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Sample records for abiotic sulfide oxidation

  1. Influence of iron sulfides on abiotic oxidation of UO2 by nitrite and dissolved oxygen in natural sediments.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Julian; Bi, Yuqiang; Hayes, Kim F

    2015-01-20

    Iron sulfide precipitates formed under sulfate reducing conditions may buffer U(IV) insoluble solid phases from reoxidation after oxidants re-enter the reducing zone. In this study, sediment column experiments were performed to quantify the effect of biogenic mackinawite on U(IV) stability in the presence of nitrite or dissolved oxygen (DO). Two columns, packed with sediment from an abandoned U contaminated mill tailings site near Rifle, CO, were biostimulated for 62 days with an electron donor (3 mM acetate) in the presence (BRS+) and absence (BRS−) of 7 mM sulfate. The bioreduced sediment was supplemented with synthetic uraninite (UO2(s)), sterilized by gamma-irradiation, and then subjected to a sequential oxidation by nitrite and DO. Biogenic iron sulfides produced in the BRS+ column, mostly as mackinawite, inhibited U(IV) reoxidation and mobilization by both nitrite and oxygen. Most of the influent nitrite (0.53 mM) exited the columns without oxidizing UO2, while a small amount of nitrite was consumed by iron sulfides precipitates. An additional 10-day supply of 0.25 mM DO influent resulted in the release of about 10% and 49% of total U in BRS+ and BRS– columns, respectively. Influent DO was effectively consumed by biogenic iron sulfides in the BRS+ column, while DO and a large U spike were detected after only a brief period in the effluent in the BRS– column.

  2. Evidence for abiotic sulfurization of marine dissolved organic matter in sulfidic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlabeln, A. M.; Niggemann, J.; Dittmar, T.

    2016-02-01

    Sedimentary organic matter abiotically sulfurizes in sulfidic marine environments. Here we hypothesize that sulfurization also affects dissolved organic matter (DOM), and that sulfidic marine environments are sources of dissolved organic sulfur (DOS) to the ocean. To test these hypotheses we studied solid-phase extractable (SPE) DOS in the Black Sea at various water column depths (oxic and anoxic) and in sediment porewaters from the German Wadden Sea. The concentration and molecular composition of SPE-DOS from these sites and from the oxic water columns of the North Sea (Germany) and of the North Pacific were compared. In support of our hypotheses, SPE-DOS concentrations were elevated in sulfidic waters compared to oxic waters. For a detailed molecular characterization of SPE-DOS, selective wet-chemical alteration experiments targeting different sulfur-containing functional groups were applied prior to Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). These experiments included harsh hydrolysis, selective derivatization of thiols, oxidation, and deoxygenation to test for thioesters, sulfonic acid esters, alkylsulfates, thiols, non-aromatic thioethers, and sulfoxides. Additionally, collision-induced fragmentation experiments were applied to test for sulfonic acids. The tests revealed that the sulfonic acid group was the main structural feature in SPE-DOS, independent of the environmental conditions of the sampling site. Only in Wadden Sea anoxic porewater also non-aromatic thioethers were found which are presumably not stable in oxic waters. The findings from our field studies were confirmed in laboratory experiments, where we abiotically sulfurized marine and algal-derived DOM under conditions similar to that in anoxic marine sediments.

  3. Prevention of sulfide oxidation in sulfide-rich waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, Elsa; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The ability to reduce sulfide oxidation in waste rock after mine closure is a widely researched area, but to reduce and/or inhibit the oxidation during operation is less common. Sulfide-rich (ca 30 % sulfur) waste rock, partially oxidized, was leached during unsaturated laboratory condition. Trace elements such as As and Sb were relatively high in the waste rock while other sulfide-associated elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn were low compared to common sulfide-rich waste rock. Leaching of unsaturated waste rock lowered the pH, from around six down to two, resulting in continuously increasing element concentrations during the leaching period of 272 days. The concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6.9 mg/L), Sb (1.2 mg/L), Zn (149 mg/L) and S (43 g/L) were strongly elevated at the end of the leaching period. Different alkaline industrial residues such as slag, lime kiln dust and cement kiln dust were added as solid or as liquid to the waste rock in an attempt to inhibit sulfide oxidation through neo-formed phases on sulfide surfaces in order to decrease the mobility of metals and metalloids over longer time scale. This will result in a lower cost and efforts of measures after mine closure. Results from the experiments will be presented.

  4. Technetium Reduction and Permanent Sequestration by Abiotic and Biotic Formation of Low-Solubility Sulfide Mineral Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Tratnyek, Paul G.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Fan, Dimin

    One way to minimize the mobility of the Tc VII oxyanion pertechnetate (TcO 4 -) is to effect reduction under sulfidogenic conditions (generated abiotically by Fe 0 or biotically) to form TcS x, which is significantly slower to oxidize than Tc IVO 2. In sediment systems, TcS x and other precipitates may oxidize more slowly due to oxygen diffusion limitations to these low permeability precipitate zones. In addition, the TcO 4 - reduction rate may be more rapid in the presence of sediment because of additional reductive surface phases. This project aims to provide a fundamental understanding of the feasibilitymore » of immobilization of TcO 4 - as TcS x in the vadose zone or groundwater by application nano zero-valent iron (nZVI), and sulfide or sulfate. Biotic batch experiments have used the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfotomaculum reducens. The iron sulfide mineral mackinawite was generated under these conditions, while vivianite was formed in nZVI only controls. The sulfide/bacteria-containing system consistently reduced aqueous pertechnetate rapidly (> 95% in the first hour), a rate similar to that for the sulfide-free, nZVI only system. Reduced Tc (aged for 3 months) generated in both SRB/nZVI systems was highly resistant to reoxidation. In reduced samples, Tc was found associated with solid phases containing Fe and S (D. reducens/nZVI) or Fe (nZVI only). Experiments using D. reducens without nZVI provided some additional insights. Firstly, stationary phase cultures were able to slowly reduce pertechnetate. Secondly, addition of pertechnetate at the beginning of cell growth (lag phase) resulted in a faster rate of Tc reduction, possibly indicating a direct (e.g. enzymatic) role for D. reducens in Tc reduction. Abiotic batch experiments were conducted with Na 2S as the sulfide source. Pertechnetate reduction was rapid in the presence of sulfide and nZVI, although the rate was suppressed at the higher S/Fe ratios tested. This suppression appeared to be

  5. Sulfide oxidation under chemolithoautotrophic denitrifying conditions.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ricardo Beristain; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Rowlette, Pieter; Flores, Elias Razo; Gómez, Jorge; Field, Jim A

    2006-12-20

    Chemolithoautotrophic denitrifying microorganisms oxidize reduced inorganic sulfur compounds coupled to the reduction of nitrate as an electron acceptor. These denitrifiers can be applied to the removal of nitrogen and/or sulfur contamination from wastewater, groundwater, and gaseous streams. This study investigated the physiology and kinetics of chemolithotrophic denitrification by an enrichment culture utilizing hydrogen sulfide, elemental sulfur, or thiosulfate as electron donor. Complete oxidation of sulfide to sulfate was observed when nitrate was supplemented at concentrations equal or exceeding the stoichiometric requirement. In contrast, sulfide was only partially oxidized to elemental sulfur when nitrate concentrations were limiting. Sulfide was found to inhibit chemolithotrophic sulfoxidation, decreasing rates by approximately 21-fold when the sulfide concentration increased from 2.5 to 10.0 mM, respectively. Addition of low levels of acetate (0.5 mM) enhanced denitrification and sulfate formation, suggesting that acetate was utilized as a carbon source by chemolithotrophic denitrifiers. The results of this study indicate the potential of chemolithotrophic denitrification for the removal of hydrogen sulfide. The sulfide/nitrate ratio can be used to control the fate of sulfide oxidation to either elemental sulfur or sulfate. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Sulfide Oxidation by Oxygen: A Look at Inorganically Controlled Reactions and Biologically Mediated Processes in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Luther, George W.; Findlay, Alyssa J.; MacDonald, Daniel J.; Owings, Shannon M.; Hanson, Thomas E.; Beinart, Roxanne A.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamics for the first electron transfer step for sulfide and oxygen indicates that the reaction is unfavorable as unstable superoxide and bisulfide radical ions would need to be produced. However, a two-electron transfer is favorable as stable S(0) and peroxide would be formed, but the partially filled orbitals in oxygen that accept electrons prevent rapid kinetics. Abiotic sulfide oxidation kinetics improve when reduced iron and/or manganese are oxidized by oxygen to form oxidized metals which in turn oxidize sulfide. Biological sulfur oxidation relies on enzymes that have evolved to overcome these kinetic constraints to affect rapid sulfide oxidation. Here we review the available thermodynamic and kinetic data for H2S and HS• as well as O2, reactive oxygen species, nitrate, nitrite, and NOx species. We also present new kinetic data for abiotic sulfide oxidation with oxygen in trace metal clean solutions that constrain abiotic rates of sulfide oxidation in metal free solution and agree with the kinetic and thermodynamic calculations. Moreover, we present experimental data that give insight on rates of chemolithotrophic and photolithotrophic sulfide oxidation in the environment. We demonstrate that both anaerobic photolithotrophic and aerobic chemolithotrophic sulfide oxidation rates are three or more orders of magnitude higher than abiotic rates suggesting that in most environments biotic sulfide oxidation rates will far exceed abiotic rates due to the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints discussed in the first section of the paper. Such data reshape our thinking about the biotic and abiotic contributions to sulfide oxidation in the environment. PMID:21833317

  7. Oxidative Weathering and Microbial Diversity of an Inactive Seafloor Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimney

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiangtao; Cui, Jiamei; Yang, Qunhui; Cui, Guojie; Wei, Bingbing; Wu, Zijun; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Huaiyang

    2017-01-01

    When its hydrothermal supply ceases, hydrothermal sulfide chimneys become inactive and commonly experience oxidative weathering on the seafloor. However, little is known about the oxidative weathering of inactive sulfide chimneys, nor about associated microbial community structures and their succession during this weathering process. In this work, an inactive sulfide chimney and a young chimney in the early sulfate stage of formation were collected from the Main Endeavor Field of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. To assess oxidative weathering, the ultrastructures of secondary alteration products accumulating on the chimney surface were examined and the presence of possible Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) was investigated. The results of ultrastructure observation revealed that FeOB-associated ultrastructures with indicative morphologies were abundantly present. Iron oxidizers primarily consisted of members closely related to Gallionella spp. and Mariprofundus spp., indicating Fe-oxidizing species likely promote the oxidative weathering of inactive sulfide chimneys. Abiotic accumulation of Fe-rich substances further indicates that oxidative weathering is a complex, dynamic process, alternately controlled by FeOB and by abiotic oxidization. Although hydrothermal fluid flow had ceased, inactive chimneys still accommodate an abundant and diverse microbiome whose microbial composition and metabolic potential dramatically differ from their counterparts at active vents. Bacterial lineages within current inactive chimney are dominated by members of α-, δ-, and γ-Proteobacteria and they are deduced to be closely involved in a diverse set of geochemical processes including iron oxidation, nitrogen fixation, ammonia oxidation and denitrification. At last, by examining microbial communities within hydrothermal chimneys at different formation stages, a general microbial community succession can be deduced from early formation stages of a sulfate chimney to actively mature sulfide

  8. Method for inhibiting oxidation of metal sulfide-containing material

    DOEpatents

    Elsetinow, Alicia; Borda, Michael J.; Schoonen, Martin A.; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2006-12-26

    The present invention provides means for inhibiting the oxidation of a metal sulfide-containing material, such as ore mine waste rock or metal sulfide taiulings, by coating the metal sulfide-containing material with an oxidation-inhibiting two-tail lipid coating (12) thereon, thereby inhibiting oxidation of the metal sulfide-containing material in acid mine drainage conditions. The lipids may be selected from phospholipids, sphingolipids, glycolipids and combinations thereof.

  9. Online oxygen control for sulfide oxidation in anaerobic treatment of high-sulfate wastewater.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Samir Kumar; Huang, Ju-Chang

    2006-04-01

    A new technique for sulfide control was investigated in an upflow-anaerobic filter (UAF) treating high-strength, sulfate-rich wastewater. The technique used periodic oxygen injection using oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) as a controlling parameter to regulate oxygen injection. The UAF was operated at a constant influent total-organic carbon of 6740 mg/L but with different influent sulfates of 1000, 3000, and 6000 mg/L. At 1000 and 3000 mg/L influent sulfates, the produced sulfide did not impose any inhibition to methane-producing bacteria (MPB). However, at 6000 mg/L influent sulfate, the produced dissolved sulfide of 804 mg S/L (free sulfide = 280 mg S/L) severely inhibited the methanogenesis, but not the sulfidogenesis. Upon oxygen injection at elevated ORP of -265 mV, sulfides were almost completely eliminated with a concomitant improvement in methane yield by 46%. If oxygenation was excessive because of an oversetting of ORP, the excess oxygen could be used rapidly by facultative heterotrophs, thereby protecting the MPB from oxygen stress. Regarding online sulfide oxidation, it was found that the biogas and injected oxygen needed to pass through an aqueous layer containing trace metals, which were found to have a significant catalytic effect on abiotic sulfide oxidation.

  10. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    where pH remains neutral. The "low-acid" oxidation of sulfides with nitrate as an electron acceptor has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale. In 90-day microcosm respirometry experiments, we exposed a mixture of pulverized quartz and pyrite -rich ore to natural, high-nitrate groundwater and inoculated the microcosms with a culture of aerobic and anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron and sulfur-oxidising microorganisms, which were enriched from ore, groundwater and activated waste water. Incubations were performed under both oxic and anoxic conditions, in addition to abiotic controls. Initial results show that oxidation of the sulfides under nitrate-rich and microbially enhanced conditions does produce less acid than the same material under oxic conditions, and to some degree can match the models as long as oxygen ingress can be controlled. These results are the focus of further research into how this process can be enhanced and whether it can be applied in the field. Nitrate-driven oxidation of sulfides could potentially be used as a new approach to reduce acid generation and leaching of contaminants from waste dumps, in a passive or actively managed process designed to deplete and/or ameliorate (i.e. through surface passivation) the mineralogical hazard. Developing our understanding of biological aspects of these processes may also allow testing of longer-term "bio-caps" for various tailings and dump materials.

  11. Carbonyl sulfide produced by abiotic thermal and photodegradation of soil organic matter from wheat field substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Mary E.; Rhew, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a reduced sulfur gas that is taken up irreversibly in plant leaves proportionally with CO2, allowing its potential use as a tracer for gross primary production. Recently, wheat field soil at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Lamont, Oklahoma, was found to be a measureable source of COS to the atmosphere. To understand the mechanism of COS production, soil and root samples were collected from the site and incubated in the laboratory over a range of temperatures (15-34°C) and light conditions (light and dark). Samples exhibited mostly COS net uptake from the atmosphere in dark and cool (<22-25°C) trials. COS emission was observed during dark incubations at high temperatures (>25°C), consistent with field observations, and at a lower temperature (19°C) when a full spectrum lamp (max wavelength 600 nm) was applied. Sterilized soil and root samples yielded only COS production that increased with temperature, supporting the hypothesis that (a) COS production in these samples is abiotic, (b) production is directly influenced by temperature and light, and (c) some COS consumption in soil and root samples is biotic.

  12. Abiotic reduction of trifluralin and pendimethalin by sulfides in black-carbon-amended coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenwen; Liu, Xinhui; Xia, Shuhua; Liang, Baocui; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-05

    Dinitroaniline herbicides such as trifluralin and pendimethalin are persistent bioaccumulative toxins to aquatic organisms. Thus, in-situ remediation of contaminated sediments is desired. This study investigated whether black carbons (BCs), including apple wood charcoal (BC1), rice straw biochar (BC2), and activated carbon (BC3), could facilitate abiotic reduction of trifluralin and pendimethalin by sulfides of environmentally-relevant concentrations in anoxic coastal sediments. The reduction rates of trifluralin and pendimethalin increased substantially with increasing BC dosages in the sediments. This enhancing effect was dependent on BC type with the greatest for BC3 followed by BC1 and BC2, which well correlated with their specific surface area. The pseudo-first order reduction rate constants (kobs) for BC3-amended sediment (2%) were 13- and 14 times the rate constants in the BC-free sediment. The reduction rates increased with increasing temperature from 8 to 25°C in the BC-amended sediment, following the Arrhenius relationship. Finally, through molecular modeling by density functional theory and reaction species identification from mass spectra, molecular pathways of trifluralin and pendimethalin reduction were elucidated. In contrary to the separate sequential reduction of each nitro group to amine group, both nitro groups, first reduced to nitroso, then eventually to amine groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxygen and sulfur isotope systematics of sulfate produced by bacterial and abiotic oxidation of pyrite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balci, N.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Mayer, B.; Mandernack, K.W.

    2007-01-01

    To better understand reaction pathways of pyrite oxidation and biogeochemical controls on ??18O and ??34S values of the generated sulfate in acid mine drainage (AMD) and other natural environments, we conducted a series of pyrite oxidation experiments in the laboratory. Our biological and abiotic experiments were conducted under aerobic conditions by using O2 as an oxidizing agent and under anaerobic conditions by using dissolved Fe(III)aq as an oxidant with varying ??18OH2O values in the presence and absence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. In addition, aerobic biological experiments were designed as short- and long-term experiments where the final pH was controlled at ???2.7 and 2.2, respectively. Due to the slower kinetics of abiotic sulfide oxidation, the aerobic abiotic experiments were only conducted as long term with a final pH of ???2.7. The ??34SSO4 values from both the biological and abiotic anaerobic experiments indicated a small but significant sulfur isotope fractionation (???-0.7???) in contrast to no significant fractionation observed from any of the aerobic experiments. Relative percentages of the incorporation of water-derived oxygen and dissolved oxygen (O2) to sulfate were estimated, in addition to the oxygen isotope fractionation between sulfate and water, and dissolved oxygen. As expected, during the biological and abiotic anaerobic experiments all of the sulfate oxygen was derived from water. The percentage incorporation of water-derived oxygen into sulfate during the oxidation experiments by O2 varied with longer incubation and lower pH, but not due to the presence or absence of bacteria. These percentages were estimated as 85%, 92% and 87% from the short-term biological, long-term biological and abiotic control experiments, respectively. An oxygen isotope fractionation effect between sulfate and water (??18 OSO4 s(-) H2 O) of ???3.5??? was determined for the anaerobic (biological and abiotic) experiments. This measured ??18 OSO42 - s(-) H2

  14. Microbial oxidation of mixtures of methylmercaptan and hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyan, A; Kolhatkar, R; Sublette, K L; Beitle, R

    1998-01-01

    Refinery spent-sulfidic caustic, containing only inorganic sulfides, has previously been shown to be amenable to biotreatment with Thiobacillus denitrificans strain F with complete oxidation of sulfides to sulfate. However, many spent caustics contain mercaptans that cannot be metabolized by this strict autotroph. An aerobic enrichment culture was developed from mixed Thiobacilli and activated sludge that was capable of simultaneous oxidation of inorganic sulfide and mercaptans using hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and methylmercaptan (MeSH) gas feeds used to simulate the inorganic and organic sulfur of a spent-sulfidic caustic. The enrichment culture was also capable of biotreatment of an actual mercaptan-containing, spent-sulfidic caustic but at lower rates than predicted by operation on MeSH and H2S fed to the culture in the gas phase, indicating that the caustic contained other inhibitory components.

  15. Abiotic Nitrous Oxide Production in Natural and Artificial Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, H.; Stanton, C. L.; Cavazos, A. R.; Ostrom, N. E.; Glass, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean contributes approximately one third of global sources of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. While nitrification is thought to be the dominant pathway for marine N2O production, mechanisms remain unresolved. Previous studies have carried the implicit assumption that marine N2O originates directly from enzymatic sources. However, abiotic production of N2O is possible via chemical reactions between nitrogenous intermediates and redox active trace metals in seawater. In this study, we investigated N2O production and isotopic composition in treatments with and without added hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and nitric oxide (NO), intermediates in microbial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, and Fe(III). Addition of substrates to sterile artificial seawater was compared with filtered and unfiltered seawater from Sapelo Island, coastal Georgia, USA. N2O production was observed immediately after addition of Fe(III) in the presence of NH2OH at pH 8 in sterile artificial seawater. Highest N2O production was observed in the presence of Fe(III), NO, and NH2OH. The isotopomer site preference of abiotically produced N2O was consistent with previous studies (31 ± 2 ‰). Higher abiotic N2O production was observed in sterile artificial seawater (salinity: 35 ppt) than filtered Sapelo Island seawater (salinity: 25 ppt) whereas diluted sterile artificial seawater (18 ppt) showed lowest N2O production, suggesting that higher salinity promotes enhanced abiotic N2O production. Addition of Fe(III) to unfiltered Sapelo Island seawater stimulated N2O production. The presence of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), which lack known N2O producing enzymes, in Sapelo Island seawater was confirmed by successful amplification of the archaeal amoA gene, whereas ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which contain N2O-producing enzymes were undetected. Given the few Fe-containing proteins present in AOA, it is likely that Fe(III) addition promoted N2O production via an abiotic vs. enzymatic N2O mechanism

  16. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase*

    PubMed Central

    Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Yadav, Pramod K.; Ballou, David P.; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be −123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  18. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    2001-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  19. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    1999-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  20. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1999-06-22

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

  1. Oxidation kinetics of molten copper sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyaser, A. H.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1995-02-01

    The oxidation kinetics of molten Cu2S baths, during top lancing with oxygen/nitrogen (argon) mixtures, have been investigated as a function of oxygen partial pressure (0.2 to 0.78), bath temperature (1200 °C to 1300 °C), gas flow rate (1 to 4 L/min), and bath mixing. Surface-tension-driven flows (the Marangoni effect) were observed both visually and photographically. Thus, the oxidation of molten Cu2S was found to progress in two distinct stages, the kinetics of which are limited by the mass transfer of oxygen in the gas phase to the melt surface. During the primary stage, the melt is partially desulfurized while oxygen dissolves in the liquid sulfide. Upon saturation of the melt with oxygen, the secondary stage commences in which surface and bath reactions proceed to generate copper and SO2 electrochemically. A mathematical model of the reaction kinetics has been formulated and tested against the measurements. The results of this study shed light on the process kinetics of the copper blow in a Peirce-Smith converter or Mitsubishi reactor.

  2. Oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionation during sulfide oxidation by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brabec, Michelle Y.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Mandernack, Kevin W.

    2012-04-01

    Sulfide-mediated anoxygenic photosynthesis (SMAP) carried out by anaerobic phototrophic bacteria may have played an important role in sulfur cycling, formation of sulfate, and, perhaps, primary production in the Earth’s early oceans. Determination of ε34SSO4-Sulfide- and ε18OSO4-H2O values for bacterial sulfide oxidation will permit more refined interpretation of the δ34S and δ18OSO4 values measured in modern anoxic environments, such as meromictic lakes where sulfide commonly extends into the photic zone, and in the ancient rock record, particularly during periods of the Precambrian when anoxic and sulfidic (euxinic) conditions were believed to be more pervasive than today. Laboratory experiments with anaerobic purple and green sulfur phototrophs, Allochromatium vinosum and Chlorobaculum tepidum, respectively, were conducted to determine the sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. Replicate experiments were conducted at 25 °C for A. vinosum and 45 °C for C. tepidum, and in duplicate at three different starting oxygen isotope values for water to determine sulfate-water oxygen isotope fractionations accurately (ε18OSO4-H2O). ε18OSO4-H2O values of 5.6 ± 0.2‰ and 5.4 ± 0.1‰ were obtained for A. vinosum and C. tepidum, respectively. Temperature had no apparent effect on the ε18OSO4-H2O values. By combining all data from both cultures, an average ε18OSO4-H2O value of 5.6 ± 0.3‰ was obtained for SMAP. This value falls between those previously reported for bacterial oxidation of sphalerite and elemental sulfur (7-9‰) and abiotic and biotic oxidation of pyrite and chalcopyrite (2-4‰). Sulfur isotope fractionation between sulfide and sulfate formed by A.vinosum was negligible (0.1 ± 0.2‰) during all experiments. For C. tepidum an apparent fractionation of -2.3 ± 0.5‰ was observed during the earlier stages of oxidation based on bulk δ34S measurements of sulfate and sulfide and became smaller (-0.7

  3. Nanostructured Metal Oxides and Sulfides for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Mai, Liqiang

    2017-05-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries with high energy density and long cycle life are considered to be one of the most promising next-generation energy-storage systems beyond routine lithium-ion batteries. Various approaches have been proposed to break down technical barriers in Li-S battery systems. The use of nanostructured metal oxides and sulfides for high sulfur utilization and long life span of Li-S batteries is reviewed here. The relationships between the intrinsic properties of metal oxide/sulfide hosts and electrochemical performances of Li-S batteries are discussed. Nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides hosts used in solid sulfur cathodes, separators/interlayers, lithium-metal-anode protection, and lithium polysulfides batteries are discussed respectively. Prospects for the future developments of Li-S batteries with nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides are also discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. An Experiment in Autotrophic Fermentation: Microbial Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sublette, Kerry L.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which uses an autotrophic bacterium to anaerobically oxidize hydrogen sulfide to sulfate in a batch-stirred tank reactor. Discusses background information, experimental procedure, and sample results of this activity. (CW)

  5. Exogenous application of hydrogen sulfide donor sodium hydrosulfide enhanced multiple abiotic stress tolerance in bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.).

    PubMed

    Shi, Haitao; Ye, Tiantian; Chan, Zhulong

    2013-10-01

    As a gaseous molecule, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recently found to be involved in plant responses to multiple abiotic stress. In this study, salt (150 and 300 mM NaCl), osmotic (15% and 30% PEG6000) and cold (4 °C) stress treatments induced accumulation of endogenous H2S level, indicating that H2S might play a role in bermudagrass responses to salt, osmotic and cold stresses. Exogenous application of H2S donor (sodium hydrosulfide, NaHS) conferred improved salt, osmotic and freezing stress tolerances in bermudagrass, which were evidenced by decreased electrolyte leakage and increased survival rate under stress conditions. Additionally, NaHS treatment alleviated the reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst and cell damage induced by abiotic stress, via modulating metabolisms of several antioxidant enzymes [catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and GR (glutathione reductase)] and non-enzymatic glutathione antioxidant pool and redox state. Moreover, exogenous NaHS treatment led to accumulation of osmolytes (proline, sucrose and soluble total sugars) in stressed bermudagrass plants. Taken together, all these data indicated the protective roles of H2S in bermudagrass responses to salt, osmotic and freezing stresses, via activation of the antioxidant response and osmolyte accumulation. These findings might be applicable to grass and crop engineering to improve abiotic stress tolerance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Toxic hydrogen sulfide and dark caves: phenotypic and genetic divergence across two abiotic environmental gradients in Poecilia mexicana.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Michael; Dewitt, Thomas J; Schlupp, Ingo; García de León, Francisco J; Herrmann, Roger; Feulner, Philine G D; Tiedemann, Ralph; Plath, Martin

    2008-10-01

    Divergent natural selection drives evolutionary diversification. It creates phenotypic diversity by favoring developmental plasticity within populations or genetic differentiation and local adaptation among populations. We investigated phenotypic and genetic divergence in the livebearing fish Poecilia mexicana along two abiotic environmental gradients. These fish typically inhabit nonsulfidic surface rivers, but also colonized sulfidic and cave habitats. We assessed phenotypic variation among a factorial combination of habitat types using geometric and traditional morphometrics, and genetic divergence using quantitative and molecular genetic analyses. Fish in caves (sulfidic or not) exhibited reduced eyes and slender bodies. Fish from sulfidic habitats (surface or cave) exhibited larger heads and longer gill filaments. Common-garden rearing suggested that these morphological differences are partly heritable. Population genetic analyses using microsatellites as well as cytochrome b gene sequences indicate high population differentiation over small spatial scale and very low rates of gene flow, especially among different habitat types. This suggests that divergent environmental conditions constitute barriers to gene flow. Strong molecular divergence over short distances as well as phenotypic and quantitative genetic divergence across habitats in directions classic to fish ecomorphology suggest that divergent selection is structuring phenotypic variation in this system.

  7. Vegetation successfully prevents oxidization of sulfide minerals in mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-07-15

    The oxidization of metal sulfide in tailings causes acid mine drainage. However, it remains unclear whether vegetation prevents the oxidization of metal sulfides. The oxidization characteristics and microbial indices of the tailings in the presence of various plant species were investigated to explore the effects of vegetation on the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. The pH, reducing sulfur, free iron oxides (Fed), chemical oxygen consumption (COC) and biological oxygen consumption (BOC) were measured. Key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus spp., Leptospirillum spp. and Thiobacillus spp.) were quantified using real-time PCR. The results indicate that vegetation growing on tailings can effectively prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. A higher pH and reducing-sulfur content and lower Fed were observed in the 0-30 cm depth interval in the presence of vegetation compared to bare tailings (BT). The COC gradually decreased with depth in all of the soil profiles; specifically, the COC rapidly decreased in the 10-20 cm interval in the presence of vegetation but gradually decreased in the BT profiles. Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanoides (CZ) profiles contained the highest BOC in the 10-20 cm interval. The abundance of key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the vegetated tailings were significantly lower than in the BT; in particular, IC was associated with the lowest iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacterial abundance. In conclusion, vegetation successfully prevented the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the tailings, and Imperata cylindrica is the most effective in reducing the number of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and helped to prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the long term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Coenzyme Q deficiency causes impairment of the sulfide oxidation pathway.

    PubMed

    Ziosi, Marcello; Di Meo, Ivano; Kleiner, Giulio; Gao, Xing-Huang; Barca, Emanuele; Sanchez-Quintero, Maria J; Tadesse, Saba; Jiang, Hongfeng; Qiao, Changhong; Rodenburg, Richard J; Scalais, Emmanuel; Schuelke, Markus; Willard, Belinda; Hatzoglou, Maria; Tiranti, Valeria; Quinzii, Catarina M

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an electron acceptor for sulfide-quinone reductase (SQR), the first enzyme of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathway. Here, we show that lack of CoQ in human skin fibroblasts causes impairment of hydrogen sulfide oxidation, proportional to the residual levels of CoQ. Biochemical and molecular abnormalities are rescued by CoQ supplementation in vitro and recapitulated by pharmacological inhibition of CoQ biosynthesis in skin fibroblasts and ADCK3 depletion in HeLa cells. Kidneys of Pdss2 kd/kd mice, which only have ~15% residual CoQ concentrations and are clinically affected, showed (i) reduced protein levels of SQR and downstream enzymes, (ii) accumulation of hydrogen sulfides, and (iii) glutathione depletion. These abnormalities were not present in brain, which maintains ~30% residual CoQ and is clinically unaffected. In Pdss2 kd/kd mice, we also observed low levels of plasma and urine thiosulfate and increased blood C4-C6 acylcarnitines. We propose that impairment of the sulfide oxidation pathway induced by decreased levels of CoQ causes accumulation of sulfides and consequent inhibition of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and glutathione depletion, which contributes to increased oxidative stress and kidney failure. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  9. Oxygen and sulfur isotope systematics of sulfate produced during abiotic and bacterial oxidation of sphalerite and elemental sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balci, N.; Mayer, B.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Mandernack, K.W.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of metal sulfide oxidation in acid mine drainage (AMD) systems have primarily focused on pyrite oxidation, although acid soluble sulfides (e.g., ZnS) are predominantly responsible for the release of toxic metals. We conducted a series of biological and abiotic laboratory oxidation experiments with pure and Fe-bearing sphalerite (ZnS & Zn 0.88Fe 0.12S), respectively, in order to better understand the effects of sulfide mineralogy and associated biogeochemical controls of oxidation on the resultant ?? 34S and ?? 18O values of the sulfate produced. The minerals were incubated in the presence and absence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans at an initial solution pH of 3 and with water of varying ?? 18O values to determine the relative contributions of H 2O-derived and O 2-derived oxygen in the newly formed sulfate. Experiments were conducted under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using O 2 and Fe(III) aq as the oxidants, respectively. Aerobic incubations with A. ferrooxidans, and S o as the sole energy source were also conducted. The ??34SSO4 values from both the biological and abiotic oxidation of ZnS and ZnS Fe by Fe(III) aq produced sulfur isotope fractionations (??34SSO4-ZnS) of up to -2.6???, suggesting the accumulation of sulfur intermediates during incomplete oxidation of the sulfide. No significant sulfur isotope fractionation was observed from any of the aerobic experiments. Negative sulfur isotope enrichment factors (??34SSO4-ZnS) in AMD systems could reflect anaerobic, rather than aerobic pathways of oxidation. During the biological and abiotic oxidation of ZnS and ZnS Fe by Fe(III) aq all of the sulfate oxygen was derived from water, with measured ?? 18OSO 4-H 2O values of 8.2??0.2??? and 7.5??0.1???, respectively. Also, during the aerobic oxidation of ZnS Fe and S o by A. ferrooxidans, all of the sulfate oxygen was derived from water with similar measured ?? 18OSO 4-H 2O values of 8.1??0.1??? and 8.3??0.3???, respectively. During biological oxidation

  10. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation is coupled to oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria of Solemya reidi

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.A.; Somero, G.N.

    1986-08-01

    Solemya reidi, a gutless clam found in sulfide-rich habitats, contains within its gills bacterial symbionts thought to oxidize sulfur compounds and provide a reduced carbon food source to the clam. However, the initial step or steps in sulfide oxidation occur in the animal tissue, and mitochondria isolated from both gill and symbiont-free foot tissue of the clam coupled the oxidation of sulfide to oxidative phosphorylation (adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis). The ability of Solemya reidi to exploit directly the energy in sulfide for ATP synthesis is unprecedented, and suggests that sulfide-habitat animals that lack bacterial symbionts may also use sulfide asmore » an inorganic energy source.« less

  11. Cupriavidus necator H16 Uses Flavocytochrome c Sulfide Dehydrogenase To Oxidize Self-Produced and Added Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Chuanjuan; Xia, Yongzhen; Liu, Daixi; Zhao, Rui; Gao, Rui

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Production of sulfide (H2S, HS−, and S2−) by heterotrophic bacteria during aerobic growth is a common phenomenon. Some bacteria with sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) and persulfide dioxygenase (PDO) can oxidize self-produced sulfide to sulfite and thiosulfate, but other bacteria without these enzymes release sulfide into the medium, from which H2S can volatilize into the gas phase. Here, we report that Cupriavidus necator H16, with the fccA and fccB genes encoding flavocytochrome c sulfide dehydrogenases (FCSDs), also oxidized self-produced H2S. A mutant in which fccA and fccB were deleted accumulated and released H2S. When fccA and fccB were expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain Pa3K with deletions of its sqr and pdo genes, the recombinant rapidly oxidized sulfide to sulfane sulfur. When PDO was also cloned into the recombinant, the recombinant with both FCSD and PDO oxidized sulfide to sulfite and thiosulfate. Thus, the proposed pathway is similar to the pathway catalyzed by SQR and PDO, in which FCSD oxidizes sulfide to polysulfide, polysulfide spontaneously reacts with reduced glutathione (GSH) to produce glutathione persulfide (GSSH), and PDO oxidizes GSSH to sulfite, which chemically reacts with polysulfide to produce thiosulfate. About 20.6% of sequenced bacterial genomes contain SQR, and only 3.9% contain FCSD. This is not a surprise, since SQR is more efficient in conserving energy because it passes electrons from sulfide oxidation into the electron transport chain at the quinone level, while FCSD passes electrons to cytochrome c. The transport of electrons from the latter to O2 conserves less energy. FCSDs are grouped into three subgroups, well conserved at the taxonomic level. Thus, our data show the diversity in sulfide oxidation by heterotrophic bacteria. IMPORTANCE Heterotrophic bacteria with SQR and PDO can oxidize self-produced sulfide and do not release H2S into the gas phase. C. necator H16 has FCSD but not SQR, and it does

  12. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Klok, Johannes B M; de Graaff, Marco; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Boelee, Nadine C; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2013-02-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concluded that the oxidation-reduction state of cytochrome c is a direct measure for the bacterial end-product formation. Given this physiological feature, incorporation of the oxidation state of cytochrome c in a mathematical model for the bacterial oxidation kinetics will yield a physiologically based model structure. This paper presents a physiologically based model, describing the dynamic formation of the various end-products in the biodesulfurization process. It consists of three elements: 1) Michaelis-Menten kinetics combined with 2) a cytochrome c driven mechanism describing 3) the rate determining enzymes of the respiratory system of haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria. The proposed model is successfully validated against independent data obtained from biological respiration tests and bench scale gas-lift reactor experiments. The results demonstrate that the model is a powerful tool to describe product formation for haloalkaliphilic biomass under dynamic conditions. The model predicts a maximum S⁰ formation of about 98 mol%. A future challenge is the optimization of this bioprocess by improving the dissolved oxygen control strategy and reactor design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. High conducting oxide--sulfide composite lithium superionic conductor

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Chengdu; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Dudney, Nancy J.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Rondinone, Adam Justin

    2017-01-17

    A solid electrolyte for a lithium-sulfur battery includes particles of a lithium ion conducting oxide composition embedded within a lithium ion conducting sulfide composition. The lithium ion conducting oxide composition can be Li.sub.7La.sub.3Zr.sub.2O.sub.12 (LLZO). The lithium ion conducting sulfide composition can be .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 (LPS). A lithium ion battery and a method of making a solid electrolyte for a lithium ion battery are also disclosed.

  14. Catalysts for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Srinivas, Girish; Bai, Chuansheng

    2000-08-08

    This invention provides catalysts for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. In particular, the invention provides catalysts for the partial oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur and water. The catalytically active component of the catalyst comprises a mixture of metal oxides containing titanium oxide and one or more metal oxides which can be selected from the group of metal oxides or mixtures of metal oxides of transition metals or lanthanide metals. Preferred metal oxides for combination with TiO.sub.2 in the catalysts of this invention include oxides of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Au, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu. Catalysts which comprise a homogeneous mixture of titanium oxide and niobium (Nb) oxide are also provided. A preferred method for preparing the precursor homogenous mixture of metal hydroxides is by coprecipitation of titanium hydroxide with one or more other selected metal hydroxides. Catalysts of this invention have improved activity and/or selectivity for elemental sulfur production. Further improvements of activity and/or selectivity can be obtained by introducing relatively low amounts (up to about 5 mol %)of a promoter metal oxide (preferably of metals other than titanium and that of the selected second metal oxide) into the homogeneous metal/titanium oxide catalysts of this invention.

  15. Interactions among sulfide-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poplawski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The responses of different phototrophic bacteria in a competitive experimental system are studied, one in which primary factors such as H2S or light limited photometabolism. Two different types of bacteria shared one limited source of sulfide under specific conditions of light. The selection of a purple and a green sulfur bacteria and the cyanobacterium was based on their physiological similarity and also on the fact that they occur together in microbial mats. They all share anoxygenic photosynthesis, and are thus probably part of an evolutionary continuum of phototrophic organisms that runs from, strictly anaerobic physiology to the ability of some cyanobacteria to shift between anoxygenic bacterial style photosynthesis and the oxygenic kind typical of eukaryotes.

  16. Sulfidization Contemporaneous with Oxidation and Metamorphism in CK6 Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCoy, T. J.; Corrigan, C. M.; Davidson, J.; Schrader, D. L.; Righter, K.

    2018-01-01

    As the most oxidized chondrites and a group of carbonaceous chondrites spanning the range of petrologic types, CK chondrites occupy an extreme in our understanding of the origin and evolution of chondritic parent bodies. With the proposed linkage of CV and CK chondrites and the suggestion that differentiation of a postulated CV-CK asteroid could have differentiated to form a core and established a magnetic dynamo, CK chondrites are receiving considerable attention. Most of this attention has focused on the similarities between CK3 and CV3 chondrites and the origin of each. We have previously argued that melting of an oxidized core could produce a magnetite-sulfide core, rather than the more conventional metal-sulfide core. In this work, we focus on CK6 chondrites to understand the origin of the most highly metamorphosed members of the group as representative of the material that might differentiate to form such an oxidized core.

  17. Kinetic studies of sulfide mineral oxidation and xanthate adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendiratta, Neeraj K.

    2000-10-01

    Sulfide minerals are a major source of metals; however, certain sulfide minerals, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are less desirable. Froth flotation is a commonly used separation technique, which requires the use of several reagents to float and depress different sulfide minerals. Xanthate, a thiol collector, has gained immense usage in sulfide minerals flotation. However, some sulfides are naturally hydrophobic and may float without a collector. Iron sulfides, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are few of the most abundant minerals, yet economically insignificant. Their existence with other sulfide minerals leads to an inefficient separation process as well as environmental problems, such as acid mine drainage during mining and processing and SO 2 emissions during smelting process. A part of the present study is focused on understanding their behavior, which leads to undesired flotation and difficulties in separation. The major reasons for the undesired flotation are attributed to the collectorless hydrophobicity and the activation with heavy metal ions. To better understand the collectorless hydrophobicity of pyrite, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) of freshly fractured pyrite electrodes was used to study the oxidation and reduction of the mineral. The EIS results showed that the rate of reaction increases with oxidation and reduction. At moderate oxidizing potentials, the rate of reaction is too slow to replenish hydrophilic iron species leaving hydrophobic sulfur species on the surface. However, at higher potentials, iron species are replaced fast enough to depress its flotation. Effects of pH and polishing were also explored using EIS. Besides collectorless hydrophobicity, the activation of pyrrhotite with nickel ions and interaction with xanthate ions makes the separation more difficult. DETA and SO2 are commonly used as pyrrhotite depressants; however, the mechanism is not very well understood. Contact angle measurements, cyclic voltammetry and Tafel

  18. Inhibition of Sulfide Mineral Oxidation by Surface Coating Agents: Batch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Ji, M. K.; Yun, H. S.; Park, Y. T.; Gee, E. D.; Lee, W. R.; Jeon, B.-H.

    2012-04-01

    Mining activities and mineral industries have impacted on rapid oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS2) which leads to Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) formation. Some of the abandoned mines discharge polluted water without proper environmental remediation treatments, largely because of financial constraints in treating AMD. Magnitude of the problem is considerable, especially in countries with a long history of mining. As metal sulfides become oxidized during mining activities, the aqueous environment becomes acid and rich in many metals, including iron, lead, mercury, arsenic and many others. The toxic heavy metals are responsible for the environmental deterioration of stream, groundwater and soils. Several strategies to remediate AMD contaminated sites have been proposed. Among the source inhibition and prevention technologies, microencapsulation (coating) has been considered as a promising technology. The encapsulation is based on inhibition of O2 diffusion by surface coating agent and is expected to control the oxidation of pyrite for a long time. Potential of several surface coating agents for preventing oxidation of metal sulfide minerals from both Young-Dong coal mine and Il-Gwang gold mine were examined by conducting batch experiments and field tests. Powdered pyrite as a standard sulfide mineral and rock samples from two mine outcrops were mixed with six coating agents (KH2PO4, MgO and KMnO4 as chemical agents, and apatite, cement and manganite as mineral agents) and incubated with oxidizing agents (H2O2 or NaClO). Batch experiments with Young-Dong coal mine samples showed least SO42- production in presence of KMnO4 (16% sulfate production compared to no surface coating agents) or cement (4%) within 8 days. In the case of Il-Gwang mine samples, least SO42- production was observed in presence of KH2PO4 (8%) or cement (2%) within 8 days. Field-scale pilot tests at Il-Gwang site also showed that addition of KH2PO4 decreased sulfate production from 200 to

  19. Kinetics of abiotic nitrous oxide production via oxidation of hydroxylamine by particulate metals in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavazos, A. R.; Taillefert, M.; Glass, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    The oceans are a significant of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. Current models of global oceanic N2­O flux focus on microbial N2O cycling and often ignore abiotic reactions, such as the thermodynamically favorable oxidation of the nitrification intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) by Mn(IV) or Fe(III). At circumneutral pH, NH2OH oxidation is more thermodynamically favorable via Mn(IV) than Fe(III) reduction. We characterized the kinetics of NH2OH oxidation in synthetic ocean water at pH 5.1-8.8 using microsensor electrodes to measure real-time N2O production. N2O production rates and yield were greater when NH2OH was oxidized by Mn(IV) than Fe(III). Accordingly, the reduction of Mn(IV) was first order with respect to NH2OH whereas the reduction of Fe(III) was zero order with respect to NH2OH. Interestingly, the order of the reaction with respect to Mn(IV) appears to be negative whereas the reaction is second order with respect to Fe(III). The inverse order with respect to Mn(IV) may be due to the aggregation of particles in seawater, which decreases their surface area and changes their reactivity. Finally, the reaction is first order with respect to protons with Fe(III) as the oxidant but zero order with Mn(IV). The stronger effect of the pH on the reaction with Fe(III) as the oxidant compared to Mn(IV) reflects the stoichiometry of these two reactions, as each mole of N2O produced by Fe(III) reduction consumes eight protons while each mole of N2O produced with Mn(IV) as the oxidant requires only four protons. Our data show that abiotic NH2OH oxidation by Mn(IV) or Fe(III) particles may represent a significant source of N2O in seawater. These findings suggest that abiotic N2O production in marine waters may be significant in areas of the oceans where particulate metals originating from aerosols, dust, or rivers may react with NH2OH released from ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms.

  20. Glacial weathering, sulfide oxidation, and global carbon cycle feedbacks.

    PubMed

    Torres, Mark A; Moosdorf, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Adkins, Jess F; West, A Joshua

    2017-08-15

    Connections between glaciation, chemical weathering, and the global carbon cycle could steer the evolution of global climate over geologic time, but even the directionality of feedbacks in this system remain to be resolved. Here, we assemble a compilation of hydrochemical data from glacierized catchments, use this data to evaluate the dominant chemical reactions associated with glacial weathering, and explore the implications for long-term geochemical cycles. Weathering yields from catchments in our compilation are higher than the global average, which results, in part, from higher runoff in glaciated catchments. Our analysis supports the theory that glacial weathering is characterized predominantly by weathering of trace sulfide and carbonate minerals. To evaluate the effects of glacial weathering on atmospheric pCO 2 , we use a solute mixing model to predict the ratio of alkalinity to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) generated by weathering reactions. Compared with nonglacial weathering, glacial weathering is more likely to yield alkalinity/DIC ratios less than 1, suggesting that enhanced sulfide oxidation as a result of glaciation may act as a source of CO 2 to the atmosphere. Back-of-the-envelope calculations indicate that oxidative fluxes could change ocean-atmosphere CO 2 equilibrium by 25 ppm or more over 10 ky. Over longer timescales, CO 2 release could act as a negative feedback, limiting progress of glaciation, dependent on lithology and the concentration of atmospheric O 2 Future work on glaciation-weathering-carbon cycle feedbacks should consider weathering of trace sulfide minerals in addition to silicate minerals.

  1. Abiotic degradation of hexahydro-l,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine in the presence of hydrogen sulfide and black carbon.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Jerome M; Ammar, Emaan; Mitch, William A

    2008-03-15

    We report that hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) was rapidly destroyed by sulfides in the presence of black carbon, forming nitrite and formaldehyde, rather than toxic nitrosated reduction products. Although traditionally viewed as inactive sorbents, black carbons have been noted to participate in the destruction of certain contaminants, such as azo dyes, via quinonoid groups. However, in our experiments sulfide modification of quinones did not seem to be involved. Although at least 1.2 mM sulfides were needed for the reaction to proceed, abiotic natural attenuation of RDX in marine sediments may occur, because these concentrations are found in certain marine sediments, together with black carbon. In the absence of natural black carbons, synthetic black carbons, such as activated carbon, may be added to sediments. As compared with other in situ techniques, such as bioremediation and zero-valent iron cutoff trenches, which often generate nitrosated byproducts, this in situ, abiotic technique may be an attractive alternative.

  2. Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

    1983-07-26

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

  3. Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Ken; Baxter, David J.

    1984-01-01

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

  4. Glacial weathering, sulfide oxidation, and global carbon cycle feedbacks

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Mark A.; Moosdorf, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Adkins, Jess F.

    2017-01-01

    Connections between glaciation, chemical weathering, and the global carbon cycle could steer the evolution of global climate over geologic time, but even the directionality of feedbacks in this system remain to be resolved. Here, we assemble a compilation of hydrochemical data from glacierized catchments, use this data to evaluate the dominant chemical reactions associated with glacial weathering, and explore the implications for long-term geochemical cycles. Weathering yields from catchments in our compilation are higher than the global average, which results, in part, from higher runoff in glaciated catchments. Our analysis supports the theory that glacial weathering is characterized predominantly by weathering of trace sulfide and carbonate minerals. To evaluate the effects of glacial weathering on atmospheric pCO2, we use a solute mixing model to predict the ratio of alkalinity to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) generated by weathering reactions. Compared with nonglacial weathering, glacial weathering is more likely to yield alkalinity/DIC ratios less than 1, suggesting that enhanced sulfide oxidation as a result of glaciation may act as a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Back-of-the-envelope calculations indicate that oxidative fluxes could change ocean–atmosphere CO2 equilibrium by 25 ppm or more over 10 ky. Over longer timescales, CO2 release could act as a negative feedback, limiting progress of glaciation, dependent on lithology and the concentration of atmospheric O2. Future work on glaciation–weathering–carbon cycle feedbacks should consider weathering of trace sulfide minerals in addition to silicate minerals. PMID:28760954

  5. Effects of Chlorine Promoted Oxidation on Arsenic Release from Sulfide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, N.; Schreiber, M.; Gotkowitz, M.

    2007-12-01

    High arsenic concentrations (>100 ppb) have been measured in wells completed in the Ordovician St. Peter sandstone aquifer of eastern Wisconsin. The primary source of arsenic is As-bearing sulfide minerals within the aquifer. Periodic disinfection of wells by chlorination may facilitate arsenic release to groundwater by increasing the rate of sulfide mineral oxidation. During typical well disinfection procedures, aquifer solids exposed along uncased portions of wells remain in direct contact with chlorine disinfection solutions for up to twenty-four hours. Due to the redox sensitivity of arsenic mobility in groundwater, it is important to evaluate the effect of repeatedly adding oxidizers to an arsenic impacted aquifer system. This study focuses on abiotic processes that mobilize arsenic from the solid phase during controlled exposure to chlorinated solutions. Two St. Peter samples with As concentrations of 21 and 674 ppm were selected for the experiments. Before reaction, the aquifer mineralogy is characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA). The samples are then reacted with solutions of 60 mg/L free chlorine, 1200 mg/L free chlorine, or nanopure water (control) at pH 7.0 and pH 8.5. These parameters represent typical solution chemistries present within the wells after disinfection. Solutions are sampled periodically during the experiments and analyzed for As, Fe, other trace metals such as Co, Mo, Cr, and Ni, and sulfate. Analysis of the post-reaction solids using SEM, EMPA, laser ablation ICP-MS and Raman techniques are used to document the changes in mineralogy due to chlorination and to document which solid phases contain As.

  6. Complete oxidation of solid phase sulfides by manganese and bacteria in anoxic marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Robert C.; Rude, Peter D.

    1988-03-01

    During the physical or biological reworking of surficial marine sediments, metal oxides are often brought into contact with both solid and dissolved sulfides. Experiments simulating these mixing processes demonstrate that in natural sediments Mn-oxides can completely oxidize solid phase sulfides to SO 4- under anoxic conditions. The major source of sulfur is probably acid volatile sulfide. Minerals containing Mn +4 are apparently more effective than Mn +3 in driving the oxidation. There is slight or no evidence for complete sulfide oxidation by Fe-oxides under similar conditions. The reaction is inhibited by DNP (dinitrophenol) and azide, implying biological mediation by a group of chemolithotrophic bacteria such as the thiobacilli, having a well-organized cytochrome system, oxidative phosphorylation coupled with sulfide oxidation, and possibly aulolrophic CO 2 fixation. Lack of sensitivity to chlorate suggests that a No 3- reductase complex is not involved. Because of metal reduction and the overall stoichiometry of reaction, this sulfide oxidation causes a rise in pH in contrast to oxidation by O 2. Alkalinity is also simultaneously depeleted by Mn, Ca carbonate precipitation. Both manganoan kutnahorite and manganoan calcite are observed to form rapidly (days) during Mn reduction. The oxidation of sulfides by Mn-oxides is likely to be important, but highly variable, in organic-rich shelf sediments and environments such as hydrothermal vents where sulfidic plumes contact oxidized metals. A substantial Proportion of sedimentary sulfide may be oxidized and Mn reduced by this pathway, particularly in bioturbated sediments. The relative roles of lithotrophic (S) and heterotrophic (C) Mn-reduction in marine sediments are presently unknown.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide priming modulates abiotic oxidative stress tolerance: insights from ROS detoxification and scavenging

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad A.; Bhattacharjee, Soumen; Armin, Saed-Moucheshi; Qian, Pingping; Xin, Wang; Li, Hong-Yu; Burritt, David J.; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son P.

    2015-01-01

    Plants are constantly challenged by various abiotic stresses that negatively affect growth and productivity worldwide. During the course of their evolution, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to recognize external signals allowing them to respond appropriately to environmental conditions, although the degree of adjustability or tolerance to specific stresses differs from species to species. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS; hydrogen peroxide, H2O2; superoxide, O2⋅-; hydroxyl radical, OH⋅ and singlet oxygen, 1O2) is enhanced under abiotic and/or biotic stresses, which can cause oxidative damage to plant macromolecules and cell structures, leading to inhibition of plant growth and development, or to death. Among the various ROS, freely diffusible and relatively long-lived H2O2 acts as a central player in stress signal transduction pathways. These pathways can then activate multiple acclamatory responses that reinforce resistance to various abiotic and biotic stressors. To utilize H2O2 as a signaling molecule, non-toxic levels must be maintained in a delicate balancing act between H2O2 production and scavenging. Several recent studies have demonstrated that the H2O2-priming can enhance abiotic stress tolerance by modulating ROS detoxification and by regulating multiple stress-responsive pathways and gene expression. Despite the importance of the H2O2-priming, little is known about how this process improves the tolerance of plants to stress. Understanding the mechanisms of H2O2-priming-induced abiotic stress tolerance will be valuable for identifying biotechnological strategies to improve abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants. This review is an overview of our current knowledge of the possible mechanisms associated with H2O2-induced abiotic oxidative stress tolerance in plants, with special reference to antioxidant metabolism. PMID:26136756

  8. Photochemically assisted fast abiotic oxidation of manganese and formation of δ-MnO 2 nanosheets in nitrate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Haesung; Chadha, Tandeep S.; Kim, Doyoon

    This study introduces a new and previously unconsidered fast abiotic formation of Mn(IV) oxides. We report photochemically assisted fast abiotic oxidation of Mn 2+ (aq) to Mn(IV) (s) by superoxide radicals generated from nitrate photolysis. This photochemical pathway generates randomly stacked layered birnessite (δ-MnO 2) nanosheets.

  9. Arsenic Bioremediation by Biogenic Iron Oxides and Sulfides

    PubMed Central

    Couture, Raoul-Marie; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Corkhill, Claire L.; Charnock, John M.; Polya, David A.; Vaughan, David; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Microcosms containing sediment from an aquifer in Cambodia with naturally elevated levels of arsenic in the associated groundwater were used to evaluate the effectiveness of microbially mediated production of iron minerals for in situ As remediation. The microcosms were first incubated without amendments for 28 days, and the release of As and other geogenic chemicals from the sediments into the aqueous phase was monitored. Nitrate or a mixture of sulfate and lactate was then added to stimulate biological Fe(II) oxidation or sulfate reduction, respectively. Without treatment, soluble As concentrations reached 3.9 ± 0.9 μM at the end of the 143-day experiment. However, in the nitrate- and sulfate-plus-lactate-amended microcosms, soluble As levels decreased to 0.01 and 0.41 ± 0.13 μM, respectively, by the end of the experiment. Analyses using a range of biogeochemical and mineralogical tools indicated that sorption onto freshly formed hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and iron sulfide mineral phases are the likely mechanisms for As removal in the respective treatments. Incorporation of the experimental results into a one-dimensional transport-reaction model suggests that, under conditions representative of the Cambodian aquifer, the in situ precipitation of HFO would be effective in bringing groundwater into compliance with the World Health Organization (WHO) provisional guideline value for As (10 ppb or 0.13 μM), although soluble Mn release accompanying microbial Fe(II) oxidation presents a potential health concern. In contrast, production of biogenic iron sulfide minerals would not remediate the groundwater As concentration below the recommended WHO limit. PMID:23666325

  10. Coupled biotic-abiotic oxidation of organic matter by biogenic MnO_{2}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Julia; Peña, Jasquelin

    2016-04-01

    Some reactive soil minerals are strongly implicated in stabilising organic matter. However, others can play an active role in the oxidation of organic molecules. In natural systems, layer-type manganese oxide minerals (MnO2) typically occur as biomineral assemblages consisting of mineral particles and microbial biomass. Both the mineral and biological fractions of the assemblage can be powerful oxidants of organic C. The biological compartment relies on a set of enzymes to drive oxidative transformations of reduced C-substrates, whereas MnO2 minerals are strong, less specific abiotic oxidants that are assumed to rely on interfacial interactions between C-substrates and the mineral surface. This project aims to understand the coupling between microbial C mineralization and abiotic C oxidation mediated by MnO2 in bacterial-MnO2 assemblages. Specifically, under conditions of high C turnover, microbial respiration can significantly alter local pH, dissolved oxygen and pool of available reductants, which may modify rates and mechanism of C oxidation by biotic and abiotic components. We first investigated changes in the solution chemistry of Pseudomonas putida suspensions exposed to varying concentrations of glucose, chosen to represent readily bioavailable substrates in soils. Glucose concentrations tested ranged between 0 and 5.5mM and changes in pH, dissolved oxygen and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon were tracked over 48h. We then combined literature review and wet-chemical experiments to compile the pH dependence of rates of organic substrate oxidation by MnO2, including glucose. Our results demonstrate a strong pH dependence for these abiotic reactions. In assemblages of P. putida - MnO2, kinetic limitations for abiotic C oxidation by MnO2 are overcome by changes in biogeochemical conditions that result from bacterial C metabolism. When extrapolated to a soil solution confronted to an input of fresh dissolved organic matter, bacterial C metabolism of the

  11. Sulfide and ammonium oxidation, acetate mineralization by denitrification in a multipurpose UASB reactor.

    PubMed

    Beristain-Cardoso, Ricardo; Gómez, Jorge; Méndez-Pampín, Ramón

    2011-02-01

    The physiological and kinetic behavior of a denitrifying granular sludge exposed to different sulfide loading rates (55-295 mg/L d) were evaluated in a UASB reactor fed with acetate, ammonium and nitrate. At any sulfide loading rates, the consumption efficiencies of sulfide, acetate and ammonium were above 95%, while nitrate consumption efficiencies were around 62-72%. At the highest sulfide loading rate the ammonium was used as electron donor for N(2) production. The increase of sulfide loading rate also affected the fate of sulfide oxidation, since elemental sulfur was the main end product instead of sulfate. However, the lithotrophic denitrifying kinetic was not affected. FISH oligonucleotide probes for Thiobacillus denitrificans, Thiomiscropira denitrificans, genus Paracoccus and Pseudomonas spp. were used to follow the microbial ecology. The results of this work have shown that four pollutants could simultaneously be removed, namely, sulfide, ammonium, acetate and nitrate under well defined denitrifying conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide-powered solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Man

    2004-12-01

    The potential utilization of hydrogen sulfide as fuel in solid oxide fuel cells has been investigated using an oxide-ion conducting YSZ electrolyte and different kinds of anode catalysts at operating temperatures in the range of 700--900°C and at atmospheric pressure. This technology offers an economically attractive alternative to present methods for removing toxic and corrosive H2S gas from sour gas streams and a promising approach for cogenerating electrical energy and useful chemicals. The primary objective of the present research was to find active and stable anode materials. Fuel cell experimental results showed that platinum was a good electrocatalyst for the conversion of H2S, but the Pt/YSZ interface was physically unstable due to the reversible formation and decomposition of PtS in H 2S streams at elevated temperatures. Moreover, instability of the Pt/YSZ interface was accelerated significantly by electrochemical reactions, and ultimately led to the detachment of the Pt anode from the electrolyte. It has been shown that an interlayer of TiO2 stabilized the Pt anode on YSZ electrolyte, thereby prolonging cell lifetime. However, the current output for a fuel cell using Pt/TiO2 as anode was not improved compared to using Pt alone. It was therefore necessary to investigate novel anode systems for H 2S-air SOFCs. New anode catalysts comprising composite metal sulfides were developed. These catalysts exhibited good electrical conductivity and better catalytic activity than Pt. In contrast to MoS2 alone, composite catalysts (M-Mo-S, M = Fe, Co, Ni) were not volatile and had superior stability. However, when used for extended periods of time, detachment of Pt current collecting film from anodes comprising metal sulfides alone resulted in a large increase in contact resistance and reduction in cell performance. Consequently, a systematic investigation was conducted to identify alternative electronic conductors for use with M-Mo-S catalysts. Anode catalysts

  13. Disguised as a Sulfate Reducer: Growth of the Deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus by Sulfide Oxidation with Nitrate.

    PubMed

    Thorup, Casper; Schramm, Andreas; Findlay, Alyssa J; Finster, Kai W; Schreiber, Lars

    2017-07-18

    This study demonstrates that the deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus can grow chemolithotrophically by coupling sulfide oxidation to the dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite to ammonium. Key genes of known sulfide oxidation pathways are absent from the genome of D. alkaliphilus Instead, the genome contains all of the genes necessary for sulfate reduction, including a gene for a reductive-type dissimilatory bisulfite reductase (DSR). Despite this, growth by sulfate reduction was not observed. Transcriptomic analysis revealed a very high expression level of sulfate-reduction genes during growth by sulfide oxidation, while inhibition experiments with molybdate pointed to elemental sulfur/polysulfides as intermediates. Consequently, we propose that D. alkaliphilus initially oxidizes sulfide to elemental sulfur, which is then either disproportionated, or oxidized by a reversal of the sulfate reduction pathway. This is the first study providing evidence that a reductive-type DSR is involved in a sulfide oxidation pathway. Transcriptome sequencing further suggests that nitrate reduction to ammonium is performed by a novel type of periplasmic nitrate reductase and an unusual membrane-anchored nitrite reductase. IMPORTANCE Sulfide oxidation and sulfate reduction, the two major branches of the sulfur cycle, are usually ascribed to distinct sets of microbes with distinct diagnostic genes. Here we show a more complex picture, as D. alkaliphilus , with the genomic setup of a sulfate reducer, grows by sulfide oxidation. The high expression of genes typically involved in the sulfate reduction pathway suggests that these genes, including the reductive-type dissimilatory bisulfite reductases, are also involved in as-yet-unresolved sulfide oxidation pathways. Finally, D. alkaliphilus is closely related to cable bacteria, which grow by electrogenic sulfide oxidation. Since there are no pure cultures of cable bacteria, D. alkaliphilus may represent an

  14. ABIOTIC DEHALOGENATION OF 1,2-DICHLOROETHANE AND 1,2-DIBROMETHANE IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION CONTAINING HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detection of significant levels of halogenated ali- phatic contaminants in groundwater resources in the U- nited States (1, 2) has spurred a considerable effort to understand the various mechanisms-both microbiological and abiotic-by which these compounds may be trans- formed...

  15. Characterization of a transient +2 sulfur oxidation state intermediate from the oxidation of aqueous sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Vairavmurthy, M.A.; Zhou, Weiqing

    1995-04-01

    The oxidation H{sub 2}S to sulfate involves a net transfer of eight electrons and occurs through the formation of several partially oxidized intermediates with oxidation states ranging from {minus}1 to +5. Known intermediates include elemental sulfur (oxidation state 0), polysulfides (outer sulfur: {minus}1, inner sulfur: 0), sulfite (+4) and thiosulfate (outer sulfur: {minus}1, inner sulfur: +5). A noticeable gap in this series of intermediates is that of a +2 sulfur oxidation state oxoacid/oxoanion species, which was never detected experimentally. Here, we present evidence of the transient existence of +2 oxidation state intermediate in the Ni(II)-catalyzed oxidation of aqueous sulfide. X-raymore » absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Fourier-transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were used to characterize this species; they suggest that it has a sulfoxylate ion (SO{sub 2}{sup 2{minus}}) structure.« less

  16. Sulfur speciation and sulfide oxidation in the water column of the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, George W., III; Church, Thomas M.; Powell, David

    We have applied sulfur speciation techniques to understand the chemistry and cycling of sulfur in Black Sea waters. The only reduced dissolved inorganic sulfur species detected (above the low minimum detection limits of the voltammetric methods employed) in the water column was hydrogen sulfide. The maximum concentration of sulfide (423 μM) is similar to previous reports. Using a cathodic stripping square wave voltammetry (CSSWV) method for nanomolar levels of sulfide, we determined the precise boundary between the "free" hydrogen sulfide (sulfidic) zone and the upper (oxic/suboxic) water column at the two stations studied. This boundary has apparently moved up by about 50 m in the past 20 years. Our results help demonstrate three chemically distinct zones of water in the central basin of the Black Sea: (1) the oxic [0-65 m], (2) the anoxic/nonsulfidic [65-100 m] and (3) the sulfidic [>100 m]. Sulfide bound to metals ("complexed" sulfide) is observed in both the oxic and anoxic/nonsulfidic zones of the water column. This supports previous studies on metal sulfide forms. From the electrochemical data, it is possible to estimate the strength of the complexation of sulfide to metals (log K = 10 to 11). Thiosulfate and sulfite were below our minimum detectable limit (MDL) of 50 nM using CSSWV. Elemental sulfur (MDL 5 nM) was detected below the onset of the hydrogen sulfide zone (90-100 m) with a maximum of 30-60 nM near 120 m. The sulfur speciation results for the Black Sea are lower by one order of magnitude or more than other marine systems such as the Cariaco Trench and salt marshes. New HPLC techniques were applied to detect thiols at submicromolar levels. The presence of thiols (2-mercaptoethylamine, 2-mercaptoethanol, N-acetylcysteine and glutathione) is correlated with the remineralization of organic matter at the oxic and anoxic/nonsulfidic interface. Water samples collected from the upper 50 m of the sulfidic zone showed significant sulfide oxidation on

  17. Microbial oxidation of soluble sulfide in produced water from the Bakkeen Sands

    SciTech Connect

    Gevertz, D.; Zimmerman, S.; Jenneman, G.E.

    1995-12-31

    The presence of soluble sulfide in produced water results in problems for the petroleum industry due to its toxicity, odor, corrosive nature, and potential for wellbore plugging. Sulfide oxidation by indigenous nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) present in brine collected from wells at the Coleville Unit (CVU) in Saskatchewan, Canada, was investigated. Sulfide oxidation took place readily when nitrate and phosphate were added to brine enrichment cultures, resulting in a decrease in sulfide levels of 99-165 ppm to nondetectable levels (< 3.3 ppm). Produced water collected from a number of producing wells was screened to determine the time required for complete sulfidemore » oxidation, in order to select candidate wells for treatment. Three wells were chosen, based on sulfide removal in 48 hours or less. These wells were treated down the backside of the annulus with a solution containing 10 mM KNO{sub 3} and 100 {mu}M NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. Following a 24- to 72-hour shut-in, reductions in pretreatment sulfide levels of greater than 90% were observed for two of the wells, as well as sustained sulfide reductions of 50% for at least two days following startup. NRB populations in the produced brine were observed to increase significantly following treatment, but no significant increases in sulfate-reducing bacteria were observed. These results demonstrate the technical feasibility of stimulating indigenous populations of NRB to remediate and control sulfide in produced brine.« less

  18. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF DIMETHYL SULFIDE WITH OZONE: EFFECT OF PROMOTER AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports improved catalytic activities and stabilities for the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a major pollutant of pulp and paper mills. Ozone was used as an oxidant and Cu, Mo, V, Cr and Mn metal oxides, and mixed metal oxides support on y-alumina as catalysts ov...

  19. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF DIMETHYL SULFIDE WITH OZONE: EFFECTS OF PROMOTER AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports improved catalytic activities and stabilities for the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a major pollutant of pulp and paper mills. Ozone was used as an oxidant and activities of Cu, Mo, Cr and Mn oxides, and mixed metal oxides supported on -alumina, were tes...

  20. Anionic Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Protect Plant Photosynthesis from Abiotic Stress by Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Wu, Honghong; Tito, Nicholas; Giraldo, Juan P

    2017-11-28

    Plant abiotic stress leads to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a consequent decrease in photosynthetic performance. We demonstrate that a plant nanobionics approach of localizing negatively charged, sub-11 nm, spherical cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) inside chloroplasts in vivo augments ROS scavenging and photosynthesis of Arabidopsis thaliana plants under excess light (2000 μmol m -2 s -1 , 1.5 h), heat (35 °C, 2.5 h), and dark chilling (4 °C, 5 days). Poly(acrylic acid) nanoceria (PNC) with a hydrodynamic diameter (10.3 nm)-lower than the maximum plant cell wall porosity-and negative ζ-potential (-16.9 mV) exhibit significantly higher colocalization (46%) with chloroplasts in leaf mesophyll cells than aminated nanoceria (ANC) (27%) of similar size (12.6 nm) but positive charge (9.7 mV). Nanoceria are transported into chloroplasts via nonendocytic pathways, influenced by the electrochemical gradient of the plasma membrane potential. PNC with a low Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ ratio (35.0%) reduce leaf ROS levels by 52%, including hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. For the latter ROS, there is no known plant enzyme scavenger. Plants embedded with these PNC that were exposed to abiotic stress exhibit an increase up to 19% in quantum yield of photosystem II, 67% in carbon assimilation rates, and 61% in Rubisco carboxylation rates relative to plants without nanoparticles. In contrast, PNC with high Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ ratio (60.8%) increase overall leaf ROS levels and do not protect photosynthesis from oxidative damage during abiotic stress. This study demonstrates that anionic, spherical, sub-11 nm PNC with low Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ ratio can act as a tool to study the impact of oxidative stress on plant photosynthesis and to protect plants from abiotic stress.

  1. Survival of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria on corroded concrete surfaces of sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Jensen, H S; Nielsen, A H; Hvitved-Jacobsen, T; Vollertsen, J

    2008-01-01

    The activity of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria within corroded concrete from a sewer manhole was investigated. The bacteria were exposed to hydrogen sulfide starvation for up till 18 months, upon which their hydrogen sulfide oxidizing activity was measured. It was tested whether the observed reduction in biological activity was caused by a biological lag phase or by decay of the bacteria. The results showed that the bacterial activity declined with approximately 40% pr. month during the first two months of hydrogen sulfide starvation. After 2-3 months of starvation, the activity stabilized. Even after 6 months of starvation, exposure to hydrogen sulfide for 6 hours a day on three successive days could restore the bacteriological activity to about 80% of the initial activity. After 12 months of starvation, the activity could, however, not be restored, and after 18 months the biological activity approached zero. The long-term survival aspect of concrete corroding bacteria has implications for predicting hydrogen sulfide corrosion in sewer systems subject to irregular hydrogen sulfide loadings, e.g. as they occur in temperate climates where hydrogen sulfide often is a summer-problem only.

  2. Polysulfides as Intermediates in the Oxidation of Sulfide to Sulfate by Beggiatoa spp.

    PubMed Central

    Schwedt, Anne; Kreutzmann, Anne-Christin; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Milucka, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Zero-valent sulfur is a key intermediate in the microbial oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. Many sulfide-oxidizing bacteria produce and store large amounts of sulfur intra- or extracellularly. It is still not understood how the stored sulfur is metabolized, as the most stable form of S0 under standard biological conditions, orthorhombic α-sulfur, is most likely inaccessible to bacterial enzymes. Here we analyzed the speciation of sulfur in single cells of living sulfide-oxidizing bacteria via Raman spectroscopy. Our results showed that under various ecological and physiological conditions, all three investigated Beggiatoa strains stored sulfur as a combination of cyclooctasulfur (S8) and inorganic polysulfides (Sn2−). Linear sulfur chains were detected during both the oxidation and reduction of stored sulfur, suggesting that Sn2− species represent a universal pool of bioavailable sulfur. Formation of polysulfides due to the cleavage of sulfur rings could occur biologically by thiol-containing enzymes or chemically by the strong nucleophile HS− as Beggiatoa migrates vertically between oxic and sulfidic zones in the environment. Most Beggiatoa spp. thus far studied can oxidize sulfur further to sulfate. Our results suggest that the ratio of produced sulfur and sulfate varies depending on the sulfide flux. Almost all of the sulfide was oxidized directly to sulfate under low-sulfide-flux conditions, whereas only 50% was oxidized to sulfate under high-sulfide-flux conditions leading to S0 deposition. With Raman spectroscopy we could show that sulfate accumulated in Beggiatoa filaments, reaching intracellular concentrations of 0.72 to 1.73 M. PMID:24212585

  3. Electric coupling between distant nitrate reduction and sulfide oxidation in marine sediment

    PubMed Central

    Marzocchi, Ugo; Trojan, Daniela; Larsen, Steffen; Louise Meyer, Rikke; Peter Revsbech, Niels; Schramm, Andreas; Peter Nielsen, Lars; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family can conduct electrons over centimeter-long distances thereby coupling oxygen reduction at the surface of marine sediment to sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers. The ability of these cable bacteria to use alternative electron acceptors is currently unknown. Here we show that these organisms can use also nitrate or nitrite as an electron acceptor thereby coupling the reduction of nitrate to distant oxidation of sulfide. Sulfidic marine sediment was incubated with overlying nitrate-amended anoxic seawater. Within 2 months, electric coupling of spatially segregated nitrate reduction and sulfide oxidation was evident from: (1) the formation of a 4–6-mm-deep zone separating sulfide oxidation from the associated nitrate reduction, and (2) the presence of pH signatures consistent with proton consumption by cathodic nitrate reduction, and proton production by anodic sulfide oxidation. Filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with the longitudinal structures characteristic of cable bacteria were detected in anoxic, nitrate-amended incubations but not in anoxic, nitrate-free controls. Nitrate reduction by cable bacteria using long-distance electron transport to get privileged access to distant electron donors is a hitherto unknown mechanism in nitrogen and sulfur transformations, and the quantitative importance for elements cycling remains to be addressed. PMID:24577351

  4. Reductive Sequestration Of Pertechnetate (99TcO4–) By Nano Zerovalent Iron (nZVI) Transformed By Abiotic Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Dimin; Anitori, Roberto; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-04-24

    Under anoxic conditions, soluble 99TcO4– can be reduced to less soluble TcO2•nH2O, but the oxide is highly susceptible to reoxidation. Here we investigate an alternative strategy for remediation of Tc-contaminated groundwater whereby sequestration as Tc sulfide is favored by sulfidic conditions stimulated by nano zero-valent iron (nZVI). nZVI was pre-exposed to increasing concentrations of sulfide in simulated Hanford groundwater for 24 hrs to mimic the stages of aquifer sulfate reduction and onset of biotic sulfidogenesis. Solid-phase characterizations of the sulfidated nZVI confirmed the formation of nanocrystalline FeS phases, but higher S/Fe ratios (>0.112) did not result in the formation ofmore » significantly more FeS. The kinetics of Tc sequestration by these materials showed faster Tc removal rates with increasing S/Fe between S/Fe = 0–0.056, but decreasing Tc removal rates with S/Fe > 0.224. The more favorable Tc removal kinetics at low S/Fe could be due to a higher affinity of TcO4– for FeS (over iron oxides), and electron microscopy confirmed that the majority of the Tc was associated with FeS phases. The inhibition of Tc removal at high S/Fe appears to have been caused by excess HS–. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that as S/Fe increased, Tc speciation shifted from TcO2•nH2O to TcS2. The most substantial change of Tc speciation occurred at low S/Fe, coinciding with the rapid increase of Tc removal rate. This agreement further confirms the importance of FeS in Tc sequestration.« less

  5. Abiotic and biotic factors responsible for antimonite oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingxin; Yang, Birong; Shi, Manman; Yuan, Kai; Guo, Wei; Wang, Qian; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-01-01

    Antimonite [Sb(III)]-oxidizing bacteria can transform the toxic Sb(III) into the less toxic antimonate [Sb(V)]. Recently, the cytoplasmic Sb(III)-oxidase AnoA and the periplasmic arsenite [As(III)] oxidase AioAB were shown to responsible for bacterial Sb(III) oxidation, however, disruption of each gene only partially decreased Sb(III) oxidation efficiency. This study showed that in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4, Sb(III) induced cellular H2O2 content and H2O2 degradation gene katA. Gene knock-out/complementation of katA, anoA, aioA and anoA/aioA and Sb(III) oxidation and growth experiments showed that katA, anoA and aioA were essential for Sb(III) oxidation and resistance and katA was also essential for H2O2 resistance. Furthermore, linear correlations were observed between cellular H2O2 and Sb(V) content in vivo and chemical H2O2 and Sb(V) content in vitro (R2 = 0.93 and 0.94, respectively). These results indicate that besides the biotic factors, the cellular H2O2 induced by Sb(III) also catalyzes bacterial Sb(III) oxidation as an abiotic oxidant. The data reveal a novel mechanism that bacterial Sb(III) oxidation is associated with abiotic (cellular H2O2) and biotic (AnoA and AioAB) factors and Sb(III) oxidation process consumes cellular H2O2 which contributes to microbial detoxification of both Sb(III) and cellular H2O2. PMID:28252030

  6. Abiotic and biotic factors responsible for antimonite oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingxin; Yang, Birong; Shi, Manman; Yuan, Kai; Guo, Wei; Wang, Qian; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-03-01

    Antimonite [Sb(III)]-oxidizing bacteria can transform the toxic Sb(III) into the less toxic antimonate [Sb(V)]. Recently, the cytoplasmic Sb(III)-oxidase AnoA and the periplasmic arsenite [As(III)] oxidase AioAB were shown to responsible for bacterial Sb(III) oxidation, however, disruption of each gene only partially decreased Sb(III) oxidation efficiency. This study showed that in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4, Sb(III) induced cellular H2O2 content and H2O2 degradation gene katA. Gene knock-out/complementation of katA, anoA, aioA and anoA/aioA and Sb(III) oxidation and growth experiments showed that katA, anoA and aioA were essential for Sb(III) oxidation and resistance and katA was also essential for H2O2 resistance. Furthermore, linear correlations were observed between cellular H2O2 and Sb(V) content in vivo and chemical H2O2 and Sb(V) content in vitro (R2 = 0.93 and 0.94, respectively). These results indicate that besides the biotic factors, the cellular H2O2 induced by Sb(III) also catalyzes bacterial Sb(III) oxidation as an abiotic oxidant. The data reveal a novel mechanism that bacterial Sb(III) oxidation is associated with abiotic (cellular H2O2) and biotic (AnoA and AioAB) factors and Sb(III) oxidation process consumes cellular H2O2 which contributes to microbial detoxification of both Sb(III) and cellular H2O2.

  7. Variability of Fe isotope compositions of hydrothermal sulfides and oxidation products at mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohu; Wang, Jianqiang; Chu, Fengyou; Wang, Hao; Li, Zhenggang; Yu, Xing; Bi, Dongwei; He, Yongsheng

    2018-04-01

    Significant Fe isotopic fractionation occurs during the precipitation and oxidative weathering of modern seafloor hydrothermal sulfides, which has an important impact on the cycling of Fe isotopes in the ocean. This study reports the Fe-isotope compositions of whole-rock sulfides and single-mineral pyrite collected from hydrothermal fields at the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge (SMAR) and the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and discusses the impacts of precipitation and late-stage oxidative weathering of sulfide minerals on Fe isotopic fractionation. The results show large variation in the Fe-isotope compositions of the sulfides from the different hydrothermal fields on the mid-oceanic ridges, indicating that relatively significant isotope fractionation occurs during the sulfide precipitation and oxidative weathering processes. The Fe-isotope compositions of the sulfides from the study area at the SMAR vary across a relatively small range, with an average value of 0.01‰. This Fe-isotope composition is similar to the Fe-isotope composition of mid-oceanic ridge basalt, which suggests that Fe was mainly leached from basalt. In contrast, the Fe-isotope composition of the sulfides from the study area at the EPR are significantly enriched in light Fe isotopes (average value - 1.63‰), mainly due to the kinetic fractionation during the rapid precipitation process of hydrothermal sulfide. In addition, the pyrite from different hydrothermal fields is enriched in light Fe isotopes, which is consistent with the phenomenon in which light Fe isotopes are preferentially enriched during the precipitation of pyrite. The red oxides have the heaviest Fe-isotope compositions (up to 0.80‰), indicating that heavy Fe isotopes are preferentially enriched in the oxidation product during the late-stage oxidation process. The data obtained from this study and previous studies show a significant difference between the Fe-isotope compositions of the sulfides from the SMAR and EPR. The relatively heavy

  8. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides: Kinetics, degradation, and oxidized products.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Xu, Xinxin; Zeng, Xiaolan; Feng, Mingbao; Qu, Ruijuan; Wang, Zunyao; Nesnas, Nasri; Sharma, Virender K

    2018-06-13

    This paper presents oxidation of polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides (PCDPSs), dioxin-like compounds, by ferrate(VI) (Fe VI O 4 2- , Fe(VI)). Kinetics of the reactions of Fe(VI) with seventeen PCDPSs, differ in number and positions of chlorine atoms (from 2 to 7), were investigated at pH 8.0. The second-order rate constants (k, M -1 s -1 ) of the reactions varied with the numbers and positions of chlorine atoms and appeared to be related with standard Gibbs free energy of formation (Δ f G 0 ) of PCDPSs. Degradation experiments in the presence of ions and humic acid demonstrated complete removal of PeCDPS by Fe(VI) in minutes. Pathways of the reaction were investigated by identifying oxidized products (OPs) of the reaction between Fe(VI) and 2,2',3',4,5-pentachlorodiphenyl sulfide (PeCDPS) at pH 8.0. Pathways of oxidation involved major pathway of attack on sulfur(II) by Fe(VI) in steps to yield sulfoxide type products, and subsequent breakage of C-S bond with the formation of sulfonic acid-containing trichloro compound. Minor pathways were hydroxylation of benzene ring and substitution of chlorine atom with hydroxyl group. Estimation of toxicity of OPs of the oxidation of PeCDPS by Fe(VI) suggested the decreased toxicity from the parent contaminant. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Oxidative Weathering of Archean Sulfides: Implications for the Great Oxidation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A.; Romaniello, S. J.; Reinhard, C.; Garcia-Robledo, E.; Revsbech, N. P.; Canfield, D. E.; Lyons, T. W.; Anbar, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    The first widely accepted evidence for oxidation of Earth's atmosphere and oceans occurs ~2.45 Ga immediately prior to the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). A major line of evidence for this transition includes the abundances and isotopic variations of redox-sensitive transition metals in marine sediments (e.g., Fe, Mo, Re, Cr, and U). It is often assumed that oxidative weathering is required to liberate these redox-sensitive elements from sulfide minerals in the crust, and hence that their presence in early Archean marine sediments signifies that oxidative weathering was stimulated by small and/or transient "whiffs" of O2 in the environment.1 However, studies of crustal sulfide reactivity have not been conducted at O2 concentrations as low as those that would have prevailed when O2 began its rise during the late Archean (estimated at <10-5 present atmospheric O2).2 As a result, it is difficult to quantify O2 concentrations implied by observed trace metal variations. As a first step toward providing more quantitative constraints on late Archean pO2, we conducted laboratory studies of pyrite and molybdenite oxidation kinetics at the nanomolar O2 concentrations that are relevant to late Archean environments. These measurements were made using recently developed, highly sensitive optical O2 sensors to monitor the rates at which the powdered minerals consumed dissolved O2 in a range of pH-buffered solutions.3Our data extend the range of experimental pyrite oxidation rates in the literature by three orders of magnitude from ~10-3 present atmospheric O2 to ~10-6. We find that molybdenite and pyrite oxidation continues to <1 nM O2 (4 x 10-6 present atmospheric O2). This implies that oxidative weathering of sulfides could occur under conditions which preserve MIF S fractionation. Furthermore, our results indicate that the rate law and reaction order of pyrite oxidation kinetics change significantly at nanomolar concentrations of O2 when compared to previous compilations.2 Our

  10. Hydrogen Peroxide Signaling in Plant Development and Abiotic Responses: Crosstalk with Nitric Oxide and Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Lijuan; Liao, Weibiao

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as a reactive oxygen species, is widely generated in many biological systems. It has been considered as an important signaling molecule that mediates various physiological and biochemical processes in plants. Normal metabolism in plant cells results in H2O2 generation, from a variety of sources. Also, it is now clear that nitric oxide (NO) and calcium (Ca2+) function as signaling molecules in plants. Both H2O2 and NO are involved in plant development and abiotic responses. A wide range of evidences suggest that NO could be generated under similar stress conditions and with similar kinetics as H2O2. The interplay between H2O2 and NO has important functional implications to modulate transduction processes in plants. Moreover, close interaction also exists between H2O2 and Ca2+ in response to development and abiotic stresses in plants. Cellular responses to H2O2 and Ca2+ signaling systems are complex. There is quite a bit of interaction between H2O2 and Ca2+ signaling in responses to several stimuli. This review aims to introduce these evidences in our understanding of the crosstalk among H2O2, NO, and Ca2+ signaling which regulates plant growth and development, and other cellular and physiological responses to abiotic stresses. PMID:26973673

  11. Disguised as a Sulfate Reducer: Growth of the Deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus by Sulfide Oxidation with Nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Thorup, Casper; Schramm, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study demonstrates that the deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus can grow chemolithotrophically by coupling sulfide oxidation to the dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite to ammonium. Key genes of known sulfide oxidation pathways are absent from the genome of D. alkaliphilus. Instead, the genome contains all of the genes necessary for sulfate reduction, including a gene for a reductive-type dissimilatory bisulfite reductase (DSR). Despite this, growth by sulfate reduction was not observed. Transcriptomic analysis revealed a very high expression level of sulfate-reduction genes during growth by sulfide oxidation, while inhibition experiments with molybdate pointed to elemental sulfur/polysulfides as intermediates. Consequently, we propose that D. alkaliphilus initially oxidizes sulfide to elemental sulfur, which is then either disproportionated, or oxidized by a reversal of the sulfate reduction pathway. This is the first study providing evidence that a reductive-type DSR is involved in a sulfide oxidation pathway. Transcriptome sequencing further suggests that nitrate reduction to ammonium is performed by a novel type of periplasmic nitrate reductase and an unusual membrane-anchored nitrite reductase. PMID:28720728

  12. Kinetics of Indigenous Nitrate Reducing Sulfide Oxidizing Activity in Microaerophilic Wastewater Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Villahermosa, Desirée; Corzo, Alfonso; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; González, Juan M.; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate decreases sulfide release in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), but little is known on how it affects the microzonation and kinetics of related microbial processes within the biofilm. The effect of nitrate addition on these properties for sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and oxygen respiration were studied with the use of microelectrodes in microaerophilic wastewater biofilms. Mass balance calaculations and community composition analysis were also performed. At basal WWTP conditions, the biofilm presented a double-layer system. The upper microaerophilic layer (~300 μm) showed low sulfide production (0.31 μmol cm-3 h-1) and oxygen consumption rates (0.01 μmol cm-3 h-1). The anoxic lower layer showed high sulfide production (2.7 μmol cm-3 h-1). Nitrate addition decreased net sulfide production rates, caused by an increase in sulfide oxidation rates (SOR) in the upper layer, rather than an inhibition of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). This suggests that the indigenous nitrate reducing-sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) were immediately activated by nitrate. The functional vertical structure of the biofilm changed to a triple-layer system, where the previously upper sulfide-producing layer in the absence of nitrate split into two new layers: 1) an upper sulfide-consuming layer, whose thickness is probably determined by the nitrate penetration depth within the biofilm, and 2) a middle layer producing sulfide at an even higher rate than in the absence of nitrate in some cases. Below these layers, the lower net sulfide-producing layer remained unaffected. Net SOR varied from 0.05 to 0.72 μmol cm-3 h-1 depending on nitrate and sulfate availability. Addition of low nitrate concentrations likely increased sulfate availability within the biofilm and resulted in an increase of both net sulfate reduction and net sulfide oxidation by overcoming sulfate diffusional limitation from the water phase and the strong coupling between SRB and NR-SOB syntrophic

  13. Emissions of putative isoprene oxidation products from mango branches under abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Jardine, Kolby J.; Meyers, Kimberly; Abrell, Leif; Alves, Eliane G.; Yanez Serrano, Ana Maria; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Karl, Thomas; Guenther, Alex; Vickers, Claudia; Chambers, Jeffrey Q.

    2013-01-01

    Although several per cent of net carbon assimilation can be re-released as isoprene emissions to the atmosphere by many tropical plants, much uncertainty remains regarding its biological significance. In a previous study, we detected emissions of isoprene and its oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) from tropical plants under high temperature/light stress, suggesting that isoprene is oxidized not only in the atmosphere but also within plants. However, a comprehensive analysis of the suite of isoprene oxidation products in plants has not been performed and production relationships with environmental stress have not been described. In this study, putative isoprene oxidation products from mango (Mangifera indica) branches under abiotic stress were first identified. High temperature/light and freeze–thaw treatments verified direct emissions of the isoprene oxidation products MVK and MACR together with the first observations of 3-methyl furan (3-MF) and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) as putative novel isoprene oxidation products. Mechanical wounding also stimulated emissions of MVK and MACR. Photosynthesis under 13CO2 resulted in rapid (<30min) labelling of up to five carbon atoms of isoprene, with a similar labelling pattern observed in the putative oxidation products. These observations highlight the need to investigate further the mechanisms of isoprene oxidation within plants under stress and its biological and atmospheric significance. PMID:23881400

  14. Emissions of putative isoprene oxidation products from mango branches under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Kolby J; Meyers, Kimberly; Abrell, Leif; Alves, Eliane G; Yanez Serrano, Ana Maria; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Karl, Thomas; Guenther, Alex; Chambers, Jeffrey Q; Vickers, Claudia

    2013-09-01

    Although several per cent of net carbon assimilation can be re-released as isoprene emissions to the atmosphere by many tropical plants, much uncertainty remains regarding its biological significance. In a previous study, we detected emissions of isoprene and its oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) from tropical plants under high temperature/light stress, suggesting that isoprene is oxidized not only in the atmosphere but also within plants. However, a comprehensive analysis of the suite of isoprene oxidation products in plants has not been performed and production relationships with environmental stress have not been described. In this study, putative isoprene oxidation products from mango (Mangifera indica) branches under abiotic stress were first identified. High temperature/light and freeze-thaw treatments verified direct emissions of the isoprene oxidation products MVK and MACR together with the first observations of 3-methyl furan (3-MF) and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) as putative novel isoprene oxidation products. Mechanical wounding also stimulated emissions of MVK and MACR. Photosynthesis under (13)CO2 resulted in rapid (<30 min) labelling of up to five carbon atoms of isoprene, with a similar labelling pattern observed in the putative oxidation products. These observations highlight the need to investigate further the mechanisms of isoprene oxidation within plants under stress and its biological and atmospheric significance.

  15. Emissions of putative isoprene oxidation products from mango branches under abiotic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, Kolby J.; Meyers, Kimberly; Abrell, Leif

    Although several per cent of net carbon assimilation can be re-released as isoprene emissions to the atmosphere by many tropical plants, much uncertainty remains regarding its biological significance. In a previous study, we detected emissions of isoprene and its oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) from tropical plants under high temperature/light stress, suggesting that isoprene is oxidized not only in the atmosphere but also within plants. However, a comprehensive analysis of the suite of isoprene oxidation products in plants has not been performed and production relationships with environmental stress have not been described. In this study, putativemore » isoprene oxidation products from mango (Mangifera indica) branches under abiotic stress were first identified. High temperature/light and freeze–thaw treatments verified direct emissions of the isoprene oxidation products MVK and MACR together with the first observations of 3-methyl furan (3-MF) and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) as putative novel isoprene oxidation products. Mechanical wounding also stimulated emissions of MVK and MACR. Photosynthesis under 13CO 2 resulted in rapid (<30min) labelling of up to five carbon atoms of isoprene, with a similar labelling pattern observed in the putative oxidation products. These observations highlight the need to investigate further the mechanisms of isoprene oxidation within plants under stress and its biological and atmospheric significance.« less

  16. Emissions of putative isoprene oxidation products from mango branches under abiotic stress

    DOE PAGES

    Jardine, Kolby J.; Meyers, Kimberly; Abrell, Leif; ...

    2013-07-23

    Although several per cent of net carbon assimilation can be re-released as isoprene emissions to the atmosphere by many tropical plants, much uncertainty remains regarding its biological significance. In a previous study, we detected emissions of isoprene and its oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) from tropical plants under high temperature/light stress, suggesting that isoprene is oxidized not only in the atmosphere but also within plants. However, a comprehensive analysis of the suite of isoprene oxidation products in plants has not been performed and production relationships with environmental stress have not been described. In this study, putativemore » isoprene oxidation products from mango (Mangifera indica) branches under abiotic stress were first identified. High temperature/light and freeze–thaw treatments verified direct emissions of the isoprene oxidation products MVK and MACR together with the first observations of 3-methyl furan (3-MF) and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) as putative novel isoprene oxidation products. Mechanical wounding also stimulated emissions of MVK and MACR. Photosynthesis under 13CO 2 resulted in rapid (<30min) labelling of up to five carbon atoms of isoprene, with a similar labelling pattern observed in the putative oxidation products. These observations highlight the need to investigate further the mechanisms of isoprene oxidation within plants under stress and its biological and atmospheric significance.« less

  17. Effect of temperature and initial dibutyl sulfide concentration in chloroform on its oxidation rate by ozone.

    PubMed

    Popiel, Stanisław; Nalepa, Tomasz; Dzierzak, Dorota; Stankiewicz, Romuald; Witkiewicz, Zygfryd

    2008-09-15

    A scheme of dibutyl sulfide (DBS) oxidation with ozone and generation of transitional products was determined in this study. The main identified intermediate product was dibutyl sulfoxide (DBSO), and the main end product of DBS oxidation was dibutyl sulfone (DBSO2). It was determined that for three temperatures: 0, 10 and 20 degrees C there was certain initial DBS concentration for which half-times observed in experimental conditions were equal and independent from temperature. Generation of phosgene and water as by-products was confirmed for the reaction of DBS with ozone in chloroform. Results of the described study allowed to present generalized mechanism of sulfide oxidation with ozone.

  18. Potentials of biological oxidation processes for the treatment of spent sulfidic caustics containing thiols.

    PubMed

    Sipma, Jan; Svitelskaya, Anna; van der Mark, Bart; Pol, Look W Hulshoff; Lettinga, Gatze; Buisman, Cees J N; Janssen, Albert J H

    2004-12-01

    This research focused on the biological treatment of sulfidic spent caustics from refineries, which contain mainly hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol (MT) and ethanethiol (ET). Also various organic compounds can be present such as BTEX. Biological oxidation of 2.5 mM MT in batch experiments occurred after MT was first auto-oxidized into dimethyldisulfide (DMDS) whereafter oxidation into sulfate was completed in 350 h. DMDS as sole substrate was completely oxidized within 40 h. Therefore, DMDS formation seems to play an important role in detoxification of MT. Biological oxidation of ET and buthanethiol was not successful in batch experiments. Complete oxidation of MT and ET was observed in flow-through reactor experiments. Simultaneous oxidation of sulfide and MT was achieved when treating a synthetic spent caustic, containing 10 mM sulfide and 2.5 mM MT, in a bubble column reactor with carrier material at a hydraulic retention time of 6 h. Addition of 7.5 mM phenol, a common pollutant of spent caustics, did not adversely affect the biological oxidation process and phenol was completely removed from the effluent. Finally, three different spent caustics solutions from refineries were successfully treated.

  19. Abiotic mechanism for the formation of atmospheric nitrous oxide from ammonium nitrate.

    PubMed

    Rubasinghege, Gayan; Spak, Scott N; Stanier, Charles O; Carmichael, Gregory R; Grassian, Vicki H

    2011-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and a primary cause of stratospheric ozone destruction. Despite its importance, there remain missing sources in the N2O budget. Here we report the formation of atmospheric nitrous oxide from the decomposition of ammonium nitrate via an abiotic mechanism that is favorable in the presence of light, relative humidity and a surface. This source of N2O is not currently accounted for in the global N2O budget. Annual production of N2O from atmospheric aerosols and surface fertilizer application over the continental United States from this abiotic pathway is estimated from results of an annual chemical transport simulation with the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ). This pathway is projected to produce 9.3(+0.7/-5.3) Gg N2O annually over North America. N2O production by this mechanism is expected globally from both megacities and agricultural areas and may become more important under future projected changes in anthropogenic emissions.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of transition metal oxide/sulfide nanostructures for electrochemical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Gamze

    This thesis is essentially oriented to develop low-cost nanostructured transition metal (nickel and vanadium) oxides and sulfides with high energy density, power density and electrochemical stability via strategies of structural design, hybridization, functionalization and surface engineering. Metal oxide and metal oxide/sulfide hybrid nanostructures in several designs, including hierarchical porous nanostructures, hollow polyhedrons, nanocubes, nanoframes, octopod nanoframes, and nanocages, were synthesized to study the contribution of structural design, compositional engineering, functionalization and surface engineering to the electrochemical properties of the materials. Modulated compositional and structural features disclosed the opportunities of large accessible active sites, facile ion transport, robustness and enhanced electrical conductivity. The best electrochemical performance with merits of highest energy density (38.9 Wh kg-1), power density (7.4 kW kg-1) and electrochemical stability (90.9% after 10000 cycles) was obtained for nickel cobalt layered double hydroxide/cobalt sulfide (NiCo-LDH/Co9S8) hybrid hollow polyhedron structure.

  1. Geochemical modeling of arsenic sulfide oxidation kinetics in a mining environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengke, Maggy F.; Tempel, Regina N.

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic sulfide (AsS (am), As 2S 3 (am), orpiment, and realgar) oxidation rates increase with increasing pH values. The rates of arsenic sulfide oxidation at higher pH values relative to those at pH˜2 are in the range of 26-4478, 3-17, 8-182, and 4-10 times for As 2S 3 (am), orpiment, AsS (am), and realgar, respectively. Numerical simulations of orpiment and realgar oxidation kinetics were conducted using the geochemical reaction path code EQ3/6 to evaluate the effects of variable DO concentrations and mineral reactivity factors on water chemistry evolution during orpiment and realgar oxidation. The results show that total As concentrations increase by ˜1.14 to 13 times and that pH values decrease by ˜0.6 to 4.2 U over a range of mineral reactivity factors from 1% to 50% after 2000 days (5.5 yr). The As release from orpiment and realgar oxidation exceeds the current U.S. National Drinking Water Standard (0.05 ppm) approximately in 200-300 days at the lowest initial dissolved oxygen concentration (3 ppm) and a reactivity factor of 1%. The results of simulations of orpiment oxidation in the presence of albite and calcite show that calcite can act as an effective buffer to the acid water produced from orpiment oxidation within relatively short periods (days/months), but the release of As continues to increase. Pyrite oxidation rates are faster than orpiment and realgar from pH 2.3 to 8; however, pyrite oxidation rates are slower than As 2S 3 (am) and AsS (am) at pH 8. The activation energies of arsenic sulfide oxidation range from 16 to 124 kJ/mol at pH˜8 and temperature 25 to 40°C, and pyrite activation energies are ˜52 to 88 kJ/mol, depending on pH and temperature range. The magnitude of activation energies for both pyrite and arsenic sulfide solids indicates that the oxidation of these minerals is dominated by surface reactions, except for As 2S 3 (am). Low activation energies of As 2S 3 (am) indicate that diffusion may be rate controlling. Limestone is

  2. Pt(ii) coordination complexes as visible light photocatalysts for the oxidation of sulfides using batch and flow processes.

    PubMed

    Casado-Sánchez, Antonio; Gómez-Ballesteros, Rocío; Tato, Francisco; Soriano, Francisco J; Pascual-Coca, Gustavo; Cabrera, Silvia; Alemán, José

    2016-07-12

    A new catalytic system for the photooxidation of sulfides based on Pt(ii) complexes is presented. The catalyst is capable of oxidizing a large number of sulfides containing aryl, alkyl, allyl, benzyl, as well as more complex structures such as heterocycles and methionine amino acid, with complete chemoselectivity. In addition, the first sulfur oxidation in a continuous flow process has been developed.

  3. Inhibition of microbiological sulfide oxidation by methanethiol and dimethyl polysulfides at natron-alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Pim L F; de Graaff, Marco; Fortuny-Picornell, Marc; van Leerdam, Robin C; Janssen, Albert J H

    2009-06-01

    To avoid problems related to the discharge of sulfidic spent caustics, a biotechnological process is developed for the treatment of gases containing both hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol. The process operates at natron-alkaline conditions (>1 mol L(-1) of sodium- and potassium carbonates and a pH of 8.5-10) to enable the treatment of gases with a high partial CO(2) pressure. In the process, methanethiol reacts with biologically produced sulfur particles to form a complex mixture predominantly consisting of inorganic polysulfides, dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), and dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS). The effect of these organic sulfur compounds on the biological oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur was studied with natron-alkaliphilic bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalivibrio. Biological oxidation rates were reduced by 50% at 0.05 mM methanethiol, while for DMDS and DMTS, this was estimated to occur at 1.5 and 1.0 mM, respectively. The inhibiting effect of methanethiol on biological sulfide oxidation diminished due to its reaction with biologically produced sulfur particles. This reaction increases the feasibility of biotechnological treatment of gases containing both hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol at natron-alkaline conditions.

  4. In Situ Gene Expression Responsible for Sulfide Oxidation and CO2 Fixation of an Uncultured Large Sausage-Shaped Aquificae Bacterium in a Sulfidic Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Tamazawa, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Takasaki, Kazuto; Mitani, Yasuo; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tamaki, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the in situ gene expression profile of sulfur-turf microbial mats dominated by an uncultured large sausage-shaped Aquificae bacterium, a key metabolic player in sulfur-turfs in sulfidic hot springs. A reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the genes responsible for sulfide, sulfite, and thiosulfate oxidation and carbon fixation via the reductive TCA cycle were continuously expressed in sulfur-turf mats taken at different sampling points, seasons, and years. These results suggest that the uncultured large sausage-shaped bacterium has the ability to grow chemolithoautotrophically and plays key roles as a primary producer in the sulfidic hot spring ecosystem in situ. PMID:27297893

  5. In Situ Gene Expression Responsible for Sulfide Oxidation and CO2 Fixation of an Uncultured Large Sausage-Shaped Aquificae Bacterium in a Sulfidic Hot Spring.

    PubMed

    Tamazawa, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Takasaki, Kazuto; Mitani, Yasuo; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tamaki, Hideyuki

    2016-06-25

    We investigated the in situ gene expression profile of sulfur-turf microbial mats dominated by an uncultured large sausage-shaped Aquificae bacterium, a key metabolic player in sulfur-turfs in sulfidic hot springs. A reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the genes responsible for sulfide, sulfite, and thiosulfate oxidation and carbon fixation via the reductive TCA cycle were continuously expressed in sulfur-turf mats taken at different sampling points, seasons, and years. These results suggest that the uncultured large sausage-shaped bacterium has the ability to grow chemolithoautotrophically and plays key roles as a primary producer in the sulfidic hot spring ecosystem in situ.

  6. An alternative pathway for marine nitrous oxide production at oxic-anoxic interfaces from coupled biotic-abiotic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, J. B.; Stanton, C. L.; Ochoa, H.; Haslun, J. A.; Gandhi, H.; Taillefert, M.; Dichristina, T. J.; Stewart, F. J.; Klotz, M. G.; Ostrom, N. E.

    2016-02-01

    Marine emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, comprise approximately a third of global sources. Recent evidence suggests that the dominant source of N2O in seawater is the activity of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota that lack characterized N2O-generating enzymes. Nitrous oxide may arise from a novel enzyme and/or abiotic reactions between nitrification intermediates, hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and nitric oxide (NO), and redox-active metals in seawater. Isotopic site preference, or difference in δ15N between the two nitrogen atoms in N2O, has been used as tracer for microbial N2O production pathways (-10 to 0‰ for nitrifier-denitrification and denitrification vs. 30-37‰ for nitrification via NH2OH oxidation). Seawater N2O site preference falls in between these two characterized end members, suggesting simultaneous production via a combination of both microbial pathways or via a novel mechanism with intermediate site preference. Here we show significant N2O production in abiotic experiments after addition of iron to seawater containing NH2OH and NO. The N2O produced from chemical reduction of NO by Fe(II) had a site preference of 16‰ whereas N2O produced from abiotic NH2OH oxidation had a site preference of 31‰. We propose that coupled biotic-abiotic N2O production pathways could contribute significant sources of N2O at marine oxic-anoxic interfaces.

  7. Evaluation of biological hydrogen sulfide oxidation coupled with two-stage upflow filtration for groundwater treatment.

    PubMed

    Levine, Audrey D; Raymer, Blake J; Jahn, Johna

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide in groundwater can be oxidized by aerobic bacteria to form elemental sulfur and biomass. While this treatment approach is effective for conversion of hydrogen sulfide, it is important to have adequate control of the biomass exiting the biological treatment system to prevent release of elemental sulfur into the distribution system. Pilot scale tests were conducted on a Florida groundwater to evaluate the use of two-stage upflow filtration downstream of biological sulfur oxidation. The combined biological and filtration process was capable of excellent removal of hydrogen sulfide and associated turbidity. Additional benefits of this treatment approach include elimination of odor generation, reduction of chlorine demand, and improved stability of the finished water.

  8. Electrochemical oxidation of iron and alkalinity generation for efficient sulfide control in sewers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Kustermans, Caroline; Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Prévoteau, Antonin; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan, Zhiguo; Pikaar, Ilje

    2017-07-01

    The addition of iron salts is one of the most commonly used dosing strategies for sulfide control in sewers. However, iron salts decrease the sewage pH which not only reduces the effectiveness of sulfide precipitation but also enhances the release of residual sulfide to the sewer atmosphere. Equally important, concentrated iron salt solutions are corrosive and their frequent transport, handling, and on-site storage often come with Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) concerns. Here, we experimentally demonstrated a novel sulfide control approach using electrochemical systems with parallel placed iron electrodes. This enabled combining anodic dissolved iron species release with cathodic hydroxyl anion production, which alleviates all the aforementioned concerns. A long-term experiment was successfully carried out achieving an average sulfide removal efficiency of 95.4 ± 4.4% at low voltage input of 2.90 ± 0.54 V over the course of 8 weeks. This electrochemical method was demonstrated to successfully achieve efficient sulfide control. In addition, it increases the sewage pH, thereby overcoming the drawbacks associated with the pH decrease in the case of conventional iron salt dosing. Ferrous ions were produced at an overall coulombic efficiency (CE) of 98.2 ± 1.2%, whereas oxygen evolution and direct sulfide oxidation were not observed. Short-term experiments showed that increasing either inter-electrode gap or current density increased the cell voltage associated with the increase in the ohmic drop of the system. Overall, this study highlights the practical potential of in-situ generation of dissolved iron species and simultaneous hydroxyl anion generation for efficient sulfide control in sewers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Formation of iron (hydr)oxides during the abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of arsenate.

    PubMed

    Song, Jia; Jia, Shao-Yi; Yu, Bo; Wu, Song-Hai; Han, Xu

    2015-08-30

    Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) is a common pathway in the formation of Fe (hydr)oxides under natural conditions, however, little is known regarding the presence of arsenate on this process. In hence, the effect of arsenate on the precipitation of Fe (hydr)oxides during the oxidation of Fe(II) is investigated. Formation of arsenic-containing Fe (hydr)oxides is constrained by pH and molar ratios of As:Fe during the oxidation Fe(II). At pH 6.0, arsenate inhibits the formation of lepidocrocite and goethite, while favors the formation of ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. At pH 7.0, arsenate promotes the formation of hollow-structured Fe (hydr)oxides containing arsenate, as the As:Fe ratio reaches 0.07. Arsenate effectively inhibits the formation of magnetite at pH 8.0 even at As:Fe ratio of 0.01, while favors the formation of lepidocrocite and green rust, which can be latterly degenerated and replaced by ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. This study indicates that arsenate and low pH value favor the slow growth of dense-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like spherical ferric arsenate. With the rapid oxidation rate of Fe(II) at high pH, ferric (hydr)oxides prefer to precipitate in the formation of loose-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like lepidocrocite and green rust. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Product distribution study of the Cl-atom initiated oxidation of ethyl methyl sulfide and diethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksdath-Mansilla, Gabriela; Peñéñory, Alicia B.; Barnes, Ian; Wiesen, Peter; Teruel, Mariano A.

    2014-03-01

    The products formed in the gas-phase reactions of Cl atoms with (CH3CH2)2S and CH3CH2SCH3 have been investigated in a large volume reactor in NOx-free air at atmospheric pressure and (298 ± 2) K using long path “in situ” FTIR spectroscopy for the analysis. HCl, SO2 and CH3CHO were identified as the major products for both reactions. For the Cl + CH3CH2SCH3 reaction HCHO was also identified as a major product. The yields of the products obtained for the reaction of Cl with (CH3CH2)2S were (59 ± 2) %, (52 ± 5) % and (103 ± 4) % for HCl, SO2 and CH3CHO, respectively. For the reaction of Cl with CH3CH2SCH3 yields of (43 ± 5) %, (55 ± 3) %, (58 ± 3) % and (53 ± 5) % were obtained for HCl, SO2, CH3CHO and HCHO, respectively. This is the first products and mechanistic study for the gas-phase Cl-initiated oxidation of non-CH3SCH3 alkyl sulfides. Comparison with previous results for the reaction of Cl with dimethyl sulfide is made and simple atmospheric degradation mechanisms are postulated to explain the formation of the observed products.

  11. Release of dissolved cadmium and sulfur nanoparticles from oxidizing sulfide minerals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cadmium enrichment (relative to Fe and Zn) in paddy rice grain occurs during the pre-harvest drainage of flooded soil, which causes oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals present in reduced soil. We investigated this process over a range of environmentally realistic Cdcontain...

  12. Method of removing hydrogen sulfide from gases utilizing a zinc oxide sorbent and regenerating the sorbent

    DOEpatents

    Jalan, Vinod M.; Frost, David G.

    1984-01-01

    A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500.degree. C. to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent.

  13. Oxidative Remobilization of Technetium Sequestered by Sulfide-Transformed Nano Zerovalent Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Dimin; Anitori, Roberto; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2014-06-02

    The dissolution of Tc(IV) sulfide and concurrent transformation of sulfidated ZVI during 2 oxidation were examined. Kinetic data obtained with 10 mL batch reactors showed that Tc(VII) 3 reduced by sulfidated nZVI has significantly slower reoxidation rates than Tc(VII) reduced by 4 nZVI only. In a 50 mL batch reactor, initial inhibition of Tc(IV) dissolution was apparent and 5 lasted until 120 hours at S/Fe = 0.112, presumably due to the redox buffer capacity of FeS. This 6 is evidenced by the parallel trends in oxidation-reduction potentials (ORP) and Tc dissolution 7 kinetics. Mӧssbauer spectra and micro X-ray diffraction ofmore » S/Fe = 0.112 suggested the 8 persistence of FeS after 24-h oxidation although X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated 9 substantial surface oxidation. After 120-h oxidation, all characterizations showed complete 10 oxidation of FeS, which further indicates that FeS inhibits Tc oxidation. X-ray absorption 11 spectroscopy for S/Fe = 0.011 showed significantly increasing percentage of TcS2 in the solid 12 phase after 24-h oxidation, indicating TcS2 is more resistant to oxidation than TcO2. At S/Fe = 13 0.112, the XAS results revealed significant transformation of Tc speciation from TcS2 to TcO2 14 after 120-h oxidation at S/Fe = 0.112. Given that no apparent Tc dissolution occurred during this 15 period, the speciation transformation might play a secondary role in hindering Tc oxidation, 16 especially as redox buffer capacity approached depletion.« less

  14. Nitrate promotes biological oxidation of sulfide in wastewaters: experiment at plant-scale.

    PubMed

    García de Lomas, Juan; Corzo, Alfonso; Gonzalez, Juan M; Andrades, Jose A; Iglesias, Emilio; Montero, María José

    2006-03-05

    Biogenic production of sulfide in wastewater treatment plants involves odors, toxicity and corrosion problems. The production of sulfide is a consequence of bacterial activity, mainly sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). To prevent this production, the efficiency of nitrate addition to wastewater was tested at plant-scale by dosing concentrated calcium nitrate (Nutriox) in the works inlet. Nutriox dosing resulted in a sharp decrease of sulfide, both in the air and in the bulk water, reaching maximum decreases of 98.7% and 94.7%, respectively. Quantitative molecular microbiology techniques indicated that the involved mechanism is the development of the nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacterium Thiomicrospira denitrificans instead of the direct inhibition of the SRB community. Denitrification rate in primary sedimentation tanks was enhanced by nitrate, being this almost completely consumed. No significant increase of inorganic nitrogen was found in the discharged effluent, thus reducing potential environmental hazards to receiving waters. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of nitrate addition in controlling sulfide generation at plant-scale, provides the mechanism and supports the environmental adequacy of this strategy.

  15. Analysis of a microbial community oxidizing inorganic sulfide and mercaptans.

    PubMed

    Duncan, K E; Sublette, K L; Rider, P A; Stepp, A; Beitle, R R; Conner, J A; Kolhatkar, R

    2001-01-01

    Successful treatment of refinery spent-sulfidic caustic (which results from the addition of sodium hydroxide solutions to petroleum refinery waste streams) was achieved in a bioreactor containing an enrichment culture immobilized in organic polymer beads with embedded powdered activated carbon (Bio-Sep). The aerobic enrichment culture had previously been selected using a gas mixture of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan (MeSH) as the sole carbon and energy sources. The starting cultures for the enrichment consisted of several different Thiobacilli spp. (T. thioparus, T. denitrificans, T. thiooxidans, and T. neopolitanus), as well as activated sludge from a refinery aerobic wastewater treatment system and sludge from an industrial anaerobic digester. Microscopic examination (light and SEM) of the beads and of microbial growth on the walls of the bioreactor revealed a great diversity of microorganisms. Further characterization was undertaken starting with culturable aerobic heterotrophic microorganisms (sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA coding for 16S rRNA, Gram staining) and by PCR amplification of DNA coding for 16S rRNA extracted directly from the cell mass, followed by the separation of the PCR products by DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). Eight prominent bands from the DGGE gel were sequenced and found to be closest to sequences of uncultured Cytophagales (3 bands), Gram-positive cocci (Micrococcineae), alpha proteobacteria (3 bands), and an unidentified beta proteobacterium. Culturable microbes included several genera of fungi as well as various Gram-positive and Gram-negative heterotrophic bacteria not seen in techniques using direct DNA extraction.

  16. Mechanism study on the sulfidation of ZnO with sulfur and iron oxide at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Tianfu; Xue, Kai; Li, Wenhua; Jiao, Fen; Qin, Wenqing

    2017-02-01

    The mechanism of ZnO sulfidation with sulfur and iron oxide at high temperatures was studied. The thermodynamic analysis, sulfidation behavior of zinc, phase transformations, morphology changes, and surface properties were investigated by HSC 5.0 combined with FactSage 7.0, ICP, XRD, optical microscopy coupled with SEM-EDS, and XPS. The results indicate that increasing temperature and adding iron oxide can not only improve the sulfidation of ZnO but also promote the formation and growth of ZnS crystals. Fe2O3 captured the sulfur in the initial sulfidation process as iron sulfides, which then acted as the sulfurizing agent in the late period, thus reducing sulfur escape at high temperatures. The addition of carbon can not only enhance the sulfidation but increase sulfur utilization rate and eliminate the generation of SO2. The surfaces of marmatite and synthetic zinc sulfides contain high oxygen due to oxidation and oxygen adsorption. Hydroxyl easily absorbs on the surface of iron-bearing zinc sulfide (Zn1-xFexS). The oxidation of synthetic Zn1-xFexS is easier than marmatite in air.

  17. Mechanism study on the sulfidation of ZnO with sulfur and iron oxide at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Tianfu; Xue, Kai; Li, Wenhua; Jiao, Fen; Qin, Wenqing

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of ZnO sulfidation with sulfur and iron oxide at high temperatures was studied. The thermodynamic analysis, sulfidation behavior of zinc, phase transformations, morphology changes, and surface properties were investigated by HSC 5.0 combined with FactSage 7.0, ICP, XRD, optical microscopy coupled with SEM-EDS, and XPS. The results indicate that increasing temperature and adding iron oxide can not only improve the sulfidation of ZnO but also promote the formation and growth of ZnS crystals. Fe2O3 captured the sulfur in the initial sulfidation process as iron sulfides, which then acted as the sulfurizing agent in the late period, thus reducing sulfur escape at high temperatures. The addition of carbon can not only enhance the sulfidation but increase sulfur utilization rate and eliminate the generation of SO2. The surfaces of marmatite and synthetic zinc sulfides contain high oxygen due to oxidation and oxygen adsorption. Hydroxyl easily absorbs on the surface of iron-bearing zinc sulfide (Zn1−xFexS). The oxidation of synthetic Zn1−xFexS is easier than marmatite in air. PMID:28186156

  18. Influence of liquid surface area on hydrogen sulfide oxidation during micro-aeration in dairy manure digesters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The specific objectives of this study were to evaluate headspace aeration for reducing hydrogen sulfide levels in low cost plug flow digesters, and to characterize the relationship between the liquid surface area and hydrogen sulfide oxidation rates. Experiments with replicate field scale plug flow ...

  19. Abiotic Protein Fragmentation by Manganese Oxide: Implications for a Mechanism to Supply Soil Biota with Oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Patrick N; Chacon, Stephany S; Walter, Eric D; Bowden, Mark E; Washton, Nancy M; Kleber, Markus

    2016-04-05

    The ability of plants and microorganisms to take up organic nitrogen in the form of free amino acids and oligopeptides has received increasing attention over the last two decades, yet the mechanisms for the formation of such compounds in soil environments remain poorly understood. We used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopies to distinguish the reaction of a model protein with a pedogenic oxide (Birnessite, MnO2) from its response to a phyllosilicate (Kaolinite). Our data demonstrate that birnessite fragments the model protein while kaolinite does not, resulting in soluble peptides that would be available to soil biota and confirming the existence of an abiotic pathway for the formation of organic nitrogen compounds for direct uptake by plants and microorganisms. The absence of reduced Mn(II) in the solution suggests that birnessite acts as a catalyst rather than an oxidant in this reaction. NMR and EPR spectroscopies are shown to be valuable tools to observe these reactions and capture the extent of protein transformation together with the extent of mineral response.

  20. Nitric oxide-activated hydrogen sulfide is essential for cadmium stress response in bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.).

    PubMed

    Shi, Haitao; Ye, Tiantian; Chan, Zhulong

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are important gaseous molecules, serving as important secondary messengers in plant response to various biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the interaction between NO and H2S in plant stress response was largely unclear. In this study, endogenous NO and H2S were evidently induced by cadmium stress treatment in bermudagrass, and exogenous applications of NO donor (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) or H2S donor (sodium hydrosulfide, NaHS) conferred improved cadmium stress tolerance. Additionally, SNP and NaHS treatments alleviated cadmium stress-triggered plant growth inhibition, cell damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst, partly via modulating enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Moreover, SNP and NaHS treatments also induced the productions of both NO and H2S in the presence of Cd. Interestingly, combined treatments with inhibitors and scavengers of NO and H2S under cadmium stress condition showed that NO signal could be blocked by both NO and H2S inhibitors and scavengers, while H2S signal was specifically blocked by H2S inhibitors and scavengers, indicating that NO-activated H2S was essential for cadmium stress response. Taken together, we assigned the protective roles of endogenous and exogenous NO and H2S in bermudagrass response to cadmium stress, and speculated that NO-activated H2S might be essential for cadmium stress response in bermudagrass. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Biological oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in mineral media using a biofilm airlift suspension reactor.

    PubMed

    Moghanloo, G M Mojarrad; Fatehifar, E; Saedy, S; Aghaeifar, Z; Abbasnezhad, H

    2010-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) removal in mineral media using Thiobacillus thioparus TK-1 in a biofilm airlift suspension reactor (BAS) was investigated to evaluate the relationship between biofilm formation and changes in inlet loading rates. Aqueous sodium sulfide was fed as the substrate into the continuous BAS-reactor. The reactor was operated at a constant temperature of 30 degrees C and a pH of 7, the optimal temperature and pH for biomass growth. The startup of the reactor was performed with basalt carrier material. Optimal treatment performance was obtained at a loading rate of 4.8 mol S(2-) m(-3) h(-1) at a conversion efficiency as high as 100%. The main product of H(2)S oxidation in the BAS-reactor was sulfate because of high oxygen concentrations in the airlift reactor. The maximum sulfide oxidation rate was 6.7 mol S(2-) m(-3) h(-1) at a hydraulic residence time of 3.3 h in the mineral medium. The data showed that the BAS-reactor with this microorganism can be used for sulfide removal from industrial effluent. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    DOEpatents

    Van Der Sluys, William G.; Burns, Carol J.; Smith, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  3. Synthesis of bacteria promoted reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide networks for advanced supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiming; Yu, Xinzhi; Guo, Di; Qu, Baihua; Zhang, Ming; Li, Qiuhong; Wang, Taihong

    2013-08-14

    Supercapacitors with potential high power are useful and have attracted much attention recently. Graphene-based composites have been demonstrated to be promising electrode materials for supercapacitors with enhanced properties. To improve the performance of graphene-based composites further and realize their synthesis with large scale, we report a green approach to synthesize bacteria-reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide (BGNS) networks. By using Bacillus subtilis as spacers, we deposited reduced graphene oxide/Ni3S2 nanoparticle composites with submillimeter pores directly onto substrate by a binder-free electrostatic spray approach to form BGNS networks. Their electrochemical capacitor performance was evaluated. Compared with stacked reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide (GNS) prepared without the aid of bacteria, BGNS with unique nm-μm structure exhibited a higher specific capacitance of about 1424 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.75 A g(-1). About 67.5% of the capacitance was retained as the current density increased from 0.75 to 15 A g(-1). At a current density of 75 A g(-1), a specific capacitance of 406 F g(-1) could still remain. The results indicate that the reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide network promoted by bacteria is a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  4. Effectiveness of various cover scenarios on the rate of sulfide oxidation of mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Connie G.; Ulrich Mayer, K.; Jones, David R.; Ellerbroek, David A.; Blowes, David W.

    2003-02-01

    Long term environmentally sound disposal of the millions of tons of mining residue is a serious challenge to the international mining industry. This paper evaluates, through a numerical investigation, the potential performance of desulfurized tailings as a cover material for the reduction of acidic drainage from sulfidic tailings. This evaluation is facilitated through a comparison of various cover types as decommissioning options. The cover types considered consist of a desulfurized tailings material cover exposed to ambient climate conditions, a water cover (flooded tailings), and a combination cover type. As part of the evaluation of cover performances, the effect of climatic variability on the potential rate of sulfide oxidation in tailings with an open ground surface, was also assessed. The numerical analysis was conducted using the model PYROX, which was modified to allow for variably-saturated conditions, time varying moisture contents, and to account for the temperature dependence of Henry's law and gas diffusion. In the case study presented here, the benign cover material consists of a low sulfide waste stream (cassiterite float tails, CFT), a by-product of the production of tin concentrate (cassiterite, SnO 2). Modelling results after a simulation period of 100 years indicate that a water cover alone or an exposed CFT cover alone are both less effective options than the combined cover type. A water cover alone leads to a reduction of approximately 99.1%, in the oxidation rate relative to uncovered tailings while the combined cover type results in the lowest potential extent of sulfide oxidation after mine closure-an approximately 99.8% reduction. Importantly, a CFT cover exposed to ambient environmental conditions can still substantially reduce the sulfide oxidation rate, by approximately 75-82% over a 100-year time period, relative to uncovered tailings. Variability in precipitation (and hence percent saturation of the surface layer) had less of an

  5. Minerals Masquerading As Enzymes: Abiotic Oxidation Of Soil Organic Matter In An Iron-Rich Humid Tropical Forest Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    Oxidative reactions play an important role in decomposing soil organic matter fractions that resist hydrolytic degradation, and fundamentally affect the cycling of recalcitrant soil carbon across ecosystems. Microbial extracellular oxidative enzymes (e.g. lignin peroxidases and laccases) have been assumed to provide a dominant role in catalyzing soil organic matter oxidation, while other potential oxidative mechanisms remain poorly explored. Here, we show that abiotic reactions mediated by the oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) could explain high potential oxidation rates in humid tropical forest soils, which often contain high concentrations of Fe(II) and experience rapid redox fluctuations between anaerobic and aerobic conditions. These abiotic reactions could provide an additional mechanism to explain high rates of decomposition in these ecosystems, despite frequent oxygen deficits. We sampled humid tropical forest soils in Puerto Rico, USA from various topographic positions, ranging from well-drained ridges to riparian valleys that experience broad fluctuations in redox potential. We measured oxidative activity by adding the model humic compound L-DOPA to soil slurries, followed by colorimetric measurements of the supernatant solution over time. Dilute hydrogen peroxide was added to a subset of slurries to measure peroxidative activity. We found that oxidative and peroxidative activity correlated positively with soil Fe(II) concentrations, counter to prevailing theory that low redox potential should suppress oxidative enzymes. Boiling or autoclaving sub-samples of soil slurries to denature any enzymes present typically increased peroxidative activity and did not eliminate oxidative activity, further suggesting the importance of an abiotic mechanism. We found substantial differences in the oxidation products of the L-DOPA substrate generated by our soil slurries in comparison with oxidation products generated by a purified enzyme (mushroom tyrosinase

  6. Complete genome sequence of Metallosphaera cuprina, a metal sulfide-oxidizing archaeon from a hot spring.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Jun; You, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Huajun; Wang, Shengyue; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2011-07-01

    The genome of the metal sulfide-oxidizing, thermoacidophilic strain Metallosphaera cuprina Ar-4 has been completely sequenced and annotated. Originally isolated from a sulfuric hot spring, strain Ar-4 grows optimally at 65°C and a pH of 3.5. The M. cuprina genome has a 1,840,348-bp circular chromosome (2,029 open reading frames [ORFs]) and is 16% smaller than the previously sequenced Metallosphaera sedula genome. Compared to the M. sedula genome, there are no counterpart genes in the M. cuprina genome for about 480 ORFs in the M. sedula genome, of which 243 ORFs are annotated as hypothetical protein genes. Still, there are 233 ORFs uniquely occurring in M. cuprina. Genome annotation supports that M. cuprina lives a facultative life on CO(2) and organics and obtains energy from oxidation of sulfidic ores and reduced inorganic sulfuric compounds.

  7. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  8. Persistency-field Eh-pH diagrams for sulfides and their application to supergene oxidation and enrichment of sulfide ore bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sato, M.

    1992-01-01

    At temperatures prevailing near the Earth's surface, metastable co-existence of chemical substances is common because chemical reactions that would directly lead to the attainment of thermody-namically most stable equilibria are often blocked by high activation energy barriers. The persistency of a metastable assemblage is then governed by alternative reaction paths that provide lower activation energy barriers. Comparison of observed mineral assemblages in the supergene oxidized and enriched sulfide ores with corresponding stability Eh-pH diagrams reveals that the supergene assemblages are mostly metastable due primarily to the persistency of sulfide minerals beyond stability boundaries. A new set of diagrams called persistency-field Eh-pH diagrams has been constructed for binary metal sulfides on the basis of electrochemical and other experimental data. Each diagram delineates the persistency field, which is a combined field of thermodynamic stability and reaction path-controlled metastability, for a specific sulfide mineral. When applied to the supergene assemblages, these new diagrams show much better correspondence to the field observations. Although there may still be room for further refinement, the new diagrams appear to provide a strong visual aid to the understanding of the behavior of sulfide minerals in the supergene conditions. ?? 1992.

  9. Bioflotation of sulfide minerals with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in relation to copper activation and surface oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pecina-Treviño, E T; Ramos-Escobedo, G T; Gallegos-Acevedo, P M; López-Saucedo, F J; Orrantia-Borunda, E

    2012-09-01

    Surface oxidation of sulfides and copper (Cu) activation are 2 of the main processes that determine the efficiency of flotation. The present study was developed with the intention to ascertain the role of the phenomena in the biomodification of sulfides by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans culture (cells and growth media) and their impact in bioflotation. Surface characteristics of chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and pyrrhotite, alone and in mixtures, after interaction with A. ferrooxidans were evaluated. Chalcopyrite floatability was increased substantially by biomodification, while bacteria depressed pyrrhotite floatability, favoring separation. The results showed that elemental sulfur concentration increased because of the oxidation generated by bacterial cells, the effect is intensified by the Fe(III) left in the culture and by galvanic contact. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans culture affects the Cu activation of sphalerite. The implications of elemental sulfur concentration and Cu activation of sphalerite are key factors that must be considered for the future development of sulfide bioflotation processes, since the depressive effect of cells could be counteracted by elemental sulfur generation.

  10. Cobalt sulfide aerogel prepared by anion exchange method with enhanced pseudocapacitive and water oxidation performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qiuyue; Shi, Zhenyu; Xue, Kaiming; Ye, Ziran; Hong, Zhanglian; Yu, Xinyao; Zhi, Mingjia

    2018-05-01

    This work introduces the anion exchange method into the sol-gel process for the first time to prepare a metal sulfide aerogel. A porous Co9S8 aerogel with a high surface area (274.2 m2 g‑1) and large pore volume (0.87 cm3 g‑1) has been successfully prepared by exchanging cobalt citrate wet gel in thioacetamide and subsequently drying in supercritical ethanol. Such a Co9S8 aerogel shows enhanced supercapacitive performance and catalytic activity toward oxygen evolution reaction (OER) compared to its oxide aerogel counterpart. High specific capacitance (950 F g‑1 at 1 A g‑1), good rate capability (74.3% capacitance retention from 1 to 20 A g‑1) and low onset overpotential for OER (220 mV) were observed. The results demonstrated here have implications in preparing various sulfide chalcogels.

  11. Cobalt sulfide aerogel prepared by anion exchange method with enhanced pseudocapacitive and water oxidation performances.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiuyue; Shi, Zhenyu; Xue, Kaiming; Ye, Ziran; Hong, Zhanglian; Yu, Xinyao; Zhi, Mingjia

    2018-05-25

    This work introduces the anion exchange method into the sol-gel process for the first time to prepare a metal sulfide aerogel. A porous Co 9 S 8 aerogel with a high surface area (274.2 m 2 g -1 ) and large pore volume (0.87 cm 3 g -1 ) has been successfully prepared by exchanging cobalt citrate wet gel in thioacetamide and subsequently drying in supercritical ethanol. Such a Co 9 S 8 aerogel shows enhanced supercapacitive performance and catalytic activity toward oxygen evolution reaction (OER) compared to its oxide aerogel counterpart. High specific capacitance (950 F g -1 at 1 A g -1 ), good rate capability (74.3% capacitance retention from 1 to 20 A g -1 ) and low onset overpotential for OER (220 mV) were observed. The results demonstrated here have implications in preparing various sulfide chalcogels.

  12. Rapid oxidation of sulfide mine tailings by reaction with potassium ferrate.

    PubMed

    Murshed, Mohamed; Rockstraw, David A; Hanson, Adrian T; Johnson, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The chemistry of sulfide mine tailings treated with potassium ferrate (K2FeO4) in aqueous slurry has been investigated. The reaction system is believed to parallel a geochemical oxidation in which ferrate ion replaces oxygen. This chemical system utilized in a pipeline (as a plug flow reactor) may have application eliminating the potential for tailings to leach acid while recovering the metal from the tailings. Elemental analyses were performed using an ICP spectrometer for the aqueous phase extract of the treated tailings; and an SEM-EDX for the tailing solids. Solids were analyzed before and after treatments were applied. ICP shows that as the mass ratio of ferrate ion to tailings increases, the concentration of metals in the extract solution increases; while EDX indicates a corresponding decrease in sulfur content of the tailing solids. The extraction of metal and reduction in sulfide content is significant. The kinetic timeframe is on the order of minutes.

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide and Ionic Liquids: Absorption, Separation, and Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chiappe, Cinzia; Pomelli, Christian Silvio

    2017-06-01

    Economical and environmental concerns are the main motivations for development of energy-efficient processes and new eco-friendly materials for the capture of greenhouse gases. Currently, H 2 S capture is dominated by physical and/or chemical absorption technologies, which are, however, energy intensive and often problematic from an environmental point of view due to emission of volatile solvent components. Ionic liquids have been proposed as a promising alternative to conventional solvents because of their low volatility and other interesting properties. The aim of the present review paper is to provide a detailed overview of the achievements and difficulties that have been encountered in finding suitable ionic liquids for H 2 S capture. The effect of ionic liquid anions, cations, and functional groups on the H 2 S absorption, separation, and oxidation are highlighted. Recent developments on yet scarcely available molecular simulations and on the development of robust predictive methods are also discussed.

  14. Identification of Bacteria Potentially Responsible for Oxic and Anoxic Sulfide Oxidation in Biofilters of a Recirculating Mariculture System

    PubMed Central

    Cytryn, Eddie; van Rijn, Jaap; Schramm, Andreas; Gieseke, Armin; de Beer, Dirk; Minz, Dror

    2005-01-01

    Bacteria presumably involved in oxygen- or nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation in the biofilters of a recirculating marine aquaculture system were identified using a new application of reverse transcription-PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis termed differential-transcription (DT)-DGGE. Biofilter samples were incubated in various concentrations of sulfide or thiosulfate (0 to 5 mM) with either oxygen or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. Before and after short-term incubations (10 to 20 h), total DNA and RNA were extracted, and a 550-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA genes was PCR amplified either directly or after reverse transcription. DGGE analysis of DNA showed no significant change of the original microbial consortia upon incubation. In contrast, DGGE of cDNA revealed several phylotypes whose relative band intensities markedly increased or decreased in response to certain incubation conditions, indicating enhanced or suppressed rRNA transcription and thus implying metabolic activity under these conditions. Specifically, species of the gammaproteobacterial genus Thiomicrospira and phylotypes related to symbiotic sulfide oxidizers could be linked to oxygen-dependent sulfide oxidation, while members of the Rhodobacteraceae (genera Roseobacter, Rhodobacter, and Rhodobium) were putatively active in anoxic, nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation. For all these organisms, the physiology of their closest cultured relatives matches their DT-DGGE-inferred function. In addition, higher band intensities following exposure to 5 mM sulfide and nitrate were observed for Thauera-, Hydrogenophaga-, and Dethiosulfovibrio-like phylotypes. For these genera, nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation has not been documented previously and therefore DT-DGGE might indicate a higher relative tolerance to high sulfide concentrations than that of other community members. We anticipate that DT-DGGE will be of general use in tracing functionally equivalent yet

  15. Alternative waste residue materials for passive in situ prevention of sulfide-mine tailings oxidation: a field evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nason, Peter; Johnson, Raymond H; Neuschütz, Clara; Alakangas, Lena; Öhlander, Björn

    2014-02-28

    Novel solutions for sulfide-mine tailings remediation were evaluated in field-scale experiments on a former tailings repository in northern Sweden. Uncovered sulfide-tailings were compared to sewage-sludge biosolid amended tailings over 2 years. An application of a 0.2m single-layer sewage-sludge amendment was unsuccessful at preventing oxygen ingress to underlying tailings. It merely slowed the sulfide-oxidation rate by 20%. In addition, sludge-derived metals (Cu, Ni, Fe, and Zn) migrated and precipitated at the tailings-to-sludge interface. By using an additional 0.6m thick fly-ash sealing layer underlying the sewage sludge layer, a solution to mitigate oxygen transport to the underlying tailings and minimize sulfide-oxidation was found. The fly-ash acted as a hardened physical barrier that prevented oxygen diffusion and provided a trap for sludge-borne metals. Nevertheless, the biosolid application hampered the application, despite the advances in the effectiveness of the fly-ash layer, as sludge-borne nitrate leached through the cover system into the underlying tailings, oxidizing pyrite. This created a 0.3m deep oxidized zone in 6-years. This study highlights that using sewage sludge in unconventional cover systems is not always a practical solution for the remediation of sulfide-bearing mine tailings to mitigate against sulfide weathering and acid rock drainage formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Alternative waste residue materials for passive in situ prevention of sulfide-mine tailings oxidation: A field evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nason, Peter; Johnson, Raymond H.; Neuschutz, Clara; Alakangas, Lena; Ohlander, Bjorn

    2014-01-01

    Novel solutions for sulfide-mine tailings remediation were evaluated in field-scale experiments on a former tailings repository in northern Sweden. Uncovered sulfide-tailings were compared to sewage-sludge biosolid amended tailings over 2 years. An application of a 0.2 m single-layer sewage-sludge amendment was unsuccessful at preventing oxygen ingress to underlying tailings. It merely slowed the sulfide-oxidation rate by 20%. In addition, sludge-derived metals (Cu, Ni, Fe, and Zn) migrated and precipitated at the tailings-to-sludge interface. By using an additional 0.6 m thick fly-ash sealing layer underlying the sewage sludge layer, a solution to mitigate oxygen transport to the underlying tailings and minimize sulfide-oxidation was found. The fly-ash acted as a hardened physical barrier that prevented oxygen diffusion and provided a trap for sludge-borne metals. Nevertheless, the biosolid application hampered the application, despite the advances in the effectiveness of the fly-ash layer, as sludge-borne nitrate leached through the cover system into the underlying tailings, oxidizing pyrite. This created a 0.3 m deep oxidized zone in 6-years. This study highlights that using sewage sludge in unconventional cover systems is not always a practical solution for the remediation of sulfide-bearing mine tailings to mitigate against sulfide weathering and acid rock drainage formation.

  17. Enhanced Oxidative and Adsorptive Removal of Diclofenac in Heterogeneous Fenton-like Reaction with Sulfide Modified Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron.

    PubMed

    Su, Yiming; Jassby, David; Song, Shikun; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhao, Hongying; Filip, Jan; Petala, Eleni; Zhang, Yalei

    2018-06-05

    Sulfidation of nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) has shown some fundamental improvements on reactivity and selectivity toward pollutants in dissolved-oxygen (DO)-stimulated Fenton-like reaction systems (DO/S-nZVI system). However, the pristine microstructure of sulfide-modified nanoscale zerovalent iron (S-nZVI) remains uncovered. In addition, the relationship between pollutant removal and the oxidation of the S-nZVI is largely unknown. The present study confirms that sulfidation not only imparts sulfide and sulfate groups onto the surface of the nanoparticle (both on the oxide shell and on flake-like structures) but also introduces sulfur into the Fe(0) core region. Sulfidation greatly inhibits the four-electron transfer pathway between Fe(0) and oxygen but facilitates the electron transfer from Fe(0) to surface-bound Fe(III) and consecutive single-electron transfer for the generation of H 2 O 2 and hydroxyl radical. In the DO/S-nZVI system, slight sulfidation (S/Fe molar ratio = 0.1) is able to nearly double the oxidative removal efficacy of diclofenac (DCF) (from 17.8 to 34.2%), whereas moderate degree of sulfidation (S/Fe molar ratio = 0.3) significantly enhances both oxidation and adsorption of DCF. Furthermore, on the basis of the oxidation model of S-nZVI, the DCF removal process can be divided into two steps, which are well modeled by parabolic and logarithmic law separately. This study bridges the knowledge gap between pollutant removal and the oxidation process of chemically modified iron-based nanomaterials.

  18. Chemical denudation and the role of sulfide oxidation at Werenskioldbreen, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachnik, Łukasz; Majchrowska, Elżbieta; Yde, Jacob C.; Nawrot, Adam P.; Cichała-Kamrowska, Katarzyna; Ignatiuk, Dariusz; Piechota, Agnieszka

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to determine the rate of chemical denudation and the relationships between dominant geochemical reactions operating in the proglacial and subglacial environments of the polythermal glacier Werenskioldbreen (SW Svalbard) during an entire ablation season. Water sampling for major ion chemistry was performed at a proglacial hydrometric station and from subglacial outflows from May to September 2011. These data were combined with measurements of discharge and supraglacial ablation rates. The slopes and intercepts in best-fit regressions of [*Ca2+ + *Mg2+ vs. *SO42-] and [HCO3- vs. *SO42-] in meltwater from ice-marginal subglacial channels were close to the stoichiometric parameters of sulfide oxidation and simple hydrolysis coupled to carbonate dissolution (*concentrations corrected for input of sea-salt). This shows that these relationships predominates the meltwater chemistry. Our findings also show that sulfide oxidation is a better indicator of the configuration of subglacial drainage systems than, for instance, Na+ and K+. In the proglacial area and in sub-artesian outflows, the ion associations represent sulfide oxidation but other processes such as ion exchange and dissolution of Ca and Mg efflorescent salts may also contribute to the solute variations. These processes may cause enhanced fluxes of Ca2+ and HCO3- from glacierized basins during the early ablation and peak flow seasons as the proglacial salts re-dissolve. The overall chemical denudation rate in the basin for 2011 (ranging from 1601 to 1762 meq m-2 yr-1 (121.9 to 132.2 t km-2 yr-1)) was very high when compared to other Svalbard valley glaciers suggesting that the high rate of chemical denudation was mostly caused by the high rates of discharge and ablation. Chemical weathering intensities (876 and 964 meq m-3 yr-1) exceeded previously reported intensities in Svalbard.

  19. Kinetics of the Bicarbonate-Assisted Oxidation of Diethyl Sulfide by Hydrogen Peroxide and Sodium Peroxoborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyatlenko, L. M.; Lobachev, V. L.; Bezbozhnaya, T. V.

    2018-07-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of diethyl sulfide (Et2S) is studied in aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide and sodium peroxoborate (Na2[B2(O2)2(OH)4]) in the presence of bicarbonate ions by means of gas-liquid distribution. The kinetics is investigated in a broad range of pH. Data show that the oxidation of Et2S by sodium peroxoborate in the range of pH 6-12 is mediated by such reactive species as hydrogen peroxide, hydrogen peroxide anions, and mono (B(O2H)(OH)3^{ - }) and diperoxoborate (B(O2H)2(OH)2^{ - }) anions. The rate of Et2S oxidation increases in the presence of bicarbonate, due to the additional reaction pathways mediated by monoperoxocarbonate species.

  20. First principles search for n-type oxide, nitride, and sulfide thermoelectrics

    PubMed Central

    Garrity, Kevin F.

    2016-01-01

    Oxides have many potentially desirable characteristics for thermoelectric applications, including low cost and stability at high temperatures, but thus far there are few known high zT n-type oxide thermoelectrics. In this work, we use high-throughput first principles calculations to screen transition metal oxides, nitrides, and sulfides for candidate materials with high power factors and low thermal conductivity. We find a variety of promising materials, and we investigate these materials in detail in order to understand the mechanisms that cause them to have high power factors. These materials all combine a high density of states near the Fermi level with dispersive bands, reducing the trade-off between the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductivity, but they do so for several different reasons. In addition, our calculations indicate that many of our candidate materials have low thermal conductivity. PMID:27885361

  1. Plant Survival in a Changing Environment: The Role of Nitric Oxide in Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Simontacchi, Marcela; Galatro, Andrea; Ramos-Artuso, Facundo; Santa-María, Guillermo E.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide in plants may originate endogenously or come from surrounding atmosphere and soil. Interestingly, this gaseous free radical is far from having a constant level and varies greatly among tissues depending on a given plant’s ontogeny and environmental fluctuations. Proper plant growth, vegetative development, and reproduction require the integration of plant hormonal activity with the antioxidant network, as well as the maintenance of concentration of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species within a narrow range. Plants are frequently faced with abiotic stress conditions such as low nutrient availability, salinity, drought, high ultraviolet (UV) radiation and extreme temperatures, which can influence developmental processes and lead to growth restriction making adaptive responses the plant’s priority. The ability of plants to respond and survive under environmental-stress conditions involves sensing and signaling events where nitric oxide becomes a critical component mediating hormonal actions, interacting with reactive oxygen species, and modulating gene expression and protein activity. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the role of nitric oxide in adaptive plant responses to some specific abiotic stress conditions, particularly low mineral nutrient supply, drought, salinity and high UV-B radiation. PMID:26617619

  2. Light-Dependent Sulfide Oxidation in the Anoxic Zone of the Chesapeake Bay Can Be Explained by Small Populations of Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Alexa J.; Hanson, Thomas E.; Luther, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial sulfide oxidation in aquatic environments is an important ecosystem process, as sulfide is potently toxic to aerobic organisms. Sulfide oxidation in anoxic waters can prevent the efflux of sulfide to aerobic water masses, thus mitigating toxicity. The contribution of phototrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria to anaerobic sulfide oxidation in the Chesapeake Bay and the redox chemistry of the stratified water column were investigated in the summers of 2011 to 2014. In 2011 and 2013, phototrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria closely related to Prosthecochloris species of the phylum Chlorobi were cultivated from waters sampled at and below the oxic-anoxic interface, where measured light penetration was sufficient to support populations of low-light-adapted photosynthetic bacteria. In 2012, 2013, and 2014, light-dependent sulfide loss was observed in freshly collected water column samples. In these samples, extremely low light levels caused 2- to 10-fold increases in the sulfide uptake rate over the sulfide uptake rate under dark conditions. An enrichment, CB11, dominated by Prosthecochloris species, oxidized sulfide with a Ks value of 11 μM and a Vmax value of 51 μM min−1 (mg protein−1). Using these kinetic values with in situ sulfide concentrations and light fluxes, we calculated that a small population of Chlorobi similar to those in enrichment CB11 can account for the observed anaerobic light-dependent sulfide consumption activity in natural water samples. We conclude that Chlorobi play a far larger role in the Chesapeake Bay than currently appreciated. This result has potential implications for coastal anoxic waters and expanding oxygen-minimum zones as they begin to impinge on the photic zone. PMID:26296727

  3. Selection and Application of Sulfide Oxidizing Microorganisms Able to Withstand Thiols in Gas Biodesulfurization Systems.

    PubMed

    Roman, Pawel; Klok, Johannes B M; Sousa, João A B; Broman, Elias; Dopson, Mark; Van Zessen, Erik; Bijmans, Martijn F M; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Janssen, Albert J H

    2016-12-06

    After the first commercial applications of a new biological process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) from low pressure biogas, the need arose to broaden the operating window to also enable the removal of organosulfur compounds from high pressure sour gases. In this study we have selected microorganisms from a full-scale biodesulfurization system that are capable of withstanding the presence of thiols. This full-scale unit has been in stable operation for more than 10 years. We investigated the microbial community by using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons which showed that methanethiol gave a competitive advantage to bacteria belonging to the genera Thioalkalibacter (Halothiobacillaceae family) and Alkalilimnicola (Ectothiorhosdospiraceae family). The sulfide-oxidizing potential of the acclimatized population was investigated under elevated thiol loading rates (4.5-9.1 mM d -1 ), consisting of a mix of methanethiol, ethanethiol, and propanethiol. With this biomass, it was possible to achieve a stable bioreactor operation at which 80% of the supplied H 2 S (61 mM d -1 ) was biologically oxidized to elemental sulfur. The remainder was chemically produced thiosulfate. Moreover, we found that a conventionally applied method for controlling the oxygen supply to the bioreactor, that is, by maintaining a redox potential set-point value, appeared to be ineffective in the presence of thiols.

  4. Enriching distinctive microbial communities from marine sediments via an electrochemical-sulfide-oxidizing process on carbon electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiue-Lin; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfide is a common product of marine anaerobic respiration, and a potent reactant biologically and geochemically. Here we demonstrate the impact on microbial communities with the removal of sulfide via electrochemical methods. The use of differential pulse voltammetry revealed that the oxidation of soluble sulfide was seen at +30 mV (vs. SHE) at all pH ranges tested (from pH = 4 to 8), while non-ionized sulfide, which dominated at pH = 4 was poorly oxidized via this process. Two mixed cultures (CAT and LA) were enriched from two different marine sediments (from Catalina Island, CAT; from the Port of Los Angeles, LA) in serum bottles using a seawater medium supplemented with lactate, sulfate, and yeast extract, to obtain abundant biomass. Both CAT and LA cultures were inoculated in electrochemical cells (using yeast-extract-free seawater medium as an electrolyte) equipped with carbon-felt electrodes. In both cases, when potentials of +630 or +130 mV (vs. SHE) were applied, currents were consistently higher at +630 then at +130 mV, indicating more sulfide being oxidized at the higher potential. In addition, higher organic-acid and sulfate conversion rates were found at +630 mV with CAT, while no significant differences were found with LA at different potentials. The results of microbial-community analyses revealed a decrease in diversity for both CAT and LA after electrochemical incubation. In addition, some bacteria (e.g., Clostridium and Arcobacter) not well-known to be capable of extracellular electron transfer, were found to be dominant in the electrochemical cells. Thus, even though the different mixed cultures have different tolerances for sulfide, electrochemical-sulfide removal can lead to major population changes. PMID:25741331

  5. Polystyrene bound oxidovanadium(IV) and dioxidovanadium(V) complexes of histamine derived ligand for the oxidation of methyl phenyl sulfide, diphenyl sulfide and benzoin.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Mannar R; Arya, Aarti; Kumar, Amit; Pessoa, João Costa

    2009-03-28

    Ligand Hsal-his (I) derived from salicylaldehyde and histamine has been covalently bound to chloromethylated polystyrene cross-linked with 5% divinylbenzene. Upon treatment with [VO(acac)(2)] in DMF, the polystyrene-bound ligand (abbreviated as PS-Hsal-his, II) gave the stable polystyrene-bound oxidovanadium(iv) complex PS-[V(IV)O(sal-his)(acac)] , which upon oxidation yielded the dioxidovanadium(v) PS-[V(V)O(2)(sal-his)] complex. The corresponding non polymer-bound complexes [V(IV)O(sal-his)(acac)] and [V(V)O(2)(sal-his)] have also been obtained. These complexes have been characterised by IR, electronic, (51)V NMR and EPR spectral studies, and thermal as well as scanning electron micrograph studies. Complexes and have been used as a catalyst for the oxidation of methyl phenyl sulfide, diphenyl sulfide and benzoin with 30% H(2)O(2) as oxidant. Under the optimised reaction conditions, a maximum of 93.8% conversion of methyl phenyl sulfide with 63.7% selectivity towards methyl phenyl sulfoxide and 36.3% towards methyl phenyl sulfone has been achieved in 2 h with 2 . Under similar conditions, diphenyl sulfide gave 83.4% conversion where selectivity of reaction products varied in the order: diphenyl sulfoxide (71.8%) > diphenyl sulfone (28.2%). A maximum of 91.2% conversion of benzoin has been achieved within 6 h, and the selectivities of reaction products are: methylbenzoate (37.0%) > benzil (30.5%) > benzaldehyde-dimethylacetal (22.5%) > benzoic acid (8.1%). The PS-bound complex, 1 exhibits very comparable catalytic potential. These polymer-anchored heterogeneous catalysts do not leach during catalytic action, are recyclable and show higher catalytic activity and turnover frequency than the corresponding non polymer-bound complexes. EPR and (51)V NMR spectroscopy was used to characterise methanolic solutions of 3 and 4 and to identify species formed upon addition of H(2)O(2) and/or acid and/or methyl phenyl sulfide.

  6. The Role of Sulfide Oxidation Impairment in the Pathogenesis of Primary CoQ Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Quinzii, Catarina M; Luna-Sanchez, Marta; Ziosi, Marcello; Hidalgo-Gutierrez, Agustin; Kleiner, Giulio; Lopez, Luis C

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a lipid present in all cell membranes. One of the multiple metabolic functions of CoQ is to transport electrons in the reaction catalyzed by sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQOR), the first enzyme of the oxidation pathway of sulfides (hydrogen sulfide, H 2 S). Early evidence of a defect in the metabolism of H 2 S in primary CoQ deficiency came from yeast studies in Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains defective for dps1 and ppt1 (homologs of PDSS1 and COQ2 , respectively), which have H 2 S accumulation. Our recent studies in human skin fibroblasts and in murine models of primary CoQ deficiency show that, also in mammals, decreased CoQ levels cause impairment of H 2 S oxidation. Patient fibroblasts carrying different mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in CoQ biosynthesis show reduced SQOR activity and protein levels proportional to the levels of CoQ. In Pdss2 kd / kd mice, kidney, the only organ clinically affected, shows reduced SQOR levels and downstream enzymes, accumulation of H 2 S, and glutathione depletion. Pdss2 kd / kd mice have also low levels of thiosulfate in plasma and urine, and increased C4-C6 acylcarnitines in blood, due to inhibition of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Also in Coq9 R 239 X mice, the symptomatic organ, cerebrum, shows accumulation of H 2 S, reduced SQOR, increase in thiosulfate sulfurtransferase and sulfite oxidase, and reduction in the levels of glutathione and glutathione enzymes, leading to alteration of the biosynthetic pathways of glutamate, serotonin, and catecholamines. Coq9 R 239 X mice have also reduced blood pressure, possible consequence of H 2 S-induced vasorelaxation. Since liver is not clinically affected in Pdss2 and Coq9 mutant mice, the effects of the impairment of H 2 S oxidation in this organ were not investigated, despite its critical role in metabolism. In conclusion, in vitro and in vivo studies of CoQ deficient models provide evidence of tissue-specific H 2 S oxidation impairment

  7. The Role of Sulfide Oxidation Impairment in the Pathogenesis of Primary CoQ Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Quinzii, Catarina M.; Luna-Sanchez, Marta; Ziosi, Marcello; Hidalgo-Gutierrez, Agustin; Kleiner, Giulio; Lopez, Luis C.

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a lipid present in all cell membranes. One of the multiple metabolic functions of CoQ is to transport electrons in the reaction catalyzed by sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQOR), the first enzyme of the oxidation pathway of sulfides (hydrogen sulfide, H2S). Early evidence of a defect in the metabolism of H2S in primary CoQ deficiency came from yeast studies in Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains defective for dps1 and ppt1 (homologs of PDSS1 and COQ2, respectively), which have H2S accumulation. Our recent studies in human skin fibroblasts and in murine models of primary CoQ deficiency show that, also in mammals, decreased CoQ levels cause impairment of H2S oxidation. Patient fibroblasts carrying different mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in CoQ biosynthesis show reduced SQOR activity and protein levels proportional to the levels of CoQ. In Pdss2kd/kd mice, kidney, the only organ clinically affected, shows reduced SQOR levels and downstream enzymes, accumulation of H2S, and glutathione depletion. Pdss2kd/kd mice have also low levels of thiosulfate in plasma and urine, and increased C4–C6 acylcarnitines in blood, due to inhibition of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Also in Coq9R239X mice, the symptomatic organ, cerebrum, shows accumulation of H2S, reduced SQOR, increase in thiosulfate sulfurtransferase and sulfite oxidase, and reduction in the levels of glutathione and glutathione enzymes, leading to alteration of the biosynthetic pathways of glutamate, serotonin, and catecholamines. Coq9R239X mice have also reduced blood pressure, possible consequence of H2S-induced vasorelaxation. Since liver is not clinically affected in Pdss2 and Coq9 mutant mice, the effects of the impairment of H2S oxidation in this organ were not investigated, despite its critical role in metabolism. In conclusion, in vitro and in vivo studies of CoQ deficient models provide evidence of tissue-specific H2S oxidation impairment, an additional pathomechanism

  8. Reconciling "Whiffs" of O2 with the Archean MIF S Record: Insights from Sulfide Oxidation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A.; Reinhard, C. T.; Romaniello, S. J.; Greaney, A. T.; Garcia-Robledo, E.; Revsbech, N. P.; Canfield, D. E.; Lyons, T. W.; Anbar, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    The Archean-Proterozoic transition is marked by the first appreciable accumulation of O2 in Earth's oceans and atmosphere at 2.4 billion years ago (Ga). However, this Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is not the first evidence for O2 in Earth's surface environment. Paleoredox proxies preserved in ancient marine shales (Mo, Cr, Re, U) suggest transient episodes of oxidative weathering before the GOE, perhaps as early as 3.0 Ga. One marine shale in particular, the 2.5 Ga Mount McRae Shale of Western Australia, contains a euxinic interval with Mo enrichments up to 50 ppm. This enrichment is classically interpreted as the result of oxidative weathering of sulfides on the continental surface. However, prior weathering models based on experiments suggested that sulfides require large amounts of O2 [>10-4 present atmospheric level (PAL) pO2] to produce this weathering signature, in conflict with estimates of Archean pO2 from non-mass-dependent (NMD) sulfur isotope anomalies (<10-5 PAL pO2). To reconcile these datasets, we conducted aqueous oxidation experiments of pyrite and molybdenite from 3 - 700 nM O2 (equivalent at equilibrium to 10-5 - 10-3 PAL) to measure oxidation kinetics as a function of the concentration of dissolved O2. We measured rates by injecting oxygenated water at a steady flow rate and monitoring dissolved O2 concentrations with LUMOS sensors. Our data extend the O2 range explored in pyrite oxidation experiments by three orders of magnitude and provide the first rates for molybdenite oxidation at O2 concentrations potentially analogous to those characteristic of the Archean atmosphere. Our results show that pyrite and molybdenite oxidize significantly more rapidly at lower O2 levels than previously thought. As a result, our revised weathering model demonstrates that the Mo enrichments observed in late Archean marine shales are potentially attainable at extremely low atmospheric pO2 values (e.g., <10-5 PAL), reconciling large sedimentary Mo enrichments with co

  9. Potential Role of Nitrite for Abiotic Fe(II) Oxidation and Cell Encrustation during Nitrate Reduction by Denitrifying Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Klueglein, Nicole; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Floetenmeyer, Matthias; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms have been observed to oxidize Fe(II) at neutral pH under anoxic and microoxic conditions. While most of the mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria become encrusted with Fe(III)-rich minerals, photoautotrophic and microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers avoid cell encrustation. The Fe(II) oxidation mechanisms and the reasons for encrustation remain largely unresolved. Here we used cultivation-based methods and electron microscopy to compare two previously described nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers ( Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002) and two heterotrophic nitrate reducers (Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 19367 and P. denitrificans Pd 1222). All four strains oxidized ∼8 mM Fe(II) within 5 days in the presence of 5 mM acetate and accumulated nitrite (maximum concentrations of 0.8 to 1.0 mM) in the culture media. Iron(III) minerals, mainly goethite, formed and precipitated extracellularly in close proximity to the cell surface. Interestingly, mineral formation was also observed within the periplasm and cytoplasm; intracellular mineralization is expected to be physiologically disadvantageous, yet acetate consumption continued to be observed even at an advanced stage of Fe(II) oxidation. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were detected by lectin staining with fluorescence microscopy, particularly in the presence of Fe(II), suggesting that EPS production is a response to Fe(II) toxicity or a strategy to decrease encrustation. Based on the data presented here, we propose a nitrite-driven, indirect mechanism of cell encrustation whereby nitrite forms during heterotrophic denitrification and abiotically oxidizes Fe(II). This work adds to the known assemblage of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in nature and complicates our ability to delineate microbial Fe(II) oxidation in ancient microbes preserved as fossils in the geological record. PMID:24271182

  10. Microbial Ecology Assessment of Mixed Copper Oxide/Sulfide Dump Leach Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, Debby Fox; Thompson, David Neal; Noah, Karl Scott

    1999-06-01

    Microbial consortia composed of complex mixtures of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the dissolution of metals from sulfide minerals. Thus, an efficient copper bioleaching operation depends on the microbial ecology of the system. A microbial ecology study of a mixed oxide/sulfide copper leaching operation was conducted using an "overlay" plating technique to differentiate and identify various bacterial consortium members of the genera Thiobacillus, “Leptospirillum”, “Ferromicrobium”, and Acidiphilium. Two temperatures (30°C and 45°C) were used to select for mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria. Cell numbers varied from 0-106 cells/g dry ore, depending on the sample location and depth. Aftermore » acid curing for oxide leaching, no viable bacteria were recovered, although inoculation of cells from raffinate re-established a microbial population after three months. Due to low the pH of the operation, very few non-iron-oxidizing acidophilic heterotrophs were recovered. Moderate thermophiles were isolated from the ore samples. Pregnant liquor solutions (PLS) and raffinate both contained a diversity of bacteria. In addition, an intermittently applied waste stream that contained high levels of arsenic and fluoride was tested for toxicity. Twenty vol% waste stream in PLS killed 100% of the cells in 48 hours, indicating substantial toxicity and/or growth inhibition. The data indicate that bacteria populations can recover after acid curing, and that application of the waste stream to the dump should be avoided. Monitoring the microbial ecology of the leaching operation provided significant information that improved copper recovery.« less

  11. Microbial Ecology Assessment of Mixed Copper Oxide/Sulfide Dump Leach Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, D F; Thompson, D N; Noah, K S

    1999-06-01

    Microbial consortia composed of complex mixtures of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the dissolution of metals from sulfide minerals. Thus, an efficient copper bioleaching operation depends on the microbial ecology of the system. A microbial ecology study of a mixed oxide/sulfide copper leaching operation was conducted using an "overlay" plating technique to differentiate and identify various bacterial consortium members of the genera Thiobacillus, Leptospirillum, Ferromicrobium, and Acidiphilium. Two temperatures (30C and 45C) were used to select for mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria. Cell numbers varied from 0-106 cells/g dry ore, depending on the sample location and depth. Aftermore » acid curing for oxide leaching, no viable bacteria were recovered, although inoculation of cells from raffinate re-established a microbial population after three months. Due to the low pH of the operation, very few non-iron-oxidizing acidophilic heterotrophs were recovered. Moderate thermophiles were isolated from the ore samples. Pregnant liquor solutions (PLS) and raffinate both contained a diversity of bacteria. In addition, an intermittently applied waste stream that contained high levels of arsenic and fluoride was tested for toxicity. Twenty vol% waste stream in PLS killed 100% of the cells in 48 hours, indicating substantial toxicity and/or growth inhibition. The data indicate that bacteria populations can recover after acid curing, and that application of the waste stream to the dump should be avoided. Monitoring the microbial ecology of the leaching operation provided significant information that improved copper recovery.« less

  12. Zinc stable isotope fractionation upon accelerated oxidative weathering of sulfidic mine waste.

    PubMed

    Matthies, R; Krahé, L; Blowes, D W

    2014-07-15

    Accelerated oxidative weathering in a reaction cell (ASTM D 5744 standard protocol) was performed over a 33 week period on well characterized, sulfidic mine waste from the Kidd Creek Cu-Zn volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit, Canada. The cell leachate was monitored for physicochemical parameters, ion concentrations and stable isotope ratios of zinc. Filtered zinc concentrations (<0.45 μm) in the leachate ranged between 4.5 mg L(-1) and 1.9 g L(-1)-potentially controlled by pH, mineral solubility kinetics and (de)sorption processes. The zinc stable isotope ratios varied mass-dependently within +0.1 and +0.52‰ relative to IRMM 3702, and were strongly dependent on the pH (rpH-d66Zn=0.65, p<0.005, n=31). At a pH below 5, zinc mobilization was governed by sphalerite oxidation and hydroxide dissolution-pointing to the isotope signature of sphalerite (+0.1 to +0.16‰). Desorption processes resulted in enrichment of (66)Zn in the leachate reaching a maximum offset of +0.32‰ compared to the proposed sphalerite isotope signature. Over a period characterized by pH=6.1 ± 0.6, isotope ratios were significantly more enriched in (66)Zn with an offset of ≈ 0.23‰ compared to sphalerite, suggesting that zinc release may have been derived from a second zinc source, such as carbonate minerals, which compose 8 wt.% of the tailings. This preliminary study confirms the benefit of applying zinc isotopes alongside standard monitoring parameters to track principal zinc sources and weathering processes in complex multi-phase matrices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High-temperature experimental analogs of primitive meteoritic metal-sulfide-oxide assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Devin L.; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2010-03-01

    We studied the oxidation-sulfidation behavior of an Fe-based alloy containing 4.75 wt.% Ni, 0.99 wt.% Co, 0.89 wt.% Cr, and 0.66 wt.% P in H 2-H 2O-CO-CO 2-H 2S gas mixtures at 1000 °C. The samples were cooled at rates of ˜3000 °C/h, comparable to estimates of the conditions after a chondrule-formation event in the early Solar System. Gas compositions were monitored in real time by a quadrupole mass spectrometer residual gas analyzer. Linear rate constants associated with gas-phase adsorption were determined. Reaction products were analyzed by optical microscopy, wavelength-dispersive-spectroscopy X-ray elemental mapping, and electron probe microanalysis. Based on analysis of the Fe-Ni-S ternary phase diagram and the reaction products, the primary corrosion product is a liquid of composition 66.6 wt.% Fe, 3.5 wt.% Ni, 29.9 wt.% S, and minor amounts of P, Cr, and Co. Chromite (FeCr 2O 4) inclusions formed by oxidation and are present in the metal foil and at the outer boundary between the sulfide and experimental atmosphere. During cooling the liquid initially crystallizes into taenite (average composition ˜15 wt.% Ni), monosulfide solid solution [mss, (Fe,Ni,Co,Cr) 1-xS], and Fe-phosphates. Upon further cooling, kamacite exsolves from this metal, enriching the taenite in Ni. The remnant metal core is enriched in P and Co and depleted in Cr at the reaction interface, relative to the starting composition. The unreacted metal core composition remains unchanged, suggesting the reactions did not reach equilibrium. We present a detailed model of reaction mechanisms based on the observed kinetics and sample morphologies, and discuss meteoritic analogs in the CR chondrite MacAlpine Hills 87320.

  14. The rate of sulfide oxidation by δMnO 2 in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wensheng; Millero, Frank J.

    1993-07-01

    The rate of oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by manganese dioxide in seawater was determined as a function of pH (2.0-9.0), temperature (5-45°C), and ionic strength (0-4 M). The overall rate constant, k, in seawater at pH = 8.17 was found to be first order with respect to both sulfide and manganese dioxide: - d[H 2S] T/dt = k[H 2S] τ[MnO 2] . The rate constant, k, for seawater (S = 35.8, pH = 8.17) at 25°C was found to be 436 M -1 min -1, or 0.0244 m -2 1 min -1 when [MnO 2] is expressed in surface area (m 2/L). The energies of activation were found to be 14 ± 1 KJ mol -1 and 10 ± 1 KJ mol -1, respectively, for pH = 8.2 and pH = 5.0 in seawater (S = 35). The rate increased from pH 2.0 to a maximum at a pH of about 5.0 and decreased at higher pH. This pH dependence was attributed to formation of a surface complex between >MnO - and H 2S. As the concentration of HS - increases above pH = 5 the rate of the reaction decreases. The rate of sulfide oxidation by MnO 2 is not strongly dependent on ionic strength. The rates in 0.57 M NaCl were found to be slightly higher than the rates in seawater. Measurements made in solutions of the major sea salts indicated that Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ caused the rates to decrease, apparently by absorbing on the surface of manganese dioxide. Measurements made in artificial seawater (Na +, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, Cl -, and SO 2-4) were found to be in good agreement with the measurements in actual seawater. Phosphate was found to inhibit the reaction significantly.

  15. Protective effects of hydrogen sulfide on chronic kidney disease by reducing oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Askari, Hassan; Seifi, Behjat; Kadkhodaee, Mehri; Sanadgol, Nima; Elshiekh, Mohammed; Ranjbaran, Mina; Ahghari, Parisa

    2018-01-01

    The current study aimed to examine the renoprotective effects of long-term treatment with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a prominent hydrogen sulfide donor, in 5/6 nephrectomy animal model. Twenty-four rats were randomly divided into 3 groups including sham-operated group (Sham), 5/6-nephrectomized group (5/6 Nx), and NaHS-treated group (5/6Nx+NaHS). NaHS (30 micromol/l) was added twice daily into the drinking water and renal failure was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. Twelve weeks after surgical procedure, blood pressure, creatinine clearance (CCr), urine concentration of neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL) and tissue concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as renal morphological changes, apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) and inflammation (p-NF-κB) were measured. Five-sixth nephrectomy induced severe renal damage as indicated by renal dysfunction, hypertension and significant histopathological injury which were associated with increased NGAL and MDA levels, oxidant/antioxidant imbalance, decreased SOD activity and CCr and also overexpression of p-NF-κB and cleaved caspase-3 proteins. Instead, NaHS treatment attenuated renal dysfunction through reduction of NGAL concentration, hypertension, CCr, oxidant/antioxidant imbalance, inflammation and apoptosis. These findings suggest that long term NaHS treatment can be useful in preventing the progression of CKD by improving oxidant/antioxidant balance and reducing inflammation and apoptosis in the kidney. PMID:29383015

  16. Continuous sulfidogenic wastewater treatment with iron sulfide sludge oxidation and recycle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dongyang; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the technical feasibility of packed-bed sulfidogenic bioreactors dosed with ferrous chloride for continuous wastewater treatment over a 450-day period. In phase I, the bioreactors were operated under different combinations of carbon, iron, and sulfate mass loads without sludge recycling to identify optimal treatment conditions. A COD/sulfate mass ratio of 2 and a Fe/S molar ratio of 1 yielded the best treatment performance with COD oxidation rate of 786 ± 82 mg/(L⋅d), which resulted in 84 ± 9% COD removal, 94 ± 6% sulfate reduction, and good iron retention (99 ± 1%) under favorable pH conditions (6.2-7.0). In phase II, the bioreactors were operated under this chemical load combination over a 62-day period, during which 7 events of sludge collection, oxidation, and recycling were performed. The collected sludge materials contained both inorganic and organic matter with FeS and FeS 2 as the main inorganic constituents. In each event, the sludge materials were oxidized in an oxidizing basin before recycling to mix with the wastewater influent. Sludge recycling yielded enhanced COD removal (90 ± 6% vs. 75 ± 7%), and better effluent quality in terms of pH (6.8 ± 0.1 vs. 6.5 ± 0.2), iron (0.7 ± 0.5 vs. 1.9 ± 1.7 mg/L), and sulfide-S (0.3 ± 0.1 vs. 0.4 ± 0.1 mg/L) removal compared to the baseline operation without sludge recycling during phase II. This process exhibited treatment stability with reasonable variations, and fairly consistent sludge content over long periods of operation under a range of COD/sulfate and Fe/S ratios without sludge recycling. The bioreactors were found to absorb recycling-induced changes efficiently without causing elevated suspended solids in the effluents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Silicon Regulates Antioxidant Activities of Crop Plants under Abiotic-Induced Oxidative Stress: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon-Ha; Khan, Abdul L.; Waqas, Muhammad; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in soil, where its availability to plants can exhilarate to 10% of total dry weight of the plant. Si accumulation/transport occurs in the upward direction, and has been identified in several crop plants. Si application has been known to ameliorate plant growth and development during normal and stressful conditions over past two-decades. During abiotic (salinity, drought, thermal, and heavy metal etc) stress, one of the immediate responses by plant is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as singlet oxygen (1O2), superoxide (O2−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals (OH), which cause severe damage to the cell structure, organelles, and functions. To alleviate and repair this damage, plants have developed a complex antioxidant system to maintain homeostasis through non-enzymatic (carotenoids, tocopherols, ascorbate, and glutathione) and enzymatic antioxidants [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX)]. To this end, the exogenous application of Si has been found to induce stress tolerance by regulating the generation of ROS, reducing electrolytic leakage, and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, and immobilizing and reducing the uptake of toxic ions like Na, under stressful conditions. However, the interaction of Si and plant antioxidant enzyme system remains poorly understood, and further in-depth analyses at the transcriptomic level are needed to understand the mechanisms responsible for the Si-mediated regulation of stress responses. PMID:28428797

  18. Silicon Regulates Antioxidant Activities of Crop Plants under Abiotic-Induced Oxidative Stress: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Ha; Khan, Abdul L; Waqas, Muhammad; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in soil, where its availability to plants can exhilarate to 10% of total dry weight of the plant. Si accumulation/transport occurs in the upward direction, and has been identified in several crop plants. Si application has been known to ameliorate plant growth and development during normal and stressful conditions over past two-decades. During abiotic (salinity, drought, thermal, and heavy metal etc) stress, one of the immediate responses by plant is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ), superoxide ([Formula: see text]), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), and hydroxyl radicals (OH), which cause severe damage to the cell structure, organelles, and functions. To alleviate and repair this damage, plants have developed a complex antioxidant system to maintain homeostasis through non-enzymatic (carotenoids, tocopherols, ascorbate, and glutathione) and enzymatic antioxidants [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX)]. To this end, the exogenous application of Si has been found to induce stress tolerance by regulating the generation of ROS, reducing electrolytic leakage, and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, and immobilizing and reducing the uptake of toxic ions like Na, under stressful conditions. However, the interaction of Si and plant antioxidant enzyme system remains poorly understood, and further in-depth analyses at the transcriptomic level are needed to understand the mechanisms responsible for the Si-mediated regulation of stress responses.

  19. Oxidative degradation of benzene rings using iron sulfide activated by hydrogen peroxide/ozone.

    PubMed

    Hara, Junko

    2017-12-01

    Mineral pyrites-metal sulfides abundant in the earth's crust-exhibit oxidative ability when exposed to water. This oxidizing ability makes mineral pyrites suitable for the natural and enhanced remediation of environmentally hazardous materials. Herein, we evaluate the benzene ring degradation ability of iron bisulfide activated by H 2 O 2 and O 3 and elucidate the corresponding reaction pathways. A set of control experiments was conducted to optimize the reaction conditions, i.e., the FeS 2 /H 2 O ratio under aerobic conditions and the H 2 O 2 and/or O 3 dosages. Benzene ring was successfully decomposed to CO 2 via organic acids even by the simplest FeS 2 /H 2 O combination. This process was accelerated by the addition of both O 3 and H 2 O 2 . The extent of degradation to CO 2 increased in the presence of O 3 , while oxalic acid generation increased in the presence of H 2 O 2 . The reaction proceeded via the radicals generated on FeS 2 /H 2 O, which is enhanced by O 3 , and a Fenton-like reaction using the iron obtained from FeS 2 dissolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Formation Mechanism of Oxide-Sulfide Complex Inclusions in High-Sulfur-Containing Steel Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Hong; Park, Joo Hyun

    2018-02-01

    The [S] content in resulfurized steel is controlled in the range of 200 to 800 ppm to ensure good machinability and workability. It is well known that "MgAl2O4(spinel)+CaS" complex inclusions are formed in molten steel during the ladle refining process, and these cause nozzle clogging during continuous casting. Thus, in the present study, the "Refractory-Slag-Metal-Inclusions (ReSMI)" multiphase reaction model was employed in conjunction with experiments to investigate the influence of slag composition and [S] content in the steel on the formation of oxide-sulfide complex inclusions. The critical [S] and [Al] contents necessary for the precipitation of CaS in the CaO-Al2O3-MgO-SiO2 (CAMS) oxide inclusions were predicted from the composition of the liquid inclusions, as observed by scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and calculated using the ReSMI multiphase reaction model. The critical [S] content increases with increasing content of SiO2 in the slag at a given [Al] content. Formation mechanisms for spinel+CaS and spinel+MnS complex inclusions were also proposed.

  1. Effect of Nitrogen Oxides on Elemental Mercury Removal by Nanosized Mineral Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Jun; Li, Liqing; Lee, Po-Heng; Feng, Yong; Shih, Kaimin

    2017-08-01

    Because of its large surface area, nanosized zinc sulfide (Nano-ZnS) has been demonstrated in a previous study to be efficient for removal of elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) from coal combustion flue gas. The excellent mercury adsorption performance of Nano-ZnS was found to be insusceptible to water vapor, sulfur dioxide, and hydrogen chloride. However, nitrogen oxides (NO X ) apparently inhibited mercury removal by Nano-ZnS; this finding was unlike those of many studies on the promotional effect of NO X on Hg 0 removal by other sorbents. The negative effect of NO X on Hg 0 adsorption over Nano-ZnS was systematically investigated in this study. Two mechanisms were identified as primarily responsible for the inhibitive effect of NO X on Hg 0 adsorption over Nano-ZnS: (1) active sulfur sites on Nano-ZnS were oxidized to inactive sulfate by NO X ; and (2) the chemisorbed mercury, i.e., HgS, was reduced to Hg 0 by NO X . This new insight into the role of NO X in Hg 0 adsorption over Nano-ZnS can help to optimize operating conditions, maximize Hg 0 adsorption, and facilitate the application of Nano-ZnS as a superior alternative to activated carbon for Hg 0 removal using existing particulate matter control devices in power plants.

  2. Interaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Nitric Oxide in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Nagpure, B. V.; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Historically acknowledged as toxic gases, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) are now recognized as the predominant members of a new family of signaling molecules, “gasotransmitters” in mammals. While H2S is biosynthesized by three constitutively expressed enzymes (CBS, CSE, and 3-MST) from L-cysteine and homocysteine, NO is generated endogenously from L-arginine by the action of various isoforms of NOS. Both gases have been transpired as the key and independent regulators of many physiological functions in mammalian cardiovascular, nervous, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and immune systems. The analogy between these two gasotransmitters is evident not only from their paracrine mode of signaling, but also from the identical and/or shared signaling transduction pathways. With the plethora of research in the pathophysiological role of gasotransmitters in various systems, the existence of interplay between these gases is being widely accepted. Chemical interaction between NO and H2S may generate nitroxyl (HNO), which plays a specific effective role within the cardiovascular system. In this review article, we have attempted to provide current understanding of the individual and interactive roles of H2S and NO signaling in mammalian cardiovascular system, focusing particularly on heart contractility, cardioprotection, vascular tone, angiogenesis, and oxidative stress. PMID:26640616

  3. Improving the efficiency of cadmium sulfide-sensitized titanium dioxide/indium tin oxide glass photoelectrodes using silver sulfide as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanocrystals are deposited on the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystalline film on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate to prepare CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO photoelectrodes through a new method known as the molecular precursor decomposition method. The Ag2S is interposed between the TiO2 nanocrystal film and CdS nanocrystals as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber. As a consequence, the energy conversion efficiency of the CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrodes is significantly improved. Under AM 1.5 G sunlight irradiation, the maximum efficiency achieved for the CdS(4)/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrode is 3.46%, corresponding to an increase of about 150% as compared to the CdS(4)/TiO2/ITO electrode without the Ag2S layer. Our experimental results show that the improved efficiency is mainly due to the formation of Ag2S layer that may increase the light absorbance and reduce the recombination of photogenerated electrons with redox ions from the electrolyte. PMID:25411566

  4. Tracking photosynthetic sulfide oxidation in a meromictic lake using sulfate δ34S and δ18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilhooly, W. P.; Reinhard, C.; Lyons, T. W.; Glass, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria oxidize sulfide and fix carbon dioxide in the presence of sunlight without producing oxygen. Environmental conditions in the Paleo- and Mesoproterozoic, when atmospheric oxygen concentrations were at low levels and portions of the oceans were anoxic and sulfidic (euxinic), were conducive to widespread carbon fixation by anoxygenic photosynthesis. This pathway may have helped sustain euxinic conditions in the Proterozoic water column. With limited organic biomarker and geochemical evidence for widespread production of anoxygenic phototrophs, however, additional proxies are needed to fingerprint paleoecological and biogeochemical signals associated with photic zone euxinia. Paired δ34S and δ18O from ancient sulfates (gypsum, barite, or CAS) may offer an added constraint on the history and ecological dominance of photosynthetic S-oxidation. Sulfate-oxygen can fractionate during sulfate reduction, but the extent of isotopic enrichment is controlled either by kinetic isotope effects imparted during intracellular enzymatic steps or equilibrium oxygen exchange with ambient water. An improved understanding of these processes can be gained from modern natural environments. Mahoney Lake is a density-stratified lake located within the White Lake Basin of British Columbia. The euxinic water column supports a dense plate of purple sulfur bacteria (Amoebobacter purpureus) that thrives where free sulfide intercepts the photic zone at ~7 m water depth. We analyzed the isotopic composition of sulfate (δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4), sulfide (δ34SH2S), and water (δ18OH2O) to track the potentially coupled processes of dissimilatory sulfate reduction and phototrophic sulfide oxidation within this meromictic lake. Large isotopic offsets observed between sulfate and sulfide within the monimolimnion (δ34SSO4-H2S = 51‰) and within pore waters along the oxic margin (δ34SSO4-H2S >50‰) are consistent with sulfate reduction in both the sediments and the anoxic

  5. Kinetics of sorption and abiotic oxidation of arsenic(III) by aquifer materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amirbahman, A.; Kent, D.B.; Curtis, G.P.; Davis, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The fate of arsenic in groundwater depends largely on its interaction with mineral surfaces. We investigated the kinetics of As(III) oxidation by aquifer materials collected from the USGS research site at Cape Cod, MA, USA, by conducting laboratory experiments. Five different solid samples with similar specific surface areas (0.6-0.9 m2 g-1) and reductively extractable iron contents (18-26 ??mol m-2), but with varying total manganese contents (0.5-3.5 ??mol m-2) were used. Both dissolved and adsorbed As(III) and As(V) concentrations were measured with time up to 250 h. The As(III) removal rate from solution increased with increasing solid manganese content, suggesting that manganese oxide is responsible for the oxidation of As(III). Under all conditions, dissolved As(V) concentrations were very low. A quantitative model was developed to simulate the extent and kinetics of arsenic transformation by aquifer materials. The model included: (1) reversible rate-limited adsorption of As(III) onto both oxidative and non-oxidative (adsorptive) sites, (2) irreversible rate-limited oxidation of As(III), and (3) equilibrium adsorption of As(V) onto adsorptive sites. Rate constants for these processes, as well as the total oxidative site densities were used as the fitting parameters. The total adsorptive site densities were estimated based on the measured specific surface area of each material. The best fit was provided by considering one fast and one slow site for each adsorptive and oxidative site. The fitting parameters were obtained using the kinetic data for the most reactive aquifer material at different initial As(III) concentrations. Using the same parameters to simulate As(III) and As(V) surface reactions, the model predictions were compared to observations for aquifer materials with different manganese contents. The model simulated the experimental data very well for all materials at all initial As(III) concentrations. The As(V) production rate was related to the

  6. Sensitivity of Interfibrillar and Subsarcolemmal Mitochondria to Cobalt Chloride-induced Oxidative Stress and Hydrogen Sulfide Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ayswarya, A.; Kurian, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a significant role not only in cardiovascular disease but also in non-communicable diseases, where it plays a significant role the mortality rate. Hydrogen sulfide, the biological gaseous signaling molecule that preserves mitochondria in its mode of action, is an effective cardioprotective drug. However, cardiac mitochondria comprise of two distinct populations, namely interfibrillar and subsarcolemmal mitochondria, which respond distinctly in cardiovascular disease. This study was designed to determine the direct impact of cobalt chloride-induced oxidative stress in isolated mitochondrial subpopulations with an intention to examine the efficacy of hydrogen sulfide in preserving interfibrillar and subsarcolemmal mitochondria functional activities when they were incubated as pretreated, co-treated and post-treated agent. Mitochondrial subpopulations were isolated from the heart of male Wistar rats and subjected to cobalt chloride treatment (500 μM) for 20 min, followed by incubation with 10 μM sodium hydrosulfide in three different ways (Pre, Co, and Post-cobalt chloride treatment). Mitochondrial oxidative stress was measured by the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive species, reduced glutathione and the activities of enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Mitochondrial membrane potential, swelling behavior and enzyme activities were measured to assess its function. The increased level of lipid peroxidation and the decreased level of reduced glutathione in cobalt chloride-induced group confirm the induction of oxidative stress and were more predominant in the subsarcolemmal mitochondria. Hydrogen sulfide treatment to interfibrillar and subsarcolemmal mitochondria preserved their functional activities, but the effect was prominent only with co-treated group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that subsarcolemmal mitochondria are more prone to oxidative stress and the co-treatment of the

  7. Organic-inorganic hybrid polyionic liquid based polyoxometalate as nano porous material for selective oxidation of sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Ezzat; Shahebrahimi, Shabnam

    2017-07-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid nano porous materials based on poly(ionic liquid)-polyoxometalate (PIL-POM) were reported. These hybrid materials were synthesized by the reaction of 4-vinyl pyridine with 1,3-propanesultone, followed by the polymerization and also sulfonate-functionalized cross-linked poly(4-vinylpyridine) and combining these polymers with H5PMo10V2O40 (PMo10V2). Activity of prepared PIL-PMo10V2 hybrids were investigated as catalysts for oxidation of sulfides with H2O2 as oxidant. For understanding catalytic activities of the PIL-PMo10V2 hybrids in oxidation of sulfides, effect of catalyst composition, substrate, and reaction conditions were studied. The results show that the PIL-PMo10V2 hybrids are active as selective heterogeneous catalysts for oxidation of sulfides and can be recovered and reused. The catalyst was characterized by FT-IR, TGA-DSC, XRD, SEM/EDX, BET, CV and zeta potential measurement. Also, average molecular weight of prepared catalysts were measured.

  8. Sulfur, sulfides, oxides and organic matter aggregated in submarine hydrothermal plumes at 9°50‧N East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breier, J. A.; Toner, B. M.; Fakra, S. C.; Marcus, M. A.; White, S. N.; Thurnherr, A. M.; German, C. R.

    2012-07-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal plume particles are known to sequester seawater trace elements and influence ocean-scale biogeochemical budgets. The relative importance of biotic versus abiotic oxidation-reduction and other particle-forming reaction, however, and the mechanisms of seawater trace element sequestration remain unknown. Suspended particulate material was collected from a non-buoyant hydrothermal plume by in situ filtration at 9°50‧N East Pacific Rise during a 3-day, 24 sample, time-series. Twenty-three samples were digested for total elemental analysis. One representative sample was selected for particle-by-particle geochemical analyses including elemental composition by X-ray fluorescence, speciation of Fe, S, and C by 1s X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Consistent with past studies, positive linear correlations were observed for P, V, As, and Cr with Fe in the bulk chemistry. Arsenic was associated with both Fe oxyhydroxides and sulfides but not uniformly distributed among either mineral type. Particle aggregation was common. Aggregates were composed of minerals embedded in an organic matrix; the minerals ranged from <20 nm to >10 μm in diameter. The speciation of major mineral forming elements (Fe, Mn, S) was complex. Over 20 different minerals were observed, nine of which were either unpredicted by thermodynamic modeling or had no close match in the thermodynamic database. Sulfur-bearing phases consisted of polysulfides (S6, S8), and metal sulfides (Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn). Four dominant species, Fe oxyhydroxide, Fe monosulfide, pyrrhotite, and pyrite, accounted for >80% of the Fe present. Particulate Mn was prevalent in both oxidized and reduced minerals. The organic matrix was: (1) always associated with minerals, (2) composed of biomolecules, and (3) rich in S. Possible sources of this S-rich organic matter include entrained near vent biomass and in situ production by S-oxidizing microorganisms. These results indicate

  9. Effect of active zinc oxide dispersion on reduced graphite oxide for hydrogen sulfide adsorption at mid-temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hoon Sub; Park, Moon Gyu; Croiset, Eric; Chen, Zhongwei; Nam, Sung Chan; Ryu, Ho-Jung; Yi, Kwang Bok

    2013-09-01

    Composites of Zinc oxide (ZnO) with reduced graphite oxide (rGO) were synthesized and used as adsorbents for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at 300 °C. Various characterization methods (TGA, XRD, FT-IR, TEM and XPS) were performed in order to link their H2S adsorption performance to the properties of the adsorbent's surface. Microwave-assisted reduction process of graphite oxide (GO) provided mild reduction environment, allowing oxygen-containing functional groups to remain on the rGO surface. It was confirmed that for the ZnO/rGO synthesize using the microwave-assisted reduction method, the ZnO particle size and the degree of ZnO dispersion remained stable over time at 300 °C, which was not the case for only the ZnO particles themselves. This stable highly dispersed feature allows for sustained high surface area over time. This was confirmed through breakthrough experiments for H2S adsorption where it was found that the ZnO/rGO composite showed almost four times higher ZnO utilization efficiency than ZnO itself. The effect of the H2 and CO2 on H2S adsorption was also investigated. The presence of hydrogen in the H2S stream had a positive effect on the removal of H2S since it allows a reducing environment for Znsbnd O and Znsbnd S bonds, leading to more active sites (Zn2+) to sulfur molecules. On the other hand, the presence of carbon dioxide (CO2) showed the opposite trend, likely due to the oxidation environment and also due to possible competitive adsorption between H2S and CO2.

  10. Garlic extracts prevent oxidative stress, hypertrophy and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes: a role for nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In ancient times, plants were recognized for their medicinal properties. Later, the arrival of synthetic drugs pushed it to the backstage. However, from being merely used for food, plants are now been widely explored for their therapeutic value. The current study explores the potential of skin and flesh extracts from a hard-necked Rocambole variety of purple garlic in preventing cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cell death. Methods Norepinephrine (NE) was used to induce hypertrophy in adult rat cardiomyocytes pretreated with garlic skin and flesh extracts. Cell death was measured as ratio of rod to round shaped cardiomyocytes. Fluorescent probes were used to measure apoptosis and oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes treated with and without extracts and NE. Pharmacological blockade of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) were used to elucidate the mechanism of action of garlic extracts. Garlic extract samples were also tested for alliin and allicin concentrations. Results Exposure of cardiomyocytes to NE induced an increase in cell size and cell death; this increase was significantly prevented upon treatment with garlic skin and flesh extracts. Norepinephrine increased apoptosis and oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes which was prevented upon pretreatment with skin and flesh extracts; NO, and H2S blockers significantly inhibited this beneficial effect. Allicin and alliin concentration were significantly higher in garlic flesh extract when compared to the skin extract. Conclusion These results suggest that both skin and flesh garlic extracts are effective in preventing NE induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cell death. Reduction in oxidative stress may also play an important role in the anti-hypertrophic and anti-apoptotic properties of garlic extracts. These beneficial effects may in part be mediated by NO and H2S. PMID:22931510

  11. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulfidic marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, DR. Jennifer; Yu, DR. Hang; Steele, Joshua

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyze important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulfide-rich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization due to decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulfide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulfidic (>1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5-270 nM), cobalt (0.5-6 nM), molybdenum (10-5,600 nM) and tungsten (0.3-8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sedimentmore » porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalyzing anaerobic oxidation of methane utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrotolerant microorganisms. Finally, our data suggest that chemical speciation of metals in highly sulfidic porewaters may exert a stronger influence on microbial bioavailability than total concentration« less

  12. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots induce oxidative stress and behavioral impairments in the marine clam Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Zalouk-Vergnoux, Aurore; Poirier, Laurence; Lopes, Christelle; Risso-de-Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots have a number of current applications in electronics and solar cells and significant future potential in medicine. The aim of the present study was to examine the toxic effects of CdS quantum dots on the marine clam Scrobicularia plana exposed for 14 d to these nanomaterials (10 µg Cd L(-1) ) in natural seawater and to compare them with soluble Cd. Measurement of labile Cd released from CdS quantum dots showed that 52% of CdS quantum dots remained in the nanoparticulate form. Clams accumulated the same levels of Cd regardless of the form in which it was delivered (soluble Cd vs CdS quantum dots). However, significant changes in biochemical responses were observed in clams exposed to CdS quantum dots compared with soluble Cd. Increased activities of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were significantly higher in clams exposed in seawater to Cd as the nanoparticulate versus the soluble form, suggesting a specific nano effect. The behavior of S. plana in sediment showed impairments of foot movements only in the case of exposure to CdS quantum dots. The results show that oxidative stress and behavior biomarkers are sensitive predictors of CdS quantum dots toxicity in S. plana. Such responses, appearing well before changes might occur at the population level, demonstrate the usefulness of this model species and type of biomarker in the assessment of nanoparticle contamination in estuarine ecosystems. © 2015 SETAC.

  13. Nano sulfide and oxide semiconductors as promising materials for studies by positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambissan, P. M. G.

    2013-06-01

    A number of wide band gap sulfide and oxide semiconducting nanomaterial systems were investigated using the experimental techniques of positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler broadening measurements. The results indicated several features of the nanomaterial systems, which were found strongly related to the presence of vacancy-type defects and their clusters. Quantum confinement effects were displayed in these studies as remarkable changes in the positron lifetimes and the lineshape parameters around the same grain sizes below which characteristic blue shifts were observed in the optical absorption spectra. Considerable enhancement in the band gap and significant rise of the positron lifetimes were found occurring when the particle sizes were reduced to very low sizes. The results of doping or substitutions by other cations in semiconductor nanosystems were also interesting. Variously heat-treated TiO2 nanoparticles were studied recently and change of positron annihilation parameters across the anatase to rutile structural transition are carefully analyzed. Preliminary results of positron annihilation studies on Eu-doped CeO nanoparticles are also presented.

  14. Factors affecting activated carbon-based catalysts for selective hydrogen sulfide oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huixing; Monnell, J.D.; Alvin, M.A.

    2008-09-01

    The primary product of coal gasification processes is synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of CO, H2, CO2, H2O and a number of minor components. Among the most significant minor components in syngas is hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In addition to its adverse environmental impact, H2S poisons the catalysts and hydrogen purification membranes, and causes severe corrosion in gas turbines. Technologies that can remove H2S from syngas and related process streams are, therefore, of considerable practical interest. To meet this need, we work towards understanding the mechanism by which prospective H2S catalysts perform in simulated fuel gas conditions. Specifically, we show thatmore » for low-temperature gas clean-up (~1408C) using activated carbon fibers and water plays a significant role in H2S binding and helps to prolong the lifetime of the material. Basic surface functional groups were found to be imperative for significant conversion of H2S to daughter compounds, whereas metal oxides (La and Ce) did little to enhance this catalysis. We show that although thermal regeneration of the material is possible, the regenerated material has a substantially lower catalytic and sorption capacity.« less

  15. Phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibition enhances nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-mediated bladder neck inhibitory neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Agis-Torres, Ángel; Recio, Paz; López-Oliva, María Elvira; Martínez, María Pilar; Barahona, María Victoria; Benedito, Sara; Bustamante, Salvador; Jiménez-Cidre, Miguel Ángel; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Fernandes, Vítor S; Hernández, Medardo

    2018-03-16

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) play a pivotal role in nerve-mediated relaxation of the bladder outflow region. In the bladder neck, a marked phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE4) expression has also been described and PDE4 inhibitors, as rolipram, produce smooth muscle relaxation. This study investigates the role of PDE4 isoenzyme in bladder neck gaseous inhibitory neurotransmission. We used Western blot and double immunohistochemical staining for the detection of NPP4 (PDE4) and PDE4A and organ baths for isometric force recording to roflumilast and tadalafil, PDE4 and PDE5, respectively, inhibitors in pig and human samples. Endogenous H 2 S production measurement and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were also performed. A rich PDE4 and PDE4A expression was observed mainly limited to nerve fibers of the smooth muscle layer of both species. Moreover, roflumilast produced a much more potent smooth muscle relaxation than that induced by tadalafil. In porcine samples, H 2 S generation was diminished by H 2 S and NO synthase inhibition and augmented by roflumilast. Relaxations elicited by EFS were potentiated by roflumilast. These results suggest that PDE4, mainly PDE4A, is mostly located within nerve fibers of the pig and human bladder neck, where roflumilast produces a powerful smooth muscle relaxation. In pig, the fact that roflumilast increases endogenous H 2 S production and EFS-induced relaxations suggests a modulation of PDE4 on NO- and H 2 S-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide enhances nitric oxide-induced tolerance of hypoxia in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Peng, Renyi; Bian, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Lina; Cheng, Wei; Hai, Na; Yang, Changquan; Yang, Tao; Wang, Xinyu; Wang, Chongying

    2016-11-01

    Our data present H 2 S in a new role, serving as a multi-faceted transducer to different response mechanisms during NO-induced acquisition of tolerance to flooding-induced hypoxia in maize seedling roots. Nitric oxide (NO), serving as a secondary messenger, modulates physiological processes in plants. Recently, hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) has been demonstrated to have similar signaling functions. This study focused on the effects of treatment with H 2 S on NO-induced hypoxia tolerance in maize seedlings. The results showed that treatment with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) enhanced survival rate of submerged maize roots through induced accumulation of endogenous H 2 S. The induced H 2 S then enhanced endogenous Ca 2+ levels as well as the Ca 2+ -dependent activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), improving the capacity for antioxidant defense and, ultimately, the hypoxia tolerance in maize seedlings. In addition, NO induced the activities of key enzymes in H 2 S biosynthesis, such as L-cysteine desulfhydrases (L-CDs), O-acetyl-L-serine (thiol)lyase (OAS-TL), and β-Cyanoalanine Synthase (CAS). SNP-induced hypoxia tolerance was enhanced by the application of NaHS, but was eliminated by the H 2 S-synthesis inhibitor hydroxylamine (HA) and the H 2 S-scavenger hypotaurine (HT). H 2 S concurrently enhanced the transcriptional levels of relative hypoxia-induced genes. Together, our findings indicated that H 2 S serves as a multi-faceted transducer that enhances the nitric oxide-induced hypoxia tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.).

  17. Nitric oxide-releasing flurbiprofen reduces formation of proinflammatory hydrogen sulfide in lipopolysaccharide-treated rat

    PubMed Central

    Anuar, Farhana; Whiteman, Matthew; Siau, Jia Ling; Kwong, Shing Erl; Bhatia, Madhav; Moore, Philip K

    2006-01-01

    The biosynthesis of both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is increased in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected mice and rats but their interaction in these models is not known. In this study we examined the effect of the NO donor, nitroflurbiprofen (and the parent molecule flurbiprofen) on NO and H2S metabolism in tissues from LPS-pretreated rats. Administration of LPS (10 mg kg−1, i.p.; 6 h) resulted in an increase (P<0.05) in plasma TNF-α, IL-1β and nitrate/nitrite (NOx) concentrations, liver H2S synthesis (from added cysteine), CSE mRNA, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (marker for neutrophil infiltration) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Nitroflurbiprofen (3–30 mg kg−1, i.p.) administration resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of the LPS-mediated increase in plasma TNF-α, IL-1β and NOx concentration, liver H2S synthesis (55.00±0.95 nmole mg protein−1, c.f. 62.38±0.47 nmole mg protein−1, n=5, P<0.05), CSE mRNA, iNOS, MPO activity and NF-κB activation. Flurbiprofen (21 mg kg−1, i.p.) was without effect. These results show for the first time that nitroflurbiprofen downregulates the biosynthesis of proinflammatory H2S and suggest that such an effect may contribute to the augmented anti-inflammatory activity of this compound. These data also highlight the existence of ‘crosstalk' between NO and H2S in this model of endotoxic shock. PMID:16491094

  18. Surface modifications of steels to improve corrosion resistance in sulfidizing-oxidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrani, Vikas

    Industrial and power generation processes employ units like boilers and gasifiers to burn sulfur containing fuels to produce steam and syn gas (H 2 and CO), which can generate electricity using turbines and fuel cells. These units often operate under environments containing gases such as H 2S, SO2, O2 etc, which can attack the metallic structure and impose serious problems of corrosion. Corrosion control in high temperature sulfur bearing environments is a challenging problem requiring information on local gaseous species at the surface of alloy and mechanisms of degradation in these environments. Coatings have proved to be a better alternative for improving corrosion resistance without compromising the bulk mechanical properties. Changes in process conditions may result in thermal and/or environment cycling between oxidizing and sulfidizing environments at the alloy surface, which can damage the protective scale formed on the alloy surface, leading to increase in corrosion rates. Objective of this study was to understand the effect of fluctuating environments on corrosion kinetics of carbon steels and develop diffusion based coatings to mitigate the high temperatures corrosion under these conditions. More specifically, the focus was: (1) to characterize the local gaseous environments at the surface of alloys in boilers; (2) optimizing diffusion coatings parameters for carbon steel; (3) understand the underlying failure mechanisms in cyclic environments; (4) to improve aluminide coating behavior by co-deposition of reactive elements such as Yttrium and Hafnium; (5) to formulate a plausible mechanism of coating growth and effects of alloying elements on corrosion; and (6) to understand the spallation behavior of scale by measuring stresses in the scales. The understanding of coating mechanism and effects of fluctuating gaseous environments provides information for designing materials with more reliable performance. The study also investigates the mechanism behind

  19. Sulfide oxidation and distribution of metals near abandoned copper mines in coastal environments, Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, R.A.; Munk, L.; Foster, A.L.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Stillings, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of sulfide-rich rocks, mostly leftover debris from Cu mining in the early 20th century, is contributing to metal contamination of local coastal environments in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Analyses of sulfide, water, sediment, precipitate and biological samples from the Beatson, Ellamar, and Threeman mine sites show that acidic surface waters generated from sulfide weathering are pathways for redistribution of environmentally important elements into and beyond the intertidal zone at each site. Volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits composed of pyrrhotite and (or) pyrite + chalcopyrite + sphalerite with subordinate galena, arsenopyrite, and cobaltite represent potent sources of Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Co, Cd, and Hg. The resistance to oxidation among the major sulfides increases in the order pyrrhotite ??? sphalerite < chalcopyrite ??? pyrite; thus, pyrrhotite-rich rocks are typically more oxidized than those dominated by pyrite. The pervasive alteration of pyrrhotite begins with rim replacement by marcasite followed by replacement of the core by sulfur, Fe sulfate, and Fe-Al sulfate. The oxidation of chalcopyrite and pyrite involves an encroachment by colloform Fe oxyhydroxides at grain margins and along crosscutting cracks that gradually consumes the entire grain. The complete oxidation of sulfide-rich samples results in a porous aggregate of goethite, lepidocrocite and amorphous Fe-oxyhydroxide enclosing hydrothermal and sedimentary silicates. An inverse correlation between pH and metal concentrations is evident in water data from all three sites. Among all waters sampled, pore waters from Ellamar beach gravels have the lowest pH (???3) and highest concentrations of base metals (to ???25,000 ??g/L), which result from oxidation of abundant sulfide-rich debris in the sediment. High levels of dissolved Hg (to 4100 ng/L) in the pore waters probably result from oxidation of sphalerite-rich rocks. The low-pH and high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Al, and SO4

  20. Hydrogen sulfide protects endothelial nitric oxide function under conditions of acute oxidative stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Al-Magableh, Mohammad R; Kemp-Harper, Barbara K; Ng, Hooi H; Miller, Alyson A; Hart, Joanne L

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the ability of H2S, released from NaHS to protect vascular endothelial function under conditions of acute oxidative stress by scavenging superoxide anions (O2(-)) and suppressing vascular superoxide anion production. O2(-) was generated in Krebs' solution by reacting hypoxanthine with xanthine oxidase (Hx-XO) or with the O2(-) generator pyrogallol to model acute oxidative stress in vitro. O2(-) generation was measured by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence. Functional responses in mouse aortic rings were assessed using a small vessel myograph. NaHS scavenged O2(-) in a concentration-dependent manner. Isolated aortic rings exposed to either Hx-XO or pyrogallol displayed significantly attenuated maximum vasorelaxation responses to the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine, and significantly reduced NO bioavailability, which was completely reversed if vessels were pre-incubated with NaHS (100 μM). NADPH-stimulated aortic O2(-) production was significantly attenuated by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyl iodonium. Prior treatment of vessels with NaHS (100 nM-100 μM; 30 min) inhibited NADPH-stimulated aortic O2(-) production in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect persisted when NaHS was washed out prior to measuring NADPH-stimulated O2(-) production. These data show for the first time that NaHS directly scavenges O2(-) and suppresses vascular NADPH oxidase-derived O2(-) production in vitro. Furthermore, these properties protect endothelial function and NO bioavailability in an in vitro model of acute oxidative stress. These results suggest that H2S can elicit vasoprotection by both scavenging O2(-) and by reducing vascular NADPH oxidase-derived O2(-) production.

  1. Dimethyl Sulfide-Dimethyl Ether and Ethylene Oxide-Ethylene Sulfide Complexes Investigated by Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy and AB Initio Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Tatamitani, Yoshio; Mase, Takayuki; Hirota, Eizi

    2015-06-01

    The ground-state rotational spectra of the dimethyl sulfide-dimethyl ether (DMS-DME) and the ethylene oxide and ethylene sulfide (EO-ES) complexes were observed by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy, and a-type and c-type transitions were assigned for the normal, 34S, and three 13C species of the DMS-DME and a-type and b-type rotational transitions for the normal, 34S, and two 13C species of the EO-ES. The observed transitions were analyzed by using an S-reduced asymmetric-top rotational Hamiltonian. The rotational parameters thus derived for the DMS-DME were found consistent with a structure of Cs symmetry with the DMS bound to the DME by two C-H(DMS)---O and one S---H-C(DME) hydrogen bonds. The barrier height V3 to internal rotation of the "free" methyl group in the DME was determined to be 915.4 (23) wn, which is smaller than that of the DME monomer, 951.72 (70) wn, and larger than that of the DME dimer, 785.4 (52) wn. For the EO-ES complex the observed data were interpreted in the terms of an antiparallel Cs geometry with the EO bound to the ES by two C-H(ES)---O and two S---H-C(EO) hydrogen bonds. We have applied a natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis to the DMS-DME and EO-ES to calculate the stabilization energy CT (= ΔEσσ*), which were closely correlated with the binding energy EB, as found for other related complexes. Y. Niide and M. Hayashi, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 220, 65-79 (2003). Y. Tatamitani, B. Liu, J. Shimada, T. Ogata, P. Ottaviani, A. Maris, W. Caminati, and J. L. Alonso, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124, 2739-2743 (2002).

  2. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 1: Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors as a result of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and low-molecular-weight thiols are commonly encountered in wine production. These odors are usually removed by the process of Cu(II) fining, a process that remains poorly understood. The present study aims to elucidate the underlying mechanisms by which Cu(II) interacts with H2S and thiol compounds (RSH) under wine-like conditions. Copper complex formation was monitored along with H2S, thiol, oxygen, and acetaldehyde concentrations after the addition of Cu(II) (50 or 100 μM) to air-saturated model wine solutions containing H2S, cysteine, 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, or 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (300 μM each). The presence of H2S and thiols in excess to Cu(II) led to the rapid formation of ∼1.4:1 H2S/Cu and ∼2:1 thiol/Cu complexes, resulting in the oxidation of H2S and thiols and reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I), which reacted with oxygen. H2S was observed to initially oxidize rather than form insoluble copper sulfide. The proposed reaction mechanisms provide insight into the extent to which H2S can be selectively removed in the presence of thiols in wine.

  3. Effect of temperature on anoxic sulfide oxidation and denitrification in the bulk wastewater phase of sewer networks.

    PubMed

    Mathioudakis, V L; Aivasidis, A

    2009-01-01

    Artificial dosage of nitrate in sewer networks is considered as one of the most effective methods for odor and corrosion control. However, there is limited knowledge on the effect of temperature on the transformations that takes place during anoxic conditions. Thus, two groups of batch experiments were conducted to gain insight in the involved processes in bulk phase of a septic municipal wastewater. It can be concluded that sewer denitrification, in bulk phase, can be simplified in three stages. According to the experimental results, nitrate or nitrite is utilized for autotrophic denitrification with sulfide, while heterotrophic utilization is initiated after the completion of anoxic sulfide oxidation. Moreover, temperature is proved to have a significant impact on sewer denitrification kinetic profile, as it determines the extent of temporal nitrite accumulation. The temperature coefficient of each anoxic process, including sulfide oxidation, nitrate utilization and denitrification/nitrite utilization is experimentally calculated and temperature dependent equations are developed, providing the rate of all anoxic processes in bulk phase of sewer wastewater, in any given temperature.

  4. Acid volatile sulfides oxidation and metals (Mn, Zn) release upon sediment resuspension: laboratory experiment and model development.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yong Seok; Kinney, Kerry A; Reible, Danny D

    2011-03-01

    Sediment from the Anacostia River (Washington, DC, USA) was suspended in aerobic artificial river water for 14 d to investigate the dynamics of dissolved metals release and related parameters including pH, acid volatile sulfides (AVS), and dissolved/solid phase Fe(2+). To better understand and predict the underlying processes, a mathematical model is developed considering oxidation of reduced species, dissolution of minerals, pH changes, and pH-dependent metals' sorption to sediment. Oxidation rate constants of elemental sulfur and zinc sulfide, and a dissolution rate constant of carbonate minerals, were adjusted to fit observations. The proposed model and parameters were then applied, without further calibration, to literature-reported experimental observations of resuspension in an acid sulfate soil collected in a coastal flood plain. The model provided a good description of the dynamics of AVS, Fe(2+), S(0)((s)), pH, dissolved carbonates concentrations, and the release of Ca((aq)), Mg((aq)), and Zn((aq)) in both sediments. Accurate predictions of Mn((aq)) release required adjustment of sorption partitioning coefficient, presumably due to the presence of Mn scavenging by phases not accounted for in the model. The oxidation of AVS (and the resulting release of sulfide-bound metals) was consistent with a two-step process, a relatively rapid AVS oxidation to elemental sulfur (S(0)((s))) and a slow oxidation of S(0)((s)) to SO(4)(2-)((aq)), with an associated decrease in pH from neutral to acidic conditions. This acidification was the dominant factor for the release of metals into the aqueous phase. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  5. Origin and fate of sulfide liquids in hotspot volcanism (La Réunion): Pb isotope constraints from residual Fe-Cu oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlastélic, I.; Gannoun, A.; Di Muro, A.; Gurioli, L.; Bachèlery, P.; Henot, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Immiscible sulfide liquids in basaltic magmas play an important role in trace metal transport and the sulfur budget of volcanic eruptions. However, sulfides are transient phases, whose origin and fate are poorly constrained. We address these issues by analyzing sulfide destabilization products preserved in lavas from La Réunion Island. Iron oxide globules and coatings, typically 20-80 μm in size, were found to occur in vesicles of differentiated lavas from Piton des Neiges, and recent pumice samples from Piton de la Fournaise. Field and mineralogical evidence indicates that the iron oxides are syn-eruptive phases not resulting from hydrothermal processes. Samples were first studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy. The globules were separated, whereas the smaller spherules and coatings were concentrated by magnetic sorting and acid leaching, and samples were processed through wet chemistry. The Fe oxide phases comprise 49-74 wt.% Fe, 26-40 wt.% O, and up to 6 wt.% Cu, 811 ppm Ni, 140 ppm Bi, and 8.5 ppm Pb. Compared to the host lava, Cu, Ni, and Bi are enriched by a factor of 101-103. Systematic Pb isotope disequilibrium (between 500 ppm and 2.9% for 206Pb/204Pb) exists between Fe oxides and host rocks, with Fe oxides generally displaying less radiogenic ratios. Unradiogenic Pb is a typical signature of sulfide, which tends to concentrate Pb, but not its parent elements U and Th. Thus, both the chemical and isotopic compositions of the vesicle-hosted Fe oxides suggest that they are more or less direct products of the destabilization of immiscible sulfide liquids. Although Pb dominantly partitions into the gas phase during sulfide breakdown, the original Pb isotope signature of sulfide is preserved in the residual oxide. The composition estimated for the parent sulfides (206Pb/204Pb = 18.20-18.77, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.575, and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.2-38.8) precludes a genetic link with the La Réunion plume, and suggests a lithospheric or crustal origin. It is estimated

  6. Removal of antimony (Sb(V)) from Sb mine drainage: biological sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation-precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huawei; Chen, Fulong; Mu, Shuyong; Zhang, Daoyong; Pan, Xiangliang; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2013-10-01

    Antimony (Sb(V)) in Sb mine drainage has adverse effects on the receiving water environments. This study for the first time demonstrated the feasibility of using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to convert sulfate ions in SMD into sulfides that reduce Sb(V) to Sb(III) and to form complex with Sb(III) as precipitate. The principal compound in the precipitate was stibnite (Sb2S3) at pH 7 and pH 9. The Sb(V) removal mechanism is sulfate-reduction and sulfide oxidization-precipitation, different from the conventional SRB-precipitation processes for heavy metals. The Sb(V)/sulfate ratio is noted an essential parameter affecting the Sb removal efficiency from SMD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by a microbial consortium in a recirculation reactor system: sulfur formation under oxygen limitation and removal of phenols.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, Sergio; Velasco, Antonio; Muñoz, Ana; Cid, Juan; Revah, Sergio; Razo-Flores, Elías

    2004-02-01

    Wastewater from petroleum refining may contain a number of undesirable contaminants including sulfides, phenolic compounds, and ammonia. The concentrations of these compounds must be reduced to acceptable levels before discharge. Sulfur formation and the effect of selected phenolic compounds on the sulfide oxidation were studied in autotrophic aerobic cultures. A recirculation reactor system was implemented to improve the elemental sulfur recovery. The relation between oxygen and sulfide was determined calculating the O2/S2- loading rates (Q(O2)/Q(S)2- = Rmt), which adequately defined the operation conditions to control the sulfide oxidation. Sulfur-producing steady states were achieved at Rmt ranging from 0.5 to 1.5. The maximum sulfur formation occurred at Rmt of 0.5 where 85% of the total sulfur added to the reactor as sulfide was transformed to elemental sulfur and 90% of it was recovered from the bottom of the reactor. Sulfide was completely oxidized to sulfate (Rmt of 2) in a stirred tank reactor, even when a mixture of phenolic compounds was present in the medium. Microcosm experiments showed that carbon dioxide production increased in the presence of the phenols, suggesting that these compounds were oxidized and that they may have been used as carbon and energy source by heterotrophic microorganisms present in the consortium.

  8. The Role of Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in Urinary Tract Function.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Vítor S; Hernández, Medardo

    2016-10-01

    This MiniReview focuses on the role played by nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) in physiology of the upper and lower urinary tract. NO and H 2 S, together with carbon monoxide, belong to the group of gaseous autocrine/paracrine messengers or gasotransmitters, which are employed for intra- and intercellular communication in almost all organ systems. Because they are lipid-soluble gases, gaseous transmitters are not constrained by cellular membranes, so that their storage in vesicles for later release is not possible. Gasotransmitter signals are terminated by falling concentrations upon reduction in production that are caused by reacting with cellular components (essentially reactive oxygen species and NO), binding to cellular components or diffusing away. NO and, more recently, H 2 S have been identified as key mediators in neurotransmission of the urinary tract, involved in the regulation of ureteral smooth muscle activity and urinary flow ureteral resistance, as well as by playing a crucial role in the smooth muscle relaxation of bladder outlet region. Urinary bladder function is also dependent on integration of inhibitory mediators, such as NO, released from the urothelium. In the bladder base and distal ureter, the co-localization of neuronal NO synthase with substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in sensory nerves as well as the existence of a high nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase activity in dorsal root ganglion neurons also suggests the involvement of NO as a sensory neurotransmitter. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  9. Utility Of Nitric Oxide And Hydrogen Sulfide-Releasing Chimeras As Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-08-01

    Aspirin is chemopreventive but has significant side effects. We developed NOSH-aspirin a safer, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide releasing hybrid. Here we report on NOSH-aspirin as an anti-inflammatory and its effects on human cancer cell kinetics and various cancer xenografts. Anti-inflammatory: Carageenan rat paw edema model. Cancer cell lines: Colon, HT-29, HCT 15, SW 480; breast, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231; pancreas, MIA PaCa2, BxPC3. Normal cell lines: human mammary, HMEpC; pancreatic epithelial, ACBRI 515. Xenografts: nude mice implanted with HT-29, MDA-MB-231, MIA PaCa2 cells, were treated with NOSH-aspirin (100mg/kg/d) or vehicle. After 3 weeks, mice were sacrificed, tumors excised, weighed, and fixed for IHC studies. NOSH-aspirin significantly reduced paw edema as function of time. NOSH-aspirin's IC 50 in nM at 24h for cell growth inhibition ranged from 50±2 to 250±10 in the cancer cell lines and about 400-fold higher in the normal cell lines. The cell growth inhibitory effects were due to a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest (G0/G1), leading to reductions in cell proliferation. In xenografts, NOSH-aspirin had no effect on the weight of the mice. Tumor volume was reduced as a function of treatment time. At sacrifice, tumor mass reductions were colon: 89%, P=0.005; breast: 91%, P=0.006; pancreas: 75%, P=0.0031. Growth inhibition was due to reduced proliferation (decreased PCNA expression), and induction of apoptosis (increased TUNEL positive cells). NOSH-aspirin is a potent anti-inflammatory, preferentially affecting cancer cells and targets parameters important in determining cellular mass. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Visible-light-enhanced interactions of hydrogen sulfide with composites of zinc (oxy)hydroxide with graphite oxide and graphene.

    PubMed

    Seredych, Mykola; Mabayoje, Oluwaniyi; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-01-17

    Composites of zinc(oxy)hydroxide-graphite oxide and of zinc(oxy)hydroxide-graphene were used as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide under ambient conditions. The initial and exhausted samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, potentiometric titration, EDX, thermal analysis, and nitrogen adsorption. An increase in the amount of H(2)S adsorbed/oxidized on their surfaces in comparison with that of pure Zn(OH)(2) is linked to the structure of the composite, the relative number of terminal hydroxyls, and the kind of graphene-based phase used. Although terminal groups are activated by a photochemical process, the graphite oxide component owing to the chemical bonds with the zinc(oxy)hydroxide phase and conductive properties helps in electron transfer, leading to more efficient oxygen activation via the formation of superoxide ions. Elemental sulfur, zinc sulfide, sulfite, and sulfate are formed on the surface. The formation of sulfur compounds on the surface of zinc(oxy)hydroxide during the course of the breakthrough experiments and thus Zn(OH)(2)-ZnS heterojunctions can also contribute to the increased surface activity of our materials. The results show the superiority of graphite oxide in the formation of composites owing to its active surface chemistry and the possibility of interface bond formation, leading to an increase in the number of electron-transfer reactions. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. CoQ deficiency causes disruption of mitochondrial sulfide oxidation, a new pathomechanism associated with this syndrome.

    PubMed

    Luna-Sánchez, Marta; Hidalgo-Gutiérrez, Agustín; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Chaves-Serrano, Julio; Barriocanal-Casado, Eliana; Santos-Fandila, Ángela; Romero, Miguel; Sayed, Ramy Ka; Duarte, Juan; Prokisch, Holger; Schuelke, Markus; Distelmaier, Felix; Escames, Germaine; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; López, Luis C

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a key component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, but it also has several other functions in the cellular metabolism. One of them is to function as an electron carrier in the reaction catalyzed by sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which catalyzes the first reaction in the hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathway. Therefore, SQR may be affected by CoQ deficiency. Using human skin fibroblasts and two mouse models with primary CoQ deficiency, we demonstrate that severe CoQ deficiency causes a reduction in SQR levels and activity, which leads to an alteration of mitochondrial sulfide metabolism. In cerebrum of Coq9 R239X mice, the deficit in SQR induces an increase in thiosulfate sulfurtransferase and sulfite oxidase, as well as modifications in the levels of thiols. As a result, biosynthetic pathways of glutamate, serotonin, and catecholamines were altered in the cerebrum, and the blood pressure was reduced. Therefore, this study reveals the reduction in SQR activity as one of the pathomechanisms associated with CoQ deficiency syndrome. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  12. Enhanced reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide on the composites of graphene/graphite oxide with copper (hydr)oxychlorides.

    PubMed

    Mabayoje, Oluwaniyi; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-06-27

    Composites of copper (hydr)oxychlorides with graphite oxide or graphene were synthesized and used as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide at dynamic conditions at ambient temperatures. The materials were extensively characterized before and after adsorption in order to link their performance to the surface features. X-ray diffraction, FTIR, thermal analysis, TEM, SEM/EDX, and adsorption of nitrogen were used. It was found that the composite with graphene has the most favorable surface features enhancing reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide. The presence of moisture in the H2S stream has a positive effect on the removal process owing to the dissociation process. H2S is retained on the surface via a direct replacement of OH groups and via acid-base reactions with the copper (hydr)oxide. Highly dispersed reduced copper species on the surface of the composite with graphene enhance activation of oxygen and cause formation of sulfites and sulfates. Higher conductivity of the graphene phase than that of graphite oxide helps in electron transfer in redox reactions.

  13. Two New Sandwich-Type Polyoxomolybdates Functionalized with Diphosphonates: Efficient and Selective Oxidation of Sulfides to Sulfones

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaopeng; Hu, Feng; Wan, Rong; Singh, Vikram; Ma, Pengtao; Wang, Jingping

    2017-01-01

    Two sandwich-type polyoxomolybdates Na8[MO2{Mo2O5(O3PCH3C(O)PO3)}2] (M = Ni2+ (1); Co2+ (2)) were synthesized by one-pot reaction of Na2HPMo12O40·14H2O, 1-hydroxy ethidene diphosphonic acid (HEDP=HOC(CH3)(PO3H2)2), and (1) NiCl2/CoCl2 (2). Compounds 1 and 2 were characterized by single crystal X-ray analysis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), IR spectroscopy, 31P NMR spectra, UV-vis spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). Structural analysis reveals that 1 and 2 exhibit similar centrosymmetric structure, which consists of one transition metal (TM) ion sandwiched by two same subunits {Mo2O5(O3PCH3C(O)PO3)}. The clusters 1 and 2 show efficient catalytic activities for oxidation of thioanisole. Moreover, they are catalytically selective for oxidizing thioanisole. Both resuable polyoxomolybdates 1 and 2 catalysts show good thermo- and hydrolytic stability. It is noted that compound 1 shows outstanding catalytic activity for oxidation of various sulfides to corresponding sulfones with 93–100% selectivity at 97–100% conversion in one hour under mild conditions, which is potentially valuable to the removal of organic sulfides. PMID:29027947

  14. Detection of the Free-Living Forms of Sulfide-Oxidizing Gill Endosymbionts in the Lucinid Habitat (Thalassia testudinum Environment)

    PubMed Central

    Gros, Olivier; Liberge, Martine; Heddi, Abdelaziz; Khatchadourian, Chaqué; Felbeck, Horst

    2003-01-01

    Target DNA from the uncultivable Codakia orbicularis endosymbiont was PCR amplified from sea-grass sediment. To confirm that such amplifications originated from intact bacterial cells rather than free DNA, whole-cell hybridization (fluorescence in situ hybridization technique) with the specific probe Symco2 was performed along with experimental infection of aposymbiotic juveniles placed in contact with the same sediment. Taken together, the data demonstrate that the sulfide-oxidizing gill endosymbiont of Codakia orbicularis is present in the environment as a free-living uncultivable form. PMID:14532089

  15. Detection of the free-living forms of sulfide-oxidizing gill endosymbionts in the lucinid habitat (Thalassia testudinum environment).

    PubMed

    Gros, Olivier; Liberge, Martine; Heddi, Abdelaziz; Khatchadourian, Chaqué; Felbeck, Horst

    2003-10-01

    Target DNA from the uncultivable Codakia orbicularis endosymbiont was PCR amplified from sea-grass sediment. To confirm that such amplifications originated from intact bacterial cells rather than free DNA, whole-cell hybridization (fluorescence in situ hybridization technique) with the specific probe Symco2 was performed along with experimental infection of aposymbiotic juveniles placed in contact with the same sediment. Taken together, the data demonstrate that the sulfide-oxidizing gill endosymbiont of Codakia orbicularis is present in the environment as a free-living uncultivable form.

  16. Multiple sulfur isotopes fractionations associated with abiotic sulfur transformations in Yellowstone National Park geothermal springs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The paper presents a quantification of main (hydrogen sulfide and sulfate), as well as of intermediate sulfur species (zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), thiosulfate, sulfite, thiocyanate) in the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) hydrothermal springs and pools. We combined these measurements with the measurements of quadruple sulfur isotope composition of sulfate, hydrogen sulfide and zero-valent sulfur. The main goal of this research is to understand multiple sulfur isotope fractionation in the system, which is dominated by complex, mostly abiotic, sulfur cycling. Results Water samples from six springs and pools in the Yellowstone National Park were characterized by pH, chloride to sulfate ratios, sulfide and intermediate sulfur species concentrations. Concentrations of sulfate in pools indicate either oxidation of sulfide by mixing of deep parent water with shallow oxic water, or surface oxidation of sulfide with atmospheric oxygen. Thiosulfate concentrations are low (<6 μmol L-1) in the pools with low pH due to fast disproportionation of thiosulfate. In the pools with higher pH, the concentration of thiosulfate varies, depending on different geochemical pathways of thiosulfate formation. The δ34S values of sulfate in four systems were close to those calculated using a mixing line of the model based on dilution and boiling of a deep hot parent water body. In two pools δ34S values of sulfate varied significantly from the values calculated from this model. Sulfur isotope fractionation between ZVS and hydrogen sulfide was close to zero at pH < 4. At higher pH zero-valent sulfur is slightly heavier than hydrogen sulfide due to equilibration in the rhombic sulfur–polysulfide – hydrogen sulfide system. Triple sulfur isotope (32S, 33S, 34S) fractionation patterns in waters of hydrothermal pools are more consistent with redox processes involving intermediate sulfur species than with bacterial sulfate reduction. Small but resolved differences in ∆33S among

  17. Zn isotopes in hydrothermal sulfides and their oxidation products along the south mid-Atlantic ridge: evidence of hydrothermal fluid deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohu; Wang, Jianqiang; Chu, Fengyou; Lei, Jijiang; Wang, Hao; Li, Zhenggang

    2018-04-01

    Significant Zn isotope fractionation occurs during seafloor hydrothermal activities. Therefore, exploring variations in Zn isotope composition affected by hydrothermal fluids and oxidative processes would help to better understand hydrothermal fluid cycling and sulfide deposition on mid-ocean ridges. In this paper, the Zn isotope compositions of different types of sulfides and their oxidation products obtained from hydrothermal fields on the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge (13-15°S) were analyzed using a Neptune plus MC-ICP-MS. The δ66Zn ratios range from -0.14‰ to +0.38‰, and the average δ66Zn ratio is +0.12±0.06‰ ( n=21, 2 SD) for all the studied sulfides and oxidation products. The Cu-rich sulfides have a slightly heavier Zn isotope composition (average δ66Zn=+0.19±0.07‰, n=6) than the Zn-rich sulfides (average δ66Zn=-0.02±0.06‰, n=5). The Zn isotope compositions of the oxidation products are similar to those of the Cu-rich sulfides, with an average δ66Zn ratio of 0.14±0.06‰ ( n=10, 2 SD). The Zn isotope compositions of all the samples are generally within the ranges of sulfides from hydrothermal fields on other mid-ocean ridges, such as the East Pacific Rise (9°N, 21°N) and the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse. However, the average Zn isotope composition indicates the presence of significantly lighter Zn isotopes relative to those reported in the literature (average δ66Zn=+0.39‰). The significant enrichment of the Zn-rich sulfides with light Zn isotopes reveals that kinetic fractionation likely occurs during mineral deposition. Furthermore, the Zn isotope compositions of the sulfides and their oxidation products (average δ66Zn=+0.12‰) are significantly lighter than the average Zn isotope composition of the ocean (δ66Zn=+0.5‰), which could further constrain the modern Zn isotope cycle in the ocean by serving as a sink for light Zn isotopes.

  18. When Bad Guys Become Good Ones: The Key Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide in the Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Farnese, Fernanda S.; Menezes-Silva, Paulo E.; Gusman, Grasielle S.; Oliveira, Juraci A.

    2016-01-01

    The natural environment of plants is composed of a complex set of abiotic stresses and their ability to respond to these stresses is highly flexible and finely balanced through the interaction between signaling molecules. In this review, we highlight the integrated action between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), particularly nitric oxide (NO), involved in the acclimation to different abiotic stresses. Under stressful conditions, the biosynthesis transport and the metabolism of ROS and NO influence plant response mechanisms. The enzymes involved in ROS and NO synthesis and scavenging can be found in different cells compartments and their temporal and spatial locations are determinant for signaling mechanisms. Both ROS and NO are involved in long distances signaling (ROS wave and GSNO transport), promoting an acquired systemic acclimation to abiotic stresses. The mechanisms of abiotic stresses response triggered by ROS and NO involve some general steps, as the enhancement of antioxidant systems, but also stress-specific mechanisms, according to the stress type (drought, hypoxia, heavy metals, etc.), and demand the interaction with other signaling molecules, such as MAPK, plant hormones, and calcium. The transduction of ROS and NO bioactivity involves post-translational modifications of proteins, particularly S-glutathionylation for ROS, and S-nitrosylation for NO. These changes may alter the activity, stability, and interaction with other molecules or subcellular location of proteins, changing the entire cell dynamics and contributing to the maintenance of homeostasis. However, despite the recent advances about the roles of ROS and NO in signaling cascades, many challenges remain, and future studies focusing on the signaling of these molecules in planta are still necessary. PMID:27148300

  19. When Bad Guys Become Good Ones: The Key Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide in the Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Farnese, Fernanda S; Menezes-Silva, Paulo E; Gusman, Grasielle S; Oliveira, Juraci A

    2016-01-01

    The natural environment of plants is composed of a complex set of abiotic stresses and their ability to respond to these stresses is highly flexible and finely balanced through the interaction between signaling molecules. In this review, we highlight the integrated action between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), particularly nitric oxide (NO), involved in the acclimation to different abiotic stresses. Under stressful conditions, the biosynthesis transport and the metabolism of ROS and NO influence plant response mechanisms. The enzymes involved in ROS and NO synthesis and scavenging can be found in different cells compartments and their temporal and spatial locations are determinant for signaling mechanisms. Both ROS and NO are involved in long distances signaling (ROS wave and GSNO transport), promoting an acquired systemic acclimation to abiotic stresses. The mechanisms of abiotic stresses response triggered by ROS and NO involve some general steps, as the enhancement of antioxidant systems, but also stress-specific mechanisms, according to the stress type (drought, hypoxia, heavy metals, etc.), and demand the interaction with other signaling molecules, such as MAPK, plant hormones, and calcium. The transduction of ROS and NO bioactivity involves post-translational modifications of proteins, particularly S-glutathionylation for ROS, and S-nitrosylation for NO. These changes may alter the activity, stability, and interaction with other molecules or subcellular location of proteins, changing the entire cell dynamics and contributing to the maintenance of homeostasis. However, despite the recent advances about the roles of ROS and NO in signaling cascades, many challenges remain, and future studies focusing on the signaling of these molecules in planta are still necessary.

  20. Oxidative Addition of Disulfides, Alkyl Sulfides, and Diphosphides to an Aluminum(I) Center.

    PubMed

    Chu, Terry; Boyko, Yaroslav; Korobkov, Ilia; Kuzmina, Lyudmila G; Howard, Judith A K; Nikonov, Georgii I

    2016-09-06

    The aluminum(I) compound NacNacAl (1) reacts with diphenyl disulfide and diethyl sulfide to form the respective four-coordinate bis(phenyl sulfide) complex NacNacAl(SPh)2 (2) and alkyl thiolate aluminum complex NacNacAlEt(SEt) (3). As well, reaction of 1 with tetraphenyl diphosphine furnishes the bis(diphenyl phosphido) complex NacNacAl(PPh2)2 (4). Production of 3 and 4 are the first examples of C(sp(3))-S and R2P-PR2 activation by a main-group element complex. All three complexes were characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystal structure analysis. Furthermore, a variable-temperature NMR spectroscopic study was undertaken on 4 to study its dynamic behavior in solution.

  1. Biotic conversion of sulphate to sulphide and abiotic conversion of sulphide to sulphur in a microbial fuel cell using cobalt oxide octahedrons as cathode catalyst.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Pritha; Ghangrekar, M M; Rao, Surampalli; Kumar, Senthil

    2017-05-01

    Varying chemical oxygen demand (COD) and sulphate concentrations in substrate were used to determine reaction kinetics and mass balance of organic matter and sulphate transformation in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). MFC with anodic chamber volume of 1 L, fed with wastewater having COD of 500 mg/L and sulphate of 200 mg/L, could harvest power of 54.4 mW/m 2 , at a Coulombic efficiency of 14%, with respective COD and sulphate removals of 90 and 95%. Sulphide concentration, even up to 1500 mg/L, did not inhibit anodic biochemical reactions, due to instantaneous abiotic oxidation to sulphur, at high inlet sulphate. Experiments on abiotic oxidation of sulphide to sulphur revealed maximum oxidation taking place at an anodic potential of -200 mV. More than 99% sulphate removal could be achieved in a MFC with inlet COD/sulphate of 0.75, giving around 1.33 kg/m 3  day COD removal. Bioelectrochemical conversion of sulphate facilitating sulphur recovery in a MFC makes it an interesting pollution abatement technique.

  2. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates toxic effects of arsenate in pea seedlings through up-regulation of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle: Possible involvement of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay Pratap; Singh, Samiksha; Kumar, Jitendra; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2015-06-01

    In plants, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an emerging novel signaling molecule that is involved in growth regulation and abiotic stress responses. However, little is known about its role in the regulation of arsenate (As(V)) toxicity. Therefore, hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate whether sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; a source of H2S) is involved in the regulation of As(V) toxicity in pea seedlings. Results showed that As(V) caused decreases in growth, photosynthesis (measured as chlorophyll fluorescence) and nitrogen content, which was accompanied by the accumulation of As. As(V) treatment also reduced the activities of cysteine desulfhydrase and nitrate reductase, and contents of H2S and nitric oxide (NO). However, addition of NaHS ameliorated As(V) toxicity in pea seedlings, which coincided with the increased contents of H2S and NO. The cysteine level was higher under As(V) treatment in comparison to all other treatments (As-free; NaHS; As(V)+NaHS). The content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and damage to lipids, proteins and membranes increased by As(V) while NaHS alleviated these effects. Enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle (AsA-GSH cycle) showed inhibition of their activities following As(V) treatment while their activities were increased by application of NaHS. The redox status of ascorbate and glutathione was disturbed by As(V) as indicated by a steep decline in their reduced/oxidized ratios. However, simultaneous NaHS application restored the redox status of the ascorbate and glutathione pools. The results of this study demonstrated that H2S and NO might both be involved in reducing the accumulation of As and triggering up-regulation of the AsA-GSH cycle to counterbalance ROS-mediated damage to macromolecules. Furthermore, the results suggest a crucial role of H2S in plant priming, and in particular for pea seedlings in mitigating As(V) stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Controlled oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides under ambient conditions by a series of titanium isopropoxide complexes using environmentally benign H2O2 as an oxidant.

    PubMed

    Panda, Manas K; Shaikh, Mobin M; Ghosh, Prasenjit

    2010-03-07

    Controlled oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides under ambient conditions has been achieved by a series of titanium isopropoxide complexes that use environmentally benign H(2)O(2) as a primary oxidant. Specifically, the [N,N'-bis(2-oxo-3-R(1)-5-R(2)-phenylmethyl)-N,N'-bis(methylene-R(3))-ethylenediamine]Ti(O(i)Pr)(2) [R(1) = t-Bu, R(2) = Me, R(3) = C(7)H(5)O(2) (1b); R(1) = R(2) = t-Bu, R(3) = C(7)H(5)O(2) (2b); R(1) = R(2) = Cl, R(3) = C(7)H(5)O(2) (3b) and R(1) = R(2) = Cl, R(3) = C(6)H(5) (4b)] complexes efficiently catalyzed the sulfoxidation reactions of organic sulfides to sulfoxides at room temperature within 30 min of the reaction time using aqueous H(2)O(2) as an oxidant. A mechanistic pathway, modeled using density functional theory for a representative thioanisole substrate catalyzed by 4b, suggested that the reaction proceeds via a titanium peroxo intermediate 4c', which displays an activation barrier of 22.5 kcal mol(-1) (DeltaG(++)) for the overall catalytic cycle in undergoing an attack by the S atom of the thioanisole substrate at its sigma*-orbital of the peroxo moiety. The formation of the titanium peroxo intermediate was experimentally corroborated by a mild ionization atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometric technique.

  4. Uranium accumulation in modern and ancient Fe-oxide sediments: Examples from the Ashadze-2 hydrothermal sulfide field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and Yubileynoe massive sulfide deposit (South Urals, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayupova, N. R.; Melekestseva, I. Yu.; Maslennikov, V. V.; Tseluyko, A. S.; Blinov, I. A.; Beltenev, V. E.

    2018-05-01

    Fe-oxyhydroxide sediments (gossans) from the Ashadze-2 hydrothermal sulfide field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and hematite-carbonate-quartz rocks (gossanites) from the Yubileynoe Cu-Zn VHMS deposit (South Urals) are characterized by anomalously high U contents (up to 352 ppm and 73 ppm, respectively). In gossans from the Ashadze-2 hydrothermal sulfide field, rare isometric anhedral uraninite grains (up to 2 μm) with outer P- and Ca-rich rims, and numerous smaller (<1 μm) grains, occur in Fe-oxyhydroxides and sepiolite, associated with pyrite, isocubanite, chalcopyrite, galena, atacamite and halite. In gossanites from the Yubileynoe deposit, numerous uraninite particles (<3 μm) are associated with apatite, V-rich Mg-chlorite, micro-nodules of pyrite, Se-bearing galena, hessite and acanthite in a hematite-carbonate-quartz matrix. Small (1-3 μm) round grains of uraninite, which locally coalesce to large grains up to 10 μm in size, are associated with authigenic chalcopyrite. The similar diagenetic processes of U accumulation in modern and ancient Fe-oxyhydroxide sediments were the result of U fixation from seawater during the oxidation of sulfide minerals. Uraninite in gossanites was mainly deposited from diagenetic pore fluids, which circulated in the sulfide-hyaloclast-carbonate sediments.

  5. Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a Meromictic, Haloalkaline Lake with an Unprecedented High Sulfide Content▿

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Foti, Mirjam; Pinkart, Holly C.; Muyzer, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Culture-dependent and -independent techniques were used to study the diversity of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake containing an unprecedentedly high sulfide concentration in the anoxic monimolimnion. Both approaches revealed the dominance of bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalimicrobium, which are common inhabitants of soda lakes. A dense population of Thioalkalimicrobium (up to 107 cells/ml) was found at the chemocline, which is characterized by a steep oxygen-sulfide gradient. Twelve Thioalkalimicrobium strains exhibiting three different phenotypes were isolated in pure culture from various locations in Soap Lake. The isolates fell into two groups according to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. One of the groups was closely related to T. cyclicum, which was isolated from Mono Lake (California), a transiently meromictic, haloalkaline lake. The second group, consisting of four isolates, was phylogenetically and phenotypically distinct from known Thioalkalimicrobium species and unique to Soap Lake. It represented a new species, for which we suggest the name Thioalkalimicrobium microaerophilum sp. nov. PMID:17114324

  6. The Oxidative Metabolism of Fossil Hydrocarbons and Sulfide Minerals by the Lithobiontic Microbial Community Inhabiting Deep Subterrestrial Kupferschiefer Black Shale.

    PubMed

    Włodarczyk, Agnieszka; Lirski, Maciej; Fogtman, Anna; Koblowska, Marta; Bidziński, Grzegorz; Matlakowska, Renata

    2018-01-01

    Black shales are one of the largest reservoirs of fossil organic carbon and inorganic reduced sulfur on Earth. It is assumed that microorganisms play an important role in the transformations of these sedimentary rocks and contribute to the return of organic carbon and inorganic sulfur to the global geochemical cycles. An outcrop of deep subterrestrial ~256-million-year-old Kupferschiefer black shale was studied to define the metabolic processes of the deep biosphere important in transformations of organic carbon and inorganic reduced sulfur compounds. This outcrop was created during mining activity 12 years ago and since then it has been exposed to the activity of oxygen and microorganisms. The microbial processes were described based on metagenome and metaproteome studies as well as on the geochemistry of the rock. The microorganisms inhabiting the subterrestrial black shale were dominated by bacterial genera such as Pseudomonas, Limnobacter, Yonghaparkia, Thiobacillus, Bradyrhizobium , and Sulfuricaulis . This study on black shale was the first to detect archaea and fungi, represented by Nitrososphaera and Aspergillus genera, respectively. The enzymatic oxidation of fossil aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons was mediated mostly by chemoorganotrophic bacteria, but also by archaea and fungi. The dissimilative enzymatic oxidation of primary reduced sulfur compounds was performed by chemolithotrophic bacteria. The geochemical consequences of microbial activity were the oxidation and dehydrogenation of kerogen, as well as oxidation of sulfide minerals.

  7. Selenium Sulfide

    MedlinePlus

    ... minutes.Do not leave selenium sulfide on your hair, scalp, or skin for long periods (e.g., ... jewelry; selenium sulfide may damage it. Wash your hair with ordinary shampoo and rinse it well. Shake ...

  8. Removal of H2S in down-flow GAC biofiltration using sulfide oxidizing bacteria from concentrated latex wastewater.

    PubMed

    Rattanapan, Cheerawit; Boonsawang, Piyarat; Kantachote, Duangporn

    2009-01-01

    A biofiltration system with sulfur oxidizing bacteria immobilized on granular activated carbon (GAC) as packing materials had a good potential when used to eliminate H(2)S. The sulfur oxidizing bacteria were stimulated from concentrated latex wastewater with sulfur supplement under aerobic condition. Afterward, it was immobilized on GAC to test the performance of cell-immobilized GAC biofilter. In this study, the effect of inlet H(2)S concentration, H(2)S gas flow rate, air gas flow rate and long-term operation on the H(2)S removal efficiency was investigated. In addition, the comparative performance of sulfide oxidizing bacterium immobilized on GAC (biofilter A) and GAC without cell immobilization (biofilter B) systems was studied. It was found that the efficiency of the H(2)S removal was more than 98% even at high concentrations (200-4000 ppm) and the maximum elimination capacity was about 125 g H(2)S/m(3)of GAC/h in the biofilter A. However, the H(2)S flow rate of 15-35 l/h into both biofilters had little influence on the efficiency of H(2)S removal. Moreover, an air flow rate of 5.86 l/h gave complete removal of H(2)S (100%) in biofilter A. During the long-term operation, the complete H(2)S removal was achieved after 3-days operation in biofilter A and remained stable up to 60-days.

  9. Adsorption-oxidation of hydrogen sulfide on Fe/walnut-shell activated carbon surface modified by NH3-plasma.

    PubMed

    Ning, Ping; Liu, Sijian; Wang, Chi; Li, Kai; Sun, Xin; Tang, Lihong; Liu, Gui

    2018-02-01

    Walnut-shell activated carbon (WSAC) supported ferric oxide was modified by non-thermal plasma (NTP), and the removal efficiency for hydrogen sulfide over Fe/WSAC modified by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was significantly promoted. The sample modified for 10min and 6.8kV output (30V input voltage) maintained 100% H 2 S conversion over a long reaction time of 390min. The surface properties of adsorbents modified by NTP under different conditions were evaluated by the methods of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis and in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), to help understand the effect of the NTP treatment. NTP treatment enhanced the adsorption capacity of Fe/WSAC, which could due to the formation of micro-pores with sizes of 0.4, 0.5 and 0.75nm. XPS revealed that chemisorbed oxygen changed into lattice oxygen after NTP treatment, and lattice oxygen is beneficial for H 2 S oxidation. From the in-situ FTIR result, transformation of the reaction path on Fe/WSAC was observed after NTP modification. The research results indicate that NTP is an effective method to improve the surface properties of the Fe/WSAC catalyst for H 2 S adsorption-oxidation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. A hypothesis for treating inflammation and oxidative stress with hydrogen sulfide during age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    George, Akash K; Singh, Mahavir; Homme, Rubens Petit; Majumder, Avisek; Sandhu, Harpal S; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2018-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness and is becoming a global crisis since affected people will increase to 288 million by 2040. Genetics, age, diabetes, gender, obesity, hypertension, race, hyperopia, iris-color, smoking, sun-light and pyroptosis have varying roles in AMD, but oxidative stress-induced inflammation remains a significant driver of pathobiology. Eye is a unique organ as it contains a remarkable oxygen-gradient that generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) which upregulates inflammatory pathways. ROS becomes a source of functional and morphological impairments in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), endothelial cells and retinal ganglion cells. Reports demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) acts as a signaling molecule and that it may treat ailments. Therefore, we propose a novel hypothesis that H 2 S may restore homeostasis in the eyes thereby reducing damage caused by oxidative injury and inflammation. Since H 2 S has been shown to be a powerful antioxidant because of its free-radicals' inhibition properties in addition to its beneficial effects in age-related conditions, therefore, patients may benefit from H 2 S salubrious effects not only by minimizing their oxidant and inflammatory injuries to retina but also by lowering retinal glutamate excitotoxicity.

  11. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 2: Iron- and Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors arising during wine production are frequently removed by Cu(II) fining. In part 1 of this study ( 10.1021/acs.jafc.6b00641 ), the reaction of H2S and thiols with Cu(II) was examined; however, the interaction of iron and copper is also known to play an important synergistic role in mediating non-enzymatic wine oxidation. The interaction of these two metals in the oxidation of H2S and thiols (cysteine, 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, and 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol) was therefore examined under wine-like conditions. H2S and thiols (300 μM) were reacted with Fe(III) (100 or 200 μM) alone and in combination with Cu(II) (25 or 50 μM), and concentrations of H2S and thiols, oxygen, and acetaldehyde were monitored over time. H2S and thiols were shown to be slowly oxidized in the presence of Fe(III) alone and were not bound to Fe(III) under model wine conditions. However, Cu(II) added to model wine containing Fe(III) was quickly reduced by H2S and thiols to form Cu(I) complexes, which then rapidly reduced Fe(III) to Fe(II). Oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of oxygen regenerated Fe(III) and completed the iron redox cycle. In addition, sulfur-derived oxidation products were observed, and the formation of organic polysulfanes was demonstrated.

  12. Investigation of weldable iron-aluminum alloys for corrosion protection in high temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banovic, Stephen William

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the corrosion behavior of weldable Fe-Al alloys in environments representative of low NOx gas compositions, i.e., high partial pressures of sulfur [p(S2)] and low partial pressures of oxygen [p(O2)]. Through an integrated experimental approach involving thermogravimetric techniques, post-exposure metallographic examination of the corroded samples, and detailed chemical microanalyses of the reaction scales, the effects of aluminum content, temperature, and gas composition on the corrosion behavior were observed. The corrosion behavior of Fe-Al alloys was found to be directly related to the type and morphology of corrosion product that formed during high temperature exposure in the oxidizing/sulfidizing environment. The inhibition stage was characterized by growth of a thin, gamma alumina scale that suppressed excessive degradation of the substrate at all temperatures. Localized mechanical failure of the initial passive scale, in combination with the inability to re-establish itself, was found to result in nodular growth of non-protective sulfide phases across the sample face due to short circuit diffusion through the gamma alumina layer. With the remnants of the initial gamma scale found between the outer and inner scale, it was concluded that these layers grew by iron diffusion outward and sulfur diffusion inward, respectively. The corrosion rate observed during development of these morphologies was directly related to the density of the nodules on the surface and the exposure temperature. The final period observed was the steady-state stage. This behavior was encountered from the onset of exposure for all Fe-5 wt% Al alloys tested, or upon coalescence of the nodular growths. After initially high corrosion rates, the weight gains were found to increase at a steady rate as subsequent growth occurred via diffusion through the continuous scale. Determination of the corrosion product growth mechanism could not be

  13. Iron Sulfide Attenuates the Methanogenic Toxicity of Elemental Copper and Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and their Soluble Metal Ion Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2016-01-01

    Elemental copper (Cu0) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25–75 µm) and coarse (500 to 1200 µm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu0 and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu0 NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excesses of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens. PMID:26803736

  14. Sulfide oxidation and acid mine drainage formation within two active tailings impoundments in the Golden Quadrangle of the Apuseni Mountains, Romania.

    PubMed

    Sima, Mihaela; Dold, Bernhard; Frei, Linda; Senila, Marin; Balteanu, Dan; Zobrist, Jurg

    2011-05-30

    Sulfidic mine tailings have to be classified as one of the major source of hazardous materials leading to water contamination. This study highlights the processes leading to sulfide oxidation and acid mine drainage (AMD) formation in the active stage of two tailings impoundments located in the southern part of the Apuseni Mountains, in Romania, a well-known region for its long-term gold-silver and metal mining activity. Sampling was undertaken when both impoundments were still in operation in order to assess their actual stage of oxidation and long-term behavior in terms of the potential for acid mine drainage generation. Both tailings have high potential for AMD formation (2.5 and 3.7 wt.% of pyrite equivalent, respectively) with lesser amount of carbonates (5.6 and 3.6 wt.% of calcite equivalent) as neutralization potential (ABA=-55.6 and -85.1 tCaCO(3)/1000 t ) and showed clear signs of sulfide oxidation yet during operation. Sequential extraction results indicate a stronger enrichment and mobility of elements in the oxidized tailings: Fe as Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides and oxides (transformation from sulfide minerals, leaching in oxidation zone), Ca mainly in water soluble and exchangeable form where gypsum and calcite are dissolved and higher mobility of Cu for Ribita and Pb for Mialu. Two processes leading to the formation of mine drainage at this stage could be highlighted (1) a neutral Fe(II) plume forming in the impoundment with ferrihydrite precipitation at its outcrop and (2) acid mine drainage seeping in the unsaturated zone of the active dam, leading to the formation of schwertmannite at its outcrop. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Pyritic event beds and sulfidized Fe (oxyhydr)oxide aggregates in metalliferous black mudstones of the Paleoproterozoic Talvivaara formation, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtasalo, Joonas J.; Laitala, Jaakko J.; Lahtinen, Raimo; Whitehouse, Martin J.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleoproterozoic, 2.0-1.9 Ga Talvivaara formation of Finland was deposited during the Shunga Event, a worldwide episode of enhanced accumulation of organic-rich sediments in the aftermath of the Lomagundi-Jatuli carbon isotope excursion. Sulfidic carbonaceous mudstones in the Talvivaara formation contain one of the largest known shale-hosted nickel deposits. In order to gain new insight into this Shungian sedimentary environment, sedimentological, petrographical and in situ S and Fe isotopic microanalyses were carried out on samples representing depositional and early-diagenetic conditions. The event-bedded lithology with tidal signatures in the organic-rich mudstones strongly indicates deposition from predominantly river-delivered mud on a highly-productive coastal area, below storm-wave base. The riverine supply of phosphorus, sulfate and iron supported high primary productivity and resulted in strong lateral and vertical chemical gradients in the nearshore waters with a shallow oxic surface layer underlain by euxinic water. The stratigraphic upper part of the Talvivaara formation contains banded intervals of thin alternating pyrite beds and carbonaceous mudstone beds. The pyrite beds were deposited by seaward excursions of the concentrated, acidic Fe-rich river plume subsequent to droughts or dry seasons, which led to intense pyrite precipitation upon mixing with euxinic waters. δ34S and δ56Fe values of the bedded pyrite (median δ34S = - 10.3 ‰ and δ56Fe = - 0.79 ‰) are consistent with the reaction of dissolved Fe(II) with H2S from bacterial sulfate reduction. Organic-rich clayey Fe-monosulfide-bearing granules were transported from the muddy estuary, and enclosed in Fe (oxyhydr)oxide aggregates that were forming by wave and current reworking in nearshore accumulations of river-delivered iron. The isotopic composition of these presently pyrrhotitic inclusions (median δ34S = - 3.3 ‰ and δ56Fe = - 1.6 ‰) indicates microbial iron reduction. The Fe

  16. Mineralogical and chemical assessment of concrete damaged by the oxidation of sulfide-bearing aggregates: Importance of thaumasite formation on reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, A.; Duchesne, J., E-mail: josee.duchesne@ggl.ulaval.ca; Fournier, B.

    Damages in concrete containing sulfide-bearing aggregates were recently observed in the Trois-Rivieres area (Quebec, Canada), characterized by rapid deterioration within 3 to 5 years after construction. A petrographic examination of concrete core samples was carried out using a combination of tools including: stereomicroscopic evaluation, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. The aggregate used to produce concrete was an intrusive igneous rock with different metamorphism degrees and various proportions of sulfide minerals. In the rock, sulfide minerals were often surrounded by a thin layer of carbonate minerals (siderite). Secondary reaction products observed in the damagedmore » concrete include 'rust' mineral forms (e.g. ferric oxyhydroxides such as goethite, limonite (FeO (OH) nH{sub 2}O) and ferrihydrite), gypsum, ettringite and thaumasite. In the presence of water and oxygen, pyrrhotite oxidizes to form iron oxyhydroxides and sulphuric acid. The acid then reacts with the phases of the cement paste/aggregate and provokes the formation of sulfate minerals. Understanding both mechanisms, oxidation and internal sulfate attack, is important to be able to duplicate the damaging reaction in laboratory conditions, thus allowing the development of a performance test for evaluating the potential for deleterious expansion in concrete associated with sulfide-bearing aggregates.« less

  17. Design and scale-up of an oxidative scrubbing process for the selective removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas.

    PubMed

    Krischan, J; Makaruk, A; Harasek, M

    2012-05-15

    Reliable and selective removal of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is an essential part of the biogas upgrading procedure in order to obtain a marketable and competitive natural gas substitute for flexible utilization. A promising biogas desulfurization technology has to ensure high separation efficiency regardless of process conditions or H(2)S load without the use or production of toxic or ecologically harmful substances. Alkaline oxidative scrubbing is an interesting alternative to existing desulfurization technologies and is investigated in this work. In experiments on a stirred tank reactor and a continuous scrubbing column in laboratory-scale, H(2)S was absorbed from a gas stream containing large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) into an aqueous solution prepared from sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). The influence of pH, redox potential and solution aging on the absorption efficiency and the consumption of chemicals was investigated. Because of the irreversible oxidation reactions of dissolved H(2)S with H(2)O(2), high H(2)S removal efficiencies were achieved while the CO(2) absorption was kept low. At an existing biogas upgrading plant an industrial-scale pilot scrubber was constructed, which efficiently desulfurizes 180m(3)/h of raw biogas with an average removal efficiency of 97%, even at relatively high and strongly fluctuating H(2)S contents in the crude gas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Corrosion behavior of an HVOF-sprayed Fe3Al coating in a high-temperature oxidizing/sulfidizing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.

    An iron aluminide (Fe3Al) intermetallic coating was deposited onto a F22 (2.25Cr-1Mo) steel substrate using a JP-5000 high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray system. The as-sprayed coating was examined by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction and was characterized in terms of oxidation and adhesion. Fe3Al-coated steel specimens were exposed to a mixed oxidizing/sulfidizing environment at 500, 600, 700, and 800DGC for approximately seven days. The gaseous environment consisted of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-2%H2O-0.12%H2S (by volume). All specimens gained mass after exposure to the environment and the mass gains were found to be inversely proportional to temperature increases. Representative specimens exposed at each temperaturemore » were cross-sectioned and subjected to examination under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray mapping. Results are presented in terms of corrosion weight gain and corrosion product formation. The purpose of the research presented here was to evaluate the effectiveness of an HVOF-sprayed Fe3Al coating in protecting a steel substrate exposed to a fossil energy environment.« less

  19. The Combined Role Of Manganese Oxides And Microbes In The yAbiotic Uptake Of Amino Acid Nitrogen Into Litter And Soil Organic yMatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, T. R.; Dria, K.

    2004-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is the largest terrestrial C and N store. Microbial yand abiotic processes that control the transformation of protein nitrogen in litter and ysoils into macromolecular humic materials play an important role in organic matter ystorage and soil productivity. There are major gaps, however, in our understanding of ythese processes and behaviors. Abiotic reactions of amines, phenols and sugars derived yfrom forest leachates or present in detrital and litter organic matter are known to be ykey processes in the formation of complex organic nitrogen. We present here the yresults from a study designed to investigate how the inherent chemistry of lignin, leaf ylitter, and progressively advanced brown-rot wood decay impact the chemical reaction yof amino acids with this organic matter. Additionally, experiments in the presence of ybirnessite (MnO2) were also conducted to investigate the role of mineral induced phenol yoxidation on specific amino acid chemical humifcation processes. Solid and liquid state yNMR, 13C-labelled tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis and stable ycarbon and nitrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry were used to track the alteration yof litter material and document uptake of 13C and 15N labeled amino acids. yPreliminary results from birnessite-containing experiments suggest that the metal-ypromoted oxidation of the lignin, leaf litter, and, in particular, demethylated brown rot ywood residues, is necessary to convert the phenols to quinones of some type permitting yamine addition. This relationship is particularly true for the production of soluble yfractions after two and six weeks of reaction in the presence of the manganese oxides. yAdditionally, the production of leachable organic matter with incorporated N was ypromoted in the soluble fractions. Ongoing NMR studies will elucidate the nature of ythe chemical binding in these experiments. y

  20. Case Study: Microbial Ecology and Forensics of Chinese Drywall-Elemental Sulfur Disproportionation as Primary Generator of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Tomei Torres, Francisco A

    2017-06-21

    Drywall manufactured in China released foul odors attributed to volatile sulfur compounds. These included hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, and sulfur dioxide. Given that calcium sulfate is the main component of drywall, one would suspect bacterial reduction of sulfate to sulfide as the primary culprit. However, when the forensics, i.e., the microbial and chemical signatures left in the drywall, are studied, the evidence suggests that, rather than dissimilatory sulfate reduction, disproportionation of elemental sulfur to hydrogen sulfide and sulfate was actually the primary cause of the malodors. Forensic evidence suggests that the transformation of elemental sulfur went through several abiological and microbial stages: (1) partial volatilization of elemental sulfur during the manufacture of plaster of Paris, (2) partial abiotic disproportionation of elemental sulfur to sulfide and thiosulfate during the manufacture of drywall, (3) microbial disproportionation of elemental sulfur to sulfide and sulfate resulting in neutralization of all alkalinity, and acidification below pH 4, (4) acidophilic microbial disproportionation of elemental sulfur to sulfide and sulfuric acid, and (5) hydrogen sulfide volatilization, coating of copper fixtures resulting in corrosion, and oxidation to sulfur dioxide.

  1. Ligand-Enhanced Abiotic Iron Oxidation and the Effects of Chemical versus Biological Iron Cycling in Anoxic Environments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a newly isolated, genetically tractable bacterium (Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain MAI-1) and explores the extent to which its nitrate-dependent iron-oxidation activity is directly biologically catalyzed. Specifically, we focused on the role of iron chelating ligands in promoting chemical oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrite under anoxic conditions. Strong organic ligands such as nitrilotriacetate and citrate can substantially enhance chemical oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrite at circumneutral pH. We show that strain MAI-1 exhibits unambiguous biological Fe(II) oxidation despite a significant contribution (∼30–35%) from ligand-enhanced chemical oxidation. Our work with the model denitrifying strain Paracoccus denitrificans further shows that ligand-enhanced chemical oxidation of Fe(II) by microbially produced nitrite can be an important general side effect of biological denitrification. Our assessment of reaction rates derived from literature reports of anaerobic Fe(II) oxidation, both chemical and biological, highlights the potential competition and likely co-occurrence of chemical Fe(II) oxidation (mediated by microbial production of nitrite) and truly biological Fe(II) oxidation. PMID:23402562

  2. Early diagenetic partial oxidation of organic matter and sulfides in the Middle Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Excello Shale Member of the Fort Scott Limestone and equivalents, northern Midcontinent region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, J.R.; Leventhal, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    A process of early diagenetic partial oxidation of organic matter and sulfides has altered the chemical composition of the Middle Pennsylvanian Excello Shale Member of the Fort Scott Limestone and equivalents in the northern Midcontinent region. This process was identified by comparison of organic carbon contents, Rock-Eval hydrogen indices, organic carbon ??13C and element compositions of core and surface mine samples of the Excello Shale Member with analyses of three other underlying and overlying organic-matter-rich marine shales (offshore shale lithofacies) from southern Iowa, northern Missouri, eastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma. The end product of the partial oxidation process is shale with relatively low contents of hydrogen-poor, C13-enriched organic matter, lower contents of sulfur and sulfide-forming elements, and relatively unchanged contents of phosphorus and many trace elements (e.g. Cr, Ni, and V). However, because of lower organic carbon contents, element/organic carbon ratios are greatly increased. The partial oxidation process apparently took place during subaerial exposure of the overlying marine carbonate member (Blackjack Creek Member of the Fort Scott Limestone) following a marine regression when meteoric waters percolated down to the level of the Excello muds allowing oxidation of organic matter and sulfides. This hypothesis is supported by earlier workers, who have identified meteoric carbonate cements within, and soil horizons at the top of the Blackjack Creek Member. The period of oxidation is constrained in that organic matter and sulfides in the Little Osage Shale Member of the Fort Scott Limestone and equivalents (immediately overlying the Blackjack Creek Member) appear unaltered. Similar alteration of other shales in the Middle and Upper Pennsylvanian sections may be local to regional in extent and would depend on the extent and duration of the marine regression and be influenced by local variations in permeability and topography

  3. Biological consilience of hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide in plants: Gases of primordial earth linking plant, microbial and animal physiologies.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Hideo; Cohen, Michael F

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced in the mammalian body through the enzymatic activities of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST). A growing number of studies have revealed that biogenic H2S produced in tissues is involved in a variety of physiological responses in mammals including vasorelaxation and neurotransmission. It is now evident that mammals utilize H2S to regulate multiple signaling systems, echoing the research history of the gaseous signaling molecules nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) that had previously only been recognized for their cytotoxicity. In the human diet, meats (mammals, birds and fishes) and vegetables (plants) containing cysteine and other sulfur compounds are the major dietary sources for endogenous production of H2S. Plants are primary producers in ecosystems on the earth and they synthesize organic sulfur compounds through the activity of sulfur assimilation. Although plant H2S-producing activities have been known for a long time, our knowledge of H2S biology in plant systems has not been updated to the extent of mammalian studies. Here we review recent progress on H2S studies, highlighting plants and bacteria. Scoping the future integration of H2S, NO and O2 biology, we discuss a possible linkage between physiology, ecology and evolutional biology of gas metabolisms that may reflect the historical changes of the Earth's atmospheric composition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dissolution behavior of Cu, Fe and Zn from gold sulfide concentrate during pre-oxidation using ozone in neutral media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, Mubarok, M. Zaki

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this work was to observe the dissolution behaviour of Cu, Fe and Zn from gold sulfide concentrate during preoxidation with ozone as the oxidant and distillation water as the media. The preoxidation experiments were carried out in five-necked reactor with variations of retention time, percent solid, particle size and oxygen dosage injected to ozone generator. The retention time was varied at 6 hours, 8 hours, 12 hours and 24 hours. The percent solid was varied at 10%, 20% and 30% while the particle size was varied at P80 -75 mesh dan P80 -20 mesh. The dosage of oxygen injection to ozone generator was varried at 1 liter per minute and 2 liter per minute. The ozone gas was produced by using ozone generator type OZ-03 and injected to the slurry by using Mazzei injector. The soluble Cu, Fe and Zn were measured by using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS). The concentrates were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), mineragraphy, fire assay and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). Fire assay, ICP and XRD were used to analyse the residues and froth. The solubilition of metals (Cu, Fe and Zn) was obtained through the formation of sulphate ion and H+ which decreased the pH, released a number of heat and then was continued by the formation of elemental sulphur (S°). The interaction of particles and gas yielded the formation of froth. The highest dissolution percentage of Cu, Fe and Zn was achieved through 24 hours oxidation at 20% (w/w), P80 -20 mesh and one liter per minute of oxygen injection dosage by 83.016%, 24.7303% and 91.6808%, respectively.

  5. Metal- and Additive-Free Oxidation of Sulfides into Sulfoxides by Fullerene-Modified Carbon Nitride with Visible-Light Illumination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Deng, Kejian; Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Zehui

    2018-05-24

    Photocatalytic selective oxidation has attracted considerable attention as an environmentally friendly strategy for organic transformations. Some methods have been reported for the photocatalytic oxidation of sulfides into sulfoxides in recent years. However, the practical application of these processes is undermined by several challenges, such as low selectivity, sluggish reaction rates, the requirement of UV-light irradiation, the use of additives, and the instability of the photocatalyst. Herein, a metal-free C 60 /graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) composite photocatalyst was fabricated by a facile method, and well characterized by TEM, SEM, FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The C 60 /g-C 3 N 4 catalyst exhibited a high photocatalytic activity at room temperature for the selective oxidation of sulfides into the corresponding sulfoxides in the presence of other functional groups, due to the synergetic roles of C 60 and g-C 3 N 4 . Several important parameters have been screened, and this method afforded good to excellent yields of sulfoxides under optimal conditions. The superoxide radical ( . O 2 - ) and singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) were identified as the oxidative species for the oxidation of sulfides into sulfoxides by exploring EPR experiments, and hence, a plausible mechanism for this oxidation was proposed. Moreover, the C 60 /g-C 3 N 4 catalyst can be easily recovered by filtration and then reused at least four times without loss in activity. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Oxidation and evaporation of sulfur species at atmospheric entry of iron sulfide fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, H.; Murozono, K.

    2017-12-01

    Micrometeorites have the most abundant flux in current accumulation of planetary materials to the Earth. Micrometeorites are heated and reacted with upper atmosphere at atmospheric entry. Evaporation of meteoritic materials, especially sulfur species, may have environmental effect at upper atmosphere (e.g. Court and Sephton, 2011; Tomkins et al., 2016). Troilite is typical FeS phase in chondritic meteorites. In this study, quick heating and cooling experiments of FeS reagent particles were carried out with a fine particles free falling apparatus with controlled gas flow (Isobe and Gondo, 2013). Starting material reagent is inhomogeneous mixture of troilite, iron oxide and iron metal. Oxygen fugacity was controlled to FMQ +1.5 log unit. Maximum temperature of the particles was higher than 1400°C for approximately 0.5 seconds. Run products with rounded shape and smooth surface show the particles were completely melted. Chemical compositions of particles analyzed on cross sections are generally well homogenized from inhomogeneous starting materials by complete melting. Molar ratios of Fe in melted regions are close to 0.5, while compositions of S and O are various. Varieties of S and O compositions show various degree of oxidation and evaporation of sulfur. Distribution of compositions of melted regions in Fe-S-O system is plotted in liquidus compositions of FeO and FeS saturated melt. Troilite in micrometeorite is melted and oxidized by atmospheric entry. Compositions of FeS melt in fine spherules are following Fe-S-O phase relations even in a few seconds. Molar ratios of Fe in melt are close to 0.5, while compositions of S and O are various. Varieties of S and O compositions show various degree of oxidation and evaporation of sulfur. Evaporation of sulfur from meteoritic materials in atmospheric entry heating may depend on oxygen fugacity of the upper atmosphere. Sulfur supply from meteoritic materials to atmosphere may be limited on planets with oxygen

  7. Biotic and abiotic characterization of bioanodes formed on oxidized carbon electrodes as a basis to predict their performance.

    PubMed

    Cercado, Bibiana; Cházaro-Ruiz, Luis Felipe; Ruiz, Vianey; López-Prieto, Israel de Jesús; Buitrón, Germán; Razo-Flores, Elías

    2013-12-15

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are based on the catalytic activity of biofilm on electrodes, or the so-called bioelectrodes, to produce electricity and other valuable products. In order to increase bioanode performance, diverse electrode materials and modification methods have been implemented; however, the factors directly affecting performance are yet unclear. In this work carbon cloth electrodes were modified by thermal, chemical, and electrochemical oxidation to enhance oxygenated surface groups, to modify the electrode texture, and consequently the electron transfer rate and biofilm adhesion. The oxidized electrodes were physically, chemically, and electrochemically characterized, then bioanodes were formed at +0.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl using domestic wastewater amended with acetate. The bioanode performance was evaluated according to the current and charge generated. The efficacy of the treatments were in the order Thermal>Electrochemical>Untreated>Chemical oxidation. The maximum current observed with untreated electrode was 0.152±0.026 mA (380±92 mA m(-2)), and it was increased by 78% and 28% with thermal and electrochemical oxidized electrodes, respectively. Moreover, the volatile solids correlated significantly with the maximum current obtained, and the electrode texture was revealed as a critical factor for increasing the bioanode performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Production of hydroxyl radicals from abiotic oxidation of pyrite by oxygen under circumneutral conditions in the presence of low-molecular-weight organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Songhu

    2017-12-01

    Besides acidic environments, pyrite oxidation also occurs in circumneutral environments, such as well-buffered marine and estuarine sediments and salt marshes where low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) (e.g., citrate and oxalate) prevail. However, the production of hydroxyl radicals (radOH) from pyrite oxidation by oxygen (O2) in these circumneutral environments is poorly understood. In this study, radOH production was measured during the abiotic oxidation of pyrite by O2 under circumneutral conditions. A pyrite suspension (50 g/L pyrite) that was buffered at pH 6-8 was exposed to air for oxygenation in the dark. Benzoate (20 mM) was added into the suspension to trap radOH. At pH 7, the cumulative radOH reached 7.5 μM within 420 min in the absence of LMWOAs, whereas it increased to 14.8, 12 and 11.2 μM in the presence of 1 mM ethylenediaminotetraacetate, citrate and oxalate, respectively. When the citrate concentration, which serves as a LMWOAs model, was increased from 0.5 to 5 mM, the cumulative radOH increased from 10.3 to 27.3 μM within 420 min at pH 7. With the decrease in pH from 8 to 6, the cumulative radOH increased from 2.1 to 23.3 μM in the absence of LMWOAs, but it increased from 8.8 to 134.9 μM in the presence of 3 mM citrate. The presence of LMWOAs enhanced the radOH production from pyrite oxidation under circumneutral conditions. In the absence of LMOWAs, radOH is produced mostly from the oxidation of adsorbed Fe(II) by O2. In the presence of citrate, radOH production is attributed mainly to the oxidation of Fe(II)-citrate- by O2 and secondarily to the oxidation of H2O on surface-sulfur defects. The acceleration of pyrite oxidation by Fe(III)-citrate increases radOH production. Fe(II)-citrate- is generated mainly from the complexation of adsorbed Fe(II) by citrate and the reduction of Fe(III)-citrate, and the generation is suppressed by the oxidation of adsorbed Fe(II). Fe(III)-citrate is generated predominantly from Fe

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Ca2+ Homeostasis Mediated by Concomitantly Produced Nitric Oxide via a Novel Synergistic Pathway in Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Amira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: The present study was designed to explore the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on Ca2+ homeostasis in rat pancreatic acini. Results: Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; an H2S donor) induced a biphasic increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a dose-dependent manner. The NaHS-induced [Ca2+]i elevation persisted with an EC50 of 73.3 μM in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ but was abolished by thapsigargin, indicating that both Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release contributed to the increase. The [Ca2+]i increase was markedly inhibited in the presence of NG-monomethyl L-arginine or 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), and diaminofluorescein-2/diaminofluorescein-2 triazole (DAF-2/DAF-2T) fluorometry demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) was also produced by H2S in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 64.8 μM, indicating that NO was involved in the H2S effect. The H2S-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited by pretreatment with U73122, xestospongin C, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, KT5823, and GP2A, indicating that phospholipase C (PLC), the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), protein kinase G (PKG), and Gq-protein play roles as intermediate components in the H2S-triggered intracellular signaling. Innovation: To our knowledge, our study is the first one highlighting the effect of H2S on intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in pancreatic acinar cells. Moreover, a novel cascade was presumed to function via the synergistic interaction between H2S and NO. Conclusion: We conclude that H2S affects [Ca2+]i homeostasis that is mediated by H2S-evoked NO production via an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-NO-sGC-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-PKG-Gq-protein-PLC-IP3 pathway to induce Ca2+ release, and this pathway is identical to the one we recently proposed for a sole effect of NO and the two gaseous molecules synergistically function to regulate Ca2+ homeostasis

  10. Effects of hydrogen sulfide on hemodynamics, inflammatory response and oxidative stress during resuscitated hemorrhagic shock in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been shown to improve survival in rodent models of lethal hemorrhage. Conversely, other authors have reported that inhibition of endogenous H2S production improves hemodynamics and reduces organ injury after hemorrhagic shock. Since all of these data originate from unresuscitated models and/or the use of a pre-treatment design, we therefore tested the hypothesis that the H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), may improve hemodynamics in resuscitated hemorrhagic shock and attenuate oxidative and nitrosative stresses. Methods Thirty-two rats were mechanically ventilated and instrumented to measure mean arterial pressure (MAP) and carotid blood flow (CBF). Animals were bled during 60 minutes in order to maintain MAP at 40 ± 2 mm Hg. Ten minutes prior to retransfusion of shed blood, rats randomly received either an intravenous bolus of NaHS (0.2 mg/kg) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl). At the end of the experiment (T = 300 minutes), blood, aorta and heart were harvested for Western blot (inductible Nitric Oxyde Synthase (iNOS), Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), phosphorylated Inhibitor κB (P-IκB), Inter-Cellular Adhesion Molecule (I-CAM), Heme oxygenase 1(HO-1), Heme oxygenase 2(HO-2), as well as nuclear respiratory factor 2 (Nrf2)). Nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide anion (O2-) were also measured by electron paramagnetic resonance. Results At the end of the experiment, control rats exhibited a decrease in MAP which was attenuated by NaHS (65 ± 32 versus 101 ± 17 mmHg, P < 0.05). CBF was better maintained in NaHS-treated rats (1.9 ± 1.6 versus 4.4 ± 1.9 ml/minute P < 0.05). NaHS significantly limited shock-induced metabolic acidosis. NaHS also prevented iNOS expression and NO production in the heart and aorta while significantly reducing NF-kB, P-IκB and I-CAM in the aorta. Compared to the control group, NaHS significantly increased Nrf2, HO-1 and HO-2 and limited O2- release in both aorta and heart (P < 0.05). Conclusions NaHS is

  11. Sulfide Oxidation by O2: Synthesis, Structure and Reactivity of Novel Sulfide-Incorporated Fe(II) Bis(imino)pyridine Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Widger, Leland R.; Siegler, Maxime A.

    2013-01-01

    The unsymmetrical iron(II) bis(imino)pyridine complexes [FeII(LN3SMe)(H2O)3](OTf)2 (1), and [FeII(LN3SMe)Cl2] (2) were synthesized and their reactivity with O2 was examined. Complexes 1 and 2 were characterized by single crystal X-ray crystallography, LDI-MS, 1H-NMR and elemental analysis. The LN3SMe ligand was designed to incorporate a single sulfide donor and relies on the bis(imino)pyridine scaffold. This scaffold was selected for its ease of synthesis and its well-precedented ability to stabilize Fe(II) ions. Complexes 1 and 2 ware prepared via a metal-assisted template reaction from the unsymmetrical pyridyl ketone precursor 2-(O=CMe)-6-(2,6-(iPr2-C6H3N=CMe)-C5H3N. Reaction of 1 with O2 was shown to afford the S-oxygenated sulfoxide complex [Fe(LN3S(O)Me)(OTf)]2+(3), whereas compound 2, under the same reaction conditions, afforded the corresponding sulfone complex [Fe(LN3S(O2)Me)Cl]2+ (4). PMID:23878411

  12. Hydrogen sulfide enhances salt tolerance through nitric oxide-mediated maintenance of ion homeostasis in barley seedling roots

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Wu, Fei-Hua; He, En-Ming; Liu, Xiang; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) are emerging as messenger molecules involved in the modulation of plant physiological processes. Here, we investigated a signalling network involving H2S and NO in salt tolerance pathway of barley. NaHS, a donor of H2S, at a low concentration of either 50 or 100 μM, had significant rescue effects on the 150 mM NaCl-induced inhibition of plant growth and modulated the K+/Na+ balance by decreasing the net K+ efflux and increasing the gene expression of an inward-rectifying potassium channel (HvAKT1) and a high-affinity K+ uptake system (HvHAK4). H2S and NO maintained the lower Na+ content in the cytoplast by increasing the amount of PM H+-ATPase, the transcriptional levels of PM H+-ATPase (HvHA1) and Na+/H+ antiporter (HvSOS1). H2S and NO modulated Na+ compartmentation into the vacuoles with up-regulation of the transcriptional levels of vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter (HvVNHX2) and H+-ATPase subunit β (HvVHA-β) and increased in the protein expression of vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter (NHE1). H2S mimicked the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) by increasing NO production, whereas the function was quenched with the addition of NO scavenger. These results indicated that H2S increased salt tolerance by maintaining ion homeostasis, which were mediated by the NO signal. PMID:26213372

  13. Experimental and theoretical study of hydrogen thiocarbonate for heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong

    2009-04-09

    In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy combined with derivative spectroscopy analysis, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy analysis, and quantum chemical calculations were used to investigate the infrared absorbance assignment and the molecular structure of hydrogen thiocarbonate on magnesium oxide. The bands at 1283 and 1257 cm(-1), which had the typical characteristic of intermediate, were observed in experiments for the heterogeneous reaction of COS on MgO. On the basis of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy analysis and quantum chemical calculations, the band at 1283 cm(-1) was assigned to the v(s) band of bridged thiocarbonate which formed on the two neighboring Mg atoms in the (100) face of MgO crystal, and the band at 1257 cm(-1) was the v(s) band of monodentate thiocarbonate on MgO. The v(as)(OCO) band of thiocarbonates was invisible in the experiment due to their weak absorbance and the interruption of surface carbonate. The formation mechanism of thiocarbonates is proposed, which occurred through a nucleophilic attack of preadsorbed COS by surface -OH groups followed by hydrogen atom transfer from the -OH group to the sulfur atom of preadsorbed COS. The activation energy for the intramolecular proton-transfer reaction of bridged thiocarbonate was calculated to be 18.52 kcal x mol(-1) at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory.

  14. Controllable atomistic graphene oxide model and its application in hydrogen sulfide removal.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liangliang; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J; van Duin, Adri C T; Lu, Xiaohua; Gubbins, Keith E

    2013-11-21

    The determination of an atomistic graphene oxide (GO) model has been challenging due to the structural dependence on different synthesis methods. In this work we combine temperature-programmed molecular dynamics simulation techniques and the ReaxFF reactive force field to generate realistic atomistic GO structures. By grafting a mixture of epoxy and hydroxyl groups to the basal graphene surface and fine-tuning their initial concentrations, we produce in a controllable manner the GO structures with different functional groups and defects. The models agree with structural experimental data and with other ab initio quantum calculations. Using the generated atomistic models, we perform reactive adsorption calculations for H2S and H2O∕H2S mixtures on GO materials and compare the results with experiment. We find that H2S molecules dissociate on the carbonyl functional groups, and H2O, CO2, and CO molecules are released as reaction products from the GO surface. The calculation reveals that for the H2O∕H2S mixtures, H2O molecules are preferentially adsorbed to the carbonyl sites and block the potential active sites for H2S decomposition. The calculation agrees well with the experiments. The methodology and the procedure applied in this work open a new door to the theoretical studies of GO and can be extended to the research on other amorphous materials.

  15. Iron Sulfide Minerals Record Microbe-Mineral Interactions in Anoxic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Gartman, A.; Cosmidis, J.; Clarke, D. R.; Girguis, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    The precipitation of most minerals in low-temperature environments on Earth is directly or indirectly influenced by the presence of organic substances and/or microbial biomass. Notably, the influence of microorganisms on the formation of Mn and Fe oxides/oxyhydroxides at the surface of the Earth has been well characterized (Chan et al., 2011; Estes et al., 2017). However, an oxygenated atmosphere is a unique feature of planet Earth. It is therefore critical for the search of life on other planetary bodies to characterize microbe-mineral interactions that form in anoxic conditions. Here we explore the role of microorganisms on the formation of iron sulfide minerals, which form under anoxic conditions. On modern Earth, sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) are the major source of dissolved sulfide in low-temperature sedimentary environments. We experimentally demonstrate that SRM play a role in the nucleation and growth of iron sulfide minerals by acting as organic templates. The physical characteristics of the resulting minerals are different from those formed under abiotic conditions. Moreover, upon forming, iron sulfide minerals become associated with organic carbon, producing a potential organo-mineral signature. We also evaluate how the presence of various organic substances affect the formation of abiotic minerals and how this could produce false biosignatures that could be mistaken as biogenic minerals. Chan, C.S., Fakra, S.C., Emerson, D., Fleming, E.J. and Edwards, K.J. (2011) Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation. Isme Journal 5, 717-727. Estes, E.R., Andeer, P.F., Nordlund, D., Wankel, S.D. and Hansel, C.M. (2017) Biogenic manganese oxides as reservoirs of organic carbon and proteins in terrestrial and marine environments. Geobiology 15, 158-172.

  16. Microbial- and thiosulfate-mediated dissolution of mercury sulfide minerals and transformation to gaseous mercury

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Rodríguez, Adiari I.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Zhang, Tong; Lamborg, Carl H.; Santelli, Cara M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Brooks, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic heavy metal that poses significant environmental and human health risks. Soils and sediments, where Hg can exist as the Hg sulfide mineral metacinnabar (β-HgS), represent major Hg reservoirs in aquatic environments. Metacinnabar has historically been considered a sink for Hg in all but severely acidic environments, and thus disregarded as a potential source of Hg back to aqueous or gaseous pools. Here, we conducted a combination of field and laboratory incubations to identify the potential for metacinnabar as a source of dissolved Hg within near neutral pH environments and the underpinning (a)biotic mechanisms at play. We show that the abundant and widespread sulfur-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Thiobacillus extensively colonized metacinnabar chips incubated within aerobic, near neutral pH creek sediments. Laboratory incubations of axenic Thiobacillus thioparus cultures led to the release of metacinnabar-hosted Hg(II) and subsequent volatilization to Hg(0). This dissolution and volatilization was greatly enhanced in the presence of thiosulfate, which served a dual role by enhancing HgS dissolution through Hg complexation and providing an additional metabolic substrate for Thiobacillus. These findings reveal a new coupled abiotic-biotic pathway for the transformation of metacinnabar-bound Hg(II) to Hg(0), while expanding the sulfide substrates available for neutrophilic chemosynthetic bacteria to Hg-laden sulfides. They also point to mineral-hosted Hg as an underappreciated source of gaseous elemental Hg to the environment. PMID:26157421

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Strains CVO and FWKO B, Two Novel Nitrate-Reducing, Sulfide-Oxidizing Bacteria Isolated from Oil Field Brine

    PubMed Central

    Gevertz, Diane; Telang, Anita J.; Voordouw, Gerrit; Jenneman, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial strains CVO and FWKO B were isolated from produced brine at the Coleville oil field in Saskatchewan, Canada. Both strains are obligate chemolithotrophs, with hydrogen, formate, and sulfide serving as the only known energy sources for FWKO B, whereas sulfide and elemental sulfur are the only known electron donors for CVO. Neither strain uses thiosulfate as an energy source. Both strains are microaerophiles (1% O2). In addition, CVO grows by denitrification of nitrate or nitrite whereas FWKO B reduces nitrate only to nitrite. Elemental sulfur is the sole product of sulfide oxidation by FWKO B, while CVO produces either elemental sulfur or sulfate, depending on the initial concentration of sulfide. Both strains are capable of growth under strictly autotrophic conditions, but CVO uses acetate as well as CO2 as its sole carbon source. Neither strain reduces sulfate; however, FWKO B reduces sulfur and displays chemolithoautotrophic growth in the presence of elemental sulfur, hydrogen, and CO2. Both strains grow at temperatures between 5 and 40°C. CVO is capable of growth at NaCl concentrations as high as 7%. The present 16s rRNA analysis suggests that both strains are members of the epsilon subdivision of the division Proteobacteria, with CVO most closely related to Thiomicrospira denitrifcans and FWKO B most closely related to members of the genus Arcobacter. The isolation of these two novel chemolithotrophic sulfur bacteria from oil field brine suggests the presence of a subterranean sulfur cycle driven entirely by hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and nitrate. PMID:10831429

  18. Blood oxidative stress (BLOS) is a secondary host defense system responding normally to anaerobic wound infection and inadvertently to dietary ultra-exogenous sulfide formation (USF).

    PubMed

    Stroot, Peter G

    2017-01-01

    Blood oxidative stress (BLOS) is the presence of white blood cells and platelets that are generating high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A mathematical model links the level of BLOS or BLOS# and plasma sulfide concentration. An increase in the BLOS# reduces the plasma sulfide concentration. The reported maximum plasma sulfide concentration for defined health conditions were used to calculate the minimum BLOS#. Elevated BLOS generates high plasma concentration of ROS, which triggers multiple responses in the body that protect the host. First, insulin production by the pancreas is inhibited, which results in elevated blood glucose levels. This results in advanced glycation end products (AGE), which thicken the blood vessel wall. Elevated blood glucose levels also increases urination, which reduces the availability of substrates for infectious bacteria. Second, one or more signaling molecules are stimulated to produce vascular hypertrophy resulting in hypertension. Third, the initial stage of atherosclerosis thickens the blood vessel wall while also protecting the inner surface of the blood vessels from localized infection. The first three mechanisms provide added protection against pathogen migration through the blood vessel wall and reduce the cross-sectional area of blood vessels, which increases the retention time (RT) for improved ROS inactivation of pathogens. Fourth, genes expressed in the liver, which are associated with drug oxidation and uptake transport, are inhibited. This inhibition protects the host from any toxins produced by an anaerobic infection. Elevated BLOS also reduces plasma sulfide concentration, which inhibits wound healing and extends aerobic conditions of the wound. The normal induction of BLOS offers a short-term, cascade of several primary mechanisms for secondary defense against anaerobic infection of a wound. Normal induction of BLOS is due to ultra-exogenous sulfide formation (USF) generated by a local anaerobic infection of a

  19. Ascorbic Acid-A Potential Oxidant Scavenger and Its Role in Plant Development and Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Nudrat A.; Shafiq, Fahad; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants under stress conditions is a common phenomenon. Plants tend to counter this problem through their ability to synthesize ROS neutralizing substances including non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidants. In this context, ascorbic acid (AsA) is one of the universal non-enzymatic antioxidants having substantial potential of not only scavenging ROS, but also modulating a number of fundamental functions in plants both under stress and non-stress conditions. In the present review, the role of AsA, its biosynthesis, and cross-talk with different hormones have been discussed comprehensively. Furthermore, the possible involvement of AsA-hormone crosstalk in the regulation of several key physiological and biochemical processes like seed germination, photosynthesis, floral induction, fruit expansion, ROS regulation and senescence has also been described. A simplified and schematic AsA biosynthetic pathway has been drawn, which reflects key intermediates involved therein. This could pave the way for future research to elucidate the modulation of plant AsA biosynthesis and subsequent responses to environmental stresses. Apart from discussing the role of different ascorbate peroxidase isoforms, the comparative role of two key enzymes, ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and ascorbate oxidase (AO) involved in AsA metabolism in plant cell apoplast is also discussed particularly focusing on oxidative stress perception and amplification. Limited progress has been made so far in terms of developing transgenics which could over-produce AsA. The prospects of generation of transgenics overexpressing AsA related genes and exogenous application of AsA have been discussed at length in the review. PMID:28491070

  20. A new portable sulfide monitor with a zinc-oxide semiconductor sensor for daily use and field study.

    PubMed

    Tanda, Naoko; Washio, Jumpei; Ikawa, Kyoko; Suzuki, Kengo; Koseki, Takeyoshi; Iwakura, Masaki

    2007-07-01

    For measuring oral malodor in daily clinical practice and in field study, we developed and evaluated a highly sensitive portable monitor system. We examined sensitivity and specificity of the sensor for volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) and obstructive gases, such as ethanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde. Each mouth air provided by 46 people was measured by this monitor, gas chromatography (GC), and olfactory panel and compared with each other. Based on the result, we used the monitor for mass health examination of a rural town with standardized measuring. The sensor detected hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl sulfide with 10-1000 times higher sensitivity than the other gases. The monitor's specificity was significantly improved by a VSC-selective filter. There were significant correlations between VSC concentration by the sulfide monitor and by GC, and by organoleptic score. Thirty-six percent of 969 examinees had oral malodor in a rural town. Seventy-eight percent of 969 examinees were motivated to take care of their oral condition by oral malodor measuring with the monitor. The portable sulfide monitor was useful to promote oral health care not only in clinics, but also in field study. The simple and quick operation system and the standardized measuring make it one of parameters of oral condition.

  1. Metabolism in the Uncultivated Giant Sulfide-Oxidizing Bacterium Thiomargarita Namibiensis Assayed Using a Redox-Sensitive Dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J.; Flood, B.; Ricci, E.

    2014-12-01

    The colorless sulfur bacteria are non-photosynthetic chemolithotrophs that live at interfaces between nitrate, or oxygen, and hydrogen sulfide. In sulfidic settings such as cold seeps and oxygen minimum zones, these bacteria are thought to constitute a critical node in the geochemical cycling of carbon, sulfur, nitrogen, and phosphorous. Many of these bacteria remain uncultivated and their metabolisms and physiologies are incompletely understood. Thiomargarita namibiensis is the largest of these sulfur bacteria, with individual cells reaching millimetric diameters. Despite the current inability to maintain a Thiomargarita culture in the lab, their large size allows for individual cells to be followed in time course experiments. Here we report on the novel use of a tetrazolium-based dye that measures the flux of NADH production from catabolic pathways via a colorimetric response. Staining with this dye allows for metabolism to be detected, even in the absence of observable cell division. When coupled to microscopy, this approach also allows for metabolism in Thiomargaritato be differentiated from that of epibionts or contaminants in xenic samples. The results of our tetrazolium dye-based assay suggests that Thiomargarita is the most metabolically versatile under anoxic conditions where it appears capable of using acetate, succinate, formate, thiosulfate, citrate, thiotaurine, hydrogen sulfide, and perhaps hydrogen as electron donors. Under hypoxic conditions, staining results suggest the utilization of acetate, citrate, and hydrogen sulfide. Cells incubated under oxic conditions showed the weakest tetrazolium staining response, and then only to hydrogen sulfide and questionably succinate. These initial results using a redox sensitive dye suggest that Thiomargarita is most metabolically versatile under anaerobic and hypoxic conditions. The results of this assay can be further evaluated using molecular approaches such as transcriptomics, as well as provide cultivation

  2. Leaching of Zinc Sulfide by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: Bacterial Oxidation of the Sulfur Product Layer Increases the Rate of Zinc Sulfide Dissolution at High Concentrations of Ferrous Ions

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, T. A.; Crundwell, F. K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the results of leaching experiments conducted with and without Thiobacillus ferrooxidans at the same conditions in solution. The extent of leaching of ZnS with bacteria is significantly higher than that without bacteria at high concentrations of ferrous ions. A porous layer of elemental sulfur is present on the surfaces of the chemically leached particles, while no sulfur is present on the surfaces of the bacterially leached particles. The analysis of the data using the shrinking-core model shows that the chemical leaching of ZnS is limited by the diffusion of ferrous ions through the sulfur product layer at high concentrations of ferrous ions. The analysis of the data shows that diffusion through the product layer does not limit the rate of dissolution when bacteria are present. This suggests that the action of T. ferrooxidans in oxidizing the sulfur formed on the particle surface is to remove the barrier to diffusion by ferrous ions. PMID:10583978

  3. Abiotic production of nitrous oxide by lightning. Implications for a false positive identification of life on Earth-Like Planets around quiescent M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Karina F.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; McKay, Christopher P.

    Nitrous oxide (N _{2}O) is uniformly mixed in the troposphere with a concentration of about 310 ppb but disappears in the stratosphere (Prinn et al., 1990); N _{2}O is mostly emitted at a rate of 1x10 (13) g yr (-1) as a byproduct of microbial activity in soils and in the ocean by two processes: a) denitrification (reduction of nitrate and nitrite), and b) nitrification (oxidation of ammonia) (Maag and Vinther, 1996). The abiotic emission of N _{2}O in the contemporaneous Earth is small, mostly arising from lightning activity (2x10 (9) g yr (-1) , Hill et al., 1984) and by reduction of nitrite by Fe(II)-minerals in soils in Antarctica (Samarkin et al., 2010). Since N _{2}O has absorption bands in the mid-IR (7.8, 8.5, and 17 mumm) that makes it detectable by remote sensing (Topfer et al., 1997; Des Marais et al., 2002), it has been suggested as a potential biosignature in the search for life in extrasolar planets (Churchill and Kasting, 2000). However, the minimum required concentration for positive identification is 10,000 ppb with missions like Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin (Churchill and Kasting, 2000). Therefore, it is not a suitable biomarker for extrasolar Earth-like planets orbiting stars similar to the Sun. Because N _{2}O is protected in the troposphere from UV photolysis by the stratospheric ozone layer, its concentration would decrease with decreasing oxygen (O _{2}) concentrations, if the biological source strength remains constant (Kasting and Donahue, 1980). For a primitive Earth-like (Hadean) atmosphere dominated by CO _{2}, and no free O _{2}, the expected N _{2}O concentration would be about 3 ppb with the current microbial N _{2}O flux (Churchill and Kasting, 2000). The resulting N _{2}O spectral signature of this atmosphere would be undetectable unless the N _{2}O microbial flux would be 10 (4) greater than its present value (Churchill and Kasting, 2000). Since this flux is unlikely, it is impossible to use it as a biomarker in anoxic CO

  4. Carbonyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbonyl sulfide ; CASRN 463 - 58 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  5. Hydrogen sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 03 / 005 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE ( CAS No . 7783 - 06 - 4 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) June 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been

  6. Selenium sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenium sulfide ; CASRN 7446 - 34 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  7. Nonaqueous System of Iron-Based Ionic Liquid and DMF for the Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide and Regeneration by Electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhihui; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Tiantian; Du, Jun; Jia, Bing; Gao, Shujing; Yu, Jiang

    2015-05-05

    To improve the hydrogen sulfide removal efficiency with the application of an iron-based imidazolium chloride ionic liquid (Fe(III)-IL) as desulfurizer, Fe(II) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) are introduced to Fe(III)-IL to construct a new nonaqueous desulfurization system (Fe(III/II)-IL/DMF). Following desulfurization, the system can be regenerated using the controlled-potential electrolysis method. The addition of Fe(II) in Fe(III)-IL is beneficial for the hydrogen sulfide removal and the electrochemical regeneration of the desulfurizer. The addition of DMF in Fe(III/II)-IL does not change the structure of Fe(III/II)-IL but clearly decreases the acidity, increases the electrolytic current, and decreases the stability of the Fe-Cl bond in Fe(III/II)-IL. Fe(III/II)-IL/DMF can remove hydrogen sulfide and can be regenerated through an electrochemical method more efficiently than can Fe(III/II)-IL. After six cycles, the desulfurization efficiency remains higher than 98%, and the average conversion rate of Fe(II) is essentially unchanged. No sulfur peroxidation occurs, and the system remains stable. Therefore, this new nonaqueous system has considerable potential for removing H2S in pollution control applications.

  8. Application of a 2-step process for the biological treatment of sulfidic spent caustics.

    PubMed

    de Graaff, Marco; Klok, Johannes B M; Bijmans, Martijn F M; Muyzer, Gerard; Janssen, Albert J H

    2012-03-01

    This research demonstrates the feasibility and advantages of a 2-step process for the biological treatment of sulfidic spent caustics under halo-alkaline conditions (i.e. pH 9.5; Na(+) = 0.8 M). Experiments with synthetically prepared solutions were performed in a continuously fed system consisting of two gas-lift reactors in series operated at aerobic conditions at 35 °C. The detoxification of sulfide to thiosulfate in the first step allowed the successful biological treatment of total-S loading rates up to 33 mmol L(-1) day(-1). In the second, biological step, the remaining sulfide and thiosulfate was completely converted to sulfate by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria. Mathematical modeling of the 2-step process shows that under the prevailing conditions an optimal reactor configuration consists of 40% 'abiotic' and 60% 'biological' volume, whilst the total reactor volume is 22% smaller than for the 1-step process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Low enthalpy geothermal fluids from the Paris Basin; Oxidation-reduction state and consequences for the prediction of corrosion and sulfide scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Criaud, A.; Fouillac, C.; Marty, B.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical data for redox components (sulfur, carbon and nitrogen species) in geothermal fluids are given for 45 wells of the Paris sedimentary basin. They are interpreted with a view to improving knowledge of the oxidation-reduction state of the system. Direct measurement with a platinum electrode is related to hydrogen sulfide content but does not represent the potential of the fluid within the aquifer. Computed values of apparent Nernst potentials for HS{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, N{sub 2}/NH{sub 4}{sup +}, CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, organic matter/CO{sub 2}, H{sup +}/H{sub 2} redox couples range from {minus}0.35 to {minus}0.15 volts/NHE. The occurrence of mineral redoxmore » buffers is also investigated. The non-consistency of the calculated results shows that there is a lack of overall redox equilibrium in the aquifer. Despite this fact, the use of a redox parameter is discussed, in order to describe and forecast by chemical models the corrosion and scaling effects within the tubing. Pyrite, mackinawite, pyrrhotite and other iron sulfides are present. Calculations based upon nitrogen or carbon components do not allow an accurate prediction of the nature of the minerals encountered. The occurrence of microenvironments with very reducing conditions is emphasized to explain the formation of such minerals.« less

  10. Unique Cobalt Sulfide/Reduced Graphene Oxide Composite as an Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries with Superior Rate Capability and Long Cycling Stability.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shengjie; Han, Xiaopeng; Li, Linlin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Fangyi; Srinivansan, Madhavi; Adams, Stefan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-03-09

    Exploitation of high-performance anode materials is essential but challenging to the development of sodium-ion batteries (SIBs). Among all proposed anode materials for SIBs, sulfides have been proved promising candidates due to their unique chemical and physical properties. In this work, a facile solvothermal method to in situ decorate cobalt sulfide (CoS) nanoplates on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) to build CoS@rGO composite is described. When evaluated as anode for SIBs, an impressive high specific capacity (540 mAh g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) ), excellent rate capability (636 mAh g(-1) at 0.1 A g(-1) and 306 mAh g(-1) at 10 A g(-1)), and extraordinarily cycle stability (420 mAh g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) after 1000 cycles) have been demonstrated by CoS@rGO composite for sodium storage. The synergetic effect between the CoS nanoplates and rGO matrix contributes to the enhanced electrochemical performance of the hybrid composite. The results provide a facile approach to fabricate promising anode materials for high-performance SIBs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Abiotic tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Bongjun; Sain, Trisha; Lacevic, Naida; Bukharina, Daria; Cha, Sang-Ho; Waas, Anthony M.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2017-03-01

    Tooth enamel comprises parallel microscale and nanoscale ceramic columns or prisms interlaced with a soft protein matrix. This structural motif is unusually consistent across all species from all geological eras. Such invariability—especially when juxtaposed with the diversity of other tissues—suggests the existence of a functional basis. Here we performed ex vivo replication of enamel-inspired columnar nanocomposites by sequential growth of zinc oxide nanowire carpets followed by layer-by-layer deposition of a polymeric matrix around these. We show that the mechanical properties of these nanocomposites, including hardness, are comparable to those of enamel despite the nanocomposites having a smaller hard-phase content. Our abiotic enamels have viscoelastic figures of merit (VFOM) and weight-adjusted VFOM that are similar to, or higher than, those of natural tooth enamels—we achieve values that exceed the traditional materials limits of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. VFOM values describe resistance to vibrational damage, and our columnar composites demonstrate that light-weight materials of unusually high resistance to structural damage from shocks, environmental vibrations and oscillatory stress can be made using biomimetic design. The previously inaccessible combinations of high stiffness, damping and light weight that we achieve in these layer-by-layer composites are attributed to efficient energy dissipation in the interfacial portion of the organic phase. The in vivo contribution of this interfacial portion to macroscale deformations along the tooth’s normal is maximized when the architecture is columnar, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of the columnar motif in the enamel of living species. We expect our findings to apply to all columnar composites and to lead to the development of high-performance load-bearing materials.

  12. Synthesis and anti-cancer potential of the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120) a dual nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide releasing hybrid.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Federica; MacKessack-Leitch, Andrew C; Eschbach, Erin K; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-10-15

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid compound capable of releasing both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e., ortho-NOSH-aspirin. Here we report on the synthesis of meta- and para-NOSH-aspirins. We also made a head-to-head evaluation of the effects of these three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin on colon cancer cell kinetics and induction of reactive oxygen species, which in recent years has emerged as a key event in causing cancer cell regression. Electron donating/withdrawing groups incorporated about the benzoate moiety significantly affected the potency of these compounds with respect to colon cancer cell growth inhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sulfur Dioxide Enhances Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Accumulation and Alleviates Oxidative Stress Induced by Aluminum Stress in Germinating Wheat Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dong-Bo; Hu, Kang-Di; Guo, Xi-Kai; Liu, Yong; Hu, Lan-Ying; Li, Yan-Hong; Wang, Song-Hua; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum ions are especially toxic to plants in acidic soils. Here we present evidences that SO2 protects germinating wheat grains against aluminum stress. SO2 donor (NaHSO3/Na2SO3) pretreatment at 1.2 mM reduced the accumulation of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and malondialdehyde, enhanced the activities of guaiacol peroxidase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase, and decreased the activity of lipoxygenase in germinating wheat grains exposed to Al stress. We also observed higher accumulation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in SO2-pretreated grain, suggesting the tight relation between sulfite and sulfide. Wheat grains geminated in water for 36 h were pretreated with or without 1 mM SO2 donor for 12 h prior to exposure to Al stress for 48 h and the ameliorating effects of SO2 on wheat radicles were studied. SO2 donor pretreatment reduced the content of reactive oxygen species, protected membrane integrity, and reduced Al accumulation in wheat radicles. Gene expression analysis showed that SO2 donor pretreatment decreased the expression of Al-responsive genes TaWali1, TaWali2, TaWali3, TaWali5, TaWali6, and TaALMT1 in radicles exposed to Al stress. These results suggested that SO2 could increase endogenous H2S accumulation and the antioxidant capability and decrease endogenous Al content in wheat grains to alleviate Al stress. PMID:26078810

  14. Structurally bound sulfide and sulfate in apatite from the Philips Mine iron oxide - apatite deposit, New York, USA: A tracer of redox changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadove, G.; Konecke, B.; Fiege, A.; Simon, A. C.

    2017-12-01

    Multiple competing hypotheses attempt to explain the genesis of iron oxide-apatite (IOA) ore deposits. Many studies have investigated the chemistry of apatite because the abundances of F and Cl can distinguish magmatic vs. hydrothermal processes. Recent experiments demonstrate that apatite incorporates S6+, S4+, and S2-, and that total sulfur (∑S) as well as the S6+/∑S ratio in apatite vary systematically as a function of oxygen fugacity [1], providing information about sulfur budget and redox. Here, we present results from X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the S K-edge, electron microprobe analyses, cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging, and element mapping of apatite from the Philip's Mine IOA deposit, southern Adirondack Mountains, USA. The Philip's Mine apatite contains inclusions of pyrite and pyrrhotite, where the latter includes iron oxide and Ni-rich domains. The apatite also contains inclusions of monazite, and exhibits complex CL zonation coincident with variations in the abundances of REE and S. The presence of monazite fingerprints fluid-mediated dissolution-reprecipitation of originally REE-enriched apatite [2]. The S XANES spectra reveal varying proportions of structurally bound S6+ and S2-, as the S6+/∑S ratio ranges from sulfide-only to sulfate-only. Notably, sulfide-dominated domains contain higher S contents than sulfate-dominated regions. These observations are consistent with co-crystallization of apatite and monosulfide solid solution (MSS) at reducing conditions, followed by decomposition of MSS to pyrrhotite, pyrite and intermediate solid solution (ISS, which is not preserved; [3]). Metasomatism of that assemblage by an oxidized fluid resulted in formation of monazite in apatite and iron oxide domains in pyrrhotite. We conclude that the deposit formed by a H2S-Fe-rich volatile phase, possibly evolved from a rather primitive magmatic source, which is consistent with the low Ti content of magnetite. The deposit was

  15. [Effect of temperature on the rate of oxidation of pyrrhotite-rich sulfide ore flotation concentrate and the structure of the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic microbial community].

    PubMed

    Moshchanetskii, P V; Pivovarova, T A; Belyi, A V; Kondrat'eva, T F

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of flotation concentrate of a pyrrhotite-rich sulfide ore by acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic microbial communities at 35, 40, and 45 degrees C was investigated. According to the physicochemical parameters of the liquid phase of the pulp, as well as the results of analysis of the solid residue after biooxidation and cyanidation, the community developed at 40 degrees C exhibited the highest rate of oxidation. The degree of gold recovery at 35, 40, and 45 degrees C was 89.34, 94.59, and 83.25%, respectively. At 40 degrees C, the highest number of microbial cells (6.01 x 10(9) cells/mL) was observed. While temperature had very little effect on the species composition of microbial communities, except for the absence of Leptospirillum ferriphilum at 35 degrees C, the shares of individual species in the communities varied with temperature. Relatively high numbers of Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, the organism oxidizing iron and elemental sulfur at higher rates than other acidophilic chemolithotrophic species, were observed at 40 degrees C.

  16. Abiotic Bromination of Soil Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Leri, Alessandra C.; Ravel, Bruce

    Biogeochemical transformations of plant-derived soil organic matter (SOM) involve complex abiotic and microbially mediated reactions. One such reaction is halogenation, which occurs naturally in the soil environment and has been associated with enzymatic activity of decomposer organisms. Building on a recent finding that naturally produced organobromine is ubiquitous in SOM, we hypothesized that inorganic bromide could be subject to abiotic oxidations resulting in bromination of SOM. Through lab-based degradation treatments of plant material and soil humus, we have shown that abiotic bromination of particulate organic matter occurs in the presence of a range of inorganic oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide andmore » assorted forms of ferric iron, producing both aliphatic and aromatic forms of organobromine. Bromination of oak and pine litter is limited primarily by bromide concentration. Fresh plant material is more susceptible to bromination than decayed litter and soil humus, due to a labile pool of mainly aliphatic compounds that break down during early stages of SOM formation. As the first evidence of abiotic bromination of particulate SOM, this study identifies a mechanistic source of the natural organobromine in humic substances and the soil organic horizon. Formation of organobromine through oxidative treatments of plant material also provides insights into the relative stability of aromatic and aliphatic components of SOM.« less

  17. Abiotic Bromination of Soil Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Leri, Alessandra C; Ravel, Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Biogeochemical transformations of plant-derived soil organic matter (SOM) involve complex abiotic and microbially mediated reactions. One such reaction is halogenation, which occurs naturally in the soil environment and has been associated with enzymatic activity of decomposer organisms. Building on a recent finding that naturally produced organobromine is ubiquitous in SOM, we hypothesized that inorganic bromide could be subject to abiotic oxidations resulting in bromination of SOM. Through lab-based degradation treatments of plant material and soil humus, we have shown that abiotic bromination of particulate organic matter occurs in the presence of a range of inorganic oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide and assorted forms of ferric iron, producing both aliphatic and aromatic forms of organobromine. Bromination of oak and pine litter is limited primarily by bromide concentration. Fresh plant material is more susceptible to bromination than decayed litter and soil humus, due to a labile pool of mainly aliphatic compounds that break down during early stages of SOM formation. As the first evidence of abiotic bromination of particulate SOM, this study identifies a mechanistic source of the natural organobromine in humic substances and the soil organic horizon. Formation of organobromine through oxidative treatments of plant material also provides insights into the relative stability of aromatic and aliphatic components of SOM.

  18. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  19. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

    1994-04-26

    A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  20. In Situ Determination of Sulfide Turnover Rates in a Meromictic Alpine Lake

    PubMed Central

    Lüthy, Lucas; Fritz, Markus; Bachofen, Reinhard

    2000-01-01

    A push-pull method, previously used in groundwater analyses, was successfully adapted for measuring sulfide turnover rates in situ at different depths in the meromictic Lake Cadagno. In the layer of phototrophic bacteria at about 12 m in depth net sulfide consumption was observed during the day, indicating active bacterial photosynthesis. During the night the sulfide turnover rates were positive, indicating a net sulfide production from the reduction of more-oxidized sulfur compounds. Because of lack of light, no photosynthesis takes place in the monimolimnion; thus, only sulfide formation is observed both during the day and the night. Sulfide turnover rates in the oxic mixolimnion were always positive as sulfide is spontaneously oxidized by oxygen and as the rates of sulfide oxidation depend on the oxygen concentrations present. Sulfide oxidation by chemolithotrophic bacteria may occur at the oxicline, but this cannot be distinguished from spontaneous chemical oxidation. PMID:10653740

  1. Diagnosing Abiotic Degradation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abiotic degradation of chlorinated solvents in ground water can be difficult to diagnose. Under current practice, most of the “evidence” is negative; specifically the apparent disappearance of chlorinated solvents with an accumulation of vinyl chloride, ethane, ethylene, or ...

  2. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation and Smac/DIABLO release are not sufficient to account for induction of apoptosis by sulindac sulfide in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Daouphars, Mikael; Koufany, Meriem; Benani, Alexandre; Marchal, Sophie; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Netter, Patrick; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves

    2005-04-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have shown chemopreventive properties in colorectal cancer, involving both cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Apart from their selectivity for COX isoenzymes, NSAIDs differ in their acidic character which supports ability to uncouple oxidative phosphorylation. To assess the possible contribution of uncoupling to their antineoplastic properties, we compared the effect of sulindac sulfide (SS), an acidic NSAID and NS-398, a non-acidic tricyclic, on mitochondrial function and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cell lines (HT29, Caco-2, HCT15 and HCT116). Although cell lines displayed a different COX status, SS and NS-398 caused growth arrest in a dose-related manner. High dose (10(-4)M) of SS but not of NS-398, increased the percentage of subG1 cell population while reducing mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsim). Cyclosporin A (CsA, 1 microM) prevented collapse of DeltaPsim induced by 10(-4)M SS but not by 7.5 microM FCCP used as a protonophoric control. SS and FCCP increased the cytosolic release of Smac/DIABLO which was differently affected by CsA pretreatment depending on the uncoupler. Finally, 7.5 microM FCCP failed to induce apoptosis whereas CsA prevented apoptosis induced by SS from 16% in HCT15 to 41% in HCT116. The present study shows that despite the ability of sulindac sulfide to behave as a protonophoric uncoupler, CsA-sensitive opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore contributes little to its pro-apoptotic effect in colorectal cancer cells.

  3. Characterization of 16S rRNA genes from oil field microbial communities indicates the presence of a variety of sulfate-reducing, fermentative, and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Voordouw, G; Armstrong, S M; Reimer, M F; Fouts, B; Telang, A J; Shen, Y; Gevertz, D

    1996-05-01

    Oil field bacteria were characterized by cloning and sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. A variety of gram-negative, sulfate-reducing bacteria was detected (16 members of the family Desulfovibrionaceae and 8 members of the family Desulfobacteriaceae). In contrast, a much more limited number of anaerobic, fermentative, or acetogenic bacteria was found (one Clostridium sp., one Eubacterium sp., and one Synergistes sp.). Potential sulfide oxidizers and/or microaerophiles (Thiomicrospira, Arcobacter, Campylobacter, and Oceanospirillum spp.) were also detected. The first two were prominently amplified from uncultured production water DNA and represented 28 and 47% of all clones, respectively. Growth on media containing sulfide as the electron donor and nitrate as the electron acceptor and designed for the isolation of Thiomicrospira spp. gave only significant enrichment of the Campylobacter sp., which was shown to be present in different western Canadian oil fields. This newly discovered sulfide oxidizer may provide a vital link in the oil field sulfur cycle by reoxidizing sulfide formed by microbial sulfate or sulfur reduction.

  4. Characterization of 16S rRNA genes from oil field microbial communities indicates the presence of a variety of sulfate-reducing, fermentative, and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, G; Armstrong, S M; Reimer, M F; Fouts, B; Telang, A J; Shen, Y; Gevertz, D

    1996-01-01

    Oil field bacteria were characterized by cloning and sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. A variety of gram-negative, sulfate-reducing bacteria was detected (16 members of the family Desulfovibrionaceae and 8 members of the family Desulfobacteriaceae). In contrast, a much more limited number of anaerobic, fermentative, or acetogenic bacteria was found (one Clostridium sp., one Eubacterium sp., and one Synergistes sp.). Potential sulfide oxidizers and/or microaerophiles (Thiomicrospira, Arcobacter, Campylobacter, and Oceanospirillum spp.) were also detected. The first two were prominently amplified from uncultured production water DNA and represented 28 and 47% of all clones, respectively. Growth on media containing sulfide as the electron donor and nitrate as the electron acceptor and designed for the isolation of Thiomicrospira spp. gave only significant enrichment of the Campylobacter sp., which was shown to be present in different western Canadian oil fields. This newly discovered sulfide oxidizer may provide a vital link in the oil field sulfur cycle by reoxidizing sulfide formed by microbial sulfate or sulfur reduction. PMID:8633860

  5. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application. PMID:26553709

  6. Hierarchically assembled 3D nanoflowers and 0D nanoparticles of nickel sulfides on reduced graphene oxide with excellent lithium storage performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronganh, Nguyen; Gao, Yang; Jiang, Wei; Tao, Haihua; Wang, Shanshan; Zhao, Bing; Jiang, Yong; Chen, Zhiwen; Jiao, Zheng

    2018-05-01

    Constructing heterostructure can endow composites with many novel physical and electrochemical properties due to the built-in specific charge transfer dynamics. However, controllable fabrication route to heterostructures is still a great challenge up to now. In this work, a SiO2-assisted hydrothermal method is developed to fabricate heterostructured nickel sulfides/reduced graphene oxide (NiSx/rGO) composite. The SiO2 particles hydrolyzed from tetraethyl orthosilicate could assist the surface controllable co-growth of 3D nanoflowers and 0D nanoparticles of Ni3S2/NiS decorated on reduced graphene oxide, and the possible co-growth mechanism is discussed in detail. In this composite, the heterostructured nanocomposite with different morphologies, chemical compositions and crystal structures, along with varied electronic states and band structure, can promote the interface charge transfer kinetics and lead to excellent lithium storage performances. Electrochemical measurements reveal that the NiSx/rGO composite presents 1187.0 mA h g-1 at 100 mA g-1 and achieves a highly stable capacity of 561.2 mA h g-1 even when the current density is up to 5 A g-1.

  7. Reduced Graphene Oxide-Cadmium Zinc Sulfide Nanocomposite with Controlled Band Gap for Large-Area Thin-Film Optoelectronic Device Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Sk; Chakraborty, Koushik; Pal, Tanusri; Ghosh, Surajit

    2017-12-01

    Herein, we report the one pot single step solvothermal synthesis of reduced grapheme oxide-cadmium zinc sulfide (RGO-Cd0.5Zn0.5S) composite. The reduction in graphene oxide (GO), synthesis of Cd0.5Zn0.5S (mentioned as CdZnS in the text) nanorod and decoration of CdZnS nanorods onto RGO sheet were done simultaneously. The structural, morphological and optical properties were studied thoroughly by different techniques, such as XRD, TEM, UV-Vis and PL. The PL intensity of CdZnS nanorods quenches significantly after the attachment of RGO, which confirms photoinduced charge transformation from CdZnS nanorods to RGO sheet through the interface of RGO-CdZnS. An excellent photocurrent generation in RGO-CdZnS thin-film device has been observed under simulated solar light irradiation. The photocurrent as well as photosensitivity increases linearly with the solar light intensity for all the composites. Our study establishes that the synergistic effect of RGO and CdZnS in the composite is capable of getting promising applications in the field of optoelectronic devising.

  8. Sulfur in oleylamine as a powerful and versatile etchant for oxide, sulfide, and metal colloidal nanoparticles: Sulfur in oleylamine as a powerful and versatile etchant

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Bin; Tian, Xinchun; Shaw, Santosh; ...

    2016-11-02

    Understanding of crystal growth is essential to the design of materials with improved properties. Unfortunately, still very little is understood about the basic growth mechanisms of nanostructures, even in the most established colloidal synthetic routes. Etching is one of the most important mechanisms to consider during particle growth, but it is rarely considered in the syntheses of oxide or chalcogenide nanostructures. Here in this paper, we report that the most common precursor for the synthesis of sulfide nanostructures – the mixture of sulfur and oleylamine – acts as a very powerful etchant for oxide, chalcogenide, and metal nanostructures. Specifically, wemore » discuss its effect on several nanoparticle compositions (PbS, Cu 2S, Fe 3O 4, and Au) and compare it to control conditions in which only oleylamine is present. Our experiments suggest that the etching results from the evolution of H 2S from the sulfur–oleylamine precursor. We predict that the simultaneous role of this precursor as both etchant and ligand stabilizer will make it a useful tool for the chemical post-processing (e.g., size reduction, focusing of size distributions, faceting) of nanocrystal dispersions.« less

  9. Controlling electrodeposited ultrathin amorphous Fe hydroxides film on V-doped nickel sulfide nanowires as efficient electrocatalyst for water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiao; Yan, Kai-Li; Lu, Shan-Shan; Dong, Bin; Gao, Wen-Kun; Chi, Jing-Qi; Liu, Zi-Zhang; Chai, Yong-Ming; Liu, Chen-Guang

    2017-09-01

    Developing cost-effective electrocatalysts with both high activity and stability remains challenging for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in water electrolysis. Herein, based on V-doped nickel sulfide nanowire on nickel foam (NiVS/NF), we further conduct controllable electrodeposition of Fe hydroxides film on NiVS/NF (eFe/NiVS/NF) to further improve OER performance and stability. For comparison, ultrafast chemical deposition of Fe hydroxides on NiVS/NF (uFe/NiVS/NF) is also utilized. V-doping of NiVS/NF may introduce more active sites for OER, and nanowire structure can expose abundant active sites and facilitate mass transport. Both of the two depositions generate amorphous Fe hydroxides film covering on the surface of nanowires and lead to enhanced OER activities. Furthermore, electrodeposition strategy realizes uniform Fe hydroxides film on eFe/NiVS/NF confirmed by superior OER activity of eFe/NiVS/NF than uFe/NiVS/NF with relatively enhanced stability. The OER activity of eFe/NiVS/NF depends on various electrodepositon time, and the optimal time (15 s) is obtained with maximum OER activity. Therefore, the controllable electrodeposition of Fe may provide an efficient and simple strategy to enhance the OER properties of electrocatalysts.

  10. Sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

    1985-11-26

    A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

  11. Sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, Stanford R.; Yeung, Edward S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

  12. Abiotic Supramolecular Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-02

    REPORT Abiotic Supramolecular Systems 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The goal of this research project was to develop new concepts for the...decision, unless so designated by other documentation. 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited UU...9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 6. AUTHORS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMES AND ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O

  13. Sulfide oxidation, nitrate respiration, carbon acquisition, and electron transport pathways suggested by the draft genome of a single orange Guaymas Basin Beggiatoa (Cand. Maribeggiatoa) sp. filament.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, Barbara J; Biddle, Jennifer F; Harbort, Christopher; Matthysse, Ann G; Teske, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    A near-complete draft genome has been obtained for a single vacuolated orange Beggiatoa (Cand. Maribeggiatoa) filament from a Guaymas Basin seafloor microbial mat, the third relatively complete sequence for the Beggiatoaceae. Possible pathways for sulfide oxidation; nitrate respiration; inorganic carbon fixation by both Type II RuBisCO and the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle; acetate and possibly formate uptake; and energy-generating electron transport via both oxidative phosphorylation and the Rnf complex are discussed here. A role in nitrite reduction is suggested for an abundant orange cytochrome produced by the Guaymas strain; this has a possible homolog in Beggiatoa (Cand. Isobeggiatoa) sp. PS, isolated from marine harbor sediment, but not Beggiatoa alba B18LD, isolated from a freshwater rice field ditch. Inferred phylogenies for the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle and the reductive (rTCA) and oxidative (TCA) tricarboxylic acid cycles suggest that genes encoding succinate dehydrogenase and enzymes for carboxylation and/or decarboxylation steps (including RuBisCO) may have been introduced to (or exported from) one or more of the three genomes by horizontal transfer, sometimes by different routes. Sequences from the two marine strains are generally more similar to each other than to sequences from the freshwater strain, except in the case of RuBisCO: only the Guaymas strain encodes a Type II enzyme, which (where studied) discriminates less against oxygen than do Type I RuBisCOs. Genes subject to horizontal transfer may represent key steps for adaptation to factors such as oxygen and carbon dioxide concentration, organic carbon availability, and environmental variability. © 2013.

  14. Oxidative degradation stability and hydrogen sulfide removal performance of dual-ligand iron chelate of Fe-EDTA/CA.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xinmei; Ma, Yiwen; Chen, Zezhi; Gong, Huijuan

    2017-09-05

    Catalytic oxidation desulfurization using chelated iron catalyst is an effective method to remove H 2 S from various gas streams including biogas. However, the ligand of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), which is usually adopted to prepare chelated iron catalyst, is liable to be oxidative degraded, and leads to the loss of desulfurization performance. In order to improve the degradation stability of the iron chelate, a series of iron chelates composed of two ligands including citric acid (CA) and EDTA were prepared and the oxidative degradation stability as well as desulfurization performance of these chelated iron catalysts were studied. Results show that the iron chelate of Fe-CA is more stable than Fe-EDTA, while for the desulfurization performance, the situation is converse. For the dual-ligand iron chelates of Fe-EDTA/CA, with the increase of mol ratio of CA to EDTA in the iron chelate solution, the oxidative degradation stability increased while the desulfurization performance decreased. The results of this work showed that Fe-EDTA/CA with a mol ratio of CA:EDTA = 1:1 presents a relative high oxidative degradation stability and an acceptable desulfurization performance with over 90% of H 2 S removal efficiency.

  15. Microbial- and thiosulfate-mediated dissolution of mercury sulfide minerals and transformation to gaseous mercury

    DOE PAGES

    Vázquez-Rodríguez, Adiari I.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Zhang, Tong; ...

    2015-06-23

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic heavy metal that poses significant environmental and human health risks. Soils and sediments, where Hg can exist as the Hg sulfide mineral metacinnabar (β-HgS), represent major Hg reservoirs in aquatic environments. Metacinnabar has historically been considered a sink for Hg in all but severely acidic environments, and thus disregarded as a potential source of Hg back to aqueous or gaseous pools. In this study, we conducted a combination of field and laboratory incubations to identify the potential for metacinnabar as a source of dissolved Hg within near neutral pH environments and the underpinning (a)biotic mechanismsmore » at play. We show that the abundant and widespread sulfur-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Thiobacillus extensively colonized metacinnabar chips incubated within aerobic, near neutral pH creek sediments. Laboratory incubations of axenic Thiobacillus thioparus cultures led to the release of metacinnabar-hosted Hg(II) and subsequent volatilization to Hg(0). This dissolution and volatilization was greatly enhanced in the presence of thiosulfate, which served a dual role by enhancing HgS dissolution through Hg complexation and providing an additional metabolic substrate for Thiobacillus. These findings reveal a new coupled abiotic-biotic pathway for the transformation of metacinnabar-bound Hg(II) to Hg(0), while expanding the sulfide substrates available for neutrophilic chemosynthetic bacteria to Hg-laden sulfides. Lastly, they also point to mineral-hosted Hg as an underappreciated source of gaseous elemental Hg to the environment.« less

  16. One-step hydrothermal synthesis of three-dimensional porous Ni-Co sulfide/reduced graphene oxide composite with optimal incorporation of carbon nanotubes for high performance supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Cheng-Ting; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2018-04-27

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous Ni-Co sulfide/reduced graphene oxide composite with the appropriate incorporation of carbon nanotubes (NCS/rGO/CNT) was fabricated as a promising material for supercapacitor electrodes. It combined the high pseudo-capacitance of Ni-Co sulfide as well as the large specific surface area and electrical double layer capacitance of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were incorporated to act as the spacer for hindering the restacking of rGO and to construct a conductive network for enhancing the electron transport. The 3D porous NCS/rGO/CNT composite was fabricated by a facile one-step hydrothermal process in which Ni-Co sulfide nanosheets were synthesized and graphene oxide was reduced simultaneously. It was shown that the capacitance and cyclic performance indeed could be effectively improved via the appropriate addition of CNTs. In addition, a flexible all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor based on the NCS/rGO/CNT electrode was fabricated and exhibited the same capacitive electrochemical performance under bending. Also, it could successfully turn on a light-emitting diode light, revealing its feasibility in practical application. All results demonstrated that the developed NCS/rGO/CNT composite has potential application in supercapacitors.

  17. One-step hydrothermal synthesis of three-dimensional porous Ni-Co sulfide/reduced graphene oxide composite with optimal incorporation of carbon nanotubes for high performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Cheng-Ting; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2018-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous Ni-Co sulfide/reduced graphene oxide composite with the appropriate incorporation of carbon nanotubes (NCS/rGO/CNT) was fabricated as a promising material for supercapacitor electrodes. It combined the high pseudo-capacitance of Ni-Co sulfide as well as the large specific surface area and electrical double layer capacitance of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were incorporated to act as the spacer for hindering the restacking of rGO and to construct a conductive network for enhancing the electron transport. The 3D porous NCS/rGO/CNT composite was fabricated by a facile one-step hydrothermal process in which Ni-Co sulfide nanosheets were synthesized and graphene oxide was reduced simultaneously. It was shown that the capacitance and cyclic performance indeed could be effectively improved via the appropriate addition of CNTs. In addition, a flexible all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor based on the NCS/rGO/CNT electrode was fabricated and exhibited the same capacitive electrochemical performance under bending. Also, it could successfully turn on a light-emitting diode light, revealing its feasibility in practical application. All results demonstrated that the developed NCS/rGO/CNT composite has potential application in supercapacitors.

  18. An ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence sensor based on reduced graphene oxide-copper sulfide composite coupled with capillary electrophoresis for determination of amlodipine besylate in mice plasma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yanfen; Wang, Hao; Sun, Shuangjiao; Tang, Lifu; Cao, Yupin; Deng, Biyang

    2016-12-15

    A new electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor based on reduced graphene oxide-copper sulfide (rGO-CuS) composite coupled with capillary electrophoresis (CE) was constructed for the ultrasensitive detection of amlodipine besylate (AML) for the first time. In this work, rGO-CuS composite was synthesized by one-pot hydrothermal method and used for electrode modification. The electrochemical and ECL behaviors of the sensor were investigated. More than 5-fold enhance in ECL intensity was observed after modified with rGO-CuS composite. The results can be ascribed to the presence of rGO-CuS composite on the electrode surface that facilitates the electron transfer rate between the electroactive center of Ru(bpy)3(2+) and the electrode. The ECL sensor was coupled with CE to improve the selectivity and the CE-ECL parameters that affect separation and detection were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the linear ranges for AML was 0.008-5.0μg/mL with a detection limit of 2.8ng/mL (S/N=3). The method displayed the advantages of high sensitivity, good selectivity, wide linear range, low detection limit and fine reproducibility, and was used to analyze AML in mice plasma with a satisfactory result, which holds a great potential in the field of pharmaceutical analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute and subacute oral toxicity of polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides in mice: determining LD50 and assessing the status of hepatic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuesheng; Liu, Fu; Chen, Binyuan; Li, Ying; Wang, Zunyao

    2012-07-01

    Polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides (PCDPSs), a series of dioxin-like compounds, have been detected in various environmental samples. However, information on the toxicity of these compounds is limited. In the present study, the toxic effects of PCDPSs were assessed after acute and subacute exposure in mice. Relationships between acute toxicity, number, and position of substituted Cl atoms were assessed. In the acute study, 11 types of PCDPSs were administered to female Kunming mice by gavage, and median lethal doses (LD50s) were determined by the Karber method. Results indicated that the LD50s of lower substituted PCDPSs were smaller than higher substituted PCDPSs. Substituted positions also influenced the LD50 of PCDPSs. Terminal necropsy showed increased relative liver weights and decreased relative kidney weights. Histological examination of livers demonstrated swollen cells, inflammation, vacuolization, and necrosis. In the 28-d subacute exposure tests, 11 types of PCDPSs were dissolved in corn oil and administered to mice at doses of 1, 10, and 100 mg/kg. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in mouse liver were determined after the exposure period. Results suggested that lower substituted PCDPSs decreased SOD activity in the high-dose groups compared with controls, and MDA level in the 100-mg/kg dose group was significantly increased. In addition, acute toxicity of PCDPSs partly corresponded to the hepatic oxidative damage observed. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  20. Process and apparatus for generating elemental sulfur and re-usable metal oxide from spent metal sulfide sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Ayala, Raul E.; Gal, Eli

    1995-01-01

    A process and apparatus for generating elemental sulfur and re-usable metal oxide from spent metal-sulfur compound. Spent metal-sulfur compound is regenerated to re-usable metal oxide by moving a bed of spent metal-sulfur compound progressively through a single regeneration vessel having a first and second regeneration stage and a third cooling and purging stage. The regeneration is carried out and elemental sulfur is generated in the first stage by introducing a first gas of sulfur dioxide which contains oxygen at a concentration less than the stoichiometric amount required for complete oxidation of the spent metal-sulfur compound. A second gas containing sulfur dioxide and excess oxygen at a concentration sufficient for complete oxidation of the partially spent metal-sulfur compound, is introduced into the second regeneration stage. Gaseous sulfur formed in the first regeneration stage is removed prior to introducing the second gas into the second regeneration stage. An oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the third cooling and purging stage. Except for the gaseous sulfur removed from the first stage, the combined gases derived from the regeneration stages which are generally rich in sulfur dioxide and lean in oxygen, are removed from the regenerator as an off-gas and recycled as the first and second gas into the regenerator. Oxygen concentration is controlled by adding air, oxygen-enriched air or pure oxygen to the recycled off-gas.

  1. Sulfur and sulfides in chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchi, Yves; Libourel, Guy

    2013-10-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfides within type I PO, POP and PP chondrules of the carbonaceous chondrite Vigarano (CV3) have been studied by secondary electron microscopy and electron microprobe. They occur predominantly as spheroidal blebs composed entirely of low-Ni iron sulfide (troilite, FeS) or troilite + magnetite but in less abundance in association with metallic Fe-Ni beads in opaque assemblages. Troilites are mainly located within the low-Ca pyroxene outer zone and their amounts increase with the abundance of low-Ca pyroxene within chondrules, suggesting co-crystallization of troilite and low-Ca pyroxene during high-temperature events. We show that sulfur concentration and sulfide occurrence in chondrules obey high temperature sulfur solubility and saturation laws. Depending on the fS2 and fO2 of the surrounding gas and on the melt composition, mainly the FeO content, sulfur dissolved in chondrule melts may eventually reach a concentration limit, the sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS), at which an immiscible iron sulfide liquid separates from the silicate melt. The occurrence of both a silicate melt and an immiscible iron sulfide liquid is further supported by the non-wetting behavior of sulfides on silicate phases in chondrules due to the high interfacial tension between their precursor iron-sulfide liquid droplets and the surrounding silicate melt during the high temperature chondrule-forming event. The evolution of chondrule melts from PO to PP towards more silicic compositions, very likely due to high PSiO(g) of the surrounding nebular gas, induces saturation of FeS at much lower S content in PP than in PO chondrules, leading to the co-crystallization of iron sulfides and low-Ca pyroxenes. Conditions of co-saturation of low-Ca pyroxene and FeS are only achieved in non canonical environments characterized by high partial pressures of sulfur and SiO and redox conditions more oxidizing than IW-3. Fe and S mass balance calculations also

  2. What do we really know about the role of microorganisms in iron sulfide mineral formation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Picard, Aude A.; Gartman, Amy; Girguis, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Iron sulfide mineralization in low-temperature systems is a result of biotic and abiotic processes, though the delineation between these two modes of formation is not always straightforward. Here we review the role of microorganisms in the precipitation of extracellular iron sulfide minerals. We summarize the evidence that links sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms and sulfide minerals in nature and we present a critical overview of laboratory-based studies of the nucleation and growth of iron sulfide minerals in microbial cultures. We discuss whether biologically derived minerals are distinguishable from abiotic minerals, possessing attributes that are uniquely diagnostic of biomineralization. These inquiries have revealed the need for additional thorough, mechanistic and high-resolution studies to understand microbially mediated formation of a variety of sulfide minerals across a range of natural environments.

  3. Assessing the Role of Iron Sulfides in the Long Term Sequestration of Uranium by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Kim F.; Bi, Yuqiang; Carpenter, Julian

    2013-12-31

    presence of ferrous iron was poorly crystalline. At UM, laboratory-scale reactor studies were performed to assess the potential for the predominant abiotic reductants formed under sulfate reducing conditions (SRCs) to: (1) reduce U(VI) in contaminated groundwater sediments), and (2) inhibit the re-oxidation of U(IV) species, and in particular, uraninite (UO 2(s)). Under SRCs, mackinawite and aqueous sulfide are the key reductants expected to form. To assess their potential for abiotic reduction of U(VI) species, a series of experiments were performed in which either FeS or S(-II) was added to solutions of U(VI), with the rates of conversion to U(IV) solids monitored as a function of pH, and carbonate and calcium concentration. In the presence of FeS and absence of oxygen or carbonate, U(IV) was completely reduced uraninite. S(-II) was also found to be an effective reductant of aqueous phase U(VI) species and produced uraninite, with the kinetics and extent of reduction depending on geochemical conditions. U(VI) reduction to uraninite was faster under higher S(-II) concentrations but was slowed by an increase in the dissolved Ca or carbonate concentration. Rapid reduction of U(VI) occurred at circumneutral pH but virtually no reduction occurred at pH 10.7. In general, dissolved Ca and carbonate slowed abiotic U(VI) reduction by forming stable Ca-U(VI)-carbonate soluble complexes that are resistant to reaction with aqueous sulfide. To investigate the stability of U(IV) against re-oxidation in the presence of iron sulfides by oxidants in simulated groundwater environments, and to develop a mechanistic understanding the controlling redox processes, continuously-mixed batch reactor (CMBR) and flow-through reactor (CMFR) studies were performed at UM. In these studies a series of experiments were conducted under various oxic groundwater conditions to examine the effectiveness of FeS as an oxygen scavenger to retard UO 2 dissolution. The results indicate that FeS is an effective

  4. Three Gaseous Neurotransmitters, Nitric oxide, Carbon Monoxide, and Hydrogen Sulfide, Are Involved in the Neurogenic Relaxation Responses of the Porcine Internal Anal Sphincter.

    PubMed

    Folasire, Oladayo; Mills, Kylie A; Sellers, Donna J; Chess-Williams, Russ

    2016-01-31

    The internal anal sphincter (IAS) plays an important role in maintaining continence and a number of neurotransmitters are known to regulate IAS tone. The aim of this study was to determine the relative importance of the neurotransmitters involved in the relaxant and contractile responses of the porcine IAS. Responses of isolated strips of IAS to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were obtained in the absence and presence of inhibitors of neurotransmitter systems. Contractile responses of the sphincter to EFS were unaffected by the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine (1 μM), but were almost completely abolished by the adrenergic neuron blocker guanethidine (10 μM). Contractile responses were also reduced (by 45% at 5 Hz, P < 0.01) following desensitisation of purinergic receptors with α,β-methylene-ATP (10 μM). In the presence of guanethidine, atropine, and α,β-methylene-ATP, the remaining relaxatory responses to EFS were examined. These responses were not altered by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (5 μM), the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide receptor antagonist, [D-p-Cl-Phe(6),Leu(17)]-vasoactive intestinal peptide (PheLeu-VIP; 100 nM), or the purinoceptor antagonists, 8-phenyltheophyline (P1 receptors) or suramin (P2 receptors). However, relaxation responses were reduced by Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA; 100 μM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis (40-50% reduction), zinc protoprophyrin IX (10 μM), an inhibitor of carbon monoxide synthesis (20-40% reduction), and also propargylglycine (30 μM) and aminooxyacetic acid (30 μM), inhibitors of hydrogen sulphide synthesis (15-20% reduction). Stimulation of IAS efferent nerves releases excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters: noradrenaline is the predominant contractile transmitter with a smaller component from ATP, whilst 3 gases mediate relaxation responses to EFS, with the combined contributions being nitric oxide > carbon monoxide > hydrogen sulfide.

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Salt Tolerance in Rice by Maintaining Na+/K+ Balance, Mineral Homeostasis and Oxidative Metabolism Under Excessive Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mostofa, Mohammad G.; Saegusa, Daisuke; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-01-01

    Being a salt sensitive crop, rice growth and development are frequently affected by soil salinity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recently explored as an important priming agent regulating diverse physiological processes of plant growth and development. Despite its enormous prospects in plant systems, the role of H2S in plant stress tolerance is still elusive. Here, a combined pharmacological, physiological and biochemical approach was executed aiming to examine the possible mechanism of H2S in enhancement of rice salt stress tolerance. We showed that pretreating rice plants with H2S donor sodium bisulfide (NaHS) clearly improved, but application of H2S scavenger hypotaurine with NaHS decreased growth and biomass-related parameters under salt stress. NaHS-pretreated salt-stressed plants exhibited increased chlorophyll, carotenoid and soluble protein contents, as well as suppressed accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), contributing to oxidative damage protection. The protective mechanism of H2S against oxidative stress was correlated with the elevated levels of ascorbic acid, glutathione, redox states, and the enhanced activities of ROS- and methylglyoxal-detoxifying enzymes. Notably, the ability to decrease the uptake of Na+ and the Na+/K+ ratio, as well as to balance mineral contents indicated a role of H2S in ion homeostasis under salt stress. Altogether, our results highlight that modulation of the level of endogenous H2S genetically or exogenously could be employed to attain better growth and development of rice, and perhaps other crops, under salt stress. Furthermore, our study reveals the importance of the implication of gasotransmitters like H2S for the management of salt stress, thus assisting rice plants to adapt to adverse environmental changes. PMID:26734015

  6. Compositions, ages, and diagenetic histories of the carbonate, sulfide, oxide, and phosphatic concretions at Gay Head, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Commeau, R.F.; O'Leary, Dennis W.

    1988-01-01

    The calcite/ankerite concretions were formed in a hot, seasonally arid, caliche-prone environment of early Raritan age; the pyrite, marcasite, and siderite concretions precipitated in sediments deposited in low-energy, marshy, estuarine environments of late Raritan age. The phosphate concretions formed in a middle to inner shelf environment. The goethite and lepidocrocite concretions are secondary oxidation or alteration products of the prexistent Cretaceous concretions that were excavated during the Pleistocene and incorporated into the glacial drift. -from Authors

  7. Gas cleaning and hydrogen sulfide removal for COREX coal gas by sorption enhanced catalytic oxidation over recyclable activated carbon desulfurizer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tonghua; Shen, Yafei; Jia, Jinping

    2014-02-18

    This paper proposes a novel self-developed JTS-01 desulfurizer and JZC-80 alkaline adsorbent for H2S removal and gas cleaning of the COREX coal gas in small-scale and commercial desulfurizing devices. JTS-01 desulfurizer was loaded with metal oxide (i.e., ferric oxides) catalysts on the surface of activated carbons (AC), and the catalyst capacity was improved dramatically by means of ultrasonically assisted impregnation. Consequently, the sulfur saturation capacity and sulfur capacity breakthrough increased by 30.3% and 27.9%, respectively. The whole desulfurizing process combined selective adsorption with catalytic oxidation. Moreover, JZC-80 adsorbent can effectively remove impurities such as HCl, HF, HCN, and ash in the COREX coal gas, stabilizing the system pressure drop. The JTS-01 desulfurizer and JZC-80 adsorbent have been successfully applied for the COREX coal gas cleaning in the commercial plant at Baosteel, Shanghai. The sulfur capacity of JTS-01 desulfurizer can reach more than 50% in industrial applications. Compared with the conventional dry desulfurization process, the modified AC desulfurizers have more merit, especially in terms of the JTS-01 desulfurizer with higher sulfur capacity and low pressure drop. Thus, this sorption enhanced catalytic desulfurization has promising prospects for H2S removal and other gas cleaning.

  8. The Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide at Low Temperature: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shanxue; Gao, Fengyu; Zhang, Bowen; Zuo, Yanran; Wang, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrolysis technology of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature was reviewed, including the development of catalysts, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanism of COS hydrolysis. It was indicated that the catalysts are mainly involved metal oxide and activated carbon. The active ingredients which can load on COS hydrolysis catalyst include alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, transition metal oxides, rare earth metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, and nanometal oxides. The catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change. The controlling steps are also different because the reaction conditions such as concentration of carbonyl sulfide, reaction temperature, water-air ratio, and reaction atmosphere are different. The hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide is base-catalyzed reaction, and the force of the base site has an important effect on the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide. PMID:23956697

  9. Review of Abiotic Degradation of Chlorinated Solvents by Reactive Iron Minerals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abiotic degradation of chlorinated solvents by reactive iron minerals such as iron sulfides, magnetite, green rust, and other Fe(II)-containing minerals has been observed in both laboratory and field conditions. These reactive iron minerals typically form under iron and sulfate ...

  10. Core-shell rhodium sulfide catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction / hydrogen oxidation reaction in hydrogen-bromine reversible fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanchao; Nguyen, Trung Van

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis and characterization of high electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) core-shell RhxSy catalysts for hydrogen evolution oxidation (HER)/hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) in H2-Br2 fuel cell are discussed. Catalysts with RhxSy as shell and different percentages (5%, 10%, and 20%) of platinum on carbon as core materials are synthesized. Cyclic voltammetry is used to evaluate the Pt-equivalent mass specific ECSA and durability of these catalysts. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) techniques are utilized to characterize the bulk and surface compositions and to confirm the core-shell structure of the catalysts, respectively. Cycling test and polarization curve measurements in the H2-Br2 fuel cell are used to assess the catalyst stability and performance in a fuel cell. The results show that the catalysts with core-shell structure have higher mass specific ECSA (50 m2 gm-Rh-1) compared to a commercial catalyst (RhxSy/C catalyst from BASF, 6.9 m2 gm-Rh-1). It also shows better HOR/HER performance in the fuel cell. Compared to the platinum catalyst, the core-shell catalysts show more stable performance in the fuel cell cycling test.

  11. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1992-07-07

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  12. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1991-10-22

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  13. SULFIDE MINERALS IN SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation processes of metal sulfides in sediments, especially iron sulfides, have been the subjects of intense scientific research because of linkages to the global biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen. Transition metal sulfides (e.g., NiS, CuS, ZnS, Cd...

  14. Complete genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic mineral-sulfide-oxidizing firmicute Sulfobacillus acidophilus type strain (NALT)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Chertkov, Olga; Chen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Sulfobacillus acidophilus Norris et al. 1996 is a member of the genus Sulfobacillus which comprises five species of the order Clostridiales. Sulfobacillus species are of interest for comparison to other sulfur and iron oxidizers and also have biomining applications. This is the first completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Sulfobacillus, and the second published genome of a member of the species S. acidophilus. The genome, which consists of one chromosome and one plasmid with a total size of 3,557,831 bp, harbors 3,626 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia ofmore » Bacteria and Archaea project.« less

  15. Complete genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic mineral-sulfide-oxidizing firmicute Sulfobacillus acidophilus type strain (NAL(T)).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Iain; Chertkov, Olga; Chen, Amy; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Pan, Chongle; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rüdiger; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Mavromatis, Konstantinos

    2012-07-30

    Sulfobacillus acidophilus Norris et al. 1996 is a member of the genus Sulfobacillus which comprises five species of the order Clostridiales. Sulfobacillus species are of interest for comparison to other sulfur and iron oxidizers and also have biomining applications. This is the first completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Sulfobacillus, and the second published genome of a member of the species S. acidophilus. The genome, which consists of one chromosome and one plasmid with a total size of 3,557,831 bp harbors 3,626 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes, and is a part of the GenomicEncyclopedia ofBacteria andArchaea project.

  16. Sulfur doped reduced graphene oxides with enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction via molten salt redox-sulfidation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuxing; Chen, Zhigang; Tang, Juanjuan; Xiao, Wei; Mao, Xuhui; Zhu, Hua; Wang, Dihua

    2016-12-07

    A spontaneous redox reaction of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in molten Li 2 CO 3 -Na 2 CO 3 -K 2 CO 3 with a small amount of Li 2 SO 4 at 550 °C was applied to synthesize sulfur and sulfur-cobalt doped rGOs (S-rGO/S-Co-rGO). The obtained S-rGOs and S-Co-rGOs show enhanced catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline aqueous solutions. The onset reduction potential and the half-wave potential of S-Co-rGO are 60 and 40 mV more positive than those of the original rGO, respectively. The reduction current density of S-Co-rGO increases by nearly five times. This study provides a green and continuous molten salt doping approach for the fabrication of heteroatom-doped graphene with excellent catalytic activity for the ORR.

  17. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots supported on gallium and indium oxide for visible-light-driven hydrogen evolution from water.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yun-xiang; Zhuang, Huaqiang; Hong, Jindui; Fang, Zheng; Liu, Hai; Liu, Bin; Huang, Yizhong; Xu, Rong

    2014-09-01

    In this work, CdS quantum dots (QDs) supported on Ga2O3 and In2O3 are applied for visible-light-driven H2 evolution from aqueous solutions that contain lactic acid. With Pt as the cocatalyst, the H2 evolution rates on CdS/Pt/Ga2O3 and CdS/Pt/In2O3 are as high as 995.8 and 1032.2 μmol h(-1), respectively, under visible light (λ>420 nm) with apparent quantum efficiencies of 43.6 and 45.3% obtained at 460 nm, respectively. These are much higher than those on Pt/CdS (108.09 μmol h(-1)), Pt/Ga2O3 (0.12 μmol h(-1)), and Pt/In2O3 (0.05 μmol h(-1)). The photocatalysts have been characterized thoroughly and their band structures and photocurrent responses have been measured. The band alignment between the CdS QDs and In2O3 can lead to interfacial charge separation, which cannot occur between the CdS QDs and Ga2O3. Among the various possible factors that contribute to the high H2 evolution rates on CdS/Pt/oxide, the surface properties of the metal oxides play important roles, which include (i) the anchoring of CdS QDs and Pt nanoparticles for favorable interactions and (ii) the efficient trapping of photogenerated electrons from the CdS QDs because of surface defects (such as oxygen defects) based on photoluminescence and photocurrent studies. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits high glucose-induced NADPH oxidase 4 expression and matrix increase by recruiting inducible nitric oxide synthase in kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hak Joo; Lee, Doug Yoon; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M; Feliers, Denis; Ghosh-Choudhury, Goutam; Abboud, Hanna E; Gorin, Yves; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S

    2017-04-07

    High-glucose increases NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) expression, reactive oxygen species generation, and matrix protein synthesis by inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in renal cells. Because hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) inhibits high glucose-induced matrix protein increase by activating AMPK in renal cells, we examined whether H 2 S inhibits high glucose-induced expression of NOX4 and matrix protein and whether H 2 S and NO pathways are integrated. High glucose increased NOX4 expression and activity at 24 h in renal proximal tubular epithelial cells, which was inhibited by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a source of H 2 S. High glucose decreased AMPK phosphorylation and activity, which was restored by NaHS. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, prevented NaHS inhibition of high glucose-induced NOX4 expression. NaHS inhibition of high glucose-induced NOX4 expression was abrogated by N (ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of NOS. NaHS unexpectedly augmented the expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) but not endothelial NOS. iNOS siRNA and 1400W, a selective iNOS inhibitor, abolished the ameliorative effects of NaHS on high glucose-induced NOX4 expression, reactive oxygen species generation, and, matrix laminin expression. Thus, H 2 S recruits iNOS to generate NO to inhibit high glucose-induced NOX4 expression, oxidative stress, and matrix protein accumulation in renal epithelial cells; the two gasotransmitters H 2 S and NO and their interaction may serve as therapeutic targets in diabetic kidney disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide regulates the levels of key metabolites and antioxidant defense system to counteract oxidative stress in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants exposed to high zinc regime.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Cengiz; Ashraf, Muhammad; Akram, Nudrat Aisha

    2018-05-01

    In the present experiment, we aimed to test the impact of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) on growth, key oxidant such as hydrogen peroxide, mineral elements, and antioxidative defense in Capia-type red sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants subjected to high concentration of zinc (Zn). A factorial experiment was designed with two Zn levels (0.05 and 0.5 mM) and 0.2 mM sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) as a donor of H 2 S supplied in combination plus nutrient solution through the root zone. High level of Zn led to reduce dry mass, chlorophyll pigments, fruit yield, leaf maximum fluorescence, and relative water content, but enhanced endogenous hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), free proline, malondialdehyde (MDA), electrolyte leakage (EL), H 2 S, as well as the activities of peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes. Exogenously applied NaHS significantly enhanced plant growth, fruit yield, water status, the levels of H 2 S and proline as well as the activities of different antioxidant enzymes, while it significantly suppressed EL, MDA, and H 2 O 2 contents in the pepper plants receiving low level Zn. NaHS application to the control plants did not significantly change all these parameters tested except the dry matter which increased significantly. High Zn regime led to increase intrinsic Zn levels in the leaves and roots, but it lowered leaf nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and iron (Fe) concentrations. However, NaHS reduces the Zn conc. and enhances Fe and N in leaf and root organs. It can be concluded that NaHS can mitigate the harmful effects of Zn on plant growth particularly by lowering the concentrations of H 2 O 2 , Zn, EL, and MDA, and enhancing the activities of enzymatic antioxidants and levels of essential nutrients in pepper plants.

  20. Effects of Tai Chi exercise on blood pressure and plasma levels of nitric oxide, carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide in real-world patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaogui; Zhang, Yi; Tao, Sai

    2015-01-01

    Objective was to investigate the effects of Tai Chi exercise on nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels, and blood pressure (BP) in patients with essential hypertension (EH). EH patients were assigned to the Tai Chi exercise group (HTC, n = 24), and hypertension group (HP, n = 16) by patients' willingness. Healthy volunteers matched for age and gender were recruited as control (NP, n = 16). HTC group performed Tai Chi (60 min/d, 6 d/week) for 12 weeks. Measurements (blood glucose, cholesterol, NO, CO, H2S and BP) were obtained at week 0, 6, and 12. SBP, MAP, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels decreased, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels increased by week 12 in the HTC group (all p < 0.05 versus baseline). Plasma NO, CO, and H2S levels in the HTC group were increased after 12 weeks (all p < 0.05 versus baseline). SBP, DBP and MAP levels were significantly lower in the HTC than in the HP group (all p < 0.05). However, no changes were observed in the HP and NP groups. Correlations were observed between changes in SBP and changes in NO, CO and H2S (r = -0.45, -0.51 and -0.46, respectively, all p < 0.05), and between changes in MAP and changes in NO, CO and H2S (r = -0.36, -0.45 and -0.42, respectively, all p < 0.05). In conclusion, Tai Chi exercise seems to have beneficial effects on BP and gaseous signaling molecules in EH patients. However, further investigation is required to understand the exact mechanisms underlying these observations, and to confirm these results in a larger cohort.

  1. Electrochemical hydrogen sulfide biosensors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tailin; Scafa, Nikki; Xu, Li-Ping; Zhou, Shufeng; Abdullah Al-Ghanem, Khalid; Mahboob, Shahid; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-02-21

    The measurement of sulfide, especially hydrogen sulfide, has held the attention of the analytical community due to its unique physiological and pathophysiological roles in biological systems. Electrochemical detection offers a rapid, highly sensitive, affordable, simple, and real-time technique to measure hydrogen sulfide concentration, which has been a well-documented and reliable method. This review details up-to-date research on the electrochemical detection of hydrogen sulfide (ion selective electrodes, polarographic hydrogen sulfide sensors, etc.) in biological samples for potential therapeutic use.

  2. Production of glycolic acid by chemolithotrophic iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and its role in delineating and sustaining acidophilic sulfide mineral-oxidizing consortia.

    PubMed

    Nancucheo, Ivan; Johnson, D Barrie

    2010-01-01

    Glycolic acid was detected as an exudate in actively growing cultures of three chemolithotrophic acidophiles that are important in biomining operations, Leptospirillum ferriphilum, Acidithiobacillus (At.) ferrooxidans, and At. caldus. Although similar concentrations of glycolic acid were found in all cases, the concentrations corresponded to ca. 24% of the total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in cultures of L. ferriphilum but only ca. 5% of the total DOC in cultures of the two Acidithiobacillus spp. Rapid acidification (to pH 1.0) of the culture medium of At. caldus resulted in a large increase in the level of DOC, although the concentration of glycolic acid did not change in proportion. The archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum grew in the cell-free spent medium of At. caldus; glycolic acid was not metabolized, although other unidentified compounds in the DOC pool were metabolized. Glycolic acid exhibited levels of toxicity with 21 strains of acidophiles screened similar to those of acetic acid. The most sensitive species were chemolithotrophs (L. ferriphilum and At. ferrivorans), while the most tolerant species were chemoorganotrophs (Acidocella, Acidobacterium, and Ferroplasma species), and the ability to metabolize glycolic acid appeared to be restricted (among acidophiles) to Firmicutes (chiefly Sulfobacillus spp.). Results of this study help explain why Sulfobacillus spp. rather than other acidophiles are the main organic carbon-degrading bacteria in continuously fed stirred tanks used to bioprocess sulfide mineral concentrates and also why temporary cessation of pH control in these systems, resulting in rapid acidification, often results in a plume of the archaeon Ferroplasma.

  3. Importance of sulfide interaction with iron as regulator of the microbial community in biogas reactors and its effect on methanogenesis, volatile fatty acids turnover, and syntrophic long-chain fatty acids degradation.

    PubMed

    Shakeri Yekta, Sepehr; Ziels, Ryan M; Björn, Annika; Skyllberg, Ulf; Ejlertsson, Jörgen; Karlsson, Anna; Svedlund, Matilda; Willén, Magnus; Svensson, Bo H

    2017-05-01

    The inhibitory effects of sulfide on microbial processes during anaerobic digestion have been widely addressed. However, other effects of sulfide are less explored, given that sulfide is a potential sulfur source for microorganisms and its high reactivity triggers a suit of abiotic reactions. We demonstrated that sulfide interaction with Fe regulates the dynamics and activities of microbial community during anaerobic digestion. This was manifested by the S:Fe molar ratio, whose increase adversely influenced the acetoclastic methanogens, Methanosaeta, and turnover of acetate. Dynamics of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, Methanoculleus and Methanobrevibacter, were presumably influenced by sulfide-induced changes in the partial pressure of hydrogen. Interestingly, conversion of the long-chain fatty acid (LCFA), oleate, to methane was enhanced together with the abundance of LCFA-degrading, β-oxidizing Syntrophomonas at an elevated S:Fe molar ratio. The results suggested that sulfur chemical speciation is a controlling factor for microbial community functions in anaerobic digestion processes. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Understanding Cu release into environment from Kure massive sulfide ore deposits, Kastamonu, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Cansu; Sonmez, Seref; Balci, Nurgul

    2014-05-01

    abiotic in order to elucidate Cu release from ore and wastes. Greater Cu release were measured from the biological experiments carried out with S and Fe oxidizers compared to those from the chemical experiments. Fe-oxide precipitation experiments carried out in the laboratory showed high Cu absorbtion into Fe-oxides produced by biological reactions carried out with Fe oxidizers. Overall, these preliminary experimental results showed that Cu release and migration from the source can be controlled by various microorganims which regulate S and Fe cycles in the field. Key words: Metal sulfide oxidation, Kure pyritic copper mines, AMD, Bioleaching, Secondary Fe-oxide precipitation

  5. Abiotic degradation of plastic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángeles-López, Y. G.; Gutiérrez-Mayen, A. M.; Velasco-Pérez, M.; Beltrán-Villavicencio, M.; Vázquez-Morillas, A.; Cano-Blanco, M.

    2017-01-01

    Degradable plastics have been promoted as an option to mitigate the environmental impacts of plastic waste. However, there is no certainty about its degradability under different environmental conditions. The effect of accelerated weathering (AW), natural weathering (NW) and thermal oxidation (TO) on different plastics (high density polyethylene, HDPE; oxodegradable high density polyethylene, HDPE-oxo; compostable plastic, Ecovio ® metalized polypropylene, PP; and oxodegradable metalized polypropylene, PP-oxo) was studied. Plastics films were exposed to AW per 110 hours; to NW per 90 days; and to TO per 30 days. Plastic films exposed to AW and NW showed a general loss on mechanical properties. The highest reduction in elongation at break on AW occurred to HDPE-oxo (from 400.4% to 20.9%) and was higher than 90% for HDPE, HDPE-oxo, Ecovio ® and PP-oxo in NW. No substantial evidence of degradation was found on plastics exposed to TO. Oxo-plastics showed higher degradation rates than their conventional counterparts, and the compostable plastic was resistant to degradation in the studied abiotic conditions. This study shows that degradation of plastics in real life conditions will vary depending in both, their composition and the environment.

  6. Investigation of the weldability of iron-aluminum-chromium overlay coatings for corrosion protection in oxidizing/sulfidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regina, Jonathan R.

    The current study investigated the effect of chromium additions on the hydrogen cracking susceptibility of Fe-Al weld overlay claddings containing chromium additions. It was found that the weldability of FeAlCr claddings was a function of both the aluminum and chromium concentrations of the weld coatings. Weld overlay compositions that were not susceptible to hydrogen cracking were identified and the underlying mechanism behind the hydrogen cracking phenomenon was investigated further. It was concluded that the cracking behavior of the FeAlCr welds depended strongly on the microstructure of the weld fusion zone. Although it was found that the cracking susceptibility was influenced by the presence of Fe-Al intermetallic phases (namely Fe3 Al and FeAl), the cracking behavior of FeAlCr weld overlay claddings also depended on the size and distribution of carbide and oxide particles present within the weld structure. These particles acted as hydrogen trapping sites, which are areas where free hydrogen segregates and can no longer contribute to the hydrogen embrittlement of the metal. It was determined that in practical applications of these FeAlCr weld overlay coatings, carbon should be present within these welds to reduce the amount of hydrogen available for hydrogen cracking. Based on the weldability results of the FeAlCr weld claddings, coating compositions that were able to be deposited crack-free were used for long-term corrosion testing in a simulated low NOx environment. These alloys were compared to a Ni-based superalloy (622), which is commonly utilized as boiler tube coatings in power plant furnaces for corrosion protection. It was found that the FeAlCr alloys demonstrated superior corrosion resistance when compared to the Ni-based superalloy. Due to the excellent long-term corrosion behavior of FeAlCr weld overlays that were immune to hydrogen cracking, it was concluded that select FeAlCr weld overlay compositions would make excellent corrosion resistant

  7. Process for thin film deposition of cadmium sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Muruska, H. Paul; Sansregret, Joseph L.; Young, Archie R.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention teaches a process for depositing layers of cadmium sulfide. The process includes depositing a layer of cadmium oxide by spray pyrolysis of a cadmium salt in an aqueous or organic solvent. The oxide film is then converted into cadmium sulfide by thermal ion exchange of the O.sup.-2 for S.sup.-2 by annealing the oxide layer in gaseous sulfur at elevated temperatures.

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide: A Signal Molecule in Plant Cross-Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Min, Xiong; Zhou, Zhi-Hao

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been considered as merely a toxic by product of cell metabolism, but nowadays is emerging as a novel gaseous signal molecule, which participates in seed germination, plant growth and development, as well as the acquisition of stress tolerance including cross-adaptation in plants. Cross-adaptation, widely existing in nature, is the phenomenon in which plants expose to a moderate stress can induce the resistance to other stresses. The mechanism of cross-adaptation is involved in a complex signal network consisting of many second messengers such as Ca2+, abscisic acid, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, as well as their crosstalk. The cross-adaptation signaling is commonly triggered by moderate environmental stress or exogenous application of signal molecules or their donors, which in turn induces cross-adaptation by enhancing antioxidant system activity, accumulating osmolytes, synthesizing heat shock proteins, as well as maintaining ion and nutrient balance. In this review, based on the current knowledge on H2S and cross-adaptation in plant biology, H2S homeostasis in plant cells under normal growth conditions; H2S signaling triggered by abiotic stress; and H2S-induced cross-adaptation to heavy metal, salt, drought, cold, heat, and flooding stress were summarized, and concluded that H2S might be a candidate signal molecule in plant cross-adaptation. In addition, future research direction also has been proposed. PMID:27833636

  9. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of coresmore » and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.« less

  10. Removal of insoluble heavy metal sulfides from water.

    PubMed

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2006-05-01

    The necessity of heavy metal removal from wastewater has led to increasing interest in absorbents. We have developed a new approach to obtain high metal adsorption capacity by precipitating metal sulfides with sodium sulfide on the surface of bentonite and adhere them to the absorbent. This method allowed to remove approximately 90% of cadmium as CdS from 10(-4)-10(-6) M CdCl2 solutions. Additional reactions are related to the removal of excess sodium sulfide by the release of hydrogen sulfide and oxidation to sulfur using carbogen gas (5% CO2, 95% O2) followed by aeration.

  11. Reduction of produced elementary sulfur in denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu; Liu, Lihong; Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2011-05-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) processes simultaneously convert sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewater into elemental sulfur, dinitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. The failure of a DSR process is signaled by high concentrations of sulfide in reactor effluent. Conventionally, DSR reactor failure is blamed for overcompetition for heterotroph to autotroph communities. This study indicates that the elementary sulfur produced by oxidizing sulfide that is a recoverable resource from sulfide-laden wastewaters can be reduced back to sulfide by sulfur-reducing Methanobacterium sp. The Methanobacterium sp. was stimulated with excess organic carbon (acetate) when nitrite was completely consumed by heterotrophic denitrifiers. Adjusting hydraulic retention time of a DSR reactor when nitrite is completely consumed provides an additional control variable for maximizing DSR performance.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide facilities production of nitric oxide via the Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthases signaling pathway to protect human umbilical vein endothelial cells from injury by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiasen; Zhuang, Shunjiu; Qi, Shaohong; Li, Li; Zhou, Junwen; Zhang, Wan; Zhao, Yun; Qi, Ning; Yin, Yangjun; Huang, Lu

    2017-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been reported as key in inducing endothelial cell injury, and endothelial cells may produce nitric oxide (NO) to protect themselves. However, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were divided into five treatment groups as follows: Normal control, Ang II, Ang II + sodium hydrosulfide [NaHS; hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor], Ang II + Akt inhibitors + NaHS, and Ang II + endothelial nitric oxide synthases (eNOS) inhibitors + NaHS. Subsequently, cell viability, apoptosis, migration, proliferation and adhesion ability were determined. In addition, tubular structure formation was observed, and the NO and phosphorylation levels of Akt and eNOS were evaluated. Compared with the normal control group, Ang II treatment reduced the viability of HUVECs and increased the level of cell apoptosis (P<0.05). Furthermore, Ang II treatment inhibited the phosphorylation level of eNOS and Akt, as well as the generation of NO (P<0.05). H2S reversed the above‑mentioned effects significantly and increased cell proliferation, adhesion ability and promoted tubular structure formation (P<0.05); however, H2S did not reverse the impact of eNOS and Akt phosphorylation levels after being processed with Akt and eNOS inhibitors, which indicates that H2S is capable of protecting HUVECs via the eNOS/Akt signaling pathway (P<0.05). Thus, H2S stimulates the production of NO and protects HUVECs via inducing the Akt/eNOS signaling pathway.

  13. Chemical dissolution of sulfide minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical dissolution treatments involving the use of aqua regia, 4 N HNO3, H2O2-ascorbic acid, oxalic acid, KClO3+HCl, and KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 were applied to specimens of nine common sulfide minerals (galena, chalcopyrite, cinnabar, molybdenite, orpiment, pyrite, stibnite, sphalerite, and tetrahedrite) mixed individually with a clay loam soil. The resultant decrease in the total sulfur content of the mixture, as determined by using the Leco induction furnace, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of each chemical treatment. A combination of KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 boiling gently for 20 min has been shown to be very effective in dissolving all the sulfide minerals. This treatment is recommended to dissolve metals residing in sulfide minerals admixed with secondary weathering products, as one step in a fractionation scheme whereby metals in soluble and adsorbed forms, and those associated with organic materials and secondary oxides, are first removed by other chemical extractants.

  14. Polyamines and abiotic stress in plants: a complex relationship1

    PubMed Central

    Minocha, Rakesh; Majumdar, Rajtilak; Minocha, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological relationship between abiotic stress in plants and polyamines was reported more than 40 years ago. Ever since there has been a debate as to whether increased polyamines protect plants against abiotic stress (e.g., due to their ability to deal with oxidative radicals) or cause damage to them (perhaps due to hydrogen peroxide produced by their catabolism). The observation that cellular polyamines are typically elevated in plants under both short-term as well as long-term abiotic stress conditions is consistent with the possibility of their dual effects, i.e., being protectors from as well as perpetrators of stress damage to the cells. The observed increase in tolerance of plants to abiotic stress when their cellular contents are elevated by either exogenous treatment with polyamines or through genetic engineering with genes encoding polyamine biosynthetic enzymes is indicative of a protective role for them. However, through their catabolic production of hydrogen peroxide and acrolein, both strong oxidizers, they can potentially be the cause of cellular harm during stress. In fact, somewhat enigmatic but strong positive relationship between abiotic stress and foliar polyamines has been proposed as a potential biochemical marker of persistent environmental stress in forest trees in which phenotypic symptoms of stress are not yet visible. Such markers may help forewarn forest managers to undertake amelioration strategies before the appearance of visual symptoms of stress and damage at which stage it is often too late for implementing strategies for stress remediation and reversal of damage. This review provides a comprehensive and critical evaluation of the published literature on interactions between abiotic stress and polyamines in plants, and examines the experimental strategies used to understand the functional significance of this relationship with the aim of improving plant productivity, especially under conditions of abiotic stress. PMID:24847338

  15. Weathering of sulfides on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    1987-01-01

    Pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages in mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks may have contributed significantly to the chemical weathering reactions that produce degradation products in the Martian regolith. By analogy and terrestrial processes, a model is proposed whereby supergene alteration of these primary Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars has generated secondary sulfides (e.g., pyrite) below the water table and produced acidic groundwater containing high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Ni, and sulfate ions. The low pH solutions also initiated weathering reactions of igneous feldspars and ferromagnesian silicates to form clay silicate and ferric oxyhydroxide phases. Near-surface oxidation and hydrolysis of ferric sulfato-and hydroxo-complex ions and sols formed gossan above the water table consisting of poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates (e.g., jarosite), oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite), and silica (opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost contains hydroxo sulfato complexes of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni, which may be stabilized in frozen acidic solutions beneath the surface of Mars. Sublimation of permafrost may replenish colloidal ferric oxides, sulfates, and phyllosilicates during dust storms on Mars.

  16. Polyamines and abiotic stress in plants: a complex relationship Frontiers in Plant Science

    Treesearch

    Rakesh Minocha; Rajtilak Majumdar; Subhash C. Minocha

    2014-01-01

    The physiological relationship between abiotic stress in plants and polyamines was reported more than 40 years ago. Ever since there has been a debate as to whether increased polyamines protect plants against abiotic stress (e.g., due to their ability to deal with oxidative radicals) or cause damage to them (perhaps due to hydrogen peroxide produced by their catabolism...

  17. Simulation of sulfide buildup in wastewater and atmosphere of sewer networks.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, A H; Yongsiri, C; Hvitved-Jacobsen, T; Vollertsen, J

    2005-01-01

    A model concept for prediction of sulfide buildup in sewer networks is presented. The model concept is an extension to--and a further development of--the WATS model (Wastewater Aerobic-anaerobic Transformations in Sewers), which has been developed by Hvitved-Jacobsen and co-workers at Aalborg University. In addition to the sulfur cycle, the WATS model simulates changes in dissolved oxygen and carbon fractions of different biodegradability. The sulfur cycle was introduced via six processes: 1. sulfide production taking place in the biofilm covering the permanently wetted sewer walls; 2. biological sulfide oxidation in the permanently wetted biofilm; 3. chemical and biological sulfide oxidation in the water phase; 4. sulfide precipitation with metals present in the wastewater; 5. emission of hydrogen sulfide to the sewer atmosphere and 6. adsorption and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide on the moist sewer walls where concrete corrosion may take place.

  18. Synthesis of zinc sulfide nanoparticles during zinc oxidization by H2S and H2S/H2O supercritical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrikov, A. A.; Fedyaeva, O. N.; Sokol, M. Ya.; Shatrova, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    Formation of zinc sulfide nanoparticles was detected during interaction of bulk samples with hydrogen sulfide at supercritical parameters. Synthesis proceeds with liberation of H2 by the reaction nZn + nH2S = (ZnS) n + nH2. It has been found by the X-ray diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy, and mass spectrometry that the addition of water stimulates coupled reactions of nanoparticle synthesis nZn + nH2O = (ZnO) n + nH2 and (ZnO) n + nH2S = (ZnS) n + nH2O and brings about an increase in the synthesis rate and morphological changes of (ZnS) n nanoparticles.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide removal in water-based drilling fluid by metal oxide nanoparticle and ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi Morgani, M.; Saboori, R.; Sabbaghi, S.

    2017-07-01

    Advanced approaches to the application of nanomaterials for environmental studies, such as waste-water treatment and pollution removal/adsorption, have been considered in recent decades. In this research, hydrogen sulfide removal from water-based drilling fluid by ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles and a ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite was studied experimentally. The ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by sedimentation and the sol-gel method. A sol-chemical was employed to synthesize the ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface analysis, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the produced ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles, and the ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite. The results showed that the concentration of hydrogen sulfide decreased from 800 ppm to about 250 ppm (about 70% removal) and less than 150 ppm (more than 80% removal) using the TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles with a 0.67 wt% concentration, respectively. Hydrogen sulfide removal using the ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite with a 0.67 wt% showed the highest value of removal in comparison with the TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles. The hydrogen sulfide level was lowered from 800 ppm to less than 5 ppm (99% removal) by the nanocomposite.

  20. Modeling of Sulfide Microenvironments on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bridges, J. C.; McAdam, A.; Steer, E. D.; Conrad, P. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Grotzinger, J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Yellowknife Bay (YKB; sol 124-198) is the second site that the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity investigated in detail on its mission in Gale Crater. YKB represents lake bed sediments from an overall neutral pH, low salinity environment, with a mineralogical composition which includes Ca-sulfates, Fe oxide/hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, amorphous material, and trioctahedral phyllosilicates. We investigate whether sulfide alteration could be associated with ancient habitable microenvironments in the Gale mudstones. Some textural evidence for such alteration may be pre-sent in the nodules present in the mudstone.

  1. High temperature regenerable hydrogen sulfide removal agents

    DOEpatents

    Copeland, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A system for high temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases using regenerable sorbents. One sorbent is stannic oxide (tin oxide, SnO.sub.2), the other sorbent is a metal oxide or mixed metal oxide such as zinc ferrite (ZnFe.sub.2 O.sub.4). Certain otherwise undesirable by-products, including hydrogen sulfide (H.sub.2 S) and sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) are reused by the system, and elemental sulfur is produced in the regeneration reaction. A system for refabricating the sorbent pellets is also described.

  2. Functional consortium for denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-03-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process simultaneously converts sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewaters to elemental sulfur, nitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. This investigation utilizes a dilution-to-extinction approach at 10(-2) to 10(-6) dilutions to elucidate the correlation between the composition of the microbial community and the DSR performance. In the original suspension and in 10(-2) dilution, the strains Stenotrophomonas sp., Thauera sp., and Azoarcus sp. are the heterotrophic denitrifiers and the strains Paracoccus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. are the sulfide-oxidizing denitrifers. The 10(-4) dilution is identified as the functional consortium for the present DSR system, which comprises two functional strains, Stenotrophomonas sp. strain Paracoccus sp. At 10(-6) dilution, all DSR performance was lost. The functions of the constituent cells in the DSR granules were discussed based on data obtained using the dilution-to-extinction approach.

  3. A preliminary cost analysis of the biotreatment of refinery spent-sulfidic caustic.

    PubMed

    Sublette, K L

    1997-01-01

    Caustics are used in petroleum refining to remove hydrogen sulfide from various hydrocarbon streams. Spent-sulfidic caustics from three refineries have been successfully biotreated on the bench and pilot scale, resulting in neutralization and removal of active Sulfides. Sulfides were completely oxidized to sulfate by Thiobacillus denitrificans strain F. Microbial oxidation of sulfide produced acid, which at least partially neutralized the caustic. A commercial-scale treatment system has been designed that features a bioreactor with a suspended culture of flocculated T. denitrificans, a settler and acid and nutrient storage and delivery systems. A cost analysis has been performed for nine cases representing a range of spent caustic sulfide and hydroxide concentrations at a base treatment rate of 10 gpm. This analysis shows that refinery spent-sulfidic caustic can be biotreated for 4-8.3 cent/gal.

  4. A Polyoxovanadate-Resorcin[4]arene-Based Porous Metal-Organic Framework as an Efficient Multifunctional Catalyst for the Cycloaddition of CO2 with Epoxides and the Selective Oxidation of Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bing-Bing; Yang, Jin; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Jian-Fang

    2017-10-02

    In this work, we report a new polyoxovanadate-resorcin[4]arene-based metal-organic framework (PMOF), [Co 2 L 0.5 V 4 O 12 ]·3DMF·5H 2 O (1), assembled with a newly functionalized wheel-like resorcin[4]arene ligand (L). 1 features an elegant porous motif and represents a rare example of PMOFs composed of both a resorcin[4]arene ligand and polyoxovanadate. Remarkably, 1 shows open V sites in the channel, which makes 1 an efficient heterogeneous Lewis acid catalyst for the cycloaddition of carbon dioxide to epoxides with high conversion and selectivity. Strikingly, 1 also exhibits high catalytic activity for the heterogeneous oxidative desulfurization of sulfides. Particularly, the heterogeneous catalyst 1 can be easily separated and reused with good catalytic activity.

  5. Copper(II)-Mediated Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiol Oxidation to Disulfides and Organic Polysulfanes and Their Reductive Cleavage in Wine: Mechanistic Elucidation and Potential Applications.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2017-03-29

    Fermentation-derived volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are undesirable in wine and are often remediated in a process known as copper fining. In the present study, the addition of Cu(II) to model and real wine systems containing hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and thiols provided evidence for the generation of disulfides (disulfanes) and organic polysulfanes. Cu(II) fining of a white wine spiked with glutathione, H 2 S, and methanethiol (MeSH) resulted in the generation of MeSH-glutathione disulfide and trisulfane. In the present study, the mechanisms underlying the interaction of H 2 S and thiols with Cu(II) is discussed, and a prospective diagnostic test for releasing volatile sulfur compounds from their nonvolatile forms in wine is investigated. This test utilized a combination of reducing agents, metal chelators, and low-oxygen conditions to promote the release of H 2 S and MeSH, at levels above their reported sensory thresholds, from red and white wines that were otherwise free of sulfidic off-odors at the time of addition.

  6. Sulfide-responsive transcriptional repressor SqrR functions as a master regulator of sulfide-dependent photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takayuki; Shen, Jiangchuan; Fang, Mingxu; Zhang, Yixiang; Hori, Koichi; Trinidad, Jonathan C; Bauer, Carl E; Giedroc, David P; Masuda, Shinji

    2017-02-28

    Sulfide was used as an electron donor early in the evolution of photosynthesis, with many extant photosynthetic bacteria still capable of using sulfur compounds such as hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) as a photosynthetic electron donor. Although enzymes involved in H 2 S oxidation have been characterized, mechanisms of regulation of sulfide-dependent photosynthesis have not been elucidated. In this study, we have identified a sulfide-responsive transcriptional repressor, SqrR, that functions as a master regulator of sulfide-dependent gene expression in the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus SqrR has three cysteine residues, two of which, C41 and C107, are conserved in SqrR homologs from other bacteria. Analysis with liquid chromatography coupled with an electrospray-interface tandem-mass spectrometer reveals that SqrR forms an intramolecular tetrasulfide bond between C41 and C107 when incubated with the sulfur donor glutathione persulfide. SqrR is oxidized in sulfide-stressed cells, and tetrasulfide-cross-linked SqrR binds more weakly to a target promoter relative to unmodified SqrR. C41S and C107S R. capsulatus SqrRs lack the ability to respond to sulfide, and constitutively repress target gene expression in cells. These results establish that SqrR is a sensor of H 2 S-derived reactive sulfur species that maintain sulfide homeostasis in this photosynthetic bacterium and reveal the mechanism of sulfide-dependent transcriptional derepression of genes involved in sulfide metabolism.

  7. Sulfide-Induced Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium Supports Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) in an Open-Water Unit Process Wetland

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Zackary L.; Jasper, Justin T.; Sedlak, David L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Open-water unit process wetlands host a benthic diatomaceous and bacterial assemblage capable of nitrate removal from treated municipal wastewater with unexpected contributions from anammox processes. In exploring mechanistic drivers of anammox, 16S rRNA gene sequencing profiles of the biomat revealed significant microbial community shifts along the flow path and with depth. Notably, there was an increasing abundance of sulfate reducers (Desulfococcus and other Deltaproteobacteria) and anammox microorganisms (Brocadiaceae) with depth. Pore water profiles demonstrated that nitrate and sulfate concentrations exhibited a commensurate decrease with biomat depth accompanied by the accumulation of ammonium. Quantitative PCR targeting the anammox hydrazine synthase gene, hzsA, revealed a 3-fold increase in abundance with biomat depth as well as a 2-fold increase in the sulfate reductase gene, dsrA. These microbial and geochemical trends were most pronounced in proximity to the influent region of the wetland where the biomat was thickest and influent nitrate concentrations were highest. While direct genetic queries for dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) microorganisms proved unsuccessful, an increasing depth-dependent dominance of Gammaproteobacteria and diatoms that have previously been functionally linked to DNRA was observed. To further explore this potential, a series of microcosms containing field-derived biomat material confirmed the ability of the community to produce sulfide and reduce nitrate; however, significant ammonium production was observed only in the presence of hydrogen sulfide. Collectively, these results suggest that biogenic sulfide induces DNRA, which in turn can explain the requisite coproduction of ammonium and nitrite from nitrified effluent necessary to sustain the anammox community. IMPORTANCE This study aims to increase understanding of why and how anammox is occurring in an engineered wetland with limited exogenous

  8. Widespread abiotic methane in chromitites.

    PubMed

    Etiope, G; Ifandi, E; Nazzari, M; Procesi, M; Tsikouras, B; Ventura, G; Steele, A; Tardini, R; Szatmari, P

    2018-06-07

    Recurring discoveries of abiotic methane in gas seeps and springs in ophiolites and peridotite massifs worldwide raised the question of where, in which rocks, methane was generated. Answers will impact the theories on life origin related to serpentinization of ultramafic rocks, and the origin of methane on rocky planets. Here we document, through molecular and isotopic analyses of gas liberated by rock crushing, that among the several mafic and ultramafic rocks composing classic ophiolites in Greece, i.e., serpentinite, peridotite, chromitite, gabbro, rodingite and basalt, only chromitites, characterized by high concentrations of chromium and ruthenium, host considerable amounts of 13 C-enriched methane, hydrogen and heavier hydrocarbons with inverse isotopic trend, which is typical of abiotic gas origin. Raman analyses are consistent with methane being occluded in widespread microfractures and porous serpentine- or chlorite-filled veins. Chromium and ruthenium may be key metal catalysts for methane production via Sabatier reaction. Chromitites may represent source rocks of abiotic methane on Earth and, potentially, on Mars.

  9. Weathering of iron sulfides under Mars surface ambient conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    The study of iron sulfide surface alternation reactions under Mars' surface ambient conditions begun during 1980 was extended through improved irradiation design and experimental protocols. A wider range of humidities and more intense irradiation were incorporated in the study. X-ray photoelectron spectra of irradiated chips suggest formation of FeSO4, FeCO3, and an iron oxide on the iron sulfide substrates studied.

  10. NO, hydrogen sulfide does not come first during tomato response to high salinity.

    PubMed

    da-Silva, Cristiane J; Mollica, Débora C F; Vicente, Mateus H; Peres, Lázaro E P; Modolo, Luzia V

    2018-06-01

    High salinity greatly impacts agriculture, particularly in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), a crop that is a model to study this abiotic stress. This work investigated whether hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) acts upstream or downstream of nitric oxide (NO) in the signaling cascade during tomato response to salt stress. An NO-donor incremented H 2 S levels by 12-18.9% while an H 2 S-donor yielded 10% more NO in roots. The NO accumulated in roots one-hour after NaCl treatment while H 2 S accumulation started two-hour later. The NO stimulated H 2 S accumulation in roots/leaves, but not the opposite (i.e H 2 S was unable to stimulate NO accumulation) two-hour post NaCl treatment. Also, NO accumulation was accompanied by an increment of transcript levels of genes that encode for H 2 S-synthesizing enzymes. Our results indicate that H 2 S acts downstream of NO in the mitigation of oxidative stress, which helps tomato plants to tolerate high salinity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. SULFIDE METHOD PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of plutonium from neutron irradiated uranium solutions. Such a solution is first treated with a soluble sullide, causing precipitation of the plutoniunn and uraniunn values present, along with those impurities which form insoluble sulfides. The precipitate is then treated with a solution of carbonate ions, which will dissolve the uranium and plutonium present while the fission product sulfides remain unaffected. After separation from the residue, this solution may then be treated by any of the usual methods, such as formation of a lanthanum fluoride precipitate, to effect separation of plutoniunn from uranium.

  12. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming; Deng, Jiushuai; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-02-01

    Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pHIEP of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, CS in the solution declined from 1000 × 10-6 mol/L to 1.4 × 10-6 mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S2- and CO32- ions.

  13. Metal Sulfides as Sensing Materials for Chemoresistive Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gaiardo, Andrea; Fabbri, Barbara; Guidi, Vincenzo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Giberti, Alessio; Gherardi, Sandro; Vanzetti, Lia; Malagù, Cesare; Zonta, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    This work aims at a broad overview of the results obtained with metal-sulfide materials in the field of chemoresistive gas sensing. Indeed, despite the well-known electrical, optical, structural and morphological features previously described in the literature, metal sulfides present lack of investigation for gas sensing applications, a field in which the metal oxides still maintain a leading role owing to their high sensitivity, low cost, small dimensions and simple integration, in spite of the wide assortment of sensing materials. However, despite their great advantages, metal oxides have shown significant drawbacks, which have led to the search for new materials for gas sensing devices. In this work, Cadmium Sulfide and Tin (IV) Sulfide were investigated as functional materials for thick-film chemoresistive gas-sensors fabrication and they were tested both in thermo- and in photo-activation modes. Furthermore, electrical characterization was carried out in order to verify their gas sensing properties and material stability, by comparing the results obtained with metal sulfides to those obtained by using their metal-oxides counterparts. The results highlighted the possibility to use metal sulfides as a novel class of sensing materials, owing to their selectivity to specific compounds, stability, and the possibility to operate at room temperature. PMID:26927120

  14. Photophysical studies of chromium sensitizers designed for excited state hole transfer to semiconductors and sequential hole/electron transfers from photoexcited cadmium sulfide nanorods to mononuclear ruthenium water-oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Huan-Wei

    a photoexcited cadmium sulfide nanorod and [Ru(diethyl 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylate)(2,2':6',2"-terpyridine)Cl] +, a mononuclear water-oxidation catalyst. Upon photoexcitation, hole transfer from the cadmium sulfide nanorod oxidizes the catalyst (Ru 2+ → Ru3+) on a 100 ps to 1 ns timescale. This is followed by electron transfer (10-100 ns) from the nanorod to reduce the Ru3+ center. The relatively slow electron transfer dynamics may provide opportunities for the accumulation of multiple holes at the catalyst, which is required for water oxidation.

  15. Atomic layer deposition of metal sulfide materials

    DOE PAGES

    Dasgupta, Neil P.; Meng, Xiangbo; Elam, Jeffrey W.; ...

    2015-01-12

    The field of nanoscience is delivering increasingly intricate yet elegant geometric structures incorporating an ever-expanding palette of materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a powerful driver of this field, providing exceptionally conformal coatings spanning the periodic table and atomic-scale precision independent of substrate geometry. This versatility is intrinsic to ALD and results from sequential and self-limiting surface reactions. This characteristic facilitates digital synthesis, in which the film grows linearly with the number of reaction cycles. While the majority of ALD processes identified to date produce metal oxides, novel applications in areas such as energy storage, catalysis, and nanophotonics are motivatingmore » interest in sulfide materials. Recent progress in ALD of sulfides has expanded the diversity of accessible materials as well as a more complete understanding of the unique chalcogenide surface chemistry. ALD of sulfide materials typically uses metalorganic precursors and hydrogen sulfide (H 2S). As in oxide ALD, the precursor chemistry is critical to controlling both the film growth and properties including roughness, crystallinity, and impurity levels. By modification of the precursor sequence, multicomponent sulfides have been deposited, although challenges remain because of the higher propensity for cation exchange reactions, greater diffusion rates, and unintentional annealing of this more labile class of materials. A deeper understanding of these surface chemical reactions has been achieved through a combination of in situ studies and quantum-chemical calculations. As this understanding matures, so does our ability to deterministically tailor film properties to new applications and more sophisticated devices. This Account highlights the attributes of ALD chemistry that are unique to metal sulfides and surveys recent applications of these materials in photovoltaics, energy storage, and photonics. Within each application

  16. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide Prolongs Postharvest Storage of Fresh-Cut Pears (Pyrus pyrifolia) by Alleviation of Oxidative Damage and Inhibition of Fungal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shuai-Ping; Wu, Jun; Li, Yan-Hong; Zheng, Ji-Lian; Han, Yi; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has proved to be a multifunctional signaling molecule in plants and animals. Here, we investigated the role of H2S in the decay of fresh-cut pears (Pyrus pyrifolia). H2S gas released by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) prolonged the shelf life of fresh-cut pear slices in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, H2S maintained higher levels of reducing sugar and soluble protein in pear slices. H2S significantly reduced the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide radicals (•O2 −) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Further investigation showed that H2S fumigation up-regulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), and guaiacol peroxidase (POD), while it down-regulated those of lipoxygenase (LOX), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO). Furthermore, H2S fumigation effectively inhibited the growth of two fungal pathogens of pear, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium expansum, suggesting that H2S can be developed as an effective fungicide for postharvest storage. The present study implies that H2S is involved in prolonging postharvest storage of pears by acting as an antioxidant and fungicide. PMID:24454881

  18. Hydrogen sulfide - cysteine cycle system enhances cadmium tolerance through alleviating cadmium-induced oxidative stress and ion toxicity in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Honglei; Wang, Xiaofeng; Dou, Yanhua; Liu, Dan; Si, Wantong; Fang, Hao; Zhao, Chen; Chen, Shaolin; Xi, Jiejun; Li, Jisheng

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a common toxic heavy metal ion. We investigated the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and cysteine (Cys) in plant responses to Cd2+ stress. The expression of H2S synthetic genes LCD and DES1 were induced by Cd2+ within 3 h, and endogenous H2S was then rapidly released. H2S promoted the expression of Cys synthesis-related genes SAT1 and OASA1, which led to endogenous Cys accumulation. The H2S and Cys cycle system was stimulated by Cd2+ stress, and it maintained high levels in plant cells. H2S inhibited the ROS burst by inducing alternative respiration capacity (AP) and antioxidase activity. H2S weakened Cd2+ toxicity by inducing the metallothionein (MTs) genes expression. Cys promoted GSH accumulation and inhibited the ROS burst, and GSH induced the expression of phytochelatin (PCs) genes, counteracting Cd2+ toxicity. In summary, the H2S and Cys cycle system played a key role in plant responses to Cd2+ stress. The Cd2+ tolerance was weakened when the cycle system was blocked in lcddes1-1 and oasa1 mutants. This paper is the first to describe the role of the H2S and Cys cycle system in Cd2+ stress and to explore the relevant and specificity mechanisms of H2S and Cys in mediating Cd2+ stress. PMID:28004782

  19. Sulfidation behavior and mechanism of zinc silicate roasted with pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yong; Peng, Ning; Xue, Ke; Min, Xiaobo; Chai, Liyuan; Pan, Qinglin; Liang, Yanjie; Xiao, Ruiyang; Wang, Yunyan; Tang, Chongjian; Liu, Hui

    2018-03-01

    Sulfidation roasting followed by flotation is widely known as a possible generic technology for enriching valuable metals in low-grade Zn-Pb oxide ores. Zn2SiO4 is the primary Zn phase in willemite. Zn4Si2O7(OH)2(H2O), the main Zn phase in hemimorphite, transforms into Zn2SiO4 at temperatures above 600 °C. To enrich the Zn in willemite and hemimorphite, the Zn species should first be converted to ZnS. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the sulfidation reaction of Zn2SiO4 during roasting with pyrite is of vital important. In this study, the sulfidation behavior and reaction mechanisms of a Zn2SiO4-pyrite roasting system were determined using HSC 5.0 software, TG-FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, XPS and SEM-EDS. The results indicate that the sulfidation process can be divided into three steps: the decomposition of pyrite and formation of a sulfur-rich environment, the sulfur-induced migration of O2- and transformation of sulfur vapor, and the sulfidation reaction via oxygen-sulfur exchange. During the sulfidation roasting process, pyrite was converted to loose and porous Fe3O4, whereas Zn2SiO4 was transformed into ZnS and SiO2 in situ. These findings provide theoretical support for controlling the sulfidation roasting process of willemite and hemimorphite.

  20. Salt lakes of Western Australia - Natural abiotic formation of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, T.; Studenroth, S.; Mulder, I.; Tubbesing, C.; Kotte, K.; Ofner, J.; Junkermann, W.; Schöler, H. F.

    2012-04-01

    Western Australia is a semi-/arid region that is heavily influenced by global climate change and agricultural land use. The area is known for its many ephemeral saline and hypersaline lakes with a wide range of hydrogeochemical parameters that have gradually changed over the last fifty years. Historically, the region was covered by eucalyptus trees and shrubs, but was cleared mainly within 10 years after WWII to make room for wheat and live stock. After the clearance of the deep rooted native plants the groundwater started to rise, bringing increased amounts of dissolved salts and minerals to the surface and discharging them into streams and lakes. Thus most of Western Australia is influenced by secondary salinisation (soil salting) [1]. Another problem is that the discharged minerals affect the pH of ground and surface water, which ranges from acidic to slightly basic. During the 2011 campaign surface water was measured with a pH between 2.5 and 7.1. Another phenomenon in Western Australia is the decrease of rainfall over the last decades assumed to be linked to the secondary salinisation. The rising saline and mineral rich groundwater increases the biotical and abiotical activity of the salt lakes. Halogenated and non-halogenated volatile organic compounds emitted from those lakes undergo fast oxidation and chemical reactions to form small particles modifying cloud microphysics and thus suppressing rain events [2]. Our objective is to gain a better understanding of this extreme environment with its hypersaline acidic lakes with regard to the potential abiotic formation of volatile organic compounds and its impact on the local climate. In spring 2011 fifty-three sediment samples from ten salt lakes in the Lake King region where taken, freeze-dried and ground. In order to simulate the abiotic formation of volatile organic compounds the soil samples were resuspended with water in gas-tight headspace vials. The headspace was measured using a purge and trap GC

  1. Dibenzyl Sulfide Metabolism by White Rot Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Wong, Eddie T.; Dettman, Heather; Gray, Murray R.; Pickard, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Microbial metabolism of organosulfur compounds is of interest in the petroleum industry for in-field viscosity reduction and desulfurization. Here, dibenzyl sulfide (DBS) metabolism in white rot fungi was studied. Trametes trogii UAMH 8156, Trametes hirsuta UAMH 8165, Phanerochaete chrysosporium ATCC 24725, Trametes versicolor IFO 30340 (formerly Coriolus sp.), and Tyromyces palustris IFO 30339 all oxidized DBS to dibenzyl sulfoxide prior to oxidation to dibenzyl sulfone. The cytochrome P-450 inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole eliminated dibenzyl sulfoxide oxidation. Laccase activity (0.15 U/ml) was detected in the Trametes cultures, and concentrated culture supernatant and pure laccase catalyzed DBS oxidation to dibenzyl sulfoxide more efficiently in the presence of 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) than in its absence. These data suggest that the first oxidation step is catalyzed by extracellular enzymes but that subsequent metabolism is cytochrome P-450 mediated. PMID:12571066

  2. Dibenzyl sulfide metabolism by white rot fungi.

    PubMed

    Van Hamme, Jonathan D; Wong, Eddie T; Dettman, Heather; Gray, Murray R; Pickard, Michael A

    2003-02-01

    Microbial metabolism of organosulfur compounds is of interest in the petroleum industry for in-field viscosity reduction and desulfurization. Here, dibenzyl sulfide (DBS) metabolism in white rot fungi was studied. Trametes trogii UAMH 8156, Trametes hirsuta UAMH 8165, Phanerochaete chrysosporium ATCC 24725, Trametes versicolor IFO 30340 (formerly Coriolus sp.), and Tyromyces palustris IFO 30339 all oxidized DBS to dibenzyl sulfoxide prior to oxidation to dibenzyl sulfone. The cytochrome P-450 inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole eliminated dibenzyl sulfoxide oxidation. Laccase activity (0.15 U/ml) was detected in the Trametes cultures, and concentrated culture supernatant and pure laccase catalyzed DBS oxidation to dibenzyl sulfoxide more efficiently in the presence of 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) than in its absence. These data suggest that the first oxidation step is catalyzed by extracellular enzymes but that subsequent metabolism is cytochrome P-450 mediated.

  3. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of a range of alkyl sulfides by a denitrifying marine bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Visscher, P.T.; Taylor, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of a bacterium was obtained from a marine microbial mat by using an anoxic medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and nitrate. The isolate grew aerobically or anaerobically as a denitrifier on alkyl sulfides, including DMS, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl sulfide (DES), ethyl methyl sulfide, dipropyl sulfide, dibutyl sulfide, and dibutyl disulfide. Cells grown on an alkyl sulfide or disulfide also oxidized the corresponding thiols, namely, methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, or butanethiol. Alkyl sulfides were metabolized by induced or derepressed cells with oxygen, nitrate, or nitrite as electron acceptor. Cells grown on DMS immediately metabolized DMS, but there was a lag before DES was consumed; with DES-grown cells, DES was immediately used but DMS was used only after a lag. Chloramphenicol prevented the eventual use of DES by DMS-grown cells and DMS use by DES-grown cells, respectively, indicating separate enzymes for the metabolism of methyl and ethyl groups. Growth was rapid on formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate but slow on methanol. The organism also grew chemolithotrophically on thiosulfate with a decrease in pH; growth required carbonate in the medium. Growth on sulfide was also carbonate dependent but slow. The isolate was identified as a Thiobacillus sp. and designated strain ASN-1. It may have utility for removing alkyl sulfides, and also nitrate, nitrite, and sulfide, from wastewaters.

  4. Sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced skin injury involves DNA damage and induction of inflammatory mediators, in part via oxidative stress, in SKH-1 hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Gu, Mallikarjuna; Inturi, Swetha; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2011-09-10

    Bifunctional alkyalating agent, sulfur mustard (SM)-induced cutaneous injury is characterized by inflammation and delayed blistering. Our recent studies demonstrated that 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM that can be used in laboratory settings, induces oxidative stress. This could be the major cause of the activation of Akt/MAP kinase and AP1/NF-κB pathways that are linked to the inflammation and microvesication, and histopathological alterations in SKH-1 hairless mouse skin. To further establish a link between CEES-induced DNA damage and signaling pathways and inflammatory responses, skin samples from mice exposed to 2 mg or 4 mg CEES for 9-48 h were subjected to molecular analysis. Our results show a strong CEES-induced phosphorylation of H2A.X and an increase in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible NOS (iNOS), and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels, indicating the involvement of DNA damage and inflammation in CEES-induced skin injury in male and female mice. Since, our recent studies showed reduction in CEES-induced inflammatory responses by glutathione (GSH), we further assessed the role of oxidative stress in CEES-related DNA damage and the induction of inflammatory molecules. Oral GSH (300 mg/kg) administration 1h before CEES exposure attenuated the increase in both CEES-induced H2A.X phosphorylation (59%) as well as expression of COX-2 (68%), iNOS (53%) and MMP-9 (54%). Collectively, our results indicate that CEES-induced skin injury involves DNA damage and an induction of inflammatory mediators, at least in part via oxidative stress. This study could help in identifying countermeasures that alone or in combination, can target the unveiled pathways for reducing skin injury in humans by SM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced skin injury involves DNA damage and induction of inflammatory mediators, in part via oxidative stress, in SKH-1 hairless mouse skin

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K.; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Gu, Mallikarjuna; Inturi, Swetha; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Bifunctional alkyalating agent, Sulfur mustard (SM)-caused cutaneous injury is characterized by inflammation and delayed blistering. Our recent studies demonstrated that 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM that can be used in laboratory settings, induces oxidative stress. This could be the major cause of the activation of Akt/MAP kinase and AP1/NF-κB pathways that are linked to the inflammation and microvesication, and histopathological alterations in SKH-1 hairless mouse skin. To further establish a link between CEES-induced DNA damage and signaling pathways and inflammatory responses, skin samples from mice exposed to 2 or 4 mg CEES for 9–48 h were subjected to molecular analysis. Our results show a strong CEES-induced phosphorylation of H2A.X and an increase in COX-2, iNOS, and MMP-9 levels, indicating the involvement of DNA damage and inflammation in CEES-caused skin injury in male and female mice. Since, our recent studies showed reduction in CEES-induced inflammatory responses by glutathione (GSH), we further assessed the role of oxidative stress in CEES-caused DNA damage and the induction of inflammatory molecules. Oral GSH (300mg/kg) administration 1 h before CEES exposure attenuated the increase in both CEES-induced H2A.X phosphorylation (59%) as well as expression of COX-2 (68%), iNOS (53%) and MMP-9 (54%). Collectively, our results indicate that CEES-induced skin injuries involve DNA damage and an induction of inflammatory mediators, at least in part via oxidative stress. This study could help in identifying countermeasures that alone or in combination, can target the unveiled pathways for reducing skin injuries in humans by SM. PMID:21722719

  6. Electrochemical sulfide removal and caustic recovery from spent caustic streams.

    PubMed

    Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Provijn, Thomas; Prévoteau, Antonin; Pikaar, Ilje; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-04-01

    Spent caustic streams (SCS) are produced during alkaline scrubbing of sulfide containing sour gases. Conventional methods mainly involve considerable chemical dosing or energy expenditures entailing high cost but limited benefits. Here we propose an electrochemical treatment approach involving anodic sulfide oxidation preferentially to sulfur coupled to cathodic caustic recovery using a two-compartment electrochemical system. Batch experiments showed sulfide removal efficiencies of 84 ± 4% with concomitant 57 ± 4% efficient caustic production in the catholyte at a final concentration of 6.4 ± 0.1 wt% NaOH (1.6 M) at an applied current density of 100 A m(-2). Subsequent long-term continuous experiments showed that stable cell voltages (i.e. 2.7 ± 0.1 V) as well as constant sulfide removal efficiencies of 67 ± 5% at a loading rate of 47 g(S) L(-1) h(-1) were achieved over a period of 77 days. Caustic was produced at industrially relevant strengths for scrubbing (i.e. 5.1 ± 0.9 wt% NaOH) at current efficiencies of 96 ± 2%. Current density between 0 and 200 A m(-2) and sulfide loading rates of 50-200 g(S) L(-1) d(-1) were tested. The higher the current density the more oxidized the sulfur species produced and the higher the sulfide oxidation. On the contrary, high loading rate resulted in a reduction of sulfide oxidation efficiency. The results obtained in this study together with engineering calculations show that the proposed process could represent a cost-effective approach for sodium and sulfur recovery from SCS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The hydrogen sulfide metabolite trimethylsulfonium is found in human urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajin, Bassam; Francesconi, Kevin A.

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is the third and most recently discovered gaseous signaling molecule following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, playing important roles both in normal physiological conditions and disease progression. The trimethylsulfonium ion (TMS) can result from successive methylation reactions of hydrogen sulfide. No report exists so far about the presence or quantities of TMS in human urine. We developed a method for determining TMS in urine using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-QQQ), and applied the method to establish the urinary levels of TMS in a group of human volunteers. The measured urinary levels of TMS were in the nanomolar range, which is commensurate with the steady-state tissue concentrations of hydrogen sulfide previously reported in the literature. The developed method can be used in future studies for the quantification of urinary TMS as a potential biomarker for hydrogen sulfide body pools.

  8. Microbial acceleration of aerobic pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH.

    PubMed

    Percak-Dennett, E; He, S; Converse, B; Konishi, H; Xu, H; Corcoran, A; Noguera, D; Chan, C; Bhattacharyya, A; Borch, T; Boyd, E; Roden, E E

    2017-09-01

    Pyrite (FeS 2 ) is the most abundant sulfide mineral on Earth and represents a significant reservoir of reduced iron and sulfur both today and in the geologic past. In modern environments, oxidative transformations of pyrite and other metal sulfides play a key role in terrestrial element partitioning with broad impacts to contaminant mobility and the formation of acid mine drainage systems. Although the role of aerobic micro-organisms in pyrite oxidation under acidic-pH conditions is well known, to date there is very little known about the capacity for aerobic micro-organisms to oxidize pyrite at circumneutral pH. Here, we describe two enrichment cultures, obtained from pyrite-bearing subsurface sediments, that were capable of sustained cell growth linked to pyrite oxidation and sulfate generation at neutral pH. The cultures were dominated by two Rhizobiales species (Bradyrhizobium sp. and Mesorhizobium sp.) and a Ralstonia species. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing and genome reconstruction indicated the presence of Fe and S oxidation pathways in these organisms, and the presence of a complete Calvin-Benson-Bassham CO 2 fixation system in the Bradyrhizobium sp. Oxidation of pyrite resulted in thin (30-50 nm) coatings of amorphous Fe(III) oxide on the pyrite surface, with no other secondary Fe or S phases detected by electron microscopy or X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Rates of microbial pyrite oxidation were approximately one order of magnitude higher than abiotic rates. These results demonstrate the ability of aerobic microbial activity to accelerate pyrite oxidation and expand the potential contribution of micro-organisms to continental sulfide mineral weathering around the time of the Great Oxidation Event to include neutral-pH environments. In addition, our findings have direct implications for the geochemistry of modern sedimentary environments, including stimulation of the early stages of acid mine drainage formation and mobilization of pyrite

  9. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-16

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H(2)S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H(2)S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC(50)s of 45.5 ± 2.5, 19.7 ± 3.3, and 7.7 ± 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G(0)/G(1) cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Microbiological Leaching of Metallic Sulfides

    PubMed Central

    Razzell, W. E.; Trussell, P. C.

    1963-01-01

    The percentage of chalcopyrite leached in percolators by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was dependent on the surface area of the ore but not on the amount. Typical examples of ore leaching, which demonstrate the role of the bacteria, are presented. In stationary fermentations, changes in KH2PO4 concentration above or below 0.1% decreased copper leaching as did reduction in the MgSO4·7H2O and increase in the (NH4)2SO4 concentration. Bacterial leaching of chalcopyrite was more effective than nonbiological leaching with ferric sulfate; ferric sulfate appeared to retard biological leaching, but this effect was likely caused by formation of an insoluble copper-iron complex. Ferrous sulfate and sodium chloride singly accentuated both bacterial and nonbiological leaching of chalcocite but jointly depressed bacterial action. Sodium chloride appeared to block bacterial iron oxidation without interfering with sulfide oxidation. Bacterial leaching of millerite, bornite, and chalcocite was greatest at pH 2.5. The economics of leaching a number of British Columbia ore bodies was discussed. PMID:16349627

  11. ELECTROCHEMICAL DETERMINATION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AT CARBON NANOTUBE MODIFIED ELECTRODES. (R830900)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) modified glassy carbon electrodes exhibiting a strong and stable electrocatalytic response towards sulfide are described. A substantial (400 mV) decrease in the overvoltage of the sulfide oxidation reaction (compared to ordinary carbon electrodes) is...

  12. The Determination of Hydrogen Sulfide in Stack Gases, Iodometric Titration After Sulfite Removal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robles, E. G.

    The determination of hydrogen sulfide in effluents from coal-fired furnaces and incinerators is complicated by the presence of sulfur oxides (which form acids). Organic compounds also may interfere with or prevent the formation of the cadmium sulfide precipitate or give false positive results because of reaction with iodine. The report presents a…

  13. Volcanogenic massive sulfide occurrence model: Chapter C in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Koski, Randolph A.; Mosier, Dan L.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Slack, John F.; Ridley, W. Ian; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Seal, Robert R.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Shanks, W.C. Pat; Thurston, Roland

    2012-01-01

    An unusual feature of VMS deposits is the common association of stratiform "exhalative" deposits precipitated from hydrothermal fluids emanating into bottom waters. These deposits may extend well beyond the margins of massive sulfide and are typically composed of silica, iron, and manganese oxides, carbonates, sulfates, sulfides, and tourmaline.

  14. Review of recent transgenic studies on abiotic stress tolerance and future molecular breeding in potato.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Akira; Huynh, Huu Duc; Endo, Tsukasa; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    Global warming has become a major issue within the last decade. Traditional breeding programs for potato have focused on increasing productivity and quality and disease resistance, thus, modern cultivars have limited tolerance of abiotic stresses. The introgression of abiotic stress tolerance into modern cultivars is essential work for the future. Recently, many studies have investigated abiotic stress using transgenic techniques. This manuscript focuses on the study of abiotic stress, in particular drought, salinity and low temperature, during this century. Dividing studies into these three stress categories for this review was difficult. Thus, based on the study title and the transgene property, transgenic studies were classified into five categories in this review; oxidative scavengers, transcriptional factors, and above three abiotic categories. The review focuses on studies that investigate confer of stress tolerance and the identification of responsible factors, including wild relatives. From a practical application perspective, further evaluation of transgenic potato with abiotic stress tolerance is required. Although potato plants, including wild species, have a large potential for abiotic stress tolerance, exploration of the factors responsible for conferring this tolerance is still developing. Molecular breeding, including genetic engineering and conventional breeding using DNA markers, is expected to develop in the future.

  15. Diffusible gas transmitter signaling in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus: identification of the biosynthetic enzymes of nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using a de novo assembled transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Andrew E.; Fontanilla, Tiana M.; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C.; Lenz, Petra H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurochemical signaling is a major component of physiological/behavioral control throughout the animal kingdom. Gas transmitters are perhaps the most ancient class of molecules used by nervous systems for chemical communication. Three gases are generally recognized as being produced by neurons: nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As part of an ongoing effort to identify and characterize the neurochemical signaling systems of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton in much of the North Atlantic Ocean, we have mined a de novo assembled transcriptome for sequences encoding the neuronal biosynthetic enzymes of these gases, i.e. nitric oxide synthase (NOS), heme oxygenase (HO) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), respectively. Using Drosophila proteins as queries, two NOS-, one HO-, and one CBS-encoding transcripts were identified. Reverse BLAST and structural analyses of the deduced proteins suggest that each is a true member of its respective enzyme family. RNA-Seq data collected from embryos, early nauplii, late nauplii, early copepodites, late copepodites and adults revealed the expression of each transcript to be stage specific: one NOS restricted primarily to the embryo and the other was absent in the embryo but expressed in all other stages, no CBS expression in the embryo, but present in all other stages, and HO expressed across all developmental stages. Given the importance of gas transmitters in the regulatory control of a number of physiological processes, these data open opportunities for investigating the roles these proteins play under different life-stage and environmental conditions in this ecologically important species. PMID:24747481

  16. Enhanced performance of denitrifying sulfide removal process under micro-aerobic condition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-07-15

    The denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process with bio-granules comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide and acetate into di-nitrogen gas, elementary sulfur and carbon dioxide, respectively, at high loading rates. This study determines the reaction rate of sulfide oxidized into sulfur, as well as the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, would be enhanced under a micro-aerobic condition. The presence of limited oxygen mitigated the inhibition effects of sulfide on denitrifier activities, and enhanced the performance of DSR granules. The advantages and disadvantages of applying the micro-aerobic condition to the DSR process are discussed. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sulfide-driven arsenic mobilization from arsenopyrite and black shale pyrite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, W.; Young, L.Y.; Yee, N.; Serfes, M.; Rhine, E.D.; Reinfelder, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that sulfide drives arsenic mobilization from pyritic black shale by a sulfide-arsenide exchange and oxidation reaction in which sulfide replaces arsenic in arsenopyrite forming pyrite, and arsenide (As-1) is concurrently oxidized to soluble arsenite (As+3). This hypothesis was tested in a series of sulfide-arsenide exchange experiments with arsenopyrite (FeAsS), homogenized black shale from the Newark Basin (Lockatong formation), and pyrite isolated from Newark Basin black shale incubated under oxic (21% O2), hypoxic (2% O2, 98% N2), and anoxic (5% H2, 95% N2) conditions. The oxidation state of arsenic in Newark Basin black shale pyrite was determined using X-ray absorption-near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). Incubation results show that sulfide (1 mM initial concentration) increases arsenic mobilization to the dissolved phase from all three solids under oxic and hypoxic, but not anoxic conditions. Indeed under oxic and hypoxic conditions, the presence of sulfide resulted in the mobilization in 48 h of 13-16 times more arsenic from arsenopyrite and 6-11 times more arsenic from isolated black shale pyrite than in sulfide-free controls. XANES results show that arsenic in Newark Basin black shale pyrite has the same oxidation state as that in FeAsS (-1) and thus extend the sulfide-arsenide exchange mechanism of arsenic mobilization to sedimentary rock, black shale pyrite. Biologically active incubations of whole black shale and its resident microorganisms under sulfate reducing conditions resulted in sevenfold higher mobilization of soluble arsenic than sterile controls. Taken together, our results indicate that sulfide-driven arsenic mobilization would be most important under conditions of redox disequilibrium, such as when sulfate-reducing bacteria release sulfide into oxic groundwater, and that microbial sulfide production is expected to enhance arsenic mobilization in sedimentary rock aquifers with major pyrite-bearing, black

  18. Draft genome sequence of Bosea sp. WAO an arsenite and sulfide oxidizer isolated from a pyrite rock outcrop in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Alexandra B; Yee, Nathan; Young, Lily Y

    2018-01-01

    This genome report describes the draft genome and physiological characteristics of Bosea sp. WAO (=DSM 102914), a novel strain of the genus Bosea in the family Bradyrhizobiaceae . Bosea sp. WAO was isolated from pulverized pyritic shale containing elevated levels of arsenic. This aerobic, gram negative microorganism is capable of facultative chemolithoautotrophic growth under aerobic conditions by oxidizing the electron donors arsenite, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, polysulfide, and amorphous sulfur. The draft genome is of a single circular chromosome 6,125,776 bp long consisting of 21 scaffolds with a G + C content of 66.84%. A total 5727 genes were predicted of which 5665 or 98.92% are protein-coding genes and 62 RNA genes. We identified the genes aioA and aioB , which encode the large and small subunits of the arsenic oxidase respectively. We also identified the genes for the complete sulfur oxidation pathway sox which is used to oxidize thiosulfate to sulfate.

  19. Co-settling of Chromite and Sulfide Melt Droplets and Trace Element Partitioning between Sulfide and Silicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoochehri, S.; Schmidt, M. W.; Guenther, D.

    2013-12-01

    both, the nucleation of newly formed sulfide droplets and the interconnectivity of separate droplets. The interfacial energies between sulfide melt and silicate or oxide crystals is even higher than for silicate melt, consequently in experiments with chromite, sulfide segregation is even more hindered. Partition coefficients of 50 elements between a sulfide and a silicate melt are determined as a function of differing temperature between 1250 - 1380 °C. As a proxy to investigate the bond strength of network modifier cations, the relation between the partition coefficients and ionic potentials of different groups of elements has been determined.

  20. Cortex proliferation in the root is a protective mechanism against abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongchang

    2015-01-01

    Although as an organ the root plays a pivotal role in nutrient and water uptake as well anchorage, individual cell types function distinctly. Cortex is regarded as the least differentiated cell type in the root, but little is known about its role in plant growth and physiology. In recent studies, we found that cortex proliferation can be induced by oxidative stress. Since all types of abiotic stress lead to oxidative stress, this finding suggests a role for cortex in coping with abiotic stress. This hypothesis was tested in this study using the spy mutant, which has an extra layer of cortex in the root. Interestingly, the spy mutant was shown to be hypersensitive to salt and oxidizing reagent applied to the leaves, but it was as tolerant as the wild type to these compounds in the soil. This result lends support to the notion that cortex has a protective role against abiotic stress arising from the soil.

  1. Iron sulfide deposits at Wadi Wassat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, R.J.; Rossman, D.L.; Bagdady, A.Y.; Conway, C.M.; Helaby, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    Massive and disseminated iron sulfide deposits in Wadi Wassat form lenticular, stratabound deposits in cherty Precambrian sedimentary rocks interlayered with Precambrian calcareous sedimentary rocks, pyroclastic rocks, and andesitic flow rocks. These rocks have been cut by a wide variety of plutonic and dike rocks including gabbro, diorite, granodiorite, diabase, rhyolite, and granite. The zone containing the sulfide lenses is nearly 16 km long and is cut off by granitic rocks at both the northern and southern ends. The lenses are as much as 200 m thick; one can be traced along strike for more than 4 km. The lenses consist mostly of iron sulfides. Pyrite is the principal sulfide mineral; near intrusive bodies the pyrite has been partially converted to pyrrhotite and locally mobilized into fractures. The sulfides have been oxidized to a depth of about 25 m. Preliminary calculations indicate that about 107,500,000 tons of sulfides, averaging 40 percent iron and 35 percent sulfur, are available to a depth of i00 m. Small amounts of nickel, cobalt, zinc, and copper are also present, but at metal prices prevailing in early 1981, these do not constitute significant resources.

  2. Low-oxygen and chemical kinetic constraints on the geochemical niche of neutrophilic iron(II) oxidizing microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschel, Gregory K.; Emerson, David; Sutka, R.; Suchecki, P.; Luther, George W., III

    2008-07-01

    Neutrophilic iron oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) must actively compete with rapid abiotic processes governing Fe(II) oxidation and as a result have adapted to primarily inhabit low-O 2 environments where they can more successfully compete with abiotic Fe(II) oxidation. The spatial distribution of these microorganisms can be observed through the chemical gradients they affect, as measured using in situ voltammetric analysis for dissolved Fe(II), Fe(III), O 2, and FeS (aq). Field and laboratory determination of the chemical environments inhabited by the FeOB were coupled with detailed kinetic competition studies for abiotic and biotic oxidation processes using a pure culture of FeOB to quantify the geochemical niche these organisms inhabit. In gradient culture tubes, the maximum oxygen levels, which were associated with growth bands of Sideroxydans lithotrophicus (ES-1, a novel FeOB), were 15-50 μM. Kinetic measurements made on S. lithotrophicus compared biotic/abiotic (killed control) Fe oxidation rates. The biotic rate can be a significant and measurable fraction of the total Fe oxidation rate below O 2 concentrations of approximately 50 μM, but biotic Fe(II) oxidation (via the biotic/abiotic rate comparison) becomes difficult to detect at higher O 2 levels. These results are further supported by observations of conditions supporting FeOB communities in field settings. Variablity in cell densities and cellular activity as well as variations in hydrous ferrous oxide mineral quantities significantly affect the laboratory kinetic rates. The microbial habitat (or geochemical niche) where FeOB are active is thus largely controlled by the competition between abiotic and biotic kinetics, which are dependent on Fe(II) concentration, P O2, temperature and pH in addition to the surface area of hydrous ferric oxide minerals and the cell density/activity of FeOB. Additional field and lab culture observations suggest a potentially important role for the iron-sulfide aqueous

  3. Sulfide bonded atomic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.

    2017-09-01

    The bonded radius, r b(S), of the S atom, calculated for first- and second-row non-transition metal sulfide crystals and third-row transition metal sulfide molecules and crystals indicates that the radius of the sulfur atom is not fixed as traditionally assumed, but that it decreases systematically along the bond paths of the bonded atoms with decreasing bond length as observed in an earlier study of the bonded radius of the oxygen atom. When bonded to non-transition metal atoms, r b(S) decreases systematically with decreasing bond length from 1.68 Å when the S atom is bonded to the electropositive VINa atom to 1.25 Å when bonded to the more electronegative IVP atom. In the case of transition metal atoms, rb(S) likewise decreases with decreasing bond length from 1.82 Å when bonded to Cu and to 1.12 Å when bonded to Fe. As r b(S) is not fixed at a given value but varies substantially depending on the bond length and the field strength of the bonded atoms, it is apparent that sets of crystal and atomic sulfide atomic radii based on an assumed fixed radius for the sulfur atom are satisfactory in that they reproduce bond lengths, on the one hand, whereas on the other, they are unsatisfactory in that they fail to define the actual sizes of the bonded atoms determined in terms of the minima in the electron density between the atoms. As such, we urge that the crystal chemistry and the properties of sulfides be studied in terms of the bond lengths determined by adding the radii of either the atomic and crystal radii of the atoms but not in terms of existing sets of crystal and atomic radii. After all, the bond lengths were used to determine the radii that were experimentally determined, whereas the individual radii were determined on the basis of an assumed radius for the sulfur atom.

  4. Abiotic controls on N2O emissions from soils and wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    The increase in atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) is a critical climate change issue contributing to global warming. Most studies on N2O production attribute microbial processes and their associated enzymatic reactions to be the main driver affecting emissions. The role of redox capable iron, manganese and organic compounds that can react with intermediates in the nitrogen cycle has also been shown to produce N2O abiotically. The importance of the abiotic pathways, however, is highly debated. The abiotic production of N2O is related to biophysiochemical controls and unique isotopic signatures of nitrogen cycle intermediates (hydroxylamine, nitric oxide, and nitrite), redox-active metals (iron and manganese) and organic matter (humic and fulvic acids). In a range of soils, we find that the iron directly associated with organic compounds is the strongest variable relating to N2O emissions. In addition to these factors, management is also assumed to affect abiotic N2O production through its impact on nitrogen cycle intermediates, but the environmental and physiochemical conditions that are changed by management are rarely considered in the abiotic production of N2O. We find that the amount and quality of organic compounds in soils directly determines the fate of soil N2O production (i.e. be emitted or consumed). Water depth in rice paddies and wetlands also plays a significant role in partitioning production and consumption of N2O. What is evident from studies on N2O emission is that abiotic reactions are coupled to biotic processes and they cannot be easily separated. The biotic/abiotic interactions have important ecological outcomes that influence abiotic production mechanisms and should be recognized as important controllers of N2O production and consumption processes in soils and sediments.

  5. Effect of sulfide on As(III) and As(V) sequestration by ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhixi; Wang, Shaofeng; Jia, Yongfeng

    2017-10-01

    The sulfide-induced change in arsenic speciation is often coupled to iron geochemical processes, including redox reaction, adsorption/desorption and precipitation/dissolution. Knowledge about how sulfide influenced the coupled geochemistry of iron and arsenic was not explored well up to now. In this work, retention and mobilization of As(III) and As(V) on ferrihydrite in sulfide-rich environment was studied. The initial oxidation states of arsenic and the contact order of sulfide notably influenced arsenic sequestration on ferrihydrite. For As(III) systems, pre-sulfidation of As(III) decreased arsenic sequestration mostly. The arsenic adsorption capacity decreased about 50% in comparison with the system without sulfide addition. For As(V) systems, pre-sulfidation of ferrihydrite decreased 30% sequestration of arsenic on ferrihydrite. Reduction of ferrihydrite by sulfide in As(V) system was higher than that in As(III) system. Geochemical modeling calculations identified formation of thioarsenite in the pre-sulfidation of As(III) system. Formation of arsenic thioanions enhanced As solubility in the pre-sulfidation of As(III) system. The high concentration of sulfide and Fe(II) in pre-sulfidation of ferrihydrite system contributed to saturation of FeS. This supplied new solid phase to immobilize soluble arsenic in aqueous phase. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) of sulfur K-edge, arsenic K-edge and iron L-edge analysis gave the consistent evidence for the sulfidation reaction of arsenic and ferrihydrite under specific geochemical settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Temperature and cell-type dependency of sulfide effects on mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Groeger, Michael; Matallo, Jose; McCook, Oscar; Wagner, Florian; Wachter, Ulrich; Bastian, Olga; Gierer, Saskia; Reich, Vera; Stahl, Bettina; Huber-Lang, Markus; Szabó, Csaba; Georgieff, Michael; Radermacher, Peter; Calzia, Enrico; Wagner, Katja

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies suggest that sulfide-induced inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase (cCox) and, consequently, the metabolic and toxic effects of sulfide are less pronounced at low body temperature. Because the temperature-dependent effects of sulfide on the inflammatory response are still a matter of debate, we investigated the impact of varying temperature on the cCox excess capacity and the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation by the sulfide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase in macrophage-derived cell lines (AMJ2-C11 and RAW 264.7). Using an oxygraph chamber, the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration was measured by stepwise titrations with sulfide and the nonmetabolizable cCox inhibitor sodium azide at 25°C and 37°C. Using the latter of the two inhibitors, the excess capacity of the cCox was obtained. Furthermore, we quantified the capacity of these cells to withstand sulfide inhibition by measuring the amount required to inhibit respiration by 50% and 90% and the viability of the cells after 24-h exposure to 100 ppm of hydrogen sulfide. At low titration rates, the AMJ2-C11 cells, but not the RAW 264.7 cells, increased their capacity to withstand exogenously added sulfide. This effect was even greater at 25°C than at 37°C. Furthermore, only the AMJ2-C11 cells remained viable after sulfide exposure for 24 h. In contrast, only in the RAW 264.7 cells that an increase in cCox excess capacity was found at low temperatures. In macrophage-derived cell lines, both the excess capacity of cCox and the efficiency of sulfide elimination may increase at low temperatures. These properties may modify the effects of sulfide in immune cells and, potentially, the inflammatory response during sulfide exposure at different body temperatures.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) attenuates uranium-induced acute nephrotoxicity through oxidative stress and inflammatory response via Nrf2-NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jifang; Zhao, Tingting; Yuan, Yan; Hu, Nan; Tang, Xiaoqing

    2015-12-05

    As an endogenous gaseous mediator, H2S exerts anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects in kidneys. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of H2S against uranium-induced nephrotoxicity in adult SD male rats after in vivo effect of uranium on endogenous H2S formation was explored in kidneys. The levels of endogenous H2S and H2S-producing enzymes (CBS and CSE) were measured in renal homogenates from rats intoxicated by an intraperitoneally (i.p.) injection of uranyl acetate at a single dose of 2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg. In rats injected i.p. with uranyl acetate (5 mg/kg) or NaHS (an H2S donor, 28 or 56 μmol/kg) alone or in combination, we determined biochemical parameters and histopathological alteration to assess kidney function, examined oxidative stress markers, and investigated Nrf2 and NF-κB pathways in kidney homogenates. The results suggest that uranium intoxication in rats decreased endogenous H2S generation as well as CBS and CSE protein expression. NaHS administration in uranium-intoxicated rats ameliorated the renal biochemical indices and histopathological effects, lowered MDA accumulation, and restored GSH level and anti-oxidative enzymes activities like SOD, CAT, GPx and GST. NaHS treatment in uranium-intoxicated rats activated uranium-inhibited protein expression and nuclear translocation of transcription factor Nrf2, which increased protein expression of downstream target-Nrf2 genes HO-1, NQO-1, GCLC, and TXNRD-1. NaHS administration in uranium-intoxicated rats inhibited uranium-induced nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of transcription factor κB/p65, which decreased protein expression of target-p65 inflammatory genes TNF-α, iNOS, and COX-2. Taken together, these data implicate that H2S can afford protection to rat kidneys against uranium-induced adverse effects through induction of antioxidant defense by activating Nrf2 pathway and reduction of inflammatory response by suppressing NF-κB pathway

  8. Surface Charge Development on Transition Metal Sulfides: An Electrokinetic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebie, Joakim; Schoonen, Martin A. A.; Fuhrmann, Mark; Strongin, Daniel R.

    1998-02-01

    The isoelectric points, pH i.e.p., of ZnS, PbS, CuFeS 2, FeS, FeS 2, NiS 2, CoS 2, and MnS 2 in NaCl supported electrolyte solutions are estimated to be between pH 3.3 and 0.6, with most of the isoelectric points below pH 2. The first electrokinetic measurements on NiS 2, CoS 2, and MnS 2 are reported here. Below pH i.e.p. the metal-sulfide surfaces are positively charged, above pH i.e.p. the surfaces are negatively charged. The addition of Me 2+ ions shifts the pH i.e.p. and changes the pH dependence considerably. The isoelectric points of the measured transition metal sulfides in the absence of metal ions or dissolved sulfide (H 2S or HS -) are in agreement with those found in earlier studies. The pH range of observed isoelectric points for metal sulfides (0.6-3.3) is compared to the considerably wider pH i.e.p. range (2-12) found for oxides. The correlation between pH i.e.p. and the electronegativities of the metal sulfides suggests that all metal sulfides will have an isoelectric point between pH 0.6 and 3.3. Compared to metal oxides, sulfides exhibit an isoelectric point that is largely independent of the nature of the metal cation in the solid.

  9. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Norio; Enomoto, Takafumi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium (IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets. Titania works as a photocatalyst to dissociate liquid water in this process. This mechanism offers a different source of a possibility of abiotic oxygen in atmospheres of exoplanets from previously considered photodissociation of water vapor in upper atmospheres by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light. Our order-of-magnitude estimation shows that possible amounts of oxygen produced by this abiotic mechanism can be comparable with or even more than that in the atmosphere of the current Earth, depending on the amount of active surface area for this mechanism. We conclude that titania may act as a potential source of false signs of life on habitable exoplanets. PMID:26354078

  10. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Narita, Norio; Enomoto, Takafumi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-09-10

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium (IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets. Titania works as a photocatalyst to dissociate liquid water in this process. This mechanism offers a different source of a possibility of abiotic oxygen in atmospheres of exoplanets from previously considered photodissociation of water vapor in upper atmospheres by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light. Our order-of-magnitude estimation shows that possible amounts of oxygen produced by this abiotic mechanism can be comparable with or even more than that in the atmosphere of the current Earth, depending on the amount of active surface area for this mechanism. We conclude that titania may act as a potential source of false signs of life on habitable exoplanets.

  11. Kelvin probe imaging of photo-injected electrons in metal oxide nanosheets from metal sulfide quantum dots under remote photochromic coloration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, A.; Yin, G.; Srinivasan, N.; Atarashi, D.; Sakai, E.; Miyauchi, M.

    2015-07-01

    Metal oxide and quantum dot (QD) heterostructures have attracted considerable recent attention as materials for developing efficient solar cells, photocatalysts, and display devices, thus nanoscale imaging of trapped electrons in these heterostructures provides important insight for developing efficient devices. In the present study, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) of CdS quantum dot (QD)-grafted Cs4W11O362- nanosheets was performed before and after visible-light irradiation. After visible-light excitation of the CdS QDs, the Cs4W11O362- nanosheet surface exhibited a decreased work function in the vicinity of the junction with CdS QDs, even though the Cs4W11O362- nanosheet did not absorb visible light. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that W5+ species were formed in the nanosheet after visible-light irradiation. These results demonstrated that excited electrons in the CdS QDs were injected and trapped in the Cs4W11O362- nanosheet to form color centers. Further, the CdS QDs and Cs4W11O362- nanosheet composite films exhibited efficient remote photochromic coloration, which was attributed to the quantum nanostructure of the film. Notably, the responsive wavelength of the material is tunable by adjusting the size of QDs, and the decoloration rate is highly efficient, as the required length for trapped electrons to diffuse into the nanosheet surface is very short owing to its nanoscale thickness. The unique properties of this photochromic device make it suitable for display or memory applications. In addition, the methodology described in the present study for nanoscale imaging is expected to aid in the understanding of electron transport and trapping processes in metal oxide and metal chalcogenide heterostructure, which are crucial phenomena in QD-based solar cells and/or photocatalytic water-splitting systems.Metal oxide and quantum dot (QD) heterostructures have attracted considerable recent attention as materials for developing efficient solar cells

  12. Effects of the capping ligands, linkers and oxide surface on the electron injection mechanism of copper sulfide quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Javier Amaya; Plata, Jose J; Márquez, Antonio M; Sanz, Javier Fdez

    2017-06-07

    Quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, QDSCs, are a clean and effective alternative to fossil fuels to reduce CO 2 emissions. However, the different components that constitute the QDSCs and the difficulty of isolating experimentally their effects on the performance of the whole system slow down the development of more efficient devices. In this work, DFT calculations are combined with a bottom-up approach to differentiate the effect of each component on the electronic structure and absorption spectra. First, Cu 2 S QDs were built including a U parameter to effectively describe the localization of electrons. The effect of capping agents is addressed using ligands with different electron-donating/withdrawing groups. The role of linkers and their adsorption on the oxide surface are also examined. Finally, we propose a main indirect electron injection mechanism based on the position of the peaks of the spectra.

  13. Complete genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic thiosulfate and sulfide-oxidizing γ-proteobacterium Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum type strain ALM 1 (DSM 14477 T)

    DOE PAGES

    Kappler, Ulrike; Davenport, Karen W.; Beatson, Scott; ...

    2016-06-03

    Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum (Sorokin et al. 2002) is a member of the family Piscirickettsiaceae in the order Thiotrichales. The -proteobacterium belongs to the colourless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from saline soda lakes with stable alkaline pH, such as Lake Mono (California) and Soap Lake (Washington State). Strain ALM 1 T is characterized by its adaptation to life in the oxic/anoxic interface towards the less saline aerobic waters (mixolimnion) of the stable stratified alkaline salt lakes. Strain ALM 1 T is the first representative of the genus Thioalkalimicrobium whose genome sequence has been deciphered and the fourth genome sequence of a type strainmore » of the Piscirickettsiaceae to be published. As a result, the 1,932,455 bp long chromosome with its 1,684 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2008.« less

  14. Complete genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic thiosulfate and sulfide-oxidizing γ-proteobacterium Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum type strain ALM 1 (DSM 14477 T)

    SciTech Connect

    Kappler, Ulrike; Davenport, Karen W.; Beatson, Scott

    Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum (Sorokin et al. 2002) is a member of the family Piscirickettsiaceae in the order Thiotrichales. The -proteobacterium belongs to the colourless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from saline soda lakes with stable alkaline pH, such as Lake Mono (California) and Soap Lake (Washington State). Strain ALM 1 T is characterized by its adaptation to life in the oxic/anoxic interface towards the less saline aerobic waters (mixolimnion) of the stable stratified alkaline salt lakes. Strain ALM 1 T is the first representative of the genus Thioalkalimicrobium whose genome sequence has been deciphered and the fourth genome sequence of a type strainmore » of the Piscirickettsiaceae to be published. As a result, the 1,932,455 bp long chromosome with its 1,684 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2008.« less

  15. Hydrogen Sulfide Suppresses Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (Ox-LDL)-stimulated Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 generation from Macrophages via the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Du, Junbao; Huang, Yaqian; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Qiaoli; Zhao, Manman; Zhu, Mingzhu; Liu, Jia; Chen, Stella X.; Bu, Dingfang; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the generation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-stimulated monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) from macrophages and possible mechanisms. THP-1 cells and RAW macrophages were pretreated with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and hexyl acrylate and then treated with ox-LDL. The results showed that ox-LDL treatment down-regulated the H2S/cystathionine-β-synthase pathway, with increased MCP-1 protein and mRNA expression in both THP-1 cells and RAW macrophages. Hexyl acrylate promoted ox-LDL-induced inflammation, whereas the H2S donor NaHS inhibited it. NaHS markedly suppressed NF-κB p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity, and recruitment to the MCP-1 promoter in ox-LDL-treated macrophages. Furthermore, NaHS decreased the ratio of free thiol groups in p65, whereas the thiol reductant DTT reversed the inhibiting effect of H2S on the p65 DNA binding activity. Most importantly, site-specific mutation of cysteine 38 to serine in p65 abolished the effect of H2S on the sulfhydration of NF-κB and ox-LDL-induced NF-κB activation. These results suggested that endogenous H2S inhibited ox-LDL-induced macrophage inflammation by suppressing NF-κB p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity, and recruitment to the MCP-1 promoter. The sulfhydration of free thiol group on cysteine 38 in p65 served as a molecular mechanism by which H2S inhibited NF-κB pathway activation in ox-LDL-induced macrophage inflammation. PMID:24550391

  16. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid has enhanced chemo-preventive properties compared to aspirin, is gastrointestinal safe with all the classic therapeutic indications

    PubMed Central

    Kodela, Ravinder; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin is chemopreventive; however, side effects preclude its long-term use. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel hybrid that releases nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide, was designed to be a safer alternative. Here we compare the gastrointestinal safety, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, anti-platelet, and chemopreventive properties of aspirin and NBS-1120 administered orally to rats at equimolar doses. Gastrointestinal safety: 6h post-administration, the number and size of hemorrhagic lesions in stomachs were counted; tissue samples were frozen for PGE2, SOD, and MDA determination. Anti-inflammatory: 1h after drug administration, the volume of carrageenan-induced rat paw edemas was measured for 5h. Anti-pyretic: fever was induced by LPS (ip) an hour before administration of the test drugs, core body temperature was measured hourly for 5h. Analgesic: time-dependent analgesic effects were evaluated by carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia. Antiplatelet: anti-aggregatory effects were studied on collagen-induced platelet aggregation of human platelet-rich plasma. Chemoprevention: Nude mice were gavaged daily for 25 days with vehicle, aspirin or NBS-1120. After one week, each mouse was inoculated subcutaneously in the right flank with HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Both agents reduced PGE2 levels in stomach tissue; however, NBS-1120 did not cause any stomach ulcers, whereas aspirin caused significant bleeding. Lipid peroxidation induced by aspirin was higher than that exerted by NBS-1120. SOD activity was significantly inhibited by aspirin but increased by NBS-1120. Both agents showed similar anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-pyretic, and anti-platelet activities. Aspirin increased plasma TNFα more than NBS-1120-treated animals. NBS-1120 was better than aspirin as a chemopreventive agent; it dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth and tumor mass. PMID:26394025

  17. 1D Ni-Co oxide and sulfide nanoarray/carbon aerogel hybrid nanostructures for asymmetric supercapacitors with high energy density and excellent cycling stability.

    PubMed

    Hao, Pin; Tian, Jian; Sang, Yuanhua; Tuan, Chia-Chi; Cui, Guanwei; Shi, Xifeng; Wong, C P; Tang, Bo; Liu, Hong

    2016-09-15

    The fabrication of supercapacitor electrodes with high energy density and excellent cycling stability is still a great challenge. A carbon aerogel, possessing a hierarchical porous structure, high specific surface area and electrical conductivity, is an ideal backbone to support transition metal oxides and bring hope to prepare electrodes with high energy density and excellent cycling stability. Therefore, NiCo 2 S 4 nanotube array/carbon aerogel and NiCo 2 O 4 nanoneedle array/carbon aerogel hybrid supercapacitor electrode materials were synthesized by assembling Ni-Co precursor needle arrays on the surface of the channel walls of hierarchical porous carbon aerogels derived from chitosan in this study. The 1D nanostructures grow on the channel surface of the carbon aerogel vertically and tightly, contributing to the enhanced electrochemical performance with ultrahigh energy density. The energy density of NiCo 2 S 4 nanotube array/carbon aerogel and NiCo 2 O 4 nanoneedle array/carbon aerogel hybrid asymmetric supercapacitors can reach up to 55.3 Wh kg -1 and 47.5 Wh kg -1 at a power density of 400 W kg -1 , respectively. These asymmetric devices also displayed excellent cycling stability with a capacitance retention of about 96.6% and 92% over 5000 cycles.

  18. Lithium Sulfide (Li2S)/Graphene Oxide Nanospheres with Conformal Carbon Coating as a High-Rate, Long-Life Cathode for Li/S Cells.

    PubMed

    Hwa, Yoon; Zhao, Juan; Cairns, Elton J

    2015-05-13

    In recent years, lithium/sulfur (Li/S) cells have attracted great attention as a candidate for the next generation of rechargeable batteries due to their high theoretical specific energy of 2600 W·h kg(-1), which is much higher than that of Li ion cells (400-600 W·h kg(-1)). However, problems of the S cathode such as highly soluble intermediate species (polysulfides Li2Sn, n = 4-8) and the insulating nature of S cause poor cycle life and low utilization of S, which prevents the practical use of Li/S cells. Here, a high-rate and long-life Li/S cell is proposed, which has a cathode material with a core-shell nanostructure comprising Li2S nanospheres with an embedded graphene oxide (GO) sheet as a core material and a conformal carbon layer as a shell. The conformal carbon coating is easily obtained by a unique CVD coating process using a lab-designed rotating furnace without any repetitive steps. The Li2S/GO@C cathode exhibits a high initial discharge capacity of 650 mA·h g(-1) of Li2S (corresponding to the 942 mA·h g(-1) of S) and very low capacity decay rate of only 0.046% per cycle with a high Coulombic efficiency of up to 99.7% for 1500 cycles when cycled at the 2 C discharge rate.

  19. The oxidation of alkylaryl sulfides and benzo[b]thiophenes by Escherichia coli cells expressing wild-type and engineered styrene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas putida CA-3.

    PubMed

    Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Coulombel, Lydie; Francuski, Djordje; Sharma, Narain D; Boyd, Derek R; Ferrall, Rory Moore O; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2013-06-01

    Nine different sulfur-containing compounds were biotransformed to the corresponding sulfoxides by Escherichia coli Bl21(DE3) cells expressing styrene monooxygenase (SMO) from Pseudomonas putida CA-3. Thioanisole was consumed at 83.3 μmoles min(-1) g cell dry weight(-1) resulting mainly in the formation of R-thioanisole sulfoxide with an enantiomeric excess (ee) value of 45 %. The rate of 2-methyl-, 2-chloro- and 2-bromo-thioanisole consumption was 2-fold lower than that of thioanisole. Surprisingly, the 2-methylthioanisole sulfoxide product had the opposite (S) configuration to that of the other 2-substituted thioanisole derivatives and had a higher ee value (84 %). The rate of oxidation of 4-substituted thioanisoles was higher than the corresponding 2-substituted substrates but the ee values of the products were consistently lower (10-23 %). The rate of benzo[b]thiophene and 2-methylbenzo[b]thiophene sulfoxidation was approximately 10-fold lower than that of thioanisole. The ee value of the benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxide could not be determined as the product racemized rapidly. E. coli cells expressing an engineered SMO (SMOeng R3-11) oxidised 2-substituted thioanisoles between 1.8- and 2.8-fold faster compared to cells expressing the wild-type enzyme. SMOeng R3-11 oxidised benzo[b]thiophene and 2-methylbenzo[b]thiophene 10.1 and 5.6 times faster that the wild-type enzyme. The stereospecificity of the reaction catalysed by SMOeng was unchanged from that of the wild type. Using the X-ray crystal structure of the P. putida S12 SMO, it was evident that the entrance of substrates into the SMO active site is limited by the binding pocket bottleneck formed by the side chains of Val-211 and Asn-46 carboxyamide group.

  20. Fabrication and Synthesis of Highly Ordered Nickel Cobalt Sulfide Nanowire-Grown Woven Kevlar Fiber/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Polyester Composites.

    PubMed

    Hazarika, Ankita; Deka, Biplab K; Kim, DoYoung; Roh, Hyung Doh; Park, Young-Bin; Park, Hyung Wook

    2017-10-18

    Well-aligned NiCo 2 S 4 nanowires, synthesized hydrothermally on the surface of woven Kevlar fiber (WKF), were used to fabricate composites with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) dispersed in polyester resin (PES) by means of vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding. The NiCo 2 S 4 nanowires were synthesized with three precursor concentrations. Nanowire growth was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Hierarchical and high growth density of the nanowires led to exceptional mechanical properties of the composites. Compared with bare WKF/PES, the tensile strength and absorbed impact energy were enhanced by 96.2% and 92.3%, respectively, for WKF/NiCo 2 S 4 /rGO (1.5%)/PES. The synergistic effect of NiCo 2 S 4 nanowires and rGO in the fabricated composites improved the electrical conductivity of insulating WKF/PES composites, reducing the resistance to ∼10 3 Ω. Joule heating performance depended strongly on the precursor concentration of the nanowires and the presence of rGO in the composite. A maximum surface temperature of 163 °C was obtained under low-voltage (5 V) application. The Joule heating performance of the composites was demonstrated in a surface deicing experiment; we observed that 17 g of ice melted from the surface of the composite in 14 min under an applied voltage of 5 V at -28 °C. The excellent performance of WKF/NiCo 2 S 4 /rGO/PES composites shows great potential for aerospace structural applications requiring outstanding mechanical properties and Joule heating capability for deicing of surfaces.

  1. Abiotic synthesis of fatty acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, W. W.; Nooner, D. W.; Oro, J.

    1978-01-01

    The formation of fatty acids by Fischer-Tropsch-type synthesis was investigated with ferric oxide, ammonium carbonate, potassium carbonate, powdered Pueblito de Allende carbonaceous chondrite, and filings from the Canyon Diablo meteorite used as catalysts. Products were separated and identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Iron oxide, Pueblito de Allende chondrite, and Canyon Diablo filings in an oxidized catalyst form yielded no fatty acids. Canyon Diablo filings heated overnight at 500 C while undergoing slow purging by deuterium produced fatty acids only when potassium carbonate was admixed; potassium carbonate alone also produced these compounds. The active catalytic combinations gave relatively high yields of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; substantial amounts of n-alkenes were almost invariably observed when fatty acids were produced; the latter were in the range C6 to C18, with maximum yield in C9 or 10.

  2. Black Carbon Facilitated Dechlorination of DDT and its Metabolites by Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Ding, Kai; Xu, Wenqing

    2016-12-06

    1,1-trichloro-2,2-di(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) and its metabolites 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDD) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE), are often detected in soils and sediments containing high concentrations of black carbon. Sulfide (∼5 mM) from biological sulfate reduction often coexists with black carbon and serves as both a strong reductant and a nucleophile for the abiotic transformation of contaminants. In this study, we found that the abiotic transformation of DDT, DDD, and DDE (collectively referred to as DDX) require both sulfide and black carbon. 89.3 ± 1.8% of DDT, 63.2 ± 1.9% of DDD, and 50.9 ± 1.6% of DDE were degraded by sulfide (5 mM) in the presence of graphite powder (21 g/L) after 28 days at pH 7. Chloride was a product of DDX degradation. To better understand the reaction pathways, electrochemical cells and batch reactor experiments with sulfide-pretreated graphite powder were used to differentiate the involvement of black carbon materials in DDX transformation by sulfide. Our results suggest that DDT and DDD are transformed by surface intermediates formed from the reaction between sulfide and black carbon, while DDE degradation involves reductive dechlorination. This research lays the groundwork for developing an alternative in situ remediation technique for rapidly decontaminating soils and sediments to lower toxic products under environmentally relevant conditions.

  3. Biogas as a fuel for solid oxide fuel cells and synthesis gas production: effects of ceria-doping and hydrogen sulfide on the performance of nickel-based anode materials.

    PubMed

    Laycock, Christian J; Staniforth, John Z; Ormerod, R Mark

    2011-05-28

    Numerous investigations have been carried out into the conversion of biogas into synthesis gas (a mixture of H(2) + CO) over Ni/YSZ anode cermet catalysts. Biogas is a variable mixture of gases consisting predominantly of methane and carbon dioxide (usually in a 2 : 1 ratio, but variable with source), with other constituents including sulfur-containing gases such as hydrogen sulfide, which can cause sulfur poisoning of nickel catalysts. The effect of temperature on carbon deposition and sulfur poisoning of 90 : 10 mol% Ni/YSZ under biogas conversion conditions has been investigated by carrying out a series of catalytic reactions of methane-rich (2 : 1) CH(4)/CO(2) mixtures in the absence and presence of H(2)S over the temperature range 750-1000 °C. The effect of ceria-doping on carbon dioxide reforming, carbon deposition and sulfur tolerance has also been investigated by carrying out a similar series of reactions over ceria-doped Ni/YSZ. Ceria was doped at 5 mol% of the nickel content to give an anode catalyst composition of 85.5 : 4.5 : 10 mol% Ni/CeO(2)/YSZ. Reactions were followed using quadrupolar mass spectrometry (QMS) and the amount of carbon deposition was analysed by subjecting the reacted catalyst samples to a post-reaction temperature programmed oxidation (TPO). On undoped Ni/YSZ, carbon deposition occurred predominantly through thermal decomposition of methane. Ceria-doping significantly suppressed methane decomposition and at high temperatures simultaneously promoted the reverse Boudouard reaction, significantly lowering carbon deposition. Sulfur poisoning of Ni/YSZ occurred in two phases, the first of which caused the most activity loss and was accelerated on increasing the reaction temperature, while the second phase had greater stability and became more favourable with increasing reaction temperature. Adding H(2)S significantly inhibited methane decomposition, resulting in much less carbon deposition. Ceria-doping significantly increased the sulfur

  4. Improved sulfide mitigation in sewers through on-line control of ferrous salt dosing.

    PubMed

    Ganigué, Ramon; Jiang, Guangming; Liu, Yiqi; Sharma, Keshab; Wang, Yue-Cong; Gonzalez, José; Nguyen, Tung; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2018-05-15

    Water utilities worldwide spend annually billions of dollars to control sulfide-induced corrosion in sewers. Iron salts chemically oxidize and/or precipitate dissolved sulfide in sewage and are especially used in medium- and large-size sewers. Iron salt dosing rates are defined ad hoc, ignoring variation in sewage flows and sulfide levels. This often results in iron overdosing or poor sulfide control. Online dosing control can adjust the chemical dosing rates to current (and future) state of the sewer system, allowing high-precision, stable and cost-effective sulfide control. In this paper, we report a novel and robust online control strategy for the dosing of ferrous salt in sewers. The control considers the fluctuation of sewage flow, pH, sulfide levels and also the perturbation from rainfall. Sulfide production in the pipe is predicted using auto-regressive models (AR) based on current flow measurements, which in turn can be used to determine the dose of ferrous salt required for cost-effective sulfide control. Following comprehensive model-based assesment, the control was successfully validated and its effectiveness demonstrated in a 3-week field trial. The online control algorithm controlled sulfide below the target level (0.5 mg S/L) while reducing chemical dosing up to 30%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. SERDP ER-1421 Abiotic and Biotic Mechanisms Controlling In Situ Remediation of NDMA: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; McKinley, James P.; Crocker, Fiona H.

    This laboratory-scale project was initiated to investigate in situ abiotic/biotic mineralization of NDMA. Under iron-reducing conditions, aquifer sediments showed rapid abiotic NDMA degradation to dimethylamine (DMA), nitrate, formate, and finally, CO2. These are the first reported experiments of abiotic NDMA mineralization. The NDMA reactivity of these different iron phases showed that adsorbed ferrous iron was the dominant reactive phase that promoted NDMA reduction, and other ferrous phases present (siderite, iron sulfide, magnetite, structural ferrous iron in 2:1 clays) did not promote NDMA degradation. In contrast, oxic sediments that were biostimulated with propane promoted biomineralization of NDMA by a cometabolic monooxygenasemore » enzyme process. Other monooxygenase enzyme processes were not stimulated with methane or toluene additions, and acetylene addition did not block mineralization. Although NDMA mineralization extent was the highest in oxic, biostimulated sediments (30 to 82%, compared to 10 to 26% for abiotic mineralization in reduced sediments), large 1-D column studies (high sediment/water ratio of aquifers) showed 5.6 times higher NDMA mineralization rates in reduced sediment (half-life 410 ± 147 h) than oxic biomineralization (half life 2293 ± 1866 h). Sequential reduced/oxic biostimulated sediment mineralization (half-life 3180 ± 1094 h) was also inefficient compared to reduced sediment. These promising laboratory-scale results for NDMA mineralization should be investigated at field scale. Future studies of NDMA remediation should focus on the comparison of this in situ abiotic NDMA mineralization (iron-reducing environments) to ex situ biomineralization, which has been shown successful in other studies.« less

  6. Microbiological and abiotic processes in modelling longer-term marine corrosion of steel.

    PubMed

    Melchers, Robert E

    2014-06-01

    Longer term exposure of mild steel in natural (biotic) waters progresses as a bimodal function of time, both for corrosion mass loss and for pit depth. Recent test results, however, found this also for immersion in clean fresh, almost pure and triply distilled waters. This shows chlorides or microbiological activity is not essential for the electrochemical processes producing bimodal behaviour. It is proposed that the first mode is aerobic corrosion that eventually produces a non-homogeneous corroded surface and rust coverage sufficient to allow formation of anoxic niches. Within these, aggressive autocatalytic reduction then occurs under anoxic abiotic conditions, caused by sulfide species originating from the MnS inclusions typical in steels. This is consistent with Wranglen's model for abiotic anoxic crevice and pitting corrosion without external aggressive ions. In biotic conditions, metabolites from anaerobic bacterial activity within and near the anoxic niches provides additional (sulfide) species to contribute to the severity of corrosion. Limited observational evidence that supports this hypothesis is given but further investigation is required to determine all contributor(s) to the cathodic current for the electrochemical reaction. The results are important for estimating the contribution of microbiological corrosion in infrastructure applications. © 2013.

  7. A novel method for improving cerussite sulfidization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qi-cheng; Wen, Shu-ming; Zhao, Wen-juan; Cao, Qin-bo; Lü, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of flotation behavior, solution measurements, and surface analyses were performed to investigate the effects of chloride ion addition on the sulfidization of cerussite in this study. Micro-flotation tests indicate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly increase the flotation recovery of cerussite, which is attributed to the formation of more lead sulfide species on the mineral surface. Solution measurement results suggest that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization induces the transformation of more sulfide ions from pulp solution onto the mineral surface by the formation of more lead sulfide species. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy indicate that more lead sulfide species form on the mineral surface when chloride ions are added prior to sulfidization. These results demonstrate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly improve the sulfidization of cerussite, thereby enhancing the flotation performance.

  8. Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

    1987-01-06

    A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

  9. Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, Stanford R.; Yeung, Edward S.

    1987-01-01

    A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

  10. Signaling in the plant cytosol: cysteine or sulfide?

    PubMed

    Gotor, Cecilia; Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; Aroca, Ángeles; García, Irene; Romero, Luis C

    2015-10-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is the first organic compound containing reduced sulfur that is synthesized in the last stage of plant photosynthetic assimilation of sulfate. It is a very important metabolite not only because it is crucial for the structure, function and regulation of proteins but also because it is the precursor molecule of an enormous number of sulfur-containing metabolites essential for plant health and development. The biosynthesis of Cys is accomplished by the sequential reaction of serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine(thiol)synthase (OASTL). In Arabidopsis thaliana, the analysis of specific mutants of members of the SAT and OASTL families has demonstrated that the cytosol is the compartment where the bulk of Cys synthesis takes place and that the cytosolic OASTL enzyme OAS-A1 is the responsible enzyme. Another member of the OASTL family is DES1, a novel L-cysteine desulfhydrase that catalyzes the desulfuration of Cys to produce sulfide, thus acting in a manner opposite to that of OAS-A1. Detailed studies of the oas-a1 and des1 null mutants have revealed the involvement of the DES1 and OAS-A1 proteins in coordinate regulation of Cys homeostasis and the generation of sulfide in the cytosol for signaling purposes. Thus, the levels of Cys in the cytosol strongly affect plant responses to both abiotic and biotic stress conditions, while sulfide specifically generated from the degradation of Cys negatively regulates autophagy induced in different situations. In conclusion, modulation of the levels of Cys and sulfide is likely critical for plant performance.

  11. Thermoelectric Properties of Lanthanum Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Lockwood, R.; Parker, J. B.; Zoltan, A.; Zoltan, L. D.; Danielson, L.; Raag, V.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes measurement of Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and Hall effect in gamma-phase lanthanum sulfide with composition of La3-x S4. Results of study, part of search for high-temperature thermoelectric energy-conversion materials, indicate this sulfide behaves like extrinsic semiconductor over temperature range of 300 to 1,400 K, with degenerate carrier concentration controlled by stoichiometric ratio of La to S.

  12. Chemical Bonding in Sulfide Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, David J.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    An understanding of chemical bonding and electronic structure in sulfide minerals is central to any attempt at understanding their crystal structures, stabilities and physical properties. It is also an essential precursor to understanding reactivity through modeling surface structure at the molecular scale. In recent decades, there have been remarkable advances in first principles (ab initio) methods for the quantitative calculation of electronic structure. These advances have been made possible by the very rapid development of high performance computers. Several review volumes that chart the applications of these developments in mineralogy and geochemistry are available (Tossell and Vaughan, 1992; Cygan andmore » Kubicki, 2001). An important feature of the sulfide minerals is the diversity of their electronic structures, as evidenced by their electrical and magnetic properties (see Pearce et al. 2006, this volume). Thus, sulfide minerals range from insulators through semiconductors to metals, and exhibit every type of magnetic behavior. This has presented problems for those attempting to develop bonding models for sulfides, and also led to certain misconceptions regarding the kinds of models that may be appropriate. In this chapter, chemical bonding and electronic structure models for sulfides are reviewed with emphasis on more recent developments. Although the fully ab initio quantitative methods are now capable of a remarkable degree of sophistication in terms of agreement with experiment and potential to interpret and predict behavior with varying conditions, both qualitative and more simplistic quantitative approaches will also be briefly discussed. This is because we believe that the insights which they provide are still helpful to those studying sulfide minerals. In addition to the application of electronic structure models and calculations to solid sulfides, work on sulfide mineral surfaces (Rosso and Vaughan 2006a,b) and solution complexes and clusters

  13. Non-hydrolytic Sol-gel Synthesis of Tin Sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajvinder

    The non-hydrolytic sol-gel (NHSG) process is an effective low temperature route well known for preparing homogeneous metal oxides. Thermodynamically as well as kinetically favored products, which cannot be prepared with the traditional solid-state routes, can be produced using NHSG. This project is focused on the exploration of NHSG synthesis of binary tin sulfides. In the past few years, metal sulfides have been the subject of significant interest. Much effort has been devoted to understand these materials because of their potential applications in electronic, optical, and superconductor devices.4 Among these materials, tin sulfides are materials of technological importance, which are being explored as semiconductors, anode materials for Li ion batteries, photoconductors, photocatalysts and absorber layer materials in photovoltaic solar cell devices. All of these applications depend upon features like homogeneity, oxidation state, high surface area and purity of the materials. These properties can be difficult to achieve by employing traditional synthetic routes, which require high temperatures due to slow diffusion, limiting the products to thermodynamically stable phases and prohibiting control over properties like particle size and surface area. A variety of low temperature methods are being explored due to the increased demand for such advanced materials. This project is focused on exploring the NHSG approach to synthesize binary tin sulfides, with the main goal of establishing conditions for the targeted synthesis of different tin sulfide polymorphs with controlled particle size. Being non-oxide materials, tin sulfides can be air sensitive, which requires special attention in handling. All reactions were carried out in absence of oxygen. This project explores the reaction of tin halides with thioethers in a dry solvent medium, leading to the formation of tin sulfides. There are a number of synthetic parameters that can be varied for the NHSG approach. A

  14. Chemical Foundations of Hydrogen Sulfide Biology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Following nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (or its newer systematic name sulfane, H2S) became the third small molecule that can be both toxic and beneficial depending on the concentration. In spite of its impressive therapeutic potential, the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects remain unclear. Any novel mechanism has to obey fundamental chemical principles. H2S chemistry was studied long before its biological relevance was discovered, however, with a few exceptions, these past works have received relatively little attention in the path of exploring the mechanistic conundrum of H2S biological functions. This review calls attention to the basic physical and chemical properties of H2S, focuses on the chemistry between H2S and its three potential biological targets: oxidants, metals and thiol derivatives, discusses the applications of these basics into H2S biology and methodology, and introduces the standard terminology to this youthful field. PMID:23850631

  15. Removal of EDB and 1,2-DCA by Abiotic Reaction with Iron (II) Sulfide

    EPA Science Inventory

    To properly evaluate the risk associated with exposure to EDB and 1,2-DCA in ground water from old spills of leaded gasoline, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms that may attenuate concentrations of these compounds in ground water. TCE reacts rapidly with iron (II) sulf...

  16. Removal of EDB and 1,2-DCA by Abiotic Reaction with Iron(II) Sulfide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethylene Dibromide (EDB) and 1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) were used as lead scavengers in leaded motor gasoline in the USA until the late 1980s. Leaded gasoline in contact with ground water should produce concentrations of EDB near 1900 µg/L, and concentrations of 1,2-DCA near 3...

  17. Zelda and company - Petrogenesis of sulfide-rich Fremdlinge and constraints on solar nebula processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, John T.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed petrographic and chemical study of Zelda (a gigantic sulfide-rich Fremdling from the Allende Ca-rich inclusion, CAI, Egg 6) and its contact with the host was conducted using analytical SEM and electron-microprobe techniques, and the results were compared with those obtained on other sulfide-rich and oxide-rich Fremdlinge. Strong evidence is presented that Zelda, a type-example of sulfide-rich Fremdlinge, has been formed from a preexisting Ur-Fremdling, similar by composition to Willy, by closed-system sulfidization of magnetite and metal. At least two different sulfidization mechanisms appear to have occurred in altering Fremdlinge: one producing compositionally homogeneous equigranular objects such as Zelda, the other producing compositionally and texturally heterogeneous objects.

  18. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R.

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin is the first dual acting NO and H{sub 2}S releasing hybrid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its IC{sub 50} for cell growth inhibition is in the low nano-molar range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure-activity studies show that the sum of the parts does not equal the whole. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin reduced tumor growth by 85% in mice bearing a colon cancer xenograft. -- Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the developmentmore » of NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC{sub 50}s of 45.5 {+-} 2.5, 19.7 {+-} 3.3, and 7.7 {+-} 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.« less

  19. Effect of inoculum and sulfide type on simultaneous hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas and nitrogen removal from swine slurry and microbial mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Wei, Benping; Chen, Ziai; Deng, Liangwei; Song, Li; Wang, Shuang; Zheng, Dan; Liu, Yi; Pu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yunhong

    2015-12-01

    Four reactors were initiated to study the effect of inoculum and sulfide type on the simultaneous hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas and nitrogen removal from swine slurry (Ssu-Nir) process. Anaerobic sludge, aerobic sludge, and water were used as inocula, and Na2S and biogas were used as a sulfide substrate, respectively. Additionally, 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to explore the bacterial diversity. The results showed that sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus, 42.2-84.4 %) were dominant in Ssu-Nir process and led to the excellent performance. Aerobic sludge was more suitable for inoculation of the Ssu-Nir process because it is better for rapidly enriching dominant sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus, 54.4 %), denitrifying sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (40.0 %) and denitrifiers (23.9 %). Lower S(2-) removal efficiency (72.6 %) and NO3 (-) removal efficiency (<90 %) of the Ssu-Nir process were obtained using biogas as a sulfide substrate than when Na2S was used. For the Ssu-Nir process with biogas as the sulfide substrate, limiting H2S absorption caused a high relative abundance of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, Thiobacillus (84.8 %) and Thiobacillus sayanicus (39.6 %), which in turn led to low relative abundance of denitrifiers (1.6 %) and denitrifying sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (24.4 %), low NO3 (-) removal efficiency, and eventually poor performance.

  20. Systems biology approach in plant abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, Tapan Kumar; Bashir, Tufail; Hashem, Abeer; Abd Allah, Elsayed Fathi

    2017-12-01

    Plant abiotic stresses are the major constraint on plant growth and development, causing enormous crop losses across the world. Plants have unique features to defend themselves against these challenging adverse stress conditions. They modulate their phenotypes upon changes in physiological, biochemical, molecular and genetic information, thus making them tolerant against abiotic stresses. It is of paramount importance to determine the stress-tolerant traits of a diverse range of genotypes of plant species and integrate those traits for crop improvement. Stress-tolerant traits can be identified by conducting genome-wide analysis of stress-tolerant genotypes through the highly advanced structural and functional genomics approach. Specifically, whole-genome sequencing, development of molecular markers, genome-wide association studies and comparative analysis of interaction networks between tolerant and susceptible crop varieties grown under stress conditions can greatly facilitate discovery of novel agronomic traits that protect plants against abiotic stresses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates mercury toxicity by sequestering it in roots or regulating reactive oxygen species productions in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Chen, Moshun; Jiang, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Soil mercury (Hg) contamination is a major factor that affects agricultural yield and food security. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) plays multifunctional roles in mediating a variety of responses to abiotic stresses. The effects of exogenous H 2 S on rice (Oryza sativa var 'Nipponbare') growth and metabolism under mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 ) stress were investigated in this study. Either 100 or 200 μM sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, a donor of H 2 S) pretreatment improved the transcription of bZIP60, a membrane-associated transcription factor, and then enhanced the expressions of non-protein thiols (NPT) and metallothioneins (OsMT-1) to sequester Hg in roots and thus inhibit Hg transport to shoots. Meanwhile, H 2 S promoted seedlings growth significantly even in the presences of Hg and superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) or catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) inhibitors, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) or 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT). H 2 S might act as an antioxidant to inhibit or scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions for maintaining the lower MDA and H 2 O 2 levels, and thereby preventing oxidative damages. All these results indicated H 2 S effectively alleviated Hg toxicity by sequestering it in roots or by regulating ROS in seedlings and then thus significantly promoted rice growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Nanoporous gold-based microbial biosensor for direct determination of sulfide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuang; Ma, Hanyue; Sun, Huihui; Gao, Rui; Liu, Honglei; Wang, Xia; Xu, Ping; Xun, Luying

    2017-12-15

    Environmental pollution caused by sulfide compounds has become a major problem for public health. Hence, there is an urgent need to explore a sensitive, selective, and simple sulfide detection method for environmental monitoring and protection. Here, a novel microbial biosensor was developed using recombinant Escherichia coli BL21 (E. coli BL21) expressing sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) for sulfide detection. As an important enzyme involved in the initial step of sulfide metabolism, SQR oxidizes sulfides to polysulfides and transfers electrons to the electron transport chain. Nanoporous gold (NPG) with its unique properties was selected for recombinant E. coli BL21 cells immobilization, and then glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was modified by the resulting E. coli/NPG biocomposites to construct an E. coli/NPG/GCE bioelectrode. Due to the catalytic oxidation properties of NPG for sulfide, the electrochemical reaction of the E. coli/NPG/GCE bioelectrode is attributed to the co-catalysis of SQR and NPG. For sulfide detection, the E. coli/NPG/GCE bioelectrode showed a good linear response ranging from 50μM to 5mM, with a high sensitivity of 18.35μAmM -1 cm -2 and a low detection limit of 2.55μM. The anti-interference ability of the E. coli/NPG/GCE bioelectrode is better than that of enzyme-based inhibitive biosensors. Further, the E. coli/NPG/GCE bioelectrode was successfully applied to the detection of sulfide in wastewater. These unique properties potentially make the E. coli/NPG/GCE bioelectrode an excellent choice for reliable sulfide detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Coupling between anammox and autotrophic denitrification for simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfide by enriched marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Rios-Del Toro, E Emilia; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the capacity of enrichments derived from marine sediments collected from different sites of the Mexican littoral to perform anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) coupled to sulfide-dependent denitrification for simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfide linked to nitrite reduction was evaluated. Sulfide-dependent denitrification out-competed anammox during the simultaneous oxidation of sulfide and ammonium. Significant accumulation of elemental sulfur (ca. 14-30 % of added sulfide) occurred during the coupling between the two respiratory processes, while ammonium was partly oxidized (31-47 %) due to nitrite limitation imposed in sediment incubations. Nevertheless, mass balances revealed up to 38 % more oxidation of the electron donors available (ammonium and sulfide) than that expected from stoichiometry. Recycling of nitrite, from nitrate produced through anammox, is proposed to contribute to extra oxidation of sulfide, while additional ammonium oxidation is suggested by sulfate-reducing anammox (SR-anammox). The complex interaction between nitrogenous and sulfurous compounds occurring through the concomitant presence of autotrophic denitrification, conventional anammox and SR-anammox may significantly drive the nitrogen and sulfur fluxes in marine environments.

  4. Selective Sulfidation of Lead Smelter Slag with Sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dawei; Jiao, Fen; Qin, Wenqing

    2016-02-01

    The selective sulfidation of lead smelter slag with sulfur was studied. The effects of temperature, sulfur dosage, carbon, and Na salts additions were investigated based on thermodynamic calculation. The results indicated that more than 96 pct of zinc in the slag could be converted into sulfides. Increasing temperature, sulfur dosage, or Na salts dosage was conducive to the sulfidation of the zinc oxides in the slag. High temperature and excess Na salts would result in the more consumption of carbon and sulfur. Carbon addition not only promoted the selective sulfidation but reduced the sulfur dosage and eliminated the generation of SO2. Iron oxides had a buffering role on the sulfur efficient utilization. The transformation of sphalerite to wurtzite was feasible under reducing condition at high temperature, especially above 1273 K (1000 °C). The growth of ZnS particles largely depended upon the roasting temperature. They were significantly increased when the temperature was above 1273 K (1000 °C), which was attributed to the formation of a liquid phase.

  5. Aqueous pyrite oxidation by dissolved oxygen and by ferric iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moses, Carl O.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Herman, Janet S.; Mills, Aaron L.

    1987-01-01

    Rates of aqueous, abiotic pyrite oxidation were measured in oxygen-saturated and anaerobic Fe(III)-saturated solutions with initial pH from 2 to 9. These studies included analyses of sulfite, thiosulfate, polythionates and sulfate and procedures for cleaning oxidation products from pyrite surfaces were evaluated. Pyrite oxidation in oxygen-saturated solutions produced (1) rates that were only slightly dependent on initial pH, (2) linear increases in sulfoxy anions and (3) thiosulfate and polythionates at pH > 3.9. Intermediate sulfoxy anions were observed only at high stirring rates. In anaerobic Fe(III)-saturated solutions, no intermediates were observed except traces of sulfite at pH 9. The faster rate of oxidation in Fe(III)-saturated solutions supports a reaction mechanism in which Fe(III) is the direct oxidant of pyrite in both aerobic and anaerobic systems. The proposal of this mechanism is also supported by theoretical considerations regarding the low probability of a direct reaction between paramagnetic molecular oxygen and diamagnetic pyrite. Results from a study of sphalerite oxidation support the hypothesis that thiosulfate is a key intermediate in sulfate production, regardless of the bonding structure of the sulfide mineral.

  6. Inhaled Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Gian Paolo; Searles, Robert; Yu, Binglan; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ichinose, Fumito; Zapol, Warren M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Breathing hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to induce a suspended animation–like state with hypothermia and a concomitant metabolic reduction in rodents. However, the impact of H2S breathing on cardiovascular function remains incompletely understood. In this study, the authors investigated the cardiovascular and metabolic effects of inhaled H2S in a murine model. Methods The impact of breathing H2S on cardiovascular function was examined using telemetry and echocardiography in awake mice. The effects of breathing H2S on carbon dioxide production and oxygen consumption were measured at room temperature and in a warmed environment. Results Breathing H2S at 80 parts per million by volume at 27°C ambient temperature for 6 h markedly reduced heart rate, core body temperature, respiratory rate, and physical activity, whereas blood pressure remained unchanged. Echocardiography demonstrated that H2S exposure decreased both heart rate and cardiac output but preserved stroke volume. Breathing H2S for 6 h at 35°C ambient temperature (to prevent hypothermia) decreased heart rate, physical activity, respiratory rate, and cardiac output without altering stroke volume or body temperature. H2S breathing seems to induce bradycardia by depressing sinus node activity. Breathing H2S for 30 min decreased whole body oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production at either 27° or 35°C ambient temperature. Both parameters returned to baseline levels within 10 min after the cessation of H2S breathing. Conclusions Inhalation of H2S at either 27° or 35°C reversibly depresses cardiovascular function without changing blood pressure in mice. Breathing H2S also induces a rapidly reversible reduction of metabolic rate at either body temperature. PMID:18362598

  7. Arsenic repartitioning during biogenic sulfidization and transformation of ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocar, Benjamin D.; Borch, Thomas; Fendorf, Scott

    2010-02-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are strong sorbents of arsenic (As) that undergo reductive dissolution and transformation upon reaction with dissolved sulfide. Here we examine the transformation and dissolution of As-bearing ferrihydrite and subsequent As repartitioning amongst secondary phases during biotic sulfate reduction. Columns initially containing As(V)-ferrihydrite coated sand, inoculated with the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), were eluted with artificial groundwater containing sulfate and lactate. Rapid and consistent sulfate reduction coupled with lactate oxidation is observed at low As(V) loading (10% of the adsorption maximum). The dominant Fe solid phase transformation products at low As loading include amorphous FeS within the zone of sulfate reduction (near the inlet of the column) and magnetite downstream where Fe(II) (aq) concentrations increase; As is displaced from the zone of sulfidogenesis and Fe(III) (s) depletion. At high As(V) loading (50% of the adsorption maximum), sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation are initially slow but gradually increase over time, and all As(V) is reduced to As(III) by the end of experimentation. With the higher As loading, green rust(s), as opposed to magnetite, is a dominant Fe solid phase product. Independent of loading, As is strongly associated with magnetite and residual ferrihydrite, while being excluded from green rust and iron sulfide. Our observations illustrate that sulfidogenesis occurring in proximity with Fe (hydr)oxides induce Fe solid phase transformation and changes in As partitioning; formation of As sulfide minerals, in particular, is inhibited by reactive Fe(III) or Fe(II) either through sulfide oxidation or complexation.

  8. Arsenic Repartitioning during Biogenic Sulfidization and Transformation of Ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kocar, B.; Borch, T; Fendorf, S

    Iron (hydr)oxides are strong sorbents of arsenic (As) that undergo reductive dissolution and transformation upon reaction with dissolved sulfide. Here we examine the transformation and dissolution of As-bearing ferrihydrite and subsequent As repartitioning amongst secondary phases during biotic sulfate reduction. Columns initially containing As(V)-ferrihydrite coated sand, inoculated with the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), were eluted with artificial groundwater containing sulfate and lactate. Rapid and consistent sulfate reduction coupled with lactate oxidation is observed at low As(V) loading (10% of the adsorption maximum). The dominant Fe solid phase transformation products at low As loading include amorphous FeS within themore » zone of sulfate reduction (near the inlet of the column) and magnetite downstream where Fe(II){sub (aq)} concentrations increase; As is displaced from the zone of sulfidogenesis and Fe(III){sub (s)} depletion. At high As(V) loading (50% of the adsorption maximum), sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation are initially slow but gradually increase over time, and all As(V) is reduced to As(III) by the end of experimentation. With the higher As loading, green rust(s), as opposed to magnetite, is a dominant Fe solid phase product. Independent of loading, As is strongly associated with magnetite and residual ferrihydrite, while being excluded from green rust and iron sulfide. Our observations illustrate that sulfidogenesis occurring in proximity with Fe (hydr)oxides induce Fe solid phase transformation and changes in As partitioning; formation of As sulfide minerals, in particular, is inhibited by reactive Fe(III) or Fe(II) either through sulfide oxidation or complexation.« less

  9. Arsenic repartitioning during biogenic sulfidization and transformation of ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kocar, Benjamin D.; Borch, Thomas; Fendorf, Scott

    Iron (hydr)oxides are strong sorbents of arsenic (As) that undergo reductive dissolution and transformation upon reaction with dissolved sulfide. Here we examine the transformation and dissolution of As-bearing ferrihydrite and subsequent As repartitioning amongst secondary phases during biotic sulfate reduction. Columns initially containing As(V)-ferrihydrite coated sand, inoculated with the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), were eluted with artificial groundwater containing sulfate and lactate. Rapid and consistent sulfate reduction coupled with lactate oxidation is observed at low As(V) loading (10% of the adsorption maximum). The dominant Fe solid phase transformation products at low As loading include amorphous FeS within themore » zone of sulfate reduction (near the inlet of the column) and magnetite downstream where Fe(II)(aq) concentrations increase; As is displaced from the zone of sulfidogenesis and Fe(III)(s) depletion. At high As(V) loading (50% of the adsorption maximum), sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation are initially slow but gradually increase over time, and all As(V) is reduced to As(III) by the end of experimentation. With the higher As loading, green rust(s), as opposed to magnetite, is a dominant Fe solid phase product. Independent of loading, As is strongly associated with magnetite and residual ferrihydrite, while being excluded from green rust and iron sulfide. Our observations illustrate that sulfidogenesis occurring in proximity with Fe (hydr)oxides induce Fe solid phase transformation and changes in As partitioning; formation of As sulfide minerals, in particular, is inhibited by reactive Fe(III) or Fe(II) either through sulfide oxidation or complexation.« less

  10. Abiotic drivers of Chihuahuan Desert plant communities

    Treesearch

    Laura Marie Ladwig

    2014-01-01

    Within grasslands, precipitation, fire, nitrogen (N) addition, and extreme temperatures influence community composition and ecosystem function. The differential influences of these abiotic factors on Chihuahuan Desert grassland communities was examined within the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, located in central New Mexico, U.S.A. Although fire is a natural...

  11. Abiotic CO2 reduction during geologic carbon sequestration facilitated by Fe(II)-bearing minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, L. C.; Maher, K.; Bird, D. K.; Brown, G. E.; Thomas, B.; Johnson, N. C.; Rosenbauer, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Redox reactions involving subsurface minerals and fluids and can lead to the abiotic generation of hydrocarbons from CO2 under certain conditions. Depleted oil reservoirs and saline aquifers targeted for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) can contain significant quantities of minerals such as ferrous chlorite, which could facilitate the abiotic reduction of carbon dioxide to n-carboxylic acids, hydrocarbons, and amorphous carbon (C0). If such reactions occur, the injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) could significantly alter the oxidation state of the reservoir and cause extensive reorganization of the stable mineral assemblage via dissolution and reprecipitation reactions. Naturally occurring iron oxide minerals such as magnetite are known to catalyze CO2 reduction, resulting in the synthesis of organic compounds. Magnetite is thermodynamically stable in Fe(II) chlorite-bearing mineral assemblages typical of some reservoir formations. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrate that GCS reservoirs buffered by the chlorite-kaolinite-carbonate(siderite/magnesite)-quartz assemblage favor the reduction of CO2 to n-carboxylic acids, hydrocarbons, and C0, although the extent of abiotic CO2 reduction may be kinetically limited. To investigate the rates of abiotic CO2 reduction in the presence of magnetite, we performed batch abiotic CO2 reduction experiments using a Dickson-type rocking hydrothermal apparatus at temperatures (373 K) and pressures (100 bar) within the range of conditions relevant to GCS. Blank experiments containing CO2 and H2 were used to rule out the possibility of catalytic activity of the experimental apparatus. Reaction of brine-suspended magnetite nanoparticles with scCO2 at H2 partial pressures typical of reservoir rocks - up to 100 and 0.1 bars respectively - was used to investigate the kinetics of magnetite-catalyzed abiotic CO2 reduction. Later experiments introducing ferrous chlorite (ripidolite) were carried out to determine the potential for

  12. Empirical equations to predict the sulfur content of mafic magmas at sulfide saturation and applications to magmatic sulfide deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chusi; Ripley, Edward M.

    2005-03-01

    composition of the parent magma of the Sonju Lake Intrusion the presented equation indicates that sulfide saturation would have been reached at 60% crystallization, when iron oxide was a liquidus mineral; the prediction is in agreement with field evidence which indicates that PGE-enrichment occurs in the oxide-rich gabbro zone. Contamination and mixing processes that may be related to the attainment of sulfide saturation in mafic magmas can also be evaluated. Mixing of a siliceous melt and a liquid of olivine tholeiite composition, similar to that thought to be a reasonable parental composition for many Duluth Complex intrusions, can induce sulfide saturation at mixing ratios in excess of 0.1. If the contaminant contains low quantities of sulfur the mixing ratio required to promote saturation is reduced. Mixing of mafic magmas at various stages of fractionation is evaluated using magma compositions that are thought to be appropriate for the generation of the Merensky Reef in the Bushveld Complex. Magma mixing is shown to be an effective process for the attainment of sulfide saturation, depending strongly on the sulfur concentrations of the end-member magmas.

  13. Carbohydrates protect protein against abiotic fragmentation by soil minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Patrick N.; Walter, Eric D.; Marean-Reardon, Carrie L.

    The degradation and turnover of soil organic matter is an important part of global carbon cycling and of particular importance with respect to attempts to predict the response of ecosystems to global climate change. Thus, it is important to mechanistically understand the processes by which organic matter can be degraded in the soil environment, including contact with reactive or catalytic mineral surfaces. We have characterized the outcome of the interaction of two minerals, birnessite and kaolinite, with two disaccharides, cellobiose and trehalose. These results show that birnessite reacts with and degrades the carbohydrates, while kaolinite does not. The reaction ofmore » disaccharides with birnessite produces Mn(II), indicating that degradation of the disaccharides is the result of their oxidation by birnessite. Furthermore, we find that both sugars can inhibit the degradation of a model protein by birnessite, demonstrating that the presence of one organic constituent can impact abiotic degradation of another. Therefore, both the reactivity of the mineral matrix and the presence of certain organic constituents influence the outcomes of abiotic degradation. These results suggest the possibility that microorganisms may be able to control the functionality of exoenzymes through the concomitant excretion of protective organic substances, such as those found in biofilms.« less

  14. Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA lifted the Administrative Stay of the TRI reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide. Hydrogen sulfide can reasonably be anticipated to cause chronic health effects in humans and significant adverse effects in aquatic organisms.

  15. A Reaction Involving Oxygen and Metal Sulfides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, William D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for oxygen generation by thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate in presence of manganese dioxide, reacted with various sulfides. Provides a table of sample product yields for various sulfides. (JM)

  16. Coupled Abiotic-Biotic Degradation of Bisphenol A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, J.; Prevatte, C.; Campagna, S. R.; Loeffler, F.

    2014-12-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant with weak estrogenic activity. BPA is readily biodegradable with oxygen available, but is recalcitrant to microbial degradation under anoxic conditions. However, BPA is susceptible to abiotic transformation under anoxic conditions. To better understand the fate of BPA in anoxic environments, the kinetics of BPA transformation by manganese oxide (d-MnO2) were investigated. BPA was rapidly transformed by MnO2 with a pseudo-first-order rate constant of 0.413 min-1. NMR and LC-MS analyses identified 4-hydroxycumyl alcohol (HCA) as a major intermediate. Up to 64% of the initial amount of BPA was recovered as HCA within 5 min, but the conversion efficiency decreased with time, suggesting that HCA was further degraded by MnO2. Further experiments confirmed that HCA was also susceptible to transformation by MnO2, albeit at 5-fold lower rates than BPA transformation. Mass balance approaches suggested that HCA was the major BPA transformation intermediate, but other compounds may also be formed. The abiotic transformation of BPA by MnO2 was affected by pH, and 10-fold higher transformation rates were observed at pH 4.5 than at pH 10. Compared to BPA, HCA has a lower octanol-water partitioning coefficient (Log Kow) of 0.76 vs 2.76 for BPA and a higher aqueous solubility of 2.65 g L-1 vs 0.31 g L-1 for BPA, suggesting higher mobility of HCA in the environment. Microcosms established with freshwater sediment materials collected from four geographically distinct locations and amended with HCA demonstrated rapid HCA biodegradation under oxic, but not under anoxic conditions. These findings suggest that BPA is not inert under anoxic conditions and abiotic reactions with MnO2 generate HCA, which has increased mobility and is susceptible to aerobic degradation. Therefore, coupled abiotic-biotic processes can affect the fate and longevity of BPA in terrestrial environments.

  17. Biogeochemistry of Fe(II) oxidation in a photosynthetic microbial mat: Implications for Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouwborst, Robert E.; Johnston, Anne; Koch, Gretchen; Luther, George W.; Pierson, Beverly K.

    2007-10-01

    We studied the role of microbial photosynthesis in the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in a high Fe(II) and high Mn(II) hot spring devoid of sulfide and atmospheric oxygen in the source waters. In situ light and dark microelectrode measurements of Fe(II), Mn(II) and O 2 were made in the microbial mat consisting of cyanobacteria and anoxygenic photosynthetic Chloroflexus sp. We show that Fe(II) oxidation occurred when the mat was exposed to varying intensities of sunlight but not near infrared light. We did not observe any Mn(II) oxidation under any light or dark condition over the pH range 5-7. We observed the impact of oxygenic photosynthesis on Fe(II) oxidation, distinct from the influence of atmospheric O 2 and anoxygenic photosynthesis. In situ Fe(II) oxidation rates in the mats and cell suspensions exposed to light are consistent with abiotic oxidation by O 2. The oxidation of Fe(II) to form primary Fe(III) phases contributed to banded iron-formations (BIFs) during the Precambrian. Both oxygenic photosynthesis, which produces O 2 as an oxidizing waste product, and anoxygenic photosynthesis in which Fe(II) is used to fix CO 2 have been proposed as Fe(II) oxidation mechanisms. Although we do not know the specific mechanisms responsible for all Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation, we assessed the relative importance of both mechanisms in this modern hot spring environment. In this environment, cyanobacterial oxygen production accounted for all the observed Fe(II) oxidation. The rate data indicate that a modest population of cyanobacteria could have mediated sufficient Fe(II) oxidation for some BIFs.

  18. Production of volatiles by the red seaweed Gelidium arbuscula (Rhodophyta): emission of ethylene and dimethyl sulfide.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Jimenez, Pilar; Brito-Romano, Olegario; Robaina, Rafael R

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different light conditions and exogenous ethylene on the emission of volatile compounds from the alga Gelidium arbuscula Bory de Saint-Vincent were studied. Special emphasis was placed on the possibility that the emission of ethylene and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) are related through the action of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) lyase. The conversion of DMSP to DMS and acrylate, which is catalyzed by DMSP lyase, can indirectly support the synthesis of ethylene through the transformation of acrylate to ethylene. After mimicking the desiccation of G. arbuscula thalli experienced during low tides, the volatile compounds emitted were trapped in the headspace of 2 mL glass vials for 1 h. Two methods based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry revealed that the range of organic volatile compounds released was affected by abiotic factors, such as the availability and spectral quality of light, salinity, and exogenous ethylene. Amines and methyl alkyl compounds were produced after exposure to white light and darkness but not after exposure to exogenous ethylene or red light. Volatiles potentially associated with the oxidation of fatty acids, such as alkenes and low-molecular-weight oxygenated compounds, accumu-lated after exposure to exogenous ethylene and red light. Ethylene was produced in all treatments, especially after exposure to exogenous ethylene. Levels of DMS, the most abundant sulfur-compound that was emitted in all of the conditions tested, did not increase after incubation with ethylene. Thus, although DMSP lyase is active in G. arbuscula, it is unlikely to contribute to ethylene synthesis. The generation of ethylene and DMS do not appear to be coordinated in G. arbuscula. © 2013 Phycological Society of America.

  19. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S...

  20. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  1. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  2. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  3. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  4. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  5. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504...-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in...

  6. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604...-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in...

  7. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-08-01

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  8. Red soil as a regenerable sorbent for high temperature removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas.

    PubMed

    Ko, Tzu-Hsing; Chu, Hsin; Lin, Hsiao-Ping; Peng, Ching-Yu

    2006-08-25

    In this study, hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) was removed from coal gas by red soil under high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor. Red soil powders were collected from the northern, center and southern of Taiwan. They were characterized by XRPD, porosity analysis and DCB chemical analysis. Results show that the greater sulfur content of LP red soils is attributed to the higher free iron oxides and suitable sulfidation temperature is around 773K. High temperature has a negative effect for use red soil as a desulfurization sorbent due to thermodynamic limitation in a reduction atmosphere. During 10 cycles of regeneration, after the first cycle the red soil remained stable with a breakthrough time between 31 and 36 min. Hydrogen adversely affects sulfidation reaction, whereas CO exhibits a positive effect due to a water-shift reaction. COS was formed during the sulfidation stage and this was attributed to the reaction of H(2)S and CO. Results of XRPD indicated that, hematite is the dominant active species in fresh red soil and iron sulfide (FeS) is a product of the reaction between hematite and hydrogen sulfide in red soils. The spinel phase FeAl(2)O(4) was found during regeneration, moreover, the amount of free iron oxides decreased after regeneration indicating the some of the free iron oxide formed a spinel phase, further reducting the overall desulfurization efficiency.

  9. EXTRACTION AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF ELEMENTAL SULFUR FROM SULFIDE MINERAL SURFACES BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY. (R826189)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple method for the quantitative determination of elemental sulfur on oxidized sulfide minerals is described. Extraction of elemental sulfur in perchloroethylene and subsequent analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography were used to ascertain the total elemental ...

  10. Transition of Blast Furnace Slag from Silicate Based to Aluminate Based: Sulfide Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhiming; Lv, Xuewei; Pang, Zhengde; He, Wenchao; Liang, Dong; Bai, Chenguang

    2017-10-01

    The effect of Al2O3 and Al2O3/SiO2 ratio on the sulfide capacity of the molten aluminosilicate CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO-TiO2 slag system with high Al2O3 content was measured at 1773 K (1500 °C) using a metal-slag equilibration method. The sulfide capacity between silicate-based and aluminate-based slag was also compared based on the thermodynamic analysis and structural characteristics of melts. At a fixed CaO/SiO2 ratio of 1.20, the sulfide capacity decreases with increasing Al2O3 content primarily due to the decrease of free oxygen (FO) and the activity of O2-. Increasing the Al2O3/SiO2 ratio from 0.47 to 0.79 causes a significant increase in the sulfide capacity of the slags, and a slight increase is found when the Al2O3/SiO2 ratio is more than 0.79. The effect of the substitution of silica by alumina on the sulfide capacity of the slags was not only due to an increase in the activity of basic oxides ( a_{{{O}^{2 - } }} ) but also to a decrease in the stability of sulfide ( γ_{{{S}^{2 - } }} ). Moreover, a_{{{O}^{2 - } }} and γ_{{{S}^{2 - } }} increase in a similar degree, and the weaker binding electronegativity of Al3+ with oxygen atoms results in a slight increase in the final sulfide capacity in the aluminate-based slag system with Al2O3 ↔ SiO2 substitution. Five different sulfide capacity models were employed to predict the sulfide capacity, and the iso-sulfide capacity distribution diagram based on the Young's model was obtained in the high Al2O3 corner of the diagram.

  11. Nitrosopersulfide (SSNO(-)) accounts for sustained NO bioactivity of S-nitrosothiols following reaction with sulfide.

    PubMed

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Santos, José L T; Mergia, Evanthia; Grman, Marian; Nagy, Péter; Kelm, Malte; Butler, Anthony; Feelisch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Sulfide salts are known to promote the release of nitric oxide (NO) from S-nitrosothiols and potentiate their vasorelaxant activity, but much of the cross-talk between hydrogen sulfide and NO is believed to occur via functional interactions of cell regulatory elements such as phosphodiesterases. Using RFL-6 cells as an NO reporter system we sought to investigate whether sulfide can also modulate nitrosothiol-mediated soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) activation following direct chemical interaction. We find a U-shaped dose response relationship where low sulfide concentrations attenuate sGC stimulation by S-nitrosopenicillamine (SNAP) and cyclic GMP levels are restored at equimolar ratios. Similar results are observed when intracellular sulfide levels are raised by pre-incubation with the sulfide donor, GYY4137. The outcome of direct sulfide/nitrosothiol interactions also critically depends on molar reactant ratios and is accompanied by oxygen consumption. With sulfide in excess, a 'yellow compound' accumulates that is indistinguishable from the product of solid-phase transnitrosation of either hydrosulfide or hydrodisulfide and assigned to be nitrosopersulfide (perthionitrite, SSNO(-); λ max 412 nm in aqueous buffers, pH 7.4; 448 nm in DMF). Time-resolved chemiluminescence and UV-visible spectroscopy analyses suggest that its generation is preceded by formation of the short-lived NO-donor, thionitrite (SNO(-)). In contrast to the latter, SSNO(-) is rather stable at physiological pH and generates both NO and polysulfides on decomposition, resulting in sustained potentiation of SNAP-induced sGC stimulation. Thus, sulfide reacts with nitrosothiols to form multiple bioactive products; SSNO(-) rather than SNO(-) may account for some of the longer-lived effects of nitrosothiols and contribute to sulfide and NO signaling.

  12. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin R.; Fiskal, Annika; Sommer, Stefan; Hensen, Christian; Lomnitz, Ulrike; Wuttig, Kathrin; Göttlicher, Jörg; Kossel, Elke; Steininger, Ralph; Canfield, Donald E.

    2016-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface. Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations >300 nM. At the boundary between sulfidic and nitrogenous conditions, iron concentrations dropped sharply to <20 nM coincident with a maximum in particulate iron concentration. Within the iron gradient, we found an increased expression of the key functional marker gene for nitrate reduction (narG). Part of this upregulation was related to the activity of known iron-oxidizing bacteria. Collectively, our data suggest that iron oxidation and removal is induced by nitrate-reducing microbes, either enzymatically through anaerobic iron oxidation or by providing nitrite for an abiotic reaction. Given the important role that iron plays in nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis and respiration, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation likely represents a key-link between the marine biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon.

  13. Crystallinity of Fe-Ni Sulfides in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Mikouchi, Takashi; Hagiya, Kenji; Le, Loan

    2008-01-01

    The main long-term goal of this research is to understand the physical conditions in the early solar nebula through the detailed characterization of a key class of mineral present in all primitive materials: Fe-Ni sulfides [1&2]. Fe-Ni sulfides can take dozens of structures, depending on the temperature of formation, as well as other physico-chemical factors which are imperfectly understood. Add to this the additional varying factor of Ni content, and we have a potentially sensitive cosmothermometer [3]. Unfortunately, this tool requires exact knowledge of the crystal structure of each grain being considered, and there have been few (none?) studies of the detailed structures of sulfides in chondritic materials. We report here on coordinated compositional and crystallographic investigation of Fe-Ni sulfides in diverse carbonaceous chondrites, initially Acfer 094 (the most primitive CM2 [4]) Tagish Lake (a unique type C2 [5]), a C1 lithology in Kaidun [6], Bali (oxidized CV3 [7]), and Efremovka (reduced CV3 [7]).

  14. Luminescence in Sulfides: A Rich History and a Bright Future

    PubMed Central

    Smet, Philippe F.; Moreels, Iwan; Hens, Zeger; Poelman, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Sulfide-based luminescent materials have attracted a lot of attention for a wide range of photo-, cathodo- and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with Ce3+ and Eu2+, the luminescence can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the sulfide host. Main application areas are flat panel displays based on thin film electroluminescence, field emission displays and ZnS-based powder electroluminescence for backlights. For these applications, special attention is given to BaAl2S4:Eu, ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. Recently, sulfide materials have regained interest due to their ability (in contrast to oxide materials) to provide a broad band, Eu2+-based red emission for use as a color conversion material in white-light emitting diodes (LEDs). The potential application of rare-earth doped binary alkaline-earth sulfides, like CaS and SrS, thiogallates, thioaluminates and thiosilicates as conversion phosphors is discussed. Finally, this review concludes with the size-dependent luminescence in intrinsic colloidal quantum dots like PbS and CdS, and with the luminescence in doped nanoparticles.

  15. p-Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    p - Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide ; CASRN 123 - 09 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for N

  16. Biological removal of air loaded with a hydrogen sulfide and ammonia mixture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-xu; Yin, Jun; Fang, Shi

    2004-01-01

    The nuisance impact of air pollutant emissions from wastewater pumping stations is a major issue of concern to China. Hydrogen sulfide and ammonia are commonly the primary odor and are important targets for removal. An alternative control technology, biofiltration, was studied. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of unit systems packed with compost in terms of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions treatment, and to establish optimal operating conditions for a full-scale conceptual design. The laboratory scale biofilter packed with compost was continuously supplied with hydrogen sulfide and ammonia gas mixtures. A volumetric load of less than 150 gH2S/(m3 x d) and 230 gNH3/(m3 x d) was applied for about fifteen weeks. Hydrogen sulfide and ammonia elimination occurred in the biofilter simultaneously. The removal efficiency, removal capacity and removal kinetics in the biofilter were studied. The hydrogen sulfide removal efficiency reached was very high above 99%, and ammonia removal efficiency was about 80%. Hydrogen sulfide was oxidized into sulphate. The ammonia oxidation products were nitrite and nitrate. Ammonia in the biofilter was mainly removed by adsorption onto the carrier material and by absorption into the water fraction of the carrier material. High percentages of hydrogen sulfide or ammonia were oxidized in the first section of the column. Through kinetics analysis, the presence of ammonia did not hinder the hydrogen sulfide removal. According to the relationship between pressure drop and gas velocity for the biofilter and Reynolds number, non-Darcy flow can be assumed to represent the flow in the medium.

  17. Abiotic gene transfer: rare or rampant?

    PubMed Central

    Kotnik, Tadej; Weaver, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic studies reveal that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) plays a prominent role in evolution and genetic variability of life. Five biotic mechanisms of HGT among prokaryotic organisms have been extensively characterized: conjugation, competence, transduction, gene-transfer-agent (GTA) particles, and transitory fusion with recombination, but it is not known whether they can account for all natural HGT. It is even less clear how HGT could have occurred before any of these mechanisms had developed. Here, we consider contemporary conditions and experiments on microorganisms to estimate possible roles of abiotic HGT – currently and throughout evolution. Candidate mechanisms include freeze-and-thaw, microbeads-agitation, and electroporation-based transformation, and we posit that these laboratory techniques have analogues in nature acting as mechanisms of abiotic HGT: freeze-and-thaw cycles in polar waters, sand-agitation at foreshores and riverbeds, and lightning-triggered electroporation in near-surface aqueous habitats. We derive conservative order-of-magnitude estimates for rates of microorganisms subjected to freeze-and-thaw cycles, sand-agitation, and lightning-triggered electroporation, at 1024, 1019, and 1017 per year, respectively. Considering the yield of viable transformants, which is by far the highest in electroporation, we argue this may still favor lightning-triggered transformation over the other two mechanisms. Electroporation-based gene transfer also appears to be the most general of these abiotic candidates, and perhaps even of all known HGT mechanisms. Future studies should provide improved estimates of gene transfer rates and cell viability, currently and in the past, but to assess the importance of abiotic HGT in nature, will likely require substantial progress – also in knowledge of biotic HGT. PMID:27067073

  18. Role of sugars under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Sami, Fareen; Yusuf, Mohammad; Faizan, Mohammad; Faraz, Ahmad; Hayat, Shamsul

    2016-12-01

    Sugars are the most important regulators that facilitate many physiological processes, such as photosynthesis, seed germination, flowering, senescence, and many more under various abiotic stresses. Exogenous application of sugars in low concentration promote seed germination, up regulates photosynthesis, promotes flowering, delayed senescence under various unfavorable environmental conditions. However, high concentration of sugars reverses all these physiological process in a concentration dependent manner. Thus, this review focuses the correlation between sugars and their protective functions in several physiological processes against various abiotic stresses. Keeping in mind the multifaceted role of sugars, an attempt has been made to cover the role of sugar-regulated genes associated with photosynthesis, seed germination and senescence. The concentration of sugars determines the expression of these sugar-regulated genes. This review also enlightens the interaction of sugars with several phytohormones, such as abscisic acid, ethylene, cytokinins and gibberellins and its effect on their biosynthesis under abiotic stress conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. A paradox resolved: Sulfide acquisition by roots of seep tubeworms sustains net chemoautotrophy

    PubMed Central

    Freytag, John K.; Girguis, Peter R.; Bergquist, Derk C.; Andras, Jason P.; Childress, James J.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2001-01-01

    Vestimentiferan tubeworms, symbiotic with sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophic bacteria, dominate many cold-seep sites in the Gulf of Mexico. The most abundant vestimentiferan species at these sites, Lamellibrachia cf. luymesi, grows quite slowly to lengths exceeding 2 meters and lives in excess of 170–250 years. L. cf. luymesi can grow a posterior extension of its tube and tissue, termed a “root,” down into sulfidic sediments below its point of original attachment. This extension can be longer than the anterior portion of the animal. Here we show, using methods optimized for detection of hydrogen sulfide down to 0.1 μM in seawater, that hydrogen sulfide was never detected around the plumes of large cold-seep vestimentiferans and rarely detectable only around the bases of mature aggregations. Respiration experiments, which exposed the root portions of L. cf. luymesi to sulfide concentrations between 51–561 μM, demonstrate that L. cf. luymesi use their roots as a respiratory surface to acquire sulfide at an average rate of 4.1 μmol⋅g−1⋅h−1. Net dissolved inorganic carbon uptake across the plume of the tubeworms was shown to occur in response to exposure of the posterior (root) portion of the worms to sulfide, demonstrating that sulfide acquisition by roots of the seep vestimentiferan L. cf. luymesi can be sufficient to fuel net autotrophic total dissolved inorganic carbon uptake. PMID:11687647

  20. Sulfidation Roasting of Hemimorphite with Pyrite for the Enrichment of Zn and Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Xiao-Bo; Xue, Ke; Ke, Yong; Zhou, Bo-Sheng; Li, Yang-Wen-Jun; Wang, Qing-Wei

    2016-09-01

    With the increasing consumption of zinc and the depletion of zinc sulfide ores, the exploitation of low-grade zinc oxide ores may be important for the sustainability of the zinc industry. Hemimorphite, a zinc hydroxyl silicate hydrate, is a significant source of Zn and Pb. It is difficult to obtain Zn and Pb from the hemimorphite using traditional technology. In this work, for the first time, sulfidation roasting of hemimorphite with pyrite was studied for the enrichment of Zn and Pb by a flotation process. Four stages of sulfidation roasting were determined based on x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry analysis. Then, the effects of sulfidation temperature, pyrite dosage and reaction time on the sulfidation percentages were investigated at the laboratory scale. The experimental results showed that the sulfidation percentages of Pb and Zn were as high as 98.08% and 90.55% under optimum conditions, respectively. Finally, a flotation test was performed to enrich Zn and Pb in the sulfidation product. A flotation concentrate with 8.78% Zn and 9.25% Pb was obtained, and the recovery of Zn and Pb reached 56.14% and 75.94%, respectively.

  1. An experimental study of Fe-Ni exchange between sulfide melt and olivine at upper mantle conditions: implications for mantle sulfide compositions and phase equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhou; von der Handt, Anette; Hirschmann, Marc M.

    2018-03-01

    The behavior of nickel in the Earth's mantle is controlled by sulfide melt-olivine reaction. Prior to this study, experiments were carried out at low pressures with narrow range of Ni/Fe in sulfide melt. As the mantle becomes more reduced with depth, experiments at comparable conditions provide an assessment of the effect of pressure at low-oxygen fugacity conditions. In this study, we constrain the Fe-Ni composition of molten sulfide in the Earth's upper mantle via sulfide melt-olivine reaction experiments at 2 GPa, 1200 and 1400 °C, with sulfide melt X_{{{Ni}}}^{{{Sulfide}}}={{Ni}}/{{Ni+{Fe}}} (atomic ratio) ranging from 0 to 0.94. To verify the approach to equilibrium and to explore the effect of {f_{{{O}2}}} on Fe-Ni exchange between phases, four different suites of experiments were conducted, varying in their experimental geometry and initial composition. Effects of Ni secondary fluorescence on olivine analyses were corrected using the PENELOPE algorithm (Baró et al., Nucl Instrum Methods Phys Res B 100:31-46, 1995), "zero time" experiments, and measurements before and after dissolution of surrounding sulfides. Oxygen fugacities in the experiments, estimated from the measured O contents of sulfide melts and from the compositions of coexisting olivines, were 3.0 ± 1.0 log units more reduced than the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer (suite 1, 2 and 3), and FMQ - 1 or more oxidized (suite 4). For the reduced (suites 1-3) experiments, Fe-Ni distribution coefficients K_{{D}}{}={(X_{{{Ni}}}^{{{sulfide}}}/X_{{{Fe}}}^{{{sulfide}}})}/{(X_{{{Ni}}^{{{olivine}}}/X_{{{Fe}}}^{{{olivine}}})}} are small, averaging 10.0 ± 5.7, with little variation as a function of total Ni content. More oxidized experiments (suite 4) give larger values of K D (21.1-25.2). Compared to previous determinations at 100 kPa, values of K D from this study are chiefly lower, in large part owing to the more reduced conditions of the experiments. The observed difference does not seem

  2. Controls on Highly Siderophile Element Concentrations in Martian Basalt: Sulfide Saturation and Under-Saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements (HSE; Re, Au and the platinum group elements) in shergottites exhibit a wide range from very high, similar to the terrestrial mantle, to very low, similar to sulfide saturated mid ocean ridge basalt (e.g., [1]). This large range has been difficult to explain without good constraints on sulfide saturation or under-saturation [2]. A new model for prediction of sulfide saturation places new constraints on this problem [3]. Shergottite data: For primitive shergottites, pressure and temperature estimates are between 1.2-1.5 GPa, and 1350-1470 C [4]. The range of oxygen fugacities is from FMQ-2 to IW, where the amount of Fe2O3 is low and thus does not have a significant effect on the S saturation values. Finally, the bulk compositions of shergottites have been reported in many recent studies (e.g., [5]). All of this information will be used to test whether shergottites are sulfide saturated [3]. Modeling values and results: The database for HSE partition coefficients has been growing with many new data for silicates and oxides [6-8] to complement a large sulfide database [9- 11]. Combining these data with simple batch melting models allows HSE contents of mantle melts to be estimated for sulfide-bearing vs. sulfide-free mantle. Combining such models with fractional crystallization modeling (e.g., [12]) allows HSE contents of more evolved liquids to be modeled. Most primitive shergottites have high HSE contents (and low S contents) that can be explained by sulfide under-saturated melting of the mantle. An exception is Dhofar 019 which has high S contents and very low HSE contents suggesting sulfide saturation. Most evolved basaltic shergottites have lower S contents than saturation, and intermediate HSE contents that can be explained by olivine, pyroxene, and chromite fractionation. An exception is EET A79001 lithology B, which has very low HSE contents and S contents higher than sulfide saturation values . evidence for sulfide saturation

  3. A proposed abiotic reaction scheme for hydroxylamine and monochloramine under chloramination relevant drinking water conditions.

    PubMed

    Wahman, David G; Speitel, Gerald E; Machavaram, Madhav V

    2014-09-01

    Drinking water monochloramine (NH2Cl) use may promote ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOB use (i) ammonia monooxygenase for biological ammonia (NH3) oxidation to hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and (ii) hydroxylamine oxidoreductase for NH2OH oxidation to nitrite. NH2Cl and NH2OH may react, providing AOB potential benefits and detriments. The NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction would benefit AOB by removing the disinfectant (NH2Cl) and releasing their growth substrate (NH3), but the NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction would also provide a possible additional inactivation mechanism besides direct NH2Cl reaction with cells. Because biological NH2OH oxidation supplies the electrons required for biological NH3 oxidation, the NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction provides a direct mechanism for NH2Cl to inhibit NH3 oxidation, starving the cell of reductant by preventing biological NH2OH oxidation. To investigate possible NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction implications on AOB, an understanding of the underlying abiotic reaction is first required. The present study conducted a detailed literature review and proposed an abiotic NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction scheme (RS) for chloramination relevant drinking water conditions (μM concentrations, air saturation, and pH 7-9). Next, RS literature based kinetics and end-products were evaluated experimentally between pHs 7.7 and 8.3, representing (i) the pH range for future experiments with AOB and (ii) mid-range pHs typically found in chloraminated drinking water. In addition, a (15)N stable isotope experiment was conducted to verify nitrous oxide and nitrogen gas production and their nitrogen source. Finally, the RS was slightly refined using the experimental data and an AQUASIM implemented kinetic model. A chloraminated drinking water relevant RS is proposed and provides the abiotic reaction foundation for future AOB biotic experiments. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Sulfidation treatment of copper-containing plating sludge towards copper resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Kuchar, D; Fukuta, T; Onyango, M S; Matsuda, H

    2006-11-02

    The present study is concerned with the sulfidation treatment of copper-containing plating sludge towards copper resource recovery by flotation of copper sulfide from treated sludge. The sulfidation treatment was carried out by contacting simulated or real copper plating sludge with Na(2)S solution for a period of 5 min to 24 h. The initial molar ratio of S(2-) to Cu(2+) (S(2-) to Me(2+) in the case of real sludge) was adjusted to 1.00, 1.25 or 1.50, while the solid to liquid ratio was set at 1:50. As a result, it was found that copper compounds were converted to various copper sulfides within the first 5 min. In the case of simulated copper sludge, CuS was identified as the main sulfidation product at the molar ratio of S(2-) to Cu(2+) of 1.00, while Cu(7)S(4) (Roxbyite) was mainly found at the molar ratios of S(2-) to Cu(2+) of 1.50 and 1.25. Based on the measurements of oxidation-reduction potential, the formation of either CuS or Cu(7)S(4) at different S(2-) to Cu(2+) molar ratios was attributed to the changes in the oxidation-reduction potential. By contrast, in the case of sulfidation treatment of real copper sludge, CuS was predominantly formed, irrespective of S(2-) to Me(2+) molar ratio.

  5. Microbial communities and arsenic biogeochemistry at the outflow of an alkaline sulfide-rich hot spring.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Yanhong; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Jiang, Dawei; Wang, Yanxin

    2016-04-29

    Alkaline sulfide-rich hot springs provide a unique environment for microbial community and arsenic (As) biogeochemistry. In this study, a representative alkaline sulfide-rich hot spring, Zimeiquan in the Tengchong geothermal area, was chosen to study arsenic geochemistry and microbial community using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Over 0.26 million 16S rRNA sequence reads were obtained from 5-paired parallel water and sediment samples along the hot spring's outflow channel. High ratios of As(V)/AsSum (total combined arsenate and arsenite concentrations) (0.59-0.78), coupled with high sulfide (up to 5.87 mg/L), were present in the hot spring's pools, which suggested As(III) oxidation occurred. Along the outflow channel, AsSum increased from 5.45 to 13.86 μmol/L, and the combined sulfide and sulfate concentrations increased from 292.02 to 364.28 μmol/L. These increases were primarily attributed to thioarsenic transformation. Temperature, sulfide, As and dissolved oxygen significantly shaped the microbial communities between not only the pools and downstream samples, but also water and sediment samples. Results implied that the upstream Thermocrinis was responsible for the transformation of thioarsenic to As(III) and the downstream Thermus contributed to derived As(III) oxidation. This study improves our understanding of microbially-mediated As transformation in alkaline sulfide-rich hot springs.

  6. Microbial communities and arsenic biogeochemistry at the outflow of an alkaline sulfide-rich hot spring

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Yanhong; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Jiang, Dawei; Wang, Yanxin

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline sulfide-rich hot springs provide a unique environment for microbial community and arsenic (As) biogeochemistry. In this study, a representative alkaline sulfide-rich hot spring, Zimeiquan in the Tengchong geothermal area, was chosen to study arsenic geochemistry and microbial community using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Over 0.26 million 16S rRNA sequence reads were obtained from 5-paired parallel water and sediment samples along the hot spring’s outflow channel. High ratios of As(V)/AsSum (total combined arsenate and arsenite concentrations) (0.59–0.78), coupled with high sulfide (up to 5.87 mg/L), were present in the hot spring’s pools, which suggested As(III) oxidation occurred. Along the outflow channel, AsSum increased from 5.45 to 13.86 μmol/L, and the combined sulfide and sulfate concentrations increased from 292.02 to 364.28 μmol/L. These increases were primarily attributed to thioarsenic transformation. Temperature, sulfide, As and dissolved oxygen significantly shaped the microbial communities between not only the pools and downstream samples, but also water and sediment samples. Results implied that the upstream Thermocrinis was responsible for the transformation of thioarsenic to As(III) and the downstream Thermus contributed to derived As(III) oxidation. This study improves our understanding of microbially-mediated As transformation in alkaline sulfide-rich hot springs. PMID:27126380

  7. An experimental and theoretical method for determination of standard electrode potential for the redox couple diphenyl sulfone/diphenyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. Z.; Wei, K. X.; Lv, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    DFT calculations were performed for diphenyl sulfide and diphenyl sulfone. The electrochemistry of diphenyl sulfide on the gold electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammety and the results show that standard electrode potential for redox couple diphenyl sulfone/diphenyl sulfide is 1.058 V, which is consistent with that of 1.057 calculated at B3LYP/6-31++G( d, p)-IEFPCM level. The front orbit theory and Mulliken charges of molecular explain well on the oxidation of diphenyl sulfide in oxidative desulfurization. According to equilibrium theory the experimental equilibrium constant in the oxidative desulfurization of H2O2, is 1.17 × 1048, which is consistent with the theoretical equilibrium constant is 2.18 × 1048 at B3LYP/6-31++G( d, p)-IEFPCM level.

  8. Biogeographic congruency among bacterial communities from terrestrial sulfidic springs

    PubMed Central

    Headd, Brendan; Engel, Annette S.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial sulfidic springs support diverse microbial communities by serving as stable conduits for geochemically diverse and nutrient-rich subsurface waters. Microorganisms that colonize terrestrial springs likely originate from groundwater, but may also be sourced from the surface. As such, the biogeographic distribution of microbial communities inhabiting sulfidic springs should be controlled by a combination of spring geochemistry and surface and subsurface transport mechanisms, and not necessarily geographic proximity to other springs. We examined the bacterial diversity of seven springs to test the hypothesis that occurrence of taxonomically similar microbes, important to the sulfur cycle, at each spring is controlled by geochemistry. Complementary Sanger sequencing and 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes retrieved five proteobacterial classes, and Bacteroidetes, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, and Firmicutes phyla from all springs, which suggested the potential for a core sulfidic spring microbiome. Among the putative sulfide-oxidizing groups (Epsilonproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria), up to 83% of the sequences from geochemically similar springs clustered together. Abundant populations of Hydrogenimonas-like or Sulfurovum-like spp. (Epsilonproteobacteria) occurred with abundant Thiothrix and Thiofaba spp. (Gammaproteobacteria), but Arcobacter-like and Sulfurimonas spp. (Epsilonproteobacteria) occurred with less abundant gammaproteobacterial populations. These distribution patterns confirmed that geochemistry rather than biogeography regulates bacterial dominance at each spring. Potential biogeographic controls were related to paleogeologic sedimentation patterns that could control long-term microbial transport mechanisms that link surface and subsurface environments. Knowing the composition of a core sulfidic spring microbial community could provide a way to monitor diversity changes if a system is threatened by anthropogenic processes or climate change. PMID

  9. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Ageing Kidney.

    PubMed

    Hou, Cui-Lan; Wang, Ming-Jie; Sun, Chen; Huang, Yong; Jin, Sheng; Mu, Xue-Pan; Chen, Ying; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Aims . The study aimed to examine whether hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) generation changed in the kidney of the ageing mouse and its relationship with impaired kidney function. Results . H 2 S levels in the plasma, urine, and kidney decreased significantly in ageing mice. The expression of two known H 2 S-producing enzymes in kidney, cystathionine γ -lyase (CSE) and cystathionine- β -synthase (CBS), decreased significantly during ageing. Chronic H 2 S donor (NaHS, 50  μ mol/kg/day, 10 weeks) treatment could alleviate oxidative stress levels and renal tubular interstitial collagen deposition. These protective effects may relate to transcription factor Nrf2 activation and antioxidant proteins such as HO-1, SIRT1, SOD1, and SOD2 expression upregulation in the ageing kidney after NaHS treatment. Furthermore, the expression of H 2 S-producing enzymes changed with exogenous H 2 S administration and contributed to elevated H 2 S levels in the ageing kidney. Conclusions . Endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in the ageing kidney is insufficient. Exogenous H 2 S can partially rescue ageing-related kidney dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress, decreasing collagen deposition, and enhancing Nrf2 nuclear translocation. Recovery of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production may also contribute to the beneficial effects of NaHS treatment.

  10. A fuel-cell-assisted iron redox process for simultaneous sulfur recovery and electricity production from synthetic sulfide wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Lin-Feng; Song, Wei; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Sun, Min

    2012-12-01

    Sulfide present in wastewaters and waste gases should be removed due to its toxicity, corrosivity, and malodorous property. Development of effective, stable, and feasible methods for sulfur recovery from sulfide attains a double objective of waste minimization and resource recovery. Here we report a novel fuel-cell-assisted iron redox (FC-IR) process for simultaneously recovering sulfur and electricity from synthetic sulfide wastewater. The FC-IR system consists of an oxidizing reactor where sulfide is oxidized to elemental sulfur by Fe(III), and a fuel cell where Fe(III) is regenerated from Fe(II) concomitantly with electricity producing. The oxidation of sulfide by Fe(III) is significantly dependent on solution pH. Increasing the pH from 0.88 to 1.96 accelerates the oxidation of sulfide, however, lowers the purity of the produced elemental sulfur. The performance of fuel cell is also a strong function of solution pH. Fe(II) is completely oxidized to Fe(III) when the fuel cell is operated at a pH above 6.0, whereas only partially oxidized below pH 6.0. At pH 6.0, the highest columbic efficiency of 75.7% is achieved and electricity production maintains for the longest time of 106 h. Coupling operation of the FC-IR system obtains sulfide removal efficiency of 99.90%, sulfur recovery efficiency of 78.6 ± 8.3%, and columbic efficiency of 58.6 ± 1.6%, respectively. These results suggest that the FC-IR process is a promising tool to recover sulfur and energy from sulfide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nitrogen isotopic fractionation during abiotic synthesis of organic solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuga, Maïa; Carrasco, Nathalie; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Bernard, Sylvain; Rigaudier, Thomas; Fleury, Benjamin; Tissandier, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    The formation of organic compounds is generally assumed to result from abiotic processes in the Solar System, with the exception of biogenic organics on Earth. Nitrogen-bearing organics are of particular interest, notably for prebiotic perspectives but also for overall comprehension of organic formation in the young Solar System and in planetary atmospheres. We have investigated abiotic synthesis of organics upon plasma discharge, with special attention to N isotope fractionation. Organic aerosols were synthesized from N2-CH4 and N2-CO gaseous mixtures using low-pressure plasma discharge experiments, aimed at simulating chemistry occurring in Titan's atmosphere and in the protosolar nebula, respectively. The nitrogen content, the N speciation and the N isotopic composition were analyzed in the resulting organic aerosols. Nitrogen is efficiently incorporated into the synthesized solids, independently of the oxidation degree, of the N2 content of the starting gas mixture, and of the nitrogen speciation in the aerosols. The aerosols are depleted in 15N by 15-25‰ relative to the initial N2 gas, whatever the experimental setup is. Such an isotopic fractionation is attributed to mass-dependent kinetic effect(s). Nitrogen isotope fractionation upon electric discharge cannot account for the large N isotope variations observed among Solar System objects and reservoirs. Extreme N isotope signatures in the Solar System are more likely the result of self-shielding during N2 photodissociation, exotic effect during photodissociation of N2 and/or low temperature ion-molecule isotope exchange. Kinetic N isotope fractionation may play a significant role in the Titan's atmosphere. On the Titan's night side, 15N-depletion resulting from electron driven reactions may counterbalance photo-induced 15N enrichments occurring on the day's side. We also suggest that the low δ15N values of Archaean organic matter (Beaumont and Robert, 1999) are partly the result of abiotic synthesis of

  12. Abiotic Formation of Methyl Halides in the Terrestrial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppler, F.

    2011-12-01

    Methyl chloride and methyl bromide are the most abundant chlorine and bromine containing organic compounds in the atmosphere. Since both compounds have relatively long tropospheric lifetimes they can effectively transport halogen atoms from the Earth's surface, where they are released, to the stratosphere and following photolytic oxidation form reactive halogen gases that lead to the chemical destruction of ozone. Methyl chloride and methyl bromide account for more than 20% of the ozone-depleting halogens delivered to the stratosphere and are predicted to grow in importance as the chlorine contribution to the stratosphere from anthropogenic CFCs decline. Today methyl chloride and methyl bromide originate mainly from natural sources with only a minor fraction considered to be of anthropogenic origin. However, until as recently as 2000 most of the methyl chloride and methyl bromide input to the atmosphere was considered to originate from the oceans, but investigations in recent years have clearly demonstrated that terrestrial sources such as biomass burning, wood-rotting fungi, coastal salt marshes, tropical vegetation and organic matter degradation must dominate the atmospheric budgets of these trace gases. However, many uncertainties still exist regarding strengths of both sources and sinks, as well as the mechanisms of formation of these naturally occurring halogenated gases. A better understanding of the atmospheric budget of both methyl chloride and methyl bromide is therefore required for reliable prediction of future ozone depletion. Biotic and abiotic methylation processes of chloride and bromide ion are considered to be the dominant pathways of formation of these methyl halides in nature. In this presentation I will focus on abiotic formation processes in the terrestrial environment and the potential parameters that control their emissions. Recent advances in our understanding of the abiotic formation pathway of methyl halides will be discussed. This will

  13. Airborne sulfur trace species intercomparison campaign: Sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide, hydrogen sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Hoell, James M., Jr.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1991-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of sulfur trace gases are presented. The intercomparison was part of the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) and was conducted during the summer of 1989. The intercomparisons were conducted on the Wallops Electra aircraft during flights from Wallops Island, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil. Sulfur measurements intercompared included sulfur dioxide (SO2), dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon disulfide (CS2), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). Measurement techniques ranged from filter collection systems with post-flight analyses to mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph systems employing various methods for measuring and identifying the sulfur gases during flight. Sampling schedules for the techniques ranged from integrated collections over periods as long as 50 minutes to one- to three-minute samples every ten or fifteen minutes. Several of the techniques provided measurements of more than one sulfur gas. Instruments employing different detection principles were involved in each of the sulfur intercomparisons. Also included in the intercomparison measurement scenario were a host of supporting measurements (i.e., ozone, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, total sulfur, aerosols, etc.) for purposes of: (1) interpreting results (i.e., correlation of any noted instrument disagreement with the chemical composition of the measurement environment); and (2) providing supporting chemical data to meet CITE-3 science objectives of studying ozone/sulfur photochemistry, diurnal cycles, etc. The results of the intercomparison study are briefly discussed.

  14. Metal sulfide for battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidotti, Ronald A.

    1988-08-01

    A number of metal sulfides can be used in batteries as a cathode (reducible) material as part of an electrochemical couple to provide energy. There are a number of physical and chemical characteristics that can be evaluated for screening potential candidates for use in batteries. These include: cell potential vs. Li, thermal and chemical stability, electrical conductivity, allotropic form (phase), reaction kinetics during discharge, type of discharge mechanism, and material rechargeability. These are reviewed in general, with emphasis on sulfides of copper, iron, and molybdenum which are currently being used as cathodes in Li and Li-alloy batteries. The presence of impurities can adversely impact performance when naturally occurring sulfide minerals are used for battery applications. Sandia National Laboratories uses natural pyrite (FeS2) for its high-temperature, thermally activated Li(Si)/FeS2 batteries. The purification and processing procedures for the FeS2 involves both chemical and physical methods. Flotation was found to yield comparable results as HF leaching for removal of silica, but without the negative health and environmental concerns associated with this technique.

  15. Natural abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soils: results from aromatic model compounds and soil samples.

    PubMed

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan G; Kotte, Karsten; Schöler, Heinz F

    2013-02-05

    Oxalic acid is the smallest dicarboxylic acid and plays an important role in soil processes (e.g., mineral weathering and metal detoxification in plants). We have first proven its abiotic formation in soils and investigated natural abiotic degradation processes based on the oxidation of soil organic matter, enhanced by Fe(3+) and H(2)O(2) as hydroxyl radical suppliers. Experiments with the model compound catechol and further hydroxylated benzenes were performed to examine a common degradation pathway and to presume a general formation mechanism of oxalic acid. Two soil samples were tested for the release of oxalic acid and the potential effects of various soil parameters on oxalic acid formation. Additionally, the soil samples were treated with different soil sterilization methods to prove the oxalic acid formation under abiotic soil conditions. Different series of model experiments were conducted to determine a range of factors including Fe(3+), H(2)O(2), reaction time, pH, and chloride concentration on oxalic acid formation. Under certain conditions, catechol is degraded up to 65.6% to oxalic acid referring to carbon. In serial experiments with two soil samples, oxalic acid was produced, and the obtained results are suggestive of an abiotic degradation process. In conclusion, Fenton-like conditions with low Fe(3+) concentrations and an excess of H(2)O(2) as well as acidic conditions were required for an optimal oxalic acid formation. The presence of chloride reduced oxalic acid formation.

  16. Unraveling the role of fungal symbionts in plant abiotic stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Lamabam Peter

    2011-01-01

    Fungal symbionts have been found to be associated with every plant studied in the natural ecosystem, where they colonize and reside entirely or partially in the internal tissues of their host plant. Fungal endophytes can express/form a range of different lifestyle/relationships with different host including symbiotic, mutualistic, commensalistic and parasitic in response to host genotype and environmental factors. In mutualistic association fungal endophyte can enhance growth, increase reproductive success and confer biotic and abiotic stress tolerance to its host plant. Since abiotic stress such as, drought, high soil salinity, heat, cold, oxidative stress and heavy metal toxicity is the common adverse environmental conditions that affect and limit crop productivity worldwide. It may be a promising alternative strategy to exploit fungal endophytes to overcome the limitations to crop production brought by abiotic stress. There is an increasing interest in developing the potential biotechnological applications of fungal endophytes for improving plant stress tolerance and sustainable production of food crops. Here we have described the fungal symbioses, fungal symbionts and their role in abiotic stress tolerance. A putative mechanism of stress tolerance by symbionts has also been covered. PMID:21512319

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide in Renal Physiology and Disease.

    PubMed

    Feliers, Denis; Lee, Hak Joo; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has only recently gained recognition for its physiological effects. It is synthesized widely in the mammalian tissues and regulates several biologic processes ranging from development, angiogenesis, neurotransmission to protein synthesis. Recent Advances: The aim of this review is to critically evaluate the evidence for a role for H2S in kidney function and disease. H2S regulates fundamental kidney physiologic processes such as glomerular filtration and sodium reabsorption. In kidney disease states H2S appears to play a complex role in a context-dependent manner. In some disease states such as ischemia-reperfusion and diabetic kidney disease it can serve as an agent that ameliorates kidney injury. In other diseases such as cis-platinum-induced kidney disease it may mediate kidney injury although more investigation is needed. Recent studies have revealed that the actions of nitric oxide and H2S may be integrated in kidney cells. Further studies are needed to understand the full impact of H2S on kidney physiology. As it is endowed with the properties of regulating blood flow, oxidative stress, and inflammation, H2S should be investigated for its role in inflammatory and toxic diseases of the kidney. Such in-depth exploration may identify specific kidney diseases in which H2S may constitute a unique target for therapeutic intervention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 720-731.

  18. Abiotic stress signaling and responses in plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Summary As sessile organisms, plants must cope with abiotic stress such as soil salinity, drought, and extreme temperatures. Core stress signaling pathways involve protein kinases related to the yeast SNF1 and mammalian AMPK, suggesting that stress signaling in plants evolved from energy sensing. Stress signaling regulates proteins critical for ion and water transport and for metabolic and gene-expression reprogramming to bring about ionic and water homeostasis and cellular stability under stress conditions. Understanding stress signaling and responses will increase our ability to improve stress resistance in crops to achieve agricultural sustainability and food security for a growing world population. PMID:27716505

  19. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of this...

  20. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of this...

  1. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of this...

  2. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of this...

  3. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of this...

  4. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of this...

  5. Laboratory chalcopyrite oxidation by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans: Oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurston, R.S.; Mandernack, K.W.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to simulate chalcopyrite oxidation under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in the absence or presence of the bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Experiments were carried out with 3 different oxygen isotope values of water (??18OH2O) so that approach to equilibrium or steady-state isotope fractionation for different starting conditions could be evaluated. The contribution of dissolved O2 and water-derived oxygen to dissolved sulfate formed by chalcopyrite oxidation was unambiguously resolved during the aerobic experiments. Aerobic oxidation of chalcopyrite showed 93 ?? 1% incorporation of water oxygen into the resulting sulfate during the biological experiments. Anaerobic experiments showed similar percentages of water oxygen incorporation into sulfate, but were more variable. The experiments also allowed determination of sulfate-water oxygen isotope fractionation, ??18OSO4-H2O, of ~ 3.8??? for the anaerobic experiments. Aerobic oxidation produced apparent ??SO4-H2O values (6.4???) higher than the anaerobic experiments, possibly due to additional incorporation of dissolved O2 into sulfate. ??34SSO4 values are ~ 4??? lower than the parent sulfide mineral during anaerobic oxidation of chalcopyrite, with no significant difference between abiotic and biological processes. For the aerobic experiments, a small depletion in ??34SSO4 of ~- 1.5 ?? 0.2??? was observed for the biological experiments. Fewer solids precipitated during oxidation under aerobic conditions than under anaerobic conditions, which may account for the observed differences in sulfur isotope fractionation under these contrasting conditions. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Comparative study of biogenic and abiotic iron-containing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z.; Shopska, M.; Paneva, D.; Kovacheva, D.; Kadinov, G.; Mitov, I.

    2016-12-01

    Series of iron-based biogenic materials prepared by cultivation of Leptothrix group of bacteria in different feeding media ( Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria isolation medium, Adler, Lieske and silicon-iron-glucose-peptone) were studied. Control samples were obtained in the same conditions and procedures but the nutrition media were not infected with bacteria, i.e. they were sterile. Room and low temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS) were used to reveal the composition and physicochemical properties of biomass and respective control samples. Comparative analysis showed differences in their composition and dispersity of present phases. Sample composition included different ratio of nanodimensional iron oxyhydroxide and oxide phases. Relaxation phenomena such as superparamagnetism or collective magnetic excitation behaviour were registered for some of them. The experimental data showed that the biogenic materials were enriched in oxyhydroxides of high dispersion. Catalytic behaviour of a selected biomass and abiotic material were studied in the reaction of CO oxidation. In situ diffuse-reflectance (DR) IRS was used to monitor the phase transformations in the biomass and CO conversion.

  7. Abscisic Acid and abiotic stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Narendra

    2007-05-01

    Abiotic stress is severe environmental stress, which impairs crop production on irrigated land worldwide. Overall, the susceptibility or tolerance to the stress in plants is a coordinated action of multiple stress responsive genes, which also cross-talk with other components of stress signal transduction pathways. Plant responses to abiotic stress can be determined by the severity of the stress and by the metabolic status of the plant. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone critical for plant growth and development and plays an important role in integrating various stress signals and controlling downstream stress responses. Plants have to adjust ABA levels constantly in responce to changing physiological and environmental conditions. To date, the mechanisms for fine-tuning of ABA levels remain elusive. The mechanisms by which plants respond to stress include both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent processes. Various transcription factors such as DREB2A/2B, AREB1, RD22BP1 and MYC/MYB are known to regulate the ABA-responsive gene expression through interacting with their corrosponding cis-acting elements such as DRE/CRT, ABRE and MYCRS/MYBRS, respectively. Understanding these mechanisms is important to improve stress tolerance in crops plants. This article first describes the general pathway for plant stress response followed by roles of ABA and transcription factors in stress tolerance including the regulation of ABA biosynthesis.

  8. Abscisic Acid and Abiotic Stress Signaling

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Abiotic stress is severe environmental stress, which impairs crop production on irrigated land worldwide. Overall, the susceptibility or tolerance to the stress in plants is a coordinated action of multiple stress responsive genes, which also cross-talk with other components of stress signal transduction pathways. Plant responses to abiotic stress can be determined by the severity of the stress and by the metabolic status of the plant. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone critical for plant growth and development and plays an important role in integrating various stress signals and controlling downstream stress responses. Plants have to adjust ABA levels constantly in responce to changing physiological and environmental conditions. To date, the mechanisms for fine-tuning of ABA levels remain elusive. The mechanisms by which plants respond to stress include both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent processes. Various transcription factors such as DREB2A/2B, AREB1, RD22BP1 and MYC/MYB are known to regulate the ABA-responsive gene expression through interacting with their corrosponding cis-acting elements such as DRE/CRT, ABRE and MYCRS/MYBRS, respectively. Understanding these mechanisms is important to improve stress tolerance in crops plants. This article first describes the general pathway for plant stress response followed by roles of ABA and transcription factors in stress tolerance including the regulation of ABA biosynthesis. PMID:19516981

  9. Abiotic and Biotic Mechanisms Controlling In Situ Remediation of NDMA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    FINAL REPORT Abiotic and Biotic Mechanisms Controlling In Situ Remediation of NDMA SERDP Project ER-1421 MAY 2009 James E. Szecsody...00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Abiotic and Biotic Mechanisms Controlling In Situ Remediation of NDMA 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...investigate whether in situ coupled abiotic/biotic degradation of N-nitrosodimethylamine ( NDMA , an emerging contaminant) could be used as a permeable

  10. Enhanced performance of denitrifying sulfide removal process at high carbon to nitrogen ratios under micro-aerobic condition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Zhang, Ruo-Chen; Xu, Xi-Jun; Fang, Ning; Wang, Ai-Jie; Ren, Nan-Qi; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2017-05-01

    The success of denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) processes, which simultaneously degrade sulfide, nitrate and organic carbon in the same reactor, counts on synergetic growths of autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifiers. Feeding wastewaters at high C/N ratio would stimulate overgrowth of heterotrophic bacteria in the DSR reactor so deteriorating the growth of autotrophic denitrifiers. The DSR tests at C/N=1.26:1, 2:1 or 3:1 and S/N =5:6 or 5:8 under anaerobic (control) or micro-aerobic conditions were conducted. Anaerobic DSR process has <50% sulfide removal with no elemental sulfur transformation. Under micro-aerobic condition to remove <5% sulfide by chemical oxidation pathway, 100% sulfide removal is achieved by the DSR consortia. Continuous-flow tests under micro-aerobic condition have 70% sulfide removal and 55% elemental sulfur recovery. Trace oxygen enhances activity of sulfide-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing bacteria to accommodate properly the wastewater with high C/N ratios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Site-specific 15N isotopic signatures of abiotically produced N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Jannis; Wolf, Benjamin; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Emmenegger, Lukas; Tuzson, Béla; Vereecken, Harry; Mohn, Joachim

    2014-08-01

    Efficient nitrous oxide (N2O) mitigation strategies require the identification of the main source and sink processes and their contribution to total soil N2O production. Several abiotic reactions of nitrification intermediates leading to N2O production are known, but their contribution to total N2O production in soils is uncertain. As the site preference (SP) of 15N in N2O is a promising tool to give more insight into N2O production processes, we investigated the SP of N2O produced by different abiotic reactions in a laboratory study. All reactions involved the nitrification intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) in combination with nitrite (NO2-), Fe3+, Fe2+ and Cu2+, reactants commonly or potentially found in soils, at different concentrations and pH values. N2O production and its four main isotopic species (14N14N16O, 15N14N16O, 14N15N16O, and 14N14N18O) were quantified simultaneously and online at high temporal resolution using quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy. Thereby, our study presents the first continuous analysis of δ18O in N2O. The experiments revealed the possibility of purely abiotic reactions over a wide range of acidity (pH 3-8) by different mechanisms. All studied abiotic pathways produced N2O with a characteristic SP in the range of 34-35‰, unaffected by process conditions and remaining constant over the course of the experiments. These findings reflect the benefit of continuous N2O isotopic analysis by laser spectroscopy, contribute new information to the challenging source partitioning of N2O emissions from soils, and emphasize the potentially significant role of coupled biotic-abiotic reactions in soils.

  12. Sulfur transformations at the hydrogen sulfide/oxygen interface in stratified waters and in cyanobacterial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Stratified water bodies allow the development of several microbial plates along the water column. The microbial plates develop in relation to nutrient availability, light penetration, and the distribution of oxygen and sulfide. Sulfide is initially produced in the sediment by sulfate-reducing bacteria. It diffuses along the water column creating a zone of hydrogen sulfide/oxygen interface. In the chemocline of Solar Lake oxygen and sulfide coexist in a 0 to 10 cm layer that moves up and down during a diurnal cycle. The microbial plate at the chemocline is exposed to oxygen and hydrogen sulfide, alternating on a diurnal basis. The cyanobacteria occupying the interface switch from anoxygenic photosynthesis in the morning to oxygenic photosynthesis during the rest of the day which results in a temporal build up of elemental sulfur during the day and disappears at night due to both oxidation to thiosulfate and sulfate by thiobacilli, and reduction to hydrogen sulfide by Desulfuromonas sp. and anaerobically respiring cyanobacteria. Sulfate reduction was enhanced in the light at the surface of the cyanobacterial mats. Microsulfate reduction measurements showed enhanced activity of sulfate reduction even under high oxygen concentrations of 300 to 800 micrometer. Apparent aerobic SO sub 4 reduction activity is explained by the co-occurrence of H sub 2. The physiology of this apparent sulfate reduction activity is studied.

  13. Oxidation in Enceladus' Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, C.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Glein, C.; Teolis, B. D.

    2017-12-01

    The detection of molecular hydrogen in the plume of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus reports that there is positive chemical affinity for methanogenesis, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon dioxide to form methane and water [Waite et al., 2017]. Methanogenesis, however, is just one of many possible metabolic pathways that could be utilized. While some of the oxidants involved in these metabolic pathways have already been detected in the plume (i.e. carbon dioxide), sulfate, which could play an important role in several of these reactions, has not yet been observed. To constrain the amount of sulfate and other oxidants that could be present to support these metabolisms, we present a geochemical model of Enceladus' ocean based on detections made by the Cassini INMS instrument [Waite et. al, 2017]. We use a model of radiolysis on the surface of Enceladus to estimate the amount of molecular oxygen (O2) contained in the ice. We calculate the delivery rate of O2 from the surface ice to the ocean using previous estimates of the rate of ice deposition on the south polar region [Kempf et al., 2010], and the meteoritic gardening rate for the older surface of the moon. Assuming this activity has occurred over 4.5 billion years, we obtain an upper limit of > 1020 moles of O2 delivered to the ocean over Enceladus' lifetime. This large amount of oxygen could react with sulfides, reduced iron, or organic materials to produce sulfate, ferric oxyhydroxides, or carbon dioxide/carboxylic acids, respectively. We calculate upper limits on the amounts of these materials using a mineralogical model of Enceladus' core [Waite et al., 2017]. We find that the abiotic oxidation of pyrrhotite, which is the most likely pathway for sulfate production, could yield a sulfate concentration > 4 mol/(kg H2O). We suggest that oxidants should be abundant in the ocean and plume unless they are being consumed by life, the rate of ice deposition on the surface is much smaller than what has been predicted, or

  14. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Gabriel [Chihuahua, MX; Chianelli, Russell R [El Paso, TX; Fuentes, Sergio [Ensenada, MX; Torres, Brenda [El Paso, TX

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  15. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  16. Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Mauro, Ernesto

    Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions. Ernesto Di Mauro Dipartimento di Genetica Bi-ologia Molecolare, Universit` "Sapienza" Roma, Italy. a At least four conditions must be satisfied for the spontaneous generation of (pre)-genetic poly-mers: 1) availability of precursors that are activated enough to spontaneously polymerize. Preliminary studies showed that (a) nucleic bases and acyclonucleosides can be synthesized from formamide H2NCOH by simply heating with prebiotically available mineral catalysts [last reviewed in (1)], and that b) nucleic bases can be phosphorylated in every possible posi-tion [2'; 3'; 5'; cyclic 2',3'; cyclic 3',5' (2)]. The higher stability of the cyclic forms allows their accumulation. 2) A polymerization mechanism. A reaction showing the formation of RNA polymers starting from prebiotically plausible precursors (3',5' cyclic GMP and 3', 5'cyclic AMP) was recently reported (3). Polymerization in these conditions is thermodynamically up-hill and an equilibrium is attained that limits the maximum length of the polymer produced to about 40 nucleotides for polyG and 100 nucleotides for polyA. 3) Ligation of the synthesized oligomers. If this type of reaction could occur according to a terminal-joining mechanism and could generate canonical 3',5' phosphodiester bonds, exponential growth would be obtained of the generated oligomers. This type of reaction has been reported (4) , limited to homogeneous polyA sequences and leading to the production of polyA dimers and tetramers. What is still missing are: 4) mechanisms that provide the proof of principle for the generation of sequence complexity. We will show evidence for two mechanisms providing this proof of principle for simple complementary sequences. Namely: abiotic sequence complementary-driven terminal ligation and sequence-complementary terminal growth. In conclusion: all the steps leading to the generation of RNA in abiotic conditions are satisfied. (1) R Saladino, C Crestini, F

  17. Giant Hydrogen Sulfide Plume in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Peru Supports Chemolithoautotrophy

    PubMed Central

    Großkopf, Tobias; Kalvelage, Tim; Löscher, Carolin R.; Paulmier, Aurélien; Contreras, Sergio; Siegel, Herbert; Holtappels, Moritz; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schilhabel, Markus B.; Graco, Michelle; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; LaRoche, Julie

    2013-01-01

    In Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems nutrient-rich waters are transported to the ocean surface, fuelling high photoautotrophic primary production. Subsequent heterotrophic decomposition of the produced biomass increases the oxygen-depletion at intermediate water depths, which can result in the formation of oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). OMZs can sporadically accumulate hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is toxic to most multicellular organisms and has been implicated in massive fish kills. During a cruise to the OMZ off Peru in January 2009 we found a sulfidic plume in continental shelf waters, covering an area >5500 km2, which contained ∼2.2×104 tons of H2S. This was the first time that H2S was measured in the Peruvian OMZ and with ∼440 km3 the largest plume ever reported for oceanic waters. We assessed the phylogenetic and functional diversity of the inhabiting microbial community by high-throughput sequencing of DNA and RNA, while its metabolic activity was determined with rate measurements of carbon fixation and nitrogen transformation processes. The waters were dominated by several distinct γ-, δ- and ε-proteobacterial taxa associated with either sulfur oxidation or sulfate reduction. Our results suggest that these chemolithoautotrophic bacteria utilized several oxidants (oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide and nitrous oxide) to detoxify the sulfidic waters well below the oxic surface. The chemolithoautotrophic activity at our sampling site led to high rates of dark carbon fixation. Assuming that these chemolithoautotrophic rates were maintained throughout the sulfidic waters, they could be representing as much as ∼30% of the photoautotrophic carbon fixation. Postulated changes such as eutrophication and global warming, which lead to an expansion and intensification of OMZs, might also increase the frequency of sulfidic waters. We suggest that the chemolithoautotrophically fixed carbon may be involved in a negative feedback loop that could fuel further

  18. Giant hydrogen sulfide plume in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru supports chemolithoautotrophy.

    PubMed

    Schunck, Harald; Lavik, Gaute; Desai, Dhwani K; Großkopf, Tobias; Kalvelage, Tim; Löscher, Carolin R; Paulmier, Aurélien; Contreras, Sergio; Siegel, Herbert; Holtappels, Moritz; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schilhabel, Markus B; Graco, Michelle; Schmitz, Ruth A; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Laroche, Julie

    2013-01-01

    In Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems nutrient-rich waters are transported to the ocean surface, fuelling high photoautotrophic primary production. Subsequent heterotrophic decomposition of the produced biomass increases the oxygen-depletion at intermediate water depths, which can result in the formation of oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). OMZs can sporadically accumulate hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is toxic to most multicellular organisms and has been implicated in massive fish kills. During a cruise to the OMZ off Peru in January 2009 we found a sulfidic plume in continental shelf waters, covering an area >5500 km(2), which contained ∼2.2×10(4) tons of H2S. This was the first time that H2S was measured in the Peruvian OMZ and with ∼440 km(3) the largest plume ever reported for oceanic waters. We assessed the phylogenetic and functional diversity of the inhabiting microbial community by high-throughput sequencing of DNA and RNA, while its metabolic activity was determined with rate measurements of carbon fixation and nitrogen transformation processes. The waters were dominated by several distinct γ-, δ- and ε-proteobacterial taxa associated with either sulfur oxidation or sulfate reduction. Our results suggest that these chemolithoautotrophic bacteria utilized several oxidants (oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide and nitrous oxide) to detoxify the sulfidic waters well below the oxic surface. The chemolithoautotrophic activity at our sampling site led to high rates of dark carbon fixation. Assuming that these chemolithoautotrophic rates were maintained throughout the sulfidic waters, they could be representing as much as ∼30% of the photoautotrophic carbon fixation. Postulated changes such as eutrophication and global warming, which lead to an expansion and intensification of OMZs, might also increase the frequency of sulfidic waters. We suggest that the chemolithoautotrophically fixed carbon may be involved in a negative feedback loop that could fuel

  19. Biological treatment process of air loaded with an ammonia and hydrogen sulfide mixture.

    PubMed

    Malhautier, Luc; Gracian, Catherine; Roux, Jean-Claude; Fanlo, Jean-Louis; Le Cloirec, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    The physico-chemical characteristics of granulated sludge lead us to develop its use as a packing material in air biofiltration. Then, the aim of this study is to investigate the potential of unit systems packed with this support in terms of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions treatment. Two laboratory scale pilot biofilters were used. A volumetric load of 680 g H2S m(-3) empty bed day(-1) and 85 g NH3 m(-3) empty bed day(-1) was applied for eight weeks to a unit called BGSn (column packed with granulated sludge and mainly supplied with hydrogen sulfide); a volumetric load of 170 g H2S m(-3) empty bed day(-1) and 340 g NH3 m(-3) empty bed day(-1) was applied for eight weeks to the other called BGNs (column packed with granulated sludge and mainly supplied with ammonia). Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide elimination occur in the biofilters simultaneously. The hydrogen sulphide and ammonia removal efficiencies reached are very high: 100% and 80% for BGSn; 100% and 80% for BGNs respectively. Hydrogen sulfide is oxidized into sulphate and sulfur. The ammonia oxidation products are nitrite and nitrate. The nitrogen error mass balance is high for BGSn (60%) and BGNs (36%). This result could be explained by the denitrification process which would have occurred in anaerobic zones. High percentages of ammonia or hydrogen sulfide are oxidized on the first half of the column. The oxidation of high amounts of hydrogen sulfide would involve some environmental stress on nitrifying bacterial growth and activity.

  20. Selenium content in sulfide ores from the Chalkidiki peninsula, Greece.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidou, A E

    1998-01-01

    Selenium (Se) was assessed in galena, sphalerite, and pyrite samples. These are components of mixed sulfide ores from the Olympias and Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres deposits and the Skouries porphyry-copper deposit. We used atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) with a hydride generator system. The highest concentration of Se (516 ppm) was found in the fine-grained galena at the -135 level of the Olympias deposits. In the Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres deposit, the highest concentration of Se (33 ppm) was found in the pyrites of the level 30. The concentration of Se in the arsenopyrites and chalcopyrites is lower than the detection limit of the analytical method (< 100 ppb). The concentrated chalcopyrite from the porphyry copper deposit at Skouries exhibits a significant Se content (average 200 ppm) in contrast to the chalcopyrite from the Olympias and the Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres. Variations in the Se content of the sulfide minerals studied could be caused by redox-pH and/or temperature conditions, as well as by the difference in crystal structure. The Se found in the areas studied may positively affect the environment. Sulfide minerals are oxidized by microorganisms, infiltrate in the soil-water in the form of selenate or selenite ion, and directly or indirectly influence the human organism.