Science.gov

Sample records for abl height climatology

  1. Towards a Wind Energy Climatology at Advanced Turbine Hub-Heights: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.

    2005-05-01

    Measurements of wind characteristics over a wide range of heights up to and above 100 m are useful to: (1) characterize the local and regional wind climate; (2) validate wind resource estimates derived from numerical models; and (3) evaluate changes in wind characteristics and wind shear over the area swept by the blades. Developing wind climatology at advanced turbine hub heights for the United States benefits wind energy development. Tall tower data from Kansas, Indiana, and Minnesota (which have the greatest number of tall towers with measurement data) will be the focus of this paper. Analyses of data from the tall towers will start the process of developing a comprehensive climatology.

  2. Monthly mean global climatology of temperature, wind, geopotential height, and pressure for 0 - 120 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Eric L.; Chandra, Sushil; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Barnett, John J.

    1988-01-01

    A monthly mean climatology is presented of temperature, wind, and geopotential height with nearly pole-to-pole coverage (80 S to 80 N) for 0 to 210 km, which can be used as a function of altitude and pressure. The purpose is to provide a reference for various atmospheric research and analysis activities. Data sources and methods of computation are described; in general, hydrostatic and thermal wind balance are maintained at all levels and latitudes. As observed in a series of cross-sectional plots, this climatology accurately reproduces most of the characteristic features of the atmosphere such as equatorial wind and the general structure of the tropopause, stratopause, and mesopause. A series of zonal wind profiles is also represented comparing this climatological wind with monthly mean climatological direct wind measurements in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The temperature and zonal wind climatology at stratospheric levels is compared with corresponding data from the National Meteorological Center, and general agreement is observed between the two data sets. Tables of the climatological values as a function of latitude and height for each month are contained in Appendix B, and are also available in floppy disk.

  3. Observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height over Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: Investigating boundary layer climatology in arid regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzooqi, Mohamed Al; Basha, Ghouse; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.; Armstrong, Peter; Molini, Annalisa

    2014-05-01

    Strong sensible heat fluxes and deep turbulent mixing - together with marked dustiness and a low substrate water content - represent a characteristic signature in the boundary layer over hot deserts, resulting in "thicker" mixing layers and peculiar optical properties. Beside these main features however, desert ABLs present extremely complex local structures that have been scarcely addressed in the literature, and whose understanding is essential in modeling processes such as the transport of dust and pollutants, and turbulent fluxes of momentum, heat and water vapor in hyper-arid regions. In this study, we analyze a continuous record of observations of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height from a single lens LiDAR ceilometer operated at Masdar Institute Field Station (24.4oN, 54.6o E, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), starting March 2013. We compare different methods for the estimation of the ABL height from Ceilometer data such as, classic variance-, gradient-, log gradient- and second derivation-methods as well as recently developed techniques such as the Bayesian Method and Wavelet covariance transform. Our goal is to select the most suited technique for describing the climatology of the ABL in desert environments. Comparison of our results with radiosonde observations collected at the nearby airport of Abu Dhabi indicate that the WCT and the Bayesian method are the most suitable tools to accurately identify the ABL height in all weather conditions. These two methods are used for the definition of diurnal and seasonal climatologies of the boundary layer conditional to different atmospheric stability classes.

  4. Two global climatologies of daily fire emission injection heights since 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remy, Samuel; Veira, Andreas; Paugam, Ronan; Sofiev, Mikhail; Kaiser, Johannes; Marenco, Franco; Burton, Sharon P.; Benedetti, Angela

    2016-04-01

    The Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) assimilates Fire Radiative Power (FRP) observations from satellite-based MODIS sensors to produce daily estimates of biomass burning emission. It has been extended to include information about injection heights of biomass burning species provided by two distinct algorithms, which also use meteorological information from the operational weather forecasts of ECMWF. Injection heights are provided by the semi-empirical Sofiev parameterization and an analytical one-dimension Plume Rise Model (PRM). The two algorithms provide estimates for injection heights for each satellite pixel. Similarly to FRP observations, these estimates are then gridded, averaged and assimilated, using a simple observation operator, so as to fill the observational gaps. A global database of daily biomass burning emissions and injection heights at 0.1° resolution has thus been produced for 2003-2015. The database is being extended in near-real-time with the operational GFAS service of the Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Service (CAMS). The two injection height datasets were compared against a new dataset of satellite-based plume height observations. The Sofiev parameterization showed a better overall agreement against observations, while the PRM was better at capturing the variability of injection heights and at estimating the injection heights of large fires. The results from both also show a differentiation depending on the type of vegetation. A positive trend with time in median injection heights from the PRM was noted, less marked from the Sofiev parameterization. This is provoked by a negative trend in number of small fires, especially in some regions such as South America. The use of biomass burning emission heights in atmospheric composition forecasts was assessed in two case studies: the SAMBBA campaign which took place in September 2012 in Brazil, and a series of large fire events in the Western U.S. in August 2013. For these case studies

  5. Turbulent Flow at 190 m Height Above London During 2006-2008: A Climatology and the Applicability of Similarity Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. R.; Lacser, A.; Barlow, J. F.; Padhra, A.; Belcher, S. E.; Nemitz, E.; Helfter, C.; Famulari, D.; Grimmond, C. S. B.

    2010-10-01

    Flow and turbulence above urban terrain is more complex than above rural terrain, due to the different momentum and heat transfer characteristics that are affected by the presence of buildings (e.g. pressure variations around buildings). The applicability of similarity theory (as developed over rural terrain) is tested using observations of flow from a sonic anemometer located at 190.3 m height in London, U.K. using about 6500 h of data. Turbulence statistics—dimensionless wind speed and temperature, standard deviations and correlation coefficients for momentum and heat transfer—were analysed in three ways. First, turbulence statistics were plotted as a function only of a local stability parameter z/Λ (where Λ is the local Obukhov length and z is the height above ground); the σ i / u * values ( i = u, v, w) for neutral conditions are 2.3, 1.85 and 1.35 respectively, similar to canonical values. Second, analysis of urban mixed-layer formulations during daytime convective conditions over London was undertaken, showing that atmospheric turbulence at high altitude over large cities might not behave dissimilarly from that over rural terrain. Third, correlation coefficients for heat and momentum were analyzed with respect to local stability. The results give confidence in using the framework of local similarity for turbulence measured over London, and perhaps other cities. However, the following caveats for our data are worth noting: (i) the terrain is reasonably flat, (ii) building heights vary little over a large area, and (iii) the sensor height is above the mean roughness sublayer depth.

  6. Intercomparison of Satellite Derived Gravity Time Series with Inferred Gravity Time Series from TOPEX/POSEIDON Sea Surface Heights and Climatological Model Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, C.; Au, A.; Klosko, S.; Chao, B.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The upcoming GRACE mission promises to open a window on details of the global mass budget that will have remarkable clarity, but it will not directly answer the question of what the state of the Earth's mass budget is over the critical last quarter of the 20th century. To address that problem we must draw upon existing technologies such as SLR, DORIS, and GPS, and climate modeling runs in order to improve our understanding. Analysis of long-period geopotential changes based on SLR and DORIS tracking has shown that addition of post 1996 satellite tracking data has a significant impact on the recovered zonal rates and long-period tides. Interannual effects such as those causing the post 1996 anomalies must be better characterized before refined estimates of the decadal period changes in the geopotential can be derived from the historical database of satellite tracking. A possible cause of this anomaly is variations in ocean mass distribution, perhaps associated with the recent large El Nino/La Nina. In this study, a low-degree spherical harmonic gravity time series derived from satellite tracking is compared with a TOPEX/POSEIDON-derived sea surface height time series. Corrections for atmospheric mass effects, continental hydrology, snowfall accumulation, and ocean steric model predictions will be considered.

  7. Urban Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazel, Anthony J.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This section on Urban Climates provides a basic understanding of what comprises the urban climate and what factors control the overall development of the urban climate. We also discuss in this section, methods for evaluating urban climate characteristics and forcing functions as well as how the urban heat island effect comes into play as a dynamic influence on urban climatology. Additionally, we examine and discuss the major radiation and energy balance of city (i.e., shortwave and longwave radiation, albedo, net all-wave radiation, total energy balance, and sensible latent, and storage heat) and the interactions of these energy balances with the lower atmosphere. The use of remote sensing to measure urban surface temperatures as a driving force in the development of the urban heat island effect is presented. We also discuss how the overall moisture, precipitation, humidity, and air movement in cities (i,e,, wind speeds and wind direction) and wind environment of the city affects urban climatology.

  8. A new evaporation duct climatology over the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yang; Yang, Kunde; Yang, Yixin; Ma, Yuanliang

    2015-10-01

    The climatology of evaporation ducts is important for shipborne electromagnetic system design and application. The evaporation duct climatology that is currently used for such applications was developed in the mid 1980s; this study presents efforts to improve it over the South China Sea (SCS) by using a state-of-the-art evaporation duct model and an improved meteorology dataset. This new climatology provides better evaporation duct height (EDH) data over the SCS, at a higher resolution of 0.312°×0.313°. A comparison between the new climatology and the old one is performed. The monthly average EDH in the new climatology is between 10 and 12 m over the SCS, higher than that in the old climatology. The spatiotemporal characteristics of the evaporation duct over the SCS in different months are analyzed in detail, based on the new climatology.

  9. A novel tropopause-related climatology of ozone profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofieva, V. F.; Tamminen, J.; Kyrölä, E.; Mielonen, T.; Veefkind, P.; Hassler, B.; Bodeker, G. E.

    2013-08-01

    A new ozone climatology, based on ozonesonde and satellite measurements, spanning the altitude region between the Earth's surface and ~60 km is presented (TpO3 climatology). This climatology is novel in that the ozone profiles are categorized according to calendar month, latitude and local tropopause heights. Compared to the standard latitude-month categorization, this presentation improves the representativeness of the ozone climatology in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere (UTLS). The probability distribution of tropopause heights in each latitude-month bin provides additional climatological information and allows transforming/comparing the TpO3 climatology to a standard climatology of zonally mean ozone profiles. The TpO3 climatology is based on high-vertical-resolution measurements of ozone from the satellite-based Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (in 1984 to 2005) and from balloon-borne ozonesondes in 1980 to 2006. The main benefits of the TpO3 climatology are reduced standard deviations on climatological ozone profiles in the UTLS, partial characterization of longitudinal variability, and characterization of ozone profiles in the presence of double tropopauses. The first successful application of the TpO3 climatology as a priori in ozone profiles retrievals from Ozone Monitoring Instrument on board the EOS-Aura satellite shows an improvement of ozone precision in UTLS of up to 10% compared with the use of conventional climatologies. In addition to being advantageous for use as a priori in satellite retrieval algorithms, the TpO3 climatology might be also useful for validating the representation of ozone in climate model simulations.

  10. A novel tropopause-related climatology of ozone profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofieva, V. F.; Tamminen, J.; Kyrölä, E.; Mielonen, T.; Veefkind, P.; Hassler, B.; Bodeker, G. E.

    2014-01-01

    A new ozone climatology, based on ozonesonde and satellite measurements, spanning the altitude region between the earth's surface and ~60 km is presented (TpO3 climatology). This climatology is novel in that the ozone profiles are categorized according to calendar month, latitude and local tropopause heights. Compared to the standard latitude-month categorization, this presentation improves the representativeness of the ozone climatology in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere (UTLS). The probability distribution of tropopause heights in each latitude-month bin provides additional climatological information and allows transforming/comparing the TpO3 climatology to a standard climatology of zonal mean ozone profiles. The TpO3 climatology is based on high-vertical-resolution measurements of ozone from the satellite-based Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (in 1984 to 2005) and from balloon-borne ozonesondes from 1980 to 2006. The main benefits of the TpO3 climatology are reduced standard deviations on climatological ozone profiles in the UTLS, partial characterization of longitudinal variability, and characterization of ozone profiles in the presence of double tropopauses. The first successful application of the TpO3 climatology as a priori in ozone profile retrievals from Ozone Monitoring Instrument on board the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura satellite shows an improvement of ozone precision in UTLS of up to 10% compared with the use of conventional climatologies. In addition to being advantageous for use as a priori in satellite retrieval algorithms, the TpO3 climatology might be also useful for validating the representation of ozone in climate model simulations.

  11. Monkey Able After Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    On May 28, 1959, a Jupiter Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile provided by a U.S. Army team in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, launched a nose cone carrying Baker, A South American squirrel monkey and Able, An American-born rhesus monkey. This photograph shows Able after recovery of the nose cone of the Jupiter rocket by U.S.S. Kiowa.

  12. Antarctic Meteorology and Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. C.; Turner, J.

    1997-07-01

    This book is a comprehensive survey of the climatology and meteorology of Antarctica. The first section of the book reviews the methods by which we can observe the Antarctic atmosphere and presents a synthesis of climatological measurements. In the second section, the authors consider the processes that maintain the observed climate, from large-scale atmospheric circulation to small-scale processes. The final section reviews our current knowledge of the variability of Antarctic climate and the possible effects of "greenhouse" warming. The authors stress links among the Antarctic atmosphere, other elements of the Antarctic climate system (oceans, sea ice and ice sheets), and the global climate system. This volume will be of greatest interest to meteorologists and climatologists with a specialized interest in Antarctica, but it will also appeal to researchers in Antarctic glaciology, oceanography and biology. Graduates and undergraduates studying physical geography, and the earth, atmospheric and environmental sciences will find much useful background material in the book.

  13. Situational Lightning Climatologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred

    2010-01-01

    Research has revealed distinct spatial and temporal distributions of lightning occurrence that are strongly influenced by large-scale atmospheric flow regimes. It was believed there were two flow systems, but it has been discovered that actually there are seven distinct flow regimes. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) has recalculated the lightning climatologies for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), and the eight airfields in the National Weather Service in Melbourne (NWS MLB) County Warning Area (CWA) using individual lightning strike data to improve the accuracy of the climatologies. The software determines the location of each CG lightning strike with 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-nmi (.9.3-, 18.5-, 37-, 55.6-km) radii from each airfield. Each CG lightning strike is binned at 1-, 3-, and 6-hour intervals at each specified radius. The software merges the CG lightning strike time intervals and distance with each wind flow regime and creates probability statistics for each time interval, radii, and flow regime, and stratifies them by month and warm season. The AMU also updated the graphical user interface (GUI) with the new data.

  14. HEIGHTS PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    POTTER, LOUIS A.

    THE "HEIGHTS" PROGRAM, AS PART OF THE GREAT CITIES SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM, IS BASED ON THE BELIEF THAT MUCH CAN BE DONE TO CHANGE THE PATTERNS OF ASPIRATION, ACHIEVEMENT, AND ADJUSTMENT WHICH CULTURALLY DEPRIVED YOUTH TEND TO FOLLOW. TRADITIONAL GOALS OF EDUCATION WILL BE FOLLOWED, BUT THE TEACHERS AND STAFF WILL HAVE AT THEIR DISPOSAL A GROUP…

  15. High-Resolution Plume Heights and Winds from More Than 12 Years of MISR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, M. J.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Nelson, D. L.; Goetz, M. B.; Baumann, C.; Kassabian, S.; Chodas, M.

    2012-12-01

    Detailed information on plume heights and wind speeds is necessary for accurately modeling downwind dispersion and long-range transport, which is important for understanding the climatic and human health effects of airborne particulates. However, obtaining this information is challenging due to the relative size and inaccessibility of the major desert regions and the hazards of making in situ measurements during intense dust storms. By using remotely-sensed observations from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite, we have assembled dust event climatologies spanning up to 12 years beginning in 2000 for the Bodélé Depression in northern Africa and the Takalamakan and Gobi Deserts in Asia. These climatologies provide valuable details about source locations, threshold wind velocities, plume dispersion, and seasonal variability. MISR has also been used to study specific dust storms in these regions, as well as on the Arabian Peninsula. By employing an automatic pattern matching approach on observations from nine different cameras, MISR is able to simultaneously retrieve cloud top heights and winds. The MISR INteractive eXplorer (MINX) software tool enables precise retrievals of plume heights and winds at a horizontal resolution of 1.1 km by incorporating additional information on the plume direction from a user. Based on comparisons with other data sources, including lidar and radar, MINX retrievals have an estimated vertical uncertainty of 200 m and a wind speed uncertainty of about 2 m/s.

  16. Tornado climatology of Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, A. M.

    After several decades of little work, a revised tornado climatology for Austria is presented. Tornadoes seldom form in the alpine areas, however, near the eastern flanks of the Alps, favourable conditions for tornado genesis are found. Whereas in the alpine regions less than 0.3 tornadoes per 10,000 km 2 a year touch down (averaged for provinces or major parts of a province), we can count 0.9 in the greater Graz area, 1.0 in the greater Linz area and 1.2 tornadoes per 10,000 km 2 a year in the greater Vienna area, suggesting the existence of so-called tornado alleys. As these regions are the most populated areas of Austria, there is a possible population bias in the dataset. The overall average for Austria is 0.3 tornadoes per 10,000 km 2 a year. The database consists of 89 tornadoes, one landspout and six waterspouts, with a total of 96 events. The seasonal peak is in July with a maximum probability of tornadoes in the late afternoon and early evening hours. Every fifth tornado occurs in the hour after 5 p.m. The maximum intensity determined for a tornado in Austria was T7 on the TORRO-Scale (F3 on the Fujita-Scale), the most common intensity is T2 on the TORRO-Scale (F1 on the Fujita-Scale).

  17. Ionospheric climatology and model from long-term databases of worldwide incoherent scatter radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Holt, J. M.; van Eyken, T.; McCready, M.; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Fukao, S.; Sulzer, M.

    2005-05-01

    Long-term databases of worldwide incoherent scatter radars are utilized to study ionospheric climatology and create empirical models for electron density, ion and electron temperatures, and ion drifts. These radars, including, from magnetic north to south and east to west, EISCAT Svalbard Radar (Norway), Soundrestrom Radar (Greenland), EISCAT Tromso Radars (Norway), Millstone Hill Radar (USA), St. Santin Radar (France), Shigaraki Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU) Radar (Japan) and Arecibo Radar (Puerto Rico), are able to characterize diurnal, seasonal, and solar cycle variations of height dependent ionospheric strctures in a broad latitude and longitude area. In these huge databases, available through the MADRIGAL system (http://www.openmadrigal.org), the data cover generally 1-2 solar cycles, and for Millstone Hill and Arecibo they span nearly 3 solar cycles. Based on these data, our systematical analyses result in a comprehensive overview of various features of the ionosphere and series of web-based empirical models (http://www.haystack.mit.edu/madrigal/Models/). This presentation will review local models for each site and discuss the ionospheric climatology, with emphasis on the development of annual/semiannual electron density variations with latitudes and longitudes, and on ionospheric thermal status at midlatitudes. This presentation will also explore the long-term trend of ionospheric electron density and ion temperature variations from Millstone Hill observations.

  18. Climatology of damage-causing hailstorms over Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, M.; Puskeiler, M.; Schmidberger, M.

    2012-04-01

    In several regions of Central Europe, such as southern Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and northern Italy, hailstorms often cause substantial damage to buildings, crops, or automobiles on the order of several million EUR. In the federal state of Baden-Württemberg, for example, most of the insured damage to buildings is caused by large hailstones. Due to both their local-scale extent and insufficient direct monitoring systems, hail swaths are not captured accurately and uniquely by a single observation system. Remote-sensing systems such as radars are able to detect convection signals in a basic way, but they lack the ability to discern a clear relation between measured intensity and hail on the ground. These shortcomings hamper statistical analysis on the hail probability and intensity. Hail modelling thus is a big challenge for the insurance industry. Within the project HARIS-CC (Hail Risk and Climate Change), different meteorological observations are combined (3D / 2D radar, lightning, satellite and radiosounding data) to obtain a comprehensive picture of the hail climatology over Germany. The various approaches were tested and calibrated with loss data from different insurance companies between 2005 and 2011. Best results are obtained by considering the vertical distance between the 0°C level of the atmosphere and the echo top height estimated from 3D reflectivity data from the radar network of German Weather Service (DWD). Additionally, frequency, intensity, width, and length of hail swaths are determined by applying a cell tracking algorithm to the 3D radar data (TRACE3D; Handwerker, 2002). The hailstorm tracks identified are merged with loss data using a geographical information system (GIS) to verify damage-causing hail on the ground. Evaluating the hailstorm climatology revealed that hail probability exhibits high spatial variability even over short distances. An important issue is the spatial pattern of hail occurrence that is considered to be due to

  19. A global monthly sea surface temperature climatology

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, D.J.; Trenberth, K.E.; Reynolds, R.W. NOAA, Climate Analysis Center, Washington, DC )

    1992-09-01

    The paper presents a new global 2 deg x 2 deg monthly sea surface temperature (SST) climatology, referred here to as the Shea-Trenberth-Reynolds (STR) climatology, which was derived by modifying a 1950-1979-based SST climatology from the Climate Analysis Center (CAC), by using data from the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set to improve the SST estimates in the regions of the Kuroshio and the Gulf Stream. A comparison of the STR climatology with the Alexander and Mobley SST climatology showed that the STR climatology is warmer in the Northern Hemisphere, and colder poleward of 45 deg S. 22 refs.

  20. Active Learning in Introductory Climatology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewey, Kenneth F.; Meyer, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a software package available for the climatology curriculum that determines possible climatic events according to a long-term climate history. Describes the integration of the software into the curriculum and presents examples of active learning. (Contains 19 references.) (YDS)

  1. Observational and Dynamical Wave Climatologies. VOS vs Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorieva, Victoria; Badulin, Sergei; Chernyshova, Anna

    2013-04-01

    The understanding physics of wind-driven waves is crucially important for fundamental science and practical applications. This is why experimental efforts are targeted at both getting reliable information on sea state and elaborating effective tools of the sea wave forecasting. The global Visual Wave Observations and satellite data from the GLOBWAVE project of the European Space Agency are analyzed in the context of these two viewpoints. Within the first "observational" aspect we re-analyze conventional climatologies of all basic wave parameters for the last decades [5]. An alternative "dynamical" climatology is introduced as a tool of prediction of dynamical features of sea waves on global scales. The features of wave dynamics are studied in terms of one-parametric dependencies of wave heights on wave periods following the theoretical concept of self-similar wind-driven seas [3, 1, 4] and recently proposed approach to analysis of Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) data [2]. Traditional "observational" climatologies based on VOS and satellite data collections demonstrate extremely consistent pictures for significant wave heights and dominant periods. On the other hand, collocated satellite and VOS data show significant differences in wave heights, wind speeds and, especially, in wave periods. Uncertainties of visual wave observations can explain these differences only partially. We see the key reason of this inconsistency in the methods of satellite data processing which are based on formal application of data interpolation methods rather than on up-to-date physics of wind-driven waves. The problem is considered within the alternative climatology approach where dynamical criteria of wave height-to-period linkage are used for retrieving wave periods and constructing physically consistent dynamical climatology. The key dynamical parameter - exponent R of one-parametric dependence Hs ~ TR shows dramatically less pronounced latitudinal dependence as compared to observed Hs

  2. Conference on Applied Climatology, 6th, Charleston, SC, Mar. 7-10, 1989, Preprints

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Papers on applied climatology are presented, covering topics such as climate resources, precipitation climatology and land use planning, urbanization and rainfall distribution, climate changes, heat stress climatology, climate and culture, climate and agriculture, studies of the 1988 drought, and climatic records. Papers are included on orography and precipitation variability, climate scenarios for impact assessment, temperature changes and the greenhouse effect, the relationship between a GCM simulated climate and the observed local climate, a synoptic approach to the detection of climatic change, and climate modeling with a limited area model coupled to a GCM. Other topics include high-resolution ground-based remote sensors, the application of a spatial synoptic climatological index to changes in atmospheric NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} concentrations, thunderstorm and lightning relationships, satellite-derived vegetation indices as indicators of climatic variability, and the relationships between precipitation and 700 mb height patterns.

  3. Climatology of urban regional systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, R. W.

    1970-01-01

    The combining of remote sensing technologies to urban-regional energy climatology is studied. It was found to be three dimensional with a mosaic urban surface, each smaller surface with its own radiant and thermal properties. Urban patterns of radiant exchange were found to be constantly changing during diurnal and annual cycles. Results were derived from Barbados data using remote methods for monitoring and mapping radiation. Isoline maps of terrestrial radiation patterns were made generalizing the minute patterns of the scan image.

  4. Climatology of globally averaged thermospheric mass density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, J. T.; Picone, J. M.

    2010-09-01

    We present a climatological analysis of daily globally averaged density data, derived from orbit data and covering the years 1967-2007, along with an empirical Global Average Mass Density Model (GAMDM) that encapsulates the 1986-2007 data. The model represents density as a function of the F10.7 solar radio flux index, the day of year, and the Kp geomagnetic activity index. We discuss in detail the dependence of the data on each of the input variables, and demonstrate that all of the terms in the model represent consistent variations in both the 1986-2007 data (on which the model is based) and the independent 1967-1985 data. We also analyze the uncertainty in the results, and quantify how the variance in the data is apportioned among the model terms. We investigate the annual and semiannual variations of the data and quantify the amplitude, height dependence, solar cycle dependence, and interannual variability of these oscillatory modes. The auxiliary material includes Fortran 90 code for evaluating GAMDM.

  5. Boundary Layer Heights from CALIOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, R.; Ackerman, S. A.; Holz, R.; Roubert, L.

    2012-12-01

    This work is focused on the development of a planetary boundary layer (PBL) height retrieval algorithm for CALIOP and validation studies. Our current approach uses a wavelet covariance transform analysis technique to find the top of the boundary layer. We use the methodology similar to that found in Davis et. al. 2000, ours has been developed to work with the lower SNR data provided by CALIOP, and is intended to work autonomously. Concurrently developed with the CALIOP algorithm we will show results from a PBL height retrieval algorithm from profiles of potential temperature, these are derived from Aircraft Meteorological DAta Relay (AMDAR) observations. Results from 5 years of collocated AMDAR - CALIOP retrievals near O'Hare airport demonstrate good agreement between the CALIOP - AMDAR retrievals. In addition, because we are able to make daily retrievals from the AMDAR measurements, we are able to observe the seasonal and annual variation in the PBL height at airports that have sufficient instrumented-aircraft traffic. Also, a comparison has been done between the CALIOP retrievals and the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) PBL height retrievals acquired during the GoMACCS experiment. Results of this comparison, like the AMDAR comparison are favorable. Our current work also involves the analysis and verification of the CALIOP PBL height retrieval from the 6 year CALIOP global data set. Results from this analysis will also be presented.

  6. TRMM-Based Lightning Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Gridded climatologies of total lightning flash rates seen by the spaceborne Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) have been updated. OTD collected data from May 1995 to March 2000. LIS data (equatorward of about 38 deg) has been added for 1998-2010. Flash counts from each instrument are scaled by the best available estimates of detection efficiency. The long LIS record makes the merged climatology most robust in the tropics and subtropics, while the high latitude data is entirely from OTD. The mean global flash rate from the merged climatology is 46 flashes per second. The peak annual flash rate at 0.5 deg scale is 160 fl/square km/yr in eastern Congo. The peak monthly average flash rate at 2.5 scale is 18 fl/square km/mo, from early April to early May in the Brahmaputra Valley of far eastern India. Lightning decreases in this region during the monsoon season, but increases further north and west. A monthly average peak from early August to early September in northern Pakistan also exceeds any monthly averages from Africa, despite central Africa having the greatest yearly average. Most continental regions away from the equator have an annual cycle with lightning flash rates peaking in late spring or summer. The main exceptions are India and southeast Asia, with springtime peaks in April and May. For landmasses near the equator, flash rates peak near the equinoxes. For many oceanic regions, the peak flash rates occur in autumn. This is particularly noticeable for the Mediterranean and North Atlantic. Landmasses have a strong diurnal cycle of lightning, with flash rates generally peaking between 3-5 pm local solar time. The central United States flash rates peak later, in late evening or early night. Flash rates peak after midnight in northern Argentina. These regions are known for large, intense, long-lived mesoscale convective systems.

  7. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; William, Olson

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  8. BCR-ABL1: Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... called p190), which is most frequently associated with Ph chromosome-positive ALL. The quantitative BCR-ABL1 molecular test measures either of the breakpoints in the fusion gene. It is used to establish a baseline value and then to monitor the person's response to ...

  9. 30 CFR 779.18 - Climatological information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Climatological information. 779.18 Section 779... PROGRAMS SURFACE MINING PERMIT APPLICATIONS-MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR INFORMATION ON ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES § 779.18 Climatological information. (a) When requested by the regulatory authority, the...

  10. 30 CFR 783.18 - Climatological information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Climatological information. 783.18 Section 783... PROGRAMS UNDERGROUND MINING PERMIT APPLICATIONS-MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR INFORMATION ON ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES § 783.18 Climatological information. (a) When requested by the regulatory authority,...

  11. Retrieval of cloud height from SCIAMACHY using oxygen absorption around 630nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorski, Michael; Deutschmann, Tim; Platt, Ulrich; Wang, Ping; Wagner, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    The SCanning Imaging Absorption spectrometer for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY) on ENVISAT allows measurements of different atmospheric trace gases (e.g. O3, NO2, SO2, CH4, HCHO, CO, BrO, H2O, O2, O4) using the DOAS technique. The HICRU algorithm retrieves cloud height using the spectral analysis of the oxygen absorption around 630nm combined with results of the Monte-Carlo model TRACY-II and a new SCIAMACHY surface albedo database. The results are compared to: 1.) cloud height retrievals of other satellite instruments (MERIS, MODIS) 2.) ISCCP climatology 3.) SCIAMACHY cloud algorithms (SACURA, FRESCO+) 4.) LIDAR/RADAR measurements. For low clouds, the HICRU algorithm retrieves cloud heights more close to the the top, because of the assumption of an appropriate cloud model with a realistic estimation of the scattering inside the cloud. It is also demonstrated, that none the three SCIAMACHY cloud algorithms HICRU, SACURA and FRESCO+ is able to retrieve the top of high clouds because of principal characteristics of the retrieval methods based on oxygen absorption. But oxygen absorptions can provide important additional information on the vertical cloud structure and multiple cloud layers if the method is combined with cloud-top-retrieval using windows in the thermal infrared. An application of these concepts to the GOSAT instrument will be discussed.

  12. MISR Interactive Explorer (MINX) : Production Digitizing to Retrieve Smoke Plume Heights and Validating Heights Against Lidar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunst, Ben

    2011-01-01

    The height at which smoke from a wildfire is injected into the atmosphere is an important parameter for climatology, because it determines how far the smoke can be transported. Using the MINX program to analyze MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer) data, I digitized wildfire smoke plumes to add to an existing database of these heights for use by scientists studying smoke transport and plume dynamics. In addition to using MINX to do production digitizing of heights, I assisted in gathering lidar data for an ongoing validation of MINX and helped evaluate those data.

  13. Sprite climatology in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin; Katzenelson, Dor; Rosenthal, Neta; Rubanenko, Lior; Ben-Ami, Yuval; Arnone, Enrico

    2015-04-01

    We present statistical analysis of 436 sprites observed in 7 winter campaigns from 2006/7-2012/13. Results show a clear peak in the frequency of sprite detections, with maximum values (< 40% of events) between 00:30 and 02:15 LST (22:30-00:15 UT; LST = UT + 2). The detection times of sprites are well-correlated with a relative increase in the fraction of + CG strokes, which exhibit maxima between 00:00 and 02:00 LST. The morphological distribution of 339 sprites, that we were able to clearly identify, is dominated by column sprites (49.3%), with angels (33.0%) and carrots (25.7%) being less frequent. This is similar to reports of winter sprites over the Sea of Japan and summer ones in Central Europe. Other shapes such as trees, wishbones, etc. appear quite rarely. Single element events constitute 16.5% of observations, with 83.5% containing 2 elements or more. Clusters of homogenous types are slightly more frequent than mixed ones (55%). Our observations suggest winter Mediterranean thunderstorms to have a vertical structure in between high tropical convective systems and the lower cloud-top cells in Japan. The climatology shows the Eastern Mediterranean to be a major sprite producer in Northern Hemisphere winter, and offers ground-based coverage for future space missions.

  14. Sprite Climatology in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin; Katzenelson, Dor; Rosenthal, Neta; Rubanenko, Lior; Ben-Ami, Yuval; Arnone, Enrico

    2015-04-01

    We present statistical analysis of 436 sprites observed in 7 winter campaigns from 2006/7-2012/13. Results show a clear peak in the frequency of sprite detections, with maximum values (< 40% of events) between 00:30-02:15 LST (22:30-00:15 UT; LST=UT+2). The detection times of sprites are well-correlated with a relative increase in the fraction of +CG strokes, which exhibit maxima between 00:00-02:00 LST. The morphological distribution of 339 sprites, that we were able to clearly identify, is dominated by column sprites (49.3%), with angels (33.0%) and carrots (25.7%) being less frequent. This is similar to reports of winter sprites over the Sea of Japan and summer ones in central Europe. Other shapes such as trees, wishbones, etc. appear quite rarely. Single element events constitute 16.5% of observations, with 83.5% containing 2 elements or more. Clusters of homogeneous types are slightly more frequent than mixed ones (55%). Our observations suggest winter East Mediterranean thunderstorms to have a vertical structure that is an intermediate type between high tropical convective systems and the lower cloud-top cells in winter thunderstorms over the Sea of Japan. The climatology shows that the Eastern Mediterranean is a major sprite producer during Northern Hemisphere winter, and thus the existing and future optical observation infrastructure in Israel offers ground-based coverage for upcoming space missions that aim to map global sprite activity.

  15. Comparative climatology - Mars and earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Spacecraft missions to Mars during the 1960's and 1970's gave a remarkably detailed picture of the meteorological and climatological conditions that characterize its atmosphere. During the relatively brief history of close-up exploration of Mars, much of the ambiguity associated with the early telescopic observations has been resolved, and a new image of the red planet has emerged. Accurate measurements taken both from orbit and the surface reveal a cool, thin atmosphere that condenses, transports water, and generates clouds and dust storms, and that has a global-scale wind system not unlike the one known on earth. This paper highlights the current view of the Martian climate system and what controls it. For perspective, comparisons with earth's climate system are included where appropriate.

  16. Effects of height acceleration on Geosat heights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, David W., III; Brooks, Ronald L.; Lockwood, Dennis W.

    1990-01-01

    A radar altimeter tracking loop, such as that utilized by Geosat, produces height errors in the presence of persistent height acceleration h(a). The correction factor for the height error is a function of both the loop feedback parameters and the height acceleration. The correction, in meters, to the sea-surface height (SSH) derived from Geosat is -0.16 h(a), where h(a) is in m/sec per sec. The errors induced by accelerations are produced primarily by changes in along-track geoid slopes. The nearly circular Geosat orbit and dynamic ocean topography produce small h(a) values. One area studied in detail encompasses the Marianas Trench and the Challenger Deep in the west central Pacific Ocean. Histograms of SSH corrections due to range accelerations have also been determined from 24-hour segments of Geosat global data. The findings are that 20 percent of the Geosat measurements have acceleration-induced errors of 2 cm or more, while 8 percent have errors of 3 cm or more.

  17. Corn yield prediction using climatology

    SciTech Connect

    Duchon, C.E.

    1986-05-01

    A method is developed to predict corn yield during the growing season using a plant process model (CERES-Maize), current weather data and climatological data. The procedure is to place the current year's daily weather (temperature and precipitation) into the model up to the time the yield prediction is to be made and sequences of historical data (one sequence per year) after that time until the end of the growing season to produce yield estimates. The mean of the distribution of yield estimates is taken as the prediction. The variance associated with a prediction is relatively constant until the time of tassel initiation and then decreases toward zero as the season progresses. As a consequence, perfect weather forecasts reach their peak value between the beginning of ear growth and the beginning of grain fill. The change in the predicted yield in response to weather as the growing season progresses is discussed for 1983 and 1976 at Peoria, Illinois. Results are given of an attempt to incorporate 30-day Climate Analytic Center outlooks into the predictive scheme. 21 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  18. Climatological data summary 1993 with historical data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoitink, D.J.; Burk, K.W.

    1994-06-01

    This document presents the climatological data summary for calendar year 1993. It presents updated historical climatologies for temperature, wind, precipitation, and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters from the Hanford Meteorology Station (HMS) and Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network. It also presents climatological normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation for the HMS. Previous documents have included climatological data collected at the old Hanford Townsite, located approximately 10 miles east-northeast of the present HMS. The records for these two different sites have been frequently interchanged as if representing the same location. With the exception of Section 2.0, the remainder of this document uses data only from the HMS, with a period of record beginning December 7, 1944.

  19. Spherical harmonic analysis of a synoptic climatology generated with a global general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christidis, Z. D.; Spar, J.

    1980-01-01

    Spherical harmonic analysis was used to analyze the observed climatological (C) fields of temperature at 850 mb, geopotential height at 500 mb, and sea level pressure. The spherical harmonic method was also applied to the corresponding "model climatological" fields (M) generated by a general circulation model, the "GISS climate model." The climate model was initialized with observed data for the first of December 1976 at 00. GMT and allowed to generate five years of meteorological history. Monthly means of the above fields for the five years were computed and subjected to spherical harmonic analysis. It was found from the comparison of the spectral components of both sets, M and C, that the climate model generated reasonable 500 mb geopotential heights. The model temperature field at 850 mb exhibited a generally correct structure. However, the meridional temperature gradient was overestimated and overheating of the continents was observed in summer.

  20. Biomes computed from simulated climatologies

    SciTech Connect

    Claussen, M.; Esch, M.

    1994-01-01

    The biome model of Prentice et al. is used to predict global patterns of potential natural plant formations, or biomes, from climatologies simulated by ECHAM, a model used for climate simulations at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie. This study undertaken in order to show the advantage of this biome model in diagnosing the performance of a climate model and assessing effects of past and future climate changes predicted by a climate model. Good overall agreement is found between global patterns of biomes computed from observed and simulated data of present climate. But there are also major discrepancies indicated by a difference in biomes in Australia, in the Kalahari Desert, and in the Middle West of North America. These discrepancies can be traced back to in simulated rainfall as well as summer or winter temperatures. Global patterns of biomes computed from an ice age simulation reveal that North America, Europe, and Siberia should have been covered largely by tundra and taiga, whereas only small differences are for the tropical rain forests. A potential northeast shift of biomes is expected from a simulation with enhanced CO{sub 2} concentration according to the IPCC Scenario A. Little change is seen in the tropical rain forest and the Sahara. Since the biome model used is not capable of predicting chances in vegetation patterns due to a rapid climate change, the latter simulation to be taken as a prediction of chances in conditions favourable for the existence of certain biomes, not as a reduction of a future distribution of biomes. 15 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. A climatology of Central American Gyres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papin, Philippe P.

    Central American gyres (CAGs) are large, low-level, cyclonic circulations that are observed over Central America during the tropical cyclone (TC) season. CAGs often occur in conjunction with TCs, and can result in torrential rainfall over portions of Central America, the Caribbean Islands, and eastern United States. The lack of prior research on CAGs, their apparent links to TC activity, and their association with high- impact weather motivates this study. To study CAG occurrence, an algorithm was developed to identify cyclonic circulations possessing similar characteristics to monsoon depressions (MDs) and monsoon gyres (MGs) in other ocean basins. This algorithm also includes a series of tests that distinguishes CAG events from large TCs and non-closed circulations. This algorithm was run between May-November 1980-2010 using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System Reanalysis 0.5o gridded dataset to produce the CAG climatology. 42 CAGs were classified (˜1.4 per season) with a bimodal distribution of occurrence favoring the early (May-Jun) and late (Sep-Nov) TC season. Stratification of CAG occurrence by the phase of the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) shows that over 75% of all CAGs develop in phases 8,1, and 2. A gyre-relative, time-lagged, CAG composite analysis is performed on CAG cases spanning from three days prior to two days after CAG formation. Positive low-level geopotential height anomalies are present in the east Pacific and Atlantic basins and are associated with anomalous low-level flow before the formation of the CAG. This results in increasing cyclonic vorticity near anomalously high precipitable water over Central America, a pattern that aids the generation of deep convection and the broad closed low-level cyclonic circulation that defines the CAG. CAGs are also split into two subsets using potential vorticity (PV) on the 350K isentropic surface. Tropical CAGs possess upper-tropospheric ridging associated with low

  2. A global satellite-assisted precipitation climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, C.; Verdin, A.; Michaelsen, J.; Peterson, P.; Pedreros, D.; Husak, G.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate representations of mean climate conditions, especially in areas of complex terrain, are an important part of environmental monitoring systems. As high-resolution satellite monitoring information accumulates with the passage of time, it can be increasingly useful in efforts to better characterize the earth's mean climatology. Current state-of-the-science products rely on complex and sometimes unreliable relationships between elevation and station-based precipitation records, which can result in poor performance in food and water insecure regions with sparse observation networks. These vulnerable areas (like Ethiopia, Afghanistan, or Haiti) are often the critical regions for humanitarian drought monitoring. Here, we show that long period of record geo-synchronous and polar-orbiting satellite observations provide a unique new resource for producing high-resolution (0.05°) global precipitation climatologies that perform reasonably well in data-sparse regions. Traditionally, global climatologies have been produced by combining station observations and physiographic predictors like latitude, longitude, elevation, and slope. While such approaches can work well, especially in areas with reasonably dense observation networks, the fundamental relationship between physiographic variables and the target climate variables can often be indirect and spatially complex. Infrared and microwave satellite observations, on the other hand, directly monitor the earth's energy emissions. These emissions often correspond physically with the location and intensity of precipitation. We show that these relationships provide a good basis for building global climatologies. We also introduce a new geospatial modeling approach based on moving window regressions and inverse distance weighting interpolation. This approach combines satellite fields, gridded physiographic indicators, and in situ climate normals. The resulting global 0.05° monthly precipitation climatology, the Climate

  3. New dynamic NNORSY ozone profile climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaifel, A. K.; Felder, M.; Declercq, C.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Climatological ozone profile data are widely used as a-priori information for total ozone using DOAS type retrievals as well as for ozone profile retrieval using optimal estimation, for data assimilation or evaluation of 3-D chemistry-transport models and a lot of other applications in atmospheric sciences and remote sensing. For most applications it is important that the climatology represents not only long term mean values but also the links between ozone and dynamic input parameters. These dynamic input parameters should be easily accessible from auxiliary datasets or easily measureable, and obviously should have a high correlation with ozone. For ozone profile these parameters are mainly total ozone column and temperature profile data. This was the outcome of a user consultation carried out in the framework of developing a new, dynamic ozone profile climatology. The new ozone profile climatology is based on the Neural Network Ozone Retrieval System (NNORSY) widely used for ozone profile retrieval from UV and IR satellite sounder data. NNORSY allows implicit modelling of any non-linear correspondence between input parameters (predictors) and ozone profile target vector. This paper presents the approach, setup and validation of a new family of ozone profile climatologies with static as well as dynamic input parameters (total ozone and temperature profile). The neural network training relies on ozone profile measurement data of well known quality provided by ground based (ozonesondes) and satellite based (SAGE II, HALOE, and POAM-III) measurements over the years 1995-2007. In total, four different combinations (modes) for input parameters (date, geolocation, total ozone column and temperature profile) are available. The geophysical validation spans from pole to pole using independent ozonesonde, lidar and satellite data (ACE-FTS, AURA-MLS) for individual and time series comparisons as well as for analysing the vertical and meridian structure of different modes of

  4. A global satellite assisted precipitation climatology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funk, Christopher C.; Verdin, Andrew P.; Michaelsen, Joel C.; Pedreros, Diego; Husak, Gregory J.; Peterson, P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate representations of mean climate conditions, especially in areas of complex terrain, are an important part of environmental monitoring systems. As high-resolution satellite monitoring information accumulates with the passage of time, it can be increasingly useful in efforts to better characterize the earth's mean climatology. Current state-of-the-science products rely on complex and sometimes unreliable relationships between elevation and station-based precipitation records, which can result in poor performance in food and water insecure regions with sparse observation networks. These vulnerable areas (like Ethiopia, Afghanistan, or Haiti) are often the critical regions for humanitarian drought monitoring. Here, we show that long period of record geo-synchronous and polar-orbiting satellite observations provide a unique new resource for producing high resolution (0.05°) global precipitation climatologies that perform reasonably well in data sparse regions. Traditionally, global climatologies have been produced by combining station observations and physiographic predictors like latitude, longitude, elevation, and slope. While such approaches can work well, especially in areas with reasonably dense observation networks, the fundamental relationship between physiographic variables and the target climate variables can often be indirect and spatially complex. Infrared and microwave satellite observations, on the other hand, directly monitor the earth's energy emissions. These emissions often correspond physically with the location and intensity of precipitation. We show that these relationships provide a good basis for building global climatologies. We also introduce a new geospatial modeling approach based on moving window regressions and inverse distance weighting interpolation. This approach combines satellite fields, gridded physiographic indicators, and in situ climate normals. The resulting global 0.05° monthly precipitation climatology, the Climate

  5. Flow Regime Based Climatologies of Lightning Probabilities for Spaceports and Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III; Sharp, David; Spratt, Scott; Lafosse, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to provide forecasters with a tool to indicate the warm season climatological probability of one or more lightning strikes within a circle at a site within a specified time interval. This paper described the AMU work conducted in developing flow regime based climatologies of lightning probabilities for the SLF and seven airports in the NWS MLB CWA in east-central Florida. The paper also described the GUI developed by the AMU that is used to display the data for the operational forecasters. There were challenges working with gridded lightning data as well as the code that accompanied the gridded data. The AMU modified the provided code to be able to produce the climatologies of lightning probabilities based on eight flow regimes for 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-n mi circles centered on eight sites in 1-, 3-, and 6-hour increments.

  6. SPARC Intercomparison of Middle Atmosphere Climatologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randel, William; Fleming, Eric; Geller, Marvin; Hamilton, Kevin; Karoly, David; Ortland, Dave; Pawson, Steve; Swinbank, Richard; Udelhofen, Petra

    2002-01-01

    This atlas presents detailed incomparisons of several climatological wind and temperature data sets which cover the middle atmosphere (over altitudes approx. 10-80 km). A number of middle atmosphere climatologies have been developed in the research community based on a variety of meteorological analyses and satellite data sets. Here we present comparisons between these climatological data sets for a number of basic circulation statistics, such as zonal mean temperature, winds and eddy flux statistics. Special attention is focused on tropical winds and temperatures, where large differences exist among separate analyses. We also include comparisons between the global climatologies and historical rocketsonde wind and temperature measurements, and also with more recent lidar temperature data. These comparisons highlight differences and uncertainties in contemporary middle atmosphere data sets, and allow biases in particular analyses to be isolated. In addition, a brief atlas of zonal mean temperature and wind statistics is provided to highlight data availability and as a quick-look reference. This technical report is intended as a companion to the climatological data sets held in archive at the SPARC Data Center (http://www.sparc.sunysb.edu).

  7. Height, health, and development

    PubMed Central

    Deaton, Angus

    2007-01-01

    Adult height is determined by genetic potential and by net nutrition, the balance between food intake and the demands on it, including the demands of disease, most importantly during early childhood. Historians have made effective use of recorded heights to indicate living standards, in both health and income, for periods where there are few other data. Understanding the determinants of height is also important for understanding health; taller people earn more on average, do better on cognitive tests, and live longer. This paper investigates the environmental determinants of height across 43 developing countries. Unlike in rich countries, where adult height is well predicted by mortality in infancy, there is no consistent relationship across and within countries between adult height on the one hand and childhood mortality or living conditions on the other. In particular, adult African women are taller than is warranted by their low incomes and high childhood mortality, not to mention their mothers' educational level and reported nutrition. High childhood mortality in Africa is associated with taller adults, which suggests that mortality selection dominates scarring, the opposite of what is found in the rest of the world. The relationship between population heights and income is inconsistent and unreliable, as is the relationship between income and health more generally. PMID:17686991

  8. Comparative Climatology of Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackwell, Stephen J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Harder, Jerald W.; Bullock, Mark A.

    stimulate further research on this critical subject. The study of climate involves much more than understanding atmospheric processes. This subtlety is particularly appreciated for Earth, where chemical cycles, geology, ocean influences, and biology are considered in most climate models. In Part IV, Surface and Interior, we look at the role that geochemical cycles, volcanism, and interior mantle processes play in the stability and evolution of terrestrial planetary climates. There is one vital commonality between the climates of all the planets of the solar system: Regardless of the different processes that dominate each of the climates of Earth, Mars, Venus, and Titan, they are all ultimately forced by radiation from the same star, albeit at variable distances. In Part V, Solar Influences, we discuss how the Sun's early evolution affected the climates of the terrestrial planets, and how it continues to control the temperatures and compositions of planetary atmospheres. This will be of particular interest as models of exoplanets, and the influences of much different stellar types and distances, are advanced by further observations. Comparisons of atmospheric and climate processes between the planets in our solar system has been a focus of numerous conferences over the past decade, including the Exoclimes conference series. In particular, this book project was closely tied to a conference on Comparative Climatology of Terrestrial Planets that was held in Boulder, Colorado, on June 25-28, 2012. This book benefited from the opportunity for the author teams to interact and obtain feedback from the broader community, but the chapters do not in general tie directly to presentations at the conference. The conference, which was organized by a diverse group of atmospheric and climate scientists led by Mark Bullock and Lori Glaze, sought to build connections between the various communities, focusing on synergies and complementary capabilities. Discussion panels at the end of most

  9. Comparative climatology of four marine stratocumulus regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Howard P.

    1990-01-01

    The climatology of marine stratocumulus (MSc) cloud regimes off the west coasts of California, Peru, Morocco, and Angola are examined. Long-term, annual averages are presented for several quantities of interest in the four MSc regimes. The climatologies were constructed using the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS). A 40 year time series of observations was extracted for 32 x 32 deg analysis domains. The data were taken from the monthly-averaged, 2 deg product. The resolution of the analysis is therefore limited to scales of greater than 200 km with submonthly variability not resolved. The averages of total cloud cover, sea surface temperature, and surface pressure are presented.

  10. Improved Mars Upper Atmosphere Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.

    2004-01-01

    The detailed characterization of the Mars upper atmosphere is important for future Mars aerobraking activities. Solar cycle, seasonal, and dust trends (climate) as well as planetary wave activity (weather) are crucial to quantify in order to improve our ability to reasonably depict the state of the Mars upper atmosphere over time. To date, our best information is found in the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Accelerometer (ACC) database collected during Phase 1 (Ls = 184 - 300; F10.7 = 70 - 90) and Phase 2 (Ls = 30 - 90; F10.7 = 90 - 150) of aerobraking. This database (100 - 170 km) consists of thermospheric densities, temperatures, and scale heights, providing our best constraints for exercising the coupled Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) and the Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM). The Planetary Data System (PDS) contains level 0 and 2 MGS Accelerometer data, corresponding to atmospheric densities along the orbit track. Level 3 products (densities, temperatures, and scale heights at constant altitudes) are also available in the PDS. These datasets provide the primary model constraints for the new MGCM-MTGCM simulations summarized in this report. Our strategy for improving the characterization of the Mars upper atmospheres using these models has been three-fold : (a) to conduct data-model comparisons using the latest MGS data covering limited climatic and weather conditions at Mars, (b) to upgrade the 15-micron cooling and near-IR heating rates in the MGCM and MTGCM codes for ad- dressing climatic variations (solar cycle and seasonal) important in linking the lower and upper atmospheres (including migrating tides), and (c) to exercise the detailed coupled MGCM and MTGCM codes to capture and diagnose the planetary wave (migrating plus non-migrating tidal) features throughout the Mars year. Products from this new suite of MGCM-MTGCM coupled simulations are being used to improve our predictions of the structure of the Mars upper atmosphere for the

  11. Constraints on Smoke Injection Height, Source Strength, and Transports from MISR and MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Petrenko, Mariya; Val Martin, Maria; Chin, Mian

    2014-01-01

    The AeroCom BB (Biomass Burning) Experiment AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) motivation: We have a substantial set of satellite wildfire plume AOD snapshots and injection heights to help calibrate model/inventory performance; We are 1) adding more fire source-strength cases 2) using MISR to improve the AOD constrains and 3) adding 2008 global injection heights; We selected GFED3-daily due to good overall source strength performance, but any inventory can be tested; Joint effort to test multiple, global models, to draw robust BB injection height and emission strength conclusions. We provide satellite-based injection height and smoke plume AOD climatologies.

  12. Tropospheric ozone climatology over Peninsular Malaysia from 1992 to 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemura, Seiichiro; Tsuruta, Haruo; Kawashima, Shigeto; Sudo, Shigeto; Peng, Leong Chow; Fook, Lim Sze; Johar, Zubaidi; Hayashi, Masayasu

    2002-08-01

    We present the climatology of tropospheric ozone over Peninsular Malaysia in tropical Asia for the 8 years from 1992 through 1999 as measured by ozonesondes twice a month. The mean ozone concentrations in vertical profile were in the same range (30-40 ppbv) as those observed at Watukosek, Indonesia, and were lower than those at Natal, Brazil, South America, and at Brazzaville, Congo, Africa, indicating that air masses over Peninsular Malaysia are primarily influenced by the maritime environment and deep convection, as shown by the significant levels of water vapor in the middle troposphere throughout the year. Seasonally averaged ozone concentrations were highest in December, January, and February (DJF) from 6 to 7.5 km altitude and in March, April, and May (MAM) at all other heights and were lowest in June, July, and August (JJA) and September, October, and November (SON), excluding 1994 and 1997, at all heights. The ozone enhancements during DJF in the middle troposphere could be caused by depression of the deep convection because of the positive temperature anomaly and negative water vapor anomaly. The ozone enhancements above the middle troposphere (>5 km) in MAM, especially in 1997 and 1998, could be predominantly attributed to photochemical production from enhanced ozone precursor gases of Northern Hemisphere origin, especially biomass burning in continental Southeast Asia. Large ozone enhancements as high as 10-20 Dobson units observed during SON of 1994 and 1997 were associated with large-scale biomass burnings in Indonesia.

  13. The Savannah River Technology Center Research and Development Climatology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Environmental Technology Section (ETS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) built and has operated the Climatology Site (CS) for almost 10 years. The Climatology Site provides a wide variety of meteorological support functions for Savannah River Site (SRS) operations and research. This document describes the Climatology Site facility to familiarize present and potential users with its capabilities.

  14. Flight summaries and temperature climatology at airliner cruise altitudes from GASP (Global Atmospheric Sampling Program) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nastrom, G. D.; Jasperson, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Temperature data obtained by the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) during the period March 1975 to July 1979 are compiled to form flight summaries of static air temperature and a geographic temperature climatology. The flight summaries include the height and location of the coldest observed temperature and the mean flight level, temperature and the standard deviation of temperature for each flight as well as for flight segments. These summaries are ordered by route and month. The temperature climatology was computed for all statistically independent temperture data for each flight. The grid used consists of 5 deg latitude, 30 deg longitude and 2000 feet vertical resolution from FL270 to FL430 for each month of the year. The number of statistically independent observations, their mean, standard deviation and the empirical 98, 50, 16, 2 and .3 probability percentiles are presented.

  15. PULSE HEIGHT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.

    1958-06-01

    A differential pulse-height discriminator circuit is described which is readily adaptable for operation in a single-channel pulse-height analyzer. The novel aspect of the circuit lies in the specific arrangement of differential pulse-height discriminator which includes two pulse-height discriminators having a comnnon input and an anticoincidence circuit having two interconnected vacuum tubes with a common cathode resistor. Pulses from the output of one discriminator circuit are delayed and coupled to the grid of one of the anticoincidence tubes by a resistor. The output pulses from the other discriminator circuit are coupled through a cathode follower circuit, which has a cathode resistor of such value as to provide a long time constant with the interelectrode capacitance of the tube, to lenthen the output pulses. The pulses are then fed to the grid of the other anticoincidence tube. With such connections of the circuits, only when the incoming pulse has a pesk value between the operating levels of the two discriminators does an output pulse occur from the anticoincidence circuit.

  16. Structure and Dynamic Regulation of Abl Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Panjarian, Shoghag; Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Shugui; Engen, John R.; Smithgall, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    The c-abl proto-oncogene encodes a unique protein-tyrosine kinase (Abl) distinct from c-Src, c-Fes, and other cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases. In normal cells, Abl plays prominent roles in cellular responses to genotoxic stress as well as in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Abl is also well known in the context of Bcr-Abl, the oncogenic fusion protein characteristic of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Selective inhibitors of Bcr-Abl, of which imatinib is the prototype, have had a tremendous impact on clinical outcomes in chronic myelogenous leukemia and revolutionized the field of targeted cancer therapy. In this minireview, we focus on the structural organization and dynamics of Abl kinases and how these features influence inhibitor sensitivity. PMID:23316053

  17. The SPARC Intercomparison of Middle Atmosphere Climatologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randel, William; Fleming, Eric; Geller, Marvin; Gelman, Mel; Hamilton, Kevin; Karoly, David; Ortland, Dave; Pawson, Steve; Swinbank, Richard; Udelhofen, Petra

    2003-01-01

    Our current confidence in 'observed' climatological winds and temperatures in the middle atmosphere (over altitudes approx. 10-80 km) is assessed by detailed intercomparisons of contemporary and historic data sets. These data sets include global meteorological analyses and assimilations, climatologies derived from research satellite measurements, and historical reference atmosphere circulation statistics. We also include comparisons with historical rocketsonde wind and temperature data, and with more recent lidar temperature measurements. The comparisons focus on a few basic circulation statistics, such as temperature, zonal wind, and eddy flux statistics. Special attention is focused on tropical winds and temperatures, where large differences exist among separate analyses. Assimilated data sets provide the most realistic tropical variability, but substantial differences exist among current schemes.

  18. Development and application of Labrador Sea climatologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Nilgun

    2007-05-01

    Two yearly climatologies of the Labrador Sea are developed. One is based on the traditional geopotential coordinates, and the other employs isopycnal coordinates in the vertical. The analysis of the results show that the isopycnal climatology has more skill at describing the mean state of the Labrador Sea, without smoothing out important flow features such as strong boundary currents and fronts. Seasonal climatologies based on the isopycnal coordinates in the vertical are also developed to study seasonal variability of the Labrador Sea hydrography and freshwater and heat fluxes. The greatest seasonal variability is observed in winter, the season in which deep convective overturning takes place. By using the objective analysis technique which successfully represented the dynamics of the Labrador Sea, a pseudo time-series of water properties is developed to study their inter-annual variability. The contribution of the West Greenland Current to the interior Labrador Sea freshwater budget is found to be greater than that of the Labrador Current, even though the Labrador Current has a larger freshwater content. Diagnostic calculations show that the Labrador Current flows southward mostly parallel to the isobaths without much of its fresher waters ever crossing into the interior Labrador Sea.

  19. Climatological data summary 1994, with historical data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoitink, D.J.; Burk, K.W.

    1995-05-01

    This document presents the climatological data measured at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site for calendar year 1994. Pacific Northwest Laboratory operates the Hanford Meteorology Station and the Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network from which these data were collected. The information contained herein includes updated historical climatologies for temperature, precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation, and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters. Further, the data are adjunct to and update Hoitink et al. (1994); however, Appendix B-Wind Climatology is excluded. 1994 was the second warmest year on record, averaging 56.2{degrees}F, 2.9{degrees}F above normal (53.3{degrees}F). For the 12-month period, 10 were warmer than normal (7 were at least 3.5{degrees}F and 2 were more than 5.0{degrees}F above normal). Precipitation totaled 6.12 in., 98% of normal (6.26 in.); snowfall totaled 5.2 in., compared to the normal of 13.8 in. The average wind speed during 1994 was 7.3 mph, 0.4 mph below normal (7.7 mph). The peak gust during the year was 52 mph from the south-southwest on February 13. There were 29 days with peak gusts {ge}40 mph, compared to a yearly average of 26.

  20. Climatology 2011: An MLS and Sonde Derived Ozone Climatology for Satellite Retrieval Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard D.; Labow, Gordon J.

    2012-01-01

    The ozone climatology used as the a priori for the version 8 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) retrieval algorithms has been updated. The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on Aura has excellent latitude coverage and measures ozone daily from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere. The new climatology consists of monthly average ozone profiles for ten degree latitude zones covering pressure altitudes from 0 to 65 km. The climatology was formed by combining data from Aura MLS (2004-2010) with data from balloon sondes (1988-2010). Ozone below 8 km (below 12 km at high latitudes) is based on balloons sondes, while ozone above 16 km (21 km at high latitudes) is based on MLS measurements. Sonde and MLS data are blended in the transition region. Ozone accuracy in the upper troposphere is greatly improved because of the near uniform coverage by Aura MLS, while the addition of a large number of balloon sonde measurements improves the accuracy in the lower troposphere, in the tropics and southern hemisphere in particular. The addition of MLS data also improves the accuracy of climatology in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. The revised climatology has been used for the latest reprocessing of SBUV and TOMS satellite ozone data.

  1. DIFFERENTIAL PULSE HEIGHT DISCRIMINATOR

    DOEpatents

    Test, L.D.

    1958-11-11

    Pulse-height discriminators are described, specifically a differential pulse-height discriminator which is adapted to respond to pulses of a band of amplitudes, but to reject pulses of amplitudes greater or less than tbe preselected band. In general, the discriminator includes a vacuum tube having a plurality of grids adapted to cut off plate current in the tube upon the application of sufficient negative voltage. One grid is held below cutoff, while a positive pulse proportional to the amplltude of each pulse is applled to this grid. Another grid has a negative pulse proportional to the amplitude of each pulse simultaneously applied to it. With this arrangement the tube will only pass pulses which are of sufficlent amplitude to counter the cutoff bias but not of sufficlent amplitude to cutoff the tube.

  2. Global Distribution of Planetary Boundary Layer Height Derived from CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The global distribution of planetary boundary layer (PBL) height, which was estimated from the attenuated back-scatter observations of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), is presented. In general, the PBL is capped by a temperature inversion that tends to trap moisture and aerosols. The gradient of back-scatter observed by lidar is almost always associated with this temperature inversion and the simultaneous decrease of moisture content. Thus, the PBL top is defined as the location of the maximum aerosol scattering gradient, which is analogous to the more conventional thermodynamic definition. The maximum standard deviation method, developed by Jordan et al. (2010), is modified and used to derive the global PBL heights. The derived PBL heights are not only consistent with the results of McGrath-Spangler and Denning (2012) but also agree well with the ground-based lidar measurements. It is found that the correlation between CALIPSO and the ground-based lidar was 0.73. The seasonal mean patterns from 4-year mid-day PBL heights over global are demonstrated. Also it is found that the largest PBL heights occur over the Tibetan Plateau and the coastal areas. The smallest PBL heights appear in the Tarim Basin and the northeast of China during the local winter. The comparison of PBL heights from CALIPSO and ECMWF under different land-cover conditions showed that, over ocean and forest surface, the PBL height estimated from the CALIPSO back-scatter climatology is larger than the ones estimated from ECMWF data. However, the PBL heights from ECMWF, over grass land and bare land surface in spring and summer are larger than the ones from CALIPSO.

  3. ABLE: The Future of Mechanical Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowell, Harvey; Finkelstein, Stan

    1989-01-01

    Advanced Bio-Mechanical Linkage Enablement (ABLE) technology constitutes a leap forward in physical aids for people with disabilities, as they integrate high technologies in rehabilitation to create individualized self-contained care systems. Described are the need for universal standards, barriers to acceptance of ABLE technologies, and ways to…

  4. Ocean surface geostrophic circulation climatology and annual variations inferred from satellite altimetry and goce gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigo, Isabel M.; Sánchez Reales, José M.; Trottini, Mario

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study for the first time absolute Surface Geostrophic Currents (SGC) variations using only satellite data. The proposed approach combines 18 years altimetry data, which provide reliable measurements of the Absolute Sea Level (ASL) height with a GOCE geoid model to obtain a Dynamic Topography with an unprecedented precision and accuracy. Our proposal allows overcoming the main limitations of existing approaches based solely on altimetry data (that suffer the lack of an independent reference to derive ASL maps), and approximations based on in-situ data (which are characterized by a sparse and non homogeneous coverage in time and space). Features of the SGC annual variations are also addressed. As a result of our study we provide a new climatology of absolute SGC in the form of a 52 weeks data set of surface current fields, gridded at a quarter degree longitude and latitude resolution resolving spatial scales as short as 140 km. For presentation, this data set is averaged monthly and the results, presented as monthly climatology, are compared with a climatology based on in-situ observations from drifter data.

  5. Regional Climatology and Surface Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilber, Anne C.; Smith, G. Louis; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The climatology and surface radiation budget (SRB) of a region are intimately related. This paper presents a brief examination of this relationship. An 8-year surface radiation budget data set has been developed based on satellite measurements. In that data set and in this paper a region is defined as a quasi-square 2.5o in latitude and approximately the same physical distance in longitude. A pilot study by Wilber et al. (1998) showed a variety of behaviors of the annual cycles for selected regions. Selected desert regions form a loop in a specific part of the plot, with large NLW and large NSW. Tropical wet regions form much smaller loops in a different part of the plot, with small NLW and large NSW. For regions selected in high latitude the annual cycles form nearly linear figures in another part of the plot. The question arises as to whether these trajectories are characteristic of the climatology of the region or simply the behavior of the few regions selected from the set of 6596 regions. In order to address this question, it is necessary to classify the climatology of the each region, e.g. as classified by Koeppen (1936) or Trenwarthe and Horne (1980). This paper presents a method of classifying climate of the regions on the basis of the surface radiation behavior such that the results are very similar to the classification of Trenwarthe and Horne. The characteristics of the annual cycle of SRB components can then be investigated further, based on the climate classification of each region.

  6. A new climatological oceanic eddy census

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Evan; Pascual, Ananda; Pujol, Isabel; Faugère, Yannice; Delepoulle, Antoine; Briol, Frederic

    2015-04-01

    We present a new climatological oceanic eddy census dataset based on gridded sea level anomalies from satellite altimeter observations that is due for release by Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic data (AVISO). The identification and automated tracking of oceanic eddies is carried out using the py-eddy-tracker of Mason et al. (2014). Daily outputs of eddy properties (including position, radius, amplitude and nonlinearity) covering the period 1993-2013 over the global domain are presented and discussed. Validation and comparison is made with the published global eddy track database of Chelton et al. (2011).

  7. Influence of entrainment and countergradient on the ABL diurnal development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Ceballos, M. A.

    2009-09-01

    The representation of the diurnal evolution of the boundary layer (ABL) by NCAR-Penn State Mesoscale Model (MM5) and by the mesoscale model Weather Research Forecast (WRF) is compared. Special attention is paid to determine the role of processes that occur near and below the inversion zone: the positive correlation between the heat flux and the gradient (countergradient) and the role of entrainment of heat originating from the free troposphere. Both processes play a key role in the modelling of the diurnal variability of temperature, moisture and atmospheric compounds. A number of 13 simulations are carried out to determine the sensitivity of the model results to the formulation of the ABL height and countergradient heat flux in the Medium Range Forecast (MRF) ABL scheme. Model results are compared with experimental data obtained from the DOMINO (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms in relation to Nitrogen oxides) campaign. It was organized by Max Planck Institute for Atmospheric Chemistry (Germany) in collaboration with the National Institute for Aerospace Technology (Spain). The DOMINO campaign took place at the "Atmospheric Sounding Station - El Arenosillo", a platform dedicated to atmospheric measurements in the Southwest of Spain. All numerical experiments are grouped in four clusters, each focussing on the sensitivity of different relevant aspects. The following aspects of the formulation are analyzed: surface moisture availability (M), the countergradient term (γc) and the ABL height (h). This is done by modifying both the bulk critical Richardson number (Ric) at the inversion zone, and a coefficient of proportionality (b) that determines the excess temperature and countergradient. The importance of b is due to its direct relation in the definition of both, γc and h. The results got with MM5 model show that temperature and specific moisture temporal evolution is not very sensitive to changes in the soil moisture availability (M value from 0.6 to 0.1). Using the MRF

  8. Monkey Able Being Ready for preflight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    A squirrel monkey, Able, is being ready for placement into a capsule for a preflight test of Jupiter, AM-18 mission. AM-18 was launched on May 28, 1959 and also carried a rhesus monkey, Baker, into suborbit.

  9. Simulating a 40-year flood event climatology of Australia with a view to ocean-land teleconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Guy J.-P.; Andreadis, Konstantinos; Stampoulis, Dimitrios; Bates, Paul

    2015-04-01

    We develop, for the first time, a proof-of-concept version for a high-resolution global flood inundation model to generate a flood inundation climatology of the past 40 years (1973-2012) for the entire Australian continent at a native 1 km resolution. The objectives of our study includes (1) deriving an inundation climatology for a continent (Australia) as a demonstrator case to understand the requirements for expanding globally; (2) developing a test bed to assess the potential and value of current and future satellite missions (GRACE, SMAP, ICESat-2, AMSR-2, Sentinels and SWOT) in flood monitoring; and (3) answering science questions such as the linking of inundation to ocean circulation teleconnections. We employ the LISFLOOD-FP hydrodynamic model to generate a flood inundation climatology. The model will be built from freely available SRTM-derived data (channel widths, bank heights and floodplain topography corrected for vegetation canopy using ICESat canopy heights). Lakes and reservoirs are represented and channel hydraulics are resolved using actual channel data with bathymetry inferred from hydraulic geometry. Simulations are run with gauged flows and floodplain inundation climatology are compared to observations from GRACE, flood maps from Landsat, SAR, and MODIS. Simulations have been completed for the entire Australian continent. Additionally, changes in flood inundation have been correlated with indices related to global ocean circulation, such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation index. We will produce data layers on flood event climatology and other derived (default) products from the proposed model including channel and floodplain depths, flow direction, velocity vectors, floodplain water volume, shoreline extent and flooded area. These data layers will be in the form of simple vector and raster formats. Since outputs will be large in size we propose to upload them onto Google Earth under the GEE API license.

  10. Urban atmospheric boundary layer height by aerosol lidar and ceilometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. H.; Park, M. S.; Park, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    The characteristics of urban atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height on January, April, July and October 2014 using the gradient method by a ceilometer with a wavelength of 910 nm and an aerosol lidar with a wavelength of 532 and 1064 nm installed at two urban sites (Gwanghwamun and Jungnang) in Korea are analyzed. The Gwanghwamun site located at urban commercial area is 10 km apart from the Jungnang site located at urban residential area. The ABL height is determined by a height with a strong gradient of vertical backscatter intensity. It is found that the ABL height at both sites show a similar pattern and has a strong diurnal variation with a steep increase at 09-12 KST with a maximum in the late afternoon. And it is not determined clearly and the correlation between the ABL height by a ceilometer and that by an aerosol lidar is relatively low in case of high PM10 concentration such as Asian dust, haze and smog. Uncertainty of ABL height is also found to be strongly affected by the weather phenomena such as rain, haze or fog.

  11. Climatology of extratropical transition for North Atlantic tropical cyclones in the high-resolution GFDL climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Vecchi, G. A.; Smith, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The extratropical transition (ET) process of tropical cyclones can lead to fundamental changes in hurricane structure and storms that continue to pose large threats to life and properties. Given the importance of ET, it is necessary to understand how ET changes under a warming climate. Towards this goal, the GFDL climate model (FLOR) is first used to understand the current-day ET climatology. The standard model and a flux-adjusted version of FLOR are both used to examine ET climatology. The operational cyclone phase space method is used to define the onset and completion times of ET. The ET climatology from the climate model is compared with those from two reanalysis data sets ranging from 1979 to 2012. Both models exhibit good skills at simulating the frequency map of phase space diagram. The flux-adjusted version shows much better skill in capturing the ET climatology in terms of ET track patterns, ET locations and monthly ET variations. The model is able to simulate the frequency ratio of reintensified tropical cyclones from all ET cases. Future work involves examining changes in the ET climatology under a changing climate.

  12. Lightning Climatology with a Generalized Additive Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Thorsten; Mayr, Georg; Umlauf, Nikolaus; Zeileis, Achim

    2016-04-01

    This study present a lightning climatology on a 1km x 1km grid estimated via generalized additive models (GAM). GAMs provide a framework to account for non-linear effects in time and space and for non-linear spatial-temporal interaction terms simultaneously. The degrees of smoothness of the non-linear effects is selected automatically in our approach. Furthermore, the influence of topography is captured in the model by including a non-linear term. To illustrate our approach we use lightning data from the ALDIS networks and selected a region in Southeastern Austria, where complex terrain extends from 200 an 3800 m asl and summertime lightning activity is high compared to other parts of the Eastern Alps. The temporal effect in the GAM shows a rapid increase in lightning activity in early July and a slow decay in activity afterwards. The estimated spatial effect is not very smooth and requires approximately 225 effective degrees of freedom. It reveals that lightning is more likely in the Eastern and Southern part of the region of interest. This spatial effect only accounts for variability not already explained by the topography. The topography effect shows lightning to be more likely at higher altitudes. The effect describing the spatio-temporal interactions takes approximately 200 degrees of freedom, and reveals local deviations of the climatology.

  13. Precipitation Climatology on Titan-like Exomoons.

    PubMed

    Tokano, Tetsuya

    2015-06-01

    The availability of liquid water on the surface on Earth's continents in part relies on the precipitation of water. This implies that the habitability of exomoons has to consider not only the surface temperature and atmospheric pressure for the presence of liquid water, but also the global precipitation climatology. This study explores the sensitivity of the precipitation climatology of Titan-like exomoons to these moons' orbital configuration using a global climate model. The precipitation rate primarily depends on latitude and is sensitive to the planet's obliquity and the moon's rotation rate. On slowly rotating moons the precipitation shifts to higher latitudes as obliquity is increased, whereas on quickly rotating moons the latitudinal distribution does not strongly depend on obliquity. Stellar eclipse can cause a longitudinal variation in the mean surface temperature and surface pressure between the subplanetary and antiplanetary side if the planet's obliquity and the moon's orbital distance are small. In this particular condition the antiplanetary side generally receives more precipitation than the subplanetary side. However, precipitation on exomoons with dense atmospheres generally occurs at any longitude in contrast to tidally locked exoplanets. PMID:25796390

  14. Precipitation Climatology on Titan-like Exomoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokano, Tetsuya

    2015-06-01

    The availability of liquid water on the surface on Earth's continents in part relies on the precipitation of water. This implies that the habitability of exomoons has to consider not only the surface temperature and atmospheric pressure for the presence of liquid water, but also the global precipitation climatology. This study explores the sensitivity of the precipitation climatology of Titan-like exomoons to these moons' orbital configuration using a global climate model. The precipitation rate primarily depends on latitude and is sensitive to the planet's obliquity and the moon's rotation rate. On slowly rotating moons the precipitation shifts to higher latitudes as obliquity is increased, whereas on quickly rotating moons the latitudinal distribution does not strongly depend on obliquity. Stellar eclipse can cause a longitudinal variation in the mean surface temperature and surface pressure between the subplanetary and antiplanetary side if the planet's obliquity and the moon's orbital distance are small. In this particular condition the antiplanetary side generally receives more precipitation than the subplanetary side. However, precipitation on exomoons with dense atmospheres generally occurs at any longitude in contrast to tidally locked exoplanets.

  15. A climatology of visible surface reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoogman, Peter; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Sun, Qingsong; Schaaf, Crystal; Mahr, Tobias; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We present a high spectral resolution climatology of visible surface reflectance as a function of wavelength for use in satellite measurements of ozone and other atmospheric species. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument is planned to measure backscattered solar radiation in the 290-740 nm range, including the ultraviolet and visible Chappuis ozone bands. Observation in the weak Chappuis band takes advantage of the relative transparency of the atmosphere in the visible to achieve sensitivity to near-surface ozone. However, due to the weakness of the ozone absorption features this measurement is more sensitive to errors in visible surface reflectance, which is highly variable. We utilize reflectance measurements of individual plant, man-made, and other surface types to calculate the primary modes of variability of visible surface reflectance at a high spectral resolution, comparable to that of TEMPO (0.6 nm). Using the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirection Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF)/albedo product and our derived primary modes we construct a high spatial resolution climatology of wavelength-dependent surface reflectance over all viewing scenes and geometries. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) Lambertian Equivalent Reflectance (LER) product provides complementary information over water and snow scenes. Preliminary results using this approach in multispectral ultraviolet+visible ozone retrievals from the GOME-2 instrument show significant improvement to the fitting residuals over vegetated scenes.

  16. A climatological analysis of Saharan cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, K.; El-Metwally, Mossad; Almazroui, Mansour; Abdel Wahab, M. M.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the climatology of Saharan cyclones is presented in order to understand the Saharan climate, its variability and its changes. This climatology includes an analysis of seasonal and interannual variations, the identification and classification of cyclone tracks, and a presentation of their chief characteristics. The data used are drawn from the 1980-2009, 2.5° × 2.5°, NCEP/NCAR reanalysis (NNRP I) dataset. It is found that cyclone numbers increase in September-October-November (SON) at 4.9 cyclones per decade, while they decrease in June-July-August at 12.3 cyclones per decade. The identification algorithm constructed 562 tracks, which are categorized into 12 distinct clusters. Around 75 % of the Saharan cyclones originate south of the Atlas Mountains. The percentage of tracks that move over the Sahara is around 48 %. The eastern Mediterranean receives 27 % of the Saharan tracks, while the western basin receives only 17 and 8 % of all the Saharan cyclones decay over the Arabian Peninsula. The maximum cyclonic activity occurs in April. There is a general decrease in the number of tracks in all categories between 1993 and 2009, compared with the period between 1980 and 1992. About 72 % of the Saharan cyclones do not live more than 3 days, and about 80 % of the cyclones in the tracks never reach central pressures 1,000 hPa during their lifetimes. The maximum deepening in the tracks occurs over the western Mediterranean and over northern Algeria.

  17. NASA GLDAS Evapotranspiration Data and Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rui, Hualan; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; Teng, William L.; Vollmer, Bruce; Rodell, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is the water lost to the atmosphere by evaporation and transpiration. ET is a shared component in the energy and water budget, therefore, a critical variable for global energy and water cycle and climate change studies. However, direct ET measurements and data acquisition are difficult and expensive, especially at the global level. Therefore, modeling is one common alternative for estimating ET. With the goal to generate optimal fields of land surface states and fluxes, the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) has been generating quality-controlled, spatially and temporally consistent, terrestrial hydrologic data, including ET and other variables that affect evaporation and transpiration, such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, wind, soil moisture, heat flux, and solar radiation. This poster presents the long-term ET climatology (mean and monthly), derived from the 61-year GLDAS-2 monthly 1.0 deg x 1.0 deg. NOAH model Experiment-1 data, and describes the basic characteristics of spatial and seasonal variations of the climatology. The time series of GLDAS-2 precipitation and radiation, and ET are also discussed to show the improvement of GLDAS-2 forcing data and model output over those from GLDAS-1.

  18. Climatology of Gravity Wave Characteristics and Middle Atmosphere Thermal Structure Characteristics over Reunion Islands, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, Vishnu

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, climatological characteristics of the gravity wave activities and thermal structure activities are studied using temperature profiles obtained from Rayleigh lidar located at Reunion Island (20.8°S, 55.5°E) over a period of ~14 years (1994-2007). The study has been performed over the height range from 30 to 65 km. The overall monthly mean temperature shows a maximum of 265-270K at the stratopause height region from ˜44-52km and peaks during the months of March and November. While there is no clear signature of seasonal oscillation in the stratopause height, the stratopause temperature shows distinct maxima during the periods March-April and October-November. The GW characteristics in terms of time (frequency), height (wave number) and GW associated Potential Energy and their seasonal dependences are presented. Generally, the temporal evolution of temperature profile illustrates the downward phase propagation indicating that the energy is propagating upward. The wave activity is clearly visible with the wave periods ranging from 260 min to 32 min. The dominant components have vertical wavelengths in the range of about ~4 km to 35 km. It is found that the seasonal variation of potential energy is maximum during summer in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. A semiannual variation is seen in the gravity wave activity over all height ranges in the months of February and August.

  19. Subvisual-thin cirrus lidar dataset for satellite verification and climatological research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Cho, Byung S.

    1992-01-01

    A polarization (0.694 microns wavelength) lidar dataset for subvisual and thin (bluish-colored) cirrus clouds is drawn from project FIRE (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) extended time observations. The clouds are characterized by their day-night visual appearance; base, top, and optical midcloud heights and temperatures; measured physical and estimated optical cloud thicknesses; integrated linear depolarization ratios; and derived k/2 eta ratios. A subset of the data supporting 30 NOAA polar-orbiting satellite overpasses is given in tabular form to provide investigators with the means to test cloud retrieval algorithms and establish the limits of cirrus detectability from satellite measurements under various conditions. Climatologically, subvisual-thin cirrus appear to be higher, colder, and more strongly depolarizing than previously reported multilatitude cirrus, although similar k/2 eta that decrease with height and temperature are found.

  20. Climatology of the Planetary Boundary Layer over the Continental United States and Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, D. J.; Medeiros, B.; Zhang, Y.; Golaz, J.; Beljaars, A.; Jacobson, A. R.

    2012-12-01

    Boundary layer processes are important in climate because they determine vertical fluxes of energy, water and trace gases, cloud formation, and lapse rate, all which influence climate feedback processes and therefore climate sensitivity. However, PBL climatology and variability have received little attention, partly for lack of observational datasets, and the representation of the PBL in climate models has not been evaluated in detail. We analyze the PBL over Europe and the continental U.S. during 1981-2005 using radiosonde observations, the ERA-Interim (a reanalysis that assimilates observations), and two contemporary climate models, the NCAR CAM5 and GFDL AM3 (which do not assimilate observations). A bulk Richardson number method is used to determine a PBL height metric in a consistent fashion from these datasets. Although the method has uncertainties that can exceed 50 % for heights < 1 km, they are generally < 20 % for higher values. Using the resulting 25-year datasets with temporal resolution of 2/day (from radiosondes), 4/day (climate models) or 8/day (reanalysis), we have analyzed the climatological diurnal and seasonal variability of the PBL over the two midlatitude spatial domains with the greatest density of radiosonde observations. Climatological heights are generally < 1 km during daytime and < 0.5 km at night over both Europe and the U.S. The amplitude and phase of the diurnal cycle are reasonably well captured by fortuitously-timed radiosonde observations over Europe, but over the U.S. the 0000 and 1200 UTC soundings do not capture the full range of diurnal variability apparent in the reanalysis. Therefore, we base all model-observation comparisons on matched temporal sampling. During daytime, summertime heights are deeper than in wintertime, but at night winter values exceed summer values. The models all reproduce general features of observed spatial, seasonal and diurnal variability, with better agreement for daytime than nighttime. While ERA

  1. Sri Lanka, Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The topography of the island nation of Sri Lanka is well shown in this color-coded shaded relief map generated with digital elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM).

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction, so that northwest slopes appear bright and southeast slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    For this special view heights below 10 meters (33 feet) above sea level have been colored red. These low coastal elevations extend 5 to 10 km (3.1 to 6.2 mi) inland on Sri Lanka and are especially vulnerable to flooding associated with storm surges, rising sea level, or, as in the aftermath of the earthquake of December 26, 2004, tsunami. These so-called tidal waves have occurred numerous times in history and can be especially destructive, but with the advent of the near-global SRTM elevation data planners can better predict which areas are in the most danger and help develop mitigation plans in the event of particular flood events.

    Sri Lanka is shaped like a giant teardrop falling from the southern tip of the vast Indian subcontinent. It is separated from India by the 50km (31mi) wide Palk Strait, although there is a series of stepping-stone coral islets known as Adam's Bridge that almost form a land bridge between the two countries. The island is just 350km (217mi) long and only 180km (112mi) wide at its broadest, and is about the same size as Ireland, West Virginia or Tasmania.

    The southern half of the island is dominated by beautiful and rugged hill country, and includes Mt Pidurutalagala, the islandaE(TM)s highest point at 2524 meters (8281 ft). The entire northern half comprises a large plain extending from the edge of

  2. Hanford Site Climatological Data Summary 1998

    SciTech Connect

    DJ Hoitink; JV Ramsdell; KW Burk

    1999-05-26

    This document presents the climatological data measured at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site for calendar year 1998. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates the Hanford Meteorology Station and the Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network from which these data were collected. The information contained herein includes updated historical climatologies for temperature; precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters. Further, the data are adjunct to and update Hoitink and Burk (1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998); however, Appendix B--Wind Climatology (1994) is excluded. 1998 was much warmer than normal, tying 1992 as the warmest year on record. The average temperature was 56.4 F, 3.1 F above normal (53.3 F). The highest July temperature ever recorded was 112 F on July 27, 1998. The first week in May, three daily temperature records were broken or tied. November 1998 was the third warmest on record. For the year 1998, there were 73 days with maximum temperature >90 F, the third highest on record. For the 12-month period, 11 months were warmer than normal and 1 was cooler than normal. The summer (June, July, and August) and autumn (September, October, and November) of 1998 were the fourth warmest on record. 1998 was slightly wetter than normal. Precipitation totaled 6.45 in., 103% of normal (6.26 in.); snow-fall totaled 7.2 in., compared to the normal of 13.8 in. There were eight thunderstorms recorded at Hanford Meteorological Station in July 1998, tying 1983 for the most thunderstorms in July. The average wind speed during 1998 was 7.9 mph, 0.2 mph above normal (7.7 mph). There were 32 days with peak gusts {ge}40 mph, compared to a yearly average of 26 mph. The peak gust during the year was 56 mph from the south-southwest on November 21. November 1998 had a record number of days (10) with wind gusts {ge}40 mph. The heating-degree days for 1997-1998 were 4,523 (14% below the 5

  3. Supporting the Digitally Able Beginning Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkey, Louise

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on research which explored the experiences six digitally able beginning teachers during their first year in secondary schools. Using a complexity theoretical framework, the barriers and enablers that influenced the integration of digital technologies into teaching practice were examined. The findings indicate that context…

  4. Planned HST observations of LSQ15abl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quimby, R. M.; Cooke, J.; Pritchard, T.

    2015-04-01

    Following the discovery and classification of LSQ15abl as a SLSN-II (ATel #7412), we have triggered the Hubble Space Telescope program, "The First UV Spectra of a Hydrogen-Rich Superluminous Supernova," (GO-13784; PI=Quimby), as well as the Swift program, "Photometry of a Hydrogen-Rich Superluminous Supernova" (Swift-1114192; PI=Quimby).

  5. ABL and BAM Friction Analysis Comparison

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Warner, Kirstin F.; Sandstrom, Mary M.; Brown, Geoffrey W.; Remmers, Daniel L.; Phillips, Jason J.; Shelley, Timothy J.; Reyes, Jose A.; Hsu, Peter C.; Reynolds, John G.

    2014-12-29

    Here, the Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program has conducted a proficiency study for Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here is a comparison of the Alleghany Ballistic Laboratory (ABL) friction data and Bundesanstalt fur Materialforschung und -prufung (BAM) friction data for 19 HEM and military standard explosives.

  6. MERIS albedo climatology and its effect on the FRESCO+ O2 A-band cloud retrieval from SCIAMACHY data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Christoph; Wang, Ping; Brunner, Dominik; Stammes, Piet; Zhou, Yipin

    2010-05-01

    Accurate cloud information is an important prerequisite for the retrieval of atmospheric trace gases from spaceborne UV/VIS sensors. Errors in the estimated cloud fraction and cloud height (pressure) result in an erroneous air mass factor and thus can lead to inaccuracies in the vertical column densities of the retrieved trace gas. In ESA's TEMIS (Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service) project, the FRESCO+ (Fast Retrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A-band) cloud retrieval is applied to, amongst others, SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY) data to determine these quantities. Effective cloud fraction and pressure are inverted by (i) radiative transfer simulations of top-of-atmosphere reflectance based on O2 absorption, single Rayleigh scattering, surface and cloud albedo in three spectral windows covering the O2 A-band and (ii) a subsequent fitting of the simulated to the measured spectrum. However, FRESCO+ relies on a relatively coarse resolution surface albedo climatology (1° x 1°) compiled from GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) measurements in the 1990's which introduces several artifacts, e.g. an overestimation of cloud fraction at coastlines or over some mountainous regions. Therefore, we test the substitution of the GOME climatology with a new land surface albedo climatology compiled for every month from MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) Albedomap data (0.05° x 0.05°) covering the period January 2003 to October 2006. The MERIS channels at 754nm and 775nm are located spectrally close to the corresponding GOME channels (758nm and 772nm) on both sides of the O2 A-band. Further, the increased spatial resolution of the MERIS product allows to better account for SCIAMACHY's pixel size of approximately 30x60km. The aim of this study is to describe and assess (i) the compilation and quality of the MERIS climatology (ii) the differences to the GOME climatology, and (iii) possible

  7. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance. PMID:25983572

  8. PULSE HEIGHT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-01-21

    An anticoincidence device is described for a pair of adjacent channels of a multi-channel pulse height analyzer for preventing the lower channel from generating a count pulse in response to an input pulse when the input pulse has sufficient magnitude to reach the upper level channel. The anticoincidence circuit comprises a window amplifier, upper and lower level discriminators, and a biased-off amplifier. The output of the window amplifier is coupled to the inputs of the discriminators, the output of the upper level discriminator is connected to the resistance end of a series R-C network, the output of the lower level discriminator is coupled to the capacitance end of the R-C network, and the grid of the biased-off amplifier is coupled to the junction of the R-C network. In operation each discriminator produces a negative pulse output when the input pulse traverses its voltage setting. As a result of the connections to the R-C network, a trigger pulse will be sent to the biased-off amplifier when the incoming pulse level is sufficient to trigger only the lower level discriminator.

  9. Behaviour of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietroni, I.; Argentini, S.

    2009-09-01

    The Antarctic Atmospheric Boundary Layer presents characteristics which are substantially different from the mid-latitudes ABLs. On the Antarctic plateau two different extreme situations are observed. During the summer a mixing height develops during the warmer hours of the day although the sensible heat flux is reduced compared to that at mid-latitudes. During the winter a long lived stable boundary layer is continuously present, the residual layer is never observed, consequently the inversion layer is connected at the free atmosphere. To understand the stable ABL process the STABLEDC (Study of the STAble Boundary Layer Environmental at Dome C) experimental field was held at Concordia, the French Italian plateau station at Dome C, during 2005. In the same period the RMO (Routine Measurements Observations) started. The data included turbulence data at the surface, temperature profiles by a microwave profiler (MTP-5P), a mini-sodar and radio-soundings. In this work we will show the results of a comparison of the ABL height at Concordia (3233 m a.s.l) during the summer and the winter using direct measurements and parameterization. The winter ABL height was estimated directly using experimental data (radio-soundings and radiometer temperature and wind velocity profiles) and different methods proposed in literature. The stable ABL height was also estimated using the formulation proposed by Zilitinkevich et al. (2007) for the long-lived stable boundary layer. The correlation of ABL height with the temperature and wind speed is also shown. The summer mixing height was instead estimated by mini-sodar data and compared with the height given by the model suggested by Batchvarova and Gryning (1991) which use as input the turbulence data.

  10. A high-resolution global sea surface temperature climatology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, R.W.; Smith, T.M.

    1995-06-01

    In response to the development of a new higher-resolution sea surface temperature (SST) analysis at the National Meteorological Center (NMC), a new monthly 1{degrees} global sea surface temperature climatology was constructed from two intermediate climatologies: the 2{degrees} SST climatology used a 30-yr 1950-1979 base period between roughly 40{degrees}S and 60{degrees}N based on in situ (ship and buoy) SST data supplemented by four years (1982-1985) of satellite SST retrievals, and sea-ice coverage data over a 12-yr period (1982-1993). The final climatology was combined from these two products so that a 1{degrees} resolution was maintained and the base period was adjusted to the 1950-1979 period wherever possible (approximately between 40{degrees}S and 60{degrees}N). Compared to the 2{degrees} climatology, the 1{degrees} climatology resolves equatorial upwelling and fronts much better. This leads to a better matching of the scales of the new analysis and climatology. In addition, because the magnitudes of large-scale features are consistently maintained in both the older 2{degrees} and the new 1{degrees} climatologies, climate monitoring of large-scale anomalies will be minimally affected by the analysis change. The use of 12 years of satellite SST retrievals makes this new climatology useful for many additional purposes because its effective resolution actually approaches 1{degrees} everywhere over the global ocean and because the mean SST values are more accurate south of 40{degrees}S than climatologies without these data. 12 refs., 16 figs.

  11. Climatology of fog in SW-Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Aurelio; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2016-04-01

    The climatology of fog in Keflavik Airport in Southwest-Iceland has been investigated for the latter half of the 20th Century. Fog is twice as frequent in the late night than in the afternoon, suggesting important, but not dominating, impact of the diurnal cycle. There is large interannual variability in the frequency of fog, but no clear long-term trend. However, there is a clear shift in seasonal frequency; the period 1953-1977 had relatively frequent fog in the autumn, while 1978-1998, fog is relatively frequent in the spring and summer. This indicates sensitivity of the fog to mean sea surface temperatures. An attempt is made to assess frequency of fog in climate scenarii.

  12. Climatology of Urban-regional Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Urbanized areas have come to be significant if not dominant components of many regional land surfaces. They represent perhaps the most dramatic recent change man has made in his environment - a change that may well burgeon in the foreseeable future as greater percentages of world populations crowd into metropolitan areas. The climate of urban-regional systems is involved because temperature, air, and pollutants added to the air are significant aspects of this change. During the past two years, substantial progress has been made in the application of remote sensing techniques to the study of urban climatology by programs jointly sponsored by NASA and the United States Geological Survey. The initial effort has endeavored with considerable success to map terrestrial radiation emission or the general thermal state of the land surface with the aid of imaging radiometers (mechanical-optical scanners).

  13. Inner Radiation Belt Dynamics and Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, P. P.; Looper, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    We present preliminary results of inner belt proton data assimilation using an augmented version of the Selesnick et al. Inner Zone Model (SIZM). By varying modeled physics parameters and solar particle injection parameters to generate many ensembles of the inner belt, then optimizing the ensemble weights according to inner belt observations from SAMPEX/PET at LEO and HEO/DOS at high altitude, we obtain the best-fit state of the inner belt. We need to fully sample the range of solar proton injection sources among the ensemble members to ensure reasonable agreement between the model ensembles and observations. Once this is accomplished, we find the method is fairly robust. We will demonstrate the data assimilation by presenting an extended interval of solar proton injections and losses, illustrating how these short-term dynamics dominate long-term inner belt climatology.

  14. Tohono O'odham Monsoon Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, G.

    2006-12-01

    The North American monsoon is a summertime weather phenomenon that develops over the southwestern North America. For thousands of years the Tohono O'odham people of this area have depended on the associated rainy season (Jukiabig Masad) to grow traditional crops using runoff agriculture. Today, the high incidence of Type II diabetes among native people has prompted many to return to their traditional agricultural diets. Local monsoon onset dates and the North American Regional Reanalysis dataset were used to develop a 24-year Tohono O'odham Nation (TON) monsoon and pre-monsoon climatology that can be used as a tool for planning runoff agriculture. Using monsoon composite datasets, temporal and spatial correlations between antecedent period meteorological variables, monsoon onset dates and total monsoon precipitation were examined to identify variables that could be useful in predicting the onset and intensity of the monsoon. The results suggest additional research is needed to identify variables related to monsoon onset and intensity.

  15. Climatology of POLDER/PARASOL cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parol, F.; Riedi, J.; Vanbauce, C.; Cornet, C.; Zeng, S.; Thieuleux, F.; Henriot, N.

    2013-05-01

    Since December 2004 the CNES PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Science coupled with Observations from a Lidar) mission has been flying in the A-Train constellation. More than seven years of data have been routinely acquired and processed by the PARASOL/POLDER ground segment (CNES) and by ICARE Data Center in Lille, France. PARASOL's unique spectral, directional and polarization capabilities give powerful constraints to the cloud retrieval scheme. They allow derivation of classical cloud properties (amount, optical depth, altitude or pressure, albedo) with state of the art performance but also provide original information (thermodynamic phase, angular variability of properties, heterogeneity parameter, etc.). Climatology of cloud fraction and cloud optical thickness have been realized over the 2005-2011 period. Some results and comparisons to MODIS are shown for the year 2008.

  16. Climatology of lightning in the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Petr; Kyznarová, Hana

    2011-06-01

    The Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI) has utilized lightning data from the Central European Lightning Detection Network (CELDN) since 1999. The CELDN primarily focuses on the detection of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning but intra-cloud (IC) lightning detection is also available. Lightning detection is used by the CHMI forecasters as an additional source to radar and satellite data for nowcasting of severe storms. Lightning data are also quantitatively used in automatic nowcasting applications. The quality of lightning data can be evaluated using their climatological characteristics. Climatological characteristics are also useful for defining decision thresholds that are valuable for human forecasters as well as for automatic nowcasting applications. The seven-year period from 2002 to 2008, which had relatively even-quality lightning data, was used to calculate the spatial and temporal distributions of lightning. The monthly number of CG strokes varies depending on the season. The highest number of CG strokes occurs during summer, with more than 20 days of at least five detected CG strokes on the Czech Republic territory in June and July. The least number of CG stokes occurs in winter, with less than three days per month having at least five detected CG stokes. The mean diurnal distribution of CG strokes peaks between 1500 and 1600 UTC and reaches a minimum between 0500 and 0800 UTC. The average spatial distribution of CG strokes shows sharp local maxima corresponding with the locations of the TV broadcast towers. The average spatial distribution of CG flash density, calculated on a 20 × 20 km grid, shows the maximum (3.23 flashes km - 2 year - 1 ) in the western part of Czech Republic and the minimum (0.92 flashes km - 2 year - 1 ) in the south-southeast of the Czech Republic. In addition, lightning characteristics related to the identified convective cells, such as distribution of the lightning stroke rates or relation to the radar derived by Vertically

  17. Height and cognitive achievement among Indian children.

    PubMed

    Spears, Dean

    2012-03-01

    Taller children perform better on average on tests of cognitive achievement, in part because of differences in early-life health and net nutrition. Recent research documenting this height-achievement slope has primarily focused on rich countries. Using the India Human Development Survey, a representative sample of 40,000 households which matches anthropometric data to learning tests, this paper documents a height-achievement slope among Indian children. The height-achievement slope in India is more than twice as steep as in the U.S. An earlier survey interviewed some IHDS children's households eleven years before. Including matched early-life control variables reduces the apparent effect of height, but does not eliminate it; water, sanitation, and hygiene may be particularly important for children's outcomes. Being one standard deviation taller is associated with being 5 percentage points more likely to be able to write, a slope that falls only to 3.4 percentage points controlling for a long list of contemporary and early-life conditions. PMID:21907646

  18. Stratocumulus cloud height variations determined from surface and satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Young, David F.; Davies, R.; Blaskovic, M.; Albrecht, Bruce A.

    1990-01-01

    Determination of cloud-top heights from satellite-inferred cloud-top temperatures is a relatively straightforward procedure for a well-behaved troposphere. The assumption of a monotonically decreasing temperature with increasing altitude is commonly used to assign a height to a given cloud-top temperature. In the hybrid bispectral threshold method, or HBTM, Minnis et al. (1987) assume that the lapse rate for the troposphere is -6.5/Kkm and that the surface temperature which calibrated this lapse rate is the 24 hour mean of the observed or modeled clear-sky, equivalent blackbody temperature. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) algorithm (Rossow et al., 1988) attempts a more realistic assignment of height by utilizing interpolations of analyzed temperature fields from the National Meteorological Center (NMC) to determine the temperature at a given level over the region of interest. Neither these nor other techniques have been tested to any useful extent. The First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Intensive Field Observations (IFO) provide an excellent opportunity to assess satellite-derived cloud height results because of the availability of both direct and indirect cloud-top altitude data of known accuracy. The variations of cloud-top altitude during the Marine Stratocumulus IFO (MSIFO, June 29 to July 19, 1987) derived from surface, aircraft, and satellite data are examined.

  19. The RHESSI Microflare Height Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christe, P.; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first in-depth statistical survey of flare source heights observed by RHESSI. Flares were found using a flare-finding algorithm designed to search the 6-10 keV count-rate when RHESSI's full sensitivity was available in order to find the smallest events (Christe et al., 2008). Between March 2002 and March 2007, a total of 25,006 events were found. Source locations were determined in the 4-10 keV, 10-15 keV, and 15-30 keV energy ranges for each event. In order to extract the height distribution from the observed projected source positions, a forward-fit model was developed with an assumed source height distribution where height is measured from the photosphere. We find that the best flare height distribution is given by g (h) oc exp(-h/lambda) where lambda = 6.1 plus or minus 0.3 Mm is the scale height. A power law height distribution with a negative power law index, gamma = 3.1 plus or minus 0.3 is also consistent with the data. Interpreted as thermal loop top sources, these heights are compared to loops generated by a potential field model (PFSS). The measured flare heights distribution are found to be much steeper than the potential field loop height distribution which may be a signature of the flare energization process.

  20. Aleukemic bcr-abl positive granulocytic sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Jew-Win; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai; Chang, Kian-Meng; Tan, Sen-Moi

    2009-11-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma (GS) can occur de novo or in association with intramedullary myeloid disorders. With the advent of sophisticated molecular detection techniques to detect diagnostic genes such as bcr-abl, PML-RARA and CBFB/MYH11 in bone marrow or peripheral blood, many cases of the so called 'primary' GS are questionable. We report a case of primary GS where the tumor mass bcr-abl translocation was demonstrated by fluorescent in situ hybridization in which there was no evidence of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). This is an important finding as it highlights the possibility that CML may present as a sole extramedullary form, and illustrates potential treatment by tyrosine kinase inhibitor. PMID:19215983

  1. Climatology of Duststorms in the World during 1982-1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, K.; Yoshimura, S.; Koshiba, A.

    2002-12-01

    A climatology of routine surface meteorological reports of duststorm (code form SYNOP / WMO) during 1982 -1993 was carried out to investigate the geographical and temporal variability of the duststorms in the world. The duststorm is defined as an ensemble of particles of dust or sand lifted to greater heights by a strong and turbulent wind. Surface visibility is reduced to lower limit; the qualification for a synoptic report is visibility below 1000 m. About 2000 stations in the world were available in the present study. The results of the present study are summarized as follows. 1) The major source regions of duststorms are Sahara, Arabia Peninsula, central Asia, Takla Makan, Gobi, Mexico and Australia. In general, the frequency of duststorms is less in the Southern Hemisphere than in the Northern Hemisphere. 2) A regional tendency can be seen in a large desert; there are little frequency of the duststorms in the interior of great deserts, such as Sahara, Rubak Khali, and Australia. On the contrary, many duststorms are reported in the west Sahara and the east Australia, which are the downstream regions of the prevailing winds. 3) In the North Hemisphere, the duststorms occur in the spring. A major peak of the frequency of the duststorms occurs in March in the North America, April to May in China and Asia, June to July in the former USSR. There are two peaks in January and May in Africa; because Africa extends over both hemispheres. The January peak is caused by Harmattan (a dry easterly wind from the Sahara). 4) The occurrence of the duststorm is related to the frontal activity and the surface condition of ground. Generally speaking, a peak season of duststorms in the world occurs about one month before the rainy season. 5) The total frequency of the duststorms in the world slightly decreased during 1982 - 1993. But, the frequency of the duststorms in the East Asia has increased since 2000.

  2. Planetary boundary layer heights from GPS radio occultation refractivity and humidity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Chi O.; Waliser, Duane E.; Chan, Steven K.; Li, Jui-Lin; Tian, Baijun; Xie, Feiqin; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2012-08-01

    The height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is an important parameter that relates to the various processes associated with the PBL. In this paper, we use Global Positioning System radio occultation (GPSRO) measurements to derive a global climatology of PBL heights. Utilizing the strength of GPSRO in capturing fine vertical structures, the top of the PBL is defined to be the height at which the vertical gradient of the refractivity or water vapor partial pressure is minimum, corresponding to the height where the refractivity or water vapor pressure changes most rapidly. A "sharpness parameter" is defined that quantifies the applicability of these definitions. The sharpness parameter is largest over the subtropical regions characterized by strong subsidence. When the sharpness parameter is large, the refractivity- and moisture-based heights are shown to converge. We derived global PBL height climatology using three years (Dec. 2006-Nov. 2009) of COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 measurements and compared with values calculated from ECMWF Reanalysis Interim (ERA-Int). We found that the mean PBL heights from GPSRO shared similar spatial and seasonal variations with ERA-Int; however, GPSRO heights were higher by 500 m. The standard deviation was also higher from GPSRO, especially in the tropics. We present detailed comparisons between GPSRO and ERA-Int over the Pacific Ocean and the Sahara desert and examine the PBL height distributions as well as its annual and diurnal variabilities. These results suggest that the underlying causes of the bias between GPSRO and ERA-Int likely vary from region to region.

  3. Is height a core geometric cue for navigation? Young children's use of height in reorientation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qingfen; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Di; Shao, Yi

    2015-02-01

    With respect to reorientation, children older than 1.5 to 2 years can use geometric cues (distance and left/right sense). However, because previous studies have focused mainly on the plane geometric properties, little is known about the role of information with respect to vertical dimension in children's reorientation. The current study aimed to examine whether and how 3- and 4-year-old children use height information to search for a hidden toy when disoriented in a small enclosure. In a slant-ceiling rectangular room and a slant-ceiling square room, 4-year-olds were able to use height information to reorient and search for the toy in the correct corner, whereas 3-year-olds were not able to do so. Our results suggest that children can, at least by the age of 4 years, use height information and that height is not used as early as other geometric properties that are in the core geometry system for navigation. PMID:25462036

  4. Unified height systems after GOCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, Reiner; Gruber, Thomas; Sideris, Michael; Rangelova, Elena; Woodworth, Phil; Hughes, Chris; Ihde, Johannes; Liebsch, Gunter; Rülke, Axel; Gerlach, Christian; Haagmans, Roger

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of global height unification are twofold, (1) the realization of accurate geopotential numbers C together with their standard deviation σ(C) at a selected set of stations (datum points of national height systems, geodetic fundamental stations (IERS), primary tide gauges (PSMSL) and primary reference clocks (IERS)) and (2) the determination of height off-sets between all existing regional/national height systems and one global height reference. In the future the primary method of height determination will be GPS-levelling with very stringent requirements concerning the consistency of the positioning and the gravity potential difference part. Consistency is required in terms of the applied standards (ITRF, zero tide system, geodetic reference system). Geopotential differences will be based on a next generation geopotential model combining GOCE and GRACE and a best possible collection of global terrestrial and altimetric gravity and topographic data. Ultimately, the envisaged accuracy of height unification is about 10 cm2/s2 (or 1cm). At the moment, in well surveyed regions, an accuracy of about 40 to 60 cm2/s2 (or 4 to 6cm) is attainable. Objective One can be realized by straight forward computation of geopotential numbers C, i.e. geopotential differences relative to an adopted height reference. No adjustment is required for this. Objective Two, the unification of existing height systems is achieved by employing a least-squares adjustment based on the GBVP-approach. In order to attain a non-singular solution, this requires for each included datum zone at least one geo-referenced station per zone, i.e. its ellipsoidal height h and, in addition, the corresponding physical height H (geopotential number, normal height, orthometric height, etc.). Changes in geopotential numbers of consecutive realizations reflect (1) temporal changes of station heights, (2) improvements or changes of the applied geopotential (or geoid) model and (3) improvements of the

  5. Latitudinal variations of cloud base height and lightning parameters in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtak, V. C.; Williams, E. R.; Boccippio, D. J.

    2005-07-01

    The observed reduction in cloud-to-ground lightning in the near-equatorial zone is examined from the perspective of the width of the main negative charge region. Thermodynamic observations of cloud base height also show a climatological minimum value in the near-equatorial region. The association of low cloud bases with both narrow updrafts and narrow charging zones may impede the bridging of the large air gap to ground, and thereby suppress cloud-to-ground lightning activity. This width dependence may be more important than the ˜ 10% variation in height of the freezing level in encouraging flashes to ground.

  6. Latitudinal variations of cloud base height and lightning parameters in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushtak, V. C.; Williams, E. R.; Boccippio, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed reduction in cloud-to-ground lightning in the new-equational zone is examined from the perspective of the width of the main negative charge region. Thermodynamic observations of cloud base height also show a climatological minimum value in the near-equatorial region. The association of low cloud base with both narrow updrafts and narrow changing zones may impede the bridging of the large air gap to ground, and thereby suppress cloud-to-ground lightning activity. This width dependence may be more important than the approx. 10% variation in height of the freezing level in the encouraging flashes to ground.

  7. Climatology of clouds and precipitation over East Antarctica using ground-based remote sensing at the Princess Elizabeth station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souverijns, Niels; Gossart, Alexandra; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Lhermitte, Stef; Van Tricht, Kristof; Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet is highly dependent on the interaction between clouds and precipitation. Our understanding of these processes is challenged by the limited availability of observations over the area and problems in Antarctic climate simulations by state-of-the-art climate models. Improvements are needed in this field, as the Antarctic ice sheet is expected to become a dominant contributor to sea level rise in the 21st century. In 2010, an observational site was established at the Princess Elisabeth (PE) Antarctic station. PE is located in the escarpment area of Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (72°S, 23°E). The instruments consist of several ground-based remote sensing instruments: a ceilometer (measuring cloud-base height and vertical structure), a 24-GHz Micro Rain Radar (MRR; providing vertical profiles of radar effective reflectivity and Doppler velocity), and a pyrometer (measuring effective cloud base temperature). An automatic weather station provides info on boundary-layer meteorology (temperature, wind speed and direction, humidity, pressure), as well as broadband radiative fluxes and snow height changes. This set of instruments can be used to infer the role of clouds in the Antarctic climate system, their interaction with radiation and their impact on precipitation. Cloud and precipitation characteristics are derived from 5-year-long measurement series, which is unprecedented for the Antarctic region. Here, we present an overview of the cloud and precipitation climatology. Statistics on cloud occurrence are calculated on annual / seasonal basis and a distinction between liquid / mixed phase and ice clouds is made. One can discriminate between liquid-bearing and ice-only clouds by investigating the ceilometer attenuated backscatter, since liquid phase clouds have a much higher signal. Furthermore, by using pyrometer measurements, we are able to identify the range of temperatures at which liquid / ice clouds are

  8. Lightning climatology in the Congo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soula, S.; Kasereka, J. Kigotsi; Georgis, J. F.; Barthe, C.

    2016-09-01

    The lightning climatology of the Congo Basin including several countries of Central Africa is analysed in detail for the first time. It is based on data from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), for the period from 2005 to 2013. A comparison of these data with Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) data for the same period shows the relative detection efficiency of the WWLLN (DE) in the 2500 km × 2500 km region increases from about 1.70% in the beginning of the period to 5.90% in 2013, and it is in agreement with previous results for other regions of the world. However, the increase of DE is not uniform over the whole region. The average monthly flash rate describes an annual cycle with a strong activity from October to March and a low one from June to August, associated with the ITCZ migration but not exactly symmetrical on both sides of the equator. The zonal distribution of the lightning flashes exhibits a maximum between 1°S and 2°S and about 56% of the flashes are located south of the equator in the 10°S-10°N interval. The diurnal evolution of the flash rate has a maximum between 1400 and 1700 UTC, according to the reference year. The annual flash density and number of stormy days show a sharp maximum localized in the eastern part of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) regardless of the reference year and the period of the year. These maxima reach 12.86 fl km- 2 and 189 days, respectively, in 2013, and correspond to a very active region located at the rear of the Virunga mountain range at altitudes that exceed 3000 m. The presence of these mountains plays a role in the thunderstorm development along the year. The estimation of this local maximum of the lightning density by taking into account the DE, leads to a value consistent with that of the global climatology by Christian et al. (2003).

  9. A Variable-Height Wheelchair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jack M.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes a variable-height wheelchair which can be raised 18 inches above normal chair height by means of an electrically operated screw jack. Photoqraphs illustrate the chair to be convenient and helpful for a handicapped chemistry student. (Author/SK)

  10. Climatological assessment of recent severe weather events

    SciTech Connect

    Changnon, D.; Changnon, S.A.

    1997-11-01

    A climatological assessment of a series of exceptionally severe and damaging storms during 1991-1994 was pursued to put these events and their frequency and intensity/severity into a temporal perspective. The severe weather events were assessed according to the damage they caused. Insurance-derived measures of property and crop losses due to weather were used in this study; these measures adjust individual storm losses to changing socioeconomic conditions. Two methods were used to assess the events: (1) a comparative analysis of event frequency, losses and intensity with those in the preceding 40 years, and (2) a comparison of temporal variations of the 1949-1994 events with fluctuations in population, cyclonic activity, and temperatures. The results showed that the 1991-1994 property losses ranked high in number and amount of loss. However, storm intensity was found to be higher in the 1950s. The temporal distributions of the catastrophes and crop losses were well related to North American cyclonic activity, and when cyclonic activity, U.S. mean temperatures, and population were combined, they explained 865 of the variability found in the frequency of catastrophes during 1949-1994. The results suggest that, although the severe weather events in 1991-1994 were exceptionally high in frequency and losses, much of the loss was a result of the ever increasing target at risk. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Tower Mesonetwork Climatology and Interactive Display Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Bauman, William H., III

    2004-01-01

    Forecasters at the 45th Weather Squadron and Spaceflight Meteorology Group use data from the tower network over the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) to evaluate Launch Commit Criteria, and issue and verify forecasts for ground operations. Systematic biases in these parameters could adversely affect an analysis, forecast, or verification. Also, substantial geographical variations in temperature and wind speed can occur under specific wind directions. To address these concerns, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a climatology of temperatures and winds from the tower network, and identified the geographical variation and significant tower biases. The mesoclimate is largely driven by the complex land-water interfaces across KSC/CCAFS. Towers with close proximity to water typically had much warmer nocturnal temperatures and higher wind speeds throughout the year. The strongest nocturnal wind speeds occurred from October to March whereas the strongest mean daytime wind speeds occurred from February to May. These results of this project can be viewed by forecasters through an interactive graphical user interface developed by the AMU. The web-based interface includes graphical and map displays of mean, standard deviation, bias, and data availability for any combination of towers, variables, months, hours, and wind directions.

  12. 16 year climatology of cirrus clouds over a tropical station in southern India using ground and space-based lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, A. K.; Gadhavi, H. S.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Raghunath, K.; Rao, S. V. B.; Jayaraman, A.

    2015-06-01

    16 year (1998-2013) climatology of cirrus clouds and their macrophysical (base height, top height and geometrical thickness) and optical properties (cloud optical thickness) observed using a ground-based lidar over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), India, is presented. The climatology obtained from the ground-based lidar is compared with the climatology obtained from seven and half years (June 2006-December 2013) of Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations. A very good agreement is found between the two climatologies in spite of their opposite viewing geometries and difference in sampling frequencies. Nearly 50-55% of cirrus clouds were found to possess geometrical thickness less than 2 km. Ground-based lidar is found to detect more number of sub-visible clouds than CALIOP which has implications for global warming studies as sub-visible cirrus clouds have significant positive radiative forcing. Cirrus clouds with mid-cloud temperatures between -50 to -70 °C have a mean geometrical thickness greater than 2 km in contrast to the earlier reported value of 1.7 km. Trend analyses reveal a statistically significant increase in the altitude of sub-visible cirrus clouds which is consistent with the recent climate model simulations. Also, the fraction of sub-visible cirrus cloud is found to be increasing during the last sixteen years (1998 to 2013) which has implications to the temperature and water vapour budget in the tropical tropopause layer.

  13. What is the Planetary Boundary Layer Height in a Global Perspective?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, F.; Syndergaard, S.; von Engeln, A.

    2014-12-01

    The planetary boundary layer (PBL) height is a fundamental parameter characterizing the vertical extent of atmospheric mixing near the surface. It is critical for understanding the PBL process and low cloud evolution and its feedback on the climate system, which remains a key uncertainty in climate modeling. The PBL height is generally defined as the altitude of a transition layer where air temperature or humidity gradient are significant within the lowest 1-5 kilometers above the surface. Numerous thermodynamic parameters, including temperature, humidity (specific/relative humidity) and their derivatives (e.g., potential/virtual potential temperature etc.) have been widely used to define the PBL height. Advances in satellite remote sensing technique allow novel ways to detect the PBL heights from space. Many new parameters are proposed for PBL height detection including GPS radio occultation (RO) measurements (e.g., refractivity, bending angle and dry-temperature) and CALIPSO lidar backscattering measurements (e.g., cloud-top-height). Large discrepancy among various PBL height definitions was revealed from radiosonde analyses, which however are restricted over lands and represent limited horizontal scales of atmospheric conditions. In this talk, we investigate the definition difference in a global perspective by using multi-year high-resolution ERA-interim (1 degree grid with 60 vertical layers) global analysis. Automatic algorithms are applied to compute the PBL heights with various physical parameters (both conventional and GPS RO) at each model grid. The global PBL height seasonal climatology and the difference among the climatologies are derived. Large discrepancy between the thermal-based and humidity-based PBL height definitions is most prominent over tropical and polar regions. Humidity-based PBL heights become problematic over dry regions, especially over high-latitude in winter season. The cloud-top height from CALIPSO is consistent with most physical

  14. Study of the consistency of climatological products of Nimbus-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhuria, Harbans L.

    1988-01-01

    The study, in addition to investigating the consistency of climatological products from Nimbus-7 Earth Radiation Budget and Temperature Humidity Infrared Radiometer experiments, focussed on the climatological analysis of the specified regions of the Earth. The climatological study consisted of the effects of various types of clouds on the net radiation, albedos, and emitted radiation. In addition to a correlational study for determining consistency level of data, a population study of the regions was formulated and conducted. The regions under this study were formed by clustering the target areas using the criteria of climatological conditions such as geography, ocean, and land. Research is limited to tropics from 18 deg north to 18 deg south. A correlational study indicates that there is high positive correlation between high clouds and albedo, and a reduced negative correlation between albedo and net radiation.

  15. Hanford Site Climatological Summary 2004 with Historical Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoitink, Dana J.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Ramsdell, James V.; Shaw, William J.

    2005-06-03

    This document presents the climatological data measured on the DOE Hanford Site for calendar year 2004. This report contains updated historical information for temperature, precipitation, wind, and normal and extreme values of temperature, and precipitation.

  16. Empirical and modeled synoptic cloud climatology of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. G.; Crane, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    A daily climatology of the atmospheric circulation of the Arctic and the associated cloud conditions were determined. These are used for comparisons with the variability of general circulation model, generated circulation, and cloud cover for the same region.

  17. Teaching a Model-based Climatology Using Energy Balance Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unwin, David

    1981-01-01

    After outlining the difficulties of teaching climatology within an undergraduate geography curriculum, the author describes and evaluates the use of a computer assisted simulation to model surface energy balance and the effects of land use changes on local climate. (AM)

  18. Building a flood climatology and rethinking flood risk at continental scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreadis, Konstantinos; Schumann, Guy; Stampoulis, Dimitrios; Smith, Andrew; Neal, Jeffrey; Bates, Paul; Sampson, Christopher; Brakenridge, Robert; Kettner, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Floods are one of the costliest natural disasters and the ability to understand their characteristics and their interactions with population, land cover and climate changes is of paramount importance. In order to accurately reproduce flood characteristics such as water inundation and heights both in the river channels and floodplains, hydrodynamic models are required. Most of these models operate at very high resolutions and are computationally very expensive, making their application over large areas very difficult. However, a need exists for such models to be applied at regional to global scales so that the effects of climate change with regards to flood risk can be examined. We use the a modeling framework that includes the VIC hydrologic and the LISFLOOD-FP hydrodynamic model to simulate a 40-year history of flood characteristics at the continental scale, particularly Australia. In order to extend the simulated flood climatology to 50-100 years in a consistent manner, reanalysis datasets have to be used as meteorological forcings to the models. The objective of this study is the evaluation of multiple atmospheric reanalysis datasets (ERA, NCEP, MERRA, JRA) as inputs to the VIC/LISFLOOD-FP model. Comparisons of the simulated flood characteristics are made with both satellite observations of inundation and a benchmark simulation of LISFLOOD-FP being forced by observed flows. The implications of having a climatology of flood characteristics are discussed, and in particular We found the magnitude and timing of floodplain water storage to significantly differ from streamflow in terms of their distribution. Furthermore, floodplain volume gave a much sharper discrimination of high hazard and low hazard periods than discharge, and using the latter can lead to significant overestimation. These results demonstrate that global streamflow statistics or precipitation should not be used to infer flood hazard and risk, but instead a flood inundation climatology is necessary.

  19. Monitoring Aerosol Optical Properties in the ABL, Using Lidar System and Sunphotometer in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallotta, J.; Pawelko, E.; Otero, L.; Ristori, P.; D'Elia, R.; Gonzalez, F.; Dworniczak, J.; Vilar, O.; Quel, E.

    2009-03-01

    At the Lasers and Applications Research Center (CEILAP, CITEFA-CONICET, (34°33' S, 58°30' W), located in an industrial suburb of the metropolitan area (Villa Martelli, Buenos Aires, Argentina), operates a multiwavelength lidar, based on a Nd:Yag laser (Continuum Surelite III P-IV). This system emits in 1064, 532 and 355 nm simultaneously (10 Hz, 600 mJ @ 1064 nm) and allows the monitoring of the optical aerosols properties in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). On the same experimental site, an AERONET sunphotometer provides the AOT value. An analysis of boundary layer behaviour in some relevant days of March, from the years 2004 to 2006 is presented. On the days analyzed, no aerosols events and clouds were registered over the ABL. Evolutions of some characteristics of the ABL are presented, such as the height of the boundary layer, height of entrainment zone (EZ) and the entrainment flux ratio.

  20. An Upper-Air Synoptic Climatology of the Western United States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Robert E.; Walker, David R.

    1992-12-01

    An automated, year-round synoptic climatology is developed for the western United States from rawinsonde observations from 1979 to 1988. The classification uses thermal, moisture, and flow parameters to characterize seasonal and interannual synoptic-scale variations in hydrodynamic and thermodynamic conditions. Based on twice daily observations for a network of 21 stations from the Pacific coast to the Rockies, a synoptic climatology is developed using air temperature, dewpoint temperature, geopotential height, and the east-west and north-south components of the wind vector at 800-, 700-, 500-, and 250-mb constant pressure surfaces. The 798 variable by 3620 day matrix is reduced to six orthogonal principal components, and the resulting component scores are grouped using a two-stage clustering technique. The 13 synoptic situations represent days experiencing homogeneous weather conditions. These synoptic situations exhibit marked seasonality and interannual variability and depict features observed in the general circulation of the atmosphere. Examples include both summer monsoonal and dry situations, zonal flow situations with a strong polar or subtropical jet, or both and strong ridging or troughing, and meridional flow.

  1. Climatological Processing and Product Development for the TRMM Ground Validation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, D. A.; Kulie, M. S.; Robinson, M.; Silberstein, D. S.; Wolff, D. B.; Ferrier, B. S.; Amitai, E.; Fisher, B.; Wang, J.; Augustine, D.; Thiele, O.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was successfully launched in November 1997.The main purpose of TRMM is to sample tropical rainfall using the first active spaceborne precipitation radar. To validate TRMM satellite observations, a comprehensive Ground Validation (GV) Program has been implemented. The primary goal of TRMM GV is to provide basic validation of satellite-derived precipitation measurements over monthly climatologies for the following primary sites: Melbourne, FL; Houston, TX; Darwin, Australia- and Kwajalein Atoll, RMI As part of the TRMM GV effort, research analysts at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) generate standardized rainfall products using quality-controlled ground-based radar data from the four primary GV sites. This presentation will provide an overview of TRMM GV climatological processing and product generation. A description of the data flow between the primary GV sites, NASA GSFC, and the TRMM Science and Data Information System (TSDIS) will be presented. The radar quality control algorithm, which features eight adjustable height and reflectivity parameters, and its effect on monthly rainfall maps, will be described. The methodology used to create monthly, gauge-adjusted rainfall products for each primary site will also be summarized. The standardized monthly rainfall products are developed in discrete, modular steps with distinct intermediate products. A summary of recently reprocessed official GV rainfall products available for TRMM science users will be presented. Updated basic standardized product results involving monthly accumulation, Z-R relationship, and gauge statistics for each primary GV site will also be displayed.

  2. Climatology of the 500-hPa mediterranean storms associated with Saudi Arabia wet season precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almazroui, Mansour; Kamil, S.; Ammar, K.; Keay, Kevin; Alamoudi, A. O.

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between the Mediterranean 500-hPa storm tracks and wet season (November-April) rainfall over Saudi Arabia is investigated. The analysis is based on the application of an objective tracking scheme to the 6-hourly 500-hPa geopotential height ERA-Interim dataset (0.75° × 0.75°) for the period 1979-2012. The resulting tracks are then associated with the ERA-Interim rainfall events over Saudi Arabia. The association procedure showed that 34 % of the tracks are related to about 70 % of the rainfall. These associated tracks are used to construct climatology. A climatology of these storm tracks revealed that the eastern Mediterranean region is the preferred location for cyclogenesis with a maximum in the southwest parts of the Black Sea. The study also examined the mean radius, average intensity and average depth of the storms. The number of tracks in winter (December-February) is about 60 % of the total number which confirms the major contribution of the Mediterranean storms to rainfall over Saudi Arabia. A significant negative trend was found for storm cyclogenesis over the central Mediterranean, and the Black sea. A significant trend decrease in track density is observed over most of the northern parts of Saudi Arabia. The peaks of storm activities are observed in December and January in 1996, 1997 and 2009. Storm activity generally declines after 2000, especially in the second half of the wet season months (February-April).

  3. A tornado and waterspout climatology for Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sioutas, Michalis V.

    2011-06-01

    The results of a systematic investigation and recording of tornado and waterspout occurrence in Greece for the 10-year period 2000-2009 are presented. This is the first database developed in Greece in an attempt to collect and record comprehensive information about tornadoes, waterspouts, funnel clouds, dust devils and other whirlwind phenomena. The primary research purpose of this database is to search, diagnose and record tornado and waterspout occurrences and identify their morphological and climatological features. Based on the 10-year data, a mean annual number of 1.1 tornadoes per unit area of 10 4 km 2, is depicted for Greece. The seasonality appears differently for various parts, with winter most active tornado season for western Greece and summer for northern Greece. Spatial distribution showed that tornadoes are more frequent over western Greece and the Ionian coasts with a local maximum over northwest Peloponnese. Waterspouts occur in both the Aegean and the Ionian Sea mostly in summer and autumn, with a peak in September, while a considerable geographical maximum is located over north off the shore of Iraklion, Crete Island. A preliminary estimate of probability of tornado occurrence for each of the 51 Greek prefectures plus the Mount Athos area, showed highest values for Kerkyra Island and Elias prefectures, western Greece. Analysis based on intensities as assessed by damage data, indicated that the majority of tornadoes reached T4 of the T-scale or F2 of the F-scale. Short wave trough is found as the most relevant synoptic circulation pattern to tornadic activity. Thermodynamic and wind parameters showed a wide range of values, suggesting that threat levels should be adjusted for various areas since tornadoes and waterspouts can occur in different environments.

  4. A Seasonal Air Transport Climatology for Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Tyson, P. D.; Annegarn, H.; Piketh, S.; Helas, G.

    1998-01-01

    A climatology of air transport to and from Kenya has been developed using kinematic trajectory modeling. Significant months for trajectory analysis have been determined from a classification of synoptic circulation fields. Five-point back and forward trajectory clusters to and from Kenya reveal that the transport corridors to Kenya are clearly bounded and well defined. Air reaching the country originates mainly from the Saharan region and northwestern Indian Ocean of the Arabian Sea in the northern hemisphere and from the Madagascan region of the Indian Ocean in the southern hemisphere. Transport from each of these source regions show distinctive annual cycles related to the northeasterly Asian monsoon and the southeasterly trade wind maximum over Kenya in May. The Saharan transport in the lower troposphere is at a maximum when the subtropical high over northern Africa is strongly developed in the boreal winter. Air reaching Kenya between 700 and 500 hPa is mainly from Sahara and northwest India Ocean flows in the months of January and March, which gives way to southwest Indian Ocean flow in May and November. In contrast, air reaching Kenya at 400 hPa is mainly from southwest Indian Ocean in January and March, which is replaced by Saharan transport in May and November. Transport of air from Kenya is invariant, both spatially and temporally, in the tropical easterlies to the Congo Basin and Atlantic Ocean in comparison to the transport to the country. Recirculation of air has also been observed, but on a limited and often local scale and not to the extent reported in southern Africa.

  5. Snow density climatology across the former USSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, X.; Zhang, T.; Wang, K.

    2014-04-01

    Snow density is one of the basic properties used to describe snow cover characteristics, and it is a key factor for linking snow depth and snow water equivalent, which are critical for water resources assessment and modeling inputs. In this study, we used long-term data from ground-based measurements to investigate snow density (bulk density) climatology and its spatiotemporal variations across the former Soviet Union (USSR) from 1966 to 2008. The results showed that the long-term monthly mean snow density was approximately 0.22 ± 0.05 g cm-3 over the study area. The maximum and minimum monthly mean snow density was about 0.33 g cm-3 in June, and 0.14 g cm-3 in October, respectively. Maritime and ephemeral snow had the highest monthly mean snow density, while taiga snow had the lowest. The higher values of monthly snow density were mainly located in the European regions of the former USSR, on the coast of Arctic Russia, and the Kamchatka Peninsula, while the lower snow density occurred in central Siberia. Significant increasing trends of snow density from September through June of the next year were observed, however, the rate of the increase varied with different snow classes. The long-term (1966-2008) monthly and annual mean snow densities had significant decreasing trends, especially during the autumn months. Spatially, significant positive trends in monthly mean snow density lay in the southwestern areas of the former USSR in November and December and gradually expanded in Russia from February through April. Significant negative trends mainly lay in the European Russia and the southern Russia. There was a high correlation of snow density with elevation for tundra snow and snow density was highly correlated with latitude for prairie snow.

  6. Olive School, Arlington Heights, Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausch, Kathy

    1974-01-01

    Article stressed the need for a music teacher in an open school to have an openness to people and ideas. It also described the educational objectives at the Olive School in Arlington Heights, Illinois. (Author/RK)

  7. Taking America To New Heights

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) is taking America to new heights with its Commercial Crew Development Round 2 (CCDev2) partners. In 2011, NASA entered into funded Space Act Agreements (SAAs) w...

  8. Estimating Climatological Bias Errors for the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert; Gu, Guojun; Huffman, George

    2012-01-01

    A procedure is described to estimate bias errors for mean precipitation by using multiple estimates from different algorithms, satellite sources, and merged products. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) monthly product is used as a base precipitation estimate, with other input products included when they are within +/- 50% of the GPCP estimates on a zonal-mean basis (ocean and land separately). The standard deviation s of the included products is then taken to be the estimated systematic, or bias, error. The results allow one to examine monthly climatologies and the annual climatology, producing maps of estimated bias errors, zonal-mean errors, and estimated errors over large areas such as ocean and land for both the tropics and the globe. For ocean areas, where there is the largest question as to absolute magnitude of precipitation, the analysis shows spatial variations in the estimated bias errors, indicating areas where one should have more or less confidence in the mean precipitation estimates. In the tropics, relative bias error estimates (s/m, where m is the mean precipitation) over the eastern Pacific Ocean are as large as 20%, as compared with 10%-15% in the western Pacific part of the ITCZ. An examination of latitudinal differences over ocean clearly shows an increase in estimated bias error at higher latitudes, reaching up to 50%. Over land, the error estimates also locate regions of potential problems in the tropics and larger cold-season errors at high latitudes that are due to snow. An empirical technique to area average the gridded errors (s) is described that allows one to make error estimates for arbitrary areas and for the tropics and the globe (land and ocean separately, and combined). Over the tropics this calculation leads to a relative error estimate for tropical land and ocean combined of 7%, which is considered to be an upper bound because of the lack of sign-of-the-error canceling when integrating over different areas with a

  9. An Aircraft-Based Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere O3, CO, and H2O Climatology for the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, S.; Pan, L. L.; Hoor, P.; Atlas, E.; Avery, M. A.; Campos, T.; Christensen, L. E.; Diskin, G. S.; Gao, R.-S.; Herman, R. L.; Hinsta, E. J.; Loewenstein, M.; Lopez, J.; Paige, M. E.; Pittman, J. V.; Podolske, J. R.; Proffitt, M. R.; Sachse, G. W.; Schiller, C.; Schlager, H.; Smith, J.; Spelten, N.; Webster, C.; Weinheimer, A.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a climatology of O3, CO, and H2O for the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), based on a large collection of high ]resolution research aircraft data taken between 1995 and 2008. To group aircraft observations with sparse horizontal coverage, the UTLS is divided into three regimes: the tropics, subtropics, and the polar region. These regimes are defined using a set of simple criteria based on tropopause height and multiple tropopause conditions. Tropopause ]referenced tracer profiles and tracer ]tracer correlations show distinct characteristics for each regime, which reflect the underlying transport processes. The UTLS climatology derived here shows many features of earlier climatologies. In addition, mixed air masses in the subtropics, identified by O3 ]CO correlations, show two characteristic modes in the tracer ]tracer space that are a result of mixed air masses in layers above and below the tropopause (TP). A thin layer of mixed air (1.2 km around the tropopause) is identified for all regions and seasons, where tracer gradients across the TP are largest. The most pronounced influence of mixing between the tropical transition layer and the subtropics was found in spring and summer in the region above 380 K potential temperature. The vertical extent of mixed air masses between UT and LS reaches up to 5 km above the TP. The tracer correlations and distributions in the UTLS derived here can serve as a reference for model and satellite data evaluation

  10. Clear sky atmosphere at cm-wavelengths from climatology data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, Bartosz; Uscka-Kowalkowska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    We utilize ground-based, balloon-borne and satellite climatology data to reconstruct site and season-dependent vertical profiles of precipitable water vapour (PWV). We use these profiles to solve radiative transfer through the atmosphere, and derive atmospheric brightness temperature (Tatm) and optical depth (τ) at centimetre wavelengths. We validate the reconstruction by comparing the model column PWV with photometric measurements of PWV, performed in clear sky conditions pointed towards the Sun. Based on the measurements, we devise a selection criteria to filter the climatology data to match the PWV levels to the expectations of the clear sky conditions. We apply the reconstruction to the location of a Polish 32-metre radio telescope, and characterize Tatm and τ year round, at selected frequencies. We also derive the zenith distance dependence for these parameters, and discuss the shortcomings of using planar, single-layer and optically thin atmospheric models in continuum radio-source flux-density measurement calibrations. We obtain PWV-Tatm and PWV-τ scaling relations in clear sky conditions, and constrain limits to which the actual Tatm and τ can deviate from those derived solely from the climatological data. Finally, we suggest a statistical method to detect clear sky that involves ground-level measurements of relative humidity. Accuracy is tested using local climatological data. The method may be useful to constrain cloud cover in cases when no other (and more robust) climatological data are available.

  11. Eight Year Climatologies from Observational (AIRS) and Model (MERRA) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearty, Thomas; Savtchenko, Andrey; Won, Young-In; Theobalk, Mike; Vollmer, Bruce; Manning, Evan; Smith, Peter; Ostrenga, Dana; Leptoukh, Greg

    2010-01-01

    We examine climatologies derived from eight years of temperature, water vapor, cloud, and trace gas observations made by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument flying on the Aqua satellite and compare them to similar climatologies constructed with data from a global assimilation model, the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). We use the AIRS climatologies to examine anomalies and trends in the AIRS data record. Since sampling can be an issue for infrared satellites in low earth orbit, we also use the MERRA data to examine the AIRS sampling biases. By sampling the MERRA data at the AIRS space-time locations both with and without the AIRS quality control we estimate the sampling bias of the AIRS climatology and the atmospheric conditions where AIRS has a lower sampling rate. While the AIRS temperature and water vapor sampling biases are small at low latitudes, they can be more than a few degrees in temperature or 10 percent in water vapor at higher latitudes. The largest sampling biases are over desert. The AIRS and MERRA data are available from the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). The AIRS climatologies we used are available for analysis with the GIOVANNI data exploration tool. (see, http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  12. TRMM precipitation analysis of extreme storms in South America: Bias and climatological contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, K. L.; Houze, R.; Zuluaga, M. D.; Choi, S. L.; Chaplin, M.

    2013-12-01

    The TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) satellite was designed both to measure spatial and temporal variation of tropical rainfall around the globe and to understand the factors controlling the precipitation. TRMM observations have led to the realization that storms just east of the Andes in southeastern South America are among the most intense deep convection in the world. For a complete perspective of the impact of intense precipitation systems on the hydrologic cycle in South America, it is necessary to assess the contribution from various forms of extreme storms to the climatological rainfall. However, recent studies have suggested that the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) algorithm significantly underestimates surface rainfall in deep convection over land. Prior to investigating the climatological behavior, this research first investigates the range of the rain bias in storms containing four different types of extreme radar echoes: deep convective cores, deep and wide convective cores, wide convective cores, and broad stratiform regions over South America. The TRMM PR algorithm exhibits bias in all four extreme echo types considered here when the algorithm rates are compared to a range of conventional Z-R relations. Storms with deep convective cores, defined as high reflectivity echo volumes that extend above 10 km in altitude, show the greatest underestimation, and the bias is unrelated to their echo top height. The bias in wide convective cores, defined as high reflectivity echo volumes that extend horizontally over 1,000 km2, relates to the echo top, indicating that storms with significant mixed phase and ice hydrometeors are similarly affected by assumptions in the TRMM PR algorithm. The subtropical region tends to have more intense precipitating systems than the tropics, but the relationship between the TRMM PR rain bias and storm type is the same regardless of the climatological regime. The most extreme storms are typically not collocated with

  13. 24 CFR 3280.104 - Ceiling heights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ceiling heights. 3280.104 Section... heights. (a) Every habitable room and bathroom shall have a minimum ceiling height of not less than 7 feet... with a minimum height of 5 feet, 0 inches. Minimum height under dropped ducts, beams, etc. shall be...

  14. 24 CFR 3280.104 - Ceiling heights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ceiling heights. 3280.104 Section... heights. (a) Every habitable room and bathroom shall have a minimum ceiling height of not less than 7 feet... with a minimum height of 5 feet, 0 inches. Minimum height under dropped ducts, beams, etc. shall be...

  15. 24 CFR 3280.104 - Ceiling heights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ceiling heights. 3280.104 Section... heights. (a) Every habitable room and bathroom shall have a minimum ceiling height of not less than 7 feet... with a minimum height of 5 feet, 0 inches. Minimum height under dropped ducts, beams, etc. shall be...

  16. 24 CFR 3280.104 - Ceiling heights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ceiling heights. 3280.104 Section... heights. (a) Every habitable room and bathroom shall have a minimum ceiling height of not less than 7 feet... with a minimum height of 5 feet, 0 inches. Minimum height under dropped ducts, beams, etc. shall be...

  17. 24 CFR 3280.104 - Ceiling heights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ceiling heights. 3280.104 Section... heights. (a) Every habitable room and bathroom shall have a minimum ceiling height of not less than 7 feet... with a minimum height of 5 feet, 0 inches. Minimum height under dropped ducts, beams, etc. shall be...

  18. The use of normalized climatological anomalies to rank synoptic-scale events and their relation to Weather Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, A. M.; Lorenzo, M. N.; Gimeno, L.; Nieto, R.; Añel, J. A.

    2009-09-01

    Several methods have been developed to rank meteorological events in terms of severity, social impact or economic impacts. These classifications are not always objective since they depend of several factors, for instance, the observation network is biased towards the densely populated urban areas against rural or oceanic areas. It is also very important to note that not all rare synoptic-scale meteorological events attract significant media attention. In this work we use a comprehensive method of classifying synoptic-scale events adapted from Hart and Grumm, 2001, to the European region (30N-60N, 30W-15E). The main motivation behind this method is that the more unusual the event (a cold outbreak, a heat wave, or a flood), for a given region, the higher ranked it must be. To do so, we use four basic meteorological variables (Height, Temperature, Wind and Specific Humidity) from NCEP reanalysis dataset over the range of 1000hPa to 200hPa at a daily basis from 1948 to 2004. The climatology used embraces the 1961-1990 period. For each variable, the analysis of raking climatological anomalies was computed taking into account the daily normalized departure from climatology at different levels. For each day (from 1948 to 2004) we have four anomaly measures, one for each variable, and another, a combined where the anomaly (total anomaly) is the average of the anomaly of the four variables. Results will be analyzed on a monthly, seasonal and annual basis. Seasonal trends and variability will also be shown. In addition, and given the extent of the database, the expected return periods associated with the anomalies are revealed. Moreover, we also use an automated version of the Lamb weather type (WT) classification scheme (Jones et al, 1993) adapted for the Galicia area (Northwestern corner of the Iberian Peninsula) by Lorenzo et al (2008) in order to compute the daily local circulation regimes in this area. By combining the corresponding daily WT with the five anomaly

  19. Estimating Planetary Boundary Layer Heights from NOAA Profiler Network Wind Profiler Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molod, Andrea M.; Salmun, H.; Dempsey, M

    2015-01-01

    An algorithm was developed to estimate planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from hourly archived wind profiler data from the NOAA Profiler Network (NPN) sites located throughout the central United States. Unlike previous studies, the present algorithm has been applied to a long record of publicly available wind profiler signal backscatter data. Under clear conditions, summertime averaged hourly time series of PBL heights compare well with Richardson-number based estimates at the few NPN stations with hourly temperature measurements. Comparisons with clear sky reanalysis based estimates show that the wind profiler PBL heights are lower by approximately 250-500 m. The geographical distribution of daily maximum PBL heights corresponds well with the expected distribution based on patterns of surface temperature and soil moisture. Wind profiler PBL heights were also estimated under mostly cloudy conditions, and are generally higher than both the Richardson number based and reanalysis PBL heights, resulting in a smaller clear-cloudy condition difference. The algorithm presented here was shown to provide a reliable summertime climatology of daytime hourly PBL heights throughout the central United States.

  20. The height premium in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kitae

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing the Indonesian Family Life Survey for the year 2007, this paper estimates that a 10 cm increase in physical stature is associated with an increase in earnings of 7.5% for men and 13.0% for women, even after controlling for an extensive set of productivity variables. When the height premium is estimated by sector, it is 12.3% for self-employed men and 18.0% for self-employed women; a height premium of 11.1% is also estimated for women in the private sector. In the public sector, however, the height premium estimate is not statistically significant for either men or women. This paper provides further evidence of discrimination based on customers' preferences for tall workers. PMID:24480546

  1. Tree Height Calculator: An Android App for Estimating Tree Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burca, V. S.; Htet, N. M.; Huang, X.; de Lanerolle, T. R.; Morelli, R.; Gourley, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Conventionally, measuring tree height requires a collection of different tools - clinometer, transit, pencil, paper, laptop computer. Results are recorded manually and entered into a spreadsheet or database for future calculation and analysis. Tree Height Calculator is a mobile Android app the integrates the various steps in this process thereby improving the accuracy and dramatically reducing the time required to go from taking measurements to analyzing data. Given the user's height and the distance from the base of the tree (which can be downloaded into the app from a server), the app uses the phone's orientation sensor to calculate the angle of elevation. A simple trigonometric formula is then used to calculate and record the tree's height in the phone's database. When the phone has a WiFi connection, the data are transmitted to a server, from where they can be downloaded directly into a spreadsheet. The application was first tested in an Environmental Science laboratory at Trinity College. On the first trial, 103 data samples were collected, stored, and uploaded to the online database with only couple of dropped data points. On the second trial, 98 data samples were gathered with no loss of data. The app combined the individual measurements taken by the students in the lab, reducing the time required to produce a graph of the class's results from days to hours.

  2. Evaluation and Applications of Cloud Climatologies from CALIOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, David; Getzewitch, Brian; Vaughan, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Clouds have a major impact on the Earth radiation budget and differences in the representation of clouds in global climate models are responsible for much of the spread in predicted climate sensitivity. Existing cloud climatologies, against which these models can be tested, have many limitations. The CALIOP lidar, carried on the CALIPSO satellite, has now acquired over two years of nearly continuous cloud and aerosol observations. This dataset provides an improved basis for the characterization of 3-D global cloudiness. Global average cloud cover measured by CALIOP is about 75%, significantly higher than for existing cloud climatologies due to the sensitivity of CALIOP to optically thin cloud. Day/night biases in cloud detection appear to be small. This presentation will discuss detection sensitivity and other issues associated with producing a cloud climatology, characteristics of cloud cover statistics derived from CALIOP data, and applications of those statistics.

  3. Fear of heights in infants?

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Karen E.; Kretch, Kari S.; LoBue, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Based largely on the famous “visual cliff” paradigm, conventional wisdom is that crawling infants avoid crossing the brink of a dangerous drop-off because they are afraid of heights. However, recent research suggests that the conventional wisdom is wrong. Avoidance and fear are conflated, and there is no compelling evidence to support fear of heights in human infants. Infants avoid crawling or walking over an impossibly high drop-off because they perceive affordances for locomotion—the relations between their own bodies and skills and the relevant properties of the environment that make an action such as descent possible or impossible. PMID:25267874

  4. Wind Climate Analyses for SRTC's Central Climatology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, A.H.

    2003-06-23

    This report was written to present climatological summaries of the wind data at the Central Climatology (CC) tower in a convenient format and to point out some features of the wind speed and direction that have not been widely appreciated in the past. Short-term (two-week) wind roses provide a means to demonstrate the temporal and spatial relationships that wind speed and direction undergo using a ten-year database from the CC tower. These relationships are best demonstrated by examining the figures provided in this report or looking at loops of computer-generated images provided by the authors.

  5. Atmospheric response to Ice Age conditions: Climatology near the Earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautenschlager, M.; Herterich, K.

    1990-12-01

    We present a 6-year simulation of the ice age atmosphere using the T21 Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The lower boundary conditions (18 kyr B.P.) were taken from CLIMAP Project Members (1981). The analysis is restricted to the surface climatology for two reasons: The surface fields are the test data derived from the geological record on land, and they define the upper boundary conditions for simulating the glacial ocean. Model results are shown for the mean annual surface fields of temperature, wind, and precipitation. In the global average the surface temperature was 4.7°C cooler compared to the present temperature. The wind strength increased in mid-latitudes and decreased in tropical trade wind regions. Precipitation did not change significantly in the global average; however, precipitation decreased over land and increased over the ocean. Most of the difference patterns between the present conditions and the ice age climate were statistically significant. The simulated surface climatology is roughly consistent with the paleogeological evidence and with numerical AGCM simulations of other authors. This suggests that presently available AGCMs, including the ECMWF model (T21), are able to describe climates far away from the present, although internal parameterizations were tuned to present data sets.

  6. Epigenetic heredity of human height

    PubMed Central

    Simeone, Pasquale; Alberti, Saverio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Genome‐wide SNP analyses have identified genomic variants associated with adult human height. However, these only explain a fraction of human height variation, suggesting that significant information might have been systematically missed by SNP sequencing analysis. A candidate for such non‐SNP‐linked information is DNA methylation. Regulation by DNA methylation requires the presence of CpG islands in the promoter region of candidate genes. Seventy two of 87 (82.8%), height‐associated genes were indeed found to contain CpG islands upstream of the transcription start site (USC CpG island searcher; validation: UCSC Genome Browser), which were shown to correlate with gene regulation. Consistent with this, DNA hypermethylation modules were detected in 42 height‐associated genes, versus 1.5% of control genes (P = 8.0199e−17), as were dynamic methylation changes and gene imprinting. Epigenetic heredity thus appears to be a determinant of adult human height. Major findings in mouse models and in human genetic diseases support this model. Modulation of DNA methylation are candidate to mediate environmental influence on epigenetic traits. This may help to explain progressive height changes over multiple generations, through trans‐generational heredity of progressive DNA methylation patterns. PMID:24963031

  7. Adult Height and Childhood Disease

    PubMed Central

    BOZZOLI, CARLOS; DEATON, ANGUS; QUINTANA-DOMEQUE, CLIMENT

    2009-01-01

    Taller populations are typically richer populations, and taller individuals live longer and earn more. In consequence, adult height has recently become a focus in understanding the relationship between health and wealth. We investigate the childhood determinants of population adult height, focusing on the respective roles of income and of disease. Across a range of European countries and the United States, we find a strong inverse relationship between postneonatal (ages 1 month to 1 year) mortality, interpreted as a measure of the disease and nutritional burden in childhood, and the mean height of those children as adults. Consistent with these findings, we develop a model of selection and stunting in which the early-life burden of undernutrition and disease not only is responsible for mortality in childhood but also leaves a residue of long-term health risks for survivors, risks that express themselves in adult height and in late-life disease. The model predicts that at sufficiently high mortality levels, selection can dominate scarring, leaving a taller population of survivors. We find evidence of this effect in the poorest and highest-mortality countries of the world, supplementing recent findings on the effects of the Great Chinese Famine. PMID:20084823

  8. Sea Surface Height 1993 - 2011

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts year-to-year variability in sea surface height, and chronicles two decades of El Niño and La Niña events. It was created using NASA ocean altimetry data from 1993 to 2011, ...

  9. Normal ABL1 is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic target in human and mouse leukemias expressing oncogenic ABL1 kinases.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Yashodhara; Koptyra, Mateusz; Hoser, Grazyna; Kantekure, Kanchan; Roy, Darshan; Gornicka, Barbara; Nieborowska-Skorska, Margaret; Bolton-Gillespie, Elisabeth; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Müschen, Markus; Valent, Peter; Wasik, Mariusz A; Richardson, Christine; Hantschel, Oliver; van der Kuip, Heiko; Stoklosa, Tomasz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2016-04-28

    Leukemias expressing constitutively activated mutants of ABL1 tyrosine kinase (BCR-ABL1, TEL-ABL1, NUP214-ABL1) usually contain at least 1 normal ABL1 allele. Because oncogenic and normal ABL1 kinases may exert opposite effects on cell behavior, we examined the role of normal ABL1 in leukemias induced by oncogenic ABL1 kinases. BCR-ABL1-Abl1(-/-) cells generated highly aggressive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)-blast phase-like disease in mice compared with less malignant CML-chronic phase-like disease from BCR-ABL1-Abl1(+/+) cells. Additionally, loss of ABL1 stimulated proliferation and expansion of BCR-ABL1 murine leukemia stem cells, arrested myeloid differentiation, inhibited genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis, and facilitated accumulation of chromosomal aberrations. Conversely, allosteric stimulation of ABL1 kinase activity enhanced the antileukemia effect of ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib and ponatinib) in human and murine leukemias expressing BCR-ABL1, TEL-ABL1, and NUP214-ABL1. Therefore, we postulate that normal ABL1 kinase behaves like a tumor suppressor and therapeutic target in leukemias expressing oncogenic forms of the kinase. PMID:26864341

  10. Height and Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Zuccolo, Luisa; Harris, Ross; Gunnell, David; Oliver, Steven; Lane, Jane Athene; Davis, Michael; Donovan, Jenny; Neal, David; Hamdy, Freddie; Beynon, Rebecca; Savovic, Jelena; Martin, Richard Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background Height, a marker of childhood environmental exposures, is positively associated with prostate cancer risk, perhaps through the insulin-like growth factor system. We investigated the relationship of prostate cancer with height and its components (leg and trunk length) in a nested case-control study and with height in a dose-response meta-analysis. Methods We nested a case-control study within a population-based randomized controlled trial evaluating treatments for localized prostate cancer in British men ages 50 to 69 years, including 1,357 cases detected through prostate-specific antigen testing and 7,990 controls (matched on age, general practice, assessment date). Nine bibliographic databases were searched systematically for studies on the height-prostate cancer association that were pooled in a meta-analysis. Results Based on the nested case-control, the odds ratio (OR) of prostate-specific antigen-detected prostate cancer per 10 cm increase in height was 1.06 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.97-1.16; ptrend = 0.2]. There was stronger evidence of an association of height with high-grade prostate cancer (OR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.06-1.43), mainly due to the leg component, but not with low-grade disease (OR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.90-1.10). In general, associations with leg or trunk length were similar. A meta-analysis of 58 studies found evidence that height is positively associated with prostate cancer (random-effects OR per 10 cm: 1.06; 95% CI: 1.03-1.09), with a stronger effect for prospective studies of more advanced/aggressive cancers (random-effects OR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.05-1.19). Conclusion These data indicate a limited role for childhood environmental exposures—as indexed by adult height—on prostate cancer incidence, while suggesting a greater role for progression, through mechanisms requiring further investigation. PMID:18768501

  11. Contribution of the Ebro Observatory team to the IRI climatological modeling: A Review.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altadill, David; Blanch, Estefania; Miquel Torta, J.

    During the recent years, the Geomagnetism and Aeronomy group of the Ebre Observatory has been working to improve the climatological prediction of some ionospheric key parameters. To do that, we have taken advantage of the increasing number of ionospheric stations providing data and sharing it through the Digital Ionospheric Data Base (DIDB). We have used the Spherical Harmonic analysis as analytical technique for globally modeling those parameters during quiet conditions. Models for bottom-side B0 and B1 parameters of IRI, for density peak height (hmF2) and for equivalent scale height (Hm) have been developed. Each SH model has been parameterized according to the time-space pattern of respectively ionospheric parameter and has been bounded to the solar activity. It has been proved that these empirical models improve, in average, the prediction of B0, B1 and hmF2 by 40%, 20% and 10% respectively with respect to previous IRI versions (hmF2 is improved by more than 30% at high and low latitudes). Due to these good results and to the analytical formulation, IRI has adopted the SH empirical models for B0 and B1 as an option in the current version (IRI 2012) and has proposed the SH model for hmF2 to be included into next releases. The analytical model for Hm could be useful to estimate information for the topside profile formulation.

  12. Estimated errors in a global gravity wave climatology from GPS radio occultation temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A.; Llamedo, P.; Alexander, P.; Schmidt, T.; Wickert, J.

    2010-07-01

    In a previous paper by Schmidt et al. (2008), from CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation data, a comparison was made between a Gaussian filter applied to the "complete" temperature profile and to its "separate" tropospheric and stratospheric height intervals, for gravity wave analyses. It was found that the separate filtering method considerably reduces a wave activity artificial enhancement near the tropopause, presumably due to the isolation process of the wave component. We now propose a simple approach to estimate the uncertainty in the calculation of the mean specific wave potential energy content, due exclusively to the filtering process of vertical temperature profiles, independently of the experimental origin of the data. The approach is developed through a statistical simulation, built up from the superposition of synthetic wave perturbations. These are adjusted by a recent gravity wave (GW) climatology and temperature profiles from reanalyses. A systematic overestimation of the mean specific wave potential energy content is detected and its variability with latitude, altitude, season and averaging height interval is highlighted.

  13. High and mighty: height increases authority in professional refereeing.

    PubMed

    Stulp, Gert; Buunk, Abraham P; Verhulst, Simon; Pollet, Thomas V

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, larger males are more likely to attain social dominance. Several lines of evidence suggest that this relationship extends to humans, as height is positively related to dominance, status and authority. We hypothesized that height is also a determinant of authority in professional refereeing. According to the International Football Association Board, FIFA, football ("soccer") referees have full authority to enforce the laws of the game and should use their body language to show authority and to help control the match. We show that height is indeed positively related to authority status: referees were taller than their assistants (who merely have an advisory role) in both a national (French League) and an international (World Cup 2010) tournament. Furthermore, using data from the German League, we found that height was positively associated with authoritative behavior. Taller referees were better able to maintain control of the game by giving fewer fouls, thereby increasing the "flow of the game". Referee height was also positively associated with perceived referee competence, as taller referees were assigned to matches in which the visiting team had a higher ranking. Thus, height appears to be positively related to authority in professional refereeing. PMID:22947680

  14. A climatological description of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C.H.

    1990-05-22

    This report provides a general climatological description of the Savannah River Site. The description provides both regional and local scale climatology. The regional climatology includes a general regional climatic description and presents information on occurrence frequencies of the severe meteorological phenomena that are important considerations in the design and siting of a facility. These phenomena include tornadoes, thunderstorms, hurricanes, and ice/snow storms. Occurrence probabilities given for extreme tornado and non-tornado winds are based on previous site specific studies. Local climatological conditions that are significant with respect to the impact of facility operations on the environment are described using on-site or near-site meteorological data. Summaries of wind speed, wind direction, and atmospheric stability are primarily based on the most recently generated five-year set of data collected from the onsite meteorological tower network (1982--86). Temperature, humidity, and precipitation summaries include data from SRL's standard meteorological instrument shelter and the Augusta National Weather Service office at Bush Field through 1986. A brief description of the onsite meteorological monitoring program is also provided. 24 refs., 15 figs., 22 tabs.

  15. Toward Creating A Global Retrospective Climatology of Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Robert J.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are thought to cause a significant direct and indirect climate forcing, but the magnitude of this forcing remains highly uncertain because of poor knowledge of global aerosol characteristics and their temporal changes. The standard long-term global product, the one-channel Advanced Very-High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aerosol optical thickness over the ocean, relies on a single predefined aerosol model and can be inaccurate in many cases. Furthermore, it provides no information on aerosol column number density, thus making it impossible to estimate the indirect aerosol effect on climate. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data can be used to detect absorbing aerosols over land, but are insensitive to aerosols located below one kilometer. It is thus clear that innovative approaches must be employed in order to extract a more quantitative and accurate aerosol climatology from available satellite and other measurements, thus enabling more reliable estimates of the direct and indirect aerosol forcings. The Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP) was established in 1998 as part of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX). Its main objective is to analyze satellite radiance measurements and field observations to infer the global distribution of aerosols, their properties, and their seasonal and interannual variations. The overall goal is to develop advanced global aerosol climatologies for the period of satellite data and to make the aerosol climatologies broadly available through the GACP web site.

  16. Biologically effective surface UV climatology at Rome and Aosta, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siani, Anna Maria; Modesti, Sarah; Casale, Giuseppe Rocco; Diemoz, Henri; Colosimo, Alfredo

    2013-05-01

    Given the beneficial and harmful effects of UV radiation on human health, our study aims to provide a characterization of erythemal and vitamin D dose rates at two Italian sites, Rome and Aosta, subject to quite different environmental conditions. Based on the respective UV climatologies, exposure times needed to induce erythema or vitamin D photoproduction are provided as a function of the UV index.

  17. Are climatological correlations with the Hale double sunspot cycle meaningful?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Herman, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A sunspot cycle which may have been subject to a predicted phase reversal between 1800 and 1880 A. D is discussed. Several climatological parameters normally correlated with this cycle are examined and do not exhibit a corresponding phase reversal during this period. It is proposed that this apparent discrepancy can be resolved by suitable observations during the upcoming half decade.

  18. Some Spatial Aspects of Southeastern United States Climatology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soule, Peter T.

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on the climatology of an eight-state region in the southern and southeastern United States. Discusses general controls of climate and spatial patterns of various climatic averages. Examines mapped extremes as a means of fostering increased awareness of the variability that exists for climatic conditions in the region. (CMK)

  19. A Total Lightning Climatology for the Tennessee Valley Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCaul, E. W.; Goodman, S. J.; Buechler, D. E.; Blakeslee, R.; Christian, H.; Boccippio, D.; Koshak, W.; Bailey, J.; Hallm, J.; Bateman, M.

    2003-01-01

    Total flash counts derived from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array are being processed for 2002 to form a climatology of total lightning for the Tennessee Valley region. The data from this active and interesting period will be compared to data fiom the National Lightning Detection Network, space-based lightning sensors, and weather radars.

  20. Comparisons of PBL heights derived from CALIPSO and ECMWF reanalysis data over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingjing; Huang, Jianping; Chen, Bin; Zhou, Tian; Yan, Hongru; Jin, Hongchun; Huang, Zhongwei; Zhang, Beidou

    2015-03-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) height was estimated using the maximum standard deviation method for Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) attenuated backscatter observations. It was only retrieved under conditions where the clouds accounted for less than 5% in a profile, where it could be compared with ground lidar results at SACOL. The correlation between CALIPSO and the ground lidar was 0.73. We present the seasonal mean patterns of 4-year mid-day PBL heights over China and use them to evaluate the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) PBL depth retrievals, inform boundary layer studies, and improve our understanding of how PBL height mediates exchanges of energy and pollutants between the surface and the atmosphere. We found that the largest PBL heights occurred over the Tibetan Plateau and coastal areas. The smallest PBL heights appeared in the Tarim Basin and northeast of China during local winter. A comparison of CALIPSO and ECMWF PBL under different land-cover conditions showed that the PBL depth estimated by the CALIPSO backscatter climatology is larger over ocean and forest surface than that estimated from ECMWF data. However, the PBL heights of ECMWF that were larger than those of CALIPSO were mainly concentrated over grassland and bare land surface in spring and summer.

  1. The letter height superiority illusion.

    PubMed

    New, Boris; Doré-Mazars, Karine; Cavézian, Céline; Pallier, Christophe; Barra, Julien

    2016-02-01

    Letters are identified better when they are embedded within words rather than within pseudowords, a phenomenon known as the word superiority effect (Reicher in Journal of Experimental Psychology, 81, 275-280, 1969). This effect is, inter alia, accounted for by the interactive-activation model (McClelland & Rumelhart in Psychological Review, 88, 375-407, 1981) through feedback from word to letter nodes. In this study, we investigated whether overactivation of features could lead to perceptual bias, wherein letters would be perceived as being taller than pseudoletters, or words would be perceived as being taller than pseudowords. In two experiments, we investigated the effects of letter and lexical status on the perception of size. Participants who had to compare the heights of letters and pseudoletters, or of words and pseudowords, indeed perceived the former stimuli as being taller than the latter. Possible alternative interpretations of this height superiority effect for letters and words are discussed. PMID:26370216

  2. Methods for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Gayle; Nasstrom, John S.

    1999-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an operational emergency response program which provides real-time dose assessments of airborne pollutant releases. This report reviews methodologies for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), which were investigated for use in the next generation of ARAC diagnostic and dispersion models. The ABL height, hABL, is an essential parameter in atmospheric dispersion modeling, controlling the extent of the vertical mixing of pollutants near the surface. Although eventually instrumentation (radiosonde, lidar, sodar, etc.) may provide accurate means for determining hABL, at present the availability of such data is too limited to provide a general capability for ARAC. The current operational ARAC diagnostic models use a fixed value of hABL for any given time. ARAC's new models support a horizontally-varying atmospheric boundary layer height, which is used to generate meteorological (mean wind, temperature, etc.) and turbulence fields. The purpose of the present work is to develop methods to derive the ABL height for all atmospheric stability regimes. One of our key requirements is to provide approaches which are applicable to routinely available data, which may be of limited temporal and spatial resolution. The final objective is to generate a consistent set of meteorological and turbulence or eddy diffusivity fields to drive the new ARAC dispersion model. A number of alternative definitions of the atmospheric boundary layer exist, leading to different approaches to deriving hABL. The definitions are based on either the turbulence characteristics of the atmosphere or the vertical structure of one or more meteorological variables. Most diagnostic analyses determine hABL from profiles of temperature or occasionally wind. A class of methods of considerable current interest are based on Richardson number criteria. Prognostic methods calculate the

  3. 29 CFR 1917.113 - Clearance heights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Clearance heights. 1917.113 Section 1917.113 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.113 Clearance heights. Clearance heights shall be prominently posted where the height is insufficient for vehicles and equipment....

  4. 29 CFR 1917.113 - Clearance heights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Clearance heights. 1917.113 Section 1917.113 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.113 Clearance heights. Clearance heights shall be prominently posted where the height is insufficient for vehicles and equipment....

  5. 29 CFR 1917.113 - Clearance heights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Clearance heights. 1917.113 Section 1917.113 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.113 Clearance heights. Clearance heights shall be prominently posted where the height is insufficient for vehicles and equipment....

  6. Origin of intraplate volcanoes from guyot heights and oceanic paleodepth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan-Auerbach, Jacqueline; Duennebier, Fred; Ito, Garrett

    2000-02-01

    The height of a guyot as measured from the surrounding regional sea floor to the volcano's slope break records the water depth at the time the guyot submerged. Thus guyot heights may be used as indicators of the paleodepth of the surrounding ocean floor. We compile data on the heights of 68 intraplate guyots and atolls in the Pacific Ocean as well as 46 volcanic islands in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans. We find that guyot heights generally increase with the age of the lithosphere upon which they were emplaced, although there is a large amount of scatter. In nearly all cases, seamount height, and thus seafloor paleodepth, is less than expected of normal seafloor. These results suggest that most of the volcanoes in this study formed on anomalously shallow seafloor, consistent with formation at hotspots. To characterize thermal anomalies associated with these hotspot swells, we model guyot heights by calculating the isostatic uplift predicted for normal lithosphere that has been partly reheated and is underlain by anomalously hot mantle. This model is able to explain the anomalous water depth at most of the seamounts with hotspot thermal anomalies of 100°-300°C. The heights of a few volcanic chains, however, are not anomalously low, suggesting that these volcanoes are not associated with hotspots. In addition, the observed trend of Hawaiian-Emperor guyot heights as well as the subdued morphology and gravity signature of the oldest Emperor seamounts supports our hypothesis that Cretaceous age Meiji seamount may have formed on or near a spreading center.

  7. GPS RO sensing of Boundary Layer Height within Southern Ocean Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuddeboom, Alex; McDonald, Adrian; Katurji, Marwan; Morgenstern, Olaf; Harvey, Mike

    2016-04-01

    The COSMIC constellation of GPS RO satellites has been used extensively over the previous few years to generate climatologies of boundary layer height (BLH). These satellites use high precision clocks to measure the time it takes for a signal to be transmitted through the atmosphere. From the time measurements, the angle of refraction of the signal can be calculated and then used in turn to calculate atmospheric refractivity. Boundary layer heights can then be determined by identifying sharp gradients in the refractivity profile. The results of this approach have been compared with radiosonde data and show a high level of agreement. By using this technique, we also generated a BLH climatology which was then used to analyse how the height of the boundary layer varies within the specific meteorological context of Southern Ocean cyclones. Analysis of the BLH behaviour over cyclones was primarily based upon generating cyclone composites. This is done by averaging together measurements in a cyclone relative framework to generate a representative cyclone. This technique allows a direct examination of the mean state, however it is also valuable for further analysis such as splitting the composite into regions and analysing the distribution of values over each of these sub-regions. We also investigated the relationship between boundary layer height and surface variables. There is a particularly strong negative relationship between sea ice concentration and boundary layer height. The reasons for this phenomenon are not entirely clear but appear to be at least partially related to changes in the surface sensible heat flux. The effects of other surface variables such as air temperature, sea surface temperature and wind speeds were relatively minor.

  8. Climatological Processing of Radar Data for the TRMM Ground Validation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulie, Mark; Marks, David; Robinson, Michael; Silberstein, David; Wolff, David; Ferrier, Brad; Amitai, Eyal; Fisher, Brad; Wang, Jian-Xin; Augustine, David; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was successfully launched in November, 1997. The main purpose of TRMM is to sample tropical rainfall using the first active spaceborne precipitation radar. To validate TRMM satellite observations, a comprehensive Ground Validation (GV) Program has been implemented. The primary goal of TRMM GV is to provide basic validation of satellite-derived precipitation measurements over monthly climatologies for the following primary sites: Melbourne, FL; Houston, TX; Darwin, Australia; and Kwajalein Atoll, RMI. As part of the TRMM GV effort, research analysts at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) generate standardized TRMM GV products using quality-controlled ground-based radar data from the four primary GV sites as input. This presentation will provide an overview of the TRMM GV climatological processing system. A description of the data flow between the primary GV sites, NASA GSFC, and the TRMM Science and Data Information System (TSDIS) will be presented. The radar quality control algorithm, which features eight adjustable height and reflectivity parameters, and its effect on monthly rainfall maps will be described. The methodology used to create monthly, gauge-adjusted rainfall products for each primary site will also be summarized. The standardized monthly rainfall products are developed in discrete, modular steps with distinct intermediate products. These developmental steps include: (1) extracting radar data over the locations of rain gauges, (2) merging rain gauge and radar data in time and space with user-defined options, (3) automated quality control of radar and gauge merged data by tracking accumulations from each instrument, and (4) deriving Z-R relationships from the quality-controlled merged data over monthly time scales. A summary of recently reprocessed official GV rainfall products available for TRMM science users will be presented. Updated basic standardized product results and trends involving

  9. Observational climatology and characteristics of wintertime atmospheric blocking over Ural-Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Ho Nam; Zhou, Wen; Shao, Yaping; Chen, Wen; Mok, Hing Yim; Wu, Man Chi

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the climatological aspects and temporal characteristics of wintertime Ural-Siberian blocking (USB, centered over 30°-100°E), for the period 1980/1981-2009/2010. Sixty-eight events are identified and their physical structure is diagnosed using thermodynamic and geostrophic vorticity tendency equations. In climatology, horizontal advections play a fundamental role in constructing a USB event, in which the anticyclonic center is a warm core in the troposphere and a cold core in the lower stratosphere. The decay of the thermal structure is related to diabatic cooling along the vertical structure and warm advection in the lower stratosphere. Meanwhile, the collapse of the height structure is caused primarily by cyclonic vorticity advection. A strong interrelationship exists between the intensity and extension of USB events. The temporal characteristics of USB events are analyzed by examining strong and weak events, which are of high and low intensity. The strong events are probably preceded by an open ridge over Europe and a cyclogenesis over the Mediterranean Sea, and their formation is followed by the stronger amplification of a Rossby wave packet across Eurasia. On the other hand, the weak events are likely to be triggered by surface cold anomalies over Siberia. Overall, the evolution of a USB event forms a dynamic linkage with the Siberian high, in which the decay stage of the USB event is accompanied by a southeastward migration of the Siberian high and a subsequent cold air outbreak in East Asia. These results advance our understanding of USB and its relationship with East Asian winter monsoon activities.

  10. Systematic Differences between Satellite-Based Presipitation Climatologies over the Tropical Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Frankin R.; Fitzjarrald, Dan; McCaul, Eugene W.

    1999-01-01

    climatologies such as the GPI show an excess (a deficit) in estimated rainfall over the E. Pacific ITCZ (Warm Pool region). We show that these algorithms need to account for regionally varying heights (or temperatures) at which tropical convection detrains to form cirrus shields. A second objective we pursue is to identify variations in the macroscale cloud physical and thermodynamic properties of precipitation regimes" and relate these differences to tropical dynamical mechanisms of tropical heat and moisture balance. Finally, we interpret the algorithm differences and their associations with tropical dynamics in terms of WCRP GPCP goals for constructing precipitation climatologies.

  11. Aerosol Property Comparison Within and Above the ABL at the ARM Program SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Delle Monache, L

    2002-05-01

    This thesis determines what, if any, measurements of aerosol properties made at the Earth surface are representative of those within the entire air column. Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site at the Southern Great Plains, the only location in the world where ground-based and in situ airborne measurements are routinely made. Flight legs during the one-year period from March 2000 were categorized as either within or above the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) by use of an objective mixing height determination technique. Correlations between aerosol properties measured at the surface and those within and above the ABL were computed. Aerosol extensive and intensive properties measured at the surface were found representative of values within the ABL, but not of within the free atmosphere.

  12. Comparing Icesat/glas Based Elevation Heights with Photogrammetric Terrain Heights from Uav-Imagery on the East Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enßle, F.; Fritz, A.; Koch, B.

    2015-08-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) and height measurements are broadly used in environmental studies. Two common elevation sources are the Ice Cloud and land elevation Satellite (ICESat), which acquired laser range measurements with the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) across the globe and elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Current developments of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) provide the opportunity to collect aerial images of remote areas at a high spatial resolution. These can be further processed to digital surface models by stereophotogrammetry and provide a reliable data source to evaluate coarse scale Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). This study compares ICESat/GLAS and SRTM90 elevation data against photogrammetric terrain heights within GLAS footprints on high altitudes on the East Tibetan Plateau. Without vegetation-bias, we were able to examine height differences under different topographic conditions and of different acquisition dates. Several resampling techniques were applied to SRTM90 data and averaged height within each footprint was calculated. ICESat/GLAS heights (n = 148) are most similar to UAV data based elevations with an averaged difference of -0.8m ±3.1m. Results furthermore indicate the validity of ICESat/GLAS heights, which are usually removed from analyses by applying different quality flags. Smallest difference of SRTM90 to UAV based heights could be observed by a natural neighbour resampling technique (averaged 3.6m ±14m), whereat other techniques achieved quite similar results. It can be confirmed that within a range of 3,800-4,200m above mean sea level the ICESat/GLAS heights are a precise source to determine elevation at footprint geolocation.

  13. MULTICHANNEL PULSE-HEIGHT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.T.; Lefevre, H.W.

    1958-01-21

    This patent deals with electronic computing circuits and more particularly to pulse-height analyzers used for classifying variable amplitude pulses into groups of different amplitudes. The device accomplishes this pulse allocation by by converting the pulses into frequencies corresponding to the amplitudes of the pulses, which frequencies are filtered in channels individually pretuned to a particular frequency and then detected and recorded in the responsive channel. This circuit substantially overcomes the disadvantages of prior annlyzers incorporating discriminators pre-set to respond to certain voltage levels, since small variation in component values is not as critical to satisfactory circuit operation.

  14. HRS Pulse Height Analysis - 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapik, Joe

    1991-07-01

    This test performs a pulse height analysis to determine individual diode response as a function of threshold for HRS detector 2. Based on this evaluation new thresholds may be determined for optimal HRS operation. Command blocks ZCTFLIT1 and ZCTFLIT2 will be updated accordingly. This test will run once during the year. Also included is one ion test which is a PHA of twice normal threshold to look for ion events (which accelerate back up the 22 kV potential of the tube, liberate electrons from the phocathode, and produce events of twice normal energy (this should be a very low, stable rate).

  15. Tropospheric ozonesonde profiles at long-term U.S. monitoring sites: 1. A climatology based on self-organizing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Ryan M.; Thompson, Anne M.; Young, George S.

    2016-02-01

    Sonde-based climatologies of tropospheric ozone (O3) are vital for developing satellite retrieval algorithms and evaluating chemical transport model output. Typical O3 climatologies average measurements by latitude or region, and season. A recent analysis using self-organizing maps (SOM) to cluster ozonesondes from two tropical sites found that clusters of O3 mixing ratio profiles are an excellent way to capture O3 variability and link meteorological influences to O3 profiles. Clusters correspond to distinct meteorological conditions, e.g., convection, subsidence, cloud cover, and transported pollution. Here the SOM technique is extended to four long-term U.S. sites (Boulder, CO; Huntsville, AL; Trinidad Head, CA; and Wallops Island, VA) with 4530 total profiles. Sensitivity tests on k-means algorithm and SOM justify use of 3 × 3 SOM (nine clusters). At each site, SOM clusters together O3 profiles with similar tropopause height, 500 hPa height/temperature, and amount of tropospheric and total column O3. Cluster means are compared to monthly O3 climatologies. For all four sites, near-tropopause O3 is double (over +100 parts per billion by volume; ppbv) the monthly climatological O3 mixing ratio in three clusters that contain 13-16% of profiles, mostly in winter and spring. Large midtropospheric deviations from monthly means (-6 ppbv, +7-10 ppbv O3 at 6 km) are found in two of the most populated clusters (combined 36-39% of profiles). These two clusters contain distinctly polluted (summer) and clean O3 (fall-winter, high tropopause) profiles, respectively. As for tropical profiles previously analyzed with SOM, O3 averages are often poor representations of U.S. O3 profile statistics.

  16. Judgments of others' heights are biased toward the height of the perceiver.

    PubMed

    Twedt, Elyssa; Crawford, L Elizabeth; Proffitt, Dennis R

    2015-04-01

    We examined how observers use one aspect of their own morphology, height, when judging the physical characteristics of other people. To address this, participants judged the heights of people as they walked past. We tested the hypothesis that differences between participant and target height account for systematic patterns of variability and bias in height estimation. Height estimate error and error variability increased as the difference between participant height and target height increased, suggesting that estimates are scaled to observers' heights. Furthermore, participants' height estimates were biased toward two standards, demonstrating classic category effects. First, estimates were biased toward participants' own heights. Second, participants biased height estimates toward the average height of the target distribution. These results support past research on using both the body and categorical information to estimate target properties but extend to real-world situations involving interactions with moving people, such as height judgments provided during eyewitness testimony. PMID:25028087

  17. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Combined Precipitation Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Arkin, Philip; Chang, Alfred; Ferraro, Ralph; Gruber, Arnold; Janowiak, John; McNab, Alan; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo

    1997-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) has released the GPCP Version 1 Combined Precipitation Data Set, a global, monthly precipitation dataset covering the period July 1987 through December 1995. The primary product in the dataset is a merged analysis incorporating precipitation estimates from low-orbit-satellite microwave data, geosynchronous-orbit -satellite infrared data, and rain gauge observations. The dataset also contains the individual input fields, a combination of the microwave and infrared satellite estimates, and error estimates for each field. The data are provided on 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg latitude-longitude global grids. Preliminary analyses show general agreement with prior studies of global precipitation and extends prior studies of El Nino-Southern Oscillation precipitation patterns. At the regional scale there are systematic differences with standard climatologies.

  18. Thunderstorm cloud height-rainfall rate relations for use with satellite rainfall estimation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, R. F.; Mack, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Observational studies of thunderstorm cloud height-rainfall rate and cloud height-volume rainfall rate relations are reviewed with significant variations being noted among climatological regimes. Analysis of the Florida (summer) and Oklahoma (spring) relations are made using a one-dimensional cloud model to ascertain the important factors in determining the individual cloud-rain relations and the differences between the two regimes. In general, the observed relations are well simulated by the model-based calculations. The generally lower predicted rain rates in Oklahoma (as compared to Florida) result from lower precipitation efficiencies which are due to a combination of larger entrainment (related to larger vertical wind shear) and drier environment. The generally steeper slope of the Oklahoma rain rate height curves is shown to be due to a stronger variation in maximum vertical velocity with cloud top height, which, in turn, is related to the greater static stability in the range of cloud tops. The impact of the regime-to-regime variations on empirical rain estimation schemes based on satellite-observed cloud height or cloud temperature information is discussed and a rain estimation approach based on model-generated cloud-rain relations is outlined.

  19. Climatology of Warm Boundary Layer Clouds at the ARM SGP Site and Their Comparison to Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Manajit; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2004-12-01

    A four-year climatology (1997-2000) of warm boundary layer cloud properties is developed for the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Parameters in the climatology include cloud liquid water path, cloud base height and surface solar flux. These parameters are retrieved from measurements produced by a dual-channel microwave radiometer, a millimeter-wave cloud radar, a micropulse lidar, a Belfort ceilometer, shortwave radiometers and atmospheric temperature profiles amalgamated from multiple sources, including radiosondes. No significant interannual differences are observed, but nighttime liquid water paths are consistently higher than daytime values. The summer months of June, July and August have the lowest liquid water paths and the highest cloud base heights. Model outputs of cloud liquid water paths from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) model and the Early Eta Model for 104 Model Output Location Time Series (MOLTS) stations in the environs of the SGP central facility are compared to observations. The ECMWF and MOLTS mean and median liquid water paths are 3 and 4 times greater, respectively, than the observed values. The MOLTS data show lower liquid water paths in summer, which is consistent with observations, while the ECMWF data exhibit the opposite tendency. A parameterization of normalized cloud forcing that requires only cloud liquid water path and solar zenith angle is developed from the observations. The parameterization, which has a correlation coefficient of 0.81 with the observations, provides estimates of surface solar flux that are comparable to values obtained from explicit radiative transfer calculations based on plane-parallel theory. This parameterization is used to estimate the impact on the surface solar flux of differences in the liquid water paths between models and observations. Overall, there is a low bias of 50% in modeled normalized cloud forcing

  20. Envisat MIPAS measurements of CFC-11: retrieval, validation, and climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, L.; Kaufmann, M.; Spang, R.; Müller, R.; Remedios, J. J.; Moore, D. P.; Volk, C. M.; von Clarmann, T.; Riese, M.

    2008-07-01

    From July 2002 to March 2004 the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) aboard the European Space Agency's Environmental Satellite (Envisat) measured nearly continuously mid infrared limb radiance spectra. These measurements are utilised to retrieve the global distribution of the chlorofluorocarbon CFC-11 by applying a new fast forward model for Envisat MIPAS and an accompanying optimal estimation retrieval processor. A detailed analysis shows that the total retrieval errors of the individual CFC-11 volume mixing ratios are typically below 10% in the altitude range 10 to 25 km and that the systematic components dominate. Contribution of a priori information to the retrieval results are less than 5 to 10% and the vertical resolution of the observations is about 3 to 4 km in the same vertical range. The data are successfully validated by comparison with several other space experiments, an air-borne in-situ instrument, measurements from ground-based networks, and independent Envisat MIPAS analyses. The retrieval results from 425 000 Envisat MIPAS limb scans are compiled to provide a new climatological data set of CFC-11. The climatology shows significantly lower CFC-11 abundances in the lower stratosphere compared with the Reference Atmospheres for MIPAS (RAMstan V3.1) climatology. Depending on the atmospheric conditions the differences between the climatologies are up to 30 to 110 ppt (45 to 150%) at 19 to 27 km altitude. Additionally, time series of CFC-11 mean abundance and variability for five latitudinal bands are presented. The observed CFC-11 distributions can be explained by the residual mean circulation and large-scale eddy-transports in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The new CFC-11 data set is well suited for further scientific studies.

  1. Derivation of Tropospheric Ozone Climatology and Trends from TOMS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, Michael J.; McPeters, Rich; Logan, Jennifer; Kim, Jae-Hwan

    2002-01-01

    This research addresses the following three objectives: (1) Derive tropospheric ozone columns from the TOMS instruments by computing the difference between total-ozone columns over cloudy areas and over clear areas in the tropics; (2) Compute secular trends in Nimbus-7 derived tropospheric Ozone column amounts and associated potential trends in the decadal-scale tropical cloud climatology; (3) Explain the occurrence of anomalously high ozone retrievals over high ice clouds.

  2. A Web-Based Climatology of Global Ocean Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risien, C. M.; Chelton, D. B.; Hodges, M. K.

    2004-12-01

    A climatology of winds over the global ocean on a 0.5° x 0.5° grid is under development based on five-years of measurements from the SeaWinds scatterometer. The SeaWinds instrument was launched on 19 June 1999 onboard the QuikSCAT satellite. SeaWinds is an active microwave radar that, using electromagnetic backscatter from the wind roughened ocean surface, measures vector winds with an accuracy equivalent to well-calibrated buoy observations. This five-year climatology is a web-based interactive atlas from which users can retrieve wind statistics, both in tabular and graphic form, for any particular region of interest. The global coverage of the scatterometer data provides valuable information about the wind statistics in the many regions of the world ocean that are sparsely sampled by ships and buoys. One of the anticipated uses of this climatology will be presented via a case study of the NOAA/HAZMAT response to a 2001 oil spill that resulted from the grounding of the tanker "Jessica" at the entrance to Puerto Baquerizo Moreno, in Wreck Bay, on San Cristóbal island, Galápagos.

  3. Mars Orbiter Camera climatology of textured dust storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Kulowski, Laura; Wang, Huiqun

    2015-09-01

    We report the climatology of "textured dust storms", those dust storms that have visible structure on their cloud tops that are indicative of active dust lifting, as observed in Mars Daily Global Maps produced from Mars Orbiter Camera wide-angle images. Textured dust storms predominantly occur in the equinox seasons while both solstice periods experience a planet-wide "pause" in textured dust storm activity. These pauses correspond to concurrent decreases in global atmospheric dust opacity. Textured dust storms most frequently occur in Acidalia Planitia, Chryse Planitia, Arcadia Planitia, and Hellas basin. To examine the nature of the link between textured dust storms and atmospheric dust opacity, we compare the textured dust storm climatology with a record of atmospheric dust opacity and find a peak global correlation coefficient of approximately 0.5 with a lag of 20-40° in solar longitude in the opacity compared to the solar climatology. This implies that textured dust storms observed at 1400 local time by MOC are responsible for a large fraction of atmospheric dust opacity and that other mechanisms (e.g., dust devil lifting or storm-scale lifting not observed in this study) may supply a comparable amount of dust.

  4. Satellite derived aerosol optical depth climatology over Bangalore, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekanth, V.

    2013-06-01

    Climatological aerosol optical depths (AOD) over Bangalore, India have been examined to bring out the temporal heterogeneity in columnar aerosol characteristics. AOD values at 550 nm derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor onboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, for the period of 2002-2011 have been analyzed (independently) for the purpose. Frequency distributions of the AOD values are examined to infer the monthly mean values. Monthly and seasonal variations of AOD are investigated in the light of regional synoptic meteorology. Climatological monthly and seasonal mean Terra and Aqua AOD values exhibited similar temporal variation patterns. Monthly mean AOD values increased from January, peaks during May and thereafter (except for a secondary peak during July) fall off to reach a minimum during December. Monsoon season recorded the highest climatological seasonal mean AOD, while winter season recorded the lowest. AOD values show an overall increasing trend on a yearly basis, which was found mainly due to sustained increase in the seasonal averaged AOD during summer. The results obtained in the present study are compared with that of the earlier studies over the same location and also with AOD over various other Indian locations. Finally, the radiative and climatic impacts are discussed.

  5. Hanford Site climatological data summary 1995 with historical data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoitink, D.J.; Burk, K.W.

    1996-05-01

    This document presents the climatological data measured at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site for calendar year 1995. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates the Hanford Meteorology Station and the Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network from which these data were collected. The information contained herein includes updated historical climatologies for temperature, precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation, and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters. Further, the data are adjunct to and update Hoitink and Burk (1994, 1995); however, Appendix B--Wind Climatology (1994) is excluded. 1995 was warmer than normal, averaging 54.7 F, 1.4 F above normal (53.3 F). For the 12-month period, 8 months were warmer than normal, and 4 were cooler than normal. 1995 was the wettest year on record. Precipitation totaled 12.31 in., 197% of normal (6.26 in.); snowfall totaled 7.7 in., compared to the normal of 13.8 in. The average wind speed during 1995 was 7.8 mph, 0.1 mph above normal (7.7 mph). The peak gust during the year was 61 mph from the south-southwest on December 12. There were 27 days with peak gusts {ge} 40 mph, compared to a yearly average of 26.

  6. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida: Phase IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2009-01-01

    The threat of lightning is a daily concern during the warm season in Florida. Research has revealed distinct spatial and temporal distributions of lightning occurrence that are strongly influenced by large-scale atmospheric flow regimes. Previously, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) calculated the gridded lightning climatologies based on seven flow regimes over Florida for 1-, 3- and 6-hr intervals in 5-, 10-,20-, and 30-NM diameter range rings around the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) and eight other airfields in the National Weather Service in Melbourne (NWS MLB) county warning area (CWA). In this update to the work, the AMU recalculated the lightning climatologies for using individual lightning strike data to improve the accuracy of the climatologies. The AMU included all data regardless of flow regime as one of the stratifications, added monthly stratifications, added three years of data to the period of record and used modified flow regimes based work from the AMU's Objective Lightning Probability Forecast Tool, Phase II. The AMU made changes so the 5- and 10-NM radius range rings are consistent with the aviation forecast requirements at NWS MLB, while the 20- and 30-NM radius range rings at the SLF assist the Spaceflight Meteorology Group in making forecasts for weather Flight Rule violations during Shuttle landings. The AMU also updated the graphical user interface with the new data.

  7. Effects of Character Education on the Self-Esteem of Intellectually Able and Less Able Elementary Students in Kuwait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannir, Abir; Al-Hroub, Anies

    2013-01-01

    This research study investigates effects of character education activities on the self-esteem of intellectually able and less able students in the lower elementary level in Kuwait. The participants were 39 students in grade three with an average age of eight years old. Students were first divided into two ability subgroups (intellectually able vs.…

  8. Effective Teaching of Able Pupils in the Primary School: The Findings of the Oxfordshire Effective Teachers of Able Pupils Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyre, Deborah; Coates, David; Fitzpatrick, Mary; Higgins, Chris; McClure, Lynne; Wilson, Helen; Chamberlin, Rosemary

    2002-01-01

    A review of British research on effective teaching of able students leads to a report on the Oxfordshire Effective Teachers of Able Pupils Project. This study found effective teachers shared similar beliefs about learning, had empathy with the needs of able children, created a secure classroom environment, held high expectations, used…

  9. 29 CFR 1917.113 - Clearance heights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance heights. 1917.113 Section 1917.113 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.113 Clearance heights. Clearance heights shall...

  10. The genetic architecture of maize height

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Height is one of the most heritable and easily measured traits in maize (Zea mays L.). Given a pedigree or estimates of the genomic identity-by-state (IBS) among related plants, height is also accurately predictable. But, mapping alleles explaining natural variation in maize height remains a formida...

  11. 29 CFR 1917.113 - Clearance heights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clearance heights. 1917.113 Section 1917.113 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.113 Clearance heights. Clearance heights shall...

  12. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida: Phase IV: Central Florida Flow Regime Based Climatologies of Lightning Probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2009-01-01

    The threat of lightning is a daily concern during the warm season in Florida. Research has revealed distinct spatial and temporal distributions of lightning occurrence that are strongly influenced by large-scale atmospheric flow regimes. Previously, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) calculated the gridded lightning climatologies based on seven flow regimes over Florida for 1-, 3- and 6-hr intervals in 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-NM diameter range rings around the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) and eight other airfields in the National Weather Service in Melbourne (NWS MLB) county warning area (CWA). In this update to the work, the AMU recalculated the lightning climatologies for using individual lightning strike data to improve the accuracy of the climatologies. The AMU included all data regardless of flow regime as one of the stratifications, added monthly stratifications, added three years of data to the period of record and used modified flow regimes based work from the AMU's Objective Lightning Probability Forecast Tool, Phase II. The AMU made changes so the 5- and 10-NM radius range rings are consistent with the aviation forecast requirements at NWS MLB, while the 20- and 30-NM radius range rings at the SLF assist the Spaceflight Meteorology Group in making forecasts for weather Flight Rule violations during Shuttle landings. The AMU also updated the graphical user interface with the new data.

  13. Estimation of atmospheric mixing layer height from radiosonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Wang, K. C.

    2014-06-01

    Mixing layer height (h) is an important parameter for understanding the transport process in the troposphere, air pollution, weather and climate change. Many methods have been proposed to determine h by identifying the turning point of the radiosonde profile. However, substantial differences have been observed in the existing methods (e.g. the potential temperature (θ), relative humidity (RH), specific humidity (q) and atmospheric refractivity (N) methods). These differences are associated with the inconsistency of the temperature and humidity profiles in a boundary layer that is not well mixed, the changing measurability of the specific humidity and refractivity with height, the measurement error of humidity instruments within clouds, and the general existence of clouds. This study proposes a method to integrate the information of temperature, humidity and cloud to generate a consistent estimate of h. We apply this method to high vertical resolution (~ 30 m) radiosonde data that were collected at 79 stations over North America during the period from 1998 to 2008. The data are obtained from the Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate Data Center (SPARC). The results show good agreement with those from N method as the information of temperature and humidity contained in N; however, cloud effects that are included in our method increased the reliability of our estimated h. From 1988 to 2008, the climatological h over North America was 1675 ± 303 m with a strong east-west gradient: higher values (generally greater than 1800 m) occurred over the Midwest US, and lower values (usually less than 1400 m) occurred over Alaska and the US West Coast.

  14. Estimation of atmospheric mixing layer height from radiosonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Wang, K. C.

    2014-02-01

    Mixing layer height (h) is an important parameter for understanding the transport process in the troposphere, air pollution, weather and climate change. Many methods have been proposed to determine h by identifying the turning point of the radiosonde profile. However, substantial differences have been observed in the existing methods (e.g., the potential temperature (θ), relative humidity (RH), specific humidity (q) and atmospheric refractivity (N) methods). These differences are associated with the inconsistency of the temperature and humidity profiles in a boundary layer that is not well mixed, the changing measurability of the specific humidity and refractivity with height, the measurement error of humidity instruments within clouds, and the general existence of clouds. This study proposes a method to integrate the information of temperature, humidity and cloud to generate a consistent estimate of h. We apply this method to high vertical resolution (~ 30 m) radiosonde data that were collected at 79 stations over North America during the period from 1998 to 2008; the data are obtained from the Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate Data Center (SPARC). The results show good agreement with those from N method as the information of temperature and humidity contained in N; however cloud effects that are included in our method increased the reliability of h. Furthermore, our results agree well with the independent h that was determined from lidar observations. From 1988 to 2008, the climatological h over North America was 1675± 303 m with a strong east-west gradient: higher values (generally greater than 1800 m) occurred over the Midwest US, and lower values (usually less than 1400 m) occurred over Alaska and the US west coast.

  15. Structural Basis for Autoinhibition of c-Abl Tyrosine Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Bhushan; Hantschel, Oliver; Young, Matthew A.; Scheffzek,Klaus; Veach, Darren; Bornmann, William; Clarkson, Bayard; Superti-Furga,Giulio; Kuriyan, John

    2003-03-21

    c-Abl is normally regulated by an autoinhibitory mechanism, the disruption of which leads to chronic myelogenous leukemia. The details of this mechanism have been elusive because c-Abl lacks aphosphotyrosine residue that triggers the assembly of the autoinhibited form of the closely related Src kinases by internally engaging the SH2 domain. Crystal structures of c-Abl show that the N-terminal myristoyl modification of c-Abl 1b binds to the kinase domain and induces conformational changes that allow the SH2 and SH3 domains to dock onto it. Autoinhibited c-Abl forms an assembly that is strikingly similar to that of inactive Src kinases but with specific differences that explain the differential ability of the drug STI-571/Gleevec/imatinib (STI-571)to inhibit the catalytic activity of Abl, but not that of c-Src.

  16. Estimating vehicle height using homographic projections

    DOEpatents

    Cunningham, Mark F; Fabris, Lorenzo; Gee, Timothy F; Ghebretati, Jr., Frezghi H; Goddard, James S; Karnowski, Thomas P; Ziock, Klaus-peter

    2013-07-16

    Multiple homography transformations corresponding to different heights are generated in the field of view. A group of salient points within a common estimated height range is identified in a time series of video images of a moving object. Inter-salient point distances are measured for the group of salient points under the multiple homography transformations corresponding to the different heights. Variations in the inter-salient point distances under the multiple homography transformations are compared. The height of the group of salient points is estimated to be the height corresponding to the homography transformation that minimizes the variations.

  17. Characterization of leukemias with ETV6-ABL1 fusion.

    PubMed

    Zaliova, Marketa; Moorman, Anthony V; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Stanulla, Martin; Harvey, Richard C; Roberts, Kathryn G; Heatley, Sue L; Loh, Mignon L; Konopleva, Marina; Chen, I-Ming; Zimmermannova, Olga; Schwab, Claire; Smith, Owen; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joelle; Chabannon, Christian; Kim, Myungshin; Frederik Falkenburg, J H; Norton, Alice; Marshall, Karen; Haas, Oskar A; Starkova, Julia; Stuchly, Jan; Hunger, Stephen P; White, Deborah; Mullighan, Charles G; Willman, Cheryl L; Stary, Jan; Trka, Jan; Zuna, Jan

    2016-09-01

    To characterize the incidence, clinical features and genetics of ETV6-ABL1 leukemias, representing targetable kinase-activating lesions, we analyzed 44 new and published cases of ETV6-ABL1-positive hematologic malignancies [22 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (13 children, 9 adults) and 22 myeloid malignancies (18 myeloproliferative neoplasms, 4 acute myeloid leukemias)]. The presence of the ETV6-ABL1 fusion was ascertained by cytogenetics, fluorescence in-situ hybridization, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and RNA sequencing. Genomic and gene expression profiling was performed by single nucleotide polymorphism and expression arrays. Systematic screening of more than 4,500 cases revealed that in acute lymphoblastic leukemia ETV6-ABL1 is rare in childhood (0.17% cases) and slightly more common in adults (0.38%). There is no systematic screening of myeloproliferative neoplasms; however, the number of ETV6-ABL1-positive cases and the relative incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and myeloproliferative neoplasms suggest that in adulthood ETV6-ABL1 is more common in BCR-ABL1-negative chronic myeloid leukemia-like myeloproliferations than in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The genomic profile of ETV6-ABL1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia resembled that of BCR-ABL1 and BCR-ABL1-like cases with 80% of patients having concurrent CDKN2A/B and IKZF1 deletions. In the gene expression profiling all the ETV6-ABL1-positive samples clustered in close vicinity to BCR-ABL1 cases. All but one of the cases of ETV6-ABL1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia were classified as BCR-ABL1-like by a standardized assay. Over 60% of patients died, irrespectively of the disease or age subgroup examined. In conclusion, ETV6-ABL1 fusion occurs in both lymphoid and myeloid leukemias; the genomic profile and clinical behavior resemble BCR-ABL1-positive malignancies, including the unfavorable prognosis, particularly of acute leukemias. The poor outcome suggests that treatment with

  18. Two Alternative Methods for Height Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollo, Karin

    2008-03-01

    Geodesists have always been dealing with coordinate transformations. There exist various kinds of transformations, like three-dimensional (spatial datum) transformations, two-dimensional (horizontal datum) transformations and one-dimensional (eg, height) transformations. In this article we discuss height transformations. Height data is usually obtained by levelling. The problematic side of levelling is that this technique is very labour intensive and costly. Nowadays as well GPS measurements can be used, which are much faster and cheaper, but in order to use GPS measurements for height determination, we need a precise geoid model to transform GPS heights to heights above sea level. In this article two different approaches to this transformation are presented. At first, the affine transformation is discussed. The method is by nature linear, and employs the barycentric coordinates of the point, the height of which is going to be computed. Secondly, the method of fuzzy modelling is used. By these methods, the transformation surface is determined and the heights of desired points can be determined. As the input data, height information from the precise levelling campaign in Estonia is used. The computed values are tested against height information, gathered from the reference geoid model. The objectives of this research are acquiring insight into using alternative methods for height transformation as well as to statistically characterise the suitability of the proposed methods.

  19. An eight-month climatology of marine stratocumulus cloud fraction, albedo, and integrated liquid water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairall, C. W.; Hare, J. E.; Snider, Jack B.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the FIRE/Extended Time Observations (ETO) program, extended time observations were made at San Nicolas Island (SNI) from March to October, 1987. Hourly averages of air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, solar irradiance, and downward longwave irradiance were recorded. The radiation sensors were standard Eppley pyranometers (shortwave) and pyrgeometers (longwave). The SNI data were processed in several ways to deduce properties of the stratocumulus covered marine boundary layer (MBL). For example, from the temperature and humidity the lifting condensation level, which is an estimate of the height of the cloud bottom, can be computed. A combination of longwave irradiance statistics can be used to estimate fractional cloud cover. An analysis technique used to estimate the integrated cloud liquid water content (W) and the cloud albedo from the measured solar irradiance is also described. In this approach, the cloud transmittance is computed by dividing the irradiance measured at some time by a clear sky value obtained at the same hour on a cloudless day. From the transmittance and the zenith angle, values of cloud albedo and W are computed using the radiative transfer parameterizations of Stephens (1978). These analysis algorithms were evaluated with 17 days of simultaneous and colocated mm-wave (20.6 and 31.65 GHz) radiometer measurements of W and lidar ceilometer measurements of cloud fraction and cloudbase height made during the FIRE IFO. The algorithms are then applied to the entire data set to produce a climatology of these cloud properties for the eight month period.

  20. Jet characterization in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS): applications to climatology and transport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, G. L.; Hegglin, M. I.; Daffer, W. H.; Santee, M. L.; Ray, E. A.; Pawson, S.; Schwartz, M. J.; Boone, C. D.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Walker, K. A.

    2011-01-01

    A method of classifying the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric (UTLS) jets has been developed that allows satellite and aircraft trace gas data and meteorological fields to be efficiently mapped in a jet coordinate view. A detailed characterization of multiple tropopauses accompanies the jet characterization. Jet climatologies show the well-known high altitude subtropical and lower altitude polar jets in the upper troposphere, as well as a pattern of concentric polar and subtropical jets in the Southern Hemisphere, and shifts of the primary jet to high latitudes associated with blocking ridges in Northern Hemisphere winter. The jet-coordinate view segregates air masses differently than the commonly-used equivalent latitude (EqL) coordinate throughout the lowermost stratosphere and in the upper troposphere. Mapping O3 data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) satellite and the Winter Storms aircraft datasets in jet coordinates highlights important advantages in comparison to an EqL-coordinate view: strong PV, tropopause height and trace gas gradients across the subtropical jet are washed out in the latter and clearly highlighted in the former. The jet coordinate view emphasizes the presence of stratospheric ozone well below the tropopause, especially poleward of and below the jet core, and highlights other transport features associated with the upper tropospheric jets. MLS and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer trace gas fields for spring 2008 in jet coordinates show very strong, closely correlated, PV, tropopause height and trace gas gradients across the jet, and evidence of intrusions of stratospheric air below the tropopause below and poleward of the subtropical jet; these features are consistent between instruments and among multiple trace gases. Our characterization of the jets is facilitating studies that will improve our understanding of upper tropospheric trace gas evolution.

  1. The Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) - in situ observation based precipitation climatology on regional and global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, T.; Schneider, U.; Rudolf, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC, http://gpcc.dwd.de) provides global monthly precipitation analyses for monitoring and research of the earth's climate. The centre is a German contribution to the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), to the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS), and to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). It contributes to water resources assessments, flood and drought monitoring, climate variability and trend analyses. GPCC published in year 2008 a new global precipitation climatology as well as a reanalysis of its full data base for all months of the period 1901-2007. The GPCC data base comprises monthly precipitation totals from more than 70 000 different stations in the world. It produces gridded data sets of monthly precipitation on the earth's land surface derived from raingauge based observation data. Intensive quality control of observation data and station metadata ensures a high analysis quality. The different GPCC products are adjusted to different user needs. It routinely produces 2 near real-time precipitation monitoring products. Its 2 non real-time products are updated at irregular time intervals after significant updates of its observation station database. All GPCC products can be visualised and accessed free of charge via Internet from http://gpcc.dwd.de. The GPCC First Guess Product of the monthly precipitation anomaly is based on synoptic weather reports (SYNOP) from about 6,300 stations worldwide received near real-time via the WMO Global Telecommunication System (GTS). The product is available within 5 days after end of an observation month. Main application purpose is near real-time drought monitoring. The product uses since mid 2008 the new GPCC monthly precipitation climatology as analysis background. Spatial product resolution: 1.0° and 2.5°. The GPCC Monitoring Product of monthly precipitation is based on SYNOP and monthly CLIMAT reports received near real-time via GTS from about

  2. Comparison of Aerosol Properties Within and Above the ABL at the ARM Program's SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Delle Monache, L

    2002-05-01

    The goal of this thesis is to determine under what conditions, if any, measurements of aerosol properties made at the Earth's surface are representative of aerosol properties within the column of air above the surface. This thesis will use data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) which is the only location in the world where ground-based and in situ airborne measurements are made on a routine basis. All flight legs in the one-year period from March 2000-March 2001 were categorized as either within or above the atmospheric boundary layer using an objective mixing height determination technique. The correlations between the aerosol properties measured at the surface and the measured within and above the ABL were then computed. The conclusion of this comparison is that the aerosol extensive and intensive properties measured at the surface are representative of values within the ABL, but not within the free atmosphere.

  3. Expression of BCR-ABL1 oncogene relative to ABL1 gene changes overtime in chronic myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Manu; Milani, Lili; Hermansson, Monica; Simonsson, Bengt; Markevaern, Berit; Syvaenen, Ann Christine; Barbany, Gisela

    2008-02-15

    Using a quantitative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay we have investigated the changes in the expression of the BCR-ABL1 oncogene relative to the wild-type ABL1 and BCR alleles in cells from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients not responding to therapy. The results show a progressive increase in the BCR-ABL1 oncogene expression at the expense of decreased expression of the ABL1 allele, not involved in the fusion. No relative changes in the expression of the two BCR alleles were found. These results demonstrate that allele-specific changes in gene expression, with selective, progressive silencing of the wild-type ABL1 allele in favor of the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 allele occur in CML patients with therapy-resistant disease.

  4. Disruption of Bcr-Abl Coiled Coil Oligomerization by Design*

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Andrew S.; Pendley, Scott S.; Bruno, Benjamin J.; Woessner, David W.; Shimpi, Adrian A.; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Lim, Carol S.

    2011-01-01

    Oligomerization is an important regulatory mechanism for many proteins, including oncoproteins and other pathogenic proteins. The oncoprotein Bcr-Abl relies on oligomerization via its coiled coil domain for its kinase activity, suggesting that a designed coiled coil domain with enhanced binding to Bcr-Abl and reduced self-oligomerization would be therapeutically useful. Key mutations in the coiled coil domain of Bcr-Abl were identified that reduce homo-oligomerization through intermolecular charge-charge repulsion yet increase interaction with the Bcr-Abl coiled coil through additional salt bridges, resulting in an enhanced ability to disrupt the oligomeric state of Bcr-Abl. The mutations were modeled computationally to optimize the design. Assays performed in vitro confirmed the validity and functionality of the optimal mutations, which were found to exhibit reduced homo-oligomerization and increased binding to the Bcr-Abl coiled coil domain. Introduction of the mutant coiled coil into K562 cells resulted in decreased phosphorylation of Bcr-Abl, reduced cell proliferation, and increased caspase-3/7 activity and DNA segmentation. Importantly, the mutant coiled coil domain was more efficacious than the wild type in all experiments performed. The improved inhibition of Bcr-Abl through oligomeric disruption resulting from this modified coiled coil domain represents a viable alternative to small molecule inhibitors for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21659527

  5. BCR-ABL/p62/SQSTM1: a cannibal embrace.

    PubMed

    Auberger, Patrick

    2012-10-25

    In this issue of Blood, Goussetis et al identify autophagy as a new pathway for the degradation of the oncoprotein BCR-ABL. They show that the therapeutic drug arsenic trioxide (AS(2)O(3)) targets BCR-ABL for autophagic degradation via a p62/SQSTM1-dependent mechanism that is critical for the antileukemic effect of the drug. PMID:23100300

  6. History Untold: Celebrating Ohio History through ABLE Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent State Univ., OH. Ohio Literacy Resource Center.

    This document is a compilation of 25 pieces of writing presenting Ohio adult basic and literacy education (ABLE) students' perspectives of community and personal history. The items included in the compilation were written by ABLE students across Ohio. The compilation is organized in three sections as follows: (1) people (9 items, including a…

  7. A surface radiation climatology across two Meteosat satellite generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, Rebekka; Müller, Richard; Trentmann, Jörg; Stöckli, Reto; Liniger, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Long term observations of the surface radiation budget are essential for climate monitoring, for climate model evaluation and for applications such as in the solar energy or agriculture sector. The Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) released a Climate Data Record (CDR) of global and direct surface irradiance as well as effective cloud albedo derived from observations of the Meteosat First Generation satellites (MFG, 1983-2005). We will present an extension of this CDR using measurements from the Meteosat Second Generation satellites (MSG, 2004-present). The differences in the spectral properties of the radiometers aboard the MFG and MSG satellites requires a modification of the original MagicSol algorithm. In order to guarantee a climatologically homogeneous continuation of MFG-based CDR, the two narrowband visible channels of the MSG satellites are combined to simulate the MFG broadband visible channel. The combination of the MFG and MSG based datasets is tested for homogeneity and no significant breaks are detected during the overlap period of 2004-2005. Validation of the extended global radiation dataset against ground based observations from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network yields a mean monthly absolute bias of 8.15 Wm-2. This complies to the target accuracy threshold of 15 Wm-2 (including a measurement uncertainty of the surface observations of 5 Wm-2) required for satellite-derived CDR's of global radiation by the Global Climate Observing System. Climatological analysis of the extended surface radiation dataset shows an overall positive trend of the global radiation for the Meteosat disc (with variable extents and significances for different regions) which can be attributed to a negative trend in the effective cloud albedo, i.e., a decrease in cloudiness. Trends due to changes in the clear sky radiation are small and only induced by trends in the water vapour fields. Trends caused by changes in the direct effects of

  8. Molecular Detection of BCR-ABL in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ya-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    All chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients have the BCR-ABL fusion gene. The constitutively activated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase is a critical pathogenetic event in CML. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib, are synthesized small molecules that primarily target BCR-ABL tyrosine kinases and have become a first-line treatment for CML. Detection of BCR-ABL transcript level by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) is a clinical routine for evaluating TKI treatment efficacy and predicting long-term response. Furthermore, because they are a main TKI resistance mechanism, the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) point mutations that are detected by Sanger sequencing can help clinicians make decisions on subsequent treatment selections. Here, we present protocols for the two abovementioned molecular methods for CML analysis. PMID:27581134

  9. Statistical examination of climatological data relevant to global temperature variation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, H.L.; Gunst, R.F.; Woodward, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    The research group at Southern Methodist University has been involved in the examination of climatological data as specified in the proposal. Our efforts have resulted in three papers which have been submitted to scholarly journals, as well as several other projects which should be completed either during the next six months or next year. In the following, we discuss our results to date along with projected progress within the next six months. Major topics discussed in this progress report include: testing for trend in the global temperature data; (2) defining and estimating mean global temperature change; and, (3) the effect of initial conditions on autoregressive models for global temperature data.

  10. Nimbus-7 global cloud climatology. II - First year results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, Larry L.; Yeh, H. Y. Michael; Wellemeyer, Charlie G.; Eck, Thomas F.; Kyle, H. Lee

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on the analysis of the Nimbus-7 satellite data set obtained on regional and seasonal variations in global cloud cover. Four midseason months (April, July, and October 1979 and January 1980) were analyzed for the total cloud amount, the cloud amounts at high, middle, and low altitudes, the cirrus and deep convective clouds, and the cloud and clear-sky 11.5 micron-derived radiances; in addition, noon versus midnight cloud amounts were examined. The Nimbus-7 data are compared with three previously published cloud climatologies, and the differences among these data sets are discussed.

  11. Mars Geoscience Climatology Orbiter (MGCO) extended study: Technical volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The FLTSATCOM Earth orbiting communications satellite is a prominent candidate to serve as the Mars Geoscience Climatology Orbiter (MGCO) spacecraft. Major aspects directly applicable are: (1) the incorporation of solid orbit insertion motor; (2) the ability to cruise to Mars in the spin-stabilized mode; (3) ample capability for payload mass and power; (4) attitude control tried to nadir and orbit plane coordinates; (5) exemplary Earth orbital performance record and projected lifetime; and (6) existence of an on-going procurement into the MGCO time period.

  12. Mars geoscience/climatology orbiter low cost mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    It will not be possible to support the multiple planetary missions of the magnitude and order of previous missions on the basis of foreseeable NASA funding. It is, therefore, necessary to seek innovative means for accomplishing the goals of planetary exploration with modestly allocated resources. In this connection, a Core Program set of planetary exploration missions has been recommended. Attention is given to a Mission Operations design overview which is based on the Mars Geoscience/Climatology Orbiter Phase-A study performed during spring of 1983.

  13. Genetically Determined Height and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, C.P.; Hamby, S.E.; Saleheen, D.; Hopewell, J.C.; Zeng, L.; Assimes, T.L.; Kanoni, S.; Willenborg, C.; Burgess, S.; Amouyel, P.; Anand, S.; Blankenberg, S.; Boehm, B.O.; Clarke, R.J.; Collins, R.; Dedoussis, G.; Farrall, M.; Franks, P.W.; Groop, L.; Hall, A.S.; Hamsten, A.; Hengstenberg, C.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Ingelsson, E.; Kathiresan, S.; Kee, F.; König, I.R.; Kooner, J.; Lehtimäki, T.; März, W.; McPherson, R.; Metspalu, A.; Nieminen, M.S.; O’Donnell, C.J.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Peters, A.; Perola, M.; Reilly, M.P.; Ripatti, S.; Roberts, R.; Salomaa, V.; Shah, S.H.; Schreiber, S.; Siegbahn, A.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Veronesi, G.; Wareham, N.; Willer, C.J.; Zalloua, P.A.; Erdmann, J.; Deloukas, P.; Watkins, H.; Schunkert, H.; Danesh, J.; Thompson, J.R.; Samani, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The nature and underlying mechanisms of an inverse association between adult height and the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) are unclear. METHODS We used a genetic approach to investigate the association between height and CAD, using 180 height-associated genetic variants. We tested the association between a change in genetically determined height of 1 SD (6.5 cm) with the risk of CAD in 65,066 cases and 128,383 controls. Using individual-level genotype data from 18,249 persons, we also examined the risk of CAD associated with the presence of various numbers of height-associated alleles. To identify putative mechanisms, we analyzed whether genetically determined height was associated with known cardiovascular risk factors and performed a pathway analysis of the height-associated genes. RESULTS We observed a relative increase of 13.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4 to 22.1; P<0.001) in the risk of CAD per 1-SD decrease in genetically determined height. There was a graded relationship between the presence of an increased number of height-raising variants and a reduced risk of CAD (odds ratio for height quartile 4 versus quartile 1, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.84; P<0.001). Of the 12 risk factors that we studied, we observed significant associations only with levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides (accounting for approximately 30% of the association). We identified several overlapping pathways involving genes associated with both development and atherosclerosis. CONCLUSIONS There is a primary association between a genetically determined shorter height and an increased risk of CAD, a link that is partly explained by the association between shorter height and an adverse lipid profile. Shared biologic processes that determine achieved height and the development of atherosclerosis may explain some of the association. PMID:25853659

  14. A preliminary zonal mean climatology of water vapour in the stratosphere and mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Rind, D.; Russell, J. M.; Harries, J. E.

    The Microwave Limb Sounder on the UARS satellite measures water vapour concentration in the stratosphere and mesosphere. Water vapour profiles are retrieved from radiance measurements using a version of the optimal estimation algorithm. This requires an a priori profile which is obtained from a climatology. The MLS retrieval currently uses the standard UARS pre-launch climatology, which contains water vapour based on a 2-D model constrained to LIMS data in the stratosphere. This climatology has several defects which affect the ability of MLS to retrieve water vapour. This paper presents a new climatology constructed from the HALOE (HALogen Occultation Experiment) and SAGE II (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) data, which have become available recently. The new climatology is more realistic in several ways, particularly in the mesosphere and near the tropopause. It is proving to be an improvement as an a priori for MLS retrievals and might also have other uses. The paper will present the climatology, show how it was constructed, and compare it to the UARS pre-launch climatology and to various other data. As it stands, this climatology is not suitable for a reference atmosphere, but it is an improvement on CIRA part III in some way simply because it contains more accurate data and shows a number of new features. Suggestions are made for constructing an improved reference climatology for middle atmosphere water vapour.

  15. Laser confocal feedback tomography and nano-step height measurement

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yidong; Wang, Weiping; Xu, Chunxin; Zhang, Shulian

    2013-01-01

    A promising method for tomography and step height measurement is proposed, which combines the high sensitivity of the frequency-shifted feedback laser and the axial positioning ability of confocal microscopy. By demodulating the feedback-induced intensity modulation signals, the obtained amplitude and phase information are used to respectively determine the coarse and fine measurement of the samples. Imaging the micro devices and biological samples by the demodulated amplitude, this approach is proved to be able to achieve the cross-sectional image in highly scattered mediums. And then the successful height measurement of nano-step on a glass-substrate grating by combination of both amplitude and phase information indicates its axial high resolution (better than 2 nm) in a non-ambiguous range of about ten microns. PMID:24145717

  16. New methodology to determine the terminal height of a fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Ibáñez, Manuel; Gritsevich, Maria; Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M.

    2015-04-01

    Despite ablation and drag processes associated with atmospheric entry of meteoroids were a subject of intensive study over the last century, little attention was devoted to interpret the observed fireball terminal height. This is a key parameter because it not only depends on the initial mass, but also on the bulk physical properties of the meteoroids and hence on their ability to ablate in the atmosphere. In this work we have developed a new approach that is tested using the fireball terminal heights observed by the Meteorite Observation and Recovery Project operated in Canada between 1970 and 1985 (hereafter referred as MORP). We then compare them to the calculation made. Our results clearly show that the new methodology is able to forecast the degree of deepening of meteoroids in the Earth's atmosphere. Then, this approach has important applications in predicting the impact hazard from cm- to meter-sized bodies that are represented, in part, in the MORP bolide list.

  17. Development of large Area Covering Height Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, K.

    2014-04-01

    Height information is a basic part of topographic mapping. Only in special areas frequent update of height models is required, usually the update cycle is quite lower as for horizontal map information. Some height models are available free of charge in the internet; for commercial height models a fee has to be paid. Mostly digital surface models (DSM) with the height of the visible surface are given and not the bare ground height, as required for standard mapping. Nevertheless by filtering of DSM, digital terrain models (DTM) with the height of the bare ground can be generated with the exception of dense forest areas where no height of the bare ground is available. These height models may be better as the DTM of some survey administrations. In addition several DTM from national survey administrations are classified, so as alternative the commercial or free of charge available information from internet can be used. The widely used SRTM DSM is available also as ACE-2 GDEM corrected by altimeter data for systematic height errors caused by vegetation and orientation errors. But the ACE-2 GDEM did not respect neighbourhood information. With the worldwide covering TanDEM-X height model, distributed starting 2014 by Airbus Defence and Space (former ASTRIUM) as WorldDEM, higher level of details and accuracy is reached as with other large area covering height models. At first the raw-version of WorldDEM will be available, followed by an edited version and finally as WorldDEM-DTM a height model of the bare ground. With 12 m spacing and a relative standard deviation of 1.2 m within an area of 1° x 1° an accuracy and resolution level is reached, satisfying also for larger map scales. For limited areas with the HDEM also a height model with 6 m spacing and a relative vertical accuracy of 0.5 m can be generated on demand. By bathymetric LiDAR and stereo images also the height of the sea floor can be determined if the water has satisfying transparency. Another method of getting

  18. Judging body weight from faces: the height-weight illusion.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Tobias M; Hecht, Heiko; Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Being able to exploit features of the human face to predict health and fitness can serve as an evolutionary advantage. Surface features such as facial symmetry, averageness, and skin colour are known to influence attractiveness. We sought to determine whether observers are able to extract more complex features, namely body weight. If possible, it could be used as a predictor for health and fitness. For instance, facial adiposity could be taken to indicate a cardiovascular challenge or proneness to infections. Observers seem to be able to glean body weight information from frontal views of a face. Is weight estimation robust across different viewing angles? We showed that participants strongly overestimated body weight for faces photographed from a lower vantage point while underestimating it for faces photographed from a higher vantage point. The perspective distortions of simple facial measures (e.g., width-to-height ratio) that accompany changes in vantage point do not suffice to predict body weight. Instead, more complex patterns must be involved in the height-weight illusion. PMID:22611670

  19. Measuring orthometric water heights from lightweight Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandini, Filippo; Olesen, Daniel; Jakobsen, Jakob; Reyna-Gutierrez, Jose Antonio; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2016-04-01

    A better quantitative understanding of hydrologic processes requires better observations of hydrological variables, such as surface water area, water surface level, its slope and its temporal change. However, ground-based measurements of water heights are restricted to the in-situ measuring stations. Hence, the objective of remote sensing hydrology is to retrieve these hydraulic variables from spaceborne and airborne platforms. The forthcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission will be able to acquire water heights with an expected accuracy of 10 centimeters for rivers that are at least 100 m wide. Nevertheless, spaceborne missions will always face the limitations of: i) a low spatial resolution which makes it difficult to separate water from interfering surrounding areas and a tracking of the terrestrial water bodies not able to detect water heights in small rivers or lakes; ii) a limited temporal resolution which limits the ability to determine rapid temporal changes, especially during extremes. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are one technology able to fill the gap between spaceborne and ground-based observations, ensuring 1) high spatial resolution; 2) tracking of the water bodies better than any satellite technology; 3) timing of the sampling which only depends on the operator 4) flexibility of the payload. Hence, this study focused on categorizing and testing sensors capable of measuring the range between the UAV and the water surface. The orthometric height of the water surface is then retrieved by subtracting the height above water measured by the sensors from the altitude above sea level retrieved by the onboard GPS. The following sensors were tested: a) a radar, b) a sonar c) a laser digital-camera based prototype developed at Technical University of Denmark. The tested sensors comply with the weight constraint of small UAVs (around 1.5 kg). The sensors were evaluated in terms of accuracy, maximum ranging distance and beam

  20. Uncertainties in derived temperature-height profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzner, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Nomographs were developed for relating uncertainty in temperature T to uncertainty in the observed height profiles of both pressure p and density rho. The relative uncertainty delta T/T is seen to depend not only upon the relative uncertainties delta P/P or delta rho/rho, and to a small extent upon the value of T or H, but primarily upon the sampling-height increment Delta h, the height increment between successive observations of p or delta. For a fixed value of delta p/p, the value of delta T/T varies inversely with Delta h. No limit exists in the fineness of usable height resolution of T which may be derived from densities, while a fine height resolution in pressure-height data leads to temperatures with unacceptably large uncertainties.

  1. Height and calories in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Griffen, Andrew S

    2016-03-01

    This paper estimates a height production function using data from a randomized nutrition intervention conducted in rural Guatemala from 1969 to 1977. Using the experimental intervention as an instrument, the IV estimates of the effect of calories on height are an order of magnitude larger than the OLS estimates. Information from a unique measurement error process in the calorie data, counterfactuals results from the estimated model and external evidence from migration studies suggest that IV is not identifying a policy relevant average marginal impact of calories on height. The preferred, attenuation bias corrected OLS estimates from the height production function suggest that, averaging over ages, a 100 calorie increase in average daily calorie intake over the course of a year would increase height by 0.06 cm. Counterfactuals from the model imply that calories gaps in early childhood can explain at most 16% of the height gap between Guatemalan children and the US born children of Guatemalan immigrants. PMID:26656205

  2. Climatological Data Rescue from historic meteorological stations in the Czech Republic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repka, M.

    2010-09-01

    Digitization of climatological data from meteorological station had several periods in past. Last period is very close connected with database system CLIDATA. The main source of historical data is archive in Ostrava regional office of CHMI where a lot of historical monthly reports of observations with daily data are stored. Other historical data were founded from various types of historical annual reports and last but not least from border cooperation with Polish and Slovak meteorological services. During several last years were imported daily data from new discovered stations, and some elements from historic stations such as precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, cloudiness, hourly data of sunshine, temperatures from thermographs and also meteorological phenomena from some synoptic stations. Within the frame of our project we could also digitize wind speed, wind direction and wind gust data. During more than 150 years of regular meteorological observation, were used a big amount of various types of monthly reports for measured data records. Meteorological stations were founded by several organizations and all of them used another kind of reports that were changed during years. We recognized nearly 30 types of precipitation monthly reports and 50 types of climatologic reports. Digitization of data especially from very historical stations brings also some problems during definition of metadata such as coordinates, elevations, measuring instruments height, a lot of observing terms or historic units of elements. Some historical annual reports mention observer's jobs, that is very interesting and we can find position of meteorological stations more exactly. Data quality control has been proceeded since 1993. First were used special programs and algorithms outside of database system. Some new programs for wrong values detection or for missing values filling are used at present. CLIDATA database system and its extensions allows to make logical and spatial data

  3. A Statistical Aggregation Engine for Climatology and Trend Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, D. R.; Simon, T. A.; Halem, M.

    2014-12-01

    Fundamental climate data records (FCDRs) from satellite instruments often span tens to hundreds of terabytes or even petabytes in scale. These large volumes make it difficult to aggregate or summarize their climatology and climate trends. It is especially cumbersome to supply the full derivation (provenance) of these aggregate calculations. We present a lightweight and resilient software platform, Gridderama that simplifies the calculation of climatology by exploiting the "Data-Cube" topology often present in earth observing satellite records. By using the large array storage (LAS) paradigm, Gridderama allows the analyst to more easily produce a series of aggregate climate data products at progressively coarser spatial and temporal resolutions. Furthermore, provenance tracking and extensive visualization capabilities allow the analyst to track down and correct for data problems such as missing data and outliers that may impact the scientific results. We have developed and applied Gridderama to calculate a trend analysis of 55 Terabytes of AIRS Level 1b infrared radiances, and show statistically significant trending in the greenhouse gas absorption bands as observed by AIRS over the 2003-2012 decade. We will extend this calculation to show regional changes in CO2 concentration from AIRS over the 2003-2012 decade by using a neural network retrieval algorithm.

  4. The climatology of Australian tropical aerosol: Evidence for regional correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, R. M.; Forgan, B. W.; Campbell, S. K.; Qin, Y.

    2013-05-01

    Biomass burning aerosols from the tropical savanna of Northern Australia constitute a globally significant aerosol source, with impacts on regional climate and air quality. Knowledge of the seasonal cycle and spatial distribution of this aerosol is required for its realistic representation in models of global climate, and to help define the role of this region in the global carbon cycle. This paper presents a decadal climatology of these aerosols, based on Sun photometer records from three stations in the Australian tropics, over the period 1998-2012. The monthly time series shows enhanced aerosol emissions following prodigious wet seasons, two of which occurred during the study period. The monthly climatology shows the expected peak during the late dry season (September-November), when most burning takes place, with clear evidence of the dominant modulating effect of fine-particle smoke emission apparent from the annual cycle of the Ångström exponent, a proxy for particle size. The aerosol levels during the early dry season are higher at the northern "Top End" stations than at the south-westerly Kimberley station. The time variation of aerosol optical depth is highly correlated between all three station pairs, with a correlation coefficient r2> 0.75 at monthly resolution between all pairs. This high correlation between widely separated stations declines only gradually as the filtering interval is reduced, suggesting remarkably high coherence in the emission and transport of biomass burning aerosol across the entire region.

  5. Global climatological maps of ionospheric parameters from recent satellite missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolle, Claudia; Luehr, Hermann; Liu, Huixin; Park, Jaeheung; Förster, Matthias; Olsen, Nils; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    Satellite observations have always been crucial in determining and regularizing the IRI model by providing global data bases for empirical models. Special attraction may have local time precessing, polar orbiting satellites which cover the Earth ionosphere from polar to equatorial regions at all local times and longitudes. Out of these, CHAMP is a successful example with a presently unique orbit altitude of 400 km, and a live time and continuous data base of 10 years at the time of COSPAR 2010. We want to present results of global climatologies on plasma parameters, such as electron density and temperature and emphasis their special characteristics. CHAMP magnetic field and electron density observations have also enabled the statistical global review of the occurrence rates of equatorial plasma irregularities. Even enhanced knowledge on the climatological distribution of these parameters is expected from multi-spacecraft satellite missions, such as is the upcoming ESA Swarm mission. It will provide a multitude of ionospheric and magnetospheric parameters, such as plasma densities and temperatures, the electric and the magnetic field, neutral density and wind, as well as GPS Total Electron Content at three satellites in two different altitudes. We will present products and scientific possibilities arising from the Swarm mission in view of enriching the development of empirical models.

  6. Tracer Lamination in the Stratosphere: A Global Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appenzeller, Christof; Holton, James R.

    1997-01-01

    Vertical soundings of stratospheric ozone often exhibit laminated tracer structures characterized by strong vertical tracer gradients. The change in time of these gradients is used to define a tracer lamination rate. It is shown that this quantity can be calculated by the cross product of the horizontal temperature and horizontal tracer gradients. A climatology based on UARS satellite-borne ozone data and on ozone-like pseudotracer data is presented. Three stratospheric regions with high lamination rates were found: the part of the stratospheric overworld which is influenced by the polar vortex, the part of the lowermost stratosphere which is influenced by the tropopause and a third region in the subtropical lower stratosphere mainly characterized with strong vertical shear. High lamination rates in the stratospheric overworld were absent during summer, whereas in the lowermost stratosphere high lamination rates were found year-round. This is consistent with the occurrence and seasonal variation of the horizontal tracer gradient and vertical shear necessary for tilting the tracer surfaces. During winter, high lamination rates associated with the stratospheric polar vortex are present down to approximately 100 hPa. Several features of the derived climatology are roughly consistent with earlier balloon-borne studies. The patterns in the southern and northern hemisphere are comparable, but details differ as anticipated from a less disturbed and more symmetric southern polar vortex.

  7. Observational Constraints of Humidity Climatology From GPS Radio Occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, P.; Jiang, J. H.; Su, H.; Mannucci, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have shown large differences in the humidity climatology of the upper troposphere (UT) region between global models and observations. Such discrepancies can lead to large differences in the water vapor feedback estimations between models, reanalyses and satellite observations, and therefore climate projection uncertainties. Global Circulation Models (GCMs) could also mischaracterize the middle troposphere moist convection leading to erroneous conclusions about the water vapor vertical distribution and horizontal transport. We observationally constrain the UT humidity by employing high accuracy (<1.0%) and high vertical resolution (100-200 m) Global Positioning System Radio Occultation (GPSRO) refractivity measurements. Preliminary results from GPSRO reveal a significantly drier tropical boundary layer than both ECMWF and MERRA reanalyses. In the middle and upper troposphere, GPSRO is moister than ECMWF but drier than MERRA. These features are more pronounced at equatorial latitudes. These differences could have greater repercussions with regards to the water vapor feedback estimation. Also, zonally varying distributions of relative humidity (RH) from GPSRO, MERRA and ECMWF were also correlated with precipitation measurements from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). We found latitudinal differences between maxima of precipitation and RH, which could imply that large-scale horizontal transport in the boundary layer plays a critical role to governing the coupling strength between precipitation and RH. The application of GPSRO data in constraining the underlying model physics will be discussed.

  8. The climatology of tornadoes and waterspouts in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaiotti, Dario B.; Giovannoni, Mauro; Pucillo, Arturo; Stel, Fulvio

    2007-02-01

    In this work 10 years of reports collected by weather amateurs are used to define a preliminary climatology of tornadoes and waterspouts in Italy. The results show behaviors different from those observed in other countries. Generally, tornadoes and waterspouts are more frequent in late summer and autumn than in the other seasons. The seasonality of tornadoes and waterspouts appears different for different Italian zones, in particular in the Po Valley and Friulian plain and coast (south to the Alps) tornadoes and waterspouts are more frequent in spring and early summer while in the Tirrenian and Ionian coasts (western and southern Italy), tornadoes and waterspouts are more frequent in late summer and autumn. As observed in other studies (Brooks, H., E. and Doswell, C. A. III, 2001. Some aspects of the international climatology of tornadoes by damage classification. Atmos. Res., 56, 191-201.) Italian tornadoes and waterspouts are statistically weaker than in other countries but this difference cannot be completely ascribed to the presence of waterspouts. The "CAPE Storm-Relative-Helicity diagrams" and "Shear Magnitude diagrams" obtained for Italian tornadoes and waterspouts show different characteristics than those obtained for US. The cause of these differences is still unknown, it can rely in the sample selection (problems with the concept of proximity sounding) or in a real climatic effect.

  9. Climatology of Tropical Intraseasonal Convective Anomalies: 1979 2002.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Charles; Carvalho, Leila M. V.; Higgins, R. Wayne; Waliser, Duane E.; Schemm, J.-K. E.

    2004-02-01

    Tropical intraseasonal convective anomalies (TICA) have a central role in subseasonal changes in the coupled ocean atmosphere system, but the climatology of TICA events has not been properly documented. This study exploits 24 years of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) data and a tracking algorithm to develop a climatology of eastward propagating TICA events. Three distinct types of TICA occurrences are documented according to their propagation characteristics. The first type (IND) is characterized by events that propagate in the Indian Ocean without significant influence in the western Pacific Ocean. The second and third types are associated with occurrences of the Madden Julian oscillation during boreal winters (MJO) and summers (ISO). The frequency of occurrence of TICA events is highest in April June and October December and lowest in July September. An analysis of the spatial and temporal characteristics reveals that MJO events tend to have the longest life cycle, greatest intensity, and largest variability inside the contiguous region of OLR anomaly. Given the data record of 24 years, the analysis of interannual occurrences of TICA events does not show statistically significant differences among events that occur in different phases of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). A procedure is developed to identify major MJO events and estimate their frequency of occurrence in the data record.

  10. Climatological Structures of the GRIPS Models: Mean States and Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven

    1999-01-01

    The GCM-Reality Intercomparison Project for SPARC (GRIPS) is assessing and monitoring the performance of state-of-the-art general circulation models (GCMs). A wide variety of tasks have been initiated. These are designed to: (1) assess the ability of the GCMs to represent the current climatological structure of the troposphere and middle atmosphere,(2) to compare their response to imposed forcing anomalies, and (3) to estimate the certainty with which future climate perturbations can be predicted. This paper is concerned with assessments of the climatological states in the GCM simulations. Comparing the simulations with observational datasets reveals considerable discrepancies in the modelled fields. While it might be anticipated that certain types of biases in the model simulations might be related to the formulation of different aspects of the numerical package (dynamical schemes, cloud schemes, radiation transfer, inclusion of gravity wave drag), there is no clear relationship between these features. This paper attempts to draw a more comprehensive picture of the GCMs'performance than has previously been shown, by comparing the dominant forcing mechanisms in the models with observational estimates, and relating model deficiencies to the differences in the physical mechanisms in the GCMS.

  11. Global Surface Ultraviolet Radiation Climatology from TOMS and ERBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubin, Dan

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop a method for calculating the distribution of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) over most of the earth's surface using NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data, and to use this method to develop a UVR climatology that is useful in the context of the global ozone depletion issue. The research carried out with this support has resulted the following accomplishments: (1) a radioactive transfer method. based on the delta-Eddington approximation, was successfully developed; (2) the method was applied to the five years of overlapping TOMS and ERBE Monthly-Hourly data to examine the impact of global variability in cloud cover on trends in surface UVR; (3) a presentation was made on effects of stratospheric ozone depletion; (4) the radioactive transfer model was finally applied to all daylight hours to make a through study of the global effect of cloud cover;and (6) a five-year global climatology of surface UVR based on all of the research has been prepared for general distribution.

  12. A climatological link between slantwise instability and surface weather conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glinton, M. R.; Gray, S. L.; Chagnon, J. M.; Morcrette, C. J.

    2012-04-01

    Midlatitude weather phenomena including rainbands in fronts and cloud heads and the descending sting jets found in extreme windstorms have been attributed, in part, to the release of conditional symmetric instability (CSI). CSI is a slantwise parcel instability arising from the combination of inertial and gravitational instability in a baroclinic atmosphere; its release gives slantwise convection. However, to date, demonstration of the link between CSI and severe weather has been confined to a few case studies. Weather forecast models with domains big enough to encompass entire midlatitude storms do not have sufficient resolution to realistically resolve the release of CSI, and CSI release is not parameterized in these models. The consequences of this lack of representation of CSI release are currently unknown and motivate this study. We present a North Atlantic climatology of the energy available for slantwise convection due to CSI derived from the ERA-Interim re-analysis, and compare it with an equivalent climatology of CAPE (the energy available for upright convection due to conditional instability). The annual cycle of land and sea surface temperatures are shown to strongly modulate these instabilities. The statistical relationship between these instabilities and surface weather conditions are presented.

  13. Climatological Diversity of Producing Places for Vegetables in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masutomi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Climatic variability, including extreme events such as heat waves, floods, and droughts, is one of main factors that threaten stable agricultural production. In fact, it has caused many agro-meteorological disasters all over the world. Furthermore, climate change will increase the frequency and severity of extreme events and will increase the risk of agro-meteorological disasters. Crop diversification that increase the variety of production locations, crops, enterprises or income sources, has been commonly identified at local scale, and is thought as an useful adaptation to climatic variability. However, little is known about crop diversification at national or international scales. Here, I focus on the spatial diversity of producing places, and propose a new index that quantifies the spatial diversity of producing places in consideration of climatological correlations between producing places. I named the index "Climatological Diversity of Producing Places (CDPP)." Second, using the CDPP, I investigated the long-term trends of vulnerability to climatic variability for 14 vegetables (31 cropping types) in Japan. I found that the GDPPs of 12 vegetables (17 cropping types) showed statistically significant increases. The results revealed the vulnerability to climatic variability has been reducing for many vegetables in Japan.

  14. Cloud base and top heights in the Hawaiian region determined with satellite and ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunxi; Wang, Yuqing; Lauer, Axel; Hamilton, Kevin; Xie, Feiqin

    2012-08-01

    We present a multi-year climatology of cloud-base-height (CBH), cloud-top-height (CTH), and trade wind inversion base height (TWIBH) for the Hawaiian region (18°N-22.5°N, 153.7°W-160.7°W). The new climatology is based on data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO), the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC), ceilometer observations and radiosondes. The climatology reported here is well suited to evaluate climate model simulations and can serve as a reference state for studies of the impact of climate change on Hawaiian ecosystems. The averaged CBH from CALIPSO in the Hawaiian Region is 890 m. The mean CTH from CALIPSO is 2110 m, which is close to the mean TWIBH from COSMIC. For non-precipitating cases, the mean TWIBH at both Lihue and Hilo is close to 2000 m. For precipitating cases, the mean TWIBH is 2450 m and 2280 m at Hilo and Lihue, respectively. The potential cloud thickness (PCT) is defined as the difference between TWIBH and CBH and the mean PCT is several hundred meters thicker for precipitating than for the non-precipitating cases at both stations. We find that the PCT is more strongly correlated to the TWIBH than the CBH and that precipitation is unlikely to occur if the TWIBH is below 1500 m. The observed rainfall intensity is correlated to the PCT, i.e., thicker clouds are more likely to produce heavy rain.

  15. Titan dune heights retrieval by using Cassini Radar Altimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Poggiali, V.; Seu, R.; Martufi, R.; Notarnicola, C.

    2014-02-01

    The Cassini Radar is a Ku band multimode instrument capable of providing topographic and mapping information. During several of the 93 Titan fly-bys performed by Cassini, the radar collected a large amount of data observing many dune fields in multiple modes such as SAR, Altimeter, Scatterometer and Radiometer. Understanding dune characteristics, such as shape and height, will reveal important clues on Titan's climatic and geological history providing a better understanding of aeolian processes on Earth. Dunes are believed to be sculpted by the action of the wind, weak at the surface but still able to activate the process of sand-sized particle transport. This work aims to estimate dunes height by modeling the shape of the real Cassini Radar Altimeter echoes. Joint processing of SAR/Altimeter data has been adopted to localize the altimeter footprints overlapping dune fields excluding non-dune features. The height of the dunes was estimated by applying Maximum Likelihood Estimation along with a non-coherent electromagnetic (EM) echo model, thus comparing the real averaged waveform with the theoretical curves. Such analysis has been performed over the Fensal dune field observed during the T30 flyby (May 2007). As a result we found that the estimated dunes' peak to trough heights difference was in the order of 60-120 m. Estimation accuracy and robustness of the MLE for different complex scenarios was assessed via radar simulations and Monte-Carlo approach. We simulated dunes-interdunes different composition and roughness for a large set of values verifying that, in the range of possible Titan environment conditions, these two surface parameters have weak effects on our estimates of standard dune heights deviation. Results presented here are the first part of a study that will cover all Titan's sand seas.

  16. A Climatology of Fair-Weather Cloud Statistics at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains Site: Temporal and Spatial Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Long, Charles N.; Gustafson, William I.

    2006-03-30

    In previous work, Berg and Stull (2005) developed a new parameterization for Fair-Weather Cumuli (FWC). Preliminary testing of the new scheme used data collected during a field experiment conducted during the summer of 1996. This campaign included a few research flights conducted over three locations within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. A more comprehensive verification of the new scheme requires a detailed climatology of FWC. Several cloud climatologies have been completed for the ACRF SGP, but these efforts have focused on either broad categories of clouds grouped by height and season (e.g., Lazarus et al. 1999) or height and time of day (e.g., Dong et al. 2005). In these two examples, the low clouds were not separated by the type of cloud, either stratiform or cumuliform, nor were the horizontal chord length (the length of the cloud slice that passed directly overhead) or cloud aspect ratio (defined as the ratio of the cloud thickness to the cloud chord length) reported. Lane et al. (2002) presented distributions of cloud chord length, but only for one year. The work presented here addresses these shortcomings by looking explicitly at cases with FWC over five summers. Specifically, we will address the following questions: •Does the cloud fraction (CF), cloud-base height (CBH), and cloud-top height (CTH) of FWC change with the time of day or the year? •What is the distribution of FWC chord lengths? •Is there a relationship between the cloud chord length and the cloud thickness?

  17. Tropical Stratospheric Cloud climatology from the PATMOS-x dataset - an assessment of convective contributions to stratospheric water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J. K.; Heidinger, A. K.; Foster, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    The PATMOS-x level 2b climatology, generated using three decades of AVHRR measurements, contains valuable information about the past global cloud record. We extract climatologies of tropical deep convective clouds from the PATMOS-x data set, based on the 10.30-11.30 micro meter brightness temperature. A comparison of the cross ropopause convective cloud frequency between ISCCP and PATMOS-x shows that PATMOS-x has a greater frequency of occurrence than does the ISCCP, and this enhanced frequency is attributed to greater horizontal resolution (2 km) in the PATMOS-x data. The high resolution makes this dataset suitable for a search for cross tropopause convection, which happens on length scales down to 1 km. We find there have been several changes in deep convective activity over land during the period 1982 to 2009. We explore specifically the epoch of the HALOE satellite, and find a correlation between land deep convective activity and anomalies in the HALOE stratospheric water retrievals. A simple model is able to predict stratospheric water vapor concentrations highly correlated to that observed using only frequency of deep convection. From this we conclude that deep convection over land contributes to moistening of the lowest tropical stratosphere on seasonal, annual and decadal timescales[1]. [1] GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 38, L18801, 5 PP., 2011 doi:10.1029/2011GL049429

  18. Tropical Stratospheric Cloud climatology from the PATMOS-x dataset - an assessment of convective contributions to stratospheric water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J. K.; Foster, M. J.; Heidinger, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    The PATMOS-x level 2b climatology, generated using three decades of AVHRR measurements, contains valuable information about the past global cloud record. We extract climatologies of tropical deep convective clouds from the PATMOS-x data set, based on the 10.30-11.30 micro meter brightness temperature. A comparison of the cross ropopause convective cloud frequency between ISCCP and PATMOS-x shows that PATMOS-x has a greater frequency of occurrence than does the ISCCP, and this enhanced frequency is attributed to greater horizontal resolution (1 km) in the PATMOS-x data. The high resolution makes this dataset suitable for a search for cross tropopause convection, which happens on length scales down to 1 km. We find there have been several changes in deep convective activity over land during the period 1982 to 2009. We explore specifically the epoch of the HALOE satellite, and find a correlation between land deep convective activity and anomalies in the HALOE stratospheric water retrievals. A simple model is able to predict stratospheric water vapor concentrations highly correlated to that observed using only frequency of deep convection. From this we conclude that deep convection over land contributes to moistening of the lowest tropical stratosphere on seasonal, annual and decadal timescales.

  19. Tropical stratospheric cloud climatology from the PATMOS-x dataset: An assessment of convective contributions to stratospheric water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J. K.; Foster, M.; Heidinger, A.

    2011-09-01

    The PATMOS-x level 2b climatology, generated using three decades of AVHRR measurements, contains valuable information about the past global cloud record. We extract climatologies of tropical deep convective clouds from the PATMOS-x data set, based on the 10.30-11.30 μm brightness temperature. A comparison of the cross tropopause convective cloud frequency between ISCCP and PATMOS-x shows that PATMOS-x has a greater frequency of occurrence than does the ISCCP, and this enhanced frequency is attributed to greater horizontal resolution (2 km) in the PATMOS-x data. The high resolution makes this dataset suitable for a search for cross tropopause convection, which happens on length scales down to 1 km. We find there have been several changes in deep convective activity over land during the period 1982 to 2009. We explore specifically the epoch of the HALOE satellite, and find a correlation between land deep convective activity and anomalies in the HALOE stratospheric water retrievals. A simple model is able to predict stratospheric water vapor concentrations highly correlated to that observed using only frequency of deep convection. From this we conclude that deep convection over land contributes to moistening of the lowest tropical stratosphere on seasonal, annual and decadal timescales.

  20. Predictability of Malaria Transmission Intensity in the Mpumalanga Province, South Africa, Using Land Surface Climatology and Autoregressive Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grass, David; Jasinski, Michael F.; Govere, John

    2003-01-01

    There has been increasing effort in recent years to employ satellite remotely sensed data to identify and map vector habitat and malaria transmission risk in data sparse environments. In the current investigation, available satellite and other land surface climatology data products are employed in short-term forecasting of infection rates in the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa, using a multivariate autoregressive approach. The climatology variables include precipitation, air temperature and other land surface states computed by the Off-line Land-Surface Global Assimilation System (OLGA) including soil moisture and surface evaporation. Satellite data products include the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and other forcing data used in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-1) model. Predictions are compared to long- term monthly records of clinical and microscopic diagnoses. The approach addresses the high degree of short-term autocorrelation in the disease and weather time series. The resulting model is able to predict 11 of the 13 months that were classified as high risk during the validation period, indicating the utility of applying antecedent climatic variables to the prediction of malaria incidence for the Mpumalanga Province.

  1. Assessing scalar concentration footprint climatology and land surface impacts on tall-tower CO2 concentration measurements in the boreal forest of central Saskatchewan, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baozhang; Zhang, Huifang; Coops, Nicholas C.; Fu, Dongjie; Worthy, Douglas E. J.; Xu, Guang; Black, T. Andy

    2014-10-01

    Reducing the large uncertainties in current estimates of CO2 sources and sinks at regional scales (102-105 km2) is fundamental to improving our understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Continuous high-precision CO2 concentration measurements on a tower within the planetary boundary layer contain information on regional carbon fluxes; however, its spatial representativeness is generally unknown. In this study, we developed a footprint model (Simple Analytical Footprint model based on Eulerian coordinates for scalar Concentration [SAFE-C]) and applied it to two CO2 concentration towers in central Canada: the East Trout Lake 106-m-tall tower (54°21'N, 104°59'W) and the Candle Lake 28-m-high tower (53°59'N, 105°07'W). Results show that the ETL tower's annual concentration footprints were around 103-105 km2. The monthly footprint climatologies in summer were 1.5-2 times larger than in winter. The impacts of land surface carbon flux associated with heterogeneous distribution of vegetation types on the CO2 concentration measurements were different for the different heights, varied with a range of ±5 % to ±10 % among four heights. This study indicates that concentration footprint climatology analysis is important in interpreting the seasonal, annual and inter-annual variations of tower measured CO2 concentration data and is essential for comparing and scaling regional carbon flux estimates using top-down or bottom-up approaches.

  2. Recent Trends of the Tropical Hydrological Cycle Inferred from Global Precipitation Climatology Project and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Y. P.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Sud, Y. C.; Betts, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Scores of modeling studies have shown that increasing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere impact the global hydrologic cycle; however, disagreements on regional scales are large, and thus the simulated trends of such impacts, even for regions as large as the tropics, remain uncertain. The present investigation attempts to examine such trends in the observations using satellite data products comprising Global Precipitation Climatology Project precipitation and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project cloud and radiation. Specifically, evolving trends of the tropical hydrological cycle over the last 20-30 years were identified and analyzed. The results show (1) intensification of tropical precipitation in the rising regions of the Walker and Hadley circulations and weakening over the sinking regions of the associated overturning circulation; (2) poleward shift of the subtropical dry zones (up to 2deg/decade in June-July-August (JJA) in the Northern Hemisphere and 0.3-0.7deg/decade in June-July-August and September-October-November in the Southern Hemisphere) consistent with an overall broadening of the Hadley circulation; and (3) significant poleward migration (0.9-1.7deg/decade) of cloud boundaries of Hadley cell and plausible narrowing of the high cloudiness in the Intertropical Convergence Zone region in some seasons. These results support findings of some of the previous studies that showed strengthening of the tropical hydrological cycle and expansion of the Hadley cell that are potentially related to the recent global warming trends.

  3. Spine Height and Disc Height Changes As the Effect of Hyperextension Using Stadiometry and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kourtis, Dimitrios; Magnusson, Marianne L; Smith, Francis; Hadjipavlou, Alex; Pope, Malcolm H

    2004-01-01

    Study Design. In vivo biomechanical design using stadiometry and MRI to measure the height change due to (hyper)extension. Summary of Background Data. Spine height is decreased under loads such as lifting, whole body vibration and sitting. Extension including increased lumbar lordosis reduces the load on the spine. Methods. The aim was to assess the effects of a supine hyperextended posture as a means of restoring the intervertebral disc height after loading and allowing rehydration of the discs. Ten healthy male subjects were tested. A hyperextension intervention was achieved by the means of an inflatable cushion placed under the lumbar spine. The spine height was measured using a stadiometer and MRI was used to assess disc height changes. Results. The spine height gain after 10 minutes of a supine hyperextended posture differed significantly between individuals but everybody gained height. MRI images of the lumbar spine were used to measure the disc height. All but one subjects gained height during the hyperextension. Images of the spine during hyperextended posture showed increased lumbar curve and an increased anterior height of each disc compared with the dimensions of the disc with the spine in neutral posture. Conclusions. All subjects lost height during sitting. Both methods demonstrated a recovery of height due to hyperextension. Hyperextension could be considered as a prophylaxis against the height loss in occupational loading. PMID:15296209

  4. Agreement between Actual Height and Estimated Height Using Segmental Limb Lengths for Individuals with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Haapala, Heidi; Peterson, Mark D.; Daunter, Alecia; Hurvitz, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the agreement between actual height or segmental length, and estimated height from segmental measures among individuals cerebral palsy (CP). Design A convenience sample of 137 children and young adults with CP (age 2–25 years) was recruited from a tertiary care center. Height, body mass, recumbent length, knee height, tibia length and ulna length were measured. Estimated height was calculated using several common prediction equations. Agreement between measured and estimated height was determined using the Bland-Altman method. Results Limits of agreement were wide for all equations, usually in the range of ± 10 cm. Repeatability of the individual measures was high, with a coefficient of variation of 1–2% for all measures. The equation using knee height demonstrated a non-uniform difference where height estimation worsened as overall height increased. Conclusions Accurate measurement of height is important, but very difficult in individuals with CP. Segmental measures are highly repeatable, and thus may be used on their own to monitor growth. However, when an accurate measure of height is needed to monitor nutritional status (i.e. for body mass index calculation), caution is warranted as there is only fair to poor agreement between actual height and estimated height. PMID:25299521

  5. Height and Weight of Children: United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamill, Peter V. V.; And Others

    This report contains national estimates based on findings from the Health Examination Survey in 1963-65 on height and weight measurements of children 6- to 11-years-old. A nationwide probability sample of 7,119 children was selected to represent the noninstitutionalized children (about 24 million) in this age group. Height was obtained in stocking…

  6. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  7. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  8. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  9. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  10. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  11. Genetic analysis of plant height in wheat.

    PubMed

    Halloran, G M

    1974-01-01

    Genetic studies of plant height were made of 8 wheats and the 28 crosses between them using the diallel method of analysis. The inheritance of plant height in a glasshouse-grown F1 diallel set in which vernalization and photoperiodic responses had been removed, indicated close to complete dominance in its expression. A similar F1 set of crosses in the field environment indicated non-allelic interaction in its expression, attributable mainly to the cultivar Chile 1B generally in its crosses with the other 7 wheats. Its removal gave close to complete average dominance in the inheritance of plant height.In the F2 generation in the field its inheritance was again subject to non-allelic interaction, attributed mainly to Chile 1B which, on removal, gave a situation of average partial dominance in height expression.Standardized deviations of Yr and (Wr + Vr) for plant height for the diallels indicated a resonably close association of tallness with dominance and shortness with recessiveness.Frequency distributions of plant height in the F1 and F2 of two crosses from the diallel confirmed certain findings of the diallel analysis.At least two groups of dominant genes were found to influence plant height expression in the crosses of the diallel ; this number must be regarded as a minimal estimate of the number of genes influencing plant height in wheat. PMID:24419549

  12. 30 CFR 56.19036 - Headframe height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Headframe height. 56.19036 Section 56.19036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Headframes and Sheaves § 56.19036 Headframe height. Headframes shall be high enough to provide clearance...

  13. 30 CFR 57.19036 - Headframe height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Headframe height. 57.19036 Section 57.19036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Headframes and Sheaves § 57.19036 Headframe height. Headframes shall be high enough to provide clearance...

  14. 30 CFR 57.19036 - Headframe height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Headframe height. 57.19036 Section 57.19036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Headframes and Sheaves § 57.19036 Headframe height. Headframes shall be high enough to provide clearance...

  15. 27 CFR 9.222 - Naches Heights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Naches Heights. 9.222... Naches Heights. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Naches Heights”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Naches Heights” is a term of viticultural significance....

  16. 30 CFR 56.19036 - Headframe height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Headframe height. 56.19036 Section 56.19036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Headframes and Sheaves § 56.19036 Headframe height. Headframes shall be high enough to provide clearance...

  17. 30 CFR 56.19036 - Headframe height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Headframe height. 56.19036 Section 56.19036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Headframes and Sheaves § 56.19036 Headframe height. Headframes shall be high enough to provide clearance...

  18. 30 CFR 56.19036 - Headframe height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Headframe height. 56.19036 Section 56.19036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Headframes and Sheaves § 56.19036 Headframe height. Headframes shall be high enough to provide clearance...

  19. 27 CFR 9.222 - Naches Heights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Naches Heights. 9.222... Naches Heights. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Naches Heights”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Naches Heights” is a term of viticultural significance....

  20. 30 CFR 57.19036 - Headframe height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Headframe height. 57.19036 Section 57.19036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Headframes and Sheaves § 57.19036 Headframe height. Headframes shall be high enough to provide clearance...

  1. 30 CFR 57.19036 - Headframe height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Headframe height. 57.19036 Section 57.19036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Headframes and Sheaves § 57.19036 Headframe height. Headframes shall be high enough to provide clearance...

  2. 30 CFR 57.19036 - Headframe height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Headframe height. 57.19036 Section 57.19036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Headframes and Sheaves § 57.19036 Headframe height. Headframes shall be high enough to provide clearance...

  3. 30 CFR 56.19036 - Headframe height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Headframe height. 56.19036 Section 56.19036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Headframes and Sheaves § 56.19036 Headframe height. Headframes shall be high enough to provide clearance...

  4. 27 CFR 9.222 - Naches Heights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Naches Heights. 9.222... Naches Heights. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Naches Heights”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Naches Heights” is a term of viticultural significance....

  5. A Total Ozone Dependent Ozone Profile Climatology Based on Ozone-Sondes and Aura MLS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labow, G. J.; McPeters, R. D.; Ziemke, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    A new total ozone-based ozone profile climatology has been created for use in satellite and/or ground based ozone retrievals. This climatology was formed by combining data from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) with data from balloon sondes and binned by zone and total ozone. Because profile shape varies with total column ozone, this climatology better captures the ozone variations than the previously used seasonal climatologies, especially near the tropopause. This is significantly different than ozone climatologies used in the past as there is no time component. The MLS instrument on Aura has excellent latitude coverage and measures ozone profiles daily from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere at ~3.5 km resolution. Almost a million individual MLS ozone measurements are merged with data from over 55,000 ozonesondes which are then binned as a function of total ozone. The climatology consists of average ozone profiles as a function of total ozone for six 30 degree latitude bands covering altitudes from 0-75 km (in Z* pressure altitude coordinates). This new climatology better represents the profile shape as a function of total ozone than previous climatologies and shows some remarkable and somewhat unexpected correlations between total ozone and ozone in the lower altitudes, particularly in the lower and middle troposphere. These data can also be used to infer biases and errors in either the MLS retrievals or ozone sondes.

  6. Development of an operational global ocean climatology through the use of remotely sensed sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.M.

    1995-05-09

    Monthly mean satellite-derived sea surface temperature SST data have been derived globally using daytime and nighttime AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) multi-channel data. From a 12 year data set (1982-1993), valid monthly daytime and nighttime climatologies were created using an eight year subset (1984-1990, 1993). Based on buoy comparisons, four years were omitted due to volcanic aerosol corruption (El Chichon 1982/83, Mt. Pinatubo 1991/92). These resulting monthly climatologies provide SST fields at approximately 1/3rd degree latitude/longitude resolution. Difference fields have been created comparing the new satellite climatology with the older and coarser-resolution climatology constructed from conventional SST data. Regional and zonal climatology differences were also created to highlight the deficiencies, especially in the Southern Hemisphere, in the older climatology believed to result primarily from a lack of buoy/ship (in situ) data. Such comparisons made it clear that the satellite climatology provided a much better product. Ocean current systems, El Nino, La Nina, and other water mass characteristics all appear with better detail and accuracy within the high-resolution satellite climatology.

  7. Beyond the "Textbook ABL": Numerical Simulations and Experimental Implications of Baroclinicity and Unsteadiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bou-Zeid, E.; Momen, M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and predicting the flow of air, and how it transports heat and trace gases, in the atmospheric boundary layer are increasingly becoming critical to a wide range of applications including wind and solar energy, urban design, agriculture, and assessment of climate change impacts and adaptations. These applications all require a level of sophistication and detail in our ability to probe and model the ABL and its interaction with the earth surface that manifestly exceeds our current capabilities. Previous work largely focused on the "textbook ABL", which is barotropic, in (quasi) steady-state, and interacts with a horizontal and homogeneous earth surface; it is evident that the "real-world ABL", even over flat terrain, rarely meets these simplifying conditions. In this talk we overview two complicating features that have been largely overlooked thus far despite their ubiquity: baroclinicity and unsteadiness. Large-eddy simulations of ABL flow with a time-varying (unsteady) or height-varying (baroclinic) pressure forcings are analyzed to understand how they modulate the bulk structure (mean fields) and turbulence (higher order moments). Our results indicate that for the unsteady ABL, the dynamics are primarily controlled by the relative magnitudes of three times scales: the inertial time scale (~ 12 hours in mid latitude), the turbulent time scale (~ 0.5 hours), and the forcing variability time scale (varies depending on meso and synoptic scale dynamics). For the baroclinic simulations, the strength and more importantly the direction of the baroclinicity can result in profiles that are vastly different from the classic barotropic case, with for example peaks in the turbulent kinetic energy that are in the middle of the layer. Both features also results in first and second order moments that, if interpreted to results from a steady barotropic case, can be highly misleading when experimental results are analyzed.

  8. Crop height determination with UAS point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenzdörffer, G. J.

    2014-11-01

    The accurate determination of the height of agricultural crops helps to predict yield, biomass etc. These relationships are of great importance not only for crop production but also in grassland management, because the available biomass and food quality are valuable information. However there is no cost efficient and automatic system for the determination of the crop height available. 3D-point clouds generated from high resolution UAS imagery offer a new alternative. Two different approaches for crop height determination are presented. The "difference method" were the canopy height is determined by taking the difference between a current UAS-surface model and an existing digital terrain model (DTM) is the most suited and most accurate method. In situ measurements, vegetation indices and yield observations correlate well with the determined UAS crop heights.

  9. Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ferrare, Richard

    2012-12-14

    Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have been computed using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and AERI measurements. Raman lidar measurements of the rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen are used to derive vertical profiles of potential temperature. AERI measurements of downwelling radiance are used in a physical retrieval approach (Smith et al. 1999, Feltz et al. 1998) to derive profiles of temperature and water vapor. The Raman lidar and AERI potential temperature profiles are merged to create a single potential temperature profile for computing PBL heights. PBL heights were derived from these merged potential temperature profiles using a modified Heffter (1980) technique that was tailored to the SGP site (Della Monache et al., 2004). PBL heights were computed on an hourly basis for the period January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2011. These heights are provided as meters above ground level.

  10. Intralocus sexual conflict over human height

    PubMed Central

    Stulp, Gert; Kuijper, Bram; Buunk, Abraham P.; Pollet, Thomas V.; Verhulst, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Intralocus sexual conflict (IASC) occurs when a trait under selection in one sex constrains the other sex from achieving its sex-specific fitness optimum. Selection pressures on body size often differ between the sexes across many species, including humans: among men individuals of average height enjoy the highest reproductive success, while shorter women have the highest reproductive success. Given its high heritability, IASC over human height is likely. Using data from sibling pairs from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, we present evidence for IASC over height: in shorter sibling pairs (relatively) more reproductive success (number of children) was obtained through the sister than through the brother of the sibling pair. By contrast, in average height sibling pairs most reproductive success was obtained through the brother relative to the sister. In conclusion, we show that IASC over a heritable, sexually dimorphic physical trait (human height) affects Darwinian fitness in a contemporary human population. PMID:22875819

  11. Annual Climatology of the Diurnal Cycle on the Canadian Prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Alan; Tawfik, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    We show the annual climatology of the diurnal cycle, stratified by opaque cloud, using the full hourly resolution of the Canadian Prairie data. The opaque cloud field itself has distinct cold and warm season diurnal climatologies; with a near-sunrise peak of cloud in the cold season and an early afternoon peak in the warm season. There are two primary climate states on the Canadian Prairies, separated by the freezing point of water, because a reflective surface snow cover acts as a climate switch. Both cold and warm season climatologies can be seen in the transition months of November, March and April with a large difference in mean temperature. In the cold season with snow, the diurnal ranges of temperature and relative humidity increase quasi-linearly with decreasing cloud, and increase from December to March with increased solar forcing. The warm season months, April to September, show a homogeneous coupling to the cloud cover, and a diurnal cycle of temperature and humidity that depends only on net longwave. Our improved representation of the diurnal cycle shows that the warm season coupling between diurnal temperature range and net longwave is weakly quadratic through the origin, rather than the linear coupling shown in earlier papers. We calculate the conceptually important 24-h imbalances of temperature and relative humidity (and other thermodynamic variables) as a function of opaque cloud cover. In the warm season under nearly clear skies, there is a warming of +2oC and a drying of -6% over the 24-h cycle, which is about 12% of their diurnal ranges. We summarize results on conserved variable diagrams and explore the impact of surface windspeed on the diurnal cycle in the cold and warm seasons. In all months, the fall in minimum temperature is reduced with increasing windspeed, which reduces the diurnal temperature range. In July and August, there is an increase of afternoon maximum temperature and humidity at low windspeeds, and a corresponding rise in

  12. C-Abl as a modulator of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Levav-Cohen, Yaara; Goldberg, Zehavit; Zuckerman, Valentina; Grossman, Tamar; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal . E-mail: haupt@md.huji.ac.il

    2005-06-10

    P53 is renowned as a cellular tumor suppressor poised to instigate remedial responses to various stress insults that threaten DNA integrity. P53 levels and activities are kept under tight regulation involving a complex network of activators and inhibitors, which determine the type and extent of p53 growth inhibitory signaling. Within this complexity, the p53-Mdm2 negative auto-regulatory loop serves as a major route through which intra- and extra-cellular stress signals are channeled to appropriate p53 responses. Mdm2 inhibits p53 transcriptional activities and through its E3 ligase activity promotes p53 proteasomal degradation either within the nucleus or following nuclear export. Upon exposure to stress signals these actions of Mdm2 have to be moderated, or even interrupted, in order to allow sufficient p53 to accumulate in an active form. Multiple mechanisms involving a variety of factors have been demonstrated to mediate this interruption. C-Abl is a critical factor that under physiological conditions is required for the maximal and efficient accumulation of active p53 in response to DNA damage. C-Abl protects p53 by antagonizing the inhibitory effect of Mdm2, an action that requires a direct interplay between c-Abl and Mdm2. In addition, c-Abl protects p53 from other inhibitors of p53, such as the HPV-E6/E6AP complex, that inhibits and degrades p53 in HPV-infected cells. Surprisingly, the oncogenic form of c-Abl, the Bcr-Abl fusion protein in CML cells, also promotes the accumulation of wt p53. However, in contrast to the activation of p53 by c-Abl, its oncogenic form, Bcr-Abl, counteracts the growth inhibitory activities of p53 by modulating the p53-Mdm2 loop. Thus, it appears that by modulating the p53-Mdm2 loop, c-Abl and its oncogenic forms critically determine the type and extent of the cellular response to DNA damage.

  13. Organic acids and selected nitrogen species for ABLE-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) executed airborne science missions aboard the NASA Wallops Electra (NA429) in the North American high latitude (greater than 45 deg North) atmosphere during Jul. to Aug. 1988 and Jul. to Aug. 1990. These missions were part of GTE's Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE). The 1988 mission , ABLE-3A, examined the ecosystems of Alaska as a source and/or sink for important tropospheric gases and particles, and gained new information on the chemical composition of the Arctic atmosphere during the summertime. During 1990 the second high latitude mission, ABLE-3B, focused on the Hudson Bay Lowland and Labrador regions of Canada. Both of these missions provided benchmark data sets on atmosphere biosphere exchange and atmospheric chemistry over largely uninhabited regions of North America. In support of the GTE/ABLE-3A and -3B field missions, the University of New Hampshire flew instrumentation aboard the Wallops Electra research aircraft to provide measurements of the trace gases nitric (HNO3), formic (HCOOH), and acetic (CH3COOH) acid. In addition, measurements were conducted to determine the major water soluble ionic composition of the atmospheric aerosol. For ABLE-3B, groundbased measurements of the acidic trace gases were also performed from the NASA micrometerological tower situated at Schefferville, Laborador. These measurements were aimed at assessing dry deposition of acidic gases to the taiga ecosystem in the Laborador region of Canada.

  14. Introducing the advanced burn life support (ABLS) course in Italy.

    PubMed

    D'Asta, F; Homsi, J; Clark, P; Buffalo, M C; Melandri, D; Carboni, A; Pinzauti, E; Graziano, A; Masellis, A; Bussolin, L; Messineo, A

    2014-05-01

    Systematic education based on internationally standardized programs is a well-established practice in Italy, especially in the emergency health care system. However, until recently, a specific program to treat burns was not available to guide emergency physicians, nurses, or volunteers acting as first responders. In 2010, two national faculty members, acting as ABA observers, and one Italian course coordinator, trained and certified in the United States, conducted a week-long training program which fully certified 10 Italian instructors. Authorized ABLS provider courses were conducted in Italy between 2010 and 2012, including one organized prior to the 20th annual meeting of the Italian Society of Burns (SIUst). In order to increase the effectiveness and diffusion of the course in Italy, changes were approved by the ABA to accommodate societal differences, including the translation of the manual into Italian. The ABA has also approved the creation and publication of a bilingual ABLS Italian website for the purpose of promoting the ABLS course in Italy. In response to high demand, a second ABLS Instructor course was organized in 2012 and has been attended by physicians and nurses from several Italian burn centers. In the following discourse the experiences of the first 15 Italian ABLS courses will be discussed. PMID:23992873

  15. Comparison of Aerosol Properties within and above the ABL at the ARM Program's SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Monache, L.D.; Perry, K.D.; Cederwall, R.T.

    2002-02-26

    The goal of this study was to determine under what conditions, if any, measurements of aerosol properties made at the Earth's surface are representative of the aerosol properties within the column of air above the surface. This project used data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site (Stokes and Schwartz 1994), which is one of the only locations in the world where ground-based and in situ airborne measurements of atmospheric aerosol are made on a routine basis. All flight legs in the one-year period from March 2000 to March 2001 were categorized as either within or above the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) using an objective mixing height determination technique. The correlations between the aerosol properties measured at the surface and those measured within and above the ABL were then computed. The conclusion of this comparison is that the aerosol extensive properties (those that depend upon the amount of aerosol that is present in the atmosphere, i.e., either the number or mass concentrations), and intensive properties (those that do not depend upon the amount of aerosol present) measured at the surface are representative of values within the ABL, but not within the free atmosphere.

  16. Climatology and Predictability of Cool-Season High Wind Events in the New York City Metropolitan and Surrounding Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layer, Michael

    Damaging wind events not associated with severe convective storms or tropical cyclones can occur over the Northeast U.S. during the cool season and can cause significant problems with transportation, infrastructure, and public safety. These non-convective wind events (NCWEs) events are difficult for operational forecasters to predict in the NYC region as revealed by relatively poor verification statistics in recent years. This study investigates the climatology of NCWEs occurring between 15 September and 15 May over 13 seasons from 2000-2001 through 2012-2013. The events are broken down into three distinct types commonly observed in the region: pre-cold frontal (PRF), post-cold frontal (POF), and nor'easter/coastal storm (NEC) cases. Relationships between observed winds and some atmospheric parameters such as 900 hPa height gradient, 3-hour MSLP tendency, low-level wind profile, and stability are also studied. Overall, PRF and NEC events exhibit stronger height gradients, stronger low-level winds, and stronger low-level stability than POF events. Model verification is also conducted over the 2009-2014 time period using the Short Range Ensemble Forecast system (SREF) from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). Both deterministic and probabilistic verification metrics are used to evaluate the performance of the ensemble during NCWEs. Although the SREF has better forecast skill than most of the deterministic SREF control members, it is rather poorly calibrated, and exhibits a significant overforecasting, or positive wind speed bias in the lower atmosphere.

  17. Variability of Atmospheric Boundary Layer height over the tropical oceans - A study using atmospheric refractivity profiles from multi campaign in-situ and satellite radio occultation data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosh, M.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) over the tropical oceans controls and regulates the influx of water vapour into the free atmosphere due to evaporation. The availability of in situ data for determining the ABL characteristics over tropical oceans are limited to different ship based campaigns and hence restricted in spatial and temporal coverage. For ABL studies the Radio Occultation (RO) based satellite data over tropical oceans have good temporal and spatial coverage but limited in temporal and spatial resolution. Atmospheric refractivity profiles are extensively used in many studies to determine the ABL height from both platforms. The present study attempts to use the advantages in both in-situ and satellite (RO) based data to quantify the variability in the ABL height over the tropical oceans. All studies done so far to identify the ABL height from RO derived refractivity profiles rely extensively on the detection of the minimum refractivity gradient (MRG) below ~6 km along with additional threshold criteria. This leads to an over estimation of ABL heights especially in presence of strong subsidence inversion caused by local/ mesoscale/ synoptic scale processes where the MRG lies significantly above the ABL. The present study attempts to quantify this over estimation using atmospheric refractivity profiles derived from thermo-dynamical parameters from radiosonde ascents over the tropical ocean, suggests an improved method of ABL detection and quantifies the variability so deduced. Over 1000 radiosonde ascents from four ship cruises conducted during DYNAMO 2011 field campaign over the tropical Indian Ocean are used for the purpose. ABL heights determined from radiosonde data using traditional methods (using virtual potential temperature and specific humidity) are compared with those identified from simulated atmospheric refractivity profiles from same data (using prevalent methods for RO) to quantify the over estimation. A new method of ABL detection from

  18. The Climatology of Extreme Rainfall in the Eastern US (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Baeck, M. L.; Yeung, J. K.; Villarini, G.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that flood peak distributions in the eastern US can be represented through mixtures of flood generating mechanisms, including landfalling tropical cyclones, extratropical cyclones and organized convective systems. The eastern US is a complex setting for examining rainfall climatology, with land-ocean boundaries, mountainous terrain and the urban megalopolis all playing important roles in controlling rainfall distribution. In this study we examine the dynamics of extreme rainfall in the eastern US through a combination of observational analyses and numerical modeling studies. Observational analyses utilize long records of high-resolution rainfall fields from the Hydro-NEXRAD system. We also utilize observational resources from the Princeton environmental sensor network, including a network of rain gages and disdrometer, to examine rainfall microstructure. Numerical model studies are based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. In addition to rainfall microstructure, analyses focus on spatial heterogeneities of rainfall associated with land surface processes and the diurnal cycle of warm season rainfall.

  19. Aerosol optical properties of the free troposphere: Tropospheric backscatter climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, James M.

    1994-12-01

    A unique ensemble of aerosol sensors (backscattersondes, nephelometers and particle counters) has been assembled during the course of this research to obtain new measurements relating to the optical properties of aerosols in the atmosphere, especially in the free troposphere. A knowledge of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio has been greatly enhanced as a result of this project and the inference of representative values along with the range of variation is now possible. Agreement between the optical model results and actual measurements appears to be quite satisfactory. An initial climatology of aerosol backscatter in the free troposphere has been developed and is in general agreement with results and inferences from global remote sensing instruments. However, the data from remote sensors may indicate a larger influence of volcanic aerosols on the upper troposphere than actually exists. Further work with high resolution soundings is needed to fully resolve this issue.

  20. The Mars Geoscience/Climatology Orbiter 1990 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, G. D.; Stuart, J. R.; Palluconi, F. D.; Blume, W. H.; Erickson, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    The fundamental objectives of the Mars Geoscience/Climatology Orbiter (MGCO) 1990 mission are related to the determination of the surface composition and topography of the planet Mars, its gravitational and intrinsic magnetic fields, and the seasonal behavior of volatiles, dust, and the atmosphere of Mars. These objectives would be achieved through a global mapping of the planet over a Martian year. For the baseline mission, a single spacecraft would be launched in August 1990, arrive at Mars in August 1991, and map the planet from a Sun-synchronous, near-circular, polar orbit for one Martian year. Attention is given to a science rationale and objectives, a mission description, the flight system, and mission operations.

  1. The Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) - in situ observation based precipitation climatology on regional and global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, T.; Schneider, U.; Rudolf, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC, http://gpcc.dwd.de) provides global monthly precipitation analyses for monitoring and research of the earth's climate. The centre is a German contribution to the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), to the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS), and to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). It contributes to water resources assessments, flood and drought monitoring, climate variability and trend analyses. GPCC published in year 2008 a new global precipitation climatology as well as a reanalysis of its full data base for all months of the period 1901-2007. The GPCC data base comprises monthly precipitation totals from more than 70 000 different stations in the world. It produces gridded data sets of monthly precipitation on the earth's land surface derived from raingauge based observation data. Intensive quality control of observation data and station metadata ensures a high analysis quality. The different GPCC products are adjusted to different user needs. It routinely produces 2 near real-time precipitation monitoring products. Its 2 non real-time products are updated at irregular time intervals after significant updates of its observation station database. All GPCC products can be visualised and accessed free of charge via Internet from http://gpcc.dwd.de. The GPCC First Guess Product of the monthly precipitation anomaly is based on synoptic weather reports (SYNOP) from about 6,300 stations worldwide received near real-time via the WMO Global Telecommunication System (GTS). The product is available within 5 days after end of an observation month. Main application purpose is near real-time drought monitoring. The product uses since mid 2008 the new GPCC monthly precipitation climatology as analysis background. Spatial product resolution: 1.0° and 2.5°. The GPCC Monitoring Product of monthly precipitation is based on SYNOP and monthly CLIMAT reports received near real-time via GTS from about

  2. Reproductive fitness advantage of BCR-ABL expressing leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Traulsen, Arne; Pacheco, Jorge M; Dingli, David

    2010-08-01

    Mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes confer a fitness advantage to cells that can lead to cancer. The tumor phenotype normally results from the interaction of many mutant genes making it difficult to estimate the fitness advantage provided by any oncogene, except when tumors depend on one oncogene only. We utilize a model of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), to quantitate the fitness advantage conferred by expression of BCR-ABL in hematopoietic cells from in vivo patient data. We show that BCR-ABL expression provides a high fitness advantage, which explains why this single mutation drives the chronic phase of CML. PMID:20153920

  3. Analysis of the global ISCCP TOVS water vapor climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittmeyer, Ian L.; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.

    1994-01-01

    A climatological examination of the global water vapor field based on a multiyear period of successfull satellite-based observations is presented. Results from the multiyear global ISCCP TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) water vapor dataset as operationally produced by NESDIS and ISCCP are shown. The methods employed for the retrieval of precipitable water content (PWC) utilize infrared measurements collected by the TOVS instrument package flown aboard the NOAA series of operational polar-orbiting satellites. Strengths of this dataset include the nearly global daily coverage, availability for a multiyear period, operational internal quality checks, and its description of important features in the mean state of the atmosphere. Weaknesses of this PWC dataset include that the infrared sensors are unable to collect data in cloudy regions, the retrievals are strongly biased toward a land-based radiosonde first-guess dataset, and the description of high spatial and temporal variability is inadequate. Primary consequences of these factors are seen in the underestimation of ITCZ water vapor maxima, and underestimation of midlatitude water vapor mean and standard deviation values where transient atmospheric phenomena contribute significantly toward time means. A comparison of TOVS analyses to SSM/I data over ocean for the month of July 1988 shows fair agreement in the magnitude and distribution of the monthly mean values, but the TOVS fields exhibit much less temporal and spatial variability on a daily basis in comparison to the SSM/I analyses. The emphasis of this paper is on the presentation and documentation of an early satellite-based water vapor climatology, and description of factors that prevent a more accurate representation of the global water vapor field.

  4. Climatology and Characteristics of Aerosol Optical Properties in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, Lauren; Ogren, John; Backman, John; Asmi, Eija; Andrews, Elisabeth; Jefferson, Anne; Bergin, Michael; Tunved, Peter; Sharma, Sangeeta; Starkweather, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    Within the Arctic, climate forcers like atmospheric aerosols are important contributors to the observed warming and environmental changes in the region. Quantifying the forcing by aerosols in the Arctic is especially difficult, given short aerosol lifetimes, annual variability in illumination and surface albedo, stratified atmospheric conditions, complex feedbacks, and long-range aerosol transport. However, in-situ surface measurements of Arctic aerosol optical properties can be used to constrain variability of light scattering and absorption, identify potential particle sources, and help evaluate the resulting forcing. Data from six WMO Global Atmosphere Watch stations are presented: Alert, Canada (ALT); Barrow, Alaska (BRW); Pallas, Finland (PAL); Summit, Greenland (SUM); Tiksi, Russia (TIK); and Zeppelin Mountain, Norway (ZEP). These sites contribute to the International Arctic System for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA), which facilitates Arctic-wide data collection and analysis. Climatologies of aerosol optical properties from each station show differences in magnitude and variability of observed parameters. For example, most stations (ALT, BRW, SUM, TIK, ZEP) experience maximum scattering in winter/spring, while PAL exhibits maximum scattering in the summer. The observed range in scattering across these sites is large (almost an order of magnitude) - SUM has the lowest annual median scattering at 0.82 Mm-1 while BRW has the highest at 6.9 Mm-1. A closer look at systematic variability between optical properties at each station, as well as site back trajectories, suggest differences in aerosol processes, sources and transport. The development of consistent climatologies and additional analyses like the ones presented here can help provide a better understanding of trans-Arctic aerosol variability, which can be an asset for improving aerosol models in this unique and remote region.

  5. Eight-year climatology of dust optical depth on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montabone, L.; Forget, F.; Millour, E.; Wilson, R. J.; Lewis, S. R.; Cantor, B.; Kass, D.; Kleinböhl, A.; Lemmon, M. T.; Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    We have produced a multiannual climatology of airborne dust from martian year 24-31 using multiple datasets of retrieved or estimated column optical depths. The datasets are based on observations of the martian atmosphere from April 1999 to July 2013 made by different orbiting instruments: the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard Mars Global Surveyor, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) aboard Mars Odyssey, and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The procedure we have adopted consists of gridding the available retrievals of column dust optical depth (CDOD) from TES and THEMIS nadir observations, as well as the estimates of this quantity from MCS limb observations. Our gridding method calculates averages and uncertainties on a regularly spaced spatio-temporal grid, using an iterative procedure that is weighted in space, time, and retrieval quality. The lack of observations at certain times and locations introduces missing grid points in the maps, which therefore may result in irregularly gridded (i.e. incomplete) fields. In order to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the resulting gridded maps, we compare with independent observations of CDOD by PanCam cameras and Mini-TES spectrometers aboard the Mars Exploration Rovers "Spirit" and "Opportunity", by the Surface Stereo Imager aboard the Phoenix lander, and by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars aboard MRO. We have statistically analyzed the irregularly gridded maps to provide an overview of the dust climatology on Mars over eight years, specifically in relation to its interseasonal and interannual variability, in addition to provide a basis for instrument intercomparison. Finally, we have produced regularly gridded maps of CDOD by spatially interpolating the irregularly gridded maps using a kriging method. These complete maps are used as dust scenarios in the Mars Climate Database (MCD) version 5, and are useful in many modeling

  6. The Interfaces Between Historical, Paleo-, and Modern Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Historical climatology, commonly defined as the study of reconstructing past climates from documentary and early instrumental data, has routinely utilized data within the last several hundred years down to sub-daily temporal resolution prior to the advent of "modern" instrumental records beginning in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Historical climate reconstruction methods generally share similar aspects conducted in both paleoclimate reconstruction and modern climatology, given the need to quantify, calibrate, and conduct careful data quality assessments. Although some studies have integrated historical climatic studies with other high resolution paleoclimatic proxies, very few efforts have integrated historical data with modern "systematic" climate networks to further examine spatial and temporal patterns of climate variability. This presentation describes historical climate examples of how such data can be integrated within modern climate timescales, including examples of documentary data on tropical cyclones from the Western Pacific and Atlantic Basins, colonial records from Belize and Constantinople, ship logbooks in the Western Arctic, plantation diaries from the American Southeast, and newspaper data from the Fiji Islands and Bermuda. Some results include a unique wet period in Belize and active tropical cyclone periods in the Western and South Pacific in the early 20th century - both are not reflected in conventional modern climate datasets. Documentary data examples demonstrate high feasibility in further understanding extreme weather events at daily timeframes such as false spring/killing frost episodes and hydrological extremes in southeastern North America. Recent unique efforts also involve community participation, secondary education, and web- based volunteer efforts to digitize and archive historical weather and climate information.

  7. Quantifying climatological ranges and anomalies for Pacific coral reef ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Gove, Jamison M; Williams, Gareth J; McManus, Margaret A; Heron, Scott F; Sandin, Stuart A; Vetter, Oliver J; Foley, David G

    2013-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are exposed to a range of environmental forcings that vary on daily to decadal time scales and across spatial scales spanning from reefs to archipelagos. Environmental variability is a major determinant of reef ecosystem structure and function, including coral reef extent and growth rates, and the abundance, diversity, and morphology of reef organisms. Proper characterization of environmental forcings on coral reef ecosystems is critical if we are to understand the dynamics and implications of abiotic-biotic interactions on reef ecosystems. This study combines high-resolution bathymetric information with remotely sensed sea surface temperature, chlorophyll-a and irradiance data, and modeled wave data to quantify environmental forcings on coral reefs. We present a methodological approach to develop spatially constrained, island- and atoll-scale metrics that quantify climatological range limits and anomalous environmental forcings across U.S. Pacific coral reef ecosystems. Our results indicate considerable spatial heterogeneity in climatological ranges and anomalies across 41 islands and atolls, with emergent spatial patterns specific to each environmental forcing. For example, wave energy was greatest at northern latitudes and generally decreased with latitude. In contrast, chlorophyll-a was greatest at reef ecosystems proximate to the equator and northern-most locations, showing little synchrony with latitude. In addition, we find that the reef ecosystems with the highest chlorophyll-a concentrations; Jarvis, Howland, Baker, Palmyra and Kingman are each uninhabited and are characterized by high hard coral cover and large numbers of predatory fishes. Finally, we find that scaling environmental data to the spatial footprint of individual islands and atolls is more likely to capture local environmental forcings, as chlorophyll-a concentrations decreased at relatively short distances (>7 km) from 85% of our study locations. These metrics will help

  8. Lightning climatology in the Congo Basin: detailed analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soula, Serge; Kigotsi, Jean; Georgis, Jean-François; Barthe, Christelle

    2016-04-01

    The lightning climatology of the Congo Basin including several countries of Central Africa is analyzed in detail for the first time. It is based on World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) data for the period from 2005 to 2013. A comparison of these data with the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) data for the same period shows the WWLLN detection efficiency (DE) in the region increases from about 1.70 % in the beginning of the period to 5.90 % in 2013, relative to LIS data, but not uniformly over the whole 2750 km × 2750 km area. Both the annual flash density and the number of stormy days show sharp maximum values localized in eastern of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and west of Kivu Lake, regardless of the reference year and the period of the year. These maxima reach 12.86 fl km-2 and 189 days, respectively, in 2013, and correspond with a very active region located at the rear of the Virunga mountain range characterised with summits that can reach 3000 m. The presence of this range plays a role in the thunderstorm development along the year. The estimation of this local maximum of the lightning density by taking into account the DE, leads to a value consistent with that of the global climatology by Christian et al. (2003) and other authors. Thus, a mean maximum value of about 157 fl km-2 y-1 is found for the annual lightning density. The zonal distribution of the lightning flashes exhibits a maximum between 1°S and 2°S and about 56 % of the flashes located below the equator in the 10°S - 10°N interval. The diurnal evolution of the flash rate has a maximum between 1400 and 1700 UTC, according to the reference year, in agreement with previous works in other regions of the world.

  9. Quantifying Climatological Ranges and Anomalies for Pacific Coral Reef Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Gove, Jamison M.; Williams, Gareth J.; McManus, Margaret A.; Heron, Scott F.; Sandin, Stuart A.; Vetter, Oliver J.; Foley, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are exposed to a range of environmental forcings that vary on daily to decadal time scales and across spatial scales spanning from reefs to archipelagos. Environmental variability is a major determinant of reef ecosystem structure and function, including coral reef extent and growth rates, and the abundance, diversity, and morphology of reef organisms. Proper characterization of environmental forcings on coral reef ecosystems is critical if we are to understand the dynamics and implications of abiotic–biotic interactions on reef ecosystems. This study combines high-resolution bathymetric information with remotely sensed sea surface temperature, chlorophyll-a and irradiance data, and modeled wave data to quantify environmental forcings on coral reefs. We present a methodological approach to develop spatially constrained, island- and atoll-scale metrics that quantify climatological range limits and anomalous environmental forcings across U.S. Pacific coral reef ecosystems. Our results indicate considerable spatial heterogeneity in climatological ranges and anomalies across 41 islands and atolls, with emergent spatial patterns specific to each environmental forcing. For example, wave energy was greatest at northern latitudes and generally decreased with latitude. In contrast, chlorophyll-a was greatest at reef ecosystems proximate to the equator and northern-most locations, showing little synchrony with latitude. In addition, we find that the reef ecosystems with the highest chlorophyll-a concentrations; Jarvis, Howland, Baker, Palmyra and Kingman are each uninhabited and are characterized by high hard coral cover and large numbers of predatory fishes. Finally, we find that scaling environmental data to the spatial footprint of individual islands and atolls is more likely to capture local environmental forcings, as chlorophyll-a concentrations decreased at relatively short distances (>7 km) from 85% of our study locations. These metrics will

  10. Application and Limitations of GPS Radio Occultation (GPS-RO) Data for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height Detection over the Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeshan, M.; Wu, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Due to recent changes in the Arctic environment, it is important to monitor the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) properties over the Arctic Ocean, especially to explore the variability in ABL clouds (such as sensitivity and feedback to sea ice loss). For example, radiosonde and satellite observations of the Arctic ABL height (and low-cloud cover) have recently suggested a positive response to sea ice loss during October that may not occur during the melt season (June-September). Owing to its high vertical and spatiotemporal resolution, an independent ABL height detection algorithm using GPS Radio Occultation (GPS-RO) refractivity in the Arctic is explored. Similar GPS-RO algorithms developed previously typically define the level of the most negative moisture gradient as the ABL height. This definition is favorable for subtropical oceans where a stratocumulus-topped ABL is often capped by a layer of sharp moisture lapse rate (coincident with the temperature inversion). The Arctic Ocean is also characterized by stratocumulus cloud cover, however, the specific humidity does not frequently decrease in the ABL capping inversion. The use of GPS-RO refractivity for ABL height retrieval therefore becomes more complex. During winter months (December-February), when the total precipitable water in the troposphere is a minimum, a fairly straightforward algorithm for ABL height retrieval is developed. The applicability and limitations of this method for other seasons (Spring, Summer, Fall) is determined. The seasonal, interannual and spatial variability in the GPS-derived ABL height over the Arctic Ocean, as well as its relation to the underlying surface (ice vs. water), is investigated. The GPS-RO profiles are also explored for the evidence of low-level moisture transport in the cold Arctic environment.

  11. Hierarchical control of ride height system for electronically controlled air suspension based on variable structure and fuzzy control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xing; Zhou, Kongkang; Zou, Nannan; Jiang, Hong; Cui, Xiaoli

    2015-09-01

    The current research of air suspension mainly focuses on the characteristics and design of the air spring. In fact, electronically controlled air suspension (ECAS) has excellent performance in flexible height adjustment during different driving conditions. However, the nonlinearity of the ride height adjusting system and the uneven distribution of payload affect the control accuracy of ride height and the body attitude. Firstly, the three-point measurement system of three height sensors is used to establish the mathematical model of the ride height adjusting system. The decentralized control of ride height and the centralized control of body attitude are presented to design the ride height control system for ECAS. The exact feedback linearization method is adopted for the nonlinear mathematical model of the ride height system. Secondly, according to the hierarchical control theory, the variable structure control (VSC) technique is used to design a controller that is able to adjust the ride height for the quarter-vehicle anywhere, and each quarter-vehicle height control system is independent. Meanwhile, the three-point height signals obtained by three height sensors are tracked to calculate the body pitch and roll attitude over time, and then by calculating the deviation of pitch and roll and its rates, the height control correction is reassigned based on the fuzzy algorithm. Finally, to verify the effectiveness and performance of the proposed combined control strategy, a validating test of ride height control system with and without road disturbance is carried out. Testing results show that the height adjusting time of both lifting and lowering is over 5 s, and the pitch angle and the roll angle of body attitude are less than 0.15°. This research proposes a hierarchical control method that can guarantee the attitude stability, as well as satisfy the ride height tracking system.

  12. ALMA telescope reaches new heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    of the Array Operations Site. This means surviving strong winds and temperatures between +20 and -20 Celsius whilst being able to point precisely enough that they could pick out a golf ball at a distance of 15 km, and to keep their smooth reflecting surfaces accurate to better than 25 micrometres (less than the typical thickness of a human hair). Once the transporter reached the high plateau it carried the antenna to a concrete pad - a docking station with connections for power and fibre optics - and positioned it with an accuracy of a few millimetres. The transporter is guided by a laser steering system and, just like some cars today, also has ultrasonic collision detectors. These sensors ensure the safety of the state-of-the-art antennas as the transporter drives them across what will soon be a rather crowded plateau. Ultimately, ALMA will have at least 66 antennas distributed over about 200 pads, spread over distances of up to 18.5 km and operating as a single, giant telescope. Even when ALMA is fully operational, the transporters will be used to move the antennas between pads to reconfigure the telescope for different kinds of observations. "Transporting our first antenna to the Chajnantor plateau is a epic feat which exemplifies the exciting times in which ALMA is living. Day after day, our global collaboration brings us closer to the birth of the most ambitious ground-based astronomical observatory in the world", said Thijs de Graauw, ALMA Director. This first ALMA antenna at the high site will soon be joined by others and the ALMA team looks forward to making their first observations from the Chajnantor plateau. They plan to link three antennas by early 2010, and to make the first scientific observations with ALMA in the second half of 2011. ALMA will help astronomers answer important questions about our cosmic origins. The telescope will observe the Universe using light with millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths, between infrared light and radio waves in

  13. The Inclusion of Differently Abled Students in the Regular Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Angela

    This study sought to evaluate the implementation of a program to foster the inclusion of differently abled students into a regular elementary school classroom. The report is based on interviews with eight regular and two special education teachers, as well as the school principal, along with classroom materials and information on inclusion…

  14. Classroom Activities for Able Students: In Fifth and Sixth Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economopoulos, Marjorie P.

    1981-01-01

    Challenging problems and project ideas for mathematically able students in grades 5 and 6 are reviewed. Number patterns are viewed as a good tool to introduce inductive and deductive thinking. Applications of mathematics in sales, the stock market, opinion polls, weather prediction, and other areas are discussed. (MP)

  15. The Able Privilege Scale: A New Educational Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Alan B.; Choate, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    The Able Privilege Scale (APS) is a theoretically derived reflexive instrument that asks participants to assess their level of personal power and privilege in relation to society depending upon the presence, and/or type, of disability. The 23-items on the APS are derived form McIntosh's concept of white privilege (1988) and adapted to reflect…

  16. Imatinib may be ABL to improve anti-angiogenic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Claudio; Fantin, Alessandro; Ruhrberg, Christiana

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that neuropilin 1 (NRP1) drives angiogenesis by promoting extracellular matrix signaling in endothelial cells via ABL1 kinase. Imatinib targets this pathway in pathological angiogenesis and may provide a novel opportunity for anti-angiogenic therapy of age-related macular degeneration, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, or solid tumor growth. PMID:27308396

  17. A Comprehensive Plan for Attracting Able Students to Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Sally; And Others

    In response to the need to draw academically able students into the teaching profession, the College of Education and Human Services at Wright State University (Ohio) has initiated several new programs and policies that form part of a comprehensive plan to recruit, select, and retain potentially talented teachers. The special programs include: (1)…

  18. Low Melt Height Solidification of Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montakhab, Mehdi; Bacak, Mert; Balikci, Ercan

    2016-06-01

    Effect of a reduced melt height in the directional solidification of a superalloy has been investigated by two methods: vertical Bridgman (VB) and vertical Bridgman with a submerged baffle (VBSB). The latter is a relatively new technique and provides a reduced melt height ahead of the solidifying interface. A low melt height leads to a larger primary dendrite arm spacing but a lower mushy length, melt-back transition length, and porosity. The VBSB technique yields up to 38 pct reduction in the porosity. This may improve a component's mechanical strength especially in a creep-fatigue type dynamic loading.

  19. Raman Lidar Retrievals of Mixed Layer Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Clayton, M.; Turner, D. D.; Newsom, R. K.; Goldsmith, J.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate determination of the atmospheric mixing layer (ML) height is important for modeling the transport of aerosols and aerosol precursors and forecasting air quality. Aerosol and water vapor profiles measured by the DOE ARM SGP and the new TWP (Darwin) ground based Raman lidars provide direct measurements of the vertical structure of ML. We have developed automated algorithms to identify sharp gradients in aerosols and water vapor at the top of the ML and have used these algorithms to derive ML heights for extended periods over the last few years. During the afternoon, these ML heights generally compare favorably with ML heights derived from potential temperature profiles derived from coincident radiosondes. However, retrieving ML heights via lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol gradients is problematic in the presence of elevated aerosol and water vapor layers which are often observed, especially at night. Consequently, we take advantage of recent modifications to these lidars that permit continuous temperature profiling, and compute ML heights using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) measurements. The resulting ML heights agree well with ML heights derived from radiosondes and provide a more realistic representation of the diurnal ML behavior. We use the Raman lidar aerosol and water vapor profiles and ML heights to derive the fractions of total column precipitable water vapor and aerosol optical thickness within and above the ML and show how the ML heights and these fractions vary with time of day and season. The SGP Raman lidar measurements show that the fraction of the aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water vapor above the ML increases from 30-60% during the day to 60-80% at night. The Darwin Raman lidar measurements reveal a shallow, moist cloud-topped ML with little diurnal variability during the austral summer and deeper ML with more diurnal variability during

  20. The genetic overlap between schizophrenia and height

    PubMed Central

    Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Chen, Xianging; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that height and schizophrenia risk are inversely correlated. These findings might arise because i) height and schizophrenia share genetic variants and ii) the effects of these shared variants are in opposite direction for the two traits. We use genome wide association data to empirically evaluate these hypotheses. We find that variants which impact on height and risk for schizophrenia are distributed across several genomic regions and the directions of effect vary, some consistent and others inconsistent with the direction expected from the phenotypic data. Moreover, signals that were in and not in accord with the phenotypic data aggregated in distinct biological pathways. PMID:24239283

  1. A Climatological study of sea breezes in the Red Sea region of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Basit A.; Abualnaja, Yasser

    2015-04-01

    Long term near surface observations from 20 stations, buoys, high resolution model data from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and Weather Research and Forecasting Modeling System (WRF(ARW)) are used to investigate the climatology of sea breezes over the Eastern side of the Red Sea region. Additionally, satellite data from second-generation Meteosat (MSG) and Radar soundings have also been analyzed to investigate major characteristics of sea breeze flow. Sea breezes blow under anticyclonic synoptic conditions, weak gradient winds, intense radiation, relatively cloud-free skies and strong near surface sea - land thermal gradient. In order to identify sea breeze signal a set of criteria based on synoptic condition, diurnal reversal of wind direction and thermal gradient has been devised. Results show that sea breezes in this region occur almost all year, but this meso-scale phenomenon is most frequent in summer months (May to August) when it occurs for almost half of the summer days. The onset of the sea breeze in this region is about 0800 LST (Local Standard Time). The sea breeze decays after 1700 LST, however, the timing of the onset and decay could be affected by season, sea-land thermal gradient, topography, sea-land orientation and the direction and strength of the prevailing wind. The depth of the predicted inflow layer reaches 1 kilometer while the height of sea breeze head may reach 3 kilometers. The rocky mountain range of Al-Sarawat, east of the Red Sea coast, restricts the inland propagation of sea breeze and significantly affects the structure of the flow. A detailed process analysis of the available data is being conducted to better understand the Sea Breeze and its effect on the local meteorology.

  2. Climatology of midlatitude ionospheric disturbances from the Very Large Array Low-frequency Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmboldt, J. F.; Lane, W. M.; Cotton, W. D.

    2012-10-01

    The results of a climatological study of ionospheric disturbances derived from observations of cosmic sources from the Very Large Array (VLA) Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) are presented. We have used the ionospheric corrections applied to the 74 MHz interferometric data within the VLSS imaging process to obtain fluctuation spectra for the total electron content (TEC) gradient on spatial scales from a few to hundreds of kilometers and temporal scales from less than one minute to nearly an hour. The observations sample nearly all times of day and all seasons. They also span latitudes and longitudes from 28°N to 40°N and 95°W to 114°W, respectively. We have binned and averaged the fluctuation spectra according to time of day, season, and geomagnetic (Kp index) and solar (F10.7) activity. These spectra provide a detailed, multiscale account of seasonal and intraday variations in ionospheric activity with wavelike structures detected at wavelengths between about 35 and 250 km. In some cases, trends between spectral power and Kp index and/or F10.7 are also apparent. In addition, the VLSS observations allow for measurements of the turbulent power spectrum down to periods of 40 s (scales of ˜0.4 km at the height of the E-region). While the level of turbulent activity does not appear to have a strong dependence on eitherKp index or F10.7, it does appear to be more pronounced during the winter daytime, summer nighttime, and near dusk during the spring.

  3. Climatology and Formation of Tropical Midlevel Clouds at the Darwin ARM Site

    SciTech Connect

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2012-10-01

    A 4-yr climatology of midlevel clouds is presented from vertically pointing cloud lidar and radar measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site at Darwin, Australia. Few studies exist of tropical midlevel clouds using a dataset of this length. Seventy percent of clouds with top heights between 4 and 8 km are less than 2 km thick. These thin layer clouds have a peak in cloud-top temperature around the melting level (0°C) and also a second peak around -12.5°C. The diurnal frequency of thin clouds is highest during the night and reaches a minimum around noon, consistent with variation caused by solar heating. Using a 1.5-yr subset of the observations, the authors found that thin clouds have a high probability of containing supercooled liquid water at low temperatures: ~20% of clouds at -30°C, ~50% of clouds at -20°C, and ~65% of clouds at -10°C contain supercooled liquid water. The authors hypothesize that thin midlevel clouds formed at the melting level are formed differently during active and break monsoon periods and test this over three monsoon seasons. A greater frequency of thin midlevel clouds are likely formed by increased condensation following the latent cooling of melting during active monsoon periods when stratiform precipitation is most frequent. This is supported by the high percentage (65%) of midlevel clouds with preceding stratiform precipitation and the high frequency of stable layers slightly warmer than 0°C. In the break monsoon, a distinct peak in the frequency of stable layers at 0°C matches the peak in thin midlevel cloudiness, consistent with detrainment from convection.

  4. Development of Satellite-based Climatology of Low-level Cloud and Fog in Mountain Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Y.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of orographic clouds and fog has major environmental and economic implications that the potential shift in the space-time distribution can effectively redistribute freshwater resources and threaten the sustainability of the ecology, geomorphology and hydrology of mountainous regions and adjacent basins. This includes the Southern Appalachian Mountains, which rely closely on the moisture input from fog, cap clouds and light rainfall, as well as cloud forests in the Andes with frequent occurrence of dense fog. However, the applicability of fog forecasting models becomes limited in regions of complex terrain. The motivation of this project is to develop a satellite-based hydroclimatology and physical parameterization of orographic low-level clouds and fog regimes in the Southern Appalachians using a general methodology that can be applied to mountainous regions elsewhere. An algorithm for the detection and extraction of stratus clouds and fog was developed using changes in vertical gradients of CPR reflectivity and liquid water products from almost 5-years of CLOUDSAT and SRTM terrain data. This population of low-level clouds and fog will be analyzed with GOES infrared and visible imagery, MODIS and CALIPSO products, and with airport cloud height and visibility records to expand the spatial coverage beyond narrow satellite sensor swaths. The climatology will be further developed through integration with results from WRF simulations for selected periods since the bulk of the PMM network has been in place (2008-present) to aid in defining meteorological and time-of-day constraints in the interpretation of simulated satellite radar reflectivity profiles. The overarching goal is to infer a representation of the diurnal cycle, seasonal and inter-annual variations of the vertical distribution of LWC and hydrometeors in orographic clouds and fog that vary spatially with landform toward developing a more general parameterization of seeder-feeder interactions in

  5. Climatology of Thermospheric Temperature and Oxygen Density during 2002-2013 at Millstone Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozell, J.; Zhang, S.; Nicolls, M. J.; Erickson, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, climate change has become an area of increasing importance as researchers strive to better understand the impact of increased greenhouse gas concentrations on earth's atmosphere. Past studies suggest that in the thermosphere and ionosphere, there is a cooling effect which results in a reduction in neutral densities and height dependent changes in electron density. The purpose of this study is to further investigate the long-term changes in the neutral atmosphere by using ground-based incoherent scatter radar (ISR) measurements of the ionosphere and thermosphere. Ion energy balance calculations can be used to estimate exospheric temperature and neutral oxygen density from the radar-measured ionospheric parameters. By using modified versions of existing codes that describe the ion energy balance equations [Nicolls et al., 2006], ionospheric data collected from the Millstone Hill ISR (42.6°N, 288.5°E) between 200 and 600 km from 2002-2013 has been used to calculate exospheric temperature and neutral oxygen density. These results are then used to create a new local empirical model that can describe the climatology of these parameters, varying with local time, season, and solar and geomagnetic activities. Comparing the exospheric temperature and neutral oxygen density data measured at Millstone Hill to corresponding MSIS values, there is a possible long-term cooling trend seen in these observed thermospheric parameters at Millstone Hill. These results, based on the most recent solar cycle observations, will be extended to include more solar cycles, and a much improved understanding of the thermospheric long-term trends may be reached.

  6. Taklimakan Desert nocturnal low-level jet: climatology and dust activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jin Ming; Liu, Huayue; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    While nocturnal low-level jets (NLLJs) occur frequently in many parts of the world, the occurrence and other detailed characteristics of NLLJs over the Taklimakan Desert (TD) are not well known. This paper presents a climatology of NLLJs and coincident dust over the TD by analyzing multi-year ERA-Interim reanalysis and satellite observations. It is found that the ERA-Interim dataset can capture the NLLJs' features well by comparison with radiosonde data from two surface sites. The NLLJs occur in more than 60 % of nights, which are primarily easterly to east-northeasterly. They typically appear at 100 to 400 m above the surface with a speed of 4 to 10 m s-1. Most NLLJs are located above the nocturnal inversion during the warm season, while they are embedded in the inversion layer during the cold season. NLLJs above the inversion have a strong annual cycle with a maximum frequency in August. We also quantify the convective boundary layer (CBL) height and construct an index to measure the magnitude of the momentum in the CBL. We find that the magnitude of momentum in the lower atmosphere from the top of the surface layer to the top of mixed layer is larger for NLLJ cases than for non-NLLJ cases, and in the warm season the downward momentum transfer process is more intense and rapid. The winds below the NLLJ core to the desert surface gain strength in summer and autumn, and these summer and autumn winds are coincident with an enhancement of aerosol optical depth. This indicates that the NLLJ is an important mechanism for dust activity and transport during the warm season over the Taklimakan.

  7. A climatology of air-sea interactions at the Mediterranean LION and AZUR buoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniaux, Guy; Prieur, Louis; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Giordani, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    The LION and AZUR buoys (respectively at 42.1°N 4.7°E and 43.4°N 7.8°E) provide an extended data set since respectively 1999 and 2001 to present for studying air-sea interactions in the northwestern Mediterranean basin. The two buoys are located where high wind events occur (resp. north western and north easterly gale winds), that force and condition deep oceanic winter convection in that region. A short-term climatology (resp. 13 and 11 years) of air-sea interactions has been developed, which includes classical meteo-oceanic parameters, but also waves period and significant wave heights and radiative fluxes. Moreover turbulent surface fluxes have been estimated from various bulk parameterizations, in order to estimate uncertainties on fluxes. An important dispersion of turbulent fluxes is found at high wind speeds according to the parameterization used, larger than taking into account the second order effects of cool skin, warm layer and waves. An important annual cycle affects air temperatures (ATs), SSTs and turbulent fluxes at the two buoys. The annual cycle of ATs and SSTs can be well reconstructed from the first two annual harmonics, while for the turbulent heat fluxes the erratic occurrence of high and low flux events, well correlated with high/dry and low windy periods, strongly affect their annual and interannual cycles. The frequency of high surface heat fluxes and high wind stress is found highest during the autumn and winter months, despite the fact that north-westerly gale winds occur all year long at LION buoy. During calm weather period, ATs and SSTs experience an important diurnal cycle (on average 1 and 0.5°C respectively), that affect latent and sensible heat fluxes. Finally, an estimate of the interannual variability of the turbulent fluxes in Autumn and Winter is discussed, in order to characterize their potential role on deep ocean convection.

  8. Biases in Total Precipitable Water Vapor Climatologies from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Eldering, Annmarie; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2006-01-01

    We examine differences in total precipitable water vapor (PWV) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) experiments sharing the Aqua spacecraft platform. Both systems provide estimates of PWV over water surfaces. We compare AIRS and AMSR-E PWV to constrain AIRS retrieval uncertainties as functions of AIRS retrieved infrared cloud fraction. PWV differences between the two instruments vary only weakly with infrared cloud fraction up to about 70%. Maps of AIRS-AMSR-E PWV differences vary with location and season. Observational biases, when both instruments observe identical scenes, are generally less than 5%. Exceptions are in cold air outbreaks where AIRS is biased moist by 10-20% or 10-60% (depending on retrieval processing) and at high latitudes in winter where AIRS is dry by 5-10%. Sampling biases, from different sampling characteristics of AIRS and AMSR-E, vary in sign and magnitude. AIRS sampling is dry by up to 30% in most high-latitude regions but moist by 5-15% in subtropical stratus cloud belts. Over the northwest Pacific, AIRS samples conditions more moist than AMSR-E by a much as 60%. We hypothesize that both wet and dry sampling biases are due to the effects of clouds on the AIRS retrieval methodology. The sign and magnitude of these biases depend upon the types of cloud present and on the relationship between clouds and PWV. These results for PWV imply that climatologies of height-resolved water vapor from AIRS must take into consideration local meteorological processes affecting AIRS sampling.

  9. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RAS by ABL allosterically enhances effector binding

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Pamela Y.; Johnson, Christian W.; Fang, Cong; Cao, Xiaoqing; Graeber, Thomas G.; Mattos, Carla; Colicelli, John

    2015-01-01

    RAS proteins are signal transduction gatekeepers that mediate cell growth, survival, and differentiation through interactions with multiple effector proteins. The RAS effector RAS- and RAB-interacting protein 1 (RIN1) activates its own downstream effectors, the small GTPase RAB5 and the tyrosine kinase Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase (ABL), to modulate endocytosis and cytoskeleton remodeling. To identify ABL substrates downstream of RAS-to-RIN1 signaling, we examined human HEK293T cells overexpressing components of this pathway. Proteomic analysis revealed several novel phosphotyrosine peptides, including Harvey rat sarcoma oncogene (HRAS)-pTyr137. Here we report that ABL phosphorylates tyrosine 137 of H-, K-, and NRAS. Increased RIN1 levels enhanced HRAS-Tyr137 phosphorylation by nearly 5-fold, suggesting that RAS-stimulated RIN1 can drive ABL-mediated RAS modification in a feedback circuit. Tyr137 is well conserved among RAS orthologs and is part of a transprotein H-bond network. Crystal structures of HRASY137F and HRASY137E revealed conformation changes radiating from the mutated residue. Although consistent with Tyr137 participation in allosteric control of HRAS function, the mutations did not alter intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rates in vitro. HRAS-Tyr137 phosphorylation enhanced HRAS signaling capacity in cells, however, as reflected by a 4-fold increase in the association of phosphorylated HRASG12V with its effector protein RAF proto-oncogene serine/threonine protein kinase 1 (RAF1). These data suggest that RAS phosphorylation at Tyr137 allosterically alters protein conformation and effector binding, providing a mechanism for effector-initiated modulation of RAS signaling.—Ting, P. Y., Johnson, C. W., Fang, C., Cao, X., Graeber, T. G., Mattos, C., Colicelli, J. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RAS by ABL allosterically enhances effector binding. PMID:25999467

  10. Converting NAD83 GPS Heights Into NAVD88 Elevations With LVGEOID, a Hybrid Geoid Height Model for the Long Valley Volcanic Region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Dzurisin, Daniel; Langbein, John; Svarc, Jerry; Hill, David P.

    2008-01-01

    A GPS survey of leveling benchmarks done in Long Valley Caldera in 1999 showed that the application of the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) geoid model GEOID99 to tie GPS heights to historical leveling measurements would significantly underestimate the caldera ground deformation (known from other geodetic measurements). The NGS geoid model was able to correctly reproduce the shape of the deformation, but required a local adjustment to give a realistic estimate of the magnitude of the uplift. In summer 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a new leveling survey along two major routes crossing the Long Valley region from north to south (Hwy 395) and from east to west (Hwy 203 - Benton Crossing). At the same time, 25 leveling bench marks were occupied with dual frequency GPS receivers to provide a measurement of the ellipsoid heights. Using the heights from these two surveys, we were able to compute a precise geoid height model (LVGEOID) for the Long Valley volcanic region. Our results show that although the LVGEOID and the latest NGS GEOID03 model practically coincide in areas outside the caldera, there is a difference of up to 0.2 m between the two models within the caldera. Accounting for this difference is critical when using the geoid height model to estimate the ground deformation due to magmatic or tectonic activity in the caldera.

  11. Mixing-Height Time Series from Operational Ceilometer Aerosol-Layer Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotteraner, Christoph; Piringer, Martin

    2016-07-01

    A new method is described to derive mixing-height time series directly from aerosol-layer height data available from a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. As complete as possible mixing-height time series are calculated by avoiding outliers, filling data gaps by linear interpolation, and smoothing. In addition, large aerosol-layer heights at night that can be interpreted as residual layers are not assigned as mixing heights. The resulting mixing-height time series, converted to an appropriate data format, can be used as input for dispersion calculations. Two case examples demonstrate in detail how the method works. The mixing heights calculated using ceilometer data are compared with values determined from radiosounding data at Vienna by applying the parcel, Heffter, and Richardson methods. The results of the parcel method, obtained from radiosonde profiles at noon, show the best fit to the ceilometer-derived mixing heights. For midnight radiosoundings, larger deviations between mixing heights from the ceilometer and those deduced from the potential temperature profiles of the soundings are found. We use data from two Vaisala CL51 ceilometers, operating in the Vienna area at an urban and rural site, respectively, during an overlapping period of about 1 year. In addition to the case studies, the calculated mixing-height time series are also statistically evaluated and compared, demonstrating that the ceilometer-based mixing height follows an expected daily and seasonal course.

  12. HEIGHT, PARTNERS AND OFFSPRING: EVIDENCE FROM TAIWAN.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hung-Lin; Yin, Ching-Chen

    2016-09-01

    Using Taiwanese data, this study finds that tall males are more successful in mate selection and reproduction, but the results are weakly significant. Height is not helpful for females' reproductive success. Specifically, tall males are more likely to have a partner at present or in the past, have at least one child, have more children, have a shorter period of celibacy and have a longer time duration of living with a partner in their lifetime. Using mediation analysis, the study shows that tall males' reproductive success is not due to their achievements in the labour market (earnings), but is simply due to their height per se. Finally, a college student data set is used to explore the relation between height and dating hours. Tall male students have more dating hours, but no relation is found between females' height and dating hours. PMID:26449270

  13. Soft computing methods for geoidal height transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyilmaz, O.; Özlüdemir, M. T.; Ayan, T.; Çelik, R. N.

    2009-07-01

    Soft computing techniques, such as fuzzy logic and artificial neural network (ANN) approaches, have enabled researchers to create precise models for use in many scientific and engineering applications. Applications that can be employed in geodetic studies include the estimation of earth rotation parameters and the determination of mean sea level changes. Another important field of geodesy in which these computing techniques can be applied is geoidal height transformation. We report here our use of a conventional polynomial model, the Adaptive Network-based Fuzzy (or in some publications, Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy) Inference System (ANFIS), an ANN and a modified ANN approach to approximate geoid heights. These approximation models have been tested on a number of test points. The results obtained through the transformation processes from ellipsoidal heights into local levelling heights have also been compared.

  14. Estimating Mixing Heights Using Microwave Temperature Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson-Gammon, John; Powell, Christina; Mahoney, Michael; Angevine, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    A paper describes the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) for making measurements of the planetary boundary layer thermal structure data necessary for air quality forecasting as the Mixing Layer (ML) height determines the volume in which daytime pollution is primarily concentrated. This is the first time that an airborne temperature profiler has been used to measure the mixing layer height. Normally, this is done using a radar wind profiler, which is both noisy and large. The MTP was deployed during the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study (TexAQS-2000). An objective technique was developed and tested for estimating the ML height from the MTP vertical temperature profiles. In order to calibrate the technique and evaluate the usefulness of this approach, estimates from a variety of measurements during the TexAQS-2000 were compared. Estimates of ML height were used from radiosondes, radar wind profilers, an aerosol backscatter lidar, and in-situ aircraft measurements in addition to those from the MTP.

  15. Jet characterization in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS): applications to climatology and transport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, G. L.; Hegglin, M. I.; Daffer, W. H.; Santee, M. L.; Ray, E. A.; Pawson, S.; Schwartz, M. J.; Boone, C. D.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Walker, K. A.

    2011-06-01

    A method of classifying the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric (UTLS) jets has been developed that allows satellite and aircraft trace gas data and meteorological fields to be efficiently mapped in a jet coordinate view. A detailed characterization of multiple tropopauses accompanies the jet characterization. Jet climatologies show the well-known high altitude subtropical and lower altitude polar jets in the upper troposphere, as well as a pattern of concentric polar and subtropical jets in the Southern Hemisphere, and shifts of the primary jet to high latitudes associated with blocking ridges in Northern Hemisphere winter. The jet-coordinate view segregates air masses differently than the commonly-used equivalent latitude (EqL) coordinate throughout the lowermost stratosphere and in the upper troposphere. Mapping O3 data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) satellite and the Winter Storms aircraft datasets in jet coordinates thus emphasizes different aspects of the circulation compared to an EqL-coordinate framework: the jet coordinate reorders the data geometrically, thus highlighting the strong PV, tropopause height and trace gas gradients across the subtropical jet, whereas EqL is a dynamical coordinate that may blur these spatial relationships but provides information on irreversible transport. The jet coordinate view identifies the concentration of stratospheric ozone well below the tropopause in the region poleward of and below the jet core, as well as other transport features associated with the upper tropospheric jets. Using the jet information in EqL coordinates allows us to study trace gas distributions in regions of weak versus strong jets, and demonstrates weaker transport barriers in regions with less jet influence. MLS and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer trace gas fields for spring 2008 in jet coordinates show very strong, closely correlated, PV, tropopause height and trace gas gradients across the jet, and

  16. Evolutionary perspectives on human height variation.

    PubMed

    Stulp, Gert; Barrett, Louise

    2016-02-01

    Human height is a highly variable trait, both within and between populations, has a high heritability, and influences the manner in which people behave and are treated in society. Although we know much about human height, this information has rarely been brought together in a comprehensive, systematic fashion. Here, we present a synthetic review of the literature on human height from an explicit evolutionary perspective, addressing its phylogenetic history, development, and environmental and genetic influences on growth and stature. In addition to presenting evidence to suggest the past action of natural selection on human height, we also assess the evidence that natural and sexual selection continues to act on height in contemporary populations. Although there is clear evidence to suggest that selection acts on height, mainly through life-history processes but perhaps also directly, it is also apparent that methodological factors reduce the confidence with which such inferences can be drawn, and there remain surprising gaps in our knowledge. The inability to draw firm conclusions about the adaptiveness of such a highly visible and easily measured trait suggests we should show an appropriate degree of caution when dealing with other human traits in evolutionary perspective. PMID:25530478

  17. Isolation of a Bacterial Strain Able To Degrade Branched Nonylphenol

    PubMed Central

    Tanghe, Tom; Dhooge, Willem; Verstraete, Willy

    1999-01-01

    Conventional enrichment of microorganisms on branched nonylphenol (NP) as only carbon and energy source yielded mixed cultures able to grow on the organic compound. However, plating yielded no single colonies capable, alone or in combination with other isolates, of degrading the NP in liquid culture. Therefore, a special approach was used, referred to as “serial dilution-plate resuspension,” to reduce culture complexity. In this way, one isolate, TTNP3, tentatively identified as a Sphingomonas sp., was found to be able to grow on NP in liquid culture. Remarkably, this isolate was able to be filtered through a 0.45-μm-pore-diameter filter. Moreover, isolate TTNP3 did not form visible colonies on mineral medium with NP, and it formed visible colonies on R2A agar only after a prolonged incubation of 1 week. High-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis of the culture media indicated that the strain starts the degradation of NP with a fission of the phenol ring and preferably uses the para isomer of NP and not the ortho isomer. No distinct accumulation of an intermediary product could be observed. PMID:9925611

  18. Associations of mortality with own height using son's height as an instrumental variable

    PubMed Central

    Carslake, David; Fraser, Abigail; Davey Smith, George; May, Margaret; Palmer, Tom; Sterne, Jonathan; Silventoinen, Karri; Tynelius, Per; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Rasmussen, Finn

    2013-01-01

    Height is associated with mortality from many diseases, but it remains unclear whether the association is causal or due to confounding by social factors, genetic pleiotropy,1 or existing ill-health. The authors investigated whether the association of height with mortality is causal by using a son's height as an instrumental variable (IV) for parents’ height among the parents of a cohort of 1,036,963 Swedish men born between 1951 and 1980 who had their height measured at military conscription, aged around 18, between 1969 and 2001. In a two-sample IV analysis adjusting for son's age at examination and secular trends in height, as well as parental age, and socioeconomic position, the hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause paternal mortality per standard deviation (SD, 6.49 cm) of height was 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.95, 0.96). The results of IV analyses of mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), respiratory disease, cancer, external causes and suicide were comparable to those obtained using son's height as a simple proxy for own height and to conventional analyses of own height in the present data and elsewhere, suggesting that such conventional analyses are not substantially confounded by existing ill-health. PMID:22560304

  19. Associations of mortality with own height using son's height as an instrumental variable.

    PubMed

    Carslake, David; Fraser, Abigail; Davey Smith, George; May, Margaret; Palmer, Tom; Sterne, Jonathan; Silventoinen, Karri; Tynelius, Per; Lawlor, Debbie A; Rasmussen, Finn

    2013-07-01

    Height is associated with mortality from many diseases, but it remains unclear whether the association is causal or due to confounding by social factors, genetic pleiotropy,(1) or existing ill-health. The authors investigated whether the association of height with mortality is causal by using a son's height as an instrumental variable (IV) for parents' height among the parents of a cohort of 1,036,963 Swedish men born between 1951 and 1980 who had their height measured at military conscription, aged around 18, between 1969 and 2001. In a two-sample IV analysis adjusting for son's age at examination and secular trends in height, as well as parental age, and socioeconomic position, the hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause paternal mortality per standard deviation (SD, 6.49cm) of height was 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.95, 0.96). The results of IV analyses of mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), respiratory disease, cancer, external causes and suicide were comparable to those obtained using son's height as a simple proxy for own height and to conventional analyses of own height in the present data and elsewhere, suggesting that such conventional analyses are not substantially confounded by existing ill-health. PMID:22560304

  20. Evaluation of proper height for squatting stool.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hwa S; Jung, Hyung-Shik

    2008-05-01

    Many jobs and activities in people's daily lives have them in squatting postures. Jobs such as housekeeping, farming and welding require various squatting activities. It is speculated that prolonged squatting without any type of supporting stool would gradually and eventually impose musculoskeletal injuries on workers. This study aims to examine the proper height of the stool according to the position of working materials for the squatting worker. A total of 40 male and female college students and 10 female farmers participated in the experiment to find the proper stool height. Student participants were asked to sit and work in three different positions: floor level of 50 mm; ankle level of 200 mm; and knee level of 400 mm. They were then provided with stools of various heights and asked to maintain a squatting work posture. For each working position, they were asked to write down their thoughts on a preferred stool height. A Likert summated rating method as well as pairwise ranking test was applied to evaluate user preference for provided stools under conditions of different working positions. Under a similar experimental procedure, female farmers were asked to indicate their body part discomfort (BPD) on a body chart before and after performing the work. Statistical analysis showed that comparable results were found from both evaluation measures. When working position is below 50 mm, the proper stool height is 100 or should not be higher than 150 mm. When working position is 200 mm, the proper stool height is 150 mm. When working position is 400 mm, the proper stool height is 200 mm. Thus, it is strongly recommended to use proper height of stools with corresponding working position. Moreover, a wearable chair prototype was designed so that workers in a squatting posture do not have to carry and move the stool from one place to another. This stool should ultimately help to relieve physical stress and hence promote the health of squatting workers. This study sought

  1. The climatology of dust aerosol over the arabian peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, A.; Rappenglueck, B.; Eltahir, E. A. B.

    2015-01-01

    Dust storms are considered to be a natural hazard over the Arabian Peninsula, since they occur all year round with maximum intensity and frequency in Spring and Summer. The Regional Climate Model version 4 (RegCM4) has been used to study the climatology of atmospheric dust over the Arabian Peninsula from 1999 to 2012. This relatively long simulation period samples the meteorological conditions that determine the climatology of mineral dust aerosols over the Arabian Peninsula. The modeled Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) has been compared against ground-based observations of three Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations that are distributed over the Arabian Peninsula and daily space based observations from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), the Moderate resolution Imaging SpectroRadimeter (MODIS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). The large scale atmospheric circulation and the land surface response that lead to dust uplifting have been analyzed. While the modeled AOD shows that the dust season extends from March to August with two pronounced maxima, one over the northern Arabian Peninsula in March with AOD equal to 0.4 and one over the southern Arabian Peninsula in July with AOD equal to 0.7, the observations show that the dust season extends from April to August with two pronounced maxima, one over the northern Arabian Peninsula in April with AOD equal to 0.5 and one over the southern Arabian Peninsula in July with AOD equal to 0.5. In spring a high pressure dominates the Arabian Peninsula and is responsible for advecting dust from southern and western part of the Arabian Peninsula to northern and eastern part of the Peninsula. Also, fast developed cyclones in northern Arabian Peninsula are responsible for producing strong dust storms over Iraq and Kuwait. However, in summer the main driver of the surface dust emission is the strong northerly wind ("Shamal") that transport dust from the northern Arabian Peninsula toward south parallel to the

  2. Cloud climatology at the Andes/Amazon Transition in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halladay, K.; New, M. G.; Malhi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The climate of tropical montane regions is complex but may be sensitive to global change. We examine the local and regional cloud climatology of a region of the tropical Andes in Peru using corrected ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) DX cloud product (1983-2008), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) MOD35 visible cloud flags (2000-2008) and ground-based cloud observations. The results were compared for three zones: highlands (grassland), eastern slope (the montane forest) and lowlands (tropical forest). We found that in the dry season (JJA) the study area is part of a localised region of increased cloud frequency relative to the highlands, lowlands and other parts the eastern slope, which is likely to result from the mean low-level wind trajectory and diurnal upslope flow. The highlands exhibited the greatest amplitude mean annual cycle of cloud frequency, with a minimum in June for all times of day. This was linked to the effect of the annual cycle of upper level zonal winds, with persistent westerlies in the austral winter suppressing cloud formation at higher elevations. Higher lowland cloud frequencies than those on the eastern slope in the morning in May and June suggest the persistence of nighttime downslope flows and low-level convergence at lower altitudes. We also examined trends and variability in cloud cover for the three zones, and their relationship to sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Lowland cloud frequencies were significantly correlated with tropical North Atlantic (TNA) SSTs in February, March, August and September, but this was reduced after detrending, whereas the eastern slope and the highlands were not significantly correlated with tropical North Atlantic SSTs. Pacific SST correlations were highest for the eastern slope and highlands from February to April. Indian Ocean SST anomalies were significantly correlated with dry season cloud frequency for the lowlands and

  3. Predictability and Diagnostics of Western Himalayan Hydro-climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, I.; Lall, U.; Robertson, A. W.; Cane, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Snowmelt dominated streamflow of the Western Himalayan rivers is an important water resource during the dry pre-monsoon months to meet the irrigation and hydropower needs in northern India. On the other hand, winter precipitation as the form of snow over Himalayas helps in maintaining the glaciers, which serve as a storehouse of freshwater throughout the year. With the help of the hydro-climatological data provided by the Bhakra Beas Management Board in India, we present the outcome of our research on the prediction and diagnostics of Satluj river basin hydro-climatology at the Indian side up to the upstream of Bhakra dam, which is a major source of water for irrigation and electricity generation (1325MW) for north India. Spring seasonal inflow anomalies to Bhakra dam are strongly correlated with large-scale precipitation and temperature in the preceding winter over the Western Himalayas and adjoining north and central Indian plains, suggesting a potentially usable predictability for reservoir managers. Winter precipitation in the Western Himalayas is mainly brought about by the mid-latitude jet stream leading to the formation of low-pressure synoptic systems known as Western Disturbances (WD). WDs originate over the North Atlantic Ocean or Mediterranean Sea, with secondaries developing over the Persian Gulf and Caspian Sea either directly or as a result of the arrival of low-pressure systems from southwest Arabia, and travel eastward over Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and northwest India. Winter WDs (and therefore the average volume of winter precipitation over Western Himalayas) are also modulated by the large-scale interaction between ocean and atmosphere led by the variation of the SSTs of the Indian Ocean and Pacific. As a result, average spring inflow volume, which is a function of the average volume of precipitation in winter, was also found to be positively correlated with the SSTs over the western and equatorial Indian Ocean, and with below-normal sea

  4. Modeling the effect of climatological drought on European wildfire extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagge, James H.; Dias, Susana; Rego, Francisco; Tallaksen, Lena M.

    2014-05-01

    Wildfires are a natural hazard most commonly associated with the Mediterranean region in Europe, but which can affect all regions and cause significant impact and damage. Because vegetation dryness is a primary factor in both the ignition and spread of wildfires, it is assumed that there is a link between climatological drought and wildfire extent in Europe. The objective of this study is therefore to test this link between wildfire extent, defined by area burned, and several climatological drought indices across all geoclimatic regions of Europe, eventually determining the relative effect and most relevant combination of these indices on fire extent. Using the European Fire Database, compiled by the EU Joint Research Centre, these analyses are performed at the national and sub-national (NUTS 1,2,3) scale for 22 countries. Drought indices used as predictor variables include the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and the Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), which calculate anomalies in precipitation and climatic water balance, respectively, accumulated over several periods (1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 months). Climate data is based on the gridded Watch Forcing Dataset ERA-Interim (WFDEI), which spans the duration of the wildfire series (1985-2010). Two methods of analysis are used in this study. First, the annual maximum wildfire extent for each country or region is modeled using multiple linear regression for all possible linear combinations of the drought indices. Second, wildfire extent is modeled individually for each month to determine how the relevant drought indices change throughout the wildfire season. Preliminary results show that, for the majority of European countries, wildfire extent is most strongly related to short-term (2-3 month) SPEI anomalies, which represent a combined lack of precipitation and increased evapotranspiration associated with high temperatures. Longer accumulated dryness (6-9 months) was also related to

  5. Climatological context for large-scale coral bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, A. D.; Casey, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    Large-scale coral bleaching was first observed in 1979 and has occurred throughout virtually all of the tropics since that time. Severe bleaching may result in the loss of live coral and in a decline of the integrity of the impacted coral reef ecosystem. Despite the extensive scientific research and increased public awareness of coral bleaching, uncertainties remain about the past and future of large-scale coral bleaching. In order to reduce these uncertainties and place large-scale coral bleaching in the longer-term climatological context, specific criteria and methods for using historical sea surface temperature (SST) data to examine coral bleaching-related thermal conditions are proposed by analyzing three, 132 year SST reconstructions: ERSST, HadISST1, and GISST2.3b. These methodologies are applied to case studies at Discovery Bay, Jamaica (77.27°W, 18.45°N), Sombrero Reef, Florida, USA (81.11°W, 24.63°N), Academy Bay, Galápagos, Ecuador (90.31°W, 0.74°S), Pearl and Hermes Reef, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (175.83°W, 27.83°N), Midway Island, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (177.37°W, 28.25°N), Davies Reef, Australia (147.68°E, 18.83°S), and North Male Atoll, Maldives (73.35°E, 4.70°N). The results of this study show that (1) The historical SST data provide a useful long-term record of thermal conditions in reef ecosystems, giving important insight into the thermal history of coral reefs and (2) While coral bleaching and anomalously warm SSTs have occurred over much of the world in recent decades, case studies in the Caribbean, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, and parts of other regions such as the Great Barrier Reef exhibited SST conditions and cumulative thermal stress prior to 1979 that were comparable to those conditions observed during the strong, frequent coral bleaching events since 1979. This climatological context and knowledge of past environmental conditions in reef ecosystems may foster a better understanding of how coral reefs will

  6. A Precipitation Climatology of the Snowy Mountains, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theobald, Alison; McGowan, Hamish; Speirs, Johanna

    2014-05-01

    The precipitation that falls in the Snowy Mountains region of southeastern Australia provides critical water resources for hydroelectric power generation. Water storages in this region are also a major source of agricultural irrigation, environmental flows, and offer a degree of flood protection for some of the major river systems in Australia. Despite this importance, there remains a knowledge gap regarding the long-term, historic variability of the synoptic weather systems that deliver precipitation to the region. This research aims to increase the understanding of long-term variations in precipitation-bearing weather systems resulting in runoff into the Snowy Mountains catchments and reservoirs, and the way in which these are influenced by large-scale climate drivers. Here we present initial results on the development of a climatology of precipitation-bearing synoptic weather systems (synoptic typology), spanning a period of over 100 years. The synoptic typology is developed from the numerical weather model re-analysis data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), in conjunction with regional precipitation and temperature data from a network of private gauges. Given the importance of surface, mid- and upper-air patterns on seasonal precipitation, the synoptic typing will be based on a range of meteorological variables throughout the depth of the troposphere, highlighting the importance of different atmospheric levels on the development and steering of synoptic precipitation bearing systems. The temporal and spatial variability of these synoptic systems, their response to teleconnection forcings and their contribution to inflow generation in the headwater catchments of the Snowy Mountains will be investigated. The resulting climatology will provide new understanding of the drivers of regional-scale precipitation variability at inter- and intra-annual timescales. It will enable greater understanding of how variability in synoptic scale

  7. Developing a cloud mask climatology covering two Meteosat satellite generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, Rebekka; Stöckli, Reto; Liniger, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Long term cloud cover observations from satellites are fundamental for climate model validation and climate monitoring. Further, they support ground-based observations in regions with sparse coverage. Additionally, information on cloud cover is needed to derive other physical parameters such as surface radiation fluxes or clear sky and cloudy atmospheric states and is of high relevance for the solar energy sector. Within the current project phase of the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) an algorithm to calculate a climatological cloud mask (or cloud cover probability) from Meteosat satellites is developed. The algorithm shall be applicable for both Meteosat first generation (1983-2005) and Meteosat second generation (2004-present) which significantly differ in their spectral properties. The algorithm linearly aggregates a set of continuous scores instead of the commonly used decision tree approach. The scores are calculated for different channels as well as different spatial and temporal settings. Each score yields a probability for the pixel's cloud cover. The final result, the cloud cover probability, is obtained by combining all available scores taking into account the varying performance of the scores during day and night and over snow. The uncertainty of the final cloud cover estimate is an inherent part of the probability. The algorithm is calibrated using cloud cover measurements from SYNOP stations located on the Meteosat disc. The subsequent validation is done at an independent set of collocated SYNOP/ARSA (Automated Radiosonde Archive) stations. The presentation introduces the applied cloud mask algorithm and presents the results of the validation for both satellite generations. The comparison of the two satellite generations addresses the climatological homogeneity of the future cloud mask climate data record which will be distributed by CM SAF after 2016. Special attention is also drawn to issues like the day-night-bias of

  8. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida: Phase V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2011-01-01

    The AMU added three years of data to the POR from the previous work resulting in a 22-year POR for the warm season months from 1989-2010. In addition to the flow regime stratification, moisture and stability stratifications were added to separate more active from less active lighting days within the same flow regime. The parameters used for moisture and stability stratifications were PWAT and TI which were derived from sounding data at four Florida radiosonde sites. Lightning data consisted of NLDN CG lightning flashes within 30 NM of each airfield. The AMU increased the number of airfields from nine to thirty-six which included the SLF, CCAFS, PAFB and thirty-three airfields across Florida. The NWS MLB requested the AMU calculate lightning climatologies for additional airfields that they support as a backup to NWS TBW which was then expanded to include airfields supported by NWS JAX and NWS MFL. The updated climatologies of lightning probabilities are based on revised synoptic-scale flow regimes over the Florida peninsula (Lambert 2007) for 5-, 10-, 20- and 30-NM radius range rings around the thirty-six airfields in 1-, 3- and 6-hour increments. The lightning, flow regime, moisture and stability data were processed in S-PLUS software using scripts written by the AMU to automate much of the data processing. The S-PLUS data files were exported to Excel to allow the files to be combined in Excel Workbooks for easier data handling and to create the tables and charts for the Gill. The AMU revised the Gill developed in the previous phase (Bauman 2009) with the new data and provided users with an updated HTML tool to display and manipulate the data and corresponding charts. The tool can be used with most web browsers and is computer operating system independent. The AMU delivered two Gills - one with just the PWAT stratification and one with both the PWAT and TI stratifications due to insufficient data in some of the PWATITI stratification combinations. This will allow

  9. Duck!: Scaling the height of a horizontal barrier to body height

    PubMed Central

    Stefanucci, Jeanine K.; Geuss, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Recent research shows that the body is used to scale environmental extents. We question whether the body is used to scale heights as measured by real actions (Experiments 1 and 2), or judgments about action and extent made from a single viewpoint (Experiments 3 and 4). First, participants walked under barriers either naturally or when wearing shoes or a helmet. Participants required a larger margin of safety (ducked at shorter heights) when they were made taller. In follow-up experiments, participants visually matched barrier heights and judged whether they could walk under them when wearing shoes or a helmet. Only the helmet decreased visually matched estimates; action judgments were no different when taller. The final experiment suggested that the change in matched estimates may have been due to lack of experience wearing the helmet. Overall, the results suggest that perceived height is scaled to the body and that when body height is altered, experience may moderate the rescaling of height. PMID:20601715

  10. Retrieval of Aerosol Height with TROPOMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, A. F. J.; de Haan, J. F.; Veefkind, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    The Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI), to be launched in 2015, will feature a new aerosol product providing the height of aerosol layers. Aerosol Layer Height will be one of two aerosol products, the other one being the Absorbing Aerosol Index. TROPOMI is a UV-VIS-NIR imaging spectrometer with daily global coverage. It will be part of ESA's Sentinel-5 Precursor mission. Algorithm development for the aerosol height product is currently underway at KNMI. In this presentation we will introduce the algorithm, highlight some of the development issues and discuss possible applications and example aerosol cases. Aerosol height observations from the near-infrared wavelength range will improve retrieval of other aerosol properties, particularly retrieval of absorption optical thickness. An increase in absorption in the ultraviolet wavelength range can be due to a higher imaginary part of the refractive index or to the aerosol layer being at a higher altitude. Independent height observations will therefore further constrain retrieval of the single scattering albedo. Furthermore, aerosol profile information is an important parameter when estimating radiative forcings and climate impacts of aerosol, it is a significant source of uncertainty in trace gas retrieval and it helps in understanding atmospheric transport mechanisms. Finally, timely available, global observations of aerosol height will be of interest to aviation safety agencies. The retrieval algorithm for aerosol height will be based on absorption by oxygen in the A-band (759-770 nm). Aerosols are assumed to be contained in a single layer. A spectral fit of reflectance (resolution 0.5 nm) across the absorption band provides layer height. The retrieval method will be optimal estimation to ensure a proper error analysis. Sensitivity studies have indicated that accuracy and precision of retrieved height for cloud-free scenes will be well below the TROPOMI science requirements (1 km). They have also shown that

  11. Isolation of Microorganisms Able To Metabolize Purified Natural Rubber

    PubMed Central

    Heisey, R. M.; Papadatos, S.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria able to grow on purified natural rubber in the absence of other organic carbon sources were isolated from soil. Ten isolates reduced the weight of vulcanized rubber from latex gloves by >10% in 6 weeks. Scanning electron microscopy clearly revealed the ability of the microorganisms to colonize, penetrate, and dramatically alter the physical structure of the rubber. The rubber-metabolizing bacteria were identified on the basis of fatty acid profiles and cell wall characteristics. Seven isolates were strains of Streptomyces, two were strains of Amycolatopsis, and one was a strain of Nocardia. PMID:16535106

  12. a Climatology of Extreme Minimum Winter Temperatures in Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, Dennis Joe

    The Extreme Minimum Winter Temperature (EMWT) is the coldest temperature recorded each winter at a given weather station. This variable is a measure of winter temperature stress. Extreme cold influences the geographic distribution of plants, and is a prime control for the production of some valuable fruit crops grown in Ohio. EMWT values are often used to map plant hardiness zones, however the magnitude of EMWT and the date that it occurs has varied widely from year to year. Climatic variables rarely remain constant over time, and the plant hardiness zones could shift significantly if the climate changes and there is a trend towards warmer EMWTs. Plants that have their present geographic ranges limited by cold winter temperatures could increase their spatial extent. Furthermore, EMWT has impacts on human health and has applications for architecture. EMWTs at eighty-nine weather stations in Ohio were analyzed. Summary statistics and return period intervals for critical EMWTs are tabulated and mapped. Return period maps may be more useful for environmental planning than plant hardiness zone maps based on average EMWT, especially in a variable climate. Graphical methods, curve fitting and a probability model for the mean were utilized to examine the long term trend. The EMWT has not warmed during the known climatic record of this variable in Ohio. This study demonstrates the need for more applied climatological studies based on the observed climate record, not obscured by the assumptions of the global warming paradigm.

  13. Tropical Plumes over the Middle East: Climatology and synoptic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubi, Amit; Dayan, Uri

    2014-08-01

    A 10-yr climatological study of Tropical Plumes (TPs) observed over the Middle East was undertaken. Several tools were used to identify and analyze these mid-tropospheric elongated cloudbands: satellite images, reanalysis and radiosonde data, backward trajectories, and cluster analysis. In order to conduct an in-depth examination of the synoptic conditions controlling this tropical-extratropical phenomenon, a dual methodology was adopted. In the first analysis, the identified 45 plumes were classified to precipitative and non-precipitative. In the second analysis, backward trajectories of the plumes were clustered in order to detect their moisture origins and pathways. In addition to the well documented south-western plumes originating in West Africa, a more southern pathway was identified, in which moisture was transported from Central to East African sources. The ‘south-western’ plumes are associated with a southwards penetration of mid-latitude troughs, associated with an intensified thermal wind and a longer jet streak, extending as far as Northwestern Africa. In the ‘southern’ category the Sub-Tropical Jet is associated with an anticyclonic flow over the south of the Arabian Peninsula, serving as an essential vehicle advecting moisture from tropical origins. This moisture pathway is considerably shorter than the south-western one. Several conditions favor precipitation induced by TPs over the domain: a northward migration of the jet streak resulting in a weakening of the wind speed over the target area, a deeper trough at the 500 hPa level and a shorter moisture corridor.

  14. "Tropical Plumes over the Middle East: Climatology and synoptic conditions"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayan, Uri; Tubi, Amit

    2015-04-01

    A 10-yr climatological study of Tropical Plumes (TPs) observed over the Middle East was undertaken. Several tools were used to identify and analyze these mid-tropospheric elongated cloudbands: satellite images, reanalysis and radiosonde data, backward trajectories, and cluster analysis. In order to conduct an in-depth examination of the synoptic conditions controlling this tropical-extratropical phenomenon, a dual methodology was adopted. In the first analysis, the identified 45 plumes were classified to precipitative and non-precipitative. In the second analysis, backward trajectories of the plumes were clustered in order to detect their moisture origins and pathways. In addition to the well documented south-western plumes originating in West Africa, a more southern pathway was identified, in which moisture was transported from Central to East African sources. The 'south-western' plumes are associated with a southwards penetration of mid-latitude troughs, associated with an intensified thermal wind and a longer jet streak, extending as far as Northwestern Africa. In the 'southern' category the Sub-Tropical Jet is associated with an anticyclonic flow over the south of the Arabian Peninsula, serving as an essential vehicle advecting moisture from tropical origins. This moisture pathway is considerably shorter than the south-western one. Several conditions favor precipitation induced by TPs over the domain: a northward migration of the jet streak resulting in a weakening of the wind speed over the target area, a deeper trough at the 500 hPa level and a shorter moisture corridor.

  15. Tropical Tropospheric Ozone Climatology: Approaches Based on SHADOZ Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Chatfield, Robert B.; Hudson, Robert D.; Andrade, Marcos; Coetzee, Geert J. R.; Posny, Francoise

    2004-01-01

    The SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) ozone sounding network was initiated in 1998 to improve the coverage of tropical in-situ ozone measurements for satellite validation, algorithm development and related process studies. Over 2000 soundings have been archived at the central website, , for 12 stations that span the entire equatorial zone [Thompson et al., JGR, 108,8238, 2003]. The most striking features of tropospheric ozone profiles in SHADOZ are: (1) persistent longitudinal variability in tropospheric ozone profiles, with a 10-15 DU column-integrated difference between Atlantic and Pacific sites; (2) intense short-term variability triggered by changing meteorological conditions and advection of pollution. The implications of these results for profile climatologies and trends are described along with several approaches to classifying ozone profiles: 1) Seasonal means during MAM (March-April-May) and SON (September-October-November); 2) Maxima and minima, identified through correlation of TOMS-derived TTO (tropical tropospheric ozone) column depth with the sonde integrated tropospheric ozone column; and 3) Meteorological regimes, a technique that is effective in the subtropics where tropical and mid-latitude conditions alternate.

  16. Climatology of daily rainfall semivariance in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Beek, C. Z.; Leijnse, H.; Torfs, P. J. J. F.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2010-03-01

    Rain gauges can offer high quality rainfall measurements at their location. Networks of rain gauges can offer better insight into the space-time variability of rainfall, but they tend to be too widely spaced for accurate estimates between points. While remote sensing systems, such as radars and networks of microwave links, can offer good insight in the spatial variability of rainfall they tend to have more problems in identifying the correct rain amounts at the ground. A way to estimate the variability of rainfall between gauge points is to interpolate between them using fitted variograms. If a dense rain gauge network is lacking it is difficult to estimate accurate variograms. In this paper a 30-year dataset of daily rain accumulations gathered at 29 automatic weather stations operated by KNMI and a one-year dataset of 10 gauges in a network with a radius of 5 km around CESAR (Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research) are employed to estimate variograms. Fitted variogram parameters are shown to vary according to season, closely following simple cosine functions allowing for applications in catchment hydrology and rainfall field generation. Semivariances at short ranges during winter and spring tend to be underestimated, but summer and autumn are well predicted. This climatological semivariance can be employed to estimate the accuracy of the rainfall input to a hydrological model even with only few gauges in a given catchment area.

  17. Martian middle-atmosphere climatology from modern spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDunn, Tamara; Bougher, Stephen; Forget, Francois; Kleinboehl, Armin; Tolson, Robert

    We construct a climatology from middle atmosphere (˜ 40-130 km) temperature and den-sity data from the following instruments: MEx/SPICAM, MRO/MCS, MGS/Accelerometer, ODY/Accelerometer, and MRO/Accelerometer. We examine the data for trends with latitude, local time, season, and solar cycle, thereby characterizing the structure and climactic patterns of the middle atmosphere using modern datasets. In this talk we identify significant middle-altitude climate patterns, including: winter polar warming (WPW), areas of sub-freezing tem-peratures, patterns of the middle-atmosphere temperature bulge, and patterns of the mesopause altitude and temperature. We also explore the implications of these patterns in the data. In brief, middle-atmosphere WPW indicates dynamical patterns linking the lower, middle, and upper atmospheres. Areas of sub-freezing temperatures indicate locations where CO2 clouds can be expected to form. Finally, the temperature bulge and mesopause patterns identified again suggest distinct large-scale circulations. These results support previous findings that solar flux, lower-atmosphere dust loading, and gravity waves from the lower atmosphere sub-stantially impact the wind systems of the middle atmosphere and the resulting distribution of energy.

  18. Climatology and Impact of Convection on the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin; Pittman, Jasna

    2007-01-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in controlling the radiative balance and the chemical composition of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Mechanisms ranging from slow transport and dehydration under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions to fast transport in convection have been proposed as regulators of the amount of water vapor in this layer. However,.details of these mechanisms and their relative importance remain poorly understood, The recently completed Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4) campaign had the opportunity to sample the.TTL over the Eastern Tropical Pacific using ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne instruments. The main goal of this study is to provide the climatological context for this campaign of deep and overshooting convective activity using various satellite observations collected during the summertime. We use the Microwave Humidity Sensor (MRS) aboard the NOAA-18 satellite to investigate the horizontal extent.and the frequency of convection reaching and penetrating into the TTL. We use the Moderate Resolution I1l1aging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua satellite to investigate the frequency distribution of daytime cirrus clouds. We use the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission(TRMM) and CloudSat to investigate the vertical structure and distribution of hydrometeors in the convective cells, In addition to cloud measurements; we investigate the impact that convection has on the concentration of radiatively important gases such as water vapor and ozone in the TTL by examining satellite measurement obtained from the Microwave Limb Sounder(MLS) aboard the Aura satellite.

  19. Climatology and Genesis Environment of North Atlantic Polar Lows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Clio; Spengler, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Polar lows are intense maritime cyclones occurring during cold air outbreaks in high latitudes. We use the Melbourne University cyclone algorithm to detect and track polar lows. The algorithm employs the Laplacian of mean sea level pressure and is applied to the ERA-Interim reanalyses from 1979 to 2014. Track density maps indicate that polar lows mainly occur close to Svalbard, as well as in the northern Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea. This is in accordance to previous studies about polar low tracks densities which are using less objective method and shorter time periods. Also the cyclogenesis density correlates well with the winter-time climatology of cold air outbreaks. Furthermore, we present inter- and intra-annual variability of polar lows and its relation to the NAO as well as sea ice extent. We also differentiated the polar low genesis environment into forward and reverse shear conditions, where forward shear implies that the thermal and mean wind are in the same direction, whereas they are opposite for reverse shear conditions. The forward and reverse shear results based on the objective tracking are similar to a previous study based on polar low tracks from the STARS data set provided by MET Norway.

  20. Climatology of upper air temperature in the Eastern Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philandras, C. M.; Nastos, P. T.; Kapsomenakis, I. N.; Repapis, C. C.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to contribute to the climatology of upper air temperature in the Mediterranean region, during the period 1965-2011. For this purpose, both radiosonde recordings and gridded reanalysis datasets of upper air temperature from National Center for Environmental Prediction-National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP-NCAR) were used for seven barometric levels at 850 hPa, 700 hPa, 500 hPa, 300 hPa, 200 hPa, 150 hPa and 100 hPa. Trends and variability of upper air temperature were analyzed on annual and seasonal basis. Further, the impact of atmospheric circulation, by means of correlation between upper air temperature at different barometric levels and specific climatic indices such as Mediterranean Oscillation Index (MOI), North Sea Caspian Pattern Index (NCPI) and North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI), was also quantified. Our findings have given evidence that air temperature is increasing at a higher rate in lower/middle troposphere against upper, and this is very likely due to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

  1. The ``coming of age'' of land surface climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1990-08-01

    Land surface climates have never been more crucial that at the present. Scenarios of climatic change, say due to greenhouse warming, require successful prediction of the land surface characteristics since this is the locus of mankind's activities. Evaluation of the state-of-the-art land surface parameterization schemes has only just begun. Here we consider the performance of the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) when coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Climate Model (CCM). The land surface climatology generated by averaging the results of a three year model integration on a monthly basis is evaluated for the continent of Australia by comparison with published descriptions of a wide range of parameters. Proposals are outlined for improved methods of validation and testing the predictions of such complex biospheric submodels at least at continental scale. Future requirements for an interactive vegetation submodel are examined by assessing the generalized life zones predicted by the CCM as compared with the life zone types currently specified in the model and those predicted by the same GCM but using a simpler land-surface scheme. It is concluded that the climate community is now poised for the next crucial step towards a fully interactive land-surface climatic model.

  2. TRMM's Contribution to Our Knowledge of Climatology, Storms and Floods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has successfully completed nearly ten years in orbit. A brief review of the history and accomplishments of this joint mission between the U.S. and Japan is presented. Research highlights will focus on the seasonal cycle of a TRMM-based rainfall climatology, which takes advantage of the multiple rain estimates available from TRMM. Examples will be given of the use of TRMM data to diagnose the impact of man on precipitation patterns through urbanization and the effect of pollution. Use of TRMM data for tropical cyclone operational analysis in the U.S. will also be shown. Methods for generating 3-hourly rainfall information from multiple satellites using TRMM to calibrate all the information will be described as will application of such information to study extreme rainfall events and associated floods and landslides. These results will emphasize the breadth of science success achieved with the 10-year record of observations from the only rain radar and passive microwave instrument combination in space. The outlook for continued operation of the TRMM satellite and progress in TRMM science and applications will be addressed.

  3. Aerosol and Precipitation Chemistry Climatology for Bermuda: the Long View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. L.; Keene, W. C.; Galloway, J. N.; Prospero, J. M.; Cooper, O. R.; Eckhardt, S.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol and precipitation ionic composition have been measured on Bermuda from 1988 through 2009. Data for the period July 1988 to July 1998, and June 2006 to July 2009 were collected during two field campaigns supported by NSF. Wet-only precipitation and flow-sectored aerosol chemical composition have been sampled from the top of a walk-up tower and virtually identical sampling, handling and analytical protocols were used for both programs. A source-receptor climatology has been developed based on daily Flexpart trajectory retroplumes which characterize the residence time as a percentage of transport arriving from different source regions. This paper compares the composition and trends in composition by dominant source region comparing flow from the Eastern North America, the North Atlantic Ocean, and from locations off/downwind of North Africa. Transport from Eastern North America is further segregated into source regions in the NE US and the SE US/Gulf of Mexico. Annual volume weighted averages in non-seasalt sulfate illustrate a distinct secular decline since 1989, and the influence of transport as a controlling influence on this temporal trend will be quantified. The long term average composition will be compared with the more recent data record on Bermuda where the radiative characteristics of different types of aerosols were simultaneously measured.

  4. Generation of Fine Scale Wind and Wave Climatologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenberghe, F. C.; Filipot, J.; Mouche, A.

    2013-12-01

    A tool to generate 'on demand' large databases of atmospheric parameters at high resolution has been developed for defense applications. The approach takes advantage of the zooming and relocation capabilities of the embedded domains that can be found in regional models like the community Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF). The WRF model is applied to dynamically downscale NNRP, CFSR and ERA40 global analyses and to generate long records, up to 30 years, of hourly gridded data over 200km2 domains at 3km grid increment. To insure accuracy, observational data from the NCAR ADP historical database are used in combination with the Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (FDDA) techniques to constantly nudge the model analysis toward observations. The atmospheric model is coupled to secondary applications such as the NOAA's Wave Watch III model the Navy's APM Electromagnetic Propagation model, allowing the creation of high-resolution climatologies of surface winds, waves and electromagnetic propagation parameters. The system was applied at several coastal locations of the Mediterranean Sea where SAR wind and wave observations were available during the entire year of 2008. Statistical comparisons between the model output and SAR observations are presented. Issues related to the global input data, and the model drift, as well as the impact of the wind biases on wave simulations will be discussed.

  5. Low/Mid-latitude Ionospheric irregularities and scintillation climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Amr; Groves, K. M.; Mahrous, Ayman; Hussein, Fayrouz

    Ionospheric scintillation occur when radio signals propagate through an irregular ionosphere (e.g., plasma bubbles). Since plasma bubbles are regions of depleted ion and electron densities, a plasma bubble located on the satellite-to-ground signal path will cause radio signals to fluctuate in phase and amplitude. Ionospheric scintillation data were analyzed in the magnetic latitudinal field-of-view 29° N -13.4° N, observed by a stand-alone SCINDA (Scintillation Network Decision Aid) - GPS receiver at Helwan, Egypt (29.86° N, 31.32° E). A minimum 20° elevation cut off angle has been set in order to minimize the multipath effect. During the enhancing phase of the current solar cycle 24 (years 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013), the behaviour of the scintillation occurrence were characterized. The seasonal, annual and solar cycle variation of scintillation occurrence is investigated together with the Total Electron Content (TEC), to put in evidence the relation between the electron density gradients and the ionospheric irregularities causing scintillation. This study considers a first step to develop a scintillation climatology over Northern Africa.

  6. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida, Phase 2, Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2007-01-01

    The threat of lightning is a daily concern during the warm season in Florida. The forecasters at the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) at Johnson Spaceflight Center in Houston, TX consider lightning in their landing forecasts for space shuttles at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), FL Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The forecasters at the National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL (NWS MLB) do the same in their routine Terminal Aerodrome Forecasts (TAFs) for seven airports in the NWS MLB County Warning Area (CWA). The Applied Meteorology Unit created flow regime climatologies of lightning probability in the 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-n mi circles surrounding the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) and all airports in the NWS MLB county warning area in 1-, 3-, and 6-hour increments. The results were presented in tabular and graphical format and incorporated into a web-based graphical user interface so forecasters could easily navigate through the data and to make the GUI usable in any web browser on computers with different operating systems.

  7. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida: Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III

    2008-01-01

    This report describes work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to add composite soundings to the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). This allows National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters to compare the current atmospheric state with climatology. In a previous phase, the AMU created composite soundings for four rawinsonde observation stations in Florida, for each of eight flow regimes. The composite soundings were delivered to the NWS Melbourne (MLB) office for display using the NSHARP software program. NWS MLB requested that the AMU make the composite soundings available for display in AWIPS. The AMU first created a procedure to customize AWIPS so composite soundings could be displayed. A unique four-character identifier was created for each of the 32 composite soundings. The AMU wrote a Tool Command Language/Tool Kit (TcVTk) software program to convert the composite soundings from NSHARP to Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) format. The NetCDF files were then displayable by AWIPS.

  8. Steps Toward an EOS-Era Aerosol Type Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2012-01-01

    We still have a way to go to develop a global climatology of aerosol type from the EOS-era satellite data record that currently spans more than 12 years of observations. We have demonstrated the ability to retrieve aerosol type regionally, providing a classification based on the combined constraints on particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo (SSA) from the MISR instrument. Under good but not necessarily ideal conditions, the MISR data can distinguish three-to-five size bins, two-to-four bins in SSA, and spherical vs. non-spherical particles. However, retrieval sensitivity varies enormously with scene conditions. So, for example, there is less information about aerosol type when the mid-visible aerosol optical depth (AOD) is less that about 0.15 or 0.2, or when the range of scattering angles observed is reduced by solar geometry, even though the quality of the AOD retrieval itself is much less sensitive to these factors. This presentation will review a series of studies aimed at assessing the capabilities, as well as the limitations, of MISR aerosol type retrievals involving wildfire smoke, desert dust, volcanic ash, and urban pollution, in specific cases where suborbital validation data are available. A synthesis of results, planned upgrades to the MISR Standard aerosol algorithm to improve aerosol type retrievals, and steps toward the development of an aerosol type quality flag for the Standard product, will also be covered.

  9. Antarctic Ultraviolet Radiation Climatology from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubin, Dan

    2004-01-01

    This project has successfully produced a climatology of local noon spectral surface irradiance covering the Antarctic continent and the Southern Ocean, the spectral interval 290-700 nm (UV-A, UV-B, and photosynthetically active radiation, PAR), and the entire sunlit part of the year for November 1979-December 1999. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data were used to specify column ozone abundance and UV-A (360- or 380-nm) reflectivity, and passive microwave (MW) sea ice concentrations were used to specify the surface albedo over the Southern Ocean. For this latter task, sea ice concentration retrievals from the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and its successor, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) were identified with ultraviolet/visible-wavelength albedos based on an empirical TOMS/MW parameterization developed for this purpose (Lubin and Morrow, 2001). The satellite retrievals of surface albedo and UV-A reflectivity were used in a delta-Eddington radiative transfer model to estimate cloud effective optical depth. These optical depth estimates were then used along with the total ozone and surface albedo to calculate the downwelling spectral UV and PAR irradiance at the surface. These spectral irradiance maps were produced for every usable day of TOMS data between 1979-1999 (every other day early in the TOMS program, daily later on).

  10. Updated population metadata for United States historical climatology network stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, T.W.; Gallo, K.P.

    2000-01-01

    The United States Historical Climatology Network (HCN) serial temperature dataset is comprised of 1221 high-quality, long-term climate observing stations. The HCN dataset is available in several versions, one of which includes population-based temperature modifications to adjust urban temperatures for the "heat-island" effect. Unfortunately, the decennial population metadata file is not complete as missing values are present for 17.6% of the 12 210 population values associated with the 1221 individual stations during the 1900-90 interval. Retrospective grid-based populations. Within a fixed distance of an HCN station, were estimated through the use of a gridded population density dataset and historically available U.S. Census county data. The grid-based populations for the HCN stations provide values derived from a consistent methodology compared to the current HCN populations that can vary as definitions of the area associated with a city change over time. The use of grid-based populations may minimally be appropriate to augment populations for HCN climate stations that lack any population data, and are recommended when consistent and complete population data are required. The recommended urban temperature adjustments based on the HCN and grid-based methods of estimating station population can be significantly different for individual stations within the HCN dataset.

  11. Solar activity and Perseid meteor heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buček, M.; Porubčan, V.; Zigo, P.

    2012-04-01

    Photographic meteor heights of the Perseid meteoroid stream compiled in the IAU Meteor Data Center catalogue observed in 1939-1992, covering five solar activity cycles, are analyzed and their potential variation within a solar activity cycle is investigated and discussed. Of the 673 Perseids selected from the catalogue, the variations of the heights for three independent sets: 524 Perseids with known information on both heights, 397 with known brightness and 279 with the geocentric velocity within a one sigma limit, were investigated. The observed beginning and endpoint heights of the Perseids, normalized for the geocentric velocity and the absolute photographic magnitude correlated with the solar activity represented by the relative sunspot number R, do not exhibit a variation consistent with the solar activity cycle. The result, confirmed also by the correlation analysis, is derived for the mass ranges of larger meteoroids observed by photographic techniques. However, a possible variation of meteor heights controlled by solar activity for smaller meteoroids detected by television and radio techniques remains still open and has to be verified.

  12. Approach for a Global Height Reference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihde, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Hermann Drewes, Christoph Foerste, Thomas Gruber, Gunter Liebsch, Roland Pail, Laura Sanchez For Earth system monitoring the heights are main parameters for global changes. Physical heights are potential differences of the outer Earth gravity field at different positions. Long term monitoring of the vertical component of the Earth surface needs a standardized defined and realized global reference relating the geometry and the gravity field of the Earth. In the last two decades, in several working groups of the International Association of Geodesy were different concepts for definition and realization of global height reference system discussed. Furthermore, the satellite gravity missions have the Earth gravity field data basis general extended. So far, it is possible to develop the present local and regional height reference systems concepts to a global approach. The presented proposal has to be understood as a model that consider the present possibilities and actual needs for the realization of a global height reference system. It includes aspects for the combination of observations and products representing the geometry and the gravity field of the Earth.

  13. The Effects of Microgravity on Seated Height (Spinal Elongation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, K. S.; Rajulu, S.

    2011-01-01

    two with the commander and pilot seats on the top and the two remaining seats underneath, thereby limiting the amount of clearance for the crewmembers seated in the bottom seat. The inner mold line of these types of vehicles are fixed due to other design constraints; therefore, it is essential that all seats incorporate additional clearance to account for adequate spinal growth thereby ensuring that the crew can safely ingress the seat and be strapped in prior to its return to earth. If there is not enough clearance to account for spinal growth deltas between seats then there is the potential that crewmembers will not be able to comfortably and safely fit into their seats. The crewmember in the bottom stacked seat may even have negative clearance with the seat above him or her which could lead to potential ingress/egress issues or potentially injury of the crewmember during landing. These impacts are specific to these types of vehicles with stacked seat configuration. Without proper knowledge of the amount of spinal elongation, or growth, which occurs due to microgravity and space flight, the design of future vehicle(s) or suits may cause injury, discomfort, and limit crew accommodation and crew complements. The experiment primarily aimed to collect seated height data for subjects exposed to microgravity environments, and feed new information regarding the effect of elongation of the spine forward into the design of the Orion. The data collected during the experiment included, two seated height measurement and two digital pictures of seated height pre-, in-, and post-flight. In addition to seated height, crewmembers had an optional task of collecting stature , standing height. Seated height data was obtained from 29 crewmembers that included 8 ISS increment crew (2 females and 6 males) and 21 Shuttle crew (1 female, 20 males), and whose mean age was 48 years ( 4 years). This study utilized the last six Shuttle flights, STS-128 to STS-134. The results show that

  14. Extending and Merging the Purple Crow Lidar Temperature Climatologies Using the Inversion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Ali; Sica, R. J.; Argall, P. S.

    2016-06-01

    Rayleigh and Raman scatter measurements from The University of Western Ontario Purple Crow Lidar (PCL) have been used to develop temperature climatologies for the stratosphere, mesosphere, and thermosphere using data from 1994 to 2013 (Rayleigh system) and from 1999 to 2013 (vibrational Raman system). Temperature retrievals from Rayleigh-scattering lidar measurements have been performed using the methods by Hauchecorne and Chanin (1980; henceforth HC) and Khanna et al. (2012). Argall and Sica (2007) used the HC method to compute a climatology of the PCL measurements from 1994 to 2004 for 35 to 110 km, while Iserhienrhien et al. (2013) applied the same technique from 1999 to 2007 for 10 to 35 km. Khanna et al. (2012) used the inversion technique to retrieve atmospheric temperature profiles and found that it had advantages over the HC method. This paper presents an extension of the PCL climatologies created by Argall and Sica (2007) and Iserhienrhien et al. (2013). Both the inversion and HC methods were used to form the Rayleigh climatology, while only the latter was adopted for the Raman climatology. Then, two different approaches were used to merge the climatologies from 10 to 110 km. Among four different functional identities, a trigonometric hyperbolic relation results in the best choice for merging temperature profiles between the Raman and Low level Rayleigh channels, with an estimated uncertainty of 0.9 K for merging temperatures. Also, error function produces best result with uncertainty of 0.7 K between the Low Level Rayleigh and High Level Rayleigh channels. The results show that the temperature climatologies produced by the HC method when using a seed pressure are comparable to the climatologies produced by the inversion method. The Rayleigh extended climatology is slightly warmer below 80 km and slightly colder above 80 km. There are no significant differences in temperature between the extended and the previous Raman channel climatologies. Through out

  15. Zebra finches are able to learn affixation-like patterns.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiani; Jansen, Naomi; ten Cate, Carel

    2016-01-01

    Adding an affix to transform a word is common across the world languages, with the edges of words more likely to carry out such a function. However, detecting affixation patterns is also observed in learning tasks outside the domain of language, suggesting that the underlying mechanism from which affixation patterns have arisen may not be language or even human specific. We addressed whether a songbird, the zebra finch, is able to discriminate between, and generalize, affixation-like patterns. Zebra finches were trained and tested in a Go/Nogo paradigm to discriminate artificial song element sequences resembling prefixed and suffixed 'words.' The 'stems' of the 'words,' consisted of different combinations of a triplet of song elements, to which a fourth element was added as either a 'prefix' or a 'suffix.' After training, the birds were tested with novel stems, consisting of either rearranged familiar element types or novel element types. The birds were able to generalize the affixation patterns to novel stems with both familiar and novel element types. Hence, the discrimination resulting from the training was not based on memorization of individual stimuli, but on a shared property among Go or Nogo stimuli, i.e., affixation patterns. Remarkably, birds trained with suffixation as Go pattern showed clear evidence of using both prefix and suffix, while those trained with the prefix as the Go stimulus used primarily the prefix. This finding illustrates that an asymmetry in attending to different affixations is not restricted to human languages. PMID:26297477

  16. The height of watermelons with wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feierl, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    We derive asymptotics for the moments as well as the weak limit of the height distribution of watermelons with p branches with wall. This generalizes a famous result of de Bruijn et al (1972 Graph Theory and Computing (New York: Academic) pp 15-22) on the average height of planted plane trees, and results by Fulmek (2007 Electron. J. Combin. 14 R64) and Katori et al (2008 J. Stat. Phys. 131 1067-83) on the expected value and higher moments, respectively, of the height distribution of watermelons with two branches. The asymptotics for the moments depend on the analytic behaviour of certain multidimensional Dirichlet series. In order to obtain this information, we prove a reciprocity relation satisfied by the derivatives of one of Jacobi’s theta functions, which generalizes the well-known reciprocity law for Jacobi’s theta functions.

  17. The height limit of a siphon

    PubMed Central

    Boatwright, A.; Hughes, S.; Barry, J.

    2015-01-01

    The maximum height of a siphon is generally assumed to be dependent on barometric pressure—about 10 m at sea level. This limit arises because the pressure in a siphon above the upper reservoir level is below the ambient pressure, and when the height of a siphon approaches 10 m, the pressure at the crown of the siphon falls below the vapour pressure of water causing water to boil breaking the column. After breaking, the columns on either side are supported by differential pressure between ambient and the low-pressure region at the top of the siphon. Here we report an experiment of a siphon operating at sea level at a height of 15 m, well above 10 m. Prior degassing of the water prevented cavitation. This experiment provides conclusive evidence that siphons operate through gravity and molecular cohesion. PMID:26628323

  18. The height limit of a siphon.

    PubMed

    Boatwright, A; Hughes, S; Barry, J

    2015-01-01

    The maximum height of a siphon is generally assumed to be dependent on barometric pressure-about 10 m at sea level. This limit arises because the pressure in a siphon above the upper reservoir level is below the ambient pressure, and when the height of a siphon approaches 10 m, the pressure at the crown of the siphon falls below the vapour pressure of water causing water to boil breaking the column. After breaking, the columns on either side are supported by differential pressure between ambient and the low-pressure region at the top of the siphon. Here we report an experiment of a siphon operating at sea level at a height of 15 m, well above 10 m. Prior degassing of the water prevented cavitation. This experiment provides conclusive evidence that siphons operate through gravity and molecular cohesion. PMID:26628323

  19. The height limit of a siphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatwright, A.; Hughes, S.; Barry, J.

    2015-12-01

    The maximum height of a siphon is generally assumed to be dependent on barometric pressure—about 10 m at sea level. This limit arises because the pressure in a siphon above the upper reservoir level is below the ambient pressure, and when the height of a siphon approaches 10 m, the pressure at the crown of the siphon falls below the vapour pressure of water causing water to boil breaking the column. After breaking, the columns on either side are supported by differential pressure between ambient and the low-pressure region at the top of the siphon. Here we report an experiment of a siphon operating at sea level at a height of 15 m, well above 10 m. Prior degassing of the water prevented cavitation. This experiment provides conclusive evidence that siphons operate through gravity and molecular cohesion.

  20. Evidence of Inbreeding Depression on Human Height

    PubMed Central

    McQuillan, Ruth; Eklund, Niina; Pirastu, Nicola; Kuningas, Maris; McEvoy, Brian P.; Esko, Tõnu; Corre, Tanguy; Davies, Gail; Kaakinen, Marika; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Kristiansson, Kati; Havulinna, Aki S.; Gögele, Martin; Vitart, Veronique; Tenesa, Albert; Aulchenko, Yurii; Hayward, Caroline; Johansson, Åsa; Boban, Mladen; Ulivi, Sheila; Robino, Antonietta; Boraska, Vesna; Igl, Wilmar; Wild, Sarah H.; Zgaga, Lina; Amin, Najaf; Theodoratou, Evropi; Polašek, Ozren; Girotto, Giorgia; Lopez, Lorna M.; Sala, Cinzia; Lahti, Jari; Laatikainen, Tiina; Prokopenko, Inga; Kals, Mart; Viikari, Jorma; Yang, Jian; Pouta, Anneli; Estrada, Karol; Hofman, Albert; Freimer, Nelson; Martin, Nicholas G.; Kähönen, Mika; Milani, Lili; Heliövaara, Markku; Vartiainen, Erkki; Räikkönen, Katri; Masciullo, Corrado; Starr, John M.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Esposito, Laura; Kolčić, Ivana; Farrington, Susan M.; Oostra, Ben; Zemunik, Tatijana; Campbell, Harry; Kirin, Mirna; Pehlic, Marina; Faletra, Flavio; Porteous, David; Pistis, Giorgio; Widén, Elisabeth; Salomaa, Veikko; Koskinen, Seppo; Fischer, Krista; Lehtimäki, Terho; Heath, Andrew; McCarthy, Mark I.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Montgomery, Grant W.; Tiemeier, Henning; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Madden, Pamela A. F.; d'Adamo, Pio; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wright, Alan F.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Dunlop, Malcolm; Rudan, Igor; Gasparini, Paolo; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Deary, Ian J.; Toniolo, Daniela; Eriksson, Johan G.; Jula, Antti; Raitakari, Olli T.; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Uitterlinden, André; Visscher, Peter M.; Wilson, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Stature is a classical and highly heritable complex trait, with 80%–90% of variation explained by genetic factors. In recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified many common additive variants influencing human height; however, little attention has been given to the potential role of recessive genetic effects. Here, we investigated genome-wide recessive effects by an analysis of inbreeding depression on adult height in over 35,000 people from 21 different population samples. We found a highly significant inverse association between height and genome-wide homozygosity, equivalent to a height reduction of up to 3 cm in the offspring of first cousins compared with the offspring of unrelated individuals, an effect which remained after controlling for the effects of socio-economic status, an important confounder (χ2 = 83.89, df = 1; p = 5.2×10−20). There was, however, a high degree of heterogeneity among populations: whereas the direction of the effect was consistent across most population samples, the effect size differed significantly among populations. It is likely that this reflects true biological heterogeneity: whether or not an effect can be observed will depend on both the variance in homozygosity in the population and the chance inheritance of individual recessive genotypes. These results predict that multiple, rare, recessive variants influence human height. Although this exploratory work focuses on height alone, the methodology developed is generally applicable to heritable quantitative traits (QT), paving the way for an investigation into inbreeding effects, and therefore genetic architecture, on a range of QT of biomedical importance. PMID:22829771

  1. Micropulse lidar-derived aerosol optical depth climatology at ARM sites worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, D. N.; Coulter, R. L.

    2013-07-01

    This paper focuses on climatology of the vertical distribution of aerosol optical depth (AOD (z)) from micropulse lidar (MPL) observations for climatically different locations worldwide. For this, a large data set obtained by MPL systems operating at 532 nm during the 4 year period 2007-2010 was used to derive vertical profiles of AOD (z) by combining the corresponding AOD data as an input from an independent measurement using nearly colocated multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) systems at five different U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites—three permanent sites (SGP in north-central Oklahoma, at 36.6°N, 97.5°W, 320 m; TWP-Darwin in the tropical western Pacific, at 12.4°S, 130.9°E, 30 m; and NSA at Barrow on the North Slope of Alaska, at 71.3°N, 156.6°W, 8 m) and two mobile facility sites (GRW at Graciosa Island in the Azores, at 39°N, 28°W, 15 m; and FKB in the Black Forest of Germany, at 48.5°N, 8.4°E, 511 m). Therefore, amount of data used in this study is constrained by the availability of the MFRSR data. The MPL raw data were averaged for 30 s in time and 30 m in altitude. The diurnally averaged AOD (z) profiles from 4 years were combined to obtain a multiyear vertical profile of AOD (z) climatology at various ARM sites, including diurnal, day-to-day, and seasonal variabilities. Most aerosols were found to be confined to 0-2 km (approximately the planetary boundary layer region) at all sites; however, all sites exhibited measurable aerosols well above the mixed layer, with different height maxima. The entire data set demonstrates large day-to-day variability at all sites. However, there is no significant diurnal variation in AOD (z) at all sites. Significant interannual variability was observed at the SGP site. Clear seasonal variations in AOD (z) profiles exist for all five sites, but seasonal behavior was distinct. Moreover, the different seasonal variability for the lower level (0 to ~2

  2. A total ozone-dependent ozone profile climatology based on ozonesondes and Aura MLS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labow, Gordon J.; Ziemke, Jerald R.; McPeters, Richard D.; Haffner, David P.; Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2015-03-01

    Ozone profiles measured with the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and ozonesondes are used to create a new ozone climatology that can be used for satellite retrievals and radiative transfer studies. The climatology is binned according to total column ozone amount and latitude rather than with season. Because of high correlation between ozone profile shape and total ozone, the ozone profiles in this climatology capture ozone variations well, especially near the tropopause. This climatology has been constructed from nearly a million individual MLS ozone profile measurements taken between 2004 and 2013 as well as over 55,000 ozonesonde measurements from 1988 to 2011. The MLS profiles were sorted by total column ozone as measured by Ozone Monitoring Instrument in observations that were coincident with the MLS measurements. The data from the sondes were used in the troposphere and lower stratosphere and MLS in the middle and upper stratosphere. These two data sets were blended together between 13 and 17 km (~159-88 hPa). This climatology consists of average ozone profiles as a function of total ozone for six 30° latitude bands covering altitudes between 0 and 75 km (in Z* pressure altitude coordinates) as well as the corresponding standard deviations for each layer. There is no seasonal component. This new climatology shows some remarkable and somewhat unexpected correlations between the total column ozone and the ozone amount at some layers, particularly in the lower and middle troposphere in some latitude bands.

  3. Polar vortices on Earth and Mars: A comparative study of the climatology and variability from reanalyses

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, D M; Montabone, L; Thomson, S; Read, P L

    2015-01-01

    Polar vortices on Mars provide case-studies to aid understanding of geophysical vortex dynamics and may help to resolve long-standing issues regarding polar vortices on Earth. Due to the recent development of the first publicly available Martian reanalysis dataset (MACDA), for the first time we are able to characterise thoroughly the structure and evolution of the Martian polar vortices, and hence perform a systematic comparison with the polar vortices on Earth. The winter atmospheric circulations of the two planets are compared, with a specific focus on the structure and evolution of the polar vortices. The Martian residual meridional overturning circulation is found to be very similar to the stratospheric residual circulation on Earth during winter. While on Earth this residual circulation is very different from the Eulerian circulation, on Mars it is found to be very similar. Unlike on Earth, it is found that the Martian polar vortices are annular, and that the Northern Hemisphere vortex is far stronger than its southern counterpart. While winter hemisphere differences in vortex strength are also reported on Earth, the contrast is not as large. Distinctions between the two planets are also apparent in terms of the climatological vertical structure of the vortices, in that the Martian polar vortices are observed to decrease in size at higher altitudes, whereas on Earth the opposite is observed. Finally, it is found that the Martian vortices are less variable through the winter than on Earth, especially in terms of the vortex geometry. During one particular major regional dust storm on Mars (Martian year 26), an equatorward displacement of the vortex is observed, sharing some qualitative characteristics of sudden stratospheric warmings on Earth. PMID:26300564

  4. Replacing climatological potential evapotranspiration estimates with dynamic satellite-based observations in operational hydrologic prediction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, K. J.; Bowman, A. L.; Hogue, T. S.; Kim, J.; Spies, R.

    2011-12-01

    In the face of a changing climate, growing populations, and increased human habitation in hydrologically risky locations, both short- and long-range planners increasingly require robust and reliable streamflow forecast information. Current operational forecasting utilizes watershed-scale, conceptual models driven by ground-based (commonly point-scale) observations of precipitation and temperature and climatological potential evapotranspiration (PET) estimates. The PET values are derived from historic pan evaporation observations and remain static from year-to-year. The need for regional dynamic PET values is vital for improved operational forecasting. With the advent of satellite remote sensing and the adoption of a more flexible operational forecast system by the National Weather Service, incorporation of advanced data products is now more feasible than in years past. In this study, we will test a previously developed satellite-derived PET product (UCLA MODIS-PET) in the National Weather Service forecast models and compare the model results to current methods. The UCLA MODIS-PET method is based on the Priestley-Taylor formulation, is driven with MODIS satellite products, and produces a daily, 250m PET estimate. The focus area is eight headwater basins in the upper Midwest U.S. There is a need to develop improved forecasting methods for this region that are able to account for climatic and landscape changes more readily and effectively than current methods. This region is highly flood prone yet sensitive to prolonged dry periods in late summer and early fall, and is characterized by a highly managed landscape, which has drastically altered the natural hydrologic cycle. Our goal is to improve model simulations, and thereby, the initial conditions prior to the start of a forecast through the use of PET values that better reflect actual watershed conditions. The forecast models are being tested in both distributed and lumped mode.

  5. United States Historical Climatology Network Daily Temperature and Precipitation Data (1871-1997)

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, D.R.

    2002-10-28

    This document describes a database containing daily observations of maximum and minimum temperature, precipitation amount, snowfall amount, and snow depth from 1062 observing stations across the contiguous US. This database is an expansion and update of the original 138-station database previously released by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) as CDIAC numeric data package NDP-042. These 1062 stations are a subset of the 1221-station US Historical Climatology Network (HCN), a monthly database compiled by the National Climatic Data Center (Asheville, North Carolina) that has been widely used in analyzing US climate. Data from 1050 of these daily records extend into the 1990s, while 990 of these extend through 1997. Most station records are essentially complete for at least 40 years; the latest beginning year of record is 1948. Records from 158 stations begin prior to 1900, with that of Charleston, South Carolina beginning the earliest (1871). The daily resolution of these data makes them extremely valuable for studies attempting to detect and monitor long-term climatic changes on a regional scale. Studies using daily data may be able to detect changes in regional climate that would not be apparent from analysis of monthly temperature and precipitation data. Such studies may include analyses of trends in maximum and minimum temperatures, temperature extremes, daily temperature range, precipitation ''event size'' frequency, and the magnitude and duration of wet and dry periods. The data are also valuable in areas such as regional climate model validation and climate change impact assessment. This database is available free of charge from CDIAC as a numeric data package (NDP).

  6. Expressing gait-line symmetry in able-bodied gait

    PubMed Central

    Jeleń, Piotr; Wit, Andrzej; Dudziński, Krzysztof; Nolan, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Background Gait-lines, or the co-ordinates of the progression of the point of application of the vertical ground reaction force, are a commonly reported parameter in most in-sole measuring systems. However, little is known about what is considered a "normal" or "abnormal" gait-line pattern or level of asymmetry. Furthermore, no reference databases on healthy young populations are available for this parameter. Thus the aim of this study is to provide such reference data in order to allow this tool to be better used in gait analysis. Methods Vertical ground reaction force data during several continuous gait cycles were collected using a Computer Dyno Graphy in-sole system® for 77 healthy young able-bodied subjects. A curve (termed gait-line) was obtained from the co-ordinates of the progression of the point of application of the force. An Asymmetry Coefficient Curve (AsC) was calculated between the mean gait-lines for the left and right foot for each subject. AsC limits of ± 1.96 and 3 standard deviations (SD) from the mean were then calculated. Gait-line data from 5 individual subjects displaying pathological gait due to disorders relating to the discopathy of the lumbar spine (three with considerable plantarflexor weakness, two with considerable dorsiflexor weakness) were compared to the AsC results from the able-bodied group. Results The ± 1.96 SD limit suggested that non-pathological gait falls within 12–16% asymmetry for gait-lines. Those exhibiting pathological gait fell outside both the ± 1.96 and ± 3SD limits at several points during stance. The subjects exhibiting considerable plantarflexor weakness all fell outside the ± 1.96SD limit from 30–50% of foot length to toe-off while those exhibiting considerable dorsiflexor weakness fell outside the ± 1.96SD limit between initial contact to 25–40% of foot length, and then surpassed the ± 3SD limit after 55–80% of foot length. Conclusion This analysis of gait-line asymmetry provides a reference

  7. The use of climatologies and Bayesian models to link observations to outcomes; an example from the Torres Strait.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Scott; Berkelmans, Ray

    2014-05-01

    After widespread coral bleaching in the Torres Strait in 2009-2010 a monitoring program was established under the National Environmental Research Program and run by the Torres Strait Regional Authority to identify ocean conditions that may lead to future bleaching. One component of this program was a real time ocean monitoring station located between Thursday and Horn Islands in the south-western part of the Torres Strait. A key outcome of the project was to make the scientific data and knowledge available to the local communities in a form that they could engage with and with which they could act to instigate outcomes relevant to their needs. The project developed climatologies to give context to the temperature data allowing for historical limits to define the significance of the real time data as related to the longer term mean. This allowed the identification of 'normal', 'significant' and 'extreme' temperature events which could be linked into appropriate responses. Bayesian models were used to encapsulate the current scientific knowledge about the drivers and responses involved in coral bleaching. These models were used to convert the environmental parameters to an output index reflecting the current and future likelihood of coral bleaching occurring. Two web sites were used to integrate the real time data, climatology data and the bleaching indices generated from the Bayesian models. The first was a more technical site developed for the local environmental managers within the Torres Strait Regional Authority, the second was targeted at the general public with a display located within the local radio station and broadcast on a daily basis. Engagement with the project has been high to the point where additional monitoring stations and data display kiosks are to be installed in the near future. The combination of climatologies to give context and conceptual models to embody system knowledge has allowed the project to go from delivering simple measurements to

  8. Endocrine disrupters: the new players able to affect the epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Casati, Lavinia; Sendra, Ramon; Sibilia, Valeria; Celotti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics represents the way by which the environment is able to program the genome; there are three main levels of epigenetic control on genome: DNA methylation, post-translational histone modification and microRNA expression. The term Epigenetics has been widened by NIH to include “both heritable changes in gene activity and expression but also stable, long-term alterations in the transcriptional potential of a cell that are not necessarily heritable.” These changes might be produced mostly by the early life environment and might affect health influencing the susceptibility to develop diseases, from cancer to mental disorder, during the entire life span. The most studied environmental influences acting on epigenome are diet, infections, wasting, child care, smoking and environmental pollutants, in particular endocrine disrupters (EDs). These are environmental xenobiotics able to interfere with the normal development of the male and female reproductive systems of wildlife, of experimental animals and possibly of humans, disrupting the normal reproductive functions. Data from literature indicate that EDs can act at different levels of epigenetic control, in some cases transgenerationally, in particular when the exposure to these compounds occurs during the prenatal and earliest period of life. Some of the best characterized EDs will be considered in this review. Among the EDs, vinclozolin (VZ), and methoxychlor (MXC) promote epigenetic transgenerational effects. Polychlorinated biphenils (PCBs), the most widespread environmental EDs, affect histone post-translational modifications in a dimorphic way, possibly as the result of an alteration of gene expression of the enzymes involved in histone modification, as the demethylase Jarid1b, an enzyme also involved in regulating the interaction of androgens with their receptor. PMID:26151052

  9. Endocrine disrupters: the new players able to affect the epigenome.

    PubMed

    Casati, Lavinia; Sendra, Ramon; Sibilia, Valeria; Celotti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics represents the way by which the environment is able to program the genome; there are three main levels of epigenetic control on genome: DNA methylation, post-translational histone modification and microRNA expression. The term Epigenetics has been widened by NIH to include "both heritable changes in gene activity and expression but also stable, long-term alterations in the transcriptional potential of a cell that are not necessarily heritable." These changes might be produced mostly by the early life environment and might affect health influencing the susceptibility to develop diseases, from cancer to mental disorder, during the entire life span. The most studied environmental influences acting on epigenome are diet, infections, wasting, child care, smoking and environmental pollutants, in particular endocrine disrupters (EDs). These are environmental xenobiotics able to interfere with the normal development of the male and female reproductive systems of wildlife, of experimental animals and possibly of humans, disrupting the normal reproductive functions. Data from literature indicate that EDs can act at different levels of epigenetic control, in some cases transgenerationally, in particular when the exposure to these compounds occurs during the prenatal and earliest period of life. Some of the best characterized EDs will be considered in this review. Among the EDs, vinclozolin (VZ), and methoxychlor (MXC) promote epigenetic transgenerational effects. Polychlorinated biphenils (PCBs), the most widespread environmental EDs, affect histone post-translational modifications in a dimorphic way, possibly as the result of an alteration of gene expression of the enzymes involved in histone modification, as the demethylase Jarid1b, an enzyme also involved in regulating the interaction of androgens with their receptor. PMID:26151052

  10. Modeling Dynamic Height and Crown Growth in Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, O.; Fransson, P.; Brännström, Å.

    2015-12-01

    Previously we have shown how principles based on productivity maximization (e.g. maximization of net primary production, net growth maximization, or functional balance) can explain allocation responses to resources, such as nutrients and light (Franklin et al., 2012). However, the success of these approaches depend on how well they align with the ultimate driver of plant behavior, fitness, or life time reproductive success. Consequently, they may not fully explain how allocation changes during the life cycle of trees where not only growth but also survival and reproduction are important. In addition, maximizing instantaneous productivity does not account for path dependence of tree growth. For example, maximizing productivity during early growth in shade may delay emergence in the forest canopy and reduce lifetime fitness compared to a more height oriented strategy. Here we present an approach to model how growth of stem diameter and leaf area in relation to stem height dynamically responds to light conditions in a way that maximizes life-time fitness (rather than instantaneous growth). The model is able to predict growth of trees growing in different types of forests, including trees emerging under a closed canopy and seedlings planted in a clear-cut area. It can also predict the response to sudden changes in the light environment, due to disturbances or harvesting. We envisage two main applications of the model, (i) Modeling effects of forest management, including thinning and planting (ii) Elucidating height growth strategies in trees and how they can be represented in vegetation models. ReferenceFranklin O, Johansson J, Dewar RC, Dieckmann U, McMurtrie RE, Brännström Å, Dybzinski R. 2012. Modeling carbon allocation in trees: a search for principles. Tree Physiology 32(6): 648-666.

  11. Modeling the plasmasphere to topside ionosphere scale height ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Pencho; Kutiev, Ivan; Belehaki, Anna; Tsagouri, Ioanna

    2015-08-01

    A new model of plasmasphere to topside ionosphere scale heights ratio is developed, based on topside electron density (Ne) profiles deduced from the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS)-1 satellite measurements. The model is able to improve operational algorithms for space weather predictions. The topside ionospheric and plasmaspheric scale heights are determined by the lowest and largest gradients of measured profiles, respectively, converted in dh/dlnNe units. The new model depends on four parameters: the month of the year (M), the local time (LT), the geomagnetic latitude (glat), and the ln(O+) density (zO) at the O+-H+ ion transition height. It is designed to replace the old one-dimensional model of the ratio in the TaD (TSM-assisted Digisonde) profiler. The parameters M, LT, and glat are approximated by trigonometric basis functions, while zO is described by a polynomial. A series of models were produced with different number of coefficients (number of terms) of the basis functions. Comparison between models revealed that those with larger number of coefficients can produce unrealistic extremes of the model curves due to the non-uniform sampling of data along the axes. Further considered is the simplest model approximating M, LT, and glat by simple 24 sinusoidal functions and linearly depending on zO. The model description and its 54 coefficients are given in Appendix 1 and can be used by other users for reconstruction of plasmasphere density profiles. The main variation of the ratio along geomagnetic latitude at fixed values of the other model parameters is illustrated in a series of plots.

  12. Global dust altitude climatology based on CALIPSO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamalis, C.; Chedin, A.; Peyridieu, S.

    2011-12-01

    seasonal climatology with both day and night time data during the last 5 years (June 2006 - May 2011) with a horizontal resolution of 1 degree. Two classes of aerosols are used from the L2 product: dust and polluted dust. It is known that the polluted dust class may also contain smoke or polluted continental aerosols, but the results on the regions possibly contaminated by these aerosols are treated with caution and generally avoided. Results show that both dust mean altitude (a.s.l.) and geometrical thickness present an obvious seasonal dependence with lower values during winter and higher values during summer. Also, there is a contrast land-sea, especially for the geometrical thickness, with higher values, more dispersed, above continents. For the dust belt the altitude is ~2 km during winter, while it reaches ~3 km during summer; the dust geometrical thickness goes from about 2 km in the Sahel region during winter to its maximum of ~3 km above Sahara and the Arabian Peninsula during summer. Above the desert regions of central Asia, altitudes over 5.5 km are observed during spring, with the subsequent long-range transport at ~4.5 km towards North America. The results are, in general, coherent with ECMWF ERA-Interim climatological wind data during the CALIPSO measurement period.

  13. Throwing velocity and jump height in female water polo players: performance predictors.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Lisa; Lynskey, Sharon; Leung, Chak Kei; Woodhouse, Danielle; Briffa, Kathy; Hopper, Diana

    2010-03-01

    Throwing velocity and vertical jumping ability are essential components for shooting and passing in water polo. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between throwing velocity and water jump height in highly skilled female water polo players. Throwing velocity and head height at ball release were measured in twenty-two female players (age 20.41 years (6.16); weight 68.28 kg (8.87)) with two 50 frames per second cameras while shooting at goal. Water jump height was also measured with a modified Yardstick device. Multiple regression analyses showed that peak lower limb power was the most significant predictor of maximal velocity. Power alone accounted for 62% of the variance in maximum velocity (p<0.001). Once power was entered into the model none of the other physical characteristics (lean mass, fat mass, land jump height and anthropometry) made a significant contribution to throwing velocity. After controlling for the effect of power, head height at ball release accounted for an additional significant proportion of the variance in maximal velocity (R(2) change 7%; p=0.049). Lower body power was a significant predictor of higher throwing velocity in highly skilled female water polo players. Players with relatively higher underlying levels of lower limb power who are able to generate greater elevation out of the water are able to throw the ball faster. PMID:19442582

  14. Synoptic climatology of major floods in the Negev Desert, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahana, Ron; Ziv, Baruch; Enzel, Yehouda; Dayan, Uri

    2002-06-01

    This study examines the extent to which the floods in the Negev Desert, an area that constitutes the southern half of Israel, are not the outcome of purely local weather conditions but are, rather, the result of distinct synoptic-scale events. This was done through compiling and analysing a hydro-climatological database of all the major floods in the Negev, and then categorizing them manually into synoptic types that cause the major floods.The type analysis is based on the US National Meteorological Center data sets with 2.5° × 2.5° resolution analysed by GrADS. Data were compiled and studied for 52 floods for the period 1965-94, with peak discharge above the magnitude of 5 year recurrence intervals (RI > 5 years) in at least one drainage basin.Distinct extreme synoptic patterns are indeed associated with 42 of the 52 floods. They were grouped into four synoptic types, two of which were associated with 37 events: (a) an active Red Sea trough, defined as a surface trough extending from East Africa through the Red Sea toward the eastern Mediterranean, accompanied by a pronounced trough at the 500 hPa level over eastern Egypt: (b) a Syrian low, defined as a well-developed Mediterranean cyclone accompanied by a pronounced upper-level trough, both located over Syria. Each of the four synoptic types has its own evolution course, and a unique seasonal and spatial distribution of its associated flooded basins.These findings imply that the major floods in the Negev can be considered as signatures of exceptional synoptic-scale evolutions, and that major floods reflect extreme climatic events. Our results indicate that it is possible to use a set of dynamic and thermodynamic variables for predicting the occurrence and location of major flash floods.

  15. Mapping Atmospheric Moisture Climatologies across the Conterminous United States.

    PubMed

    Daly, Christopher; Smith, Joseph I; Olson, Keith V

    2015-01-01

    Spatial climate datasets of 1981-2010 long-term mean monthly average dew point and minimum and maximum vapor pressure deficit were developed for the conterminous United States at 30-arcsec (~800m) resolution. Interpolation of long-term averages (twelve monthly values per variable) was performed using PRISM (Parameter-elevation Relationships on Independent Slopes Model). Surface stations available for analysis numbered only 4,000 for dew point and 3,500 for vapor pressure deficit, compared to 16,000 for previously-developed grids of 1981-2010 long-term mean monthly minimum and maximum temperature. Therefore, a form of Climatologically-Aided Interpolation (CAI) was used, in which the 1981-2010 temperature grids were used as predictor grids. For each grid cell, PRISM calculated a local regression function between the interpolated climate variable and the predictor grid. Nearby stations entering the regression were assigned weights based on the physiographic similarity of the station to the grid cell that included the effects of distance, elevation, coastal proximity, vertical atmospheric layer, and topographic position. Interpolation uncertainties were estimated using cross-validation exercises. Given that CAI interpolation was used, a new method was developed to allow uncertainties in predictor grids to be accounted for in estimating the total interpolation error. Local land use/land cover properties had noticeable effects on the spatial patterns of atmospheric moisture content and deficit. An example of this was relatively high dew points and low vapor pressure deficits at stations located in or near irrigated fields. The new grids, in combination with existing temperature grids, enable the user to derive a full suite of atmospheric moisture variables, such as minimum and maximum relative humidity, vapor pressure, and dew point depression, with accompanying assumptions. All of these grids are available online at http://prism.oregonstate.edu, and include 800-m and 4

  16. The International Reference Ionosphere - Climatological Standard for the Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) a joint project of URSI and COSPAR is the defacto standard for a climatological specification of ionospheric parameters. IRI is based on a wide range of ground and space data and has been steadily improved since its inception in 1969 with the ever-increasing volume of ionospheric data and with better mathematical descriptions of the observed global and temporal variation patterns. The IRI model has been validated with a large amount of data including data from the most recent ionospheric satellites (KOMPSAT, ROCSAT and TIMED) and data from global network of ionosondes. Several IRI teams are working on specific aspects of the IRI modeling effort including an improved representation of the topside ionosphere with a seamless transition to the plasmasphere, a new effort to represent the global variation of F2 peak parameters using the Neural Network (NN) technique, and the inclusion of several additional parameters in IRI, e.g., spread-F probability and ionospheric variability. Annual IRI workshops are the forum for discussions of these efforts and for all science activities related to IRI as well as applications of the IRI model in engineering and education. In this paper I will present a status report about the IRI effort with special emphasis on the presentations and results from the most recent IRI Workshops (Paris, 2004; Tortosa, 2005) and on the most important ongoing IRI activities. I will discuss the latest version of the IRI model, IRI-2006, highlighting the most recent changes and additions. Finally, the talk will review some of the applications of the IRI model with special emphasis on the use for radiowave propagation studies and communication purposes.

  17. Understanding the Rainfall Daily Climatology of Northwestern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito-Castillo, L.

    2007-05-01

    Maximum monthly precipitation (MMP) over northwestern Mexico is not concurrent because it occurs in different months from July through September. However, instead of occurring progressively from one month to the next as latitude increases, as it might be logic since rains move progressively from south to north as monsoon develops, MMP occurs in July in latitudes of Jalisco state, then MMP shifts to August more to the north in latitudes of Nayarit state and along the eastern coast of the Gulf of California, then it occurs in July in higher latitudes through the main axis of the Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO), and finally MMP shifts to September to the west in the California Peninsula. The maximum monthly streamflow occurs in a similar pattern as MMP does but one month later. When daily rainfall climatology of the region is calculated, i.e. the long-term mean per day from stations with more than 20 years of data between 1940 and 2004, it is possible to understand why the behavior of MMP occurs in a July-August-July pattern from south to north. Preliminary results indicate that at latitudes of Nayarit state normal frequent storms with abundant rains develop at the end of July and through the August. These rains sum to the rains that move from the south to the north, as monsoon develops increasing the volume of precipitations at those latitudes in August. To the east crossing the SMO through northwestern Zacatecas state maximum volume of precipitations also is observed in August. However, in higher latitudes it is not observed any increment of rains in August and consequently maximum volume of precipitations occurs in July. To understand the dynamics of the rains at the latitudes of Nayarit state it results necessary to investigate the source of these local rains and explain why the increase of precipitations in August is limited at those latitudes.

  18. Mapping Atmospheric Moisture Climatologies across the Conterminous United States

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Christopher; Smith, Joseph I.; Olson, Keith V.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial climate datasets of 1981–2010 long-term mean monthly average dew point and minimum and maximum vapor pressure deficit were developed for the conterminous United States at 30-arcsec (~800m) resolution. Interpolation of long-term averages (twelve monthly values per variable) was performed using PRISM (Parameter-elevation Relationships on Independent Slopes Model). Surface stations available for analysis numbered only 4,000 for dew point and 3,500 for vapor pressure deficit, compared to 16,000 for previously-developed grids of 1981–2010 long-term mean monthly minimum and maximum temperature. Therefore, a form of Climatologically-Aided Interpolation (CAI) was used, in which the 1981–2010 temperature grids were used as predictor grids. For each grid cell, PRISM calculated a local regression function between the interpolated climate variable and the predictor grid. Nearby stations entering the regression were assigned weights based on the physiographic similarity of the station to the grid cell that included the effects of distance, elevation, coastal proximity, vertical atmospheric layer, and topographic position. Interpolation uncertainties were estimated using cross-validation exercises. Given that CAI interpolation was used, a new method was developed to allow uncertainties in predictor grids to be accounted for in estimating the total interpolation error. Local land use/land cover properties had noticeable effects on the spatial patterns of atmospheric moisture content and deficit. An example of this was relatively high dew points and low vapor pressure deficits at stations located in or near irrigated fields. The new grids, in combination with existing temperature grids, enable the user to derive a full suite of atmospheric moisture variables, such as minimum and maximum relative humidity, vapor pressure, and dew point depression, with accompanying assumptions. All of these grids are available online at http://prism.oregonstate.edu, and include 800-m

  19. Chemical climatology of the southeastern United States, 1999-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidy, G. M.; Blanchard, C. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Tanenbaum, S.; Shaw, S.; Knipping, E.; Tombach, I.; Jansen, J.; Walters, J.

    2014-11-01

    A series of experiments (the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study - SOAS) took place in central Alabama in June-July, 2013 as part of the broader Southern Atmosphere Study (SAS). These projects were aimed at studying oxidant photochemistry and formation and impacts of aerosols at a detailed process level in a location where high biogenic organic vapor emissions interact with anthropogenic emissions, and the atmospheric chemistry occurs in a subtropical climate in North America. The majority of the ground-based experiments were located at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Centreville (CTR) site near Brent, Alabama, where extensive, unique aerometric measurements of trace gases and particles and meteorology were made beginning in the early 1990s through 2013. The SEARCH network data permits a characterization of the temporal and spatial context of the SOAS findings. Our earlier analyses of emissions and air quality trends are extended through 2013 to provide a perspective for continued decline in ambient concentrations, and the implications of these changes to regional sulfur oxide, nitrogen-ozone, and carbon chemistry. The narrative supports the SAS program in terms of long-term average chemistry (chemical climatology) and short-term comparisons of early summer average spatial variability across the southeastern US at high temporal (hourly) resolution. The long-term measurements show that the SOAS experiments took place during the second wettest and coolest year in the 2000-2013 period, with lower than average solar radiation. The pollution levels at CTR and other SEARCH sites were the lowest since full measurements began in 1999. Changes in anthropogenic gas and particle emissions between 1999 and 2013 account for the decline in pollutant concentrations at the monitoring sites in the region. The data provide an opportunity to contrast SOAS results with temporally and spatially variable conditions in support of the development of tests

  20. Climatology of Aerosol Optical Properties in Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queface, Antonio J.; Piketh, Stuart J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    A thorough regionally dependent understanding of optical properties of aerosols and their spatial and temporal distribution is required before we can accurately evaluate aerosol effects in the climate system. Long term measurements of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent and retrieved single scattering albedo and size distribution, were analyzed and compiled into an aerosol optical properties climatology for southern Africa. Monitoring of aerosol parameters have been made by the AERONET program since the middle of the last decade in southern Africa. This valuable information provided an opportunity for understanding how aerosols of different types influence the regional radiation budget. Two long term sites, Mongu in Zambia and Skukuza in South Africa formed the core sources of data in this study. Results show that seasonal variation of aerosol optical thicknesses at 500 nm in southern Africa are characterized by low seasonal multi-month mean values (0.11 to 0.17) from December to May, medium values (0.20 to 0.27) between June and August, and high to very high values (0.30 to 0.46) during September to November. The spatial distribution of aerosol loadings shows that the north has high magnitudes than the south in the biomass burning season and the opposite in none biomass burning season. From the present aerosol data, no long term discernable trends are observable in aerosol concentrations in this region. This study also reveals that biomass burning aerosols contribute the bulk of the aerosol loading in August-October. Therefore if biomass burning could be controlled, southern Africa will experience a significant reduction in total atmospheric aerosol loading. In addition to that, aerosol volume size distribution is characterized by low concentrations in the non biomass burning period and well balanced particle size contributions of both coarse and fine modes. In contrast high concentrations are characteristic of biomass burning period, combined with

  1. Climatology and a dynamical investigation of tropical cyclogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaadi, Ali; Brunet, Gilbert; Yau, Peter M. K.

    2014-05-01

    In general, observation has indicated that only a small fraction of the easterly waves occur in a single hurricane season contribute to tropical cyclogenesis. However, this small fraction includes a large portion of named storms. In addition, it has recently been shown that named storms in the Atlantic and eastern Pacific basins are almost all associated with a cyclonic Kelvin cat's eye of a tropical easterly wave critical layer, located equatorward of the easterly jet axis. Therefore, to better understand the dynamics involved in tropical cyclogenesis, it is desirable to investigate the flow characteristics and the physical mechanism for an easterly wave to form a cat's eye. We have chosen the simplest of all scenarios to present the fundamental concepts of tropical cyclogenesis in a tropical wave critical layer. Our methodology involves performing a climatological study of developing easterly waves covering the 1998-2001 hurricane seasons using ERA-Interim 6-hourly reanalysis data. Spatial and temporal filtering is applied to decompose the desired fields, and time-lagged composites are obtained in a translating reference frame following the disturbances. The stability analysis of the basic state flow has been investigated. The composite basic state zonal wind profiles indicate a cyclonic critical layer at cat's eye formation region. Composite perturbation potential vorticity showed a wave-like pattern, which is in agreement with typical characteristics of easterly waves. Statistical analysis is also used to determine the levels of confidence in the composite fields to assess the reliability of the results. In addition, the total potential vorticity diagnostics show a closed pattern only for one of the easterly wave troughs within the domain, the one associated with the tropical storms, and seem to be a better approach to distinguish developing vs. non-developing disturbances.

  2. The Global Historical Climatology Network: A preview of Version 2

    SciTech Connect

    Vose, R.S.; Schmoyer, R.L.; Peterson, T.C.; Eischeid, J.K.

    1995-02-01

    Instruments that could reliably measure temperature, precipitation, and pressure were developed by the late 17th and early 18th centuries. It has been estimated that weather records have been collected at one to two hundred thousand locations since those first instruments were placed in the field. Numerous applications, from global change studies to climate impact assessments to general circulation models, make use of such historical records. Given their importance, it is unfortunate that one cannot approach a single researcher or data center to acquire all of the records for all of the stations, or even a large portion of them. In 1990, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) undertook a collaborative effort aimed at solving this problem. The initiative completed its first data product, known as the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) version 1.0, in 1992. This data base contains quality-controlled monthly climatic time series from 6,039 temperature, 7,533 precipitation, 1,883 sea level pressure, and 1,873 station pressure stations located on global land areas. This paper describes the data and methods being used to compile GHCN version 2.0, an expanded and improved version of its predecessor. Planned for distribution in early 1995, its enhancements will include (1) data for additional stations--perhaps three times as many as in version 1.0, plus maximum/minimum temperature measurements; (2) detailed assessments of data quality, including nearest-neighbor checks; and (3) adjustments for nonclimatic inhomogeneities, such as station relocations and land use changes.

  3. Lightning climatology in the Congo Basin: methodology and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kigotsi, Jean; Soula, Serge; Georgis, Jean-François; Barthe, Christelle

    2016-04-01

    The global climatology of lightning issued from space observations (OTD and LIS) clearly showed the maximum of the thunderstorm activity is located in a large area of the Congo Basin, especially in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The first goal of the present study is to compare observations from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) over a 9-year period (2005-2013) in this 2750 km × 2750 km area. The second goal is to analyse the lightning activity in terms of time and space variability. The detection efficiency (DE) of the WWLLN relative to LIS has increased between 2005 and 2013, typically from about 1.70 % to 5.90 %, in agreement with previous results for other regions of the world. The mean monthly flash rate describes an annual cycle with a maximum between November and March and a minimum between June and August, associated with the ICTZ migration but not exactly symmetrical on both sides of the equator. The diurnal evolution of the flash rate has a maximum between 1400 and 1700 UTC, depending on the reference year, in agreement with previous works in other regions of the world. The annual flash density shows a sharp maximum localized in eastern DRC regardless of the reference year and the period of the year. This annual maximum systematically located west of Kivu Lake corresponds to that previously identified by many authors as the worldwide maximum which Christian et al. (2013) falsely attributed to Rwanda. Another more extended region within the Congo Basin exhibits moderately large values, especially during the beginning of the period analyzed. A comparison of both patterns of lightning density from the WWLLN and from LIS allows to validate the representativeness of this world network and to restitute the total lightning activity in terms of lightning density and rate.

  4. UK tornado climatology and the development of simple prediction tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, J.; Wright, A.

    2004-04-01

    The principle features of tornado climatology in the UK are presented based on the 5-year period from January 1995. Just over one third of reported tornadoes occurred in the south-east region of England, and most tornado activity took place during the spring and summer while the least activity occurred during autumn. This was different to the seasonal distribution for the period from 1960 to 1989 when autumn had the greatest number of tornadoes. The reported tornado distribution was shown to be significantly affected by topography and the density of potential observers. Of the ground-based meteorological variables tested, air temperature was most closely related to tornado occurrence with a peak at 13 deg;C. An equation incorporating air temperature, dew-point temperature, wind speed and pressure was shown to predict a tornado day with an accuracy of 86. 2%. The probability that a tornado would occur on a predicted day was 81. 2%. The model was used to predict actual tornado occurrences across England, Wales and Scotland during the 5-year study period, and it was estimated that just over five-times as many tornadoes occurred than were reported. The model results suggest that the bias induced by population density was not greater than the combined influence of topography and spatial setting. This is important in the UK, because most tornadoes are reported in lowland areas which are heavily populated and it has been difficult until now to determine the extent to which tornado reports are biased by the density of potential observers.

  5. Borehole climatology: a discussion based on contributions from climate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Rouco, J. F.; Beltrami, H.; Zorita, E.; Stevens, M. B.

    2008-01-01

    Progress in understanding climate variability through the last millennium leans on simulation and reconstruction efforts. Exercises blending both approaches present a great potential for answering questions relevant both for the simulation and reconstruction of past climate, and depend on the specific peculiarities of proxies and methods involved in climate reconstructions, as well as on the realism and limitations of model simulations. This paper explores research specifically related to paleoclimate modeling and borehole climatology as a branch of climate reconstruction that has contributed significantly to our knowledge of the low frequency climate evolution during the last five centuries. The text flows around three main issues that group most of the interaction between model and geothermal efforts: the use of models as a validation tool for borehole climate reconstructions; comparison of geothermal information and model simulations as a means of either model validation or inference about past climate; and implications of the degree of realism on simulating subsurface climate on estimations of future climate change. The use of multi-centennial simulations as a surrogate reality for past climate suggests that within the simplified reality of climate models, methods and assumptions in borehole reconstructions deliver a consistent picture of past climate evolution at long time scales. Comparison of model simulations and borehole profiles indicate that borehole temperatures are responding to past external forcing and that more realism in the development of the soil model components in climate models is desirable. Such an improved degree of realism is important for the simulation of subsurface climate and air-ground interaction; results indicate it could also be crucial for simulating the adequate energy balance within climate change scenario experiments.

  6. Borehole climatology: a discussion based on contributions from climate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Rouco, J. F.; Beltrami, H.; Zorita, E.; Stevens, M. B.

    2009-03-01

    Progress in understanding climate variability through the last millennium leans on simulation and reconstruction efforts. Exercises blending both approaches present a great potential for answering questions relevant both for the simulation and reconstruction of past climate, and depend on the specific peculiarities of proxies and methods involved in climate reconstructions, as well as on the realism and limitations of model simulations. This paper explores research specifically related to paleoclimate modeling and borehole climatology as a branch of climate reconstruction that has contributed significantly to our knowledge of the low frequency climate evolution during the last five centuries. The text flows around three main issues that group most of the interaction between model and geothermal efforts: the use of models as a validation tool for borehole climate reconstructions; comparison of geothermal information and model simulations as a means of either model validation or inference about past climate; and implications of the degree of realism on simulating subsurface climate on estimations of future climate change. The use of multi-centennial simulations as a surrogate reality for past climate suggests that within the simplified reality of climate models, methods and assumptions in borehole reconstructions deliver a consistent picture of past climate evolution at long time scales. Comparison of model simulations and borehole profiles indicate that borehole temperatures are responding to past external forcing and that more realism in the development of the soil model components in climate models is desirable. Such an improved degree of realism is important for the simulation of subsurface climate and air-ground interaction; results indicate it could also be crucial for simulating the adequate energy balance within climate change scenario experiments.

  7. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Meier, Matthias M.; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B.; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-10-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis suggests

  8. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierens, K.; Dilger, F.

    2013-11-01

    Aircraft at cruise levels can cause two kinds of contrails, the well known exhaust contrails and the less well-known aerodynamic contrails. While the possible climate impact of exhaust contrails has been studied for many years, research on aerodynamic contrails began only a few years ago and nothing is known about a possible contribution of these ice clouds to climate impact. In order to make progress in this respect, we first need a climatology of their formation conditions and this is given in the present paper. Aerodynamic contrails are defined here as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data: first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation), and how frequently (probability) aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Furthermore, we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally, we argue that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

  9. An Emerging Global Aerosol Climatology from the MODIS Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Kleidman, Richard G.; Levy, Robert C.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Mattoo, Shana; Martins, J. Vandelei; Ichoku, Charles; Koren, Ilan; Hongbin, Yu; Holben, Brent N.

    2008-01-01

    The recently released Collection 5 MODIS aerosol products provide a consistent record of the Earth's aerosol system. Comparison with ground-based AERONET observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) we find that Collection 5 MODIS aerosol products estimate AOD to within expected accuracy more than 60% of the time over ocean and more than 72% of the time over land. This is similar to previous results for ocean, and better than the previous results for land. However, the new Collection introduces a 0.01 5 offset between the Terra and Aqua global mean AOD over ocean, where none existed previously. Aqua conforms to previous values and expectations while Terra is high. The cause of the offset is unknown, but changes to calibration are a possible explanation. We focus the climatological analysis on the better understood Aqua retrievals. We find that global mean AOD at 550 nm over oceans is 0.13 and over land 0.19. AOD in situations with 80% cloud fraction are twice the global mean values, although such situations occur only 2% of the time over ocean and less than 1% of the time over land. There is no drastic change in aerosol particle size associated with these very cloudy situations. Regionally, aerosol amounts vary from polluted areas such as East Asia and India, to the cleanest regions such as Australia and the northern continents. In almost all oceans fine mode aerosol dominates over dust, except in the tropical Atlantic downwind of the Sahara and in some months the Arabian Sea.

  10. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  11. Growth hormone: health considerations beyond height gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The therapeutic benefit of growth hormone (GH) therapy in improving height in short children is widely recognized; however, GH therapy is associated with other metabolic actions that may be of benefit in these children. Beneficial effects of GH on body composition have been documented in several dif...

  12. 75 FR 22691 - Death of Dorothy Height

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-10248 Filed 4-29-10; 8:45 am... memory of Dorothy Height, I hereby order, by the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the...

  13. Intersection of Southern Parkway and Southern Heights, looking toward the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Intersection of Southern Parkway and Southern Heights, looking toward the Beechmont Historic District, showing changes in landscaping, northeast - Southern Heights-Beechmont District Landscapes, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  14. CALIOP-derived Smoke Plume Injection Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, A. J.; Winker, D. M.; Choi, H. D.; Fairlie, T. D.; Westberg, D. J.; Roller, C. M.; Pouliot, G.; Vaughan, M.; Pierce, T. E.; Trepte, C. R.; Rao, V.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning is a dominant natural and anthropogenic disturbance that feeds back to the climate system. Fire regimes, ecosystem fuels, fire severity and intensity vary widely, even within the same system, largely under the control of weather and climate. These strongly influence fire plume injection height and thus the transport of related biomass burning emissions, affecting air quality, human health and the climate system. If our knowledge of plume injection height is incorrect, transport models of those emissions will likewise be incorrect, adversely affecting our ability to analyze and predict climate feedbacks (i.e. black carbon to the Arctic, precipitation, cloud-radiation relationships) and public health (air quality forecast). Historically, plume height was based on the pioneering work of G.A. Briggs [1969; 1971] and verified with limited field campaigns. However, we currently have two satellite instruments, Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard CALIPSO (afternoon overpass) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) onboard TERRA (morning overpass), that can provide the statistics necessary to verify our assumptions and improve fire plume injection height estimates for use in both small- and large-scale models. We have developed a methodology to assess fire plume injection height using the Langley Trajectory Model (LaTM), CALIOP, Hazard Mapping System (HMS) smoke plume, and MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) thermal anomaly data that is capable of generating two distinct types of verification data. A single CALIOP smoke-filled aerosol envelop can be traced back to numerous fire events, and using multiple CALIOP transects from numerous days, a daily smoke plume injection height evolution from a single fire can be defined. Additionally, we have linked the smoke plumes to ecosystems and the meteorological variables that define fire weather. In concert, CALIOP and MISR data can produce the statistical knowledge

  15. A GEOMETRICAL HEIGHT SCALE FOR SUNSPOT PENUMBRAE

    SciTech Connect

    Puschmann, K. G.; Ruiz Cobo, B.; MartInez Pillet, V. E-mail: brc@iac.e

    2010-09-10

    Inversions of spectropolarimetric observations of penumbral filaments deliver the stratification of different physical quantities in an optical depth scale. However, without establishing a geometrical height scale, their three-dimensional geometrical structure cannot be derived. This is crucial in understanding the correct spatial variation of physical properties in the penumbral atmosphere and to provide insights into the mechanism capable of explaining the observed penumbral brightness. The aim of this work is to determine a global geometrical height scale in the penumbra by minimizing the divergence of the magnetic field vector and the deviations from static equilibrium as imposed by a force balance equation that includes pressure gradients, gravity, and the Lorentz force. Optical depth models are derived from the inversion of spectropolarimetric data of an active region observed with the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. We use a genetic algorithm to determine the boundary condition for the inference of geometrical heights. The retrieved geometrical height scale permits the evaluation of the Wilson depression at each pixel and the correlation of physical quantities at each height. Our results fit into the uncombed penumbral scenario, i.e., a penumbra composed of flux tubes with channeled mass flow and with a weaker and more horizontal magnetic field as compared with the background field. The ascending material is hotter and denser than their surroundings. We do not find evidence of overturning convection or field-free regions in the inner penumbral area analyzed. The penumbral brightness can be explained by the energy transfer of the ascending mass carried by the Evershed flow, if the physical quantities below z = -75 km are extrapolated from the results of the inversion.

  16. A 3-Year Climatology of Cloud and Radiative Properties Derived from GOES-8 Data Over the Southern Great Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khaiyer, M. M.; Rapp, A. D.; Doelling, D. R.; Nordeen, M. L.; Minnis, P.; Smith, W. L., Jr.; Nguyen, L.

    2001-01-01

    While the various instruments maintained at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) provide detailed cloud and radiation measurements for a small area, satellite cloud property retrievals provide a means of examining the large-scale properties of the surrounding region over an extended period of time. Seasonal and inter-annual climatological trends can be analyzed with such a dataset. For this purpose, monthly datasets of cloud and radiative properties from December 1996 through November 1999 over the SGP region have been derived using the layered bispectral threshold method (LBTM). The properties derived include cloud optical depths (ODs), temperatures and albedos, and are produced on two grids of lower (0.5 deg) and higher resolution (0.3 deg) centered on the ARM SGP CF. The extensive time period and high-resolution of the inner grid of this dataset allows for comparison with the suite of instruments located at the ARM CF. In particular, Whole-Sky Imager (WSI) and the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL) cloud products can be compared to the cloud amounts and heights of the LBTM 0.3 deg grid box encompassing the CF site. The WSI provides cloud fraction and the ARSCL computes cloud fraction, base, and top heights using the algorithms by Clothiaux et al. (2001) with a combination of Belfort Laser Ceilometer (BLC), Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR), and Micropulse Lidar (MPL) data. This paper summarizes the results of the LBTM analysis for 3 years of GOES-8 data over the SGP and examines the differences between surface and satellite-based estimates of cloud fraction.

  17. Pharmacogenetics of BCR/ABL Inhibitors in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Polillo, Marialuisa; Galimberti, Sara; Baratè, Claudia; Petrini, Mario; Danesi, Romano; Di Paolo, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia was the first haematological neoplasia that benefited from a targeted therapy with imatinib nearly 15 years ago. Since then, several studies have investigated the role of genes, their variants (i.e., polymorphisms) and their encoded proteins in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase activity inhibitors (TKIs). Transmembrane transporters seem to influence in a significant manner the disposition of TKIs, especially that of imatinib at both cellular and systemic levels. In particular, members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family (namely ABCB1 and ABCG2) together with solute carrier (SLC) transporters (i.e., SLC22A1) are responsible for the differences in drug pharmacokinetics. In the case of the newer TKIs, such as nilotinib and dasatinib, the substrate affinity of these drugs for transporters is variable but lower than that measured for imatinib. In this scenario, the investigation of genetic variants as possible predictive markers has led to some discordant results. With the partial exception of imatinib, these discrepancies seem to limit the application of discovered biomarkers in the clinical settings. In order to overcome these issues, larger prospective confirmative trials are needed. PMID:26402671

  18. Dogs are able to solve a means-end task

    PubMed Central

    Range, Friederike; Hentrup, Marleen; Viranyi, Zsofia

    2014-01-01

    Dogs, although very skilled in social communicative tasks, have shown limited abilities in the domain of physical cognition. Consequently, several researchers hypothesized that domestication enhanced dogs’ cognitive abilities in the social realm, but relaxed selection on the physical one. For instance, dogs failed to demonstrate means-end understanding, an important form of relying on physical causal connection, when tested in a string-pulling task. Here, we tested dogs in an ‘on/off’ task using a novel approach. Thirty-two dogs were confronted with four different conditions in which they could choose between two boards one with a reward ‘on’ and another one with a reward ‘off’ (reward was placed next to the board). The dogs chose the correct board when 1) both rewards were placed at the same distance from the dog, when 2) the reward placed ‘on’ the board was closer to the dog, and 3) even when the reward placed ‘off’ the board was much closer to the dog and was food. Interestingly, in the latter case dogs did not perform above chance, if instead of a direct reward, the dogs had to retrieve an object placed on the board to get a food reward. In contrast to previous string pulling studies, our results show that dogs are able to solve a means-end task even if proximity of the unsupported reward is a confounding factor. PMID:21445577

  19. Pharmacogenetics of BCR/ABL Inhibitors in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Polillo, Marialuisa; Galimberti, Sara; Baratè, Claudia; Petrini, Mario; Danesi, Romano; Di Paolo, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia was the first haematological neoplasia that benefited from a targeted therapy with imatinib nearly 15 years ago. Since then, several studies have investigated the role of genes, their variants (i.e., polymorphisms) and their encoded proteins in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase activity inhibitors (TKIs). Transmembrane transporters seem to influence in a significant manner the disposition of TKIs, especially that of imatinib at both cellular and systemic levels. In particular, members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family (namely ABCB1 and ABCG2) together with solute carrier (SLC) transporters (i.e., SLC22A1) are responsible for the differences in drug pharmacokinetics. In the case of the newer TKIs, such as nilotinib and dasatinib, the substrate affinity of these drugs for transporters is variable but lower than that measured for imatinib. In this scenario, the investigation of genetic variants as possible predictive markers has led to some discordant results. With the partial exception of imatinib, these discrepancies seem to limit the application of discovered biomarkers in the clinical settings. In order to overcome these issues, larger prospective confirmative trials are needed. PMID:26402671

  20. Are monkeys able to plan for future exchange?

    PubMed

    Bourjade, Marie; Thierry, Bernard; Call, Josep; Dufour, Valérie

    2012-09-01

    Whether or not non-human animals can plan for the future is a hotly debated issue. We investigate this question further and use a planning-to-exchange task to study future planning in the cooperative domain in two species of monkeys: the brown capuchin (Cebus apella) and the Tonkean macaque (Macaca tonkeana). The rationale required subjects to plan for a future opportunity to exchange tokens for food by collecting tokens several minutes in advance. Subjects who successfully planned for the exchange task were expected to select suitable tokens during a collection period (5/10 min), save them for a fixed period of time (20/30 min), then take them into an adjacent compartment and exchange them for food with an experimenter. Monkeys mostly failed to transport tokens when entering the testing compartment; hence, they do not seem able to plan for a future exchange with a human partner. Three subjects did however manage to solve the task several times, albeit at very low rates. They brought the correct version of three possible token types, but rarely transported more than one suitable token at a time. Given that the frequency of token manipulation predicted transport, success might have occurred by chance. This was not the case, however, since in most cases subjects were not already holding the token in their hands before they entered the testing compartment. Instead, these results may reflect subjects' strengths and weaknesses in their time-related comprehension of the task. PMID:22532073

  1. A new river discharge and river temperature climatology data set for the pan-Arctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitefield, Jonathan; Winsor, Peter; McClelland, James; Menemenlis, Dimitris

    2015-04-01

    Most regional ocean models that use discharge as part of the forcing use relatively coarse river discharge data sets (1°, or ∼110 km) compared to the model resolution (typically 1/4° or less), and do not account for seasonal changes in river water temperature. We introduce a new climatological data set of river discharge and river water temperature with 1/6° grid spacing over the Arctic region (Arctic River Discharge and Temperature; ARDAT), incorporating observations from 30 Arctic rivers. The annual mean discharge for all rivers in ARDAT is 2817 ± 330 km3 yr-1. River water temperatures range between 0 °C in winter to 14.0-17.6 °C in July, leading to a long-term mean monthly heat flux from all rivers of 3.2 ± 0.6 TW, of which 31% is supplied by Alaskan rivers and 69% is supplied by Eurasian rivers. This riverine heat flux is equivalent to 44% of the estimated ocean heat flux associated with the Bering Strait throughflow, but during the spring freshet can be ∼10 times as large, suggesting that heat flux associated with Arctic rivers is an important component of the Arctic heat budget on seasonal time scales. We apply the ARDAT data set to a high-resolution regional ocean-ice model, and compare results to a model integration using a 1° resolution discharge data set. Integrated freshwater content on the Arctic shelves (<200 m) increases by ∼3600 km3 in the ARDAT forced model run compared to the coarser forcing, suggesting that river discharge is contained on the Arctic shelves when forced with the ARDAT data set. Modelled summer heat fluxes over the shelves increase by 8 TW when river water temperature is included, which subsequently reduces basin-wide September sea ice extent by ∼10%. Regional differences are larger, where e.g., sea ice extent on the Beaufort shelf is reduced by ∼36%. Using a non-linear free surface parameterization along with the ARDAT data set, we find an increase in the sea surface height gradient around river mouths

  2. First look at the NOAA Aircraft-based Tropospheric Ozone Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, M.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; McClure-Begley, A.; Lin, M.; Tarasick, D.; Johnson, B. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network's aircraft program has operated since the 1990s as part of the NOAA Global Monitoring Division network to capture spatial and temporal variability in greenhouse tracers (i.e. CO2, CO, N2O, methane, SF6, halo- and hydro-carbons). Since 2005 the suite of airborne measurements also includes ozone, humidity and temperature profiling through the troposphere (up to 8 km). Light commercial aircraft are equipped with modified 2B Technology ozone monitors (Model 205DB), incorporate temperature and humidity probes, and include global positioning system instrumentation. The dataset was analyzed for tropospheric ozone variability at five continental US stations. As site locations within the Tropospheric Aircraft Ozone Measurement Program have flights only once (four times at one site) a month and begun a decade ago, this raises the question of whether this sampling frequency allows the derivation of an accurate vertical climatology of ozone values. We interpret the representativeness of the vertical and seasonal ozone distribution from aircraft measurements using multi-decadal hindcast simulations conducted with the GFDL AM3 chemistry-climate model. When available, climatology derived from co-located ozone-sonde data will be used for comparisons. The results of the comparisons are analyzed to establish altitude ranges in the troposphere where the aircraft climatology would be deemed to be the most representative. Aircraft-based climatologies are tested from two approaches: comparing the aircraft-based climatology to the daily sampled model and to the subset of model data with matching aircraft dates. Whenever the model and aircraft climatologies show significant seasonal differences, further information is gathered from a seasonal Gaussian distribution plot. We will report on the minimum frequency in flights that can provide adequate climatological representation of seasonal and vertical variability in tropospheric ozone.

  3. Ocean-atmosphere interaction and the tropical climatology. Part I. The dangers of flux correction

    SciTech Connect

    Neelin, J.D.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    1995-05-01

    This sequence of papers examines the role of dynamical feedbacks between the ocean and the atmosphere in determining features of the tropical climatology. A stripped-down, intermediate, coupled ocean-atmosphere model is used to provide a prototype problem for the Pacific basin. Here the authors contrast the fully coupled case with the case where flux correction is used to construct the climatology. In the fully coupled case, the climatology is determined largely by feedback mechanisms within the ocean basin: winds driven by gradients of sea surface temperature (SST) within the basin interact with the ocean circulation to maintain SST gradients. For all realistic cases, these lead to a unique steady solution for the tropical climatology. In the flux-corrected case, the artificially constructed climatology becomes unstable at sufficiently large coupling, leading to multiple steady states as found in a number of coupled models. Using continuation methods, we show that there is a topological change in the bifurcation structure as flux correction is relaxed toward a fully coupled case; this change is characterized as an imperfection and must occur generically for all flux-corrected cases. The cold branch is steady solutions is governed by mechanisms similar to the fully coupled case. The warm branch, however, is spurious and disappears. The dynamics of this and consequences for coupled models are discussed. Multiple steady states can be ruled out as a mechanism for El Nino in favor of oscillatory mechanisms. The important role that coupled feedbacks are suggested to play in establishing tropical climatology is referred to as {open_quotes}the climatological version of the Bjerknes hypothesis.{close_quotes} 43 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Climatology of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen in a changing Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipizer, Marina; Crise, Alessandro; Partescano, Elena; Rabitti, Anna; Giorgetti, Alessandra

    2015-04-01

    A new climatology, based on a comprehensive dataset (1911-2009) of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen, is presented for the whole Adriatic Sea, by using Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis (DIVA). Climatological maps were produced at 26 levels and validated with Ordinary Cross Validation. The approximation error and the uncertainty degree associated to the updated climatology have been estimated in order to provide information on the reliability of the products obtained. The concept of Climatology-Observation Misfit (COM) has been introduced as an estimate of the uncertainty of the patterns revealed in the climatology, which is induced by the dynamical variability associated with the climatological structures. The uncertainty associated with the climatology, higher in the upper layer and in the northern and shallower part of the basin, underlines the importance of mesoscale processes in the Adriatic Sea. Lastly, in order to identify possible temporal trends, long-term variability has been investigated in the Mid Adriatic and the South Adriatic Pits. New or better resolved features emerged from this analysis: (1) below 100 m all properties profoundly differ between the Middle and the South Adriatic and seem characterized by different biogeochemical dynamics; (2) the South Adriatic Pit clearly shows the remote effects of the Eastern Mediterranean Transient, while no effect is observed in Middle Adriatic Pits; (3) the deepest part of the South Adriatic seems now to be significantly saltier (+0.18 since the period 1910-1914, with an increase of +0.018 decade-1 since the late 1940s) and warmer (+0.54°C since 1910-1914),; (4) the Middle Adriatic Pits present a long-term increase in Apparent Oxygen Utilisation (+0.77 ml l-1 since 1910-1914, with a constant increase of +0.2 ml l-1 decade-1 after the 1970s).

  5. Prices, infrastructure, household characteristics and child height.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D; Strauss, J

    1992-10-01

    A Brazilian household survey, ENDEF, in 1974-75 and the 1974 Informacoes Basicas Municipais (IBM) provided data for the analysis of the impact of community services and infrastructure and household characteristics on the logarithm of child height, standardized for age and gender. The sample was comprised of 36,974 children stratified by residential location, the child's age, and the educational level of the mother. Variance and covariance matrices were estimated with the jackknife developed by Efron (1982). Household characteristics included the logarithm of per capita expenditure as a measure of household resource availability, income, and parental education. Community characteristics were local market price indices for 6 food groups (dairy products, beans, cereals, meat, fish, and sugar), level of urbanization, buildings with sewage, water, and electricity connections per capita, per capita number of buildings, and population density. Health services were measured as per capita number of hospitals and clinics and doctors and nurses, and the number of beds are hospital. Educational services include a measure of student teacher ratios, elementary school class size, and per capita number of teachers living in the community. the results show that expenditure had a positive, significant effect on the height of children 2 years and older. Expenditure was a significant determinant for literate and illiterate mothers, and not well educated mothers. The impact of maternal education was largest on the length of babies and declined with the age of the child. Father's education had not impact of length of babies. The effect of parents' education was complementary. The effect of father's education was largest when mothers had some education. Better educated parents had healthier children. Maternal rather than paternal height had an impact of the length of a baby. In the community models, prices had a significant effect on child height, in both urban and rural areas, in all

  6. Climatology of atmospheric PM10 concentration in the Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigi, A.; Ghermandi, G.

    2014-01-01

    The limits to atmospheric pollutant concentration set by the European Commission provide a challenging target for the municipalities in the Po Valley, because of the characteristic climatic conditions and high population density of this region. In order to assess climatology and trends in the concentration of atmospheric particles in the Po Valley, a dataset of PM10 data from 41 sites across the Po Valley have been analysed, including both traffic and background sites (either urban, suburban or rural). Of these 41 sites, 18 with 10 yr or longer record have been analysed for long term trend in de-seasonalized monthly means, in annual quantiles and in monthly frequency distribution. A widespread significant decreasing trend has been observed at most sites, up to few percent per year, by Generalised Least Square and Theil-Sen method. All 41 sites have been tested for significant weekly periodicity by Kruskal-Wallis test for mean anomalies and by Wilcoxon test for weekend effect magnitude. A significant weekly periodicity has been observed for most PM10 series, particularly in summer and ascribed mainly to anthropic particulate emissions. A cluster analysis has been applied in order to highlight stations sharing similar pollution conditions over the reference period. Five clusters have been found, two gathering the metropolitan areas of Torino and Milano and their respective nearby sites and the other three clusters gathering north-east, north-west and central Po Valley sites respectively. Finally the observed trends in atmospheric PM10 have been compared to trends in provincial emissions of particulates and PM precursors, and analysed along with data on vehicular fleet age, composition and fuel sales. Significant basin-wide drop in emissions occurred for gaseous pollutants, contrarily to emissions of PM10 and PM2.5, whose drop resulted low and restricted to few provinces. It is not clear whether the decrease for only gaseous emissions is sufficient to explain the

  7. Uncertainties in calculating precipitation climatology in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Park, S. K.

    2016-02-01

    This study examines the uncertainty in calculating the fundamental climatological characteristics of precipitation in the East Asia region from multiple fine-resolution gridded analysis data sets based on in situ rain gauge observations and data assimilations. Five observation-based gridded precipitation data sets are used to derive the long-term means, standard deviations in lieu of interannual variability and linear trends over the 28-year period from 1980 to 2007. Both the annual and summer (June-July-August) mean precipitation is examined. The agreement amongst these precipitation data sets is examined using two metrics including the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) defined as the ratio between long-term means and the corresponding standard deviations, and Taylor diagrams, which allow examinations of the pattern correlation, the standard deviation, and the centered root mean square error. It is found that the five gauge-based precipitation analysis data sets agree well in the long-term mean and interannual variability in most of the East Asia region including eastern China, Manchuria, South Korea, and Japan, which are densely populated and have fairly high-density observation networks. The regions of large inter-data-set variations include Tibetan Plateau, Mongolia, northern Indo-China, and North Korea. The regions of large uncertainties are typically lightly populated and are characterized by severe terrain and/or extremely high elevations. Unlike the long-term mean and interannual variability, agreement between data sets in the linear trend is weak, both for the annual and summer mean values. In most of the East Asia region, the SNR for the linear trend is below 0.5: the inter-data-set variability exceeds the multi-data ensemble mean. The uncertainty in the spatial distribution of long-term means among these data sets occurs both in the spatial pattern and variability, but the uncertainty for the interannual variability and time trend is much larger in the

  8. Uncertainties in calculating precipitation climatology in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Park, S. K.

    2015-08-01

    This study examines the uncertainty in calculating the fundamental climatological characteristics of precipitation in the East Asia region from multiple fine-resolution gridded analysis datasets based on in-situ rain gauge observations. Five observation-based gridded precipitation datasets are used to derive the long-term means, standard deviations in lieu of interannual variability and linear trends over the 28-year period from 1980 to 2007. Both the annual and summer (June-July-August) mean precipitation is examined. The agreement amongst these precipitation datasets are examined using multiple metrics including the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) defined as the ratio between long-term means and the corresponding standard deviations, and Taylor diagrams which allows examinations of the pattern correlation, the standard deviation, and the centered root mean square error. It is found that the five gauge-based precipitation analysis datasets agree well in the long-term mean and interannual variability in most of the East Asia region including eastern China, Manchuria, South Korea, and Japan, which are densely populated and have fairly high density observation networks. The regions of large inter-dataset variations include Tibetan Plateau, Mongolia, northern Indo-China, and North Korea. The regions of large uncertainties are typically lightly populated and are characterized by severe terrain and/or extreme high elevations. Unlike the long-term mean and interannual variability, agreements between datasets in the linear trend is weak, both for the annual and summer mean values. In most of the East Asia region, the SNR for the linear trend is below 0.5, i.e., the inter-dataset variability exceeds the multi-data ensemble mean. The uncertainty in the spatial distribution of long-term means among these datasets occurs both in the spatial pattern and variability, but the uncertainty for the interannual variability and time trend is much larger in the variability than in the

  9. High Resolution Hydro-climatological Projections for Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, Andre Richard

    Accurate identification of the impact of global warming on water resources and hydro-climatic extremes represents a significant challenge to the understanding of climate change on the regional scale. Here an analysis of hydro-climatic changes in western Canada is presented, with specific focus on the Fraser and Athabasca River basins and on changes in hydro-climatic extremes. The analysis is based on a suite of simulations designed to characterize internal variability, as well as model uncertainty. A small ensemble of Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1) simulations was employed to generate global climate projections, which were downscaled to 10 km resolution using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF V3.4.1) with several sets of physical parameterizations. Downscaling was performed for a historical validation period and a mid- and end-21st-century projection period, using the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory. Daily station observations and monthly gridded datasets were used for validation. Changes in hydro-climatic extremes are characterized using Extreme Value Analysis. A novel method of aggregating data from climatologically similar stations was employed to increase the statistical power of the analysis. Changes in mean and extreme precipitation are found to differ strongly between seasons and regions, but (relative) changes in extremes generally follow changes in the (seasonal) mean. At the end of the 21st century, precipitation and precipitation extremes are projected to increase by 30% at the coast in fall and land-inwards in winter, while the projected increase in summer precipitation is smaller and changes in extremes are often not statistically significant. Reasons for the differences between seasons, the role of precipitation recycling in atmospheric water transport, and the sensitivity to physics parameterizations are discussed. Major changes are projected for the Fraser River basin, including earlier snowmelt and a 50% reduction in

  10. Modeling the Climatology of Tornado Occurrence with Bayesian Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Vincent Y. S.

    Our mechanistic understanding of tornadic environments has significantly improved by the recent technological enhancements in the detection of tornadoes as well as the advances of numerical weather predictive modeling. Nonetheless, despite the decades of active research, prediction of tornado occurrence remains one of the most difficult problems in meteorological and climate science. In our efforts to develop predictive tools for tornado occurrence, there are a number of issues to overcome, such as the treatment of inconsistent tornado records, the consideration of suitable combination of atmospheric predictors, and the selection of appropriate resolution to accommodate the variability in time and space. In this dissertation, I address each of these topics by undertaking three empirical (statistical) modeling studies, where I examine the signature of different atmospheric factors influencing the tornado occurrence, the sampling biases in tornado observations, and the optimal spatiotemporal resolution for studying tornado occurrence. In the first study, I develop a novel Bayesian statistical framework to assess the probability of tornado occurrence in Canada, in which the sampling bias of tornado observations and the linkage between lightning climatology and tornadogenesis are considered. The results produced reasonable probability estimates of tornado occurrence for the under-sampled areas in the model domain. The same study also delineated the geographical variability in the lightning-tornado relationship across Canada. In the second study, I present a novel modeling framework to examine the relative importance of several key atmospheric variables (e.g., convective available potential energy, 0-3 km storm-relative helicity, 0-6 km bulk wind difference, 0-tropopause vertical wind shear) on tornado activity in North America. I found that the variable quantifying the updraft strength is more important during the warm season, whereas the effects of wind

  11. Assessing Extremes Climatology Using NWS Local Climate Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.; Hollingshead, A.; Hilderbrand, D.; Mayes, B.; Hartley, T.; Kempf McGavock, N. M.; Lau, E.; Olenic, E. A.; Motta, B.; Bunge, R.; Brown, L. E.; Fritsch, F.

    2010-12-01

    The Local Climate Analysis Tool (LCAT) is evolving out of a need to support and enhance the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) field offices’ ability to access, manipulate, and interpret local climate data and characterize climate variability and change impacts. LCAT will enable NWS Regional Headquarters, Weather Forecast Offices, Weather Service Offices, and River Forecast Centers the ability to conduct regional and local climate studies using station and reanalysis gridded data and various statistical techniques for climate analysis. The analysis results will be used for climate services to guide local decision makers in weather and climate sensitive actions and to deliver information to the general public. Field offices need standardized, scientifically sound methodology for local climate analysis (such as trend, composites, and principal statistical and time-series analysis) that is comprehensive, accessible, and efficient, with the potential to expand with growing NOAA Climate Services needs. The methodology for climate analyses is practiced by the NWS Climate Prediction Center (CPC), NOAA National Climatic Data Center, and NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, as well as NWS field office staff. LCAT will extend this practice at the local level, allowing it to become both widespread and standardized, and thus improve NWS climate services capabilities. LCAT focus is on the local scale (as opposed to national and global scales of CPC products). The LCAT will: -Improve professional competency of local office staff and expertise in providing local information to their users. LCAT will improve quality of local climate services -Ensure adequate local input to CPC products that depend on local information, such as the U.S. Drought Monitor. LCAT will allow improvement of CPC climate products -Allow testing of local climate variables beyond temperature averages and precipitation totals such as climatology of

  12. European drought climatologies for the period 1950 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinoni, Jonathan; Naumann, Gustavo; Vogt, Jürgen V.; Barbosa, Paulo

    2014-05-01

    In the context of global climate change, characterized in particular by rising temperatures and more extreme weather events, drought is one of the most relevant natural disasters that has hit Europe frequently in the last decades. This paper presents climatologies of a set of drought indicators and derived drought characteristics at European scale for the period 1950-2012. Following the definitions in Spinoni et al. (2013), we computed drought frequency, duration, severity, and maximum intensity on a grid with spatial resolution of 0.25°x0.25°. Calculations have been based on three well-known drought indicators calculated for time scales of 3 and 12 months: the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), the Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), and the Reconnaissance Drought Index (RDI). Indicators have been calculated on a monthly basis for the period 1951-2012, using statistical distributions fitted to a 30-year baseline period (1971-2000). Input data stem from the E-OBS (version 9.0) European grids (0.25°x0.25°) provided by the Royal Meteorological Service of The Netherlands (KNMI). Monthly precipitation data served as input for all indicators, while mean monthly temperature data were used to calculate Thornthwaite's potential evapotranspiration necessary to calculate SPEI and RDI. On the basis of these indicators, we then quantified, on a monthly basis, the total European area under meteorological drought conditions from 1950 to 2012 and their intensity. We further sub-divided Europe into 14 regions according to geographical borders and climatic features and for each of them we computed linear trends of different drought characteristics (i.e. frequency, duration, severity, and intensity) for the entire period, and for the sub-periods 1951-1980 and 1981-2010. Results show that the Mediterranean, the Balkans, and Eastern Europe are characterized by increasing drought frequency, duration, severity, and maximum intensity, while Russia and

  13. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Christopher J; Meier, Matthias M; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-01-01

    [1] The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis

  14. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP): Results, Status and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.

    2007-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) is one of a number of long-term, satellite-based, global analyses routinely produced under the auspices of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and its Global Energy and Watercycle EXperiment (GEWEX) program. The research quality analyses are produced a few months after real-time through the efforts of scientists at various national agencies and universities in the U.S., Europe and Japan. The primary product is a monthly analysis of surface precipitation that is globally complete and spans the period 1979-present. There are also pentad analyses for the same period and a daily analysis for the 1997-present period. Although generated with somewhat different data sets and analysis schemes, the pentad and daily data sets are forced to agree with the primary monthly analysis on a grid box by grid box basis. The primary input data sets are from low-orbit passive microwave observations, geostationary infrared observations and surface raingauge information. Examples of research with the data sets are discussed, focusing on tropical (25N-25s) rainfall variations and possible long-term changes in the 28-year (1979-2006) monthly dataset. Techniques are used to discriminate among the variations due to ENSO, volcanic events and possible long-term changes for rainfall over both land and ocean. The impact of the two major volcanic eruptions over the past 25 years is estimated to be about a 5% maximum reduction in tropical rainfall during each event. Although the global change of precipitation in the data set is near zero, a small upward linear change over tropical ocean (0.06 mm/day/l0yr) and a slight downward linear change over tropical land (-0.03 mm/day/l0yr) are examined to understand the impact of the inhomogeneity in the data record and the length of the data set. These positive changes correspond to about a 5% increase (ocean) and 3% increase (ocean plus land) during this time period. Relations between variations in

  15. Towards worldwide height unification using ocean information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodworth, P. L.; Hughes, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes how we are contributing to worldwide height system unification (WHSU) by using ocean models together with sea level (tide gauge and altimeter) information, geodetic (GPS and levelling) data, and new geoid models based on information from the GRACE and GOCE gravity missions, to understand how mean sea level (MSL) varies from place to place along the coast. For the last two centuries, MSL has been used to define datums for national levelling systems. However, there are many problems with this. One consequence of WHSU will be the substitution of conventional datums as a reference for heights with the use of geoid, as the only true "level" or datum. This work is within a number of GOCE-related activities funded by the European Space Agency. The study is focused on the coastlines of North America and Europe where the various datasets are most copious.

  16. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  17. 47 CFR 22.1011 - Antenna height limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna height limitations. 22.1011 Section 22... MOBILE SERVICES Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1011 Antenna height limitations. The antenna height of offshore stations must not exceed 61 meters (200 feet) above mean sea level. The antenna height...

  18. 47 CFR 22.1011 - Antenna height limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna height limitations. 22.1011 Section 22... MOBILE SERVICES Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1011 Antenna height limitations. The antenna height of offshore stations must not exceed 61 meters (200 feet) above mean sea level. The antenna height...

  19. 47 CFR 22.1011 - Antenna height limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna height limitations. 22.1011 Section 22... MOBILE SERVICES Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1011 Antenna height limitations. The antenna height of offshore stations must not exceed 61 meters (200 feet) above mean sea level. The antenna height...

  20. 47 CFR 22.1011 - Antenna height limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna height limitations. 22.1011 Section 22... MOBILE SERVICES Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1011 Antenna height limitations. The antenna height of offshore stations must not exceed 61 meters (200 feet) above mean sea level. The antenna height...

  1. 47 CFR 22.1011 - Antenna height limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna height limitations. 22.1011 Section 22... MOBILE SERVICES Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1011 Antenna height limitations. The antenna height of offshore stations must not exceed 61 meters (200 feet) above mean sea level. The antenna height...

  2. DETERMINATION OF EARLY STAGE CORN PLANT HEIGHT USING STEREO VISION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to map crop height and changes in crop height over time in agricultural fields would be a useful diagnostic tool to identify where and when crop stress is occurring. Additionally, plant height or rate of plant height change could be used to evaluate spatial crop response to inputs of fe...

  3. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  4. 46 CFR 42.20-40 - Standard height of superstructure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard height of superstructure. 42.20-40 Section 42... FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-40 Standard height of superstructure. (a) The standard height of a superstructure shall be as given in table 42.20-40(a): Table 42.20-40(a) Standard Heights (in...

  5. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  6. 46 CFR 42.20-40 - Standard height of superstructure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard height of superstructure. 42.20-40 Section 42... FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-40 Standard height of superstructure. (a) The standard height of a superstructure shall be as given in Table 42.20-40(a): Table 42.20-40(a) Standard Heights (in...

  7. 46 CFR 42.20-40 - Standard height of superstructure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard height of superstructure. 42.20-40 Section 42... FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-40 Standard height of superstructure. (a) The standard height of a superstructure shall be as given in table 42.20-40(a): Table 42.20-40(a) Standard Heights (in...

  8. 46 CFR 42.20-40 - Standard height of superstructure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard height of superstructure. 42.20-40 Section 42... FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-40 Standard height of superstructure. (a) The standard height of a superstructure shall be as given in Table 42.20-40(a): Table 42.20-40(a) Standard Heights (in...

  9. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  10. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  11. 46 CFR 42.20-40 - Standard height of superstructure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard height of superstructure. 42.20-40 Section 42... FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-40 Standard height of superstructure. (a) The standard height of a superstructure shall be as given in Table 42.20-40(a): Table 42.20-40(a) Standard Heights (in...

  12. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  13. A Global Ozone Climatology from Ozone Soundings via Trajectory Mapping: A Stratospheric Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J. J.; Tarasick, D. W.; Fioletov, V. E.; McLinden, C.; Zhao, T.; Gong, S.; Sioris, G.; Jin, J. J.; Liu, G.; Moeini, O.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores a domain-filling trajectory approach to generate a global ozone climatology from sparse ozonesonde data. Global ozone soundings of 51,898 profiles at 116 stations over 44 years (1965-2008) are used, from which forward and backward trajectories are performed for 4 days, driven by a set of meteorological reanalysis data. Ozone mixing ratios of each sounding from the surface to 26 km altitude are assigned to the entire path along the trajectory. The resulting global ozone climatology is archived monthly for five decades from the 1960s to the 2000s with grids of 5 degree 5 degree 1 km (latitude, longitude, and altitude). It is also archived yearly from 1965 to 2008. This climatology is validated at 20 ozonesonde stations by comparing the actual ozone sounding profile with that found through the trajectories, using the ozone soundings at all the stations except one being tested. The two sets of profiles are in good agreement, both individually with correlation coefficients between 0.975 and 0.998 and root mean square (RMS) differences of 87 to 482 ppbv, and overall with a correlation coefficient of 0.991 and an RMS of 224 ppbv. The ozone climatology is also compared with two sets of satellite data, from the Satellite Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) and the Optical Spectrography and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS). Overall, the ozone climatology compares well with SAGE and OSIRIS data by both seasonal and zonal means. The mean difference is generally under 20 above 15 km. The comparison is better in the northern hemisphere, where there are more ozonesonde stations, than in the southern hemisphere; it is also better in the middle and high latitudes than in the tropics, where assimilated winds are imperfect in some regions. This ozone climatology can capture known features in the stratosphere, as well as seasonal and decadal variations of these features. Furthermore, it provides a wealth of detail about longitudinal variations in the stratosphere such

  14. Cloud Coverage and Height Distribution from the GLAS Polar Orbiting Lidar: Comparison to Passive Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhime, J. D.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Mahesh, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) began full on orbit operations in September 2003. A main application of the two-wavelength GLAS lidar is highly accurate detection and profiling of global cloud cover. Initial analysis indicates that cloud and aerosol layers are consistently detected on a global basis to cross-sections down to 10(exp -6) per meter. Images of the lidar data dramatically and accurately show the vertical structure of cloud and aerosol to the limit of signal attenuation. The GLAS lidar has made the most accurate measurement of global cloud coverage and height to date. In addition to the calibrated lidar signal, GLAS data products include multi level boundaries and optical depth of all transmissive layers. Processing includes a multi-variable separation of cloud and aerosol layers. An initial application of the data results is to compare monthly cloud means from several months of GLAS observations in 2003 to existing cloud climatologies from other satellite measurement. In some cases direct comparison to passive cloud retrievals is possible. A limitation of the lidar measurements is nadir only sampling. However monthly means exhibit reasonably good global statistics and coverage results, at other than polar regions, compare well with other measurements but show significant differences in height distribution. For polar regions where passive cloud retrievals are problematic and where orbit track density is greatest, the GLAS results are particularly an advance in cloud cover information. Direct comparison to MODIS retrievals show a better than 90% agreement in cloud detection for daytime, but less than 60% at night. Height retrievals are in much less agreement. GLAS is a part of the NASA EOS project and data products are thus openly available to the science community (see http://glo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  15. Statistical Sampling of Tide Heights Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the study was to determine if it was possible to reduce the cost of verifying computational models of tidal waves and currents. Statistical techniques were used to determine the least number of samples required, in a given situation, to remain statistically significant, and thereby reduce overall project costs. Commercial, academic, and Federal agencies could benefit by applying these techniques, without the need to 'touch' every item in the population. For example, the requirement of this project was to measure the heights and times of high and low tides at 8,000 locations for verification of computational models of tidal waves and currents. The application of the statistical techniques began with observations to determine the correctness of submitted measurement data, followed by some assumptions based on the observations. Among the assumptions were that the data were representative of data-collection techniques used at the measurement locations, that time measurements could be ignored (that is, height measurements alone would suffice), and that the height measurements were from a statistically normal distribution. Sample means and standard deviations were determined for all locations. Interval limits were determined for confidence levels of 95, 98, and 99 percent. It was found that the numbers of measurement locations needed to attain these confidence levels were 55, 78, and 96, respectively.

  16. Algorithmic height compression of unordered trees.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naoum, Farah; Godin, Christophe

    2016-01-21

    By nature, tree structures frequently present similarities between their sub-parts. Making use of this redundancy, different types of tree compression techniques have been designed in the literature to reduce the complexity of tree structures. A popular and efficient way to compress a tree consists of merging its isomorphic subtrees, which produces a directed acyclic graph (DAG) equivalent to the original tree. An important property of this method is that the compressed structure (i.e. the DAG) has the same height as the original tree, thus limiting partially the possibility of compression. In this paper we address the problem of further compressing this DAG in height. The difficulty is that compression must be carried out on substructures that are not exactly isomorphic as they are strictly nested within each-other. We thus introduced a notion of quasi-isomorphism between subtrees that makes it possible to define similar patterns along any given path in a tree. We then proposed an algorithm to detect these patterns and to merge them, thus leading to compressed structures corresponding to DAGs augmented with return edges. In this way, redundant information is removed from the original tree in both width and height, thus achieving minimal structural compression. The complete compression algorithm is then illustrated on the compression of various plant-like structures. PMID:26551155

  17. On the climatological probability of the vertical propagation of stationary planetary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, K.; Braesicke, P.; Sinnhuber, M.; Versick, S.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a diagnostic tool to assess in a climatological framework the optimal propagation conditions for stationary planetary waves. Analyzing 50 winters using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data we derive probability density functions (PDFs) of positive refractive indices as a function of zonal and meridional wave numbers. We contrast this quantity with classical climatological means of the refractive index. Introducing a Membership Value Function (MVF) based on fuzzy logic, we objectively generate a modified set of PDFs (mPDFs) and demonstrate their superior performance compared to the climatological mean of refractive indices and the original PDFs. We argue that mPDFs allow an even better understanding of how background conditions impact wave propagation in a climatological sense. As expected, probabilities are decreasing with increasing zonal wave numbers. In addition we discuss the meridional wave number dependency of the PDFs which is usually neglected, highlighting the contribution of meridional wave numbers 2 and 3 in the stratosphere. We also describe how mPDFs change in response to strong vortex regime (SVR) and weak vortex regime (WVR) conditions, with increased probabilities during WVR than SVR in the stratosphere. We conclude that the mPDFs are a convenient way to summarize climatological information about planetary wave propagation in reanalysis and climate model data.

  18. On the climatological probability of the vertical propagation of stationary planetary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Khalil; Braesicke, Peter; Sinnhuber, Miriam; Versick, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a diagnostic tool to assess a climatological framework of the optimal propagation conditions for stationary planetary waves. Analyzing 50 winters using NCEP/NCAR (National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research) reanalysis data we derive probability density functions (PDFs) of positive vertical wave number as a function of zonal and meridional wave numbers. We contrast this quantity with classical climatological means of the vertical wave number. Introducing a membership value function (MVF) based on fuzzy logic, we objectively generate a modified set of PDFs (mPDFs) and demonstrate their superior performance compared to the climatological mean of vertical wave number and the original PDFs. We argue that mPDFs allow an even better understanding of how background conditions impact wave propagation in a climatological sense. As expected, probabilities are decreasing with increasing zonal wave numbers. In addition we discuss the meridional wave number dependency of the PDFs which is usually neglected, highlighting the contribution of meridional wave numbers 2 and 3 in the stratosphere. We also describe how mPDFs change in response to strong vortex regime (SVR) and weak vortex regime (WVR) conditions, with increased probabilities of the wave propagation during WVR than SVR in the stratosphere. We conclude that the mPDFs are a convenient way to summarize climatological information about planetary wave propagation in reanalysis and climate model data.

  19. Building a 15-Year Cloud Climatology using Lidar in Space Observations: CALIOP and CloudSat now, EarthCARE next.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdy, M.; Chepfer, H.; Donovan, D. P.; Noel, V.; Marchand, R.; Cesana, G.; Hoareau, C.; Chiriaco, M.; Bastin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Today, the CALIOP lidar and CloudSat radar have collected more than seven years of observations, and willhopefully still operate in 2016, after the EarthCARE-ATLID/CPR launch. Lidars and Radars in space providecutting edge information on the detailed vertical structure of clouds: a key element for both the evaluation ofthe description of clouds in climate models, and the survey of the clouds inter-annual evolution in variousclimatic conditions (El Nino, variation of North Atlantic Oscillations, polar regions, etc). For this purpose,the observations collected by CALIOP and by ATLID as well as CloudSat and EarthCARE CPR need to bemerged into a long-term (15 years) cloud climatology. Here, we examine the possibility of building such a climatology, with the aim of defining its accuracy andrelevance for cloud inter-annual studies. We examine the differences between the instruments (wavelengths,satellite's altitudes, telescope fields of view, multiple scattering processes, spatial resolutions) and theirability to detect the same clouds consistently. Then, we define a set of cloud detection thresholds for ATLID,CALIOP, CloudSat and EarthCARE-CPR and test against synthetic cloud scenes (cirrus and shallowcumulus) over small areas (about 200km) produced by a lidar and radar instrument simulator (ECSIM)running on Large Eddy Simulations. Doing so, we verify that the fourth instruments will be able to detect thesame clouds despite their differences (e.g. their sensitivities to noise). Finally, we use the COSP lidar andradar simulator to predict the global scale cloud cover that ATLID, CALIOP, CloudSat and EarthCARE CPRwould observe if they were overflying the same atmosphere predicted by a GCM. Our results suggest that amerged CALIOP/ATLID and CloudSat/CPR cloud climatology could be to be useful for clouds inter-annualstudies, if the post-launch sensitivity of EarthCARE instruments is in line with what is predicted today.

  20. Wave climatological analysis in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Dong, Changming; He, Yijun

    2016-06-01

    The ERA-40 and ERA-Interim datasets from ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) are used to study the wave and wind climate in the East China Sea (ECS). The temporal and spatial variablities in the wave and wind fields on multiple scales from the intraseasonal to decadal are discussed in detail. The results show that the wave height and the wind speed are highly correlated, especially in winter. For interannual and decadal scale, the wind and wave in the ECS is strongly influenced by the ENSO and PDO with the negative correlation. The trend spatial distributions of the mean state and extreme events are presented with wave height increase by 0.005-0.01 m a-1 in most of the ECS from 1979 to 2014. The influence of typhoon on the extreme wave is significant. Vector empirical orthogonal function (VEOF) methods are used to analyze the primary three modes of wave and wind variability. Because the monthly values are filtered the fluctuation with period shorter than 14 months before VEOF analysis, the three modes presents interannual variations. The first mode is presented as the wind blowing from land to sea or from sea to land. The second mode reflects the asymmetry of winter and summer monsoon for wind and wave. And the third mode presents as a cyclone located near 28°N which caused by a cyclonic eddy existing in the north of the ECS. The waves are further categorized based on quasi-wave age. The wind waves and swell distributions display obvious differences in different seasons. The wind waves are found to be dominated in autumn and winter in the ECS.

  1. Qualified temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen climatologies in a changing Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipizer, M.; Partescano, E.; Rabitti, A.; Giorgetti, A.; Crise, A.

    2014-10-01

    An updated climatology, based on a comprehensive data set (1911-2009) of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen, has been produced for the whole Adriatic Sea with the variational inverse method using the DIVA (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis) software. Climatological maps were produced at 26 levels and validated with ordinary cross-validation and with a real vs. synthetic temperature-salinity diagram intercomparison. The concept of climatology-observation misfit (COM) has been introduced as an estimate of the physical variability associated with the climatological structures. In order to verify the temporal stability of the climatology, long-term variability has been investigated in the Middle Adriatic and the South Adriatic pits, regarded as the most suitable records of possible long-term changes. Compared with previous climatologies, this study allows a clear identification of the seasonal dynamic of the southern Adriatic, where a clear oxygen minimum is typically observed in the centre of the South Adriatic Gyre. New and better resolved features emerged from this analysis: (1) below 100 m all properties profoundly differ between the central and the southern Adriatic and seem characterized by different biogeochemical dynamics; (2) the South Adriatic Pit clearly shows the remote effects of the Eastern Mediterranean Transient, while no effect is observed in the Middle Adriatic Pit; (3) the deepest part of the southern Adriatic seems now to be significantly saltier (+0.18 psu since the period 1910-1914, with an increase of +0.018 decade-1 since the late 1940s) and warmer (+0.54 °C since 1910-1914) even though a long-term temperature trend could not be statistically demonstrated; (4) the Middle Adriatic Pit shows a long-term increase in apparent oxygen utilization (+0.77 mL L-1 since 1910-1914, with a constant increase of +0.2 mL L-1 decade-1 after the 1970s).

  2. Qualified temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen climatologies in a changing Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipizer, M.; Partescano, E.; Rabitti, A.; Giorgetti, A.; Crise, A.

    2014-02-01

    An updated climatology, based on a comprehensive dataset (1911-2009) of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen, has been produced for the whole Adriatic Sea with the Variational Inverse Method using the DIVA software. Climatological maps were produced at 26 levels and validated with Ordinary Cross Validation and with real vs. synthetic Temperature-Salinity diagram intercomparison. The concept of Climatology-Observation Misfit (COM) has been introduced as an estimate of the physical variability associated with the climatological structures. In order to verify the temporal stability of the climatology, long-term variability has been investigated in the Mid Adriatic and the South Adriatic Pits, regarded as the most suitable records of possible long-term changes. Compared with previous climatologies, this study reveals a surface temperature rise (up to 2 °C), a clear deep dissolved oxygen minimum in the South Adriatic Gyre and a bottom summer oxygen minimum in the North Adriatic. Below 100 m all properties profoundly differ between the Middle and the South Adriatic. The South Adriatic Pit clearly shows the remote effects of the Eastern Mediterranean Transient, while no effect is observed in Middle Adriatic Pits. The deepest part of the South Adriatic seems now to be significantly saltier (+0.18 since the period 1911-1914, with an increase of +0.018 decade-1 since the late 1940s) and warmer (+0.54 °C since 1911-1914), even though a long-term temperature trend could not be statistically demonstrated. Conversely, the Middle Adriatic Pits present a long-term increase in apparent oxygen utilisation (+0.77 mL L-1 since 1911-1914, with a constant increase of +0.2 mL L-1 decade-1 after the 1970s).

  3. MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF THE ROUNDHOUSE KICK ACCORDING TO HEIGHT AND DISTANCE IN TAEKWONDO

    PubMed Central

    Falco, C.

    2013-01-01

    Competition regulation in taekwondo has experienced several changes during the last few years, for example, kicks to the head score more points than kicks to the chest. In addition, some external factors such as the height of target and execution distance seem to affect the kick performance. The aim of this study was to analyse selected biomechanical parameters (impact force, reaction time, and execution time) according to the height and execution distance in two different male groups (experts (n = 12) and novices (n = 21)). Athletes kicked twice from every execution distance (short, normal and long) and towards two different heights of target (chest and head) in a random order. Novices kicked to the head with a longer reaction time than to the chest (p < 0.05) but experts were able to kick with similar performance for both heights. From short and normal distances experts kicked with similar performance; whereas from the normal distance novices had longer reaction and execution time than from the short distance (p < 0.05). In conclusion, in counterattacking situations, experts should perform the roundhouse kick to the head instead of to the chest, because it produces better scores with similar performance; whereas novice athletes should avoid kicking to the head because they are not able to kick with similar performance. Moreover, it is recommended that during counterattacks higher-level taekwondo athletes should intend to kick from normal distances. PMID:24744499

  4. Some Singularities and Irregularities in the Seasonal Progression of the 700 mb Height Field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzante, John R.

    1983-06-01

    A climatological investigation of singularities in the seasonal progression of 5-day means of 700 mb height was undertaken for the region 30-90°N, from 160°E eastward to 0°, for the period 1947-76. A harmonic analysis was performed at each of the 127 gridpoints (10° longitude by 10° latitude spacing) in order to determine the field of deviations (for each 5-day period) between the long-term mean value and the first harmonic value (which represents the smooth seasonal progression of heights). The Students's t-test was applied at each gridpoint to test whether the long-term (population) mean is significantly different from the first harmonic value (i.e., to test if the deviation is zero). The significance of the field of t-statistics for each 5-day period was estimated using a modification of the technique presented by Livezey and Chen (1981).The results of the analyses described above indicate that the 700 mb height field deviates significantly from the first harmonic during several times of the year. A pattern characterized by height rises centered over Alaska from late December through late January is terminated abruptly by the January thaw. In late February, a regional singularity (manifasted as rapid height rises), perhaps related to the termination of the February minimum in Hawaiian rainfall, is found in the eastern Pacific. The `end of winter' in the eastern North Pacific is heralded by a very rapid northward shift of the westerlies from late February through early March.During the spring, the rapid rise of heights experienced in most regions is interrupted by a southward advance and strengthening of the westerlies in the eastern Pacific during late May and June. During summer, heights over most of the domain rise to `excessively high' values relative to the first harmonic; the only exception is significantly negative deviations in eastern North America. This phenomenon results in the most deviant 5-day period (29 July-2 August) in terms of percentage of

  5. The Increasing Use of Remote Sensing Data in Studying the Climatological Impacts on Public Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempler, Steven; Benedict, Karl; Ceccato, Pietro; Golden, Meredith; Maxwell, Susan; Morian, Stan; Soebiyanto, Radina; Tong, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    One of the more fortunate outcomes of the capture and transformation of remote sensing data into applied information is their usefulness and impacts to better understanding climatological impacts on public health. Today, with petabytes of remote sensing data providing global coverage of climatological parameters, public health research and policy decision makers have an unprecedented (and growing) data record that relates the effects of climatic parameters, such as rainfall, heat, soil moisture, etc. to incidences and spread of disease, as well as predictive modeling. In addition, tools and services that specifically serve public health researchers and respondents have grown in response to needs of the these information users.

  6. Problems in the climatology of the 1980 Mount St. Helens eruptions. [surface heat and water budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Critchfield, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    A brief review of the effects of climate and weather on the 1980 Mount St. Helens eruptions and the subsequent dispersion of ash and gases and the reciprocal influences of the eruptions on climate and climatology is presented. The effects of mesoscale destruction of snow fields and vegetation, a revised mountain profile, and ash deposits are addressed along with impacts on hemispheric climate and disruption of normal climatological observations, in the areas directly affected by the explosions and ashfall. Environmental and economic consequences are also considered.

  7. A 30 year High -Spatial Resolution Cloud Climatology from NOAA's PATMOS-x Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidinger, A. K.; Walther, A.; Foster, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Pathfinder Atmospheres Extended (PATMOS-x) project at NOAA has recently developed a new higher spatial resolution data set derived from over 30 years of data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The PATMOS-x data is now online and has been submitted into the GEWEX cloud climatology assessment library of cloud climate data sets. This data also benefits from a recent recalibration of the solar reflectance channels. This work will present our latest analysis and provide our insights into the strengths and limitations of this new data. Comparisons with GEWEX data sets and to the recently generated AVHRR cloud climatology from EUMETSAT will be shown.

  8. Tennessee Valley Total and Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Climatology Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, Dennis; Blakeslee, R. J.; Hall, J. M.; McCaul, E. W.

    2008-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) has been in operation since 2001 and consists often VHF receivers deployed across northern Alabama. The NALMA locates sources of impulsive VHF radio signals from total lightning by accurately measuring the time that the signals arrive at the different receiving stations. The sources detected are then clustered into flashes by applying spatially and temporally constraints. This study examines the total lightning climatology of the region derived from NALMA and compares it to the cloud-to-ground (CG) climatology derived from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) The presentation compares the total and CG lightning trends for monthly, daily, and hourly periods.

  9. MULTI-CHANNEL PULSE HEIGHT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-11-25

    An improved multi-channel pulse height analyzer of the type where the device translates the amplitude of each pulse into a time duration electrical quantity which is utilized to control the length of a train of pulses forwarded to a scaler is described. The final state of the scaler for any one train of pulses selects the appropriate channel in a magnetic memory in which an additional count of one is placed. The improvement consists of a storage feature for storing a signal pulse so that in many instances when two signal pulses occur in rapid succession, the second pulse is preserved and processed at a later time.

  10. Outer layer effects in wind-farm boundary layers: Coriolis forces and boundary layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In LES studies of wind-farm boundary layers, scale separation between the inner and outer region of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is frequently assumed, i.e., wind turbines are presumed to fall within the inner layer and are not affected by outer layer effects. However, modern wind turbine and wind farm design tends towards larger rotor diameters and farm sizes, which means that outer layer effects will become more important. In a prior study, it was already shown for fully-developed wind farms that the ABL height influences the power performance. In this study, we use the in-house LES code SP-Wind to investigate the importance of outer layer effects on wind-farm boundary layers. In a suite of LES cases, the ABL height is varied by imposing a capping inversion with varying inversion strengths. Results indicate the growth of an internal boundary layer (IBL), which is limited in cases with low inversion layers. We further find that flow deceleration combined with Coriolis effects causes a change in wind direction throughout the farm. This effect increases with decreasing boundary layer height, and can result in considerable turbine wake deflection near the end of the farm. The authors are supported by the ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no: 306471). Computations were performed on VSC infrastructiure (Flemish Supercomputer Center), funded by the Hercules Foundation and the Flemish Government-department EWI.

  11. The European 2015 drought from a climatological perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita-Scholz, Monica; Tallaksen, Lena; Kingston, Daniel; Stagge, James

    2016-04-01

    The summer drought of 2015 affected a large portion of continental Europe and was one of the worst droughts since the heat wave of 2003. The summer was characterized by exceptionally high temperatures in many parts of the central and eastern part of Europe, with daily maximum temperatures 2 °C warmer compared to the seasonal mean (1971-2000) over most of western Europe, and more than 3 °C warmer in the east. Combined with a lack of precipitation, these conditions resulted in high evapotranspiration, strongly affecting soil moisture content and vegetation. Further, it led to record low river flows in several major European rivers, e.g. the Elbe River recorded its lowest flow in the last 60 years. Understanding how the 2015 drought event developed and the factors that contributed to it may help improve seasonal forecasting models and assess the risk of this kind of event occurring in the future. This paper analyses the European summer drought of 2015 by placing it into historical context with past historical droughts and by discussing the role of the main contributing factors controlling the occurrence and persistence of this event: temperature and precipitation anomalies, blocking episodes and sea surface temperatures. Large parts of central Europe experienced a severe lack of precipitation, with widespread areas of negative 3-month Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI3) values present from May onwards. During summer, values dropped as low as -3 in Eastern Europe - corresponding to an annual probability of 0.1. Similar to the 2003 summer drought, the upper level atmospheric circulation over continental Europe was characterized by a large positive 500hPa geopotential height anomaly bordered by a large negative anomaly to the north and west (i.e. over the central North Atlantic Ocean extending to northern Scandinavia) and another center of positive geopotential height anomalies over Greenland and northern Canada. Simultaneously, summer sea surface temperature (SST

  12. Reaching new heights: Comparing interpretation bias modification to exposure therapy for extreme height fear

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Shari A.; Teachman, Bethany A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cognitive models of anxiety disorders posit that biases in interpretation maintain, and potentially cause, anxiety. This study tested whether it is possible to decrease height fear symptoms through cognitive bias modification for interpretations (CBM-I). Additionally, the clinical utility of CBM-I was tested by comparing it to an already established treatment: exposure therapy. Method Extremely height fearful (N = 110) individuals participated in the study. Acrophobic symptoms were measured before and after two sessions of CBM-I, and compared to the standard treatment for acrophobia (exposure therapy), a combination of CBM-I and exposure therapy, and a Control condition. Results In line with hypotheses, participants in the three active conditions showed greater response to treatment than the Control condition in height-relevant interpretation bias, symptoms, and behavioral avoidance on a height stressor, with few differences between the active conditions. Further, symptom change was mediated by change in interpretation bias. Conclusions Overall, findings suggest that different pathways to fear reduction (exposure vs. shifting interpretations) can lead to similar reductions in height fear. This study provides the first evidence that directly shifting cognitive processing, even with no therapist involvement, can reduce symptoms as effectively as the gold standard, therapist-directed exposure therapy. PMID:24588406

  13. Waveform retracking for improving inland water heights from altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uebbing, Bernd; Forootan, Ehsan; Kusche, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    retrackers, such as the β-5 model, threshold retrackers and the sub-waveform retrackers, including our new approach. Results show that sub-waveform retrackers are able to handle a broad spectrum of waveform shapes ranging from the theoretical ocean case to shapes which are significantly contaminated by peaks. The quality of water heights derived from these retrackers, e.g., over Lake Volta is usually better compared to conventional retracking methods, providing standard deviations with respect to gauge data of 32cm, 10cm and 8cm for Topex/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2, respectively. Results over Lake Victoria in an area with significant land contamination in the altimeter footprint confirmed the favorable performance of the sub-waveform approaches compared to conventional retrackers. Over smaller lakes, such as Lake Naivasha, the water heights still improved compared to the unretracked case, but conventional threshold retrackers showed better results for most of the observed waveforms, which were mostly categorized as singular, specular peaks.

  14. Rain height statistics for satellite communication in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeep, J. S.

    2008-09-01

    The calculation of fade margin required for 99.99% of the time availability of satellite link requires the knowledge of rain height. There is a shortage of results on rain height over Malaysian equatorial stations. The results on rain height in relation to 0 °C isotherm height (Hi) over four stations are presented. The variations of 0 °C isotherm heights for two monsoon seasons have been studied based on an analysis of radiosonde. The exceedence probability statistics of rain height are compared between the two seasons.

  15. Optimal inflatable space towers of high height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonkin, A.

    Author suggested, developed theory, and computed some projects of an optimal inflatable space tower of the heights some hundreds km. These towers can be used for tourism, scientist observation of space, Earth surface, Earth weather, Earth top atmosphere, and for radio, TV, communication transmissions. These towers can be used for launching of the space ships and Earth s atellites. The computed projects not expensive, do not request rockets. They need only in thin strong films composed from the artificial fibers and fabricated by a current industry. Towers can be built by a current technology. Towers can be explored (for tourism, communication, etc.) in a time of the construction process and give a profit, self- financing for further constriction. They can permanent increase their height. The tower design does not request a work at the high altitudes. All construction works will be making at the Earth surface. Author suggests the transport system for this tower of a high capability, which does not request a power energy issue. The small engine (only for a friction compensation) is located at the Earth surface. The tower is separated on sections and has a special protection of a case of a damage. It is considered also the problems of security, control, repair, etc. of the suggested towers. The author has also solved additional problems, which appear in these projects and which can look as difficult for the given proposal and current technology. The author is prepared to discuss the problems with serious organizations, which want to research and develop these projects.

  16. Meniscus height controlled convective self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Satyan; Crosby, Alfred

    Convective self-assembly techniques based on the 'coffee-ring effect' allow for the fabrication of materials with structural hierarchy and multi-functionality across a wide range of length scales. The coffee-ring effect describes deposition of non-volatiles at the edge of droplet due to capillary flow and pattern formations due to pinning and de-pinning of meniscus with the solvent evaporation. We demonstrate a novel convective self-assembly method which uses a piezo-actuated bending motion for driving the de-pinning step. In this method, a dilute solution of nanoparticles or polymers is trapped by capillary forces between a blade and substrate. As the blade oscillates with a fixed frequency and amplitude and the substrate translates at a fixed velocity, the height of the capillary meniscus oscillates. The meniscus height controls the contact angle of three phase contact line and at a critical angle de-pinning occurs. The combination of convective flux and continuously changing contact angle drives the assembly of the solute and subsequent de-pinning step, providing a direct means for producing linear assemblies. We demonstrate a new method for convective self-assembly at an accelerated rate when compared to other techniques, with control over deposit dimensions. Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0185).

  17. Torch height control helps fabricator raise productivity

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    For high-speed, high-quality plate cutting with oxyfuel, several control factors are widely recognized to affect cut quality. Flame type and flame adjustment are critical factors. Matching the correct torch tip size and oxygen pressure setting to the precise material composition and exact thickness of the steel plate are essential. Control settings for preheating the fuel and for torch travel speed are equally important. A high-performance drive system is another essential part of the equation. Precisely matched to the exact size, weight and configuration of the gantry or cantilever machine, the right motor and drive combination can provide smoother x-y axis movement for cleaner cuts, less slag and less overall scrap. With the advent of the torch height control sensor for cantilever and gantry machines, there is a new element to consider in the quality equation. These torch-mounted sensor systems are helping some fabricators improve cut quality by making it easier for machine operators to maintain an optimum and consistent distance between the torch tip and the steel plate. Used by many fabricators in Europe for well over a decade, torch height control sensors are beginning to show their value in the United States.

  18. Latest Adjustment of the Argentine Height System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñón, D. A.; Cimbaro, S. R.; Sanchez, R. E.

    2013-05-01

    For over 70 years the National Geographic Institute of Argentina (NGI) has conducted a systematic project to building benchmarks throughout the country, which have been measured with spirit leveling and gravimetry techniques. The measurements were undertaken on a total of approximately 18,000 benchmarks, which define the High Precision Leveling Network of Argentina. The first adjustment of this network took place in 1971. This assignment was given to the Defense Mapping Agency of the United States of America (DMA). Leveling lines that were built and measured after the year 1971 were adjusted to this original network. It was of great importance to perform a new adjustment calculation with modern techniques to update the entire network. Some modern tools worth mentioning are: gravity interpolation using prediction method and topographic correction calculation by the Hammer method using SRTM model. All historical field books were digitalized to retrieve the information corresponding to the spirit leveling, from which it was then possible to calculate geopotential difference between the nodes, using the gravity acceleration values over the benchmarks. Subsequently, by the method of least squares it was possible to calculate the geopotential numbers of the nodes, and then the orthometric height of all the benchmarks. The recommendations of the Working Group III of SIRGAS (Geodetic Reference System for the Americas) were taken into account in relation to this task. The development of this paper shows the results that have been obtained so far in the development of the New Height System for Argentina.

  19. Using infrasound to constrain ash plume height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Oliver; De Angelis, Silvio; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Airborne volcanic ash advisories are currently based on analyses of satellite imagery with relatively low temporal resolution, and numerical simulations of atmospheric plume dispersion. These simulations rely on key input parameters such as the maximum height of eruption plumes and the mass eruption rate at the vent, which remain loosely constrained. In this study, we present a proof-of-concept workflow that incorporates the analysis of volcanic infrasound with numerical modelling of volcanic plume rise in a realistic atmosphere. We analyse acoustic infrasound records from two explosions during the 2009 eruption of Mt. Redoubt, USA, that produced plumes reaching heights of 12-14 km. We model the infrasonic radiation at the source under the assumptions of linear acoustic theory and calculate variations in mass ejection velocity at the vent. The estimated eruption velocities serve as the input for numerical models of plume rise. The encouraging results highlight the potential for infrasound measurements to be incorporated into numerical modelling of ash dispersion, and confirm their value for volcano monitoring operations.

  20. Absence of modulatory action on haptic height perception with musical pitch

    PubMed Central

    Geronazzo, Michele; Avanzini, Federico; Grassi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Although acoustic frequency is not a spatial property of physical objects, in common language, pitch, i.e., the psychological correlated of frequency, is often labeled spatially (i.e., “high in pitch” or “low in pitch”). Pitch-height is known to modulate (and interact with) the response of participants when they are asked to judge spatial properties of non-auditory stimuli (e.g., visual) in a variety of behavioral tasks. In the current study we investigated whether the modulatory action of pitch-height extended to the haptic estimation of height of a virtual step. We implemented a HW/SW setup which is able to render virtual 3D objects (stair-steps) haptically through a PHANTOM device, and to provide real-time continuous auditory feedback depending on the user interaction with the object. The haptic exploration was associated with a sinusoidal tone whose pitch varied as a function of the interaction point's height within (i) a narrower and (ii) a wider pitch range, or (iii) a random pitch variation acting as a control audio condition. Explorations were also performed with no sound (haptic only). Participants were instructed to explore the virtual step freely, and to communicate height estimation by opening their thumb and index finger to mimic the step riser height, or verbally by reporting the height in centimeters of the step riser. We analyzed the role of musical expertise by dividing participants into non-musicians and musicians. Results showed no effects of musical pitch on high-realistic haptic feedback. Overall there is no difference between the two groups in the proposed multimodal conditions. Additionally, we observed a different haptic response distribution between musicians and non-musicians when estimations of the auditory conditions are matched with estimations in the no sound condition. PMID:26441745

  1. Towards a Model Climatology of Relative Humidity in the Upper Troposphere for Estimation of Contrail and Contrail-Induced Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Manyin, M.; Ott, L.; Oman, L.; Benson, C.; Pawson, S.; Douglass, A. R.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of contrails and contrail cirrus is very sensitive to the relative humidity of the upper troposphere. To reduce uncertainty in an estimate of the radiative impact of aviation-induced cirrus, a model must therefore be able to reproduce the observed background moisture fields with reasonable and quantifiable fidelity. Here we present an upper tropospheric moisture climatology from a 26-year ensemble of simulations using the GEOS CCM. We compare this free-running model's moisture fields to those obtained from the MLS and AIRS satellite instruments, our most comprehensive observational databases for upper tropospheric water vapor. Published comparisons have shown a substantial wet bias in GEOS-5 assimilated fields with respect to MLS water vapor and ice water content. This tendency is clear as well in the GEOS CCM simulations. The GEOS-5 moist physics in the GEOS CCM uses a saturation adjustment that prevents supersaturation, which is unrealistic when compared to in situ moisture observations from MOZAIC aircraft and balloon sondes as we will show. Further, the large-scale satellite datasets also consistently underestimate super-saturation when compared to the in-situ observations. We place these results in the context of estimates of contrail and contrail cirrus frequency.

  2. Is there a climatological signature to deep root functioning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamzai, A.; de Beurs, K.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation has the ability to influence local water, carbon and energy fluxes in complex ways. In many climate models, dynamic vegetation is closely linked to soil moisture since 95% of all roots are located in the upper 2m of soil. However, in some ecosystems this bottom 5% of roots contributes an important percentage of net transpiration through the processes of hydraulic lift and redistribution. Hydraulic lift and redistribution is the movement of water by vegetation through the use of a passive water potential gradient. During periods where water is readily available, vegetation is able to store excess water in deeper soils. When conditions become more arid, the vegetation is able to bring this water back up to the near surface in order to re-hydrate the soil. This water is then used in transpiration and also aids in soil decomposition and nutrient breakdown in the upper soil layers. While hydraulic lift and redistribution has been identified in individual plant species, there has been limited work to understand the contribution of deep root functioning on broader spatial scales. Here we propose to use satellite data products in conjunction with ground-based observations in order to better determine the atmospheric link to deep moisture across land cover types within the state of Oklahoma. For this preliminary assessment, we will utilize the 8-day MOD 16 evapotranspiration product along with soil moisture observations from the Oklahoma Mesonet to compare and contrast a paired dry and wet case study period. We hypothesize that the presence of deep root functioning in certain land cover types increases resiliency to drought and will be observable between the case studies as reduced suppression of evapotranspiration and enhanced latent cooling of the surface.

  3. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF THE TREATMENT OF AREA SOURCES BY THE CLIMATOLOGICAL DISPERSION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The discussion is directed to users of the Climatological Dispersion Model (CDM) who are interested in that model's sensitivity to the manner in which the area-source emissions are specified. The CDM was used to estimate annual average SO2 concentrations from area-source emission...

  4. Data Albums: A synthesis engine to support case study and climatology analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskey, M.; Ramachandran, R.; Kulkarni, A.; Conover, H.; Goodman, H.; Zavodsky, B.; Braun, S. A.; Wilson, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Case study analysis and climatology studies are common approaches used in Atmospheric Science research. Research based on case studies involves a detailed description of specific weather events using data from different sources to characterize the physical processes responsible for a given event. Climatology-based research tends to focus on the representativeness of a given event by studying the characteristics and distribution of a large number of events. The current Earth Science data systems are not designed to assemble multi-instrument, multi mission datasets around specific events. In addition, such analyses typically require additional information from a variety of distributed resources such as storm and damage reports, images, and videos to provide complete contextual understanding. Consequently, it is both tedious and time consuming to manually gather relevant data and information from a wide variety of distributed resources for case studies and climatology analyses. This presentation will describe a synthesis engine currently being developed to create curated 'Data Albums' to support case study analysis and climatology studies in an automated manner. This engine drives different software brokers that aggregate information from different resources. In addition, an ontology-based relevancy ranking service is integrated into the engine to filter the aggregated results. The aggregated results are synthesized into a structured form and presented to the users in an interactive infographic display. Example applications of this engine will be demonstrated during the presentation.

  5. Validation of Global Climatologies of Trace Gases Using NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courchaine, Brian; Venable, Jessica C.

    1995-01-01

    Methane is an important trace gas because it is a greenhouse gas that affects the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. It is produced from biological and anthropogenic sources, and is increasing globally at a rate of approximately 0.6% per year [Climate Change 1992, IPCC]. By using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (NOAA/CMDL) ground station data, a global climatology of methane values was produced. Unfortunately, because the NOAA/CMDL ground stations are so sparse, the global climatology is low resolution. In order to compensate for this low resolution data, it was compared to in-situ flight data obtained from the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE). The smoothed ground station data correlated well with the flight data. Thus, for the first time it is shown that the smoothing process used to make global contours of methane using the ground stations is a plausible way to approximate global atmospheric concentrations of the gas. These verified climatologies can be used for testing large-scale models of chemical production, destruction, and transport. This project develops the groundwork for further research in building global climatologies from sparse ground station data and studying the transport and distribution of trace gases.

  6. Statistical examination of climatological data relevant to global temperature variation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, H.L.; Gunst, R.F.; Woodward, W.A.

    1998-07-01

    Advanced statistical procedures have been developed to analyze and model climatological data. Research has focused on the following areas: testing the global temperature series for trend; the effect of initial conditions on autoregressive models for global temperature data; long memory modeling of the carbon dioxide data; and spatial modeling of global temperature data.

  7. AIR POLLUTION CLIMATOLOGY OF AN ISOLATED POINT SOURCE USING CONVECTIVE SCALING PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An air pollution climatology, which incorporated convective scaling parameters, is used to investigate the conditions associated with hourly sulfur dioxide concentrations from a coal-fired power plant. ne year of data from the Paradise power plant in central Kentucky (UeSeAs) was...

  8. Analysis of global cloudiness. 2: Comparison of ground-based and satellite-based cloud climatologies

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, I.I.; Schlesinger, M.E. |

    1994-08-01

    Cloud climatologies are developed and intercompared for International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCO) (1983-1988), Meteor I (1971-1980), Meteor II (1979-1988), and Nimbus 7 (1979-1985) satellite observations, and for Berlyand and Strokina (1975, 1980) and Warren et al. (1986, 1988) ground-based observations. The satellite annual-mean, global- mean cloudiness, 0.57 +/- 0.05, is less than the ground-based value, 0.61 +/- 0.01, predominantly because of the low value for Nimbus 7. There is agreement between the satellite means of ISCCP, 0.62, and Meteor II, 0.61, and the ground-based means of Warren et al., 0.62, and Berlyand and Strokina, 0.60. Each satellite- and ground-based climatology shows that the hemispheric- mean cloudiness is larger in summer than that in winter in both the northern and southern hemispheres. Excluding Nimbus 7 observations, the zonal- mean cloudiness distributions for January, July, and July minus January display reasonably good agreement between 60 deg S and 60 deg N. In polar latitudes there is significant disagreement among the different climatologies, even in the sign of cloudiness changes from winter to summer. This evinces the need for special cloudiness experiments in polar regions, particularly in winter and summer.

  9. Climatology of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere determined from Sage 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiou, Er-Woon; McCormick, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a vertically-resolved global climatology of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere based on multi-year SAGE 2 observations. Seasonally averaged zonal mean profiles are illustrated in terms of both mixing ration and relative humidity.

  10. Using a mesoscale prognostic model to construct a regional scale transport climatology. Part 2: Transport patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, S.L.; Dean, D.; Atchison, M.K.

    1998-12-31

    This study continues an investigation of the use of a prognostic mesoscale meteorological model to construct a regional scale climatology of pollution transport patterns around a site suffering from sparse data. In Part 1 of this study, the authors examined the accuracy of the RAMS model in simulating the weather at an eastern Mediterranean site. For this part of the investigation, they examined the effect of varying types of weather data on the transport climatology results. Due to the large amounts of data generated by a lengthy weather simulation, they also attempted to reduce the amount of required simulation time by using samples of weather data. Five months (1990--1994) of NCAR/NCEP reanalysis gridded wind data are subjected to an S-mode eigenvector analysis to produce a set of 12 two-dimensional wind patterns over a 1000 km square region in the eastern Mediterranean. The five months are then clustered on the basis of similarity to these 12 patterns. A set of days is selected from each of the groups to form a sample. This set of days is considered representative of the wind patterns during the five months period. The authors will compare transport climatology results obtained using the full set of RAMS forecast data from Part 1 to those obtained using representative and random samples of the data. They also examine the effect of using sparse data on the transport climatology results.

  11. Uncertainty in Climatology-Based Estimates of Soil Water Infiltration Losses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Local climatology is often used to estimate infiltration losses at the field scale. The objective of this work was to assess the uncertainty associated with such estimates. We computed infiltration losses from the water budget of a soil layer from monitoring data on water flux values at the soil su...

  12. A Meso-Climatology Study of the High-Resolution Tower Network Over the Florida Spaceport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Bauman, William H., III

    2004-01-01

    Forecasters at the US Air Force 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) use wind and temperature data from the tower network over the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) to evaluate Launch Commit Criteria and to issue and verify temperature and wind advisories, watches, and warnings for ground operations. The Spaceflight Meteorology Group at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX also uses these data when issuing forecasts for shuttle landings at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Systematic biases in these parameters at any of the towers could adversely affect an analysis, forecast, or verification for all of these operations. In addition, substantial geographical variations in temperature and wind speed can occur under specific wind directions. Therefore, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU), operated by ENSCO Inc., was tasked to develop a monthly and hourly climatology of temperatures and winds from the tower network, and identify the geographical variation, tower biases, and the magnitude of those biases. This paper presents a sub-set of results from a nine-year climatology of the KSC/CCAFS tower network, highlighting the geographical variations based on location, month, times of day, and specific wind direction regime. Section 2 provides a description of the tower mesonetwork and instrumentation characteristics. Section 3 presents the methodology used to construct the tower climatology including QC methods and data processing. The results of the tower climatology are presented in Section 4 and Section 5 summarizes the paper.

  13. 32. Moving draw span from Ship Canal to University Heights ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Moving draw span from Ship Canal to University Heights Bridge. June 14, 1906 artist rendering - University Heights Bridge, Spanning Harlem River at 207th Street & West Harlem Road, New York County, NY

  14. A climatology of tropospheric humidity inversions in five reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunke, Michael A.; Stegall, Steve T.; Zeng, Xubin

    2015-02-01

    Specific humidity is generally thought to decrease with height in the troposphere. However, here we document the existence of specific humidity inversions in five reanalyses: the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) second reanalysis (NCEP-2), the European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts (ECMWF) 40-year reanalysis (ERA-40), the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research Applications (MERRA), NCEP's Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), and the ECMWF interim reanalysis (ERA-Interim). These inversions are most frequent in the polar regions. Inversions do occur elsewhere, most notably over the subtropical stratus regions, but are less frequent and likely overproduced depending on the location. Polar inversions are the most persistent in winter and the strongest (as defined by the humidity difference divided by the pressure difference across the inversion) in summer or autumn with low bases (at pressures > 900 hPa). Winter humidity inversions are lower, being near-surface, due to the persistence of low-level temperature inversions associated with these humidity inversions, while summer humidity inversions tend to be located near cloud top providing moisture to prevent the melt season stratus from evaporating. The most important contributions to affect humidity inversions in MERRA are dynamics, turbulence, and moist physics. However, local advection may not play as much of a role as regional humidity convergence. The subtropical stratus inversions are as thick as polar humidity inversions but with higher bases generally at pressures < 900 hPa. These inversions are confirmed by rawinsonde data, but there are discrepancies between the observed annual and diurnal cycles in inversion frequency and those portrayed in the reanalyses.

  15. High resolution precipitation climatology for the Andes of South Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachte, Katja; Bendix, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    The climate of Ecuador is strongly dominated by the complex structure of the Andes Mountains. Due to their heights and north-south orientation they act like a barrier, which cause delineation between the western and eastern flanks, as well as the inner-Andean areas. Commonly the Ecuadorian climate is classified in three zones, Costa, Interandina and Oriente. Existing precipitation products such as the GPCC or TRMM data are enabled to represent these climate zones, but because of their spatial resolution, they pass to capture the different regimes within a zone. Especially the inner-Andean region (Interandina) with its characteristic complex terrain shows spatially high climate variability. Local circulation systems, e.g. mountain-valley breezes as well as effects of windward and lee-side, drive the climate conditions allowing for the differentiation of air temperature and rainfall distribution on relative small scales. These highly variable patterns are also reflected by the diversity of ecosystems, e.g. rainforest, dry forest and Paramo, in a relative small area. In order to represent the local systems a dynamical downscaling approach for the Ecuadorian region is applied. In doing so the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used. A suitable model setup was evaluated within a sensitivity study, where various parametrization schemes were tested. The most suitable physics combination was used for a 30 year hint cast simulation. The poster presents first results of the high resolution climate simulations. On the basis of the spatial distribution of rainfall patterns distinct precipitation regimes within the Interandina will be shown. The aim is to highlight and discuss the importance of the adequately representation of the terrain in mountainous regions like the Andean Mountains.

  16. Measuring Forest Height and Biomass from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agueh, Temilola Elisabeth Fato

    2013-01-01

    Talk about doing earth science at NASA and how what we do is focus on the biosphere- that is the living portion of the earth.In particular, we are interested in looking at forests-quantifying deforestation, regrowth, change in general and helping develop new cutting-edge technologies and instruments to be able to measure these changes in land use, land cover and quality more accurately.

  17. 50 CFR 648.50 - Shell-height standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Shell-height standard. 648.50 Section 648... Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery § 648.50 Shell-height standard. (a) Minimum shell height. The minimum shell height for in-shell scallops that may be landed, or possessed at or after landing, is 3.5 inches (8.9...

  18. 50 CFR 648.50 - Shell-height standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shell-height standard. 648.50 Section 648... Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery § 648.50 Shell-height standard. (a) Minimum shell height. The minimum shell height for in-shell scallops that may be landed, or possessed at or after landing, is 3.5 inches (8.9...

  19. 50 CFR 648.50 - Shell-height standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Shell-height standard. 648.50 Section 648... Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery § 648.50 Shell-height standard. (a) Minimum shell height. The minimum shell height for in-shell scallops that may be landed, or possessed at or after landing, is 3.5 inches (8.9...

  20. 50 CFR 648.50 - Shell-height standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Shell-height standard. 648.50 Section 648... Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery § 648.50 Shell-height standard. (a) Minimum shell height. The minimum shell height for in-shell scallops that may be landed, or possessed at or after landing, is 3.5 inches (8.9...

  1. 50 CFR 648.50 - Shell-height standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Shell-height standard. 648.50 Section 648... Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery § 648.50 Shell-height standard. (a) Minimum shell height. The minimum shell height for in-shell scallops that may be landed, or possessed at or after landing, is 3.5 inches (8.9...

  2. Sea surface height and steric height increases in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-06-01

    Sea surface height has increased by 3 millimeters per year, globally averaged, since 1993. Some fraction of sea surface height change is due to added water from melting glaciers, for instance, and some is due to increasing heat and salinity changes (steric effects). Focusing on the Southern Hemisphere, Sutton and Roemmich analyzed temperature and salinity data from the Argo float array in relation to earlier data from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) to estimate the steric changes. These were compared with the total sea surface height changes over the same period seen in satellite altimetric data. They found that on decadal time scales, about half of the rise in sea surface height in the Southern Ocean is due to steric effects, with the proportion increasing southward. The accompanying increase in ocean heat content south of 30°S can account for most of the global heat content change during this period. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL046802, 2011)

  3. ON A p-ADIC ANALOGUE OF TATE HEIGHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzin'sh, A. A.

    1983-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the Tate height of an elliptic curve and its p-adic analogue. The main result is a series of explicit formulas for computing the local archimedean part of the Tate height. These results are used to obtain a new method for constructing the p-adic Tate height. Bibliography: 5 titles.

  4. 47 CFR 24.132 - Power and antenna height limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power and antenna height limits. 24.132 Section... PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.132 Power and antenna height limits. (a) Stations... unlimited in antenna height except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section. (d)(1) MTA and...

  5. 47 CFR 80.763 - Effective antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective antenna height. 80.763 Section 80.763... MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.763 Effective antenna height. The effective height of the antenna is the vertical distance between the center of the...

  6. 47 CFR 24.232 - Power and antenna height limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power and antenna height limits. 24.232 Section... PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.232 Power and antenna height limits. (a)(1) Base... radiated power (EIRP) with an antenna height up to 300 meters HAAT, except as described in paragraph...

  7. 47 CFR 73.211 - Power and antenna height requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Power and antenna height requirements. 73.211... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.211 Power and antenna height requirements. (a... Class C and C0 stations is 100 kW. (2) Class C0 stations must have an antenna height above...

  8. 47 CFR 24.132 - Power and antenna height limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power and antenna height limits. 24.132 Section... PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.132 Power and antenna height limits. (a) Stations... unlimited in antenna height except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section. (d)(1) MTA and...

  9. 47 CFR 24.232 - Power and antenna height limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power and antenna height limits. 24.232 Section... PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.232 Power and antenna height limits. (a)(1) Base... radiated power (EIRP) with an antenna height up to 300 meters HAAT, except as described in paragraph...

  10. 47 CFR 73.614 - Power and antenna height requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power and antenna height requirements. 73.614... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Television Broadcast Stations § 73.614 Power and antenna height requirements.... No minimum antenna height above average terrain is specified. (b) Maximum power. Applications...

  11. 47 CFR 73.211 - Power and antenna height requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power and antenna height requirements. 73.211... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.211 Power and antenna height requirements. (a... Class C and C0 stations is 100 kW. (2) Class C0 stations must have an antenna height above...

  12. 47 CFR 24.132 - Power and antenna height limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power and antenna height limits. 24.132 Section... PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.132 Power and antenna height limits. (a) Stations... unlimited in antenna height except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section. (d)(1) MTA and...

  13. 47 CFR 24.232 - Power and antenna height limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power and antenna height limits. 24.232 Section... PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.232 Power and antenna height limits. (a)(1) Base... radiated power (EIRP) with an antenna height up to 300 meters HAAT, except as described in paragraph...

  14. 47 CFR 73.614 - Power and antenna height requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power and antenna height requirements. 73.614... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Television Broadcast Stations § 73.614 Power and antenna height requirements.... No minimum antenna height above average terrain is specified. (b) Maximum power. Applications...

  15. 47 CFR 101.125 - Temporary fixed antenna height restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Temporary fixed antenna height restrictions... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.125 Temporary fixed antenna height restrictions. The overall antenna structure heights employed by mobile stations in the...

  16. 47 CFR 101.125 - Temporary fixed antenna height restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Temporary fixed antenna height restrictions... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.125 Temporary fixed antenna height restrictions. The overall antenna structure heights employed by mobile stations in the...

  17. 47 CFR 101.125 - Temporary fixed antenna height restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Temporary fixed antenna height restrictions... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.125 Temporary fixed antenna height restrictions. The overall antenna structure heights employed by mobile stations in the...

  18. 47 CFR 24.132 - Power and antenna height limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power and antenna height limits. 24.132 Section... PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.132 Power and antenna height limits. (a) Stations... unlimited in antenna height except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section. (d)(1) MTA and...

  19. 47 CFR 73.211 - Power and antenna height requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power and antenna height requirements. 73.211... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.211 Power and antenna height requirements. (a... Class C and C0 stations is 100 kW. (2) Class C0 stations must have an antenna height above...

  20. 47 CFR 73.614 - Power and antenna height requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power and antenna height requirements. 73.614... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Television Broadcast Stations § 73.614 Power and antenna height requirements.... No minimum antenna height above average terrain is specified. (b) Maximum power. Applications...