4 mM) stress. Enhanced expression of all3940 gene measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR at different time points under above mentioned treatments clearly demonstrates its role in tolerance against aforesaid abiotic stresses. This study opens the gate for developing transgenic cyanobacteria capable of growing successfully under above mentioned stresses.

  18. Psychoanalytic transformations.

    PubMed

    Riolo, Fernando

    2007-12-01

    The author describes how Bion took Freud's conception of dreams as a form of thought and used it as the basis of his theory of transformations. Bion developed an expanded theory of 'dream thought', understood as a process of selection and transformation of sensory and emotional experiences. In this theory, the work of analysis is in turn conceived as a process not only of deciphering symbols, of revealing already existing unconscious meanings, but also of symbol production--of a process for generating thoughts and conferring meaning on experiences that have never been conscious and never been repressed because they have never been 'thought'. Analysis, in its specific operational sense, becomes a system of transformation whereby unconscious somatopsychic processes acquire the conditions for representability and become capable of translation into thoughts, words and interpretations. The rules of transformation applied by the patient in his representations and those applied by the analyst in his interpretations have the same importance for the analytic process as those described by Freud for the process of dreaming. The author discusses the broad categories of transformation adduced by Bion (rigid motion, projective, and in hallucinosis) and introduces some further distinctions within them.

  19. Isolation and characterization of the Agvip1 gene and response to abiotic and metal ions stresses in three celery cultivars.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Chen, Yi-Yun; Wang, Feng; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Jiang, Qian; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2014-09-01

    VIP1, a VirE2-interacting protein 1, specifically interacts with VirE2 and acts as a molecular adaptor in Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. This protein is widely used in plant genetic engineering. In this study, we cloned the Agvip1 gene that encodes the AgVIP1 protein from three celery (Apium graveolens) cultivars, namely, "Liuhe Huangxinqin", "Jinnan Shiqin", and "Ventura". The sequence analysis indicated that the Agvip1 gene from the three celery cultivars contained 768 bp Open Reading Frame and encoded with 255 amino acid residues. The N-terminal of AgVIP1 contained RNA recognition motif superfamily, a conserved domain. The Agvip1 gene in three cultivars had very high homology. The phylogenetic tree of VIP1-like proteins was constructed among celery and other plant species, showing that VIP1-like proteins from Solanum lycopersicum and Solanum tuberosum in Solanaceae had the shortest evolutionary relationship with AgVIP1 from A. graveolens in Apiaceae. Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that the Agvip1 gene had tissue-specific expression, mainly in the celery root. The expression analysis showed that the Agvip1 gene was induced by abiotic stresses differently in three celery cultivars. In "Liuhe Huangxinqin", the Agvip1 gene was up-regulated under hot, cold stresses. In "Jinnan Shiqin", the Agvip1 gene was up-regulated obviously under cold, drought treatments. However, in "Ventura", the Agvip1 gene was up-regulated under salt stress. The Agvip1 was also induced after metal ions treatments in three celery cultivars. These findings will provide more information on the Agvip1 gene and AgVIP1 protein, and enhance the understanding of the Agvip1 gene regulatory mechanisms under abiotic and metal ions stresses in celery.

  20. Over-expression of the apple spermidine synthase gene in pear confers multiple abiotic stress tolerance by altering polyamine titers.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Peng; Pang, Xiao-Ming; Matsuda, Narumi; Kita, Masayuki; Inoue, Hiromichi; Hao, Yu-Jin; Honda, Chikako; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2008-04-01

    An apple spermidine synthase (SPDS) gene (MdSPDS1) was verified to encode a functional protein by the complementation of the spe3 yeast mutant, which lacks the SPDS gene. To justify our hypothesis that apple SPDS is involved in abiotic stress responses and to obtain transgenic fruit trees tolerant to abiotic stresses as well, MdSPDS1-over-expressing transgenic European pear (Pyrus communis L. 'Ballad') plants were created by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A total of 21 transgenic lines showing various spermidine (Spd) titers and MdSPDS1 expression levels were obtained. Selected lines were exposed to salt (150 mM NaCl), osmosis (300 mM mannitol), and heavy metal (500 microM CuSO4) stresses for evaluating their stress tolerances. Transgenic line no. 32, which was revealed to have the highest Spd accumulation and expression level of MdSPDS1, showed the strongest tolerance to these stresses. When growth increments, electrolyte leakage (EL), and values of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were monitored, line no. 32 showed the lowest growth inhibition and the least increase in EL or TBARS under stress conditions. Spd titers in wild-type and transgenic lines showed diverse changes upon stresses, and these changes were not consistent with the changes in MdSPDS1 expressions. Moreover, there were no differences in the sodium concentration in the shoots between the wild type and line no. 32, whereas the copper concentration was higher in the wild type than in line no. 32. Although the mechanism(s) underlying the involvement of polyamines in stress responses is not known, these results suggest that the over-expression of the SPDS gene substantially increased the tolerance to multiple stresses by altering the polyamine titers in pear. Thus, MdSPDS1-over-expressing transgenic pear plants could be used to improve desert land and/or to repair polluted environments.

  1. Investigation of In-situ Biogeochemical Reduction of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater by Reduced Iron Minerals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogeochemical transformation is a process in which chlorinated solvents are degraded abiotically by reactive minerals formed by, at least in part or indirectly from, anaerobic biological processes. Five mulch biowall and/or vegetable oil-based bioremediation applications for tr...

  2. Arsenic Mobilization Influenced By Iron Reduction And Sulfidogenesis Under Dynamic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocar, B. D.; Stewart, B. D.; Herbel, M.; Fendorf, S.

    2004-12-01

    Sulfidogenesis and iron reduction are ubiquitous processes that occur in a variety of anoxic subsurface and surface environments, which profoundly impact the cycling of arsenic. Of the iron (hydr)oxides, ferrihydrite possesses one of the highest capacities to retain arsenic, and is globally distributed within soils and sediments. Upon dissimilatory iron reduction, ferrihydrite may transform to lower surface area minerals, such as goethite and magnetite, which decreases arsenic retention, thus enhancing its transport. Here we examine how arsenic retained on ferrihydrite is mobilized under dynamic flow in the presence of Sulfurosprillum barnesii strain SES-3, a bacteria capable of reducing both As(V) and Fe(III). Ferrihydrite coated sands, loaded with 150 mg kg-1 As(V), were inoculated with S. barnesii, packed into a column and reacted with a synthetic groundwater solution. Within several days after initiation of flow, the concentration of arsenic in the column effluent increased dramatically coincident with the mineralogical transformation of ferrihydrite and As(V) reduction to As(III). Following the initial pulse of arsenic, effluent concentration then declined to less than 10 μ M. Thus, arsenic release into the aqueous phase is contingent upon the incongruent reduction of As(V) and Fe(III) as mediated by biological activity. Reaction of abiotically or biotically generated dissolved sulfide with iron (hydr)oxides may have a dramatic influence on the fate of arsenic within surface and subsurface environments. Accordingly, we examined the reaction of dissolved bisulfide and iron (hydr)oxide complexed with arsenic in both batch and column systems. Low ratios of sulfide to iron in batch reaction systems result in the formation of elemental sulfur and concomitant arsenic release from the iron (hydr)oxide surface. High sulfide to iron ratios, in contrast, appear to favor the formation of iron and arsenic sulfides. Our findings demonstrate that iron (hydr)oxides may

  3. Asymmetric coexistence: bidirectional abiotic and biotic effects between goose barnacles and mussels.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Takashi; Tokeshi, Mutsunori

    2006-07-01

    1. Species coexistence depends on the net effect of interacting species, representing the sum of multiple interaction components that may act simultaneously and vary independently depending on ambient environmental conditions. Consequently, for a comprehensive understanding of the compound nature of species interactions and coexistence, a mechanistic approach that allows a separate evaluation of each interaction component is required. 2. Two sessile filter-feeders, the goose barnacle Capitulum mitella and the mussel Septifer virgatus, coexist on moderately wave-exposed rocky shores in south-western Japan. In the upper intertidal, Capitulum positively influenced Septifer survivorship and growth through amelioration of thermal stress and of physical disturbance. On the other hand, these species are potential competitors as they have similar body sizes and modes of resource utilization. These opposite processes, facilitation and competition, are based on abiotic characteristics and biotic functions of the two species, respectively. 3. In order to quantify the bidirectional abiotic, biotic and net effects, a series of experimental manipulations was conducted involving the use of living neighbours with both abiotic and biotic effects, and artificial mimics to simulate abiotic effects without biotic effects. 4. Capitulum had strong positive abiotic effects on the mussel survivorship in most experimental periods, while the biotic effect was negligible or weakly negative, suggesting that the net effect of Capitulum on mussel survival was largely attributable to the abiotic effect. In contrast, a significantly negative biotic effect on the mussel growth rate was always present, though this was cancelled out by the larger, positive abiotic effect. In the case of Septifer, its abiotic and biotic effects on the survivorship of goose barnacles were negligible, while those on the growth rate showed temporal variation. 5. With respect to the relationship between species

  4. Release of proteins from intact chloroplasts induced by reactive oxygen species during biotic and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Verma, Dheeraj; Jin, Shuangxia; Singh, Nameirakpam D; Daniell, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Plastids sustain life on this planet by providing food, feed, essential biomolecules and oxygen. Such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions require efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus. However, specific factors, especially large molecules, released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have not yet been fully elucidated. When tobacco and lettuce transplastomic plants expressing GFP within chloroplasts, were challenged with Erwinia carotovora (biotic stress) or paraquat (abiotic stress), GFP was released into the cytoplasm. During this process GFP moves gradually towards the envelope, creating a central red zone of chlorophyll fluorescence. GFP was then gradually released from intact chloroplasts into the cytoplasm with an intact vacuole and no other visible cellular damage. Different stages of GFP release were observed inside the same cell with a few chloroplasts completely releasing GFP with detection of only red chlorophyll fluorescence or with no reduction in GFP fluorescence or transitional steps between these two phases. Time lapse imaging by confocal microscopy clearly identified sequence of these events. Intactness of chloroplasts during this process was evident from chlorophyll fluorescence emanated from thylakoid membranes and in vivo Chla fluorescence measurements (maximum quantum yield of photosystem II) made before or after infection with pathogens to evaluate their photosynthetic competence. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion serve as signal molecules for generation of reactive oxygen species and Tiron, scavenger of superoxide anion, blocked release of GFP from chloroplasts. Significant increase in ion leakage in the presence of paraquat and light suggests changes in the chloroplast envelope to facilitate protein release. Release of GFP-RC101 (an antimicrobial peptide), which was triggered by Erwinia infection, ceased after conferring protection, further confirming this export phenomenon. These results suggest a

  5. Abiotic factors affecting the persistence of avian influenza virus in surface waters of waterfowl habitats.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Shamus P; Dalton, Melinda S; Cressler, Alan M; Berghaus, Roy D; Stallknecht, David E

    2014-05-01

    Avian influenza (AI) virus can remain infectious in water for months, and virus-contaminated surface water is considered to be a source of infection within wild waterfowl populations. Previous work has characterized the effects of pH, salinity, and temperature on viral persistence in water, but most of that work was done with modified distilled water. The objective of this study was to identify the abiotic factors that influence the duration of AI virus persistence in natural surface water. Surface water samples were collected from 38 waterfowl habitats distributed across the United States. Samples were submitted to the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory for chemical analysis and the University of Georgia for viral reduction time analysis. Samples were filtered with 0.22-μm filters, and the durations of persistence of three wild-bird-derived influenza A viruses within each water sample at 10, 17, and 28°C were determined. The effects of the surface water physicochemical factors on the duration of AI viral persistence in laboratory experiments were evaluated by multivariable linear regression with robust standard errors. The duration of AI virus persistence was determined to be longest in filtered surface water with a low temperature (<17°C), a neutral-to-basic pH (7.0 to 8.5), low salinity (<0.5 ppt), and a low ammonia concentration (<0.5 mg/liter). Our results also highlighted potential strain-related variation in the stability of AI virus in surface water. These results bring us closer to being able to predict the duration of AI virus persistence in surface water of waterfowl habitats.

  6. Abiotic Factors Affecting the Persistence of Avian Influenza Virus in Surface Waters of Waterfowl Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Melinda S.; Cressler, Alan M.; Berghaus, Roy D.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Avian influenza (AI) virus can remain infectious in water for months, and virus-contaminated surface water is considered to be a source of infection within wild waterfowl populations. Previous work has characterized the effects of pH, salinity, and temperature on viral persistence in water, but most of that work was done with modified distilled water. The objective of this study was to identify the abiotic factors that influence the duration of AI virus persistence in natural surface water. Surface water samples were collected from 38 waterfowl habitats distributed across the United States. Samples were submitted to the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory for chemical analysis and the University of Georgia for viral reduction time analysis. Samples were filtered with 0.22-μm filters, and the durations of persistence of three wild-bird-derived influenza A viruses within each water sample at 10, 17, and 28°C were determined. The effects of the surface water physicochemical factors on the duration of AI viral persistence in laboratory experiments were evaluated by multivariable linear regression with robust standard errors. The duration of AI virus persistence was determined to be longest in filtered surface water with a low temperature (<17°C), a neutral-to-basic pH (7.0 to 8.5), low salinity (<0.5 ppt), and a low ammonia concentration (<0.5 mg/liter). Our results also highlighted potential strain-related variation in the stability of AI virus in surface water. These results bring us closer to being able to predict the duration of AI virus persistence in surface water of waterfowl habitats. PMID:24584247

  7. Abiotic Dissolved Organic Matter-Mineral Interaction in the Karstic Floridan Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, J.; Zimmerman, A.

    2007-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM)-mineral interaction (e.g. adsorption, desorption, mineral dissolution) in groundwater is a significant factor controlling geochemical, environmental and microbial processes and may be helpful in efforts to track groundwater sources or contaminant fate. Despite its importance, the dynamics and consequences of these abiotic interactions remain poorly understood, largely due to the inaccessibility and heterogeneity of the subsurface, as well as the chemical complexity of DOM. This study models the OM-mineral interactions that takes place in the Floridan aquifer through laboratory adsorption-desorption experiments using DOM (groundwater, river water, soil extracts) and carbonate minerals (calcite, dolomite) collected in north Florida. High performance liquid chromatography-size exclusion chromatography (HPLC-SEC) and UV-fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectrophotometry was used to examine the organic compound types exhibiting preferential affinity for carbonate minerals. Our results show that the DOM-carbonate adsorption/desorption isotherms are well described by the Freundlich model. Freundlich exponents (average value: 0.6488) less than one indicated a filling of adsorption sites. Minerals from Ocala tend to have higher adsorption affinity as well as adsorption capacity than those from Suwannee River Basin; however, both were found to have mineral dissolution. Two fluorescent signals, indicative of a fulvic-like (at excitation wavelength 295-310 nm, emission 400-420 nm) and a protein-like (275/345nm) moiety, were detected in DOM. A reduction in the fulvic-like peak intensity occurred following carbonate adsorption while the protein-like peaks remain almost unchanged indicating the preferential adsorption of fulvic acids. HPLC-SEC results (DOM properties as a function of molecular weight) will be discussed. The chemical properties of DOM in environmental groundwater samples will also be presented and evaluated in light of

  8. Reduction and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metal ions using combined zero valent iron and anaerobic bacteria. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Weathers, L.

    1998-06-01

    'Previous research findings indicate that both zero valent iron and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) can yield significant decreases in Cr(VI) or U(VI) concentrations due to abiotic and microbial reduction, respectively. The major hypothesis associated with this research project is that a combined abiotic-biological system can synergistically combine both processes to maximize metal ion reduction in an engineered permeable reactive barrier. The overall goal of this project is to design a combined abiotic/microbial, reactive, permeable, in-situ barrier with sufficient reductive potential to prevent downgradient migration of toxic metal ions. The field-scale application of this technology would utilize anaerobic digester sludge, Fe(O) particles for supporting anaerobic biofilms, and suitable aquifer material for construction of the barrier. Successful completion of this goal requires testing of the two hypotheses listed above by evaluating: (1) the rates of abiotic metal ion reduction, and (2) the rates of microbial metal ion reduction in microbial and combined abiotic/microbial reduction systems under a range of environmental conditions. This report summarizes work after one and one-half years of a three year project. Abiotic studies: The thrust of the abiotic research conducted to date has been to determine the rates of Cr(VI) reduction in batch reactors and to evaluate the role of aquifer materials on those rates. Experiments have been conducted to determine the rates of reduction by Fe(II) and Fe(O). The parameters that have been evaluated are the effect of pH and the presence of sulfide and aquifer material.'

  9. Abiotic Synthesis of Methane Under Alkaline Hydrothermal Conditions: the Effect of pH in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foustoukos, D. I.; Qi, F.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2004-12-01

    Abiotic formation of methane in hydrothermal reaction zones at mid-ocean ridges likely occurs by Fischer-Tropsch catalytic processes involving reaction of CO2-bearing fluids with mineral surfaces. The elevated concentrations of dissolved methane and low molecular weight hydrocarbons observed in high temperature vent fluids issuing from ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, in particular, suggest that Fe and Cr-bearing mineral phases attribute as catalysts, enhancing abiotic production of alkanes. The chemi-adsorption of dissolved CO2 on the catalytic mineral surface, however, might be influenced by a pH dependent surface electron charge developed within the mineral-fluid interface. Thus, a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the role of pH on rates of carbon reduction in fluids coexisting with Fe-oxides at 390 degree C and 400 bars. At two distinct pH conditions, acidic (pH = 5) and alkaline (pH = 8.8), the abiotic production of isotopically labelled CH4(aq) was monitored during FeO reaction with aqueous NaCl-NaHCO3-H2-bearing fluid (0.56 mol/kg NaCl, 0.03 mol/kg NaH13CO3). Despite the lower H2(aq) concentrations (120 mmol/kg) in the high pH system, concentrations of abiogenic methane attained values of 195 umol/kg and 120 umol/kg respectively, suggesting enhanced catalytic properties of mineral under moderately high pH. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), performed on unreacted and final solid products, reveal the significantly greater abundances of alkyl (C-C-) groups on the surface of FeO oxidized at elevated pH, in comparison with mineral reacted at low pH conditions. Thus, enhanced adsorption of dissolved CO2 and the resulting Fischer-Tropsch formation of alkyl groups likely contributes to methane production observed at alkaline conditions. Introducing the effect of pH in the Fischer-Tropsch mechanism of alkane formation has important implications for the recently discovered Lost City ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal system, where elevated p

  10. Hydrogen peroxide priming modulates abiotic oxidative stress tolerance: insights from ROS detoxification and scavenging

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad A.; Bhattacharjee, Soumen; Armin, Saed-Moucheshi; Qian, Pingping; Xin, Wang; Li, Hong-Yu; Burritt, David J.; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son P.

    2015-01-01

    Plants are constantly challenged by various abiotic stresses that negatively affect growth and productivity worldwide. During the course of their evolution, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to recognize external signals allowing them to respond appropriately to environmental conditions, although the degree of adjustability or tolerance to specific stresses differs from species to species. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS; hydrogen peroxide, H2O2; superoxide, O2⋅-; hydroxyl radical, OH⋅ and singlet oxygen, 1O2) is enhanced under abiotic and/or biotic stresses, which can cause oxidative damage to plant macromolecules and cell structures, leading to inhibition of plant growth and development, or to death. Among the various ROS, freely diffusible and relatively long-lived H2O2 acts as a central player in stress signal transduction pathways. These pathways can then activate multiple acclamatory responses that reinforce resistance to various abiotic and biotic stressors. To utilize H2O2 as a signaling molecule, non-toxic levels must be maintained in a delicate balancing act between H2O2 production and scavenging. Several recent studies have demonstrated that the H2O2-priming can enhance abiotic stress tolerance by modulating ROS detoxification and by regulating multiple stress-responsive pathways and gene expression. Despite the importance of the H2O2-priming, little is known about how this process improves the tolerance of plants to stress. Understanding the mechanisms of H2O2-priming-induced abiotic stress tolerance will be valuable for identifying biotechnological strategies to improve abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants. This review is an overview of our current knowledge of the possible mechanisms associated with H2O2-induced abiotic oxidative stress tolerance in plants, with special reference to antioxidant metabolism. PMID:26136756

  11. Transforming Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cookson, Peter W., Jr., Ed.; Schneider, Barbara, Ed.

    The authors in this book address the issues that relate to the crisis in American education and review some of the proposed solutions. To transform education, schools must be examined as social systems that are interrelated with families, communities, and the world of work. Following the introduction, section 1, "Conditions for Educational…

  12. Transformation & Metamorphosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The sculptures of Canadian artist Brian Jungen are a great inspiration for a lesson on creating new forms. Jungen transforms found objects into unique creations without fully concealing their original form or purpose. Frank Stella's sculpture series, including "K.132,2007" made of stainless steel and spray paint, is another great example of…

  13. Transforming Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, C. H.; Feldman, Phillip

    1994-01-01

    Presents comparisons between the traditional curriculum and the essential learnings curriculum implemented at the Moss Point School District in Moss Point, Mississippi. Describes in detail the curriculum transformation process. Provides insight into the role of technology in the reading/language arts curriculum. (RS)

  14. Transformation Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2007-01-01

    The program for the march by librarians on America's capital for the American Library Association (ALA) conference is predictably loaded with lobbying, legislation, and DC tours. It also abounds with professional opportunity and reflects the impact of Leslie Burger, one of the most activist ALA presidents in recent history. Her "Transformation"…

  15. Transformative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2008-01-01

    If you're at all skeptical that "formative assessment" is just another buzzword, then here's a book that will change the way you think about the role that formative assessment can play in transforming education into a more powerful and positive process. Renowned expert W. James Popham clarifies what formative assessment really is, why…

  16. Functional and transcriptome analysis reveals an acclimatization strategy for abiotic stress tolerance mediated by Arabidopsis NF-YA family members.

    PubMed

    Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) is a heterotrimeric complex formed by NF-YA/NF-YB/NF-YC subunits that binds to the CCAAT-box in eukaryotic promoters. In contrast to other organisms, in which a single gene encodes each subunit, in plants gene families of over 10 members encode each of the subunits. Here we report that five members of the Arabidopsis thaliana NF-YA family are strongly induced by several stress conditions via transcriptional and miR169-related post-transcriptional mechanisms. Overexpression of NF-YA2, 7 and 10 resulted in dwarf late-senescent plants with enhanced tolerance to several types of abiotic stress. These phenotypes are related to alterations in sucrose/starch balance and cell elongation observed in NF-YA overexpressing plants. The use of transcriptomic analysis of transgenic plants that express miR169-resistant versions of NF-YA2, 3, 7, and 10 under an estradiol inducible system, as well as a dominant-repressor version of NF-YA2 revealed a set of genes, whose promoters are enriched in NF-Y binding sites (CCAAT-box) and that may be directly regulated by the NF-Y complex. This analysis also suggests that NF-YAs could participate in modulating gene regulation through positive and negative mechanisms. We propose a model in which the increase in NF-YA transcript levels in response to abiotic stress is part of an adaptive response to adverse environmental conditions in which a reduction in plant growth rate plays a key role.

  17. Kinetics of Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation of 6-line ferrihydrite under anaerobic flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Marcus, M.A.; Bargar, J.R.

    2010-04-01

    The readsorption of ferrous ions produced by the abiotic and microbially-mediated reductive dissolution of iron oxy-hydroxides drives a series of transformations of the host minerals. To further understand the mechanisms by which these transformations occur and their kinetics within a microporous flow environment, flow-through experiments were conducted in which capillary tubes packed with ferrihydrite-coated glass spheres were injected with inorganic Fe(II) solutions under circumneutral pH conditions at 25 C. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to identify the secondary phase(s) formed and to provide data for quantitative kinetic analysis. At concentrations at and above 1.8 mM Fe(II) in the injection solution, magnetite was the only secondary phase formed (no intermediates were detected), with complete transformation following a nonlinear rate law requiring 28 hours and 150 hours of reaction at 18 and 1.8 mM Fe(II), respectively. However, when the injection solution consisted of 0.36 mM Fe(II), goethite was the predominant reaction product and formed much more slowly according to a linear rate law, while only minor magnetite was formed. When the rates are normalized based on the time to react half of the ferrihydrite on a reduced time plot, it is apparent that the 1.8 mM and 18 mM input Fe(II) experiments can be described by the same reaction mechanism, while the 0.36 input Fe(II) experiment is distinct. The analysis of the transformation kinetics suggest that the transformations involved an electron transfer reaction between the aqueous as well as sorbed Fe(II) and ferrihydrite acting as a semiconductor, rather than a simple dissolution and recrystallization mechanism. A transformation mechanism involving sorbed inner sphere Fe(II) alone is not supported, since the essentially equal coverage of sorption sites in the 18 mM and 1.8 mM Fe(II) injections cannot explain the difference in the transformation rates observed.

  18. Accessible reactive surface area and abiotic redox reactivity of iron oxyhydroxides in acidic brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehlau, Jennifer H.; Toner, Brandy M.; Arnold, William A.; Penn, R. Lee

    2017-01-01

    The reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in low pH and high ionic strength solutions was quantified to assess abiotic contributions to oxidation-reduction chemistry in acidic brine environments, such as mine groundwater seepage, lakes in Western Australia, and acid mine drainage settings, which are of global interest for their environmental impacts and unique geomicrobiology. Factors expected to influence accessible and reactive surface area, including Fe(II) adsorption and aggregate size, were measured as a function of pH and CaCl2 concentration and related to the kinetics of redox reactions in aqueous suspensions of synthetic goethite (α-FeOOH), akaganeite (β-FeOOH), and ferrihydrite (Fe10O14(OH)2) nanoparticles. Aqueous conditions and iron oxyhydroxides were chosen based on characterization of natural iron-rich mine microbial mats located in Soudan Underground Mine State Park, Minnesota, USA. Quinone species were used as redox sensors because they are well-defined probes and are present in natural organic matter. Fe(II) adsorption to the iron oxyhydroxide mineral surfaces from aqueous solution was measurable only at pH values above 4 and either decreased or was not affected by CaCl2 concentration. Concentrations at or above 0.020 M CaCl2 in acetate buffer (pH 4.5) induced particle aggregation. Assessment of Fe(II) adsorption and particle aggregation in acidic brine suggested that accessible reactive surface area may be limited in acidic brines. This was supported by observations of decreasing benzoquinone reduction rate by adsorbed Fe(II) at high CaCl2 concentration. In contrast, the hydroquinone oxidation rate increased at high CaCl2 concentrations, which may be due to suppressed adsorption of Fe(II) generated by the reaction. Results suggest that iron geochemical cycling in acidic brine environments will be substantially different than for iron oxyhydroxides in low-saline waters with circumneutral pH. These findings have implications for acidic

  19. A NAP-Family Histone Chaperone Functions in Abiotic Stress Response and Adaptation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh Lata

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of gene expression is one of the most significant molecular mechanisms of abiotic stress response in plants. Via altering DNA accessibility, histone chaperones affect the transcriptional competence of genomic loci. However, in contrast to other factors affecting chromatin dynamics, the role of plant histone chaperones in abiotic stress response and adaptation remains elusive. Here, we studied the physiological function of a stress-responsive putative rice (Oryza sativa) histone chaperone of the NAP superfamily: OsNAPL6. We show that OsNAPL6 is a nuclear-localized H3/H4 histone chaperone capable of assembling a nucleosome-like structure. Utilizing overexpression and knockdown approaches, we found a positive correlation between OsNAPL6 expression levels and adaptation to multiple abiotic stresses. Results of comparative transcriptome profiling and promoter-recruitment studies indicate that OsNAPL6 functions during stress response via modulation of expression of various genes involved in diverse functions. For instance, we show that OsNAPL6 is recruited to OsRad51 promoter, activating its expression and leading to more efficient DNA repair and abrogation of programmed cell death under salinity and genotoxic stress conditions. These results suggest that the histone chaperone OsNAPL6 may serve a regulatory role in abiotic stress physiology possibly via modulating nucleosome dynamics at various stress-associated genomic loci. Taken together, our findings establish a hitherto unknown link between histone chaperones and abiotic stress response in plants. PMID:27342307

  20. Soil abiotic factors influence interactions between belowground herbivores and plant roots.

    PubMed

    Erb, Matthias; Lu, Jing

    2013-03-01

    Root herbivores are important ecosystem drivers and agricultural pests, and, possibly as a consequence, plants protect their roots using a variety of defensive strategies. One aspect that distinguishes belowground from aboveground plant-insect interactions is that roots are constantly exposed to a set of soil-specific abiotic factors. These factors can profoundly influence root resistance, and, consequently, the outcome of the interaction with belowground feeders. In this review, we synthesize the current literature on the impact of soil moisture, nutrients, and texture on root-herbivore interactions. We show that soil abiotic factors influence the interaction by modulating herbivore abundance and behaviour, root growth and resistance, beneficial microorganisms, as well as natural enemies of the herbivores. We suggest that abiotic heterogeneity may explain the high variability that is often encountered in root-herbivore systems. We also propose that under abiotic stress, the relative fitness value of the roots and the potential negative impact of herbivory increases, which may lead to a higher defensive investment and an increased recruitment of beneficial microorganisms by the plant. At the same time, both root-feeding herbivores and natural enemies are likely to decrease in abundance under extreme environmental conditions, leading to a context- and species-specific impact on plant fitness. Only by using tightly controlled experiments that include soil abiotic heterogeneity will it be possible to understand the impact of root feeders on an ecosystem scale and to develop predictive models for pest occurrence and impact.

  1. AP2/ERF family transcription factors in plant abiotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Mizoi, Junya; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2012-02-01

    In terrestrial environments, temperature and water conditions are highly variable, and extreme temperatures and water conditions affect the survival, growth and reproduction of plants. To protect cells and sustain growth under such conditions of abiotic stress, plants respond to unfavourable changes in their environments in developmental, physiological and biochemical ways. These responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors. The AP2/ERF family is a large family of plant-specific transcription factors that share a well-conserved DNA-binding domain. This transcription factor family includes DRE-binding proteins (DREBs), which activate the expression of abiotic stress-responsive genes via specific binding to the dehydration-responsive element/C-repeat (DRE/CRT) cis-acting element in their promoters. In this review, we discuss the functions of the AP2/ERF-type transcription factors in plant abiotic stress responses, with special emphasis on the regulations and functions of two major types of DREBs, DREB1/CBF and DREB2. In addition, we summarise the involvement of other AP2/ERF-type transcription factors in abiotic stress responses, which has recently become clear. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant gene regulation in response to abiotic stress.

  2. How plants handle multiple stresses: hormonal interactions underlying responses to abiotic stress and insect herbivory.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy; Rieu, Ivo; Mariani, Celestina; van Dam, Nicole M

    2016-08-01

    Adaptive plant responses to specific abiotic stresses or biotic agents are fine-tuned by a network of hormonal signaling cascades, including abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene, jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid. Moreover, hormonal cross-talk modulates plant responses to abiotic stresses and defenses against insect herbivores when they occur simultaneously. How such interactions affect plant responses under multiple stresses, however, is less understood, even though this may frequently occur in natural environments. Here, we review our current knowledge on how hormonal signaling regulates abiotic stress responses and defenses against insects, and discuss the few recent studies that attempted to dissect hormonal interactions occurring under simultaneous abiotic stress and herbivory. Based on this we hypothesize that drought stress enhances insect resistance due to synergistic interactions between JA and ABA signaling. Responses to flooding or waterlogging involve ethylene signaling, which likely reduces plant resistance to chewing herbivores due to its negative cross-talk with JA. However, the outcome of interactions between biotic and abiotic stress signaling is often plant and/or insect species-dependent and cannot simply be predicted based on general knowledge on the involvement of signaling pathways in single stress responses. More experimental data on non-model plant and insect species are needed to reveal general patterns and better understand the molecular mechanisms allowing plants to optimize their responses in complex environments.

  3. Biotic and abiotic factors predicting the global distribution and population density of an invasive large mammal

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jesse S.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Burdett, Chris L.; Theobald, David M.; Gray, Miranda; Miller, Ryan S.

    2017-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors are increasingly acknowledged to synergistically shape broad-scale species distributions. However, the relative importance of biotic and abiotic factors in predicting species distributions is unclear. In particular, biotic factors, such as predation and vegetation, including those resulting from anthropogenic land-use change, are underrepresented in species distribution modeling, but could improve model predictions. Using generalized linear models and model selection techniques, we used 129 estimates of population density of wild pigs (Sus scrofa) from 5 continents to evaluate the relative importance, magnitude, and direction of biotic and abiotic factors in predicting population density of an invasive large mammal with a global distribution. Incorporating diverse biotic factors, including agriculture, vegetation cover, and large carnivore richness, into species distribution modeling substantially improved model fit and predictions. Abiotic factors, including precipitation and potential evapotranspiration, were also important predictors. The predictive map of population density revealed wide-ranging potential for an invasive large mammal to expand its distribution globally. This information can be used to proactively create conservation/management plans to control future invasions. Our study demonstrates that the ongoing paradigm shift, which recognizes that both biotic and abiotic factors shape species distributions across broad scales, can be advanced by incorporating diverse biotic factors. PMID:28276519

  4. Molecular and physiological responses to abiotic stress in forest trees and their relevance to tree improvement.

    PubMed

    Harfouche, Antoine; Meilan, Richard; Altman, Arie

    2014-11-01

    Abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and cold, are the major environmental stresses that adversely affect tree growth and, thus, forest productivity, and play a major role in determining the geographic distribution of tree species. Tree responses and tolerance to abiotic stress are complex biological processes that are best analyzed at a systems level using genetic, genomic, metabolomic and phenomic approaches. This will expedite the dissection of stress-sensing and signaling networks to further support efficient genetic improvement programs. Enormous genetic diversity for stress tolerance exists within some forest-tree species, and due to advances in sequencing technologies the molecular genetic basis for this diversity has been rapidly unfolding in recent years. In addition, the use of emerging phenotyping technologies extends the suite of traits that can be measured and will provide us with a better understanding of stress tolerance. The elucidation of abiotic stress-tolerance mechanisms will allow for effective pyramiding of multiple tolerances in a single tree through genetic engineering. Here we review recent progress in the dissection of the molecular basis of abiotic stress tolerance in forest trees, with special emphasis on Populus, Pinus, Picea, Eucalyptus and Quercus spp. We also outline practices that will enable the deployment of trees engineered for abiotic stress tolerance to land owners. Finally, recommendations for future work are discussed.

  5. Assessing Utilization and Environmental Risks of Important Genes in Plant Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad S.; Khan, Muhammad A.; Ahmad, Dawood

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic plants with improved salt and drought stress tolerance have been developed with a large number of abiotic stress-related genes. Among these, the most extensively used genes are the glycine betaine biosynthetic codA, the DREB transcription factors, and vacuolar membrane Na+/H+ antiporters. The use of codA, DREBs, and Na+/H+ antiporters in transgenic plants has conferred stress tolerance and improved plant phenotype. However, the future deployment and commercialization of these plants depend on their safety to the environment. Addressing environmental risk assessment is challenging since mechanisms governing abiotic stress tolerance are much more complex than that of insect resistance and herbicide tolerance traits, which have been considered to date. Therefore, questions arise, whether abiotic stress tolerance genes need additional considerations and new measurements in risk assessment and, whether these genes would have effects on weediness and invasiveness potential of transgenic plants? While considering these concerns, the environmental risk assessment of abiotic stress tolerance genes would need to focus on the magnitude of stress tolerance, plant phenotype and characteristics of the potential receiving environment. In the present review, we discuss environmental concerns and likelihood of concerns associated with the use of abiotic stress tolerance genes. Based on our analysis, we conclude that the uses of these genes in domesticated crop plants are safe for the environment. Risk assessment, however, should be carefully conducted on biofeedstocks and perennial plants taking into account plant phenotype and the potential receiving environment. PMID:27446095

  6. Research advances in major cereal crops for adaptation to abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, RK; Satya, Pratik

    2014-01-01

    With devastating increase in population there is a great necessity to increase crop productivity of staple crops but the productivity is greatly affected by various abiotic stress factors such as drought, salinity. An attempt has been made a brief account on abiotic stress resistance of major cereal crops viz. In spite of good successes obtained on physiological and use molecular biology, the benefits of this high cost technology are beyond the reach of developing countries. This review discusses several morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and molecular mechanisms of major cereal crops related to the adaptation of these crop to abiotic stress factors. It discusses the effect of abiotic stresses on physiological processes such as flowering, grain filling and maturation and plant metabolisms viz. photosynthesis, enzyme activity, mineral nutrition, and respiration. Though significant progress has been attained on the physiological, biochemical basis of resistance to abiotic stress factors, very little progress has been achieved to increase productivity under sustainable agriculture. Therefore, there is a great necessity of inter-disciplinary research to address this issue and to evolve efficient technology and its transfer to the farmers’ fields. PMID:25523172

  7. Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Transformations of Cysteine with Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chiheng; Erickson, Paul R; Lundeen, Rachel A; Stamatelatos, Dimitrios; Alaimo, Peter J; Latch, Douglas E; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-06-21

    Cysteine (Cys) plays numerous key roles in the biogeochemistry of natural waters. Despite its importance, a full assessment of Cys abiotic transformation kinetics, products and pathways under environmental conditions has not been conducted. This study is a mechanistic evaluation of the photochemical and nonphotochemical (dark) transformations of Cys in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The results show that Cys underwent abiotic transformations under both dark and irradiated conditions. Under dark conditions, the transformation rates of Cys were moderate and were highly pH- and temperature-dependent. Under UVA or natural sunlight irradiations, Cys transformation rates were enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude compared to rates under dark conditions. Product analysis indicated cystine and cysteine sulfinic acid were the major photooxidation products. In addition, this study provides an assessment of the contributions of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and triplet dissolved organic matter to the CDOM-sensitized photochemical oxidation of Cys. The results suggest that another unknown pathway was dominant in the CDOM-sensitized photodegradation of Cys, which will require further study to identify.

  8. The transition from abiotic to biotic chemistry: When and where?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, J. L.

    2001-12-01

    /product molecules survived long enough to be part of the reaction chain although most researchers who have advanced this scenario favor hydrothermal temperatures. Of the various reactions that have so far been proposed and investigated none have been demonstrated to be autocatalytic. In addition, the reactions are probably not unique to hydrothermal temperatures and would also occur at lower temperatures albeit at slower rates. Based on the estimated Arrhenius activation energies for the synthesis/decomposition reactions of the reactant/product molecules it is likely that they would have been more favorable at lower temperatures. This stability argument is especially important as the autocatalytic reactions advanced to the point of synthesizing informational molecules such as nucleic acids which have very short life times at elevated temperatures. Thus even "metabolic life" as it evolved into biochemistry as we know it would likely only have been feasible if the early Earth was cool. If the transition from abiotic chemistry to biochemistry on the early Earth indeed required cool temperatures, the transition could have occurred during cold, quiescent periods between large bolide impacts. The first life that arose, regardless of the process, may not have survived subsequent bolide impacts, however. Life may have originated several times before surface conditions became tranquil enough for periods sufficiently long to permit the survival and evolution of the first living entities into the first cellular organisms found in the fossil record 3.5 billion years ago. 1. C. Wills and J. L. Bada, 2000. "The Spark of Life: Darwin and the Primeval Soup" (Perseus Publishing, Cambridge MA) 291 pp.

  9. Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Stolz

    2011-06-15

    A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory

  10. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  11. Transformation plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadic, Muamer; Guenneau, Sébastien; Enoch, Stefan; Huidobro, Paloma A.; Martín-Moreno, Luis; García-Vidal, Francisco J.; Renger, Jan; Quidant, Romain

    2012-07-01

    Surface plasmons polaritons (SPPs) at metal/dielectric interfaces have raised lots of expectations in the on-going quest towards scaling down optical devices. SPP optics offers a powerful and flexible platform for real two-dimensional integrated optics, capable of supporting both light and electrons. Yet, a full exploitation of the features of SPPs is conditioned by an accurate control of their flow. Most efforts have so far focused on the extrapolation of concepts borrowed from guided optics. This strategy has already led to many important breakthroughs but a fully deterministic control of SPP modes remains a challenge. Recently, the field of optics was stimulated by a novel paradigm, transformation optics, which offers the capability to control light flow in any desired fashion. While it has already significantly contributed to the design of metamaterials with unprecedented optical properties, its versatility offers new opportunities towards a fully deterministic control of SPPs and the design of a new class of plasmonic functionalities. Here, we review recent progress in the application of transformation optics to SPPs. We first briefly describe the theoretical formalism of transformation plasmonics, focusing on its specificities over its three-dimensional optical counterpart. Numerical simulations are then used to illustrate its capability to tame SPP flows at a metal interface patterned with a dielectric load. Finally, we review recent experimental implementations leading to unique SPP functionalities at optical frequencies.

  12. Harm reduction

    PubMed Central

    Normand, Jacques; Li, Jih-Heng; Thomson, Nicholas; Jarlais, Don Des

    2014-01-01

    The “Harm Reduction” session was chaired by Dr. Jacques Normand, Director of the AIDS Research Program of the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse. The three presenters (and their presentation topics) were: Dr. Don Des Jarlais (High Coverage Needle/Syringe Programs for People Who Inject Drugs in Low and Middle Income Countries: A Systematic Review), Dr. Nicholas Thomson (Harm Reduction History, Response, and Current Trends in Asia), and Dr. Jih-Heng Li (Harm Reduction Strategies in Taiwan). PMID:25278732

  13. Ubiquitination pathway as a target to develop abiotic stress tolerance in rice

    PubMed Central

    Dametto, Andressa; Buffon, Giseli; Dos Reis Blasi, Édina Aparecida; Sperotto, Raul Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses may result in significant losses in rice grain productivity. Protein regulation by the ubiquitin/proteasome system has been studied as a target mechanism to optimize adaptation and survival strategies of plants to different environmental stresses. This article aimed at highlighting recent discoveries about the roles ubiquitination may play in the exposure of rice plants to different abiotic stresses, enabling the development of modified plants tolerant to stress. Responses provided by the ubiquitination process include the regulation of the stomatal opening, phytohormones levels, protein stabilization, cell membrane integrity, meristematic cell maintenance, as well as the regulation of reactive oxygen species and heavy metals levels. It is noticeable that ubiquitination is a potential means for developing abiotic stress tolerant plants, being an excellent alternative to rice (and other cultures) improvement programs. PMID:26236935

  14. In vivo role of nitric oxide in plant response to abiotic and biotic stress.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai-Tao; Li, Rong-Jun; Cai, Wei; Liu, Wen; Fu, Zheng-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2012-03-01

    Over the past few years, nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as an important regulator in many physiological events, especially in response to abiotic and biotic stress. However, the roles of NO were mostly derived from pharmacological studies or the mutants impaired NO synthesis unspecifically. In our recent study, we highlighted a novel strategy by expressing the rat neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in Arabidopsis to explore the in vivo role of NO. Our results suggested that plants were able to perform well in the constitutive presence of nNOS, and provided a new class of plant experimental system with specific in vivo NO release. Furthermore, our findings also confirmed that the in vivo NO is essential for most of environmental abiotic stresses and disease resistance against pathogen infection. Proper level of NO may be necessary and beneficial, not only in plant response to the environmental abiotic stress, but also to biotic stress.

  15. Targeting metabolic pathways for genetic engineering abiotic stress-tolerance in crops.

    PubMed

    Reguera, Maria; Peleg, Zvi; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2012-02-01

    Abiotic stress conditions are the major limitations in modern agriculture. Although many genes associated with plant response(s) to abiotic stresses have been indentified and used to generate stress tolerant plants, the success in producing stress-tolerant crops is limited. New technologies are providing opportunities to generate stress tolerant crops. Biotechnological approaches that emphasize the development of transgenic crops under conditions that mimic the field situation and focus on the plant reproductive stage will significantly improve the opportunities of producing stress tolerant crops. Here, we highlight recent advances and discuss the limitations that hinder the fast integration of transgenic crops into agriculture and suggest possible research directions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant gene regulation in response to abiotic stress.

  16. Integer cosine transform for image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, K.-M.; Pollara, F.; Shahshahani, M.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes a recently introduced transform algorithm called the integer cosine transform (ICT), which is used in transform-based data compression schemes. The ICT algorithm requires only integer operations on small integers and at the same time gives a rate-distortion performance comparable to that offered by the floating-point discrete cosine transform (DCT). The article addresses the issue of implementation complexity, which is of prime concern for source coding applications of interest in deep-space communications. Complexity reduction in the transform stage of the compression scheme is particularly relevant, since this stage accounts for most (typically over 80 percent) of the computational load.

  17. One-electron standard reduction potentials of nitroaromatic and cyclic nitramine explosives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extensive studies have been conducted in the past decades to predict the environmental abiotic and biotic redox fate of nitroaromatic and nitramine explosives. However, surprisingly little information is available on one-electron standard reduction potentials (Eo(R-NO2/R-NO2_)). The Eo(R-NO2/R-NO2...

  18. QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS FOR CHEMICAL REDUCTIONS OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sufficient kinetic data on abiotic reduction reactions involving organic contaminants are now available that quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for these reactions can be developed. Over 50 QSARs have been reported, most in just the last few years, and they ar...

  19. Abiotic dechlorination in rock matrices impacted by long-term exposure to TCE.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Charles E; Towne, Rachael M; Lippincott, David R; Lacombe, Pierre J; Bishop, Michael E; Dong, Hailiang

    2015-01-01

    Field and laboratory tests were performed to evaluate the abiotic reaction of trichloroethene (TCE) in sedimentary rock matrices. Hydraulically conductive fractures, and the rock directly adjacent to the hydraulically conductive fractures, within a historically contaminated TCE bedrock aquifer were used as the basis for this study. These results were compared to previous work using rock that had not been exposed to TCE (Schaefer et al., 2013) to assess the impact of long-term TCE exposure on the abiotic dechlorination reaction, as the longevity of these reactions after long-term exposure to TCE was hitherto unknown. Results showed that potential abiotic TCE degradation products, including ethane, ethene, and acetylene, were present in the conductive fractures. Using minimally disturbed slices of rock core at and near the fracture faces, laboratory testing on the rocks confirmed that abiotic dechlorination reactions between the rock matrix and TCE were occurring. Abiotic daughter products measured in the laboratory under controlled conditions were consistent with those measured in the conductive fractures, except that propane also was observed as a daughter product. TCE degradation measured in the laboratory was well described by a first order rate constant through the 118-d study. Observed bulk first-order TCE degradation rate constants within the rock matrix were 1.3×10(-8) s(-1). These results clearly show that abiotic dechlorination of TCE is occurring within the rock matrix, despite decades of exposure to TCE. Furthermore, these observed rates of TCE dechlorination are expected to have a substantial impact on TCE migration and uptake/release from rock matrices.

  20. Attachment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to abiotic surfaces of cooking utensils.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Makiko; Yokoigawa, Kumio

    2012-04-01

    We examined the attachment of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 to abiotic surfaces of cooking utensils. When the cell suspension in 0.85% NaCl (about 100 cells/mL, 10 mL) was contacted with various abiotic surfaces (square pieces, 25 cm²) at 25 °C for 20 min, the number of attached cells varied depending on the types of abiotic materials. The pathogen well attached to stainless steel (about 50 cells/25 cm²), pure titanium (35 to 45 cells/25 cm²), and glass (about 20 cells/25 cm²), but little attached to aluminum foil and plastics, irrespective of strains used. Fewer cells (below 10 cells/25 cm²) attached to stainless steel, pure titanium, and glass surfaces conditioned with aseptically sliced beef (sirloin) and autoclaved beef tallow at 25 °C for 20 min, but bovine serum albumin did not reduce the number of attached cells. The cells grown at 15 °C to the stationary phase (OD660 = about 2.8) less attached to the abiotic surfaces than those grown at 25 °C and 37 °C. When we pretreated the cells at 37 °C for 2 h with 50 μM N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (HHL), the number of cells attached to stainless steel was reduced by 70%. The number of cells attached to cooking utensils seemed to change depending on types of abiotic materials, adhesion of beef tallow to abiotic surfaces, growth temperature of the pathogen, and HHL-producing bacteria.

  1. Regulatory roles of serotonin and melatonin in abiotic stress tolerance in plants

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harmeet; Mukherjee, Soumya; Baluska, Frantisek; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the physiological and biochemical basis of abiotic stress tolerance in plants has always been one of the major aspects of research aiming to enhance plant productivity in arid and semi-arid cultivated lands all over the world. Growth of stress-tolerant transgenic crops and associated agricultural benefits through increased productivity, and related ethical issues, are also the major concerns of current research in various laboratories. Interesting data on the regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in plants by serotonin and melatonin has accumulated in the recent past. These two indoleamines possess antioxidative and growth-inducing properties, thus proving beneficial for stress acclimatization. Present review shall focus on the modes of serotonin and melatonin-induced regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Complex molecular interactions of serotonin and auxin-responsive genes have suggested their antagonistic nature. Data from genomic and metabolomic analyses of melatonin-induced abiotic stress signaling have lead to an understanding of the regulation of stress tolerance through the modulation of transcription factors, enzymes and various signaling molecules. Melatonin, nitric oxide (NO) and calmodulin interactions have provided new avenues for research on the molecular aspects of stress physiology in plants. Investigations on the characterization of receptors associated with serotonin and melatonin responses, are yet to be undertaken in plants. Patenting of biotechnological inventions pertaining to serotonin and melatonin formulations (through soil application or foliar spray) are expected to be some of the possible ways to regulate abiotic stress tolerance in plants. The present review, thus, summarizes the regulatory roles of serotonin and melatonin in modulating the signaling events accompanying abiotic stress in plants. PMID:26633566

  2. Regulatory roles of serotonin and melatonin in abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harmeet; Mukherjee, Soumya; Baluska, Frantisek; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the physiological and biochemical basis of abiotic stress tolerance in plants has always been one of the major aspects of research aiming to enhance plant productivity in arid and semi-arid cultivated lands all over the world. Growth of stress-tolerant transgenic crops and associated agricultural benefits through increased productivity, and related ethical issues, are also the major concerns of current research in various laboratories. Interesting data on the regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in plants by serotonin and melatonin has accumulated in the recent past. These two indoleamines possess antioxidative and growth-inducing properties, thus proving beneficial for stress acclimatization. Present review shall focus on the modes of serotonin and melatonin-induced regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Complex molecular interactions of serotonin and auxin-responsive genes have suggested their antagonistic nature. Data from genomic and metabolomic analyses of melatonin-induced abiotic stress signaling have lead to an understanding of the regulation of stress tolerance through the modulation of transcription factors, enzymes and various signaling molecules. Melatonin, nitric oxide (NO) and calmodulin interactions have provided new avenues for research on the molecular aspects of stress physiology in plants. Investigations on the characterization of receptors associated with serotonin and melatonin responses, are yet to be undertaken in plants. Patenting of biotechnological inventions pertaining to serotonin and melatonin formulations (through soil application or foliar spray) are expected to be some of the possible ways to regulate abiotic stress tolerance in plants. The present review, thus, summarizes the regulatory roles of serotonin and melatonin in modulating the signaling events accompanying abiotic stress in plants.

  3. EsDREB2B, a novel truncated DREB2-type transcription factor in the desert legume Eremosparton songoricum, enhances tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in yeast and transgenic tobacco

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dehydration-Responsive Element-Binding Protein2 (DREB2) is a transcriptional factor which regulates the expression of several stress-inducible genes. DREB2-type proteins are particularly important in plant responses to drought, salt and heat. DREB2 genes have been identified and characterized in a variety of plants, and DREB2 genes are promising candidate genes for the improvement of stress tolerance in plants. However, little is known about these genes in plants adapted to water-limiting environments. Results In this study, we describe the characterization of EsDREB2B, a novel DREB2B gene identified from the desert plant Eremosparton songoricum. Phylogenetic analysis and motif prediction indicate that EsDREB2B encodes a truncated DREB2 polypeptide that belongs to a legume-specific DREB2 group. In E. songoricum, EsDREB2B transcript accumulation was induced by a variety of abiotic stresses, including drought, salinity, cold, heat, heavy metal, mechanical wounding, oxidative stress and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. Consistent with the predicted role as a transcription factor, EsDREB2B was targeted to the nucleus of onion epidermal cells and exhibited transactivation activity of a GAL4-containing reporter gene in yeast. In transgenic yeast, overexpression of EsDREB2B increased tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses. Our findings indicate that EsDREB2B can enhance stress tolerance in other plant species. Heterologous expression of EsDREB2B in tobacco showed improved tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, and the transgenic plants exhibited no reduction in foliar growth. We observed that EsDREB2B is a functional DREB2-orthologue able to influence the physiological and biochemical response of transgenic tobacco to stress. Conclusions Based upon these findings, EsDREB2B encodes an abiotic stress-inducible, transcription factor which confers abiotic stress-tolerance in yeast and transgenic tobacco. PMID:24506952

  4. Waste Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Marilyn; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that focus on waste reduction in the school and community. The ideas are divided into grade level categories. Sample activities include Techno-Trash, where children use tools to take apart broken appliances or car parts, then reassemble them or build new creations. Activities are suggested for areas including language arts and…

  5. [Relationship between antophyte foliar morphology and abiotic factors in the main rainforests of Eastern Cuba].

    PubMed

    Quesada, Eddy Martínez

    2009-01-01

    Relationship between antophyte foliar morphology and abiotic factors in the main rainforests of Eastern Cuba. The foliar morphology of representative antophytes in four rainforest types of Eastern Cuba was studied in relation to the main abiotic factors. Although there are several leaf types in these forests, the microphyll type is the most important among endemic species in the ophiolites complex and the Montane rainforest. At the Lowland rainforest (metamorphic complex) the mesophyll leaf was the most important. Most foliar epidermis had structures normally found in mesomorphic plants, but xeromorphic and higromorphic morphologies were also present.

  6. The soybean GmbZIP1 transcription factor enhances multiple abiotic stress tolerances in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shi-Qing; Chen, Ming; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Zhao, Chang-Ping; Li, Liancheng; Xu, Hui-jun; Tang, Yi-miao; Zhao, Xin; Ma, You-Zhi

    2011-04-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive element binding proteins (AREBs) are basic domain/leucine zipper transcription factors that bind to the ABA-responsive element (ABRE) in the promoter regions of ABA-inducible genes in plants. A novel bZIP transcription factor gene, GmbZIP1, encoding 438 amino acids with a conserved bZIP domain composed of 60 amino acids was isolated from salt-tolerant soybean cv. Tiefeng 8. Southern blotting showed that only one copy was present in the soybean genome. Phylogenetic analyses showed that GmbZIP1 belonged to the AREB subfamily of the bZIP family and was most closely related to AtABF2 and OsTRAB1. The expression of GmbZIP1 was highly induced by ABA, drought, high salt and low temperature; and GmbZIP1 was expressed in soybean roots, stems and leaves under different stress conditions. GmbZIP1 was localized inside the nuclei of transformed onion epidermal cells. Overexpression of GmbZIP1 enhanced the responses of transgenic plants to ABA and triggered stomatal closure under stresses, potentially leading to improved tolerances to several abiotic stresses such as high salt, low temperature and drought in transgenic plants. Furthermore, overexpression of GmbZIP1 affected the expression of some ABA or stress-related genes involved in regulating stomatal closure in Arabidopsis under ABA, drought and high salt stress conditions. A few AREB elements were detected in the promoter region of those ABA or stress-related genes, suggesting that GmbZIP1 regulates the ABA response or stomatal closure mediated by those downstream genes in transgenic Arabidopsis. Moreover, GmbZIP1 was used to improve the drought tolerance trait of Chinese wheat varieties BS93. Functional analysis showed that overexpression of GmbZIP1 enhanced the drought tolerance of transgenic wheat, and transcripts of GmbZIP1 were detected in transgenic wheat using RT-PCR. In addition, GmbZIP1 overexpression did not result in growth retardation in all transgenic plants, suggesting that Gmb

  7. Hamlet's Transformation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, P. D.

    1997-12-01

    William Shakespeare's Hamlet has much evidence to suggest that the Bard was aware of the cosmological models of his time, specifically the geocentric bounded Ptolemaic and Tychonic models, and the infinite Diggesian. Moreover, Shakespeare describes how the Ptolemaic model is to be transformed to the Diggesian. Hamlet's "transformation" is the reason that Claudius, who personifies the Ptolemaic model, summons Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, who personify the Tychonic. Pantometria, written by Leonard Digges and his son Thomas in 1571, contains the first technical use of the word "transformation." At age thirty, Thomas Digges went on to propose his Perfit Description, as alluded to in Act Five where Hamlet's age is given as thirty. In Act Five as well, the words "bore" and "arms" refer to Thomas' vocation as muster-master and his scientific interest in ballistics. England's leading astronomer was also the father of the poet whose encomium introduced the First Folio of 1623. His oldest child Dudley became a member of the Virginia Company and facilitated the writing of The Tempest. Taken as a whole, such manifold connections to Thomas Digges support Hotson's contention that Shakespeare knew the Digges family. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern in Hamlet bear Danish names because they personify the Danish model, while the king's name is latinized like that of Claudius Ptolemaeus. The reason Shakespeare anglicized "Amleth" to "Hamlet" was because he saw a parallel between Book Three of Saxo Grammaticus and the eventual triumph of the Diggesian model. But Shakespeare eschewed Book Four, creating this particular ending from an infinity of other possibilities because it "suited his purpose," viz. to celebrate the concept of a boundless universe of stars like the Sun.

  8. Rotary Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLyman, Colonel Wm. T.

    1996-01-01

    None given. From first Par: Many spacecraft (S/C) and surface rovers require the transfer of signals and power across rotating interfaces. Science instruments, antennas and solar arrays are elements needing rotary power transfer for certain (S/C) configurations. Delivery of signal and power has mainly been done by using the simplest means, the slip ring approach. This approach, although simple, leaves debris generating noise over a period of time...The rotary transformer is a good alternative to slip rings for signal and power transfer.

  9. TRANSFORMER APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Wolfgang, F.; Nicol, J.

    1962-11-01

    Transformer apparatus is designed for measuring the amount of a paramagnetic substance dissolved or suspended in a diamagnetic liquid. The apparatus consists of a cluster of tubes, some of which are closed and have sealed within the diamagnetic substance without any of the paramagnetic material. The remaining tubes are open to flow of the mix- ture. Primary and secondary conductors are wrapped around the tubes in such a way as to cancel noise components and also to produce a differential signal on the secondaries based upon variations of the content of the paramagnetic material. (AEC)

  10. Biotic conversion of sulphate to sulphide and abiotic conversion of sulphide to sulphur in a microbial fuel cell using cobalt oxide octahedrons as cathode catalyst.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Pritha; Ghangrekar, M M; Rao, Surampalli; Kumar, Senthil

    2017-02-08

    Varying chemical oxygen demand (COD) and sulphate concentrations in substrate were used to determine reaction kinetics and mass balance of organic matter and sulphate transformation in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). MFC with anodic chamber volume of 1 L, fed with wastewater having COD of 500 mg/L and sulphate of 200 mg/L, could harvest power of 54.4 mW/m(2), at a Coulombic efficiency of 14%, with respective COD and sulphate removals of 90 and 95%. Sulphide concentration, even up to 1500 mg/L, did not inhibit anodic biochemical reactions, due to instantaneous abiotic oxidation to sulphur, at high inlet sulphate. Experiments on abiotic oxidation of sulphide to sulphur revealed maximum oxidation taking place at an anodic potential of -200 mV. More than 99% sulphate removal could be achieved in a MFC with inlet COD/sulphate of 0.75, giving around 1.33 kg/m(3) day COD removal. Bioelectrochemical conversion of sulphate facilitating sulphur recovery in a MFC makes it an interesting pollution abatement technique.

  11. Integrating ecology and physiology of root-hemiparasitic interaction: interactive effects of abiotic resources shape the interplay between parasitism and autotrophy.

    PubMed

    Těšitel, Jakub; Těšitelová, Tamara; Fisher, James P; Lepš, Jan; Cameron, Duncan D

    2015-01-01

    Root hemiparasites are green photosynthetic plants, which parasitically acquire resources from host xylem. Mineral nutrients and water, two principal below-ground abiotic resources, were assumed to affect the interaction between hemiparasites and their hosts. The shape of these effects and the underlying physiological mechanisms have, however, remained unclear. We conducted a glasshouse experiment with root-hemiparasitic Rhinanthus alectorolophus, in which we manipulated the availability of mineral nutrients and water. Biomass production and Chl fluorescence of the hemiparasites and hosts were recorded, together with proportion of host-derived carbon in hemiparasite biomass. The abiotic resources had profound interactive effects on the performance of both the hemiparasite and the hosts, as well as the balance of above-ground biomass between them. These effects were mainly based on an increase of growth and photosynthetic efficiency under high nutrient concentrations, on the hemiparasite's ability to induce strong water stress on the hosts if water is limiting, and on release of the host from parasitism by simultaneous abundance of both resources. Hemiparasitism is a highly variable interaction, in which environmental conditions affect both the parasitic and autotrophic (and thus competitive) components. A hemiparasite's own photosynthesis plays a crucial role in the assimilation of parasitized mineral resources and their transformation into growth and fitness.

  12. Reduction Corporoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hakky, Tariq S.; Martinez, Daniel; Yang, Christopher; Carrion, Rafael E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Here we present the first video demonstration of reduction corporoplasty in the management of phallic disfigurement in a 17 year old man with a history sickle cell disease and priapism. Introduction Surgical management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora has yet to be defined in the literature. Materials and Methods: We preformed bilateral elliptical incisions over the lateral corpora as management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora to correct phallic disfigurement. Results The patient tolerated the procedure well and has resolution of his corporal disfigurement. Conclusions Reduction corporoplasty using bilateral lateral elliptical incisions in the management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora is a safe an feasible operation in the management of phallic disfigurement. PMID:26005988

  13. Nitrate reduction

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  14. Glycinebetaine accumulation is more effective in chloroplasts than in the cytosol for protecting transgenic tomato plants against abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Park, Eung-Jun; Jeknić, Zoran; Pino, María-Teresa; Murata, Norio; Chen, Tony Hwei-Hwang

    2007-08-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Moneymaker) plants were transformed with a gene for choline oxidase (codA) from Arthrobacter globiformis. The gene product (CODA) was targeted to the chloroplasts (Chl-codA), cytosol (Cyt-codA) or both compartments simultaneously (ChlCyt-codA). These three transgenic plant types accumulated different amounts and proportions of glycinebetaine (GB) in their chloroplasts and cytosol. Targeting CODA to either the cytosol or both compartments simultaneously increased total GB content by five- to sixfold over that measured from the chloroplast targeted lines. Accumulation of GB in codA transgenic plants was tissue dependent, with the highest levels being recorded in reproductive organs. Despite accumulating, the lowest amounts of GB, Chl-codA plants exhibited equal or higher degrees of enhanced tolerance to various abiotic stresses. This suggests that chloroplastic GB is more effective than cytosolic GB in protecting plant cells against chilling, high salt and oxidative stresses. Chloroplastic GB levels were positively correlated with the degree of oxidative stress tolerance conferred, whereas cytosolic GB showed no such a correlation. Thus, an increase in total GB content does not necessarily lead to enhanced stress tolerance, but additional accumulation of chloroplastic GB is likely to further raise the level of stress tolerance beyond what we have observed.

  15. Authentic Research Experience and “Big Data” Analysis in the Classroom: Maize Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Makarevitch, Irina; Frechette, Cameo; Wiatros, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Integration of inquiry-based approaches into curriculum is transforming the way science is taught and studied in undergraduate classrooms. Incorporating quantitative reasoning and mathematical skills into authentic biology undergraduate research projects has been shown to benefit students in developing various skills necessary for future scientists and to attract students to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines. While large-scale data analysis became an essential part of modern biological research, students have few opportunities to engage in analysis of large biological data sets. RNA-seq analysis, a tool that allows precise measurement of the level of gene expression for all genes in a genome, revolutionized molecular biology and provides ample opportunities for engaging students in authentic research. We developed, implemented, and assessed a series of authentic research laboratory exercises incorporating a large data RNA-seq analysis into an introductory undergraduate classroom. Our laboratory series is focused on analyzing gene expression changes in response to abiotic stress in maize seedlings; however, it could be easily adapted to the analysis of any other biological system with available RNA-seq data. Objective and subjective assessment of student learning demonstrated gains in understanding important biological concepts and in skills related to the process of science. PMID:26163561

  16. A barley homolog of yeast ATG6 is involved in multiple abiotic stress responses and stress resistance regulation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaowei; Zeng, Zhanghui; Liu, Cuicui; Yuan, Weiyi; Hou, Ning; Bian, Hongwu; Zhu, Muyuan; Han, Ning

    2017-03-19

    Autophagy is a highly conserved degradation pathway among eukaryote cells, which can recycle damaged or unwanted cell materials upon encountering stress conditions. As a key component of the Class III PI3K kinase complex, ATG6/Beclin-1 is essential for autophagosome formation. In this study, we isolated a putative HvATG6 gene in barley genome. The protein encoded by HvATG6 shares high sequence identity to ATG6 orthologs in rice and wheat, and has a typical autophagy-specific domain containing segments of repeated β-sheet-α-helix. The expression of HvATG6 protein restored the appearance of autophagosomes in yeast atg6 mutant, indicating that HvATG6 complements the deficiency of yeast ATG6 protein in autophagy. Punctate florescence signals, considered as the PAS for autophagosome initiation, were observed in the cytoplasm of cells when HvATG6-GFP fusion construct was transformed into barley protoplast. Furthermore, the expression of HvATG6 was upregulated by various abiotic stresses including dark, H2O2 treatment, nitrogen deficiency, high salinity, drought, low temperature and toxic aluminum. Knockdown of HvATG6 in barley leaves through barley strip mosaic virus (BSMV)-induced gene silencing led to accelerated yellowing under dark and H2O2 treatments. Based on the above findings, we propose that barley ATG6 plays the similar role as other plant ATG6 orthologs, and might be involved in stress-induced autophagy process.

  17. Sterility Caused by Floral Organ Degeneration and Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis and Cereal Grains

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ashley R.; Zhao, Dazhong

    2016-01-01

    Natural floral organ degeneration or abortion results in unisexual or fully sterile flowers, while abiotic stresses lead to sterility after initiation of floral reproductive organs. Since normal flower development is essential for plant sexual reproduction and crop yield, it is imperative to have a better understanding of plant sterility under regular and stress conditions. Here, we review the functions of ABC genes together with their downstream genes in floral organ degeneration and the formation of unisexual flowers in Arabidopsis and several agriculturally significant cereal grains. We further explore the roles of hormones, including auxin, brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid, gibberellic acid, and ethylene, in floral organ formation and fertility. We show that alterations in genes affecting hormone biosynthesis, hormone transport and perception cause loss of stamens/carpels, abnormal floral organ development, poor pollen production, which consequently result in unisexual flowers and male/female sterility. Moreover, abiotic stresses, such as heat, cold, and drought, commonly affect floral organ development and fertility. Sterility is induced by abiotic stresses mostly in male floral organ development, particularly during meiosis, tapetum development, anthesis, dehiscence, and fertilization. A variety of genes including those involved in heat shock, hormone signaling, cold tolerance, metabolisms of starch and sucrose, meiosis, and tapetum development are essential for plants to maintain normal fertility under abiotic stress conditions. Further elucidation of cellular, biochemical, and molecular mechanisms about regulation of fertility will improve yield and quality for many agriculturally valuable crops. PMID:27790226

  18. Abiotic stresses activate a MAPkinase in the model grass species Lolium temulentum L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage and turf grasses are utilized in diverse environments which exposes them to a variety of abiotic stresses, however very little is known concerning the perception or molecular responses to these various stresses. In the model grass species Lolium temulentum (Lt), a 46 kDa mitogen-activated pro...

  19. miRNAs: Major modulators for crop growth and development under abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Noman, Ali; Fahad, Shah; Aqeel, Muhammad; Ali, Usman; Amanullah; Anwar, Sumera; Baloch, Shahbaz Khan; Zainab, Madiha

    2017-02-25

    Cumulatively, biotic and abiotic stresses of various magnitudes can decrease the production of crops by 70%. miRNAs have emerged as a genetic tool with enormous potential that can be exploited to understand stress tolerance at the molecular level and eventually regulate stress in crops. Plant miRNA targets frequently fit into diverse families of TFs that control the expression of genes related to a certain trait. As key machinery in gene regulatory networks, it is agreed that a broad understanding of miRNAs will greatly increase our understanding of plant responses to environmental stresses. miRNA-led stress regulatory networks are being considered as novel tools for the development of abiotic stress tolerance in crops. At this time, we need to expand our knowledge about the modulatory role of miRNAs during environmental fluctuations. It has become exceedingly clear that with increased understanding of the role of miRNAs during stress, the techniques for using miRNA-mediated gene regulation to enhance plant stress tolerance will become more effective and reliable. In this review we present: (1) miRNAs as a potential avenue for the modulation of abiotic stresses, and (2) summarize the research progress regarding plant responses to stress. Current progress is explained through discussion of the identification and validation of several miRNAs that enhance crop tolerance of salinity, drought, etc., while missing links on different aspects of miRNAs related to abiotic stress tolerance are noted.

  20. Form and function of grass ring patterns in arid grasslands: the role of abiotic controls.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Sujith; D'Odorico, Paolo; Wang, Lixin; Collins, Scott

    2008-12-01

    Ring-shaped growth patterns commonly occur in resource-limited arid and semi-arid environments. The spatial distribution, geometry, and scale of vegetation growth patterns result from interactions between biotic and abiotic processes, and, in turn, affect the spatial patterns of soil moisture, sediment transport, and nutrient dynamics in aridland ecosystems. Even though grass ring patterns are observed worldwide, a comprehensive understanding of the biotic and abiotic processes that lead to the formation, growth and breakup of these rings is still lacking. Our studies on patterns of infiltration and soil properties of blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis) grass rings in the northern Chihuahuan desert indicate that ring patterns result from the interaction between clonal growth mechanisms and abiotic factors such as hydrological and aeolian processes. These processes result in a negative feedback between sediment deposition and vegetation growth inside the bunch grass, which leads to grass die back at the center of the grass clump. We summarize these interactions in a simple theoretical and conceptual model that integrates key biotic and abiotic processes in ring formation, growth and decline.

  1. Abiotic emissions of methane and reduced organic compounds from organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeckmann, T.; Keppler, F.; Vigano, I.; Derendorp, L.; Holzinger, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent laboratory studies show that the important greenhouse gas methane, but also other reduced atmospheric trace gases, can be emitted by abiotic processes from organic matter, such as plants, pure organic compounds and soils. It is very difficult to distinguish abiotic from biotic emissions in field studies, but in laboratory experiments this is easier because it is possible to carefully prepare/sterilize samples, or to control external parameters. For example, the abiotic emissions always show a strong increase with temperature when temperatures are increased to 70C or higher, well above the temperature optimum for bacterial activity. UV radiation has also been clearly shown to lead to emission of methane and other reduced gases from organic matter. Interesting information on the production mechanism has been obtained from isotope studies, both at natural abundance and with isotope labeling. For example, the methoxyl groups of pectin were clearly identified to produce methane. However, analysis of the isotopic composition of methane from natural samples clearly indicates that there must be other molecular mechanisms that lead to methane production. Abiotic methane generation could be a ubiquitous process that occurs naturally at low rates from many different sources.

  2. Electrode impedance analysis of chronic tungsten microwire neural implants: understanding abiotic vs. biotic contributions

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Viswanath; Patrick, Erin; Dieme, Robert; Sanchez, Justin C.; Prasad, Abhishek; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Changes in biotic and abiotic factors can be reflected in the complex impedance spectrum of the microelectrodes chronically implanted into the neural tissue. The recording surface of the tungsten electrode in vivo undergoes abiotic changes due to recording site corrosion and insulation delamination as well as biotic changes due to tissue encapsulation as a result of the foreign body immune response. We reported earlier that large changes in electrode impedance measured at 1 kHz were correlated with poor electrode functional performance, quantified through electrophysiological recordings during the chronic lifetime of the electrode. There is a need to identity the factors that contribute to the chronic impedance variation. In this work, we use numerical simulation and regression to equivalent circuit models to evaluate both the abiotic and biotic contributions to the impedance response over chronic implant duration. COMSOL® simulation of abiotic electrode morphology changes provide a possible explanation for the decrease in the electrode impedance at long implant duration while biotic changes play an important role in the large increase in impedance observed initially. PMID:24847248

  3. Comprehensive analysis suggests overlapping expression of rice ONAC transcription factors in abiotic and biotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Huang, Lei; Hong, Yongbo; Zhang, Huijuan; Song, Fengming; Li, Dayong

    2015-02-17

    NAC (NAM/ATAF/CUC) transcription factors comprise a large plant-specific gene family that contains more than 149 members in rice. Extensive studies have revealed that NAC transcription factors not only play important roles in plant growth and development, but also have functions in regulation of responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, biological functions for most of the members in the NAC family remain unknown. In this study, microarray data analyses revealed that a total of 63 ONAC genes exhibited overlapping expression patterns in rice under various abiotic (salt, drought, and cold) and biotic (infection by fungal, bacterial, viral pathogens, and parasitic plants) stresses. Thirty-eight ONAC genes exhibited overlapping expression in response to any two abiotic stresses, among which 16 of 30 selected ONAC genes were upregulated in response to exogenous ABA. Sixty-five ONAC genes showed overlapping expression patterns in response to any two biotic stresses. Results from the present study suggested that members of the ONAC genes with overlapping expression pattern may have pleiotropic biological functions in regulation of defense response against different abiotic and biotic stresses, which provide clues for further functional analysis of the ONAC genes in stress tolerance and pathogen resistance.

  4. The Importance of Biotic vs. Abiotic Drivers of Local Plant Community Composition Along Regional Bioclimatic Gradients.

    PubMed

    Klanderud, Kari; Vandvik, Vigdis; Goldberg, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    We assessed if the relative importance of biotic and abiotic factors for plant community composition differs along environmental gradients and between functional groups, and asked which implications this may have in a warmer and wetter future. The study location is a unique grid of sites spanning regional-scale temperature and precipitation gradients in boreal and alpine grasslands in southern Norway. Within each site we sampled vegetation and associated biotic and abiotic factors, and combined broad- and fine-scale ordination analyses to assess the relative explanatory power of these factors for species composition. Although the community responses to biotic and abiotic factors did not consistently change as predicted along the bioclimatic gradients, abiotic variables tended to explain a larger proportion of the variation in species composition towards colder sites, whereas biotic variables explained more towards warmer sites, supporting the stress gradient hypothesis. Significant interactions with precipitation suggest that biotic variables explained more towards wetter climates in the sub alpine and boreal sites, but more towards drier climates in the colder alpine. Thus, we predict that biotic interactions may become more important in alpine and boreal grasslands in a warmer future, although more winter precipitation may counteract this trend in oceanic alpine climates. Our results show that both local and regional scales analyses are needed to disentangle the local vegetation-environment relationships and their regional-scale drivers, and biotic interactions and precipitation must be included when predicting future species assemblages.

  5. WRKY Proteins: Signaling and Regulation of Expression during Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    WRKY proteins are emerging players in plant signaling and have been thoroughly reported to play important roles in plants under biotic stress like pathogen attack. However, recent advances in this field do reveal the enormous significance of these proteins in eliciting responses induced by abiotic stresses. WRKY proteins act as major transcription factors, either as positive or negative regulators. Specific WRKY factors which help in the expression of a cluster of stress-responsive genes are being targeted and genetically modified to induce improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants. The knowledge regarding the signaling cascade leading to the activation of the WRKY proteins, their interaction with other proteins of the signaling pathway, and the downstream genes activated by them are altogether vital for justified targeting of the WRKY genes. WRKY proteins have also been considered to generate tolerance against multiple abiotic stresses with possible roles in mediating a cross talk between abiotic and biotic stress responses. In this review, we have reckoned the diverse signaling pattern and biological functions of WRKY proteins throughout the plant kingdom along with the growing prospects in this field of research. PMID:25879071

  6. Jasmonate signaling in plant development and defense response to multiple (a)biotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Santino, Angelo; Taurino, Marco; De Domenico, Stefania; Bonsegna, Stefania; Poltronieri, Palmiro; Pastor, Victoria; Flors, Victor

    2013-07-01

    Plants frequently live in environments characterized by the presence of simultaneous and different stresses. The intricate and finely tuned molecular mechanisms activated by plants in response to abiotic and biotic environmental factors are not well understood, and less is known about the integrative signals and convergence points activated by plants in response to multiple (a)biotic stresses. Phytohormones play a key role in plant development and response to (a)biotic stresses. Among these, one of the most important signaling molecules is an oxylipin, the plant hormone jasmonic acid. Oxylipins are derived from oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Jasmonic acid and its volatile derivative methyl jasmonate have been considered for a long time to be the bioactive forms due to their physiological effects and abundance in the plant. However, more recent studies showed unambiguously that they are only precursors of the active forms represented by some amino acid conjugates. Upon developmental or environmental stimuli, jasmonates are synthesized and accumulate transiently. Upon perception, jasmonate signal transduction process is finely tuned by a complex mechanism comprising specific repressor proteins which in turn control a number of transcription factors regulating the expression of jasmonate responsive genes. We discuss the latest discoveries about the role of jasmonates in plants resistance mechanism against biotic and abiotic stresses. Finally, the deep interplay of different phytohormones in stresses signaling will be also discussed.

  7. Natural abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soils: results from aromatic model compounds and soil samples.

    PubMed

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan G; Kotte, Karsten; Schöler, Heinz F

    2013-02-05

    Oxalic acid is the smallest dicarboxylic acid and plays an important role in soil processes (e.g., mineral weathering and metal detoxification in plants). We have first proven its abiotic formation in soils and investigated natural abiotic degradation processes based on the oxidation of soil organic matter, enhanced by Fe(3+) and H(2)O(2) as hydroxyl radical suppliers. Experiments with the model compound catechol and further hydroxylated benzenes were performed to examine a common degradation pathway and to presume a general formation mechanism of oxalic acid. Two soil samples were tested for the release of oxalic acid and the potential effects of various soil parameters on oxalic acid formation. Additionally, the soil samples were treated with different soil sterilization methods to prove the oxalic acid formation under abiotic soil conditions. Different series of model experiments were conducted to determine a range of factors including Fe(3+), H(2)O(2), reaction time, pH, and chloride concentration on oxalic acid formation. Under certain conditions, catechol is degraded up to 65.6% to oxalic acid referring to carbon. In serial experiments with two soil samples, oxalic acid was produced, and the obtained results are suggestive of an abiotic degradation process. In conclusion, Fenton-like conditions with low Fe(3+) concentrations and an excess of H(2)O(2) as well as acidic conditions were required for an optimal oxalic acid formation. The presence of chloride reduced oxalic acid formation.

  8. Biotic and Abiotic Stresses Activate Different Ca2+ Permeable Channels in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiao-Qiang; Jiang, Zhong-Hao; Yi, Yan-Yan; Yang, Yi; Ke, Li-Ping; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zhu, Shan

    2017-01-01

    To survive, plants must respond rapidly and effectively to various stress factors, including biotic and abiotic stresses. Salinity stress triggers the increase of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) via Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane, as well as bacterial flg22 and plant endogenous peptide Pep1. However, the interaction between abiotic stress-induced [Ca2+]i increases and biotic stress-induced [Ca2+]i increases is still not clear. Employing an aequorin-based Ca2+ imaging assay, in this work, we investigated the [Ca2+]i changes in response to flg22, Pep1, and NaCl treatments in Arabidopsis thaliana. We observed an additive effect on the [Ca2+]i increase which induced by flg22, Pep1, and NaCl. Our results indicate that biotic and abiotic stresses may activate different Ca2+ permeable channels. Further, calcium signal induced by biotic and abiotic stresses was independent in terms of spatial and temporal patterning. PMID:28197161

  9. Do positive interactions increase with abiotic stress? A test from a semi-arid steppe.

    PubMed Central

    Maestre, Fernando T; Cortina, Jordi

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical models predict that the relative importance of facilitation and competition may vary inversely across gradients of abiotic stress. However, these predictions have not been thoroughly tested in the field, especially in semi-arid environments. In this study, we evaluated how the net effect of the tussock grass Stipa tenacissima on the shrub Pistacia lentiscus varied across a gradient of abiotic stress in semi-arid Mediterranean steppes. We fitted the relationship between accumulated rainfall and the relative neighbour index (our measures of abiotic stress and of the net effect of S. tenacissima on P. lentiscus, respectively), which varied across this gradient, to a quadratic model. Competitive interactions dominated at both extremes of the gradient. Our results do not support established theory. Instead, they suggest that a shift from facilitation to competition under high abiotic stress conditions is likely to occur when the levels of the most limiting resource are so low that the benefits provided by the facilitator cannot overcome its own resource uptake. PMID:15504009

  10. Unveiling the Redox Control of Plant Reproductive Development during Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zinta, Gaurav; Khan, Asif; AbdElgawad, Hamada; Verma, Vipasha; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Plants being sessile in nature are often challenged to various abiotic stresses including temperature fluctuations, water supply, salinity, and nutrient availability. Exposure of plants to such environmental perturbations result in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. To scavenge ROS, enzymatic and molecular antioxidants are produced at a cellular level. ROS act as a signaling entity at lower concentrations maintaining normal growth and development, but if their levels increase beyond certain threshold, they produce toxic effects in plants. Some developmental stages, such as development of reproductive organs are more sensitive to abiotic stress than other stages of growth. As success of plant reproductive development is directly correlated with grain yield, stresses coinciding with reproductive phase results in the higher yield losses. In this article, we summarize the redox control of plant reproductive development, and elaborate how redox homeostasis is compromised during abiotic stress exposure. We highlight why more emphasis should be given to understand redox control of plant reproductive organ development during abiotic stress exposure96to engineer crops with better crop yield. We specifically discuss the role of ROS as a signaling molecule and its cross-talk with other signaling molecules such as hormones and sugars. PMID:27379102

  11. Compartment-specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Zechmann, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The tripeptide thiol glutathione (γ-L-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine) is the most important sulfur containing antioxidant in plants and essential for plant defense against abiotic and biotic stress conditions. It is involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), redox signaling, the modulation of defense gene expression, and the regulation of enzymatic activities. Even though changes in glutathione contents are well documented in plants and its roles in plant defense are well established, still too little is known about its compartment-specific importance during abiotic and biotic stress conditions. Due to technical advances in the visualization of glutathione and the redox state through microscopical methods some progress was made in the last few years in studying the importance of subcellular glutathione contents during stress conditions in plants. This review summarizes the data available on compartment-specific importance of glutathione in the protection against abiotic and biotic stress conditions such as high light stress, exposure to cadmium, drought, and pathogen attack (Pseudomonas, Botrytis, tobacco mosaic virus). The data will be discussed in connection with the subcellular accumulation of ROS during these conditions and glutathione synthesis which are both highly compartment specific (e.g., glutathione synthesis takes place in chloroplasts and the cytosol). Thus this review will reveal the compartment-specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress conditions. PMID:25368627

  12. Competition and abiotic stress among trees and shrubs in northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Welden, C.W.; Slauson, W.L.; Ward, R.T. )

    1988-10-01

    We tested several hypotheses about the relationship of competition to abiotic stress, using the vegetation of the semiarid Piceance Basin of northwestern Colorado. We studied competition among the shrubs Amelanchier utahensis, Artemisia tridentata, and Symphoricarpos oreophilus, and between the trees Pinus edulis and Juniperus osteosperma, in 10 sites. We calculated several indices of abiotic moisture stress, based on the slope, aspect, and elevation of each site. Competition was measured by regressions of the distance separating neighboring plants vs. the sum of their canopy areas. We detected competition among these plants in all but one combination of species and in most sites. No significant differences in the intensity of competition were found within species combinations. Significant differences in the importance of competition were found in one of three interspecific combinations of shrub species, and in two of three combinations of tree species. Neither the intensity nor the importance of competition showed any consistent relationship with any index of abiotic moisture stress. Thus, no hypothesized relationship between abiotic stress and competition is supported. Our data also show no consistent relationship between the importance of competition and its intensity, supporting our hypothesis that the intensity and the importance of competition are independent.

  13. Abiotic Hydrolysis of Fluorotelomer-Based Polymers as a Source of Perfluorocarboxylates at the Global Scale

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluorotelomer-based polymers (FTPs) are the main product of the fluorotelomer industry. For nearly 10 years, whether FTPs degrade to form perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorocarboxylate (PFCA) homologues has been vigorously contested. Here we show that circum-neutral abiotic h...

  14. Review of Abiotic Degradation of Chlorinated Solvents by Reactive Iron Minerals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abiotic degradation of chlorinated solvents by reactive iron minerals such as iron sulfides, magnetite, green rust, and other Fe(II)-containing minerals has been observed in both laboratory and field conditions. These reactive iron minerals typically form under iron and sulfate ...

  15. Unraveling the role of fungal symbionts in plant abiotic stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Lamabam Peter

    2011-01-01

    Fungal symbionts have been found to be associated with every plant studied in the natural ecosystem, where they colonize and reside entirely or partially in the internal tissues of their host plant. Fungal endophytes can express/form a range of different lifestyle/relationships with different host including symbiotic, mutualistic, commensalistic and parasitic in response to host genotype and environmental factors. In mutualistic association fungal endophyte can enhance growth, increase reproductive success and confer biotic and abiotic stress tolerance to its host plant. Since abiotic stress such as, drought, high soil salinity, heat, cold, oxidative stress and heavy metal toxicity is the common adverse environmental conditions that affect and limit crop productivity worldwide. It may be a promising alternative strategy to exploit fungal endophytes to overcome the limitations to crop production brought by abiotic stress. There is