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Sample records for ablated wall material

  1. Experiment and analysis of ablation and condensation in NIF first wall materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, H.; Peterson, P.F.; Turner, R.E.; Anderson, A.T.

    1996-06-14

    Experiments were performed on Nova at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study the ablation and condensation process of National Ignition Facility (NIF) first wall materials. Plates of candidate first wall materials (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 4}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were exposed to x-rays from hohlraums in the Nova chamber. Ablated material was collected and measured on a receiving plate which was blocked form direct x-ray exposure. This article presents the results form these experiments and comparisons with predictions from numerical simulations The net condensation flux was calculated using the TSUNAMI code, which was modified to incorporate the feature of condensation boundaries.

  2. Modeling and experiments of x-ray ablation of National Ignition Facility first wall materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.T.; Burnham, A.K.; Tobin, M.T.; Peterson, P.F.

    1996-06-04

    This paper discusses results of modeling and experiments on the x-ray response of selected materials relevant to NIF target chamber design. X-ray energy deposition occurs in such small characteristic depths (on the order of a micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion significantly affect the material response, even during the typical 10-ns pulses. The finite-difference ablation model integrates four separate processes: x-ray energy deposition, heat conduction, hydrodynamics, and surface vaporization. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser facility in Livermore on response of various materials to NIF-relevant x-ray fluences. Fused silica, Si nitride, B carbide, B, Si carbide, C, Al2O3, and Al were tested. Response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with SEM and atomic force microscopes. Judgements were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material; relative importances of these processes were also studied with the x-ray response model.

  3. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  4. Method of manufacturing hollow members having uniform wall thickness through use of ablation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Paul R.; Downs, Raymond L.; Henderson, Timothy M.

    1982-01-01

    A method of manufacturing a hollow structure of uniform wall thickness comprising the steps of selecting or forming a precursor having one wall surface of desired geometry, treating a portion of the precursor consisting of the one wall surface and a uniform depth of material beneath the wall surface to increase resistance to ablation, and then removing by ablation and discarding the remaining or untreated portion of the precursor.

  5. Rail gun performance and plasma characteristics due to wall ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment of Bauer, et al. (1982) is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time.

  6. Performance loss due to wall ablation in plasma armature railguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. V.; Parsons, W. M.; Cummings, C. E.; Fox, W. E.

    1985-07-01

    Parametric measurements have been performed on a plasma armature railgun at Los Alamos. The railgun is extensively instrumented for studies of the projectile motion and its interaction with the plasma armature. The most important parameter, driving current, was varied from 100 kA to 400 kA. Additional parameters investigated include current waveform, injection velocity, injection gas, wall insulation material, and initial pressure. For all combinations of parameters investigated, the measured performance was substantially below theoretical predictions. A strong correlation was found between performance loss and abnormal plasma armature features such as multiple arc formation, or separation of the armature from the projectile. In extreme cases, the plasma armature was observed to come to rest inside the railgun. A plasma armature model has been developed which successfully accounts for the measured performance loss and for many of the abnormal plasma armature features. By incorporating the ablation of wall material into the armature plasma this model predicts two parasitic forces that dominate the motion of the armature at high velocity. One force is the inertial drag term m dot sub a v. The other is frictional drag between the hot, turbulent plasma and the walls, which increases M sub a v squared. Simple scaling relations, which incorporate the plasma armature model, show that velocities less than 10 km/s will be extremely difficult to achieve with plasma armature railguns unless the effects of ablation are eliminated or carefully controlled.

  7. Wall ablation, gas dynamics, and the history of wall stresses in ICF target chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.D. )

    1989-09-30

    We calculate the history of wall stresses for spherical aluminum LMF-type ICF target chambers 10 cm thick with 1400-MJ pellets using a simple computer program called CHAMBER that incorporates the physics of first-wall ablation and chamber gas dynamics, including dissociation, ionization, and gas reverberations. By considering the time dependence of the wall stresses, we calculate peak stresses that are higher or lower than previous estimates based on the dynamic formula {sigma}{sub dyn} {approx}Pr/{Delta}R, depending on the radius of the chamber. Here P is the interior pressure, R is the chamber radius, and {Delta}R is the wall thickness. In particular, the previous estimates are too small for chambers with radii R > 4 m or R < 0.5 m, because the ablation impulse dominates the stress for R > 4 m, and the post-ablation pressure impulse dominates for R < 0.5 cm. CHAMER also shows that considerably more wall mass can be ablated after the x-ray-vaporized mass fills the chamber if the thermalized vapor radiates more energy to the wall than the wall can conduct away by heat condition, as in small chambers. Venting of a chamber can reduce the wall stress only to that caused by the ablation impulse, and only for vents with radii comparable to the radius of the chamber. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  8. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  9. Femtosecond lasers for machining of transparent, brittle materials: ablative vs. non-ablative femtosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on precision machining of transparent materials by means of ablative and non-ablative femtosecond laser processing. Ablation technology will be compared with a newly developed patent pending non-ablative femtosecond process, ClearShapeTM, using the Spectra-Physics Spirit industrial femtosecond laser.

  10. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  11. Alternate nozzle ablative materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    Four subscale solid rocket motor tests were conducted successfully to evaluate alternate nozzle liner, insulation, and exit cone structural overwrap components for possible application to the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) nozzle asasembly. The 10,000 lb propellant motor tests were simulated, as close as practical, the configuration and operational environment of the full scale SRM. Fifteen PAN based and three pitch based materials had no filler in the phenolic resin, four PAN based materials had carbon microballoons in the resin, and the rest of the materials had carbon powder in the resin. Three nozzle insulation materials were evaluated; an aluminum oxide silicon oxide ceramic fiber mat phenolic material with no resin filler and two E-glass fiber mat phenolic materials with no resin filler. It was concluded by MTI/WD (the fabricator and evaluator of the test nozzles) and NASA-MSFC that it was possible to design an alternate material full scale SRM nozzle assembly, which could provide an estimated 360 lb increased payload capability for Space Shuttle launches over that obtainable with the current qualified SRM design.

  12. New Combined Laser Ablation Platform Determines Cell Wall Chemistry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    NREL has designed and developed a combined laser ablation/pulsed sample introduction/mass spectrometry platform that integrates pyrolysis and/or laser ablation with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Using this apparatus, we can measure the cell wall chemical composition of untreated biomass materials. Understanding the chemical composition of untreated biomass is key to both the biochemical and thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels. In the biochemical conversion process, the new technique provides a better understanding of the chemistry of lignin and will improve accessibility to plant sugars. In thermochemical conversion, the information provided by the new technique may help to reduce the formation of unwanted byproducts during gasification. NREL validated the ability of the system to detect pyrolysis products from plant materials using poplar, a potentially high-impact bioenergy feedstock. In the technique, biomass vapors are produced by laser ablation using the 3rd harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser (355 nm). The resulting vapors are entrained in a free jet expansion of helium, then skimmed and introduced into an ionization region. REMPI is used to ionize the vapors because it is highly sensitive for detecting lignin and aromatic metabolites. The laser ablation method was used to selectively volatilize specific plant tissues and detect lignin-based products from the vapors with enhanced sensitivity. This will allow the determination of lignin distribution in future biomass studies.

  13. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm‑1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility

  14. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm-1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm-1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm-1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility was

  15. Analysis and removal of ITER relevant materials and deposits by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Qingmei; Huber, Alexander; Philipps, Volker; Sergienko, Gennady; Gierse, Niels; Mertens, Philippe; Hai, Ran; Ding, Hongbin

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of the deposition of eroded wall material on the plasma-facing materials in fusion devices is one of the crucial issues to maintain the plasma performance and to fulfill safety requirements with respect to tritium retention by co-deposition. Laser ablation with minimal damage to the plasma facing material is a promising method for in situ monitoring and removal of the deposition, especially for plasma-shadowed areas which are difficult to reach by other cleaning methods like plasma discharge. It requires the information of ablation process and the ablation threshold for quantitative analysis and effective removal of the different deposits. This paper presents systemic laboratory experimental analysis of the behavior of the ITER relevant materials, graphite, tungsten, aluminum (as a substitution of beryllium) and mixed deposits ablated by a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) with different energy densities (1-27 J/cm2, power density 0.3-3.9 GW/cm2). The mixed deposits consisted of W-Al-C layer were deposited on W substrate by magnetron sputtering and arc plasma deposition. The aim was to select the proper parameters for the quantitative analysis and for laser removal of the deposits by investigating the ablation efficiency and ablation threshold for the bulk materials and deposits. The comparison of the ablation and saturation energy thresholds for pure and mixed materials shows that the ablation threshold of the mixed layer depends on the concentration of the components. We propose laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for determination of the elemental composition of deposits and then we select the laser parameters for the layer removal. Comparison of quantitative analysis results from laboratory to that from TEXTOR shows reasonable agreements. The dependence of the spectra on plasma parameters and ambient gas pressure is investigated.

  16. Modeling Ablation of Fibrous Materials from Bulk to Knudsen Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachaud, Jean; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2008-01-01

    Material-environment interactions are analyzed at microscopic scale to explain the lower than expected density observed by post-flight analysis of the char layer on the Stardust shield. Mass transfer, ablation (oxidation), and surface recession of fibrous material is simulated in 3D using a Monte-Carlo simulation tool. Ablation is found to occur either at the surface or in volume depending on Knudsen and Thiele number values. This study supports the idea of volume ablation followed by possible carbon fiber spallation that may explain post-flight analyses.

  17. Ablation-cooled material removal with ultrafast bursts of pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerse, Can; Kalaycıoğlu, Hamit; Elahi, Parviz; Çetin, Barbaros; Kesim, Denizhan K.; Akçaalan, Önder; Yavaş, Seydi; Aşık, Mehmet D.; Öktem, Bülent; Hoogland, Heinar; Holzwarth, Ronald; Ilday, Fatih Ömer

    2016-09-01

    The use of femtosecond laser pulses allows precise and thermal-damage-free removal of material (ablation) with wide-ranging scientific, medical and industrial applications. However, its potential is limited by the low speeds at which material can be removed and the complexity of the associated laser technology. The complexity of the laser design arises from the need to overcome the high pulse energy threshold for efficient ablation. However, the use of more powerful lasers to increase the ablation rate results in unwanted effects such as shielding, saturation and collateral damage from heat accumulation at higher laser powers. Here we circumvent this limitation by exploiting ablation cooling, in analogy to a technique routinely used in aerospace engineering. We apply ultrafast successions (bursts) of laser pulses to ablate the target material before the residual heat deposited by previous pulses diffuses away from the processing region. Proof-of-principle experiments on various substrates demonstrate that extremely high repetition rates, which make ablation cooling possible, reduce the laser pulse energies needed for ablation and increase the efficiency of the removal process by an order of magnitude over previously used laser parameters. We also demonstrate the removal of brain tissue at two cubic millimetres per minute and dentine at three cubic millimetres per minute without any thermal damage to the bulk.

  18. Ultrafast laser ablation of transparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Lara; Russ, Simone; Kaiser, Myriam; Kumkar, Malte; Faißt, Birgit; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the influence of the pulse duration and the temporal spacing between pulses on the ablation of aluminosilicate glass by comparing the results obtained with pulse durations of 0.4 ps and 6 ps. We found that surface modifications occur already at fluences below the single pulse ablation threshold and that laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) emerge as a result of those surface modifications. For 0.4 ps the ablation threshold fluences is lower than for 6 ps. Scanning electron micrographs of LIPSS generated with 0.4 ps exhibit a more periodic and less coarse structure as compared to structures generated with 6 ps. Furthermore we report on the influence of temporal spacing between the pulses on the occurrence of LIPSS and the impact on the quality of the cutting edge. Keywords: LIPSS,

  19. Ablative Laser Propulsion Using Multi-Layered Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nehls, Mary; Edwards, David; Gray, Perry; Schneider, T.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental investigations are ongoing to study the force imparted to materials when subjected to laser ablation. When a laser pulse of sufficient energy density impacts a material, a small amount of the material is ablated. A torsion balance is used to measure the momentum produced by the ablation process. The balance consists of a thin metal wire with a rotating pendulum suspended in the middle. The wire is fixed at both ends. Recently, multi-layered material systems were investigated. These multi-layered materials were composed of a transparent front surface and opaque sub surface. The laser pulse penetrates the transparent outer surface with minimum photon loss and vaporizes the underlying opaque layer.

  20. Microscopic Scale Simulation of the Ablation of Fibrous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachaud, Jean Romain; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2010-01-01

    Ablation by oxidation of carbon-fiber preforms impregnated in carbonized phenolic matrix is modeled at microscopic scale. Direct numerical simulations show that the carbonized phenolic matrix ablates in volume leaving the carbon fibers exposed. This is due to the fact that the reactivity of carbonized phenolic is higher than the reactivity of carbon fibers. After the matrix is depleted, the fibers ablate showing progressive reduction of their diameter. The overall material recession occurs when the fibers are consumed. Two materials with the same carbon-fiber preform, density and chemical composition, but with different matrix distributions are studied. These studies show that at moderate temperatures (< 1000 K) the microstructure of the material influences its recession rate; a fact that is not captured by current models that are based on chemical composition only. Surprisingly, the response of these impregnated-fiber materials is weakly dependent on the microstructure at very high temperatures (e.g., Stardust peak heating conditions: 3360K).

  1. Resin-Impregnated Carbon Ablator: A New Ablative Material for Hyperbolic Entry Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Lengowski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Ablative materials are required to protect a space vehicle from the extreme temperatures encountered during the most demanding (hyperbolic) atmospheric entry velocities, either for probes launched toward other celestial bodies, or coming back to Earth from deep space missions. To that effect, the resin-impregnated carbon ablator (RICA) is a high-temperature carbon/phenolic ablative thermal protection system (TPS) material designed to use modern and commercially viable components in its manufacture. Heritage carbon/phenolic ablators intended for this use rely on materials that are no longer in production (i.e., Galileo, Pioneer Venus); hence the development of alternatives such as RICA is necessary for future NASA planetary entry and Earth re-entry missions. RICA s capabilities were initially measured in air for Earth re-entry applications, where it was exposed to a heat flux of 14 MW/sq m for 22 seconds. Methane tests were also carried out for potential application in Saturn s moon Titan, with a nominal heat flux of 1.4 MW/sq m for up to 478 seconds. Three slightly different material formulations were manufactured and subsequently tested at the Plasma Wind Tunnel of the University of Stuttgart in Germany (PWK1) in the summer and fall of 2010. The TPS integrity was well preserved in most cases, and results show great promise.

  2. Excimer lasers in cardiovascular surgery: Ablation products and photoacoustic spectrum of the arterial wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, D. L.; Paraskevopoulos, G.; Jolly, G. S.; Irwin, R. S.; McKenney, D. J.; Nip, W. S.; Farrell, E. M.; Higginson, L. A. J.

    1986-03-01

    Photoacoustic spectra of normal artery wall and of atherosclerotic plaque are reported. Threshold fluences for ablative formation of gaseous products for each excimer laser line were calculated from the photoacoustic spectrum and the measured threshold for the KrF laser.

  3. Water absorption and desorption in shuttle ablator and insulation materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Smith, C. F.; Wooden, V. A.; Cothren, B. E.; Gregory, H.

    1982-01-01

    Shuttle systems ablator and insulation materials underwent water soak with subsequent water desorption in vacuum. Water accumulation in these materials after a soak for 24 hours ranged from +1.1% for orbiter tile to +161% for solid rocket booster MSA-1. After 1 minute in vacuum, water retention ranged from none in the orbiter tile to +70% for solid rocket booster cork.

  4. Development of moldable carbonaceous materials for ablative rocket nozzles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, R. J.; Bortz, S. A.; Schwartz, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a materials system developed for use as low-cost ablative nozzles for NASA's 260-in. solid rocket motor. Petroleum coke and carbon black fillers were employed; high density was achieved by controlling particle size distribution. An alumina catalyzed furfuryl ester resin which produced high carbon residues after pyrolysis was employed as the binder. Staple carbon fibers improved the strength and crack resistance of molded bodies. In static firing tests of two subscale nozzles, this material compared favorably in erosion rate with several other ablative systems.

  5. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Tumor Seeding in the Chest Wall After Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Toshiya Shibata, Toyomichi; Maetani, Yoji; Kubo, Takeshi; Nishida, Naoshi; Itoh, Kyo

    2006-06-15

    Tumor seeding in the chest wall was depicted at follow-up CT obtained 9 months after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed, injecting emulsion of 10 mg of epirubicin and 1 ml of iodized oil followed by gelatin sponge particles via the microcatheter placed in the right eleventh intercostal artery. The patient died of tumor growth in the liver one year after the embolization, but no progression of the tumor seeding was noted during the follow-up period. We conclude that transcatheter arterial embolization was effective for the control of tumor seeding after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  6. Laser Ablation of Materials for Propulsion of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Carruth, Ralph; Campbell, Jonathan; Gray, Perry

    2004-01-01

    A report describes experiments performed as part of a continuing investigation of the feasibility of laser ablation of materials as a means of propulsion for small spacecraft. In each experiment, a specimen of ablative material was mounted on a torsion pendulum and irradiated with a laser pulse having an energy of 5 J. The amplitude of the resulting rotation of the torsion pendulum was taken to be an indication of the momentum transferred from the laser beam. Of the ablative materials tested, aluminum foils yielded the smallest rotation amplitudes of the order of 10 degrees. Black coating materials yielded rotation amplitudes of the order of 90 degrees. Samples of silver coated with a fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) copolymer yielded the largest rotation amplitudes 6 to 8 full revolutions. The report presents a theory involving heating of a confined plasma followed by escape of the plasma to explain the superior momentum transfer performance of the FEP specimens. It briefly discusses some concepts for optimizing designs of spacecraft engines to maximize the thrust obtainable by exploiting the physical mechanisms of the theory. Also discussed is the use of laser-ablation engines with other types of spacecraft engines.

  7. Review of Laser Ablation Process for Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2003-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The original method developed by researchers at Rice University utilized a "double pulse laser oven" process. A graphite target containing about 1 atomic percent of metal catalysts is ablated inside a 1473K oven using laser pulses (10 ns pulse width) in slow flowing argon. Two YAG lasers with a green pulse (532 nm) followed by an IR pulse (1064 nm) with a 50 ns delay are used for ablation. This set up produced single wall carbon nanotube material with about 70% purity having a diameter distribution peaked around 1.4 nm. The impurities consist of fullerenes, metal catalyst clusters (10 to 100 nm diameter) and amorphous carbon. The rate of production with the initial set up was about 60 mg per hour with 10Hz laser systems. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to improve the rate, consistency and study effects of different process parameters on the quality and quantity of SWCNTs. These variations include one to three YAG laser systems (Green, Green and IR), different pulse widths (nano to microseconds as well as continuous) and different laser wavelengths (Alexandrite, CO, CO2, free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). It is noted that yield from the single laser (Green or IR) systems is only a fraction of the two laser systems. The yield seemed to scale up with the repetition rate of the laser systems (10 to 60 Hz) and depended on the beam uniformity and quality of the laser pulses. The shift to longer wavelength lasers (free electron, CO and CO2) did not improve the quality, but increased the rate of production because these lasers are either continuous (CW) or high repetition rate pulses (kHz to MHz). The average power and the peak power of the lasers seem to influence the yields. Very high peak powers (MegaWatts per square centimeter) are noted to increase ablation of bigger particles with reduced yields of SWCNTs. Increased average powers

  8. Patient-specific left atrial wall-thickness measurement and visualization for radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Jiro; Skanes, Allan C.; White, James A.; Rajchl, Martin; Drangova, Maria

    2014-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: For radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation of the left atrium, safe and effective dosing of RF energy requires transmural left atrium ablation without injury to extra-cardiac structures. The thickness of the left atrial wall may be a key parameter in determining the appropriate amount of energy to deliver. While left atrial wall-thickness is known to exhibit inter- and intra-patient variation, this is not taken into account in the current clinical workflow. Our goal is to develop a tool for presenting patient-specific left atrial thickness information to the clinician in order to assist in the determination of the proper RF energy dose. METHODS: We use an interactive segmentation method with manual correction to segment the left atrial blood pool and heart wall from contrast-enhanced cardiac CT images. We then create a mesh from the segmented blood pool and determine the wall thickness, on a per-vertex basis, orthogonal to the mesh surface. The thickness measurement is visualized by assigning colors to the vertices of the blood pool mesh. We applied our method to 5 contrast-enhanced cardiac CT images. RESULTS: Left atrial wall-thickness measurements were generally consistent with published thickness ranges. Variations were found to exist between patients, and between regions within each patient. CONCLUSION: It is possible to visually determine areas of thick vs. thin heart wall with high resolution in a patient-specific manner.

  9. Improved ablative materials for the ASRM nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, A.; Clinton, R. G.; Armour, W.; Koenig, J.

    1992-01-01

    Rayon precursor carbon-cloth phenolic was developed more than 30 years ago and is used in most nozzles today including the Poseidon, Trident, Peacekeeper, Small ICBM, Space Shuttle, and numerous tactical and space systems. Specifications and manufacturing controls were placed on these materials and, once qualified, a no-change policy was instituted. The current material is acceptable; however, prepreg variability does not always accommodate the requirements of automation. The advanced solid rocket motor requires material with less variability for automated manufacturing. An advanced solid rocket motor materials team, composed of NASA, Thiokol, Aerojet, SRI, and Lockheed specialists, along with materials suppliers ICI Fiberite/Polycarbon, BP Chemicals/Hitco, and Amoco, embarked on a program to improve the current materials. The program consisted of heat treatment studies and standard and low-density material improvements evaluation. Improvements evaluated included fiber/fabric heat treatments, weave variations, resin application methods, process controls, and monitors.

  10. Resonant ablation of single-wall carbon nanotubes by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunyan, N. R.; Komlenok, M. S.; Kononenko, V. V.; Pashinin, V. P.; Pozharov, A. S.; Konov, V. I.; Obraztsova, E. D.

    2015-01-01

    The thin 50 nm film of bundled arc-discharge single-wall carbon nanotubes was irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses with wavelengths 675, 1350 and 1745 nm corresponding to the absorption band of metallic nanotubes E11M, to the background absorption and to the absorption band of semiconducting nanotubes E11S, respectively. The aim was to induce a selective removal of nanotubes of specific type from the bundled material. Similar to conducted thermal heating experiments, the effect of laser irradiation results in suppression of all radial breathing modes in the Raman spectra, with preferential destruction of the metallic nanotubes with diameters less than 1.26 nm and of the semiconducting nanotubes with diameters 1.36 nm. However, the etching rate of different nanotubes depends on the wavelength of the laser irradiation. It is demonstrated that the relative content of nanotubes of different chiralities can be tuned by a resonant laser ablation of undesired nanotube fraction. The preferential etching of the resonant nanotubes has been shown for laser wavelengths 675 nm (E11M) and 1745 nm (E11S).

  11. Near-vacuum hohlraums with uranium walls for driving high density carbon ablators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. V.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Ho, D. D.; Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Hamza, A. V.; Nikroo, A.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental results for unlined uranium near-vacuum hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility. X-ray wall losses are lower in uranium than in gold at radiation temperatures near 300 eV. In addition, the intensity of x-rays with energy hν > 1 . 8 keV is lower for uranium hohlraums. The softer uranium spectrum allows the use of ablators with lower levels of dopants that reduce rocket efficiency and increase the risk of polluting the hot-spot with emissive material. Experiments in the ViewFactor platform measured 5% higher total x-ray intensity and 30% lower intensity of hν > 1 . 8 keV for uranium relative to gold. Back-lit implosions using undoped high-density carbon (HDC, or diamond) capsules achieved a velocity of 400 +/- 20 km/s compared to 360 +/- 20 km/s for gold. These results have led the NIF HDC campaign to baseline uranium hohlraums for upcoming experiments. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Laser ablation process for single-walled carbon nanotube production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single-walled carbon nanotubes. The original method developed by researchers at Rice University used a "double-pulse laser oven" process. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to include one-laser pulse (green or infrared), different pulse widths (ns to micros as well as continuous wave), and different laser wavelengths (e.g., CO2, or free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). Some of these variations are tried with different combinations and concentrations of metal catalysts, buffer gases (e.g., helium), oven temperatures, flow conditions, and even different porosities of the graphite targets. This article is an attempt to cover all these variations and their relative merits. Possible growth mechanisms under these different conditions will also be discussed.

  13. Numerical studies of wall-plasma interactions and ionization phenomena in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Zeng, Guangshang; Tang, Haibin; Huang, Yuping; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Wall-plasma interactions excited by ablation controlled arcs are very critical physical processes in pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs). Their effects on the ionization processes of ablated vapor into discharge plasma directly determine PPT performances. To reveal the physics governing the ionization phenomena in PPT discharge, a modified model taking into account the pyrolysis effect of heated polytetrafluoroethylene propellant on the wall-plasma interactions was developed. The feasibility of the modified model was analyzed by creating a one-dimensional simulation of a rectangular ablative PPT. The wall-plasma interaction results based on this modified model were found to be more realistic than for the unmodified model; this reflects the dynamic changes of the inflow parameters during discharge in our model. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial variations of the different plasma species in the discharge chamber were numerically studied. The numerical studies showed that polytetrafluoroethylene plasma was mainly composed of monovalent ions; carbon and fluorine ions were concentrated in the upstream and downstream discharge chamber, respectively. The results based on this modified model were in good agreement with the experimental formation times of the various plasma species. A large number of short-lived and highly ionized carbon and fluorine species (divalent and trivalent ions) were created during initial discharge. These highly ionized species reached their peak density earlier than the singly ionized species.

  14. Ablative thermal management structural material on the hypersonic vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Shortland, H.; Tsai, C.

    1995-09-01

    A hypersonic vehicle is designed to fly at high Mach number in the earth`s atmosphere that will result in higher aerodynamic heating loads on specific areas of the vehicle. A thermal protection system is required for these areas that may exceed the operating temperature limit of structural materials. This paper delineates the application of ablative material as the passive type of thermal protection system for the nose or wing leading edges. A simplified quasi-steady-state one-dimensional computer model was developed to evaluate the performance and thermal design of a leading edge. The detailed description of the governing mathematical equations and results are presented. This model provides a quantitative information to support the design estimate, performance optimization, and assess preliminary feasibility of using ablation as a design approach.

  15. Method for materials deposition by ablation transfer processing

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1996-01-01

    A method in which a thin layer of semiconducting, insulating, or metallic material is transferred by ablation from a source substrate, coated uniformly with a thin layer of said material, to a target substrate, where said material is desired, with a pulsed, high intensity, patternable beam of energy. The use of a patternable beam allows area-selective ablation from the source substrate resulting in additive deposition of the material onto the target substrate which may require a very low percentage of the area to be covered. Since material is placed only where it is required, material waste can be minimized by reusing the source substrate for depositions on multiple target substrates. Due to the use of a pulsed, high intensity energy source the target substrate remains at low temperature during the process, and thus low-temperature, low cost transparent glass or plastic can be used as the target substrate. The method can be carried out atmospheric pressures and at room temperatures, thus eliminating vacuum systems normally required in materials deposition processes. This invention has particular application in the flat panel display industry, as well as minimizing materials waste and associated costs.

  16. Method for materials deposition by ablation transfer processing

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1996-04-16

    A method in which a thin layer of semiconducting, insulating, or metallic material is transferred by ablation from a source substrate, coated uniformly with a thin layer of said material, to a target substrate, where said material is desired, with a pulsed, high intensity, patternable beam of energy. The use of a patternable beam allows area-selective ablation from the source substrate resulting in additive deposition of the material onto the target substrate which may require a very low percentage of the area to be covered. Since material is placed only where it is required, material waste can be minimized by reusing the source substrate for depositions on multiple target substrates. Due to the use of a pulsed, high intensity energy source the target substrate remains at low temperature during the process, and thus low-temperature, low cost transparent glass or plastic can be used as the target substrate. The method can be carried out atmospheric pressures and at room temperatures, thus eliminating vacuum systems normally required in materials deposition processes. This invention has particular application in the flat panel display industry, as well as minimizing materials waste and associated costs. 1 fig.

  17. Multiscale Modeling of Ablation and Pyrolysis in PICA-Like materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachaud, Jean; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2008-01-01

    During atmospheric entry of planetary probes, the thermal protection system (TIPS) of the probe is exposed to high temperatures under low pressures. In these conditions, carbonous fibrous TIPS materials may undergo oxidation leading to mass loss and wall recession called ablation. This work aims to improve the understanding of material/environment interactions through a study of the coupling between oxygen transport in the Knudsen regime, heterogeneous oxidation of carbon, and surface recession. A 3D Random Walk Monte Carlo simulation tool is used for this study. The fibrous architecture of a model material, consisting of high porosity random array of carbon fibers, is numerically represented on a 3D Cartesian grid. Mass transport in the Knudsen regime from the boundary layer to the surface, and inside this porous material is simulated by random walk. A reaction probability is used to simulate the heterogeneous oxidation reaction. The surface recession of the fibers is followed by front tracking using a simplified marching cube approach. The output data of the simulations are ablation velocity and dynamic evolution of the material porosity. A parametric study is carried out to analyze the material behavior as a function of Knudsen number for the porous media (length of the mean free path compared to the mean pore diameter) and the intrinsic reactivity of the carbon fibers. The model is applied to Stardust mission reentry conditions and explains the unexpected behavior of the TIPS material that underwent mass loss in volume.

  18. Carbon Nanotube-Enhanced Carbon-Phenenolic Ablator Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikolaev, P.; Stackpoole, M.; Fan, W.; Cruden, B. A.; Waid, M.; Moloney, P.; Arepalli, S.; Arnold, J.; Partridge, H.; Yowell, L.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of PICA (phenolic impregnated carbon ablator) as the selected material for heat shielding for future earth return vehicles. It briefly reviews the manufacturing of PICA and the advantages for the use of heat shielding, and then explains the reason for using Carbon Nanotubes to improve strength of phenolic resin that binds carbon fibers together. It reviews the work being done to create a carbon nanotube enhanced PICA. Also shown are various micrographic images of the various PICA materials.

  19. Mechanisms affecting kinetic energies of laser-ablated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.R. |; Leboeuf, J.N.; Wood, R.F.; Geohegan, D.B.; Donato, J.M.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Laser materials processing techniques are expected to have a dramatic impact on materials science and engineering in the near future and beyond. One of the main laser materials processing techniques is Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for thin film growth. While experimentalists search for optimal approaches for thin film growth with pulsed laser deposition (PLD), a systematic effort in theory and modeling of various processes during PLD is needed. The quality of film deposited depends critically on the range and profile of the kinetic energy and density of the ablated plume. While it is to the advantage of pulsed laser deposition to have high kinetic energy, plumes that are too energetic causes film damage. A dynamic source effect was found to accelerate the plume expansion velocity much higher than that from a conventional free expansion model. A self-similar theory and a hydrodynamic model are developed to study this effect, which may help to explain experimentally observed high front expansion velocity. Background gas can also affect the kinetic energies. High background gas may cause the ablated materials to go backward. Experimentally observed plume splitting is also discussed.

  20. Preparation And Analysis Of Specimens Of Ablative Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, William C.

    1994-01-01

    Procedure for chemical analysis of specimens of silicone-based ablative thermal-insulation materials SLA-561 and MA25 involves acid digestion of specimens to prepare them for analysis by inductively-coupled-plasma/atomic-emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES). In comparison with atomic-absorption spectroscopy (AAS), ICP/AES is faster and more accurate than AAS. Results of analyses stored in data base, used to trace variations in concentrations of chemical elements in materials during long-term storage, and used in timely manner in investigations of failures. Acid-digestion portion of procedure applied to other thermal-insulation materials containing room-temperature-vulcanizing silicones and enables instrumental analysis of these materials.

  1. Intumescent-ablators as improved thermal protection materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1977-01-01

    Nitroaromatic amine-based intumescent coatings were improved with regard to their thermal protection ability by adding endothermic decomposing fillers with endotherms at or near the exothermic reaction of the intumescent agent, since the effectiveness of the intumescent coatings without fillers is reduced by the exothermic behavior of the coatings during thermal activation. Fillers were dispersed directly in the base coating. Potassium fluoborate, ammonium fluoborate, zinc borate, and ammonium oxalate function as endothermic ablative materials at specific temperature regions, and also enhance the char formation during the intumescent process.

  2. Modeling of the Ablation of Fibrous Materials in the Knudsen Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachaud, J.; Mansour, N. N.

    2008-01-01

    During atmospheric entry of planetary probes, the thermal protection system (TPS) of the probe is exposed to high temperatures under low pressures. In these conditions, carbonous TPS materials undergo gasification in the Knudsen regime leading to mass loss and wall recession called ablation. This work aims to improve the understanding of materiaVenvironment interactions through a study of the coupling between carbon dioxide transport in the Knudsen regime, heterogeneous oxidation of carbon, and sutface recession. A 3D Monte-Carlo simulation tool is used for this study. The fibrous architecture of the materiils, consisting of high porosity random array of carbon fibers, is numerically reproduced on a 3D Cartesian grid. Mass transport in the Knudsen regime from the boundary layer to the surface, and inside this porous material is simulated by random walk. A reaction probability is used to simulate the heterogeneous oxidation reaction. The surface recession is followed by front tracking using a simplified marching cube approach. The output data of the simulations are ablation velocity and dynamic evolution of the material porosity. A parametric study is carried out to analyze the material behavior as a function of Knudsen number for the porous media (length of the mean free path compared to the mean pore diameter) and the intrinsic reactivity of the carbon fibers. The results enable extrapolation of laboratory experimental data to actual entry conditions.

  3. Carbon Nanotube-enhanced Carbon-phenolic Ablator Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, P.; Stackpoole, M.; Fan, W.; Cruden, B.; Waid, M.; Maloney, P.; Arepalli, S.; Arnold, J.; Partridge, H.; Yowell, L.

    2006-01-01

    Phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) is a thermal protection system (TPS) material developed at NASA Ames Research Center in the mid-90 s for Discovery missions. It was used on the Stardust return capsule heat shield which successfully executed the highest speed Earth entry to date on January 15, 2006. PICA is a porous fibrous carbon insulation infiltrated with phenolic resin, and is an excellent ablator that is effective for heating rates up to 1000 W/sq cm. It is one of several candidate TPS materials for the next generation of crewed spacecraft for Lunar and Mars missions. We will describe an ongoing research effort at NASA to improve mechanical properties of the phenolic matrix with carbon nanotubes. The aim is two-fold: to increase overall TPS strength during reentry and to improve Micrometeoroid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) protection in space. The former requires at least a good dispersion of nanotubes in phenolic, while the latter also requires covalent bonding between them to couple and transfer impact energy effectively from matrix to nanotubes. We will discuss the required chemical functionalization of nanotubes, processing issues and test results.

  4. Severe Chest Wall Toxicity From Cryoablation in the Setting of Prior Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Binkley, Michael S; Aggarwal, Sonya; Qian, Yushen; Carter, Justin N; Shah, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with metastatic synovial sarcoma of parotid origin, treated definitively with chemoradiation, who subsequently developed oligometastatic disease limited to the lungs. She underwent multiple left and right lung wedge resections and left lower lobectomy, followed by right lower lobe stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), 54 Gy in three fractions to a right lower lobe lesion abutting the chest wall. Two years later, she was treated with cryoablation for a separate right upper lobe nodule abutting the chest wall. Two months later, she presented with acute shortness of breath, pleuritic chest pain, decreased peripheral blood O2 saturation, and productive cough. A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated severe chest wall necrosis in the area of recent cryoablation that, in retrospect, also received a significant radiation dose from her prior SABR. This case demonstrates that clinicians should exercise caution in using cryoablation when treating lung tumors abutting a previously irradiated chest wall. Note: Drs. Loo and Shah contributed equally as co-senior authors. PMID:27004154

  5. An assessment of the readiness of ablative materials for preflight application to the shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.; Brewer, W. D.; Clark, R. K.; Pittman, C. M.; Brinkley, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    The shuttle orbiter relies primarily on a reusable surface insulation (RSI) thermal protection system (TPS). The RSI is very efficient in its thermal performance; however, the RSI tile system has shown poor mechanical integrity. The state-of-the-art of the ablative TPS is reviewed, and an assessment made of the ablator's readiness for use on the shuttle orbiter. Unresolved technical issues with regard to the ablative TPS are identified. Short time, highly focused analytical and experimental programs were initiated to: (1) identify candidate ablation materials; (2) assess the data base for these materials; (3) evaluate the need and kind of waterproof coating; (4) calculate thermal and other stresses in an ablator tile; (5) identify an acceptable ablator/RSI tile joint filler; and (6) assess the sensitivity of the ablator to sequential heat pulses. Results from some of these programs are discussed.

  6. The ablation of graphitic materials in the sublimation regime.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.; Dickey, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    A large variety of graphitic materials have been tested in an arc heated air stream at a surface pressure of 4.3 atm and a nominal surface temperature of 3925 K. Included were commercial and developmental grades of artificial graphites, both two and three dimensional carbon-carbon composites, composites seeded with refractory compounds, and several special materials such as pyrolytic graphite, mesophase graphite, glassy carbon, and natural graphite. ATJ graphite was used as a control material. Except for the seeded materials which had poor performance, the mass loss rate for all the man-made graphitic materials fell within the range of 17 per cent less to 30 per cent more than the rate for ATJ. Thus it is concluded that wide variations in constituents, processing, fabrication and structure have relatively little effect on the ablation performance of graphitic materials, at least under the conditions of the present tests. Particulate mass loss was observed for all the materials tested and is the dominant mechanism for mass removal at the present test conditions. It is suggested that this mechanism results from physical failure, primarily by compressive thermal stress.

  7. Pre-ignition laser ablation of nanocomposite energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, S. C.; Massad, R. A.; Pantoya, M. L.

    2013-06-01

    Laser ignition of energetic material composites was studied for initiation with heating rates from 9.5 × 104 to 1.7 × 107 K/s. This is a unique heating rate regime for laser ignition studies because most studies employ either continuous wave CO2 lasers to provide thermal ignition or pulsed Nd:YAG lasers to provide shock ignition. In this study, aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) nanoparticle powders were pressed into consolidated pellets and ignited using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm wavelength) with varied pulse energy. Results show reduced ignition delay times corresponding to laser powers at the ablation threshold for the sample. Heating rate and absorption coefficient were determined from an axisymmetric heat transfer model. The model estimates absorption coefficients from 0.1 to 0.15 for consolidated pellets of Al + MoO3 at 1064 nm wavelength. Ablation resulted from fracturing caused by a rapid increase in thermal stress and slowed ignition of the pellet.

  8. Pre-ignition laser ablation of nanocomposite energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stacy, S. C.; Massad, R. A.; Pantoya, M. L.

    2013-06-07

    Laser ignition of energetic material composites was studied for initiation with heating rates from 9.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K/s. This is a unique heating rate regime for laser ignition studies because most studies employ either continuous wave CO{sub 2} lasers to provide thermal ignition or pulsed Nd:YAG lasers to provide shock ignition. In this study, aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) nanoparticle powders were pressed into consolidated pellets and ignited using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm wavelength) with varied pulse energy. Results show reduced ignition delay times corresponding to laser powers at the ablation threshold for the sample. Heating rate and absorption coefficient were determined from an axisymmetric heat transfer model. The model estimates absorption coefficients from 0.1 to 0.15 for consolidated pellets of Al + MoO{sub 3} at 1064 nm wavelength. Ablation resulted from fracturing caused by a rapid increase in thermal stress and slowed ignition of the pellet.

  9. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  10. Chemical models for simulating single-walled nanotube production in arc vaporization and laser ablation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical kinetic models for the nucleation and growth of clusters and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) growth are developed for numerical simulations of the production of SWNTs. Two models that involve evaporation and condensation of carbon and metal catalysts, a full model involving all carbon clusters up to C80, and a reduced model are discussed. The full model is based on a fullerene model, but nickel and carbon/nickel cluster reactions are added to form SWNTs from soot and fullerenes. The full model has a large number of species--so large that to incorporate them into a flow field computation for simulating laser ablation and arc processes requires that they be simplified. The model is reduced by defining large clusters that represent many various sized clusters. Comparisons are given between these models for cases that may be applicable to arc and laser ablation production. Solutions to the system of chemical rate equations of these models for a ramped temperature profile show that production of various species, including SWNTs, agree to within about 50% for a fast ramp, and within 10% for a slower temperature decay time.

  11. Boundary conditions at the ablative walls in two-temperature modelling of thermal plasmas with reactive working gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, Leonid; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new set of boundary conditions at ablative hot walls with thermionic electron emission for two-temperature thermal arc models in which the temperature of electrons can deviate from the temperature of heavy particles,~{{T}\\text{e}}\

  12. Analysis of fabric materials cut using ultraviolet laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Chih-Chung; Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Andrew Yeh, J.

    2016-04-01

    Laser ablation technology has widely been applied in the clothing industry in recent years. However, the laser mechanism would affect the quality of fabric contours and its components. Hence, this study examined carbonization and oxidation conditions and contour variation in nonwoven, cotton, and composite leather fabrics cut by using an ultraviolet laser at a wavelength of 355 nm. Processing parameters such as laser power, pulse frequency, scanning speed, and number of pulses per spot were adjusted to investigate component variation of the materials and to determine suitable cutting parameters for the fabrics. The experimental results showed that the weights of the component changed substantially by pulse frequency but slightly by laser power, so pulse frequency of 100 kHz and laser power of 14 W were the approximate parameters for three fabrics for the smaller carbonization and a sufficient energy for rapidly cutting, which the pulse duration of laser system was fixed at 300 μs and laser irradiance was 0.98 J/mm2 simultaneously. In addition, the etiolate phenomenon of nonwoven was reduced, and the component weight of cotton and composite leather was closed to the value of knife-cut fabric as the scanning speed increased. The approximate scanning speed for nonwoven and composite leather was 200 mm/s, and one for cotton was 150 mm/s, respectively. The sharper and firmer edge is obtained by laser ablation mechanism in comparison with traditional knife cutting. Experimental results can serve as the reference for laser cutting in the clothing industry, for rapidly providing smoother patterns with lower carbonization and oxidation edge in the fashion industry.

  13. A study of the effect of selected material properties on the ablation performance of artificial graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Eighteen material properties were measured on 45 different, commercially available, artificial graphites. Ablation performance of these same graphites were also measured in a Mach 2 airstream at a stagnation pressure of 5.6 atm. Correlations were developed, where possible, between pairs of the material properties. Multiple regression equations were then formulated relating ablation performance to the various material properties, thus identifying those material properties having the strongest effect on ablation performance. These regression equations reveal that ablation performance in the present test environment depends primarily on maximum grain size, density, ash content, thermal conductivity, and mean pore radius. For optimization of ablation performance, grain size should be small, ash content low, density and thermal conductivity high, and mean pore radius large.

  14. Remote Recession Sensing of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael W.; Stackpoole, Margaret; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Gonzales, Gregory Lewis; Ho, Thanh

    2014-01-01

    Material recession and charring are two major processes determining the performance of ablative heat shield materials. Even in ground testing, the characterization of these two mechanisms relies on measurements of material thickness before and after testing, thus providing only information integrated over the test time. For recession measurements, optical methods such as imaging the sample surface during testing are under investigation but require high alignment and instrument effort, therefore being not established as a standard measurement method. For char depth measurements, the most common method so far consists in investigation of sectioned samples after testing or in the case of Stardust where core extractions were performed to determine char information. In flight, no reliable recession measurements are available, except total recession after recovering the heat shield on ground. Developments of mechanical recession sensors have been started but require substantial on board instrumentation adding mass and complexity. In this work, preliminary experiments to evaluate the feasibility of remote sensing of material recession and possibly char depth through optically observing the emission signatures of seeding materials in the post shock plasma is investigated. It is shown that this method can provide time resolved recession measurements without the necessity of accurate alignment procedures of the optical set-up and without any instrumentation on board of a spacecraft. Furthermore, recession data can be obtained without recovering flight hardware which would be a huge benefit for inexpensive heat shield material testing on board of small re-entry probes, e.g. on new micro-satellite re-entry probes as a possible future application of Cubesats or RBR

  15. Laser-solid interaction and dynamics of laser-ablated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.R.; Neboeuf, J.N.; Wood, R.F.; Geohegan, D.B.; Donato, J.M.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-09-01

    An annealing model is extended to treat the vaporization process, and a hydrodynamic model describes the ablated material. We find that dynamic source and ionization effects accelerate the expansion front of the ablated plume with thermal vaporization temperature. The vaporization process and plume propagation in high background gas pressure are studied.

  16. Observations of soft x-ray emission and wall ablation in a fast low-energy pulsed capillary discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Wyndham, E. S.; Ramos-Moore, E.; Ferrari, P.; Favre, M.

    2013-08-01

    We report on experimental observations of pulsed capillary discharges aimed at soft x-ray production within the water-window range. Through systematical studies of capillary tube characteristics and discharge conditions, radiation emission was analysed. Plasma properties were studied by means of spectrometry, wide-band PIN diode signals and plasma micro-channel plate imaging. Surface and bulk material analyses were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) in order to characterize the capillary inner surface after discharges. We report on hollow cathode effect enhancement by modification of cathode electrode aperture, as well as pressure conditions along the capillary, which were found to have an important effect over plasma and x-ray yields due to the modification of local electrical field and gas density. Capillary tube material and inner diameter also modified the interaction of the plasma channel with the capillary surface, thus modifying the plasma source characteristics. It was found that emission of the NVI line at 28.8 Å can be enhanced within the conditions studied, from no significant emission to sources delivering an average brightness of over 70.0 mW mm-2 per 2π sr. This demonstrates that hollow cathode electrons and plasma-wall interaction and ablation have a direct impact on emission quality.

  17. Ablative Thermal Protection: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laub, Bernie

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: Why ablative thermal protections - TPS. Ablative TPS chronology: strategic reentry systems, solid rocket motor nozzles, space (manned missions and planetary entry probes). Ablation mechanisms. Ablation material testing. Ablative material testing.

  18. Nuclear radiation effects on the ablation performance of advanced composite heatshield materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, R. S.; Laganelli, A. L.; Somers, J.

    1981-06-01

    Results are presented from experiments to define the influence of simulated nuclear radiation damage on the ablation response of carbon-phenolic materials. Tests were conducted in a 50 MW arc jet facility. Several damaging methods were used and the effects of material properties were studied. The data were used to refine theoretical models of the ablation response. Effects of nonisothermal thermocouple measurements and material expansion due to outgassing and delamination are included. Results show that the ablation response is critically dependent upon the char layer expansion characteristics and material properties are shown to have a significant influence. The effect of the simulated nuclear damage on the ablation performance of these materials is negligible.

  19. The thermal and mechanical properties of a low density elastomeric ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, W. T.; Robertson, R. W.; Bush, A. L.; Pears, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical properties data were obtained for a low density elastomeric resin based ablation material with phenolic-glass honeycomb reinforcement. Data were obtained for the material in the charred and uncharred state. Ablation material specimens were charred in a laboratory furnace at temperatures in the range from 600 K to 1700 K to obtain char specimens representative of the ablation char layer formed during reentry. These specimens were then used to obtain effective thermal conductivity, heat capacity, porosity, and permeability data at the char formation temperature. This provided a boxing of the data which enables the prediction of the transient response of the material during ablation. Limited comparisons were made between the furnace charred specimens and specimens which had been exposed to simulated reentry conditions.

  20. Femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials in the optical breakdown regime: Expansion of a transparent shell

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Siegel, J. Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Solis, J.

    2014-09-15

    Phase transition pathways of matter upon ablation with ultrashort laser pulses have been considered to be understood long-since for metals and semiconductors. We provide evidence that also certain dielectrics follow the same pathway, even at high pulse energies triggering optical breakdown. Employing femtosecond microscopy, we observe a characteristic ring pattern within the ablating region that dynamically changes for increasing time delays between pump and probe pulse. These transient Newton rings are related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer with the reflection at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Analysis of the ring structure shows that the ablation mechanism is initiated by a rarefaction wave leading within a few tens of picoseconds to the formation of a transparent thin shell of reduced density and refractive index, featuring optically sharp interfaces. The shell expands and eventually detaches from the solid material at delays of the order of 100 ps.

  1. Femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials in the optical breakdown regime: Expansion of a transparent shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Siegel, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Solis, J.

    2014-09-01

    Phase transition pathways of matter upon ablation with ultrashort laser pulses have been considered to be understood long-since for metals and semiconductors. We provide evidence that also certain dielectrics follow the same pathway, even at high pulse energies triggering optical breakdown. Employing femtosecond microscopy, we observe a characteristic ring pattern within the ablating region that dynamically changes for increasing time delays between pump and probe pulse. These transient Newton rings are related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer with the reflection at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Analysis of the ring structure shows that the ablation mechanism is initiated by a rarefaction wave leading within a few tens of picoseconds to the formation of a transparent thin shell of reduced density and refractive index, featuring optically sharp interfaces. The shell expands and eventually detaches from the solid material at delays of the order of 100 ps.

  2. Research and application of surface heat treatment for multipulse laser ablation of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Song; Chen, Genyu; Zhou, Cong

    2015-11-01

    This study analysed a laser ablation platform and built heat transfer equations for multipulse laser ablation of materials. The equations include three parts: laser emission after the material melt and gasification; end of laser emission after the material melts and there is the presence of a super-hot layer and solid-phase heat transfer changes during material ablation. For each of the three parts, the effects of evaporation, plasma shielding and energy accumulation under the pulse interval were considered. The equations are reasonable, and all the required parameters are only related to the laser parameters and material properties, allowing the model to have a certain versatility and practicability. The model was applied for numerical simulation of the heat transfer characteristics in the multipulse laser ablation of bronze and diamond. Next, experiments were conducted to analyse the topography of a bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheel after multipulse laser ablation. The theoretical analysis and experimental results showed that multipulse laser can merge the truing and dressing on a bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheel. This study provides theoretical guidance for optimising the process parameters in the laser ablation of a bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheel. A comparative analysis showed that the numerical solution to the model is in good agreement with the experimental data, thus verifying the correctness and feasibility of the heat transfer model.

  3. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  4. X-ray Micro-Tomography of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panerai, Francesco; Ferguson, Joseph; Borner, Arnaud; Mansour, Nagi N.; Barnard, Harold S.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray micro-tomography is a non-destructive characterization technique that allows imaging of materials structures with voxel sizes in the micrometer range. This level of resolution makes the technique very attractive for imaging porous ablators used in hypersonic entry systems. Besides providing a high fidelity description of the material architecture, micro-tomography enables computations of bulk material properties and simulations of micro-scale phenomena. This presentation provides an overview of a collaborative effort between NASA Ames Research Center and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, aimed at developing micro-tomography experiments and simulations for porous ablative materials. Measurements are carried using x-rays from the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley Lab on different classes of ablative materials used in NASA entry systems. Challenges, strengths and limitations of the technique for imaging materials such as lightweight carbon-phenolic systems and woven textiles are discussed. Computational tools developed to perform numerical simulations based on micro-tomography are described. These enable computations of material properties such as permeability, thermal and radiative conductivity, tortuosity and other parameters that are used in ablator response models. Finally, we present the design of environmental cells that enable imaging materials under simulated operational conditions, such as high temperature, mechanical loads and oxidizing atmospheres.Keywords: Micro-tomography, Porous media, Ablation

  5. A parametric study of single-wall carbon nanotube growth by laser ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William A.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Hadjiev, Victor G.; Scott, Carl D.

    2004-01-01

    Results of a parametric study of carbon nanotube production by the double-pulse laser oven process are presented. The effect of various operating parameters on the production of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is estimated by characterizing the nanotube material using analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermo gravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The study included changing the sequence of the laser pulses, laser energy, pulse separation, type of buffer gas used, operating pressure, flow rate, inner tube diameter, as well as its material, and oven temperature. It was found that the material quality and quantity improve with deviation from normal operation parameters such as laser energy density higher than 1.5 J/cm2, pressure lower than 67 kPa, and flow rates higher than 100 sccm. Use of helium produced mainly small diameter tubes and a lower yield. The diameter of SWCNTs decreases with decreasing oven temperature and lower flow rates.

  6. Estimation of surface heat flux for ablation and charring of thermal protection material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Wei-qi; He, Kai-feng; Zhou, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Ablation of the thermal protection material of the reentry hypersonic flight vehicle is a complex physical and chemical process. To estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperature measurement is much more complex than the conventional inverse heat conduction problem case. In the paper, by utilizing a two-layer pyrogeneration-plane ablation model to model the ablation and charring of the material, modifying the finite control volume method to suit for the numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with variable-geometry, the CGM along with the associated adjoint problem is developed to estimate the surface heat flux. This estimation method is verified with a numerical example at first, the results show that the estimation method is feasible and robust. The larger is the measurement noise, the greater is the deviation of the estimated result from the exact value, and the measurement noise of ablated surface position has a significant and more direct influence on the estimated result of surface heat flux. Furthermore, the estimation method is used to analyze the experimental data of ablation of blunt Carbon-phenolic material Narmco4028 in an arc-heater. It is shown that the estimated surface heat flux agrees with the heating power value of the arc-heater, and the estimation method is basically effective and potential to treat the engineering heat conduction problem with ablation.

  7. Picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide: Effect of crystallinity on the material response

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, Rocio; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon; Lejardi, Ainhoa; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon

    2011-11-01

    The picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) as a function of laser fluence and degree of crystallinity was examined. The ablation parameters and the surface modifications were analyzed under various irradiation conditions using laser wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet through the visible. When processing the amorphous PLLA, both energy threshold and topography varied considerably depending on laser wavelength. Laser irradiation showed a reduction in the energy ablation threshold as the degree of crystallinity increased, probably related to photomechanical effects involved in laser ablation with ultra-short pulses and the lower stress accommodation behavior of semicrystalline polymers. In particular, cooperative chain motions are impeded by the higher degree of crystallinity, showing fragile mechanical behavior and lower energy dissipation. The experimental results on ablation rate versus laser energy showed that UV laser ablation on semicrystalline PLLA was more efficient than the visible ablation, i.e., it exhibits higher etch rates over a wide range of pulse energy conditions. These results were interpreted in terms of photo-thermal and photo-chemical response of polymers as a function of material micro-structure and incident laser wavelength. High quality micro-grooves were produced in amorphous PLLA, reveling the potential of ultra-fast laser processing technique in the field of micro-structuring biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications.

  8. Damage in materials following ablation by ultrashort laser pulses: A molecular-dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Bouilly, Delphine; Perez, Danny; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2007-11-01

    The formation of craters following femtosecond- and picosecond-pulse laser ablation in the thermal regime is studied using a generic two-dimensional numerical model based on molecular-dynamics simulations and the Lennard-Jones potential. Femtosecond pulses are found to produce very clean craters through a combination of etching of the walls and the formation of a very thin heat affected zone. Our simulations also indicate that dislocations are emitted continuously during all of the ablation process (i.e., for hundreds of ps). For picosecond pulses, we observe much thicker heat affected zones which result from melting and recrystallization following the absorption of the light. In this case also, continuous emission of dislocations--though fewer in number--takes place throughout the ablation process.

  9. Space Vehicle Heat Shield Having Edgewise Strips of Ablative Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Poteet, Carl C. (Inventor); Bouslog, Stan A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A heat shield for a space vehicle comprises a plurality of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) blocks secured to a surface of the space vehicle and arranged in a pattern with gaps therebetween. The heat shield further comprises a plurality of PICA strips disposed in the gaps between the PICA blocks. The PICA strips are mounted edgewise, such that the structural orientation of the PICA strips is substantially perpendicular to the structural orientation of the PICA blocks.

  10. Off-Hugoniot characterization of alternative inertial confinement fusion ablator materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Alastair S.; Prisbrey, Shon; Baker, Kevin L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Fry, Jonathan; Dittrich, Thomas R.; Wu, Kuang-Jen J.; Kervin, Margaret L.; Schoff, Michael E.; Farrell, Mike; Nikroo, Abbas; Hurricane, Omar A.

    2016-05-01

    The ablation material used during the National Ignition Campaign, a glow- discharge polymer (GDP), does not couple as efficiently as simulations indicated to the multiple- shock inducing radiation drive environment created by laser power profile [1]. We investigate the performance of two other ablators, boron carbide (B4C) and high-density carbon (HDC) and compare with GDP under the same hohlraum conditions. Ablation performance is determined through measurement of the shock speed produced in planar samples of the ablator subjected to the identical multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environments that are similar to a generic three-shock ignition drive. Simulations are in better agreement with the off-Hugoniot performance of B4C than either HDC or GDP.

  11. Replacement of Ablators with Phase-Change Material for Thermal Protection of STS Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Raj K.; Stuckey, Irvin; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of the research and development program to develop new Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials for aerospace applications at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), an experimental study was conducted on a new concept for a non-ablative TPS material. Potential loss of TPS material and ablation by-products from the External Tank (ET) or Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) during Shuttle flight with the related Orbiter tile damage necessitates development of a non-ablative thermal protection system. The new Thermal Management Coating (TMC) consists of phase-change material encapsulated in micro spheres and a two-part resin system to adhere the coating to the structure material. The TMC uses a phase-change material to dissipate the heat produced during supersonic flight rather than an ablative material. This new material absorbs energy as it goes through a phase change during the heating portion of the flight profile and then the energy is slowly released as the phase-change material cools and returns to its solid state inside the micro spheres. The coating was subjected to different test conditions simulating design flight environments at the NASA/MSFC Improved Hot Gas Facility (IHGF) to study its performance.

  12. Preliminary Evaluation of Techniques to Fabricate Beryllium, Polyimide, and Ge-doped CH/CD Ablator Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B; Letts, S; Nikroo, A; Nobile, A; McElfresh, M; Cooley, J; Alexander, D

    2004-11-08

    This report including appendices provides information to complete this deliverable. It summarizes the important features of each ablator material, with particular focus to its usefulness for ignition capsules. More detailed discussions of each ablator type are in the Appendix. Included at the end of each separate discussion in the Appendix is a list of all published work with an ICF focus on that ablator type. This report is organized into Be based and polymer (C) based ablators. We summarize status, outstanding issues, and how we plan to address them. Details are in the Appendix. For Be there are two fabrication routes, one by machining bulk pieces into hemi-shells which are then bonded together, and the other by sputtering Be with Cu dopant onto spherical plastic mandrels to build up a wall. This method allows for radial variation in the Cu dopant concentration, while the machining approach is best suited to a uniform doping level. For plastic, we have already made a down select, eliminating polyimide because its performance as an ablator has been seen to be significantly different from that predicted by simulations. The other polymer, GDP (glow discharge polymer or sometimes called plasma polymer) comes in both a normal (hydrogenated) and deuterated form. There are differences between them (besides the H or D) and these will be detailed. The choice between them will be determined in part by cryogenic measurement of the IR absorption spectrum of DT scheduled to occur in the next few months. An initial list of specifications for ignition targets exists. However these specifications are continuing to evolve. This is due to evolving plans for NIF's deliverable energy and to more refined design simulations. Many requirements are not well specified due to lack of knowledge of the effect on the implosion. These requirements include: grain size and texture, fill hole size, fill tube size, bond joint thickness, allowable porosity (size and number), diameter and wall

  13. High spatial resolution mapping of deposition layers on plasma facing materials by laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Qingmei; Li, Cong; Hai, Ran; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin; Zhou, Yan; Yan, Longwen; Duan, Xuru

    2014-05-15

    A laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (LAM-TOF-MS) system with high spatial resolution, ∼20 nm in depth and ∼500 μm or better on the surface, is developed to analyze the composition distributions of deposition layers on the first wall materials or first mirrors in tokamak. The LAM-TOF-MS system consists of a laser ablation microprobe combined with a TOF-MS and a data acquisition system based on a LabVIEW program software package. Laser induced ablation combined with TOF-MS is an attractive method to analyze the depth profile of deposited layer with successive laser shots, therefore, it can provide information for composition reconstruction of the plasma wall interaction process. In this work, we demonstrate that the LAM-TOF-MS system is capable of characterizing the depth profile as well as mapping 2D composition of deposited film on the molybdenum first mirror retrieved from HL-2A tokamak, with particular emphasis on some of the species produced during the ablation process. The presented LAM-TOF-MS system provides not only the 3D characterization of deposition but also the removal efficiency of species of concern.

  14. Contribution of material's surface layer on charge state distribution in laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Masafumi; Steski, Dannie; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Washio, Masakazu

    2016-02-01

    To generate laser ablation plasma, a pulse laser is focused onto a solid target making a crater on the surface. However, not all the evaporated material is efficiently converted to hot plasma. Some portion of the evaporated material could be turned to low temperature plasma or just vapor. To investigate the mechanism, we prepared an aluminum target coated by thin carbon layers. Then, we measured the ablation plasma properties with different carbon thicknesses on the aluminum plate. The results showed that C(6+) ions were generated only from the surface layer. The deep layers (over 250 nm from the surface) did not provide high charge state ions. On the other hand, low charge state ions were mainly produced by the deeper layers of the target. Atoms deeper than 1000 nm did not contribute to the ablation plasma formation. PMID:26931982

  15. Comparison of Ablation Predictions for Carbonaceous Materials Using CEA and JANAF-Based Species Thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.

    2011-01-01

    In most previous work at NASA Ames Research Center, ablation predictions for carbonaceous materials were obtained using a species thermodynamics database developed by Aerotherm Corporation. This database is derived mostly from the JANAF thermochemical tables. However, the CEA thermodynamics database, also used by NASA, is considered more up to date. In this work, the FIAT code was modified to use CEA-based curve fits for species thermodynamics, then analyses using both the JANAF and CEA thermodynamics were performed for carbon and carbon phenolic materials over a range of test conditions. The ablation predictions are comparable at lower heat fluxes where the dominant mechanism is carbon oxidation. However, the predictions begin to diverge in the sublimation regime, with the CEA model predicting lower recession. The disagreement is more significant for carbon phenolic than for carbon, and this difference is attributed to hydrocarbon species that may contribute to the ablation rate.

  16. Contribution of material's surface layer on charge state distribution in laser ablation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaki, Masafumi; Steski, Dannie; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Washio, Masakazu

    2016-02-01

    To generate laser ablation plasma, a pulse laser is focused onto a solid target making a crater on the surface. However, not all the evaporated material is efficiently converted to hot plasma. Some portion of the evaporated material could be turned to low temperature plasma or just vapor. To investigate the mechanism, we prepared an aluminum target coated by thin carbon layers. Then, we measured the ablation plasma properties with different carbon thicknesses on the aluminum plate. The results showed that C6+ ions were generated only from the surface layer. The deep layers (over 250 nm from the surface) did not provide high charge state ions. On the other hand, low charge state ions were mainly produced by the deeper layers of the target. Atoms deeper than 1000 nm did not contribute to the ablation plasma formation.

  17. Ablation of carbonaceous materials in a hydrogen-helium arc-jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Lundell, J. H.; Green, M. J.; Winovich, W.; Covington, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The stagnation-point ablation rates of a graphite, a carbon-carbon composite, and four carbon-phenolic materials are measured in an arc-jet wind tunnel with a 50% hydrogen-50% helium mixture as the test gas. Flow environments are determined through measurements of static and impact pressures, heat-transfer rates to a calorimeter, and radiation spectra, and through numerical calculation of the flow through the wind tunnel, spectra, and heat-transfer rates. The environments so determined are: impact pressure approx. 3 atm, Mach number approx. 2.1, convective heat-transfer rate approx. 14 kw/sq cm, and radiative heat-transfer rate approx. 7 kw/sq cm in the absence of ablation. Ablation rates are determined from the measured rates of mass loss and recession of the ablation specimens. Compared with the predicted ablation rates obtained by running RASLE and CMA codes, the measured rates are higher by about 15% for all tested materials.

  18. Liquid-assisted laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Giron, A.; Sola, D.; Peña, J. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, results obtained by laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials assisted by liquids are reported. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse-width in the nanosecond range was used to machine the materials, which were immersed in water and ethylene glycol. Variation in geometrical parameters, morphology, and ablation yields were studied by using the same laser working conditions. It was observed that machined depth and removed volume depended on the thermal, optical, and mechanical features of the processed materials as well as on the properties of the surrounding medium in which the laser processing was carried out. Variation in ablation yields was studied in function of the liquid used to assist the laser process and related to refractive index and viscosity. Material features and working conditions were also related to the obtained results in order to correlate ablation parameters with respect to the hardness of the processed materials.

  19. Adding crumb rubber into exterior wall materials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Han; Thong-On, Norasit; Zhang, Xiong

    2002-10-01

    In Arizona US, most houses are built with walls covered by stuccos/coatings/mortars. This paper presents an explorative investigation of adding crumb rubber into stuccos/coatings/mortars. A series of experiments are conducted to examine the thermal and mechanical performance of the crumb rubber mixes. The results show that, the mixes with crumb rubber do exhibit more desirable performances like being high in crack-resistance and thermal insulation, and low in thermal expansion/contraction. The drawback for the crumb rubber mixes is the reduction in compressive strength, but which can be compensated by other means. As a site experiment, an area of 100 square-feet of crumb rubber coatings for two mix designs is sprayed on a tire-adobe wall. After being sprayed more than 14 months, the coatings apparently are in good condition. Significance of this study is that this practice, if accepted, will yield improved products that consume large quantities of crumb rubber.

  20. Investigation of ablation thresholds of optical materials using 1-µm-focusing beam at hard X-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Takahisa; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Senba, Yasunori; Tono, Kensuke; Sato, Takahiro; Togashi, Tadashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kim, Jangwoo; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Mimura, Hidekazu; Yabashi, Makina; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated the ablation thresholds of optical materials by using hard X-ray free electron laser. A 1-µm-focused beam with 10-keV of photon energy from SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser (SACLA) was irradiated onto silicon and SiO2 substrates, as well as the platinum and rhodium thin films on these substrates, which are widely used for optical materials such as X-ray mirrors. We designed and installed a dedicated experimental chamber for the irradiation experiments. For the silicon substrate irradiated at a high fluence, we observed strong mechanical cracking at the surface and a deep ablation hole with a straight side wall. We confirmed that the ablation thresholds of uncoated silicon and SiO2 substrates agree with the melting doses of these materials, while those of the substrates under the metal coating layer are significantly reduced. The ablation thresholds obtained here are useful criteria in designing optics for hard X-ray free electron lasers.

  1. Characterization of Candidate Materials for Remote Recession Measurements of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Bradley D.; Winter, Michael; Panerai, Francesco; Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean C. C.; Stackpoole, Margaret; Danehy, Paul M.; Splinter, Scott

    2016-01-01

    A method of remotely measuring surface recession of a material sample in a plasma flow through emission spectroscopy of the post shock layer was characterized through experiments in the NASA Langley HYMETS arc jet facility. Different methods for delivering the seed products into the Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) material samples were investigated. Three samples were produced by seeding the PICA material with combinations of Al, Si, HfO2, VB2, Al2O3, SiO2, TiC, HfC, NaCl, and MgCl2 through infusing seed materials into a core of PICA, or through encapsulating seed material in an epoxy disk, mechanically bonding the disk to a PICA sample. The PICA samples seeded with the candidate tracers were then tested at surface temperatures near 2400 K under low pressure air plasma. The emission of Al, Ti, V, Na, and Mg in the post-shock layer was observed in the UV with a high resolution imaging spectrometer viewing the whole stagnation line from the side, and from UV to NIR with a fiber-coupled miniaturized spectrometer observing the sample surface in the wavelength range from 200 nm to 1,100 nm from the front through a collimator. Al, Na, and Mg were found to be emitting in the post-shock spectra even before the recession reached the seeding depth - therefore possibly characterizing the pyrolysis process rather than the recession itself. The appearance of Ti and V emission in the spectra was well correlated with the actual recession which was monitored through a video of the front surface of the sample. The applicability of a seed material as an indicator for recession appears to be related to the melting temperature of the seed material. Future parametric studies will be carried out in low power plasma facilities at the University of Kentucky.

  2. Colour marking of transparent materials by laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Yasutaka; Sugioka, Koji; Miyamoto, Iwao; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate colour marking of a transparent material using laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA) system. After the LIPAA process, metal thin film is deposited on the surface of the ablated groove. This feature is applied to RGB (red, green and blue) colour marking by using specific metal targets. The metal targets, for instance, are Pb3O4 for red, Cr2O3 for green and [Cu(C32H15ClN8)] for blue colour marking. Additionally, adhesion of the metal thin film deposited on the processed groove by various experimental conditions is investigated.

  3. First-wall/blanket materials selection for STARFIRE tokamak reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Mattas, R.F.; Clemmer, R.G.; Davis, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The development of the reference STARFIRE first-wall/blanket design involved numerous trade-offs in the materials selection process for the breeding material, coolant structure, neutron multiplier, and reflector. The major parameters and properties that impact materials selection and design criteria are reviewed.

  4. Low-order harmonic generation in nanosecond laser ablation plasmas of carbon containing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Quintas, I.; Oujja, M.; Sanz, M.; Martín, M.; Ganeev, R. A.; Castillejo, M.

    2013-08-01

    In this work we report on a systematic study of the spatiotemporal behaviour of low-order harmonics generated in nanosecond laser ablation plasmas of carbon containing materials. Plasmas were generated from targets of graphite and boron carbide ablated with a nanosecond Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. Low-order harmonics (3rd and 5th) of the fundamental wavelength of a ns Nd:YAG driving laser, propagating perpendicularly to the ablation laser at variable time delays, were observed. The temporal study of the low-order harmonics generated under vacuum and atmospheres of Kr and Xe, revealed the presence of two populations that contribute to the harmonic generation (HG) at different times. It was found that under vacuum only small species contribute to the HG process, whereas under buffer gas, heavier species, such as clusters and nanoparticles, contribute to the HG at longer times. Optical emission spectroscopy, time of flight mass spectrometry and characterization of deposits collected on-line on a nearby substrate provided additional information that complemented the results of the spatiotemporal study of the generated harmonics. This approach to ablation plume analysis allows elucidating the identity of the nonlinear emitters in laser ablation plasmas and facilitates the investigation of efficient, nanoparticle-enhanced, coherent short wavelength generation processes.

  5. On single-photon ultraviolet ablation of polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Stephen R.; Burns, F. C.; Otis, C. E.

    1992-05-01

    The nature of uv ablation of organic polymers is discussed in terms of a pseudo-zeroth-order rate law of the form dx/dt = k0e-(Eact/kT), where Eact is assumed to be the strength of the weakest bonds in the polymer and T is the local temperature increase from the incident laser pulse. Equations derived from previous models that assumed nonthermal photodecomposition were duplicated from this photothermal model. Even for the simple case of single-photon absorption, nonideal behavior is affected by radiationless decay, pulse length, and thermal diffusion. These effects were probed. Results indicated that thermal diffusion may have a significant effect on the threshold fluence and to some degree on the shape of the etch depth versus fluence curve. Absorption dynamics (saturation and radiationless decay) appear to be the dominant factor in determining the functional dependence of etch depth on fluence. As a result of competition between absorption saturation and radiationless decay, the penetration depth is intensity dependent. High fluence as well as short temporal pulses (subnanosecond) penetrate more deeply into the polymer than predicted by simple Beer's law absorption. The apparent existence of an optimum pulse length, for a given absorbing system, is another result of the absorption dynamics.

  6. Experimental study of generalized self-filtering unstable resonators in an ablative-wall flash-lamp-pumped dye laser.

    PubMed

    Mahmodi, M; Farahbod, A H; Hariri, A

    1998-02-20

    The performance of a generalized self-filtering unstable resonator (GSFUR) that consists of two curved mirrors in a nonconfocal scheme with a low magnification of M = -1.62 in an ablative-wall flash-lamp dye laser is reported. The objective was to study the near- and far-field intensity distribution and the divergence of the laser beam. It was found that the output beam has a nearly Gaussian distribution with a pulse duration of ~400 ns FWHM, almost independent of the diameter of the field-limiting aperture, but increases slightly with the pumping rate. A diffraction-limited laser beam of 1.1 mrad was obtained from this laser cavity. The output energy was ~1 mJ when an intracavity glass plate was used as an output coupler. The required relations needed for the GSFUR design were also derived. PMID:18268685

  7. Systematic Examination of Stardust Bulbous Track Wall Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Clemett, S. J.; Nguyen, A. N.; Berger, E. L.; Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of Comet Wild-2 samples returned by NASA's Stardust spacecraft have focused primarily on terminal particles (TPs) or well-preserved fine-grained materials along the track walls [1,2]. However much of the collected material was melted and mixed intimately with the aerogel by the hypervelocity impact [3,4]. We are performing systematic examinations of entire Stardust tracks to establish the mineralogy and origins of all comet Wild 2 components [7,8]. This report focuses on coordinated analyses of indigenous crystalline and amorphous/melt cometary materials along the aerogel track walls, their interaction with aerogel during collection and comparisons with their TPs.

  8. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental restorative materials with an ultra short pulse laser (USPL) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Andreas; Wehry, Richard; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Schelle, Florian

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental restoration materials following laser ablation using an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system. Specimens of phosphate cement (PC), ceramic (CE) and composite (C) were used. Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and a pulse length of 8 ps. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the thickness of the restoration material. A time delay for temperature increase was observed in the PC and C group. Employing the USPL system for removal of restorative materials, heat generation has to be considered.

  9. The thermal and mechanical properties of a low-density glass-fiber-reinforced elastomeric ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, W. T.; Robertson, R. W.; Bush, A. L.; Pears, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of the thermal and mechanical properties was performed on a molded low-density elastomeric ablation material designated as Material B. Both the virgin and charred states were examined to provide meaningful inputs to the design of a thermal protection system. Chars representative of the flight chars formed during ablation were prepared in a laboratory furnace from 600 K to 1700 K and properties of effective thermal conductivity, heat capacity, porosity and permeability were determined on the furnace chars formed at various temperature levels within the range. This provided a boxing of the data which will enable the prediction of the transient response of the material during flight ablation.

  10. Velocity measurements of inert porous materials driven by infrared-laser-ablated thin-film titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedeaux, Brett C.; Trott, Wayne M.; Castañeda, Jaime N.

    2010-02-01

    This article presents and interprets a series of experiments performed to measure the velocity of four inert low-density porous materials that were accelerated by an ablated thin-film titanium metal, created by vaporizing a 250-nm-thick layer of titanium with a high-energy, Q-switched, pulsed, and 1.054 μm neodymium-glass laser. Inert powder materials were chosen to match, among other characteristics, the morphology of energetic materials under consideration for use in detonator applications. The observed behavior occurs near the thin-film titanium ablation layer, through complex physical mechanisms, including laser absorption in the metal layer, ablation and formation of confined plasma that is a blackbody absorber of the remaining photon energy, and vaporization of the remaining titanium metal. One-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling provided a basis of comparison with the measured velocities. We found, as predicted in wave-propagation-code modeling, that an Asay foil can indicate total momentum of the driven material that is mechanically softer (lower in shock impedance) than the foil. The key conclusion is that the specific impulse delivered by the laser transfers a corresponding momentum to soft, organic power columns that are readily compacted. Impulse from the laser is less efficient in transferring momentum to hard inorganic particles that are less readily compacted.

  11. Material options for a commercial fusion reactor first wall

    SciTech Connect

    Dabiri, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    A study has been conducted to evaluate the potential of various materials for use as first walls in high-power-density commercial fusion reactors. Operating limits for each material were obtained based on a number of criteria, including maximum allowable structural temperatures, critical heat flux, ultimate tensile strength, and design-allowable stress. The results with water as a coolant indicate that a modified alloy similar to HT-9 may be a suitable candidate for low- and medium-power-density reactor first walls with neutron loads of up to 6 MW/m/sup 2/. A vanadium or copper alloy must be used for high-power-density reactors. The neutron wall load limit for vanadium alloys is about 14 MW/sup 2/, provided a suitable coating material is chosen. The extremely limited data base for radiation effects hinders any quantitative assessment of the limits for copper alloys.

  12. Equations of State for Ablator Materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterne, P. A.; Benedict, L. X.; Hamel, S.; Correa, A. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Fratanduono, D. E.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss the development of the tabular equation of state (EOS) models for ablator materials in current use at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in simulations of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility. We illustrate the methods with a review of current models for ablator materials and discuss some of the challenges in performing hydrocode simulations with high-fidelity multiphase models. We stress the importance of experimental data, as well as the utility of ab initio electronic structure calculations, in regions where data is not currently available. We illustrate why Hugoniot data alone is not sufficient to constrain the EOS models. These cases illustrate the importance of experimental EOS data in multi-megabar regimes, and the vital role they play in the development and validation of EOS models for ICF simulations.

  13. Modeling of plume dynamics in laser ablation processes for thin film deposition of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Chen, K.R.; Donato, J.M.; Geohegan, D.B.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    The transport dynamics of laser-ablated neutral/plasma plumes are of significant interest for film growth by pulsed-laser deposition of materials since the magnitude and kinetic energy of the species arriving at the deposition substrate are key processing parameters. Dynamical calculations of plume propagation in vacuum and in background gas have been performed using particle-in-cell hydrodynamics, continuum gas dynamics, and scattering models. Results from these calculations are presented and compared with experimental observations.

  14. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron

    PubMed Central

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E.

    2016-01-01

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  15. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron.

    PubMed

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E

    2016-01-01

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  16. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron.

    PubMed

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E

    2016-06-09

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  17. A simulation-based and analytic analysis of the off-Hugoniot response of alternative inertial confinement fusion ablator materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Alastair S.; Prisbrey, Shon; Baker, Kevin L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Fry, Jonathan; Dittrich, Thomas R.; Wu, Kuang-Jen J.; Kervin, Margaret L.; Schoff, Michael E.; Farrell, Mike; Nikroo, Abbas; Hurricane, Omar A.

    2016-09-01

    The attainment of self-propagating fusion burn in an inertial confinement target at the National Ignition Facility will require the use of an ablator with high rocket-efficiency and ablation pressure. The ablation material used during the National Ignition Campaign (Lindl et al. 2014) [1], a glow-discharge polymer (GDP), does not couple as efficiently as simulations indicated to the multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environment created by laser power profile (Robey et al., 2012). We investigate the performance of two other ablators, boron carbide (B4C) and high-density carbon (HDC) compared to the performance of GDP under the same hohlraum conditions. Ablation performance is determined through measurement of the shock speed produced in planar samples of the ablator material subjected to the identical multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environments that are similar to a generic three-shock ignition drive. Simulations are in better agreement with the off-Hugoniot performance of B4C than either HDC or GDP, and analytic estimations of the ablation pressure indicate that while the pressure produced by B4C and GDP is similar when the ablator is allowed to release, the pressure reached by B4C seems to exceed that of HDC when backed by a Au/quartz layer.

  18. Micromachining of transparent materials by laser ablation of organic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Niino, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Akira

    2000-11-01

    Transparent materials such as fused silica, quartz, calcium fluoride, and fluorocarbon polymer were etched upon irradiation of organic solution containing pyrene with a conventional KrF excimer laser. Threshold fluence for etching was 240 mJ/cm2 for fused silica. Etch rate remarkably depended on a concentration of pyrene: higher etch rate with the increase of pyrene concentration. It means that pyrene molecules play an important role in this process. The etch rate can be easily controlled through changing a laser pulse number, a laser fluence and a concentration of solution. The mechanism for this process is discussed by cyclic multiphotonic absorption of pyrene in the excited states, thermal relaxation, and formation of super-heated solution. As the results, it is suggested that the process is based on the combination of two processes in the interface between the transparent materials and the liquid: one is a heating process by a super-heated liquid and the other is an attacking process by a high temperature and pressure vapor.

  19. Optimization of laser ablation and signal enhancement for nuclear material detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaHaye, Nicole L.

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the role of different laser parameters on laser ablation properties, specifically in terms of performance in laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Many laser parameters affect laser ablation performance, including laser wavelength and pulse duration, as presented here. It was previously thought that wavelength plays no role in ultrafast laser ablation; however, it was found that shorter wavelength yields lower detection limits and ablation threshold. Our results also demonstrate that in the laser pulse duration range of 40 fs to 1 ps, negligible differences occur in signal intensity, elemental ratios, and detection limits. U/Pb and U/Th ratios, which were examined to ensure limited fractionation, give comparable results at all pulse widths investigated. A parametric study of plasma hydrodynamics will also be presented. An elemental detection method combining laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and LA-ICP-MS is developed, with plasma density and temperature actively monitored to investigate how plasma conditions affect ICP-MS results. The combination of these two methods will help to mitigate the disadvantages of using each technique individually. Depth and spatial analysis of thin films was performed using femtosecond LA-ICP-MS to study the stoichiometric distribution of the films. The thin film-substrate interface was probed, revealing intermixing between the two layers. Lastly, the persistence of uranium emission in laser-produced plasmas (LPP) was investigated under various Ar ambient environments. Plasma collisional effects and confinement play a very important role in emission intensity and persistence, yielding important results for future LIBS and laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) research. Lastly, suggestions for future work are made, which include extension of the LIBS and LA-ICP-MS systems to other samples like oxide thin films and spatial and depth profiling of known

  20. Ablation by-products of dental materials from the Er:YAG laser and the dental handpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-05-01

    Recently there has been much interest in lasers and their potential use to replace the dental drill. The research has been directed towards vital dental tissues. It must be understood that any laser to be used in dentistry which will replace the dental drill must also ablate and remove existing dental materials. Some concern exists about the ablation products when the Er:YAG laser is used to ablate dental materials. It is incumbent on the professionals using these lasers to understand the materials being produced by these lasers and protect themselves and their patients from possible toxic products. It is the intent of this paper to evaluate the products produced by the ablation of both dental amalgam and composite dental restorative materials and compare them with those produced by the traditional dental handpiece (drill).

  1. Molecular deformation mechanisms of the wood cell wall material.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kai; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-02-01

    Wood is a biological material with outstanding mechanical properties resulting from its hierarchical structure across different scales. Although earlier work has shown that the cellular structure of wood is a key factor that renders it excellent mechanical properties at light weight, the mechanical properties of the wood cell wall material itself still needs to be understood comprehensively. The wood cell wall material features a fiber reinforced composite structure, where cellulose fibrils act as stiff fibers, and hemicellulose and lignin molecules act as soft matrix. The angle between the fiber direction and the loading direction has been found to be the key factor controlling the mechanical properties. However, how the interactions between theses constitutive molecules contribute to the overall properties is still unclear, although the shearing between fibers has been proposed as a primary deformation mechanism. Here we report a molecular model of the wood cell wall material with atomistic resolution, used to assess the mechanical behavior under shear loading in order to understand the deformation mechanisms at the molecular level. The model includes an explicit description of cellulose crystals, hemicellulose, as well as lignin molecules arranged in a layered nanocomposite. The results obtained using this model show that the wood cell wall material under shear loading deforms in an elastic and then plastic manner. The plastic regime can be divided into two parts according to the different deformation mechanisms: yielding of the matrix and sliding of matrix along the cellulose surface. Our molecular dynamics study provides insights of the mechanical behavior of wood cell wall material at the molecular level, and paves a way for the multi-scale understanding of the mechanical properties of wood.

  2. Discrete Element study of granular material - Bumpy wall interface behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Cheikh, Khadija; Rémond, Sébastien; Pizette, Patrick; Vanhove, Yannick; Djelal, Chafika

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a DEM study of a confined granular material sheared between two parallel bumpy walls. The granular material consists of packed dry spherical particles. The bumpiness is modeled by spheres of a given diameter glued on horizontal planes. Different bumpy surfaces are modeled by varying diameter or concentration of glued spheres. The material is sheared by moving the two bumpy walls at fixed velocity. During shear, the confining pressure applied on each bumpy wall is controlled. The effect of wall bumpiness on the effective friction coefficient and on the granular material behavior at the bumpy walls is reported for various shearing conditions. For given bumpiness and confining pressure that we have studied, it is found that the shear velocity does not affect the shear stress. However, the effective friction coefficient and the behavior of the granular material depend on the bumpiness. When the diameter of the glued spheres is larger than about the average grains diameter of the medium, the latter is uniformly sheared and the effective friction coefficient remains constant. For smaller diameters of the glued spheres, the effective friction coefficient increases with the diameter of glued spheres. The influence of glued spheres concentration is significant only for small glued spheres diameters, typically half of average particle diameter of the granular material. In this case, increasing the concentration of glued spheres leads to a decrease in effective friction coefficient and to shear localization at the interface. For different diameters and concentrations of glued spheres, we show that the effect of bumpiness on the effective friction coefficient can be characterized by the depth of interlocking.

  3. Laser-solid interaction and dynamics of the laser-ablated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.R.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Geohegan, D.B.; Wood, R.F.; Donato, J.M.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    Rapid transformations through the liquid and vapor phases induced by laser-solid interactions are described by the authors` thermal model with the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to determine the vaporization temperature under different surface pressure condition. Hydrodynamic behavior of the vapor during and after ablation is described by gas dynamic equations. These two models are coupled. Modeling results show that lower background pressure results lower laser energy density threshold for vaporization. The ablation rate and the amount of materials removed are proportional to the laser energy density above its threshold. The authors also demonstrate a dynamic source effect that accelerates the unsteady expansion of laser-ablated material in the direction perpendicular to the solid. A dynamic partial ionization effect is studied as well. A self-similar theory shows that the maximum expansion velocity is proportional to c{sub s}{alpha}, where 1 {minus} {alpha} is the slope of the velocity profile. Numerical hydrodynamic modeling is in good agreement with the theory. With these effects, {alpha} is reduced. Therefore, the expansion front velocity is significantly higher than that from conventional models. The results are consistent with experiments. They further study how the plume propagates in high background gas condition. Under appropriate conditions, the plume is slowed down, separates with the background, is backward moving, and hits the solid surface. Then, it splits into two parts when it rebounds from the surface. The results from the modeling will be compared with experimental observations where possible.

  4. Flight and ground tests of a very low density elastomeric ablative material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. C.; Chapman, A. J., III

    1972-01-01

    A very low density ablative material, a silicone-phenolic composite, was flight tested on a recoverable spacecraft launched by a Pacemaker vehicle system; and, in addition, it was tested in an arc heated wind tunnel at three conditions which encompassed most of the reentry heating conditions of the flight tests. The material was composed, by weight, of 71 percent phenolic spheres, 22.8 percent silicone resin, 2.2 percent catalyst, and 4 percent silica fibers. The tests were conducted to evaluate the ablator performance in both arc tunnel and flight tests and to determine the predictability of the albator performance by using computed results from an existing one-dimensional numerical analysis. The flight tested ablator experienced only moderate surface recession and retained a smooth surface except for isolated areas where the char was completely removed, probably following reentry and prior to or during recovery. Analytical results show good agreement between arc tunnel and flight test results. The thermophysical properties used in the analysis are tabulated.

  5. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Ablation of Refractory Material Due to Rocket Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael F.; Vu, Bruce T.

    2012-01-01

    CR Tech's Thermal Desktop-SINDA/FLUINT software was used in the thermal analysis of a flame deflector design for Launch Complex 39B at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The analysis of the flame deflector takes into account heat transfer due to plume impingement from expected vehicles to be launched at KSC. The heat flux from the plume was computed using computational fluid dynamics provided by Ames Research Center in Moffet Field, California. The results from the CFD solutions were mapped onto a 3-D Thermal Desktop model of the flame deflector using the boundary condition mapping capabilities in Thermal Desktop. The ablation subroutine in SINDA/FLUINT was then used to model the ablation of the refractory material.

  6. Non-Intrusive Sensor for In-Situ Measurement of Recession Rate of Ablative and Eroding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, George (Inventor); Tiliakos, Nicholas (Inventor); Benel, Gabriel (Inventor); Thomson, Clint (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A non-intrusive sensor for in-situ measurement of recession rate of heat shield ablatives. An ultrasonic wave source is carried in the housing. A microphone is also carried in the housing, for collecting the reflected ultrasonic waves from an interface surface of the ablative material. A time phasing control circuit is also included for time-phasing the ultrasonic wave source so that the waves reflected from the interface surface of the ablative material focus on the microphone, to maximize the acoustic pressure detected by the microphone and to mitigate acoustic velocity variation effects through the material through a de-coupling process that involves a software algorithm. A software circuit for computing the location off of which the ultrasonic waves scattered to focus back at the microphone is also included, so that the recession rate of the heat shield ablative may be monitored in real-time through the scan-focus approach.

  7. Lightweight Ablative and Ceramic Thermal Protection System Materials for NASA Exploration Systems Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, Peter G.; Lawrence, Timothy W.; Gubert, Michael K.; Milos, Frank S.; Kiser, James D.; Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Koenig, John R.

    2006-01-01

    As a collaborative effort among NASA Centers, the "Lightweight Nonmetallic Thermal Protection Materials Technology" Project was set up to assist mission/vehicle design trade studies, to support risk reduction in thermal protection system (TPS) material selections, to facilitate vehicle mass optimization, and to aid development of human-rated TPS qualification and certification plans. Missions performing aerocapture, aerobraking, or direct aeroentry rely on advanced heatshields that allow reductions in spacecraft mass by minimizing propellant requirements. Information will be presented on candidate materials for such reentry approaches and on screening tests conducted (material property and space environmental effects tests) to evaluate viable candidates. Seventeen materials, in three classes (ablatives, tiles, and ceramic matrix composites), were studied. In additional to physical, mechanical, and thermal property tests, high heat flux laser tests and simulated-reentry oxidation tests were performed. Space environmental effects testing, which included exposures to electrons, atomic oxygen, and hypervelocity impacts, was also conducted.

  8. Data Report on Material Ablation and Shock Pressure Measurements at ZBL

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2007-01-03

    A series of tests were conducted on Z-Beamlet Laser (ZBL) to provide data that can be used to determine the laser coupling coefficient and validate code capabilities. The gauges and cables in the chamber were shielded with conduit and resulted in high fidelity signals. The stress measurements show a clear trend of peak stress attenuation with propagation distance, as would be expected. The aluminum sample stresses measured were in the 4 to 8 Kbar range. This constitutes a good data set for model validation. VISAR was considered as a diagnostic for this test series but predicted stress levels were uncertain and we had good success previously with PVDF at this test facility; plus, the aggressive test schedule and limited number of shots left little opportunity to set up this diagnostic. Shock profile measurements were made with both PVDF and Quartz gauges. The PVDF gauge and the Quartz gauge measured very similar shock pulses transmitted through 1.5-mm thick 2024-T3 samples at a nominal fluence of 400 J/cm{sup 2}. The similarity in the two profiles indicates good correlation between measurement techniques and the differences between the sensor areas allow one to evaluate different parts of the beam. The laser beam ablated the front surfaces of the samples. Surface profile measurements of the ablated surface were used to estimate the depth of material removed. Ablated sample surface and crater formation indicate a non-uniform hot spot in the center of the sample.

  9. Optical modeling of laser ablated microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, M. C.; Davies, E.; Holmes, A. S.

    2012-11-01

    From only an a priori knowledge of the optical parameters of a laser beam, the delivery system together with a substrate's material properties, a ray-tracing model capable of predicting the 3-D topology of micro/nanostructures machined by pulsed laser ablation has been developed. The model includes secondary illumination effects produced by the microstructure created by successive pulses (wall reflections, refraction, wave guiding, shadowing, etc.) as well as the complete optical properties of the beam delivery system. We have used material ablation by pulsed excimer lasers and associated beam delivery systems to demonstrate some of the capabilities of the model. Good agreement is obtained between computations and experimental results in terms of the predicted ablation depth per pulse and the wall taper angle of channels and holes. The model can predict ablated profiles of holes and indicate the most efficient drilling strategy in terms of material removal rates. The model also shows diffraction effects are not required to explain the tapering vertical walls observed when ablating microstructures. Finally, the model has been used to demonstrate aberrations in an optical imaging system limiting the creation of submicron features in an ablated microstructure. Provided photons are absorbed linearly in a substrate according to Beer's law with negligible thermal diffusion effects, the model is equally applicable to using other types of pulsed laser sources and systems with imaged or focused beams.

  10. Laser ablation in liquids as a new technique of sampling in elemental analysis of solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muravitskaya, E. V.; Rosantsev, V. A.; Belkov, M. V.; Ershov-Pavlov, E. A.; Klyachkovskaya, E. V.

    2009-02-01

    Laser ablation in liquid media is considered as a new sample preparation technique in the elemental composition analysis of materials using optical emission spectroscopy of inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES). Solid samples are transformed into uniform colloidal solutions of nanosized analyte particles using laser radiation focused onto the sample surface. High homogeneity of the resulting solution allows performing the ICP-OES quantitative analysis especially for the samples, which are poorly soluble in acids. The technique is compatible with the conventional solution-based standards.

  11. Photothermal ablation of bone metastasis of breast cancer using PEGylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Liu, Yi; Ma, Xueming; Hu, Shaoyu; Zhang, Jiawei; Wu, Qian; Ye, Wenbin; Zhu, Siyuan; Yang, Dehong; Qu, Dongbin; Jiang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates therapeutic efficacy of photothermal therapy (PTT) in an orthotropic xenograft model of bone metastasis of breast cancer. The near-infrared (NIR) irradiation on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWNTs) resulted in a rapid heat generation which increased with the MWNTs concentration up to 100 μg/ml. MWNTs alone exhibited no toxicity, but inclusion of MWNTs dramatically decreased cell viability when combined with laser irradiation. Thermographic observation revealed that treatment with 10 μg MWNTs followed by NIR laser irradiation resulted in a rapid increase in temperature up to 73.4±11.98 °C in an intraosseous model of bone metastasis of breast cancer. In addition, MWNTs plus NIR laser irradiation caused a remarkably greater suppression of tumor growth compared with treatment with either MWNTs injection or NIR irradiation alone, significantly reducing the amount of tumor-induced bone destruction. All these demonstrate the efficacy of PTT with MWNTs for bone metastasis of breast cancer. PMID:26122018

  12. A Gas-Surface Interaction Model For The Numerical Study Of High Temperature Flows Over Pyrolyzing Ablative Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchi, A.; Bianchi, D.; Nasuti, F.

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, modified surface mass and energy balances have been implemented in the ablative boundary condition of a two-dimensional full Navier-Stokes solver, to take into account the pyrolysis gas injection. A finite- rate ablation model is used, with steady-state ablation approximation to obtain the surface temperature. Hence, with this approximation, the conductive heat flux entering the wall can be directly computed without coupling with a solid conduction solver. Moreover, under this approximation, the pyrolysis gas mass flow rate is a known fraction of the char mass flow rate. Simulations of carbon-phenolic solid rocket motor nozzle have been performed to validate the model and to investigate the most uncertain parameters. Results show the influence of pyrolysis gas composition and ratio between mass fluxes of pyrolysis gas and of gaseous carbon, over the final erosion.

  13. Ablative material testing for low-pressure, low-cost rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, G. Paul; Smith, Timothy D.

    1995-01-01

    The results of an experimental evaluation of ablative materials suitable for the production of light weight, low cost rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles are presented. Ten individual specimens of four different compositions of silica cloth-reinforced phenolic resin materials were evaluated for comparative erosion in a subscale rocket engine combustion chamber. Gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen were used as propellants, operating at a nominal chamber pressure of 1138 kPa (165 psi) and a nominal mixture ratio (O/F) of 3.3. These conditions were used to thermally simulate operation with RP-1 and liquid oxygen, and achieved a specimen throat gas temperature of approximately 2456 K (4420 R). Two high-density composition materials exhibited high erosion resistance, while two low-density compositions exhibited approximately 6-75 times lower average erosion resistance. The results compare favorably with previous testing by NASA and provide adequate data for selection of ablatives for low pressure, low cost rocket engines.

  14. Ablative material testing for low-pressure, low-cost rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, G. Paul; Smith, Timothy D.

    1995-10-01

    The results of an experimental evaluation of ablative materials suitable for the production of light weight, low cost rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles are presented. Ten individual specimens of four different compositions of silica cloth-reinforced phenolic resin materials were evaluated for comparative erosion in a subscale rocket engine combustion chamber. Gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen were used as propellants, operating at a nominal chamber pressure of 1138 kPa (165 psi) and a nominal mixture ratio (O/F) of 3.3. These conditions were used to thermally simulate operation with RP-1 and liquid oxygen, and achieved a specimen throat gas temperature of approximately 2456 K (4420 R). Two high-density composition materials exhibited high erosion resistance, while two low-density compositions exhibited approximately 6-75 times lower average erosion resistance. The results compare favorably with previous testing by NASA and provide adequate data for selection of ablatives for low pressure, low cost rocket engines.

  15. Wire Cloth as Porous Material for Transpiration-cooled Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Kinsler, Martin R; Cochran, Reeves B

    1951-01-01

    The permeability characteristics and tensile strength of a porous material developed from stainless-steel corduroy wire cloth for use in transpiration-cooled walls where the primary stresses are in one direction were investigated. The results of this investigation are presented and compared with similar results obtained with porous sintered metal compacts. A much wider range of permeabilities is obtainable with the wire cloth than with the porous metal compacts considered and the ultimate tensile strength in the direction of the primary stresses for porous materials produced from three mesh sizes of wire cloth are from two to three times the ultimate tensile strengths of the porous metal compacts.

  16. Strain Sensitivity in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Multifunctional Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M. (Technical Monitor); Smits, Jan M., VI

    2005-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes represent the future of structural aerospace vehicle systems due to their unparalleled strength characteristics and demonstrated multifunctionality. This multifunctionality rises from the CNT's unique capabilities for both metallic and semiconducting electron transport, electron spin polarizability, and band gap modulation under strain. By incorporating the use of electric field alignment and various lithography techniques, a single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) test bed for measurement of conductivity/strain relationships has been developed. Nanotubes are deposited at specified locations through dielectrophoresis. The circuit is designed such that the central, current carrying section of the nanotube is exposed to enable atomic force microscopy and manipulation in situ while the transport properties of the junction are monitored. By applying this methodology to sensor development a flexible single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) based strain sensitive device has been developed. Studies of tensile testing of the flexible SWNT device vs conductivity are also presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using single walled HiPCO (high-pressure carbon monoxide) carbon nanotubes as strain sensing agents in a multi-functional materials system.

  17. Synthesis of nano-structured materials by laser-ablation and their application to sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, T.; Suehiro, J.

    2007-07-01

    We describe the synthesis of nano-structured materials of ZnO and Pd by laser ablation and their applications to sensors. The synthesis of ZnO nano-wires was performed by nano-particle assisted deposition (NPAD) where nano-crystals were grown with nano-particles generated by laser-ablating a ZnO sintered target in an Ar background gas. The synthesized ZnO nano-wires were characterized with a scanning electron microscopy and the photoluminescent characteristics were examined under an excitation with the third harmonics of a Nd:YAG laser. The nano-wires with a diameter in the range from 50 to 150 nm and a length of up to 5 μm were taken out of the substrate by laser blow-off technique and/or sonication. It was confirmed that the nano-wires showed the stimulated emission under optical pumping, indicating a high quality of the crystalinity. Pd nano-particles were generated by laser-ablating a Pd plate in pure water. The transmission electron microscope observation revealed that Pd nano-particles with a diameter in the range from 3 nm to several tens of nanometers were produced. Using these nano-structured materials, we successfully fabricated sensors by the dielectrophoresis techniques. In the case of the ultraviolet photosensor, a detection sensitivity of 10 nW/cm 2 was achieved and in the case of hydrogen sensing, the response time of less than 10 s has been demonstrated with Pd nano-particles.

  18. Experimental performance of an ablative material as an external insulator for a hypersonic research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, R. L.; Chapman, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    An ablative material composed of silica-filled elastomeric silicone was tested to evaluate its thermal and structural performance as an external insulator, or heat shield, for a hypersonic research aircraft. The material was also tested to determine whether it would form a durable char layer when initially heated and thereafter function primarily as an insulator with little further pyrolysis or char removal. Aerothermal tests were representative of nominal Mach 6 cruise conditions of the aircraft, and additional tests were representative of Mach 8 cruise and interference heating conditions. Radiant heating tests were used to simulate the complete nominal Mach 6 surface-temperature history. The silica char that formed during aerothermal tests was not durable. The char experienced a general and preferential surface recession, with the primary mechanism for char removal being erosion. Tests revealed that radiant heating is not a valid technique for simulating aerodynamic heating of the material.

  19. Shock wave and material vapour plume propagation during excimer laser ablation of aluminium samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, S. H.; Greif, R.; Russo, R. E.

    1999-10-01

    A probe beam deflection technique was utilized to measure the propagation of a shock wave and material vapour plume generated during excimer laser ablation of aluminium samples. The measured transit time of the laser-induced shock wave was compared with the prediction based on an ideal blast-wave model, using the Sedov-Taylor solution. The prediction of the incident laser energy converted into the laser-induced gasdynamic flow utilizing this blast-wave model overestimated the efficiency, even under conditions when the measured shock-wave velocity follows the correct model relation. The propagation of material vapour was measured from the deflection of the probe beam at later times. The propagation velocity of material vapour ranged from 20-40 m s-1 with a greater velocity near the target surface.

  20. A Short Review of Ablative-Material Response Models and Simulation Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachaud, Jean; Magin, Thierry E.; Cozmuta, Ioana; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2011-01-01

    A review of the governing equations and boundary conditions used to model the response of ablative materials submitted to a high-enthalpy flow is proposed. The heritage of model-development efforts undertaken in the 1960s is extremely clear: the bases of the models used in the community are mathematically equivalent. Most of the material-response codes implement a single model in which the equation parameters may be modified to model different materials or conditions. The level of fidelity of the models implemented in design tools only slightly varies. Research and development codes are generally more advanced but often not as robust. The capabilities of each of these codes are summarized in a color-coded table along with research and development efforts currently in progress.

  1. Graphite and ablative material response to CO2 laser, carbon-arc, and xenon-arc radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    The behavior was investigated of graphite and several charring ablators in a variety of high-radiative heat-flux environments. A commercial-grade graphite and nine state-of-the-art charring ablators were subjected to various radiative environments produced by a CO2 laser and a carbon arc. Graphite was also tested in xenon-arc radiation. Heat-flux levels ranged from 10 to 47 MW/sq m. Tests were conducted in air, nitrogen, helium, and a CO2-N2 mixture which simulated the Venus atmosphere. The experimental results were compared with theoretical results obtained with a one-dimensional charring-ablator analysis and a two-dimensional subliming-ablator analysis. Neither the graphite nor the charring ablators showed significant differences in appearance or microstructure after testing in the different radiative environments. The performance of phenolic nylon and graphite was predicted satisfactorily with existing analyses and published material property data. Good agreement between experimental and analytical results was obtained by using sublimation parameters from a chemical nonequilibrium analysis of graphite sublimation. Some charring ablators performed reasonably well and could withstand radiative fluxes of the level encountered in certain planetary entries. Other materials showed excessive surface recession and/or large amounts of cracking and spalling, and appear to be unsuitable for severe radiative environments.

  2. Materials for Multifunctional Balloon Catheters With Capabilities in Cardiac Electrophysiological Mapping and Ablation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Lu, Nanshu; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Kim, Yun-Soung; Lee, Stephen P.; Xu, Lizhi; Wu, Jian; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Song, Jizhou; Liu, Zhuangjian; Viventi, Jonathan; de Graff, Bassel; Elolampi, Brian; Mansour, Moussa; Slepian, Marvin J.; Hwang, Sukwon; Moss, Joshua D.; Won, Sang-Min; Huang, Younggang; Litt, Brian; Rogers, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Development of advanced surgical tools for minimally invasive procedures represents an activity of central importance to improvements in human health. A key materials challenge is in the realization of bio-compatible interfaces between the classes of semiconductor and sensor technologies that might be most useful in this context and the soft, curvilinear surfaces of the body. This paper describes a solution based on biocompatible materials and devices that integrate directly with the thin elastic membranes of otherwise conventional balloon catheters, to provide multimodal functionality suitable for clinical use. We present sensors for measuring temperature, flow, tactile, optical and electrophysiological data, together with radio frequency (RF) electrodes for controlled, local ablation of tissue. These components connect together in arrayed layouts designed to decouple their operation from large strain deformations associated with deployment and repeated inflation/deflation. Use of such ‘instrumented’ balloon catheter devices in live animal models and in vitro tests illustrates their operation in cardiac ablation therapy. These concepts have the potential for application in surgical systems of the future, not only those based on catheters but also on other platforms, such as surgical gloves. PMID:21378969

  3. Matrix Effects on Boron Containing Materials due to Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci R.; Akpovo, Charlemagne A.; Martinez, Jorge; Ford, Alan; Herbert, Kenley; Johnson, Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a spectroscopic technique that is used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of materials in the liquid, solid, or gas phase. LIBS can also be used for the detection of isotopic shifts in atomic and diatomic species via Laser-Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectroscopy (LAMIS). However, any additional elements that are entrained into the plasma other than the element of interest, can affect the extent of ablation and quality of spectra and hence, potentially obscure or aid in the relative abundance assessment for a given element. To address the importance of matrix effects, the isotopic analysis of boron obtained from boron oxide (BO) emission originating from different boron-containing compounds, such as boron nitride (BN), boric acid (H3BO3) , and borax (Na2B4O710H2O), via LIBS has been performed here. Each of these materials has different physical properties and elemental composition in order to illustrate possible challenges for the LAMIS method. A calibration-free model similar to that for the original LAMIS work is used to determine properties of the plasma as the matrix is changed. DTRA

  4. Characterization of material ablation driven by laser generated intense extreme ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Nozomi Masuda, Masaya; Deguchi, Ryo; Murakami, Masakatsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2015-09-14

    We present a comparative study on the hydrodynamic behaviour of plasmas generated by material ablation by the irradiation of nanosecond extreme ultraviolet (EUV or XUV) or infrared laser pulses on solid samples. It was clarified that the difference in the photon energy deposition and following material heating mechanism between these two lights result in the difference in the plasma parameters and plasma expansion characteristics. Silicon plate was ablated by either focused intense EUV pulse (λ = 9–25 nm, 10 ns) or laser pulse (λ = 1064 nm, 10 ns), both with an intensity of ∼10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2}. Both the angular distributions and energy spectra of the expanding ions revealed that the photoionized plasma generated by the EUV light differs significantly from that produced by the laser. The laser-generated plasma undergoes spherical expansion, whereas the EUV-generated plasma undergoes planar expansion in a comparatively narrow angular range. It is presumed that the EUV radiation is transmitted through the expanding plasma and directly photoionizes the samples in the solid phase, consequently forming a high-density and high-pressure plasma. Due to a steep pressure gradient along the direction of the target normal, the EUV plasma expands straightforward resulting in the narrower angular distribution observed.

  5. Hydrogen film cooling of a small hydrogen-oxygen thrust chamber and its effect on erosion rates of various ablative materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N.; Roberts, W. E.; Russell, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine what arrangement of film-coolant-injection orifices should be used to decrease the erosion rates of small, high temperature, high pressure ablative thrust chambers without incurring a large penalty in combustion performance. All of the film cooling was supplied through holes in a ring between the outer row of injector elements and the chamber wall. The best arrangement, which had twice the number of holes as there were outer row injection elements, was also the simplest. The performance penalties, presented as a reduction in characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency, were 0.8 and 2.8 percentage points for the 10 and 20 percent cooling flows, respectively, The best film-coolant injector was then used to obtain erosion rates for 19 ablative materials. The throat erosion rate was reduced by a factor of 2.5 with a 10 percent coolant flow. Only the more expensive silica phenolic materials had low enough erosion rates to be considered for use in the nozzle throat. However, some of the cheaper materials might qualify for use in other areas of small nozzles with large throat diameters where the higher erosion rates are more acceptable.

  6. Spark ablation-inductively coupled plasma spectrometry for analysis of geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golightly, D.W.; Montaser, A.; Smith, B.L.; Dorrzapf, A.F.

    1989-01-01

    Spark ablation-inductively coupled plasma (SA-ICP) spectrometry is applied to the measurement of hafnium-zirconium ratios in zircons and to the determination of cerium, cobalt, iron, lead, nickel and phosphorus in ferromanganese nodules. Six operating parameters used for the high-voltage spark and argon-ICP combination are established by sequential simplex optimization of both signal-to-background ratio and signal-to-noise ratio. The time-dependences of the atomic emission signals of analytes and matrix elements ablated from a finely pulverized sample embedded in a pressed disk of copper demonstrate selective sampling by the spark. Concentration ratios of hafnium to zirconium in zircons are measured with a precision of 4% (relative standard deviation, RSD). For ferromanganese nodules, spectral measurements based on intensity ratios of analyte line to the Mn(II) 257.610 nm line provide precisions of analysis in the range from 7 to 14% RSD. The accuracy of analysis depends on use of standard additions of the reference material USGS Nod P-1, and an independent measurement of the Mn concentration. ?? 1989.

  7. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-15

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  8. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  9. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for analysis of pellets of plant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Marcos S.; Schenk, Emily R.; Santos, Dário; Krug, Francisco José; Almirall, José R.

    An evaluation of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (LAICP OES) for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. Ground leaves of orange citrus, soy and sugarcane were comminuted using a high-speed ball mill, pressed into pellets and sampled directly with laser ablation and analyzed by ICP OES. The limits of detection (LODs) for the method ranged from as low as 0.1 mg kg- 1 for Zn to as high as 94 mg kg- 1 for K but were generally below 6 mg kg- 1 for most of the elements of interest. A certified reference material consisting of a similar matrix (NIST SRM 1547 peach leaves) was used to check the accuracy of the calibration and the reported method resulted in an average bias of ~ 5% for all the elements of interest. The precision for the reported method ranged from as low as 4% relative standard deviation (RSD) for Mn to as high as 17% RSD for Zn but averaged ~ 6.5% RSD for all the elements (n = 10). The proposed method was tested for the determination of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained for the corresponding acid digests by ICP-OES, no differences being observed by applying a paired t-test at the 95% confidence level. The reported direct solid sampling method provides a fast alternative to acid digestion that results in similar and appropriate analytical figures of merit with regard to sensitivity, accuracy and precision for plant material analysis.

  10. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-Based Structural Health Sensing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Smits, Jan M.; Williams, Phillip A.

    2004-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based materials represent the future aerospace vehicle construction material of choice based primarily on predicted strength-to-weight advantages and inherent multifunctionality. The multifunctionality of SWCNTs arises from the ability of the nanotubes to be either metallic or semi-conducting based on their chirality. Furthermore, simply changing the environment around a SWCNT can change its conducting behavior. This phenomenon is being exploited to create sensors capable of measuring several parameters related to vehicle structural health (i.e. strain, pressure, temperature, etc.) The structural health monitor is constructed using conventional electron-beam lithographic and photolithographic techniques to place specific electrode patterns on a surface. SWCNTs are then deposited between the electrodes using a dielectrophoretic alignment technique. Prototypes have been constructed on both silicon and polyimide substrates, demonstrating that surface-mountable and multifunctional devices based on SWCNTs can be realized.

  11. Subscale Testing of Nozzle Ablative Materials in a Supersonic Particle Impingement Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howse, S.; Lawrence, T.

    2004-01-01

    Recent efforts to evaluate materials to replace the current NARC rayon used in the nozzle ablative of the NASA's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (SRM), several tests were developed to look at the performance of supersonic particle impact region of the aft exit cone. It was seen in early testing that some potential candidates did not perform as well as the current NARC based material and so the 24 inch Solid Rocket Motor (SRTM) exit cone design was extended and contoured to induce particle impingement in the aft end. The SRTM testing provided a larger testbed to evaluate the results seen in the Solid Fuel Supersonic Blast Tube. Testing was performed in each test bed on two variants of the final two candidate materials. The materials were a standard prewoven Lyocell, a postwoven Lyocell, an Enka rayon, and Enka rayon processed at a higher carbonization temperature. This paper presents the results of the four materials in the SSBT and the SRTM tests as compared against the NARC baseline. Erosion, char, and plylift results are discussed in detail.

  12. Modeling Initial Stage of Ablation Material Pyrolysis: Graphitic Precursor Formation and Interfacial Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Tapan G.; Lawson, John W.; Keblinski, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    Reactive molecular dynamics simulations are used to study initial stage of pyrolysis of ablation materials and their composites with carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers. The products formed during pyrolysis are characterized and water is found as the primary product in all cases. The water formation mechanisms are analyzed and the value of the activation energy for water formation is estimated. A detailed study on graphitic precursor formation reveals the presence of two temperature zones. In the lower temperature zone (less than 2000 K) polymerization occurs resulting in formation of large, stable graphitic precursors, and in the high temperature zone (greater than 2000 K) polymer scission results in formation of short polymer chains/molecules. Simulations performed in the high temperature zone on the phenolic resin composites (with carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers) shows that the presence of interfaces had no substantial effect on the chain scission rate or the activation energy value for water formation.

  13. Dynamic materials evaluation by confined plasma ablation and laser-generated shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisley, Dennis L.; Swift, D. C.; Forsman, A. C.; Kyrala, George A.; Johnson, Randall P.; Kopp, Roger A.; Hauer, Allan A.; Wark, Justin S.; Loveridge, A.; Allen, A. M.; Kalantar, Daniel H.

    2000-08-01

    Laser-generated shocks can and have been used to study their effects on single crystal materials during shock compression. While a crystal undergoes shock compression and release, the transient x- ray diffraction (TXD) of the Bragg and Laue signals is indicative of the change in the crystal lattice spacing. The lattice spacing directly relates to the strain in the crystal. From the dynamic lattice data, strain, strain rate, and/or phase change in a material may be determined. Confined ablation plasmas can efficiently launch a flyer plate for direct impact on a target material imparting a well-characterized shock input and generate kilobar to megabar pressure pulses over a wide range of pulse duration (= 20 ns). The laser-launched flyer plates are analogous to those launched by gas guns, but the smaller size provides an experimental method not easily accessible by larger gas gun experiments. With lasers, diagnostic equipment can be easily synchronized to study dynamic material parameters, i.e., single crystal shock dynamics, interfacial bond strengths of thin coatings, grain-interfaces, texture, and high strain rates (106 - 109 sec-1).

  14. Improved model for the angular dependence of excimer laser ablation rates in polymer materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pedder, J. E. A.; Holmes, A. S.; Dyer, P. E.

    2009-10-26

    Measurements of the angle-dependent ablation rates of polymers that have applications in microdevice fabrication are reported. A simple model based on Beer's law, including plume absorption, is shown to give good agreement with the experimental findings for polycarbonate and SU8, ablated using the 193 and 248 nm excimer lasers, respectively. The modeling forms a useful tool for designing masks needed to fabricate complex surface relief by ablation.

  15. Ablation processing of biomedical materials by ultrashort laser pulse ranging from 50 fs through 2 ps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozono, Kazue; Obara, Minoru; Sakuma, Jun

    2003-06-01

    In recent years, femtosecond laser processing of human hard/soft tissues has been studied. Here, we have demonstrated ablation etching of hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is a key component of human tooth and human bone. The human bone is mainly made of hydroxyapatite oriented along the collagen. The micromachining of hydroxyapatite is highly required for orthopedics and dentistry. The important issue is to preserve the chemical property of the ablated surface. If chemical properties of hydroxyapatite change once, the human bone or tooth cannot grow again after laser processing. As for nanosecond laser ablation (for example excimer laser ablation), the relative content of calcium and phosphorus in (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is found to change after laser ablation. We used here pulsewidth tunable output from 50 fs through 2 ps at 820 nm and 1 kpps. We measured calcium spectrum and phosphorus spectrum of the ablated surface of hydroxyapatite by XPS. As a result, the chemical content of calcium and phosphorus is kept unchanged before and after 50-fs - 2-ps laser ablation. We also demonstrated ablation processing of human tooth with Ti:sapphire laser, and precise ablation processing and microstructure fabrication are realized.

  16. Classification of plastic materials by imaging laser-induced ablation plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negre, Erwan; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Pelascini, Frederic; Yu, Jin

    2016-08-01

    A method of rapid classification and identification of plastic materials has been studied in this work. Such method is based on fast spectroscopic imagery of laser-induced ablation plume on plastics to be analyzed. More specifically, a classification schema has been developed first according to the nature of the CC bonds which characterize the polymer matrix. Our results show that the spatial distribution and the evolution of the molecular species in the ablation plume, such as C2 and CN, exhibit clear different behaviors for polymers without any native CC bond, with CC single bonds or with CC double bonds respectively. Therefore the morphological parameters of the populations of the molecular species extracted from the time-resolved spectroscopic images of the plumes provide efficient indicators to classify the polymers characterized by the above mentioned different kinds of CC bonds. When dealing with different polymers with the same kind of CC bond, CC single bond for instance, other indicators should be introduced to provide the further discrimination. Such indicators can be for example a specific native molecular bond other than CC bonds, CN for example, the total emission intensity of which may exhibit specific time evolution. The robustness of the developed classification schema has been then studied with respect to two of the most frequently used additives in plastics fabrication, graphite and titanium. Our results show a negligible influence of these additives in the morphology of the populations of the molecular species when such additives are mixed into the polymer matrix with the percentages usually used in plastics productions, which demonstrates the validity of the developed classification schema for plastics.

  17. Evaulation of B{sub 4}C as an ablator material for NIF capsules. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A.K.; Alford, C.S.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Dittrich, T.R.; Wallace, R.J.; Honea, E.C.; King, C.M.; Steinman, D.

    1997-03-26

    Boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) is examined as a potential fuel container and ablator for implosion capsules on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A capsule of pure B{sub 4}C encasing a layer of solid DT implodes stably and ignites with anticipated NIF x-ray drives, producing 18 MJ of energy. Thin films of B{sub 4}C were found to be resistant to oxidation and modestly transmitting in the infrared (IR), possibly enabling IR fuel characterization and enhancement for thin permeation barriers but not for full-thickness capsules. Polystyrene mandrels 0.5 mm in diameter were successfully coated with 0.15-2.0 micrometers of B{sub 4}C. Thickness estimated from optical density agreed well with those measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The B{sub 4}C microstructure was columnar but finer than for Be made at the same conditions. B{sub 4}C is a very strong material, with a fiber tensile strength capable of holding NIF fill pressures at room temperature, but it is also very brittle, and microscopic flaws or grain structure may limit the noncryogenic fill pressure. Argon (Ar) permeation rates were measured for a few capsules that had been further coated with 5 micrometers of plasma polymer. The B{sub 4}C coatings tended to crack under tensile load. Some shells filled more slowly than they leaked, suggesting that the cracks open and close under opposite pressure loading. As observed earlier for Ti coatings, 0.15-micrometer layers of B{sub 4}C had better gas retention properties than 2-micrometer layers, possibly because of fewer cracks. Permeation and fill strength issues for capsules with a full ablator thickness of B{sub 4}C are unresolved. 21 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Micromachining of optically transparent materials by laser ablation of a solution containing pyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Akira; Niino, Hiroyuki; Wang, Jun

    2001-01-01

    Optically transparent materials such as fused silica, quartz crystal, calcium fluoride, and fluorocarbon polymer were etched upon irradiation of organic solution containing pyrene with a conventional KrF or XeCl excimer laser. Threshold fluences for etching were 240 mJ/cm2 for fused silica, 330 mJ/cm2 for quartz crystal, 740 mJ/cm2 for calcium fluoride, and 45 mJ/cm2 for fluorocarbon polymer. These threshold values were remarkably low compared with those of direct ablation by using conventional lasers. Their etch rates remarkably depended on a concentration of pyrene: the etch rate became higher as the pyrene concentration increased. It means that pyrene molecules play an important role in this process. The mechanisms for this process is discussed by cyclic multiphotonic absorption of pyrene in the excited states, thermal relaxation, and formation of super-heated solution. As the results suggest, the process is based on the combination of two physical processes in the interface between the transparent materials and the liquid: one is a heating process by a super-heated liquid and the other is an attacking process by a high temperature and pressure vapor. The mechanism is also referred to thermal properties of materials.

  19. Advances in laser ablation MC-ICPMS isotopic analysis of rock materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. D.

    2007-12-01

    single-step equilibrium processes to 0.510 or even lower for kinetic processes. Rayleigh fractionation involving a kinetic process with a single-step β of 0.510 produces an effective β of 0.512. Such differences in fractionation laws can be crucial for determining excesses or deficits in isotopes relative to mass fractionation. Contrary to some assertions, Si isotope ratios can be measured with high accuracy and precision using 193 nm excimer lasers with nanosecond pulse widths (Shahar and Young, 2007). Silicon isotope ratios in CAIs measured by 193 nm LA-MC-ICPMS have been combined with Mg isotope ratios to constrain the astrophysical environments in which these oldest solar system materials formed. Accuracy of the measurements was determined using gravimetric standards of various matrix compositions. The results establish that matrix effects for Si are below detection at the ± 0.2 ‰ precision of the laser ablation technique. High mass resolving power (m/Δ m ~ 9000) is necessary to obtain accurate Si isotope ratios by laser ablation. High-precision LA-MC-ICPMS measurements of 176Hf/177Hf in zircons can be obtained by normalizing to 179Hf/177Hf assuming an exponential fractionation law and no mass-dependent Hf, Lu, or Yb stable isotope fractionation. With corrections for interfering 176Lu and 176Yb precision for this method can be on the order of 0.3 epsilon (0.03 ‰). The approach has been used to infer the existence of continental crust on Earth 4.4 billion years before present (Harrison et al., 2005).

  20. Extinction characterization of soot produced by laser ablating carbon fiber composite materials in air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiping; Ma, Zhiliang; Zhang, Zhenrong; Zhou, Menglian; Wei, Chenghua

    2015-05-01

    In order to research the dynamic process of energy coupling between an incident laser and a carbon fiber/epoxy resin composite material, an extinction characterization analysis of soot, which is produced by laser ablating and located in an air flow that is tangential to the surface of the composite material, is carried out. By the theory analyses, a relationship of mass extinction coefficient and extinction cross section of the soot is derived. It is obtained that the mass extinction coefficients of soot aggregates are the same as those of the primary particles when they contain only a few primary particles. This conclusion is significant when the soot is located in an air flow field, where the generations of the big soot aggregates are suppressed. A verification experiment is designed. The experiment employs Laser Induced Incandescence technology and laser extinction method for the soot synchronization diagnosis. It can derive a temporal curve of the mass extinction coefficient from the soot concentration and laser transmittance. The experiment results show that the mass extinction coefficient becomes smaller when the air flow velocity is higher. The reason is due to the decrease of the scatter effects of the soot particles. The experiment results agree with the theory analysis conclusion.

  1. The kinetics of reaction of the by-products of ablative materials at high temperatures and the rate of heat transfer between hot surfaces and reactive gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spokes, G. N.; Beadle, P. C.; Gac, N. A.; Golden, D. M.; King, K. D.; Benson, S. W.

    1971-01-01

    Research has been conducted by means of laboratory experiments to enhance understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions taking place during ablative processes that accompany the reentry or manned space vehicles into planetary atmospheres. Fundamental mechanisms of those chemical reactions believed to be important in the thermal degradation of ablative plastic heat shield materials, and the gases evolved, are described.

  2. Performance of a Light-Weight Ablative Thermal Protection Material for the Stardust Mission Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covington, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    New tests and analyses are reported that were carried out to resolve testing uncertainties in the original development and qualification of a lightweight ablative material used for the Stardust spacecraft forebody heat shield. These additional arcjet tests and analyses confirmed the ablative and thermal performance of low density Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) material used for the Stardust design. Testing was done under conditions that simulate the peak convective heating conditions (1200 W/cm2 and 0.5 atm) expected during Earth entry of the Stardust Sample Return Capsule. Test data and predictions from an ablative material response computer code for the in-depth temperatures were compared to guide iterative adjustment of material thermophysical properties used in the code so that the measured and predicted temperatures agreed. The PICA recession rates and maximum internal temperatures were satisfactorily predicted by the computer code with the revised properties. Predicted recession rates were also in acceptable agreement with measured rates for heating conditions 37% greater than the nominal peak heating rate of 1200 W/sq cm. The measured in-depth temperature response data show consistent temperature rise deviations that may be caused by an undocumented endothermic process within the PICA material that is not accurately modeled by the computer code. Predictions of the Stardust heat shield performance based on the present evaluation provide evidence that the maximum adhesive bondline temperature will be much lower than the maximum allowable of 250 C and an earlier design prediction. The re-evaluation also suggests that even with a 25 percent increase in peak heating rates, the total recession of the heat shield would be a small fraction of the as-designed thickness. These results give confidence in the Stardust heat shield design and confirm the potential of PICA material for use in new planetary probe and sample return applications.

  3. 1-D Transient Thermal Modeling of an Ablative Material (MCC-1) Exposed to a Simulated Convective Titan 4 Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinarts, Thomas R.; Crain, William K.; Stuckey, C. Irvin; Palko, Richard L.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the work is to demonstrate that the flat test panel substrate temperatures are consistent with analysis predictions for MCC-1 applied to a aluminum substrate. The testing was performed in an aerothermal facility on samples of three different thicknesses of MCC-1 on an aluminum substrate. The results of the test were compared with a Transient Thermal model. The key assumptions of the Transient Thermal model were: (1) a one-dimensional heat transfer; (2) a constant ablation recession rate (determined from pre and post-test measurements); (3) ablation temperature of 540 degrees F; (4) Char left behind the ablation front; and (5) temperature jump correction for incident heat transfer coefficient. Two methods were used to model the heating of bare MCC-1: (1) Directly input surface temperature as a function of time; and (2) Aerothermal heating using calibration plate data and subtracting the radiation losses to tunnel walls. The results are presented as graphs. This article is presented in Viewgraph format.

  4. Development and Analysis of Synthetic Composite Materials Emulating Patient AAA Wall Material Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margossian, Christa M.

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) rupture accounts for 14,000 deaths a year in the United States. Since the number of ruptures has not decreased significantly in recent years despite improvements in imaging and surgical procedures, there is a need for an accurate, noninvasive technique capable of establishing rupture risk for specific patients and discriminating lesions at high risk. In this project, synthetic composite materials replicating patient-specific wall stiffness and strength were developed and their material properties evaluated. Composites utilizing various fibers were developed to give a range of stiffness from 1825.75 kPa up through 8187.64 kPa with one base material, Sylgard 170. A range of strength from 631.12 kPa to 1083 kPa with the same base material was also found. By evaluating various base materials and various reinforcing fibers, a catalogue of stiffnesses and strengths was started to allow for adaptation to specific patient properties. Three specific patient properties were well-matched with two composites fabricated: silk thread-reinforced Sylgard 170 and silk thread-reinforced Dragon Skin 20. The composites showed similar stiffnesses to the specific patients while reaching target stresses at particular strains. Not all patients were matched with composites as of yet, but recommendations for future matches are able to be determined. These composites will allow for the future evaluation of flow-induced wall stresses in models replicating patient material properties and geometries.

  5. Dissociation along the principal Hugoniot of the Laser Mégajoule ablator material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin-Lalu, P.; Recoules, V.; Salin, G.; Plisson, T.; Brambrink, E.; Vinci, T.; Bolis, R.; Huser, G.

    2016-08-01

    Glow discharge polymer hydrocarbon (GDP-CH) is used as the ablator material in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules for the Laser Mégajoule and National Ignition Facility. Due to its fabrication process, GDP-CH chemical composition and structure differ from commercially available plastics and detailed knowledge of its properties in the warm dense matter regime is needed to achieve accurate design of ICF capsules. First-principles ab initio simulations of the GDP-CH principal Hugoniot up to 8 Mbar were performed using the quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) code abinit and showed that atomic bond dissociation has an effect on the compressibility. Results from these simulations are used to parametrize a quantum semiempirical model in order to generate a tabulated equation of state that includes dissociation. Hugoniot measurements obtained from an experiment conducted at the LULI2000 laser facility confirm QMD simulations as well as EOS modeling. We conclude by showing the EOS model influence on shock timing in a hydrodynamic simulation.

  6. Propagation in atmosphere of ablated material from femtosecond laser machining of fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Trevor; Canfield, Brian; Davis, Lloyd

    2014-03-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses provide a means to machine structures with small heat-affected areas through highly non-linear mechanisms that enable direct writing of nanoscale features, which can be applied for fabricating a range of devices, including micro-optics and micro-fluidics. A single, tightly focused ultrashort pulse induces extreme conditions on sub-picosecond time-scales and forms a region of expanding plasma beyond the focal region. This plasma, which typically limits the depth of the nanoscale features to create shallow craters, results in the ejection of micro/nano-particles. The generation and use of these particles have a large range of applications in nanotechnology. We have studied the propagation, in atmosphere, of micro/nano particles ejected using single pulses from a 100 fs, 800 nm laser tightly focused with either a line or spot profile near the back surface of a fused silica substrate. The substrate was translated such that a fresh portion was ablated with each pulse. Time-gated images of the ejected material were taken using an intensified charged coupled device camera with additional illumination along the axial direction. Physical mechanisms and experimental results to date will be discussed.

  7. Dissociation along the principal Hugoniot of the Laser Mégajoule ablator material.

    PubMed

    Colin-Lalu, P; Recoules, V; Salin, G; Plisson, T; Brambrink, E; Vinci, T; Bolis, R; Huser, G

    2016-08-01

    Glow discharge polymer hydrocarbon (GDP-CH) is used as the ablator material in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules for the Laser Mégajoule and National Ignition Facility. Due to its fabrication process, GDP-CH chemical composition and structure differ from commercially available plastics and detailed knowledge of its properties in the warm dense matter regime is needed to achieve accurate design of ICF capsules. First-principles ab initio simulations of the GDP-CH principal Hugoniot up to 8 Mbar were performed using the quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) code abinit and showed that atomic bond dissociation has an effect on the compressibility. Results from these simulations are used to parametrize a quantum semiempirical model in order to generate a tabulated equation of state that includes dissociation. Hugoniot measurements obtained from an experiment conducted at the LULI2000 laser facility confirm QMD simulations as well as EOS modeling. We conclude by showing the EOS model influence on shock timing in a hydrodynamic simulation. PMID:27627404

  8. Laser ablation plasmas for diagnostics of structured electronic and optical materials during or after laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; González, Jhanis J.

    2012-03-01

    Laser induced plasma can be used for rapid optical diagnostics of electronic, optical, electro-optical, electromechanical and other structures. Plasma monitoring and diagnostics can be realized during laser processing in real time by means of measuring optical emission that originates from the pulsed laser-material interaction. In post-process applications, e.g., quality assurance and quality control, surface raster scanning and depth profiling can be realized with high spatial resolution (~10 nm in depth and ~3 μm lateral). Commercial instruments based on laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) are available for these purposes. Since only a laser beam comes in direct contact with the sample, such diagnostics are sterile and non-disruptive, and can be performed at a distance, e.g. through a window. The technique enables rapid micro-localized chemical analysis without a need for sample preparation, dissolution or evacuation of samples, thus it is particularly beneficial in fabrication of thin films and structures, such as electronic, photovoltaic and electro-optical devices or circuits of devices. Spectrum acquisition from a single laser shot provides detection limits for metal traces of ~10 μg/g, which can be further improved by accumulating signal from multiple laser pulses. LIBS detection limit for Br in polyethylene is 90 μg/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation (halogen detection is a requirement for semiconductor package materials). Three to four orders of magnitude lower detection limits can be obtained with a femtosecond laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS), which is also provided on commercial basis. Laser repetition rate is currently up to 20 Hz in LIBS instruments and up to 100 kHz in LA-ICP-MS.

  9. Basic ablation phenomena during laser thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Shearin, Alan; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents studies of microsecond ablation phenomena that take place during laser thrombolysis. The main goals were to optimize laser parameters for efficient ablation, and to investigate the ablation mechanism. Gelatin containing an absorbing dye was used as the clot model. A parametric study was performed to identify the optimal wavelength, spot size, pulse energies, and repetition rate for maximum material removal. The minimum radiant exposures to achieve ablation at any wavelength were measured. The results suggest that most visible wavelengths were equally efficient at removing material at radiant exposures above threshold. Ablation was initiated at surface temperatures just above 100 degrees Celsius. A vapor bubble was formed during ablation. Less than 5% of the total pulse energy is coupled into the bubble energy. A large part of the delivered energy is unaccounted for and is likely released partly as acoustic transients from the vapor expansion and partly wasted as heat. The current laser and delivery systems may not be able to completely remove large clot burden that is sometimes encountered in heart attacks. However, laser thrombolysis may emerge as a favored treatment for strokes where the occlusion is generally smaller and rapid recanalization is of paramount importance. A final hypothesis is that laser thrombolysis should be done at radiant exposures close to threshold to minimize any damaging effects of the bubble dynamics on the vessel wall.

  10. 29 CFR 1926.856 - Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment. 1926....856 Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment. (a) Mechanical equipment shall not be used on floors or working surfaces unless such floors or surfaces are of sufficient strength to...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.856 - Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment. 1926....856 Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment. (a) Mechanical equipment shall not be used on floors or working surfaces unless such floors or surfaces are of sufficient strength to...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.856 - Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....856 Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment. (a) Mechanical equipment shall not be used on floors or working surfaces unless such floors or surfaces are of sufficient strength to support... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment....

  13. 29 CFR 1926.856 - Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment. 1926....856 Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment. (a) Mechanical equipment shall not be used on floors or working surfaces unless such floors or surfaces are of sufficient strength to...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.856 - Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment. 1926....856 Removal of walls, floors, and material with equipment. (a) Mechanical equipment shall not be used on floors or working surfaces unless such floors or surfaces are of sufficient strength to...

  15. High-resolution chemical depth profiling of solid material using a miniature laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike B; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2015-02-17

    High-resolution chemical depth profiling measurements of copper films are presented. The 10 μm thick copper test samples were electrodeposited on a Si-supported Cu seed under galvanostatic conditions in the presence of particular plating additives (SPS, Imep, PEI, and PAG) used in the semiconductor industry for the on-chip metallization of interconnects. To probe the trend of these plating additives toward inclusion into the deposit upon growth, quantitative elemental mass spectrometric measurements at trace level concentration were conducted by using a sensitive miniature laser ablation ionization mass spectrometer (LIMS), originally designed and developed for in situ space exploration. An ultrashort pulsed laser system (τ ∼ 190 fs, λ = 775 nm) was used for ablation and ionization of sample material. We show that with our LIMS system, quantitative chemical mass spectrometric analysis with an ablation rate at the subnanometer level per single laser shot can be conducted. The measurement capabilities of our instrument, including the high vertical depth resolution coupled with high detection sensitivity of ∼10 ppb, high dynamic range ≥10(8), measurement accuracy and precision, is of considerable interest in various fields of application, where investigations with high lateral and vertical resolution of the chemical composition of solid materials are required, these include, e.g., wafers from semiconductor industry or studies on space weathered samples in space research.

  16. Investigation of the particle size distribution of the ejected material generated during the single femtosecond laser pulse ablation of aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, Xiaonong

    2014-10-01

    Single femtosecond laser pulses are employed to ablate an aluminium target in vacuum, and the particle size distribution of the ablated material deposited on a mica substrate is examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The recorded AFM images show that these particles have a mean radius of several tens of nanometres. It is also determined that the mean radius of these deposited nanoparticles increases when the laser fluence at the aluminium target increases from 0.44 J/cm2 to 0.63 J/cm2. The mechanism of the laser-induced nanoparticle generation is thought to be photomechanical tensile stress relaxation. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm that the nanoparticles thus produced have the same structure as the bulk aluminium.

  17. Demonstration of the improved rocket efficiency in direct-drive implosions using different ablator materials.

    PubMed

    Michel, D T; Goncharov, V N; Igumenshchev, I V; Epstein, R; Froula, D H

    2013-12-13

    The success of direct-drive implosions depends critically on the ability to create high ablation pressures (∼100  Mbar) and accelerating the imploding shell to ignition-relevant velocities (>3.7×10(7 ) cm/s) using direct laser illumination. This Letter reports on an experimental study of the conversion of absorbed laser energy into kinetic energy of the shell (rocket efficiency) where different ablators were used to vary the ratio of the atomic number to the atomic mass. The implosion velocity of Be shells is increased by 20% compared to C and CH shells in direct-drive implosions when a constant initial target mass is maintained. These measurements are consistent with the predicted increase in the rocket efficiency of 28% for Be and 5% for C compared to a CH ablator.

  18. Evidence for substitutional boron in doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, P.; Pichler, T.; Reppert, J.; Rao, A. M.; Grobosch, M.; Knupfer, M.

    2010-05-03

    Precise determination of acceptors in the laser ablation grown B doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been elusive. Photoemission spectroscopy finds evidence for subpercent substitutional B in this material, which leads to superconductivity in thin film SWNT samples.

  19. Interactions between grape skin cell wall material and commercial enological tannins. Practical implications.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Cano-Lechuga, Mario; Ruiz-García, Yolanda; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2014-01-01

    Commercial enological tannins were used to investigate the role that cell wall material plays in proanthocyanidin adsorption. Insoluble cell wall material, prepared from the skin of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Monastrell berries, was combined with solutions containing six different commercial enological tannins (proanthocyanidin-type tannins). Analysis of the proanthocyanidins in the solution, after fining with cell wall material, using phloroglucinolysis and size exclusion chromatography, provided quantitative and qualitative information on the non-adsorbed compounds. Cell wall material showed strong affinity for the proanthocyanidins, one of the commercial tannins being bound up to 61% in the experiment. Comparison of the molecular mass distribution of the commercial enological tannins in solution, before and after fining, suggested that cell walls affinity for proanthocyanidins was more related with the proanthocyanidin molecular mass than with their percentage of galloylation. These interactions may have some enological implications, especially as regards the time of commercial tannins addition to the must/wine.

  20. Coupled molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo model to study the role of chemical processes during laser ablation of polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Manish; Conforti, Patrick F.; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2007-08-01

    The coarse grained chemical reaction model is enhanced to build a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation framework with an embedded Monte Carlo (MC) based reaction scheme. The MC scheme utilizes predetermined reaction chemistry, energetics, and rate kinetics of materials to incorporate chemical reactions occurring in a substrate into the MD simulation. The kinetics information is utilized to set the probabilities for the types of reactions to perform based on radical survival times and reaction rates. Implementing a reaction involves changing the reactants species types which alters their interaction potentials and thus produces the required energy change. We discuss the application of this method to study the initiation of ultraviolet laser ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate). The use of this scheme enables the modeling of all possible photoexcitation pathways in the polymer. It also permits a direct study of the role of thermal, mechanical, and chemical processes that can set off ablation. We demonstrate that the role of laser induced heating, thermomechanical stresses, pressure wave formation and relaxation, and thermochemical decomposition of the polymer substrate can be investigated directly by suitably choosing the potential energy and chemical reaction energy landscape. The results highlight the usefulness of such a modeling approach by showing that various processes in polymer ablation are intricately linked leading to the transformation of the substrate and its ejection. The method, in principle, can be utilized to study systems where chemical reactions are expected to play a dominant role or interact strongly with other physical processes.

  1. First wall and blanket module safety enhancement by material selection and design decision

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    A thermal/mechanical study has been performed which illustrates the behavior of a fusion reactor first wall and blanket module during a loss of coolant flow event. The relative safety advantages of various material and design options were determined. A generalized first wall-blanket concept was developed to provide the flexibility to vary the structural material (stainless steel vs titanium), coolant (helium vs water), and breeder material (liquid lithium vs solid lithium aluminate). In addition, independent vs common first wall-blanket cooling and coupled adjacent module cooling design options were included in the study. The comparative analyses were performed using a modified thermal analysis code to handle phase change problems.

  2. Summary of SLAC's SEY Measurement On Flat Accelerator Wall Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen /SLAC

    2007-06-08

    The electron cloud effect (ECE) causes beam instabilities in accelerator structures with intense positively charged bunched beams. Reduction of the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the beam pipe inner wall is effective in controlling cloud formation. We summarize SEY results obtained from flat TiN, TiZrV and Al surfaces carried out in a laboratory environment. SEY was measured after thermal conditioning, as well as after low energy, less than 300 eV, particle exposure.

  3. Laser ablation in liquids: an efficient sample preparation technique in ICP elemental analysis of art materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyachkovskaya, E. V.; Kozhukh, N. M.; Muravitskaya, E. V.; Rosantsev, V. A.; Belkov, M. V.; Ershov-Pavlov, E. A.

    2007-06-01

    Laser ablation in liquid media is proposed as a new sample preparation technique in elemental composition analysis of art pigments using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Solid samples are transformed to colloidal solutions of nanosized analyte particles. This makes the technique compatible with convevtional solutionbased standardization. The dissociation of particles in solution is improved, which increases the accuracy of quantitative ICP measurements.

  4. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  5. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  6. Femtosecond laser ablation properties of transparent materials: impact of the laser process parameters on the machining throughput

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matylitsky, V. V.; Hendricks, F.; Aus der Au, J.

    2013-03-01

    High average power, high repetition rate femtosecond lasers with μJ pulse energies are increasingly used for bio-medical and material processing applications. With the introduction of femtosecond laser systems such as the SpiritTM platform developed by High Q Lasers and Spectra-Physics, micro-processing of solid targets with femtosecond laser pulses have obtained new perspectives for industrial applications [1]. The unique advantage of material processing with subpicosecond lasers is efficient, fast and localized energy deposition, which leads to high ablation efficiency and accuracy in nearly all kinds of solid materials. The study on the impact of the laser processing parameters on the removal rate for transparent substrate using femtosecond laser pulses will be presented. In particular, examples of micro-processing of poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) - bio-degradable polyester and XensationTM glass (Schott) machined with SpiritTM ultrafast laser will be shown.

  7. Multiple exciton generation induced enhancement of the photoresponse of pulsed-laser-ablation synthesized single-wall-carbon-nanotube/PbS-quantum-dots nanohybrids

    PubMed Central

    Ka, Ibrahima; Le Borgne, Vincent; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Ma, Dongling; El Khakani, My Ali

    2016-01-01

    The pulsed laser deposition method was used to decorate appropriately single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with PbS quantum dots (QDs), leading to the formation of a novel class of SWCNTs/PbS-QDs nanohybrids (NHs), without resorting to any ligand engineering and/or surface functionalization. The number of laser ablation pulses (NLp) was used to control the average size of the PbS-QDs and their coverage on the SWCNTs’ surface. Photoconductive (PC) devices fabricated from these SWCNTs/PbS-QDs NHs have shown a significantly enhanced photoresponse, which is found to be PbS-QD size dependent. Wavelength-resolved photocurrent measurements revealed a strong photoconductivity of the NHs in the UV-visible region, which is shown to be due to multiple exciton generation (MEG) in the PbS-QDs. For the 6.5 nm-diameter PbS-QDs (with a bandgap (Eg) = 0.86 eV), the MEG contribution of the NHs based PC devices was shown to lead to a normalized internal quantum efficiency in excess of 300% for photon energies ≥4.5Eg. While the lowest MEG threshold in our NHs based PC devices is found to be of ~2.5Eg, the MEG efficiency reaches values as high as 0.9 ± 0.1. PMID:26830452

  8. Multiple exciton generation induced enhancement of the photoresponse of pulsed-laser-ablation synthesized single-wall-carbon-nanotube/PbS-quantum-dots nanohybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ka, Ibrahima; Le Borgne, Vincent; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Ma, Dongling; El Khakani, My Ali

    2016-02-01

    The pulsed laser deposition method was used to decorate appropriately single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with PbS quantum dots (QDs), leading to the formation of a novel class of SWCNTs/PbS-QDs nanohybrids (NHs), without resorting to any ligand engineering and/or surface functionalization. The number of laser ablation pulses (NLp) was used to control the average size of the PbS-QDs and their coverage on the SWCNTs’ surface. Photoconductive (PC) devices fabricated from these SWCNTs/PbS-QDs NHs have shown a significantly enhanced photoresponse, which is found to be PbS-QD size dependent. Wavelength-resolved photocurrent measurements revealed a strong photoconductivity of the NHs in the UV-visible region, which is shown to be due to multiple exciton generation (MEG) in the PbS-QDs. For the 6.5 nm-diameter PbS-QDs (with a bandgap (Eg) = 0.86 eV), the MEG contribution of the NHs based PC devices was shown to lead to a normalized internal quantum efficiency in excess of 300% for photon energies ≥4.5Eg. While the lowest MEG threshold in our NHs based PC devices is found to be of ~2.5Eg, the MEG efficiency reaches values as high as 0.9 ± 0.1.

  9. Multiple exciton generation induced enhancement of the photoresponse of pulsed-laser-ablation synthesized single-wall-carbon-nanotube/PbS-quantum-dots nanohybrids.

    PubMed

    Ka, Ibrahima; Le Borgne, Vincent; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Ma, Dongling; El Khakani, My Ali

    2016-01-01

    The pulsed laser deposition method was used to decorate appropriately single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with PbS quantum dots (QDs), leading to the formation of a novel class of SWCNTs/PbS-QDs nanohybrids (NHs), without resorting to any ligand engineering and/or surface functionalization. The number of laser ablation pulses (NLp) was used to control the average size of the PbS-QDs and their coverage on the SWCNTs' surface. Photoconductive (PC) devices fabricated from these SWCNTs/PbS-QDs NHs have shown a significantly enhanced photoresponse, which is found to be PbS-QD size dependent. Wavelength-resolved photocurrent measurements revealed a strong photoconductivity of the NHs in the UV-visible region, which is shown to be due to multiple exciton generation (MEG) in the PbS-QDs. For the 6.5 nm-diameter PbS-QDs (with a bandgap (Eg) = 0.86 eV), the MEG contribution of the NHs based PC devices was shown to lead to a normalized internal quantum efficiency in excess of 300% for photon energies ≥4.5Eg. While the lowest MEG threshold in our NHs based PC devices is found to be of ~2.5Eg, the MEG efficiency reaches values as high as 0.9 ± 0.1. PMID:26830452

  10. Organic materials in the wall paintings in Pompei: a case study of Insula del Centenario

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The present research concerns the Roman wall paintings preserved at Insula del Centenario (IX, 8), the important Pompeian block situated in the Regio IX, along Via di Nola. Results The aims of this research are two: to verify the presence of lipidic and proteinaceous material to spread the pigments, and to identify organic matter in painting materials owing to previous restoration works. The samples collected from the wall paintings of different rooms have been investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), and Gas Chromatography/ Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). Conclusions The analytical results show that these Roman wall paintings were realized without the use of lipidic and proteinaceous materials, supposedly in fresco technique. Moreover, it was detected that wax, egg, and animal glue were used in previous restoration works for protective purpose and to restore the wall paintings to their original brilliant colours. PMID:23006771

  11. Recognition of wall materials through active thermography coupled with numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Pietrarca, Francesca; Mameli, Mauro; Filippeschi, Sauro; Fantozzi, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of historical buildings, wall thickness as well as wall constituents are not often known a priori, and active IR thermography can be exploited as a nonintrusive method for detecting what kind of material lies beneath the external plaster layer. In the present work, the wall of a historical building is subjected to a heating stimulus, and the surface temperature temporal trend is recorded by an IR camera. A hybrid numerical model is developed in order to simulate the transient thermal response of a wall made of different known materials underneath the plaster layer. When the numerical thermal contrast and the appearance time match with the experimental thermal images, the material underneath the plaster can be qualitatively identified. PMID:27607254

  12. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

    2013-03-12

    Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

  13. Wall-collision line broadening of molecular oxygen within nanoporous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Can T.; Lewander, Maerta; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Svensson, Tomas; Svanberg, Sune; Adolfsson, Erik

    2011-10-15

    Wall-collision broadening of near-infrared absorption lines of molecular oxygen confined in nanoporous zirconia is studied by employing high-resolution diode-laser spectroscopy. The broadening is studied for pores of different sizes under a range of pressures, providing new insights on how wall collisions and intermolecular collisions influence the total spectroscopic line profile. The pressure series show that wall-collision broadening is relatively more prominent under reduced pressures, enabling sensitive means to probe pore sizes of porous materials. In addition, we show that the total wall-collision-broadened profile strongly deviates from a Voigt profile and that wall-collision broadening exhibits an additive-like behavior to the pressure and Doppler broadening.

  14. Selective Laser Ablation of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus with IgG Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mocan, Lucian; Ilie, Ioana; Tabaran, Flaviu A; Iancu, Cornel; Mosteanu, Ofelia; Pop, Teodora; Zdrehus, Claudiu; Bartos, Dana; Mocan, Teodora; Matea, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    Severe infections caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other bacteria are responsible for millions of deaths each year. One of the main objectives of future antibiotic strategies is to develop new anti-infective agents, which would be highly effective and drug-resistant (antimicrobial resistance being currently exhibited by MRSA), using specific antibodies conjugated to thermally active nanomaterials such as NIR-responsive photothermal contrast agents. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) covalently functionalized with immunoglobulin G (IgG, an antagonist of Staphylococcal protein A-SpA, which is a MRSA membrane associated protein) were selectively delivered (at various concentrations and incubation times) into MRSA bacteria. Following treatment, cultures were irradiated using an 808 nm 2 w laser diode. The post irradiation death rate ranged from 39.6% (for 1 mg/L) to 79.2% (for 50 mg/L) at 60 seconds (p < 0.001), while at 30 minutes, the death rate increased from 45.2% (1 mg/L) to 85.72% (50 mg/L), p < 0.001. Irradiated MRSAs treated with MWCNTs alone (control) for 60 seconds and 30 minutes, at concentrations ranging from 1 mg/L to 50 mg/L, resulted in significantly lower death rates (7.1-34.1% for 60 seconds, 11.7-48.8% for 30 minutes). Using IgG molecules bound to MWCNTs, followed by laser irradiation, we obtained a very efficacious nanoshell-mediated laser therapy of individual MRSA agents providing highly localized killing effects for IgG-MWCNTs targeted bacteria.

  15. Influence of Wall Material on VUV Emission from Hydrogen Plasma in H- Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacal, M.; Glass-Maujean, M.; Ivanov, A. A., Jr; Nishiura, M.; Sasao, M.; Wada, M.

    2002-11-01

    The study of VUV emission from a hydrogen plasma produced in a filament discharge in a magnetic multicusp device showed that the use of tantalum and tungsten filaments leads to significant differences in the spectra. The effect of the filament material is interpreted in terms of the fresh film of this material, deposited on the wall. The synthetic spectrum convoluted with our apparatus function for the conditions of this experiment (gas temperature 500 K, electron energy 100 eV) agrees roughly well with the spectrum obtained with tungsten covered walls, but not with the spectrum obtained with tantalum covered walls. We show that in the case of tungsten covered walls the E-V singlet excitation is indeed a two-step Franck-Condon transition, going through either B or C state from an initial H2 molecule with v"=0, added to a Franck-Condon transition to highly excited states cascading to the B or C states. The excitation process to high v" states in the case of tantalum covered walls is a three step process, in which the first step is the formation by recombinative desorption on the wall of a vibrationally excited molecule with v"=1 or 2, which serves as the initial molecule in the subsequent E-V excitation through the B state. The results indicate a larger recombination coefficient of atoms on the tantalum covered wall.

  16. Molecular simulation of RMM: ordered mesoporous SBA-15 type material having microporous ZSM-5 walls.

    PubMed

    Sonwane, C G; Li, Q

    2005-09-29

    SBA-15 is a novel porous material with uniform size mesopores arranged in a regular pattern. The adjacent mesopores are connected to each other by microporous walls. The major disadvantages of these materials are that the walls are amorphous and have low thermal, hydrothermal, and mechanical stability. Recently, there have been a few attempts to either coat the walls of SBA-15 by microporous crystalline zeolites or to fabricate SBA-15 using CMK-3 in such a way that the walls are made up of ZSM-5. The present work provides a first-ever study of RMM (replicated mesoporous materials, which are SBA-15 like ordered mesoporous materials with walls made up of ZSM-5) using molecular modeling. A random orientation of the unit cells and the distribution of sizes of the supercells located at nucleation sites would be ideal to model the RMM. However, such a study would introduce more uncertainties with regard to voids between the individual supercells, noncrystalline silica, and the location of active sites where the nucleation occurs. In a simpler model studied in the present work, the walls of SBA-15 were made up of regularly arranged ZSM-5 having the same orientation. The structure was characterized by estimating the nitrogen accessible area/volume by Connolly surfaces, small-angle and wide-angle X-ray diffraction patterns, methane adsorption, and ice as a probe to study the pore structure. It was found that RMMs have significantly higher methane adsorption capacity compared to SBA-15 and the majority of methane is adsorbed in the microporous walls of RMM. Further research in the field of RMM is needed to obtain the details of zeolitic wall structure. PMID:16853309

  17. Comparisons of kinetic ablation models for the capillary discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Li Rui; Li Xingwen; Jia Shenli; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2010-07-15

    The properties of kinetic ablation models are considered in this paper. The widely used kinetic ablation model (model-K) only considers monatomic vapor. A revised model (model-Z) was introduced by taking into account the polyatomic vapor's internal degrees of freedom, as well as the temperature dependence of the average particle mass. In this work, both temperature and pressure dependence of average particle mass and the specific heat ratio {gamma} are taken into account, producing an improved version of model-Z (denoted model-Z{sup *}). Ablation data calculated by model-K and model-Z* for two typical capillary materials are presented. Compared to model-K, model-Z* predicts an increased ablation rate at lower plasma temperature and higher plasma density, and a decreased rate for the opposite conditions. Finally, based on the plasma parameters in a typical discharge cycle, all three models are used to calculate the time-dependent ablation rate and the integrated ablated mass. It is found that the main difference between their results arises because of the different average particle masses near the wall surface, and model-Z* is the most accurate for the discharge cycle considered. Further, it is found that the ablation parameters are highly sensitive to the pressure, in particular, through the pressure dependence of average particle mass.

  18. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  19. Synthesis of nanocrystalline material by sputtering and laser ablation at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyub, P.; Chandra, R.; Taneja, P.; Sharma, A. K.; Pinto, R.

    Physical vapor deposition techniques such as sputtering and laser ablation - which are very commonly used in thin film technology - appear to hold much promise for the synthesis of nanocrystalline thin films as well as loosely aggregated nanoparticles. We present a systematic study of the process parameters that facilitate the growth of nanocrystalline metals and oxides. The systems studied include TiO2, ZnO, γ-Al2O3, Cu2O, Ag and Cu. The mean particle size and crystallographic orientation are influenced mainly by the sputtering power, the substrate temperature and the nature, pressure and flow rate of the sputtering gas. In general, nanocrystalline thin films were formed at or close to 300 K, while loosely adhering nanoparticles were deposited at lower temperatures.

  20. [Progress in the application of laser ablation ICP-MS to surface microanalysis in material science].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Jia, Yun-hai; Chen, Ji-wen; Shen, Xue-jing; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Leiz; Li, Dong-ling; Hang, Peng-cheng; Zhao, Zhen; Fan, Wan-lun; Wang, Hai-zhou

    2014-08-01

    In the present paper, apparatus and theory of surface analysis is introduced, and the progress in the application of laser ablation ICP-MS to microanalysis in ferrous, nonferrous and semiconductor field is reviewed in detail. Compared with traditional surface analytical tools, such as SEM/EDS (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrum), EPMA (electron probe microanalysis analysis), AES (auger energy spectrum), etc. the advantage is little or no sample preparation, adjustable spatial resolution according to analytical demand, multi-element analysis and high sensitivity. It is now a powerful complementary method to traditional surface analytical tool. With the development of LA-ICP-MS technology maturing, more and more analytical workers will use this powerful tool in the future, and LA-ICP-MS will be a super star in elemental analysis field just like LIBS (Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy).

  1. Mineralogical determination in situ of a highly heterogeneous material using a miniaturized laser ablation mass spectrometer with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubeck, Anna; Tulej, Marek; Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Riedo, Andreas; McMahon, Sean; Wurz, Peter; Bengtson, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Techniques enabling in situ elemental and mineralogical analysis on extraterrestrial planets are strongly required for upcoming missions and are being continuously developed. There is ample need for quantitative and high-sensitivity analysis of elemental as well as isotopic composition of heterogeneous materials. Here we present in situ spatial and depth elemental profiles of a heterogeneous rock sample on a depth-scale of nanometres using a miniaturized laser ablation mass spectrometer (LMS) designed for planetary space missions. We show that the LMS spectra alone could provide highly detailed compositional, three-dimensional information and oxidation properties of a natural, heterogeneous rock sample. We also show that a combination of the LMS and Raman spectroscopy provide comprehensive mineralogical details of the investigated sample. These findings are of great importance for future space missions where quick, in situ determination of the mineralogy could play a role in the process of selecting a suitable spot for drilling.

  2. Experience with wall materials in jet and implications for a future ignited tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebut, P. H.; Dietz, K. J.; Lallia, P. P.

    1989-04-01

    A variety of materials have been used in JET for wall protection and high heat flux components. The machine initially operated with metallic walls, but the inner surface of the vessel ( ~ 200 m2) is now covered to more than 50% with fine grain and carbon fibre reinforced graphite tiles. The remaining wall area is carbonized. This paper presents the materials behaviour in the presence of plasma; their influence on plasma properties; the conditioning methods employed; a discussion of future enhancements of inner wall components and the planned use of beryllium as an alternative to the present concept of an allgraphite machine. It is essential for the further development of fusion that the experience gained in JET is transferred to the next machine, which should produce a burning plasma on a scale comparable to a reactor. Such a proposed machine is a single null divertor tokamak with the following parameters: 3 m plasma minor radius, 7.5 m major radius, elongation ~ 2, aspect ratio ~ 2.5, toroidal field 4.5 T, pulse duration 2000 s and fusion power up to 5 GW. The underlying physics for the choice of these parameters and the basic design is presented. Based on this concept and the experience with materials in JET, the lay-out of inner wall components, as well as possibilities for plasma exhaust and refuelling are discussed. As a consequence of this assessment, open questions with respect to the physics of the plasma edge and materials properties are highlighted.

  3. Textured coatings as first-wall materials : exposure to energetic ions on RHEPP-1.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Brian E.; Renk, Timothy Jerome

    2010-11-01

    The level of energy deposition on future inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor first walls, particularly in direct-drive scenarios, makes the ultimate survivability of such wall materials a challenge. We investigate the survivability of three-dimensional (3-D) dendritic materials fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and exposed to repeated intense helium beam pulses on the RHEPP-1 facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Prior exposures of flat materials have led to what appears to be unacceptable mass loss on timescales insufficient for economical reactor operation. Two potential advantages of such dendritic materials are (a) increased effective surface area, resulting in lowered fluences to most of the wall material surface, and (b) improvement in materials properties for such micro-engineered metals compared to bulk processing. Several dendritic fabrications made with either tungsten and tungsten with rhenium show little or no morphology change after up to 800 pulses of 1 MeV helium at reactor-level thermal wall loading. Since the rhenium is added in a thin surface layer, its use does not appear to raise environmental concerns for fusion designs.

  4. Renewable and functional wood materials by grafting polymerization within cell walls.

    PubMed

    Cabane, Etienne; Keplinger, Tobias; Merk, Vivian; Hass, Philipp; Burgert, Ingo

    2014-04-01

    A "grafting-from" polymerization approach within and at the complex and heterogeneous macromolecular assembly of wood cell walls is shown. The approach allows for the implementation of novel functionalities in renewable and functional wood-based materials. The native wood structure is retained and used as a hierarchical multiscale framework for a modular two-step polymerization process. The versatility and potential of the approach is shown by a polymerization of either hydrophobic or hydrophilic and pH-responsive monomers in the wood structure. Characterization of the modified wood reveals the presence of polymer in the cell wall, and the new properties of these wood materials are discussed.

  5. Laser ablation and high precision patterning of biomaterials and intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Spyratou, E.; Makropoulou, M.

    2010-10-01

    The use of intraocular lenses (IOL) is the most promising method for restoring excellent vision in cataract surgery. In addition, multifocal intraocular lenses for good distant and near vision are investigated. Several new materials, techniques and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses in order to improve their optical properties and reduce the diffractive aberrations. As pulsed laser ablation is well established as a universal tool for surface processing of organic polymer materials, this study was focused in using laser ablation with short and ultra short laser pulses for surface modification of PMMA and intraocular lenses, instead of using other conventional techniques. The main advantage of using very short laser pulses, e.g. of ns, ps or fs duration, is that heat diffusion into the polymer material is negligible. As a result high precision patterning of the sample, without thermal damage of the surroundings, becomes possible. In this study, laser ablation was performed using commercially available hydrophobic acrylic IOLs, hydrophilic acrylic IOLs, and PMMA IOLs, with various diopters. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the phenomenology of the etched patterns by testing the ablation rate, versus laser energy fluence, at several wavelengths and the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM), or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The irradiated polymers have different optical properties, at the applied wavelengths, and therefore, present different ablation behaviour and morphology of the laser ablated crater walls and surrounding surfaces. The experimental results, some theoretical assumptions for mathematical modeling of the relevant ablation mechanisms are discussed.

  6. High-gravity-assisted pulsed laser ablation system for the fabrication of functionally graded material thin film.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, T; Morinaga, S; Nagayama, K

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a novel method for the fabrication of a thin film deposited on an appropriate substrate having a continuous composition gradient. The composition gradient was achieved by a combination of pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of the target material with a very strong acceleration field generated on a moving disk rotating at a very high speed. The PLA process was used to produce a cloud of high-energy particles of the target material that will be deposited on a substrate placed on the rotating disk. After deposition, the particles will diffuse on the surface of the thin film under a strong acceleration field. The high energy of the particles and their diffusion on the substrate surface in a high-vacuum environment produces a macroscopic composition distribution in the thin film. We have constructed an experimental apparatus consisting of a vacuum chamber in which a circular disk made of titanium is driven by a high-frequency inductive motor. An acceleration field of up to 10,000 G can be generated by this apparatus. Functionally graded material thin films of FeSi(2) with a continuous concentration gradient were successfully fabricated by this method under a gravity field of 5400 G. A significant advantage of this method is that it allows us to fabricate graded thin films with a very smooth surface covered by few droplets.

  7. High-gravity-assisted pulsed laser ablation system for the fabrication of functionally graded material thin film.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, T; Morinaga, S; Nagayama, K

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a novel method for the fabrication of a thin film deposited on an appropriate substrate having a continuous composition gradient. The composition gradient was achieved by a combination of pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of the target material with a very strong acceleration field generated on a moving disk rotating at a very high speed. The PLA process was used to produce a cloud of high-energy particles of the target material that will be deposited on a substrate placed on the rotating disk. After deposition, the particles will diffuse on the surface of the thin film under a strong acceleration field. The high energy of the particles and their diffusion on the substrate surface in a high-vacuum environment produces a macroscopic composition distribution in the thin film. We have constructed an experimental apparatus consisting of a vacuum chamber in which a circular disk made of titanium is driven by a high-frequency inductive motor. An acceleration field of up to 10,000 G can be generated by this apparatus. Functionally graded material thin films of FeSi(2) with a continuous concentration gradient were successfully fabricated by this method under a gravity field of 5400 G. A significant advantage of this method is that it allows us to fabricate graded thin films with a very smooth surface covered by few droplets. PMID:19334931

  8. NMR study of domain wall pinning in a magnetically ordered material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleshakov, I. V.; Popov, P. S.; Kuz'min, Yu. I.; Dudkin, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance in the form of spin echo in combination with magnetic field pulses applied to a magnetically ordered material sample offers a convenient tool for studying characteristics of the centers of domain-wall pinning. Possibilities of this method have been demonstrated in experiments with lithium-zinc ferrite.

  9. On-line double isotope dilution laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the quantitative analysis of solid materials.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Beatriz; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; García Alonso, J Ignacio; Malherbe, Julien; García-Fonseca, Sergio; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2014-12-01

    We report on the determination of trace elements in solid samples by the combination of on-line double isotope dilution and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The proposed method requires the sequential analysis of the sample and a certified natural abundance standard by on-line IDMS using the same isotopically-enriched spike solution. In this way, the mass fraction of the analyte in the sample can be directly referred to the certified standard so the previous characterization of the spike solution is not required. To validate the procedure, Sr, Rb and Pb were determined in certified reference materials with different matrices, including silicate glasses (SRM 610, 612 and 614) and powdered samples (PACS-2, SRM 2710a, SRM 1944, SRM 2702 and SRM 2780). The analysis of powdered samples was carried out both by the preparation of pressed pellets and by lithium borate fusion. Experimental results for the analysis of powdered samples were in agreement with the certified values for all materials. Relative standard deviations in the range of 6-21% for pressed pellets and 3-21% for fused solids were obtained from n=3 independent measurements. Minimal sample preparation, data treatment and consumption of the isotopically-enriched isotopes are the main advantages of the method over previously reported approaches.

  10. Laser Ablation Sampling of Materials Directly into the Formed Liquid Microjunction of a Continuous Flow Surface Sampling Probe/Electrospray Ionization Emitter for Mass Spectral Analysis and Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Lorenz, Matthias; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Transmission geometry laser ablation directly into a formed liquid microjunction of a continuous flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe/electrospray ionization emitter was utilized for molecular and elemental detection and mass spectrometry imaging. The ability to efficiently capture and ionize ablated material was demonstrated by the detection of various small soluble n-mers of polyaniline and silver ion solvent clusters formed from laser ablation of electropolymerized polyaniline and silver thin films, respectively. In addition, analysis of surfaces that contain soluble components was accomplished by coating or laminating the sample with an insoluble film to enable liquid junction formation without directly extracting material from the surface. The ability to perform mass spectrometry imaging at a spatial resolution of about 50 m was illustrated by using laminated inked patterns on a microscope slide. In general, these data demonstrate at least an order of magnitude signal enhancement compared to the non-contact, laser ablation droplet capture-based surface sampling/ionization approaches that have been previously presented.

  11. Tungsten carbide precursors as an example for influence of a binder on the particle formation in the nanosecond laser ablation of powdered materials.

    PubMed

    Holá, Markéta; Mikuska, Pavel; Hanzlíková, Renáta; Kaiser, Jozef; Kanický, Viktor

    2010-03-15

    A study of LA-ICP-MS analysis of pressed powdered tungsten carbide precursors was performed to show the advantages and problems of nanosecond laser ablation of matrix-unified samples. Five samples with different compositions were pressed into pellets both with silver powder as a binder serving to keep the matrix unified, and without any binder. The laser ablation was performed by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser working at 213 nm. The particle formation during ablation of both sets of pellets was studied using an optical aerosol spectrometer allowing the measurement of particle concentration in two size ranges (10-250 nm and 0.25-17 microm) and particle size distribution in the range of 0.25-17 microm. Additionally, the structure of the laser-generated particles was studied after their collection on a filter using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the particle chemical composition was determined by an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS). The matrix effect was proved to be reduced using the same silver powdered binder for pellet preparation in the case of the laser ablation of powdered materials. The LA-ICP-MS signal dependence on the element content present in the material showed an improved correlation for Co, Ti, Ta and Nb of the matrix-unified samples compared to the non-matrix-unified pellets. In the case of W, the ICP-MS signal of matrix-unified pellets was influenced by the changes in the particle formation.

  12. Ultrashort pulsed laser (USPL) application in dentistry: basic investigations of ablation rates and thresholds on oral hard tissue and restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Schelle, Florian; Polz, Sebastian; Haloui, Hatim; Braun, Andreas; Dehn, Claudia; Frentzen, Matthias; Meister, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    Modern ultrashort pulse lasers with scanning systems provide a huge set of parameters affecting the suitability for dental applications. The present study investigates thresholds and ablation rates of oral hard tissues and restorative materials with a view towards a clinical application system. The functional system consists of a 10 W Nd:YVO4 laser emitting pulses with a duration of 8 ps at 1,064 nm. Measurements were performed on dentin, enamel, ceramic, composite, and mammoth ivory at a repetition rate of 500 kHz. By employing a scanning system, square-shaped cavities with an edge length of 1 mm were created. Ablation threshold and rate measurements were assessed by variation of the applied fluence. Examinations were carried out employing a scanning electron microscope and optical profilometer. Irradiation time was recorded by the scanner software in order to calculate the overall ablated volume per time. First high power ablation rate measurements were performed employing a laser source with up to 50 W. Threshold values in the range of 0.45 J/cm(2) (composite) to 1.54 J/cm(2) (enamel) were observed. Differences between any two materials are statistically significant (p < 0.05). Preparation speeds up to 37.53 mm(3)/min (composite) were achieved with the 10 W laser source and differed statistically significant for any two materials (p < 0.05) with the exception of dentin and mammoth ivory (p > 0.05). By employing the 50 W laser source, increased rates up to ∼50 mm(3)/min for dentin were obtained. The results indicate that modern USPL systems provide sufficient ablation rates to be seen as a promising technology for dental applications.

  13. Thermal performance and radio-frequency transmissivity of candidate ablation materials for S-band antenna window application on manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tillian, D. J.; Cubley, H. D.

    1970-01-01

    A test program was conducted in the MSC 1.5 MW arc-heated facility to evaluate the thermal performance of ablation materials having potential application as radio frequency windows. These tests were conducted for the improvement of omnidirectional antenna operating characteristics during atmospheric reentry. Since a full scale model of the Apollo command service module was available for antenna tests, this mockup was used as a basic for the tests. Test models were subjected to heating conditions simulating the nominal lunar return trajectory (AS-501) and the design trajectories, high heat load and high heating rate. RF measurements were made before and after the arc jet tests to measure attenuation effects due to the thermal degradation of the materials under consideration. The test program demonstrated that additional development is required in materials technology to achieve an ablative system with both good RF transmission characteristics and thermal-structural integrity.

  14. Simultaneous spatial and temporal focusing of femtosecond pulses: A new paradigm for material processing and tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Erica K.

    Femtosecond lasers are now prolific in many disciplines. While the mechanisms of femtosecond-material interactions are widely understood, femtosecond lasers as industrial and medical tools still have shortcomings. Currently conventional state of the art platforms are unable to support low numerical aperture (NA) beams (that provide large focal volumes and long working distances) without sacrificing axial precision. Furthermore inline (refractive) delivery systems that are necessary for industrial and clinical medical applications are currently hindered by nonlinear effects when delivering femtosecond pulses with tens of microJoule pulse energies and greater. In this thesis Simultaneous Space Time Focusing (SSTF) is presented as a new paradigm to move the field of femtosecond micromachining significantly forward. With this system we have delivered microjoule femtosecond pulses with low numerical aperture geometries (<0.05 NA) with characteristics that are significantly improved compared to standard focusing paradigms. Nonlinear effects that would normally result in focal plane shifts and focal spot distortion are mitigated when SSTF is employed. As a result, it is shown that SSTF will enable surgical implementations that are presently inhibited. Initial ablation experiments of ocular tissue show unprecedented performance with this technique. Implementation of SSTF, in the past, has been overly complicated. Multiple compressors and diffraction gratings resulted in low throughput efficiency. In the second part of this thesis we have focused on significantly streamlining the SSTF design into a flexible, single grating, integrated SSTF/chirped-pulse amplification system with an inline (refractive) delivery system to move towards industrial and clinical medical applications. For the first time this design also allows for variation of the beam aspect ratio of an SSTF beam, and thus the degree of pulse-front tilt at focus, while maintaining a net zero-dispersion system

  15. The Influence of SiC on the Ablation Response of Advanced Refractory Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey D.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In continuing our studies of advanced refractory composite materials we have recently completed an arc-jet test series of a diverse group of ceramics and ceramic matrix composites. The compositions range from continuous fiber reinforced ceramics to monoliths. Many of these materials contain SiC and one objective of this test series was to identify the influence of SiC oxidation mechanisms on material performance. Hence the arc heater was operated at two conditions; one in which the passive oxidation of SiC would be dominant and the other where the active oxidation of SiC would be dominant. It is shown here that the active oxidation mechanism of SiC does not dominate material performance when it is present at levels equal to or below 20 volume percent.

  16. Technique for Evaluating the Erosive Properties of Ablative Internal Insulation Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McComb, J. C.; Hitner, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    A technique for determining the average erosion rate versus Mach number of candidate internal insulation materials was developed for flight motor applications in 12 inch I.D. test firing hardware. The method involved the precision mounting of a mechanical measuring tool within a conical test cartridge fabricated from either a single insulation material or two non-identical materials each of which constituted one half of the test cartridge cone. Comparison of the internal radii measured at nine longitudinal locations and between eight to thirty two azimuths, depending on the regularity of the erosion pattern before and after test firing, permitted calculation of the average erosion rate and Mach number. Systematic criteria were established for identifying erosion anomalies such as the formation of localized ridges and for excluding such anomalies from the calculations. The method is discussed and results presented for several asbestos-free materials developed in-house for the internal motor case insulation in solid propellant rocket motors.

  17. Thrust improvement with ablative insert nozzle extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. M.; Back, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    Aspects are examined of an investigation by the Marshall Space Flight Center into the conceptual feasibility of increasing the thrust performance of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) by using a conical nozzle extension fitted with an ablative insert in order to achieve a low-cost, near-term gain in payload. The ablating insert would provide a controlled increase in nozzle expansion ratio during launch and early climbout (first 30-60 seconds) so as to reduce thrust loss from nozzle over-expansion in the lower atmosphere. Summaries are given of JPL studies in the area of: defining the near-wall flow environment in the extended nozzle insert region; selecting potential insert materials; conceptualizing an extension/insert geometrical configuration; and identifying future experimental efforts necessary to verify the feasibility of the concepts.

  18. Use of a compact fiber optic spectrometer for spectral feedback during the laser ablation of dental hard tissues and restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joyce Y.; Fan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    One perceived disadvantage of caries removal using lasers is the loss of the tactile feedback associated with the handpiece. However, alternative methods of acoustic and optical feedback become available with the laser that can be exploited to provide information about the chemical composition of the material ablated, the ablation efficiency and rate, the depth of the incision, and the surface and plume temperature during ablation. Such information can be used to increase the selectivity of ablation, avoid peripheral thermal damage and excessive heat deposition in the tooth, and provide a mechanism of robotic automation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that a compact fiberoptic spectrometer could be used to differentiate between the ablation of sound and carious enamel and dentin and between dental hard tissues and composite. Sound and carious tooth surfaces along with composite restorative materials were scanned with λ=0.355, 2.79 and 9.3 μm laser pulses at irradiation intensities ranging from 0.5-100 J/cm2 and spectra were acquired from λ=250-900-nm using a compact fiber-optic spectrometer. Emission spectra varied markedly with the laser wavelength and pulse duration. Optical feedback was not successful in differentiating between sound and carious enamel and dentin even with the addition of various chromophores to carious lesion areas. However, the spectral feedback was successfully used to differentiate between composites and sound enamel and dentin enabling the selective removal of composite from tooth surfaces using a computer controlled λ=9.3-μm pulsed CO II laser and scanning system.

  19. Effect of Different Molding Materials on the Thin-Walled Compacted Graphite Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górny, Marcin; Dańko, Rafał; Lelito, Janusz; Kawalec, Magdalena; Sikora, Gabriela

    2016-08-01

    This article addresses the effects of six mold materials used for obtaining thin-walled compacted graphite iron castings with a wall thickness of 3 mm. During this research, the following materials were analyzed: fine silica sand, coarse silica sand, cerabeads, molohite and also insulated materials in the shape of microspheres, including low-density alumina/silica ceramic sand. Granulometric and SEM observations indicate that the sand matrix used in these studies differs in terms of size, homogeneity and shape. This study shows that molds made with insulating sands (microspheres) possess both: thermal conductivity and material mold ability to absorb heat, on average to be more than five times lower compared to those of silica sand. In addition to that, the resultant peak of heat transfer coefficient at the mold/metal interface for microspheres is more than four times lower in comparison with fine silica sand. This is accompanied by a significant decrease in the cooling rate of metal in the mold cavity which promotes the development of compacted graphite in thin-walled castings as well as ferrite fractions in their microstructure.

  20. Effect of Different Molding Materials on the Thin-Walled Compacted Graphite Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górny, Marcin; Dańko, Rafał; Lelito, Janusz; Kawalec, Magdalena; Sikora, Gabriela

    2016-10-01

    This article addresses the effects of six mold materials used for obtaining thin-walled compacted graphite iron castings with a wall thickness of 3 mm. During this research, the following materials were analyzed: fine silica sand, coarse silica sand, cerabeads, molohite and also insulated materials in the shape of microspheres, including low-density alumina/silica ceramic sand. Granulometric and SEM observations indicate that the sand matrix used in these studies differs in terms of size, homogeneity and shape. This study shows that molds made with insulating sands (microspheres) possess both: thermal conductivity and material mold ability to absorb heat, on average to be more than five times lower compared to those of silica sand. In addition to that, the resultant peak of heat transfer coefficient at the mold/metal interface for microspheres is more than four times lower in comparison with fine silica sand. This is accompanied by a significant decrease in the cooling rate of metal in the mold cavity which promotes the development of compacted graphite in thin-walled castings as well as ferrite fractions in their microstructure.

  1. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the

  2. Effect of wall material on the antioxidant activity and physicochemical properties of Rubus fruticosus juice microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Dafne I; Beristain, Cesar I; Azuara, Ebner; Luna, Guadalupe; Jimenez, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus fruticosus) juice possesses compounds with antioxidant activity, which can be protected by different biopolymers used in the microencapsulation. Therefore, the effects of cell wall material including maltodextrin (MD), Arabic gum (GA) and whey protein concentrate (WPC) were evaluated on the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of encapsulated blackberries using a spray-drying technique. Anthocyanin concentration, polymeric colour, total polyphenols, radical scavenging activity of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrilhydrazil radical, reducing power and the stability at different storage conditions were evaluated. GA and MD conferred a similar protection to the antioxidant compounds when the microcapsules were stored at low water activities (aw < 0.515) in contrast to at a high moisture content (aw > 0.902), whereas WPC presented a high protection. Therefore, the selection of the best wall material for blackberry juice encapsulation depends of the conditions of storage of the powder.

  3. Ablation gas dynamics of low-Z materials illuminated by soft x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, S.P.

    1991-09-06

    Though many of our results will have much greater generality, the main purpose of this paper is to provide a simple, accurate, physical theory of what happens when a Planckian spectrum of soft x-rays is incident on one side of the slab of initially cold, dense material, of small nuclear charge Z. Our approach will be to consider in some detail the idealized situation. A semi-infinite (x {le} 0) slab of initially cold (T < 300 K), dense ({rho} {approximately} 1 {minus} 10 g/cc), low-Z (Z < 5) material is suddenly subjected at time t = 0 and thereafter to radiation incoming from x = +{infinity} with a specific intensity in directions toward the slab that is Planckian, characterized by a black-body temperature, T{sub R} in the soft x-ray region.

  4. Aerophytic Cyanobacteria as a Factor in the Biodegradation of Technical Materials on External Building Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piontek, Marlena; Lechów, Hanna

    2014-12-01

    A study conducted at the Institute of Environmental Engineering, University of Zielona Góra showed the presence of 4 species of aerophytic cyanobacteria in the biological material sampled from the external building wall with visible biocorrosion: Gloeocapsa montana Kützing, Phormidium calcareum Kützing, Aphanothece saxicola Nägeli, Gloeothece caldariorum (P. Richter) Hollerbach. High levels of moisture were detected in the places of biofilm occurrence.

  5. Chamber wall materials response to pulsed ions at power-plant level fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, T. J.; Provencio, P. P.; Tanaka, T. J.; Olson, C. L.; Peterson, R. R.; Stolp, J. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Knowles, T. R.

    2005-12-01

    Candidate dry-wall materials for the reactor chambers of future laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plants have been exposed to ion pulses from RHEPP-1, located at Sandia National Laboratories. These pulses simulate the MeV-level ion pulses with fluences of up to 20 J/cm 2 that can be expected to impinge on the first wall of such future plants. Various forms of tungsten and tungsten alloy were subjected to up to 1600 pulses, usually while being heated to 600 °C. Other metals were exposed as well. Thresholds for roughening and material removal, and evolution of surface morphology were measured and compared with code predictions for materials response. Powder-metallurgy (PM) tungsten is observed to undergo surface roughening and subsurface crack formation that evolves over hundreds of pulses, and which can occur both below and above the melt threshold. This roughening is worse than for other metals, and worse than for either tungsten alloyed with rhenium (W25Re), or for CVD and single-crystal forms of tungsten. Carbon, particularly the form used in composite material, appears to suffer material loss well below its sublimation point. Some engineered materials were also investigated. It appears that some modification to PM tungsten is required for its successful use in a reactor environment.

  6. Advanced Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Early NASA missions (Gemini, Apollo, Mars Viking) employed new ablative TPS that were tailored for the entry environment. After 40 years, heritage ablative TPS materials using Viking or Pathfinder era materials are at or near their performance limits and will be inadequate for future exploration missions. Significant advances in TPS materials technology are needed in order to enable any subsequent human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit. This poster summarizes some recent progress at NASA in developing families of advanced rigid/conformable and flexible ablators that could potentially be used for thermal protection in planetary entry missions. In particular the effort focuses technologies required to land heavy (approx.40 metric ton) masses on Mars to facilitate future exploration plans.

  7. Preparation of Silicon Nitride Multilayer Ceramic Radome Material and Optimal Design of the Wall Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Fei; Shen Qiang; Zhang Lianmeng

    2008-02-15

    A study of silicon nitride ceramic radomes, which includes preparation of the material and optimal design of the radome wall structure, is presented in this paper. Multilayer radome wall structure with high dielectric constant skins and a low dielectric constant core layer is used for broadband application. As a candidate material for both the skins and core layer, silicon nitride ceramics of controlled dielectric constant in the range 3.0{approx}7.5 were prepared by adding different content of sintering aids such as magnesia, alumina, silica and zirconium phosphate binder and choosing suitable sintering methods. A computer aided design (CAD) for the wall structure of silicon nitride multilayer ceramic radome based on microwave equivalent network method is carried out according to design requirements. By optimizing the thickness of skins and core layer, the power transmission efficiency of such a multilayer Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic radome is calculated. The calculated results suggest that when the dielectric constant of skins lies in the range 6{approx}7.5 and core layer in the range 3.5{approx}4, the power transmission efficiency is above 85% with frequency of 2{approx}18 GHz while the thickness of skins is less than 0.03{lambda} and the thickness ratio of skins to core layer is less than 1:15.

  8. Effect of Surface Nonequilibrium Thermochemistry in Simulation of Carbon Based Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kang; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates that coupling of a material thermal response code and a flow solver using finite-rate gas/surface interaction model provides time-accurate solutions for multidimensional ablation of carbon based charring ablators. The material thermal response code used in this study is the Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Response and Ablation Program (TITAN), which predicts charring material thermal response and shape change on hypersonic space vehicles. Its governing equations include total energy balance, pyrolysis gas momentum conservation, and a three-component decomposition model. The flow code solves the reacting Navier-Stokes equations using Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) method. Loose coupling between material response and flow codes is performed by solving the surface mass balance in DPLR and the surface energy balance in TITAN. Thus, the material surface recession is predicted by finite-rate gas/surface interaction boundary conditions implemented in DPLR, and the surface temperature and pyrolysis gas injection rate are computed in TITAN. Two sets of gas/surface interaction chemistry between air and carbon surface developed by Park and Zhluktov, respectively, are studied. Coupled fluid-material response analyses of stagnation tests conducted in NASA Ames Research Center arc-jet facilities are considered. The ablating material used in these arc-jet tests was a Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). Computational predictions of in-depth material thermal response and surface recession are compared with the experimental measurements for stagnation cold wall heat flux ranging from 107 to 1100 Watts per square centimeter.

  9. Deposition Mitigation of the First Mirrors Exposed in EAST with Metal and Carbon Mixed Wall Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Rong; Chen, Junling; Chen, Longwei; Zhu, Dahuan

    2014-09-01

    In order to investigate the effect of aperture geometry on deposition mitigation, stainless steel (SS) first mirrors (FMs) were fixed on the holders of protective aperture geometry with different depth-diameter ratios (DDRs) and exposed in the deposition dominated environment of EAST. A baffle was used during the wall conditioning. The surface properties and reflectivity of the FMs were characterized before and after exposure. It is shown that using aperture geometry and a baffle can effectively mitigate the impurities deposition. The degradation of the surface and specular reflectivity of the FMs is reduced with the increase of DDRs in the range of 0 to 2. The main contaminated elements in a low-Z and high-Z mixed wall materials environment were still carbon and oxygen.

  10. Projectile shape and material effects in hypervelocity impact response of dual-wall structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Darzi, Kent

    1992-01-01

    All large spacecraft are susceptible to impacts by meteoroids and pieces of orbiting space debris. These impacts occur at extremely high speeds and can damage flight-critical systems, which can in turn lead to catastrophic failure of the spacecraft. A long-duration spacecraft developed for a mission into this environment must include adequate protection against perforation of pressurized components by such impacts. This paper presents the results of an investigation into the effects of projectile shape and material on the perforation of aluminum dual-wall structural systems. Impact damage is characterized according to the extent of perforation, crater, and spall damage in the structural systems as a result of hypervelocity projectile impact loadings. Analysis of the damage data shows that there are distinct differences in impact damage from cylindrical and spherical projectiles. Projectile density is also found to affect the type and extent of damage sustained by dual-wall structural systems.

  11. Method of measuring material properties of rock in the wall of a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Overmier, David K.

    1985-01-01

    To measure the modulus of elasticity of the rock in the wall of a borehole, a plug is cut in the borehole wall. The plug, its base attached to the surrounding rock, acts as a short column in response to applied forces. A loading piston is applied to the top of the plug and compression of the plug is measured as load is increased. Measurement of piston load and plug longitudinal deformation are made to determine the elastic modulus of the plug material. Poisson's ratio can be determined by simultaneous measurements of longitudinal and lateral deformation of the plug in response to loading. To determine shear modulus, the top of the plug is twisted while measurements are taken of torsional deformation.

  12. Method of measuring material properties of rock in the wall of a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Overmier, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    To measure the modulus of elasticity of the rock in the wall of a borehole, a plug is cut in the borehole wall. The plug, its base attached to the surrounding rock, acts as a short column in response to applied forces. A loading piston is applied to the top of the plug and compression of the plug is measured as load is increased. Measurements of piston load and plug longitudinal deformation are made to determine the elastic modulus of the plug material. Poisson's ratio can be determined by simultaneous measurements of longitudinal and lateral deformation of the plug in response to loading. To determine shear modulus, the top of the plug is twisted while measurements are taken of torsional deformation.

  13. Hydroxide nanoparticles for cultural heritage: consolidation and protection of wall paintings and carbonate materials.

    PubMed

    Chelazzi, David; Poggi, Giovanna; Jaidar, Yareli; Toccafondi, Nicola; Giorgi, Rodorico; Baglioni, Piero

    2013-02-15

    Colloids and Material Science are nowadays providing innovative and effective technological solutions in a wide range of applicative fields. In the last decade, nanomaterials have been specifically designed to ensure the long-term restoration and preservation of movable and immovable artworks. The main tasks to address by conservation scientists concern the cleaning, the deacidification and the consolidation of different kinds of artistic substrates. The aim of the present contribution is to provide an up-to-date overview on the synthesis and preparation of colloidal systems tailored to the consolidation and protection of wall paintings, plasters and stones, highlighting the most recent improvements. Two case studies, widely representative of typical consolidation problems, are presented, i.e. the preservation of wall paintings belonging to a Mesoamerican archeological site and the consolidation of two Italian Renaissance buildings.

  14. Picosecond and subpicosecond visible laser ablation of optically transparent polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Skordoulis, C. D.; Makropoulou, M. I.; Kar, A. K.

    1998-09-01

    The ablation rates, as a function of the laser fluence, of the optically transparent polymers, Nylon-6,6 and PMMA, are reported using picosecond and subpicosecond laser pulses, obtained from a Regenerative Amplified Nd:YAG laser system. The laser pulses had a duration of 100 ps at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths and 0.8 ps at 595 nm. The ablation rate results indicate a strong saturation behaviour for both polymers in the investigated irradiation conditions. The material removal is 2-3 times higher in the case of the visible (532 nm) picosecond laser ablation experiments. The surface topology of the polymers was also studied. The obtained Atomic Force Microscopy images reveal no mechanical damage in the inner ablation crater wall. The qualitative analysis of the ablation mechanism for ultrashort pulse laser irradiation reveals a combination of photochemically induced direct bond dissociation and a photothermal process due to the relaxation of the excited polymers within the vibrational levels of the ground state.

  15. Contribution of wall material to the vibrational excitation and negative ion formation in hydrogen negative ion sources (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacal, M.; Ivanov, A. A.; Glass-Maujean, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Nishiura, M.; Sasao, M.; Wada, M.

    2004-05-01

    The wall production contribution to the negative hydrogen ion formation in multicusp ion sources has been investigated using the photodetachment diagnostic (for determining the negative ion density and temperature), negative ion and electron extraction, and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission spectroscopy. The wall material was modified either by depositing thin films from filaments made of different material or by depositing fresh material of the same filament. Thus we show that a fresh tantalum film leads to enhanced negative ion density and enhanced temperature of the hot negative ion population. The slow poisoning effect due to argon additive also indicates the presence of the wall contribution to H- formation. The study of the VUV spectra with different wall materials indicates the presence of vibrationally excited states of H2.

  16. Methods for TEM analysis of NIST's single-walled carbon nanotube Standard Reference Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Elisabeth; Geiss, Roy; Fagan, Jeffrey A.

    2009-08-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will soon release a series of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) reference materials (RMs) to provide users with a well-characterized material for their applications. The SWCNT reference material will be introduced as a series of three types of material: (1) raw soot characterized for composition, which will be certified as a Standard Reference Material, (2) purified (greater than 90 % SWCNT by weight) bucky paper and (3) dispersed, length-sorted populations characterized by length. The instrumental characterization of NIST's SWCNT reference materials is extensive, and this paper aims to provide researchers with dispersion preparation methods for TEM (transmission electron microscopy) analysis of the SWCNT raw soot. A selection of dispersing solvents, including organic solvents, aqueous surfactants and DNA dispersions, were prepared and examined by TEM. Recommendations for sample preparation of the SWCNT SRM 2483 to yield images similar to those presented here are given. Examples of images of the length-sorted SWCNT reference material are also shown. These results illustrate the importance of optimal dispersion to enable imaging of SWCNT characteristics.

  17. Modification of narrow ablating capillaries under the influence of multiple femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubin, K. V.; Lotov, K. V.; Trunov, V. I.; Pestryakov, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses that propagate through narrow ablating capillaries cause modification of capillary walls, which is studied experimentally and theoretically. At low intensities, the laser-induced periodic surface structures and porous coating composed of sub-micron particles appear on the walls. At higher intensities, the surface is covered by deposited droplets of the size up to 10 μm. In both cases, the ablated material forms a solid plug that completely blocks the capillary after several hundreds or thousands of pulses. The suggested theoretical model indicates that the plug formation is a universal effect. It must take place in any narrow tube subject to ablation under the action of short laser pulses.

  18. The roles of thermal insulation and heat storage in the energy performance of the wall materials: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Long, Linshuang; Ye, Hong

    2016-01-01

    A high-performance envelope is the prerequisite and foundation to a zero energy building. The thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of a wall are two thermophysical properties that strongly influence the energy performance. Although many case studies have been performed, the results failed to give a big picture of the roles of these properties in the energy performance of an active building. In this work, a traversal study on the energy performance of a standard room with all potential wall materials was performed for the first time. It was revealed that both heat storage materials and insulation materials are suitable for external walls. However, the importances of those materials are distinct in different situations: the heat storage plays a primary role when the thermal conductivity of the material is relatively high, but the effect of the thermal insulation is dominant when the conductivity is relatively low. Regarding internal walls, they are less significant to the energy performance than the external ones, and they need exclusively the heat storage materials with a high thermal conductivity. These requirements for materials are consistent under various climate conditions. This study may provide a roadmap for the material scientists interested in developing high-performance wall materials. PMID:27052186

  19. The roles of thermal insulation and heat storage in the energy performance of the wall materials: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Long, Linshuang; Ye, Hong

    2016-01-01

    A high-performance envelope is the prerequisite and foundation to a zero energy building. The thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of a wall are two thermophysical properties that strongly influence the energy performance. Although many case studies have been performed, the results failed to give a big picture of the roles of these properties in the energy performance of an active building. In this work, a traversal study on the energy performance of a standard room with all potential wall materials was performed for the first time. It was revealed that both heat storage materials and insulation materials are suitable for external walls. However, the importances of those materials are distinct in different situations: the heat storage plays a primary role when the thermal conductivity of the material is relatively high, but the effect of the thermal insulation is dominant when the conductivity is relatively low. Regarding internal walls, they are less significant to the energy performance than the external ones, and they need exclusively the heat storage materials with a high thermal conductivity. These requirements for materials are consistent under various climate conditions. This study may provide a roadmap for the material scientists interested in developing high-performance wall materials. PMID:27052186

  20. The roles of thermal insulation and heat storage in the energy performance of the wall materials: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Linshuang; Ye, Hong

    2016-04-01

    A high-performance envelope is the prerequisite and foundation to a zero energy building. The thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of a wall are two thermophysical properties that strongly influence the energy performance. Although many case studies have been performed, the results failed to give a big picture of the roles of these properties in the energy performance of an active building. In this work, a traversal study on the energy performance of a standard room with all potential wall materials was performed for the first time. It was revealed that both heat storage materials and insulation materials are suitable for external walls. However, the importances of those materials are distinct in different situations: the heat storage plays a primary role when the thermal conductivity of the material is relatively high, but the effect of the thermal insulation is dominant when the conductivity is relatively low. Regarding internal walls, they are less significant to the energy performance than the external ones, and they need exclusively the heat storage materials with a high thermal conductivity. These requirements for materials are consistent under various climate conditions. This study may provide a roadmap for the material scientists interested in developing high-performance wall materials.

  1. The roles of thermal insulation and heat storage in the energy performance of the wall materials: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Long, Linshuang; Ye, Hong

    2016-04-07

    A high-performance envelope is the prerequisite and foundation to a zero energy building. The thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of a wall are two thermophysical properties that strongly influence the energy performance. Although many case studies have been performed, the results failed to give a big picture of the roles of these properties in the energy performance of an active building. In this work, a traversal study on the energy performance of a standard room with all potential wall materials was performed for the first time. It was revealed that both heat storage materials and insulation materials are suitable for external walls. However, the importances of those materials are distinct in different situations: the heat storage plays a primary role when the thermal conductivity of the material is relatively high, but the effect of the thermal insulation is dominant when the conductivity is relatively low. Regarding internal walls, they are less significant to the energy performance than the external ones, and they need exclusively the heat storage materials with a high thermal conductivity. These requirements for materials are consistent under various climate conditions. This study may provide a roadmap for the material scientists interested in developing high-performance wall materials.

  2. Potential Energy Savings Due to Phase Change Material in a Building Wall Assembly: An Examination of Two Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Kenneth W; Stovall, Therese K

    2012-03-01

    Phase change material (PCM), placed in an exterior wall, alters the temperature profile within the wall and thus influences the heat transport through the wall. This may reduce the net energy transport through the wall via interactions with diurnal temperature swings in the external environment or reduce the electricity needed to meet the net load through the wall by shifting the time of the peak load to a time when the cooling system operates more efficiently. This study covers a broad range of parameters that can influence the effectiveness of such a merged thermal storage-thermal insulation system. These parameters included climate, PCM location within the wall, amount of PCM, midpoint of the PCM melting and freezing range relative to the indoor setpoint temperature, temperature range over which phase change occurs, and the wall orientation. Two climates are investigated using finite difference and optimization analyses: Phoenix and Baltimore, with two utility rate schedules. Although potential savings for a PCM with optimized properties were greater when the PCM was concentrated near the inside wall surface, other considerations described here lead to a recommendation for a full-thickness application. An examination of the temperature distribution within the walls also revealed the potential for this system to reduce the amount of energy transported through the wall framing. Finally, economic benefits can exceed energy savings when time-of-day utility rates are in effect, reflecting the value of peak load reductions for the utility grid.

  3. Use of Phase Change Material in a Building Wall Assembly: A Case Study of Technical Potential in Two Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Kenneth W; Stovall, Therese K

    2012-01-01

    Phase change material (PCM), placed in an exterior wall, alters the temperature profile within the wall and thus influences the heat transport through the wall. This may reduce the net energy transport through the wall via interactions with diurnal temperature swings in the external environment or reduce the electricity needed to meet the net load through the wall by shifting the time of the peak load to a time when the cooling system operates more efficiently. This study covers a broad range of parameters that can influence the effectiveness of such a merged thermal storage-thermal insulation system. These parameters included climate, PCM location within the wall, amount of PCM, midpoint of the PCM melting and freezing range relative to the indoor setpoint temperature, temperature range over which phase change occurs, and the wall orientation. Two climates are investigated using finite difference and optimization analyses: Phoenix and Baltimore, with two utility rate schedules. Although potential savings for a PCM with optimized properties were greater when the PCM was concentrated near the inside wall surface, other considerations described here lead to a recommendation for a full-thickness application. An examination of the temperature distribution within the walls also revealed the potential for this system to reduce the amount of energy transported through the wall framing. Finally, economic benefits can exceed energy savings when time-of-day utility rates are in effect, reflecting the value of peak load reductions for the utility grid.

  4. Modeling and analysis of electrostatic adhesion force for climbing robot on dielectric wall materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jiu-Bing; Qin, Lan; Zhang, Wan-Xiong; Xie, Li; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, electrostatic adhesion technology on the wall climbing robots has attracted many researchers interest for its outstanding characteristics. In this paper, a theoretical analytical model is derived from the electrostatic adhesion field between the dielectric wall and a coplanar array of parallel strip electrodes called inter-digital electrodes (IDE). Due to the polarization on the different dielectric being complicated, the field is divided into four layers in order to obtain corresponding boundaries. Besides, the roughness of the wall surface, alternately polarities applied voltages and different dielectric parameter with different layer, all of which are also taken into account in the model since they have a significant influence on the electrostatic adhesion field. Based on this model, the electrostatic adhesion force (EAF) is calculated utilizing the Maxwell stress tensor (MST) formulation. As we all known, EAF is vital to the climbing robot design. Specially, it is possible for us to optimize the load to weight ratio in next step. Through comparing the finite element method (FEM) simulation with theoretical computation, the simulation and calculated data show that our proposed scheme can achieve desired results. Moreover, experiments of electrostatic adhesion performance for the adhesive on some different dielectric materials are also implemented.

  5. Angled Cool-Tip Electrode for Radiofrequency Ablation of Small Superficial Subcapsular Tumors in the Liver: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il Jung; Lee, Shin Jae; Shin, Min Woo; Shin, Won Sun; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Gyoung Min; Kim, Man Deuk; Won, Jong Yun; Lee, Do Yun; Choi, Jin Sub; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of angled cool-tip electrode for radiofrequency ablation of small superficial subcapsular liver tumors abutting abdominal wall, in order to traverse normal liver parenchyma, and thereby, obtain favorable configuration of ablation margin. Materials and Methods In this study, we retrospectively analyzed 15 small superficial subcapsular liver tumors abutting abdominal wall in 15 patients, treated with radiofrequency ablation from March 2013 to June 2015 using a cool-tip electrode manually modified to create 25–35° angle at the junction between exposed and insulated segments. The tumors were hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 13) and metastases (n = 2: cholangiocellular carcinoma and rectosigmoid cancer), with maximum diameter of 10–26 mm (mean, 15.68 ± 5.29 mm). Under ultrasonographic guidance, the electrode tip was advanced to the depth of the tumors' epicenter about 1 cm from the margin. The tip was re-directed to penetrate the tumor for radiofrequency ablation. Minimal ablation margin was measured at immediate post-treatment CT. Radiological images and medical records were evaluated for success rate, length of minimal ablation margin and complications. Results Technical success rate of obtaining complete necrosis of the tumors was 100%, with no procedure-related complication. Minimal ablation margin ranged from 3–12 mm (mean, 7.07 ± 2.23 mm). CT/MRI follow-up at 21–1022 days (mean, 519.47 ± 304.51 days) revealed no local recurrence, but distant recurrence in 9 patients. Conclusion Using an angled cool-tip electrode for radiofrequency ablation of small superficial subcapsular tumors abutting abdominal wall may be a feasible technique for obtaining adequate ablation margin and lower complication rate. PMID:27587963

  6. Novel Materials Containing Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Wrapped in Polymer Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Richard E.; O'Connell, Michael J.; Smith, Kenneth; Colbert, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    In this design, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been coated in polymer molecules to create a new type of material that has low electrical conductivity, but still contains individual nanotubes, and small ropes of individual nanotubes, which are themselves good electrical conductors and serve as small conducting rods immersed in an electrically insulating matrix. The polymer is attached through weak chemical forces that are primarily non-covalent in nature, caused primarily through polarization rather than the sharing of valence electrons. Therefore, the electronic structure of the SWNT involved is substantially the same as that of free, individual (and small ropes of) SWNT. Their high conductivity makes the individual nanotubes extremely electrically polarizable, and materials containing these individual, highly polarizable molecules exhibit novel electrical properties including a high dielectric constant.

  7. Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM using polymerized whey proteins as wall material.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yujun; Zheng, Zhe; Zhang, Tiehua; Hendricks, Gregory; Guo, Mingruo

    2016-09-01

    Survivability of probiotics in foods is essential for developing functional food containing probiotics. We investigated polymerized whey protein (PWP)-based microencapsulation process which is developed for protecting probiotics like Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and compared with the method using sodium alginate (SA). The entrapment rate was 89.3 ± 4.8% using PWP, while it was 73.2 ± 1.4% for SA. The microencapsulated NCFM by PWP and SA were separately subjected to digestion juices and post-fermentation storage of fermented cows' and goats' milk using the encapsulated culture. The log viable count of NCFM in PWP-based microencapsulation was 4.56, compared with that of 4.26 in SA-based ones and 3.13 for free culture. Compared with using SA as wall material, PWP was more effective in protecting probiotic. Microencapsulation of L. acidophilus NCFM using PWP as wall material can be exploited in the development of fermented dairy products with better survivability of probiotic organism. PMID:27309796

  8. Solid state 1H NMR studies of cell wall materials of potatoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Huiru; Belton, Peter S.; Ng, Annie; Waldron, Keith W.; Ryden, Peter

    1999-04-01

    Cell wall materials from potatoes ( Solanum tuberosum) prepared by two different methods have been studied using NMR proton relaxation times. Spin lattice relaxation in both the rotating and laboratory frames as well as transverse relaxation have been measured over a range of temperatures and hydration levels. It was observed that the sample prepared using a DMSO extraction showed anomalous behaviour of spin lattice relaxation in the laboratory frame probably due to residual solvent in the sample. Spin lattice relaxation in the laboratory frame is the result of hydroxymethyl rotation and another unidentified high frequency motion. In the rotating frame relaxation is adequately explained by hydroxymethyl rotation alone. In neither experiment is methyl group rotation observed, calculation suggests that this is due to the low density of methyl groups in the sample. Non-freezing water in potato cell walls, α-cellulose and pectin was found about 0.2, 0.04 and 0.18 g per gram dry matter, indicating preferable hydration of pectin compared to cellulose. The effects of hydration are most noticeable in the measurements that reflect low frequency motions, particularly transverse relaxation, where both second moments and the relative intensity of signals arising from immobile material are reduced by hydration.

  9. LIFE Materials: Topical Assessment Report for LIFE Volume 1 TOPIC: Solid First Wall and Structural Components TASK: Radiation Effects on First Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, A

    2008-11-26

    This report consists of the following chapters: CHAPTER A: LIFE Requirements for Materials. Part 1: The structure of the First Wall--Basic requirements; A qualitative view of the challenge; The candidate materials; and Base-line material's properties. CHAPTER B: Summary of Existing Knowledge--Brief historical introduction; Design window; The temperature window; Evolution of the design window with damage; Damage calculations; He and H production; Swelling resistance; Incubation dose for swelling; Design criterion No. 1, Strength; Design criterion No. 2, Corrosion resistance; Design criterion No. 3, Creep resistance; Design criterion No. 4, Radiation induced embrittlement; and Conclusions. CHAPTER C: Identification of Gaps in Knowledge & Vulnerabilities. CHAPTER D: Strategy and Future Work.

  10. Evaluation of a Thermoprotective Gel for Hydrodissection During Percutaneous Microwave Ablation: In Vivo Results

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, Anna J. Lubner, Meghan G. Ziemlewicz, Timothy J. Kitchin, Douglas R. Hinshaw, J. Louis Johnson, Alexander D. Lee, Fred T. Brace, Christopher L.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo evaluate whether thermoreversible poloxamer 407 15.4 % in water (P407) can protect non-target tissues adjacent to microwave (MW) ablation zones in a porcine model.Materials and MethodsMW ablation antennas were placed percutaneously into peripheral liver, spleen, or kidney (target tissues) under US and CT guidance in five swine such that the expected ablation zones would extend into adjacent diaphragm, body wall, or bowel (non-target tissues). For experimental ablations, P407 (a hydrogel that transitions from liquid at room temperature to semi-solid at body temperature) was injected into the potential space between target and non-target tissues, and the presence of a gel barrier was verified on CT. No barrier was used for controls. MW ablation was performed at 65 W for 5 min. Thermal damage to target and non-target tissues was evaluated at dissection.ResultsAntennas were placed 7 ± 3 mm from the organ surface for both control and gel-protected ablations (p = 0.95). The volume of gel deployed was 49 ± 27 mL, resulting in a barrier thickness of 0.8 ± 0.5 cm. Ablations extended into non-target tissues in 12/14 control ablations (mean surface area = 3.8 cm{sup 2}) but only 4/14 gel-protected ablations (mean surface area = 0.2 cm{sup 2}; p = 0.0005). The gel barrier remained stable at the injection site throughout power delivery.ConclusionWhen used as a hydrodissection material, P407 protected non-targeted tissues and was successfully maintained at the injection site for the duration of power application. Continued investigations to aid clinical translation appear warranted.

  11. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  12. NASA-JSC Protocol for the Characterization of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Material Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pasha; Gorelik, Olga; Hadjiev, Victor; Holmes, William; Devivar, Rodrigo; Files, Bradley; Yowell, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that the raw as well as purified single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material always contain certain amount of impurities of varying composition (mostly metal catalyst and non-tubular carbon). Particular purification method also creates defects and/or functional groups in the SWCNT material and therefore affects the its dispersability in solvents (important to subsequent application development). A number of analytical characterization tools have been used successfully in the past years to assess various properties of nanotube materials, but lack of standards makes it difficult to compare these measurements across the board. In this work we report the protocol developed at NASA-JSC which standardizes measurements using TEM, SEM, TGA, Raman and UV-Vis-NIR absorption techniques. Numerical measures are established for parameters such as metal content, homogeneity, thermal stability and dispersability, to allow easy comparison of SWCNT materials. We will also report on the recent progress in quantitative measurement of non-tubular carbon impurities and a possible purity standard for SWCNT materials.

  13. Apparatus and method to keep the walls of a free-space reactor free from deposits of solid materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for keeping interior walls of a reaction vessel free of undesirable deposits of solid materials in gas-to-solid reactions. The apparatus includes a movable cleaning head which is configured to be substantially complementary to the interior contour of the walls of the reaction vessel. The head ejects a stream of gas with a relatively high velocity into a narrow space between the head and the walls. The head is moved substantially continuously to at least intermittently blow the stream of gas to substantially the entire surface of the walls wherein undesirable solid deposition is likely to occur. The disclosed apparatus and process is particularly useful for keeping the walls of a free-space silane-gas-to-solid-silicon reactor free of undesirable silicon deposits.

  14. High resolution multiphoton ablation with negligible thermal effects in transparent materials using Q-switched microchip lasers with 300 picosecond pulses at 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhalla, Taghrid; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2014-03-01

    Self-Q-switched microchip lasers are attractive alternative to femtosecond lasers for micromachining in transparent materials. They can easily reach pulse peak powers needed to trigger ablation in all materials, including diamond, ceramics, plastics, and glasses. In addition, they are low cost with compact and rugged design. In this work, we report on using microchip lasers for micro-engraving different types of transparent materials. Micro-size marking is demonstrated on the surface of borosilicate glass. Microfluidic channels are engraved on BK-7 glass microchips with ion-doped waveguides. Arrays of dense micro-channels are fabricated at the surface of thermoplastics with a zone affected by thermal effects limited to the micron range.

  15. Fluidisation and plastic activity in a model soft-glassy material flowing in micro-channels with rough walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scagliarini, A.; Lulli, M.; Sbragaglia, M.; Bernaschi, M.

    2016-06-01

    By means of mesoscopic numerical simulations of a model soft-glassy material, we investigate the role of boundary roughness on the flow behaviour of the material, probing the bulk/wall and global/local rheologies. We show that the roughness reduces the wall slip induced by wettability properties and acts as a source of fluidisation for the material. A direct inspection of the plastic events suggests that their rate of occurrence grows with the fluidity field, reconciling our simulations with kinetic elasto-plastic descriptions of jammed materials. Notwithstanding, we observe qualitative and quantitative differences in the scaling, depending on the distance from the rough wall and on the imposed shear. The impact of roughness on the orientational statistics is also studied.

  16. Nanometer-scale ablation using focused, coherent extreme ultraviolet/soft x-ray light

    DOEpatents

    Menoni, Carmen S.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Vaschenko, Georgiy; Bloom, Scott; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Hemberg, Oscar

    2011-04-26

    Ablation of holes having diameters as small as 82 nm and having clean walls was obtained in a poly(methyl methacrylate) on a silicon substrate by focusing pulses from a Ne-like Ar, 46.9 nm wavelength, capillary-discharge laser using a freestanding Fresnel zone plate diffracting into third order is described. Spectroscopic analysis of light from the ablation has also been performed. These results demonstrate the use of focused coherent EUV/SXR light for the direct nanoscale patterning of materials.

  17. Material migration studies with an ITER first wall panel proxy on EAST

    DOE PAGES

    Ding, R.; Pitts, R. A.; Borodin, D.; Carpentier, S.; Ding, F.; Gong, X. Z.; Guo, H. Y.; Kirschner, A.; Kocan, M.; Li, J. G.; et al

    2015-01-23

    The ITER beryllium (Be) first wall (FW) panels are shaped to protect leading edges between neighbouring panels arising from assembly tolerances. This departure from a perfectly cylindrical surface automatically leads to magnetically shadowed regions where eroded Be can be re-deposited, together with co-deposition of tritium fuel. To provide a benchmark for a series of erosion/re-deposition simulation studies performed for the ITER FW panels, dedicated experiments have been performed on the EAST tokamak using a specially designed, instrumented test limiter acting as a proxy for the FW panel geometry. Carbon coated molybdenum plates forming the limiter front surface were exposed tomore » the outer midplane boundary plasma of helium discharges using the new Material and Plasma Evaluation System (MAPES). Net erosion and deposition patterns are estimated using ion beam analysis to measure the carbon layer thickness variation across the surface after exposure. The highest erosion of about 0.8 µm is found near the midplane, where the surface is closest to the plasma separatrix. No net deposition above the measurement detection limit was found on the proxy wall element, even in shadowed regions. The measured 2D surface erosion distribution has been modelled with the 3D Monte Carlo code ERO, using the local plasma parameter measurements together with a diffusive transport assumption. In conclusion, excellent agreement between the experimentally observed net erosion and the modelled erosion profile has been obtained.« less

  18. Material migration studies with an ITER first wall panel proxy on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, R.; Pitts, R. A.; Borodin, D.; Carpentier, S.; Ding, F.; Gong, X. Z.; Guo, H. Y.; Kirschner, A.; Kocan, M.; Li, J. G.; Luo, G. -N.; Mao, H. M.; Qian, J. P.; Stangeby, P. C.; Wampler, W. R.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, W. Z.; Chen, J. L.; Gan, K. F.

    2015-01-23

    The ITER beryllium (Be) first wall (FW) panels are shaped to protect leading edges between neighbouring panels arising from assembly tolerances. This departure from a perfectly cylindrical surface automatically leads to magnetically shadowed regions where eroded Be can be re-deposited, together with co-deposition of tritium fuel. To provide a benchmark for a series of erosion/re-deposition simulation studies performed for the ITER FW panels, dedicated experiments have been performed on the EAST tokamak using a specially designed, instrumented test limiter acting as a proxy for the FW panel geometry. Carbon coated molybdenum plates forming the limiter front surface were exposed to the outer midplane boundary plasma of helium discharges using the new Material and Plasma Evaluation System (MAPES). Net erosion and deposition patterns are estimated using ion beam analysis to measure the carbon layer thickness variation across the surface after exposure. The highest erosion of about 0.8 µm is found near the midplane, where the surface is closest to the plasma separatrix. No net deposition above the measurement detection limit was found on the proxy wall element, even in shadowed regions. The measured 2D surface erosion distribution has been modelled with the 3D Monte Carlo code ERO, using the local plasma parameter measurements together with a diffusive transport assumption. In conclusion, excellent agreement between the experimentally observed net erosion and the modelled erosion profile has been obtained.

  19. Material migration studies with an ITER first wall panel proxy on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, R.; Pitts, R. A.; Borodin, D.; Carpentier, S.; Ding, F.; Gong, X. Z.; Guo, H. Y.; Kirschner, A.; Kocan, M.; Li, J. G.; Luo, G.-N.; Mao, H. M.; Qian, J. P.; Stangeby, P. C.; Wampler, W. R.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, W. Z.

    2015-02-01

    The ITER beryllium (Be) first wall (FW) panels are shaped to protect leading edges between neighbouring panels arising from assembly tolerances. This departure from a perfectly cylindrical surface automatically leads to magnetically shadowed regions where eroded Be can be re-deposited, together with co-deposition of tritium fuel. To provide a benchmark for a series of erosion/re-deposition simulation studies performed for the ITER FW panels, dedicated experiments have been performed on the EAST tokamak using a specially designed, instrumented test limiter acting as a proxy for the FW panel geometry. Carbon coated molybdenum plates forming the limiter front surface were exposed to the outer midplane boundary plasma of helium discharges using the new Material and Plasma Evaluation System (MAPES). Net erosion and deposition patterns are estimated using ion beam analysis to measure the carbon layer thickness variation across the surface after exposure. The highest erosion of about 0.8 µm is found near the midplane, where the surface is closest to the plasma separatrix. No net deposition above the measurement detection limit was found on the proxy wall element, even in shadowed regions. The measured 2D surface erosion distribution has been modelled with the 3D Monte Carlo code ERO, using the local plasma parameter measurements together with a diffusive transport assumption. Excellent agreement between the experimentally observed net erosion and the modelled erosion profile has been obtained.

  20. Fracture toughness of irradiated candidate materials for ITER first wall/blanket structures: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1996-04-01

    Disk compact specimens of candidate materials for first wall/blanket structures in ITER have been irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 250{degrees}C. These specimens have been tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250{degrees}C to determine J-integral values and tearing moduli. The results show that irradiation at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness of austenic stainless steels, but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the temperature increases. Irradiation at 250{degrees}C is more damaging that at 90{degrees}C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. The ferritic-martensitic steels HT-9 and F82H show significantly greater reductions in fracture toughness that the austenitic stainless steels.

  1. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Westphal, Saskia; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  2. [The Interaction of Oil Microcapsule Wall Materials between Whey Protein and Acacia].

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Li, Ru-yi; Wang, Hui; Li, Qian; Li, De-jun; Tu, Zong-cai

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between whey protein and acacia which were used as wall material was studied on the formation of the oils microcapsules by the FTIR Spectroscopy and Computer Aided Analysis. The results indicated that whey protein changed obviously in amide A and amide I by high pressured homogenization and spray-drying. The amide A moved from 3 406.5 cm(-1) to 3 425.4 cm(-1) which was possibly due to covalent cross-linking between whey protein and acacia. Furthermore the amide I moved from 1 648.6 cm(-1) to 1 654.7 cm(-1) for intramolecular hydrogen bonding of protein had been weaken. After Gaussian fitting on amide I , it was found that the content of secondary structure of α-helix content and β-folding in whey protein reduced from 19.55% to 17.50% and from 30.59% to 25.63%, respectively. This suggests that protein intramolecular hydrogen bonding force was abated, resulting in abating the rigid structure of the protein molecules and enhancing of the toughness structure. The protein molecules showed some flexibility. The result of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis showed that whey protein--gum Arabic complexes produced covalent products in larger molecular weight. During the spray-drying process, covalent cross-linking produced between whey protein and gum Arabic which improved emulsifying activity of the complex whey protein and gum Arabic produced covalent cross-linking and improved the complex emulsifying activity. Observing the surface structure of the fish oil microcapsule by SEM, the compound of whey protein and acacia as wall material was proved better toughness, less micropore, and more compact structure.

  3. [The Interaction of Oil Microcapsule Wall Materials between Whey Protein and Acacia].

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Li, Ru-yi; Wang, Hui; Li, Qian; Li, De-jun; Tu, Zong-cai

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between whey protein and acacia which were used as wall material was studied on the formation of the oils microcapsules by the FTIR Spectroscopy and Computer Aided Analysis. The results indicated that whey protein changed obviously in amide A and amide I by high pressured homogenization and spray-drying. The amide A moved from 3 406.5 cm(-1) to 3 425.4 cm(-1) which was possibly due to covalent cross-linking between whey protein and acacia. Furthermore the amide I moved from 1 648.6 cm(-1) to 1 654.7 cm(-1) for intramolecular hydrogen bonding of protein had been weaken. After Gaussian fitting on amide I , it was found that the content of secondary structure of α-helix content and β-folding in whey protein reduced from 19.55% to 17.50% and from 30.59% to 25.63%, respectively. This suggests that protein intramolecular hydrogen bonding force was abated, resulting in abating the rigid structure of the protein molecules and enhancing of the toughness structure. The protein molecules showed some flexibility. The result of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis showed that whey protein--gum Arabic complexes produced covalent products in larger molecular weight. During the spray-drying process, covalent cross-linking produced between whey protein and gum Arabic which improved emulsifying activity of the complex whey protein and gum Arabic produced covalent cross-linking and improved the complex emulsifying activity. Observing the surface structure of the fish oil microcapsule by SEM, the compound of whey protein and acacia as wall material was proved better toughness, less micropore, and more compact structure. PMID:26117866

  4. Preliminary characterisation of new glass reference materials (GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G) by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry using 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm wavelengths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guillong, M.; Hametner, K.; Reusser, E.; Wilson, S.A.; Gunther, D.

    2005-01-01

    New glass reference materials GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G have been characterised using a prototype solid state laser ablation system capable of producing wavelengths of 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm. This system allowed comparison of the effects of different laser wavelengths under nearly identical ablation and ICP operating conditions. The wavelengths 213 nm and 266 nm were also used at higher energy densities to evaluate the influence of energy density on quantitative analysis. In addition, the glass reference materials were analysed using commercially available 266 nm Nd:YAG and 193 nm ArF excimer lasers. Laser ablation analysis was carried out using both single spot and scanning mode ablation. Using laser ablation ICP-MS, concentrations of fifty-eight elements were determined with external calibration to the NIST SRM 610 glass reference material. Instead of applying the more common internal standardisation procedure, the total concentration of all element oxide concentrations was normalised to 100%. Major element concentrations were compared with those determined by electron microprobe. In addition to NIST SRM 610 for external calibration, USGS BCR-2G was used as a more closely matrix-matched reference material in order to compare the effect of matrix-matched and non matrix-matched calibration on quantitative analysis. The results show that the various laser wavelengths and energy densities applied produced similar results, with the exception of scanning mode ablation at 266 nm without matrix-matched calibration where deviations up to 60% from the average were found. However, results acquired using a scanning mode with a matrix-matched calibration agreed with results obtained by spot analysis. The increased abundance of large particles produced when using a scanning ablation mode with NIST SRM 610, is responsible for elemental fractionation effects caused by incomplete vaporisation of large particles in the ICP.

  5. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes as electrode material for microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Thepsuparungsikul, N; Phonthamachai, N; Ng, H Y

    2012-01-01

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a novel and innovative technology that could allow direct harvesting of energy from wastewater through microbial activity with simultaneous oxidation of organic matter in wastewater. Among all MFC parts, electrode materials play a crucial role in electricity generation. A variety of electrode materials have been used, including plain graphite, carbon paper and carbon cloth. However, these electrode materials generated only limited electricity or power. Recently, many research studies have been conducted on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) because of their unique physical and chemical properties that include high conductivity, high surface area, corrosion resistance, and electrochemical stability. These properties make them extremely attractive for fabricating electrodes and catalyst supports. In this study, CNT-based electrodes had been developed to improve MFC performance in terms of electricity generation and treatment efficiency. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl groups have been employed to fabricate electrodes for single-chamber air-cathode MFCs. The quality of the prepared MWCNTs-based electrodes was evaluated by morphology, electrical conductivity and specific surface area using a field emission scanning electron microscope, four-probe method and Brunauer-Emmerr-Teller method, respectively. The performance of MFCs equipped with MWCNT-based electrodes was evaluated by chemical analysis and electrical monitoring and calculation. In addition, the performance of these MFCs, using MWCNTs as electrodes, was compared against that using commercial carbon cloth.

  6. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes as electrode material for microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Thepsuparungsikul, N; Phonthamachai, N; Ng, H Y

    2012-01-01

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a novel and innovative technology that could allow direct harvesting of energy from wastewater through microbial activity with simultaneous oxidation of organic matter in wastewater. Among all MFC parts, electrode materials play a crucial role in electricity generation. A variety of electrode materials have been used, including plain graphite, carbon paper and carbon cloth. However, these electrode materials generated only limited electricity or power. Recently, many research studies have been conducted on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) because of their unique physical and chemical properties that include high conductivity, high surface area, corrosion resistance, and electrochemical stability. These properties make them extremely attractive for fabricating electrodes and catalyst supports. In this study, CNT-based electrodes had been developed to improve MFC performance in terms of electricity generation and treatment efficiency. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl groups have been employed to fabricate electrodes for single-chamber air-cathode MFCs. The quality of the prepared MWCNTs-based electrodes was evaluated by morphology, electrical conductivity and specific surface area using a field emission scanning electron microscope, four-probe method and Brunauer-Emmerr-Teller method, respectively. The performance of MFCs equipped with MWCNT-based electrodes was evaluated by chemical analysis and electrical monitoring and calculation. In addition, the performance of these MFCs, using MWCNTs as electrodes, was compared against that using commercial carbon cloth. PMID:22437017

  7. 230Th/U dating of Last Interglacial brain corals from Bonaire (southern Caribbean) using bulk and theca wall material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obert, J. Christina; Scholz, Denis; Felis, Thomas; Brocas, William M.; Jochum, Klaus P.; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2016-04-01

    We compared the suitability of two skeletal materials of the Atlantic brain coral Diploria strigosa for 230Th/U-dating: the commonly used bulk material comprising all skeletal elements and the denser theca wall material. Eight fossil corals of presumably Last Interglacial age from Bonaire, southern Caribbean Sea, were investigated, and several sub-samples were dated from each coral. For four corals, both the ages and the activity ratios of the bulk material and theca wall agree within uncertainty. Three corals show significantly older ages for their bulk material than for their theca wall material as well as substantially elevated 232Th content and (230Th/238U) ratios. The bulk material samples of another coral show younger ages and lower (230Th/238U) ratios than the corresponding theca wall samples. This coral also contains a considerable amount of 232Th. The application of the available open-system models developed to account for post-depositional diagenetic effects in corals shows that none of the models can successfully be applied to the Bonaire corals. The most likely explanation for this observation is that the assumptions of the models are not fulfilled by our data set. Comparison of the theca wall and bulk material data enables us to obtain information about the open-system processes that affected the corals. The corals showing apparently older ages for their bulk material were probably affected by contamination with a secondary (detrital) phase. The most likely source of the detrital material is carbonate sand. The higher (230Th/232Th) ratio of this material implies that detrital contamination would have a much stronger impact on the ages than a contaminant with a bulk Earth (230Th/232Th) ratio and that the threshold for the commonly applied 232Th reliability criterion would be much lower than the generally used value of 1 ng g-1. The coral showing apparently younger ages for its bulk material was probably influenced by more than one diagenetic process. A

  8. The physicochemical properties of microwave-assisted encapsulated anthocyanins from Ipomoea batatas as affected by different wall materials

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Nawi, Norazlina; Muhamad, Ida Idayu; Mohd Marsin, Aishah

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the impact of different wall materials on the physicochemical properties of microwave-assisted encapsulated anthocyanins from Ipomoea batatas. Using the powder characterization technique, purple sweet potato anthocyanin (PSPAs) powders were analysed for moisture content, water activity, dissolution time, hygroscopicity, color and morphology. PSPAs were produced using different wall materials: maltodextrin (MD), gum arabic (GA) and a combination of gum arabic and maltodextrin (GA + MD) at a 1:1 ratio. Each of the wall materials was homogenized to the core material at a core/wall material ratio of 5 and were microencapsulated by microwave-assisted drying at 1100 W. Results indicated that encapsulated powder with the GA and MD combination presented better quality of powder with the lowest value of moisture content and water activity. With respect to morphology, the microcapsule encapsulated with GA + MD showed several dents in coating surrounding its core material, whereas other encapsulated powders showed small or slight dents entrapped onto the bioactive compound. Colorimetric analysis showed changes in values of L, a*, b*, hue and chroma in the reconstituted powder compared to the initial powder. PMID:25838887

  9. Dynamic compaction of granular materials in a tube with wall friction, applied to deflagration-to-detonation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.G.; Kapila, A.K.

    1995-09-01

    A theoretical problem is considered in which a granular material is pushed through a tube of arbitrary cross-section by a constant velocity piston against the resistance of compaction work and wall friction. The crushing of the material is dictated by a simple yet physically reasonable compaction law. By considering two special cases - the limit of vanishing friction and the quasistatic limit - we identify the two basic compaction wave structures. We then consider the general case in which the two waves interact. Estimates suggest that for typical deflagration-to-detonation tests explosive at the wall melts on time scales short compared to the experiment.

  10. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  11. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  12. Microencapsulation of garlic oleoresin using maltodextrin as wall material by spray drying technology.

    PubMed

    Balasubramani, P; Palaniswamy, P T; Visvanathan, R; Thirupathi, V; Subbarayan, A; Prakash Maran, J

    2015-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on microencapsulation of garlic oleoresin by spray drying with garlic oleoresin concentration (10%, 20% and 30%) as core material, maltodextrin concentration (40%, 50% and 60%) as wall material and inlet temperature of drying air (180 °C, 200 °C and 220 °C) as process parameters. The process in-terms of encapsulation efficiency was optimised following response surface methodology and Pareto analysis of variance (ANOVA). Second order polynomial regression model showed good fit of the experimental data with high coefficient of determination (R(2)) along with predicted values. The relationships between the independent and dependent parameters were represented using response surface and contour plots. The optimum levels of process parameters, viz., garlic oleoresin concentration, maltodextrin concentration and inlet temperature of air drying were found to be 10%, 60% and 200 °C, respectively with the maximum encapsulation efficiency of 81.9% and desirability of 0.998. The microencapsulated garlic oleoresin powder obtained at optimized conditions was spherical with smooth surface as analysed through scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Volatile Retention and Morphological Properties of Microencapsulated Tributyrin Varied by Wall Material and Drying Method.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Joseph D; Cadwallader, Keith R; Lee, Youngsoo

    2016-03-01

    Butyric acid is an important short-chain fatty acid for intestinal health and has been shown to improve certain intestinal disease states. A triglyceride containing 3 butyric acid esters, tributyrin (TB) can serve as a source of butyric acid; however, the need to target intestinal delivery and mitigate unpleasant sensory qualities has limited its use in food. Microencapsulation, the entrapment of one or more cores within a matrix, may provide a solution to the aforementioned challenge. This research primarily focused on the influence of (1) wall material: whey and soy protein isolate (WPI and SPI, respectively) and gamma-cyclodextrin (GCD), (2) wall additives: inulin of varying chain length, and (3) processing method: spray or oven drying (SD or OD, respectively) on the morphological properties and volatile retention of TB within microcapsules. SPI-based microcapsules retained significantly less (P < 0.001) TB compared to WPI-based microcapsules as measured by gas chromatography. The inclusion of inulin in the SD WPI-based microcapsules increased (P < 0.001) TB retention over WPI-based microcapsules without inulin. Inulin inclusion into WPI-based microcapsules resulted in a smoother, minimally-dented, circular morphology as compared to noninulin containing WPI-based microcapsules as shown by scanning electron microscopy. GCD and TB OD microcapsules retained more (P < 0.001) TB (94.5% ± 1.10%) than all other WPI, WPI-inulin, and GCD TB SD microcapsules. When spray dried, the GCD-based microcapsules exhibited (P < 0.001) TB retention than all other microcapsules, indicating the GCD may be unsuitable for spray drying. These findings demonstrate that microencapsulated TB in GCD can lead to minimal TB losses during processing that could be utilized in functional food applications for intestinal health.

  14. Rapid ablation of dental hard tissue using promoter-assisted pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederickson, Christopher J.; Lu, Quiang; Hayes, Donald J.; Wallace, David B.; Grove, Michael E.; Bell, Brent A.; Motamedi, Massoud; Rastegar, Sohi; Wright, C. G.; Arcoria, Charles J.

    1997-05-01

    Nd:YAG lasers have been used previously for selective removal of various material from teeth. To permit ablation of healthy enamel with the Nd:YAG laser, we have adopted a strategy in which micro-drops of photoabsorptive 'promoters' are placed on the enamel to enhance absorption of individual laser pulses. Ink-jet technology dispenses the micro-drops with micron- and millisecond-scale precision. Various promoters using drug and cosmetic dyes, indocyanine green, or carbon-black pigments have been studied. Typical ablation parameters are 1.064 micrometers ; 20-180 mJ per pulse; 100 microsecond(s) ; 10-30 pulses/sec; 0.2-2.0 nl drops. Recent results from the program include: (1) For a variety of promoters, a monotonic relationship obtains between absorption coefficient at 1.064 micrometers and the efficiency of ablation of enamel. (2) With different promoter volumes, the efficiency of ablation rises, plateaus, then falls with increasing volume. (3) At drilling rates of 30 pulses/sec, ablation efficiency approaches rates of 0.1 mm3/sec. LM and SEM observations show a glassy 'pebbled' crater surface indicative of hydroxyapatite that has cooled, condensed, and solidified on the crater walls. Together these results favor the view that a micro-drop promoter-assisted Nd:YAG drill can five clinically useful ablations hard dental tissue.

  15. X-ray ablation measurements and modeling for ICF applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.T.

    1996-09-01

    X-ray ablation of material from the first wall and other components of an ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) chamber is a major threat to the laser final optics. Material condensing on these optics after a shot may cause damage with subsequent laser shots. To ensure the successful operation of the ICF facility, removal rates must be predicted accurately. The goal for this dissertation is to develop an experimentally validated x-ray response model, with particular application to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate knowledge of the x-ray and debris emissions from ICF targets is a critical first step in the process of predicting the performance of the target chamber system. A number of 1-D numerical simulations of NIF targets have been run to characterize target output in terms of energy, angular distribution, spectrum, and pulse shape. Scaling of output characteristics with variations of both target yield and hohlraum wall thickness are also described. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser on the effects of relevant x-ray fluences on various materials. The response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope instruments. Judgments were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material. Measurements of removal depths were made to provide data for the modeling. The finite difference ablation code developed here (ABLATOR) combines the thermomechanical response of materials to x-rays with models of various removal mechanisms. The former aspect refers to energy deposition in such small characteristic depths ({approx} micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion are significant effects on the nanosecond time scale. The material removal models use the resulting time histories of temperature and pressure-profiles, along with ancillary local conditions, to predict rates of surface vaporization and the onset of conditions that would lead to spallation.

  16. Aluminum 2219-T87 and 5456-H116 - A comparative study of spacecraft wall materials in dual-wall structures under hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.

    1992-01-01

    All earth-orbiting spacecraft are susceptible to high-speed impacts by pieces of orbital debris. To prevent mission failure and possibly loss of life, protection against perforation by high-speed orbital debris particles must be included in the spacecraft design. Although any number of materials can be used to manufacture perforation-resistant structures, aluminum is often used in such systems because of its relatively high strength-to-weight ratio. This paper presents the results of a study in which the high speed impact response characteristics of dual-wall structures made from two different aluminum alloys were analyzed to determine which alloy would be more suitable for use in a perforation-resistant dual-wall structural system that is to be exposed to the orbital debris environment. Impact response characteristics were obtained numerically and experimentally. At impact speeds below 7 km/s, it was found that the two aluminum alloys considered contributed similar levels of perforation resistance; at speeds in excess of 7 km/s, aluminum 2219-T87 was superior to aluminum 5546-H116 in preventing perforation of dual-wall structural systems.

  17. X-ray-ablated plumes in inertial confinement fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, John Mitchell

    Modeling of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target chamber phenomena presents researchers with various technical problems requiring creative solutions. In particular, the wide ranging physical and time scales of the problem give special difficulty when modeling one shot cycle of an ICF target chamber. Ultimately, the goal of the modeling effort is a unified model beginning with target injection and ending with condensation of the vaporized debris. The work here develops a combined gas dynamics/X-ray ablation model used to predict the response of materials to X-ray emissions from ICF targets. This model in combination with experiments performed at the Nova facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) aided in the design effort for the first wall of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The phenomena inside an ICF target chamber include the fusion bum of a D-T fuel capsule enclosed in a hohlraum leading to the emission of neutrons, debris, and X rays. The X rays emitted from the target deposit on target facing surfaces, heating and vaporizing the surface layers of the material. The vapor plume generated will travel through the chamber and deposit on various other surfaces. For the NIF and other ICF laser facilities, modeling of these X-ray ablated plumes is important to ascertain the performance of the first wall surface of the target chamber. The first wall must be designed to minimize contamination to laser optics that interface with the target chamber. For this work, experiments were performed to assess the performance of materials at X-ray fluences expected at the NIF first wall. These experiments included long-term exposure of potential target chamber materials, the X-ray response of stainless steel, and a louvered geometry experiment to aid in the assessment of the geometrical design and material selection of the first wall. The results of these experiments show that boron carbide and stainless steel will both perform adequately during facility

  18. Photochemical ablation of organic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingling, Yaroslava G.; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2003-04-01

    We have investigated by molecular dynamics simulations the ablation of material that is onset by photochemical processes. We compare this system with only photochemical processes to a system containing photochemical and photothermal processes. The simulations reveal that ablation by purely photochemical processes is accompanied by the ejection of relatively cold massive molecular clusters from the surface of the sample. The top of the plume exhibits high temperatures whereas the residual part of the sample is cold. The removal of the damaged material through big molecular cluster ejection is consistent with experimental observations of low heat damage of material.

  19. Electromechanical Behavior of Chemically Reduced Graphene Oxide and Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchirouf, Abderrahmane; Müller, Christian; Kanoun, Olfa

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose strain-sensitive thin films based on chemically reduced graphene oxide (GO) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) without adding any further surfactants. In spite of the insulating properties of the thin-film-based GO due to the presence functional groups such as hydroxyl, epoxy, and carbonyl groups in its atomic structure, a significant enhancement of the film conductivity was reached by chemical reduction with hydro-iodic acid. By optimizing the MWCNT content, a significant improvement of electrical and mechanical thin film sensitivity is realized. The optical properties and the morphology of the prepared thin films were studied using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The UV-Vis spectra showed the ability to tune the band gap of the GO by changing the MWCNT content, whereas the SEM indicated that the MWCNTs were well dissolved and coated by the GO. Investigations of the piezoresistive properties of the hybrid nanocomposite material under mechanical load show a linear trend between the electrical resistance and the applied strain. A relatively high gauge factor of 8.5 is reached compared to the commercial metallic strain gauges. The self-assembled hybrid films exhibit outstanding properties in electric conductivity, mechanical strength, and strain sensitivity, which provide a high potential for use in strain-sensing applications.

  20. Thermographic Imaging of Material Loss in Boiler Water-Wall Tubing by Application of Scanning Line Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Winfree, William P.

    2000-01-01

    Localized wall thinning due to corrosion in utility boiler water-wall tubing is a significant inspection concern for boiler operators. Historically, conventional ultrasonics has been used for inspection of these tubes. This technique has proven to be very manpower and time intensive. This has resulted in a spot check approach to inspections, documenting thickness measurements over a relatively small percentage of the total boiler wall area. NASA Langley Research Center has developed a thermal NDE technique designed to image and quantitatively characterize the amount of material thinning present in steel tubing. The technique involves the movement of a thermal line source across the outer surface of the tubing followed by an infrared imager at a fixed distance behind the line source. Quantitative images of the material loss due to corrosion are reconstructed from measurements of the induced surface temperature variations. This paper will present a discussion of the development of the thermal imaging system as well as the techniques used to reconstruct images of flaws. The application of the thermal line source coupled with the analysis technique represents a significant improvement in the inspection speed for large structures such as boiler water-walls. A theoretical basis for the technique will be presented which explains the quantitative nature of the technique. Further, a dynamic calibration system will be presented for the technique that allows the extraction of thickness information from the temperature data. Additionally, the results of applying this technology to actual water-wall tubing samples and in situ inspections will be presented.

  1. Quantitative analysis of trace elements in environmental powders with laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry using non-sample-corresponding reference materials for signal evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Gerald; Limbeck, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is an attractive alternative to traditional procedures for the analysis of environmental samples (i.e., conventional liquid measurement after sample digestion). However, for accurate quantification, certified reference materials (CRM) are necessary which match the composition of the sample and include all elements of interest at the required concentration levels. The limited availability of appropriate CRMs hampers therefore substantial application. In this work, an LA-ICP-MS procedure allowing for accurate determination of trace element contents in powdered environmental samples is presented. For LA-ICP-MS analysis, the samples are mixed with an internal standard (silver oxide) and a binder (sodium tetra borate) and subsequently pressed to pellets. Quantification is accomplished using a calibration function determined using CRMs with varying matrix composition and analyte content, pre-treated and measured in the same way as the samples. With this approach, matrix-induced ablation differences resulting from varying physical/chemical properties of the individual CRMs could be compensated. Furthermore, ICP-related matrix-effects could be minimized using collision/reaction cell technology. Applicability of the procedure has been demonstrated by assessment of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn in four different environmental CRMs (NIST SRM1648a (urban particulate matter), NIST SRM2709 (San Joaquin Soil), BCR144 (sewage sludge), and BCR723 (road dust)). Signal evaluation was performed by alternative use of three CRMs for calculation of the calibration function whereas the remaining fourth CRM acted as unknown sample, resulting in a good agreement between measured and certified values for all elements and reference materials.

  2. Ablation of Martian glaciers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Henry J.; Davis, Philip A.

    1987-01-01

    Glacier like landforms are observed in the fretted terrain of Mars in the latitude belts near + or - 42 deg. It was suggested that sublimation or accumulation-ablation rates could be estimated for these glaciers if their shapes were known. To this end, photoclinometric profiles were obtained of a number of these landforms. On the basis of analyses of these profiles, it was concluded that ice is chiefly ablating from these landforms that either are inactive rock-glaciers or have materials within them that are moving exceedingly slowly at this time. These conclusions are consistent with other geologic information. The analyses were performed using a two-dimensional model of an isothermal glacier.

  3. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  4. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  5. A Numerical study of ablative flow driven by thermodynamics and kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Ryan; Dubief, Yves; White, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    The main focus of this research is to elucidate the relationship between ablative/erosive flows and their interaction with a spatially dynamic boundary conditions. The fluid-solid interface is described by a level-set (LS) approach, enabling efficient and accurate computation of wall-normal vectors and other geometrical properties. Boundary conditions at the interface are imposed using immersed boundary methods (IBM). Our LS/IBM ablation algorithm is able to simulate various ablation processes, in particular ablation by chemical reactions and phase-change. The momentum boundary conditions are handled through cut cell IBM applied implicitly. This method is fully mass conserving and eliminates issues with spurious pressure oscillations. Scalar boundary conditions are simulated with a form of the ghost fluid method, with known thermal and chemical physics, to interpolate values across the fluid/solid interface after they are decoupled. We will discuss two applications of this algorithm. The first is the simulation of an experiment of the oxidation of a carbon material at around 1000K conducted at NASA AMES. The second focuses on the interactions between heated wall-turbulence and a low-melting point material in collaboration with parallel experiments at University of New Hampshire. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of NSF, grand No. CBET 0967857, and NASA, grant No. NNX11AM07A, and the computational support of the Vermont Advanced Computing Center at the University of Vermont.

  6. Online monitoring of nanoparticles formed during nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Hana; Holá, Markéta; Vojtíšek-Lom, Michal; Ondráček, Jakub; Kanický, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    The particle size distribution of dry aerosol originating from laser ablation of glass material was monitored simultaneously with Laser Ablation - Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis and two aerosol spectrometers - Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The unique combination of LA-ICP-MS and FMPS offers the possibility of measuring the particle size distribution every 1 s of the ablation process in the size range of 5.6-560 nm. APS extends the information about particle concentration in the size range 0.54-17 μm. Online monitoring of the dry aerosol was performed for two ablation modes (spot and line with a duration of 80 s) with a 193 nm excimer laser system, using the glass reference material NIST 610 as a sample. Different sizes of laser spot for spot ablation and different scan speeds for line ablation were tested. It was found that the FMPS device is capable of detecting changes in particle size distribution at the first pulses of spot laser ablation and is suitable for laser ablation control simultaneously with LA-ICP-MS analysis. The studied parameters of laser ablation have an influence on the resulting particle size distribution. The line mode of laser ablation produces larger particles during the whole ablation process, while spot ablation produces larger particles only at the beginning, during the ablation of the intact layer of the ablated material. Moreover, spot ablation produces more primary nano-particles (in ultrafine mode size range < 100 nm) than line ablation. This effect is most probably caused by a reduced amount of large particles released from the spot ablation crater. The larger particles scavenge the ultrafine particles during the line ablation mode.

  7. In situ deuterium inventory measurements of a-C:D layers on tungsten in TEXTOR by laser induced ablation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierse, N.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; Giesen, T. F.; Huber, A.; Laengner, M.; Möller, S.; Nonhoff, M.; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Xiao, Q.; Zlobinski, M.; Samm, U.; the TEXTOR Team

    2014-04-01

    Laser induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) is a diagnostic to provide temporally and spatially resolved in situ measurements of tritium retention and material migration in order to characterize the status of the first wall in future fusion devices. In LIAS, a ns-laser pulse ablates the first nanometres of the first wall plasma-facing components into the plasma edge. The resulting line radiation by plasma excitation is observed by spectroscopy. In the case of the full ionizing plasma and with knowledge of appropriate photon efficiencies for the corresponding line emission the amount of ablated material can be measured in situ. We present the photon efficiency for the deuterium Balmer α-line resulting from ablation in TEXTOR by performing LIAS on amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:D) layers deposited on tungsten substrate of thicknesses between 0.1 and 1.1 μm. An experimental inverse photon efficiency of [ {\\frac{{D}}{{{XB}}}} ]_{{D}_\\alpha({EXP})}^{{a {- C:D}}\\mathop {\\mathop \\to \\limits_{{LIAS}} } D}= 75.9 +/- 23.4 was determined. This value is a factor 5 larger than predicted values from the ADAS database for atomic injection of deuterium under TEXTOR plasma edge conditions and about twice as high, assuming normal wall recycling and release of molecular deuterium and break-up of D2 via the molecular ion which is usually observed at the high temperature tokamak edge (Te > 30 eV).

  8. Investigation of gelatin/multi-walled carbon nanotube nanocomposite films as packaging materials

    PubMed Central

    Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Dadfar, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi; Dadfar, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Ahmadi, Farhad; Niakosari, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Gelatin composite films were prepared from gelatin solutions (10% w/v) containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2% w/w gelatin) as nanofiller. The water solubility, water swelling, water uptake, water vapor permeability (WVP), mechanical, and antibacterial properties of the films were examined. Water solubility, water swelling, water uptake, and WVP for gelatin films were 45 ± 1%, 821 ± 42%, 45 ± 1.1%, and 0.4 ± 0.022 g mm/m2 kPa h, respectively. Incorporation of MWCNT caused a significant decrease in water solubility, water swelling, water uptake, and WVP. Gelatin/MWCNT films containing 1–1.5% MWCNT showed the lowest water vapor transmission. Tensile strength, elongation at break, and Young's modulus for gelatin films were 13.4 ± 1.2 MPa, 95 ± 5%, and 45.4 ± 7 MPa, respectively. Incorporation of MWCNT caused a significant increase in tensile strength and decrease in the elongation at break. The largest mechanical strength was found at 1.5% MWCNT. All gelatin/MWCNT films showed significant antibacterial activities against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Our results suggest that the gelatin/MWCNT composites films could be used as a very attractive alternative to traditional materials for different biomedical and food applications. PMID:24804066

  9. Overall evaluation study for isotropic graphite as fusion first wall material in japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashina, Toshiro; Hino, Tomoaki

    1989-04-01

    Isotropie graphite has been widely used as first wall material in present large fusion devices. For isotropic graphites with different properties, however, overall evaluations with respect to vacuum engineering properties, thermal-mechanical properties and interations with plasmas have not been performed systematically. In 1986, under the support of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, the "Graphite Project Team" was organized. Fifteen institutions participated in this project and eighteen isotropic graphites supplied from seven graphite manufactures of Japan were studied as "common samples". From each company, both high- and low-density graphites were supplied since it was presumed that the vacuum engineering and thermal-mechanical properties depended on the density. During an approximately two years research period, we have obtained several interesting results on surface roughness, gas desorption, hydrogen permeation, failure due to heat load and fracture toughness. It was found that the vacuum engineering properties such as the surface area, the gas desorption and the hydrogen permeation depended significanly on the pore structure of the graphite. The surface area increased with the bulk density and the hydrogen permeation rate decreased with the bulk density. The gas desorption was very small for the graphite baked in vacuum. Treated in the same way, the amount of gas released from low-density graphite was smaller. The ash content of the graphite could be reduced to ppm levels by halogen gas treatment. The heat load experiments showed that most of the graphites failed at roughly the same heat load. The measured value of the fracture toughness was approximately the same. The change of the surface morphology by hydrogen ion irradiation and the desorption of trapped ions are also discussed.

  10. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  11. Analytical and numerical investigation of structural response of compliant wall materials, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, R.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of an electrostatically driven wall system for a compliant wall drag reduction program is reported. The electrostatic wall system is capable of producing deflections of many orders greater than the wall thicknesses and at small wavelengths. An intermediate large response theory is used for structural analysis. The theoretical predictions are compared to bench test results, and good agreement between the two is obtained. The effects of aerodynamic loads and perturbation electric fields on the theoretical solutions are considered. It is shown that for very small wavelengths (lambda almost equals 2 mm) the aerodynamic effects can be estimated using potential theory without loss of accuracy, and the perturbation electric fields do not effect solutions as long as the deflections are less than one percent of the wavelength. Resonance effects for this type of structure are shown to be fairly small.

  12. Effect of Non-Equilibrium Surface Thermochemistry in Simulation of Carbon Based Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates that coupling of a material thermal response code and a flow solver using non-equilibrium gas/surface interaction model provides time-accurate solutions for the multidimensional ablation of carbon based charring ablators. The material thermal response code used in this study is the Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal-response and AblatioN Program (TITAN), which predicts charring material thermal response and shape change on hypersonic space vehicles. Its governing equations include total energy balance, pyrolysis gas mass conservation, and a three-component decomposition model. The flow code solves the reacting Navier-Stokes equations using Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) method. Loose coupling between the material response and flow codes is performed by solving the surface mass balance in DPLR and the surface energy balance in TITAN. Thus, the material surface recession is predicted by finite-rate gas/surface interaction boundary conditions implemented in DPLR, and the surface temperature and pyrolysis gas injection rate are computed in TITAN. Two sets of nonequilibrium gas/surface interaction chemistry between air and the carbon surface developed by Park and Zhluktov, respectively, are studied. Coupled fluid-material response analyses of stagnation tests conducted in NASA Ames Research Center arc-jet facilities are considered. The ablating material used in these arc-jet tests was Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). Computational predictions of in-depth material thermal response and surface recession are compared with the experimental measurements for stagnation cold wall heat flux ranging from 107 to 1100 Watts per square centimeter.

  13. Depth Profiling of Polymer Composites by Ultrafast Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Clayton, Clive; Longtin, Jon

    2009-03-01

    Past work has shown femtosecond laser ablation to be an athermal process at low fluences in polymer systems. The ablation rate in this low fluence regime is very low, allowing for micro-scale removal of material. We have taken advantage of this fact to perform shallow depth profiling ablation on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. Neat composite and resin samples were studied to establish reference ablation profiles. These profiles and the effects of the heterogeneous distribution of carbon fibers were observed through confocal laser profilometry and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Weathered materials that have been subjected to accelerated tests in artificial sunlight or water conditions were ablated to determine the correlation between exposure and change in ablation characteristics. Preliminary Raman and micro-ATR analysis performed before and after ablation shows no chemical changes indicative of thermal effects. The low-volume-ablation property was utilized in an attempt to expose the sizing-matrix interphase for analysis.

  14. The Pack Method for Compressive Tests of Thin Specimens of Materials Used in Thin-Wall Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitchison, C S; Tuckerman, L B

    1939-01-01

    The strength of modern lightweight thin-wall structures is generally limited by the strength of the compression members. An adequate design of these members requires a knowledge of the compressive stress-strain graph of the thin-wall material. The "pack" method was developed at the National Bureau of Standards with the support of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to make possible a determination of compressive stress-strain graphs for such material. In the pack test an odd number of specimens are assembled into a relatively stable pack, like a "pack of cards." Additional lateral stability is obtained from lateral supports between the external sheet faces of the pack and outside reactions. The tests seems adequate for many problems in structural research.

  15. Indirect-drive ablative Richtmyer Meshkov node scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landen, O. L.; Baker, K. L.; Clark, D. S.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hammel, B. A.; Ho, D. D.; Hurricane, O. A.; Lindl, J. D.; Loomis, E. N.; Masse, L.; Mauche, C.; Milovich, J. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Yi, S. A.; Velikovich, A. L.; Weber, C.

    2016-05-01

    The ablation front Rayleigh Taylor hydroinstability growth dispersion curve for indirect-drive implosions has been shown to be dependent on the Richtmyer Meshkov growth during the first shock transit phase. In this paper, a simplified treatment of the first shock ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (ARM) growth dispersion curve is used to extract differences in ablation front perturbation growth behavior as function of foot pulse shape and ablator material for comparing the merits of various ICF design option.

  16. Analytical and numerical investigation of structural response of compliant wall materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G. L.; Balasubramanian, R.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of an electrostatically driven wall system for a compliant wall drag reduction program is reported. The electrostatic wall system is capable of producing deflections of many orders greater than the thicknesses and at small wavelengths. An intermediate large response theory was used for structural analysis. The theoretical predictions were compared to bench test results, and good agreement between the two was obtained. The effects of aerodynamic loads and perturbation electric fields on the theoretical solutions were considered. It was shown that for very small wavelengths (approximately 2mm) the aerodynamic effects can be estimated using potential theory without loss of accuracy, and the perturbation electric fields do not affect solutions as long as the deflections are less than one percent of the wavelength. Resonance effects for this type of structure were shown to be fairly small.

  17. Simple spherical ablative-implosion model

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, F.J.; Steele, J.T.; Larsen, J.T.

    1980-06-23

    A simple model of the ablative implosion of a high-aspect-ratio (shell radius to shell thickness ratio) spherical shell is described. The model is similar in spirit to Rosenbluth's snowplow model. The scaling of the implosion time was determined in terms of the ablation pressure and the shell parameters such as diameter, wall thickness, and shell density, and compared these to complete hydrodynamic code calculations. The energy transfer efficiency from ablation pressure to shell implosion kinetic energy was examined and found to be very efficient. It may be possible to attach a simple heat-transport calculation to our implosion model to describe the laser-driven ablation-implosion process. The model may be useful for determining other energy driven (e.g., ion beam) implosion scaling.

  18. Comparative Investigation between In Situ Laser Ablation Versus Bulk Sample (Solution Mode) Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) Analysis of Trinitite Post-Detonation Materials.

    PubMed

    Dustin, Megan K; Koeman, Elizabeth C; Simonetti, Antonio; Torrano, Zachary; Burns, Peter C

    2016-09-01

    In the event of the interception of illicit nuclear materials or detonation of a nuclear device, timely and accurate deciphering of the chemical and isotopic composition of pertinent samples is pivotal in enhancing both nuclear security and source attribution. This study reports the results from a first time (to our knowledge), detailed comparative investigation conducted of Trinitite post-detonation materials using both solution mode (SM) and laser ablation (LA) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) techniques. Trace element abundances determined for bulk Trinitite samples subsequent to digestion and preparation for SM-ICP-MS analysis compare favorably to calculated median concentrations based on LA-ICP-MS analyses for the identical samples. The trace element concentrations obtained by individual LA-ICP-MS analyses indicate a large scatter compared to the corresponding bulk sample SM-ICP-MS results for the same sample; this feature can be attributed to the incorporation into the blast melt of specific, precursor accessory minerals (minerals in small quantities, such as carbonates, sulfates, chlorites, clay, and mafic minerals) present at ground zero. The favorable comparison reported here validates and confirms the use of the LA-ICP-MS technique in obtaining accurate forensic information at high spatial resolution in nuclear materials for source attribution purposes. This investigation also reports device-like (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratios (∼0.022) for Pu-rich regions of the blast melt that are also characterized by higher Ca and U contents, which is consistent with results from previous studies. PMID:27566253

  19. A Self-Limiting Electro-Ablation Technique for the Top-Down Synthesis of Large-Area Monolayer Flakes of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Das, Saptarshi; Bera, Mrinal K; Tong, Sheng; Narayanan, Badri; Kamath, Ganesh; Mane, Anil; Paulikas, Arvydas P; Antonio, Mark R; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S; Roelofs, Andreas K

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of an electrochemical process that converts two dimensional layered materials of arbitrary thicknesses into monolayers. The lateral dimensions of the monolayers obtained by the process within a few seconds time at room temperature were as large as 0.5 mm. The temporal and spatial dynamics of this physical phenomenon, studied on MoS2 flakes using ex-situ AFM imaging, Raman mapping, and photoluminescence measurements trace the origin of monolayer formation to a substrate-assisted self-limiting electrochemical ablation process. Electronic structure and atomistic calculations point to the interplay between three essential factors in the process: (1) strong covalent interaction of monolayer MoS2 with the substrate; (2) electric-field induced differences in Gibbs free energy of exfoliation; (3) dispersion of MoS2 in aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. This process was successful in obtaining monolayers of other 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, like WS2 and MoTe2 as well. PMID:27323877

  20. A Self-Limiting Electro-Ablation Technique for the Top-Down Synthesis of Large-Area Monolayer Flakes of 2D Materials

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saptarshi; Bera, Mrinal K.; Tong, Sheng; Narayanan, Badri; Kamath, Ganesh; Mane, Anil; Paulikas, Arvydas P.; Antonio, Mark R.; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Roelofs, Andreas K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of an electrochemical process that converts two dimensional layered materials of arbitrary thicknesses into monolayers. The lateral dimensions of the monolayers obtained by the process within a few seconds time at room temperature were as large as 0.5 mm. The temporal and spatial dynamics of this physical phenomenon, studied on MoS2 flakes using ex-situ AFM imaging, Raman mapping, and photoluminescence measurements trace the origin of monolayer formation to a substrate-assisted self-limiting electrochemical ablation process. Electronic structure and atomistic calculations point to the interplay between three essential factors in the process: (1) strong covalent interaction of monolayer MoS2 with the substrate; (2) electric-field induced differences in Gibbs free energy of exfoliation; (3) dispersion of MoS2 in aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. This process was successful in obtaining monolayers of other 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, like WS2 and MoTe2 as well. PMID:27323877

  1. A Self-Limiting Electro-Ablation Technique for the Top-Down Synthesis of Large-Area Monolayer Flakes of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Saptarshi; Bera, Mrinal K.; Tong, Sheng; Narayanan, Badri; Kamath, Ganesh; Mane, Anil; Paulikas, Arvydas P.; Antonio, Mark R.; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Roelofs, Andreas K.

    2016-06-01

    We report the discovery of an electrochemical process that converts two dimensional layered materials of arbitrary thicknesses into monolayers. The lateral dimensions of the monolayers obtained by the process within a few seconds time at room temperature were as large as 0.5 mm. The temporal and spatial dynamics of this physical phenomenon, studied on MoS2 flakes using ex-situ AFM imaging, Raman mapping, and photoluminescence measurements trace the origin of monolayer formation to a substrate-assisted self-limiting electrochemical ablation process. Electronic structure and atomistic calculations point to the interplay between three essential factors in the process: (1) strong covalent interaction of monolayer MoS2 with the substrate; (2) electric-field induced differences in Gibbs free energy of exfoliation; (3) dispersion of MoS2 in aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. This process was successful in obtaining monolayers of other 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, like WS2 and MoTe2 as well.

  2. A Self-Limiting Electro-Ablation Technique for the Top-Down Synthesis of Large-Area Monolayer Flakes of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Das, Saptarshi; Bera, Mrinal K; Tong, Sheng; Narayanan, Badri; Kamath, Ganesh; Mane, Anil; Paulikas, Arvydas P; Antonio, Mark R; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S; Roelofs, Andreas K

    2016-06-21

    We report the discovery of an electrochemical process that converts two dimensional layered materials of arbitrary thicknesses into monolayers. The lateral dimensions of the monolayers obtained by the process within a few seconds time at room temperature were as large as 0.5 mm. The temporal and spatial dynamics of this physical phenomenon, studied on MoS2 flakes using ex-situ AFM imaging, Raman mapping, and photoluminescence measurements trace the origin of monolayer formation to a substrate-assisted self-limiting electrochemical ablation process. Electronic structure and atomistic calculations point to the interplay between three essential factors in the process: (1) strong covalent interaction of monolayer MoS2 with the substrate; (2) electric-field induced differences in Gibbs free energy of exfoliation; (3) dispersion of MoS2 in aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. This process was successful in obtaining monolayers of other 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, like WS2 and MoTe2 as well.

  3. Export of cyst wall material and Golgi organelle neogenesis in Giardia lamblia depend on endoplasmic reticulum exit sites.

    PubMed

    Faso, Carmen; Konrad, Christian; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Hehl, Adrian B

    2013-04-01

    Giardia lamblia parasitism accounts for the majority of cases of parasitic diarrheal disease, making this flagellated eukaryote the most successful intestinal parasite worldwide. This organism has undergone secondary reduction/elimination of entire organelle systems such as mitochondria and Golgi. However, trophozoite to cyst differentiation (encystation) requires neogenesis of Golgi-like secretory organelles named encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs), which traffic, modify and partition cyst wall proteins produced exclusively during encystation. In this work we ask whether neogenesis of Golgi-related ESVs during G. lamblia differentiation, similarly to Golgi biogenesis in more complex eukaryotes, requires the maintenance of distinct COPII-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subdomains in the form of ER exit sites (ERES) and whether ERES are also present in non-differentiating trophozoites. To address this question, we identified conserved COPII components in G. lamblia cells and determined their localization, quantity and dynamics at distinct ERES domains in vegetative and differentiating trophozoites. Analogous to ERES and Golgi biogenesis, these domains were closely associated to early stages of newly generated ESV. Ectopic expression of non-functional Sar1 GTPase variants caused ERES collapse and, consequently, ESV ablation, leading to impaired parasite differentiation. Thus, our data show how ERES domains remain conserved in G. lamblia despite elimination of steady-state Golgi. Furthermore, the fundamental eukaryotic principle of ERES to Golgi/Golgi-like compartment correspondence holds true in differentiating Giardia presenting streamlined machinery for secretory organelle biogenesis and protein trafficking. However, in the Golgi-less trophozoites ERES exist as stable ER subdomains, likely as the sole sorting centres for secretory traffic. PMID:23094658

  4. Characterizing moisture-dependent mechanical properties of organic materials: humidity-controlled static and dynamic nanoindentation of wood cell walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertinetti, Luca; Hangen, Ude D.; Eder, Michaela; Leibner, Petra; Fratzl, Peter; Zlotnikov, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Nanoindentation is an ideal technique to study local mechanical properties of a wide range of materials on the sub-micron scale. It has been widely used to investigate biological materials in the dry state; however, their properties are strongly affected by their moisture content, which until now has not been consistently controlled. In the present study, we developed an experimental set-up for measuring local mechanical properties of materials by nanoindentation in a controlled environment of relative humidity (RH) and temperature. The significance of this new approach in studying biological materials was demonstrated for the secondary cell wall layer (S2) in Spruce wood (Picea abies). The hardness of the cell wall layer decreased from an average of approximately 0.6 GPa at 6% RH down to approximately 0.2 GPa at 79% RH, corresponding to a reduction by a factor of 3. Under the same conditions, the indentation modulus also decreased by about 40%. The newly designed experimental set-up has a strong potential for a variety of applications involving the temperature- and humidity-dependent properties of biological and artificial organic nanocomposites.

  5. Laser inertial fusion dry-wall materials response to pulsed ions at power-plant level fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, T. J.; Tanaka, T. J.; Olson, C. L.; Peterson, R. R.; Knowles, T. R.

    2004-08-01

    Pulses of MeV-level ions with fluences of up to 20 J/cm 2 can be expected to impinge on the first-wall of future laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plants. To simulate the effect of these ions, we have exposed candidate dry-wall materials to ion pulses from RHEPP-1, located at Sandia National Laboratories. Various forms of tungsten and tungsten alloy were exposed to up to 1000 pulses, with some samples heated to 600 °C. Thresholds for roughening and material removal, and evolution of surface morphology were measured and compared with code predictions for materials response. Tungsten is observed to undergo surface roughening and subsurface crack formation that evolves over hundreds of pulses, and which can occur both below and above the melt threshold. Heating and Re-alloying mitigate, but do not eliminate, these apparently thermomechanically-caused effects. Use of a 3-D geometry, and/or use of the tungsten in thin-film form may offer improved survivability compared to bulk tungsten.

  6. An Approximate Ablative Thermal Protection System Sizing Tool for Entry System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    A computer tool to perform entry vehicle ablative thermal protection systems sizing has been developed. Two options for calculating the thermal response are incorporated into the tool. One, an industry-standard, high-fidelity ablation and thermal response program was integrated into the tool, making use of simulated trajectory data to calculate its boundary conditions at the ablating surface. Second, an approximate method that uses heat of ablation data to estimate heat shield recession during entry has been coupled to a one-dimensional finite-difference calculation that calculates the in-depth thermal response. The in-depth solution accounts for material decomposition, but does not account for pyrolysis gas energy absorption through the material. Engineering correlations are used to estimate stagnation point convective and radiative heating as a function of time. The sizing tool calculates recovery enthalpy, wall enthalpy, surface pressure, and heat transfer coefficient. Verification of this tool is performed by comparison to past thermal protection system sizings for the Mars Pathfinder and Stardust entry systems and calculations are performed for an Apollo capsule entering the atmosphere at lunar and Mars return speeds.

  7. An Approximate Ablative Thermal Protection System Sizing Tool for Entry System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    A computer tool to perform entry vehicle ablative thermal protection systems sizing has been developed. Two options for calculating the thermal response are incorporated into the tool. One, an industry-standard, high-fidelity ablation and thermal response program was integrated into the tool, making use of simulated trajectory data to calculate its boundary conditions at the ablating surface. Second, an approximate method that uses heat of ablation data to estimate heat shield recession during entry has been coupled to a one-dimensional finite-difference calculation that calculates the in-depth thermal response. The in-depth solution accounts for material decomposition, but does not account for pyrolysis gas energy absorption through the material. Engineering correlations are used to estimate stagnation point convective and radiative heating as a function of time. The sizing tool calculates recovery enthalpy, wall enthalpy, surface pressure, and heat transfer coefficient. Verification of this tool is performed by comparison to past thermal protection system sizings for the Mars Pathfinder and Stardust entry systems and calculations are performed for an Apollo capsule entering the atmosphere at lunar and Mars return speeds.

  8. Safety Analysis Using Lebesgue Strain Measure of Thick-Walled Cylinder for Functionally Graded Material under Internal and External Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, A. K.; Sharma, Richa; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Safety analysis has been done for thick-walled circular cylinder under internal and external pressure using transition theory which is based on the concept of generalized principal Lebesgue strain measure. Results have been analyzed theoretically and discussed numerically. From the analysis, it can be concluded that circular cylinder made of functionally graded material is on the safer side of the design as compared to homogeneous cylinder with internal and external pressure, which leads to the idea of “stress saving” that minimizes the possibility of fracture of cylinder. PMID:24089605

  9. Safety analysis using Lebesgue strain measure of thick-walled cylinder for functionally graded material under internal and external pressure.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, A K; Sharma, Richa; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Safety analysis has been done for thick-walled circular cylinder under internal and external pressure using transition theory which is based on the concept of generalized principal Lebesgue strain measure. Results have been analyzed theoretically and discussed numerically. From the analysis, it can be concluded that circular cylinder made of functionally graded material is on the safer side of the design as compared to homogeneous cylinder with internal and external pressure, which leads to the idea of "stress saving" that minimizes the possibility of fracture of cylinder.

  10. Safety analysis using Lebesgue strain measure of thick-walled cylinder for functionally graded material under internal and external pressure.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, A K; Sharma, Richa; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Safety analysis has been done for thick-walled circular cylinder under internal and external pressure using transition theory which is based on the concept of generalized principal Lebesgue strain measure. Results have been analyzed theoretically and discussed numerically. From the analysis, it can be concluded that circular cylinder made of functionally graded material is on the safer side of the design as compared to homogeneous cylinder with internal and external pressure, which leads to the idea of "stress saving" that minimizes the possibility of fracture of cylinder. PMID:24089605

  11. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  12. Composite of single walled carbon nanotube and sulfosalicylic acid doped polyaniline: a thermoelectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana Chatterjee, Mukulika; Banerjee, Dipali; Chatterjee, Krishanu

    2016-08-01

    Nanocomposites containing single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and highly ordered polyaniline (PANI) have been synthesized employing an in situ polymerization using different weight percentages of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as template and aniline as a reactant. The composites show homogeneously dispersed SWCNTs which are uniformly coated with PANI through a strong interface interaction. Structural characterization shows that the PANI cultivated along the surface of the SWCNTs in an ordered manner during the SWCNT-directed polymerization process. Measurements at room temperature displayed a significant enhancement in both the electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power which could be attributed to the more ordered chain structures of the PANI on SWCNT. As a result, the power factor of the composite is improved which increases with temperature. At the same time, the measured value of thermal conductivity at room temperature being lowest among the reported values, has resulted in best ZT at room temperature. The lowest value of thermal conductivity is attributed to the large phonon scattering due to the introduction of nanointerfaces.

  13. Glue septal ablation: A promising alternative to alcohol septal ablation

    PubMed Central

    Aytemir, Kudret; Oto, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined as myocardial hypertrophy in the absence of another cardiac or systemic disease capable of producing the magnitude of present hypertrophy. In about 70% of patients with HCM, there is left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction (LVOTO) and this is known as obstructive type of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM). Cases refractory to medical treatment have had two options either surgical septal myectomy or alcohol septal ablation (ASA) to alleviate LVOT gradient. ASA may cause some life-threatening complications including conduction disturbances and complete heart block, hemodynamic compromise, ventricular arrhythmias, distant and massive myocardial necrosis. Glue septal ablation (GSA) is a promising technique for the treatment of HOCM. Glue seems to be superior to alcohol due to some intrinsic advantageous properties of glue such as immediate polymerization which prevents the leak into the left anterior descending coronary artery and it is particularly useful in patients with collaterals to the right coronary artery in whom alcohol ablation is contraindicated. In our experience, GSA is effective and also a safe technique without significant complications. GSA decreases LVOT gradient immediately after the procedure and this reduction persists during 12 months of follow-up. It improves New York Heart Association functional capacity and decrease interventricular septal wall thickness. Further studies are needed in order to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of this technique. PMID:27011786

  14. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  15. Laser ablation of blepharopigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, M.; Karas, S.; McCord, C.D. Jr. )

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses laser ablation of blepharopigmentation in four stages: first, experimentally, where pigment vaporization is readily achieved with the argon blue-green laser; second, in the rabbit animal model, where eyelid blepharopigmentation markings are ablated with the laser; third, in human subjects, where the argon blue-green laser is effective in the ablation of implanted eyelid pigment; and fourth, in a case report, where, in a patient with improper pigment placement in the eyelid, the laser is used to safely and effectively ablate the undesired pigment markings. This article describes in detail the new technique of laser ablation of blepharopigmentation. Potential complications associated with the technique are discussed.

  16. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K.L.

    1985-10-01

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well. (LSP)

  17. Electrochemical biosensing of galactose based on carbon materials: graphene versus multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dalkıran, Berna; Erden, Pınar Esra; Kılıç, Esma

    2016-06-01

    In this study, two enzyme electrodes based on graphene (GR), Co3O4 nanoparticles and chitosan (CS) or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), Co3O4 nanoparticles, and CS, were fabricated as novel biosensing platforms for galactose determination, and their performances were compared. Galactose oxidase (GaOx) was immobilized onto the electrode surfaces by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Optimum working conditions of the biosensors were investigated and the analytical performance of the biosensors was compared with respect to detection limit, linearity, repeatability, and stability. The MWCNTs-based galactose biosensor provided about 1.6-fold higher sensitivity than its graphene counterpart. Moreover, the linear working range and detection limit of the MWCNTs-based galactose biosensor was superior to the graphene-modified biosensor. The successful application of the purposed biosensors for galactose biosensing in human serum samples was also investigated. PMID:27074783

  18. A simple solution to expanding available reference materials for Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis: Applications to sedimentary materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, Mohamed E.; Fryer, Brian J.

    2011-08-01

    Analytical data on sediments are of great importance in understanding and documenting environmental issues. For laboratories interested in in-situ chemical analysis of sediments by LA-ICP-MS, a major issue is the lack of appropriate matrix matched sediment reference materials. Those available were largely designed for partial extractions which generally do not reflect the total elemental compositions. In this work we provide a comprehensive study on chemical compositions of seven currently available sediment reference materials (Lake sediments: LKSD-1, LKSD-2, LKSD-3, Stream sediments: STSD-2, STSD-3, and Marine sediments: PACS-2, MESS-3) as determined by Solution Nebulization Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (SN-ICP-MS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) after digestion in a mixture of concentrated HNO 3 and HF acids. We also report a simple method to prepare these sediment reference materials and more generally appropriate sediment cores for LA-ICP-MS analysis using epoxy resin. This sample preparation method maintains sediment integrity for high spatial resolution analysis which is required for tracing changes in environmental conditions over short time periods. This work also demonstrates the application of fs-LA-ICP-MS as a tool for direct, rapid and high spatial resolution analysis of sediments.

  19. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  20. [Chest wall moulages for radiotherapy of resected breast cancer with fast electrons: comparative tests of different materials].

    PubMed

    Niewald, M; Lehmann, W; Tkocz, H J; Scharding, B; Uhlmann, U; Schnabel, K; Leetz, H K

    1986-10-01

    Irradiation of the thoracic wall with high-speed electrons is one of the standard methods of prophylaxis and therapy of local recurrences and cutaneous metastases of an operated mammary carcinoma. The surface dose, however, is only 85% of the maximum dose, due to the depth dose curve of the electron beams with the preponderantly applied energy of 7MeV. This is a poor value, since most of all recurrences appear near to the surface and so the risk of giving an insufficient dose is involved. The dose distribution could be essentially improved by the use of moulages on the chest. These moulages were made of different materials which were tested and compared with respect to their suitability for radiotherapeutic purposes. The best materials proved to be "Urgo-Plastan" (manufacturer: Holphar, Sulzbach) and "Orthoplast" (manufacturer: Johnson & Johnson, Düsseldorf). Both materials are synthetic substances which after heating can easily be adapted to the body shape and which offer a good stability, little inconvenience for the patient and a relative easy handling. With these moulage materials, the surface dose is increased to 98% ("Urgo-Plastan") and 99% ("Orthoplast") of the maximum dose. PMID:3095940

  1. Steam-assisted crystallization of TPA{sup +}-exchanged MCM-41 type mesoporous materials with thick pore walls

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong Li; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Yi Meng

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: ► Mesoporous Ti-containing silica with thicker pore walls was synthesized. ► Ion-exchange and steam-assisted crystallization led to MCM-41/MFI composite. ► The introduction of Ti inhibited the formation of separated MFI particles. ► Lower temperature favored retaining mesoporous characteristics and morphology. -- Abstract: Hierarchical MCM-41/MFI composites were synthesized through ion-exchange of as-made MCM-41 type mesoporous materials with tetrapropylammonium bromide and subsequent steam-assisted recrystallization. The obtained samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis, FT-IR, {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C CP/MAS and nitrogen adsorption–desorption. The XRD patterns show that the MCM-41/MFI composite possesses both ordered MCM-41 phase and zeolite MFI phase. SEM and TEM images indicate that the recrystallized materials retained the mesoporous characteristics and the morphology of as-made mesoporous materials without the formation of bulky zeolite, quite different from the mechanical mixture of MCM-41 and MFI structured zeolite. Among others, lower recrystallization temperature and the introduction of the titanium to the parent materials are beneficial to preserve the mesoporous structure during the recrystallization process.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate structural materials under simulated first-wall/aqueous coolant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.R.; Hull, A.B.; Kassner, T.F.

    1990-10-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Types 316NG, 316, and 304 stainless steels (SS) was investigated in slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in oxygenated water that simulates important parameters anticipated in first-wall/blanket systems. The water chemistry was based on a computer code which yielded the nominal concentrations of radiolytic species produced in an aqueous environment under ITER-type conditions. Actual SSRTs were performed in a less benign, more oxidizing reference environment at temperatures from 52 to 150{degree}C. Predominantly ductile fracture was observed in Type 316NG and nonsensitized Types 316 SS and 304 SS SSRT specimens strained to failure in a reference ITER water chemistry. The failure behavior of Type 304 SS specimens heat-treated to yield sensitization values of 2, 3, or 20 Coulomb (C)/cm{sup 2} by the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) technique, demonstrated that the degree of sensitization had a dramatic effect on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility. Ranking for resistance to SCC in simulated ITER water by electron microscopy and SSRT parameters, i.e., failure time, ultimate strength, total elongation and stress ratio is 304 SS (EPR = 20 <2 C/cm{sup 2}) < 316NG SS. 11 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Effect of varieties composition of wall material on physical and chemistry characteristics of microcapsulated kaffir lime leave oleoresin (Citrus hystrix DC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifatunissa, Zhulfani Nur; Kawiji, Khasanah, Lia Umi; Utami, Rohula

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of variety composition of wall material on characteristic of micro capsulated kaffir lime leave oleoresin which includes yield, water content, and solubility in water, microstructure, residual solvent content and active compound content. This study used variety composition of maltodextrin and carrageenan (100%: 0%; 97%: 3%; 95%: 5%; 90%: 10%) as wall material, and kaffir lime leave oleoresin as core material which was extracted by maceration using ethanol as solvent. Analysis's result showed that the varieties composition of wall material influenced on yield and water content significantly. However, there was no significant influence discovered in solubility in water and residual solvent content. Active compounds contained in the product of oleoresin microcapsules kaffir lime leaves are citronella, citronellol, citronellyl acetate, nerolidol, phytol, farnesol while the levels of residual solvents in this study ranged from 0.01-0.015%. Based on experiment result showed that use carrageenan can produce preferable microstructure.

  4. Preparation and performance of thermal insulation energy saving coating materials for exterior wall.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Liang, Jinsheng; Tang, Qingguo; Chen, Gong; Chen, Yalei

    2014-05-01

    Nano zinc oxide with a high refractive index has good thermal reflection performance, hollow glass microspheres have good thermal reflection and insulation performance, and sepiolite nanofibers with many nanostructural pores have good thermal insulation performance. The dispensability of nano zinc oxide in coating materials was improved by optimizing surface silane coupling agent modification process, leading to the good thermal reflection performance. The thermal insulation performance was improved by hollow glass microspheres and sepiolite nanofibers. On this basis, the thermal insulation coating materials were prepared by exploring the effect of amount, complex mode, and other factors of the above three kinds of functional fillers on the thermal reflection and insulation performance of coating materials. The results showed that the surface modification effect of nano zinc oxide was the best when the silane coupling agent addition was 6%. The reflection and insulation performance of the coatings were the best when the additions of modified nano zinc oxide, hollow glass microspheres, and sepiolite nanofibers were 3%, 4%, and 4%, respectively. Compared with the control coating materials, the thermal insulation effect was improved obviously, which was evaluated by the -13.5 degrees C increase of maximum temperature difference between the upper and the lower surfaces.

  5. On the Ablation Models of Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.

    2005-12-15

    The neutral gas shielding model and neutral-gas-plasma shielding model are analyzed qualitatively. The main physical processes that govern the formation of the shielding gas cloud and, consequently, the ablation rate are considered. For the neutral gas shielding model, simple formulas relating the ablation rate and cloud parameters to the parameters of the pellet and the background plasma are presented. The estimates of the efficiency of neutral gas shielding and plasma shielding are compared. It is shown that the main portion of the energy flux of the background electrons is released in the plasma cloud. Formulas for the ablation rate and plasma parameters are derived in the neutral-gas-plasma shielding model. The question is discussed as to why the neutral gas shielding model describes well the ablation rate of the pellet material, although it does not take into account the ionization effects and the effects associated with the interaction of ionized particles with the magnetic field. The reason is that the ablation rate depends weakly on the energy flux of hot electrons; as a result, the attenuation of this flux by the electrostatic shielding and plasma shielding has little effect on the ablation rate. This justifies the use of the neutral gas shielding model to estimate the ablation rate (to within a factor of about 2) over a wide range of parameters of the pellet and the background plasma.

  6. Wall Covering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The attractive wall covering shown below is one of 132 styles in the Mirror Magic II line offered by The General Tire & Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. The material is metallized plastic fabric, a spinoff from space programs. Wall coverings are one of many consumer applications of aluminized plastic film technology developed for NASA by a firm later bought by King-Seeley Thermos Company, Winchester, Massachusetts, which now produces the material. The original NASA use was in the Echo 1 passive communications satellite, a "space baloon" made of aluminized mylar; the high reflectivity of the metallized coating enabled relay of communications signals from one Earth station to another by "bouncing" them off the satellite. The reflectivity feature also made the material an extremely efficient insulator and it was subsequently widely used in the Apollo program for such purposes as temperature control of spacecraft components and insulation of tanks for fuels that must be maintained at very low temperatures. I Used as a wall covering, the aluminized material offers extra insulation, reflects light and I resists cracking. In addition to General Tire, King-Seeley also supplies wall covering material to Columbus Coated Fabrics Division of Borden, Incorporated, Columbus, Ohio, among others.

  7. Femtosecond laser ablation of brass in air and liquid media

    SciTech Connect

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2013-06-07

    Laser ablation of brass in air, water, and ethanol was investigated using a femtosecond laser system operating at a wavelength of 785 nm and a pulse width less than 130 fs. Scanning electron and optical microscopy were used to study the efficiency and quality of laser ablation in the three ablation media at two different ablation modes. With a liquid layer thickness of 3 mm above the target, ablation rate was found to be higher in water and ethanol than in air. Ablation under water and ethanol showed cleaner surfaces and less debris re-deposition compared to ablation in air. In addition to spherical particles that are normally formed from re-solidified molten material, micro-scale particles with varying morphologies were observed scattered in the ablated structures (craters and grooves) when ablation was conducted under water. The presence of such particles indicates the presence of a non-thermal ablation mechanism that becomes more apparent when ablation is conducted under water.

  8. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Pham, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of this research is on the class of materials known as phenolic impregnated carbon ablators. It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the thermal protection system material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory and SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. Although it has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To understand failure mechanisms in carbon ablators, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor), virgin, and charred ablator materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the tensile strength and toughness. It was observed that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred carbon ablators, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred carbon ablators showed greater strength values compared with FiberForm samples, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  9. Nanochemical effects in femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-02-18

    We study chemical energy released from the oxidation of aluminum in multipulse femtosecond laser ablation in air and oxygen. Our study shows that the released chemical energy amounts to about 13% of the incident laser energy, and about 50% of the ablated material is oxidized. The ablated material mass per laser pulse is measured to be on the nanogram scale. Our study indicates that femtosecond laser ablation is capable of inducing nanochemical reactions since the femtosecond laser pulse can controllably produce nanoparticles, clusters, and atoms from a solid target.

  10. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  11. Features of the synthesis of nanocolloid oxides by laser ablation of bulk metal targets in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapin, Ivan N.; Svetlichnyi, Valery A.

    2015-12-01

    Laser ablation of bulk targets in a fluid -- a promising new method for the synthesis of "pure" nanocolloids. Nanocrystalline materials produced by laser ablation are widely used in biology, medicine, and catalysis. High local temperature during ablation and large surface area of the particles promote chemical reactions and the formation of a complex composition of nanoparticles. In this paper the characteristics of the process of ablation and the obtaining of nanoparticles in a liquid by laser ablation of active materials (Zn, Ce, Ti, Si) were studied. Ways of increasing the productivity of laser ablation were discussed. Characterization of nanocolloids and nanocrystalline powders were performed.

  12. Transient and steady-state velocity of domain walls for a complete range of drive fields. [in magnetic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourne, H. C., Jr.; Bartran, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    Approximate analytic solutions for transient and steady-state 180 deg domain-wall motion in bulk magnetic material are obtained from the dynamic torque equations with a Gilbert damping term. The results for the Walker region in which the transient solution approaches the familiar Walker steady-state solution are presented in a slightly new form for completeness. An analytic solution corresponding to larger drive fields predicts an oscillatory motion with an average value of the velocity which decreases with drive field for reasonable values of the damping parameter. These results agree with those obtained by others from a computer solution of the torque equation and those obtained by others with the assumption of a very large anisotropy field.

  13. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  14. Application of acid-treated yeast cell wall (AYC) as a pharmaceutical additive I. AYC as a novel coating material.

    PubMed

    Kasai, T; Eguchi, T; Ishiwaki, N; Kaneshige, J; Ozeki, T; Yuasa, H

    2000-08-25

    Acid-treated yeast cell wall (AYC) was newly prepared by acidifying the cell wall of brewer's yeast and the potential to use AYC as a novel coating material was studied. AYC had an oval shape with the diameter of several microm. The rheogram of AYC aqueous dispersion showed the plastic fluid property that is generally observed in the suspension. Core tablets containing 3% of acetaminophen (AAP) were coated with the AYC aqueous dispersion containing 5% (w/v) of AYC and 0.35% (w/v) of glycerol at various coating percents. The AAP release profile from the AYC-coated tablets was studied by the JP13 paddle method using solutions at various pH. Tensile strength and permeability of oxygen and water vapor of AYC cast film were measured. The AAP release from the AYC-coated tablets showed sigmoidal release profile with an initial lag time and the duration of the lag time depended on the coating percent of AYC. The pH of the dissolution fluid or the storage at room temperature for 120 days had little affect on AAP release from the AYC-coated tablets. These results suggest that it is possible to control the start time of medicine release independent of the pH by coating of AYC, that is the time-controlled release. The AYC cast film showed a large tensile strength and an extremely small oxygen permeability coefficient and a sufficient level of water permeability coefficient in order to protect from moisture. These results present that AYC has the high utility as a novel aqueous coating material for DDS preparations. PMID:11011986

  15. Influence of the Liquid on Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitz, A.; Hoppius, J. S.; Gurevich, E. L.; Ostendorf, A.

    Ultrashort pulse laser ablation has become a very important industrial method for highly precise material removal ranging from sensitive thin film processing to drilling and cutting of metals. Over the last decade, a new method to produce pure nanoparticles emerged from this technique: Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquids (PLAL). By this method, the ablation of material by a laser beam is used to generate a metal vapor within the liquid in order to obtain nanoparticles from its recondensation process. It is well known that the liquid significantly alters the ablation properties of the substrate, in our case iron. For example, the ablation rate and crater morphology differ depending on the used liquid. We present our studies on the efficiency and quality of ablated grooves in water, methanol, acetone, ethanol and toluene. The produced grooves are investigated by means of white-light interferometry, EDX and SEM.

  16. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  17. BUILDING MATERIAL CHARACTERIZATION USING A CONCRETE FLOOR AND WALL CONTAMINATION PROFILING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Dr. S.,; Charters, G.; Thacker, Dr. D.

    2003-02-27

    Certain radioisotopes can penetrate concrete and contaminate the concrete well below the surface. The challenge is to determine the extent and magnitude of the contamination problem in real-time. The concrete profiling technology, TRUPROSM in conjunction with portable radiometric instrumentation produces a profile of radiological or chemical contamination through the material being studied. The data quality, quantity, and representativeness may be used to produce an activity profile from the hot spot surface into the material being sampled. This activity profile may then be expanded to ultimately characterize the facility and expedite waste segregation and facility closure at a reduced cost and risk. Performing a volumetric concrete or metal characterization safer and faster (without lab intervention) is the objective of this characterization technology. This way of determining contamination can save considerable time and money. Currently, concrete core bores are shipped to certified laboratories where the concrete residue is run through a battery of tests to determine the contaminants. The existing core boring operation volatilizes or washes out some of the contaminants (like tritium) and oftentimes cross-contaminates the area around the core bore site. The volatilization of the contaminants can lead to airborne problems in the immediate vicinity of the core bore. Cross-contamination can increase the contamination area and thereby increase the amount of waste generated. The goal is to avoid those field activities that could cause this type of release.

  18. 1064 nm FT-Raman spectroscopy for investigations of plant cell walls and other biomass materials.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Umesh P

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy with its various special techniques and methods has been applied to study plant biomass for about 30 years. Such investigations have been performed at both macro- and micro-levels. However, with the availability of the Near Infrared (NIR) (1064 nm) Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman instruments where, in most materials, successful fluorescence suppression can be achieved, the utility of the Raman investigations has increased significantly. Moreover, the development of several new capabilities such as estimation of cellulose-crystallinity, ability to analyze changes in cellulose conformation at the local and molecular level, and examination of water-cellulose interactions have made this technique essential for research in the field of plant science. The FT-Raman method has also been applied to research studies in the arenas of biofuels and nanocelluloses. Moreover, the ability to investigate plant lignins has been further refined with the availability of near-IR Raman. In this paper, we present 1064-nm FT-Raman spectroscopy methodology to investigate various compositional and structural properties of plant material. It is hoped that the described studies will motivate the research community in the plant biomass field to adapt this technique to investigate their specific research needs.

  19. 1064 nm FT-Raman spectroscopy for investigations of plant cell walls and other biomass materials

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Umesh P.

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy with its various special techniques and methods has been applied to study plant biomass for about 30 years. Such investigations have been performed at both macro- and micro-levels. However, with the availability of the Near Infrared (NIR) (1064 nm) Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman instruments where, in most materials, successful fluorescence suppression can be achieved, the utility of the Raman investigations has increased significantly. Moreover, the development of several new capabilities such as estimation of cellulose-crystallinity, ability to analyze changes in cellulose conformation at the local and molecular level, and examination of water-cellulose interactions have made this technique essential for research in the field of plant science. The FT-Raman method has also been applied to research studies in the arenas of biofuels and nanocelluloses. Moreover, the ability to investigate plant lignins has been further refined with the availability of near-IR Raman. In this paper, we present 1064-nm FT-Raman spectroscopy methodology to investigate various compositional and structural properties of plant material. It is hoped that the described studies will motivate the research community in the plant biomass field to adapt this technique to investigate their specific research needs. PMID:25295049

  20. Effects of Laser Wavelength on Ablator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent or spectral radiation effects are potentially significant for thermal protection materials. NASA atmospheric entry simulations include trajectories with significant levels of shock layer radiation which is concentrated in narrow spectral lines. Tests using two different high powered lasers, the 10.6 micron LHMEL I CO2 laser and the near-infrared 1.07 micron fiber laser, on low density ablative thermal protection materials offer a unique opportunity to evaluate spectral effects. Test results indicated that the laser wavelength can impact the thermal response of an ablative material, in terms of bond-line temperatures, penetration times, mass losses, and char layer thicknesses.

  1. Verification and Validation of EnergyPlus Phase Change Material Model for Opaque Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Christensen, C.; Bianchi, M.

    2012-08-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) represent a technology that may reduce peak loads and HVAC energy consumption in buildings. A few building energy simulation programs have the capability to simulate PCMs, but their accuracy has not been completely tested. This study shows the procedure used to verify and validate the PCM model in EnergyPlus using a similar approach as dictated by ASHRAE Standard 140, which consists of analytical verification, comparative testing, and empirical validation. This process was valuable, as two bugs were identified and fixed in the PCM model, and version 7.1 of EnergyPlus will have a validated PCM model. Preliminary results using whole-building energy analysis show that careful analysis should be done when designing PCMs in homes, as their thermal performance depends on several variables such as PCM properties and location in the building envelope.

  2. Composite wall concept for high temperature turbine shrouds: Survey of low modulus strain isolator materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Allen, G. P.; Wisander, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconium oxide turbine seal specimens, incorporating various low modulus porous metal strain isolator pads between the zirconium oxide and a dense metal substrate, were subjected to cyclic thermal shock testing. Specimens that had a low modulus pad composed of sintered FeNiCrAlY fibermetal survived 1000 thermal shock cycles without spalling of the ceramic. A figure of merit for the low modulus pad materials taking into consideration the elastic modulus, thermal conductivity, strength, and oxidation resistance of the pad was proposed, and showed reasonable agreement with the thermal shock results. A potential surface distress problem on the zirconium oxide, associated with nonuniform temperature distribution and rapid stress relaxation was identified. One approach to solving the surface distress problem through application of laser surface fusion of the zirconium oxide layer showed some promise, but improvements in the laser surface fusion process are necessary to prevent process associated damage to the ceramic.

  3. Effect of wall thickness and material on flexural fatigue of hollow rolling elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, E. N.; Parker, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hollow cylindrical bars were tested in a rolling-contact fatigue tester to determine the effects of material and outside diameter to inside diameter (OD/ID) ratios on fatigue failure mode and subsequent failure propagation. The range of applied loads with OD/ID ratios of 2.0, 1.6, 1.4, and 1.2 resulted in maximum tangential tensile stresses ranging from 165 to 655 MPa at the bore surface. Flexural failures of the hollow test bars occurred when this bore stress was 490 MPa or greater with AISI 52100 hollow bars and 338 MPa or greater with AISI M-50 hollow bars. Good correlation was obtained in relating the failures of these hollow bars with flexural failures of drilled balls from full-scale bearing test published previously.

  4. Ablation of Myocardial Tissue With Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fei; Varghese, Frency; Pakhomov, Andrei G.; Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Philpott, Jonathan; Zemlin, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Ablation of cardiac tissue is an essential tool for the treatment of arrhythmias, particularly of atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and ventricular tachycardia. Current ablation technologies suffer from substantial recurrence rates, thermal side effects, and long procedure times. We demonstrate that ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) can potentially overcome these limitations. Methods We used optical mapping to monitor electrical activity in Langendorff-perfused New Zealand rabbit hearts (n = 12). We repeatedly inserted two shock electrodes, spaced 2–4 mm apart, into the ventricles (through the entire wall) and applied nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) (5–20 kV/cm, 350 ns duration, at varying pulse numbers and frequencies) to create linear lesions of 12–18 mm length. Hearts were stained either with tetrazolium chloride (TTC) or propidium iodide (PI) to determine the extent of ablation. Some stained lesions were sectioned to obtain the three-dimensional geometry of the ablated volume. Results In all animals (12/12), we were able to create nonconducting lesions with less than 2 seconds of nsPEF application per site and minimal heating (< 0.2°C) of the tissue. The geometry of the ablated volume was smoother and more uniform throughout the wall than typical for RF ablation. The width of the lesions could be controlled up to 6 mm via the electrode spacing and the shock parameters. Conclusions Ablation with nsPEFs is a promising alternative to radiofrequency (RF) ablation of AF. It may dramatically reduce procedure times and produce more consistent lesion thickness than RF ablation. PMID:26658139

  5. Numerical simulation of film-cooled ablative rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landrum, D. B.; Beard, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research effort was to evaluate the impact of incorporating an additional cooling port downstream between the injector and nozzle throat in the NASA Fast Track chamber. A numerical model of the chamber was developed for the analysis. The analysis did not model ablation but instead correlated the initial ablation rate with the initial nozzle wall temperature distribution. The results of this study provide guidance in the development of a potentially lighter, second generation ablative rocket nozzle which maintains desired performance levels.

  6. Effect of material properties on the strain to failure of thick-walled cylinders subjected to internal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.P.; Priddy, T.G. )

    1994-05-01

    The determination of the fully plastic response and pressure limit of a pressure vessel is of considerable importance in design, especially in autofrettage considerations. This paper presents the results of an experimental study which measured the maximum internal pressure which can be applied to thick-walled cylindrical vessels. Both aluminum and steel, with material properties ranging from ductile to brittle, were tested at stress levels through plastic and strain hardening ranges to fracture. From these tests, the pressure-expansion and through-thickness yielding characteristics were determined for these specimens. It is shown that a strain-to-failure criterion, based on the triaxiality of stress in the critical region, can be used to predict the complete pressure versus strain relations and maximum pressure for these cylinders. A simple tension-true stress-strain relation of the material is employed to analytically predict the response of the cylinder into the plastic regime. Finally, simplified theoretical and empirical formulas for bursting pressures are checked against the experimental results.

  7. Sprayable lightweight ablative coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G. (Inventor); Sharpe, Max H. (Inventor); Hill, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved lightweight, ablative coating is disclosed that may be spray applied and cured without the development of appreciable shrinkage cracks. The ablative mixture consists essentially of phenolic microballoons, hollow glass spheres, glass fibers, ground cork, a flexibilized resin binder, and an activated colloidal clay.

  8. Hard tissue ablation with a spray-assisted mid-IR laser.

    PubMed

    Kang, H W; Rizoiu, I; Welch, A J

    2007-12-21

    The objective of this study was to understand the dominant mechanism(s) for dental enamel ablation with the application of water spray. A free-running Er,Cr:YSGG (yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser was used to ablate human enamel tissue at various radiant exposures. During dental ablation, distilled water was sprayed on the sample surface, and these results were compared to ablation without a spray (dry ablation). In order to identify dominant ablation mechanisms, transient acoustic waves were compared to ablation thresholds and the volume of material removed. The ablation profile and depth were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Irregular surface modification, charring and peripheral cracks were associated with dry ablation, whereas craters for spray samples were relatively clean without thermal damage. In spite of a 60% higher ablation threshold for spray associated irradiations owing to water absorption, acoustic peak pressures were six times higher and ablation volume was up to a factor of 2 larger compared to dry ablation. The enhanced pressure and ablation performance of the spray-assisted process was the result of rapid water vaporization, material ejection with recoil stress, interstitial water explosion and possibly liquid-jet formation. With water cooling and abrasive/disruptive mechanical effects, the spray ablation can be a safe and efficient modality for dental treatment. PMID:18065837

  9. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  10. Femtosecond laser lithotripsy: feasibility and ablation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jinze; Teichman, Joel M. H.; Wang, Tianyi; Neev, Joseph; Glickman, Randolph D.; Chan, Kin Foong; Milner, Thomas E.

    2010-03-01

    Light emitted from a femtosecond laser is capable of plasma-induced ablation of various materials. We tested the feasibility of utilizing femtosecond-pulsed laser radiation (λ=800 nm, 140 fs, 0.9 mJ/pulse) for ablation of urinary calculi. Ablation craters were observed in human calculi of greater than 90% calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), cystine (CYST), or magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (MAPH). Largest crater volumes were achieved on CYST stones, among the most difficult stones to fragment using Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) lithotripsy. Diameter of debris was characterized using optical microscopy and found to be less than 20 μm, substantially smaller than that produced by long-pulsed Ho:YAG ablation. Stone retropulsion, monitored by a high-speed camera system with a spatial resolution of 15 μm, was negligible for stones with mass as small as 0.06 g. Peak shock wave pressures were less than 2 bars, measured by a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) needle hydrophone. Ablation dynamics were visualized and characterized with pump-probe imaging and fast flash photography and correlated to shock wave pressures. Because femtosecond-pulsed laser ablates urinary calculi of soft and hard compositions, with micron-sized debris, negligible stone retropulsion, and small shock wave pressures, we conclude that the approach is a promising candidate technique for lithotripsy.

  11. Micrometeoroid ablation simulated in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Thomas, Evan W.; DeLuca, Michael; Horanyi, Mihaly; Janches, Diego; Munsat, Tobin L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    A facility is developed to simulate the ablation of micrometeoroids in laboratory conditions, which also allows measuring the ionization probability of the ablated material. An electrostatic dust accelerator is used to generate iron and meteoric analog particles with velocities 10-50 km/s. The particles are then introduced into a cell filled with nitrogen, air or carbon dioxide gas with pressures adjustable in the 0.02 - 0.5 Torr range, where the partial or complete ablation of the particle occurs over a short distance. An array of biased electrodes is used to collect the ionized products with spatial resolution along the ablating particles' path, allowing thus the study of the temporal resolution of the process. A simple ablation model is used to match the observations. For completely ablated particles the total collected charge directly yields the ionization efficiency for. The measurements using iron particles in N2 and air are in relatively good agreement with earlier data. The measurements with CO2 and He gases, however, are significantly different from the expectations.

  12. Flexible Ablators: Applications and Arcjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin A S.; Mcguire, Kathy; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gorbunov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Flexible ablators were conceived in 2009 to meet the technology pull for large, human Mars Exploration Class, 23 m diameter hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. As described elsewhere, they have been recently undergoing initial technical readiness (TRL) advancement by NASA. The performance limits of flexible ablators in terms of maximum heat rates, pressure and shear remain to be defined. Further, it is hoped that this emerging technology will vastly expand the capability of future NASA missions involving atmospheric entry systems. This paper considers four topics of relevance to flexible ablators: (1) Their potential applications to near/far term human and robotic missions (2) Brief consideration of the balance between heat shield diameter, flexible ablator performance limits, entry vehicle controllability and aft-body shear layer impingement of interest to designers of very large entry vehicles, (3) The approach for developing bonding processes of flexible ablators for use on rigid entry bodies and (4) Design of large arcjet test articles that will enable the testing of flexible ablators in flight-like, combined environments (heat flux, pressure, shear and structural tensile loading). Based on a review of thermal protection system performance requirements for future entry vehicles, it is concluded that flexible ablators have broad applications to conventional, rigid entry body systems and are enabling to large deployable (both inflatable and mechanical) heat shields. Because of the game-changing nature of flexible ablators, it appears that NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) will fund a focused, 3-year TRL advancement of the new materials capable of performance in heat fluxes in the range of 200-600 W/sq. cm. This support will enable the manufacture and use of the large-scale arcjet test designs that will be a key element of this OCT funded activity.

  13. Testing of Advanced Conformal Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Agrawal, Parul; Beck, Robin

    2013-01-01

    In support of the CA250 project, this paper details the results of a test campaign that was conducted at the Ames Arcjet Facility, wherein several novel low density thermal protection (TPS) materials were evaluated in an entry like environment. The motivation for these tests was to investigate whether novel conformal ablative TPS materials can perform under high heat flux and shear environment as a viable alternative to rigid ablators like PICA or Avcoat for missions like MSL and beyond. A conformable TPS over a rigid aeroshell has the potential to solve a number of challenges faced by traditional rigid TPS materials (such as tiled Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) system on MSL, and honeycomb-based Avcoat on the Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV)). The compliant (high strain to failure) nature of the conformable ablative materials will allow better integration of the TPS with the underlying aeroshell structure and enable monolithic-like configuration and larger segments to be used in fabrication.A novel SPRITE1 architecture, developed by the researchers at NASA Ames was used for arcjet testing. This small probe like configuration with 450 spherecone, enabled us to test the materials in a combination of high heat flux, pressure and shear environment. The heat flux near the nose were in the range of 500-1000 W/sq cm whereas in the flank section of the test article the magnitudes were about 50 of the nose, 250-500W/sq cm range. There were two candidate conformable materials under consideration for this test series. Both test materials are low density (0.28 g/cu cm) similar to Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) or Silicone Impregnated Refractory Ceramic Ablator (SIRCA) and are comprised of: A flexible carbon substrate (Carbon felt) infiltrated with an ablative resin system: phenolic (Conformal-PICA) or silicone (Conformal-SICA). The test demonstrated a successful performance of both the conformable ablators for heat flux conditions between 50

  14. A New Ablative Heat Shield Sensor Suite Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    A new sensor suite is developed to measure performance of ablative thermal protection systems used in planetary entry vehicles for robotic and human exploration. The new sensor suite measures ablation of the thermal protection system under extreme heating encountered during planetary entry. The sensor technology is compatible with a variety of thermal protection materials, and is applicable over a wide range of entry conditions.

  15. A Theoretical Study of Stagnation-Point Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard

    1959-01-01

    A simplified analysis is made of ablation cooling near the stagnation point of a two-dimensional or axisymmetric body which occurs as the body vaporizes directly from the solid state. The automatic shielding mechanism Is discussed and the important thermal properties required by a good ablation material are given. The results of the analysis are given in terms of dimensionless parameters.

  16. Laser ablation of dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, M.; Stuke, M.

    1992-01-01

    High density 50 μs pulses of the UV dyes PPF, POPOP and BBO and of two dyes in the visible region, Xanthen N92 and Fluorol 7GA were generated by laser ablation. Dye powders were pressed with 7800 kp/cm 2 in round pellets which were ablated by exposure to KrF excimer laser radiation (248 nm) at a fluence of 100 mJ/cm 2. The ablation cloud was optically activated with a XeCl excimer laser. Its fluorescence spectrum was measured and was identified as a dye vapour fluorescence spectrum by comparison to conventional dye solution and dye vapour spectra. The dye cloud is not deflected in an electric field (10 6 V/m). By changing the delay time between the ablation laser and the focused activation laser, the velocity distribution of the ablated dye was measured. Its maximum is at 600 m/s for PPF. Knowing the thickness of the ablated dye layer per shot (300 Å) and the size of the ablation cloud (pictures of a video camera), one can estimate the maximum density of the dye in the gas pulse to be 10 -5 mol/ l in the range of concentration of lasing dyes. However, no lasing was observed up to now.

  17. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  18. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  19. Excimer laser ablation of aluminum: influence of spot size on ablation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2016-11-01

    The dependence of ablation rate of an Al alloy on laser beam spot size (10–150 µm) was investigated using an ArF excimer laser operating at a wavelength of 193 nm and pulse width less than 4 ns. Ablation was conducted in air at a fluence of 11 J cm‑2 and at a repetition rate of 20 Hz. Surface morphology and depth of craters produced by a variable number of laser pulses were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used as an additional diagnostic technique to estimate the amount of material ablated from craters produced by a laser beam of different diameters. Laser beam spot size and number of laser pulses applied to the same spot were found to influence crater morphology, ablation rate, shape and amount of particles deposited at or around the crater rim. Ablation rate was found to be less dependent on spot size for craters greater than 85 µm. A four-fold increase in ablation rate was observed with decreasing crater size from 150 µm to 10 µm.

  20. Higher Order Chemistry Models in the CFD Simulation of Laser-Ablated Carbon Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greendyke, R. B.; Creel, J. R.; Payne, B. T.; Scott, C. D.

    2005-01-01

    Production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) has taken place for a number of years and by a variety of methods such as laser ablation, chemical vapor deposition, and arc-jet ablation. Yet, little is actually understood about the exact chemical kinetics and processes that occur in SWNT formation. In recent time, NASA Johnson Space Center has devoted a considerable effort to the experimental evaluation of the laser ablation production process for SWNT originally developed at Rice University. To fully understand the nature of the laser ablation process it is necessary to understand the development of the carbon plume dynamics within the laser ablation oven. The present work is a continuation of previous studies into the efforts to model plume dynamics using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The ultimate goal of the work is to improve understanding of the laser ablation process, and through that improved understanding, refine the laser ablation production of SWNT.

  1. Quality evaluation of peony seed oil spray-dried in different combinations of wall materials during encapsulation and storage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Wang, Shu-Jie; Tu, Zong-Cai; Wang, Hui; Li, Ru-Yi; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Tao; Su, Ting; Li, Cui

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the performance of peony seed oil microencapsulated by spray drying during encapsulation and storage. Four different combinations of gum arabic (GA), corn syrup (CS), whey protein concentrate (WPC) and sodium caseinate (CAS) were used to encapsulate peony seed oil. The best encapsulation efficiency was obtained for CAS/CS followed by the CAS/GA/CS combination with the encapsulation ratio of 93.71 and 92.80 %, respectively, while the lowest encapsulation efficiency was obtained for WPC/GA/CS (85.96 %). Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the particles were spherical in shape and did not exhibit apparent cracks or fissures, and gum arabic was uniformly distributed across the wall of the microcapsules. Oxidative stability study indicated that the CAS/GA/CS combination presented the best protection against lipid oxidation and the smallest loss of polyunsaturated fatty acid content among all of the formulas as measured by gas chromatography. Therefore, CAS/GA/CS could be promising materials encapsulate peony seed oil with high encapsulation efficiency and minimal lipid oxidation. PMID:27478215

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotubes covalently functionalized with polytyrosine: A new material for the development of NADH-based biosensors.

    PubMed

    Eguílaz, Marcos; Gutierrez, Fabiana; González-Domínguez, Jose Miguel; Martínez, María T; Rivas, Gustavo

    2016-12-15

    We report for the first time the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) covalently functionalized with polytyrosine (Polytyr) (SWCNT-Polytyr) as a new electrode material for the development of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-based biosensors. The oxidation of glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) modified with SWCNT-Polytyr at potentials high enough to oxidize the tyrosine residues have allowed the electrooxidation of NADH at low potentials due to the catalytic activity of the quinones generated from the primary oxidation of tyrosine without any additional redox mediator. The amperometric detection of NADH at 0.200V showed a sensitivity of (217±3)µAmM(-1)cm(-2) and a detection limit of 7.9nM. The excellent electrocatalytic activity of SWCNT-Polytyr towards NADH oxidation has also made possible the development of a sensitive ethanol biosensor through the immobilization of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) via Nafion entrapment, with excellent analytical characteristics (sensitivity of (5.8±0.1)µAmM(-1)cm(-2), detection limit of 0.67µM) and very successful application for the quantification of ethanol in different commercial beverages.

  3. Single-walled carbon nanotubes covalently functionalized with polytyrosine: A new material for the development of NADH-based biosensors.

    PubMed

    Eguílaz, Marcos; Gutierrez, Fabiana; González-Domínguez, Jose Miguel; Martínez, María T; Rivas, Gustavo

    2016-12-15

    We report for the first time the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) covalently functionalized with polytyrosine (Polytyr) (SWCNT-Polytyr) as a new electrode material for the development of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-based biosensors. The oxidation of glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) modified with SWCNT-Polytyr at potentials high enough to oxidize the tyrosine residues have allowed the electrooxidation of NADH at low potentials due to the catalytic activity of the quinones generated from the primary oxidation of tyrosine without any additional redox mediator. The amperometric detection of NADH at 0.200V showed a sensitivity of (217±3)µAmM(-1)cm(-2) and a detection limit of 7.9nM. The excellent electrocatalytic activity of SWCNT-Polytyr towards NADH oxidation has also made possible the development of a sensitive ethanol biosensor through the immobilization of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) via Nafion entrapment, with excellent analytical characteristics (sensitivity of (5.8±0.1)µAmM(-1)cm(-2), detection limit of 0.67µM) and very successful application for the quantification of ethanol in different commercial beverages. PMID:27387261

  4. Navigation Systems for Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, B. J.; Kruecker, J.; Abi-Jaoudeh, N; Locklin, J.; Levy, E.; Xu, S.; Solbiati, L.; Kapoor, A.; Amalou, H.; Venkatesan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Navigation systems, devices and intra-procedural software are changing the way we practice interventional oncology. Prior to the development of precision navigation tools integrated with imaging systems, thermal ablation of hard-to-image lesions was highly dependent upon operator experience, spatial skills, and estimation of positron emission tomography-avid or arterial-phase targets. Numerous navigation systems for ablation bring the opportunity for standardization and accuracy that extends our ability to use imaging feedback during procedures. Existing systems and techniques are reviewed, and specific clinical applications for ablation are discussed to better define how these novel technologies address specific clinical needs, and fit into clinical practice. PMID:20656236

  5. Comparative analysis of the biaxial mechanical behavior of carotid wall tissue and biological and synthetic materials used for carotid patch angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Kamenskiy, Alexey V; Pipinos, Iraklis I; MacTaggart, Jason N; Kazmi, Syed A Jaffar; Dzenis, Yuris A

    2011-11-01

    Patch angioplasty is the most common technique used for the performance of carotid endarterectomy. A large number of patching materials are available for use while new materials are being continuously developed. Surprisingly little is known about the mechanical properties of these materials and how these properties compare with those of the carotid artery wall. Mismatch of the mechanical properties can produce mechanical and hemodynamic effects that may compromise the long-term patency of the endarterectomized arterial segment. The aim of this paper was to systematically evaluate and compare the biaxial mechanical behavior of the most commonly used patching materials. We compared PTFE (n  =  1), Dacron (n  =  2), bovine pericardium (n  =  10), autogenous greater saphenous vein (n  =  10), and autogenous external jugular vein (n  =  9) with the wall of the common carotid artery (n  =  18). All patching materials were found to be significantly stiffer than the carotid wall in both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. Synthetic patches demonstrated the most mismatch in stiffness values and vein patches the least mismatch in stiffness values compared to those of the native carotid artery. All biological materials, including the carotid artery, demonstrated substantial nonlinearity, anisotropy, and variability; however, the behavior of biological and biologically-derived patches was both qualitatively and quantitatively different from the behavior of the carotid wall. The majority of carotid arteries tested were stiffer in the circumferential direction, while the opposite anisotropy was observed for all types of vein patches and bovine pericardium. The rates of increase in the nonlinear stiffness over the physiological stress range were also different for the carotid and patching materials. Several carotid wall samples exhibited reverse anisotropy compared to the average behavior of the carotid tissue. A similar characteristic was

  6. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  7. Porous wall hollow glass microspheres as a medium or substrate for storage and formation of novel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, George G; Serkiz, Steven M.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Heung, Leung K.

    2014-06-24

    Porous wall hollow glass microspheres are provided as a template for formation of nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, In addition, the carbon nanotubes in combination with the porous wall hollow glass microsphere provides an additional reaction template with respect to carbon nanotubes.

  8. Ventricular dysfunction following direct-current shock atrioventricular junction ablation.

    PubMed

    Warren, R J; Vohra, J K; Chan, W; Lichtenstein, M; Mond, H G; Hunt, D

    1991-02-01

    Catheter-induced His bundle ablation for refractory supraventricular arrhythmias is most commonly performed with direct-current shock energy of 200-300 joules. The high energy pulse delivered by direct-current shock produces a lesion in the atrioventricular node by fulguration, with the residual energy being dissipated as a pressure wave. The effect of direct-current shock His bundle ablation on global and regional ventricular function was assessed in 14 consecutive patients by radionuclide ventriculography performed before and after ablation and again three months later. All studies were performed with ventricular pacing at 110 bpm. Global left ventricular ejection fraction was found to be significantly reduced at the three month study (0.43 +/- 0.03 vs 0.50 +/- 0.03, pre ablation, p = 0.02). A significant reduction in wall-motion score was also seen in six of the seven patients who had normal wall motion in pacing rhythm prior to ablation. Deterioration was mainly seen at the left and right ventricular apices. The observed reduction in ventricular function that follows direct-current shock His bundle ablation may result from myocardial damage from electro-coagulation or from barotrauma and supports continued investigation into alternative, less traumatic energy sources for the procedure. PMID:2036072

  9. Ventricular dysfunction following direct-current shock atrioventricular junction ablation.

    PubMed

    Warren, R J; Vohra, J K; Chan, W; Lichtenstein, M; Mond, H G; Hunt, D

    1991-02-01

    Catheter-induced His bundle ablation for refractory supraventricular arrhythmias is most commonly performed with direct-current shock energy of 200-300 joules. The high energy pulse delivered by direct-current shock produces a lesion in the atrioventricular node by fulguration, with the residual energy being dissipated as a pressure wave. The effect of direct-current shock His bundle ablation on global and regional ventricular function was assessed in 14 consecutive patients by radionuclide ventriculography performed before and after ablation and again three months later. All studies were performed with ventricular pacing at 110 bpm. Global left ventricular ejection fraction was found to be significantly reduced at the three month study (0.43 +/- 0.03 vs 0.50 +/- 0.03, pre ablation, p = 0.02). A significant reduction in wall-motion score was also seen in six of the seven patients who had normal wall motion in pacing rhythm prior to ablation. Deterioration was mainly seen at the left and right ventricular apices. The observed reduction in ventricular function that follows direct-current shock His bundle ablation may result from myocardial damage from electro-coagulation or from barotrauma and supports continued investigation into alternative, less traumatic energy sources for the procedure.

  10. Focal Ablation of Prostate Cancer: Four Roles for MRI Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Graham; Bouley, Donna; Gill, Harcharan; Daniel, Bruce; Pauly, Kim Butts; Diederich, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There is currently a great deal of interest in the possible use of focal therapies for prostate cancer, since such treatments offer the prospect for control or cure of the primary disease with minimal side effects. Many forms of thermal therapy have been proposed for focal ablation of prostate cancer, including laser, high intensity ultrasound and cryotherapy. This review will demonstrate the important roles that MRI guidance can offer to such focal ablation, focusing on the use of high intensity ultrasonic applicators as an example of one promising technique. Materials and Methods Transurethral and interstitial high intensity ultrasonic applicators, designed specifically for ablation of prostate tissue were tested extensively in vivo in a canine model. The roles of MRI in positioning the devices, monitoring prostate ablation, and depicting ablated tissue were assessed using appropriate MRI sequences. Results MRI guidance provides a very effective tool for the positioning of ablative devices in the prostate, and thermal monitoring successfully predicted ablation of prostate tissue when a threshold of 52°C was achieved. Contrast enhanced MRI accurately depicted the distribution of ablated prostate tissue, which is resorbed at 30 days. Conclusions Guidance of thermal therapies for focal ablation of prostate cancer will likely prove critically dependent on MRI functioning in four separate roles. Our studies indicate that in 3 roles: device positioning; thermal monitoring of prostate ablation; and depiction of ablated prostate tissue, MR techniques are highly accurate and likely to be of great benefit in focal prostate cancer ablation. A fourth critical role, identification of cancer within the gland for targeting of thermal therapy, is more problematic at present, but will likely become practical with further technological advances. PMID:23587506

  11. Demonstration of Enhanced Radiation Drive in Hohlraums Made from a Mixture of High-Z Wall Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schein, Jochen; Jones, Ogden; Rosen, Mordecai; Dewald, Eduard; Glenzer, Siegfried; Gunther, Janelle; Hammel, Bruce; Landen, Otto; Suter, Laurence; Wallace, Russell

    2007-04-27

    We present results from experiments, numerical simulations and analytic modeling, demonstrating enhanced hohlraum performance. Care in the fabrication and handling of hohlraums with walls consisting of high-Z mixtures (cocktails) has led to our demonstration, for the first time, of a significant increase in radiation temperature compared to a pure Au hohlraum that is in agreement with predictions and is ascribable to reduced wall losses. The data suggest that a National Ignition Facility ignition hohlraum made of a U:Au:Dy cocktail should have {approx}17% reduction in wall losses compared to a similar gold hohlraum.

  12. Laparoscopic ablation of symptomatic renal cysts.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, S C; Hulbert, J C; Pharand, D; Schuessler, W W; Vancaillie, T G; Kavoussi, L R

    1993-10-01

    We report a laparoscopic approach to the drainage and ablation of symptomatic simple renal cysts. Ten patients with chronic pain, 6 of whom failed primary aspiration, underwent laparoscopic cyst ablation: 6 had solitary renal cysts, 3 had multiple cysts and 1 had a peripelvic cyst. The approach was transabdominal in 9 patients and extraperitoneal in 1. Intraoperatively, cyst fluid was obtained for cytological examination, and cyst walls were excised and sent for pathological examination. When possible, the remaining inner cyst walls were fulgurated to prevent recurrence. Mean total operating room time was 2 hours 27 minutes and blood loss was minimal. The sole complication was a postoperative retroperitoneal hematoma, which was managed conservatively. Malignancy was diagnosed in 2 patients, each of whom had a negative preoperative aspiration. These patients subsequently underwent radical nephrectomy. All remaining patients were asymptomatic at a mean followup of 10 months. Laparoscopic ablation of renal cysts is a safe and effective alternative to open surgery in patients who have failed conservative measures. Preoperative and intraoperative evaluation for malignancy should be performed.

  13. Metal particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Liu, Chunyi; Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate metal particles of Zn and Al alloys using femtosecond (150 fs) and nanosecond (4 ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Characterization of particles and correlation with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) performance was investigated. Particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation were mainly primary particles with irregular shape and hard agglomerates (without internal voids). Particles produced by femtosecond laser ablation consisted of spherical primary particles and soft agglomerates formed from numerous small particles. Examination of the craters by white light interferometric microscopy showed that there is a rim of material surrounding the craters formed after nanosecond laser ablation. The determination of the crater volume by white light interferometric microscopy, considering the rim of material surrounding ablation craters, revealed that the volume ratio (fs/ns) of the craters on the selected samples was approximately 9 (Zn), 7 (NIST627 alloy) and 5 (NIST1711 alloy) times more ablated mass with femtosecond pulsed ablation compared to nanosecond pulsed ablation. In addition, an increase of Al concentration from 0 to 5% in Zn base alloys caused a large increase in the diameter of the particles, up to 65% while using nanosecond laser pulses. When the ablated particles were carried in argon into an ICP-MS, the Zn and Al signals intensities were greater by factors of {approx} 50 and {approx} 12 for fs vs. ns ablation. Femtosecond pulsed ablation also reduced temporal fluctuations in the {sup 66}Zn transient signal by a factor of ten compared to nanosecond laser pulses.

  14. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    SciTech Connect

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Meier, W.R.

    1982-08-17

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. Produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithiumceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  15. Suitability of a tumour-mimicking material for the evaluation of high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation under magnetic resonance guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo, S.; Kivinen, J.; Melodelima, D.; Curiel, L.

    2013-04-01

    This study tests the suitability of a tumour-mimic for targeting magnetic resonance (MR)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). An agarose-based tumour-mimic was injected as a warm solution that polymerized in tissue. Thermal characteristics and acoustic absorption of the mimic were observed within the values reported for tissues. The relaxation times at 3T were 1679 ± 15 ms for T1 and 41 ± 1 ms for T2. The mimic was clearly visible on in vivo images. With lower contrast the tumour-mimic was visible on T2-weighted images, where it was possible to detect the ablated tissue surrounding the mimic after sonications. HIFU sonications were performed to induce thermal ablation on and around the mimic using a Sonalleve system (Philips). MR thermometry maps were performed during HIFU. The average temperature when the sonication was done at the tumour-mimic was 67.6 ± 8.0 °C in vitro and 67.6 ± 5.0 °C in vivo. The average temperature for sonications at tissues was 68.4 ± 8.7 °C in vitro (liver) and 66.0 ± 2.6 °C in vivo (muscle), with no significant difference between tissue and tumour-mimic (p > 0.05). The tumour-mimic behaviour when using MR-guided HIFU was similar to tissues, showing that this mimic can be used as an alternative to tumour models for validating MR-guided HIFU devices targeting.

  16. Rare event molecular dynamics simulations of plasma induced surface ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Sharia, Onise; Holzgrafe, Jeffrey; Park, Nayoung; Henkelman, Graeme

    2014-08-21

    The interaction of thermal Ar plasma particles with Si and W surfaces is modeled using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. At plasma energies above the threshold for ablation, the ablation yield can be calculated directly from MD. For plasma energies below threshold, the ablation yield becomes exponentially low, and direct MD simulations are inefficient. Instead, we propose an integration method where the yield is calculated as a function of the Ar incident kinetic energy. Subsequent integration with a Boltzmann distribution at the temperature of interest gives the thermal ablation yield. At low plasma temperatures, the ablation yield follows an Arrhenius form in which the activation energy is shown to be the threshold energy for ablation. Interestingly, equilibrium material properties, including the surface and bulk cohesive energy, are not good predictors of the threshold energy for ablation. The surface vacancy formation energy is better, but is still not a quantitative predictor. An analysis of the trajectories near threshold shows that ablation occurs by different mechanisms on different material surfaces, and both the mechanism and the binding of surface atoms determine the threshold energy.

  17. Rare event molecular dynamics simulations of plasma induced surface ablation.

    PubMed

    Sharia, Onise; Holzgrafe, Jeffrey; Park, Nayoung; Henkelman, Graeme

    2014-08-21

    The interaction of thermal Ar plasma particles with Si and W surfaces is modeled using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. At plasma energies above the threshold for ablation, the ablation yield can be calculated directly from MD. For plasma energies below threshold, the ablation yield becomes exponentially low, and direct MD simulations are inefficient. Instead, we propose an integration method where the yield is calculated as a function of the Ar incident kinetic energy. Subsequent integration with a Boltzmann distribution at the temperature of interest gives the thermal ablation yield. At low plasma temperatures, the ablation yield follows an Arrhenius form in which the activation energy is shown to be the threshold energy for ablation. Interestingly, equilibrium material properties, including the surface and bulk cohesive energy, are not good predictors of the threshold energy for ablation. The surface vacancy formation energy is better, but is still not a quantitative predictor. An analysis of the trajectories near threshold shows that ablation occurs by different mechanisms on different material surfaces, and both the mechanism and the binding of surface atoms determine the threshold energy. PMID:25149805

  18. General Model for Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Marschall, Jochen; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A previous paper (AIAA 94-2042) presented equations and numerical procedures for modeling the thermochemical ablation and pyrolysis of thermal protection materials which contain multiple surface species. This work describes modifications and enhancements to the Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry (MAT) theory and code for application to the general case which includes surface area constraints, rate limited surface reactions, and non-thermochemical mass loss (failure). Detailed results and comparisons with data are presented for the Shuttle Orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon oxidation protection system which contains a mixture of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), silica (SiO2), silicon carbide (SiC), and carbon (C).

  19. Rotational ablation of discrete lesions in the coronary arteries is safe. A nonrandomized comparison with percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Cheirif, J; Wray, R; Heibig, J; Harris, S; Staudacher, R; Bucay, M; Zacca, N

    1995-01-01

    Rotational ablation is receiving increasing attention as a new therapeutic intervention for coronary artery disease. In a nonrandomized study, we compared echocardiographic regional wall-motion scores of patients treated with rotational ablation with those of patients treated with percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. We found that rotational ablation achieved angiographic results comparable to those of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, and was in fact associated with less myocardial ischemia. The reduction in ischemia observed in the ablation group might arise from shorter treatment times in those patients, from the use of nitroglycerin infusion in the ablation group, or from both factors. Images PMID:7580361

  20. Compositional analysis of Chinese water chestnut (Eleocharis dulcis) cell-wall material from parenchyma, epidermis, and subepidermal tissues.

    PubMed

    Grassby, Terri; Jay, Andrew J; Merali, Zara; Parker, Mary L; Parr, Adrian J; Faulds, Craig B; Waldron, Keith W

    2013-10-01

    Chinese water chestnut (Eleocharis dulcis (Burman f.) Trin ex Henschel) is a corm consumed globally in Oriental-style cuisine. The corm consists of three main tissues, the epidermis, subepidermis, and parenchyma; the cell walls of which were analyzed for sugar, phenolic, and lignin content. Sugar content, measured by gas chromatography, was higher in the parenchyma cell walls (931 μg/mg) than in the subepidermis (775 μg/mg) or epidermis (685 μg/mg). The alkali-extractable phenolic content, measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, was greater in the epidermal (32.4 μg/mg) and subepidermal cell walls (21.7 μg/mg) than in the cell walls of the parenchyma (12.3 μg/mg). The proportion of diferulic acids was higher in the parenchyma. The Klason lignin content of epidermal and subepidermal cell walls was ~15%. Methylation analysis of Chinese water chestnut cell-wall polysaccharides identified xyloglucan as the predominant hemicellulose in the parenchyma for the first time, and also a significant pectin component, similar to other nongraminaceous monocots.

  1. [Steam ablation of varicose veins].

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Renate R; Malskat, Wendy S J; Neumann, H A M Martino

    2013-01-01

    In many western countries endovenous thermal ablation techniques have largely replaced classical surgery for the treatment of saphenous varicose veins as they are more effective and patient friendly. Because these treatments can be performed under local tumescent anaesthesia, patients can mobilize immediately after the procedure. A new method of thermal ablation is endovenous steam ablation, which is a fast and easy procedure. Steam ablation may cause less pain than laser ablation and it is also cheaper and more flexible than segmental radiofrequency ablation. PMID:23484513

  2. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  3. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Don A.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2005-04-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period. This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered. The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  4. Simulation of Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Levashov, Pavel R.; Itina, Tatian E.

    2010-10-08

    We investigate the physical reasons of a strange decrease in the ablation depth observed in femtosecond double-pulse experiments with increasing delay between the pulses. Two ultrashort pulses of the same energy produce the crater which is less than that created by a single pulse. Hydrodynamic simulation shows that the ablation mechanism is suppressed when the delay between the pulses exceeds the electron-ion relaxation time. In this case, the interaction of the second laser pulse with the expanding target material leads to the formation of the second shock wave suppressing the rarefaction wave created by the first pulse. The modeling of the double-pulse ablation for different delays between pulses confirms this explanation.

  5. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  6. [Radiofrequency ablation of an unresectable abdominal tumor].

    PubMed

    Sézeur, Alain; Fritsch, Sylvie; Louvet, Christophe; Kujas, Albert; Mosnier, Henri; Talbot, Jean-Noël; Grimberg, Sylvie

    2003-02-01

    Remnant malignant tissue is left behind after conventional surgery for an unresectable intraperitoneal malignant tumor. Standard radiotherapy or chemotherapy rarely enables good tumor control. We report the case of a 74-year-old man who developed a local recurrence of a sigmoid tumor located 5 to 6 cm from the anus. The tumor was fixed to the pelvic wall and could not be totally eradicated with conventional surgery. Preoperative peroperative assessment confirmed the absence of metastatic spread. Radiotherapy could not be performed due to risk of bowel injury. Peroperative radiofrequency ablation was followed by surgical colorectal resection without restoration of intestinal continuity, leaving only tumor tissue destroyed by radiofrequency. No adjuvant treatment was proposed because of intolerance to chemotherapy. Clinical assessment and thoracic and abdominal CT scan confirmed the absence of recurrence 26 months after radiofrequency ablation. Serum markers remained normal.

  7. Low temperature ablation models made by pressure/vacuum application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, M. C.; Heier, W. C.

    1970-01-01

    Method developed employs high pressure combined with strong vacuum force to compact ablation models into desired conical shape. Technique eliminates vapor hazard and results in high material density providing excellent structural integrity.

  8. Transport properties associated with carbon-phenolic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biolsi, L.

    1982-01-01

    Entry vehicle heat shields designed for entry into the atmosphere of the outer planets are usually made of carbonaceous material such as carbon-phenolic ablator. Ablative injection of this material is an important mechanism for reducing the heat at the surface of the entry vehicle. Conductive transport properties in the shock layer are important for some entry conditions. The kinetic theory of gases has been used to calculate the transport properties for 17 gaseous species obtained from the ablation of carbon-phenolic heat shields. Results are presented for the pure species and for the gas mixture.

  9. Ablation by ultrashort laser pulses: Atomistic and thermodynamic analysis of the processes at the ablation threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Inogamov, Nail A.; Rethfeld, Baerbel; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2008-07-15

    Ultrafast laser irradiation of solids may ablate material off the surface. We study this process for thin films using molecular-dynamics simulation and thermodynamic analysis. Both metals and Lennard-Jones (LJ) materials are studied. We find that despite the large difference in thermodynamical properties between these two classes of materials--e.g., for aluminum versus LJ the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} of critical to triple-point temperature differs by more than a factor of 4--the values of the ablation threshold energy E{sub abl} normalized to the cohesion energy, {epsilon}{sub abl}=E{sub abl}/E{sub coh}, are surprisingly universal: all are near 0.3 with {+-}30% scattering. The difference in the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} means that for metals the melting threshold {epsilon}{sub m} is low, {epsilon}{sub m}<{epsilon}{sub abl}, while for LJ it is high, {epsilon}{sub m}>{epsilon}{sub abl}. This thermodynamical consideration gives a simple explanation for the difference between metals and LJ. It explains why despite the universality in {epsilon}{sub abl}, metals thermomechanically ablate always from the liquid state. This is opposite to LJ materials, which (near threshold) ablate from the solid state. Furthermore, we find that immediately below the ablation threshold, the formation of large voids (cavitation) in the irradiated material leads to a strong temporary expansion on a very slow time scale. This feature is easily distinguished from the acoustic oscillations governing the material response at smaller intensities, on the one hand, and the ablation occurring at larger intensities, on the other hand. This finding allows us to explain the puzzle of huge surface excursions found in experiments at near-threshold laser irradiation.

  10. Thermochemical Ablation Analysis of the Orion Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sixel, William

    2015-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will one day carry astronauts to the Moon and beyond, and Orion's heatshield is a critical component in ensuring their safe return to Earth. The Orion heatshield is the structural component responsible for absorbing the intense heating environment caused by re-entry to Earth's atmosphere. The heatshield is primarily composed of Avcoat, an ablative material that is consumed during the re-entry process. Ablation is primarily characterized by two processes: pyrolysis and recession. The decomposition of in-depth virgin material is known as pyrolysis. Recession occurs when the exposed surface of the heatshield reacts with the surrounding flow. The Orion heatshield design was changed from an individually filled Avcoat honeycomb to a molded block Avcoat design. The molded block Avcoat heatshield relies on an adhesive bond to keep it attached to the capsule. In some locations on the heatshield, the integrity of the adhesive bond cannot be verified. For these locations, a mechanical retention device was proposed. Avcoat ablation was modelled in CHAR and the in-depth virgin material temperatures were used in a Thermal Desktop model of the mechanical retention device. The retention device was analyzed and shown to cause a large increase in the maximum bondline temperature. In order to study the impact of individual ablation modelling parameters on the heatshield sizing process, a Monte Carlo simulation of the sizing process was proposed. The simulation will give the sensitivity of the ablation model to each of its input parameters. As part of the Monte Carlo simulation, statistical uncertainties on material properties were required for Avcoat. Several properties were difficult to acquire uncertainties for: the pyrolysis gas enthalpy, non-dimensional mass loss rate (B´c), and Arrhenius equation parameters. Variability in the elemental composition of Avcoat was used as the basis for determining the statistical uncertainty in pyrolysis gas

  11. Reflecting ablating heat shields for planetary entry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. L.; Nachtsheim, P. R.; Howe, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    Heat shielding for planetary entry probes of future Jovian and Venusian missions will encounter heating levels well beyond those previously experienced. These entries are typically dominated by radiative heating from the shock layer. This paper demonstrates the potential of reflecting this incident radiation diffusely from an ablating material. This technique contrasts with the absorption experienced by char-forming or graphitic ablators. Two dielectric materials, Teflon (polytetra-fluoroethylene) and boron nitride, are examined for their ablative performance, including reflection, in a combined convective- and radiative-heating environment. For Teflon, at the conditions obtained, superimposition of radiative heating upon a convective stream causes no additional increase in surface recession over the convective only results. For boron nitride, an excellent room-temperature reflector in the visible spectrum, a decrease in reflectivity from 90 to 55 percent is experienced when the surface undergoes sublimation at high temperatures. The process of reflection in each of these materials is described in terms of backscattering from crystals. The significance of a sizable reflection as a mode of energy accommodation is demonstrated for Venusian entries as a potential reduction in mass loss due to ablation.

  12. Ablation of CsI by XUV Capillary Discharge Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pira, Peter; Zelinger, Zdenek; Burian, Tomas; Vysin, Ludek; Wild, Jan; Juha, Libor; Lancok, Jan; Nevrly, Vaclav

    2015-09-01

    XUV capillary discharge laser (CDL) is suitable source for ablation of ionic crystals as material which is difficult to ablate by conventional laser. Single crystal of CsI was irradiated by 2.5 ns pulses of a 46.9 nm radiation at 2 Hz. The CDL beam was focused by Sc/Si multilayer spherical mirror. Attenuation length of CsI for this wavelength is 38 nm. Ablation rate was calculated after irradiation of 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 pulses. Depth of the craters was measured by optical profiler (white light interferometry). Ablation threshold was determined from craters after irradiation with the changing fluence and compared with modeling by XUV-ABLATOR.

  13. Renal Artery Embolization Combined With Radiofrequency Ablation in a Porcine Kidney Model: Effect of Small and Narrowly Calibrated Microparticles as Embolization Material on Coagulation Diameter, Volume, and Shape

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M. Kortes, N.; Zelzer, S.; Arnegger, F. U.; Stampfl, U.; Bellemann, N.; Gehrig, T.; Nickel, F.; Kenngott, H. G.; Mogler, C.; Longerich, T.; Meinzer, H. P.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of renal artery embolization with small and narrowly calibrated microparticles on the coagulation diameter, volume, and shape of radiofrequency ablations (RFAs) in porcine kidneys. Forty-eight RFAs were performed in 24 kidneys of 12 pigs. In 6 animals, bilateral renal artery embolization was performed with small and narrowly calibrated microparticles. Upper and lower kidney poles were ablated with identical system parameters. Applying three-dimensional segmentation software, RFAs were segmented on registered 2 mm-thin macroscopic slices. Length, depth, width, volume{sub s}egmented, and volume{sub c}alculated were determined to describe the size of the RFAs. To evaluate the shape of the RFAs, depth-to-width ratio (perfect symmetry-to-lesion length was indicated by a ratio of 1), sphericity ratio (perfect sphere was indicated by a sphericity ratio of 1), eccentricity (perfect sphere was indicated by an eccentricity of 0), and circularity (perfect circle was indicated by a circularity of 1) were determined. Embolized compared with nonembolized RFAs showed significantly greater depth (23.4 {+-} 3.6 vs. 17.2 {+-} 1.8 mm; p < 0.001) and width (20.1 {+-} 2.9 vs. 12.6 {+-} 3.7 mm; p < 0.001); significantly larger volume{sub s}egmented (8.6 {+-} 3.2 vs. 3.0 {+-} 0.7 ml; p < 0.001) and volume{sub c}alculated (8.4 {+-} 3.0 ml vs. 3.3 {+-} 1.1 ml; p < 0.001); significantly lower depth-to-width (1.17 {+-} 0.10 vs. 1.48 {+-} 0.44; p < 0.05), sphericity (1.55 {+-} 0.44 vs. 1.96 {+-} 0.43; p < 0.01), and eccentricity (0.84 {+-} 0.61 vs. 1.73 {+-} 0.91; p < 0.01) ratios; and significantly greater circularity (0.62 {+-} 0.14 vs. 0.45 {+-} 0.16; p < 0.01). Renal artery embolization with small and narrowly calibrated microparticles affected the coagulation diameter, volume, and shape of RFAs in porcine kidneys. Embolized RFAs were significantly larger and more spherical compared with nonembolized RFAs.

  14. Nozzle designs with pitch precursor ablatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, H. R.; Bedard, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recent developments in carbon phenolic ablatives for solid rocket motor nozzles have yielded a pitch precursor carbon fiber offering significant raw material availability and cost saving advantages as compared to conventional rayon precursor material. This paper discusses the results of an experimental program conducted to assess the thermal performance and characterize the thermal properties of pitch precursor carbon phenolic ablatives. The end result of this program is the complete thermal characterization of pitch fabric, pitch mat, hybrid pitch/rayon fabric and pitch mat molding compound. With these properties determined an analytic capability now exists for predicting the thermal performance of these materials in rocket nozzle liner applications. Further planned efforts to verify material performance and analytical prediction procedures through actual rocket motor firings are also discussed.

  15. [Microscope observation of the microbial distribution on the wall of different pipe material in water supply system].

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-Hui; Cai, Yun-Long; Zhi, Xin-Hua; You, Jia-Yin

    2009-09-15

    Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope and confocal laser scanning microscope were used to observe the microbial distribution and biofilm structure on the surface of stainless steel plugs and the wall of PPR pipe in the water distribution system. The results show that, it is not easy for microbial to attach on the surface of stainless steel plugs. Little bacteria was observed in a short period of time (less than 3 months). Bacteria can be easily observed in the sediment of the PPR pipe wall at the end of water supply system. Bacteria was tightly adhered to the surface of the PPR pipe wall. Combination of scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope is a practical way to observe the surface structure of discontinuous biofilm in the pipeline. The inner and three-dimensional structure of the pipe biofilm can be simultaneously observed by confocal laser scanning microscope.

  16. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  17. Transcatheter radiofrequency ablation of atrial tissue using a suction catheter.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, T; Prunier, L; Cuize, L; Bruneval, P; Von Euw, D; Le Heuzey, J Y; Peronneau, P

    1989-01-01

    Closed chest ablative technique that avoid barotrauma would be attractive for ablation at thin walled cardiac structures, such as the atrial free wall or coronary sinus. Transcatheter radiofrequency (RF) currents produce tissue necrosis the size of which is dependent on the contact between the tissue and the electrode. In order to assess the effects of transvenous RF ablation of atrial free wall using a suction electrode catheter, we delivered in ten dogs, one single unmodulated RF pulse 1.2 MHz, in a unipolar mode, through the distal electrode of a lumen catheter (USCI 8F) (USCI, Billerica, MA USA) located in the right appendage. During the pulse an 80 KPa vacuum depression was applied to the lumen of the catheter. Each pulse had a 10 seconds duration and the mean delivered power was 4.3 +/- 1.4 W. Aortic pressure and electrocardiogram were monitored during the procedure. A right atrial electrophysiological study was performed at the ablated site, at control, after suction application and after RF pulse delivery. The animals were sacrificed after 14 or 21 days. Atrial pacing threshold values decreased after suction application in comparison to control values after the pulse (0.42 +/- 0.06 vs 0.60 +/- 0.23 mA, P less than O.05) but increased after the pulse delivery (2.60 +/- 1.85 mA, P less than 0.01). In contrast, the atrial effective refractory period did not significantly change after suction, nor after RF pulse delivery. Aortic pressure remained unchanged throughout the procedure. Complex arrhythmias were not observed during or after RF pulse delivery. One dog died suddenly at the first day after ablation, but this death was most probably unrelated to RF ablation. Anatomic lesions had a length of 8.8 +/- 3.3 mm, a width of 4.6 +/- 2.5 mm and a depth of 3.6 +/- 1.1 mm. They were transmural in nine of the ten dogs but without atrial wall perforation in any case. Lesions suggesting tissue volatilization were present in four dogs. These results demonstrate that

  18. Thermal ablation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Cao, Cheng-Song; Yu, Yang; Si, Ya-Meng

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and cryoablation are alternative forms of therapy used widely in various pathological states, including treatment of carcinogenesis. The reason is that ablation techniques have ability of modulating the immune system. Furthermore, recent studies have applied this form of therapy on tumor microenvironment and in the systematic circulation. Moreover, RFA and cryoablation result in an inflammatory immune response along with tissue disruption. Evidence has demonstrated that these procedures affect carcinogenesis by causing a significant local inflammatory response leading to an immunogenic gene signature. The present review enlightens the current view of these techniques in cancer. PMID:27703520

  19. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  20. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  1. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  2. Amalgam ablation with the Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Any laser that will be used by dentist to replace the dental drill (handpiece) must remove dental hard tissues safely. These lasers must also have the ability to ablate the restorative dental materials which are present in the teeth being treated. Prior to any laser being used to treat humans a thorough knowledge of the effects of the laser treatment on dental materials must be understood. Cores of dental amalgam were created and sliced into thin wafers for this experiment. Ablation efficiency and thermal changes were evaluated with and without water. It appears as if the Er:YAG laser can effectively ablate amalgam dental material with and without water. The water prevents the temperature from increasing much above baseline and does not reduce efficiency of ablation.

  3. UV laser ablation patterns in intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagiou, D. P.; Evangelatos, Ch.; Apostolopoulos, A.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of UV solid state laser radiation on intraocular lens (IOL) polymer surfaces as an alternative method to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs customization. Laser ablation experiments were performed on PMMA plates and commercially available hydrophobic and hydrophilic acrylic IOLs with the 5th harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=213 nm). Circular arrays of holes were drilled on the polymer surface, covering the centre and the peripheries of the IOL. The morphology of the ablated IOL surface was examined with a conventional optical microscope (Leitz GMBH Wetzlar) and with a scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fei - Innova Nanoscope) at various laser parameters. Quantitative measurements of ablation rates were performed with a contact profilometer (Dektak-150), in which a mechanical stylus scanned across the surface of gold-coated IOLs (after SEM imaging) to measure variationsF in surface height. Laser interaction with IOLs depends on optical and mechanical material properties, in addition to laser radiation parameters. The exact ablation mechanism is discussed. Some polymer materials, depending on their properties, are more susceptible to the photothermal mechanism than the photochemical one or vice versa. In summary, every IOL polymer exhibits specific attributes in its interaction with the 5th harmonic of Nd:YAG laser.

  4. Recent developments in the photophysics of single-walled carbon nanotubes for their use as active and passive material elements in thin film photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Michael S; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Crochet, Jared J; Doorn, Stephen K; Duque, Juan G; Mohite, Aditya; Telg, Hagen

    2013-09-28

    The search for environmentally clean energy sources has spawned a wave of research into the use of carbon nanomaterials for photovoltaic applications. In particular, research using semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes has undergone dramatic transformations due to the availability of high quality samples through colloidal separation techniques. This has led to breakthrough discoveries on how energy and charge transport occurs in these materials and points to applications in energy harvesting. We present a review of the relevant photophysics of carbon nanotubes that dictate processes important for integration as active and passive material elements in thin film photovoltaics. Fundamental processes ranging from light absorption and internal conversion to exciton transport and dissociation are discussed in detail from both a spectroscopic and a device perspective. We also give a perspective on the future of these fascinating materials to be used as active and passive material elements in photovoltaics.

  5. Measurement of Preheat and Shock Melting in Be Ablators During the First Few ns of the NIF Ignition Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D K; Prisbrey, S T; Page, R H; Braun, D G; Edwards, M J; Hibbard, R L; Moreno, K A; Mauldin, M P; Nikroo, A

    2008-05-28

    We have developed a scaled hohlraum platform to experimentally measure preheat in ablator materials during the first few nanoseconds of the radiation drive proposed for ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility [J. A. Paisner, J. D. Boyes, S. A. Kumpan, et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. The platform design approximates the radiation environment of the pole of the capsule by matching both the laser spot intensity and illuminated hohlraum wall fraction in scaled halfraums driven by the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, et al., Optics Communications 133, 495 (1997)]. A VISAR reflecting from the rear surface of the sample was used to measure sample motion prior to shock breakout. The experiments show that the first {approx}20 {micro}m of a Be ablator will be melted by radiation preheat, with subsequent material melted by the initial shock, in agreement with simulations. The experiments also show no evidence of anomalous heating of buried high-z doped layers in the ablator.

  6. Metallic Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan Michael (Inventor); Hofer, Richard Robert (Inventor); Mikellides, Ioannis G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A Hall thruster apparatus having walls constructed from a conductive material, such as graphite, and having magnetic shielding of the walls from the ionized plasma has been demonstrated to operate with nearly the same efficiency as a conventional non-magnetically shielded design using insulators as wall components. The new design is believed to provide the potential of higher power and uniform operation over the operating life of a thruster device.

  7. An experimental investigation of the damping contribution of an elastomeric ablator on aluminum beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Damping results are presented for an elastometric ablation material bonded to an aluminum alloy substrate. Tests were conducted on aluminum beams 0.159, 0.318, and 0.476 cm thick, and with and without an ablator. Ablation-material thickness varied from 0.159 to 0.953 cm. Comparative damping data were obtained by using variations of the free-free beam technique with strain gages and piezoelectric transducers. Of the two test arrangements employed, the technique using strain gages produced results that indicated less restraint of the beams. Ablation material, in thicknesses less than 1 cm, substantially increased the damping parameter of the aluminum beams.

  8. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  9. Ablation of film stacks in solar cell fabrication processes

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-04-02

    A dielectric film stack of a solar cell is ablated using a laser. The dielectric film stack includes a layer that is absorptive in a wavelength of operation of the laser source. The laser source, which fires laser pulses at a pulse repetition rate, is configured to ablate the film stack to expose an underlying layer of material. The laser source may be configured to fire a burst of two laser pulses or a single temporally asymmetric laser pulse within a single pulse repetition to achieve complete ablation in a single step.

  10. Overview of the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amar, Adam J.; Oliver, A. Brandon; Kirk, Benjamin S.; Salazar, Giovanni; Droba, Justin

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the capabilities of the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) code is presented. CHAR is a one-, two-, and three-dimensional unstructured continuous Galerkin finite-element heat conduction and ablation solver with both direct and inverse modes. Additionally, CHAR includes a coupled linear thermoelastic solver for determination of internal stresses induced from the temperature field and surface loading. Background on the development process, governing equations, material models, discretization techniques, and numerical methods is provided. Special focus is put on the available boundary conditions including thermochemical ablation, surface-to-surface radiation exchange, and flowfield coupling. Finally, a discussion of ongoing development efforts is presented.

  11. Overview of the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amar, Adam J.; Oliver, A. Brandon; Kirk, Benjamin S.; Salazar, Giovanni; Droba, Justin

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the capabilities of the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) code is presented. CHAR is a one-, two-, and three-dimensional unstructured continuous Galerkin finite-element heat conduction and ablation solver with both direct and inverse modes. Additionally, CHAR includes a coupled linear thermoelastic solver for determination of internal stresses induced from the temperature field and surface loading. Background on the development process, governing equations, material models, discretization techniques, and numerical methods is provided. Special focus is put on the available boundary conditions including thermochemical ablation and contact interfaces, and example simulations are included. Finally, a discussion of ongoing development efforts is presented.

  12. The temperature dependence of ultra-cold neutron wall losses in material bottles coated with deuterated polystryene

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Martiin D; Bagdasarova, Yelena; Clayton, Steven M; Currie, Scott A; Griffith, William C; Ito, Takeyasu; Makela, Mark F; Morris, Cheistopher; Rahaman, Mohamad S; Ramsey, John C; Saunders, Alexander; Rios, Raymond

    2011-01-18

    Ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) from the LANSCE super-thermal deuterium source were used to fill an acrylic bottle coated with deuterated polystyrene. The bottle was constructed to minimize losses through the filling valve. The storage time was extracted from a series of measurements where the number of neutrons was counted after they were held in the bottle for durations varying from 60-1200 s. The data were collected at temperatures of 18, 40, 65, 105, and 295 K. The data has been analyzed in terms of the ratio of the imaginary to real part of the wall potential. The analysis considers the velocity dependence of the probability per bounce of wall loss. The implication of these measurements for the SNS electric dipole moment search will be presented.

  13. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  14. Developing Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes into an Industrial Material through the Super-Growth CVD Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaba, Don

    2013-03-01

    Since the discovery of the carbon nanotube (CNT) 20 years ago, extensive effort has been made to utilize their exceptional intrinsic properties toward industrial applications. However, availability has significantly thwarted these endeavors. In one section of my presentation, I will describe our efforts toward the economical mass-production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) based on the water-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique, from which highly efficient synthesis of vertically aligned SWCNTs grow from substrates (SWCNT forests). Further, I will discuss our work to promote the industrial use of SWCNTs as a member of the Technology Research Association for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (TASC) (A consortium of five companies and AIST founded for the specific purpose of developing SWCNT industrial technology.) Specifically, I will present our progress on developing the technology for the synthetic control of SWCNTs and the development of standardized evaluation techniques for the purpose of understanding the relationship between the SWCNT forest structure, e.g. length, density, crystallinity, etc and the targeted property, e.g. conductivity, mechanical reinforcement, etc. Finally, I will present several examples of applications from composites to CNT-based devices. Technology Research Association for Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (TASC), Japan

  15. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation, endovenous radiofrequency ablation and endovenous steam ablation.

    PubMed

    Malskat, W S J; Stokbroekx, M A L; van der Geld, C W M; Nijsten, T E C; van den Bos, R R

    2014-03-01

    Endovenous thermal ablation (EVTA) techniques are very effective for the treatment of varicose veins, but their exact working mechanism is still not well documented. The lack of knowledge of mechanistic properties has led to a variety of EVTA protocols and a commercially driven dissemination of new or modified techniques without robust scientific evidence. The aim of this study is to compare temperature profiles of 980-and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation (EVLA), segmental radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and endovenous steam ablation (EVSA). In an experimental setting, temperature measurements were performed using thermocouples; raw potato was used to mimic a vein wall. Two laser wavelengths (980 and 1,470 nm) were used with tulip-tip fibers and 1,470 nm also with a radial-emitting fiber. Different powers and pullback speeds were used to achieve fluences of 30, 60, and 90 J/cm. For segmental RFA, 1 cycle of 20 s was analyzed. EVSA was performed with two and three pulses of steam per centimeter. Maximum temperature increase, time span of relevant temperature increase, and area under the curve of the time of relevant temperature increase were measured. In all EVLA settings, temperatures increased and decreased rapidly. High fluence is associated with significantly higher temperatures and increased time span of temperature rise. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm EVLA with tulip-tip fibers did not differ significantly. Radial EVLA showed significantly higher maximum temperatures than tulip-tip EVLA. EVSA resulted in mild peak temperatures for longer durations than EVLA. Maximum temperatures with three pulses per centimeter were significantly higher than with two pulses. RFA temperature rises were relatively mild, resulting in a plateau-shaped temperature profile, similar to EVSA. Temperature increase during EVLA is fast with a high-peak temperature for a short time, where EVSA and RFA have longer plateau phases and lower maximum temperatures. PMID

  16. Guiding and Ionization Blueshift in Ablative Capillary Waveguide Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffey, Chris; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Bulanov, Stepan; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalintchenko, Galina; Rousseau, Pascal; Yanovsky, Victor; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Krushelnick, Karl; Levin, Michael; Zigler, Arie

    2009-01-22

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in plasmas has been demonstrated with gradients which are orders of magnitude greater than the limit on conventional Radio Frequency accelerators. However, the acceleration length is limited by two factors, the dephasing length and the Rayleigh range of the laser pulse. Dephasing length is the distance in which electrons overtake the laser pulse and can be increased by decreasing plasma density. Alternatively the interaction length can be extended by orders of magnitude by using ablative wall discharge capillary targets, in which a plasma is preformed with a transverse density profile capable of guiding the focused laser. We have demonstrated guiding of high intensity laser pulses from the HERCULES laser over 3 cm for powers up to 35 TW. The quality of the laser spot can be retained and the intensity remains high even at the exit of the capillary. The transmitted laser spectrum shows blueshifting due to field ionization by the laser pulse. This ionization might enhance electron injection at low electron density for LWFA GeV accelerators. The field ionization affects carbon atoms and ions from the ablated capillary, which are not present in hydrogen-filled capillaries. This creates an additional challenge to guiding compared to hydrogen-filled capillaries. However, the setup and materials are easier to come by. The use of these capillary targets may also be of interest to other high intensity laser-plasma interactions requiring long interaction lengths such as high harmonic generation from gases and plasmas, or x-ray lasing in underdense plasmas.

  17. Comparison of Combination Therapies in the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Transarterial Chemoembolization with Radiofrequency Ablation versus Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Michael; Zivin, Sean P.; Wroblewski, Kristen; Doshi, Taral; Vasnani, Raj J.; Van Ha, Thuong G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare retrospectively the outcomes and complications of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting embolic agents combined with radiofrequency (RF) ablation or microwave (MW) ablation in treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods From 2003–2011, 89 patients with HCC received a combination therapy—transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation in 38 patients and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation in 51 patients. Local tumor response, tumor progression-free survival (PFS), overall PFS, overall survival (OS), and complications were compared. Overall PFS and OS were compared between the two treatment groups in multivariate analysis controlling for Child-Pugh class, Barcelona Clinic Liver Classification stage, and index tumor size. Results Complete local tumor response was achieved in 37 (80.4%) of the tumors treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation and 49 (76.6%) of the tumors treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation (P = .67). The median tumor PFS and overall PFS were 20.8 months and 9.3 months (P = .72) for transarterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation and 21.8 months and 9.2 months for transarterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation (P = .32). The median OS of the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation group was 23.3 months, and the median OS of the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation group was 42.6 months, with no significant difference in the survival experience between the two groups (log-rank test, P = .10). In the multivariate analysis, Barcelona Clinic Liver Classification stage was the only factor associated with overall PFS and OS. One patient in the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation cohort (3%) and two patients in the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation cohort (4%) required prolonged hospitalization (< 48 h) for pain

  18. Aspergillosis complicating a microwave ablation cavity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh; Bandula, Steven; Brown, Jeremy; Whelan, Jeremy; Illing, Rowland

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a patient who following chemotherapy developed semi-invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and an aspergilloma in a lung cavity previously formed by microwave ablation (MWA). A 55-year-old woman presented with cough and shortness of breath after finishing three cycles of chemotherapy for a metastatic nerve sheath tumour. She had been treated by MWA for pulmonary metastases 2 years previously which resulted in a residual right apical lung cavity. Postchemotherapy imaging showed that this cavity had enlarged, developed a thicker wall and contained lobulated soft tissue with a crescent sign on coronal reformats. In addition, the patient's Aspergillus-specific IgG was markedly raised. Treatment with itraconazole improved the symptoms and reduced the cavity size and wall thickness. This case shows that persisting lung cavities after MWA are a potential site for semi-invasive aspergillosis and has implications for the timing of chemotherapy in patient with metastatic lung disease. PMID:27624446

  19. Micropillar fabrication on bovine cortical bone by direct-write femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yong C.; Altman, Katrina J.; Farson, Dave F.; Flores, Katharine M.

    2009-11-01

    We investigated fabrication of cylindrical micropillars on bovine cortical bone using direct-write femtosecond laser ablation. The ablation threshold of the material was measured by single-pulse ablation tests, and the incubation coefficient was measured from linear scanned ablation tests. A motion system was programmed to apply multiple layers of concentric rings of pulses to machine pillars of various diameters and heights. The diameter of the top surface of the pillar was found to steadily decrease due to incubation of damage from successive layers of pulses during the machining process. Pillar top diameter was predicted based on a paraxial beam fluence approximation and single-pulse ablation threshold and incubation coefficient measurements. Pillar diameters predicted as successive layers of pulses were applied were well-matched to experiments, confirming that femtosecond laser ablation of the cortical bone was well-modeled by single-pulse ablation threshold measurements and an incubation coefficient.

  20. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOEpatents

    Maniscalco, James A.; Meier, Wayne R.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  1. Laboratory Micrometeroid/Dust Ablation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E.; Horanyi, M.; Janches, D.; Munsat, T. L.; Plane, J. M. C.; Simolka, J.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Each day, somewhere between 5-270 tonnes of meteoric material ablates in Earth's upper atmosphere. Thisenormous range is significant because the Interplanetary Dust Particle (IDP) input has implications in ourunderstanding of meteor transport in the atmosphere, the formation of layers of metal atoms and ions,nucleation of noctilucent clouds, effects on stratospheric aerosols and O3 chemistry, and dust evolution inour solar system. As the dust ablates, it produces light, as well as a plasma trail of ionized atmosphericatoms and electrons. These meteor signatures are detected by photographic means, or by radar, but thereremain uncertainties in the luminous efficiency and ionization coefficient of meteors - two parameters thatare essential to evaluate densities, masses, height distributions and fluxes. Precise measurements of theseparameters would allow for not only an understanding of the layers of metal atoms and ions and meteoricsmoke particles in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but also would allow for the Earth's atmosphereto be used as a dust detector to detect and characterize the dust environment in our solar system. This work discusses the preliminary results of the new dust ablation facility at the 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Institute for Modeling Plasma, Atmospheres and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) at the University of Colorado, which aims to characterize the ionization coefficient and luminous efficiency of ablating micrometeroids.

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as base material for THz photoconductive switching: a theoretical study from input power to output THz emission.

    PubMed

    Heshmat, Barmak; Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Beard, Matthew Craig; Papadopoulos, Chris; Darcie, Thomas Edward

    2011-08-01

    This paper studies the relation between photoexcitation of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based device, and its THz output power in the context of THz photoconductive (PC) switching and THz photomixing. A detailed approach of calculating output THz power for such a device describes the effect of each parameter on the performance of the THz PC switch and highlights the design dependent achievable limits. A numerical assessment, with typical values for each parameter, shows that-subject to thermal stability of the device-SWNT based PC switch can improve the output power by almost two orders of magnitudes compared to conventional materials such as LT-GaAs.

  3. A novel radial anode layer ion source for inner wall pipe coating and materials modification—Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon coatings from butane gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmu, Peter P.; Markwitz, Andreas; Suschke, Konrad; Futter, John

    2014-08-01

    We report a new ion source development for inner wall pipe coating and materials modification. The ion source deposits coatings simultaneously in a 360° radial geometry and can be used to coat inner walls of pipelines by simply moving the ion source in the pipe. Rotating parts are not required, making the source ideal for rough environments and minimizing maintenance and replacements of parts. First results are reported for diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on Si and stainless steel substrates deposited using a novel 360° ion source design. The ion source operates with permanent magnets and uses a single power supply for the anode voltage and ion acceleration up to 10 kV. Butane (C4H10) gas is used to coat the inner wall of pipes with smooth and homogeneous DLC coatings with thicknesses up to 5 μm in a short time using a deposition rate of 70 ± 10 nm min-1. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry results showed that DLC coatings contain hydrogen up to 30 ± 3% indicating deposition of hydrogenated DLC (a-C:H) coatings. Coatings with good adhesion are achieved when using a multiple energy implantation regime. Raman spectroscopy results suggest slightly larger disordered DLC layers when using low ion energy, indicating higher sp3 bonds in DLC coatings. The results show that commercially interesting coatings can be achieved in short time.

  4. A novel radial anode layer ion source for inner wall pipe coating and materials modification--hydrogenated diamond-like carbon coatings from butane gas.

    PubMed

    Murmu, Peter P; Markwitz, Andreas; Suschke, Konrad; Futter, John

    2014-08-01

    We report a new ion source development for inner wall pipe coating and materials modification. The ion source deposits coatings simultaneously in a 360° radial geometry and can be used to coat inner walls of pipelines by simply moving the ion source in the pipe. Rotating parts are not required, making the source ideal for rough environments and minimizing maintenance and replacements of parts. First results are reported for diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on Si and stainless steel substrates deposited using a novel 360° ion source design. The ion source operates with permanent magnets and uses a single power supply for the anode voltage and ion acceleration up to 10 kV. Butane (C4H10) gas is used to coat the inner wall of pipes with smooth and homogeneous DLC coatings with thicknesses up to 5 μm in a short time using a deposition rate of 70 ± 10 nm min(-1). Rutherford backscattering spectrometry results showed that DLC coatings contain hydrogen up to 30 ± 3% indicating deposition of hydrogenated DLC (a-C:H) coatings. Coatings with good adhesion are achieved when using a multiple energy implantation regime. Raman spectroscopy results suggest slightly larger disordered DLC layers when using low ion energy, indicating higher sp(3) bonds in DLC coatings. The results show that commercially interesting coatings can be achieved in short time. PMID:25173323

  5. 3D Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jay; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wilkinson, Curt; Mercer, Ken

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion spacecraft to carry astronauts farther into the solar system than ever before, with human exploration of Mars as its ultimate goal. One of the technologies required to enable this advanced, Apollo-shaped capsule is a 3-dimensional quartz fiber composite for the vehicle's compression pad. During its mission, the compression pad serves first as a structural component and later as an ablative heat shield, partially consumed on Earth re-entry. This presentation will summarize the development of a new 3D quartz cyanate ester composite material, 3-Dimensional Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System (3D-MAT), designed to meet the mission requirements for the Orion compression pad. Manufacturing development, aerothermal (arc-jet) testing, structural performance, and the overall status of material development for the 2018 EM-1 flight test will be discussed.

  6. Functionalization of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes with gallium to form Ga-CNx-multi-wall carbon nanotube hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Trevor J.; Hashim, Daniel P.; Zhan, Xiaobo; Bravo-Sanchez, Mariela; Hahm, Myung Gwan; López-Luna, Edgar; Linhardt, Robert J.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Navarro-Contreras, Hugo; Vidal, Miguel A.

    2012-08-01

    In an effort to combine group III-V semiconductors with carbon nanotubes, a simple solution-based technique for gallium functionalization of nitrogen-doped multi-wall carbon nanotubes has been developed. With an aqueous solution of a gallium salt (GaI3), it was possible to form covalent bonds between the Ga3+ ion and the nitrogen atoms of the doped carbon nanotubes to form a gallium nitride-carbon nanotube hybrid at room temperature. This functionalization was evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

  7. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  8. Laser ablation of phenylazide in an argon matrix: direct observation and chemical reactivity of ablated fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, H.; Sato, T.; Yabe, A.

    Ablation of pentafluorophenylazide (FPA) in an Ar matrix at 8-10 K was carried out upon irradiation with ns-pulsed UV lasers in a vacuum. The plume of ablated products was monitored by a time-resolved imaging/spectroscopic technique using a gated and intensified CCD camera system. A large amount of pentafluorophenylnitrene (FPN) having a high kinetic energy ( 6 eV) was ejected as fragments from the matrix film during ablation. A quantitative formation of triplet FPN from the photolysis of the FPA was observed by spectroscopic measurements in the IR and UV-visible regions, and was confirmed by a theoretical IR spectrum calculated according to density functional theory. A FPN beam is useful for chemical surface modification of organic materials, such as aromatic polyester and alkylthiol. A surface analysis of these materials by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy showed that the FPN was immobilized onto the surface through chemical bonds. This technique for the chemical surface modification of materials is made possible by a pulsed beam of reactive fragments with a high density in the laser ablation process.

  9. Diagnosing Implosion Velocity and Ablator Dynamics at NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, Gary; Hayes, Anna; Jungman, Jerry; Wilson, Doug; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Bradley, Paul; Rundberg, Bob; Cerjan, Charlie

    2009-10-01

    An enhanced understanding of the environment in a burning NIF capsule is of interest to both astrophysics and thermonuclear ignition. In this talk we introduce a new diagnostic idea, designed to measure dynamic aspects of the capsule implosion that are not currently accessible. During the burn,the NIF capsule ablator is moving relative to the 14.1 MeV dt neutrons that are traversing the capsule. The resulting neutron-ablator Doppler shift causes a few unique nuclear reactions to become sensitive detectors of the ablator velocity at peak burn time. The ``point-design'' capsule at the NIF will be based on a ^9Be ablator, and the ^9Be(n,p)^9Li reaction has an energy threshold of 14.2 MeV, making it the ideal probe. As discussed in detail below, differences in the ablator velocity lead to significant differences in the rate of ^9Li production. We present techniques for measuring this ^9Li implosion velocity diagnostic at the NIF. The same experimental techniques, measuring neutron reactions on the ablator material, will allow us to determine other important dynamical quantities, such as the areal density and approximate thickness of the ablator at peak burn.

  10. High-Density Carbon (HDC) Ablator for Ignition Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, D.; Haan, S.; Milovich, J.; Salmonson, J.; Zimmerman, G.; Benedict, L.; Biener, J.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D.; Dewalds, E.; Edwards, J.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; MacKinnon, A.; Marinak, M.; McNaney, J.; Meezan, N.; Ross, S.; Tommasini, R.

    2013-10-01

    HDC ablators show high performance based on simulations and experiments. HDC capsules have good 1-D performance because HDC has high density (3.5 g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator that absorbs more radiation, and have good 2-D performance because the ablator surface is substantially smoother than plastic ablators. A 25 μm thick layer doped with 0.26 at.% of W is sufficient to block the M-band radiation. W can be doped very uniformly in HDC. Simulations using NLTE model for W shows that the capsule can tolerate close to 300 ng of W-doped ablator material in the hot spot. If W is replaced with Si, the entire ablator has to be uniformly doped with 3 at.% of Si. Surprisingly, the hot spot can tolerate about the same amount of ablator mass for the 3 at.% Si-doped HDC as it can for W-doped. The main reason is that Si radiates less and consequently raises the hot spot temperature which in term increases the electron heat conduction. 4, 3, and 2-shock designs and their stabilites will be presented. An undoped HDC Symcap with DT fill reached a record neutron yield of 1.7e15. W-doped HDC Symcap and DT-layered shots will be conducted in Fall. Comparison of simulations with measured data will be presented. Performed under US DOE Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Assessment of tbe Performance of Ablative Insulators Under Realistic Solid Rocket Motor Operating Conditions (a Doctoral Dissertation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Heath Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ablative insulators are used in the interior surfaces of solid rocket motors to prevent the mechanical structure of the rocket from failing due to intense heating by the high-temperature solid-propellant combustion products. The complexity of the ablation process underscores the need for ablative material response data procured from a realistic solid rocket motor environment, where all of the potential contributions to material degradation are present and in their appropriate proportions. For this purpose, the present study examines ablative material behavior in a laboratory-scale solid rocket motor. The test apparatus includes a planar, two-dimensional flow channel in which flat ablative material samples are installed downstream of an aluminized solid propellant grain and imaged via real-time X-ray radiography. In this way, the in-situ transient thermal response of an ablator to all of the thermal, chemical, and mechanical erosion mechanisms present in a solid rocket environment can be observed and recorded. The ablative material is instrumented with multiple micro-thermocouples, so that in-depth temperature histories are known. Both total heat flux and thermal radiation flux gauges have been designed, fabricated, and tested to characterize the thermal environment to which the ablative material samples are exposed. These tests not only allow different ablative materials to be compared in a realistic solid rocket motor environment but also improve the understanding of the mechanisms that influence the erosion behavior of a given ablative material.

  12. Mathematical modeling of radiofrequency ablation for varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Young; Kwak, Byung Kook; Seo, Taewon

    2014-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional mathematical model for the study of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with blood flow for varicose vein. The model designed to analyze temperature distribution heated by radiofrequency energy and cooled by blood flow includes a cylindrically symmetric blood vessel with a homogeneous vein wall. The simulated blood velocity conditions are U = 0, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 40 mm/s. The lower the blood velocity, the higher the temperature in the vein wall and the greater the tissue damage. The region that is influenced by temperature in the case of the stagnant flow occupies approximately 28.5% of the whole geometry, while the region that is influenced by temperature in the case of continuously moving electrode against the flow direction is about 50%. The generated RF energy induces a temperature rise of the blood in the lumen and leads to an occlusion of the blood vessel. The result of the study demonstrated that higher blood velocity led to smaller thermal region and lower ablation efficiency. Since the peak temperature along the venous wall depends on the blood velocity and pullback velocity, the temperature distribution in the model influences ablation efficiency. The vein wall absorbs more energy in the low pullback velocity than in the high one. PMID:25587351

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Radiofrequency Ablation for Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun Young; Kwak, Byung Kook

    2014-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional mathematical model for the study of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with blood flow for varicose vein. The model designed to analyze temperature distribution heated by radiofrequency energy and cooled by blood flow includes a cylindrically symmetric blood vessel with a homogeneous vein wall. The simulated blood velocity conditions are U = 0, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 40 mm/s. The lower the blood velocity, the higher the temperature in the vein wall and the greater the tissue damage. The region that is influenced by temperature in the case of the stagnant flow occupies approximately 28.5% of the whole geometry, while the region that is influenced by temperature in the case of continuously moving electrode against the flow direction is about 50%. The generated RF energy induces a temperature rise of the blood in the lumen and leads to an occlusion of the blood vessel. The result of the study demonstrated that higher blood velocity led to smaller thermal region and lower ablation efficiency. Since the peak temperature along the venous wall depends on the blood velocity and pullback velocity, the temperature distribution in the model influences ablation efficiency. The vein wall absorbs more energy in the low pullback velocity than in the high one. PMID:25587351

  14. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang

    2015-05-15

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  15. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  16. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of side pumped, preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  17. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Holloway, Brian C.; Eklund, Peter C.; Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin C.; Shinn, Michelle

    2010-04-06

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  18. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Holloway, Brian C; Eklund, Peter C; Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C; Shinn, Michelle

    2012-11-27

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  19. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  20. Onoufrios, the famous XVI's century iconographer, creator of the ``Berati School'': studying the technique and materials used in wall paintings of inscribed churches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidou, E.; Arapi, M.; Zorba, T.; Anastasiou, M.; Civici, N.; Stamati, F.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.

    2006-06-01

    The study of the materials and techniques employed for wall painting, complementing the information from historical and aesthetic data, contributes to the integrated knowledge of the iconographer and his period. In the 16th century, regarding the iconography in the former Byzantine area, besides the School of Crete and Francos Catelanos and his school, a third artistic personality who also created his own school, Onoufrios, appeared in central Albania and expanded his activity as a painter to northern Greece as well as nearby areas, such as Ohrid. Inscriptions documenting the works of Onoufrios are found in some of the churches that he decorated with wall paintings: “St. Apostles” (1547) Kastoria Greece, “St. Nicolas” Shelcan Albania, “St. Paraskevi” (1554), Valsh Albania, while are attributed to him the church of “St. Theodores” in Berati, Albania (before 1547) and others. He is one of the best icon painters of the whole Balkan region, and the best painter that has ever worked in Albanian territory. Onoufrios managed to combine the local painting tradition with the best tradition of the eastern (Paleologian) and western (Italian) schools, resulting in a realistic and natural depiction. He is the creator of the “Berati School” that expanded to other parts of the peninsula. His individual character can be distinguished in the work of his students: his son Nikolaos (who inherited his style in painting), Onoufrios from Cyprus, etc. Based on careful observations, we extracted number of paint samples from wall paintings of three of the above mentioned churches. Ground and paint layers were examined using micro-FTIR, Optical Microscopy, TXRF and SEM-EDS, to characterize materials and methods used by the artist to create these works. Our findings in each church are discussed and compared with the others in order to understand how and with what material and resources the painter worked and how he developed his technique. The presence of calcium

  1. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tissue: In Vivo Experimental Comparison of Microwave and Radiofrequency

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Bozzi, Elena; Faviana, Pinuccia; Cioni, Dania; Della Pina, Clotilde; Sbrana, Alberto; Fontanini, Gabriella; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2010-08-15

    This study was designed to compare feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation versus radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tissue in a rabbit model. Twenty New Zealand White rabbits were submitted to MW (n = 10, group A) or RF ablation (n = 10, group B). The procedures were performed with a prototype MW ablation device with a 1.6-cm radiating section antenna (Valleylab MW Ablation System) and with a 2-cm exposed-tip RF electrode (Cool-tip RF Ablation System). At immediate computed tomography increase in density, maximum diameters (D1-D3) of ablation zones were measured and ablation volume was calculated. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 and 7 days after the procedure. Technical success was achieved in nine of 10 rabbits in each group. One death occurred in group B. Complications included pneumothorax (group A, n = 4; group B, n = 4), abscess (group A, n = 1; group B, n = 1), and thoracic wall burn (group A, n = 4). No significant differences were demonstrated in attenuation increase (P = 0.73), dimensions (P = 0.28, 0.86, 0.06, respectively, comparing D1-D3) and volume (P = 0.17). At histopathology, ablation zones were similar, with septal necrosis, edema, hemorrhage, and peripheral lymphocytic infiltrate. Complete thrombosis of more than 90% of vessels up to 2 mm in diameter was depicted at the periphery of the ablation zone in group A specimens. In group B specimens, complete thrombosis was depicted in 20% of vessels. Feasibility and safety of MW and RF ablation are similar in a lung rabbit model. MW ablation produces a greater damage to peripheral small vessels inducing thrombosis.

  2. Effects of processing on elastomer ablation performance in a radiant heating environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hender, D. R.; Clarke, B. H.

    1990-06-01

    Quartz lamp ablation tests, prompted by a change in material processing and supplier, were performed on an elastomer used for ablative thermal protection. These tests detected a drop in ablative efficiency which appeared to be related to the new processing techniques. After considerable work in exploring post-cure processing modifications to alleviate the perceived problem, a full-scale ground test of the system showed, as a byproduct, that there was no functional difference in ablative performance between the two differently processed materials. The full-scale environment was a mixture of convective and radiant heating, whereas for the ablative tests it was purely radiative. It was concluded that although the ablative testing was probably prudent, the choice of test facility led to misleading results. It would have been better to have selected a test method which, while more expensive, would have provided a closer match to the full-scale environment.

  3. Heat Preservation Performance Attenuation of the Exterior Wall Thermal Insulation Materials Commonly Used in South of Jiangsu Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Hai-Rong; Wang, Li-Wen

    2016-05-01

    The computational model of heat conduction is deduced for external insulation system of the exterior wall by the variable controlling method. In the method, the thermophysical parameter is constant. The external insulation systems of EPS, XPS, PUR, and PF are analyzed with this model. The weaken state is computed after the external insulation systems have been constructed for several years. The study results show that the insulation ability of deferent systems are all weakened with increase of the service time. The weaken amplitudes are all more than 8%. And it is as more as 18.6% in the XPS system, which is 8% more than EPS system. There are many cracks in the anti-crack mortar. So, it is the key factor for the weaken behavior in XPS system.

  4. Kinetic investigation of the oxidation of naval excess hazardous materials in supercritical water for the design of a transpiration-wall reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, S.F.; Hanush, R.G.; Hunter, T.B.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Sandia`s supercritical fluids reactor (SFR) to generate data for the design of a transpiration-wall supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) reactor. The reactor is intended for the disposal of hazardous material generated on naval vessels. The design parameters for the system require an accurate knowledge of destruction efficiency vs. time and temperature. Three candidate materials were selected for testing. The experiments consisted of oxidizing these materials in the SFR at isothermal conditions over the temperature range of 400-550C at 24.1 MPa. A small extrapolation of the results shows that these materials can be adequately destroyed (to 99.9% destruction removal efficiency, DRE, based on total organic carbon (TOC) in the effluent) in approximately 5 seconds at 600C. The results vary smoothly and predictably with temperature such that extrapolation to higher temperatures beyond the experimental capabilities of the SFR can be made with reasonable confidence. The preliminary design of the transpiration-wall reactor has a rapid heat-up section within the reactor vessel that requires the addition of a fuel capable of quickly reacting with oxygen at temperatures below 500C. Candidate alcohols and JP-5 jet fuel were evaluated in this context. Oxidation rates for the alcohols were examined using in situ Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the potential utility of supplying the oxidizer line with hydrogen peroxide as an additive to enhance rapid initiation of the feed at unusually low temperatures was investigated. Experiments were conducted in the Supercritical Constant Volume Reactor (SCVR) using hydrogen peroxide as the initial oxidizing species. The results show that this concept as a method of enhancing low temperature reactivity appears to fail because thermal decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide is more rapid than the fuel oxidation rate at low temperatures. 8 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Great Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Steve; Moore, Tim

    1996-01-01

    Explains why installing a well-designed indoor climbing wall can draw new users to an athletic facility. Climbing-wall design elements and gear are discussed and a checklist for working with contractors is provided.(GR)

  6. Ames Infusion Stories for NASA Annual Technology Report: Development of an Ablative 3D Quartz / Cyanate Ester Composite Multi-Functional Material for the Orion Spacecraft Compression Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brandon; Jan, Darrell Leslie; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    Vehicles re-entering Earth's atmosphere require protection from the heat of atmospheric friction. The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) has more demanding thermal protection system (TPS) requirements than the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) missions, especially in regions where the structural load passes through. The use of 2-dimensional laminate materials along with a metal insert, used in EFT1 flight test for the compression pad region, are deemed adequate but cannot be extended for Lunar return missions.

  7. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry-a review.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S

    2002-05-24

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas. PMID:18968642

  8. Novel catheter enabling simultaneous radiofrequency ablation and optical coherence reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, D.; Lloret, Juan; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Rubio-Guivernau, J. L.; Margallo-Balbás, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A novel radiofrequency ablation catheter has been developed with integrated custom designed optics, enabling real-time monitoring of radiofrequency ablation procedures through polarization-sensitive optical coherence reflectometry. The optics allow for proper tissue illumination through a view-port machined in the catheter tip, thus providing lesion depth control over the RF ablation treatment. The system was verified in an in-vitro model of swine myocardium. Optical performance and thermal stability was confirmed after more than 25 procedures, without any damage to the optical assembly induced by thermal stress or material degradation. The use of this catheter in RF ablation treatments may make possible to assess lesion depth during therapy, thus translating into a reduction of potential complications on the procedure. PMID:26417499

  9. Solid sampling with 193-nm excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph

    2007-02-01

    Reproducible and sensitive elemental analysis of solid samples is a crucial task in areas of geology (e.g. microanalysis of fluid inclusions), material sciences, industrial quality control as well as in environmental, forensic and biological studies. To date the most versatile detection method is mass-spectroscopic multi-element analysis. In order to obtain reproducible results, this requires transferring the solid sample into the gas-phase while preserving the sample's stoichiometric composition. Laser ablation in combination with Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a proven powerful technique to meet the requirements for reliable solid sample analysis. The sample is laser ablated in an air-tight cell and the aerosol is carried by an inert gas to a micro-wave induced plasma where its constituents are atomized and ionized prior to mass analysis. The 193 nm excimer laser ablation, in particular, provides athermal sample ablation with very precise lateral ablation and controlled depth profiling. The high photon energy and beam homogeneity of the 193 nm excimer laser system avoids elemental fractionation and permits clean ablation of even transmissive solid materials such as carbonates, fluorites and pure quartz.

  10. Similarities and differences in ablative and non-ablative iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Alicia A.; Misra, Adwiteeya; Kastner, Elliot J.; Mazur, Courtney M.; Petryk, James D.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    The use of hyperthermia to treat cancer is well studied and has utilized numerous delivery techniques, including microwaves, radio frequency, focused ultrasound, induction heating, infrared radiation, warmed perfusion liquids (combined with chemotherapy), and recently, metallic nanoparticles (NP) activated by near infrared radiation (NIR) and alternating magnetic field (AMF) based platforms. It has been demonstrated by many research groups that ablative temperatures and cytotoxicity can be produced with locally NP-based hyperthermia. Such ablative NP techniques have demonstrated the potential for success. Much attention has also been given to the fact that NP may be administered systemically, resulting in a broader cancer therapy approach, a lower level of tumor NP content and a different type of NP cancer therapy (most likely in the adjuvant setting). To use NP based hyperthermia successfully as a cancer treatment, the technique and its goal must be understood and utilized in the appropriate clinical context. The parameters include, but are not limited to, NP access to the tumor (large vs. small quantity), cancer cell-specific targeting, drug carrying capacity, potential as an ionizing radiation sensitizer, and the material properties (magnetic characteristics, size and charge). In addition to their potential for cytotoxicity, the material properties of the NP must also be optimized for imaging, detection and direction. In this paper we will discuss the differences between, and potential applications for, ablative and non-ablative magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

  11. Regional Pericarditis Status Post Cardiac Ablation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Joseph; Eddin, Moneer; Loli, Akil

    2014-01-01

    Context: Regional pericarditis is elusive and difficult to diagnosis. Healthcare providers should be familiar with post-cardiac ablation complications as this procedure is now widespread and frequently performed. The management of regional pericarditis differs greatly from that of acute myocardial infarction. Case report: A 52 year-old male underwent atrial fibrillation ablation and developed severe mid-sternal chest pain the following day with electrocardiographic findings suggestive of acute myocardial infarction, and underwent coronary angiography, a left ventriculogram, and 2D transthoracic echocardiogram, all of which were unremarkable without evidence of obstructive coronary disease, wall motion abnormalities, or pericardial effusions. Ultimately, the patient was diagnosed with regional pericarditis. After diagnosis, the patient's presenting symptoms resolved with treatment including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and colchicine. Conclusion: This is the first reported case study of regional pericarditis status post cardiac ablation. Electrocardiographic findings were classic for an acute myocardial infarction; however, coronary angiography and left ventriculogram demonstrated no acute coronary occlusion or ventricular wall motion abnormalities. Healthcare professionals must remember that the electrocardiographic findings in pericarditis are not always classic and that pericarditis can occur status post cardiac ablation. PMID:25317395

  12. The Influence of Ablation on Radiative Heating for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Sutton, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Using the coupled ablation and radiation capability recently included in the LAURA flowfield solver, this paper investigates the influence of ablation on the shock-layer radiative heating for Earth entry. The extension of the HARA radiation model, which provides the radiation predictions in LAURA, to treat a gas consisting of the elements C, H, O, and N is discussed. It is shown that the absorption coefficient of air is increased with the introduction of the C and H elements. A simplified shock layer model is studied to show the impact of temperature, as well as the abundance of C and H, on the net absorption or emission from an ablation contaminated boundary layer. It is found that the ablation species reduce the radiative flux in the vacuum ultraviolet, through increased absorption, for all temperatures. However, in the infrared region of the spectrum, the ablation species increase the radiative flux, through strong emission, for temperatures above 3,000 K. Thus, depending on the temperature and abundance of ablation species, the contaminated boundary layer may either provide a net increase or decrease in the radiative flux reaching the wall. To assess the validity of the coupled ablation and radiation LAURA analysis, a previously analyzed Mars-return case (15.24 km/s), which contains significant ablation and radiation coupling, is studied. Exceptional agreement with previous viscous shock-layer results is obtained. A 40% decrease in the radiative flux is predicted for ablation rates equal to 20% of the free-stream mass flux. The Apollo 4 peak-heating case (10.24 km/s) is also studied. For ablation rates up to 3.4% of the free-stream mass flux, the radiative heating is reduced by up to 19%, while the convective heating is reduced by up to 87%. Good agreement with the Apollo 4 radiometer data is obtained by considering absorption in the radiometer cavity. For both the Mars return and the Apollo 4 cases, coupled radiation alone is found to reduce the radiative

  13. Radiative ablation of disks around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan

    Hot, massive stars (spectral types O and B) have extreme luminosities (10. 4 -10. 6 L?) that drive strong stellar winds through UV line-scattering.Some massive stars also have disks, formed by either decretion from the star (as in the rapidly rotating "Classical Be stars"), or accretion during the star's formation. This dissertation examines the role of stellar radiation in driving (ablating) material away from these circumstellar disks. A key result is that the observed month to year decay of Classical Be disks can be explained by line-driven ablation without, as previously done, appealing to anomalously strong viscous diffusion. Moreover, the higher luminosity of O stars leads to ablation of optically thin disks on dynamical timescales of order a day, providing a natural explanation for the lack of observed Oe stars. In addition to the destruction of Be disks, this dissertation also introduces a model for their formation by coupling observationally inferred non-radial pulsation modes and rapid stellar rotation to launch material into orbiting Keplerian disks of Be-like densities. In contrast to such Be decretion disks, star-forming accretion disks are much denser and so are generally optically thick to continuum processes. To circumvent the computational challenges associated with radiation hydrodynamics through optically thick media, we develop an approximate method for treating continuum absorption in the limit of geometrically thin disks. The comparison of ablation with and without continuum absorption shows that accounting for disk optical thickness leads to less than a 50% reduction in ablation rate, implying that ablation rate depends mainly on stellar properties like luminosity. Finally, we discuss the role of "thin-shell mixing" in reducing X-rays from colliding wind binaries. Laminar, adiabatic shocks produce well understood X-ray emission, but the emission from radiatively cooled shocks is more complex due to thin-shell instabilities. The parameter

  14. Ablation and Thermal Response Property Model Validation for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, F. S.; Chen, Y.-K.

    2009-01-01

    Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was the heatshield material for the Stardust probe and is also a candidate heatshield material for the Orion Crew Module. As part of the heatshield qualification for Orion, physical and thermal properties were measured for newly manufactured material, included emissivity, heat capacity, thermal conductivity, elemental composition, and thermal decomposition rates. Based on these properties, an ablation and thermal-response model was developed for temperatures up to 3500 K and pressures up to 100 kPa. The model includes orthotropic and pressure-dependent thermal conductivity. In this work, model validation is accomplished by comparison of predictions with data from many arcjet tests conducted over a range of stagnation heat flux and pressure from 107 Watts per square centimeter at 2.3 kPa to 1100 Watts per square centimeter at 84 kPa. Over the entire range of test conditions, model predictions compare well with measured recession, maximum surface temperatures, and in depth temperatures.

  15. Matricectomy and nail ablation.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert; Haneke, Eckart

    2002-11-01

    Matricectomy refers to the complete extirpation of the nail matrix, resulting in permanent nail loss. Usually however, matricectomy is only partial, restricted to one or both lateral horns of the matrix. Nail ablation is the definitive removal of the entire nail organ. The most important common denominator in the successful matricectomy is the total removal or destruction of the matrix tissue. Matricectomy may be indicated for the management of onychauxis, onychogryphosis, congenital nail dystrophies, and chronic painful nail, such as recalcitrant ingrown toenail or split within the medial or lateral one-third of the nail.

  16. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  17. Modeling and Simulation of Ablation-Controlled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrapu, Madhusudhan N.

    Ablation and plasma formation in high energy laser target interactions and arc discharges are studied numerically. Each of the two processes is modeled separately due to the type of energy source and the resulting flow eld. Ablation of the target material and plasma formation are coupled to obtain evaporation rate, temperature distribution, velocity eld, and species concentration self-consistently. Laser ablation is studied in the perspective of directed energy applications, where beam size varies from few centimeters to tens of centimeters with energies extending up to 10 kW/cm2. Because of this high energy deposition, the evaporated material expands to supersonic speeds into the free space. Due to the large spot sizes and associated supersonic flow, one dimensional Euler equations are considered to be sufficient for modeling the plume. Instead, more emphasis was given to evaporation model, by introducing Knudsen layer kinetics at the plume target interface, and plasma shielding. The evaporation rate is validated with results from the experiments and simulations are carried out to nd the in fluence of laser beam frequency on evaporation rates. The evaporation model used in this work is found to be more accurate than the widely used model based on sonic speed assumption. The optimum beam wavelength for Al surfaces is found to be 850 nm. Attenuation of telemetry data by plasma is a concern for the testing of directed energy systems. Electrostatic approach for the mitigation of communication attenuation is analyzed to obtain the fluency limits up to which the approach can be implemented. It is found from sheath calculations that uninterrupted telemetry can be achieved through Al plasma for fluences below 4 J/cm2 at a background pressure of 1 atm, using a maximum bias voltage of 10 kV . Arc discharge ablation is modeled for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The electric arc generated between the electrodes, placed inside a Helium chamber, evaporates the catalyst

  18. Analysis of thermal residual stress in a thick-walled ring of Duralcan-base Al-SiC functionally graded material

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Yasuyoshi; Watanabe, Yoshimi

    1996-12-01

    A ring-cutting test and an elastic theory were applied to evaluate the macroscopic residual stress in a thick-walled ring made of Al-SiC functionally graded material (FGM). The FGM ring specimens, with outer diameter 90 mm, radial thickness approximately 8.4 to 10 mm, and width 30 mm, were fabricated by the centrifugal casting method from an ingot of Duralcan F3D.20S of Al-20 vol pct SiC master composite. Because of a difference in centrifugal forces of SiC particles and of molten aluminum alloy, the rings had a graded composition of SiC particles in the radial direction. The volume fractions of SiC particles in each ring specimen varied in the range of 0 to 43 vol pct from the inner to the outer surface of the ring, depending on the applied mold spin speed. A ring diametral compression test was performed to validate an analytical formula based on the curved beam theory that can account for the graded properties of the material. Excellent agreement between the theory that can account for the graded properties of the material. Excellent agreement between the theory and the experiment was found. The residual stress was found to be generated by a cooling of {Delta}T = 140 K, which was from half the melting point corresponding stress-free condition to the ambient temperature. The hoop residual stresses in the FGM ring varied in the range of {minus}50 to +35 MPa and from tension at the inner surface to compression at the outer space because of the graded composition. With an increase in wall thickness and/or composition gradation, the residual stresses were found to increase.

  19. Bumper wall for plasma device

    DOEpatents

    Coultas, Thomas A.

    1977-01-01

    Operation of a plasma device such as a reactor for controlled thermonuclear fusion is facilitated by an improved bumper wall enclosing the plasma to smooth the flow of energy from the plasma as the energy impinges upon the bumper wall. The bumper wall is flexible to withstand unequal and severe thermal shocks and it is readily replaced at less expense than the cost of replacing structural material in the first wall and blanket that surround it.

  20. Diamagnetic composite material structure for reducing undesired electromagnetic interference and eddy currents in dielectric wall accelerators and other devices

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Poole, Brian R.; Hawkins, Steven A.

    2015-06-30

    The devices, systems and techniques disclosed here can be used to reduce undesired effects by magnetic field induced eddy currents based on a diamagnetic composite material structure including diamagnetic composite sheets that are separated from one another to provide a high impedance composite material structure. In some implementations, each diamagnetic composite sheet includes patterned conductor layers are separated by a dielectric material and each patterned conductor layer includes voids and conductor areas. The voids in the patterned conductor layers of each diamagnetic composite sheet are arranged to be displaced in position from one patterned conductor layer to an adjacent patterned conductor layer while conductor areas of the patterned conductor layers collectively form a contiguous conductor structure in each diamagnetic composite sheet to prevent penetration by a magnetic field.

  1. Material deposition on inner divertor quartz-micro balances during ITER-like wall operation in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, H. G.; Philipps, V.; Freisinger, M.; Widdowson, A.; Heinola, K.; Kirschner, A.; Möller, S.; Petersson, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Huber, A.; Matthews, G. F.; Rubel, M.; Sergienko, G.

    2015-08-01

    The migration of beryllium, tungsten and carbon to remote areas of the inner JET-ILW divertor and the accompanying co-deposition of deuterium has been investigated using post-mortem analysis of the housings of quartz-micro balances (QMBs) and their quartz crystals. The analysis of the deposition provides that the rate of beryllium atoms is significantly reduced compared to the analogue deposition rate of carbon during the carbon wall conditions (JET-C) at the same locations of the QMBs. A reduction factor of 50 was found at the entrance gap to the cryo-pumps while it was 14 under tile 5, the semi-horizontal target plate. The deposits consist of C/Be atomic ratios of typically 0.1-0.5 showing an enrichment of carbon in remote areas compared to directly exposed areas with less carbon. The deuterium retention fraction D/Be is between 0.3 and 1 at these unheated locations in the divertor.

  2. Development of an energetic plasma source for simulating edge localized mode plasma interactions with first wall and diverter materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzic, David

    2005-10-01

    Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) pose a significant problem to current and future fusion reactors. One concern in a device such as ITER is that ELMs may be the limiting factor for successful operation. ITER ELMs are predicted to impart between 1 -- 10 MJ/m^2 onto the divertor surface and first wall of the reactor. This may lead to significant erosion of the divertors and possible melting. The ELM Simulating Plasma gun (ESP-gun) in operation at UIUC is intended to produce plasmas similar to those found in TOKAMAK ELM events. ESP-gun operates with several small pulse forming networks (PFN) that are sequentially triggered to produce a ringing, under-damped current waveform with peak currents in excess of 50 kA. Each PFN is connected to the conical theta pinch to produce high Te, high ne plasmas similar to ELM events. A Triple Langmuir Probe (TLP) diagnoses and measures the quality of the plasmas produced by the ESP-gun. To date, an ne of 1(10)^19/m^3 and greater with a Te greater than 50 eV in the target area have been measured. From these measurements, plasma energies can be calculated. Axial magnetic field measurements during the theta pinch at the location of the coil and at a downstream target are accomplished.

  3. Dynamical modeling of laser ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Chen, K.R.; Donato, J.M.; Geohegan, D.B.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1995-09-01

    Several physics and computational approaches have been developed to globally characterize phenomena important for film growth by pulsed laser deposition of materials. These include thermal models of laser-solid target interactions that initiate the vapor plume; plume ionization and heating through laser absorption beyond local thermodynamic equilibrium mechanisms; gas dynamic, hydrodynamic, and collisional descriptions of plume transport; and molecular dynamics models of the interaction of plume particles with the deposition substrate. The complexity of the phenomena involved in the laser ablation process is matched by the diversity of the modeling task, which combines materials science, atomic physics, and plasma physics.

  4. Percutaneous Ablation in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bradford J.; Gervais, Debra A.

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation in the kidney is now performed as a standard therapeutic nephron-sparing option in patients who are poor candidates for resection. Its increasing use has been largely prompted by the rising incidental detection of renal cell carcinomas with cross-sectional imaging and the need to preserve renal function in patients with comorbid conditions, multiple renal cell carcinomas, and/or heritable renal cancer syndromes. Clinical studies to date indicate that radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are effective therapies with acceptable short- to intermediate-term outcomes and with a low risk in the appropriate setting, with attention to pre-, peri-, and postprocedural detail. The results following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma are reviewed in this article, including those of several larger scale studies of ablation of T1a tumors. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the kidney are presented, and potential complications are discussed. © RSNA, 2011 PMID:22012904

  5. Verification and Validation of EnergyPlus Conduction Finite Difference and Phase Change Material Models for Opaque Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares-Velasco, Paulo Cesar; Christensen, Craig; Bianchi, Marcus; Booten, Chuck

    2012-07-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) represent a potential technology to reduce peak loads and HVAC energy consumption in buildings. There are few building energy simulation programs that have the capability to simulate PCM but their accuracy has not been completely tested. This report summarizes NREL efforts to develop diagnostic tests cases to obtain accurate energy simulations when PCMs are modeled in residential buildings.

  6. High pressure, energy, and impulse loading of the wall in a 1-GJ Laboratory Microfusion Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.

    1989-07-24

    A proposed Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) must be able to withstand repeated, low-repetition-rate fusion explosions at the 1-GJ (one-quarter ton) yield level. The energy release will occur at the center of a chamber only a few meters in radius, subjecting the interior or first wall to severe levels of temperature, pressure, and impulse. We show by theory and computation that the wall loading can be ameliorated by interposing a spherical shell of low-Z material between the fuel and the wall. This sacrificial shield converts the source energy components that are most damaging to the wall (soft x-rays and fast ions) to more benign plasma kinetic energy from the vaporized shield, and stretches the time duration over which this energy is delivered to the wall from nanoseconds to microseconds. Numerical calculations emphasize thin, volleyball-sized plastic shields, and much thicker ones of frozen nitrogen. Wall shielding criteria of small (or no) amount of surface ablation, low impulse and pressure loading, minimal shrapnel danger, small expense, and convenience in handling all favor the thin plastic shields. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Ablation characteristics of electrospun core-shell nanofiber by femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Park, ChangKyoo; Xue, Ruipeng; Lannutti, John J; Farson, Dave F

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the femtosecond laser ablation properties of core and shell polymers their relationship to the ablation characteristics of core-shell nanofibers. The single-pulse ablation threshold of bulk polycaprolactone (PCL) was measured to be 2.12J/cm(2) and that of bulk polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was 4.07J/cm(2). The incubation coefficients were measured to be 0.82±0.02 for PCL and 0.53±0.03 for PDMS. PDMS-PCL core-shell and pure PCL nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning. The energy/volume of pure PCL and PDMS-PCL core-shell nanofiber ablation was investigated by measuring linear ablation grooves made at different scanning speeds. At large scanning speed, higher energy/volume was required for machining PDMS-PCL nanofiber than for PCL nanofiber. However, at small scanning speed, comparable energy/volume was measured for PDMS-PCL and PCL nanofiber ablation. Additionally, in linear scanned ablation of PDMS-PCL fibers at small laser pulse energy and large scanning speed, there were partially ablated fibers where the shell was ablated but the core remained. This was attributed to the lower ablation threshold of the shell material.

  8. Ablation characteristics of electrospun core-shell nanofiber by femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Park, ChangKyoo; Xue, Ruipeng; Lannutti, John J; Farson, Dave F

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the femtosecond laser ablation properties of core and shell polymers their relationship to the ablation characteristics of core-shell nanofibers. The single-pulse ablation threshold of bulk polycaprolactone (PCL) was measured to be 2.12J/cm(2) and that of bulk polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was 4.07J/cm(2). The incubation coefficients were measured to be 0.82±0.02 for PCL and 0.53±0.03 for PDMS. PDMS-PCL core-shell and pure PCL nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning. The energy/volume of pure PCL and PDMS-PCL core-shell nanofiber ablation was investigated by measuring linear ablation grooves made at different scanning speeds. At large scanning speed, higher energy/volume was required for machining PDMS-PCL nanofiber than for PCL nanofiber. However, at small scanning speed, comparable energy/volume was measured for PDMS-PCL and PCL nanofiber ablation. Additionally, in linear scanned ablation of PDMS-PCL fibers at small laser pulse energy and large scanning speed, there were partially ablated fibers where the shell was ablated but the core remained. This was attributed to the lower ablation threshold of the shell material. PMID:27157748

  9. Increasing the penetration depth for ultrafast laser tissue ablation using glycerol based optical clearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabay, Ilan; Subramanian, Kaushik G.; Martin, Chris; Yildirim, Murat; Tuchin, Valery V.; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2016-03-01

    Background: Deep tissue ablation is the next challenge in ultrafast laser microsurgery. By focusing ultrafast pulses below the tissue surface one can create an ablation void confined to the focal volume. However, as the ablation depth increases in a scattering tissue, increase in the required power can trigger undesired nonlinear phenomena out of focus that restricts our ability to ablate beyond a maximum ablation depth of few scattering lengths. Optical clearing (OC) might reduce the intensity and increase the maximal ablation depth by lowering the refractive index mismatch, and therefore reducing scattering. Some efforts to ablate deeper showed out of focus damage, while others used brutal mechanical methods for clearing. Our clinical goal is to create voids in the scarred vocal folds and inject a biomaterial to bring back the tissue elasticity and restore phonation. Materials and methods: Fresh porcine vocal folds were excised and applied a biocompatible OC agent (75% glycerol). Collimated transmittance was monitored. The tissue was optically cleared and put under the microscope for ablation threshold measurements at different depths. Results: The time after which the tissue was optically cleared was roughly two hours. Fitting the threshold measurements to an exponential decay graph indicated that the scattering length of the tissue increased to 83+/-16 μm, which is more than doubling the known scattering length for normal tissue. Conclusion: Optical clearing with Glycerol increases the tissue scattering length and therefore reduces the energy for ablation and increases the maximal ablation depth. This technique can potentially improve clinical microsurgery.

  10. Multidiagnostic analysis of ultrafast laser ablation of metals with pulse pair irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoruso, S.; Bruzzese, R.; Wang, X.; O'Connell, G.; Lunney, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    Copper targets are irradiated in the ablation regime by pairs of equal, time-delayed collinear laser pulses separated on a timescale going from ≈2 ps to ≈2 ns. The ablation plume is characterized by ion probe diagnostic, fast imaging, and temporally and spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The variation in the ablation efficiency with the delay between the pulses is analyzed by measuring the ablation crater profile with a contact profilometer. The second laser pulse modifies the characteristics of the plasma plume produced by the first pulse and the ablation efficiency. The different mechanisms involved in double pulse ultrafast laser ablation are identified and discussed. The experimental findings are interpreted in the frame of a simple model of the interaction of the second pulse with the nascent ablation plume produced by the first pulse. This model yields consistent and quantitative agreement with the experimental findings predicting the observed experimental trends of the ablation depth reduction and ion yield increase with the delay between the pulses, as well as the characteristic timescale of the observed changes. The possibility of controlling the characteristics of the plumes produced during ultrafast laser ablation via an efficient coupling of the energy of the second pulse to the various ablation components produced by the first pulse is of particular interest in ultrafast pulsed laser deposition and microprobe analyses of materials.

  11. Ultrafast properties of femtosecond-laser-ablated GaAs and its application to terahertz optoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Madéo, Julien; Margiolakis, Athanasios; Zhao, Zhen-Yu; Hale, Peter J; Man, Michael K L; Zhao, Quan-Zhong; Peng, Wei; Shi, Wang-Zhou; Dani, Keshav M

    2015-07-15

    We report on the first terahertz (THz) emitter based on femtosecond-laser-ablated gallium arsenide (GaAs), demonstrating a 65% enhancement in THz emission at high optical power compared to the nonablated device. Counter-intuitively, the ablated device shows significantly lower photocurrent and carrier mobility. We understand this behavior in terms of n-doping, shorter carrier lifetime, and enhanced photoabsorption arising from the ablation process. Our results show that laser ablation allows for efficient and cost-effective optoelectronic THz devices via the manipulation of fundamental properties of materials.

  12. A study of structure formation on PET, PBT, and PS surfaces by excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongdae

    Usually polymer surface treatment is performed to modify surface layers by inserting some functional group and/or by inducing roughness on surfaces to improve their wettability, printability, and adhesion to other polymers or metals. In this work, different polymer surfaces were treated using an excimer laser (LPX 240i, Lambda Physik). Polystyrene, polyethylene terephtalate, and polybutylene terephtalate were chosen as model materials for this study. Films were made by cast film processing and stretched with biaxial stretching machine. With excimer laser treatment on polymer surfaces, it was found that we could produce 1--2 micron size structures depending on material properties and film processing conditions. Materials with lower UV absorption coefficient produced double digit micron size structures, while those with higher UV absorption coefficients produced single digit micron size structures. In all these cases the structures formed only on stretched films. In addition to those microstructure developments, the determination of ablation threshold fluence was of interest mainly for understanding fundamentals of ablation behavior and technical applications. In this study, ablation thresholds were measured by various methods including ablation depth, ablation weight, and ablation sound level measurements. Among these methods, we confirmed that the measurement by ablation sound level gives the most reliable results, because this method is based on single pulse ablation. To understand the ablation phenomenon, and how microstructures can be developed during ablation, different material processing and excimer laser conditions were chosen for experimentation. During our experiments, we observed incubation phenomenon during laser ablation and showed that this incubation was significant for materials with low UV absorption coefficients. Based on UV absorption value change after excimer laser irradiation, we proposed a mechanism to explain the ablation of PS films. From

  13. Towards Fully Diagnosed Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azechi, Hiroshi

    2002-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with material ablation through the unstable interface is the key physics that determines the success or failure of inertial fusion energy. The ablative RT instability has also general resemblance to hydrodynamic instabilities occurring in Type Ia supernovae and in interstellar clouds, such as the Eagle Nebula. In the laser fusion community, it is generally accepted that the Bodner-Takabe formula [1] with significant improvement by Betti [2] may predict correct dispersion relation of the growth rates of the ablative RT instability. However, there still exist theoretical uncertainties due to the different treatment of electron transport from the laser absorption region to the ablation region. The difference in the electron transport is most pronounced at short wavelength perturbation that is below spatial resolution of most x-ray imagers. The direct effect of the transport is the ablation density profile, which measurement is also a formidable task with conventional diagnostic techniques. We will present our RT growth as well as the ablation density measurements based on recently developed novel techniques of high spatial resolution: moir interferometry, penumbral imaging, and Fresnel-phase-zone-plate imaging. [1] S. Bodner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 33, 761 (1974); H. Takabe et al., Phys. Fluids 28, 3676 (1985). [2] R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1446 (1998).

  14. Thermal melting and ablation of silicon by femtosecond laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I. Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Bunkin, A. F.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.

    2013-03-15

    The space-time dynamics of thermal melting, subsurface cavitation, spallative ablation, and fragmentation ablation of the silicon surface excited by single IR femtosecond laser pulses is studied by timeresolved optical reflection microscopy. This dynamics is revealed by monitoring picosecond and (sub)nanosecond oscillations of probe pulse reflection, which is modulated by picosecond acoustic reverberations in the dynamically growing surface melt subjected to ablation and having another acoustic impedance, and by optical interference between the probe pulse replicas reflected by the spalled layer surface and the layer retained on the target surface. The acoustic reverberation periods change during the growth and ablation of the surface melt film, which makes it possible to quantitatively estimate the contributions of these processes to the thermal dynamics of the material surface. The results on the thermal dynamics of laser excitation are supported by dynamic measurements of the ablation parameters using noncontact ultrasonic diagnostics, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical interference microscopy of the modified regions appearing on the silicon surface after ablation.

  15. The effect of external mean flow on sound transmission through double-walled cylindrical shells lined with poroelastic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Bhaskar, Atul; Zhang, Xin

    2014-03-01

    Sound transmission through a system of double shells, lined with poroelastic material in the presence of external mean flow, is studied. The porous material is modeled as an equivalent fluid because shear wave contributions are known to be insignificant. This is achieved by accounting for the energetically most dominant wave types in the calculations. The transmission characteristics of the sandwich construction are presented for different incidence angles and Mach numbers over a wide frequency range. It is noted that the transmission loss exhibits three dips on the frequency axis as opposed to flat panels where there are only two such frequencies—results are discussed in the light of these observations. Flow is shown to decrease the transmission loss below the ring frequency, but increase this above the ring frequency due to the negative stiffness and the damping effect added by the flow. In the absence of external mean flow, porous material provides superior insulation for most part of the frequency band of interest. However, in the presence of external flow, this is true only below the ring frequency—above this frequency, the presence of air gap in sandwich constructions is the dominant factor that determines the acoustic performance. In the absence of external flow, an air gap always improves sound insulation.

  16. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes act as charge transport channel to boost the efficiency of hole transport material free perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Nian; Liu, Pei; Qi, Fei; Xiao, Yuqin; Yu, Wenjing; Yu, Zhenhua; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shi-Shang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2016-11-01

    The two-step spin coating process produces rough perovskite surfaces in ambient condition with high humidity, which are unfavorable for the contact between the perovskite film and the low temperature carbon electrode. To tackle this problem, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are embedded into the perovskite layer. The MWCNTs can act as charge transport high way between individual perovskite nanoparticles and facilitate the collection of the photo-generated holes by the carbon electrode. Longer carrier lifetime is confirmed in the perovskite solar cells with addition of MWCNTs using open circuit voltage decay measurement. Under optimized concentration of MWCNT, average power conversion efficiency of 11.6% is obtained in hole transport material free perovskite solar cells, which is boosted by ∼15% compared to solar cells without MWCNT.

  17. On sound transmission through double-walled cylindrical shells lined with poroelastic material: Comparison with Zhou's results and further effect of external mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; He, Chuanbo

    2015-12-01

    In this discussion, the corrections to the errors found in the derivations and the numerical code of a recent analytical study (Zhou et al. Journal of Sound and Vibration 333 (7) (2014) 1972-1990) on sound transmission through double-walled cylindrical shells lined with poroelastic material are presented and discussed, as well as the further effect of the external mean flow on the transmission loss. After applying the corrections, the locations of the characteristic frequencies of thin shells remain unchanged, as well as the TL results above the ring frequency where BU and UU remain the best configurations in sound insulation performance. In the low-frequency region below the ring frequency, however, the corrections attenuate the TL amplitude significantly for BU and UU, and hence the BB configuration exhibits the best performance which is consistent with previous observations for flat sandwich panels.

  18. Effect of liquid properties on laser ablation of aluminum and titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Peixuan; Li, Peijie; Leksina, E. G.; Michurin, S. V.; He, Liangju

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the effect of liquid properties on laser ablation in liquids, aluminum 5A06 and titanium TB5 targets were irradiated by single-pulse infrared laser in isopropanol, distilled water, glycerin and as a comparison, in air, respectively. Craters induced by laser ablation were characterized using scanning electron and white-light interferometric microscopies. The results show that for liquid-mediated ablation, craters with porous surface structures were formed in aluminum target through phase explosion, while no micro-cavities were formed in titanium target owing to high critical temperature of titanium. In addition, ablation rates of aluminum and titanium targets vary with types of ambient media in accordance with such sequence: air < isopropanol < water < glycerin. Further, the influence of liquid properties on material-removal mechanisms for laser ablation in liquid is discussed. It is concluded that the density, thermal conductivity and acoustical impedance of liquid play a dominant role in laser ablation efficiency.

  19. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  20. Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jonathan K.; Al-Tariq, Quazi Z.; Zaw, Taryar M. Raman, Steven S. Lu, David S.K.

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo assess radiofrequency (RF) ablation efficacy, as well as the patency of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPSs), in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and MethodsRetrospective database review of patients with pre-existing TIPS undergoing RF ablation of HCC was conducted over a 159-month period ending in November 2013. TIPS patency pre- and post-RF ablation was assessed by ultrasound, angiography, and/or contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. Patient demographics and immediate post-RF ablation outcomes and complications were also reviewed.Results19 patients with 21 lesions undergoing 25 RF ablation sessions were included. Child-Pugh class A, B, and C scores were seen in 1, 13, and 5 patients, respectively. Eleven patients (58 %) ultimately underwent liver transplantation. Immediate technical success was seen in all ablation sessions without residual tumor enhancement (100 %). No patients (0 %) suffered liver failure within 1 month of ablation. Pre-ablation TIPS patency was demonstrated in 22/25 sessions (88 %). Of 22 cases with patent TIPS prior to ablation, post-ablation patency was demonstrated in 22/22 (100 %) at immediate post-ablation imaging and in 21/22 (95 %) at last follow-up (1 patient was incidentally noted to have occlusion 31 months later). No immediate complications were observed.ConclusionAblation efficacy was similar to the cited literature values for patients without TIPS. Furthermore, TIPS patency was preserved in the majority of cases. Patients with both portal hypertension and HCC are not uncommonly encountered, and a pre-existing TIPS does not appear to be a definite contraindication for RF ablation.

  1. Electrical and Material Characteristics of Low Pressure Chemical-Vapor Deposited Tungsten Films in Cold Wall Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Rajiv V.

    The kinetics and related mechanisms of non-self limiting nature of Si reduction of WF_6 in cold wall systems are investigated. The growth of such films in Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD) and Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) systems is compared. Based on thermodynamic considerations, the origin of W-O layer is attributed to a secondary reaction between water vapors, WF_6 and substrate Si. The beneficial role played by the W-O layer is that it prevents the volume shrinkage and restricts lateral encroachment. A physical model is proposed which explains the non-self limiting growth of W films based on the microstructure of the film, the process parameters, the presence of W-O, and the Si gradient across the W films. The surface science study in the UHV system has helped in developing this model. It is postulated that the fine grained W structure surrounded by W-O layer formed in the LPCVD system assists in faster out-diffusion of Si through W films compared to an UHV system. This explains why the activation energy (0.2 eV) is lower for Si out-diffusion through films grown in the LPCVD system than that for the UHV system (0.48 eV). This, also, supports the significantly lower values of coefficient for Si out-diffusion in the case of LPCVD system. The out-diffused Si is substituted to W to complete the film growth. The effects of deposition temperature on growth, composition, structure, adhesion properties, stress and resistivity of tungsten films deposited purely by SiH _4 reduction of WF_6 are also reported. Silicon reduced W is characterized electrically by fabricating Schottky Barriers and FET (Field Effect Transistors). Increased diffusion of Si into W as a function of deposition temperature increases the barrier height from 0.60 eV to 0.64 eV. The contact resistances of Si reduced W surrounded by amorphous layer of W-O is very close to that for H_2 reduced W. Raised source and drain are formed on NFET and PFET by low temperature selective epitaxial Si, which

  2. Two-Dimensional Finite Element Ablative Thermal Response Analysis of an Arcjet Stagnation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Laub, Bernard; Braun, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    The finite element ablation and thermal response (FEAtR, hence forth called FEAR) design and analysis program simulates the one, two, or three-dimensional ablation, internal heat conduction, thermal decomposition, and pyrolysis gas flow of thermal protection system materials. As part of a code validation study, two-dimensional axisymmetric results from FEAR are compared to thermal response data obtained from an arc-jet stagnation test in this paper. The results from FEAR are also compared to the two-dimensional axisymmetric computations from the two-dimensional implicit thermal response and ablation program under the same arcjet conditions. The ablating material being used in this arcjet test is phenolic impregnated carbon ablator with an LI-2200 insulator as backup material. The test is performed at the NASA, Ames Research Center Interaction Heating Facility. Spatially distributed computational fluid dynamics solutions for the flow field around the test article are used for the surface boundary conditions.

  3. Acoustic signal characteristics during IR laser ablation and their consequences for acoustic tissue discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahen, Kester; Vogel, Alfred

    2000-06-01

    IR laser ablation of skin is accompanied by acoustic signals the characteristics of which are closely linked to the ablation dynamics. A discrimination between different tissue layers, for example necrotic and vital tissue during laser burn debridement, is therefore possible by an analysis of the acoustic signal. We were able to discriminate tissue layers by evaluating the acoustic energy. To get a better understanding of the tissue specificity of the ablation noise, we investigated the correlation between sample water content, ablation dynamics, and characteristics of the acoustic signal. A free running Er:YAG laser with a maximum pulse energy of 2 J and a spot diameter of 5 mm was used to ablate gelatin samples with different water content. The ablation noise in air was detected using a piezoelectric transducer with a bandwidth of 1 MHz, and the acoustic signal generated inside the ablated sample was measured simultaneously ba a piezoelectric transducer in contact with the sample. Laser flash Schlieren photography was used to investigate the expansion velocity of the vapor plume and the velocity of the ejected material. We observed large differences between the ablation dynamics and material ejection velocity for gelatin samples with 70% and 90% water content. These differences cannot be explained by the small change of the gelatin absorption coefficient, but are largely related to differences of the mechanical properties of the sample. The different ablation dynamics are responsible for an increase of the acoustic energy by a factor of 10 for the sample with the higher water content.

  4. Below-Band-Gap Laser Ablation Of Diamond For TEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Thomas; Foote, Marc C.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Fortier, Edward P.; Posthill, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Thin, electron-transparent layers of diamond for examination in transmission electron microscope (TEM) fabricated from thicker diamond substrates by using laser beam to ablate surface of substrate. Involves use of photon energy below band gap. Growing interest in use of diamond as bulk substrate and as coating material in variety of applications has given rise to increasing need for TEM for characterization of diamond-based materials. Below-band-gap laser ablation method helps to satisfy this need. Also applied in general to cutting and etching of diamonds.

  5. Successful control of life-threatening polymorphic ventricular tachycardia by radiofrequency catheter ablation in an infant.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuriko; Sumitomo, Naokata; Okuma, Hiromi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Fukuhara, Junji; Ichikawa, Rie; Matsumura, Masaharu; Miyashita, Michio; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Watanabe, Mamie; Joo, Kunitaka; Makita, Naomasa; Horie, Minoru

    2014-05-01

    We present a case of a 9-month-old girl in whom malignant polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) was successfully controlled by radiofrequency catheter ablation under guidance with a three-dimensional mapping system. The VTs originated from the left ventricular lateral wall, left ventricular anterior wall, and left ventricular apex. At least six types of VTs were documented during the electrophysiology study. All VTs were successfully controlled after two sessions of radiofrequency catheter ablation, and she was discharged from our hospital on propranolol, mexiletine, flecainide, and aprindine. PMID:23836069

  6. Epicardial Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Roderick; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Epicardial mapping and ablation via a percutaneous subxiphoid technique has been instrumental in improving the working understanding of complex myocardial scars in various arrhythmogenic substrates. Endocardial ablation alone may not be sufficient in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and Chagas disease to prevent recurrent ventricular tachycardia. Multiple observational studies have demonstrated greater freedom from recurrence with adjunctive epicardial ablation compared with endocardial ablation alone. While epicardial ablation is performed predominantly at tertiary referral centers, knowledge of the technical approach, clinical indications, and potential complications is imperative to maximizing clinical success and patient safety. In 1996, Sosa and colleagues modified the pericardiocentesis technique to enable percutaneous access to the pericardial space for mapping and catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia.1 Originally developed for patients with epicardial scarring due to chagasic cardiomyopathy and patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy refractory to endocardial ablationm,2,3 this approach has since become an essential part of the armamentarium for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia. Myocardial scars are three-dimensionally complex with varying degrees of transmurality, and the ability to map and ablate the epicardial surface has contributed to a greater understanding of scar-related VT in postinfarction cardiomyopathy and nonischemic substrates including idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and chagasic cardiomyopathy. In this review, we highlight the percutaneous approach and discuss clinical indications and potential complications. PMID:26306131

  7. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin; Zhong, Xiang Li

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser-material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 0.087 J/cm2) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 1.576 J/cm2), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α-1 = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α-1 = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the Cdbnd C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas Cdbnd C bond is partially eliminated through the femtosecond laser treatment due to the difference in photon energy of the two laser beams. A reduction in the Cdbnd C bond through the chain scission process creates free radical carbons which then form crosslinks with each other or react with oxygen, nitrogen and water in air producing oxygen-rich (Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bond) and nitrogen-rich (Csbnd N) functional groups.

  8. Effect of Twisted Fiber Anisotropy in Cardiac Tissue on Ablation with Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fei; Zemlin, Christian W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ablation of cardiac tissue with pulsed electric fields is a promising alternative to current thermal ablation methods, and it critically depends on the electric field distribution in the heart. Methods We developed a model that incorporates the twisted anisotropy of cardiac tissue and computed the electric field distribution in the tissue. We also performed experiments in rabbit ventricles to validate our model. We find that the model agrees well with the experimentally determined ablation volume if we assume that all tissue that is exposed to a field greater than 3 kV/cm is ablated. In our numerical analysis, we considered how tissue thickness, degree of anisotropy, and electrode configuration affect the geometry of the ablated volume. We considered two electrode configurations: two parallel needles inserted into the myocardium (“penetrating needles” configuration) and one circular electrode each on epi- and endocardium, opposing each other (“epi-endo” configuration). Results For thick tissues (10 mm) and moderate anisotropy ratio (a = 2), we find that the geometry of the ablated volume is almost unaffected by twisted anisotropy, i.e. it is approximately translationally symmetric from epi- to endocardium, for both electrode configurations. Higher anisotropy ratio (a = 10) leads to substantial variation in ablation width across the wall; these variations were more pronounced for the penetrating needle configuration than for the epi-endo configuration. For thinner tissues (4 mm, typical for human atria) and higher anisotropy ratio (a = 10), the epi-endo configuration yielded approximately translationally symmetric ablation volumes, while the penetrating electrodes configuration was much more sensitive to fiber twist. Conclusions These results suggest that the epi-endo configuration will be reliable for ablation of atrial fibrillation, independently of fiber orientation, while the penetrating electrode configuration may experience problems when the

  9. [New techniques of tumor ablation (microwaves, electroporation)].

    PubMed

    de Baere, T

    2011-09-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency tumor ablation of liver tumors in the late 1990s, local destructive therapies have been applied to lung, renal and bone lesions. In addition, new techniques have been introduced to compensate for the limitations of radiofrequency ablation, namely the reduced rate of complete ablation for tumors larger than 3 cm and tumors near vessels larger than 3 mm. Microwave ablation is currently evolving rapidly. While it is a technique based on thermal ablation similar to radiofrequency ablation, there are significant differences between both techniques. Electroporation, of interest because of the non-thermal nature of the ablation process, also is under evaluation.

  10. Diagnosing implosion velocity and ablator dynamics at NIF (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Anna; Grim, Gary; Jungnam, Jerry; Bradley, Paul; Rundberg, Bob; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Wilson, Doug

    2009-07-09

    An enhanced understanding of the unique physics probed in a burning NIP capsule is important for both nuclear weapons physics and thermonuclear ignition. In this talk we introduce a new diagnostic idea, designed to measure dynamic aspects of the capsule implosion that are not currently accessible. The current set of diagnostics for the NIF experiments includes reaction history (a time resolved measure of the d + t burn), neutron time-of-flight and spectrometry and spatial imaging of the neutron production and scattering. Although valuable, this abbreviated set of diagnostics cannot determine key dynamical properties of the implosion, such as implosion velocity (v{sub impl}) and ablator thickness. To surpass the present limits of {approx} 10{sup 15} d+t reactions, it will be necessary to increase significantly the implosion energy delivered to the DT fuel by finely tuning the balance between the remaining (imploding) ablator mass and velocity. If too much mass remains, the implosion velocity will be too slow, and the subsecpwnt PdV work will not be sufficient to overcome cooling via conduction and radiation. If too little mass remains, hydrodynamic instabilities will occur, resulting in unpredictable and degraded performance. Detailed calculations suggest the ablator must reach an implosion velocity of 3-4 x 10{sup 7} cm/sec and an areal density of {rho}{Delta}R {approx}200 mg/cm{sup 2} in order to achieve ignition. The authors present a new scheme to measure these important quantities using neutron reactions on the ablator material. During the burn, the ablator is moving relative to the 14.1 MeV d+t neutrons that are traversing the capsule. The resulting neutron-ablator Doppler shift causes a few unique nuclear reactions to become sensitive detectors of the ablator velocity at peak burn time. The 'point-design' capsule at the NIF will be based on a {sup 9}Be ablator, and the {sup 9}Be(n,p){sup 9}Li reaction has an energy threshold of 14.2 MeV, making it the ideal

  11. A novel cell ablation strategy blocks tobacco anther dehiscence.

    PubMed Central

    Beals, T P; Goldberg, R B

    1997-01-01

    We utilized a new cell ablation strategy to ablate specific anther cell types involved in the dehiscence process. The tobacco TA56 gene promoter is active within the circular cell cluster, stomium, and connective regions of the anther at different developmental stages. We introduced a cytotoxic TA56/barnase gene into tobacco plants together with three different anticytotoxic barstar genes. The anticytotoxic barstar genes were used to protect subsets of anther cell types from the cytotoxic effects of the TA56/barnase gene. The chimeric barstar genes were fused with (1) the tobacco TP12 gene promoter that is active at high levels in most anther cell types; (2) the soybean lectin gene promoter that is active earlier in the connective, and at lower levels in the circular cell cluster and stomium, than is the TA56 promoter; and (3) the tobacco TA20 gene promoter that is active at high levels in most anther cell types but has a different developmental profile than does the TP12 promoter. Normal anther development and dehiscence occurred in plants containing the TA56/barnase and TP12/barstar genes, indicating that barstar protects diverse anther cell types from the cytotoxic effects of barnase. Anthers containing the TA56/barnase and lectin/barstar genes also developed normally but failed to dehisce because of extensive ablation of the circular cell cluster, stomium, and contiguous connective regions. Anthers containing the TA56/barnase and TA20/barstar genes failed to dehisce as well. However, only the stomium region was ablated in these anthers. The connective, circular cell cluster, and adjacent wall regions were protected from ablation by the formation of barnase/barstar complexes. We conclude that anther dehiscence at flower opening depends on the presence of a functional stomium region and that chimeric barnase and barstar genes containing promoters that are active in several overlapping cell types can be used for targeted cell ablation experiments. PMID:9338959

  12. Unraveling wall conditioning effects on plasma facing components in NSTX-U with the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedoya, F.; Allain, J. P.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Buzi, L.; Koel, B. E.

    2016-11-01

    A novel Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) diagnostic, the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP), has been recently commissioned in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U). MAPP is currently monitoring the chemical evolution of the PFCs in the NSTX-U lower divertor at 107 cm from the tokamak axis on a day-to-day basis. In this work, we summarize the methodology that was adopted to obtain qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the samples chemistry. Using this methodology, we were able to describe all the features in all our spectra to within a standard deviation of ±0.22 eV in position and ±248 s-1 eV in area. Additionally, we provide an example of this methodology with data of boronized ATJ graphite exposed to NSTX-U plasmas.

  13. Cold ablation driven by localized forces in alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Hada, Masaki; Zhang, Dongfang; Pichugin, Kostyantyn; Hirscht, Julian; Kochman, Michał A; Hayes, Stuart A; Manz, Stephanie; Gengler, Regis Y N; Wann, Derek A; Seki, Toshio; Moriena, Gustavo; Morrison, Carole A; Matsuo, Jiro; Sciaini, Germán; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2014-01-01

    Laser ablation has been widely used for a variety of applications. Since the mechanisms for ablation are strongly dependent on the photoexcitation level, so called cold material processing has relied on the use of high-peak-power laser fluences for which nonthermal processes become dominant; often reaching the universal threshold for plasma formation of ~1 J cm(-2) in most solids. Here we show single-shot time-resolved femtosecond electron diffraction, femtosecond optical reflectivity and ion detection experiments to study the evolution of the ablation process that follows femtosecond 400 nm laser excitation in crystalline sodium chloride, caesium iodide and potassium iodide. The phenomenon in this class of materials occurs well below the threshold for plasma formation and even below the melting point. The results reveal fast electronic and localized structural changes that lead to the ejection of particulates and the formation of micron-deep craters, reflecting the very nature of the strong repulsive forces at play. PMID:24835317

  14. Optodynamic aspect of a pulsed laser ablation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrovatin, Rok; Možina, Janez

    1995-02-01

    A study of a pulsed laser ablation process is presented from a novel, optodynamic aspect. By quantitative analysis of laser-induced bulk ultrasonic and blast waves in the air the ablation dynamics is characterized. In this way the influence of the laser pulse parameters and of the interacting material on the ablation process was assessed. By the analysis of the laser drilling process of thin layered samples the material influence was demonstrated. Besides the ultrasonic evaluation of the laser pulse power density the plasma shielding for 10 ns laser pulses was analyzed by the same method. All measurements were noncontact. Bulk waves in the solid and blast waves in the air were measured simultaneously, an interferometric and a probe beam deflection method were used, respectively.

  15. Low cost fabrication of ablative heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecka, A. M.; Schofield, W. C.

    1972-01-01

    A material and process study was performed using subscale panels in an attempt to reduce the cost of fabricating ablative heat shield panels. Although no improvements were made in the material formulation, a significant improvement was obtained in the processing methods compared to those employed in the previous work. The principal feature of the new method is the press filling and curing of the ablation material in a single step with the bonding and curing of the face sheet. This method was chosen to replace the hand troweling and autoclave curing procedure used previously. Double-curvature panels of the same size as the flat panels were fabricated to investigate fabrication problems. It was determined that the same materials and processes used for flat panels can be used to produce the curved panels. A design with severe curvatures consisting of radii of 24 x 48 inches was employed for evaluation. Ten low-density and ten high-density panels were fabricated. With the exception of difficulties related to short run non-optimum tooling, excellent panel filling and density uniformity were obtained.

  16. Wonderful Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  17. Ion acceleration enhanced by target ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Lin, C. Wang, H. Y.; Lu, H. Y.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.; Cowan, T. E.

    2015-07-15

    Laser proton acceleration can be enhanced by using target ablation, due to the energetic electrons generated in the ablation preplasma. When the ablation pulse matches main pulse, the enhancement gets optimized because the electrons' energy density is highest. A scaling law between the ablation pulse and main pulse is confirmed by the simulation, showing that for given CPA pulse and target, proton energy improvement can be achieved several times by adjusting the target ablation.

  18. Direct-drive–ignition designs with mid-Z ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Lafon, M.; Betti, R.; Anderson, K. S.; Collins, T. J. B.; Epstein, R.; McKenty, P. W.; Myatt, J. F.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.

    2015-03-15

    Achieving thermonuclear ignition using direct laser illumination relies on the capability to accelerate spherical shells to high implosion velocities while maintaining shell integrity. Ablator materials of moderate atomic number Z reduce the detrimental effects of laser–plasma instabilities in direct-drive implosions. To validate the physics of moderate-Z ablator materials for ignition target designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), hydro-equivalent targets are designed using pure plastic (CH), high-density carbon, and glass (SiO{sub 2}) ablators. The hydrodynamic stability of these targets is investigated through two-dimensional (2D) single-mode and multimode simulations. The overall stability of these targets to laser-imprint perturbations and low-mode asymmetries makes it possible to design high-gain targets. Designs using polar-drive illumination are developed within the NIF laser system specifications. Mid-Z ablator targets are an attractive candidate for direct-drive ignition since they present better overall performance than plastic ablator targets through reduced laser–plasma instabilities and a similar hydrodynamic stability.

  19. Direct-drive–ignition designs with mid-Z ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Lafon, M.; Betti, R.; Anderson, K. S.; Collins, T. J. B.; Epstein, R.; McKenty, P. W.; Myatt, J. F.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.

    2015-03-01

    Achieving thermonuclear ignition using direct laser illumination relies on the capability to accelerate spherical shells to high implosion velocities while maintaining shell integrity. Ablator materials of moderate atomic number Z reduce the detrimental effects of laser–plasma instabilities in direct-drive implosions. To validate the physics of moderate-Z ablator materials for ignition target designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), hydro-equivalent targets are designed using pure plastic (CH), high-density carbon, and glass (SiO2) ablators. The hydrodynamic stability of these targets is investigated through two-dimensional (2D) single-mode and multimode simulations. The overall stability of these targets to laser-imprint perturbations and low-mode asymmetries makes it possible to design high-gain targets. Designs using polar-drive illumination are developed within the NIF laser system specifications. Mid-Z ablator targets are an attractive candidate for direct-drive ignition since they present better overall performance than plastic ablator targets through reduced laser–plasma instabilities and a similar hydrodynamic stability.

  20. Gruneisen-stress induced ablation of biological tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.; Scammon, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of biomedical applications of lasers is frequently to remove tissue in a controlled manner. However, for ablation induced by thermal- or photo-decomposition, damage to surrounding tissue may be excessive in some instances. Tissue can also be ablated by a hydrodynamic process referred to as front surface spallation, in which a thin layer next to a free surface is heated to levels, below vaporization but, so rapidly that it cannot undergo thermal expansion during laser heating. This generates a stress pulse, which propagates away from the heated region, with an initial amplitude that can be calculated using the Grueneisen coefficient. As the pulse reflects from the free surface, a tensile tail can develop of sufficient amplitude, exceeding the material strength, that a layer will be spalled off, taking much of the laser-deposited energy with it. Because tissue is generally a low strength material, this process has the potential of producing controlled ablation with reduced damage to the remaining tissue. However, to achieve these conditions, the laser pulse length, absorption depth and fluence must be properly tailored. This paper presents hydrodynamic calculations and analytical modeling relating to both stress- and thermal-induced ablation as a function of laser and tissue properties to illustrate the potential benefits of stress induced ablation. Also, guidance is given for tailoring the exposure parameters to enhance front surface spallation. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Chirality Distribution Measurements of the NIST Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Reference Material Using Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Kevin; Simpson, Jeff; Scheel, Logan; Fagan, Jeff; Hightwalker, Angela

    2013-03-01

    The ability to rapidly and easily determine the chiral vector distribution within a nanotube population remains a key measurement need for carbon nanotube processing and applications. We report Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) measurements of a SWCNT reference material from NIST. The SWCNT samples were synthesized using the CoMoCat method, dispersed in aqueous solutions by wrapping in deoxycholate surfactant, and separated by length using ultracentrifugation. We measure Raman spectra over a wide range of excitation wavelengths from 457 nm to 850 nm using a series of discrete and continuously tunable laser sources coupled to a triple-grating spectrometer with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled detector. The spectra reveal Raman-active vibrational modes including the low-frequency radial breathing mode and higher-order modes. Chirality distributions are determined from the Raman spectra, specifically the RBM frequency and energy excitation profiles, together with input from theoretical models. RRS is sensitive to both major and minor chiral species in the sample. We will compare the resulting chirality distribution obtained from RRS with those obtained from other orthogonal measurement techniques.

  2. Chirality Distribution Measurements of the NIST Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Reference Material Using Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, L. F.; Simpson, J. R.; Fagan, J. A.; Hight Walker, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    The ability to rapidly and easily determine the chiral vector distribution within a nanotube population remains a key measurement need for carbon nanotube processing and applications. We report Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) measurements of a SWCNT reference material from NIST. The SWCNT samples were synthesized using the CoMoCat method, dispersed in aqueous solutions by wrapping in deoxycholate surfactant, and separated by length using ultracentrifugation. We measure Raman spectra over a wide range of excitation wavelengths from 457 nm to 850 nm using a series of discrete and continuously tunable laser sources coupled to a triple-grating spectrometer with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled detector. The spectra reveal Raman-active vibrational modes including the low-frequency radial breathing mode and higher-order modes. Chirality distributions are determined from the Raman spectra, specifically the RBM frequency and energy excitation profiles, together with input from theoretical models. RRS is sensitive to both major and minor chiral species in the sample. We will compare the resulting chirality distribution obtained from RRS with those obtained from other orthogonal measurement techniques.

  3. In Situ-Grown ZnCo2O4 on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Air Electrode Materials for Rechargeable Lithium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Xu, Wu; Yan, Pengfei; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Cao, Ruiguo; Bowden, Mark E; Engelhard, Mark H; Wang, Chong-Min; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2015-11-01

    The development of highly efficient catalysts is critical for the practical application of lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries. Nanosheet-assembled ZnCo2O4 (ZCO) microspheres and thin films grown in situ on single-walled carbon nanotube (ZCO/SWCNT) composites as high-performance air electrode materials for Li-O2 batteries are reported. The in situ grown ZCO/SWCNT electrodes delivered high discharge capacities, decreased the onset of the oxygen evolution reaction by 0.9 V during the charging process, and led to longer cycling stability. These results indicate that in situ grown ZCO/SWCNT composites can be used as highly efficient air electrode materials for oxygen reduction and evolution reactions. The enhanced catalytic activity displayed by the uniformly dispersed ZCO catalyst on nanostructured electrodes is expected to inspire further development of other catalyzed electrodes for Li-O2 batteries and other applications. PMID:26457378

  4. Multi-walled carbon nanotube modified dummy-template magnetic molecularly imprinted microspheres as solid-phase extraction material for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in fish.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaowen; Lin, Saichai; Gan, Ning; Chen, Xidong; Cao, Yuting; Li, Tianhua; Zhan, Pan

    2014-07-01

    Novel multi-walled carbon nanotube modified dummy-template molecularly imprinted microspheres (MWCNTs@DMMIPs) were successfully synthesized as adsorbents for six kinds of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). MWCNTs@DMMIPs were prepared by a surface molecular imprinting technique. Core-shell Fe3 O4 @SiO2 nanoparticles were employed as magnetic support. 3,4-Dichlorobenzene acetic acid was used as a dummy template instead of PCBs, methacrylic acid was used as functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate was used as the cross-linker. The resulting absorbent was characterized by various methods. The adsorbent was employed for extracting PCBs and exhibited good selectivity and high adsorption efficiency. Furthermore, it was reusable and capable of magnetic separation. Adsorption kinetics fit well with a pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and also exhibited a three-stage intra-particle diffusion model. The Freundlich model was used to describe the adsorption isotherms. The materials were successfully applied to the magnetic dispersive solid-phase extraction of six kinds of PCBs followed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry determination in fish samples, the limit of detection of six kinds of PCBs were 0.0028-0.0068 μg/L and spiked recoveries ranged between 73.41 and 114.21%. The prepared adsorbent was expected to be a new material for the removal and recovery of PCBs from contaminated foods.

  5. Standard addition method for laser ablation ICPMS using a spinning platform.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Fanny; Malherbe, Julien; Bier, Naomi; Molloy, John L; Long, Stephen E

    2013-04-01

    A method has been developed for the fast and easy determination of Pb, Sr, Ba, Ni, Cu, and Zn, which are of geological and environmental interest, in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) using a spinning sample platform. The platform, containing a sample and a standard, is spun during the ablation, allowing the quasi-simultaneous ablation of both materials. The aerosols resulting from the ablation of sample and standard were mixed in the ablation cell allowing quantification of analytes by standard additions. The proportion of standard versus sample of the mixing can be increased by performing the ablation further from the axis of rotation. The ablated masses have been determined using a new strategy based on isotope dilution analysis. This spinning laser ablation method has been applied to the Allende meteorite and four powdered standard reference materials (SRMs) fused in lithium borate glasses: two sediments as well as a soil and a rock material. SRM 612 (Trace Elements in Glass) was also analyzed despite having a matrix slightly different from the glass standard obtained by lithium borate fusion. The deviation from the certified values was found to be less than 15% for most of the mass fractions for all the elements and samples studied, with an average precision of 10%. These results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method for the direct and fast analysis of solid samples of different matrixes by standard additions, using a single standard sample.

  6. Standard addition method for laser ablation ICPMS using a spinning platform.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Fanny; Malherbe, Julien; Bier, Naomi; Molloy, John L; Long, Stephen E

    2013-04-01

    A method has been developed for the fast and easy determination of Pb, Sr, Ba, Ni, Cu, and Zn, which are of geological and environmental interest, in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) using a spinning sample platform. The platform, containing a sample and a standard, is spun during the ablation, allowing the quasi-simultaneous ablation of both materials. The aerosols resulting from the ablation of sample and standard were mixed in the ablation cell allowing quantification of analytes by standard additions. The proportion of standard versus sample of the mixing can be increased by performing the ablation further from the axis of rotation. The ablated masses have been determined using a new strategy based on isotope dilution analysis. This spinning laser ablation method has been applied to the Allende meteorite and four powdered standard reference materials (SRMs) fused in lithium borate glasses: two sediments as well as a soil and a rock material. SRM 612 (Trace Elements in Glass) was also analyzed despite having a matrix slightly different from the glass standard obtained by lithium borate fusion. The deviation from the certified values was found to be less than 15% for most of the mass fractions for all the elements and samples studied, with an average precision of 10%. These results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method for the direct and fast analysis of solid samples of different matrixes by standard additions, using a single standard sample. PMID:23418996

  7. Ablative Approaches for Pulmonary Metastases.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Matthew J; Ricardi, Umberto; Ball, David; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary metastases are common in patients with cancer for which surgery is considered a standard approach in appropriately selected patients. A number of patients are not candidates for surgery due to a medical comorbidities or the extent of surgery required. For these patients, noninvasive or minimally invasive approaches to ablate pulmonary metastases are potential treatment strategies. This article summarizes the rationale and outcomes for non-surgical treatment approaches, including radiotherapy, radiofrequency and microwave ablation, for pulmonary metastases.

  8. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-01

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology. PMID:23614661

  9. UV laser ablation of intraocular lenses: SEM and AFM microscopy examination of the biomaterial surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, E.; Asproudis, I.; Tsoutsi, D.; Bacharis, C.; Moutsouris, K.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2010-02-01

    Several new materials and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses (IOLs), in order to improve their optical properties, to reduce the diffractive aberrations and to decrease the incidence of posterior capsular opacification. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of UV ( λ = 266 nm) laser pulses to ablate the intraocular lenses materials, and thus to provide an alternative to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs fabrication. Ablation experiments were conducted using various polymer substrates of hydrophobic acrylic IOLs and PMMA IOLs. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the morphology of the ablated area by imaging the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphological appearance of IOL samples reveals the effect of a photochemical and photothermal ablation mechanism.

  10. Dopant Distribution in NIF Beryllium Ablator Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Xu, H. W.; Youngblood, K. P.; Wall, D. R.; Stephens, R. B.; Moreno, K. A.; Nikroo, A.; Salmonson, J. D.; Haan, S. W.; Wu, K. J.; Wang, Y. M.; Hamza, A. V.

    2012-10-01

    Good implosion performance requires capsule ablator material with spherically uniform x-ray opacity, which is controlled by one of several dopants (Cu, Si, Al, etc.) in the Be shell. During production, the dopant concentration is radially stepped. However, the various Be-dopant interactions result in vastly different dopant distribution patterns, some quite inhomogeneous. We have characterized these structures and established the phenomenological basis and the magnitudes of the inhomogeneity both in spatial length scales and in atomic percent. We will discuss the case of inhomogeneous Cu diffusion in detail, followed by discussions of other dopants and the estimate of the impact of these structures on target implosion.

  11. Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Ryan C.B.; Stavas, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  12. Relationship between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for Geologic Samples: Applications for in situ Absolute Geochronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    In planetary sciences, in situ absolute geochronology is a scientific and engineering challenge. Currently, the age of the Martian surface can only be determined by crater density counting. However this method has significant uncertainties and needs to be calibrated with absolute ages. We are developing an instrument to acquire in situ absolute geochronology based on the K-Ar method. The protocol is based on the laser ablation of a rock by hundreds of laser pulses. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) gives the potassium content of the ablated material and a mass spectrometer (quadrupole or ion trap) measures the quantity of 40Ar released. In order to accurately measure the quantity of released 40Ar in cases where Ar is an atmospheric constituent (e.g., Mars), the sample is first put into a chamber under high vacuum. The 40Arquantity, the concentration of K and the estimation of the ablated mass are the parameters needed to give the age of the rocks. The main uncertainties with this method are directly linked to the measures of the mass (typically some µg) and of the concentration of K by LIBS (up to 10%). Because the ablated mass is small compared to the mass of the sample, and because material is redeposited onto the sample after ablation, it is not possible to directly measure the ablated mass. Our current protocol measures the ablated volume and estimates the sample density to calculate ablated mass. The precision and accuracy of this method may be improved by using knowledge of the sample's geologic properties to predict its response to laser ablation, i.e., understanding whether natural samples have a predictable relationship between laser energy deposited and resultant ablation volume. In contrast to most previous studies of laser ablation, theoretical equations are not highly applicable. The reasons are numerous, but the most important are: a) geologic rocks are complex, polymineralic materials; b) the conditions of ablation are unusual (for example

  13. Effect of air-flow on the evaluation of refractive surgery ablation patterns.

    PubMed

    Dorronsoro, Carlos; Schumacher, Silvia; Pérez-Merino, Pablo; Siegel, Jan; Mrochen, Michael; Marcos, Susana

    2011-02-28

    An Allegretto Eye-Q laser platform (Wavelight GmbH, Erlangen, Germany) was used to study the effect of air-flow speed on the ablation of artificial polymer corneas used for testing refractive surgery patterns. Flat samples of two materials (PMMA and Filofocon A) were ablated at four different air flow conditions. The shape and profile of the ablated surfaces were measured with a precise non-contact optical surface profilometer. Significant asymmetries in the measured profiles were found when the ablation was performed with the clinical air aspiration system, and also without air flow. Increasing air-flow produced deeper ablations, improved symmetry, and increased the repeatability of the ablation pattern. Shielding of the laser pulse by the plume of smoke during the ablation of plastic samples reduced the central ablation depth by more than 40% with no-air flow, 30% with clinical air aspiration, and 5% with 1.15 m/s air flow. A simple model based on non-inertial dragging of the particles by air flow predicts no central shielding with 2.3 m/s air flow, and accurately predicts (within 2 μm) the decrease of central ablation depth by shielding. The shielding effects for PMMA and Filofocon A were similar despite the differences in the ablation properties of the materials and the different full-shielding transmission coefficient, which is related to the number of particles ejected and their associated optical behavior. Air flow is a key factor in the evaluation of ablation patterns in refractive surgery using plastic models, as significant shielding effects are found with typical air-flow levels used under clinical conditions. Shielding effects can be avoided by tuning the air flow to the laser repetition rate.

  14. Scaling ablation rates for picosecond lasers using burst micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappe, Ralf; Haloui, Hatim; Seifert, Albert; Weis, Alexander; Nebel, Achim

    2010-02-01

    High-precision micromachining with picosecond lasers became an established process. Power scaling led to industrial lasers, generating average power levels well above 50 W for applications like structuring turbine blades, micro moulds, and solar cells. In this paper we report, how a smart distribution of energy into groups of pulses can significantly improve ablation rates for some materials, also providing a better surface quality. Machining micro moulds in stainless steel, a net ablation rate of ~1 mm3/min is routinely achieved, e.g. using pulse energy of 200 μJ at a repetition rate of 200 kHz. This is industrial standard, and demonstrates an improvement by two orders of magnitude over the recent years. When the energy was distributed to a burst of 10 pulses (25 μJ), repeated with 200 kHz, the ablation rate of stainless steel was 5 times higher with the same 50 W average power. Bursts of 10 pulses repeated with 1 MHz (5 μJ) even resulted in an ablation rate as high as 12 mm3/min. In addition, optimized pulse delays achieved a reduction of the surface roughness by one order of magnitude, providing Ra values as low as 200 nm. Similar results were performed machining silicon, scaling the ablation rate from 1.2 mm3/min (1 pulse, 250 μJ, 200 kHz) to 15 mm3/min (6 pulses, 8 μJ, 1 MHz). Burst machining of ceramics, copper and glass did not change ablation rates, only improved surface quality. For glass machining, we achieved record-high ablation rates of >50 mm3/min, using a new state-of-the-art laser which could generate >70 W of average power and repetition rates as high as 2 MHz.

  15. Implementation of Radiation, Ablation, and Free Energy Minimization Modules for Coupled Simulations of Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Thompson, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A description of models and boundary conditions required for coupling radiation and ablation physics to a hypersonic flow simulation is provided. Chemical equilibrium routines for varying elemental mass fraction are required in the flow solver to integrate with the equilibrium chemistry assumption employed in the ablation models. The capability also enables an equilibrium catalytic wall boundary condition in the non-ablating case. The paper focuses on numerical implementation issues using FIRE II, Mars return, and Apollo 4 applications to provide context for discussion. Variable relaxation factors applied to the Jacobian elements of partial equilibrium relations required for convergence are defined. Challenges of strong radiation coupling in a shock capturing algorithm are addressed. Results are presented to show how the current suite of models responds to a wide variety of conditions involving coupled radiation and ablation.

  16. Formation of nanostructures under femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashitkov, S. I.; Romashevskii, S. A.; Komarov, P. S.; Burmistrov, A. A.; Zhakhovskii, V. V.; Inogamov, N. A.; Agranat, M. B.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of studying the morphology of the modified surface of aluminium, nickel and tantalum after ablation of the surface layer by a femtosecond laser pulse. The sizes of characteristic elements of a cellular nanostructure are found to correlate with thermo-physical properties of the material and the intensity of laser radiation.

  17. Ablation Thermal Protection Systems: Suitability of ablation systems to thermal protection depends on complex physical and chemical processes.

    PubMed

    Ungar, E W

    1967-11-10

    The performance of ablation thermal protection systems is intimately related to the mass transfer, heat transfer, and chemical reactions which occur within the gas boundary layer. Production of a liquid layer and phase change or chemical reaction heat sinks greatly improve materials performance. Materials are available which achieve many goals for thermal protection. However, advanced materials which are now being developed provide hope of further reductions in the weight of heat-shielding structures. PMID:17732614

  18. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  19. Thermal-mechanical modeling of laser ablation hybrid machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matin, Mohammad Kaiser

    2001-08-01

    Hard, brittle and wear-resistant materials like ceramics pose a problem when being machined using conventional machining processes. Machining ceramics even with a diamond cutting tool is very difficult and costly. Near net-shape processes, like laser evaporation, produce micro-cracks that require extra finishing. Thus it is anticipated that ceramic machining will have to continue to be explored with new-sprung techniques before ceramic materials become commonplace. This numerical investigation results from the numerical simulations of the thermal and mechanical modeling of simultaneous material removal from hard-to-machine materials using both laser ablation and conventional tool cutting utilizing the finite element method. The model is formulated using a two dimensional, planar, computational domain. The process simulation acronymed, LAHM (Laser Ablation Hybrid Machining), uses laser energy for two purposes. The first purpose is to remove the material by ablation. The second purpose is to heat the unremoved material that lies below the ablated material in order to ``soften'' it. The softened material is then simultaneously removed by conventional machining processes. The complete solution determines the temperature distribution and stress contours within the material and tracks the moving boundary that occurs due to material ablation. The temperature distribution is used to determine the distance below the phase change surface where sufficient ``softening'' has occurred, so that a cutting tool may be used to remove additional material. The model incorporated for tracking the ablative surface does not assume an isothermal melt phase (e.g. Stefan problem) for laser ablation. Both surface absorption and volume absorption of laser energy as function of depth have been considered in the models. LAHM, from the thermal and mechanical point of view is a complex machining process involving large deformations at high strain rates, thermal effects of the laser, removal of

  20. Fundamental Mechanisms of Pulsed Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albagli, Douglas

    The ability to cut and remove biological tissue with short pulsed laser light, a process called laser ablation, has the potential to revolutionize many surgical procedures. Ablation procedures using short pulsed lasers are currently being developed or used in many fields of medicine, including cardiology, ophthalmology, dermatology, dentistry, orthopedics, and urology. Despite this, the underlying physics of the ablation process is not well understood. In fact, there is wide disagreement over whether the fundamental mechanism is primarily photothermal, photomechanical, or photochemical. In this thesis, both experimental and theoretical techniques are developed to explore this issue. The photothermal model postulates that ablation proceeds through vaporization of the target material. The photomechanical model asserts that ablation is initiated when the laser-induced tensile stress exceeds the ultimate tensile strength of the target. I have developed a three dimensional model of the thermoelastic response of tissue to short pulsed laser irradiation which allows the time dependent stress distribution to be calculated given the optical, thermal and mechanical properties of the target. A complimentary experimental technique has been developed to verify this model, measure the needed physical properties of the tissue, and record the thermoelastic response of the tissue at the onset of ablation. The results of this work have been widely disseminated to the international research community and have led to significant findings which support the photomechanical model of ablation of tissue. First, the energy deposited in tissue is an order of magnitude less than that required for vaporization. Second, unlike the one-dimensional thermoelastic model of laser-induced stress generation that has appeared in the literature, the full three-dimensional model predicts the development of significant tensile stresses on the surface of the target, precisely where ablation is observed to